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Sample records for activity optimal tracers

  1. Vertical Diffusivities of Active and Passive Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and Rq (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: (a) The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, Rq. (b) In doubly stable regimes (DS, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of Rq < 0 and Ri > 0. (c) In DC regimes (diffusive convection, partial derivative of T with respect to z < 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0, Rq > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. (d) In SF regimes (salt fingers, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z > 0, Rq < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. (e) The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. (f) Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  2. Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

    1986-01-21

    The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

  3. The Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Mcentire, R. W.; Haerendel, G.; Paschmann, G.; Bryant, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    In order to study the access of solar wind ions to the magnetosphere, together with the processes that transport and accelerate magnetospheric particles, the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) mission will release and monitor lithium and barium tracer ions in both the solar wind and the magnetosphere. A single, massive release of barium in the dawn magnetosheath will in addition create a visible artificial comet in the flowing solar wind plasma, within which studies of a range of different plasma effects will be undertaken. The AMPTE will obtain comprehensive measurements of natural magnetospheric particle populations' elemental composition and dynamics. AMPTE comprises three spacecraft: the Ion Release Module, the Charge Composition Explorer, and the United Kingdom Subsatellite.

  4. Gastric activity studies using a magnetic tracer.

    PubMed

    Cordova-Fraga, T; Bernal-Alvarado, J J; Gutierrez-Juarez, G; Sosa, M; Vargas-Luna, M

    2004-10-01

    A magnetic pulse generator has been set up in order to study gastric activity. Two coils 1.05 m in diameter, arranged in a Helmholtz configuration, were used. The system generated magnetic field pulses higher than 15 mT, of duration 17.3+/-1.2 ms. Measurements were performed in 11 male volunteers, with average age 29.3+/-6.4 years and body mass index 26.0+/-4.8 kg m(-2). Magnetite (Fe3O4) particles with diameters from 75 to 125 microm were used as magnetic tracers, which were mixed in 250 ml of yogurt in concentrations from 2 to 5 g. Signals were registered by using a high speed 3 axis fluxgate digital magnetometer and processed to determine the relaxation of the magnetic tracers by fitting a first-order exponential function to the data, a mean relaxation constant K = 116+/-40 s(-1) was obtained. Also, an average gastric peristaltic frequency was measured; a value of 3.2+/-0.3 cpm was determined. PMID:15535190

  5. Curvature-induced activation of a passive tracer in an active bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallory, S. A.; Valeriani, C.; Cacciuto, A.

    2014-09-01

    We use numerical simulations to study the motion of a large asymmetric tracer immersed in a low-density suspension of self-propelled particles in two dimensions. Specifically, we analyze how the curvature of the tracer affects its translational and rotational motion in an active environment. We find that even very small amounts of curvature are sufficient for the active bath to impart directed motion to the tracer, which results in its effective activation. We propose simple scaling arguments to characterize this induced activity in terms of the curvature of the tracer and the strength of the self-propelling force. Our results suggest new ways of controlling the transport properties of passive tracers in an active medium by carefully tailoring their geometry.

  6. Curvature-induced activation of a passive tracer in an active bath.

    PubMed

    Mallory, S A; Valeriani, C; Cacciuto, A

    2014-09-01

    We use numerical simulations to study the motion of a large asymmetric tracer immersed in a low-density suspension of self-propelled particles in two dimensions. Specifically, we analyze how the curvature of the tracer affects its translational and rotational motion in an active environment. We find that even very small amounts of curvature are sufficient for the active bath to impart directed motion to the tracer, which results in its effective activation. We propose simple scaling arguments to characterize this induced activity in terms of the curvature of the tracer and the strength of the self-propelling force. Our results suggest new ways of controlling the transport properties of passive tracers in an active medium by carefully tailoring their geometry. PMID:25314448

  7. Reactive compatibilizer-tracer: A powerful tool for designing, scaling up and optimizing reactive blending processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei-Yun; Feng, Lian-Fang; Zhang, Cai-Liang; Hu, Guo-Hua

    2015-05-01

    A concept of reactive compatibilizer-tracer is developed to study reactive polymer blending processes in a twin screw extruder. It is summarized as follows. Fluorescent moieties such as anthracene are attached to a reactive compatibilizer so that the latter can be served both as a compatibilizer and a tracer. When evaluating its compatibilizing efficiency for a polymer blending system, unlike the polymer components of the blend which are continuously fed to the extruder, the reactive compatibilizer-tracer is added as a pulse. The concentration of the reactive compatibilizer-tracer in the polymer blend at the die exit is measured, in-line and in real time, using probes capable of detecting the signal of the emission of fluorescent moieties of the reactive compatibilizer-tracer. In the meantime, the corresponding size of the dispersed phase domains of the blend is determined off-line. These two pieces of information allow assessing the compatibilizing efficiency of a reactive compatibilizer in a much easier manner and using a much smaller amount of compatibilizer. Consequently, the concept of reactive compatibilizer-tracer can help select most appropriate compatibilizers under real industrial polymer blending conditions as well as scaling up and/or optimizing them.

  8. Optimization of microfluidic PET tracer synthesis with Cerenkov imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Dooraghi, Alex A.; Keng, Pei Y.; Chen, Supin; Javed, Muhammad R.; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; van Dam, R. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic technologies provide an attractive platform for the synthesis of radiolabeled compounds. Visualization of radioisotopes on chip is critical for synthesis optimization and technological development. With Cerenkov imaging, beta particle emitting isotopes can be localized with a sensitive CCD camera. In order for Cerenkov imaging to also serve as a quantitative tool, it is necessary to understand how material properties relevant to Cerenkov emission, namely, index of refraction and beta particle stopping power, affect Cerenkov light output. In this report, we investigate the fundamental physical characteristics of Cerenkov photon yield at different stages of [18F]FDG synthesis on the electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) microfluidic platform. We also demonstrate how Cerenkov imaging has enabled synthesis optimization. Geant4, a Monte Carlo program applied extensively in high energy physics, is used to simulate Cerenkov photon yield from 18F beta particles traversing materials of interest during [18F]FDG synthesis on chip. Our simulations show that the majority (approximately two-thirds) of the 18F beta particle energy available to produce Cerenkov photons is deposited on the glass plates of the EWOD chip. This result suggests the possibility of using a single calibration factor to convert Cerenkov signal to radioactivity, independent of droplet composition. We validate our simulations with a controlled measurement examining varying ratios of [18O]H2O, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and acetonitrile (MeCN), and find a consistent calibration independent of solvent composition. However, the calibration factor may underestimate the radioactivity in actual synthesis due to discoloration of the droplet during certain steps of probe synthesis. In addition to the attractive quantitative potential of Cerenkov imaging, this imaging strategy provides indispensable qualitative data to guide synthesis optimization. We are able to use this imaging technique to optimize the

  9. Optimization of microfluidic PET tracer synthesis with Cerenkov imaging.

    PubMed

    Dooraghi, Alex A; Keng, Pei Y; Chen, Supin; Javed, Muhammad R; Kim, Chang-Jin C J; Chatziioannou, Arion F; van Dam, R Michael

    2013-10-01

    Microfluidic technologies provide an attractive platform for the synthesis of radiolabeled compounds. Visualization of radioisotopes on chip is critical for synthesis optimization and technological development. With Cerenkov imaging, beta particle emitting isotopes can be localized with a sensitive CCD camera. In order for Cerenkov imaging to also serve as a quantitative tool, it is necessary to understand how material properties relevant to Cerenkov emission, namely, index of refraction and beta particle stopping power, affect Cerenkov light output. In this report, we investigate the fundamental physical characteristics of Cerenkov photon yield at different stages of [(18)F]FDG synthesis on the electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) microfluidic platform. We also demonstrate how Cerenkov imaging has enabled synthesis optimization. Geant4, a Monte Carlo program applied extensively in high energy physics, is used to simulate Cerenkov photon yield from (18)F beta particles traversing materials of interest during [(18)F]FDG synthesis on chip. Our simulations show that the majority (approximately two-thirds) of the (18)F beta particle energy available to produce Cerenkov photons is deposited on the glass plates of the EWOD chip. This result suggests the possibility of using a single calibration factor to convert Cerenkov signal to radioactivity, independent of droplet composition. We validate our simulations with a controlled measurement examining varying ratios of [(18)O]H2O, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and acetonitrile (MeCN), and find a consistent calibration independent of solvent composition. However, the calibration factor may underestimate the radioactivity in actual synthesis due to discoloration of the droplet during certain steps of probe synthesis. In addition to the attractive quantitative potential of Cerenkov imaging, this imaging strategy provides indispensable qualitative data to guide synthesis optimization. We are able to use this imaging technique to

  10. Flow optimization study of a batch microfluidics PET tracer synthesizing device

    PubMed Central

    Elizarov, Arkadij M.; Meinhart, Carl; van Dam, R. Michael; Huang, Jiang; Daridon, Antoine; Heath, James R.; Kolb, Hartmuth C.

    2010-01-01

    We present numerical modeling and experimental studies of flow optimization inside a batch microfluidic micro-reactor used for synthesis of human-scale doses of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) tracers. Novel techniques are used for mixing within, and eluting liquid out of, the coin-shaped reaction chamber. Numerical solutions of the general incompressible Navier Stokes equations along with time-dependent elution scalar field equation for the three dimensional coin-shaped geometry were obtained and validated using fluorescence imaging analysis techniques. Utilizing the approach presented in this work, we were able to identify optimized geometrical and operational conditions for the micro-reactor in the absence of radioactive material commonly used in PET related tracer production platforms as well as evaluate the designed and fabricated micro-reactor using numerical and experimental validations. PMID:21072595

  11. Optimization of Sampling Positions for Measuring Ventilation Rates in Naturally Ventilated Buildings Using Tracer Gas

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiong; Zong, Chao; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2012-01-01

    Finding out the optimal sampling positions for measurement of ventilation rates in a naturally ventilated building using tracer gas is a challenge. Affected by the wind and the opening status, the representative positions inside the building may change dynamically at any time. An optimization procedure using the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was conducted. In this method, the concentration field inside the building was estimated by a three-order RSM polynomial model. The experimental sampling positions to develop the model were chosen from the cross-section area of a pitched-roof building. The Optimal Design method which can decrease the bias of the model was adopted to select these sampling positions. Experiments with a scale model building were conducted in a wind tunnel to achieve observed values of those positions. Finally, the models in different cases of opening states and wind conditions were established and the optimum sampling position was obtained with a desirability level up to 92% inside the model building. The optimization was further confirmed by another round of experiments.

  12. Reconstruction of Atmospheric Tracer Releases with Optimal Resolution Features: Concentration Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Turbelin, Gregory; Issartel, Jean-Pierre; Kumar, Pramod; Feiz, Amir Ali

    2015-04-01

    function which exhibits a priori information about the unknown releases apparent to the monitoring network. The properties of the weight function provide an optimal data resolution and model resolution to the retrieved source estimates. The retrieved source estimates are proved theoretically to be stable against the random measurement errors and their reliability can be interpreted in terms of the distribution of the weight functions. Further, the same framework can be extended for the identification of the point type releases by utilizing the maximum of the retrieved source estimates. The inversion technique has been evaluated with the several diffusion experiments, like, Idaho low wind diffusion experiment (1974), IIT Delhi tracer experiment (1991), European Tracer Experiment (1994), Fusion Field Trials (2007), etc. In case of point release experiments, the source parameters are mostly retrieved close to the true source parameters with least error. Primarily, the proposed technique overcomes two major difficulties incurred in the source reconstruction: (i) The initialization of the source parameters as required by the optimization based techniques. The converged solution depends on their initialization. (ii) The statistical knowledge about the measurement and background errors as required by the Bayesian inference based techniques. These are hypothetically assumed in case of no prior knowledge.

  13. A quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) analysis of triarylmethane dye tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, Jarai; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.

    2006-01-01

    Dyes are important hydrological tracers. Many different dyes have been proposed as optimal tracers, but none of these dyes can be considered an ideal water tracer. Some dyes are toxic and most sorb to subsurface materials. The objective of this study was to find the molecular structure of an optimal water tracer. We used QSAR to screen a large number of hypothetical molecules, belonging to the class of triarylmethane dyes, in regard to their sorption characteristics to a sandy soil. The QSAR model was based on experimental sorption data obtained from four triarylmethane dyes: C.I. Food Blue 2 (C.I. 42090; Brilliant Blue FCF), C.I. Food Green 3 (C.I. 42053; FD&C Green No. 3), C.I. Acid Blue 7 (C.I. 42080; ORCOacid Blue A 150%), and C.I. Acid Green 9 (C.I. 42100; ORCOacid Fast Green B). Sorption characteristics of the dyes to the sandy soil were expressed with the Langmuir isotherm. Our premise was that dye sorption can be reduced by attachment of sulfonic acid (SO 3) groups to the triarylmethane template. About 70 hypothetical dyes were created and QSAR were used to estimate sorption characteristics. The results indicated that both the position and the number of SO 3 groups affected dye sorption. Sorption decreased with increasing number of SO 3 groups attached to the molecule. Increasing the number of sulfonic acid groups also decreases the toxicity of the compounds. An optimal triarylmethane water tracer contains 4 to 6 SO 3 groups.

  14. Optimizing illumination in the greenhouse using a 3D model of tomato and a ray tracer.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Pieter H B; Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard H; van der Heijden, Gerie W A M

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of energy use for assimilation lighting is one of the most urgent goals of current greenhouse horticulture in the Netherlands. In recent years numerous lighting systems have been tested in greenhouses, yet their efficiency has been very difficult to measure in practice. This simulation study evaluated a number of lighting strategies using a 3D light model for natural and artificial light in combination with a 3D model of tomato. The modeling platform GroIMP was used for the simulation study. The crop was represented by 3D virtual plants of tomato with fixed architecture. Detailed data on greenhouse architecture and lamp emission patterns of different light sources were incorporated in the model. A number of illumination strategies were modeled with the calibrated model. Results were compared to the standard configuration. Moreover, adaptation of leaf angles was incorporated for testing their effect on light use efficiency (LUE). A Farquhar photosynthesis model was used to translate the absorbed light for each leaf into a produced amount of carbohydrates. The carbohydrates produced by the crop per unit emitted light from sun or high pressure sodium lamps was the highest for horizontal leaf angles or slightly downward pointing leaves, and was less for more upward leaf orientations. The simulated leaf angles did not affect light absorption from inter-lighting LED modules, but the scenario with LEDs shining slightly upward (20(°)) increased light absorption and LUE relative to default horizontal beaming LEDs. Furthermore, the model showed that leaf orientation more perpendicular to the string of LEDs increased LED light interception. The combination of a ray tracer and a 3D crop model could compute optimal lighting of leaves by quantification of light fluxes and illustration by rendered lighting patterns. Results indicate that illumination efficiency increases when the lamp light is directed at most to leaves that have a high photosynthetic potential.

  15. Comparison of denitrification activity measurements in groundwater using cores and natural-gradient tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Garabedian, S.P.; Brooks, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The transport of many solutes in groundwater is dependent upon the relative rates of physical flow and microbial metabolism. Quantifying rates of microbial processes under subsurface conditions is difficult and is most commonly approximated using laboratory studies with aquifer materials. In this study, we measured in situ rates of denitrification in a nitrate- contaminated aquifer using small-scale, natural-gradient tracer tests and compared the results with rates obtained from laboratory incubations with aquifer core material. Activity was measured using the acetylene block technique. For the tracer tests, co-injection of acetylene and bromide into the aquifer produced a 30 ??M increase in nitrous oxide after 10 m of transport (23-30 days). An advection-dispersion transport model was modified to include an acetylene-dependent nitrous oxide production term and used to simulate the tracer breakthrough curves. The model required a 4-day lag period and a relatively low sensitivity to acetylene to match the narrow nitrous oxide breakthrough curves. Estimates of in situ denitrification rates were 0.60 and 1.51 nmol of N2O produced cm-3 aquifer day-1 for two successive tests. Aquifer core material collected from the tracer test site and incubated as mixed slurries in flasks and as intact cores yielded rates that were 1.2-26 times higher than the tracer test rate estimates. Results with the coring-dependent techniques were variable and subject to the small- scale heterogeneity within the aquifer, while the tracer tests integrated the heterogeneity along a flow path, giving a rate estimate that is more applicable to transport at the scale of the aquifer.

  16. Optimal recovery of regional carbon dioxide surface fluxes by data assimilation of anthropogenic and biogenic tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Elliott

    Measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) have led to an understanding of the past and present CO2 trends at global scales. However, many of the processes that underlie the CO 2 fluxes are highly uncertain, especially at smaller spatial scales in the terrestrial biosphere. Our abilities to forecast climate change and manage the carbon cycle are reliant on an understanding of these underlying processes. In this dissertation, new steps were taken to understand the biogenic and anthropogenic processes based on analysis with an atmospheric transport model and simultaneous measurements of CO2 and other trace gases. The biogenic processes were addressed by developing an approach for quantifying photosynthesis and respiration surface fluxes using observations of CO 2 and carbonyl sulfide (COS). There is currently no reliable method for separating the influence of these gross biosphere fluxes on atmospheric CO2 concentrations. First, the plant sink for COS was quantified as a function of the CO2 photosynthesis uptake using the STEM transport model and measurements of COS and CO2 from the INTEX-NA campaign. Next, the STEM inversion model was modified for the simultaneous optimization of fluxes using COS and CO2 measurements and using only CO 2 measurements. The CO2-only inversion was found to be process blind, while the simultaneous COS/CO2 inversion was found to provide a unique estimate of the respiration and photosynthesis component fluxes. Further validation should be pursued with independent observations. The approach presented here is the first application of COS measurements for inferring information about the carbon cycle. Anthropogenic emissions were addressed by improving the estimate of the fossil fuel component of observed CO2 by using observed carbon monoxide (CO). Recent applications of the CO approach were based on simple approximations of non-fossil fuel influences on the measured CO such as sources from oxidation of volatile organic carbon species

  17. Tomographic inversion of active thermal tracer experiments to characterize aquifer heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter; Brauchler, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    The tomographical approach has been established as an efficient and robust way to characterize spatial heterogeneity of hydraulic aquifer properties. It has been successfully applied on pressure signals and solute tracers, but only little experience is available using heat tracer signals in a tomographic setup. The advantage of using a heat tracer is that temperature can be easily monitored with good temporal and spatial resolution and it provides information directly about the heat transport in the subsurface. In this study, we consider active injection of warm water into a shallow groundwater well. The concept is tested on a virtual aquifer implemented in a numerical model. The thermal evolution in the system after repeated injection at different depth levels is monitored though a tomographical observation setup. This delivers thermal tracer travel times for each combination of injection (source) and observation points (receivers). The combined inversion of all source-receiver travel times is formulated and efficiently solved as an eikonal problem. The result of the eikonal inversion is a cross section through the aquifer of mean tracer velocity and of inverted flow paths. By assuming that the heat transport is dominated by advection, a hydraulic diffusivity map can be calculated from the velocity map, similar to solute tracer tomography, introducing one new variable, which is known as the thermal retardation factor. This assumption is crucial for the inversion procedure, and it also reflects that our main interest is in the detection of preferential flow paths, where thermal diffusion plays only a minor role. For this purpose, early time diagnostics are used instead of, for example, the mean breakthrough time at the receivers. To characterize the reliability of the results, the null-space energy map is calculated based on the inverted advection flow paths. First results of the heat tracer inversion approach are comparable to those from other hydrogeological

  18. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems. PMID:27288672

  19. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems.

  20. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  1. Optimization of a tracer-based PLIF diagnostic for simultaneous imaging of EGR and temperature in IC engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothamer, D. A.; Snyder, J. A.; Hanson, R. K.; Steeper, R. R.

    2010-04-01

    A tracer-based planar laser-induced fluorescence (TB-PLIF) imaging diagnostic using 3-pentanone has been optimized for use in IC engines. The diagnostic utilizes dual-wavelength excitation of 3-pentanone in the ultraviolet to make simultaneous measurements of exhaust gas residual mole fraction and temperature. A merit function based optimization of the diagnostic precision was performed which allowed for selection of optimal excitation wavelengths for the conditions of interest. Optimized system performance was validated in a motored optical engine over a wide range of in-cylinder temperatures and pressures. In-cylinder results verify the utility of the uncertainty estimates. Differences in magnitude between the estimated and measured precision were determined to be due to errors in parameter values used in the calculations. The observed 2.1% temperature precision at a temperature of 600 K was compared with previous TB-PLIF temperature measurements and shown to be approximately a factor of 2 better than previous results.

  2. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel.

    PubMed

    Ben-Isaac, E; Fodor, É; Visco, P; van Wijland, F; Gov, Nir S

    2015-07-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels both in artificial (in vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells has been extensively studied with experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct nonthermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures," and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies.

  3. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Isaac, E.; Fodor, É.; Visco, P.; van Wijland, F.; Gov, Nir S.

    2015-07-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels both in artificial (in vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells has been extensively studied with experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct nonthermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures," and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies.

  4. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel.

    PubMed

    Ben-Isaac, E; Fodor, É; Visco, P; van Wijland, F; Gov, Nir S

    2015-07-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels both in artificial (in vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells has been extensively studied with experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct nonthermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures," and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies. PMID:26274211

  5. Optimal Defaults and Active Decisions*

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Gabriel D.; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.; Metrick, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Defaults often have a large influence on consumer decisions. We identify an overlooked but practical alternative to defaults: requiring individuals to make an explicit choice for themselves. We study such “active decisions” in the context of 401(k) saving. We find that compelling new hires to make active decisions about 401(k) enrollment raises the initial fraction that enroll by 28 percentage points relative to a standard opt-in enrollment procedure, producing a savings distribution three months after hire that would take 30 months to achieve under standard enrollment. We also present a model of 401(k) enrollment and derive conditions under which the optimal enrollment regime is automatic enrollment (i.e., default enrollment), standard enrollment (i.e., default non-enrollment), or active decisions (i.e., no default and compulsory choice). Active decisions are optimal when consumers have a strong propensity to procrastinate and savings preferences are highly heterogeneous. Financial illiteracy, however, favors default enrollment over active decision enrollment. PMID:20041043

  6. Optimal Defaults and Active Decisions.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Gabriel D; Choi, James J; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C; Metrick, Andrew

    2009-11-01

    Defaults often have a large influence on consumer decisions. We identify an overlooked but practical alternative to defaults: requiring individuals to make an explicit choice for themselves. We study such "active decisions" in the context of 401(k) saving. We find that compelling new hires to make active decisions about 401(k) enrollment raises the initial fraction that enroll by 28 percentage points relative to a standard opt-in enrollment procedure, producing a savings distribution three months after hire that would take 30 months to achieve under standard enrollment. We also present a model of 401(k) enrollment and derive conditions under which the optimal enrollment regime is automatic enrollment (i.e., default enrollment), standard enrollment (i.e., default non-enrollment), or active decisions (i.e., no default and compulsory choice). Active decisions are optimal when consumers have a strong propensity to procrastinate and savings preferences are highly heterogeneous. Financial illiteracy, however, favors default enrollment over active decision enrollment.

  7. Optimal Weights For Measuring Redshift Space Distortions in Multi-tracer Galaxy Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David W.; Samushia, Lado; Gagrani, Praful

    2016-08-01

    Since the volume accessible to galaxy surveys is fundamentally limited, it is extremely important to analyse available data in the most optimal fashion. One way of enhancing the cosmological information extracted from the clustering of galaxies is by weighting the galaxy field. The most widely used weighting schemes assign weights to galaxies based on the average local density in the region (FKP weights) and their bias with respect to the dark matter field (PVP weights). They are designed to minimize the fractional variance of the galaxy power-spectrum. We demonstrate that the currently used bias dependent weighting scheme can be further optimized for specific cosmological parameters. We develop a procedure for computing the optimal weights and test them against mock catalogues for which the values of all fitting parameters, as well as the input power-spectrum are known. We show that by applying these weights to the joint power-spectrum of Emission Line Galaxies and Luminous Red Galaxies from the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument survey, the variance in the measured growth rate parameter can be reduced by as much as 36 per cent.

  8. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  9. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M.; Palumbo, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  10. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-15

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009-2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  11. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes. PMID:27079264

  12. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  13. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009-2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes. PMID:27079264

  14. Quantification of the Bioturbation Activity of Lumbriculus Variegatus Worms Using Fluorescent Particulate Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Gonzalez, L. M.; Roche, K. R.; Xie, M.; Packman, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Important biological, physical and chemical processes, such as fluxes of oxygen, nutrients and contaminants, occur across sediment-water interfaces. These processes are influenced by bioturbation activities of benthic animals. Bioturbation is thought to be significant in releasing metals to the water column from contaminated sediments, but metals contamination also affects organism activity. Consequently, the aim of this study was to consider the interactions of biological activity, sediment chemistry, pore water transport, and chemical reactions in sediment mixing and the flux and toxicity of metals in sediments. Prior studies have modeled bioturbation as a diffusive process. However, diffusion models often do not describe accurately sediment mixing due to bioturbation. To this end, we used the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model to assess sediment mixing caused by bioturbation activity of Lumbriculus variegatus worms. We performed experiments using fine-grained sediments with different levels of zinc contamination from Lake DePue, which is a Superfund Site in Illinois. The tests were conducted in an aerated fresh water chamber. Fluorescent particulate tracers were added to the sediment surface to quantify mixing processes and the influence of metals contaminants on L. variegatus bioturbation activity. We observed sediment mixing and organism activity by time-lapse photography over 14 days. Then, we analyzed the images to characterize the fluorescent particle concentration as a function of sediment depth and time. Results reveal that sediment mixing caused by L. variegatus is subdiffusive in time and superdiffusive in space. These results suggest that anomalous sediment mixing is probably a ubiquitous process, as this behavior has only been observed previously in marine sediments. Also, the experiments indicate that bioturbation and sediment mixing decreased in the presence of higher metals concentrations in sediments. This process is expected to decrease

  15. Polynomial optimization techniques for activity scheduling. Optimization based prototype scheduler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Surender

    1991-01-01

    Polynomial optimization techniques for activity scheduling (optimization based prototype scheduler) are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: agenda; need and viability of polynomial time techniques for SNC (Space Network Control); an intrinsic characteristic of SN scheduling problem; expected characteristics of the schedule; optimization based scheduling approach; single resource algorithms; decomposition of multiple resource problems; prototype capabilities, characteristics, and test results; computational characteristics; some features of prototyped algorithms; and some related GSFC references.

  16. Tracers for monitoring the activity of sodium/glucose cotransporters in health and disease

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Ernest M; Barrio, Jorge R; Hirayama, Bruce A; Kepe, Vladimir

    2014-09-30

    Radiolabeled tracers for sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. The tracers are methyl or ethyl pyranosides having an equatorial hydroxyl group at carbon-2 and a C 1 preferred conformation, radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124I, or free hexoses radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124. Also provided are in vivo and in vitro techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study glucose transport, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

  17. Improving Radium-Based Tracer Techniques: Hydrologic Controls on Porewater Radium Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, A. L.; Wilson, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrologic variability influences coastal ecosystems and groundwater biogeochemistry on a range of temporal and spatial scales. Radium isotopes (223Ra, t1/2=11.1 d; 224Ra, t1/2=3.66 d; 226Ra, t1/2=1600 y; and 228Ra, t1/2=5.75 y) are excellent tracers of groundwater movement and discharge in coastal systems, but the accuracy of these tracers has been hindered by poor constraints on porewater radium activity. Porewater activities vary by as much as two orders of magnitude, creating a proportionally large uncertainty in radium-based estimates of coastal groundwater discharge. To determine the primary hydrologic factors that control porewater radium activity, a field and modeling study was performed at an island within North Inlet Salt Marsh in Georgetown, South Carolina. We chose this island because of its well-defined boundaries, the lack of a freshwater upland, its relatively constant elevated salinity, and its stable porewater chemistry (pH and redox). Vibracores collected across the site revealed marsh mud from 1 - 4m thick overlying sand. Porewater radium activity was measured in groundwater samples (wells screened at 1, 2, and 4m depth) and nearby surface water samples collected from November 2009 to February 2011. Water salinity, temperature, pH, and redox were also recorded. Sediment samples were collected from the top 10 cm of the marsh mud as well as from previously-collected sediment cores for analysis of bulk radium generation rates. Statistical analyses revealed no significant relationship (P > 0.05) between porewater radium activity and the known controls of salinity, pH, temperature, and redox. Spatial variations in radium were controlled by differences in groundwater residence time. Porewater radium activity decreased with depth by up to an order of magnitude and laterally by up to a factor of four. Vertical activity variations reflect the contrasting sediment grain size, permeability, and porewater residence time between marsh mud and underlying sand

  18. Characterization of Hydraulic Active Fractures in a Dolostone Aquifer Using Heat and Contaminants As Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldaner, C. H.; Coleman, T. I.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The number of hydraulically active fractures serving as advective contaminant migration pathways facilitating plume migration in fractured rock aquifers cannot be determined with confidence from indirect means such as visual inspection of core, borehole geophysics, and is only inferred from hydraulic tests. However, the position of depth-discrete hydraulic activity may be determined using contaminants or heat as tracers yet spatially detailed profile measurement techniques are required without imparting measurement bias of an open borehole. Contaminant concentration profiles from numerous samples along continuous core from a site contaminated since the early 1980's and heat injection in the sealed boreholes with high resolution profile monitoring are used to characterize the fracture network . Heat pulse tests using active distributed temperature sensing (DTS) were conducted in coreholes sealed with an impermeable flexible liner manufactured by FLUTe (Santa Fe, NM) to detect hydraulically active fracture zones. Using a Silixa ULTIMA-HSTM DTS, temperature data was acquired every 12.6 cm along an optic fiber cable with a spatial resolution of 29 cm. Temperature precision is on the order of 0.02°C for averaged measurements collected over 5 minute intervals. The test consisted of heating the measurement cable for 4 hours and monitoring the cooling process for over 8 hours. The resulting dataset consists of high-resolution temperature profiles at five-minute time steps during the test period. Dolostone rock composes most of the lithology units of the corehole, therefore it is unlikely that there are significant variations in rock thermal diffusivity. Multiple, successive temperature profiles were used to identify depth-discrete, hydraulically active flow zones with varying transmissivity based on different rates of heat dissipation. These variations were then compared with independent datasets including detected concentrations of contaminants in numerous rock core

  19. Extensive hydrothermal activity revealed by multi-tracer survey in the Wallis and Futuna region (SW Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konn, C.; Fourré, E.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Donval, J. P.; Guyader, V.; Birot, D.; Alix, A. S.; Gaillot, A.; Perez, F.; Dapoigny, A.; Pelleter, E.; Resing, J. A.; Charlou, J. L.; Fouquet, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The study area is close to the Wallis and Futuna Islands in the French EEZ. It exists on the western boundary of the fastest tectonic area in the world at the junction of the Lau and North-Fiji basins. At this place, the unstable back-arc accommodates the plate motion in three ways: (i) the north Fiji transform fault, (ii) numerous unstable spreading ridges, and (iii) large areas of recent volcanic activity. This instability creates bountiful opportunity for hydrothermal discharge to occur. Based on geochemical (CH4, TDM, 3He) and geophysical (nephelometry) tracer surveys: (1) no hydrothermal activity could be found on the Futuna Spreading Centre (FSC) which sets the western limit of hydrothermal activity; (2) four distinct hydrothermal active areas were identified: Kulo Lasi Caldera, Amanaki Volcano, Fatu Kapa and Tasi Tulo areas; (3) extensive and diverse hydrothermal manifestations were observed and especially a 2D distribution of the sources. At Kulo Lasi, our data and especially tracer ratios (CH4/3He 50×106 and CH4/TDM 4.5) reveal a transient CH4 input, with elevated levels of CH4 measured in 2010, that had vanished in 2011, most likely caused by an eruptive magmatic event. By contrast at Amanaki, vertical tracer profiles and tracer ratios point to typical seawater/basalt interactions. Fatu Kapa is characterised by a substantial spatial variability of the hydrothermal water column anomalies, most likely due to widespread focused and diffuse hydrothermal discharge in the area. In the Tasi Tulo zone, the hydrothermal signal is characterised by a total lack of turbidity, although other tracer anomalies are in the same range as in nearby Fatu Kapa. The background data set revealed the presence of a Mn and 3He chronic plume due to the extensive and cumulative venting over the entire area. To that respect, we believe that the joined domain composed of our active area and the nearby active area discovered in the East by Lupton et al. (2012) highly contribute to the

  20. Radio active galactic nuclei in galaxy clusters: Feedback, merger signatures, and cluster tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno-Mahler, Rachel Beth

    Galaxy clusters, the largest gravitationally-bound structures in the universe, are composed of 50-1000s of galaxies, hot X-ray emitting gas, and dark matter. They grow in size over time through cluster and group mergers. The merger history of a cluster can be imprinted on the hot gas, known as the intracluster medium (ICM). Merger signatures include shocks, cold fronts, and sloshing of the ICM, which can form spiral structures. Some clusters host double-lobed radio sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN). First, I will present a study of the galaxy cluster Abell 2029, which is very relaxed on large scales and has one of the largest continuous sloshing spirals yet observed in the X-ray, extending outward approximately 400 kpc. The sloshing gas interacts with the southern lobe of the radio galaxy, causing it to bend. Energy injection from the AGN is insufficient to offset cooling. The sloshing spiral may be an important additional mechanism in preventing large amounts of gas from cooling to very low temperatures. Next, I will present a study of Abell 98, a triple system currently undergoing a merger. I will discuss the merger history, and show that it is causing a shock. The central subcluster hosts a double-lobed AGN, which is evacuating a cavity in the ICM. Understanding the physical processes that affect the ICM is important for determining the mass of clusters, which in turn affects our calculations of cosmological parameters. To further constrain these parameters, as well as models of galaxy evolution, it is important to use a large sample of galaxy clusters over a range of masses and redshifts. Bent, double-lobed radio sources can potentially act as tracers of galaxy clusters over wide ranges of these parameters. I examine how efficient bent radio sources are at tracing high-redshift (z>0.7) clusters. Out of 646 sources in our high-redshift Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) sample, 282 are candidate new, distant clusters of galaxies based on

  1. Active ion tracer experiments attempted in conjunction with the ion composition experiment on GEOS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. T.

    It is pointed out that to date six ion injection/tracer experiments have been attempted in conjunction with the GEOS-2 Ion Composition Experiment: three rocket borne Ba shaped-charge releases (Porcupine 3 and 4 and Ba-GEOS), one Li release, and two periods of operation of the Xe(+) accelerator on the SCATHA satellite. The characteristics of each of these six releases are outlined, and upper limits are placed on possible ion fluxes reaching GEOS-2. The order of magnitude of ion fluxes to be expected from each release is estimated, and it is shown that three of the experiments had no real chance of succeeding in the first place.

  2. Development of Purine-Derived 18F-Labeled Pro-drug Tracers for Imaging of MRP1 Activity with PET

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) is a drug efflux transporter that has been implicated in the pathology of several neurological diseases and is associated with development of multidrug resistance. To enable measurement of MRP1 function in the living brain, a series of 6-halopurines decorated with fluorinated side chains have been synthesized and evaluated as putative pro-drug tracers. The tracers were designed to undergo conjugation with glutathione within the brain and hence form the corresponding MRP1 substrate tracers in situ. 6-Bromo-7-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)purine showed good brain uptake and rapid metabolic conversion. Dynamic PET imaging demonstrated a marked difference in brain clearance rates between wild-type and mrp1 knockout mice, suggesting that the tracer can allow noninvasive assessment of MRP1 activity in vivo. PMID:24456310

  3. U Activity Ratios in Surface Waters as Tracers and Chronometers of Water Transfers in the Critical zone;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, F.

    2015-12-01

    The use of radioactive disequilibria as tracers and chronometers of weathering processes and related mass transfers has been recognized since the 60'. The development, over the last two decades, of analytical methods for measuring very precisely U-series nuclides (especially, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra) in environmental samples has opened up new scientific applications in Earth Surface Sciences. Here, we propose to present the potential of U activity ratios in surface waters as geochemical tracer and chronometer of water transfers at a watershed scale. This will be illustrated from studies performed at different scales, with the analysis of U activity ratios in surface waters from small watersheds (Strengbach and Ringelbach watersheds in the Vosges Mountain, France) but also from watersheds of much more regional extension (e.g., the Upper Rhine basin or the Ganges basin). These various studies show that variations of U activity ratios in surface waters are mainly associated with 234U-238U fractionations occurring during the water transfer within the bedrock, which intensity depends on two main parameters: the petro-physical characteristics of the aquifer, principally the geometry of water-rock interfaces and the duration of the water-rock interactions. This readily explains why different U activity ratios (UAR) can be observed in the different aquifers of a continental hydrosystem and hence why UAR can be used to trace the source of river waters. For a hydrological system developed on a substratum marked by fairly homogeneous petro-physical characteristics, the main parameter controlling the UAR in waters draining such a system would be the duration of the water-rock interactions. Variations of UAR in stream or spring waters of such a system can therefore be modeled using simple reactive transport model, which allows the estimation of both the dissolution rate of the bedrock and the residence time of the waters within the aquifer.

  4. A tracer-based inversion method for diagnosing eddy-induced diffusivity and advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, S. D.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bryan, F. O.

    2015-02-01

    A diagnosis method is presented which inverts a set of tracer flux statistics into an eddy-induced transport intended to apply for all tracers. The underlying assumption is that a linear flux-gradient relationship describes eddy-induced tracer transport, but a full tensor coefficient is assumed rather than a scalar coefficient which allows for down-gradient and skew transports. Thus, Lagrangian advection and anisotropic diffusion not necessarily aligned with the tracer gradient can be diagnosed. In this method, multiple passive tracers are initialized in an eddy-resolving flow simulation. Their spatially-averaged gradients form a matrix, where the gradient of each tracer is assumed to satisfy an identical flux-gradient relationship. The resulting linear system, which is overdetermined when using more than three tracers, is then solved to obtain an eddy transport tensor R which describes the eddy advection (antisymmetric part of R) and potentially anisotropic diffusion (symmetric part of R) in terms of coarse-grained variables. The mathematical basis for this inversion method is presented here, along with practical guidelines for its implementation. We present recommendations for initialization of the passive tracers, maintaining the required misalignment of the tracer gradients, correcting for nonconservative effects, and quantifying the error in the diagnosed transport tensor. A method is proposed to find unique, tracer-independent, distinct rotational and divergent Lagrangian transport operators, but the results indicate that these operators are not meaningfully relatable to tracer-independent eddy advection or diffusion. With the optimal method of diagnosis, the diagnosed transport tensor is capable of predicting the fluxes of other tracers that are withheld from the diagnosis, including even active tracers such as buoyancy, such that relative errors of 14% or less are found.

  5. In Situ Tracer method for establishing the presence and predicting the activity of heavy metal-reducing microbes in the subsurface. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, K.

    2003-07-01

    Tracer method to establish presence and distribution of chromium reducing microbes. The primary objective of this research was to establish an in situ tracer method for detecting the presence. distribution. and activity of subsurface heavy metal-reducing microorganisms. Research focused on microbial systems responsible for the reduction of chromium and a suite of biotracers coupled to the reduction process. The tracer method developed may be used to characterize sites contaminated with chromium or expedite bioremediation: and although research focused on chromium. the method can be easily extended to other metals, organics, and radionuclides. This brief final report contains three major sections. The first identifies specific products of the research effort such as students supported and publications. The second section briefly presents major research findings, while the last section summarizes the overall research effort.

  6. Accuracy and optimal timing of activity measurements in estimating the absorbed dose of radioiodine in the treatment of Graves' disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, S.; Horowitz, J.; Traino, A. C.; Chipkin, S. R.; Hollot, C. V.; Chait, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Calculation of the therapeutic activity of radioiodine 131I for individualized dosimetry in the treatment of Graves' disease requires an accurate estimate of the thyroid absorbed radiation dose based on a tracer activity administration of 131I. Common approaches (Marinelli-Quimby formula, MIRD algorithm) use, respectively, the effective half-life of radioiodine in the thyroid and the time-integrated activity. Many physicians perform one, two, or at most three tracer dose activity measurements at various times and calculate the required therapeutic activity by ad hoc methods. In this paper, we study the accuracy of estimates of four 'target variables': time-integrated activity coefficient, time of maximum activity, maximum activity, and effective half-life in the gland. Clinical data from 41 patients who underwent 131I therapy for Graves' disease at the University Hospital in Pisa, Italy, are used for analysis. The radioiodine kinetics are described using a nonlinear mixed-effects model. The distributions of the target variables in the patient population are characterized. Using minimum root mean squared error as the criterion, optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules are determined for estimation of the target variables, and probabilistic bounds are given for the errors under the optimal times. An algorithm is developed for computing the optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules for the target variables. This algorithm is implemented in a freely available software tool. Taking into consideration 131I effective half-life in the thyroid and measurement noise, the optimal 1-point time for time-integrated activity coefficient is a measurement 1 week following the tracer dose. Additional measurements give only a slight improvement in accuracy.

  7. Evaluation of radioisotope tracer and activation analysis techniques for contamination monitoring in space environment simulation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smathers, J. B.; Kuykendall, W. E., Jr.; Wright, R. E., Jr.; Marshall, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radioisotope measurement techniques and neutron activation analysis are evaluated for use in identifying and locating contamination sources in space environment simulation chambers. The alpha range method allows the determination of total contaminant concentration in vapor state and condensate state. A Cf-252 neutron activation analysis system for detecting oils and greases tagged with stable elements is described. While neutron activation analysis of tagged contaminants offers specificity, an on-site system is extremely costly to implement and provides only marginal detection sensitivity under even the most favorable conditions.

  8. Enhancing the activation of silicon carbide tracer particles for PEPT applications using gas-phase deposition of alumina at room temperature and atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdesueiro, D.; Garcia-Triñanes, P.; Meesters, G. M. H.; Kreutzer, M. T.; Gargiuli, J.; Leadbeater, T. W.; Parker, D. J.; Seville, J. P. K.; van Ommen, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    We have enhanced the radio-activation efficiency of SiC (silicon carbide) particles, which by nature have a poor affinity towards 18F ions, to be employed as tracers in studies using PEPT (Positron Emission Particle Tracking). The resulting SiC-Al2O3 core-shell structure shows a good labelling efficiency, comparable to γ-Al2O3 tracer particles, which are commonly used in PEPT. The coating of the SiC particles was carried at 27±3 °C and 1 bar in a fluidized bed reactor, using trimethylaluminium and water as precursors, by a gas phase technique similar to atomic layer deposition. The thickness of the alumina films, which ranged from 5 to 500 nm, was measured by elemental analysis and confirmed with FIB-TEM (focused ion beam - transmission electron microscope), obtaining consistent results from both techniques. By depositing such a thin film of alumina, properties that influence the hydrodynamic behaviour of the SiC particles, such as size, shape and density, are hardly altered, ensuring that the tracer particle shows the same flow behaviour as the other particles. The paper describes a general method to improve the activation efficiency of materials, which can be applied for the production of tracer particles for many other applications too.

  9. CURRENT HELICITY OF ACTIVE REGIONS AS A TRACER OF LARGE-SCALE SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, H.; Moss, D.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Kuzanyan, K.; Sokoloff, D.

    2012-05-20

    We demonstrate that the current helicity observed in solar active regions traces the magnetic helicity of the large-scale dynamo generated field. We use an advanced two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamo saturation based on the evolution of the magnetic helicity and algebraic quenching. For comparison, we also studied a more basic two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with simple algebraic alpha-quenching only. Using these numerical models we obtained butterfly diagrams both for the small-scale current helicity and also for the large-scale magnetic helicity, and compared them with the butterfly diagram for the current helicity in active regions obtained from observations. This comparison shows that the current helicity of active regions, as estimated by -A {center_dot} B evaluated at the depth from which the active region arises, resembles the observational data much better than the small-scale current helicity calculated directly from the helicity evolution equation. Here B and A are, respectively, the dynamo generated mean magnetic field and its vector potential. A theoretical interpretation of these results is given.

  10. Tracer development at ESRI

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.C.; Rose, P.E.; McPherson, P.

    1996-04-10

    At ESRI the Tracer Development Program is divided into three components: liquid-phase tracers, vapor-phase tracers, and pre-test modeling. The liquid-phase project has tested 40 aromatic acids and 10 fluorescent tracers for geothermal use. The vapor-phase project, which develops tracers for reservoirs such as the Geysers, is currently focused on testing SF{sub 6} at high temperatures and examining HPLC methods for the sensitive analysis of alcohol tracers. The pre-test modeling component is exploring the feasibility of using simple numerical models to lower the cost of tracer tests by providing estimates of tracer quantities, flowpaths, and arrival times.

  11. Optimal rotation sequences for active perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakath, David; Rachuy, Carsten; Clemens, Joachim; Schill, Kerstin

    2016-05-01

    One major objective of autonomous systems navigating in dynamic environments is gathering information needed for self localization, decision making, and path planning. To account for this, such systems are usually equipped with multiple types of sensors. As these sensors often have a limited field of view and a fixed orientation, the task of active perception breaks down to the problem of calculating alignment sequences which maximize the information gain regarding expected measurements. Action sequences that rotate the system according to the calculated optimal patterns then have to be generated. In this paper we present an approach for calculating these sequences for an autonomous system equipped with multiple sensors. We use a particle filter for multi- sensor fusion and state estimation. The planning task is modeled as a Markov decision process (MDP), where the system decides in each step, what actions to perform next. The optimal control policy, which provides the best action depending on the current estimated state, maximizes the expected cumulative reward. The latter is computed from the expected information gain of all sensors over time using value iteration. The algorithm is applied to a manifold representation of the joint space of rotation and time. We show the performance of the approach in a spacecraft navigation scenario where the information gain is changing over time, caused by the dynamic environment and the continuous movement of the spacecraft

  12. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Frank; Remmer, Hilke; Kuhlmann, Christian; Wawrzik, Thilo; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Mathew; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-06-01

    Sensitivity and spatial resolution in magnetic particle imaging are affected by magnetic properties of the nanoparticle tracers used during imaging. Here, we have carried out a comprehensive magnetic characterization of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles that were designed for MPI. We used ac susceptometry, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry, and magnetic particle spectroscopy to evaluate the tracer's magnetic core size, hydrodynamic size, and magnetic anisotropy. Our results present a self-consistent set of magnetic and structural parameters for the tracers that is consistent with direct measurements of size using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering and that can be used to better understand their MPI performance.

  13. A fluorescein tracer release experiment in the hydrothermally active crater of Vailulu'u volcano, Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S. R.; Staudigel, H.; Workman, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Girard, A. P.

    2003-08-01

    On 3 April 2001, a 20 kg point source of fluorescein dye was released 30 m above the bottom of the active summit caldera of Vailulu'u submarine volcano, Samoa. Vailulu'u crater is 2000 m wide and at water depths of 600-1000 m, with the bottom 200 m completely enclosed; it thus provides an ideal site to study the hydrodynamics of an active hydrothermal system. The magmatically driven hydrothermal system in the crater is currently exporting massive amounts of particulates, manganese, and helium. The dispersal of the dye was tracked for 4 days with a fluorimeter in tow-yo mode from the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Sea. Lateral dispersion of the dye ranged from 80 to 500 m d-1; vertical dispersion had two components: a diapycnal diffusivity component averaging 21 cm2 s-1, and an advective component averaging 0.025 cm s-1. These measurements constrain the mass export of water from the crater during this period to be 8-1.3+4.6 × 107 m3 d-1, which leads to a "turnover" time for water in the crater of ˜3.2 days. Coupled with temperature data from CTD profiles and Mn analyses of water samples, the power output from the crater is 610-100+350 MW, and the manganese export flux is ˜240 kg d-1. The Mn/Heat ratio of 4.7 ng J-1 is significantly lower than ratios characteristic of hot smokers and diffuse hydrothermal flows on mid-ocean ridges and points to phase separation processes in this relatively shallow hydrothermal system.

  14. A survey of HC3N in extragalactic sources. Is HC3N a tracer of activity in ULIRGs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, J. E.; Aalto, S.; Costagliola, F.; Pérez-Beaupuits, J.-P.; Monje, R.; Muller, S.

    2011-03-01

    Context. HC3N is a molecule that is mainly associated with Galactic star-forming regions, but it has also been detected in extragalactic environments. Aims: To present the first extragalactic survey of HC3N, when combining earlier data from the literature with six new single-dish detections, and to compare HC3N with other molecular tracers (HCN, HNC), as well as other properties (silicate absorption strength, IR flux density ratios, C ii flux, and megamaser activity). Methods: We present mm IRAM 30 m, OSO 20 m, and SEST observations of HC3N rotational lines (mainly the J = 10-9 transition) and of the J = 1-0 transitions of HCN and HNC. Our combined HC3N data account for 13 galaxies (excluding the upper limits reported for the non-detections), while we have HCN and HNC data for more than 20 galaxies. Results: A preliminary definition "HC3N-luminous galaxy" is made based upon the HC3N/HCN ratio. Most (~80%) HC3N-luminous galaxies seem to be deeply obscured galaxies and (U)LIRGs. A majority (~60% or more) of the HC3N-luminous galaxies in the sample present OH mega- or strong kilomaser activity. A possible explanation is that both HC3N and OH megamasers need warm dust for their excitation. Alternatively, the dust that excites the OH megamaser offers protection against UV destruction of HC3N. A high silicate absorption strength is also found in several of the HC3N-luminous objects, which may help the HC3N to survive. Finally, we find that a high HC3N/HCN ratio is related to a high dust temperature and a low C ii flux. Appendix is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Offset active galactic nuclei as tracers of galaxy mergers and supermassive black hole growth

    SciTech Connect

    Comerford, Julia M.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2014-07-10

    Offset active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are AGNs that are in ongoing galaxy mergers, which produce kinematic offsets in the AGNs relative to their host galaxies. Offset AGNs are also close relatives of dual AGNs. We conduct a systematic search for offset AGNs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by selecting AGN emission lines that exhibit statistically significant line-of-sight velocity offsets relative to systemic. From a parent sample of 18,314 Type 2 AGNs at z < 0.21, we identify 351 offset AGN candidates with velocity offsets of 50 km s{sup –1} < |Δv| < 410 km s{sup –1}. When we account for projection effects in the observed velocities, we estimate that 4%-8% of AGNs are offset AGNs. We designed our selection criteria to bypass velocity offsets produced by rotating gas disks, AGN outflows, and gravitational recoil of supermassive black holes, but follow-up observations are still required to confirm our candidates as offset AGNs. We find that the fraction of AGNs that are offset candidates increases with AGN bolometric luminosity, from 0.7% to 6% over the luminosity range 43 < log (L{sub bol}) [erg s{sup –1}] <46. If these candidates are shown to be bona fide offset AGNs, then this would be direct observational evidence that galaxy mergers preferentially trigger high-luminosity AGNs. Finally, we find that the fraction of AGNs that are offset AGN candidates increases from 1.9% at z = 0.1 to 32% at z = 0.7, in step with the growth in the galaxy merger fraction over the same redshift range.

  16. Black Carbon, Metal Concentrations and Lead Isotopes Ratios in Aerosols as Tracers of Human and Natural Activities in Northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinot, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric brown clouds (ABC) observed as widespread layers of brownish haze are regional scale plumes of air pollutants with a hot spot of emission located in East Asia. ABC are mainly composed of aerosol particles such as Black Carbon (BC) emitted to the atmosphere during biomass burning and fossil fuels combustion. The atmospheric lifetime of BC ranges from a few days in wet season up to one month in dry season. The use of stable lead isotopes and 21 elements as tracers of air pollution was applied to identify and characterized the main sources of anthropogenic activities in Asian region. Aerosol samples from Haiphong (North Vietnam) were collected by a high volume sampler for a period of one year from October 2012 to October 2013. Vietnam's 207Pb/206Pb ratios were almost identical to those found for China. Ratios of 207Pb/206Pb ranged from 0.837 to 0.871 which agrees with values previously reported for the last 10 years in China (0.841 - 0.879). No significant variation in isotope ratio was observed during the sampling period, which suggests that there was no large seasonal variation in the isotope ratios of airborne lead. Trajectory analysis showed that almost two third of the air masses originated from East Northeast which implies that China was a major source of lead in atmosphere. Enrichment factor calculations indicated a large influence of coal activity (EF(Al) As = 1982 ± 796, EF(Al) Cd = 972 ± 659, EF(Al) Sb = 1358 ± 930) but the difference between combustion and mining exploitation could not be evidenced. Significant correlations were found between two others groups of elements: As, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Al, Fe K, Co. Wind dilution was effective on metals concentration variation. During the cold and dry season (winter) ambient concentrations were high and variable, during the warm and wet season (summer) concentrations were stable and low. Taken together, these factors also identified industrial and lithogenic activities in the region.

  17. Testing and optimizing active rotary flux compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Carder, B.M.; Eimerl, D.; Goodwin, E.J.; Trenholme, J.; Foley, R.J.; Bird, W.L.

    1981-06-01

    The test program for an Active Rotary Flux Compressor (ARFC) has demonstrated conclusively that large compression factors can be obtained with a laminated-iron, wave-wound, rotary flux compressor. Peak-current to startup-current ratios of 17 have been produced with a rotor tip speed of 60 meters per second. Sub-millisecond pulse widths were also measured: the minimum, 590 ..mu..sec (FWHM), was obtained at 5607 rpm with an 8-inch diameter, 4-pole rotor. The machine was operated without a high current output switch, proving the feasibility of a novel commutation scheme described. A computational code has been developed that will calculate the output waveshape of the model ARFC with reasonable accuracy. The code is being refined to better account for saturation in the iron laminations. A second optimization code selects the best design for a given application. This code shows favorable cost effectiveness of large ARFC's over the conventional capacitors to drive flashlamps for large lasers.

  18. Magnetic Particle Imaging with Tailored Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Kemp, Scott J.; Arami, Hamed; Saritas, Emine U.; Croft, Laura R.; Konkle, Justin; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Halkola, Aleksi; Rahmer, Jürgen; Borgert, Jörn; Conolly, Steven M.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) shows promise for medical imaging, particularly in angiography of patients with chronic kidney disease. As the first biomedical imaging technique that truly depends on nanoscale materials properties, MPI requires highly optimized magnetic nanoparticle tracers to generate quality images. Until now, researchers have relied on tracers optimized for MRI T2*-weighted imaging that are suboptimal for MPI. Here, we describe new tracers tailored to MPI's unique physics, synthesized using an organic-phase process and functionalized to ensure biocompatibility and adequate in vivo circulation time. Tailored tracers showed up to 3x greater SNR and better spatial resolution than existing commercial tracers in MPI images of phantoms. PMID:25438306

  19. Synthesis optimization of 2-(4-N-[11C]methylaminophenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole ([11C]PIB), β-amyloid PET imaging tracer for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Coliva, A; Monterisi, C; Apollaro, A; Gatti, D; Penso, M; Gianolli, L; Perani, D; Gilardi, M C; Carpinelli, A

    2015-11-01

    [11C]PIB is the most used amyloid plaques-specific positron-emitting radiotracers. The radiosynthesis of this compound, carried out by methylation of its precursor with [11C]methyl triflate in 2-butanone, has been improved optimizing the initial concentration and the purification method. Two HPLC methods were compared: good radiochemical yields, specific activities, and chemical purity above 98% were achieved by using as eluant acetonitrile/citrate and formulation in 10% ethanol.

  20. Optimized plasmonic nanostructures for improved sensing activities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Guillot, Nicolas; Rouxel, Jérémy; Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc; Toury, Timothée

    2012-09-10

    The paper outlines the optimization of plasmonic nanostructures in order to improve their sensing properties such as their sensitivity and their ease of manipulation. The key point in this study is the optimization of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties essential to the sensor characteristics, and more especially for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Two aspects were considered in order to optimize the sensing performance: apolar plasmonic nanostructures for non polarization dependent detection and improvements of SERS sensitivity by using a molecular adhesion layer between gold nanostructures and glass. Both issues could be generalized to all plasmon-resonance-based sensing applications.

  1. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Frank; Remmer, Hilke; Kuhlmann, Christian; Wawrzik, Thilo; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Mathew; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity and spatial resolution in Magnetic Particle Imaging are affected by magnetic properties of the nanoparticle tracers used during imaging. Here, we have carried out a comprehensive magnetic characterization of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles that were designed for MPI. We used ac susceptometry, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry, and magnetic particle spectroscopy to evaluate the tracer’s magnetic core size, hydrodynamic size, and magnetic anisotropy. Our results present a self-consistent set of magnetic and structural parameters for the tracers that is consistent with direct measurements of size using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering and that can be used to better understand their MPI performance. PMID:25729125

  2. ALMA Observations of the Submillimeter Dense Molecular Gas Tracers in the Luminous Type-1 Active Nucleus of NGC 7469

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Takuma; Kohno, Kotaro; Aalto, Susanne; Doi, Akihiro; Espada, Daniel; Fathi, Kambiz; Harada, Nanase; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hattori, Takashi; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Ikarashi, Soh; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Iono, Daisuke; Ishizuki, Sumio; Krips, Melanie; Martín, Sergio; Matsushita, Satoki; Meier, David S.; Nagai, Hiroshi; Nakai, Naomasa; Nakajima, Taku; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Nomura, Hideko; Regan, Michael W.; Schinnerer, Eva; Sheth, Kartik; Takano, Shuro; Tamura, Yoichi; Terashima, Yuichi; Tosaki, Tomoka; Turner, Jean L.; Umehata, Hideki; Wiklind, Tommy

    2015-09-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 1 observations of the central kiloparsec region of the luminous type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469 with unprecedented high resolution (0.″5 ×0.″4 = 165 × 132 pc) at submillimeter wavelengths. Utilizing the wide bandwidth of ALMA, we simultaneously obtained HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3), CS(7-6), and partially CO(3-2) line maps, as well as the 860 μm continuum. The region consists of the central ˜1″ component and the surrounding starburst ring with a radius of ˜1.″5-2.″5. Several structures connect these components. Except for CO(3-2), these dense gas tracers are significantly concentrated toward the central ˜1″, suggesting their suitability to probe the nuclear regions of galaxies. Their spatial distribution resembles well those of centimeter and mid-infrared continuum emissions, but it is anticorrelated with the optical one, indicating the existence of dust-obscured star formation. The integrated intensity ratios of HCN(4-3)/HCO+(4-3) and HCN(4-3)/CS(7-6) are higher at the active galactic nucleus (AGN) position than at the starburst ring, which is consistent with our previous findings (submillimeter-HCN enhancement). However, the HCN(4-3)/HCO+(4-3) ratio at the AGN position of NGC 7469 (1.11 ± 0.06) is almost half of the corresponding value of the low-luminosity type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 1097 (2.0 ± 0.2), despite the more than two orders of magnitude higher X-ray luminosity of NGC 7469. But the ratio is comparable to that of the close vicinity of the AGN of NGC 1068 (˜1.5). Based on these results, we speculate that some heating mechanisms other than X-ray (e.g., mechanical heating due to an AGN jet) can contribute significantly for shaping the chemical composition in NGC 1097.

  3. Tracer design for magnetic particle imaging (invited)

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) uses safe iron oxide nanoparticle tracers to offer fundamentally new capabilities for medical imaging, in applications as vascular imaging and ultra-sensitive cancer therapeutics. MPI is perhaps the first medical imaging platform to intrinsically exploit nanoscale material properties. MPI tracers contain magnetic nanoparticles whose tunable, size-dependent magnetic properties can be optimized by selecting a particular particle size and narrow size-distribution. In this paper we present experimental MPI measurements acquired using a homemade MPI magnetometer: a zero-dimensional MPI imaging system designed to characterize tracer performance by measuring the derivative of the time-varying tracer magnetization, M’(H(t)), at a driving frequency of 25 kHz. We show that MPI performance is optimized by selecting phase-pure magnetite tracers of a particular size and narrow size distribution; in this work, tracers with 20 nm median diameter, log-normal distribution shape parameter, σv, equal to 0.26, and hydrodynamic diameter equal to 30 nm showed the best performance. Furthermore, these optimized MPI tracers show 4 × greater signal intensity (measured at the third harmonic) and 20% better spatial resolution compared with commercial nanoparticles developed for MRI. PMID:22434939

  4. 238U-234U activity ratio as tracer of waterpathway within the watershed substratum: evidence of U data from the Strengbach and Ringelbach research catchments (Vosges , France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, F.; Schaffhausen, Th.; Pierret, M.-C.; Ambroise, B.

    2012-04-01

    U activity ratios were measured in spring and source waters collected in two small research watersheds developed on granitic bedrocks in Vosges Mountains (Eastern France), i.e., the Strengbach (http://ohge.u-strasbg.fr) and the Ringelbach catchments. The data indicates a clear relationship between the emerging altitude of sources/springs in each slope of the watersheds, and the intensity of 234U-238U activity ratios in the waters. Such a relationship can be readily explained through a scenario assuming that U mobilization in these waters and their 234U enrichment (consequence of the alpha recoil process) are controlled by the duration of the water-pathway within the substratum of the watershed: longer water pathway within the watershed, longer duration of water-rock interaction and hence higher 234U enrichment in the source/spring waters. The immediate consequence of such an interpretation is that (234U/238U) activity ratio in surface waters, at least at the scale of such small and elemental watersheds, might be a geochemical tracer useful to constrain a key hydrological parameter which controls, at least partly, the nature and the intensity of water-rock interactions in the watershed, namely the water pathway within the watershed substratum. The data also suggests that U activity ratios could be also very relevant to constrain the contribution of deep waters within surface waters. Future developments in this domain will certainly confirm the interest of U activity ratio as hydrological tracer of the water-rock interactions.

  5. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluation of various display designs for a simple k/s sup 2 plant in a compensatory tracking task using an optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s sup 2 plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  6. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Sanjay; Schmidt, David K.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/(s squared) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multichannel task. Utilizing the closed-loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  7. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluations of various display designs for a simple k/s-squared plant in a compensatory tracking task using an Optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s-squared plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  8. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/s(2) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multi-channel task. Utilizing the closed loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  9. INL Tracer Interpretation

    2007-03-27

    This spreadsheet application is for tracer test analysis. The analyses are based on the first temporal moment of a tracer. The governing equations are briefly discussed, and the individual steps required of the user are outlined. A series of Excel macros written in Visual Basic calculate mean residence time, swept pore volume, and flow-storage geometry from a tracer history.

  10. Effects of submesoscale turbulence on ocean tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Katherine M.; Hamlington, Peter E.; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2016-01-01

    Ocean tracers such as carbon dioxide, nutrients, plankton, and oil advect, diffuse, and react primarily in the oceanic mixed layer where air-sea gas exchange occurs and light is plentiful for photosynthesis. There can be substantial heterogeneity in the spatial distributions of these tracers due to turbulent stirring, particularly in the submesoscale range where partly geostrophic fronts and eddies and small-scale three-dimensional turbulence are simultaneously active. In this study, a large eddy simulation spanning horizontal scales from 20 km down to 5 m is used to examine the effects of multiscale turbulent mixing on nonreactive passive ocean tracers from interior and sea-surface sources. The simulation includes the effects of both wave-driven Langmuir turbulence and submesoscale eddies, and tracers with different initial and boundary conditions are examined in order to understand the respective impacts of small-scale and submesoscale motions on tracer transport. Tracer properties are characterized using spatial fields and statistics, multiscale fluxes, and spectra, and the results detail how tracer mixing depends on air-sea tracer flux rate, tracer release depth, and flow regime. Although vertical fluxes of buoyancy by submesoscale eddies compete with mixing by Langmuir turbulence, vertical fluxes of tracers are often dominated by Langmuir turbulence, particularly for tracers that are released near the mixed-layer base or that dissolve rapidly through the surface, even in regions with pronounced submesoscale activity. Early in the evolution of some tracers, negative eddy diffusivities occur co-located with regions of negative potential vorticity, suggesting that symmetric instabilities or other submesoscale phenomenon may act to oppose turbulent mixing.

  11. Regional brain distribution of 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]Fluoro-D-talose: A new PET tracer for measurement of galactokinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haradahira, T.; Inoue, O.; Suzuki, K.

    1994-05-01

    We have recently developed a 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-talose (2-[F-18]FDTal) as a new PET tracer for measurements of galactokinase activities in tissues. The rational of 2-[F-18]FDTal as a PET tracer is based on the metabolic trapping by a formation of 2-[F-18]FDTal-1-phosphate by galactokinase. In this study, we have examined the regional brain distribution of 2-[F-18]FDTal in monkey by PET, and compared it with those of 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (2-[F-18]FDG) and 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-galactose (2-[F-18]FDTal), PET tracers for D-glucose and D-galactose metabolisms, respectively. The F-18 sugars used for the PET studies were prepared through nucleophilic fluorinations of the corresponding triflates with [F-18]fluoride. PET imaging obtained by i.v. injection of 2-[F-18]FDTal in rhesus monkey showed very high accumulation of the radioactivity into an occipital cortex region. This regional distribution was very similar to that of 2-[F-18]FDGal, but was quite different with that of 2-[F-18]FDG. In PET data analyses, washout of the radioactivity from the occipital cortex (30% loss of the initial activity) was observed in an early period ({<=}5 min) after injection of 2-[F-18]FDTal, in contrast with the continuous increase of the radioactivity in the same region after injection of 2-[F-18]FDGal. This data indicates a smaller phosphorylation rate constant (K3) of 2-[F-18]FDTal by brain galactokinase than that of 2-[F-18]FDGal. 2-[F-18]FDGal has been reported to be partly metabolized into an UDP-2-[F-18]FDGal via 2-CF-18]FDGal-l-phosphate in animal brains. Therefore 2-[F-18]FDTal offers an advantage over 2-[F-18]FDGal in undergoing its simple metabolism which enables us to make a simple kinetic model for PET imaging. We conclude that 2-[F-18]FDTal may be a new PET tracer to give a characteristic regional brain distribution which reflect the regional galactokinase activity.

  12. Multiple objective optimization for active sensor management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Scott F.; Dolia, Alexander N.; Harris, Chris J.; White, Neil M.

    2005-03-01

    The performance of a multi-sensor data fusion system is inherently constrained by the configuration of the given sensor suite. Intelligent or adaptive control of sensor resources has been shown to offer improved fusion performance in many applications. Common approaches to sensor management select sensor observation tasks that are optimal in terms of a measure of information. However, optimising for information alone is inherently sub-optimal as it does not take account of any other system requirements such as stealth or sensor power conservation. We discuss the issues relating to developing a suite of performance metrics for optimising multi-sensor systems and propose some candidate metrics. In addition it may not always be necessary to maximize information gain, in some cases small increases in information gain may take place at the cost of large sensor resource requirements. Additionally, the problems of sensor tasking and placement are usually treated separately, leading to a lack of coherency between sensor management frameworks. We propose a novel approach based on a high level decentralized information-theoretic sensor management architecture that unifies the processes of sensor tasking and sensor placement into a single framework. Sensors are controlled using a minimax multiple objective optimisation approach in order to address probability of target detection, sensor power consumption, and sensor survivability whilst maintaining a target estimation covariance threshold. We demonstrate the potential of the approach through simulation of a multi-sensor, target tracking scenario and compare the results with a single objective information based approach.

  13. Optimal active vibration absorber: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  14. A Spectrophotometric Assay Optimizing Conditions for Pepsin Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Ethelynda E.; Kimsey, R. Scott

    1998-01-01

    Describes a laboratory protocol optimizing the conditions for the assay of pepsin activity using the Coomasie Blue dye binding assay of protein concentration. The dye bonds through strong, noncovalent interactions to basic and aromatic amino acid residues. (DDR)

  15. Visualization of oxygen reduction sites at Pt electrodes on YSZ by means of 18O tracer incorporation: the width of the electrochemically active zone.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander Karl; Schintlmeister, Arno; Hutter, Herbert; Fleig, Jürgen

    2010-10-21

    In this study the electrochemically active region of oxygen incorporation into yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was visualized by means of (18)O tracer incorporation experiments on dense Pt thin film microelectrodes combined with ToF-SIMS analysis. The localization and the shape of the incorporation zone were found to strongly depend on the polarization of the electrode. In case of lower overpotentials the active zone next to the three phase boundary (TPB) was frame-shaped and located beneath the Pt electrode. Increases in polarization led to an extension of the incorporation zone along the free YSZ surface. Owing to the low temperature of 300-330 °C a profile-broadening caused by diffusion in YSZ could be minimized and quantitatively separated from the measured profiles. The TPB-width (i.e. the decay length of electrochemical activity) was determined to be approximately 1.0-1.3 μm at these temperatures.

  16. Multidisciplinary design optimization of mechatronic vehicles with active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuping; McPhee, John

    2005-05-01

    A multidisciplinary optimization method is applied to the design of mechatronic vehicles with active suspensions. The method is implemented in a GA-A'GEM-MATLAB simulation environment in such a way that the linear mechanical vehicle model is designed in a multibody dynamics software package, i.e. A'GEM, the controllers and estimators are constructed using linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) method, and Kalman filter algorithm in Matlab, then the combined mechanical and control model is optimized simultaneously using a genetic algorithm (GA). The design variables include passive parameters and control parameters. In the numerical optimizations, both random and deterministic road inputs and both perfect measurement of full state variables and estimated limited state variables are considered. Optimization results show that the active suspension systems based on the multidisciplinary optimization method have better overall performance than those derived using conventional design methods with the LQG algorithm.

  17. Use of tracers to investigate preferential flow in heterogeneous and unstable media : the case of active mudslides in French Alps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc, V.; Garel, E.; Debieche, T. H.; Krzeminska, D. M.; Bogaard, T. A.; Malet, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    Among the difficulties usually encountered in catchment hydrology, the study of local scale hydrological processes comes up against the critical point of scaling up the information to proper scale in term of risk or resources management. In highly heterogeneous media, the major impact of preferential flow makes the question still trickier since the problem of measurements is to be added to the areal extrapolation. One of the most suitable methods to elaborate hydrological conceptual scheme at hillslope or catchment scale is water tracing (both environmental and artificial). In the framework of the GACH2C and ECOUPREF projects, environmental and artificial tracers, both isotopes and solutes, were used to clarify infiltration and groundwater recharge processes on different black marl unstable hillslopes of southern French Alps. The investigation was carried out at different time steps (from event to long term scale) and from local to catchment scale. Long term isotopic monitoring showed that mean residence time of groundwater was quite short (around a year). However, local isotopic and hydrochemical anomalies suggested that part of groundwater recharge could be due to areas outside the watershed. At local scale, artificial rainfall experiments were carried out in summers 2007 and 2008 and in autumn 2007 using bromide and chloride as tracers. Despite the impervious nature of the marl material, initial results showed how efficient was the role of areal heterogeneity (fissures system, matrix-blocks contacts) on the rapid percolation of water to the water table. Experimental investigations in different soil surface contexts made it possible to propose a first attempt of macropore flow typology and assess the impact of initial and forcing conditions on the preferential flow generation. The analysis of these data provides a description of the main flow mechanisms in the marl material. This advancement in hydrological process understanding helps in better understanding the

  18. Online activities to optimize in person learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, Tim

    Students' unprecedented access to content on the web is providing a unique opportunity to transform the role lectures in education, moving the focus from content delivery to helping students synthesize the content into knowledge. We have introduced a variety of activities to facilitate this transformation at the University of Illinois, including web-based preflight assessments of student understanding before lecture, peer instruction (clickers) to assess and facilitate student understanding during lecture, and web-based multimedia pre-lectures designed to provide students with content before lecture. In this talk I will discuss the pedagogical motivation for introducing these activities, and the impact they have had at the University of Illinois. .

  19. Optimized Conditioning of Activated Reactor Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Tress, G.; Doehring, L.; Pauli, H.; Beer, H.-F.

    2002-02-25

    The research reactor DIORIT at the Paul Scherrer Institute was decommissioned in 1993 and is now being dismantled. One of the materials to be conditioned is activated reactor graphite, approximately 45 tons. A cost effective conditioning method has been developed. The graphite is crushed to less than 6 mm and added to concrete and grout. This graphite concrete is used as matrix for embedding dismantling waste in containers. The waste containers that would have been needed for separate conditioning and disposal of activated reactor graphite are thus saved. Applying the new method, the cost can be reduced from about 55 SFr/kg to about 17 SFr/kg graphite.

  20. Gearbox design for uncertain load requirements using active robust optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Shaul; Avigad, Gideon; Purshouse, Robin C.; Fleming, Peter J.

    2016-04-01

    Design and optimization of gear transmissions have been intensively studied, but surprisingly the robustness of the resulting optimal design to uncertain loads has never been considered. Active Robust (AR) optimization is a methodology to design products that attain robustness to uncertain or changing environmental conditions through adaptation. In this study the AR methodology is utilized to optimize the number of transmissions, as well as their gearing ratios, for an uncertain load demand. The problem is formulated as a bi-objective optimization problem where the objectives are to satisfy the load demand in the most energy efficient manner and to minimize production cost. The results show that this approach can find a set of robust designs, revealing a trade-off between energy efficiency and production cost. This can serve as a useful decision-making tool for the gearbox design process, as well as for other applications.

  1. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Hyman, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimization problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. We use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations. PMID:25580080

  2. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Hyman, James M.

    2013-12-10

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimization problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. Here we use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Finally, though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.

  3. Chlorine Isotopes: As a Possible Tracer of Fluid/Bio-Activities on Mars and a Progress Report on Chlorine Isotope Analysis by TIMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y.; Numata, M.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2009-01-01

    Significantly large mass fractionations between chlorine isotopes (Cl-35, Cl-37) have been reported for terrestrial materials including both geological samples and laboratory materials. Also, the chlorine isotopic composition can be used as a tracer for early solar system processes. Moreover, chlorine is ubiquitous on the Martian surface. Typical chlorine abundances in Gusev soils are approx.0.5 %. The global surface average chlorine abundance also is approx.0.5 %. Striking variations among outcrop rocks at Meridiani were reported with some chlorine abundances as high as approx.2%. Characterizing conditions under which chlorine isotopic fractionation may occur is clearly of interest to planetary science. Thus, we have initiated development of a chlorine isotopic analysis technique using TIMS at NASA-JSC. We present here a progress report on the current status of development at JSC and discuss the possible application of chlorine isotopic analysis to Martian meteorites in a search for fluid- and possibly biological activity on Mars.

  4. A personal exposure study employing scripted activities and paths in conjunction with atmospheric releases of perfluorocarbon tracers in Manhattan, New York

    PubMed Central

    LIOY, PAUL J; VALLERO, DANIEL; FOLEY, GARY; GEORGOPOULOS, PANOS; HEISER, JOHN; WATSON, TOM; REYNOLDS, MICHAEL; DALOIA, JAMES; TONG, SAI; ISUKAPALLI, SASTRY

    2014-01-01

    A personal exposure study was conducted in New York City as part of the Urban Dispersion Program (UDP). It examined the contact of individuals with four harmless perflourocarbon tracers (PFT) released in Midtown Manhattan with approval by city agencies at separate locations, during two types of experiments, completed during each release period. Two continuous 1 h release periods separated by a 1.5 h ventilation time were completed on 3 October 2005. Stationary site and personal exposure measurements were taken during each period, and the first half hour after the release ended. Two types of scripted exposure activities are reported: Outdoor Source Scale, and Outdoor Neighborhood Scale; requiring 1- and 10-min duration samples, respectively. The results showed that exposures were influenced by the surface winds, the urban terrain, and the movements of people and vehicles typical in urban centers. The source scale exposure data indicated that local conditions significantly affected the distribution of each tracer, and consequently the exposures. The highest PFT exposures resulted from interaction of the scripted activities with local surface conditions. The range measured for 1- min exposures were large with measured values exceeding 5000 ppqv (parts per quadrillion by volume). The neighborhood scale measurements quantified exposures at distances up to seven blocks away from the release points. Generally, but not always, the PFT levels returned quickly to zero indicating that after cessation of the emissions the concentrations decrease rapidly, and reduce the intensity of local exposures. The near source and neighborhood personal exposure route results provided information to establish a baseline for determining how a release could affect both the general public and emergency responders, and evaluate the adequacy of re-entry or exit strategies from a local area. Finally, the data also show that local characteristics can produce “hot spots”. PMID:17505505

  5. Assessment and optimization of uterine activity during labor.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kathleen R; Miller, Lisa

    2011-03-01

    Accurate assessment of uterine activity during labor is essential to promote optimal patient outcomes. This review provides clinicians with information to develop an evidence-based, standardized approach to the evaluation and management of uterine activity during labor including identification and treatment of excessive uterine activity. Common terminology is defined in an effort to enhance clear and direct communication and accurate assessment. The latest evidence regarding normal labor is presented along with physiology related to uterine activity and fetal oxygenation. Suggestions for managing excessive uterine activity are offered as well as a synopsis of risk reduction strategies for clinical practice.

  6. Active supports and force optimization for the MMT primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Hubert M.; Callahan, Shawn P.; Cuerden, Brian; Davison, Warren B.; Derigne, S. T.; Dettmann, Lee R.; Parodi, G.; Trebisky, T. J.; West, Steve C.; Williams, Joseph T.

    1998-08-01

    We describe the active support system and optimization of support forces for the 6.5 m primary mirror for the Multiple Mirror Telescope Conversion. The mirror was figured to an accuracy of 26 nm rms surface error, excluding certain flexible bending modes that will be controlled by support forces in the telescope. On installation of the mirror into its telescope support cell, an initial optimization of support forces is needed because of minor differences between the support used during fabrication and that in the telescope cell. The optimization is based on figure measurements made interferometrically in the vibration- isolated test tower of the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab. Actuator influence functions were determined by finite- element analysis and verified by measurement. The optimization is performed by singular value decomposition of the influence functions into normal modes. Preliminary results give a wavefront accuracy better than that of the atmosphere in 0.11 arcsecond seeing.

  7. Activated sludge optimization using ATP in pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Bäckman, Göran; Gytel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    The activated sludge process is an old technology, but still the most commonly used one for treatment of wastewater. Despite the wide spread usage the technology still suffers from instability (Tandoi et al. 2006) and high operating cost. Activated sludge processes often carry a large solids inventory. Managing the total inventory without interference is the key component of the optimization process described in this paper. Use of nutrients is common in pulp and paper effluent treatment. Feeding enough nutrients to support the biomass growth is a delicate balance. Overfeeding or underfeeding of nutrients can result in higher costs. Detrimental substances and toxic components in effluents entering a biological treatment system can cause severe, long lasting disturbances (Hynninen & Ingman 1998; Bergeron & Pelletier 2004). A LumiKem test kit is used to measure biological activity with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in a pulp and paper mill. ATP data are integrated with other standardized mill parameters. Measurements of active volatile suspended solids based on ATP can be used to quantify the living biomass in the activated sludge process and to ensure that sufficient biomass is present in order to degrade the wastewater constituents entering the process. Information about active biomass will assist in optimizing sludge inventories and feeding of nutrients allowing the living biomass to re-populate to create optimal efficiency. ATP measurements can also be used to alert operators if any components toxic to bacteria are present in wastewater. The bio stress index represents the stress level experienced by the microbiological population. This parameter is very useful in monitoring toxicity in and around bioreactors. Results from the wastewater process optimization and ATP measurements showed that treatment cost could be reduced by approximately 20-30% with fewer disturbances and sustained biological activity compared to the reference period. This was mainly achieved by

  8. Quadratic Optimization in the Problems of Active Control of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loncaric, J.; Tsynkov, S. V.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the problem of suppressing the unwanted component of a time-harmonic acoustic field (noise) on a predetermined region of interest. The suppression is rendered by active means, i.e., by introducing the additional acoustic sources called controls that generate the appropriate anti-sound. Previously, we have obtained general solutions for active controls in both continuous and discrete formulations of the problem. We have also obtained optimal solutions that minimize the overall absolute acoustic source strength of active control sources. These optimal solutions happen to be particular layers of monopoles on the perimeter of the protected region. Mathematically, minimization of acoustic source strength is equivalent to minimization in the sense of L(sub 1). By contrast. in the current paper we formulate and study optimization problems that involve quadratic functions of merit. Specifically, we minimize the L(sub 2) norm of the control sources, and we consider both the unconstrained and constrained minimization. The unconstrained L(sub 2) minimization is certainly the easiest problem to address numerically. On the other hand, the constrained approach allows one to analyze sophisticated geometries. In a special case, we call compare our finite-difference optimal solutions to the continuous optimal solutions obtained previously using a semi-analytic technique. We also show that the optima obtained in the sense of L(sub 2) differ drastically from those obtained in the sense of L(sub 1).

  9. Tracer attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    The self-purifying capacity of aquifers strongly depends on the attenuation of waterborne contaminants, i.e., irreversible loss of contaminant mass on a given scale as a result of coupled transport and transformation processes. A general formulation of tracer attenuation in groundwater is presented. Basic sensitivities of attenuation to macrodispersion and retention are illustrated for a few typical retention mechanisms. Tracer recovery is suggested as an experimental proxy for attenuation. Unique experimental data of tracer recovery in crystalline rock compare favorably with the theoretical model that is based on diffusion-controlled retention. Non-Fickian hydrodynamic transport has potentially a large impact on field-scale attenuation of dissolved contaminants.

  10. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Hyman, James M.

    2013-12-10

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimizationmore » problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. Here we use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Finally, though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.« less

  11. Optimization to Low Temperature Activity in Psychrophilic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Struvay, Caroline; Feller, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Psychrophiles, i.e., organisms thriving permanently at near-zero temperatures, synthesize cold-active enzymes to sustain their cell cycle. These enzymes are already used in many biotechnological applications requiring high activity at mild temperatures or fast heat-inactivation rate. Most psychrophilic enzymes optimize a high activity at low temperature at the expense of substrate affinity, therefore reducing the free energy barrier of the transition state. Furthermore, a weak temperature dependence of activity ensures moderate reduction of the catalytic activity in the cold. In these naturally evolved enzymes, the optimization to low temperature activity is reached via destabilization of the structures bearing the active site or by destabilization of the whole molecule. This involves a reduction in the number and strength of all types of weak interactions or the disappearance of stability factors, resulting in improved dynamics of active site residues in the cold. Considering the subtle structural adjustments required for low temperature activity, directed evolution appears to be the most suitable methodology to engineer cold activity in biological catalysts. PMID:23109875

  12. Tracer Test Interpretation Methods for Reservior Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, George Michael

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop tools that can be used to interpret tracer tests and obtain estimates of reservoir and operational parameters. These tools (mostly in the form of spreadsheet applications) can be used to optimize geothermal resource management.

  13. Evaluation of leakage from fume hoods using tracer gas, tracer nanoparticles and nanopowder handling test methodologies.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kevin H; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R; Bennett, James S; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and nanoparticles as well as an active test using an operator handling nanoalumina were conducted. A commercially available particle generator was used to produce sodium chloride tracer nanoparticles. Containment effectiveness was evaluated by sampling both in the breathing zone (BZ) of a mannequin and operator as well as across the hood opening. These containment tests were conducted across a range of hood face velocities (60, 80, and 100 ft/min) and with the room ventilation system turned off and on. For the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was much more prominent on the left side of the hood (closest to the room supply air diffuser) although some leakage was noted on the right side and in the BZ sample locations. During the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was primarily noted when the room air conditioner was on for both the low and medium hood exhaust airflows. When the room air conditioner was turned off, the static tracer gas tests showed good containment across most test conditions. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. The impact of a room air conditioner was demonstrated with containment being adversely impacted during the use of room air ventilation. The tracer nanoparticle approach is a simple method requiring minimal setup and instrumentation. However, the method requires the reduction in

  14. Evaluation of leakage from fume hoods using tracer gas, tracer nanoparticles and nanopowder handling test methodologies.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kevin H; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R; Bennett, James S; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and nanoparticles as well as an active test using an operator handling nanoalumina were conducted. A commercially available particle generator was used to produce sodium chloride tracer nanoparticles. Containment effectiveness was evaluated by sampling both in the breathing zone (BZ) of a mannequin and operator as well as across the hood opening. These containment tests were conducted across a range of hood face velocities (60, 80, and 100 ft/min) and with the room ventilation system turned off and on. For the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was much more prominent on the left side of the hood (closest to the room supply air diffuser) although some leakage was noted on the right side and in the BZ sample locations. During the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was primarily noted when the room air conditioner was on for both the low and medium hood exhaust airflows. When the room air conditioner was turned off, the static tracer gas tests showed good containment across most test conditions. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. The impact of a room air conditioner was demonstrated with containment being adversely impacted during the use of room air ventilation. The tracer nanoparticle approach is a simple method requiring minimal setup and instrumentation. However, the method requires the reduction in

  15. EVALUATION OF LEAKAGE FROM FUME HOODS USING TRACER GAS, TRACER NANOPARTICLES AND NANOPOWDER HANDLING TEST METHODOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kevin H.; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R.; Bennett, James S.; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and nanoparticles as well as an active test using an operator handling nanoalumina were conducted. A commercially available particle generator was used to produce sodium chloride tracer nanoparticles. Containment effectiveness was evaluated by sampling both in the breathing zone (BZ) of a mannequin and operator as well as across the hood opening. These containment tests were conducted across a range of hood face velocities (60, 80, and 100 feet/minute) and with the room ventilation system turned off and on. For the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was much more prominent on the left side of the hood (closest to the room supply air diffuser) although some leakage was noted on the right side and in the BZ sample locations. During the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was primarily noted when the room air conditioner was on for both the low and medium hood exhaust air flows. When the room air conditioner was turned off, the static tracer gas tests showed good containment across most test conditions. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. The impact of a room air conditioner was demonstrated with containment being adversely impacted during the use of room air ventilation. The tracer nanoparticle approach is a simple method requiring minimal setup and instrumentation. However, the method requires the reduction in

  16. Using conversions of chemically reacting tracers for numerical determination of temperature profiles in flowing systems and temperature histories in batch systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F.; Chemburkar, R.M.; Robinson, B.A.; Travis, B.J.

    1996-04-01

    This report presents the mathematical bases for measuring internal temperatures within batch and flowing systems using chemically reacting tracers. This approach can obtain temperature profiles of plug-flow systems and temperature histories within batch systems. The differential equations for reactant conversion can be converted into Fredholm integral equations of the first kind. The experimental variable is the tracer-reaction activation energy. When more than one tracer is used, the reactions must have different activation energies to gain information. In systems with temperature extrema, multiple solutions for the temperature profiles or histories can exist, When a single parameter in the temperature distribution is needed, a single-tracer test may furnish this information. For multi-reaction tracer tests, three Fredholm equations are developed. Effects of tracer-reaction activation energy, number of tracers used, and error in the data are evaluated. The methods can determine temperature histories and profiles for many existing systems, and can be a basis for analysis of the more complicated dispersed-flow systems. An alternative to using the Fredholm-equation approach is the use of an assumed temperature- distribution function and incorporation of this function into the basic integral equation describing tracer behavior. The function contains adjustable parameters which are optimized to give the temperature distribution. The iterative Fredholm equation method is tested to see what is required to discriminate between two models of the temperature behavior of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. Experimentally, ester and amide hydrolyses are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 75-100{degrees}C. Hydrolyses of bromobenzene derivatives are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 150-275{degrees}C.

  17. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  18. Optimal planning of LEO active debris removal based on hybrid optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao-qian; Chen, Li-hu

    2015-06-01

    The mission planning of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) active debris removal problem is studied in this paper. Specifically, the Servicing Spacecraft (SSc) and several debris exist on near-circular near-coplanar LEOs. The SSc should repeatedly rendezvous with the debris, and de-orbit them until all debris are removed. Considering the long-duration effect of J2 perturbation, a linear dynamics model is used for each rendezvous. The purpose of this paper is to find the optimal service sequence and rendezvous path with minimum total rendezvous cost (Δv) for the whole mission, and some complex constraints (communication time window constraint, terminal state constraint, and time distribution constraint) should be satisfied meanwhile. Considering this mission as a hybrid optimal control problem, a mathematical model is proposed, as well as the solution method. The proposed approach is demonstrated by a typical active debris removal problem. Numerical experiments show that (1) the model and solution method proposed in this paper can effectively address the planning problem of LEO debris removal; (2) the communication time window constraint and the J2 perturbation have considerable influences on the optimization results; and (3) under the same configuration, some suboptimal sequences are equivalent to the optimal one since their difference in Δv cost is very small.

  19. Optimal inference with suboptimal models: Addiction and active Bayesian inference

    PubMed Central

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H.B.; Mathys, Christoph; Dolan, Ray; Wurst, Friedrich; Kronbichler, Martin; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    When casting behaviour as active (Bayesian) inference, optimal inference is defined with respect to an agent’s beliefs – based on its generative model of the world. This contrasts with normative accounts of choice behaviour, in which optimal actions are considered in relation to the true structure of the environment – as opposed to the agent’s beliefs about worldly states (or the task). This distinction shifts an understanding of suboptimal or pathological behaviour away from aberrant inference as such, to understanding the prior beliefs of a subject that cause them to behave less ‘optimally’ than our prior beliefs suggest they should behave. Put simply, suboptimal or pathological behaviour does not speak against understanding behaviour in terms of (Bayes optimal) inference, but rather calls for a more refined understanding of the subject’s generative model upon which their (optimal) Bayesian inference is based. Here, we discuss this fundamental distinction and its implications for understanding optimality, bounded rationality and pathological (choice) behaviour. We illustrate our argument using addictive choice behaviour in a recently described ‘limited offer’ task. Our simulations of pathological choices and addictive behaviour also generate some clear hypotheses, which we hope to pursue in ongoing empirical work. PMID:25561321

  20. Is Peer Interaction Necessary for Optimal Active Learning?

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Jan Keith; Peterson, Ernie

    2014-01-01

    Meta-analyses of active-learning research consistently show that active-learning techniques result in greater student performance than traditional lecture-based courses. However, some individual studies show no effect of active-learning interventions. This may be due to inexperienced implementation of active learning. To minimize the effect of inexperience, we should try to provide more explicit implementation recommendations based on research into the key components of effective active learning. We investigated the optimal implementation of active-learning exercises within a “lecture” course. Two sections of nonmajors biology were taught by the same instructor, in the same semester, using the same instructional materials and assessments. Students in one section completed in-class active-learning exercises in cooperative groups, while students in the other section completed the same activities individually. Performance on low-level, multiple-choice assessments was not significantly different between sections. However, students who worked in cooperative groups on the in-class activities significantly outperformed students who completed the activities individually on the higher-level, extended-response questions. Our results provide additional evidence that group processing of activities should be the recommended mode of implementation for in-class active-learning exercises. PMID:26086656

  1. Is Peer Interaction Necessary for Optimal Active Learning?

    PubMed

    Linton, Debra L; Farmer, Jan Keith; Peterson, Ernie

    2014-01-01

    Meta-analyses of active-learning research consistently show that active-learning techniques result in greater student performance than traditional lecture-based courses. However, some individual studies show no effect of active-learning interventions. This may be due to inexperienced implementation of active learning. To minimize the effect of inexperience, we should try to provide more explicit implementation recommendations based on research into the key components of effective active learning. We investigated the optimal implementation of active-learning exercises within a "lecture" course. Two sections of nonmajors biology were taught by the same instructor, in the same semester, using the same instructional materials and assessments. Students in one section completed in-class active-learning exercises in cooperative groups, while students in the other section completed the same activities individually. Performance on low-level, multiple-choice assessments was not significantly different between sections. However, students who worked in cooperative groups on the in-class activities significantly outperformed students who completed the activities individually on the higher-level, extended-response questions. Our results provide additional evidence that group processing of activities should be the recommended mode of implementation for in-class active-learning exercises.

  2. Selective optimization of side activities: the SOSA approach.

    PubMed

    Wermuth, Camille G

    2006-02-01

    Selective optimization of side activities of drug molecules (the SOSA approach) is an intelligent and potentially more efficient strategy than HTS for the generation of new biological activities. Only a limited number of highly diverse drug molecules are screened, for which bioavailability and toxicity studies have already been performed and efficacy in humans has been confirmed. Once the screening has generated a hit it will be used as the starting point for a drug discovery program. Using traditional medicinal chemistry as well as parallel synthesis, the initial 'side activity' is transformed into the 'main activity' and, conversely, the initial 'main activity' is significantly reduced or abolished. This strategy has a high probability of yielding safe, bioavailable, original and patentable analogues. PMID:16533714

  3. Universal tracer monitored titrations.

    PubMed

    DeGrandpre, Michael D; Martz, Todd R; Hart, Robert D; Elison, David M; Zhang, Alice; Bahnson, Anna G

    2011-12-15

    Titrations, while primarily known as the chemical rite of passage for fledgling science students, are still widely used for chemical analysis. With its many years of existence and improvement, the method would seem an unlikely candidate for innovation, yet it is desirable, in this age of autonomous sensing where analyzers may be sent into space or to the bottom of the ocean, to have a simplified titrimetric method that does not rely upon volumetric or gravimetric measurement of sample and titrant. In previous work on the measurement of seawater alkalinity, we found that use of a tracer in the titrant eliminates the need to measure mass or volume. Here, we show the versatility of the method for diverse types of titrations and tracers. The results suggest that tracers may be employed in all types of titrations, opening the door for greatly simplified laboratory and field-based chemical analysis.

  4. Optimization of pectin extraction and antioxidant activities from Jerusalem artichoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengyi; Shi, Xuejie; Xu, Lanlan; Yi, Yuetao

    2016-03-01

    Jerusalem artichoke is an economic crop widely planted in saline-alkaline soil. The use of Jerusalem artichoke is of great significance. In this study, the response surface method was employed to optimize the effects of processing variables (extraction temperature, pH, extraction time, and liquid-to-solid ratio) on the yield of Jerusalem artichoke pectin. Under the optimal extraction conditions: pH 1.52, 63.62 min, 100°C and a liquid-to-solid ratio of 44.4 mL/g, the maximum pectin yield was predicted to be 18.76%. Experiments were conducted under these optimal conditions and a pectin yield of 18.52±0.90% was obtained, which validated the model prediction. The effects of diff erent drying methods (freeze drying, spray drying and vacuum drying) on the properties of Jerusalem artichoke pectin were evaluated and they were compared with apple pectin. FTIR spectral analysis showed no major structural diff erences in Jerusalem artichoke pectin samples produced by various drying treatments. The antioxidant activities of pectin dried by diff erent methods were investigated using in vitro hydroxyl and DPPH radical scavenging systems. The results revealed that the activities of spray dried pectin (SDP) and apple pectin (AP) were stronger than those of vacuum oven dried pectin (ODP) and vacuum freeze dried pectin (FDP). Therefore compared with the other two drying methods, the spray drying method was the best.

  5. Environmental Monitoring Networks Optimization Using Advanced Active Learning Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevski, Mikhail; Volpi, Michele; Copa, Loris

    2010-05-01

    The problem of environmental monitoring networks optimization (MNO) belongs to one of the basic and fundamental tasks in spatio-temporal data collection, analysis, and modeling. There are several approaches to this problem, which can be considered as a design or redesign of monitoring network by applying some optimization criteria. The most developed and widespread methods are based on geostatistics (family of kriging models, conditional stochastic simulations). In geostatistics the variance is mainly used as an optimization criterion which has some advantages and drawbacks. In the present research we study an application of advanced techniques following from the statistical learning theory (SLT) - support vector machines (SVM) and the optimization of monitoring networks when dealing with a classification problem (data are discrete values/classes: hydrogeological units, soil types, pollution decision levels, etc.) is considered. SVM is a universal nonlinear modeling tool for classification problems in high dimensional spaces. The SVM solution is maximizing the decision boundary between classes and has a good generalization property for noisy data. The sparse solution of SVM is based on support vectors - data which contribute to the solution with nonzero weights. Fundamentally the MNO for classification problems can be considered as a task of selecting new measurement points which increase the quality of spatial classification and reduce the testing error (error on new independent measurements). In SLT this is a typical problem of active learning - a selection of the new unlabelled points which efficiently reduce the testing error. A classical approach (margin sampling) to active learning is to sample the points closest to the classification boundary. This solution is suboptimal when points (or generally the dataset) are redundant for the same class. In the present research we propose and study two new advanced methods of active learning adapted to the solution of

  6. Reinforcement active learning in the vibrissae system: optimal object localization.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Goren; Dorfman, Nimrod; Ahissar, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    Rats move their whiskers to acquire information about their environment. It has been observed that they palpate novel objects and objects they are required to localize in space. We analyze whisker-based object localization using two complementary paradigms, namely, active learning and intrinsic-reward reinforcement learning. Active learning algorithms select the next training samples according to the hypothesized solution in order to better discriminate between correct and incorrect labels. Intrinsic-reward reinforcement learning uses prediction errors as the reward to an actor-critic design, such that behavior converges to the one that optimizes the learning process. We show that in the context of object localization, the two paradigms result in palpation whisking as their respective optimal solution. These results suggest that rats may employ principles of active learning and/or intrinsic reward in tactile exploration and can guide future research to seek the underlying neuronal mechanisms that implement them. Furthermore, these paradigms are easily transferable to biomimetic whisker-based artificial sensors and can improve the active exploration of their environment. PMID:22789551

  7. Reinforcement active learning in the vibrissae system: optimal object localization.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Goren; Dorfman, Nimrod; Ahissar, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    Rats move their whiskers to acquire information about their environment. It has been observed that they palpate novel objects and objects they are required to localize in space. We analyze whisker-based object localization using two complementary paradigms, namely, active learning and intrinsic-reward reinforcement learning. Active learning algorithms select the next training samples according to the hypothesized solution in order to better discriminate between correct and incorrect labels. Intrinsic-reward reinforcement learning uses prediction errors as the reward to an actor-critic design, such that behavior converges to the one that optimizes the learning process. We show that in the context of object localization, the two paradigms result in palpation whisking as their respective optimal solution. These results suggest that rats may employ principles of active learning and/or intrinsic reward in tactile exploration and can guide future research to seek the underlying neuronal mechanisms that implement them. Furthermore, these paradigms are easily transferable to biomimetic whisker-based artificial sensors and can improve the active exploration of their environment.

  8. Optimal Placement of Accelerometers for the Detection of Everyday Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Ian; Kikhia, Basel; Nugent, Chris; Boytsov, Andrey; Hallberg, Josef; Synnes, Kåre; McClean, Sally; Finlay, Dewar

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an investigation to determine the optimal placement of accelerometers for the purpose of detecting a range of everyday activities. The paper investigates the effect of combining data from accelerometers placed at various bodily locations on the accuracy of activity detection. Eight healthy males participated within the study. Data were collected from six wireless tri-axial accelerometers placed at the chest, wrist, lower back, hip, thigh and foot. Activities included walking, running on a motorized treadmill, sitting, lying, standing and walking up and down stairs. The Support Vector Machine provided the most accurate detection of activities of all the machine learning algorithms investigated. Although data from all locations provided similar levels of accuracy, the hip was the best single location to record data for activity detection using a Support Vector Machine, providing small but significantly better accuracy than the other investigated locations. Increasing the number of sensing locations from one to two or more statistically increased the accuracy of classification. There was no significant difference in accuracy when using two or more sensors. It was noted, however, that the difference in activity detection using single or multiple accelerometers may be more pronounced when trying to detect finer grain activities. Future work shall therefore investigate the effects of accelerometer placement on a larger range of these activities. PMID:23867744

  9. Dynamics of passive tracers in a bath of self-propelling granular particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamoy, E.; Confesor, M. N.

    2015-06-01

    We report on our experimental investigation of the dynamics of a passive tracer in a bath of active self-propelling granular particles. We found a caging like dynamics of the passive tracer such that for low active particle concentrations the passive tracer exhibits longer periods of inactivity. For increasing active particle concentration the occurrence of short period inactivity increases.

  10. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, T.; Stetzenbach, K.

    1991-12-31

    Studies continued on organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization project. Tracers studied include benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. The main focus of the work performed during the time period from 07/01/91 to 12/31/91 has been the continuation of (1) LC-MS optimization for tracer identification, (2) batch sorption and degradation studies, (3) neoprene tubing evaluation studies, and (4) soil column evaluation of tracer compounds. All of these areas of research (except perhaps the neoprene tubing evaluation) are ongoing and will continue throughout the coming year.

  11. Stable isotopes as tracers of methane dynamics in Everglades marshes with and without active populations of methane oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happell, James D.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Whiting, Gary J.; Showers, William J.

    1993-01-01

    The stable carbon isotopic composition of CH4 is used to study the processes that affect it during transport through plants from sediment to the atmosphere. The enhancement of CH4 flux from Cladium and Eleocharis over the flux from open water or clipped sites indicated that these plants served as gas conduits between the sediments and the atmosphere. Lowering of the water table below the sediment surface caused an Everglades sawgrass marsh to shift from emission of CH4 to consumption of atmospheric CH4. Cladium transported gases passively mainly via molecular diffusion and/or effusion instead of actively via bulk flow. Stable isotropic data gave no evidence that CH4 oxidation was occurring in the rhizosphere of Cladium. Both CH4 stable carbon isotope and flux data indicated a lack of CH4 oxidation at the sediment-water interface in Everglades marl soils and its presence in peat soils where 40 to 92 percent of the flux across the sediment-water interface was oxidized.

  12. ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios in freshwaters as tracers of hydrological processes: The Strengbach watershed (Vosges, France)

    SciTech Connect

    Riotte, J.; Chabaux, F.

    1999-05-01

    ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr isotopic ratios, as well as major and trace (U, Ba, Sr, Rb) element concentrations were analyzed in dissolved loads of the Strengback stream (Vosges, France) in order to constrain the sources of U isotopes ({sup 234}U--{sup 238}U) to river waters. The variations of the ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios along the stream indicate a clear dependence between the ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios of the surface waters and the different types of rocks forming the watershed, with near equilibrium values for the waters draining granites and high ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) disequilibria (1.4) for those flowing over carbonates. The high ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) disequilibria are related to a supply of {sup 234}U-enriched groundwaters located within the carbonate rocks. The ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios of the waters at the outlet of the catchment collecting the sources of the stream on the granitic lithology, decrease from 1.02 to 0.96 when the discharge of the stream increases. Such a tendency requires mixing between a water body enriched in {sup 234}U which weathered the granitic bed rock at secular equilibrium, and a water with a ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratio below unity representing a mobilization of U from material that has already been weathered. Comparison of the geochemical characteristics of waters collected during the year and those collected during a flood event, reveals the involvement of two different weathered end-members, depending on the hydrological conditions: during the year, the dissolved U transported by the river originates from bed-rock and deep horizons of the weathering profile, whereas a significant part of U, during the flood event, is supplied by superficial horizons of soils, probably complexes by organic colloids. These results outline the potential of ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios to investigate hydrological processes and emphasize that their use as tracers

  13. Fast Micro-Differential Evolution for Topological Active Net Optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Long; Zhan, Zhi-Hui; Gong, Yue-Jiao; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yun; Li, Qing

    2016-06-01

    This paper studies the optimization problem of topological active net (TAN), which is often seen in image segmentation and shape modeling. A TAN is a topological structure containing many nodes, whose positions must be optimized while a predefined topology needs to be maintained. TAN optimization is often time-consuming and even constructing a single solution is hard to do. Such a problem is usually approached by a "best improvement local search" (BILS) algorithm based on deterministic search (DS), which is inefficient because it spends too much efforts in nonpromising probing. In this paper, we propose the use of micro-differential evolution (DE) to replace DS in BILS for improved directional guidance. The resultant algorithm is termed deBILS. Its micro-population efficiently utilizes historical information for potentially promising search directions and hence improves efficiency in probing. Results show that deBILS can probe promising neighborhoods for each node of a TAN. Experimental tests verify that deBILS offers substantially higher search speed and solution quality not only than ordinary BILS, but also the genetic algorithm and scatter search algorithm. PMID:26068933

  14. Fast Micro-Differential Evolution for Topological Active Net Optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Long; Zhan, Zhi-Hui; Gong, Yue-Jiao; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yun; Li, Qing

    2016-06-01

    This paper studies the optimization problem of topological active net (TAN), which is often seen in image segmentation and shape modeling. A TAN is a topological structure containing many nodes, whose positions must be optimized while a predefined topology needs to be maintained. TAN optimization is often time-consuming and even constructing a single solution is hard to do. Such a problem is usually approached by a "best improvement local search" (BILS) algorithm based on deterministic search (DS), which is inefficient because it spends too much efforts in nonpromising probing. In this paper, we propose the use of micro-differential evolution (DE) to replace DS in BILS for improved directional guidance. The resultant algorithm is termed deBILS. Its micro-population efficiently utilizes historical information for potentially promising search directions and hence improves efficiency in probing. Results show that deBILS can probe promising neighborhoods for each node of a TAN. Experimental tests verify that deBILS offers substantially higher search speed and solution quality not only than ordinary BILS, but also the genetic algorithm and scatter search algorithm.

  15. Optimal stimulus scheduling for active estimation of evoked brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafashan, MohammadMehdi; Ching, ShiNung

    2015-12-01

    Objective. We consider the problem of optimal probing to learn connections in an evoked dynamic network. Such a network, in which each edge measures an input-output relationship between sites in sensor/actuator-space, is relevant to emerging applications in neural mapping and neural connectivity estimation. Approach. We show that the problem of scheduling nodes to a probe (i.e., stimulate) amounts to a problem of optimal sensor scheduling. Main results. By formulating the evoked network in state-space, we show that the solution to the greedy probing strategy has a convenient form and, under certain conditions, is optimal over a finite horizon. We adopt an expectation maximization technique to update the state-space parameters in an online fashion and demonstrate the efficacy of the overall approach in a series of detailed numerical examples. Significance. The proposed method provides a principled means to actively probe time-varying connections in neuronal networks. The overall method can be implemented in real time and is particularly well-suited to applications in stimulation-based cortical mapping in which the underlying network dynamics are changing over time.

  16. Optimal Recognition Method of Human Activities Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oniga, Stefan; József, Sütő

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research is an exhaustive analysis of the various factors that may influence the recognition rate of the human activity using wearable sensors data. We made a total of 1674 simulations on a publically released human activity database by a group of researcher from the University of California at Berkeley. In a previous research, we analyzed the influence of the number of sensors and their placement. In the present research we have examined the influence of the number of sensor nodes, the type of sensor node, preprocessing algorithms, type of classifier and its parameters. The final purpose is to find the optimal setup for best recognition rates with lowest hardware and software costs.

  17. Structural Optimization of Zn(II)-Activated MR Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Matosziuk, Lauren M.; Leibowitz, Jonathan H.; Heffern, Marie C.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Ratner, Mark A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the structural optimization and mechanistic investigation of a series of bio-activated MRI contrast agents that transform from low relaxivity to high relaxivity in the presence of Zn(II). The change in relaxivity results from a structural transformation of the complex that alters the coordination environment about the Gd(III) center. Here, we have performed a series of systematic modifications to determine the structure which provides the optimal change in relaxivity in response to the presence of Zn(II). Relaxivity measurements in the presence and absence of Zn(II) were used in conjunction with regarding water access (namely number of water molecules bound) to the Gd(III) center and temperature-dependent 13C NMR spectroscopy to determine how the coordination environment about the Gd(III) center is affected by: the distance between the Zn(II)-binding domain and the Gd(III)-chelate, the number of functional groups on the Zn(II)-binding domain, and the presence of Zn(II). The results of this study provide valuable insight into the elucidation of design principles for future bio-activated MR probes. PMID:23777423

  18. Optimal Recursive Digital Filters for Active Bending Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2013-01-01

    In the design of flight control systems for large flexible boosters, it is common practice to utilize active feedback control of the first lateral structural bending mode so as to suppress transients and reduce gust loading. Typically, active stabilization or phase stabilization is achieved by carefully shaping the loop transfer function in the frequency domain via the use of compensating filters combined with the frequency response characteristics of the nozzle/actuator system. In this paper we present a new approach for parameterizing and determining optimal low-order recursive linear digital filters so as to satisfy phase shaping constraints for bending and sloshing dynamics while simultaneously maximizing attenuation in other frequency bands of interest, e.g. near higher frequency parasitic structural modes. By parameterizing the filter directly in the z-plane with certain restrictions, the search space of candidate filter designs that satisfy the constraints is restricted to stable, minimum phase recursive low-pass filters with well-conditioned coefficients. Combined with optimal output feedback blending from multiple rate gyros, the present approach enables rapid and robust parametrization of autopilot bending filters to attain flight control performance objectives. Numerical results are presented that illustrate the application of the present technique to the development of rate gyro filters for an exploration-class multi-engined space launch vehicle.

  19. A Wolf Pack Algorithm for Active and Reactive Power Coordinated Optimization in Active Distribution Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, H. M.; Jiang, X. J.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an active and reactive power dynamic optimization model for active distribution network (ADN), whose control variables include the output of distributed generations (DGs), charge or discharge power of energy storage system (ESS) and reactive power from capacitor banks. To solve the high-dimension nonlinear optimization model, a new heuristic swarm intelligent method, namely wolf pack algorithm (WPA) with better global convergence and computational robustness, is adapted so that the network loss minimization can be achieved. In this paper, the IEEE33-bus system is used to show the effectiveness of WPA technique compared with other techniques. Numerical tests on the modified IEEE 33-bus system show that WPA for active and reactive multi-period optimization of ADN is exact and effective.

  20. Optimization of an Active Twist Rotor Blade Planform for Improved Active Response and Forward Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the optimum blade tip planform for a model-scale active twist rotor. The analysis identified blade tip design traits which simultaneously reduce rotor power of an unactuated rotor while leveraging aeromechanical couplings to tailor the active response of the blade. Optimizing the blade tip planform for minimum rotor power in forward flight provided a 5 percent improvement in performance compared to a rectangular blade tip, but reduced the vibration control authority of active twist actuation by 75 percent. Optimizing for maximum blade twist response increased the vibration control authority by 50 percent compared to the rectangular blade tip, with little effect on performance. Combined response and power optimization resulted in a blade tip design which provided similar vibration control authority to the rectangular blade tip, but with a 3.4 percent improvement in rotor performance in forward flight.

  1. Tracer for circulation determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, H.; Santos, S.; Wysong, R. D.

    1985-03-19

    An improved tracer particle is described comprising an ion exchange core having a polymer coating thereon, the coated ion exchange core having a reaction site capable of reacting with a compound containing an oxirane group, said coated ion exchange core having been treated with a compound containing an oxirane group to react with said coated ion exchange core causing an increase in mass of the tracer particle. Preferably, the ion exchange core is labelled with a radionuclide. These particles have improved characteristics including improved stability against leaching and improved handling properties. Such particles are useful in circulatory determinations involving the injection of the particles as a suspension in a physiologically acceptable carrier or medium into the circulatory system of animals.

  2. Tracer tomography (in) rocks!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Jimenez Parras, Santos; Bayer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Physical behavior of fractured aquifers is rigorously controlled by the presence of interconnected conductive fractures, as they represent the main pathways for flow and transport. Ideally, they are simulated as a discrete fracture network (DFN) in a model to capture the role of fracture system geometry, i.e. fracture length, height, and width (aperture/transmissivity). Such network may be constrained by prior geological information or direct data resources such as field mapping, borehole logging and geophysics. With the many geometric features, however, calibration of a DFN to measured data is challenging. This is especially the case when spatial properties of a fracture network need to be calibrated to flow and transport data. One way to increase the insight in a fractured rock is by combining the information from multiple field tests. In this study, a tomographic configuration that combines multiple tracer tests is suggested. These tests are conducted from a borehole with different injection levels that act as sources. In a downgradient borehole, the tracer is recorded at different levels or receivers, in order to maximize insight in the spatial heterogeneity of the rock. As tracer here we chose heat, and temperature breakthrough curves are recorded. The recorded tracer data is inverted using a novel stochastic trans-dimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure. An initial DFN solution is generated and sequentially modified given available geological information, such as expected fracture density, orientation, length distribution, spacing and persistency. During this sequential modification, the DFN evolves in a trans-dimensional inversion space through adding and/or deleting fracture segments. This stochastic inversion algorithm requires a large number of thousands of model runs to converge, and thus using a fast and robust forward model is essential to keep the calculation efficient. To reach this goal, an upwind coupled finite difference method is employed

  3. Tracers and Tracer Testing: Design, Implementation, Tracer Selection, and Interpretation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    G. Michael Shook; Shannon L.; Allan Wylie

    2004-01-01

    Conducting a successful tracer test requires adhering to a set of steps. The steps include identifying appropriate and achievable test goals, identifying tracers with the appropriate properties, and implementing the test as designed. When these steps are taken correctly, a host of tracer test analysis methods are available to the practitioner. This report discusses the individual steps required for a successful tracer test and presents methods for analysis. The report is an overview of tracer technology; the Suggested Reading section offers references to the specifics of test design and interpretation.

  4. What Oceanographers are Learning From Transient Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, W. J.

    2002-12-01

    A number of substances have been released into the environment on a global scale from humankind's activities. Observation of the passage of these tracers into and through the oceans is providing us with a remarkable opportunity to examine the rates, pathways, and mechanics by which material fluxes occur. Such information is critical to our understanding of how the ocean participates in the grand biogeochemical cycles, the earth system, and long-term climate regulation. This understanding is important for forecasting and possibly ameliorating natural and anthropogenic global change. How we extract this information from the evolving distributions of transient tracers is in itself an unfolding story. In general, there are three basic but related approaches that are used. The first involves "pathway visualization" whereby the observed distributions highlight the routes whereby these tracers propagate into the ocean interior. Observations from the WOCE and other programs provide us with compelling pictures of transient tracer distributions never before seen. This visualization provides geographic information about where the tracers have reached, and within some broad time-scale. A second approach involves the diagnosis of various transport properties directly from the observed fields, whether by regression calculations, inversions, or Green function estimates. Such calculations often lead to some estimate of the flow field, such as advection or turbulent mixing rates; or to a measure of inherent biogeochemical reactivity, such as adsorption, consumption, or particulate transport. A related approach involves the direct calculation of "tracer ages", which provide some measure of the ventilation time-scale of the water masses. Such a calculation, however, has subtle issues associated with it. Finally, comparison of observed tracer fields with prognostic model calculations has been used for evaluation and intercomparison of model performance. So what are we learning from

  5. Optimal design of active and semi-active suspensions including time delays and preview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hac', A.; Youn, I.

    1993-10-01

    Several control laws for active and semi-active suspension based on a linear half car model are derived and investigated. The strategies proposed take full advantage of the fact that the road input to the rear wheels is a delayed version of that to the front wheels, which in turn can be obtained either from the measurements of the front wheels and body motions or by direct preview of road irregularities if preview sensors are available. The suspension systems are optimized with respect to ride comfort, road holding and suspension rattle space as expressed by the mean-square-values of body acceleration (including effects of heave and pitch), tire deflections and front and rear suspension travels. The optimal control laws that minimize the given performance index and include passivity constraints in the semi-active case are derived using calculus of variation. The optimal semi-active suspension becomes piecewise linear, varying between passive and fully active systems and combinations of them. The performances of active and semi-active systems with and without preview were evaluated by numerical simulation in the time and frequency domains. The results show that incorporation of time delay between the front and rear axles in controller design improves the dynamic behavior of the rear axle and control of body pitch motion, while additional preview improves front wheel dynamics and body heave.

  6. Pro-active optimal control for semi-active vehicle suspension based on sensitivity updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Johannes; Gerdts, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    This article suggests a strategy to control semi-active suspensions of vehicles in a pro-active way to adapt to future road profiles. The control strategy aims to maximise comfort while maintaining good handling properties. It employs suitably defined optimal control problems in combination with a parametric sensitivity analysis. The optimal control techniques are used to optimise the time-dependent damper coefficients in an electro-rheological damper for given nominal road profiles. The parametric sensitivity analysis is used to adapt the computed nominal optimal controls to perturbed road profiles in real time. The method is particularly useful for events with a low excitation frequency such as ramps, bumps, or potholes. For high-frequency excitations standard controllers are preferable; so we propose a switched open-closed-loop controller design. Various examples demonstrate the performance of the approach.

  7. Application of constrained optimization to active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Mukhopadhyay, V.

    1981-01-01

    Active control of aeroelastic response is a complex in which the designer usually tries to satisfy many criteria which are often conflicting. To further complicate the design problem, the state space equations describing this type of control problem are usually of high order, involving a large number of states to represent the flexible structure and unsteady aerodynamics. Control laws based on the standard Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) method are of the same high order as the aeroelastic plant. To overcome this disadvantage of the LQG mode, an approach developed for designing low order optimal control laws which uses a nonlinear programming algorithm to search for the values of the control law variables that minimize a composite performance index, was extended to the constrained optimization problem. The method involves searching for the values of the control law variables that minimize a basic performance index while satisfying several inequality constraints that describe the design criteria. The method is applied to gust load alleviation of a drone aircraft.

  8. Travel-time-based thermal tracer tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter; Brauchler, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    Active thermal tracer testing is a technique to get information about the flow and transport properties of an aquifer. In this paper we propose an innovative methodology using active thermal tracers in a tomographic setup to reconstruct cross-well hydraulic conductivity profiles. This is facilitated by assuming that the propagation of the injected thermal tracer is mainly controlled by advection. To reduce the effects of density and viscosity changes and thermal diffusion, early-time diagnostics are used and specific travel times of the tracer breakthrough curves are extracted. These travel times are inverted with an eikonal solver using the staggered grid method to reduce constraints from the pre-defined grid geometry and to improve the resolution. Finally, non-reliable pixels are removed from the derived hydraulic conductivity tomograms. The method is applied to successfully reconstruct cross-well profiles as well as a 3-D block of a high-resolution fluvio-aeolian aquifer analog data set. Sensitivity analysis reveals a negligible role of the injection temperature, but more attention has to be drawn to other technical parameters such as the injection rate. This is investigated in more detail through model-based testing using diverse hydraulic and thermal conditions in order to delineate the feasible range of applications for the new tomographic approach.

  9. Tracer testing for reservoir description

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, W.E.; Abbaszadeh-Dehghani, M.

    1987-05-01

    When a reservoir is studied in detail for an EOR project, well-to-well tracers should be used as a tool to help understand the reservoir in a quantitative way. Tracers complement the more traditional reservoir evaluation tools. This paper discusses the concepts underlying tracer testing, the analysis methods used to produce quantitative results, and the meaning of these results in terms of conceptual picture of the reservoir. Some of the limitations of these analysis methods are discussed, along with ongoing research on tracer flow.

  10. Improving quantitative structure-activity relationships through multiobjective optimization.

    PubMed

    Nicolotti, Orazio; Giangreco, Ilenia; Miscioscia, Teresa Fabiola; Carotti, Angelo

    2009-10-01

    A multiobjective optimization algorithm was proposed for the automated integration of structure- and ligand-based molecular design. Driven by a genetic algorithm, the herein proposed approach enabled the detection of a number of trade-off QSAR models accounting simultaneously for two independent objectives. The first was biased toward best regressions among docking scores and biological affinities; the second minimized the atom displacements from a properly established crystal-based binding topology. Based on the concept of dominance, 3D QSAR equivalent models profiled the Pareto frontier and were, thus, designated as nondominated solutions of the search space. K-means clustering was, then, operated to select a representative subset of the available trade-off models. These were effectively subjected to GRID/GOLPE analyses for quantitatively featuring molecular determinants of ligand binding affinity. More specifically, it was demonstrated that a) diverse binding conformations occurred on the basis of the ligand ability to profitably contact different part of protein binding site; b) enzyme selectivity was better approached and interpreted by combining diverse equivalent models; and c) trade-off models were successful and even better than docking virtual screening, in retrieving at high sensitivity active hits from a large pool of chemically similar decoys. The approach was tested on a large series, very well-known to QSAR practitioners, of 3-amidinophenylalanine inhibitors of thrombin and trypsin, two serine proteases having rather different biological actions despite a high sequence similarity. PMID:19785453

  11. Optimization of Spinal Muscular Atrophy subject's muscle activity during gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umat, Gazlia; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary disease related muscle nerve disorder caused by degeneration of the anterior cells of the spinal cord. SMA is divided into four types according to the degree of seriousness. SMA patients show different gait with normal people. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of SMA patient muscle actions and the difference that exists between SMA subjects and normal subjects. Therefore, the electromyography (EMG) test will be used to track the behavior of muscle during walking and optimization methods are used to get the muscle stress that is capable of doing the work while walking. Involved objective function is non-linear function of the quadratic and cubic functions. The study concludes with a comparison of the objective function using the force that sought to use the moment of previous studies and the objective function using the data obtained from EMG. The results shows that the same muscles, peroneus longus and bisepsfemoris, were used during walking activity by SMA subjects and control subjects. Muscle stress force best solution achieved from part D in simulation carried out.

  12. Neutron Activation Analysis PRognosis and Optimization Code System.

    2004-08-20

    Version 00 NAAPRO predicts the results and main characteristics (detection limits, determination limits, measurement limits and relative precision of the analysis) of neutron activation analysis (instrumental and radiochemical). Gamma-ray dose rates for different points of time after sample irradiation and input count rate of the spectrometry system are also predicted. The code uses standard Windows user interface and extensive graphical tools for the visualization of the spectrometer characteristics (efficiency, response and background) and simulated spectrum.more » Optimization part is not included in the current version of the code. This release is designated NAAPRO, Version 01.beta. The MCNP code was used for generating detector responses. PREPRO-2000 and FCONV programs were used at the preparation of the program nuclear databases. A special program was developed for viewing, editing and updating of the program databases (not included into the present program package). The MCNP, PREPRO-2000 and FCONV software packages are not included in the NAAPRO package.« less

  13. RELAP-7 Progress Report. FY-2015 Optimization Activities Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Ray Alden; Zou, Ling; Andrs, David

    2015-09-01

    This report summarily documents the optimization activities on RELAP-7 for FY-2015. It includes the migration from the analytical stiffened gas equation of state for both the vapor and liquid phases to accurate and efficient property evaluations for both equilibrium and metastable (nonequilibrium) states using the Spline-Based Table Look-up (SBTL) method with the IAPWS-95 properties for steam and water. It also includes the initiation of realistic closure models based, where appropriate, on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s TRACE code. It also describes an improved entropy viscosity numerical stabilization method for the nonequilibrium two-phase flow model of RELAP-7. For ease of presentation to the reader, the nonequilibrium two-phase flow model used in RELAP-7 is briefly presented, though for detailed explanation the reader is referred to RELAP-7 Theory Manual [R.A. Berry, J.W. Peterson, H. Zhang, R.C. Martineau, H. Zhao, L. Zou, D. Andrs, “RELAP-7 Theory Manual,” Idaho National Laboratory INL/EXT-14-31366(rev. 1), February 2014].

  14. HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

  15. Tracer dating and ocean ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, G.; Sarmiento, J.L. )

    1990-06-15

    The interpretation of transient tracer observations depends on difficult to obtain information on the evolution in time of the tracer boundary conditions and interior distributions. Recent studies have attempted to circumvent this problem by making use of a derived quantity, age, based on the simultaneous distribution of two complementary tracers, such as tritium and its daughter, helium 3. The age is defined with reference to the surface such that the boundary condition takes on a constant value of zero. The authors use a two-dimensional model to explore the circumstances under which such a combination of conservation equations for two complementary tracers can lead to a cancellation of the time derivative terms. An interesting aspect of this approach is that mixing can serve as a source or sink of tracer based age. The authors define an idealized ventilation age tracer that is conservative with respect to mixing, and they explore how its behavior compares with that of the tracer-based ages over a range of advective and diffusive parameters.

  16. Low-Level Volatile Organic Compounds in Active Public Supply Wells as Ground-Water Tracers in the Los Angeles Physiographic Basin, California, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Burow, Karen R.; Belitz, Kenneth; Dubrovsky, Neil M.; Land, Michael; Gronberg, JoAnn

    2001-01-01

    Data were collected to evaluate the use of low-level volatile organic compounds (VOC) to assess the vulnerability of public supply wells in the Los Angeles physiographic basin. Samples of untreated ground water from 178 active public supply wells in the Los Angeles physiographic basin show that VOCs were detected in 61 percent of the ground-water samples; most of these detections were low, with only 29 percent above 1 mg/L (microgram per liter). Thirty-nine of the 86 VOCs analyzed were detected in at least one sample, and 11 VOCs were detected in 7 percent or more of the samples. The six most frequently detected VOCs were trichloromethane (chloroform) (46 percent); trichloroethene (TCE) (28 percent); tetrachloro-ethene (PCE) (19 percent); methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) (14 percent); 1,1-dichloroethane (11 percent); and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) (11 percent). These VOCs were also the most frequently detected VOCs in ground water representative of a wide range of hydrologically conditions in urban areas nationwide. Only two VOCs (TCE and PCE) exceeded state and federal primary maximum contaminant levels (MCL) for drinking water in a total of seven samples. Because samples were collected prior to water treatment, sample concentrations do not represent the concentrations entering the drinking-water system.Ground water containing VOCs may be considered to be a tracer of postindustrial-aged water-water that was recharged after the onset of intense urban development. The overall distribution of VOC detections is related to the hydrological and the engineered recharge facilities in the Coastal Los Angeles Basin and the Coastal Santa Ana Basin that comprise the Los Angeles physiographic basin. Most of the ground-water recharge occurs at engineered recharge facilities in the generally coarse-grained northeastern parts of the study area (forebay areas). Ground-water recharge from the land surface is minimal in the southwestern part of the basins, distal from the recharge

  17. Tracer airflow measurement system (TRAMS)

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Duo

    2007-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring fluid flow in a duct is disclosed. The invention uses a novel high velocity tracer injector system, an optional insertable folding mixing fan for homogenizing the tracer within the duct bulk fluid flow, and a perforated hose sampling system. A preferred embodiment uses CO.sub.2 as a tracer gas for measuring air flow in commercial and/or residential ducts. In extant commercial buildings, ducts not readily accessible by hanging ceilings may be drilled with readily plugged small diameter holes to allow for injection, optional mixing where desired using a novel insertable foldable mixing fan, and sampling hose.

  18. Microwave irradiation of rats at 2. 45 GHz activates pinocytotic-like uptake of tracer by capillary endothelial cells of cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, C.; Phelan, A.M.; Kues, H.; Lange, D.G. )

    1990-01-01

    Far-field exposures of male albino rats to 2.45-GHz microwaves (10-microseconds pulses, 100 pps) at a low average power density (10 mW/cm2; SAR approximately 2 W/kg) and short durations (30-120 min) resulted in increased uptakes of tracer through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The uptake of systemically administered rhodamine-ferritin complex by capillary endothelial cells (CECs) of the cerebral cortex was dependent on power density and on duration of exposure. At 5 mW/cm2, for example, a 15-min exposure had no effect. Near-complete blockade of uptake resulted when rats were treated before exposure to microwaves with a single dose of colchicine, which inhibits microtubular function. A pinocytotic-like mechanism is presumed responsible for the microwave-induced increase in BBB permeability.

  19. Physical Activity in Childhood May Be the Key to Optimizing Lifespan Skeletal Health

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Katherine B.; Almstedt, Hawley C.; Janz, Kathleen F

    2011-01-01

    Physical activities undertaken in childhood, particularly activities which apply large forces quickly convey optimal benefits to bone mass, size, and structure. Evidence is accumulating that benefits persist well beyond activity cessation. This review examines the potential for early childhood activity to improve bone mineralization and structure and explores childhood activity as prevention for osteoporosis in later life. PMID:21918458

  20. Nitrate in Polar Ice: A New Tracer of Solar Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversi, R.; Usoskin, I. G.; Solanki, S. K.; Becagli, S.; Frezzotti, M.; Severi, M.; Stenni, B.; Udisti, R.

    2012-09-01

    Knowledge of the long-term variability of solar activity is of both astrophysical and geoscientific interest. Reconstructions of solar activity over multiple millennia are traditionally based on cosmogenic isotopes 14C or 10Be measured in natural terrestrial archives, but the two isotopes exhibit significant differences on millennial time scales, so that our knowledge of solar activity at this time scale remains somewhat uncertain. Here we present a new potential proxy of solar activity on the centennial-millennial time scale, based on a chemical tracer, viz. nitrate content in an ice core drilled at Talos Dome (Antarctica). We argue that this location is optimal for preserving the solar signal in the nitrate content during the Holocene. By using the firn core from the same location we show that the 11-year and Gleissberg cycles are present with the variability of 10 - 25 % in nitrate content in the pre-industrial epoch. This is consistent with the results of independent efforts of modeling HNO3 and NO y in Antarctic near surface air. However, meteorological noise on the interannual scale makes it impossible to resolve individual solar cycles. Based on different processes of formation and transport compared to cosmogenic isotopes, it provides new, independent insight into long-term solar activity and helps resolve the uncertainties related to cosmogenic isotopes as diagnostics of solar activity.

  1. Radioactive tracers improve completion and fracturing practices. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Voneiff, G.W.; Robinson, B.M.

    1995-03-01

    Radioactive tracers placed in hydraulic fracture treatments can aid completion optimization. Much like other new fracturing technologies, tracers are not necessarily profitable on every well that they are applied to but achieve substantial benefits on 5% to 10% of the wells. When averaged over a large number of wells, tracer technology can increase some field reserves by up to 10%, resulting in an increased profit of $100,000/well. To evaluate pay intervals that may be unstimulated or understimulated, radioactive tracer technology must be applied to every hydraulically fracture well. Radioactive tracer benefits were evaluated in four formations: Almond sand in Wyoming; Cotton Valley sand in East Texas; Delaware in New Mexico; Red Fork in Oklahoma. Benefit-to-cost ratios ranged from 9:1 to 12:1 for typical pay and permeability values (Table 1). Formation permeability and net pay strongly impact the magnitude of the benefits. However, the benefit over a full range of reservoir properties was evaluated, and the technology remained cost-effective, even when only a small percentage of identified problems could be corrected. This article includes a typical example of how radioactive tracers were used to increase production two-fold in a well by identifying understimulated pay.

  2. Determination of plasma-free fatty acid kinetics with tracers: Methodologic considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, J.M.; Jensen, M.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Plasma-free fatty acids (FFA) are an important source of energy for a variety of tissues. Recently, there has been an increased interest in the measurement of FFA kinetics in vivo, using radiolabeled or stable isotopic tracers. Standard techniques for measurement of FFA-specific activity are relatively imprecise and have limited sensitivity. The authors have developed a method for determination of the concentration and specific activity of individual plasma FFA that is precise (coefficient of variation less than 2%) and sensitive (detection limit in the high femptomolar to low picomolar range). Using this method, one can measure the kinetics of three or more long-chain fatty acids simultaneously. Its sensitivity is a particular advantage if one wishes to measure low rates of FFA turnover such as are encountered during hyperinsulinemia. It has been suggested that, for optimal accuracy in the determination of substrate kinetics, the tracer should be administered in the left ventricle and mixed venous blood samples should be obtained from the right heart. They have conducted experiments in dogs which demonstrate that peripheral tracer infusion and more conventional arterial (or arterialized venous) sampling actually provide more accurate estimates of FFA turnover; this is fortunate, since intracardiac infusion and sampling are not practical for human studies. 39 references.

  3. Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Scheier, Michael F.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Optimism is an individual difference variable that reflects the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future. Higher levels of optimism have been related prospectively to better subjective well-being in times of adversity or difficulty (i.e., controlling for previous well-being). Consistent with such findings, optimism has been linked to higher levels of engagement coping and lower levels of avoidance, or disengagement, coping. There is evidence that optimism is associated with taking proactive steps to protect one's health, whereas pessimism is associated with health-damaging behaviors. Consistent with such findings, optimism is also related to indicators of better physical health. The energetic, task-focused approach that optimists take to goals also relates to benefits in the socioeconomic world. Some evidence suggests that optimism relates to more persistence in educational efforts and to higher later income. Optimists also appear to fare better than pessimists in relationships. Although there are instances in which optimism fails to convey an advantage, and instances in which it may convey a disadvantage, those instances are relatively rare. In sum, the behavioral patterns of optimists appear to provide models of living for others to learn from. PMID:20170998

  4. The Popcorn Box Activity and Reasoning about Optimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteley, Walter J.; Mamolo, Ami

    2012-01-01

    A well-known optimization problem is the Popcorn Box investigation, which involves a movie theater snack container. The problem has been tailored for classroom investigations by the Ontario Association for Mathematics Education. The exploration was designed for students in grades 9 through 12. A common strategy proposed for algebra students is to…

  5. Is Peer Interaction Necessary for Optimal Active Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linton, Debra L.; Farmer, Jan Keith; Peterson, Ernie

    2014-01-01

    Meta-analyses of active-learning research consistently show that active-learning techniques result in greater student performance than traditional lecture-based courses. However, some individual studies show no effect of active-learning interventions. This may be due to inexperienced implementation of active learning. To minimize the effect of…

  6. Redesigning TRACER trial after TRITON.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L

    2015-10-15

    Designing of smart clinical trials is critical for regulatory approval and future drug utilization. Importantly, trial design should be reconsidered if the interim analyses suggest unexpected harm, or conflicting results were yielded from the other trials within the same therapeutic area. With regard to antiplatelet agents, the perfect example is redesigning of the ongoing PRoFESS trial by eliminating aspirin from clopidogrel arm after the earlier MATCH trial results became available. The goal was to aseess the unchanged TRACER trial design in light of the evidence yielded from the earlier completed TRITON trial. TRACER was designed as a triple versus dual antiplatelet trial in NSTEMI patients with no previous long-term outcome data supporting such aggressive strategy. TRITON data represented dual versus dual antiplatelet therapy, and became available before TRACER enrollment starts revealing prasugrel front-loaded early vascular benefit predominantly in STEMI patients with the growing over time bleeding and cancer risks. Moreover, large prasugrel NSTEMI TRITON cohort exhibited trend towards excess mortality in experimental arm warning against aggressive TRACER design. The long-term TRITON results in general, and especially in the NSTEMI patients challenge unchanged TRACER trial design. Applying dual, rather than triple antiplatelet therapy protocol modification should be considered in TRACER to minimize bleeding, cancer, and non-cardiovascular death risks. PMID:26126053

  7. Magnetic Particle Imaging Tracers: State-of-the-Art and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Lisa M; Situ, Shu F; Griswold, Mark A; Samia, Anna Cristina S

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging imaging modality with promising applications in diagnostic imaging and guided therapy. The image quality in MPI is strongly dependent on the nature of its iron oxide nanoparticle-based tracers. The selection of potential MPI tracers is currently limited, and the underlying physics of tracer response is not yet fully understood. An in-depth understanding of the magnetic relaxation processes that govern MPI tracers, gained through concerted theoretical and experimental work, is crucial to the development of optimized MPI tracers. Although tailored tracers will lead to improvements in image quality, tailored relaxation may also be exploited for biomedical applications or more flexible image contrast, as in the recent demonstration of color MPI.

  8. Optimized geometric configuration of active ring laser gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, John; Salloum, Tony

    2016-05-01

    We present a thorough derivation of the Sagnac effect for a ring laser gyroscope of any arbitrary polygonal configuration. We determine optimized alternative geometric configurations for the mirrors. The simulations incur the implementation of a lasing medium with the standard square system, triangular, pentagonal, and oblongated square configuration (diamond). Simulations of possible new geometric configurations are considered, as well as the possibility of adjusting the concavity of the mirrors.

  9. Development of a new positron emission tomography tracer for targeting tumor angiogenesis: synthesis, small animal imaging, and radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Cam; Frederick, C Brandon; Yuan, Hong; Dyer, Laura A; Lockyer, Pamela; Lalush, David S; Veleva, Anka N

    2013-05-15

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer progression and correlates with disease aggressiveness and poor clinical outcomes. Affinity ligands discovered by screening phage display random peptide libraries can be engineered to molecularly target tumor blood vessels for noninvasive imaging and early detection of tumor aggressiveness. In this study, we tested the ability of a phage-display-selected peptide sequence recognizing specifically bone marrow- derived pro-angiogenic tumor-homing cells, the QFP-peptide, radiolabeled with 64Cu radioisotope to selectively image tumor vasculature in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET). To prepare the targeted PET tracer we modified QFP-phage with the DOTA chelator and radiolabeled the purified QFP-phage-DOTA intermediate with 64Cu to obtain QFP-targeted radioconjugate with high radiopharmaceutical yield and specific activity. We evaluated the new PET tracer in vivo in a subcutaneous (s.c.) Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) mouse model and conducted tissue distribution, small animal PET/CT imaging study, autoradiography, histology, fluorescence imaging, and dosimetry assessments. The results from this study show that, in the context of the s.c. LLC immunocompetent mouse model, the QFP-tracer can target tumor blood vessels selectively. However, further optimization of the biodistribution and dosimetry profile of the tracer is necessary to ensure efficient radiopharmaceutical applications enabled by the biological specificity of the QFP-peptide.

  10. Application of separable parameter space techniques to multi-tracer PET compartment modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Morey, A. Michael; Kadrmas, Dan J.

    2016-02-01

    Multi-tracer positron emission tomography (PET) can image two or more tracers in a single scan, characterizing multiple aspects of biological functions to provide new insights into many diseases. The technique uses dynamic imaging, resulting in time-activity curves that contain contributions from each tracer present. The process of separating and recovering separate images and/or imaging measures for each tracer requires the application of kinetic constraints, which are most commonly applied by fitting parallel compartment models for all tracers. Such multi-tracer compartment modeling presents challenging nonlinear fits in multiple dimensions. This work extends separable parameter space kinetic modeling techniques, previously developed for fitting single-tracer compartment models, to fitting multi-tracer compartment models. The multi-tracer compartment model solution equations were reformulated to maximally separate the linear and nonlinear aspects of the fitting problem, and separable least-squares techniques were applied to effectively reduce the dimensionality of the nonlinear fit. The benefits of the approach are then explored through a number of illustrative examples, including characterization of separable parameter space multi-tracer objective functions and demonstration of exhaustive search fits which guarantee the true global minimum to within arbitrary search precision. Iterative gradient-descent algorithms using Levenberg-Marquardt were also tested, demonstrating improved fitting speed and robustness as compared to corresponding fits using conventional model formulations. The proposed technique overcomes many of the challenges in fitting simultaneous multi-tracer PET compartment models.

  11. Structure Guided Optimization, in Vitro Activity, and in Vivo Activity of Pan-PIM Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Burger, Matthew T; Han, Wooseok; Lan, Jiong; Nishiguchi, Gisele; Bellamacina, Cornelia; Lindval, Mika; Atallah, Gordana; Ding, Yu; Mathur, Michelle; McBride, Chris; Beans, Elizabeth L; Muller, Kristine; Tamez, Victoriano; Zhang, Yanchen; Huh, Kay; Feucht, Paul; Zavorotinskaya, Tatiana; Dai, Yumin; Holash, Jocelyn; Castillo, Joseph; Langowski, John; Wang, Yingyun; Chen, Min Y; Garcia, Pablo D

    2013-12-12

    Proviral insertion of Moloney virus (PIM) 1, 2, and 3 kinases are serine/threonine kinases that normally function in survival and proliferation of hematopoietic cells. As high expression of PIM1, 2, and 3 is frequently observed in many human malignancies, including multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and myeloid leukemias, there is interest in determining whether selective PIM inhibition can improve outcomes of these human cancers. Herein, we describe our efforts toward this goal. The structure guided optimization of a singleton high throughput screening hit in which the potency against all three PIM isoforms was increased >10,000-fold to yield compounds with pan PIM K is < 10 pM, nanomolar cellular potency, and in vivo activity in an acute myeloid leukemia Pim-dependent tumor model is described. PMID:24900629

  12. 18O-Tracer Metabolomics Reveals Protein Turnover and CDP-Choline Cycle Activity in Differentiating 3T3-L1 Pre-Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Jay S; Miranda, Cristobal L; Bobe, Gerd; Maier, Claudia S; Stevens, Jan F

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of precursor cells into mature adipocytes (adipogenesis) has been an area of increased focus, spurred by a rise in obesity rates. Though our understanding of adipogenesis and its regulation at the cellular level is growing, many questions remain, especially regarding the regulation of the metabolome. The 3T3-L1 cell line is the most well characterized cellular model of adipogenesis. Using a time course metabolomics approach, we show that the 3T3-L1 preadipocyte metabolome is greatly altered during the first 48 hours of differentiation, where cells go through about two rounds of cell division, a process known as mitotic clonal expansion. Short-chain peptides were among several small molecules that were increased during mitotic clonal expansion. Additional indicators of protein turnover were also increased, including bilirubin, a degradation product of heme-containing proteins, and 3-methylhistidine, a post-translationally modified amino acid that is not reutilized for protein synthesis. To study the origin of the peptides, we treated differentiating preadipocytes with 18O labeled water and found that 18O was incorporated into the short chain peptides, confirming them, at least in part, as products of hydrolysis. Inhibitors of the proteasome or matrix metalloproteinases affected the peptide levels during differentiation, but inhibitors of autophagy or peptidases did not. 18O was also incorporated into several choline metabolites including cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline), glycerophosphocholine, and several phosphatidylcholine species, indicative of phosphatidylcholine synthesis/degradation and of flux through the CDP-choline cycle, a hallmark of proliferating cells. 18O-Tracer metabolomics further showed metabolic labeling of glutamate, suggestive of glutaminolysis, also characteristic of proliferating cells. Together, these results highlight the utility of 18O isotope labeling in combination with metabolomics to uncover changes in

  13. 18O-Tracer Metabolomics Reveals Protein Turnover and CDP-Choline Cycle Activity in Differentiating 3T3-L1 Pre-Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, Jay S.; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Bobe, Gerd; Maier, Claudia S.; Stevens, Jan F.

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of precursor cells into mature adipocytes (adipogenesis) has been an area of increased focus, spurred by a rise in obesity rates. Though our understanding of adipogenesis and its regulation at the cellular level is growing, many questions remain, especially regarding the regulation of the metabolome. The 3T3-L1 cell line is the most well characterized cellular model of adipogenesis. Using a time course metabolomics approach, we show that the 3T3-L1 preadipocyte metabolome is greatly altered during the first 48 hours of differentiation, where cells go through about two rounds of cell division, a process known as mitotic clonal expansion. Short-chain peptides were among several small molecules that were increased during mitotic clonal expansion. Additional indicators of protein turnover were also increased, including bilirubin, a degradation product of heme-containing proteins, and 3-methylhistidine, a post-translationally modified amino acid that is not reutilized for protein synthesis. To study the origin of the peptides, we treated differentiating preadipocytes with 18O labeled water and found that 18O was incorporated into the short chain peptides, confirming them, at least in part, as products of hydrolysis. Inhibitors of the proteasome or matrix metalloproteinases affected the peptide levels during differentiation, but inhibitors of autophagy or peptidases did not. 18O was also incorporated into several choline metabolites including cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline), glycerophosphocholine, and several phosphatidylcholine species, indicative of phosphatidylcholine synthesis/degradation and of flux through the CDP-choline cycle, a hallmark of proliferating cells. 18O-Tracer metabolomics further showed metabolic labeling of glutamate, suggestive of glutaminolysis, also characteristic of proliferating cells. Together, these results highlight the utility of 18O isotope labeling in combination with metabolomics to uncover changes in

  14. Quantification of brain perfusion with tracers retained by the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pupi, A.; Bacciottini, L.; De Cristofaro, M.T.R.; Formiconi, A.R.; Castagnoli, A.

    1991-12-31

    Almost a decade ago, tracers, labelled with {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc, that are retained by the brain, started to be used for studies of regional brain perfusion (regional cerebral blood flow, rCBF). To date, these tracers have been used for brain perfusion imaging with SPECT in brain disorders as well as for physiological activation protocols. Only seldom, however, have they been used in protocols that quantitatively measure rCBF. Nevertheless, comparative studies with perfusion reference tracers have repeatedly demonstrated that the brain uptake of these brain-retained tracers is correlated to perfusion, the major determinant of the distribution of these tracers in the brain. The brain kinetics of {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, which is the tracer most commonly used, was described with a two-compartment tissue model. The theoretical approach, which is, in itself, sufficient for modeling quantitative measurements with {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, initially suggested the possibility of empirically narrowing the distance between the brain`s regional uptake of the tracer and rCBF with a linearization algorithm which uses the cerebellum as the reference region. The value of this empirical method is hampered by the fact that the cerebellum can be involved in cerebrovascular disease (i.e. cerebellar diaschisis) as well as in several other brain disorders (e.g. anxiety, and dementia of the Alzheimer type). It also was proposed that different reference regions (occipital, whole slice, or whole brain) should be selected in relation to the brain disorder under study. However, this approach does not solve the main problem because it does not equip us with a reliable tool to evaluate rCBF with a high predictive value, and, at the same time, to reduce intersubject variability. The solution would be to measure a quantitative parameter which directly reflects rCBF, such as the unidirectional influx constant of the freely diffusible flow-limited tracers. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Optimality of incompletely measurable active and passive attitude control systems. [for satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiehlen, W.; Popp, K.

    1973-01-01

    Passive attitude control systems and active systems with incomplete state measurements are only suboptimal systems in the sense of optimal control theory, since optimal systems require complete state measurements or state estimations. An optimal system, then, requires additional hardware (especially in the case of flexible spacecraft) which results in higher costs. Therefore, it is a real engineering problem to determine how much an optimal system exceeds the suboptimal system, or in other words, what is the suboptimal system's degree of optimality. The problem will be treated in three steps: (1) definition of the degree of optimality for linear, time-invariant systems; (2) a computation method using the quadratic cost functional; (3) application to a gravity-gradient stabilized three-body satellite and a spinning flexible satellite.

  16. Multiobjective optimization in a pseudometric objective space as applied to a general model of business activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachaturov, R. V.

    2016-09-01

    It is shown that finding the equivalence set for solving multiobjective discrete optimization problems is advantageous over finding the set of Pareto optimal decisions. An example of a set of key parameters characterizing the economic efficiency of a commercial firm is proposed, and a mathematical model of its activities is constructed. In contrast to the classical problem of finding the maximum profit for any business, this study deals with a multiobjective optimization problem. A method for solving inverse multiobjective problems in a multidimensional pseudometric space is proposed for finding the best project of firm's activities. The solution of a particular problem of this type is presented.

  17. AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING BYPASSED OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS AND FRACTURED RESERVOIRS USING PARTITIONING TRACERS

    SciTech Connect

    Akhil Datta-Gupta

    2003-08-01

    We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling partitioning interwell tracer tests in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Specifically, we utilize the unique features of streamline models to develop an efficient approach for interpretation and history matching of field tracer response. A critical aspect here is the underdetermined and highly ill-posed nature of the associated inverse problems. We have adopted an integrated approach whereby we combine data from multiple sources to minimize the uncertainty and non-uniqueness in the interpreted results. For partitioning interwell tracer tests, these are primarily the distribution of reservoir permeability and oil saturation distribution. A novel approach to multiscale data integration using Markov Random Fields (MRF) has been developed to integrate static data sources from the reservoir such as core, well log and 3-D seismic data. We have also explored the use of a finite difference reservoir simulator, UTCHEM, for field-scale design and optimization of partitioning interwell tracer tests. The finite-difference model allows us to include detailed physics associated with reactive tracer transport, particularly those related with transverse and cross-streamline mechanisms. We have investigated the potential use of downhole tracer samplers and also the use of natural tracers for the design of partitioning tracer tests. Finally, the behavior of partitioning tracer tests in fractured reservoirs is investigated using a dual-porosity finite-difference model.

  18. Importance of sites of tracer administration and sampling in turnover studies

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.

    1982-01-01

    Our recent studies with tritium and /sup 14/C-labeled lactate and alanine in starved rats revealed that the sites of tracer administration and sampling have a profound effect on the kinetics of the specific activity curves and the calculation of metabolic parameters. The importance of the sites of tracer administration and sampling for the experimental design and interpretation of tracer data in vivo is discussed.

  19. Optimization of endochin-like quinolones for antimalarial activity

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Rolf; Kelly, Jane X.; Smilkstein, Martin J.; Hinrichs, David; Koop, Dennis R.; Riscoe, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Structural analogs of the antimalarial Endochin were synthesized and screened for antiplasmodial activity against drug sensitive and multidrug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Structural features have been identified that are associated with improved potency while other features are associated with equipotency against an atovaquone-resistant clinical isolate. Relative to endochin the most active compound ELQ-121 shows ≈ 100-fold improvement in IC50 for inhibition of P. falciparum in vitro and it also exhibits enhanced metabolic stability. A polyethylene glycol carbonate ester prodrug of ELQ-121 demonstrated in vivo efficacy against P. yoelii in mice. This is the first report of an endochin-like quinolone that is efficacious in treating malaria in a mammalian host. PMID:21040724

  20. Optimal Activation of Isopsoralen To Prevent Amplicon Carryover

    PubMed Central

    Fahle, Gary A.; Gill, Vee J.; Fischer, Steven H.

    1999-01-01

    We compared the efficiencies of activation of the photochemical isopsoralen compound 10 and its resulting amplicon neutralizations under conditions with a UV transilluminator box at room temperature (RT) and a HRI-300 UV photothermal reaction chamber at RT and at 5°C. Our data suggest that use of the HRI-300 reaction chamber at 5°C results in a statistically significantly higher degree of amplicon neutralization. PMID:9854109

  1. Bioethics. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Cathy, Comp.; Cadoree, Michelle

    This guide lists published materials on many aspects of bioethics, the literature of which is varied and scattered. Related guides in the LC Science Tracer Bullet series are TB 80-9, Terminal Care, TB 80-11, Drug Research on Human Subjects, TB 83-4, Science Policy, and TB 84-7, Biotechnology. Not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography, this…

  2. Tracer-monitored flow titrations.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Milton K; Rocha, Diogo L; Rocha, Fábio R P; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing tracer-monitored titrations in a flow system is demonstrated. A dye tracer is used to estimate the instant sample and titrant volumetric fractions without the need for volume, mass or peak width measurements. The approach was applied to spectrophotometric flow titrations involving variations of sample and titrant flow-rates (i.e. triangle programmed technique) or concentration gradients established along the sample zone (i.e. flow injection system). Both strategies required simultaneous monitoring of two absorbing species, namely the titration indicator and the dye tracer. Mixing conditions were improved by placing a chamber with mechanical stirring in the analytical path aiming at to minimize diffusional effects. Unlike most of flow-based titrations, the innovation is considered as a true titration, as it does not require a calibration curve thus complying with IUPAC definition. As an application, acidity evaluation in vinegars involving titration with sodium hydroxide was selected. Phenolphthalein and brilliant blue FCF were used as indicator and dye tracer, respectively. Effects of sample volume, titrand/titrant concentrations and flow rates were investigated aiming at improved accuracy and precision. Results were reliable and in agreement with those obtained by a reference titration procedure.

  3. Following Footsteps: ECD Tracer Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smale, Jim, Editor

    2002-01-01

    This document consists of the single 2002 issue of The Bernard van Leer Foundation's "Early Childhood Matters," a periodical addressed to practitioners in the field of early childhood education and including information on projects funded by the Foundation. Articles in this issue focus on early childhood development tracer studies of former…

  4. Tracer-monitored flow titrations.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Milton K; Rocha, Diogo L; Rocha, Fábio R P; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing tracer-monitored titrations in a flow system is demonstrated. A dye tracer is used to estimate the instant sample and titrant volumetric fractions without the need for volume, mass or peak width measurements. The approach was applied to spectrophotometric flow titrations involving variations of sample and titrant flow-rates (i.e. triangle programmed technique) or concentration gradients established along the sample zone (i.e. flow injection system). Both strategies required simultaneous monitoring of two absorbing species, namely the titration indicator and the dye tracer. Mixing conditions were improved by placing a chamber with mechanical stirring in the analytical path aiming at to minimize diffusional effects. Unlike most of flow-based titrations, the innovation is considered as a true titration, as it does not require a calibration curve thus complying with IUPAC definition. As an application, acidity evaluation in vinegars involving titration with sodium hydroxide was selected. Phenolphthalein and brilliant blue FCF were used as indicator and dye tracer, respectively. Effects of sample volume, titrand/titrant concentrations and flow rates were investigated aiming at improved accuracy and precision. Results were reliable and in agreement with those obtained by a reference titration procedure. PMID:26703261

  5. Optimal Time-Resource Allocation for Energy-Efficient Physical Activity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Thatte, Gautam; Li, Ming; Lee, Sangwon; Emken, B. Adar; Annavaram, Murali; Narayanan, Shrikanth; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Mitra, Urbashi

    2011-01-01

    The optimal allocation of samples for physical activity detection in a wireless body area network for health-monitoring is considered. The number of biometric samples collected at the mobile device fusion center, from both device-internal and external Bluetooth heterogeneous sensors, is optimized to minimize the transmission power for a fixed number of samples, and to meet a performance requirement defined using the probability of misclassification between multiple hypotheses. A filter-based feature selection method determines an optimal feature set for classification, and a correlated Gaussian model is considered. Using experimental data from overweight adolescent subjects, it is found that allocating a greater proportion of samples to sensors which better discriminate between certain activity levels can result in either a lower probability of error or energy-savings ranging from 18% to 22%, in comparison to equal allocation of samples. The current activity of the subjects and the performance requirements do not significantly affect the optimal allocation, but employing personalized models results in improved energy-efficiency. As the number of samples is an integer, an exhaustive search to determine the optimal allocation is typical, but computationally expensive. To this end, an alternate, continuous-valued vector optimization is derived which yields approximately optimal allocations and can be implemented on the mobile fusion center due to its significantly lower complexity. PMID:21796237

  6. Field measurements of tracer gas transport by barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Lagus, P.L.; McKinnis, W.B.; Hearst, J.R.; Burkhard, N.R.; Smith, C.F.

    1994-07-28

    Vertical gas motions induced by barometric pressure variations can carry radioactive gases out of the rubblized region produced by an underground nuclear explosion, through overburden rock, into the atmosphere. To better quantify transit time and amount of transport, field experiments were conducted at two sites on Pahute Mesa, Kapelli and Tierra, where radioactive gases had been earlier detected in surface cracks. At each site, two tracer gases were injected into the rubblized chimney 300-400 m beneath the surface and their arrival was monitored by concentration measurements in gas samples extracted from shallow collection holes. The first ``active`` tracer was driven by a large quantity of injected air; the second ``passive`` tracer was introduced with minimal gas drive to observe the natural transport by barometric pumping. Kapelli was injected in the fall of 1990, followed by Tierra in the fall of 1991. Data was collected at both sites through the summer of 1993. At both sites, no surface arrival of tracer was observed during the active phase of the experiment despite the injection of several million cubic feet of air, suggesting that cavity pressurization is likely to induce horizontal transport along high permeability layers rather than vertical transport to the surface. In contrast, the vertical pressure gradients associated with barometric pumping brought both tracers to the surface in comparable concentrations within three months at Kapelli, whereas 15 months elapsed before surface arrival at Tierra. At Kapelli, a quasisteady pumping regime was established, with tracer concentrations in effluent gases 1000 times smaller than concentrations thought to exist in the chimney. Tracer concentrations observed at Tierra were typically an order of magnitude smaller. Comparisons with theoretical calculations suggest that the gases are traveling through {approximately}1 millimeter vertical fractures spaced 2 to 4 meters apart. 6 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhollan, Gregory; /SLAC /Saxed Surface Science, Austin, TX

    2010-08-25

    We have developed an activation procedure by which the reactivity to CO{sub 2}, a principal cause of yield decay for GaAs photocathodes, is greatly reduced. The use of a second alkali in the activation process is responsible for the increased immunity of the activated surface. The best immunity was obtained by using a combination of Cs and Li without any loss in near bandgap yield. Optimally activated photocathodes have nearly equal quantities of both alkalis.

  8. Assessing Activity Pattern Similarity with Multidimensional Sequence Alignment based on a Multiobjective Optimization Evolutionary Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Mei-Po; Xiao, Ningchuan; Ding, Guoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Due to the complexity and multidimensional characteristics of human activities, assessing the similarity of human activity patterns and classifying individuals with similar patterns remains highly challenging. This paper presents a new and unique methodology for evaluating the similarity among individual activity patterns. It conceptualizes multidimensional sequence alignment (MDSA) as a multiobjective optimization problem, and solves this problem with an evolutionary algorithm. The study utilizes sequence alignment to code multiple facets of human activities into multidimensional sequences, and to treat similarity assessment as a multiobjective optimization problem that aims to minimize the alignment cost for all dimensions simultaneously. A multiobjective optimization evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) is used to generate a diverse set of optimal or near-optimal alignment solutions. Evolutionary operators are specifically designed for this problem, and a local search method also is incorporated to improve the search ability of the algorithm. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by comparing it with a popular existing method called ClustalG using a set of 50 sequences. The results indicate that our method outperforms the existing method for most of our selected cases. The multiobjective evolutionary algorithm presented in this paper provides an effective approach for assessing activity pattern similarity, and a foundation for identifying distinctive groups of individuals with similar activity patterns. PMID:26190858

  9. The Contributions of Physical Activity and Fitness to Optimal Health and Wellness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohuruogu, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The paper examined the role of physical activity and fitness more especially in the area of disease prevention and control by looking at the major ways by which regular physical activity and fitness contributes to optimal health and wellness. The Surgeor General's Report (1996), stressed that physical inactivity is a national problem which…

  10. Atomic hydrogen maser active oscillator cavity and bulb design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Washburn, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance characteristics and reliability of the active oscillator atomic hydrogen maser depend upon oscillation parameters which characterize the interaction region of the maser, the resonant cavity and atom storage bulb assembly. With particular attention to use of the cavity frequency switching servo (1) to reduce cavity pulling, it is important to maintain high oscillation level, high atomic beam flux utilization efficiency, small spin exchange parameter and high cavity quality factor. It is also desirable to have a small and rigid cavity and bulb structure and to minimize the cavity temperature sensitivity. Curves for a novel hydrogen maser cavity configuration which is partially loaded with a quartz dielectric cylinder and show the relationships between cavity length, cavity diameter, bulb size, dielectric thickness, cavity quality factor, filling factor and cavity frequency temperature coefficient are presented. The results are discussed in terms of improvement in maser performance resulting from particular design choices.

  11. Numerical Modeling for Integrated Design of a DNAPL Partitioning Tracer Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, J. E.; Divine, C. E.; Dugan, P. J.; Wolf, L.; Boving, T.; Louth, M.; Brusseau, M. L.; Hayes, D.

    2002-12-01

    . Partitioning coefficients were measured in the laboratory in water and in solutions containing expected post-remediation residual concentrations of the chemical remediation agent, which was shown to influence the partitioning coefficients. The numerical model was used to optimize the injection-extraction rates and distribution to most efficiently sweep the NAPL hot spot, to enable hydraulic capture of the tracers, and to predict the peaks and arrival times of the tracer breakthrough curves. Field results are presented to evaluate the effectiveness of the PTT design approach.

  12. Development of Standardized Mobile Tracer Correlation Approach for Large Area Emission Measurements (DRAFT UNDER EPA REVIEW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-wittig, T. A.; Thoma, E.; Green, R.; Hater, G.; Swan, N.; Chanton, J.

    2013-12-01

    Improved understanding of air emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water ponds, open-source processing, and agricultural operations is a topic of increasing environmental importance. In many cases, the size of the area source, coupled with spatial-heterogeneity, make direct (on-site) emission assessment difficult; methane emissions, from landfills for example, can be particularly complex [Thoma et al, 2009]. Recently, whole-facility (remote) measurement approaches based on tracer correlation have been utilized [Scheutz et al, 2011]. The approach uses a mobile platform to simultaneously measure a metered-release of a conservative gas (the tracer) along with the target compound (methane in the case of landfills). The known-rate tracer release provides a measure of atmospheric dispersion at the downwind observing location allowing the area source emission to be determined by a ratio calculation [Green et al, 2010]. Although powerful in concept, the approach has been somewhat limited to research applications due to the complexities and cost of the high-sensitivity measurement equipment required to quantify the part-per billion levels of tracer and target gas at kilometer-scale distances. The advent of compact, robust, and easy to use near-infrared optical measurement systems (such as cavity ring down spectroscopy) allow the tracer correlation approach to be investigated for wider use. Over the last several years, Waste Management Inc., the U.S. EPA, and collaborators have conducted method evaluation activities to determine the viability of a standardized approach through execution of a large number of field measurement trials at U.S. landfills. As opposed to previous studies [Scheutz et al, 2011] conducted at night (optimal plume transport conditions), the current work evaluated realistic use-scenarios; these scenarios include execution by non-scientist personnel, daylight operation, and full range of atmospheric condition (all plume transport

  13. Inert and Reacting Tracers for Reservoir Sizing in Fractured, Hot Dry Rock Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, J.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Ferguson, J.H.

    1986-01-21

    Flow characterization and volumetric sizing techniques using tracers in fractured hot dry rock reservoirs are discussed. Statistical methods for analyzing the residence time distribution (RTD) are presented. Tracer modal volumes and RTD shape are correlated with reservoir performance parameters such as active heat transfer area and dispersion levels. Chemically reactive tracers are proposed for mapping advance rates of cooled regions in HDR reservoirs, providing early warning of thermal drawdown. Important reaction rate parameters are identified for screening potential tracers. Current laboratory research and field work is reviewed.

  14. HURON (HUman and Robotic Optimization Network) Multi-Agent Temporal Activity Planner/Scheduler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Hook; Mrozinski, Joseph J.; Elfes, Alberto; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Shelton, Kacie E.; Smith, Jeffrey H.; Lincoln, William P.; Weisbin, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    HURON solves the problem of how to optimize a plan and schedule for assigning multiple agents to a temporal sequence of actions (e.g., science tasks). Developed as a generic planning and scheduling tool, HURON has been used to optimize space mission surface operations. The tool has also been used to analyze lunar architectures for a variety of surface operational scenarios in order to maximize return on investment and productivity. These scenarios include numerous science activities performed by a diverse set of agents: humans, teleoperated rovers, and autonomous rovers. Once given a set of agents, activities, resources, resource constraints, temporal constraints, and de pendencies, HURON computes an optimal schedule that meets a specified goal (e.g., maximum productivity or minimum time), subject to the constraints. HURON performs planning and scheduling optimization as a graph search in state-space with forward progression. Each node in the graph contains a state instance. Starting with the initial node, a graph is automatically constructed with new successive nodes of each new state to explore. The optimization uses a set of pre-conditions and post-conditions to create the children states. The Python language was adopted to not only enable more agile development, but to also allow the domain experts to easily define their optimization models. A graphical user interface was also developed to facilitate real-time search information feedback and interaction by the operator in the search optimization process. The HURON package has many potential uses in the fields of Operations Research and Management Science where this technology applies to many commercial domains requiring optimization to reduce costs. For example, optimizing a fleet of transportation truck routes, aircraft flight scheduling, and other route-planning scenarios involving multiple agent task optimization would all benefit by using HURON.

  15. Pharmaceuticals as Groundwater Tracers - Applications and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheytt, T. J.; Mersmann, P.; Heberer, T.

    2003-12-01

    Pharmaceutically active substances and metabolites are found at concentrations up to the microgram/L-level in groundwater samples from the Berlin (Germany) area and from several other places world wide. Among the compounds detected in groundwater are clofibric acid, propyphenazone, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and carbamazepine. Clofibric acid, the active metabolite of clofibrate and etofibrate (blood lipid regulators) is detected in groundwater at maximum concentrations of 7300 ng/L. Among the most important input paths of drugs are excretion and disposal into the sewage system. Groundwater contamination is likely to be due to leaky sewage systems, influent streams, bank filtration, and irrigation with effluent water from sewage treatment plants. There are no known natural sources of the above mentioned pharmaceuticals. The use of pharmaceuticals as tracers may include: (a) Quantification of infiltration from underground septic tanks (b) Detection of leaky sewage systems / leaky sewage pipes (c) Estimation of the effectiveness of sewage treatment plants (d) Identification of transport pathways of other organic compounds (e) Quantification of surface water / groundwater interaction (f) Characterization of the biodegradation potential. The use of pharmaceuticals as tracers is limited by variations in input. These variations depend on the amount of drugs prescribed and used in the study area, the social structure of the community, the amount of hospital discharge, and temporal concentration variations. Furthermore, the analysis of trace amounts of pharmaceuticals is sophisticated and expensive and may therefore limit the applicability of pharmaceuticals as tracers. Finally, the transport and degradation behavior of pharmaceuticals is not fully understood. Preliminary experiments in the laboratory were conducted using sediment material and groundwater from the Berlin area to evaluate the transport and sorption behavior of selected drugs. Results of the column experiments

  16. Dynamics of ellipsoidal tracers in swimming algal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ou; Peng, Yi; Liu, Zhengyang; Tang, Chao; Xu, Xinliang; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-10-01

    Enhanced diffusion of passive tracers immersed in active fluids is a universal feature of active fluids and has been extensively studied in recent years. Similar to microrheology for equilibrium complex fluids, the unusual enhanced particle dynamics reveal intrinsic properties of active fluids. Nevertheless, previous studies have shown that the translational dynamics of spherical tracers are qualitatively similar, independent of whether active particles are pushers or pullers—the two fundamental classes of active fluids. Is it possible to distinguish pushers from pullers by simply imaging the dynamics of passive tracers? Here, we investigated the diffusion of isolated ellipsoids in algal C. reinhardtii suspensions—a model for puller-type active fluids. In combination with our previous results on pusher-type E. coli suspensions [Peng et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 068303 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.068303], we showed that the dynamics of asymmetric tracers show a profound difference in pushers and pullers due to their rotational degree of freedom. Although the laboratory-frame translation and rotation of ellipsoids are enhanced in both pushers and pullers, similar to spherical tracers, the anisotropic diffusion in the body frame of ellipsoids shows opposite trends in the two classes of active fluids. An ellipsoid diffuses fastest along its major axis when immersed in pullers, whereas it diffuses slowest along the major axis in pushers. This striking difference can be qualitatively explained using a simple hydrodynamic model. In addition, our study on algal suspensions reveals that the influence of the near-field advection of algal swimming flows on the translation and rotation of ellipsoids shows different ranges and strengths. Our work provides not only new insights into universal organizing principles of active fluids, but also a convenient tool for detecting the class of active particles.

  17. Multiple-tracer gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-gas tracer system has been designed, built, and used on an explosively fractured oil shale rubble bed. This paper deals exclusively with the hardware, software, and overall operation of the tracer system. This system is a field portable, self-contained unit, which utilizes a mass spectrometer for gas analysis. The unit has a 20 channel sample port capability and is controlled by a desk top computer. The system is configured to provide a dynamic sensitivity range of up to six orders of magnitude. A roots blower is manifolded to the unit to provide continuous flow in all sample lines. The continuous flow process allows representative samples as well as decreasing the time between each measurement. Typical multiplex cycle time to evaluate four unique gases is approximately 12 seconds.

  18. Tracer diffusion inside fibrinogen layers.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Sagués, Francesc; Sokolov, Igor M

    2014-01-28

    We investigate the obstructed motion of tracer (test) particles in crowded environments by carrying simulations of two-dimensional Gaussian random walk in model fibrinogen monolayers of different orientational ordering. The fibrinogen molecules are significantly anisotropic and therefore they can form structures where orientational ordering, similar to the one observed in nematic liquid crystals, appears. The work focuses on the dependence between level of the orientational order (degree of environmental crowding) of fibrinogen molecules inside a layer and non-Fickian character of the diffusion process of spherical tracer particles moving within the domain. It is shown that in general particles motion is subdiffusive and strongly anisotropic, and its characteristic features significantly change with the orientational order parameter, concentration of fibrinogens, and radius of a diffusing probe. PMID:25669566

  19. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Ferguson, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (Ho) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ0. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωHo) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories. PMID:25422528

  20. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Shah, Saqlain A; Ferguson, R M; Krishnan, K M

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (Ho ) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ0. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωH o) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories. PMID:25422528

  1. Borehole flowmeter logging for the accurate design and analysis of tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, Stefano; Crosta, Giovanni B; Frattini, Paolo; Villa, Alberto; Godio, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests often give ambiguous interpretations that may be due to the erroneous location of sampling points and/or the lack of flow rate measurements through the sampler. To obtain more reliable tracer test results, we propose a methodology that optimizes the design and analysis of tracer tests in a cross borehole mode by using vertical borehole flow rate measurements. Experiments using this approach, herein defined as the Bh-flow tracer test, have been performed by implementing three sequential steps: (1) single-hole flowmeter test, (2) cross-hole flowmeter test, and (3) tracer test. At the experimental site, core logging, pumping tests, and static water-level measurements were previously carried out to determine stratigraphy, fracture characteristics, and bulk hydraulic conductivity. Single-hole flowmeter testing makes it possible to detect the presence of vertical flows as well as inflow and outflow zones, whereas cross-hole flowmeter testing detects the presence of connections along sets of flow conduits or discontinuities intercepted by boreholes. Finally, the specific pathways and rates of groundwater flow through selected flowpaths are determined by tracer testing. We conclude that the combined use of single and cross-borehole flowmeter tests is fundamental to the formulation of the tracer test strategy and interpretation of the tracer test results. PMID:25417730

  2. Estrogen receptor mediated activity in bankside groundwater, with flood suspended particulate matter and floodplain soil - an approach combining tracer substance, bioassay and target analysis.

    PubMed

    Wölz, J; Grosshans, K; Streck, G; Schulze, T; Rastall, A; Erdinger, L; Brack, W; Fleig, M; Kühlers, D; Braunbeck, T; Hollert, H

    2011-10-01

    Bankside groundwater is widely used as drinking water resource and, therefore, contamination has to be avoided. In the European Union groundwater protection is explicit subject to Water Framework Directive. While groundwater pollution may originate from different sources, this study investigated on impacts via flood events. Groundwater was sampled with increasing distance to the river Rhine near Karlsruhe, Germany. Samples were HPLC-MS-MS analyzed for the river contaminant carbamazepine to indicate river water infiltration, giving permanent presence in 250 m distance to the river (14-47 μg L⁻¹). Following a flood event, concentrations of about 16-20 μg L⁻¹ could also be detected in a distance of 750 m to the river. Furthermore, estrogenic activity as determined with the Yeast Estrogen Screen assay was determined to increase up to a 17β-ethinylestradiol equivalent concentration (E-EQ)=2.9 ng L⁻¹ near the river, while activity was initially measured following the flood with up to E-EQ=2.6 ng L⁻¹ in 750 m distance. Detections were delayed with increasing distance to the river indicating river water expansion into the aquifer. Flood suspended matter and floodplain soil were fractionated and analyzed for estrogenic activity in parallel giving up to 1.4 ng g⁻¹ and up to 0.7 ng g⁻¹, respectively. Target analysis focusing on known estrogenic active substances only explained < 1% of measured activities. Nevertheless, river water infiltration was shown deep into bankside groundwater, thus, impacting groundwater quality. Therefore, flood events have to be in the focus when aiming for groundwater and drinking water protection as well as for implementation of Water Framework Directive.

  3. Fluorescent particle tracers for surface hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, F.; Grimaldi, S.; Rapiti, E.; Porfiri, M.

    2012-12-01

    flow rates. Experimental results demonstrate that the fluorescent particles can be used to reliably trace high velocity streams in adverse illumination conditions and in the presence of foam and reflections on the water surface. Furthermore, flow velocities and travel times calculated through an array of commonly used tracers are consistent with results obtained through the proposed methodology and demonstrate a higher reliability of the fluorescent particles versus traditional tracers that are affected by dispersions and turbulence. Additional proof-of-concept experiments are conducted on a semi-natural hillslope plot under high turbidity loads and soil and rain drops interaction. Ad-hoc experiments with particles of varying diameters ranging from 75 to 1180 μm are performed to assess the visibility and detectability of the particle tracers in these severe environmental conditions and their feasibility in estimating overland flow velocities. Videos of beads' transit are processed through both supervised and unsupervised techniques to obtain average surface velocities of water flowing on the hill. Experimental results have demonstrated the feasibility of using the particles for environmental applications and have led to the identification of optimal diameters, namely, 1000-1180 μm, for flow measurements in the described hillslope plot.

  4. Tailoring the magnetic and pharmacokinetic properties of iron oxide magnetic particle imaging tracers

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Richard Mathew; Khandhar, Amit P; Arami, Hamed; Hua, Loc; Hovorka, Ondrej; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an attractive new modality for imaging distributions of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers in vivo. With exceptional contrast, high sensitivity, and good spatial resolution, MPI shows promise for clinical imaging in angiography and oncology. Critically, MPI requires high-quality iron oxide nanoparticle tracers with tailored magnetic and surface properties to achieve its full potential. In this review, we discuss optimizing iron oxide nanoparticles’ physical, magnetic, and pharmacokinetic properties for MPI, highlighting results from our recent work in which we demonstrated tailored, biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticle tracers that provided two times better linear spatial resolution and five times better signal-to-noise ratio than Resovist. PMID:23787461

  5. Numerical simulation study on active and passive hydroforming process optimization of box shaped part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. P.; Dong, J. L.; He, T. D.; Wang, B.

    2016-08-01

    Low qualified rate and inferior quality frequently occurring in the general deep drawing process of a certain box-shaped part, now use hydroforming to optimize forming process, in order to study the effect of hydroforming for improving the quality and formability, purposed five process schemes: general deep drawing, active hydroforming, passive hydroforming, general deep drawing combined with active hydroforming, passive combined with active hydroforming. Each process was simulated by finite element simulation and results were analysed. The results indicate the passive combined with active hydroforming is the best scheme which can obtain smallest thickness thinning and satisfactory formability, then optimized hydroforming pressure, blank holder force subsequently by adjust the simulation parameters. Research result proves that active/passive hydroforming is a new method for complex parts forming.

  6. Active melanogenesis in non-S phase melanocytes in B16 melanomas in vivo investigated by double-tracer microautoradiography with 18F-fluorodopa and 3H-thymidine.

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, R.; Yamada, S.; Ishiwata, K.; Kubota, K.; Ido, T.

    1992-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxy-2-[18F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine (2-[18F]FDOPA) and [6-3H]thymidine ([3H]Thd) were simultaneously injected into mice transplanted with B16 melanomas of FM3A mammary carcinoma. Melanogenesis was differentiated from DNA synthesis in the mitotic cell cycle by monitoring grain distribution with double-tracer microautoradiography. The percentages of pigmented cells were inversely proportional to those of [3H]Thd-labelled cells, indicating that the greater the number of melanocytes, the smaller was the number of proliferating cells. The number of grains produced by 2-[18F]FDOPA in the [3H]Thd-unlabelled melanocytes was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than the numbers in the [3H]Thd-labelled melanocytes and in nonmelanocytes. The [3H]Thd-unlabelled non-melanocytes and FM3A cells showed the lowest accumulation of 2-[18F]DOPA, which may have resulted from the basic amino acid demand by malignant neoplasms via amino acid transport. The [3H]Thd-labelled cells, regardless of whether they were pigmented or not, had slightly more grains with 2-[18F]FDOPA than the [3H]Thd-unlabelled non-melanocytes (P < 0.05), which may have resulted from the enhanced amino acid requirement for proliferation. Melanogenesis appeared to be activated only in the non-S phase of the mitotic cycle in melanocytes. Images Figure 2 PMID:1419597

  7. Optimization of the activated sludge anoxic reactor configuration as a means to control nutrient removal kinetically.

    PubMed

    Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2007-04-01

    Factors influencing the determination of optimum reactor configuration for activated sludge denitrification are investigated in this paper. A kinetic optimization method is presented to evaluate optimal pre- and post-denitrification bioreactor stages. Applying the method developed, simulation studies were carried out to investigate the impacts of the ratio of the influent readily biodegradable and slowly biodegradable substrates and the oxygen entering the denitrification zones on the optimal anoxic reactor configuration. In addition, the paper describes the effects of the slowly biodegradable substrate on the denitrification efficiency using external substrate dosing, and it demonstrates kinetic considerations concerning the hydrolysis process. It has been shown that as a function of the biodegradable substrate composition, the stage system design with three optimized reactor compartments can effectively increase reaction rates in the denitrification zones, and can provide flexibility for varying operation conditions. PMID:17321565

  8. Active Nozzle Control and Integrated Design Optimization of a Beam Subject to Fluid-Dynamic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borglund, D.

    1999-02-01

    Active nozzle control is used to improve the stability of a beam subject to forces induced by fluid flow through attached pipes. The control system has a significant effect on the structural stability, making both flutter and divergence type of instabilities possible. The stability analysis is carried out using a state-variable approach based on a finite element formulation of the structural dynamics. The simultaneous design of the control system and the beam shape minimizing structural mass is performed using numerical optimization. The inclusion of the control system in the optimization gives a considerable reduction of the structural mass but results in an optimal design which is very sensitive to imperfections. Using a simple model of the control system uncertainties, a more robust design is obtained by solving a modified optimization problem. Throughout the study, the theoretical findings are verified by experiments.

  9. Microfluidics: a groundbreaking technology for PET tracer production?

    PubMed

    Rensch, Christian; Jackson, Alexander; Lindner, Simon; Salvamoser, Ruben; Samper, Victor; Riese, Stefan; Bartenstein, Peter; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Björn

    2013-07-05

    Application of microfluidics to Positron Emission Tomography (PET) tracer synthesis has attracted increasing interest within the last decade. The technical advantages of microfluidics, in particular the high surface to volume ratio and resulting fast thermal heating and cooling rates of reagents can lead to reduced reaction times, increased synthesis yields and reduced by-products. In addition automated reaction optimization, reduced consumption of expensive reagents and a path towards a reduced system footprint have been successfully demonstrated. The processing of radioactivity levels required for routine production, use of microfluidic-produced PET tracer doses in preclinical and clinical imaging as well as feasibility studies on autoradiolytic decomposition have all given promising results. However, the number of microfluidic synthesizers utilized for commercial routine production of PET tracers is very limited. This study reviews the state of the art in microfluidic PET tracer synthesis, highlighting critical design aspects, strengths, weaknesses and presenting several characteristics of the diverse PET market space which are thought to have a significant impact on research, development and engineering of microfluidic devices in this field. Furthermore, the topics of batch- and single-dose production, cyclotron to quality control integration as well as centralized versus de-centralized market distribution models are addressed.

  10. Novel fluorine-18 labeled 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)-7-azaisatin derivatives as potential PET tracers for in vivo imaging of activated caspases in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Christopher M; Hermann, Sven; Faust, Andreas; Riemann, Burkhard; Schober, Otmar; Schäfers, Michael; Haufe, Günter; Kopka, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    The programmed type I cell death, defined as apoptosis, is induced by complex regulated signaling pathways that trigger the intracellular activation of executioner caspases-3, -6 and -7. Once activated, these enzymes initiate cellular death through cleavage of proteins which are responsible for DNA repair, signaling and cell maintenance. Several radiofluorinated inhibitors of caspases-3 and -7, comprising a moderate lipophilic 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)isatin lead structure, are currently being investigated for imaging apoptosis in vivo by us and others. The purpose of this study was to increase the intrinsic hydrophilicity of the aforementioned lead structure to alter the pharmacokinetic behavior of the resulting caspase-3 and -7 targeted radiotracer. Therefore, fluorinated and non-fluorinated derivatives of 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)-7-azaisatin were synthesized and tested for their inhibitory properties against recombinant caspases-3 and -7. Fluorine-18 has been introduced by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) of an alkyne precursor with 2-[(18)F]fluoroethylazide. Using dynamic micro-PET biodistribution studies in vivo the kinetic behavior of one promising PET-compatible 5-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl 7-azaisatin derivative has been compared to a previously described isatin based radiotracer.

  11. Coordinated Action of Fast and Slow Reserves for Optimal Sequential and Dynamic Emergency Reserve Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salkuti, Surender Reddy; Bijwe, P. R.; Abhyankar, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an optimal dynamic reserve activation plan after the occurrence of an emergency situation (generator/transmission line outage, load increase or both). An optimal plan is developed to handle the emergency situation, using coordinated action of fast and slow reserves, for secure operation with minimum overall cost. This paper considers the reserves supplied by generators (spinning reserves) and loads (demand-side reserves). The optimal backing down of costly/fast reserves and bringing up of slow reserves in each sub-interval in an integrated manner is proposed. The simulation studies are performed on IEEE 30, 57 and 300 bus test systems to demonstrate the advantage of proposed integrated/dynamic reserve activation plan over the conventional/sequential approach.

  12. Predictive value of tracer studies for /sup 131/I treatment in hyperthyroid cats

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, M.R.; Turrel, J.M.; Hays, M.T.

    1988-02-01

    In 76 cats with hyperthyroidism, peak thyroidal radioiodine (/sup 131/I) uptakes and effective half-lives were determined after administration of tracer and therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I. In 6 additional hyperthyroid cats, only peak thyroidal uptakes after administration of tracer and therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I were determined. Good correlation was found between peak thyroidal uptakes of tracer and therapeutic /sup 131/I; however, only fair correlation was observed between effective half-lives. In 79% of the cats, the effective half-life for therapeutic /sup 131/I was longer than that for tracer /sup 131/I. After administration of therapeutic activity of /sup 131/I, monoexponential and biphasic decay curves were observed in 51 and 16 cats, respectively. Using therapeutic kinetic data, radiation doses to the thyroid gland were calculated retrospectively on the basis of 2 methods for determining the activity of /sup 131/I administered: (1) actual administration of tracer-compensated activity and (2) hypothetic administration of uniform activity (3 mCi). Because of the good predictive ability of tracer kinetic data for the therapeutic kinetic data, the tracer-compensated radiation doses came significantly (P = 0.008) closer to the therapeutic goal than did the uniform-activity doses. In addition, the use of tracer kinetic information reduced the extent of the tendency for consistently high uniform-activity doses. A manual method for acquiring tracer kinetic data was developed and was an acceptable alternative to computerized techniques. Adoption of this method gives individuals and institutions with limited finances the opportunity to characterize the iodine kinetics in cats before proceeding with administration of therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I.

  13. Differentiating atmospheric and mineral sources of sulfur during snowmelt using δ 34S, 35S activity, and δ 18O of sulfate and water as tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, J. B.; Mayer, B.; Mitchell, M. J.; Michel, R. L.; Bailey, S.; Kendall, C.

    2003-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of sulfur was studied during the 2000 snowmelt at Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont, USA using a combination of isotopic, chemical, and hydrometric measurements. The snowpack and 10 streams of varying size and land use were sampled for sulfate concentrations and isotopic analyses of 35S, δ 34S, and δ 18O of sulfate. Values of δ 18O of water were measured at one of the streams. Apportionment of atmospheric and mineral S sources based on δ 34S was possible at 7 of the 10 streams. Weathering of S-containing minerals was a major contributor to sulfate flux in streamwater, but atmospheric contributions exceeded 50% in several of the streams at peak snowmelt and averaged 41% overall. In contrast, δ 18Osulfate values of streamwater remained significantly lower than those of atmospheric sulfate throughout the melt period, indicating that atmospheric sulfate undergoes microbial redox reactions in the soil that replace the oxygen of atmospheric sulfate with isotopically lighter oxygen from soil water. Streamwater 35S activities were low relative to those of the snowpack; the youngest 35S-ages of the atmospheric S component in each of the 7 streams ranged from 184 to 320 days. Atmospheric S contributions to streamwater, as determined by δ 34S values, co-varied both with 35S activity and new water contributions as determined by δ 18Owater. However, the δ 18Osulfate and 35S ages clearly show that this new water carries very little of the atmospheric sulfate entering with the current snowmelt to the stream. Most incoming atmospheric sulfate first cycles through the organic soil S pool and ultimately reaches the stream as pedogenic sulfate.

  14. Lead isotopes in soils and groundwaters as tracers of the impact of human activities on the surface environment: The Domizio-Flegreo Littoral (Italy) case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grezzi, G.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Albanese, S.

    2011-01-01

    The isotopic signature of geogenic and anthropogenic materials, in combination with concentration data for pollutants, can help trace the origin and the extent of contamination in the environment. This approach is particularly effective if naturally occurring and anthropogenically introduced metals have different isotopic ratios. Lead isotope analysis on soils from 7 profiles (1. m depth) and on groundwaters from 8 wells have been used to determine the impact of human activities on the surface environment of Domizio-Flegreo Littoral. Result obtained show that in sub-rural areas the isotopic composition of the samples collected along the soil profiles of Domizio-Flegreo Littoral is likely mostly controlled by the nature of the parent geologic material (natural) while in more urbanized areas (Giugliano) Pb isotopic composition in superficial soils is mostly influenced by anthropic sources such as motor vehicles. Lead isotopic ratios in groundwaters also show that the use of pesticides and, probably, the influence of aerosols and the presence of illegal waste disposal can influence water quality. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  15. 16. cap alpha. -(/sup 77/Br)bromoestradiol-17. beta. : a high specific-activity, gamma-emitting tracer with uptake in rat uterus and induced mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenellenbogen, J.A.; Senderoff, S.G.; McElvany, K.D.; O'Brien, H.A. Jr.; Welch, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    16..cap alpha..-(/sup 77/Br)bromoestradiol-17..beta.. (compound 1) has been synthesized by radiobromination of estrone enoldiacetate. Tissue uptake studies performed 1 hr after administration of compound 1 to immature or mature female rats showed uterus-to-blood ratios of 13, with nontarget tissue-to-blood ratios ranging from 0.6 to 2. Co-administration of unlabeled estradiol caused a selective depression in the uterine uptake with no effect on nontarget tissue uptake. In adult animals bearing adenocarcinomas induced by DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene), tumor-to-blood ratios of 6.3 were obtained, this uptake also being depressed in animals treated with unlabeled estradiol. The studies demonstrate that compound 1 has suitable binding properties and sufficiently high specific activity so that its uptake in estrogen target tissues in vivo is mediated primarily by the estrogen receptor. Furthermore, they suggest that this compound may be suitable for imaging human breast tumors that contain estrogen receptors.

  16. Topology optimization of magnetorheological fluid layers in sandwich plates for semi-active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates topology optimization of the magnetorheological (MR) fluid layer in a sandwich plate for improving the semi-active vibration control performance. Therein, a uniform magnetic field is applied across the MR fluid layer to provide a semi-active damping control effect. In the optimization model, the pseudo-densities describing the MR fluid material distribution are taken as design variables, and an artificial magneto-rheological fluid model (AMRF) with penalization is proposed to suppress intermediate density values. For reducing the vibration level under harmonic excitations, the dynamic compliance under a specific excitation frequency, or the frequency-aggregated dynamic compliance in a given frequency band, is taken as the objective function to be minimized. In this context, the adjoint-variable sensitivity analysis scheme is derived. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical examples, in which the structural dynamic performance can be remarkably improved through optimization. The influences of several key factors on the optimal designs are also explored. It is shown that the AMRF model is effective in yielding clear boundaries in the final optimal solutions without use of additional regularization techniques.

  17. A boundary element approach to optimization of active noise control sources on three-dimensional structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunefare, K. A.; Koopmann, G. H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical development of an approach to active noise control (ANC) applicable to three-dimensional radiators. The active noise control technique, termed ANC Optimization Analysis, is based on minimizing the total radiated power by adding secondary acoustic sources on the primary noise source. ANC Optimization Analysis determines the optimum magnitude and phase at which to drive the secondary control sources in order to achieve the best possible reduction in the total radiated power from the noise source/control source combination. For example, ANC Optimization Analysis predicts a 20 dB reduction in the total power radiated from a sphere of radius at a dimensionless wavenumber ka of 0.125, for a single control source representing 2.5 percent of the total area of the sphere. ANC Optimization Analysis is based on a boundary element formulation of the Helmholtz Integral Equation, and thus, the optimization analysis applies to a single frequency, while multiple frequencies can be treated through repeated analyses.

  18. Petroleum characterization by perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.; Fajer, R.W. ); Harris, B.R. Jr. ); DeRose, W.E. ); Ottaviani, W.L. )

    1992-02-01

    Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs), a class of six compounds, were used to help characterize the Shallow Oil Zone (SOZ) reservoir at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC) at Elk Hills. The SOZ reservoir is undergoing a pilot gas injection program to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of injecting gas into the SOZ for improved oil recovery. PFTs were utilized in the pilot gas injection to qualitatively assess the extent of the pilot gas injection so as to determine the degree of gas containment within the SOZ reservoir.

  19. Evaluation of Oatp and Mrp2 activities in hepatobiliary excretion using newly developed positron emission tomography tracer [11C]dehydropravastatin in rats.

    PubMed

    Shingaki, Tomotaka; Takashima, Tadayuki; Ijuin, Ryosuke; Zhang, Xuan; Onoue, Tomohiro; Katayama, Yumiko; Okauchi, Takashi; Hayashinaka, Emi; Cui, Yilong; Wada, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Masaaki; Maeda, Kazuya; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-10-01

    We developed a pravastatin derivative, sodium (3R,5R)-3,5-dihydroxy-7-((1S,2S,6S,8S)-6-hydroxy-2-methyl-8-((1-[(11)C]-(E)-2-methyl-but-2-enoyl)oxy)-1,2,6,7,8,8a-hexahydronaphthalen-1-yl)heptanoate ([(11)C]DPV), as a positron emission tomography (PET) probe for noninvasive measurement of hepatobiliary transport, and conducted pharmacokinetic analysis in rats as a feasibility study for future clinical study. Transport activities of DPV in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes and rodent multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (rMrp2; human, MRP2)-expressing membrane vesicles were similar to those of pravastatin. Rifampicin diminished the uptake of DPV and pravastatin by the hepatocytes, with similar inhibition potency. [(11)C]DPV underwent biotransformation to produce at least two metabolites in rat, but metabolism of [(11)C]DPV occurred negligibly in human hepatocytes during a 90-minute incubation. After intravenous injection, [(11)C]DPV was mainly distributed to the liver and kidneys, where the tissue uptake clearances (CLuptake,liver and CLuptake,kidney) were blood-flow-limited (73.6 ± 4.8 and 24.6 ± 0.6 ml/min per kilogram, respectively). Systemic elimination of [(11)C]DPV was delayed in rifampicin-treated rat and an Mrp2-deficient mutant rat, Eisai hyperbilirubinemic mutant rat (EHBR). Rifampicin treatment decreased both CLuptake,liver and CLuptake,kidney of [(11)C]DPV by 30% (P < 0.05), whereas these parameters were unchanged in EHBR. Meanwhile, the canalicular efflux clearance (CLint,bile) of [(11)C]DPV, which was 12.2 ± 1.5 ml/min per kilogram in the control rat, decreased by 60% and 89% in rifampicin-treated rat and EHBR (P < 0.05), respectively. These results indicate that [(11)C]DPV is taken up into the liver by organic anion-transporting polypeptides (rodent, Oatps; human, OATP) and excreted into bile by Mrp2 in rat, and that rifampicin may inhibit Mrp2 as well as Oatps, and consequently increase systemic exposure of [(11)C]DPV. PET using [(11)C]DPV is

  20. Development and optimization of the activated charcoal suspension composition based on a mixture design approach.

    PubMed

    Ronowicz, Joanna; Kupcewicz, Bogumiła; Pałkowski, Łukasz; Krysiński, Jerzy

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a new drug product containing activated charcoal was designed and developed. The excipient levels in the pharmaceutical formulation were optimized using a mixture design approach. The adsorption power of the activated charcoal suspension was selected as the critical quality attribute influencing the efficacy of medical treatment. Significant prognostic models (p<0.05) were obtained to describe in detail the interrelations between excipient levels and the adsorption power of the formulation. Liquid flavour had a critical impact on the adsorption power of the suspension. Formulations containing the largest amount of liquid flavour showed the lowest adsorption power. Sorbitol was not adsorbed onto activated charcoal so strongly as liquid flavour. A slight increase in the content of carboxymethylcellulose sodium led to a marked decrease in adsorption power. The obtained mathematical models and response surface allowed selection of the optimal composition of excipients in a final drug product.

  1. Development of Kinetic Interface Sensitive Tracers (KIS-Tracer) for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Injections into Deep Saline Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, M.; Maier, F.; Licha, T.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    The storage of captured CO2 into geological formations is recently one of the most promising technologies to mitigate anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions into the earth's atmosphere. Deep saline aquifers are considered as the most potential sequestration sites of CO2 due to their huge storage capacities of several thousand Gt. Ongoing research deals mainly with the investigation of relevant physico-chemical processes, the fate of CO2 and the risk assessment during and after supercritical CO2 (scCO2) injections. The occurring processes at the interface between injected scCO2 and formation brine play a major role to evaluate the fate and behavior of scCO2 in the reservoir. This is because the interface represents a reactive zone where numerous physico-chemical processes like dissolution of scCO2 in water as well as dissolution and precipitation of minerals take place. In most cases it is desired to maximize the interface size to increase the storage efficiency. Therefore, knowledge on interface size and dynamics would allow the observation of plume spreading and the detection of mixing or fingering effects. In order to gain this information innovative tracers are necessary which are able to quantify the temporal and spatial development of scCO2/water interfaces. As a result, it may be possible to assess the storage efficiency and to optimize subsequent injections. Up to now, such time-dependent tracers for reservoir studies are not available and limited to equilibrium tracers (known as partitioning and interfacial tracers, respectively). Therefore, novel reactive tracers (KIS-Tracers) are developed to overcome this gap. The idea is to find suitable molecules which allow the implementation of a defined chemical reaction at the interface. Due to the known kinetic constants the change of interface size can be characterized over time. The new tracer is injected together with the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) into a deep saline aquifer. Afterwards, the tracer adsorbs at

  2. Accuracy of Optimized Branched Algorithms to Assess Activity-Specific PAEE

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Andy G.; Hill, James O.; Byrnes, William C.; Browning, Raymond C.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the activity-specific accuracy achievable by branched algorithm (BA) analysis of simulated daily-living physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) within a sedentary population. METHODS Sedentary men (n=8) and women (n=8) first performed a treadmill calibration protocol, during which heart rate (HR), accelerometry (ACC), and PAEE were measured in 1-minute epochs. From these data, HR-PAEE, and ACC-PAEE regressions were constructed and used in each of six analytic models to predict PAEE from ACC and HR data collected during a subsequent simulated daily-living protocol. Criterion PAEE was measured during both protocols via indirect calorimetry. The accuracy achieved by each model was assessed by the root mean square of the difference between model-predicted daily–living PAEE and the criterion daily-living PAEE (expressed here as % of mean daily living PAEE). RESULTS Across the range of activities an unconstrained post hoc optimized branched algorithm best predicted criterion PAEE. Estimates using individual calibration were generally more accurate than those using group calibration (14 vs. 16 % error, respectively). These analyses also performed well within each of the six daily-living activities, but systematic errors appeared for several of those activities, which may be explained by an inability of the algorithm to simultaneously accommodate a heterogeneous range of activities. Analyses of between mean square error by subject and activity suggest that optimization involving minimization of RMS for total daily-living PAEE is associated with decreased error between subjects but increased error between activities. CONCLUSION The performance of post hoc optimized branched algorithms may be limited by heterogeneity in the daily-living activities being performed. PMID:19952842

  3. Balloon tracer for atmospheric pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Lichfield, E.W.; Ivey, M.D.; Zak, B.D.; Church, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    An operational prototype of the Balloon Tracer was developed and described. This prototype was designed to be capable of meeting all of the desired specifications for the Balloon Tracer. Its buoyancy adjustment subsystem is shown. Three Gilian instrument pumps operating in parallel provide a flow of about 12 litres per minute, depending upon backpressure. The miniature Klippard mechanical valves are actuated by a servo mechanism which only requires power when the state of the valves is being changed. The balloon itself for the operational prototype is just under 3 meters in diameter. A block diagram of the operational prototype payload measures ambient pressure, temperature, and humidity obtained from AIR which outputs its data in ASCII format. The vertical anemometer, which has a measured starting speed of under 2 cm/s, makes use of a Gill styrofoam propeller and a Spaulding Instruments rotation sendor. The command decoder is built around a chip developed originally for remote control television tuners. The command receiver operating on 13.8035 MHz was developed and built by Hock Engineering. The Argos transmitter is a Telonics platform transmitter terminal. The heart of the control system is an Intel 8052AH BASIC microcomputer with both random access and read only memory.

  4. Performance of actively suspended cabs in highway trucks—Evaluation and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Madany, M. M.; El Razaz, Z. S.

    1988-11-01

    This paper describes a study of an active damping system and the effects of such a system on the riding quality and dynamic motions of a tractor-semitrailer truck. The truck, represented by a nine-degree-of-freedom model, is subject to randomly profiled road excitations. Feedback gains are selected on the basis of realistic actuator models with limited bandwidths. The potential improvements in ride comfort are investigated by using closed-loop control in conjunction with a transfer matrix approach. Optimization techniques are employed to design the active suspension system. It is shown that marked improvements in ride quality can be obtained with actively controlled dampers in the cab suspension.

  5. An optimized activity-based probe for the study of caspase-6 activation

    PubMed Central

    Edgington, Laura E.; van Raam, Bram J.; Verdoes, Martijn; Wierschem, Christoph; Salvesen, Guy S.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Summary While significant efforts have been made to understand the mechanisms of caspase activation during apoptosis, many questions remain regarding how and when the executioner caspases get activated. We describe the design and synthesis of an activity-based probe that labels caspases-3/-6 /-7, allowing direct monitoring of all executioner caspases simultaneously. This probe has enhanced in vivo properties and reduced cross-reactivity compared to our previously reported probe AB50. Using this probe we find that caspase-6 undergoes a conformational change and can bind substrates even in the absence of cleavage of the pro-enzyme. We also demonstrate that caspase-6 activation does not require active caspases-3/-7 suggesting that it may auto-activate or be cleaved by other proteases. Together, our results suggest that caspase-6 activation proceeds through a unique mechanism that may be important for its diverse biological functions. PMID:22444589

  6. Tracer mass recovery in fractured aquifers estimated from multiple well tests.

    PubMed

    Sanford, William E; Cook, Peter G; Robinson, Neville I; Weatherill, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Forced-gradient tracer tests in fractured aquifers often report low mass recoveries. In fractured aquifers, fractures intersected by one borehole may not be intersected by another. As a result (1) injected tracer can follow pathways away from the withdrawal well causing low mass recovery and (2) recovered water can follow pathways not connected to the injection well causing significant tracer dilution. These two effects occur along with other forms of apparent mass loss. If the strength of the connection between wells and the amount of dilution can be predicted ahead of time, tracer tests can be designed to optimize mass recovery and dilution. A technique is developed to use hydraulic tests in fractured aquifers to calculate the conductance (strength of connection) between well pairs and to predict mass recovery and amount of dilution during forced gradient tracer tests. Flow is considered to take place through conduits, which connect the wells to each other and to distant sources or sinks. Mass recovery is related to the proportion of flow leaving the injection well and arriving at the withdrawal well, and dilution is related to the proportion of the flow from the withdrawal well that is derived from the injection well. The technique can be used to choose well pairs for tracer tests, what injection and withdrawal rates to use, and which direction to establish the hydraulic gradient to maximize mass recovery and/or minimize dilution. The method is applied to several tracer tests in fractured aquifers in the Clare Valley, South Australia. PMID:16857034

  7. A Bayesian approach to optimal sensor placement for structural health monitoring with application to active sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Eric B.; Todd, Michael D.

    2010-05-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for optimal sensor and/or actuator placement for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Starting from a general formulation of Bayes risk, we derive a global optimality criterion within a detection theory framework. The optimal configuration is then established as the one that minimizes the expected total presence of either type I or type II error during the damage detection process. While the approach is suitable for many sensing/actuation SHM processes, we focus on the example of active sensing using guided ultrasonic waves by implementing an appropriate statistical model of the wave propagation and feature extraction process. This example implements both pulse-echo and pitch-catch actuation schemes and takes into account line-of-site visibility and non-uniform damage probabilities over the monitored structure. The optimization space is searched using a genetic algorithm with a time-varying mutation rate. We provide three actuator/sensor placement test problems and discuss the optimal solutions generated by the algorithm.

  8. Layout optimization methodology of piezoelectric transducers in energy-recycling semi-active vibration control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezawa, Akihiro; Makihara, Kanjuro; Kogiso, Nozomu; Kitamura, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    An optimization methodology is proposed for the piezoelectric transducer (PZT) layout of an energy-recycling semi-active vibration control (ERSAVC) system for a space structure composed of trusses. Based on numerical optimization techniques, we intend to generate optimal location of PZTs under the constraint for the total length of PZTs. The design variables are set as the length of the PZT on each truss based on the concept of the ground structure approach. The transient problems of the mechanical and electrical vibrations based on the ERSAVC theory are considered as the equations of state. The objective is to minimize the integration of the square of all displacement over the whole analysis time domain. The sensitivity of the objective function is derived based on the adjoint variable method. Based on these formulations, an optimization algorithm is constructed using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and the method of moving asymptotes. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the validity and utility of the proposed methodology. Using the proposed methodology, the optimal location of PZTs for the vibration suppression for multi-modal vibration is studied, which can be benchmark results of further study in the context of ERSAVC systems.

  9. A computational model for optimal muscle activity considering muscle viscoelasticity in wrist movements

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Duk; Koike, Yasuharu

    2013-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of neural motor control, it is important to clarify how the central nervous system organizes the coordination of redundant muscles. Previous studies suggested that muscle activity for step-tracking wrist movements are optimized so as to reduce total effort or end-point variance under neural noise. However, since the muscle dynamics were assumed as a simple linear system, some characteristic patterns of experimental EMG were not seen in the simulated muscle activity of the previous studies. The biological muscle is known to have dynamic properties in which its elasticity and viscosity depend on activation level. The motor control system is supposed to consider the viscoelasticity of the muscles when generating motor command signals. In this study, we present a computational motor control model that can control a musculoskeletal system with nonlinear dynamics. We applied the model to step-tracking wrist movements actuated by five muscles with dynamic viscoelastic properties. To solve the motor redundancy, we designed the control model to generate motor commands that maximize end-point accuracy under signal-dependent noise, while minimizing the squared sum of them. Here, we demonstrate that the muscle activity simulated by our model exhibits spatiotemporal features of experimentally observed muscle activity of human and nonhuman primates. In addition, we show that the movement trajectories resulting from the simulated muscle activity resemble experimentally observed trajectories. These results suggest that, by utilizing inherent viscoelastic properties of the muscles, the neural system may optimize muscle activity to improve motor performance. PMID:23324321

  10. Characteristics and Evolution of Passive Tracers in the Oceanic Mixed Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Katherine; Hamlington, Peter; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2015-11-01

    Ocean tracers such as CO2 and plankton reside primarily in the mixed layer where air-sea gas exchange occurs and light is plentiful for photosynthesis. There can be substantial heterogeneity in the distributions of these tracers due to turbulent mixing, particularly in the submesoscale range where partly geostrophic eddies and small-scale 3D turbulence are both active. In this talk, LES spanning scales from 20km down to 5m are used to examine the role of turbulent mixing on nonreactive passive ocean tracers. The simulations include the effects of both wave-driven Langmuir turbulence and submesoscale eddies, and tracers with different initial and boundary conditions are examined. Tracer properties are characterized using spatial fields, statistics, multiscale fluxes, and spectra, and results show that passive tracer mixing depends on air-sea flux rate, release depth, and flow regime. The results indicate that while submesoscale eddies transport buoyancy upward to extract potential energy, the same is not true of passive tracers, whose entrainment is instead suppressed. Early in the evolution of some tracers, counter-gradient transport occurs co-located with regions of negative potential vorticity, suggesting that symmetric instabilities may act to oppose turbulent mixing.

  11. Tracers for Characterizing Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karen Wright; George Redden; Carl D. Palmer; Harry Rollins; Mark Stone; Mason Harrup; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-02-01

    Information about the times of thermal breakthrough and subsequent rates of thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is necessary for reservoir management, designing fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting economic return. Thermal breakthrough in heterogeneous porous media can be estimated using conservative tracers and assumptions about heat transfer rates; however, tracers that undergo temperature-dependent changes can provide more detailed information about the thermal profile along the flow path through the reservoir. To be effectively applied, the thermal reaction rates of such temperature sensitive traces must be well characterized for the range of conditions that exist in geothermal systems. Reactive tracers proposed in the literature include benzoic and carboxylic acids (Adams) and organic esters and amides (Robinson et al.); however, the practical temperature range over which these tracers can be applied (100-275°C) is somewhat limited. Further, for organic esters and amides, little is known about their sorption to the reservoir matrix and how such reactions impact data interpretation. Another approach involves tracers where the reference condition is internal to the tracer itself. Two examples are: 1) racemization of polymeric amino acids, and 2) mineral thermoluminescence. In these cases internal ratios of states are measured rather than extents of degradation and mass loss. Racemization of poly-L-lactic acid (for example) is temperature sensitive and therefore can be used as a temperature-recording tracer depending on the rates of racemization and stability of the amino acids. Heat-induced quenching of thermoluminescence of pre-irradiated LiF can also be used. To protect the tracers from alterations (extraneous reactions, dissolution) in geothermal environments we are encapsulating the tracers in core-shell colloidal structures that will subsequently be tested for their ability to be transported and to protect the

  12. Evaluation of [111In]-Labeled Zinc-Dipicolylamine Tracers for SPECT Imaging of Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Douglas R.; Plaunt, Adam J.; Turkyilmaz, Serhan; Smith, Miles; Wang, Yuzhen; Rusckowski, Mary

    2015-01-01

    heavily on tracer molecular structure suggesting that it may be possible to rapidly fine-tune the structural properties for optimized in vivo imaging performance and clinical translation. PMID:25115869

  13. Life cycle analysis within pharmaceutical process optimization and intensification: case study of active pharmaceutical ingredient production.

    PubMed

    Ott, Denise; Kralisch, Dana; Denčić, Ivana; Hessel, Volker; Laribi, Yosra; Perrichon, Philippe D; Berguerand, Charline; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov; Loeb, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    As the demand for new drugs is rising, the pharmaceutical industry faces the quest of shortening development time, and thus, reducing the time to market. Environmental aspects typically still play a minor role within the early phase of process development. Nevertheless, it is highly promising to rethink, redesign, and optimize process strategies as early as possible in active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) process development, rather than later at the stage of already established processes. The study presented herein deals with a holistic life-cycle-based process optimization and intensification of a pharmaceutical production process targeting a low-volume, high-value API. Striving for process intensification by transfer from batch to continuous processing, as well as an alternative catalytic system, different process options are evaluated with regard to their environmental impact to identify bottlenecks and improvement potentials for further process development activities.

  14. [Measurement of cellular activity with the MTT test. Optimization of the method].

    PubMed

    Bank, U; Reinhold, D; Ansorge, S

    1991-01-01

    Since a few years activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenases has been determined by MTT-test as alternative method to measurement of the cellular activity and proliferation by incorporation of tritiated thymidine. In this test the tetrazolium salt MTT is converted into blue, insoluble formazan dye crystals, which have to be dissolved by a suitable extraction mixture. The present paper describes a modified extraction method using an isopropanol-dimethylformamide mixture acidified to pH 5.5. The modified method enables an optimal, easy to handle, less time and work consuming MTT-assay. A MTT concentration of 1 mg/ml was found to be optimal. The extinction maximum was identified at 566 nm.

  15. An Optimal CDS Construction Algorithm with Activity Scheduling in Ad Hoc Networks.

    PubMed

    Penumalli, Chakradhar; Palanichamy, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    A new energy efficient optimal Connected Dominating Set (CDS) algorithm with activity scheduling for mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) is proposed. This algorithm achieves energy efficiency by minimizing the Broadcast Storm Problem [BSP] and at the same time considering the node's remaining energy. The Connected Dominating Set is widely used as a virtual backbone or spine in mobile ad hoc networks [MANETs] or Wireless Sensor Networks [WSN]. The CDS of a graph representing a network has a significant impact on an efficient design of routing protocol in wireless networks. Here the CDS is a distributed algorithm with activity scheduling based on unit disk graph [UDG]. The node's mobility and residual energy (RE) are considered as parameters in the construction of stable optimal energy efficient CDS. The performance is evaluated at various node densities, various transmission ranges, and mobility rates. The theoretical analysis and simulation results of this algorithm are also presented which yield better results.

  16. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Dörfliger, N.; Kennedy, K.; Müller, I.; Aragno, M.

    Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra). In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  17. Retention of chemical tracers in geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, R.N.; Breitenbach, K.A.; Fossum, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of chemical tracers for use in geothermal reservoir monitoring are examined. Tracers are used to determine the magnitude of connectivity between injection and production wells in order to estimate the likelihood of premature fluid breakthrough. Even though chemical tracers are generally less environmentally sensitive than radioactive materials, quantities injected need to be much larger to be distinguishable by chemical analysis. As a result, a non-equilibrium concentration of tracer material is injected into the reservoir, and the tracer is susceptible to retention within the reservoir by ion exchange, diffusion into the solids or immobile reservoir fluid, adsorption or dissolution. These various reactions lead to changes in the tracer concentration as the traced fluid flows through the reservoir, and therefore reduce the capability of the experiment to distinguish concentration changes due to purely mechanical effects. Experimental observations reported here show that substantial fractions of KI tracer were retained under reservoir conditions, even though it appears that the retained material was subsequently released into more dilute fluid. The result is an apparent storage and release mechanism that will distort the later response of a tracer breakthrough.

  18. USING TRACERS TO DESCRIBE NAPL HETEROGENEITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tracers are frequently used to estimate both the average travel time for water flow through the tracer swept volume and NAPL saturation. The same data can be used to develop a statistical distribution describing the hydraulic conductivity in the sept volume and a possible distri...

  19. Artificial neural network optimization of Althaea rosea seeds polysaccharides and its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Liu, Wenhui; Tian, Shuge

    2014-09-01

    A combination of an orthogonal L16(4)4 test design and a three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was applied to optimize polysaccharides from Althaea rosea seeds extracted by hot water method. The highest optimal experimental yield of A. rosea seed polysaccharides (ARSPs) of 59.85 mg/g was obtained using three extraction numbers, 113 min extraction time, 60.0% ethanol concentration, and 1:41 solid-liquid ratio. Under these optimized conditions, the ARSP experimental yield was very close to the predicted yield of 60.07 mg/g and was higher than the orthogonal test results (40.86 mg/g). Structural characterizations were conducted using physicochemical property and FTIR analysis. In addition, the study of ARSP antioxidant activity demonstrated that polysaccharides exhibited high superoxide dismutase activity, strong reducing power, and positive scavenging activity on superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, and reducing power. Our results indicated that ANNs were efficient quantitative tools for predicting the total ARSP content.

  20. Optimization of Antifungal Extracts from Ficus hirta Fruits Using Response Surface Methodology and Antifungal Activity Tests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuying; Wan, Chunpeng; Peng, Xuan; Chen, Yuhuan; Chen, Ming; Chen, Jinyin

    2015-01-01

    The fruits of Ficus hirta (FH) display strong antifungal activity against Penicillium italicum and Penicillium digitatum. In order to optimize the extraction conditions of antifungal extracts from FH fruit, various extraction parameters, such as ethanol concentration, extraction time, solvent to solid ratio and temperature, were chosen to identify their effects on the diameters of inhibition zones (DIZs) against these two Penicillium molds. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to obtain the optimal combination of these parameters. Results showed that the optimal extraction parameters for maximum antifungal activity were: 90% (v/v) ethanol concentration, 65 min extraction time, 31 mL/g solvent to solid ratio and 51 °C temperature. Under the abovementioned extraction conditions, the experimental DIZs values obtained experimentally were 57.17 ± 0.75 and 39.33 ± 0.82 mm, which were very close to the values of 57.26 and 39.29 mm predicted by the model. Further, nine kinds of phytopathogens were tested in vitro to explore the antifungal activity of the FH extracts. It was found for the first time that the FH extracts showed significant inhibition on the growth of P. italicum, A. citri, P. vexans, P. cytosporella and P. digitatum. PMID:26528961

  1. What is the difference between a brusselator and a realistic tracer gas chemistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustfeld, H.

    2003-04-01

    The chemistry of realistic active tracer gases in the troposphere (and the stratosphere) is rather complicated: More than fifty active tracers undergo more than 150 reactions on scales that differ by more than 15 orders of magnitude. A strong time dependence of the reactions is intrinsic due to photolytic reactions. Nevertheless the relevant dimension of these systems is small and therefore a comparison with a simple low dimensional chemical system becomes possible.

  2. Tracer studies on an aerated lagoon.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Alistair; Shilton, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The city of Palmerston North, New Zealand, has two aerated lagoons as its secondary treatment facility. Interest about treatment efficiency led to an investigation into the hydraulics in the second lagoon to determine if further optimisation was viable. A tracer study using rhodamine WT was undertaken to ascertain the stimulus response output. Samples were also taken at 24 points within the lagoon to determine the tracer concentration profile throughout the lagoon. The mean residence time was determined to be 39.9 h compared with a theoretical residence time of 55.4 h. Peak concentration of the tracer at the outlet occurred at 0.44 of the mean residence time. The results of the tracer study pointed to 28% of volume being dead space. A subsequent sludge survey indicated that 26% of the design volume of the lagoon was filled with sludge. While the curved geometry of the lagoon did not appear to impact the hydraulics the fact that the first aerator is confined in a relatively smaller area will have locally boosted the mixing energy input in this inlet zone. From interpretation of the tracer response and the tracer distribution profiles it appears that the aerators are mixing the influent into the bulk flow effectively in the front end of the lagoon and that there was no evidence of any substantive short-circuiting path of concentrated tracer around to the outlet. The tracer distribution profiles gave direct insight as to how the tracer was being transported within the pond and should be used more often when conducting tracer studies. Comparison with the literature indicated that the lagoon's hydraulic efficiency was on par with a baffled pond system and it would be expected that addition of several baffles to the lagoon would provide minimal further improvement. PMID:22277219

  3. Performance of Optimized Actuator and Sensor Arrays in an Active Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, D. L.; Padula, S. L.; Lyle, K. H.; Cline, J. H.; Cabell, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted in NASA Langley's Acoustics and Dynamics Laboratory to determine the effectiveness of optimized actuator/sensor architectures and controller algorithms for active control of harmonic interior noise. Tests were conducted in a large scale fuselage model - a composite cylinder which simulates a commuter class aircraft fuselage with three sections of trim panel and a floor. Using an optimization technique based on the component transfer functions, combinations of 4 out of 8 piezoceramic actuators and 8 out of 462 microphone locations were evaluated against predicted performance. A combinatorial optimization technique called tabu search was employed to select the optimum transducer arrays. Three test frequencies represent the cases of a strong acoustic and strong structural response, a weak acoustic and strong structural response and a strong acoustic and weak structural response. Noise reduction was obtained using a Time Averaged/Gradient Descent (TAGD) controller. Results indicate that the optimization technique successfully predicted best and worst case performance. An enhancement of the TAGD control algorithm was also evaluated. The principal components of the actuator/sensor transfer functions were used in the PC-TAGD controller. The principal components are shown to be independent of each other while providing control as effective as the standard TAGD.

  4. Optimization of polysaccharides extraction from Tricholoma mongolicum Imai and their antioxidant and antiproliferative activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Zhao, Yongming; Li, Wei; Wang, Zhibao; Shen, Lixia

    2015-10-20

    Response surface methodology was used to optimize the enzyme-assisted extraction parameters for polysaccharides from Tricholoma mongolicum Imai (TMIPs). The orthogonal test design was employed to determine the optimal concentration of three kinds of enzyme (trypsin, pectinase and papain) and the optimal concentrations of trypsin, pectinase and papain were 1.5%, 2.5%, and 2.0% (dry weight % of T. mongolicum Imai powder), respectively. In addition, three variables that remarkably affected the yield of polysaccharides such as extraction temperature, pH and extraction time were studied based on a Box-Behnken design. The results demonstrated that extraction time was the most remarkable factor affecting the TMIPs yield, followed by pH and temperature. Optimal extraction was obtained at 48.4°C, pH 5.4, and extraction time of 132min. Under these optimum conditions, the yield was 24.01%, which is consistent with the predicted value. Furthermore, crude polysaccharides were purified to obtain four fractions. In vitro antioxidant and antiproliferative activities results showed that TMIP-4 had stronger antioxidant and antiproliferative capacity than other fractions.

  5. Optimization of nickel adsorption from aqueous solution by using activated carbon prepared from waste apricot by chemical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, S.; Önal, Y.; Akmil-Başar, C.; Bilmez-Erdemoğlu, S.; Sarıcı-Özdemir, Ç.; Köseoğlu, E.; İçduygu, G.

    2005-12-01

    Waste apricot supplied by Malatya apricot plant (Turkey) was activated by using chemical activation method and K 2CO 3 was chosen for this purpose. Activation temperature was varied over the temperature range of 400-900 °C and N 2 atmosphere was used with 10 °C/min heat rate. The maximum surface area (1214 m 2/g) and micropore volume (0.355 cm 3/g) were obtained at 900 °C, but activated carbon was predominantly microporous at 700 °C. The resulting activated carbons were used for removal of Ni(II) ions from aqueous solution and adsorption properties have been investigated under various conditions such as pH, activation temperature, adsorbent dosage and nickel concentration. Adsorption parameters were determined by using Langmuir model. Optimal condition was determined as; pH 5, 0.7 g/10 ml adsorbent dosage, 10 mg/l Ni(II) concentration and 60 min contact time. The results indicate that the effective uptake of Ni(II) ions was obtained by activating the carbon at 900 °C.

  6. Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

    2003-12-17

    Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigates the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. This topical report describes the demonstration of the model-based predictive optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory in a test facility in real-time using time-of-use differentiated electricity prices without demand charges. The laboratory testing findings presented in this topical report cover the second of three project phases. The novel supervisory controller successfully executed a three-step procedure consisting of (1) short-term weather prediction, (2) optimization of control strategy over the next planning horizon using a calibrated building model, and (3) post-processing of the optimal strategy to yield a control command for the current time step that can be executed in the test facility. The primary and secondary building mechanical systems were effectively orchestrated by the model-based predictive optimal controller in real-time while observing comfort and operational constraints. The findings reveal that when the optimal controller is given imperfect weather fore-casts and when the building model used for planning control strategies does not match the actual building perfectly, measured utility costs savings relative to conventional building operation can be substantial. This requires that the facility under control lends itself to passive storage utilization and the building model

  7. Determining optimal clothing ensembles based on weather forecasts, with particular reference to outdoor winter military activities.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Marco; Pavlinic, Daniela Z; Crisci, Alfonso; Capecchi, Valerio; Orlandini, Simone; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2011-07-01

    Military and civil defense personnel are often involved in complex activities in a variety of outdoor environments. The choice of appropriate clothing ensembles represents an important strategy to establish the success of a military mission. The main aim of this study was to compare the known clothing insulation of the garment ensembles worn by soldiers during two winter outdoor field trials (hike and guard duty) with the estimated optimal clothing thermal insulations recommended to maintain thermoneutrality, assessed by using two different biometeorological procedures. The overall aim was to assess the applicability of such biometeorological procedures to weather forecast systems, thereby developing a comprehensive biometeorological tool for military operational forecast purposes. Military trials were carried out during winter 2006 in Pokljuka (Slovenia) by Slovene Armed Forces personnel. Gastrointestinal temperature, heart rate and environmental parameters were measured with portable data acquisition systems. The thermal characteristics of the clothing ensembles worn by the soldiers, namely thermal resistance, were determined with a sweating thermal manikin. Results showed that the clothing ensemble worn by the military was appropriate during guard duty but generally inappropriate during the hike. A general under-estimation of the biometeorological forecast model in predicting the optimal clothing insulation value was observed and an additional post-processing calibration might further improve forecast accuracy. This study represents the first step in the development of a comprehensive personalized biometeorological forecast system aimed at improving recommendations regarding the optimal thermal insulation of military garment ensembles for winter activities.

  8. Determining optimal clothing ensembles based on weather forecasts, with particular reference to outdoor winter military activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, Marco; Pavlinic, Daniela Z.; Crisci, Alfonso; Capecchi, Valerio; Orlandini, Simone; Mekjavic, Igor B.

    2011-07-01

    Military and civil defense personnel are often involved in complex activities in a variety of outdoor environments. The choice of appropriate clothing ensembles represents an important strategy to establish the success of a military mission. The main aim of this study was to compare the known clothing insulation of the garment ensembles worn by soldiers during two winter outdoor field trials (hike and guard duty) with the estimated optimal clothing thermal insulations recommended to maintain thermoneutrality, assessed by using two different biometeorological procedures. The overall aim was to assess the applicability of such biometeorological procedures to weather forecast systems, thereby developing a comprehensive biometeorological tool for military operational forecast purposes. Military trials were carried out during winter 2006 in Pokljuka (Slovenia) by Slovene Armed Forces personnel. Gastrointestinal temperature, heart rate and environmental parameters were measured with portable data acquisition systems. The thermal characteristics of the clothing ensembles worn by the soldiers, namely thermal resistance, were determined with a sweating thermal manikin. Results showed that the clothing ensemble worn by the military was appropriate during guard duty but generally inappropriate during the hike. A general under-estimation of the biometeorological forecast model in predicting the optimal clothing insulation value was observed and an additional post-processing calibration might further improve forecast accuracy. This study represents the first step in the development of a comprehensive personalized biometeorological forecast system aimed at improving recommendations regarding the optimal thermal insulation of military garment ensembles for winter activities.

  9. Increasing the Lifetime of Mobile WSNs via Dynamic Optimization of Sensor Node Communication Activity

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Dayan Adionel; Sakai, Lucas Jun; Alberti, Antonio Marcos; de Souza, Rausley Adriano Amaral

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a simple and flexible method for increasing the lifetime of fixed or mobile wireless sensor networks is proposed. Based on past residual energy information reported by the sensor nodes, the sink node or another central node dynamically optimizes the communication activity levels of the sensor nodes to save energy without sacrificing the data throughput. The activity levels are defined to represent portions of time or time-frequency slots in a frame, during which the sensor nodes are scheduled to communicate with the sink node to report sensory measurements. Besides node mobility, it is considered that sensors’ batteries may be recharged via a wireless power transmission or equivalent energy harvesting scheme, bringing to the optimization problem an even more dynamic character. We report large increased lifetimes over the non-optimized network and comparable or even larger lifetime improvements with respect to an idealized greedy algorithm that uses both the real-time channel state and the residual energy information. PMID:27657075

  10. Numerical evaluation of the PERTH (PERiodic Tracer Hierarchy) method for estimating time-variable travel time distribution in variably saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Harman, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    The distribution of water travel times is one of the crucial hydrologic characteristics of the catchment. Recently, it has been argued that a rigorous treatment of travel time distributions should allow for their variability in time because of the variable fluxes and partitioning of water in the water balance, and the consequent variable storage of a catchment. We would like to be able to observe the structure of the temporal variations in travel time distributions under controlled conditions, such as in a soil column or under irrigation experiments. However, time-variable travel time distributions are difficult to observe using typical active and passive tracer approaches. Time-variability implies that tracers introduced at different times will have different travel time distributions. The distribution may also vary during injection periods. Moreover, repeat application of a single tracer in a system with significant memory leads to overprinting of break-through curves, which makes it difficult to extract the original break-through curves, and the number of ideal tracers that can be applied is usually limited. Recognizing these difficulties, the PERTH (PERiodic Tracer Hierarchy) method has been developed. The method provides a way to estimate time-variable travel time distributions by tracer experiments under controlled conditions by employing a multi-tracer hierarchy under periodical hydrologic forcing inputs. The key assumption of the PERTH method is that as time gets sufficiently large relative to injection time, the average travel time distribution of two distinct ideal tracers injected during overlapping periods become approximately equal. Thus one can be used as a proxy for the other, and the breakthrough curves of tracers applied at different times in a periodic forcing condition can be separated from one another. In this study, we tested the PERTH method numerically for the case of infiltration at the plot scale using HYDRUS-1D and a particle

  11. Optimization Extraction Process of Polysaccharides from Suillus granulatus and Their Antioxidant and Immunological Activities In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Yan, Song; Chen, Shuang; Gong, Liying; Su, Tingting; Wang, Zhanyong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suillus granulatus is an edible and medicinal fungus in China. S. granulatus polysaccharide (SGP) was considered as the main bioactivity compounds in S. granulatus. Therefore, the extraction of SGP and their antioxidant activities were studied in this work. Materials and Methods: Fruiting bodies of S. granulatus were purchased from a local market (Fushun, China). Response surface methodology was adopted to optimize the extraction conditions of SGP. The antioxidant and immunological activities in vitro were also assayed. Results: The extraction of SGP was optimized by a Box–Behnken design. The optimal conditions for the extraction of polysaccharides were as follows: Pre-extraction time, 2 h; extraction temperature, 94°C; ratio of water to raw material, 25; and extraction frequency, 2. Under these conditions, the experimental yield of polysaccharides was 5.38% ±0.15%, which agreed with the predicted yield. The antioxidant assay in vitro showed that SGPs had relatively high scavenging ability for hydroxyl radicals and higher scavenging ability for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical. However, the scavenging ability of SGPs for superoxide anion radical and reducing power was relatively low. The polysaccharides also significantly increased splenocyte proliferation in vitro. Conclusion: SGP possessed good antioxidant and immunological activities in vitro and explored as a novel natural antioxidant or functional food. SUMMARY The predictive model of Suillus granulatus polysaccharide (SGP) extraction is adequate for the extraction processSGP possessed a good antioxidant activity in vitroLymphocyte proliferation in vitro was significantly increased by SGPPictorial abstract (in MS Powerpoint Format) is submitted as a separated file in the online submission system. Abbreviation used: SGP: Suillus granulatus polysaccharides, RSM: Response surface methodology, BBD: Box–Behnken design, Vc: Ascorbic acid, DPPH: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, MTT: 3

  12. Using Tracer Technology to Characterize Contaminated Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Maresca, Joseph, W., Jr., Ph.D.; Bratton, Wesley, L., Ph.D., P.E.; Dickerson, Wilhelmina; Hales, Rochelle

    2005-12-30

    The Pipeline Characterization Using Tracers (PCUT) technique uses conservative and partitioning, reactive or other interactive tracers to remotely determine the amount of contaminant within a run of piping or ductwork. The PCUT system was motivated by a method that has been successfully used to characterize subsurface soil contaminants and is similar in operation to that of a gas chromatography column. By injecting a ?slug? of both conservative and partitioning tracers at one end (or section) of the piping and measuring the time history of the concentration of the tracers at the other end (or another section) of the pipe, the presence, location, and amount of contaminant within the pipe or duct can be determined. The tracers are transported along the pipe or duct by a gas flow field, typically air or nitrogen, which has a velocity that is slow enough so that the partitioning tracer has time to interact with the contaminant before the tracer slug completely passes over the contaminate region. PCUT not only identifies the presence of contamination, it also can locate the contamination along the pipeline and quantify the amount of residual. PCUT can be used in support of deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of piping and ducts that may have been contaminated with hazardous chemicals such as chlorinated solvents, petroleum products, radioactive materials, or heavy metals, such as mercury.

  13. Wanted: Scalable Tracers for Diffusion Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Scalable tracers are potentially a useful tool to examine diffusion mechanisms and to predict diffusion coefficients, particularly for hindered diffusion in complex, heterogeneous, or crowded systems. Scalable tracers are defined as a series of tracers varying in size but with the same shape, structure, surface chemistry, deformability, and diffusion mechanism. Both chemical homology and constant dynamics are required. In particular, branching must not vary with size, and there must be no transition between ordinary diffusion and reptation. Measurements using scalable tracers yield the mean diffusion coefficient as a function of size alone; measurements using nonscalable tracers yield the variation due to differences in the other properties. Candidate scalable tracers are discussed for two-dimensional (2D) diffusion in membranes and three-dimensional diffusion in aqueous solutions. Correlations to predict the mean diffusion coefficient of globular biomolecules from molecular mass are reviewed briefly. Specific suggestions for the 3D case include the use of synthetic dendrimers or random hyperbranched polymers instead of dextran and the use of core–shell quantum dots. Another useful tool would be a series of scalable tracers varying in deformability alone, prepared by varying the density of crosslinking in a polymer to make say “reinforced Ficoll” or “reinforced hyperbranched polyglycerol.” PMID:25319586

  14. Dual-tracer receptor concentration imaging using tracers with different tissue delivery kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Diop, Mamadou; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hasan, Tayyaba; St. Lawrence, Keith; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    Simultaneous dynamic fluorescent imaging of a suitable untargeted tracer in conjunction with any molecular targeted fluorescent agent has been shown to be a powerful approach for quantifying cancer-specific cell surface receptors in vivo in the presence of non-specific uptake and tracer delivery variability. The identification of a "suitable" untargeted tracer (i.e., one having equivalent plasma and tissue delivery pharmacokinetics to the targeted tracer) for every targeted tracer, however, may not always be feasible or could require extensive testing. This work presents a "deconvolution" approach capable of correcting for plasma and tissue-delivery pharmacokinetic differences between tracers by quantifying dynamic differences in targeted and untargeted tracer uptake in a receptor-free tissue (one devoid of targeted molecular species) and correcting uptake in all other tissues accordingly. This deconvolution correction approach is evaluated in theoretical models and explored in an in vivo mouse xenograft model of human glioma. In the animal experiments, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR: a receptor known to be overexpressed in the investigated glioma cell line) was targeted using a fluorescent tracer with very different plasma pharmacokinetics than a second untargeted fluorescent tracer. Without correcting for these differences, the dual-tracer approach yielded substantially higher estimations of EGFR concentration in all tissues than expected; however, deconvolution correction was able to produce estimates that matched ex vivo validation.

  15. Optimal area of retinal photocoagulation necessary for suppressing active iris neovascularisation associated with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Shiraya, Tomoyasu; Kato, Satoshi; Shigeeda, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    To determine the optimal area of retinal photocoagulation required for suppressing active neovascularisation (NVI) associated with diabetic retinopathy. We studied 1 eye each of 4 patients in whom active NVI was ophthalmoscopically shown to have been suppressed by additional photocoagulation. These patients initially underwent pan-retinal photocoagulation for diabetic retinopathy at another hospital, but NVI developed subsequently. We compared the areas of photocoagulation before and after additional photocoagulation and compared the area of retinal photocoagulation. The photocoagulated areas before and after additional photocoagulation in the four eyes were 20.7 and 45.2, 36.6 and 56.3, 30.4 and 67.4, and 11.7 and 53.4 %, respectively. The area of retinal photocoagulation required to suppress active NVI is calculated to be ~50 %.

  16. Robust active combustion control for the optimization of environmental performance and energy efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demayo, Trevor Nat

    Criteria pollutant regulations, climate change concerns, and energy conservation efforts are placing strict constraints in the design and operation of advanced, stationary combustion systems. To ensure minimal pollutant emissions and maximal efficiency at every instant of operation while preventing reaction blowout, combustion systems need to react and adapt in real-time to external changes. This study describes the development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multivariable feedback control system, designed to maximize the performance of natural gas-fired combustion systems. A feedback sensor array was developed to monitor reaction stability and measure combustion performance as a function of NOx, CO, and O, emissions. Acoustic and UV chemiluminescent emissions were investigated for use as stability indicators. Modulated signals of CH* and CO2* chemiluminescence were found to correlate well with the onset of lean blowout. A variety of emissions sensors were tested and evaluated, including conventional CEMS', micro-fuel cells, a zirconia NOx transducer, and a rapid response predictive NOx sensor based on UV flame chemiluminescence. A dual time-scale controller was designed to actively optimize operating conditions by maximizing a multivariable performance function J using a linear direction set search algorithm. The controller evaluated J under slow, quasi steady-state conditions, while dynamically monitoring the reaction zone at high speed for pre-blowout instabilities or boundary condition violations. To establish the input control parameters, two burner systems were selected: a 30 kW air-swirl, generic research burner, and a 120 kW scaled, fuel-staged, industrial boiler burner. The parameters, chosen to most affect burner performance, consisted of air swirl intensity and excess air for the generic burner, and fuel-staging and excess air for the boiler burner. A set of optimization parameters was also established to ensure efficient and deterministic

  17. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  18. Computational design optimization of an SMA-based active steerable needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konh, Bardia; Hutapea, Parsaoran

    2015-04-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated needle is currently being developed to assist surgeons/physicians in their percutaneous interventional procedures. The proposed active surgical needle can potentially compensate the possible misplacements of the needle tip in the tissue benefiting from the improved navigation provided by the attached SMA actuators. In this study finite element tools have been utilized in order to maintain an optimum design of the active needle configuration. There are several parameters involved in the design affecting the active needle's applicability and maneuverability; among them are the length, diameter and the maximum residual strain of the SMA wires, the stiffness and diameters of the surgical needle and the offset distance between the needle and the actuator. For analyzing the response of the active needle structure a parametric model was developed in ANSYS. This model was linked to the automated optimization tools for an improved design of the active needle. The most sensitive parameters affecting the active needle's steerability were found to be the offset distance and the length of the needle. Considering the results and the clinical limitations, an improved design of the active needle was presented.

  19. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  20. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-28

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  1. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  2. Evaluation of 13C isotopic tracers for metabolic flux analysis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, Christian M.; Walther, Jason L.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is the most comprehensive means of characterizing cellular metabolic states. Uniquely labeled isotopic tracers enable more focused analyses to probe specific reactions within the network. As a result, the choice of tracer largely determines the precision with which one can estimate metabolic fluxes, especially in complex mammalian systems that require multiple substrates. Here we have experimentally determined metabolic fluxes in a tumor cell line, successfully recapitulating the hallmarks of cancer cell metabolism. Using these data, we computationally evaluated specifically labeled 13C glucose and glutamine tracers for their ability to precisely and accurately estimate fluxes in central carbon metabolism. These methods enabled us to to identify the optimal tracer for analyzing individual fluxes, specific pathways, and central carbon metabolism as a whole. [1,2-13C2]glucose provided the most precise estimates for glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the overall network. Tracers such as [2-13C]glucose and [3-13C]glucose also outperformed the more commonly used [1-13C]glucose. [U-13C5]glutamine emerged as the preferred isotopic tracer for analysis of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. These results provide valuable, quantitative information on the performance of 13C-labeled substrates and can aid in the design of more informative MFA experiments in mammalian cell culture. PMID:19622376

  3. Optimization of the extraction of polysaccharides from tobacco waste and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yanqiu; Gao, Yuzhen; Wang, Weifeng; Cheng, Yuyuan; Lu, Ping; Ma, Cong; Zhang, Yuehua

    2016-10-01

    A response surface methodology was used to optimize the parameters for extracting the polysaccharides from tobacco waste (TWPs) using hot water. The extraction process, carried out under the following optimized parameters: an extraction temperature of 90°C, a ratio of water to raw material of 54, and an extraction time of 115min, allowed an experimental yield of 28.32±1.78%. The chemical composition analysis showed that TWPs were composed of mannose, rhamnose, glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, glucose, galactose and arabinose with the following molecular ratio: 1.00:2.69:1.29:2.29:5.23:6.90:3.92. The molecular weights of its four major fractions were 0.558, 1.015, 16.286, and 151.194kDa. Bioactivity experiments showed that TWPs not only decreased the reactive oxygen species level in salt-stressed tomato seedlings, but also possessed significant antioxidant activities in vitro. Antioxidant activity in vivo further showed that TWPs could significantly increase the activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT), and decrease the level of malondialodehyde (MDA). In addition, according to the acute toxicity test, TWPs did not cause behavioral changes or any death of mice. This study provides an effective method to utilize tobacco waste resources. PMID:27211300

  4. Statistical optimization and anticancer activity of a red pigment isolated from Streptomyces sp. PM4

    PubMed Central

    Karuppiah, Valliappan; Aarthi, Chandramohan; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kannan, Lakshmanan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To enhance the pigment production by Streptomyces sp. PM4 for evaluating its anticancer activity. Methods Response surface methodology was employed to enhance the production of red pigment from Streptomyces sp. PM4. Optimized pigment was purified and evaluated for the anticancer activity against HT1080, Hep2, HeLa and MCF7 cell lines by MTT assay. Results Based on the response surface methodology, it could be concluded that maltose (4.06 g), peptone (7.34 g), yeast extract (4.34 g) and tyrosine (2.89 g) were required for the maximum production of pigment (1.68 g/L) by the Streptomyces sp. PM4. Optimization of the medium with the above tested features increased the pigment yield by 4.6 fold. Pigment showed the potential anticancer activity against HT1080, HEp-2, HeLa and MCF-7cell lines with the IC50 value of 18.5, 15.3, 9.6 and 8.5 respectively. Conclusions The study revealed that the maximum amount of pigment could be produced to treat cancer. PMID:23905024

  5. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosikhin, Ahmad Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  6. Optimal Tracking Controller Design for Active Queue Management Routers via LQ-Servo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Min; Yang, Ji Hoon; Suh, Byung Suhl

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes the LQ-Servo controller for AQM (Active Queue Management) routers. The proposed controller structure is made by taking a traditional servo mechanism based on Linear Quadratic approach and by augmenting a new state variable to the feed forward loop. Since the controller structure is consists of a standard optimal feedback regulator and a feed forward controller, it is able to enhance the usefulness of resources and to reduce unnecessary memory reservations such as RAM (Random Access Memory) or SMA (Shared Memory Area) on ordinary router systems, respectively.

  7. Data set of optimal parameters for colorimetric red assay of epoxide hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Stephani; Adriani, Patricia Pereira; Borges, Flavia Garcia; Lopes, Adriana Rios; Campana, Patricia T; Chambergo, Felipe S

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Epoxide hydrolase of Trichoderma reesei: Biochemical properties and conformational characterization" [1]. Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides to the corresponding vicinal diols. This article describes the optimal parameters for the colorimetric red assay to determine the enzymatic activity, with an emphasis on the characterization of the kinetic parameters, pH optimum and thermal stability of this enzyme. The effects of reagents that are not resistant to oxidation by sodium periodate on the reactions can generate false positives and interfere with the final results of the red assay. PMID:27366781

  8. Front end optimization for the monolithic active pixel sensor of the ALICE Inner Tracking System upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Degerli, Y.; Dorokhov, A.; Flouzat, C.; Gajanana, D.; Gao, C.; Guilloux, F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hristozkov, S.; Junique, A.; Keil, M.; Kofarago, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kwon, Y.; Lattuca, A.; Mager, M.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marras, D.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Pham, T. H.; Puggioni, C.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Rousset, J.; Siddhanta, S.; Snoeys, W.; Song, M.; Usai, G.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; Yang, P.

    2016-02-01

    ALICE plans to replace its Inner Tracking System during the second long shut down of the LHC in 2019 with a new 10 m2 tracker constructed entirely with monolithic active pixel sensors. The TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS imaging Sensor process has been selected to produce the sensor as it offers a deep pwell allowing full CMOS in-pixel circuitry and different starting materials. First full-scale prototypes have been fabricated and tested. Radiation tolerance has also been verified. In this paper the development of the charge sensitive front end and in particular its optimization for uniformity of charge threshold and time response will be presented.

  9. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Krishnan, K. M.; Ferguson, R. M.

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ{sub 0} excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (H{sub o}) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ{sub 0}. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωH{sub o}) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

  10. Development and characterization of food-grade tracers for the global grain tracing and recall system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Armstrong, Paul R; Thomasson, J Alex; Sui, Ruixiu; Casada, Mark; Herrman, Timothy J

    2010-10-27

    Tracing grain from the farm to its final processing destination as it moves through multiple grain-handling systems, storage bins, and bulk carriers presents numerous challenges to existing record-keeping systems. This study examines the suitability of coded caplets to trace grain, in particular, to evaluate methodology to test tracers' ability to withstand the rigors of a commercial grain handling and storage systems as defined by physical properties using measurement technology commonly applied to assess grain hardness and end-use properties. Three types of tracers to dispense into bulk grains for tracing the grain back to its field of origin were developed using three food-grade substances [processed sugar, pregelatinized starch, and silicified microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC)] as a major component in formulations. Due to a different functionality of formulations, the manufacturing process conditions varied for each tracer type, resulting in unique variations in surface roughness, weight, dimensions, and physical and spectroscopic properties before and after coating. The applied two types of coating [pregelatinized starch and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)] using an aqueous coating system containing appropriate plasticizers showed uniform coverage and clear coating. Coating appeared to act as a barrier against moisture penetration, to protect against mechanical damage of the surface of the tracers, and to improve the mechanical strength of tracers. The results of analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests showed the type of tracer, coating material, conditioning time, and a theoretical weight gain significantly influenced the morphological and physical properties of tracers. Optimization of these factors needs to be pursued to produce desirable tracers with consistent quality and performance when they flow with bulk grains throughout the grain marketing channels.

  11. Development and characterization of food-grade tracers for the global grain tracing and recall system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Armstrong, Paul R; Thomasson, J Alex; Sui, Ruixiu; Casada, Mark; Herrman, Timothy J

    2010-10-27

    Tracing grain from the farm to its final processing destination as it moves through multiple grain-handling systems, storage bins, and bulk carriers presents numerous challenges to existing record-keeping systems. This study examines the suitability of coded caplets to trace grain, in particular, to evaluate methodology to test tracers' ability to withstand the rigors of a commercial grain handling and storage systems as defined by physical properties using measurement technology commonly applied to assess grain hardness and end-use properties. Three types of tracers to dispense into bulk grains for tracing the grain back to its field of origin were developed using three food-grade substances [processed sugar, pregelatinized starch, and silicified microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC)] as a major component in formulations. Due to a different functionality of formulations, the manufacturing process conditions varied for each tracer type, resulting in unique variations in surface roughness, weight, dimensions, and physical and spectroscopic properties before and after coating. The applied two types of coating [pregelatinized starch and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)] using an aqueous coating system containing appropriate plasticizers showed uniform coverage and clear coating. Coating appeared to act as a barrier against moisture penetration, to protect against mechanical damage of the surface of the tracers, and to improve the mechanical strength of tracers. The results of analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests showed the type of tracer, coating material, conditioning time, and a theoretical weight gain significantly influenced the morphological and physical properties of tracers. Optimization of these factors needs to be pursued to produce desirable tracers with consistent quality and performance when they flow with bulk grains throughout the grain marketing channels. PMID:20883029

  12. Analysis of unit mobility ratio well-to-well tracer flow to determine reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Abbaszadeh-Dehghani, M.; Brigham, W.E.

    1983-02-01

    This study has been carried out in two related sections. In the first section, exact analytic equations have been derived to define breakthrough curves for different developed flooding well patterns for unit mobility ratio. The first section also includes an extension of an analytical definition of pattern breakthrough curves for mobility ratio other than one. The second part discusses flow of a tracer slug in various patterns. In each system, the longitudinal mixing of the tracer slug in a general streamtube of the pattern has been formulated mathematically. A line integral along a streamtube was derived which represents the length of the mixed zone. When this line integral was substituted into the mixing equation, an expression for the concentration of tracer at any location within a streamtube resulted. The study shows that the effluent tracer concentration depends upon the pattern geometry and size, and the dispersion constant of the formation. Tracer production curves for the different patterns considered have also been correlated into a set of curves depending on a/..cap alpha.., (a = distance between like wells, ..cap alpha.. = dispersion constant). The correlation was achieved by deriving two sets of correction factors, one for tracer peak concentration, and another for a/..cap alpha.. ratio. As a result of this correlation, a tracer response from any repeated homogeneous pattern can be estimated from the response of an equivalent five-spot system by utilizing the correction factors. A computer program based on a non-linear optimization technique was developed which decomposes a detected tracer breakthrough profile from a multilayered system into responses from individual layers. The algorithm utilizes the equations of the five-spot pattern in conjunction with the developed correction factors. A five-spot field example which has been successfully decomposed into several layers is shown to illustrate the use of this research. 42 figures, 15 tables.

  13. Optimal placement of piezoelectric plates for active vibration control of gas turbine blades: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Marx, N.; Gentili, S.; Schwingshackl, C. W.; Di Mare, L.; Cerri, G.; Dini, D.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the gas turbine blade vibrations can give rise to catastrophic failures and a reduction of the blades life because of fatigue related phenomena[1]-[3] . In last two decades, the adoption of piezoelectric elements, has received considerable attention by many researcher for its potential applicability to different areas of mechanical, aerospace, aeronautical and civil engineering. Recently, a number of studies of blades vibration control via piezoelectric plates and patches have been reported[4]-[6] . It was reported that the use of piezoelectric elements can be very effective in actively controlling vibrations. In one of their previous contributions[7] , the authors of the present manuscript studied a model to control the blade vibrations by piezoelectric elements and validated their results using a multi-physics finite elements package (COMSOL) and results from the literature. An optimal placement method of piezoelectric plate has been developed and applied to different loading scenarios for realistic configurations encountered in gas turbine blades. It has been demonstrated that the optimal placement depends on the spectrum of the load, so that segmented piezoelectric patches have been considered and, for different loads, an optimal combination of sequential and/or parallel actuation and control of the segments has been studied. In this paper, an experimental investigation carried out by the authors using a simplified beam configuration is reported and discussed. The test results obtained by the investigators are then compared with the numerical predictions [7] .

  14. Optimization and static output-feedback control for half-car active suspensions with constrained information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Changzheng; Yu, Shenbo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the static output-feedback control problem of active suspension systems with information structure constraints is investigated. In order to simultaneously improve the ride comfort and stability, a half car model is used. Other constraints such as suspension deflection, actuator saturation, and controller constrained information are also considered. A novel static output-feedback design method based on the variable substitution is employed in the controller design. A single-step linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem is solved to derive the initial feasible solution with a sparsity constraint. The initial infeasibility issue of the static output-feedback is resolved by using state-feedback information. Specifically, an optimization algorithm is proposed to search for less conservative results based on the feasible controller gain matrix. Finally, the validity of the designed controller for different road profiles is illustrated through numerical examples. The simulation results indicate that the optimized static output-feedback controller can achieve better suspension performances when compared with the feasible static output-feedback controller.

  15. Extraction optimization, characterization and immunity activity of polysaccharides from Fructus Jujubae.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guoting; Zhang, Wuxia; Wang, Qingjie; Zhang, Amin; Mu, Haibo; Bai, Hongjin; Duan, Jinyou

    2014-10-13

    The versatile Fructus Jujubae is widely used in Chinese and Korean traditional medicine. In this study, the extraction optimization, characterization and immunostimulatory activities of polysaccharides from Fructus Jujubae were investigated. Based on a four-variable-three-level Box-Behnken statistical design, the optimal extraction parameters were optimized as follows: extraction temperature 90 °C, extraction time 3.23 h, water to raw material ratio 33:1 and extraction 3 times. Under these conditions, the experimental yield of polysaccharides was 6.47 ± 0.26%, which was close to the predicted yield value (6.54%). The crude Fructus Jujubae polysaccharide was further purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography repeatedly, and two homogenous fractions, designated as RQP1d and RQP2d with molecular weight of 83.8 and 123.0 kDa respectively, were obtained. Their structures were determined by chemical analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Finally, preliminary immunological tests indicated that both RQP1d and RQP2d significantly stimulated NO production in RAW264.7 macrophages, and promoted LPS-induced splenocyte proliferation. These data implied Fructus Jujubae polysaccharides had the potential to be explored as novel natural immunostimulant for using in functional foods or medicine. PMID:25037349

  16. Optimized extraction of polysaccharides from Taxus chinensis var. mairei fruits and its antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunjian; Li, Zhao; Li, Chunying; Yang, Lei; Yao, Liping; Fu, Yujie; He, Xin; Shi, Kunming; Lu, Zhicheng

    2015-04-01

    The simultaneous ultrasonic/microwave-assisted extraction (UMAE) method is potentially useful for the extraction of polysaccharides from Taxus chinensis var. mairei fruits (TCFPs). In this study, we used a response surface methodology to identify optimal TCFPs extraction conditions. Optimal parameters were determined as follows: a liquid to raw material ratio of 33 mL/g, an extraction time of 10 min, a microwave power level of 560 W, and a fixed ultrasonic power of 50 W. Under the optimized conditions, TCFPs yields obtained by UMAE were 4.33 ± 0.15%, a 1.79-fold increase compared with conventional heating reflux extraction (HRE). In addition, the extraction time used in UMAE was shorter than that required for HRE: 10 versus 90 min. UMAE is therefore a rapid and efficient method for the extraction of TCFPs. The inhibitory effect of TCFPs on S180 tumor growth in vivo was also studied. The tumor inhibition rate of TCFPs was 76.33%, indicating a tumor-inhibiting effect. Analysis of organ weights demonstrated that TCFPs exhibited no toxicity to liver, kidney, spleen, heart, or lung relative to a positive control group. TCFPs thus show antitumor activity with no organ toxicity.

  17. A simple method to measure effective catalase activities: optimization, validation, and application in green coffee.

    PubMed

    Montavon, Philippe; Kukic, Koraljka Rade; Bortlik, Karlheinz

    2007-01-15

    Oxidative metabolism in coffee cherries during maturation appears to be regulated by the timely expression of redox enzymes such as catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and polyphenoloxidase (PPO). Among these enzymes, CAT is suspected to contribute significantly in setting the redox status of the healthy cherry and the processed bean. The initial redox status of the green bean might further control the nature and dynamics of reactions induced by roasting and eventually quality aspects of the end product. In this respect, Arabica (Coffea arabica) and Robusta (Coffea canephora) typically differ by their cup coffee flavor profiles. We developed an assay that allowed us to screen numerous green coffee samples for effective CAT activities. The proposed assay, which monitors CAT activities by online oxygen sensing in green coffee crude suspensions incubated with H2O2, seeks to integrate potential effects of endogenous inhibitors and activators. After optimization and validation of the assay, 23 Arabicas, 23 Robustas, and 8 Arabustas were analyzed. Nearly all Arabicas (22 of 23) harbored high CAT activity levels, whereas all Robustas harbored low ones. Arabustas performed like Arabicas of the lower CAT activity range. The traditional spectrophotometric assay did not reveal these specificities. Because of its simplicity, our assay might be valuable for assessing effective CAT activities in various plant tissues. PMID:17141173

  18. A simple method to measure effective catalase activities: optimization, validation, and application in green coffee.

    PubMed

    Montavon, Philippe; Kukic, Koraljka Rade; Bortlik, Karlheinz

    2007-01-15

    Oxidative metabolism in coffee cherries during maturation appears to be regulated by the timely expression of redox enzymes such as catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and polyphenoloxidase (PPO). Among these enzymes, CAT is suspected to contribute significantly in setting the redox status of the healthy cherry and the processed bean. The initial redox status of the green bean might further control the nature and dynamics of reactions induced by roasting and eventually quality aspects of the end product. In this respect, Arabica (Coffea arabica) and Robusta (Coffea canephora) typically differ by their cup coffee flavor profiles. We developed an assay that allowed us to screen numerous green coffee samples for effective CAT activities. The proposed assay, which monitors CAT activities by online oxygen sensing in green coffee crude suspensions incubated with H2O2, seeks to integrate potential effects of endogenous inhibitors and activators. After optimization and validation of the assay, 23 Arabicas, 23 Robustas, and 8 Arabustas were analyzed. Nearly all Arabicas (22 of 23) harbored high CAT activity levels, whereas all Robustas harbored low ones. Arabustas performed like Arabicas of the lower CAT activity range. The traditional spectrophotometric assay did not reveal these specificities. Because of its simplicity, our assay might be valuable for assessing effective CAT activities in various plant tissues.

  19. Monitoring High Velocity Salt Tracer via 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography - Possibility for Salt Tracer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doro, K. O.; Cirpka, O. A.; Patzelt, A.; Leven, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogeological testing in a tomographic sequence as shown by the use of hydraulic tomography, allows an improvement of the spatial resolution of subsurface parameters. In this regard, recent studies show increasing interest in tracer tomography which involves sequential and spatially separated tracer injections and the measurement of their corresponding tracer breakthrough at different locations and depths. Such concentration measurements however require large experimental efforts and can be simplified by geophysical tracer monitoring techniques such as electrical resistivity. In this study, we present the use of 4-D, cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for monitoring salt tracer experiments in high velocity flow fields. For our study, we utilized a set up that enables the conduction of salt tracer experiments with complete recovery within 84 hours over a transport distance of 16 m. This allows the repetition of the experiments with different injection depths for a tomographic salt tracer testing. For ERT monitoring, we designed modular borehole electrodes for repeated usage in a flexible manner. We also assess the use of a high speed resistivity data acquisition mode for field scale tracer monitoring ensuring high spatial and temporal resolution without sacrificing data accuracy. We applied our approach at the Lauswiesen test site, Tübingen, Germany. In our 10 m × 10 m tracer monitoring domain with 16 borehole electrodes, we acquired 4650 data points in less than 18 minutes for each monitoring cycle. Inversion results show that the tracer could be successfully imaged using this approach. The results show that repeated salt tracer tests can be efficiently monitored at a high resolution with ERT which gives the possibility for salt tracer tomography at field scale. Our results also provide a data base for extending current hydrogeophysical inversion approaches to field scale data.

  20. Stress optimization of leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots for an active Gurney flap mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire Gómez, Jon; Booker, Julian D.; Mellor, Phil H.

    2015-04-01

    The EU's Green Rotorcraft programme is pursuing the development of a functional and airworthy Active Gurney Flap (AGF) for a full-scale helicopter rotor blade. Interest in the development of this `smart adaptive rotor blade' technology lies in its potential to provide a number of aerodynamic benefits, which would in turn translate into a reduction in fuel consumption and noise levels. The AGF mechanism selected employs leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots. These provide important advantages over bearings as they are not susceptible to seizing and do not require maintenance (i.e. lubrication or cleaning). A baseline design of this mechanism was successfully tested both in a fatigue rig and in a 2D wind tunnel environment at flight-representative deployment schedules. For full validation, a flight test would also be required. However, the severity of the in-flight loading conditions would likely compromise the mechanical integrity of the pivots' leaf-springs in their current form. This paper investigates the scope for stress reduction through three-dimensional shape optimization of the leaf-springs of a generic crossed flexure pivot. To this end, a procedure combining a linear strain energy formulation, a parametric leaf-spring profile definition and a series of optimization algorithms is employed. The resulting optimized leaf-springs are proven to be not only independent of the angular rotation at which the pivot operates, but also linearly scalable to leaf-springs of any length, minimum thickness and width. Validated using non-linear finite element analysis, the results show very significant stress reductions relative to pivots with constant cross section leaf-springs, of up to as much as 30% for the specific pivot configuration employed in the AGF mechanism. It is concluded that shape optimization offers great potential for reducing stress in crossed flexure pivots and, consequently, for extending their fatigue life and/or rotational range.

  1. Nickel isotopes as a new geochemical tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, L.; Williams, H. M.; Siebert, C.; Halliday, A.

    2010-12-01

    Research into "non-traditional" stable isotope systems has been of great interest over the past decade. The stable isotope system of nickel (Ni) has not been studied as intensively as other transition metals (e.g. Fe, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Mo), even though it is a ubiquitous element in geological environments and is a bioessential trace metal, e.g. for production of methane by methanogens. We have developed a novel chemical separation procedure to isolate Ni from most geological matrices. Because of its chemical behavior during ion-exchange chromatography complete separation of Ni is very complex. We therefore make use of a Ni double spike that allows us to optimize the chemical separation and correct instrumental mass bias during mass spectrometry analysis. This technique allows high precision Ni isotope measurements resulting in long term external reproducibility of USGS rock standard BHVO-2 of 0.09‰ (2s.d.) on δ60/58Ni with typical measurement errors as low as 0.04‰ (2s.d.). We have measured the isotope composition of Ni in a variety of terrestrial samples demonstrating significant isotope variation. In magmatic rocks Ni isotopes appear to be largely homogeneous, with only small variations (no more than 0.2‰) between different rock types, from ultramafic to felsic. There is no evidence of significant isotopic fractionation during melting and differentiation of the silicate Earth. In contrast we find significant systematic isotope variations (up to 1.5‰) between magmatic rocks and FeMn crusts, shales and sulphides. Our data clearly demonstrate mass-dependent fractionation of Ni isotopes in the marine and terrestrial environment by inorganic processes, in addition to the biological fractionations already reported by others, highlighting the potential of Ni isotopes as a powerful new tracer for Earth Surface processes.

  2. Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

    2005-09-30

    Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple

  3. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory A. Mulhollan

    2010-11-16

    Specific activation recipes for bulk, 100 nm thick MBE grown and high polarization III-V photocathode material have been developed which mitigate the effects of exposure to background gasses. Lifetime data using four representative gasses were acquired for bulk GaAs, 100 nm unstrained GaAs and strained superlattice GaAs/GaAsP, all activated both with Cs and then Cs and Li (bi-alkali). Each photoemitter showed marked resilience improvement when activated using the bi-alkali recipe compared to the standard single alkali recipe. A dual alkali activation system at SLAC was constructed, baked and commissioned with the purpose of performing spin-polarization measurements on electrons emitted from the bi-alkali activated surfaces. An end station at SSRL was configured with the required sources for energy resolved photoemission measurements on the bi-alkali activated and CO2 dosed surfaces. The bi-alkali recipes were successfully implemented at SLAC/SSRL. Measurements at SLAC of the photoelectron spin-polarization from the modified activation surface showed no sign of a change in value compared to the standard activated material, i.e., no ill effects. Analysis of photoemission data indicates that the addition of Li to the activation layer results in a multi-layer structure. The presence of Li in the activation layer also acts as an inhibitor to CO2 absorption, hence better lifetimes in worse vacuum were achieved. The bi-alkali activation has been tested on O2 activated GaAs for comparison with NF3 activated surfaces. Comparable resilience to CO2 exposure was achieved for the O2 activated surface. An RF PECVD amorphous silicon growth system was modified to allow high temperature heat cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to film deposition. Growth versus thickness data were collected. Very thin amorphous silicon germanium layers were optimized to exhibit good behavior as an electron emitter. Growth of the amorphous silicon germanium films on the above substrates was fine tuned

  4. Development of liposomal Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharide: formulation optimization and evaluation of its immunological activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenguang; Ma, Xia; Deng, Bihua; Huang, Yee; Bo, Ruonan; Gao, Zhenzhen; Yu, Yun; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the optimizing preparation conditions of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharide liposome (GLPL) with response surface methodology (RSM) and the immunological enhancement activity of GLPL. The immunological enhancement activity of GLPL on splenocyte proliferation was measured. The optimum formulation of GLPL, in which the ratio of soybean phospholipid to cholesterol(w/w) of 11:1, the ratio of soybean phospholipid to tween-80 (w/w) of 10.5:1 and ultrasonic time(min) of 11, had higher entrapment efficiency (EE) of 71.43±0.49% with spherical shape and uniform sizes. In addition, GLPL could significantly promote splenocyte proliferation singly or synergistically with PHA and LPS. That indicated that the immunological enhancement of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharide (GLP) was significantly enhanced after encapsulation with the liposome.

  5. Extraction optimization, characterization and antioxidant activity in vitro of polysaccharides from mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qingxia; Xie, Yufeng; Wang, Wei; Yan, Yuhua; Ye, Hong; Jabbar, Saqib; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2015-09-01

    Extraction optimization, characterization and antioxidant activity in vitro of polysaccharides from mulberry leaves (MLP) were investigated in the present study. The optimal extraction conditions with an extraction yield of 10.0 ± 0.5% for MLP were determined as follows: extraction temperature 92 °C, extraction time 3.5h and ratio (v/w, mL/g) of extraction solvent (water) to raw material 34. Two purified fractions, MLP-3a and MLP-3b with molecular weights of 80.99 and 3.64 kDa, respectively, were obtained from crude MLP by chromatography of DEAE-Cellulose 52 and Sephadex G-100. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy revealed that crude MLP, MLP-3a and MLP-3b were acidic polysaccharides. Furthermore, crude MLP and MLP-3a had more complicated monosaccharide compositions, while MLP-3b had a relatively higher content of uronic acid. Crude MLP, MLP-3a and MLP-3b exhibited potent Fe(2+) chelating power and scavenging activities on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl, superoxide and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethyl-benzothiazolin-6-sulfonic acid) radicals. The results suggested that MLP could be explored as natural antioxidant. PMID:26005139

  6. Optimization on Preparation Conditions of Salidroside Liposome and Its Immunological Activity on PCV-2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yibo; Zhao, Xiaojuan; Lv, Fang; Zhang, Jinqiu; Deng, Bihua; Zhao, Yanhong; Hu, Yuanliang; Wang, Deyun; Liu, Jiaguo; Lu, Yu; Bo, Ruonan; Liu, Zhenguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the preparation conditions of salidroside liposome with high encapsulation efficiency (EE) and to study the immunological enhancement activity of salidroside liposome as porcine circovirus type 2 virus (PCV-2) vaccine adjuvant. Response surface methodology (RSM) was selected to optimize the conditions for the preparation of salidroside liposome using Design-Expert V8.0.6 software. Three kinds of salidroside liposome adjuvants were prepared to study their adjuvant activity. BALB/c mice were immunized with PCV-2 encapsulated in different kinds of salidroside liposome adjuvants. The PCV-2-specific IgG in immunized mice serum was determined with ELISA. The results showed that when the concentration of ammonium sulfate was 0.26 mol·L−1, ethanol volume 6.5 mL, temperature 43°C, ethanol injection rate 3 mL·min−1, and salidroside liposome could be prepared with high encapsulation efficiency of 94.527%. Salidroside liposome as adjuvant could rapidly induce the production of PCV-2-specific IgG and salidroside liposome I adjuvant proved to provide the best effect among the three kinds of salidroside liposome adjuvants. PMID:25878712

  7. Optimized mirror supports, active primary mirrors and adaptive secondaries for the Optical Very Large Array (OVLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Luc

    1994-06-01

    This article first deals with general aspects of optimizing mirror supports. A wide variety of support topologies have been optimized by Nelson et al for unobscured entrance pupils. Optical forces and locations of point supports have been calculated here for annular pupils. Efficient topologies introducing a small amount of defocusing are also proposed for unobscured and annular pupils. Support efficiencies are given for each topology. Wavefront errors are estimated in the case of a defective cell, in order to specify tolerances on forces and geometries. The OVLA active optics is then discussed. The very thin, meniscus-shaped primary will be actively supported by 29 actuators and 3 fixed points. Actuator locations and forces have been calculated to minimize the mirror deflection under its own weight but also to allow a good control of astigmatism. We finally present a study of a concave adaptive secondary for the OVLA telescopes. As an initial result, we propose a defocus adaptive corrector with a variable thickness distribution. Conditions of use are defined, and performances are evaluated.

  8. Simulation and optimization of a coking wastewater biological treatment process by activated sludge models (ASM).

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohui; Yang, Yang; Wu, Gaoming; Mao, Juan; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Applications of activated sludge models (ASM) in simulating industrial biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are still difficult due to refractory and complex components in influents as well as diversity in activated sludges. In this study, an ASM3 modeling study was conducted to simulate and optimize a practical coking wastewater treatment plant (CWTP). First, respirometric characterizations of the coking wastewater and CWTP biomasses were conducted to determine the specific kinetic and stoichiometric model parameters for the consecutive aeration-anoxic-aeration (O-A/O) biological process. All ASM3 parameters have been further estimated and calibrated, through cross validation by the model dynamic simulation procedure. Consequently, an ASM3 model was successfully established to accurately simulate the CWTP performances in removing COD and NH4-N. An optimized CWTP operation condition could be proposed reducing the operation cost from 6.2 to 5.5 €/m(3) wastewater. This study is expected to provide a useful reference for mathematic simulations of practical industrial WWTPs.

  9. Optimization of extraction, characterization and antioxidant activity of polysaccharides from Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Hong; Hu, Bing; Zhou, Li; Jabbar, Saqib; Zeng, Xiaoxiong; Shen, Wenbiao

    2016-01-01

    The root of Brassica rapa L. has been traditionally used as a Uyghur folk medicine to cure cough and asthma by Uyghur nationality in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. In the present study, therefore, extraction optimization, characterization and antioxidant activity in vitro of polysaccharides from the root of B. rapa L. (BRP) were investigated. The optimal extraction conditions with an extraction yield of 21.48 ± 0.41% for crude BRP were obtained as follows: extraction temperature 93°C, extraction time 4.3h and ratio of extraction solvent (water) to raw material 75 mL/g. The crude BRP was purified by chromatographic columns of DEAE-52 cellulose and Sephadex G-100, affording three purified fractions of BRP-1-1, BRP-2-1 and BRP-2-2 with average molecular weight of 1510, 1110 and 838 kDa, respectively. Monosaccharide composition analysis indicated that BRP-1-1 was composed of mannose, rhamnose, glucose, galactose and arabinose, BRP-2-1 was composed of rhamnose, galacturonic acid, galactose and arabinose, and BRP-2-2 was composed of rhamnose and galacturonic acid in a molar ratio of 1.27: 54.92. Furthermore, the crude BRP exhibited relatively higher antioxidant activity in vitro than purified fractions; hence, it could be used as a natural antioxidant in functional foods or medicines.

  10. Optimized culture condition for enhancing lytic performance of waste activated sludge by Geobacillus sp. G1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunxue; Zhou, Aijuan; Hou, Yanan; Zhang, Xu; Guo, Zechong; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Wenzong

    2014-01-01

    Hydrolysis is known as the rate-limiting step during waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion. The optimization of the culture conditions of Geobacillus sp. G1 for enhancing WAS hydrolysis was conducted in this study with uniform design and response surface methodology. Taking the lysis rate of Escherichia coli as the response, the Plackett-Burman design was used to screen the most important variables. Experimental results showed that the maximum predicted lysis rate of E. coli was 50.9% for 4 h treatment time with concentrations of skim milk, NaCl and NH4SO4 at 10.78, 4.36 and 11.28 g/L, respectively. The optimized dosage ratio of Geobacillus sp. G1 to WAS was 35%:65% (VG1:VWAS). Under this condition, soluble protein was increased to 695 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L, which was 5.0 times higher than that obtained in the control (140 mg COD/L). The corresponding protease activity reached 1.1 Eu/mL. Scanning electron microscopy showed that abundant cells were apparently lysed with treatment of Geobacillus sp. G1.

  11. Optimization, characterization, and biological activity of polysaccharides from Berberis dasystachya Maxim.

    PubMed

    Han, Lijuan; Suo, Yourui; Yang, Yongjing; Meng, Jing; Hu, Na

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the extraction of water-soluble polysaccharides (BDPs) from Berberis dasystachya Maxim using dynamic microwave-assisted extraction (DMAE) was discussed. A Box-Behnken design combined with response surface methodology has been employed to optimize extraction parameters of DMAE. The BDPs have been analyzed in order to identify a variety of chemical properties. Antioxidant and anti-tumor activities in vitro have been studied by DPPH, ABTS, reducing power assay, and MTT assay, respectively. The results obtained showed that the optimal extraction conditions were as follows: ratio of water to raw material (X1) 25.84 mg/L, extraction power (X2) 433.13W, extraction time (X3) 35.18 min, and the maximum yield of extraction was 6.472 ± 0.384%, which was in good agreement with the predicted value. The physicochemical tests demonstrated that the BDPs mainly consist of rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose and lactose in a molar ratio of 1:17.3:1.33:7:2.33:1.78; the average molecular weight of the BDPs was estimated to be from 2.95×10(5) and 1.52×10(3)Da, respectively. Furthermore, the BDPs exhibited effective antioxidant and anti-proliferative properties in vitro. Such pharmaceutical activities could prove useful for potential future applications involving the berries of B. dasystachya Maxim.

  12. Optimization of magnetic powdered activated carbon for aqueous Hg(II) removal and magnetic recovery.

    PubMed

    Faulconer, Emily K; von Reitzenstein, Natalia V Hoogesteijn; Mazyck, David W

    2012-01-15

    Activated carbon is known to adsorb aqueous Hg(II). MPAC (magnetic powdered activated carbon) has the potential to remove aqueous Hg to less than 0.2 μg/L while being magnetically recoverable. Magnetic recapture allows simple sorbent separation from the waste stream while an isolated waste potentially allows for mercury recycling. MPAC Hg-removal performance is verified by mercury mass balance, calculated by quantifying adsorbed, volatilized, and residual aqueous mercury. The batch reactor contained a sealed mercury-carbon contact chamber with mixing and constant N(2) (g) headspace flow to an oxidizing trap. Mercury adsorption was performed using spiked ultrapure water (100 μg/L Hg). Mercury concentrations were obtained using EPA method 245.1 and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy. MPAC synthesis was optimized for Hg removal and sorbent recovery according to the variables: C:Fe, thermal oxidation temperature and time. The 3:1 C:Fe preserved most of the original sorbent surface area. As indicated by XRD patterns, thermal oxidation reduced the amorphous characteristic of the iron oxides but did not improve sorbent recovery and damaged porosity at higher oxidation temperatures. Therefore, the optimal synthesis variables, 3:1 C:Fe mass ratio without thermal oxidation, which can achieve 92.5% (± 8.3%) sorbent recovery and 96.3% (± 9%) Hg removal. The mass balance has been closed to within approximately ± 15%. PMID:22104766

  13. The application of multi-objective optimization method for activated sludge process: a review.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongliang; Chen, Wenliang; Lu, Xiwu

    2016-01-01

    The activated sludge process (ASP) is the most generally applied biological wastewater treatment approach. Depending on the design and specific application, activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) can achieve biological nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) removal, besides the removal of organic carbon substances. However, the effluent N and P limits are getting tighter because of increased emphasis on environmental protection, and the needs for energy conservation as well as the operational reliability. Therefore, the balance between treatment performance and cost becomes a critical issue for the operations of WWTPs, which necessitates a multi-objective optimization (MOO). Recent studies in this field have shown promise in utilizing MOO to address the multiple conflicting criteria (i.e. effluent quality, operation cost, operation stability), including studying the ASP models that are primarily responsible for the process, and developing the method of MOO in the wastewater treatment process, which facilitates better optimization of process performance. Based on a better understanding of the application of MOO for ASP, a comprehensive review is conducted to offer a clear vision of the advances, and potential areas for future research are also proposed in the field. PMID:26819377

  14. Optimization, characterization, sulfation and antitumor activity of neutral polysaccharides from the fruit of Borojoa sorbilis cuter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangfang; Liao, Kangsheng; Wu, Yunshan; Pan, Qi; Wu, Lilan; Jiao, Hong; Guo, Dean; Li, Ben; Liu, Bo

    2016-10-20

    Extraction optimization, purification, characterization, sulfation and antitumor activity of polysaccharides from the fruit body of Borojoa sorbilis cuter were investigated in present study. The optimal Ultrahigh Pressure extraction condition was determined as: extraction once with the solid-liquid ratio of 1:10 in 30°C and 1500Mpa for crude polysaccharide (BP) and experimental yield was 8.28%. Four water-soluble polysaccharides named as BP1-1, BP1-2, BP1-3 and BP1-4, with molecular weight of 35.8, 32.4, 30.1 and 27.7kDa, were purified by DEAE Sepharose and Superdex 200 chromatography. On the basis of chemical and spectroscopic analyses, BP1-1-BP1-4 were found to be neutral β-d-galactan containing a (1→4)-linked backbone. S-BP1s with the DSS of 1.18, was sulfated by chloro-sulfonic acid-pyridine method. Furthermore, S-BP1s exhibited significant in vitro antitumor activity against liver cancer HepG2 and lung cancer A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicated that S-BP1s could be potentially developed as functional antitumor drug. PMID:27474578

  15. Simulation and optimization of a coking wastewater biological treatment process by activated sludge models (ASM).

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohui; Yang, Yang; Wu, Gaoming; Mao, Juan; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Applications of activated sludge models (ASM) in simulating industrial biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are still difficult due to refractory and complex components in influents as well as diversity in activated sludges. In this study, an ASM3 modeling study was conducted to simulate and optimize a practical coking wastewater treatment plant (CWTP). First, respirometric characterizations of the coking wastewater and CWTP biomasses were conducted to determine the specific kinetic and stoichiometric model parameters for the consecutive aeration-anoxic-aeration (O-A/O) biological process. All ASM3 parameters have been further estimated and calibrated, through cross validation by the model dynamic simulation procedure. Consequently, an ASM3 model was successfully established to accurately simulate the CWTP performances in removing COD and NH4-N. An optimized CWTP operation condition could be proposed reducing the operation cost from 6.2 to 5.5 €/m(3) wastewater. This study is expected to provide a useful reference for mathematic simulations of practical industrial WWTPs. PMID:26439861

  16. Optimization extraction, characterization and antioxidant activities of pectic polysaccharide from tangerine peels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruizhan; Jin, Chenguang; Tong, Zhigang; Lu, Juan; Tan, Li; Tian, Li; Chang, Qingquan

    2016-01-20

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) process of pectic polysaccharide (TPPs) from tangerines peel. The optimal extraction conditions were as follows: microwave power 704 W, extraction temperature 52.2 °C, and extraction time 41.8 min Under these conditions, the experimental yield was 19.9 ± 0.2%. The purified pectic polysaccharide TPPs-2-1 was successfully obtained by anion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. TPPs-2-1, linked mainly by α-glycosidic bonds, consisted of galacturonic acid (GalA), arabinose (Ara), galactose (Gal), rhamnose (Rha), glucose (Glc) and mannose (Man) with the average molecular weight of 17.8 kDa, and had typical IR spectra characteristic of pectic polysaccharides. Antioxidant activities were investigated on the basis of ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), hydroxyl radical (OH), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and superoxide radical (O2(-)) scavenging assay. TPPs-2-1 exhibited significant antioxidant activity in a concentration-dependent manner and might be exploited as effective natural antioxidant applied in functional food and medicine.

  17. Optimization of enzyme-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from alfalfa and its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaopu; Dong, Xiaofang; Tong, Jianming

    2013-11-01

    In this present study, an efficient complex enzyme-assisted extraction technology was developed and optimized to extract polysaccharides from alfalfa using four factors at five levels central composite rotatable response surface design (CCRD). The experimental data was fitted to a second order polynomial equation with high coefficient of determination values (R(2)>0.95). The results of statistical analysis showed that the linear and quadratic terms of these four variables had significant effects (P<0.05) on the yield of polysaccharides from alfalfa. The optimum conditions were as follows: enzyme concentration of 2.5%, 2.0%, 3.0% (weight of alfalfa) of cellulase, papain and pectase, extraction temperature 52.7 °C, extraction pH 3.87, ratio of water to raw material 78.92 mL/g and extraction time 2.73 h. Under the optimal conditions, the experimental extraction yield of alfalfa polysaccharides was 5.05 ± 0.02%, which was well matched with the value (5.09%) predicted by the CCRD model. Moreover, evaluation of the antioxidant activity of polysaccharides from alfalfa in vitro suggested that the polysaccharides had good antioxidant effect, especially scavenging activity for hydroxyl radical and DPPH radical, which indicated that the polysaccharides from alfalfa may be explored as a novel natural antioxidant.

  18. Extraction optimization, preliminary characterization and immunological activities in vitro of polysaccharides from Elaeagnus angustifolia L. pulp.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongtao; Chen, Juncheng; Tian, Shan; Gu, Hongling; Li, Na; Sun, Yao; Ru, Jiajia; Wang, Junru

    2016-10-20

    In this research, extraction optimization, preliminary characterization and immunological activities in vitro of polysaccharides from Elaeagnus angustifolia L. pulp were investigated. A response surface methodology (RSM) with a Box-Behnken design (BBD) was used to optimize the extraction process. The maximum EAP yield was 9.82±0.38%, which is in good agreement with the predicted value (9.93±0.24%). Two homogeneous polysaccharides, EAP-1a and EAP-1b with molecular weights of 8.70kDa and 4.39kDa respectively, were prepared by DEAE-52 cellulose and Sephadex G-100 columns and characterized by HPLC, HPGPC, and FT-IR. Three polysaccharides (EAP, EAP-1a and EAP-1b) could stimulate macrophages to release NO and enhance phagocytic activities of RAW 264.7 cells in dose-dependent manner. Moreover, there was no significant difference between crude EAP group (400μg/mL) and positive control group (LPS) in effects on macrophages. The results implied that EAP had the potential to be developed as natural medicines or health foods. PMID:27474576

  19. Optimized combined electrical-chemical parthenogenetic activation for in vitro matured bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, S M; Hajian, M; Moulavi, F; Shahverdi, A H; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2008-10-01

    Sperm-mediated oocyte activation is a complex procedure, both in steps and duration, not yet been completely mimicked during in vitro studies, e.g., parthenogenesis or somatic cell nuclear transfer. Furthermore, parthenogenetic studies have been recognized as a suitable model for studying activation efficiency for nuclear transfer cloning. This study, therefore, was conducted to develop an optimized artificial activation method, based on bovine cloning. In vitro matured bovine oocytes were initially exposed to electrical pulse, used for cell fusion during cloning, and then treated with 15 temporal sequential combinations of 3 chemical activators [calcium ionophore (CI), strontium (SR) and ethanol (ET)], followed by exposure to a protein kinase inhibitor or used for in vitro fertilization as control group. Treated and naturally fertilized oocytes were further cultured for up to 8 days. Embryo development was scored daily and blastocyst cell counting was carried out using differential staining at day 8 of culture. Among 15 temporal sequential combinations of three chemical activators, the best cleavage rates were associated with double (SR-CI, 84.4%), triple (CI-SR-ET, 79.4%) and single (CI, 73.7%) compounds, respectively, which were not significantly different with each other and with in vitro fertilized (IVF) (85.5%). The highest blastocyst rates were gained with ET-SR (24.5%), SR-CI-ET (20.4%) and CI (24.5%) accordingly which were not significantly different with each other but significantly lower than IVF (47%). Embryo cell counting further confirmed reasonably better quality of blastocysts produced using double, triple and single compounds. Although most of the sequential artificial activation compounds induced high cleavage rate, close to IVF, but this did not assure comparable further embryo development to the blastocyst stage. Nevertheless, the results suggest exposure of in vitro matured bovine oocytes to electrical pulse, followed by exposure to CI-6

  20. Optimal Sensor Placement for Measuring Physical Activity with a 3D Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Boerema, Simone T.; van Velsen, Lex; Schaake, Leendert; Tönis, Thijs M.; Hermens, Hermie J.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerometer-based activity monitors are popular for monitoring physical activity. In this study, we investigated optimal sensor placement for increasing the quality of studies that utilize accelerometer data to assess physical activity. We performed a two-staged study, focused on sensor location and type of mounting. Ten subjects walked at various walking speeds on a treadmill, performed a deskwork protocol, and walked on level ground, while simultaneously wearing five ProMove2 sensors with a snug fit on an elastic waist belt. We found that sensor location, type of activity, and their interaction-effect affected sensor output. The most lateral positions on the waist belt were the least sensitive for interference. The effect of mounting was explored, by making two subjects repeat the experimental protocol with sensors more loosely fitted to the elastic belt. The loose fit resulted in lower sensor output, except for the deskwork protocol, where output was higher. In order to increase the reliability and to reduce the variability of sensor output, researchers should place activity sensors on the most lateral position of a participant's waist belt. If the sensor hampers free movement, it may be positioned slightly more forward on the belt. Finally, sensors should be fitted tightly to the body. PMID:24553085

  1. Analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection

    SciTech Connect

    Kocabas, I.

    1989-10-01

    This work studied tracer and thermal transients during reinjection in geothermal reserviors and developed a new technique which combines the results from interwell tracer tests and thermal injection-backflow tests to estimate the thermal breakthrough times. Tracer tests are essential to determine the degree of connectivity between the injection wells and the producing wells. To analyze the tracer return profiles quantitatively, we employed three mathematical models namely, the convection-dispersion (CD) model, matrix diffusion (MD) model, and the Avodnin (AD) model, which were developed to study tracer and heat transport in a single vertical fracture. We considered three types of tracer tests namely, interwell tracer tests without recirculation, interwell tracer tests with recirculation, and injection-backflow tracer tests. To estimate the model parameters, we used a nonlinear regression program to match tracer return profiles to the solutions.

  2. The effect of activation level on muscle function during locomotion: are optimal lengths and velocities always used?

    PubMed

    Holt, N C; Azizi, E

    2016-01-27

    Skeletal muscle exhibits broad functional diversity, despite its inherent length and velocity constraints. The observed variation in morphology and physiology is assumed to have evolved to allow muscle to operate at its optimal length and velocity during locomotion. Here, we used the variation in optimum lengths and velocities that occurs with muscle activation level to experimentally test this assumption. Muscle ergometry and sonomicrometry were used to characterize force-length and power-velocity relationships, and in vivo operating lengths and velocities, at a range of activation levels. Operating lengths and velocities were mapped onto activation level specific force-length and power-velocity relationships to determine whether they tracked changing optima. Operating velocities decreased in line with decreased optimal velocities, suggesting that optimal velocities are always used. However, operating lengths did not change with changing optima. At high activation levels, fibres used an optimal range of lengths. However, at lower activation levels, fibres appeared to operate on the ascending limb of sub-maximally activated force-length relationships. This suggests that optimal lengths are only used when demand is greatest. This study provides the first mapping of operating lengths to activation level-specific optima, and as such, provides insight into our assumptions about the factors that determine muscle performance during locomotion.

  3. Estimation of muscle activity using higher-order derivatives, static optimization, and forward-inverse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Taiga; Idehara, Katsutoshi; Xin, Xin

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new method to estimate muscle activity in a straightforward manner with high accuracy and relatively small computational costs by using the external input of the joint angle and its first to fourth derivatives with respect to time. The method solves the inverse dynamics problem of the skeletal system, the forward dynamics problem of the muscular system, and the load-sharing problem of muscles as a static optimization of neural excitation signals. The external input including the higher-order derivatives is required for a calculation of constraints imposed on the load-sharing problem. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by the simulation of a simple musculoskeletal model with a single joint. Moreover, the influences of the muscular dynamics, and the higher-order derivatives on the estimation of the muscle activity are demonstrated, showing the results when the time constants of the activation dynamics are very small, and the third and fourth derivatives of the external input are ignored, respectively. It is concluded that the method can have the potential to improve estimation accuracy of muscle activity of highly dynamic motions. PMID:27211782

  4. An optimized molecular inclusion complex of diferuloylmethane: enhanced physical properties and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qunyou; Li, Yi; Wu, Jianyong; Mei, Hu; Zhao, Chunjing; Zhang, Jingqing

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to explore and evaluate the enhanced physical properties and biological activity of a molecular inclusion complex (MICDH) comprising diferuloylmethane (DFM) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. Methods The preparation conditions of MICDH were optimized using an orthogonal experimental design. The solubility, in vitro release and model fitting, microscopic morphology, molecular structure simulation, anti-lung cancer activity, and action mechanism of MICDH were evaluated. Results The solubility of DFM was improved 4400-fold upon complexation with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. The release rate of DFM was significantly higher from MICDH than from free DFM. MICDH exhibited higher antitumor activity against human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells than free DFM. More cells were arrested in the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle or were induced to undergo apoptosis when treated with MICDH than when treated with free DFM. Furthermore, increased reactive oxygen species and intracellular calcium ion levels and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed in cells treated with MICDH. Conclusion MICDH markedly improved the physical properties and antitumor activity of DFM. MICDH may prove to be a preferred alternative to free DFM as a formulation for DFM delivery in lung cancer treatment. PMID:23091376

  5. Active DNA demethylation in post-mitotic neurons: a reason for optimism.

    PubMed

    Gavin, David P; Chase, Kayla A; Sharma, Rajiv P

    2013-12-01

    Over the last several years proteins involved in base excision repair (BER) have been implicated in active DNA demethylation. We review the literature supporting BER as a means of active DNA demethylation, and explain how the various components function and cooperate to remove the potentially most enduring means of epigenetic gene regulation. Recent evidence indicates that the same pathways implicated during periods of widespread DNA demethylation, such as the erasure of methyl marks in the paternal pronucleus soon after fertilization, are operational in post-mitotic neurons. Neuronal functional identities, defined here as the result of a combination of neuronal subtype, location, and synaptic connections are largely maintained through DNA methylation. Chronic mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, may be the result of both altered neurotransmitter levels and neurons that have assumed dysfunctional neuronal identities. A limitation of most current psychopharmacological agents is their focus on the former, while not addressing the more profound latter pathophysiological process. Previously, it was believed that active DNA demethylation in post-mitotic neurons was rare if not impossible. If this were the case, then reversing the factors that maintain neuronal identity, would be highly unlikely. The emergence of an active DNA demethylation pathway in the brain is a reason for great optimism in psychiatry as it provides a means by which previously pathological neurons may be reprogrammed to serve a more favorable role. Agents targeting epigenetic processes have shown much promise in this regard, and may lead to substantial gains over traditional pharmacological approaches.

  6. Design, Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship Optimization of Lycorine Derivatives for HCV Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duozhi; Cai, Jieyun; Cheng, Junjun; Jing, Chenxu; Yin, Junlin; Jiang, Jiandong; Peng, Zonggen; Hao, Xiaojiang

    2015-01-01

    Lycorine is reported to be a multifunctional compound. We previously showed that lycorine is an HCV inhibitor with strong activity. Further research on the antivirus mechanism indicated that lycorine does not affect the enzymes that are indispensable to HCV replication but suppresses the expression of Hsc70 in the host cell to limit HCV replication. However, due to the cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction of lycorine, lycorine is unsafe to be a anti-HCV agent for clinical application. As a result of increasing interest, its structure was optimized for the first time and a novel series of lycorine derivatives was synthesized, all of which lost their cytotoxicity to different degrees. Structure-activity analysis of these compounds revealed that disubstitution on the free hydroxyl groups at C1 and C2 and/or degradation of the benzodioxole group would markedly reduce the cytotoxicity. Furthermore, an α, β-unsaturated ketone would improve the HCV inhibitory activity of lycorine. The C3-C4 double bond is crucial to the anti-HCV activity because hydrogenation of this double bond clearly weakened HCV inhibition. PMID:26443922

  7. Development of Buccal Adhesive Tablet with Prolonged Antifungal activity: Optimization and ex vivo Deposition Studies.

    PubMed

    Madgulkar, A; Kadam, S; Pokharkar, V

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of the present work was to prepare buccal adhesive tablets of miconazole nitrate. The simplex centroid experimental design was used to arrive at optimum ratio of carbopol 934P, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M and polyvinylpyrollidone, which will provide desired drug release and mucoadhesion. Swelling index, mucoadhesive strength and in vitro drug release of the prepared tablet was determined. The drug release and bioadhesion was dependent on type and relative amounts of the polymers. The optimized combination was subjected to in vitro antifungal activity, transmucosal permeation, drug deposition in mucosa, residence time and bioadhesion studies. IR spectroscopy was used to investigate any interaction between drug and excipients. Dissolution of miconazole from tablets was sustained for 6 h. based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the prepared slow release buccoadhesive tablets of miconazole would markedly prolong the duration of antifungal activity. Comparison of in vitro antifungal activity of tablet with marketed gel showed that drug concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration were achieved immediately from both formulations but release from tablet was sustained up to 6 h, while the gel showed initially fast drug release, which did not sustain later. Drug permeation across buccal mucosa was minimum from the tablet as well as marketed gel; the deposition of drug in mucosa was higher in case of tablet. In vitro residence time and bioadhesive strength of tablet was higher than gel. Thus the buccoadhesive tablet of miconazole nitrate may offer better control of antifungal activity as compared to the gel formulation. PMID:20490296

  8. Optimal design of active spreading systems to remediate sorbing groundwater contaminants in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscopo, Amy N.; Neupauer, Roseanna M.; Kasprzyk, Joseph R.

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of in situ remediation to treat contaminated aquifers is limited by the degree of contact between the injected treatment chemical and the groundwater contaminant. In this study, candidate designs that actively spread the treatment chemical into the contaminant are generated using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Design parameters pertaining to the amount of treatment chemical and the duration and rate of its injection are optimized according to objectives established for the remediation - maximizing contaminant degradation while minimizing energy and material requirements. Because groundwater contaminants have different reaction and sorption properties that influence their ability to be degraded with in situ remediation, optimization was conducted for six different combinations of reaction rate coefficients and sorption rates constants to represent remediation of the common groundwater contaminants, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and toluene, using the treatment chemical, permanganate. Results indicate that active spreading for contaminants with low reaction rate coefficients should be conducted by using greater amounts of treatment chemical mass and longer injection durations relative to contaminants with high reaction rate coefficients. For contaminants with slow sorption or contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers, two different design strategies are acceptable - one that injects high concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a short duration or one that injects lower concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a long duration. Thus, decision-makers can select a strategy according to their preference for material or energy use. Finally, for scenarios with high ambient groundwater velocities, the injection rate used for active spreading should be high enough for the groundwater divide to encompass the entire contaminant plume.

  9. Optimal design of active spreading systems to remediate sorbing groundwater contaminants in situ.

    PubMed

    Piscopo, Amy N; Neupauer, Roseanna M; Kasprzyk, Joseph R

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of in situ remediation to treat contaminated aquifers is limited by the degree of contact between the injected treatment chemical and the groundwater contaminant. In this study, candidate designs that actively spread the treatment chemical into the contaminant are generated using a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Design parameters pertaining to the amount of treatment chemical and the duration and rate of its injection are optimized according to objectives established for the remediation - maximizing contaminant degradation while minimizing energy and material requirements. Because groundwater contaminants have different reaction and sorption properties that influence their ability to be degraded with in situ remediation, optimization was conducted for six different combinations of reaction rate coefficients and sorption rates constants to represent remediation of the common groundwater contaminants, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and toluene, using the treatment chemical, permanganate. Results indicate that active spreading for contaminants with low reaction rate coefficients should be conducted by using greater amounts of treatment chemical mass and longer injection durations relative to contaminants with high reaction rate coefficients. For contaminants with slow sorption or contaminants in heterogeneous aquifers, two different design strategies are acceptable - one that injects high concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a short duration or one that injects lower concentrations of treatment chemical mass over a long duration. Thus, decision-makers can select a strategy according to their preference for material or energy use. Finally, for scenarios with high ambient groundwater velocities, the injection rate used for active spreading should be high enough for the groundwater divide to encompass the entire contaminant plume.

  10. Tracer-based prediction of thermal reservoir lifetime: scope, limitations, and the role of thermosensitive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Karmakar, S.; Licha, T.; Nottebohm, M.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal-lifetime prediction is a traditional endeavour of inter-well tracer tests conducted in geothermal reservoirs. Early tracer test signals (detectable within the first few years of operation) are expected to correlate with late-time production temperature evolutions ('thermal breakthrough', supposed to not occur before some decades of operation) of a geothermal reservoir. Whenever a geothermal reservoir can be described as a single-fracture system, its thermal lifetime will, ideally, be determined by two parameters (say, fracture aperture and porosity), whose inversion from conservative-tracer test signals is straightforward and non-ambiguous (provided that the tracer tests, and their interpretation, are performed in accordance to the rules of the art). However, as soon as only 'few more' fractures are considered, this clear-cut correlation is broken. A given geothermal reservoir can simultaneously feature a single-fracture behaviour, in terms of heat transport, and a multiple-fracture behaviour, in terms of solute tracer transport (or vice-versa), whose effective values of fracture apertures, spacings, and porosities are essentially uncorrelated between heat and solute tracers. Solute transport parameters derived from conservative-tracer tests will no longer characterize the heat transport processes (and thus temperature evolutions) taking place in the same reservoir. Parameters determining its thermal lifetime will remain 'invisible' to conservative tracers in inter-well tests. We demonstrate this issue at the example of a five-fracture system, representing a deep-geothermal reservoir, with well-doublet placement inducing fluid flow 'obliquely' to the fractures. Thermal breakthrough in this system is found to strongly depend on fracture apertures, whereas conservative-solute tracer signals from inter-well tests in the same system do not show a clear-cut correlation with fracture apertures. Only by using thermosensitive substances as tracers, a reliable

  11. Boron isotopes as an artificial tracer.

    PubMed

    Quast, Konrad W; Lansey, Kevin; Arnold, Robert; Bassett, Randy L; Rincon, Martha

    2006-01-01

    A field study was conducted using a combination of intrinsic and artificial tracers to estimate travel times and dilution during transport of infiltrate from a reclaimed water infiltration basin to nearby monitoring wells. A major study objective was to validate boric acid enriched in (10)B as an artificial tracer. Basin 10E at the Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds in Whittier, California, was the site of the test. The basin normally receives a mixture of treated municipal waste water, purchased State Project water, and local runoff from the San Gabriel River. Approximately 3.5 kg of (10)B-enriched boric acid was dispersed among 2.05 x 10(5) m(3) of basin water to initiate the experiment. The resultant median delta(11)B in the infiltration basin was -71 per thousand. Prior to tracer addition, the basin water had an intrinsic delta(11)B of +2 per thousand. Local monitoring wells that were used to assess travel times had delta(11)B values of +5 per thousand and +8 per thousand at the time of tracer addition. Analytic results supported an assumption that boron is conserved during ground water transport and that boron enriched in (10)B is a useful artificial tracer. Several intrinsic tracers were used to reinforce the boric acid tracer findings. These included stable isotopes of oxygen (delta(18)O) and hydrogen (deltaD), sulfate concentration, and the boron to chloride ratio. Xenon isotopes, (136)Xe and (124)Xe, also supported boron isotope results. Xenon isotopes were added to the recharge basin as dissolved gases by investigators from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  12. Long residence times - bad tracer tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests conducted at geothermal well doublets or triplets in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley [1] all face, with very few exceptions so far, one common issue: lack of conclusive tracer test results, or tracer signals still undetectable for longer than one or two years after tracer injection. While the reasons for this surely differ from site to site (Riehen, Landau, Insheim, Bruchsal, ...), its effects on how the usefulness of tracer tests is perceived by the non-tracer community are pretty much the same. The 'poor-signal' frustration keeps nourishing two major 'alternative' endeavours : (I) design and execute tracer tests in single-well injection-withdrawal (push-pull), 'instead of' inter-well flow-path tracing configurations; (II) use 'novel' tracer substances instead of the 'old' ones which have 'obviously failed'. Frustration experienced with most inter-well tracer tests in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley has also made them be regarded as 'maybe useful for EGS' ('enhanced', or 'engineered' geothermal systems, whose fluid RTD typically include a major share of values below one year), but 'no longer worthwhile a follow-up sampling' in natural, large-scale hydrothermal reservoirs. We illustrate some of these arguments with the ongoing Bruchsal case [2]. The inter-well tracer test conducted at Bruchsal was (and still is!) aimed at assessing inter-well connectivity, fluid residence times, and characterizing the reservoir structure [3]. Fluid samples taken at the geothermal production well after reaching a fluid turnover of about 700,000 m3 showed tracer concentrations in the range of 10-8 Minj per m3, in the liquid phase of each sample (Minj being the total quantity of tracer injected as a short pulse at the geothermal re-injection well). Tracer signals might actually be higher, owing to tracer amounts co-precipitated and/or adsorbed onto the solid phase whose accumulation in the samples was unavoidable (due to pressure relief and degassing during the very sampling

  13. Boussinesq modeling of HB06 tracer releases Part 2: Tracer plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. B.; Feddersen, F.; Guza, R. T.

    2010-12-01

    Tracer plumes simulated with a Boussinesq surfzone model (funwaveC) are compared with 5 plumes observed during the HB06 experiment (Huntington Beach, Fall 2006). Surfzone tracer plumes were formed by continuously releasing dye tracer into the wave-driven alongshore current. Bulk cross-shore eddy diffusivities, O(1 m2 s-1), were estimated from the observed plumes and agreed best with a mixing-length scaling based on large 2D eddies [Clark et al., JGR, in press 2010]. The mechanisms for surfzone cross-shore tracer dispersion are not well known, and are explored here with the time-dependent, wave and horizontal eddy resolving, funwaveC model. The funwaveC model is run with observed bathymetry, and initialized in 4m depth with the observed obliquely incident and directionally spread waves. Modeled and observed waves and currents are similar, and discussed in Part 1. Model tracer is dispersed by the surfzone horizontal eddy field, a breaking wave eddy diffusivity, and a small O(0.01 m2 s-1) background diffusivity. Modeled and observed mean plume structures agree, but can be degraded by a mismatch between observed and modeled alongshore currents, especially near the tracer source. Bulk tracer eddy diffusivities agree with HB06 observations, and the long narrow plume assumption (used for diffusion analysis) is discussed with modeled tracer fluxes. The model suggests that cross-shore mixing at time scales of many wave periods is dominated by horizontal eddies, not by the breaking eddy diffusivity.

  14. Engineering and optimization of an allosteric biosensor protein for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ ligands.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Gierach, Izabela; Gillies, Alison R; Warden, Charles D; Wood, David W

    2011-11-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ or PPARG) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, and is a potential drug target for a variety of diseases. In this work, we constructed a series of bacterial biosensors for the identification of functional PPARγ ligands. These sensors entail modified Escherichia coli cells carrying a four-domain fusion protein, comprised of the PPARγ ligand binding domain (LBD), an engineered mini-intein domain, the E. coli maltose binding protein (MBD), and a thymidylate synthase (TS) reporter enzyme. E. coli cells expressing this protein exhibit hormone ligand-dependent growth phenotypes. Unlike our published estrogen (ER) and thyroid receptor (TR) biosensors, the canonical PPARγ biosensor cells displayed pronounced growth in the absence of ligand. They were able to distinguish agonists and antagonists, however, even in the absence of agonist. To improve ligand sensitivity of this sensor, we attempted to engineer and optimize linker peptides flanking the PPARγ LBD insertion point. Truncation of the original linkers led to decreased basal growth and significantly enhanced ligand sensitivity of the PPARγ sensor, while substitution of the native linkers with optimized G(4)S (Gly-Gly-Gly-Gly-Ser) linkers further increased the sensitivity. Our studies demonstrate that the properties of linkers, especially the C-terminal linker, greatly influence the efficiency and fidelity of the allosteric signal induced by ligand binding. Our work also suggests an approach to increase allosteric behavior in this multidomain sensor protein, without modification of the functional LBD. PMID:21893405

  15. Mechanically Robust Plasma-Activated Interfaces Optimized for Vascular Stent Applications.

    PubMed

    Santos, Miguel; Filipe, Elysse C; Michael, Praveesuda L; Hung, Juichien; Wise, Steven G; Bilek, Marcela M M

    2016-04-20

    The long-term performance of many medical implants is limited by the use of inherently incompatible and bioinert materials. Metallic alloys, ceramics, and polymers commonly used in cardiovascular devices encourage clot formation and fail to promote the appropriate molecular signaling required for complete implant integration. Surface coating strategies have been proposed for these materials, but coronary stents are particularly problematic as the large surface deformations they experience in deployment require a mechanically robust coating interface. Here, we demonstrate a single-step ion-assisted plasma deposition process to tailor plasma-activated interfaces to meet current clinical demands for vascular implants. Using a process control-feedback strategy which predicts crucial coating growth mechanisms by adopting a suitable macroscopic plasma description in combination with noninvasive plasma diagnostics, we describe the optimal conditions to generate highly reproducible, industry-scalable stent coatings. These interfaces are mechanically robust, resisting delamination even upon plastic deformation of the underlying material, and were developed in consideration of the need for hemocompatibility and the capacity for biomolecule immobilization. Our optimized coating conditions combine the best mechanical properties with strong covalent attachment capacity and excellent blood compatibility in initial testing with plasma and whole blood, demonstrating the potential for improved vascular stent coatings. PMID:27015083

  16. Testing and comparison of four ionic tracers to measure stream flow loss by multiple tracer injection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zellweger, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    An injectate containing lithium, sodium, chloride and bromide was added continuously at five sites along a 507 m study reach of St Kevin Gulch, Lake County, Colorado to determine which sections of the stream were losing water to the stream bed and to ascertain how well the four tracers performed. The acidity of the stream (pH 3.6) made it possible for lithium and sodium, which are normally absorbed by ion exchange with stream bed sediment, to be used as conservative tracers. Net flow losses as low as 0.81 s-1, or 8% of flow, were calculated between measuring sites. By comparing the results of simultaneous injection it was determined whether subsections of the study reach were influent or effluent. Evaluation of tracer concentrations along 116 m of stream indicated that all four tracers behaved conservatively. Discharges measured by Parshall flumes were 4-18% greater than discharges measured by tracer dilution. -from Author

  17. Exploring Hydrofluorocarbons as Groundwater Age Tracers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. B.; Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L. N.; Casile, G.; Sanford, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater dating tracers are an essential tool for analyzing hydrologic conditions in groundwater systems. Commonly used tracers for dating post-1940's groundwater include sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), 3H-3He, and other isotopic tracers (85Kr, δ2H and δ18O isotopes, etc.). Each tracer carries a corresponding set of advantages and limitations imposed by field, analytical, and interpretive methods. Increasing the number available tracers is appealing, particularly if they possess inert chemical properties and unique temporal emission histories from other tracers. Atmospherically derived halogenated trace gases continue to hold untapped potential for new tracers, as they are generally inert and their emission histories are well documented. SF5CF3, and CFC-13 were previously shown to have application as dating tracers, though their low mixing ratios and low solubility require large amounts of water to be degassed for their quantification. Two related groups of compounds, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are hypothesized to be potential age tracers, having similar mixing ratios to the CFCs and relatively high solubility. However, these compounds yield gas chromatography electron capture detector (GC-ECD) responses that are 10-2 -10-5 less than CFC-12, making purge and trap or field stripping GC-ECD approaches impractical. Therefore, in order to use dissolved HCFCs and HFCs as age tracers, different approaches are needed. To solve this problem, we developed an analytical method that uses an atomic emission detector (GC-AED) in place of an ECD to detect fluorinated compounds. In contrast to the ECD, the AED is a universally sensitive, highly linear, elementally specific detector. The new GC-AED system is being used to measure chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), and other fluorinated compounds in one liter water samples to study their potential as age dating tracers. HCFC-22 is a

  18. TRACER - TRACING AND CONTROL OF ENGINEERING REQUIREMENTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    TRACER (Tracing and Control of Engineering Requirements) is a database/word processing system created to document and maintain the order of both requirements and descriptive material associated with an engineering project. A set of hierarchical documents are normally generated for a project whereby the requirements of the higher level documents levy requirements on the same level or lower level documents. Traditionally, the requirements are handled almost entirely by manual paper methods. The problem with a typical paper system, however, is that requirements written and changed continuously in different areas lead to misunderstandings and noncompliance. The purpose of TRACER is to automate the capture, tracing, reviewing, and managing of requirements for an engineering project. The engineering project still requires communications, negotiations, interactions, and iterations among people and organizations, but TRACER promotes succinct and precise identification and treatment of real requirements separate from the descriptive prose in a document. TRACER permits the documentation of an engineering project's requirements and progress in a logical, controllable, traceable manner. TRACER's attributes include the presentation of current requirements and status from any linked computer terminal and the ability to differentiate headers and descriptive material from the requirements. Related requirements can be linked and traced. The program also enables portions of documents to be printed, individual approval and release of requirements, and the tracing of requirements down into the equipment specification. Requirement "links" can be made "pending" and invisible to others until the pending link is made "binding". Individuals affected by linked requirements can be notified of significant changes with acknowledgement of the changes required. An unlimited number of documents can be created for a project and an ASCII import feature permits existing documents to be incorporated

  19. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1996-06-01

    Extensive tracer testing is expected to take place at the C-well complex in the Nevada Test Site as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The C-well complex consists of one pumping well, C3, and two injection wells, C1 and C2 into which tracer will be introduced. The goal of this research was to provide USGS with numerous tracers to completed these tests. Several classes of fluorinated organic acids have been evaluated. These include numerous isomers of fluorinated benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. Also several derivatives of 2-hydroxy nicotinic acid (pyridone) have been tested. The stability of these compounds was determined using batch and column tests. Ames testing (mutagenicity/carcinogenicity) was conducted on the fluorinated benzoic acids and a literature review of toxicity of the fluorobenzoates and three perfluoro aliphatic acids was prepared. Solubilities were measured and method development work was performed to optimize the detection of these compounds. A Quality Assurance (QA) Program was developed under existing DOE and USGS guidelines. The program includes QA procedures and technical standard operating procedures. A tracer test, using sodium iodide, was performed at the C-well complex. HRC chemists performed analyses on site, to provide real time data for the USGS hydrologists and in the laboratories at UNLV. Over 2,500 analyses were performed. This report provides the results of the laboratory experiments and literature reviews used to evaluate the potential tracers and reports on the results of the iodide C-well tracer test.

  20. Rapid dual-tracer PTSM+ATSM PET imaging of tumour blood flow and hypoxia: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Rust, T C; Kadrmas, D J

    2006-01-01

    Blood flow and hypoxia are interrelated aspects of physiology that affect cancer treatment and response. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM are related PET tracers for blood flow and hypoxia, and the ability to rapidly image both tracers in a single scan would bring several advantages over conventional single-tracer techniques. Using dynamic imaging with staggered injections, overlapping signals for multiple PET tracers may be recovered utilizing information from kinetics and radioactive decay. In this work, rapid dual-tracer PTSM+ATSM PET was simulated and tested as a function of injection delay, order and relative dose for several copper isotopes, and the results were compared relative to separate single-tracer data. Time-activity curves representing a broad range of tumour blood flow and hypoxia levels were simulated, and parallel dual-tracer compartment modelling was used to recover the signals for each tracer. The main results were tested further using a torso phantom simulation of PET tumour imaging. Using scans as short as 30 minutes, the dual-tracer method provided measures of blood flow and hypoxia similar to single-tracer imaging. The best performance was obtained by injecting PTSM first and using a somewhat higher dose for ATSM. Comparable results for different copper isotopes suggest that tracer kinetics with staggered injections play a more important role than radioactive decay in the signal separation process. Rapid PTSM+ATSM PET has excellent potential for characterizing both tumour blood flow and hypoxia in a single, fast scan, provided that technological hurdles related to algorithm development and routine use can be overcome.

  1. Bi-objective optimization of a multiple-target active debris removal mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérend, Nicolas; Olive, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    The increasing number of space debris in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) raises the question of future Active Debris Removal (ADR) operations. Typical ADR scenarios rely on an Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) using one of the two following disposal strategies: the first one consists in attaching a deorbiting kit, such as a solid rocket booster, to the debris after rendezvous; with the second one, the OTV captures the debris and moves it to a low-perigee disposal orbit. For multiple-target ADR scenarios, the design of such a mission is very complex, as it involves two optimization levels: one for the space debris sequence, and a second one for the "elementary" orbit transfer strategy from a released debris to the next one in the sequence. This problem can be seen as a Time-Dependant Traveling Salesman Problem (TDTSP) with two objective functions to minimize: the total mission duration and the total propellant consumption. In order to efficiently solve this problem, ONERA has designed, under CNES contract, TOPAS (Tool for Optimal Planning of ADR Sequence), a tool that implements a Branch & Bound method developed in previous work together with a dedicated algorithm for optimizing the "elementary" orbit transfer. A single run of this tool yields an estimation of the Pareto front of the problem, which exhibits the trade-off between mission duration and propellant consumption. We first detail our solution to cope with the combinatorial explosion of complex ADR scenarios with 10 debris. The key point of this approach is to define the orbit transfer strategy through a small set of parameters, allowing an acceptable compromise between the quality of the optimum solution and the calculation cost. Then we present optimization results obtained for various 10 debris removal scenarios involving a 15-ton OTV, using either the deorbiting kit or the disposal orbit strategy. We show that the advantage of one strategy upon the other depends on the propellant margin, the maximum duration allowed

  2. Active shape models with invariant optimal features: application to facial analysis.

    PubMed

    Sukno, Federico M; Ordás, Sebastián; Butakoff, Constantine; Cruz, Santiago; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2007-07-01

    This work is framed in the field of statistical face analysis. In particular, the problem of accurate segmentation of prominent features of the face in frontal view images is addressed. We propose a method that generalizes linear Active Shape Models (ASMs), which have already been used for this task. The technique is built upon the development of a nonlinear intensity model, incorporating a reduced set of differential invariant features as local image descriptors. These features are invariant to rigid transformations, and a subset of them is chosen by Sequential Feature Selection for each landmark and resolution level. The new approach overcomes the unimodality and Gaussianity assumptions of classical ASMs regarding the distribution of the intensity values across the training set. Our methodology has demonstrated a significant improvement in segmentation precision as compared to the linear ASM and Optimal Features ASM (a nonlinear extension of the pioneer algorithm) in the tests performed on AR, XM2VTS, and EQUINOX databases. PMID:17496371

  3. Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization for Hybrid Flowshop Scheduling Problem with Maintenance Activities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-qing; Pan, Quan-ke; Mao, Kun

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid algorithm which combines particle swarm optimization (PSO) and iterated local search (ILS) is proposed for solving the hybrid flowshop scheduling (HFS) problem with preventive maintenance (PM) activities. In the proposed algorithm, different crossover operators and mutation operators are investigated. In addition, an efficient multiple insert mutation operator is developed for enhancing the searching ability of the algorithm. Furthermore, an ILS-based local search procedure is embedded in the algorithm to improve the exploitation ability of the proposed algorithm. The detailed experimental parameter for the canonical PSO is tuning. The proposed algorithm is tested on the variation of 77 Carlier and Néron's benchmark problems. Detailed comparisons with the present efficient algorithms, including hGA, ILS, PSO, and IG, verify the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:24883414

  4. [Optimization of biotransformation conditions of active component in Panax notoginseng stalks and leaves by Fusarium sacchari].

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Hu, Xiao-Min; Jiang, Bin-Hui; Zhao, Yu-Qing

    2007-12-01

    By using Fusarium sacchari, a rare microbial strain isolated and screened from planted ginseng soil, the active component notoginseng triterpenes in Panax notoginseng stalks and leaves was biotransformed. Taking three main anti-tumor components, i. e., 20 (S)-protopanoxadiol-20-O-beta-D-glucopyranose (compound K, C-K), 20-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl (1 --> 6) -beta-D-glucopyranosyl-20 (S)-protopanaxadiol (compound Mx, C-Mx) and 20 (S)-protopanoxadiol-20-O-alpha-L-arabofuranose (1 --> 6)-beta-D-glucopyranose (ginseng Mc, G-Mc) as evaluation indices, the optimization of biotransformation conditions of notoginseng triterpenes in P. notoginseng stalks and leaves were obtained by factor biotransformation experiment, i. e., initial pH value 6, substrate addition 40 mg, medium volume 30 ml, and transforming for 6 days at 30 degrees C. The method could increase the utility and economic benefit of P. notoginseng stalks and leaves effectively.

  5. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding.

    PubMed

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10-20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%.

  6. Optimal myelin elongation relies on YAP activation by axonal growth and inhibition by Crb3/Hippo pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Ruani N.; Cotter, Laurent; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Berthelot, Jade; Bartolami, Sylvain; Pereira, Jorge A.; Gonzalez, Sergio; Suter, Ueli; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Fast nerve conduction relies on successive myelin segments that electrically isolate axons. Segment geometry—diameter and length—is critical for the optimization of nerve conduction and the molecular mechanisms allowing this optimized geometry are partially known. We show here that peripheral myelin elongation is dynamically regulated by stimulation of YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription cofactor activity during axonal elongation and limited by inhibition of YAP activity via the Hippo pathway. YAP promotes myelin and non-myelin genes transcription while the polarity protein Crb3, localized at the tips of the myelin sheath, activates the Hippo pathway to temper YAP activity, therefore allowing for optimal myelin growth. Dystrophic Dy2j/2j mice mimicking human peripheral neuropathy with reduced internodal lengths have decreased nuclear YAP which, when corrected, leads to longer internodes. These data show a novel mechanism controlling myelin growth and nerve conduction, and provide a molecular ground for disease with short myelin segments. PMID:27435623

  7. Optimal myelin elongation relies on YAP activation by axonal growth and inhibition by Crb3/Hippo pathway.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Ruani N; Cotter, Laurent; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Berthelot, Jade; Bartolami, Sylvain; Pereira, Jorge A; Gonzalez, Sergio; Suter, Ueli; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-07-20

    Fast nerve conduction relies on successive myelin segments that electrically isolate axons. Segment geometry-diameter and length-is critical for the optimization of nerve conduction and the molecular mechanisms allowing this optimized geometry are partially known. We show here that peripheral myelin elongation is dynamically regulated by stimulation of YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription cofactor activity during axonal elongation and limited by inhibition of YAP activity via the Hippo pathway. YAP promotes myelin and non-myelin genes transcription while the polarity protein Crb3, localized at the tips of the myelin sheath, activates the Hippo pathway to temper YAP activity, therefore allowing for optimal myelin growth. Dystrophic Dy(2j/2j) mice mimicking human peripheral neuropathy with reduced internodal lengths have decreased nuclear YAP which, when corrected, leads to longer internodes. These data show a novel mechanism controlling myelin growth and nerve conduction, and provide a molecular ground for disease with short myelin segments.

  8. Optimization of selenylation modification for garlic polysaccharide based on immune-enhancing activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Jin; Qiu, Shulei; Li, Youying; Wang, Deyun; Liu, Cui; Li, Xiuping; Hou, Ranran; Yue, Chanjuan; Liu, Jie; Li, Hongquan; Hu, Yuanliang

    2016-01-20

    Garlic polysaccharide (GPS) was modified in selenylation respectively by nitric acid-sodium selenite (NA-SS), glacial acetic acid-selenous acid (GA-SA), glacial acetic acid-sodium selenite (GA-SS) and selenium oxychloride (SOC) methods each under nine modification conditions of L9(3(4)) orthogonal design and each to obtain nine selenizing GPSs (sGPSs). Their structures were identified, yields and selenium contents were determined, selenium yields were calculated, and the immune-enhancing activities of four sGPSs with higher selenium yields were compared taking unmodified GPS as control. The results showed that among four methods the selenylation efficiency of NA-SS method were the highest, the activity of sGPS5 was the strongest and significantly stronger than that of unmodified GPS. This indicates that selenylation modification can significantly enhance the immune-enhancing activity of GPS, NA-SS method is the best method and the optimal conditions are 0.8:1 weight ratio of sodium selenite to GPS, reaction temperature of 70 °C and reaction time of 10h.

  9. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  10. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  11. Optimizing Physical Activity Among Older Adults Post Trauma: Overcoming System and Patient Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells PT, Chris L.; Boltz, Marie; Holtzman, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    By 2050 it is anticipated that close to half (40%) of all trauma patients will be over the age of 65. Recovery post trauma for these individuals is more complicated than among younger individuals. Specifically there is an increased risk for: (1) functional decline; (2) higher mortality rates; (3) longer length of stay; (4) greater resource consumption; (5) nursing home placement; (6) adverse events such as infections, pressure ulcers and falls; and (7) rehospitalization post discharge. Early mobilization has been shown to improve outcomes. Unfortunately, there are many challenges to early mobilization. The Function Focused Care Intervention was developed to overcome these challenges. The purpose of this paper was to describe the initial recruitment of the first 25 participants and delineate the challenges and successes associated with implementation of this intervention. Overall the intervention was implemented as intended and recruitment rates were consistent with other studies. Most patients were female, white and on average 79 years of age. Optimizing physical activity of patients was a low priority for the nurses with patient safety taking precedence. Patients spent most of the time in bed. Age, depression and tethering were the only factors that were associated with physical activity and functional outcomes of patients. Ongoing work is needed to keep patients physically active in the immediate post trauma recovery period. PMID:26547682

  12. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst. PMID:25229121

  13. Activated d16HER2 homodimers and SRC kinase mediate optimal efficacy for trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Castagnoli, Lorenzo; Iezzi, Manuela; Ghedini, Gaia C; Ciravolo, Valentina; Marzano, Giulia; Lamolinara, Alessia; Zappasodi, Roberta; Gasparini, Patrizia; Campiglio, Manuela; Amici, Augusto; Chiodoni, Claudia; Palladini, Arianna; Lollini, Pier Luigi; Triulzi, Tiziana; Menard, Sylvie; Nanni, Patrizia; Tagliabue, Elda; Pupa, Serenella M

    2014-11-01

    A splice isoform of the HER2 receptor that lacks exon 16 (d16HER2) is expressed in many HER2-positive breast tumors, where it has been linked with resistance to the HER2-targeting antibody trastuzumab, but the impact of d16HER2 on tumor pathobiology and therapeutic response remains uncertain. Here, we provide genetic evidence in transgenic mice that expression of d16HER2 is sufficient to accelerate mammary tumorigenesis and improve the response to trastuzumab. A comparative analysis of effector signaling pathways activated by d16HER2 and wild-type HER2 revealed that d16HER2 was optimally functional through a link to SRC activation (pSRC). Clinically, HER2-positive breast cancers from patients who received trastuzumab exhibited a positive correlation in d16HER2 and pSRC abundance, consistent with the mouse genetic results. Moreover, patients expressing high pSRC or an activated "d16HER2 metagene" were found to derive the greatest benefit from trastuzumab treatment. Overall, our results establish the d16HER2 signaling axis as a signature for decreased risk of relapse after trastuzumab treatment.

  14. Optimization of selenylation modification for garlic polysaccharide based on immune-enhancing activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Jin; Qiu, Shulei; Li, Youying; Wang, Deyun; Liu, Cui; Li, Xiuping; Hou, Ranran; Yue, Chanjuan; Liu, Jie; Li, Hongquan; Hu, Yuanliang

    2016-01-20

    Garlic polysaccharide (GPS) was modified in selenylation respectively by nitric acid-sodium selenite (NA-SS), glacial acetic acid-selenous acid (GA-SA), glacial acetic acid-sodium selenite (GA-SS) and selenium oxychloride (SOC) methods each under nine modification conditions of L9(3(4)) orthogonal design and each to obtain nine selenizing GPSs (sGPSs). Their structures were identified, yields and selenium contents were determined, selenium yields were calculated, and the immune-enhancing activities of four sGPSs with higher selenium yields were compared taking unmodified GPS as control. The results showed that among four methods the selenylation efficiency of NA-SS method were the highest, the activity of sGPS5 was the strongest and significantly stronger than that of unmodified GPS. This indicates that selenylation modification can significantly enhance the immune-enhancing activity of GPS, NA-SS method is the best method and the optimal conditions are 0.8:1 weight ratio of sodium selenite to GPS, reaction temperature of 70 °C and reaction time of 10h. PMID:26572388

  15. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 micrometers down to approximately 25 micrometers (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  16. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.; Dirusso, E.; Fleming, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 microns down to approximately 25 microns (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  17. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction of Bioactive Compounds from Ampelopsis grossedentata Stems: Process Optimization and Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuefei; Ying, Le; Sun, Da; Zhang, Shikang; Zhu, Yuejin; Xu, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction of bioactive compounds including flavonoids and phenolics from Ampelopsis grossedentata stems was carried out. Extraction parameters such as pressure, temperature, dynamic time and modifier, were optimized using an orthogonal array design of L9 (34), and antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay and ferrous ion chelating (FIC) assay. The best conditions obtained for SC-CO2 extraction of flavonoids was 250 bar, 40 °C, 50 min, and with a modifier of methanol/ethanol (1:3, v/v), and that for phenolics extraction was 250 bar, 40 °C, 50 min, and with a modifier of methanol/ethanol (1:1, v/v). Meantime, flavonoids and phenolics were found to be mainly responsible for the DPPH scavenging activity of the extracts, but not for the chelating activity on ferrous ion according to Pearson correlation analysis. Furthermore, several unreported flavonoids such as apigenin, vitexin, luteolin, etc., have been detected in the extracts from A. grossedentata stems. PMID:22072923

  18. Optimization of environmental conditions for production of a novel cold-active lipase from Pichia lynferdii Y-7723

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipases with abnormal functionality such as high thermostability and optimal activity at extreme conditions gain special attentions because of their applicability in the restricted reaction conditions. In particular, cold-active lipase(CAL)s have gained special attention in various industrial fields...

  19. Geodetic Network Design and Optimization on the Active Tuzla Fault (Izmir, Turkey) for Disaster Management

    PubMed Central

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozener, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    Both seismological and geodynamic research emphasize that the Aegean Region, which comprises the Hellenic Arc, the Greek mainland and Western Turkey is the most seismically active region in Western Eurasia. The convergence of the Eurasian and African lithospheric plates forces a westward motion on the Anatolian plate relative to the Eurasian one. Western Anatolia is a valuable laboratory for Earth Science research because of its complex geological structure. Izmir is a large city in Turkey with a population of about 2.5 million that is at great risk from big earthquakes. Unfortunately, previous geodynamics studies performed in this region are insufficient or cover large areas instead of specific faults. The Tuzla Fault, which is aligned trending NE–SW between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey, is an important fault in terms of seismic activity and its proximity to the city of Izmir. This study aims to perform a large scale investigation focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region's tectonics. In order to investigate the crustal deformation along the Tuzla Fault and Izmir Bay, a geodetic network has been designed and optimizations were performed. This paper suggests a schedule for a crustal deformation monitoring study which includes research on the tectonics of the region, network design and optimization strategies, theory and practice of processing. The study is also open for extension in terms of monitoring different types of fault characteristics. A one-dimensional fault model with two parameters – standard strike-slip model of dislocation theory in an elastic half-space – is formulated in order to determine which sites are suitable for the campaign based geodetic GPS measurements. Geodetic results can be used as a background data for disaster management systems.

  20. Analysis of unit mobility ratio well-to-well tracer flow to determine reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Abbaszadeh-Dehghani, M.

    1983-02-01

    This study has been performed in 2 related sections. In the first section, exact analytic equations have been derived to define breakthrough curves for different developed flooding patterns for unit mobility ratio. The breakthrough curves have been correlated into a single curve. Because of this correlation, it is concluded that the breakthrough curve for any other repeating pattern should also lie near this same correlating curve. An analytic definition of breakthrough curves for a developed 5-spot at various mobility ratios also is included. Flow of a tracer slug in various developed patterns is discussed. In each system, an expression was derived to define the concentration of tracer in a streamtube. A computer program based on a nonlinear optimization technique was developed which analyzes a tracer breakthrough profile from a stratified reservoir. A 5-spot field example which has been decomposed into several layers is shown to illustrate the use of the research.

  1. Overview of SIMS-Based Experimental Studies of Tracer Diffusion in Solids and Application to Mg Self-Diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S.; Bruce Warmack, Robert J.; Radhakrishnan, Bala; Hunter, Jerry L.; Sohn, Yongho; Coffey, Kevin R.; Murch, Graeme E.; Belova, Irina V.

    2014-09-23

    Tracer diffusivities provide the most fundamental information on diffusion in materials and are the foundation of robust diffusion databases. Compared to traditional radiotracer techniques that utilize radioactive isotopes, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based thin-film technique for tracer diffusion is based on the use of enriched stable isotopes that can be accurately profiled using SIMS. Experimental procedures & techniques that are utilized for the measurement of tracer diffusion coefficients are presented for pure magnesium, which presents some unique challenges due to the ease of oxidation. The development of a modified Shewmon-Rhines diffusion capsule for annealing Mg and an ultra-highmore » vacuum (UHV) system for sputter deposition of Mg isotopes are discussed. Optimized conditions for accurate SIMS depth profiling in polycrystalline Mg are provided. An automated procedure for the correction of heat-up and cool-down times during tracer diffusion annealing is discussed. The non-linear fitting of a SIMS depth profile data using the thin film Gaussian solution to obtain the tracer diffusivity along with the background tracer concentration and tracer film thickness is discussed. An Arrhenius fit of the Mg self-diffusion data obtained using the low-temperature SIMS measurements from this study and the high-temperature radiotracer measurements of Shewmon and Rhines (1954) was found to be a good representation of both types of diffusion data that cover a broad range of temperatures between 250 - 627° C (523 900 K).« less

  2. Overview of SIMS-Based Experimental Studies of Tracer Diffusion in Solids and Application to Mg Self-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S.; Bruce Warmack, Robert J.; Radhakrishnan, Bala; Hunter, Jerry L.; Sohn, Yongho; Coffey, Kevin R.; Murch, Graeme E.; Belova, Irina V.

    2014-09-23

    Tracer diffusivities provide the most fundamental information on diffusion in materials and are the foundation of robust diffusion databases. Compared to traditional radiotracer techniques that utilize radioactive isotopes, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based thin-film technique for tracer diffusion is based on the use of enriched stable isotopes that can be accurately profiled using SIMS. Experimental procedures & techniques that are utilized for the measurement of tracer diffusion coefficients are presented for pure magnesium, which presents some unique challenges due to the ease of oxidation. The development of a modified Shewmon-Rhines diffusion capsule for annealing Mg and an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system for sputter deposition of Mg isotopes are discussed. Optimized conditions for accurate SIMS depth profiling in polycrystalline Mg are provided. An automated procedure for the correction of heat-up and cool-down times during tracer diffusion annealing is discussed. The non-linear fitting of a SIMS depth profile data using the thin film Gaussian solution to obtain the tracer diffusivity along with the background tracer concentration and tracer film thickness is discussed. An Arrhenius fit of the Mg self-diffusion data obtained using the low-temperature SIMS measurements from this study and the high-temperature radiotracer measurements of Shewmon and Rhines (1954) was found to be a good representation of both types of diffusion data that cover a broad range of temperatures between 250 - 627° C (523 900 K).

  3. A new aquifer assessment tool using reactive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D.; Smalley, A. L.; Banwart, S. A.; Lerner, D. N.; Thomson, N. R.; Thornton, S. F.; Wilson, R. D.

    2003-04-01

    A major obstacle to making informed decisions about trigger levels for restoration and choosing remediation options is that current Site Investigation (SI) practice fails to make optimal use of available SI techniques resulting in poor value for money in conceptual site models. Often it is simply too expensive to obtain the type of site data required to build the case for natural attenuation, even though this restoration option may be relatively cheaper than a pump-and-treat system. In particular, aquifer property measurement techniques for groundwater transport and reactions are too costly and this results in over-reliance on literature values or model assumptions. This results in overly uncertain predictions of in situ performance and therefore unnecessarily cautious risk assessment and costly remediation strategies. Therefore, cost-effective SI tools that have the capability of producing high quality characterisation data are required. The dipole flow test which circulates groundwater between isolated injection (source) and extraction (sink) chambers within a single borehole has been used successfully by others to delineate heterogeneous hydraulic properties in both highly permeable and fractured rock aquifers. We propose to extend this approach by adding a suite of reactive tracers into a dipole flow field to assess the geochemical properties and biodegradation potential of aquifers. If successful this will provide a method to ascertain site-specific parameters for use in appropriate reactive transport models. The initial phase of this project involves the construction of a laboratory-scale physical model of a dipole probe to investigate the utility of the dipole flow and reactive tracer test (DFRTT) as an aquifer assessment tool. This phase will also serve as the developmental stage between mathematical theory and a host of planned field trials. The development of the laboratory-scale DFRTT including initial scoping calculations, numerical simulation results

  4. Characterization of a soluble, catalytically active form of Escherichia coli leader peptidase: requirement of detergent or phospholipid for optimal activity.

    PubMed

    Tschantz, W R; Paetzel, M; Cao, G; Suciu, D; Inouye, M; Dalbey, R E

    1995-03-28

    Leader peptidase is a novel serine protease in Escherichia coli, which functions to cleave leader sequences from exported proteins. Its catalytic domain extends into the periplasmic space and is anchored to the membrane by two transmembrane segments located at the N-terminal end of the protein. At present, there is no information on the structure of the catalytic domain. Here, we report on the properties of a soluble form of leader peptidase (delta 2-75), and we compare its properties to those of the wild-type enzyme. We find that the truncated leader peptidase has a kcat of 3.0 S-1 and a Km of 32 microM with a pro-OmpA nuclease A substrate. In contrast to the wild-type enzyme (pI of 6.8), delta 2-75 is water-soluble and has an acidic isoelectric point of 5.6. We also show with delta 2-75 that the replacement of serine 90 and lysine 145 with alanine residues results in a 500-fold reduction in activity, providing further evidence that leader peptidase employs a catalytic serine/lysine dyad. Finally, we find that the catalysis of delta 2-75 is accelerated by the presence of the detergent Triton X-100, regardless if the substrate is pro-OmpA nuclease A or a peptide substrate. Triton X-100 is required for optimal activity of delta 2-75 at a level far below the critical micelle concentration. Moreover, we find that E. coli phospholipids stimulate the activity of delta 2-75, suggesting that phospholipids may play an important physiological role in the catalytic mechanism of leader peptidase. PMID:7696258

  5. Simulation and interpretation of inter-well tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huseby, Olaf; Sagen, Jan; Viig, Sissel; Dugstad, Øyvind

    2013-05-01

    In inter-well tracer tests (IWTT), chemical compounds or radioactive isotopes are used to label injection water and gas to establish well connections and fluid patterns in petroleum reservoirs. Tracer simulation is an invaluable tool to ease the interpretation of IWTT results and is also required for assisted history matching application of tracer data. In this paper we present a new simulation technique to analyse and interpret tracer results. Laboratory results are used to establish and test formulations of the tracer conservation equations, and the technique is used to provide simulated tracer responses that are compared with observed tracer data from an extensive tracer program. The implemented tracer simulation methodology use a fast post-processing of previously simulated reservoir simulation runs. This provides a fast, flexible and powerful method for analysing gas tracer behaviour in reservoirs. We show that simulation time for tracers can be reduced by factor 100 compared to solving the tracer flow equations simultaneously with the reservoir fluid flow equations. The post-processing technique, combined with a flexible built-in local tracer-grid refinement is exploited to reduce numerical smearing, particularly severe for narrow tracer pulses.

  6. DENSE MEDIA CYCLONE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell

    2002-04-11

    The test data obtained from the Baseline Assessment that compares the performance of the density traces to that of different sizes of coal particles is now complete. The experimental results show that the tracer data can indeed be used to accurately predict HMC performance. The following conclusions were drawn: (i) the tracer curve is slightly sharper than curve for coarsest size fraction of coal (probably due to the greater resolution of the tracer technique), (ii) the Ep increases with decreasing coal particle size, and (iii) the Ep values are not excessively large for the well-maintained HMC circuits. The major problems discovered were associated with improper apex-to-vortex finder ratios and particle hang-up due to media segregation. Only one plant yielded test data that were typical of a fully optimized level of performance.

  7. Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

    2009-02-01

    A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

  8. Biological tracer for waste site characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Strong-Gunderson, J.

    1995-07-01

    Remediating hazardous waste sites requires detailed site characterization. In groundwater remediation, characterizing the flow paths and velocity is a major objective. Various tracers have been used for measuring groundwater velocity and transport of contaminants, colloidal particles, and bacteria and nutrients. The conventional techniques use dissolved solutes, dyes. and gases to estimate subsurface transport pathways. These tracers can provide information on transport and diffusion into the matrix, but their estimates for groundwater flow through fractured regions are very conservative. Also, they do not have the same transport characteristics as bacteria and suspended colloid tracers, both of which must be characterized for effective in-place remediation. Bioremediation requires understanding bacterial transport and nutrient distribution throughout the acquifer, knowledge of contaminants s mobile colloidal particles is just essential.

  9. Particle and tracer diffusion in complex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koynov, Kaloian; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-02-01

    The diffusion of fluorescent tracers can be studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). This powerful method offers the possibility to monitor very small tracers at low concentrations, down to single molecules. Furthermore it possesses a sub-femtoliter detection volume that can be precisely positioned in a heterogeneous environment to probe the local dynamics. Despite its great potential and high versatility in addressing the diffusion and transport properties in complex systems, FCS has been predominantly applied in molecular and cell biology. Here we present some applications that are more relevant for material and soft matter science. First, we study the diffusion of single tracers with molecular sizes in undiluted polymer systems. Next, the diffusion of small molecules and semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) in silica inverse opals is studied and correlated to the size and morphology of the inverse opals. Finally, we show how FCS can be used to measure the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles at water-oil interfaces.

  10. High and low molecular weight tracers for the electron microscopical detection of sialoglycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Mureşan, V; Simionescu, N

    1987-03-01

    Hydrazide-derivative tracers of different molecular weights have been synthesized for use in the electron microscopical detection of sodium periodate-oxidized sialyl residues of glycoconjugates in various tissues and cells. Haemundecapeptide hydrazide, horseradish peroxidase hydrazide, and Limulus polyphemus haemocyanin hydrazide were obtained by coupling adipic acid dihydrazide to the tracers with the aid of water-soluble carbodiimide. The enzymatic tracers thus prepared retained their peroxidatic activity. On conversion to the hydrazide derivative, the haemocyanin molecule dissociated into its hexameric subunits. In order to test by transmission electron microscopy the ability of the conjugates to bind to the sialoglycoconjugates of endothelial cell surfaces, each tracer was perfused in situ into rat pancreatic vasculature previously oxidized with 1 mM sodium periodate. The three tracers characteristically labelled the various microdomains of the luminal cell coat of the capillary endothelial cell. The electron opacity of the haemocyanin subunits allowed their easy detection when bound to the cell surface or to components of the extracellular matrix. The bound markers were not displaced by a high ionic strength buffer, and did not label desialylated cell surfaces. These results indicate that the three hydrazide-derivative tracers may be useful tools for the electron microscopical detection of cellular and extracellular sialoglycoconjugates. PMID:3597134

  11. Partitioning gas tracer tests for measurement of water in municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Paul T; Jakubowitch, Andrew; Briening, Michele L; Chiu, Pei C

    2003-11-01

    A key component in the operation of almost all bioreactor landfills is the addition of water to maintain optimal moisture conditions. To determine how much water is needed and where to add it, in situ methods are required to measure water within solid waste. Existing technologies often result in measurements of unknown accuracy, because of the variability of solid waste materials and time-dependent changes in packing density, both of which influence most measurement methods. To overcome these problems, a new technology recently developed by hydrologists for measuring water in the vadose zone--the partitioning gas tracer test--was tested. In this technology, the transport behavior of two gas tracers within solid waste is used to measure the fraction of the void space filled with water. One tracer is conservative and does not react with solids or liquids, while a second tracer partitions into the water and is separated from the conservative tracer during transport. This technology was tested in four different solid waste packings and was capable of determining the volumetric water content to within 48% of actual values, with most measurement errors less than 15%. This technology and the factors that affect its applicability to landfills are discussed in this paper. PMID:14649759

  12. Monodisperse magnetite nanoparticle tracers for in vivo magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Khandhar, Amit P; Ferguson, R Matthew; Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging modality that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle tracer distributions. In this study, we synthesized monodisperse tracers for enhanced MPI performance and investigated both, their blood clearance time using a 25 kHz magnetic particle spectrometer (MPS), and biodistribution using a combination of quantitative T2-weighted MRI and tissue histology. In vitro and in vivo MPI performance of our magnetic nanoparticle tracers (MNTs), subject to biological constraints, were compared to commercially available SPIOs (Resovist). Monodisperse MNTs showed a 2-fold greater signal per unit mass, and 20% better spatial resolution. In vitro evaluation of tracers showed that MPI performance of our MNTs is preserved in blood, serum-rich cell-culture medium and gel; thus independent of changes in hydrodynamic volume and fluid viscosity - a critical prerequisite for in vivo MPI. In a rodent model, our MNTs circulated for 15 min - 3× longer than Resovist - and supported our in vitro evaluation that MPI signal is preserved in the physiological environment. Furthermore, MRI and histology analysis showed that MNTs distribute in the reticuloendothelial system (RES) in a manner similar to clinically approved SPIO agents. MNTs demonstrating long-circulation times and optimized MPI performance show potential as angiography tracers and blood-pool agents for the emerging MPI imaging modality. PMID:23434348

  13. A simulation study on superparamagnetic nanoparticle based multi-tracer tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Batra, Akash; Jain, Shray; Ye, Clark; Liu, Jinming; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been utilized in biomedical sensing, detection, therapeutics, and diagnostics due to their unique magnetic response under different driving fields. In this letter, we report a multi-tracer tracking method that uses different kinds of MNPs as magnetic tracers along with two alternating magnetic fields that can be potentially used to build magnetic-based flow cytometry. By applying two driving fields at frequency f H and f L to MNPs, the response signal is measured at the combinatorial frequencies such as f H ± 2 f L (3rd harmonics), f H ± 4 f L (5th harmonics), f H ± 6 f L (7th harmonics), and so on. Each MNP has its own signature of phase and amplitude, and it is possible to differentiate individual MNPs in a mixture. We theoretically demonstrated colorizing up to 4-MNP tracers in one mixture with an error rate lower than 10%. The performance of multi-tracer imaging can be optimized by increasing the driving field frequency, choosing MNPs with higher saturation magnetization, and using MNP tracers with more centralized size distribution.

  14. Characterization of crushed tuff for the evaluation of the fate of tracers in transport studies in the unsaturated zone

    SciTech Connect

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.; Raymond, R.; Bish, D.L.; Gladney, E.S.; Lopez, E.A.

    1987-03-01

    Results of field-scale (caisson) transport studies under unsaturated moisture and steady and nonsteady flow conditions indicate variability and a lack of conservation of mass in solute transport. The tuff materials used in that study were analyzed for the presence of tracers and of freshly precipitated material to help explain the variability and lack of conservation of mass. Selected tuff samples were characterized by neutron activation analysis for tracer identification, by x-ray diffraction for mineral identification, by petrographic analysis for identification of freshly precipitated material, and by x-ray fluorescence analysis for identification of major and trace elements. The results of these analyses indicate no obvious presence of freshly precipitated material that would retard tracer movement. The presence of the nonsorbing tracers (bromide and iodide) suggest the retention of these tracers in immobile water. The presence of the nonsorbing tracers (bromide and iodide) suggest the retention of these tracers in immobile water. The presence of sorbing and nonsorbing tracers on the tuff at some locations (even cesium at the 415-cm depth) and not at others suggests variability in transport. 15 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Estimates of tracer-based piston-flow ages of groundwater from selected sites-National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 1992-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Stephen R.; Shapiro, Stephanie D.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Widman, Peggy K.; Casile, Gerolamo C.; Wayland, Julian E.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents selected age data interpreted from measured concentrations of environmental tracers in groundwater from 1,399 National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program groundwater sites across the United States. The tracers of interest were chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He). Tracer data compiled for this analysis primarily were from wells representing two types of NAWQA groundwater studies - Land-Use Studies (shallow wells, usually monitoring wells, in recharge areas under dominant land-use settings) and Major-Aquifer Studies (wells, usually domestic supply wells, in principal aquifers and representing the shallow, used resource). Reference wells (wells representing groundwater minimally impacted by anthropogenic activities) associated with Land-Use Studies also were included. Tracer samples were collected between 1992 and 2005, although two networks sampled from 2006 to 2007 were included because of network-specific needs. Tracer data from other NAWQA Program components (Flow System Studies, which are assessments of processes and trends along groundwater flow paths, and various topical studies) were not compiled herein. Tracer data from NAWQA Land-Use Studies and Major-Aquifer Studies that previously had been interpreted and published are compiled herein (as piston-flow ages), but have not been reinterpreted. Tracer data that previously had not been interpreted and published are evaluated using documented methods and compiled with aqueous concentrations, equivalent atmospheric concentrations (for CFCs and SF6), estimates of tracer-based piston-flow ages, and selected ancillary data, such as redox indicators, well construction, and major dissolved gases (N2, O2, Ar, CH4, and CO2). Tracer-based piston-flow ages documented in this report are simplistic representations of the tracer data. Tracer-based piston-flow ages are a convenient means of conceptualizing groundwater age. However, the piston

  16. Tracer monitored titrations: measurement of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Martz, Todd; Takeshita, Yuichiro; Rolph, Rebecca; Bresnahan, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The tracer monitored titration (TMT) technique is evaluated for measurement of dissolved oxygen. The TMT developed in this work uses a simple apparatus consisting of a low-precision pump for titrant delivery and an optical detector based on a white LED and two photodiodes with interference filters. It is shown that the classic Winkler method can be made free of routine volumetric and gravimetric measurements by application of TMT theory, which allows tracking the amounts of titrant and sample using a chemical tracer. The measurement precision of the prototype setup was 0.3% RSD.

  17. Radiopharmaceutical Tracers for Neural Progenitor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mangner, Thomas J.

    2006-09-29

    The Technical Report summarizes the results of the synthesis and microPET animal scanning of several compounds labeled with positron-emitting isotopes in normal, neonatal and kainic acid treated (seizure induced) rats as potential PET tracers to image the process of neurogenesis using positron emission tomography (PET). The tracers tested were 3'-deoxy-3'-[F-18]fluorothymidine ([F-18]FLT) and 5'-benzoyl-FTL, 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-[F-18]fluoro-B-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-bromouracil (FBAU) and 3',5'-dibenzoyl-FBAU, N-[F-18]fluoroacetyl-D-glucosamine (FLAG) and tetraacetyl-FLAG, and L-[1-C-11]leucine.

  18. Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

    1981-04-01

    A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

  19. Analysis of fluorescent particle tracer data

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    Four fluorescent particle tracer experiments were conducted during the July 1979 ASCOT experiment in the Anderson Creek Valley of northern California. The purpose of the experiment was to examine the transport and elongation of a plume traveling in the Anderson Creek nocturnal drainage flow and investigate the interaction of the Anderson Creek and Putah Creek flow fields. Sequential samples of tracer material at three downwind locations in Anderson Creek gave effective transport velocities of 1 to 2 m/s and showed an approximately linear relationship between plume elongation and travel distance. Integrated samples taken in both the Anderson Creek and Putah Creek air sheds indicated considerable interaction between the two flow fields.

  20. Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1988-01-01

    A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

  1. Galaxy tracers in N-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, F. J.; Evrard, August E.; Davis, Marc

    1993-01-01

    Using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics, we have modeled the formation of a compact group of galaxies with sufficient resolution to trace galaxies. Radiative cooling allows the baryons to dissipate their thermal energy and collapse to overdensities characteristic of real galaxies. With their cross section greatly reduced, these galaxy tracers remain distinct during cluster formation while their dark matter halos merge. In addition, the number density, the mass distribution function, and even the morphology of these objects are similar to those of observed galaxies. A viable population of galaxy tracers can be unambiguously defined.

  2. New Combined L-band Active/Passive Soil Moisture Retrieval Algorithm Optimized for Argentine Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruscantini, C. A.; Grings, F. M.; Salvia, M.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Karszenbaum, H.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of L-band passive microwave satellite observations to provide soil moisture (mv) measurements is well known. Despite its high sensitivity to near-surface mv, radiometric technology suffers from having a relatively low spatial resolution. Conversely active microwave observations, although their finer resolution, are difficult to be interpreted for mv content due to the confounding effects of vegetation and roughness. There have been and there are strong motivations for the realization of satellite missions that carry passive and active microwave instruments on board. This has also led to important contributions in algorithm development. In this line of work, NASA-CONAE SAC-D/Aquarius mission had on board an L band radiometer and scatterometer. This was followed by the launch of NASA SMAP mission (Soil Moisture Active Passive), as well as several airborne campaigns that provide active and passive measurements. Within this frame, a new combined active/passive mv retrieval algorithm is proposed by deriving an analytical expression of brightness temperature and radar backscattering relation using explicit semi-empirical models. Simple models (i.e. that can be easily inverted and have relatively low amount of ancillary parameters) were selected: ω-τ model (Jackson et al., 1982, Water Resources Research) and radar-only model (Narvekar et al., 2015, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing). A major challenge involves coupling the active and passive models to be consistent with observations. Coupling equations can be derived using theoretical active/passive high-order radiative transfer models, such as 3D Numerical Method of Maxwell equations (Zhou et al., 2004, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing) and Tor Vergata (Ferrazzoli et al., 1995,Remote Sensing of Environment) models. In this context, different coupling equations can be optimized for different land covers using theoretical forward models with specific parametrization for each

  3. Tracer monitored titrations: measurement of total alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Martz, Todd R; Dickson, Andrew G; DeGrandpre, Michael D

    2006-03-15

    We introduce a new titration methodology, tracer monitored titration (TMT), in which analyses are free of volumetric and gravimetric measurements and insensitive to pump precision and reproducibility. Spectrophotometric monitoring of titrant dilution, rather than volume increment, lays the burden of analytical performance solely on the spectrophotometer. In the method described here, the titrant is a standardized mixture of acid-base indicator and strong acid. Dilution of a pulse of titrant in a titration vessel is tracked using the total indicator concentration measured spectrophotometrically. The concentrations of reacted and unreacted indicator species, derived from Beer's law, are used to calculate the relative proportions of titrant and sample in addition to the equilibrium position (pH) of the titration mixture. Because the method does not require volumetric or gravimetric additions of titrant, simple low-precision pumps can be used. Here, we demonstrate application of TMT for analysis of total alkalinity (A(T)). High-precision, high-accuracy seawater A(T) measurements are crucial for understanding, for example, the marine CaCO3 budget and saturation state, anthropogenic CO2 penetration into the oceans, calcareous phytoplankton blooms, and coral reef dynamics. We present data from 286 titrations on three types of total alkalinity standards: Na2CO3 in 0.7 mol kg x soln(-1) NaCl, NaOH in 0.7 mol kg x soln(-1) NaCl, and a seawater Certified Reference Material (CRM). Based on Na2CO3 standards, the accuracy and precision are +/-0.2 and +/-0.1% (4 and 2 micromol kg x soln(-1) for A(T) approximately 2100-2500 micromol kg x soln(-1), n = 242), using low-precision solenoid pumps to introduce sample and titrant. Similar accuracy and precision were found for analyses run 42 days after the initial experiments. Excellent performance is achieved by optimizing the spectrophotometric detection system and relying upon basic chemical thermodynamics for calculating the

  4. Optimization for ultrasound extraction of polysaccharides from mulberry fruits with antioxidant and hyperglycemic activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; You, Li-Jun; Abbasi, Arshad Mehmood; Fu, Xiong; Liu, Rui Hai

    2015-10-01

    Single-factor experiment and Box-Behnken design (BBD) were applied to optimize the ultrasound-assisted extraction of mulberry fruits polysaccharides (MFP). Under optimum conditions: ratio of water to raw material 40.25, extraction temperature 69°C, ultrasonic power 190W and extraction time 75 min, the MFP yield was 3.13% (±0.07%), in accordance to the predicted value of 3.04%. The mulberry fruits polysaccharides fractions was obtained by deproteinization (MFP-1), followed by decolorization and deionization (MFP-2). Carbohydrate content in MFP, MFP-1 and MFP-2 was 58.61% (±1.47%), 69.98% (±0.91%), 81.18% (±1.29%), as well as proteins was estimated 16.50% (±0.86%), 1.57% (±0.63%), 1.02% (±0.18%), respectively. The FT-IR indicated that MFP, MFP-1 and MFP-2 were acidic polysaccharides. The MFP-1 exhibited the strongest antioxidant activity, while MFP-2 showed the strongest hyperglycemic activity in vitro. This may be caused by their different compositions and physical properties in the different mulberry fruit polysaccharides fractions.

  5. Dynamic optimization of walker-assisted FES-activated paraplegic walking: simulation and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Nekoukar, Vahab; Erfanian, Abbas

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a musculoskeletal model of walker-assisted FES-activated paraplegic walking for the generation of muscle stimulation patterns and characterization of the causal relationships between muscle excitations, multi-joint movement, and handle reaction force (HRF). The model consists of the lower extremities, trunk, hands, and a walker. The simulation of walking is performed using particle swarm optimization to minimize the tracking errors from the desired trajectories for the lower extremity joints, to reduce the stimulations of the muscle groups acting around the hip, knee, and ankle joints, and to minimize the HRF. The results of the simulation studies using data recorded from healthy subjects performing walker-assisted walking indicate that the model-generated muscle stimulation patterns are in agreement with the EMG patterns that have been reported in the literature. The experimental results on two paraplegic subjects demonstrate that the proposed methodology can improve walking performance, reduce HRF, and increase walking speed when compared to the conventional FES-activated paraplegic walking.

  6. Optimization of polysaccharides extraction from watermelon rinds: Structure, functional and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Romdhane, Molka Ben; Haddar, Anissa; Ghazala, Imen; Jeddou, Khawla Ben; Helbert, Claire Boisset; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, optimization of hot water extraction, structural characteristics, functional properties, and biological activities of polysaccharides extracted from watermelon rinds (WMRP) were investigated. The physicochemical characteristics and the monosaccharide composition of these polysaccharides were then determined using chemical composition analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). SEM images showed that extracted polysaccharides had a rough surface with many cavities. GC-FID results proved that galactose was the dominant sugar in the extracted polysaccharides, followed by arabinose, glucose, galacturonic acid, rhamnose, mannose, xylose and traces of glucuronic acid. The findings revealed that WMRP displayed excellent antihypertensive and antioxidant activities. Those polysaccharides had also a protection effect against hydroxyl radical-induced DNA damage. Functional properties of extracted polysaccharides were also evaluated. WMRP showed good interfacial dose-dependent proprieties. Overall, the results suggested that WMRP presents a promising natural source of antioxidants and antihypertensive agents. PMID:27596431

  7. Improving both aqueous solubility and anti-cancer activity by assessing progressive lead optimization libraries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Li, Fei; Wu, Ling; Wang, Wenyi; Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Qiu; Zhou, Hongyu; Yan, Bing

    2015-05-01

    Thiazolidinone compounds 1-3 are lead compounds that have cytoselective toxicity toward non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and drug-resistant NSCLC cells while showing low toxicity to normal human fibroblasts (NHFB). However, this class of compounds generally has a very low aqueous solubility (∼0.1 μg/ml). In order to improve both solubility and anti-cancer activity, we designed and synthesized two lead-optimization libraries and investigated these libraries using simultaneous high-throughput solubility and cytotoxicity assays. By all-around modifications on R(1), R(2) and R(3) substitutions, consecutive library synthesis, and testing, we improved the aqueous solubility (5-fold improvement in solubility, from 0.1 to 0.5 μg/ml) and anti-cancer activity (10-fold improvement in EC50 from 0.72-0.98 μM to 0.08-0.16 μM) in the new lead thiazolidinone compound 31.

  8. Optimization for ultrasound extraction of polysaccharides from mulberry fruits with antioxidant and hyperglycemic activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; You, Li-Jun; Abbasi, Arshad Mehmood; Fu, Xiong; Liu, Rui Hai

    2015-10-01

    Single-factor experiment and Box-Behnken design (BBD) were applied to optimize the ultrasound-assisted extraction of mulberry fruits polysaccharides (MFP). Under optimum conditions: ratio of water to raw material 40.25, extraction temperature 69°C, ultrasonic power 190W and extraction time 75 min, the MFP yield was 3.13% (±0.07%), in accordance to the predicted value of 3.04%. The mulberry fruits polysaccharides fractions was obtained by deproteinization (MFP-1), followed by decolorization and deionization (MFP-2). Carbohydrate content in MFP, MFP-1 and MFP-2 was 58.61% (±1.47%), 69.98% (±0.91%), 81.18% (±1.29%), as well as proteins was estimated 16.50% (±0.86%), 1.57% (±0.63%), 1.02% (±0.18%), respectively. The FT-IR indicated that MFP, MFP-1 and MFP-2 were acidic polysaccharides. The MFP-1 exhibited the strongest antioxidant activity, while MFP-2 showed the strongest hyperglycemic activity in vitro. This may be caused by their different compositions and physical properties in the different mulberry fruit polysaccharides fractions. PMID:26076608

  9. Optimization of recombinant expression enables discovery of novel cytochrome P450 activity in rice diterpenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Naoki; Wu, Yisheng; Xu, Meimei; Peters, Reuben J.

    2015-01-01

    The oxygenation reactions catalyzed by cytochromes P450 (CYPs) play critical roles in plant natural products biosynthesis. At the same time, CYPs are one of most challenging enzymes to functionally characterize due to the difficulty of recombinantly expressing these membrane-associated monooxygenases. In the course of investigating rice diterpenoid biosynthesis we have developed a synthetic biology approach for functional expression of relevant CYPs in Escherichia coli. In certain cases activity was observed for only one of two closely related paralogs although it seems clear that related reactions are required for production of the known diterpenoids. Here we report that optimization of the recombinant expression system enabled characterization of not only these previously recalcitrant CYPs, but also discovery of additional activity relevant to rice diterpenoid biosynthesis. Of particular interest, CYP701A8 was found to catalyze 3β-hydroxylation of syn-pimaradiene, which is presumably relevant to momilactone biosynthesis, while CYP71Z6 & 7 were found to catalyze multiple reactions, with CYP71Z6 catalyzing the production of 2α,3α-dihydroxy-ent-isokaurene via 2α-hydroxy- ent-isokaurene, and CYP71Z7 catalyzing the production of 3α-hydroxy-ent-cassadien-2- one via 2α-hydroxy-ent-cassadiene and ent-cassadien-2-one, which may be relevant to oryzadione and phytocassane biosynthesis, respectively. PMID:25758958

  10. Development of Novel Sugar Isomerases by Optimization of Active Sites in Phosphosugar Isomerases for Monosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Yeong-Su

    2013-01-01

    Phosphosugar isomerases can catalyze the isomerization of not only phosphosugar but also of monosaccharides, suggesting that the phosphosugar isomerases can be used as sugar isomerases that do not exist in nature. Determination of active-site residues of phosphosugar isomerases, including ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Clostridium difficile (CDRPI), mannose-6-phosphate isomerase from Bacillus subtilis (BSMPI), and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PFGPI), was accomplished by docking of monosaccharides onto the structure models of the isomerases. The determinant residues, including Arg133 of CDRPI, Arg192 of BSMPI, and Thr85 of PFGPI, were subjected to alanine substitutions and found to act as phosphate-binding sites. R133D of CDRPI, R192 of BSMPI, and T85Q of PFGPI displayed the highest catalytic efficiencies for monosaccharides at each position. These residues exhibited 1.8-, 3.5-, and 4.9-fold higher catalytic efficiencies, respectively, for the monosaccharides than the wild-type enzyme. However, the activities of these 3 variant enzymes for phosphosugars as the original substrates disappeared. Thus, R133D of CDRPI, R192 of BSMPI, and T85Q of PFGPI are no longer phosphosugar isomerases; instead, they are changed to a d-ribose isomerase, an l-ribose isomerase, and an l-talose isomerase, respectively. In this study, we used substrate-tailored optimization to develop novel sugar isomerases which are not found in nature based on phosphosugar isomerases. PMID:23204422

  11. An optimal approach to active damping of nonlinear vibrations in composite plates using piezoelectric patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saviz, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper a nonlinear approach to studying the vibration characteristic of laminated composite plate with surface-bonded piezoelectric layer/patch is formulated, based on the Green Lagrange type of strain-displacements relations, by incorporating higher-order terms arising from nonlinear relations of kinematics into mathematical formulations. The equations of motion are obtained through the energy method, based on Lagrange equations and by using higher-order shear deformation theories with von Karman-type nonlinearities, so that transverse shear strains vanish at the top and bottom surfaces of the plate. An isoparametric finite element model is provided to model the nonlinear dynamics of the smart plate with piezoelectric layer/ patch. Different boundary conditions are investigated. Optimal locations of piezoelectric patches are found using a genetic algorithm to maximize spatial controllability/observability and considering the effect of residual modes to reduce spillover effect. Active attenuation of vibration of laminated composite plate is achieved through an optimal control law with inequality constraint, which is related to the maximum and minimum values of allowable voltage in the piezoelectric elements. To keep the voltages of actuator pairs in an allowable limit, the Pontryagin’s minimum principle is implemented in a system with multi-inequality constraint of control inputs. The results are compared with similar ones, proving the accuracy of the model especially for the structures undergoing large deformations. The convergence is studied and nonlinear frequencies are obtained for different thickness ratios. The structural coupling between plate and piezoelectric actuators is analyzed. Some examples with new features are presented, indicating that the piezo-patches significantly improve the damping characteristics of the plate for suppressing the geometrically nonlinear transient vibrations.

  12. Optimization of low energy sonication treatment for granular activated carbon colonizing biomass assessment.

    PubMed

    Saccani, G; Bernasconi, M; Antonelli, M

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at optimizing a low energy sonication (LES) treatment for granular activated carbon (GAC)-colonizing biomass detachment and determination, evaluating detachment efficiency and the effects of ultrasound exposure on bacterial cell viability. GAC samples were collected from two filters fed with groundwater. Conventional heterotrophic plate count (HPC) and fluorescence microscopy with a double staining method were used to evaluate cell viability, comparing two LES procedures, without and with periodical bulk substitution. A 20 min LES treatment, with bulk substitution after cycles of 5 min as maximum treatment time, allowed to recover 87%/100% of attached biomass, protecting detached bacteria from ultrasound damaging effects. Observed viable cell inactivation rate was 6.5/7.9% cell/min, with membrane-compromised cell damage appearing to be even higher (11.5%/13.1% cell/min). Assessing bacterial detachment and damaging ultrasound effects, fluorescence microscopy turned out to be more sensitive compared to conventional HPC. The optimized method revealed a GAC-colonizing biomass of 9.9 x 10(7) cell/gGAC for plant 1 and 8.8 x 10(7) cell/gGAC for plant 2, 2 log lower than reported in literature. The difference between the two GAC-colonizing biomasses is higher in terms of viable cells (46.3% of total cells in plant 1 GAC-colonizing biomass compared to the 33.3% in plant 2). Studying influent water contamination through multivariate statistical analyses, apossible combined toxic and genotoxic effect of chromium VI and trichloroethylene was suggested as a reason for the lower viable cell fraction observed in plant 2 GAC-colonizing population.

  13. Signatures of active and passive optimized Lévy searching in jellyfish.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andy M

    2014-10-01

    Some of the strongest empirical support for Lévy search theory has come from telemetry data for the dive patterns of marine predators (sharks, bony fishes, sea turtles and penguins). The dive patterns of the unusually large jellyfish Rhizostoma octopus do, however, sit outside of current Lévy search theory which predicts that a single search strategy is optimal. When searching the water column, the movement patterns of these jellyfish change over time. Movement bouts can be approximated by a variety of Lévy and Brownian (exponential) walks. The adaptive value of this variation is not known. On some occasions movement pattern data are consistent with the jellyfish prospecting away from a preferred depth, not finding an improvement in conditions elsewhere and so returning to their original depth. This 'bounce' behaviour also sits outside of current Lévy walk search theory. Here, it is shown that the jellyfish movement patterns are consistent with their using optimized 'fast simulated annealing'--a novel kind of Lévy walk search pattern--to locate the maximum prey concentration in the water column and/or to locate the strongest of many olfactory trails emanating from more distant prey. Fast simulated annealing is a powerful stochastic search algorithm for locating a global maximum that is hidden among many poorer local maxima in a large search space. This new finding shows that the notion of active optimized Lévy walk searching is not limited to the search for randomly and sparsely distributed resources, as previously thought, but can be extended to embrace other scenarios, including that of the jellyfish R. octopus. In the presence of convective currents, it could become energetically favourable to search the water column by riding the convective currents. Here, it is shown that these passive movements can be represented accurately by Lévy walks of the type occasionally seen in R. octopus. This result vividly illustrates that Lévy walks are not necessarily

  14. Formulation and process optimization of multiparticulate pulsatile system delivered by osmotic pressure-activated rupturable membrane.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sheng-Feng; Hsieh, Chien-Ming; Chen, Ying-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Ho, Hsiu-O; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a multiparticulate pulsatile drug delivery system activated by a rupturable controlled-release membrane (Eudragit(®) RS) via osmotic pressure (with NaCl as the osmogent) was developed and characterized for omeprazole, omeprazole sodium, and propranolol HCl which have different water solubilities. Multiparticulates in pellet form for incorporation with or without the osmogent were manufactured by three methods and then used to coat a polymeric membrane. Results demonstrated that drug/osmogent-containing pellets manufactured by the extrusion/spheronization method with incorporation of the osmogent were optimal. The lag time (tL) to initiate pulsatile release is regulated by tL=l(2)/(6×D), which is dependent on the coating levels (l(2)) and plasticizer content (D). The pulsatile release pattern was found to be dependent on the osmotic pressure (osmogent), drug solubility, and mechanical properties of the polymeric membrane (elasticity and toughness). Omeprazole with lower water solubility could not generate sufficient osmotic pressure to create a crack in the membrane to activate pulsatile release, whereas the two other model drugs with higher solubilities could. But adsorption of omeprazole sodium on Eudragit(®) RS via charge-charge interactions led the its incomplete release. Finally, with 4% osmogent of NaCl added, a lag time in a range from 0 to 12h proportionally regulated by varying both the membrane thickness and plasticizer level initiated the complete pulsatile release of propranolol HCl. In conclusion, a multiparticulate pulsatile drug delivery system activated by a rupturable controlled-release membrane via osmotic pressure was successfully developed, and clinical applications of chronotherapy with drugs like propranolol HCl are expected.

  15. Structural and Dynamic Requirements for Optimal Activity of the Essential Bacterial Enzyme Dihydrodipicolinate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Reboul, C. F.; Porebski, B. T.; Griffin, M. D. W.; Dobson, R. C. J.; Perugini, M. A.; Gerrard, J. A.; Buckle, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) is an essential enzyme involved in the lysine biosynthesis pathway. DHDPS from E. coli is a homotetramer consisting of a ‘dimer of dimers’, with the catalytic residues found at the tight-dimer interface. Crystallographic and biophysical evidence suggest that the dimers associate to stabilise the active site configuration, and mutation of a central dimer-dimer interface residue destabilises the tetramer, thus increasing the flexibility and reducing catalytic efficiency and substrate specificity. This has led to the hypothesis that the tetramer evolved to optimise the dynamics within the tight-dimer. In order to gain insights into DHDPS flexibility and its relationship to quaternary structure and function, we performed comparative Molecular Dynamics simulation studies of native tetrameric and dimeric forms of DHDPS from E. coli and also the native dimeric form from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). These reveal a striking contrast between the dynamics of tetrameric and dimeric forms. Whereas the E. coli DHDPS tetramer is relatively rigid, both the E. coli and MRSA DHDPS dimers display high flexibility, resulting in monomer reorientation within the dimer and increased flexibility at the tight-dimer interface. The mutant E. coli DHDPS dimer exhibits disorder within its active site with deformation of critical catalytic residues and removal of key hydrogen bonds that render it inactive, whereas the similarly flexible MRSA DHDPS dimer maintains its catalytic geometry and is thus fully functional. Our data support the hypothesis that in both bacterial species optimal activity is achieved by fine tuning protein dynamics in different ways: E. coli DHDPS buttresses together two dimers, whereas MRSA dampens the motion using an extended tight-dimer interface. PMID:22685390

  16. Optimized Expression and Purification for High-Activity Preparations of Algal [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Yacoby, I.; Tegler, L. T.; Pochekailov, S.; Zhang, S.; King, P. W.

    2012-04-01

    Recombinant expression and purification of metallo-enzymes, including hydrogenases, at high-yields is challenging due to complex, and enzyme specific, post-translational maturation processes. Low fidelities of maturation result in preparations containing a significant fraction of inactive, apo-protein that are not suitable for biophysical or crystallographic studies. We describe the construction, overexpression and high-yield purification of a fusion protein consisting of the algal [2Fe2S]-ferredoxin PetF (Fd) and [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1. The maturation of Fd-HydA1 was optimized through improvements in culture conditions and media components used for expression. We also demonstrated that fusion of Fd to the N-terminus of HydA1, in comparison to the C-terminus, led to increased expression levels that were 4-fold higher. Together, these improvements led to enhanced HydA1 activity and improved yield after purification. The strong binding-affinity of Fd for DEAE allowed for two-step purification by ion exchange and StrepTactin affinity chromatography. In addition, the incorporation of a TEV protease site in the Fd-HydA1 linker allowed for the proteolytic removal of Fd after DEAE step, and purification of HydA1 alone by StrepTactin. In combination, this process resulted in HydA1 purification yields of 5 mg L{sup -1} of culture from E. coli with specific activities of 1000 U (U = 1 {micro}mol hydrogen evolved mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}). The [FeFe]-hydrogenases are highly efficient enzymes and their catalytic sites provide model structures for synthetic efforts to develop robust hydrogen activation catalysts. In order to characterize their structure-function properties in greater detail, and to use hydrogenases for biotechnological applications, reliable methods for rapid, high-yield expression and purification are required.

  17. Influence of Transport on Two-Dimensional Model Simulation. Tracer Sensitivity to 2-D Model Transport. 1; Long Lived Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Considine, David B.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we examine the sensitivity of long lived tracers to changes in the base transport components in our 2-D model. Changes to the strength of the residual circulation in the upper troposphere and stratosphere and changes to the lower stratospheric K(sub zz) had similar effects in that increasing the transport rates decreased the overall stratospheric mean age, and increased the rate of removal of material from the stratosphere. Increasing the stratospheric K(sub yy) increased the mean age due to the greater recycling of air parcels through the middle atmosphere, via the residual circulation, before returning to the troposphere. However, increasing K(sub yy) along with self-consistent increases in the corresponding planetary wave drive, which leads to a stronger residual circulation, more than compensates for the K(sub yy)-effect, and produces significantly younger ages throughout the stratosphere. Simulations with very small tropical stratospheric K(sub yy) decreased the globally averaged age of air by as much as 25% in the middle and upper stratosphere, and resulted in substantially weaker vertical age gradients above 20 km in the extratropics. We found only very small stratospheric tracer sensitivity to the magnitude of the horizontal mixing across the tropopause, and to the strength of the mesospheric gravity wave drag and diffusion used in the model. We also investigated the transport influence on chemically active tracers and found a strong age-tracer correlation, both in concentration and calculated lifetimes. The base model transport gives the most favorable overall comparison with a variety of inert tracer observations, and provides a significant improvement over our previous 1995 model transport. Moderate changes to the base transport were found to provide modest agreement with some of the measurements. Transport scenarios with residence times ranging from moderately shorter to slightly longer relative to the base case simulated N2O lifetimes

  18. Tracer Transport in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, E. J.; Pfister, L.; Bergman, J. W.; Atlas, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Trace species such as carbon monoxide, ozone, and very short-lived halocarbons in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) are important for chemistry and the radiation budget. Also, these species can be used to diagnose transport pathways into and through the TTL. TTL tracer concentrations are controlled primarily by input from extreme deep convective systems that rapidly transport air from the lower troposphere into the TTL, rapid horizontal transport, and slow vertical transport, with the rapid convective transport directly to the uppermost TTL being particularly important for species with short lifetimes. The extreme deep convection overshooting to near the tropical tropopause is poorly represented by convective parameterizations used in global models. Here, we investigate tracer transport using trajectories along with explicit calculations of convective influence. The times and locations of convective influence on the trajectory parcels are determined by tracing the trajectories through two-dimensional, three-hourly fields of convective cloud top height from geostationary satellite and TRMM. The tracer simulations are constrained by measurements from the Aura MLS and ACE-FTS satellites, as well as measurements from recent high-altitude aircraft campaigns. The model is used to evaluate the sensitivity of TTL tracer concentrations to diabatic heating rate (approximately in balance with vertical motion) and the occurrence frequency of extreme convection.

  19. Molecules as Tracers of Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costagliola, F.; Aalto, S.; Rodriguez, M. I.; Muller, S.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Martín, S.; Peréz-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.; Lindberg, J. E.; Batejat, F.; Jütte, E.; van der Werf, P.; Lahuis, F.

    2011-11-01

    Here we present the results of a 3 mm survey of 23 galaxies, obtained with the EMIR receiver at the IRAM 30 m telescope. Emission of the main molecular species is compared with existing chemical models, in order to find and test molecular signatures of galaxy evolution and to compare them to IR evolutionary tracers.

  20. Using neural networks to describe tracer correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lary, D. J.; Müller, M. D.; Mussa, H. Y.

    2003-11-01

    Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural 5 network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and CH4 volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.). In this study a neural network using Quickprop learning and one hidden layer with eight nodes was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation co-efficient of 0.9995. Such an accurate representation of tracer-tracer correlations allows more use to be made of long-term datasets to constrain chemical models. Such as the 10 dataset from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) which has continuously observed CH4 (but not N2O) from 1991 till the present. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download

  1. Using neural networks to describe tracer correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lary, D. J.; Müller, M. D.; Mussa, H. Y.

    2004-01-01

    Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and methane volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.). In this study a neural network using Quickprop learning and one hidden layer with eight nodes was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation coefficient between simulated and training values of 0.9995. Such an accurate representation of tracer-tracer correlations allows more use to be made of long-term datasets to constrain chemical models. Such as the dataset from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) which has continuously observed CH4 (but not N2O) from 1991 till the present. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  2. Using Neural Networks to Describe Tracer Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, D. J.; Mueller, M. D.; Mussa, H. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and CH4 volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.). In this study a neural network using Quickprop learning and one hidden layer with eight nodes was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation co- efficient of 0.9995. Such an accurate representation of tracer-tracer correlations allows more use to be made of long-term datasets to constrain chemical models. Such as the dataset from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) which has continuously observed CH4, (but not N2O) from 1991 till the present. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  3. Natural and artificial nobel gas hydrologic tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, G.B.

    1994-06-01

    Noble gas isotopes provide opportunities for ground water tracing. Both naturally occurring tracers and artificially injected tracers can be used. The equilibration of water with the earth`s atmosphere records the temperature and atmospheric pressure during ground water recharge. This temperature/pressure record can be used to distinguish cold recharge from warmer recharge with a resolution of 1-2 C temperature and 500m in altitude. The radioactive decay of U and Th produce large concentrations of 4He in old ground water and this 4He signature can be useful in tracing the small addition of old water (>10,000 yr.) to young water (<100 yr.). The decay of 3H present either form nuclear testing or cosmic ray interactions leads to detectable amounts of 3He in young ground water (<50 yr.). By measuring both 3H and 3He, the mean age of the 3H in the water can be calculated. In addition to these natural tracers, isotopically enriched noble gas isotopes are readily available at low cost and can be used an non-hazardous water tracers. This inert, persistent, and harmless tracing technique can used in many situations at a cost of about one dollar per million gallons of water traced.

  4. Subsurface barrier integrity verification using perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.M.; Heiser, J.; Milian, L.; Senum, G.

    1996-12-01

    Subsurface barriers are an extremely promising remediation option to many waste management problems. Gas phase tracers include perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT`s) and chlorofluorocarbon tracers (CFC`s). Both have been applied for leak detection in subsurface systems. The focus of this report is to describe the barrier verification tests conducted using PFT`s and analysis of the data from the tests. PFT verification tests have been performed on a simulated waste pit at the Hanford Geotechnical facility and on an actual waste pit at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The objective of these tests were to demonstrate the proof-of-concept that PFT technology can be used to determine if small breaches form in the barrier and for estimating the effectiveness of the barrier in preventing migration of the gas tracer to the monitoring wells. The subsurface barrier systems created at Hanford and BNL are described. The experimental results and the analysis of the data follow. Based on the findings of this study, conclusions are offered and suggestions for future work are presented.

  5. Evaluating Contaminants of Emerging Concern as tracers of wastewater from septic systems.

    PubMed

    James, C Andrew; Miller-Schulze, Justin P; Ultican, Shawn; Gipe, Alex D; Baker, Joel E

    2016-09-15

    Bacterial and nutrient contamination from anthropogenic sources impacts fresh and marine waters, reducing water quality and restricting recreational and commercial activities. In many cases the source of this contamination is ambiguous, and a tracer or set of tracers linking contamination to source would be valuable. In this work, the effectiveness of utilizing a suite of Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) as tracers of bacteria from human septic system effluent is investigated. Field sampling was performed at more than 20 locations over approximately 18 months and analyzed for a suite of CECs and fecal coliform bacteria. The sampling locations included seeps and small freshwater discharges to the shoreline. Sites were selected and grouped according to level of impact by septic systems as determined by previous field sampling programs. A subset of selected locations had been positively identified as being impacted by effluent from failing septic systems through dye testing. The CECs were selected based on their predominant use, their frequency of use, and putative fate and transport properties. In addition, two rounds of focused sampling were performed at selected sites to characterize short-term variations in CEC and fecal coliform concentrations, and to evaluate environmental persistence following source correction activities. The results indicate that a suite of common use compounds are suitable as generalized tracers of bacterial contamination from septic systems and that fate and transport properties are important in tracer selection. Highly recalcitrant or highly labile compounds likely follow different loss profiles in the subsurface compared to fecal bacteria and are not suitable tracers. The use of more than one tracer compound is recommended due to source variability of septic systems and to account for variations in the subsurface condition. In addition, concentrations of some CECs were measured in receiving waters at levels which suggested the

  6. Fluorescence imaging applied to tracer distributions in variably saturated fractured clayey till.

    PubMed

    Rosenbom, Annette E; Ernstsen, Vibeke; Flühler, Hannes; Jensen, Karsten H; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Wydler, Hannes

    2008-01-01

    The study of mechanisms controlling preferential flow and transport in variably saturated fractured clayey till is often hindered by insufficient spatial resolution or unknown measuring volume. With the objective to study these mechanisms while circumventing the obstacles, tracer experiments with two fluorescent tracers Acid Yellow 7 (AY7) and Sulforhodamine B (SB) were performed at three different rain events for a fall and a summer season. Irrigated areas were excavated down to depths of 2.8 m and the movement of both tracers in the exposed profiles was delineated simultaneously by high spatial resolution apparent concentration maps (pixel approximately 1 mm(2)) obtained with an imaging device. The device consists of a light source and a CCD camera, both equipped with tracer-specific-filters for fluorescent light. The fluorescence images were corrected for nonuniform lighting, changing surface roughness, and varying optical properties of the soil profile. The resulting two-dimensional apparent concentration distribution profiles of the tracers showed that: (i) relative low water content in the upper 10 cm of the irrigated till in summer had a pronounced retardation effect on the AY7-migration and no effect on the SB-migration; (ii) the dead-end biopores were not activated in the fall season; (iii) only 3D fracture-plans connected to hydraulically active 1D-biopores contributed to the leaching; (iv) the tracer migration primary followed macropores during both seasons, though AY7 also followed a topsoil piston transport in summer; (v) the highest tracer pixel apparent concentrations were often found in macropores and most pronounced in the summer season; and (vi) 3D-dilution in fractures seems to play a dominating role in AY7-migration in the fall season.

  7. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  8. Tracer Partitioning in Two-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Hesse, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The concentration distributions of geochemical tracers in a subsurface reservoir can be used as an indication of the reservoir flow paths and constituent fluid origin. In this case, we are motivated by the origin of marked geochemical gradients in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir in northeastern New Mexico. This reservoir contains 99% CO2 with various trace noble gas components and overlies the formation brine in a sloping aquifer. It is thought that magmatic CO2 entered the reservoir, and displaced the brine. This displacement created gradients in the concentrations of the noble gases. Two models to explain noble gas partitioning in two-phase flow are presented here. The first model assumes that the noble gases act as tracers and uses a first order non-linear partial differential equation to compute the volume fraction of each phase along the displament path. A one-way coupled partial differential equation determines the tracer concentration, which has no effect on the overall flow or phase saturations. The second model treats each noble gas as a regular component resulting in a three-component, two-phase system. As the noble gas injection concentration goes to zero, we see the three-component system behave like the one-way coupled system of the first model. Both the analytical and numerical solutions are presented for these models. For the process of a gas displacing a liquid, we see that a noble gas tracer with greater preference for the gas phase, such as Helium, will move more quickly along the flowpath than a heavier tracer that will more easily enter the liquid phase, such as Argon. When we include partial miscibility of both the major and trace components, these differences in speed are shown in a bank of the tracer at the saturation front. In the three component model, the noble gas bank has finite width and concentration. In the limit where the noble gas is treated as a tracer, the width of the bank is zero and the concentration increases linearly

  9. An effect of physical activity-based recreation programs on children's optimism, humor styles, and school life adjustment.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jae-Eun; Lee, Gwang-Uk

    2015-06-01

    This study puts its purpose in identifying the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on the optimism of children, humor styles, and school life adjustment. To achieve the study purpose, this study selected 190 subjects as samples were extracted targeting senior students of elementary schools who participated in the physical activity-based recreation in the metropolitan areas as of 2014. As research methods, questionnaire papers were used and reliability analysis, factor analysis, correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis were conducted by utilizing SPSS 18.0 after inputting analysis data into the computer. The study results, obtained in this study are as follows: First, in terms of the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on optimism, participation frequency and participation intensity would have an effect on optimism, while participation period would have a significant effect on being positive among the sub-factors of optimism. Second, participation in physical activity-based recreation programs might have a significant effect on humor styles. Third, in terms of the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on the school life adjustment, it was demonstrated that participation period and participation intensity would have a significant effect on school life adjustment, while participation frequency would have a significant effect on regulation-observance and school life satisfaction.

  10. Halon-1301, a new Groundwater Age Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Monique; van der Raaij, Rob; Morgenstern, Uwe; Jackson, Bethanna

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater dating is an important tool to assess groundwater resources in regards to direction and time scale of groundwater flow and recharge and to assess contamination risks and manage remediation. To infer groundwater age information, a combination of different environmental tracers, such as tritium and SF6, are commonly used. However ambiguous age interpretations are often faced, due to a limited set of available tracers and limitations of each tracer method when applied alone. There is a need for additional, complementary groundwater age tracers. We recently discovered that Halon-1301, a water soluble and entirely anthropogenic gaseous substance, may be a promising candidate [Beyer et al, 2014]. Halon-1301 can be determined along with SF6, SF5CF3 and CFC-12 in groundwater using a gas chromatography setup with attached electron capture detector developed by Busenberg and Plummer [2008]. Halon-1301 has not been assessed in groundwater. This study assesses the behaviour of Halon-1301 in water and its suitability as a groundwater age tracer. We determined Halon-1301 in 17 groundwater and various modern (river) waters sites located in 3 different groundwater systems in the Wellington Region, New Zealand. These waters have been previously dated with tritium, CFC-12, CFC-11 and SF6 with mean residence times ranging from 0.5 to over 100 years. The waters range from oxic to anoxic and some show evidence of CFC contamination or degradation. This allows us to assess the different properties affecting the suitability of Halon-1301 as groundwater age tracer, such as its conservativeness in water and local contamination potential. The samples are analysed for Halon-1301 and SF6simultaneously, which allows identification of issues commonly faced when using gaseous tracers such as contamination with modern air during sampling. Overall we found in the assessed groundwater samples Halon-1301 is a feasible new groundwater tracer. No sample indicated significantly elevated

  11. PET tracer development—a tale of mice and men

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Rodney J; Dorow, Donna; Roselt, Peter

    2006-01-01

    PET scanning is an emerging technology for the clinical evaluation of many disease processes in man. The vast majority of clinical positron emission tomography (PET) studies are performed using a single tracer, fluorodeoxyglucose. Despite the excellent diagnostic performance of this tracer, it has recognised limitations. New tracers offer the potential to both address these limitations, and to establish new applications for PET. Small animal PET is a logical technique for validating new tracers relevant to human diseases. However, interspecies differences in the handling of chemicals may significantly influence the handling of novel tracers. This requires caution in extrapolating findings in animals to expectations of performance in man. Already there are several examples where biodistribution studies in mice would not have predicted the clinical utility of existing PET tracers. Nevertheless, application of a systematic approach to tracer development is likely to speed transition of new tracers from animals into man. PMID:17114061

  12. AIR INFILTRATION MEASUREMENTS USING TRACER GASES: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a literature review of air filtration measurements using tracer gases, including sulfur hexafluoride, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and radioactive argon and krypton. Sulfur hexafluoride is the commonest tracer gas of choice...

  13. Helium as a Dynamical Tracer in the Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, J. P.; Liu, X.; Wang, W.; Burns, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    Helium has been a missing constituent in current thermosphere general circulation models. Although typically a minor gas relative to the more abundant major gasses, its unique properties of being chemically inert and light make it an excellent tracer of thermosphere dynamics. Studying helium can help simplify understanding of transport effects. This understanding can then be projected to other gasses whose overall structure and behavior are complex but, by contrasting with helium, can be evaluated for its transport dependencies. The dynamical influences on composition impact estimates of thermosphere mass density, where helium during solar minima can have a direct contribution, as well as ionosphere electron density. Furthermore, helium estimates in the upper thermosphere during solar minima have not been observed since the 1976 minimum. Indirect estimates of helium in the upper thermosphere during the recent extreme solar minimum indicates winter-time helium concentrations exceeded NRL-MSISE00 estimates by 30%-70% during periods of quiet geomagnetic activity. For times of active geomagnetic conditions, helium concentrations near ~450 km altitude are estimated to decrease while oxygen concentrations increase. An investigation of the altitude structure in thermosphere mass density storm-time perturbations reveal the important effects of composition change with maximum perturbation occurring near the He/O transition region and a much weaker maximum occurring near the O/N2 transition region. However, evaluating helium behavior and its role as a dynamical tracer is not straightforward and model development is necessary to adequately establish the connection to specific dynamical processes. Fortunately recent efforts have led to the implementation of helium modules in the NCAR TIEGCM and TIME-GCM. In this invited talk, the simulated helium behavior and structure will be shown to reproduce observations (such as the wintertime helium bulge and storm-time response) and its

  14. Tracer Brownian Motion in Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zanten, John; Amin, Samiul; Kloxin, Christopher

    2003-03-01

    The utility of tracer tracer Brownian motion in probing the structure and dynamics of complex fluids is gaining increasing recognition. This is primarily due to the significant advantages that so-called tracer microrheology provides over traditional mechanical rheometry such as gently probing a material's linear response over a wide frequency range and small sample volumes. The underlying basis of the technique relies on having a correct understanding of the connection between the Brownian or thermal motion of the probe particles and the viscoelastic response of the suspending media. Although this connection has been well established for simple viscous fluids it is still not well understood for viscoelastic media. This to primarily due to:(i) the presence of local heterogeneities in these complex systems, (ii) the possible perturbation of the local rheological properties brought about by the probe particles and (iii) the influence of longitudinal dynamical modes. Previous experimental investigations have primarily focused on aqueous biopolymer solutions where the above mentioned factors do not seem to play a significant role. Recent investigations indicate that the above-mentioned factors may significantly influence tracer Brownian motion. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the connection between the probe Brownian motion and the viscoelastic response of the suspending media, comprehensive studies of several polymer and surfactant solutions-semi-dilute PEO solutions, CTAB/KBr & CTAB/NaSal wormlike micelle solutions, Pluronic F108 micellar dispersions & FCC soft crystals-were undertaken. Tracer microrheology results are reported for both ensemble diffusing wave spectroscopy-based ensemble and one & two particle tracking measurements.

  15. Multirate Transport of Natural Tracers in a Fractured System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, K. L.; Malama, B.; Heath, J. E.; Gardner, P.; Robinson, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Flow and transport in fractured systems is important in both groundwater applications and low-permeability hydrocarbon systems. We apply the multirate solute transport model to the flow of single-phase natural tracers in low-permeability hydrocarbon source rocks. We explore the effects of fracture and domain geometry, reservoir boundary conditions, and initial conditions of both the flow and transport problems using analytical and semi-analytical solutions. The flow and transport solutions will be combined to optimize reservoir characterization using a Bayesian framework. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Optimization of physicochemical properties and safety profile of novel bacterial topoisomerase type II inhibitors (NBTIs) with activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Reck, Folkert; Ehmann, David E; Dougherty, Thomas J; Newman, Joseph V; Hopkins, Sussie; Stone, Gregory; Agrawal, Nikunj; Ciaccio, Paul; McNulty, John; Barthlow, Herbert; O'Donnell, Jennifer; Goteti, Kosalaram; Breen, John; Comita-Prevoir, Janelle; Cornebise, Mark; Cronin, Mark; Eyermann, Charles J; Geng, Bolin; Carr, Greg R; Pandarinathan, Lakshmipathi; Tang, Xuejun; Cottone, Andrew; Zhao, Liang; Bezdenejnih-Snyder, Natascha

    2014-10-01

    Type II bacterial topoisomerases are well validated targets for antimicrobial chemotherapy. Novel bacterial type II topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) of these targets are of interest for the development of new antibacterial agents that are not impacted by target-mediated cross-resistance with fluoroquinolones. We now disclose the optimization of a class of NBTIs towards Gram-negative pathogens, especially against drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Physicochemical properties (pKa and logD) were optimized for activity against P. aeruginosa and for reduced inhibition of the hERG channel. The optimized analogs 9g and 9i displayed potent antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa, and a significantly improved hERG profile over previously reported analogs. Compound 9g showed an improved QT profile in in vivo models and lower clearance in rat over earlier compounds. The compounds show promise for the development of new antimicrobial agents against drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  17. Estimation of muscle forces in gait using a simulation of the electromyographic activity and numerical optimization.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Emiliano Pablo; Crespo, Marcos José; Braidot, Ariel Andrés Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Clinical gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait patterns. However, a complete distribution of muscle forces throughout the gait cycle is a current challenge for many researchers. Two techniques are often used to estimate muscle forces: inverse dynamics with static optimization and computer muscle control that uses forward dynamics to minimize tracking. The first method often involves limitations due to changing muscle dynamics and possible signal artefacts that depend on day-to-day variation in the position of electromyographic (EMG) electrodes. Nevertheless, in clinical gait analysis, the method of inverse dynamics is a fundamental and commonly used computational procedure to calculate the force and torque reactions at various body joints. Our aim was to develop a generic musculoskeletal model that could be able to be applied in the clinical setting. The musculoskeletal model of the lower limb presents a simulation for the EMG data to address the common limitations of these techniques. This model presents a new point of view from the inverse dynamics used on clinical gait analysis, including the EMG information, and shows a similar performance to another model available in the OpenSim software. The main problem of these methods to achieve a correct muscle coordination is the lack of complete EMG data for all muscles modelled. We present a technique that simulates the EMG activity and presents a good correlation with the muscle forces throughout the gait cycle. Also, this method showed great similarities whit the real EMG data recorded from the subjects doing the same movement.

  18. Optimization of Electrically Active Magnetic Nanoparticles as Accurate and Efficient Microbial Extraction Tools

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, Barbara C.; Cloutier, Ashley K.; Alocilja, Evangelyn C.

    2015-01-01

    Food defense requires the means to efficiently screen large volumes of food for microbial pathogens. Even rapid detection methods often require lengthy enrichment steps, making them impractical for this application. There is a great need for rapid, sensitive, specific, and inexpensive methods for extracting and concentrating microbial pathogens from food. In this study, an immuno-magnetic separation (IMS) methodology was developed for Escherichia coli O157:H7, using electrically active magnetic nanoparticles (EAMNPs). The analytical specificity of the IMS method was evaluated against Escherichia coli O55:H7 and Shigella boydii, and was improved over previous protocols by the addition of sodium chloride during the conjugation of antibodies onto MNPs. The analytical sensitivity of the IMS method was greatest when a high concentration of antibodies (1.0 mg/mL) was present during conjugation. EAMNP concentrations of 1.0 and 0.5 mg/mL provided optimal analytical sensitivity and analytical specificity. The entire IMS procedure requires only 35 min, and antibody-conjugated MNPs show no decline in performance up to 149 days after conjugation. This analytically sensitive and specific extraction protocol has excellent longevity and shows promise as an effective extraction for multiple electrochemical biosensor applications. PMID:25664527

  19. Path planning and parameter optimization of uniform removal in active feed polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Shaozhi; Zhang, Chunlei; Zhang, Linghua; Chen, Huanan

    2015-06-01

    A high-quality ultrasmooth surface is demanded in short-wave optical systems. However, the existing polishing methods have difficulties meeting the requirement on spherical or aspheric surfaces. As a new kind of small tool polishing method, active feed polishing (AFP) could attain a surface roughness of less than 0.3 nm (RMS) on spherical elements, although AFP may magnify the residual figure error or mid-frequency error. The purpose of this work is to propose an effective algorithm to realize uniform removal of the surface in the processing. At first, the principle of the AFP and the mechanism of the polishing machine are introduced. In order to maintain the processed figure error, a variable pitch spiral path planning algorithm and the dwell time-solving model are proposed. For suppressing the possible mid-frequency error, the uniformity of the synthesis tool path, which is generated by an arbitrary point at the polishing tool bottom, is analyzed and evaluated, and the angular velocity ratio of the tool spinning motion to the revolution motion is optimized. Finally, an experiment is conducted on a convex spherical surface and an ultrasmooth surface is finally acquired. In conclusion, a high-quality ultrasmooth surface can be successfully obtained with little degradation of the figure and mid-frequency errors by the algorithm.

  20. Mycosynthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles: Optimization, characterization and antimicrobial activity against human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Balakumaran, M D; Ramachandran, R; Balashanmugam, P; Mukeshkumar, D J; Kalaichelvan, P T

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to isolate soil fungi from Kolli and Yercaud Hills, South India with the ultimate objective of producing antimicrobial nanoparticles. Among 65 fungi tested, the isolate, Bios PTK 6 extracellularly synthesized both silver and gold nanoparticles with good monodispersity. Under optimized reaction conditions, the strain Bios PTK 6 identified as Aspergillus terreus has produced extremely stable nanoparticles within 12h. These nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis. spectrophotometer, HR-TEM, FTIR, XRD, EDX, SAED, ICP-AES and Zetasizer analyses. A. terreus synthesized 8-20 nm sized, spherical shaped silver nanoparticles whereas gold nanoparticles showed many interesting morphologies with a size of 10-50 nm. The presence and binding of proteins with nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR study. Interestingly, the myco derived silver nanoparticles exhibited superior antimicrobial activity than the standard antibiotic, streptomycin except against Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The leakage of intracellular components such as protein and nucleic acid demonstrated that silver nanoparticles damage the bacterial cells by formation of pores, which affects membrane permeability and finally leads to cell death. Further, presence of nanoparticles in the bacterial membrane and the breakage of cell wall were also observed using SEM. Thus, the obtained results clearly reveal that these antimicrobial nanoparticles could be explored as promising candidates for a variety of biomedical and pharmaceutical applications.

  1. Optimization of synthesis, characterization and cytotoxic activity of Seleno-Capparis spionosa L. polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yu-Bin; Dong, Fang; Lang, Lang; Zhang, Ling-Wen; Miao, Jing; Liu, Zhen-Feng; Jin, Li-Na; Hao, Ying

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an experiment was designed to optimize the synthesis of seleno-Capparis spionosa L. polysaccharide (Se-CSPS) by response surface methodology. Three independent variables (reaction time, reaction temperature and ratio of Na(2)SeO(3) to CSPS) were tested. Furthermore, the thermal stability, particle size, shape and cytotoxic activity of Se-CSPS in vitro were investigated. The optimum reaction conditions were obtained shown as follows: reaction time 7.5 h, reaction temperature 71 °C, and ratio of Na(2)SeO(3) to CSPS 0.9 g/g. Under these conditions, the Se content in Se-CSPS reached 5.547 mg/g, which was close to the predicted value (5.518 mg/g) by the model. The thermal stability, particle size and shape of Se-CSPS were significantly different from those of CSPS. Additionally, a MTT assay indicated that the Se-CSPS could inhibit the proliferation of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner.

  2. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding

    PubMed Central

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10–20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  3. Extraction Optimization of Tinospora cordifolia and Assessment of the Anticancer Activity of Its Alkaloid Palmatine

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Huma; Dixit, Savita

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To optimize the conditions for the extraction of alkaloid palmatine from Tinospora cordifolia by using response surface methodology (RSM) and study its anticancerous property against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) induced skin carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. Methods. The effect of three independent variables, namely, extraction temperature, time, and cycles was investigated by using central composite design. A single topical application of DMBA (100 μg/100 μL of acetone), followed 2 weeks later by repeated application of croton oil (1% in acetone three times a week) for 16 weeks, exhibited 100 percent tumor incidence (Group 2). Results. The highest yield of alkaloid from Tinospora cordifolia could be achieved at 16 hours of extraction time under 40°C with 4 extraction cycles. Alkaloid administration significantly decreases tumor size, number, and the activity of serum enzyme when compared with the control (Group 2). In addition, depleted levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase and increased DNA damage were restored in palmatine treated groups. Conclusion. The data of the present study clearly indicate the anticancer potential of palmatine alkaloid in DMBA induced skin cancer model in mice. PMID:24379740

  4. Mycosynthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles: Optimization, characterization and antimicrobial activity against human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Balakumaran, M D; Ramachandran, R; Balashanmugam, P; Mukeshkumar, D J; Kalaichelvan, P T

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to isolate soil fungi from Kolli and Yercaud Hills, South India with the ultimate objective of producing antimicrobial nanoparticles. Among 65 fungi tested, the isolate, Bios PTK 6 extracellularly synthesized both silver and gold nanoparticles with good monodispersity. Under optimized reaction conditions, the strain Bios PTK 6 identified as Aspergillus terreus has produced extremely stable nanoparticles within 12h. These nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis. spectrophotometer, HR-TEM, FTIR, XRD, EDX, SAED, ICP-AES and Zetasizer analyses. A. terreus synthesized 8-20 nm sized, spherical shaped silver nanoparticles whereas gold nanoparticles showed many interesting morphologies with a size of 10-50 nm. The presence and binding of proteins with nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR study. Interestingly, the myco derived silver nanoparticles exhibited superior antimicrobial activity than the standard antibiotic, streptomycin except against Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The leakage of intracellular components such as protein and nucleic acid demonstrated that silver nanoparticles damage the bacterial cells by formation of pores, which affects membrane permeability and finally leads to cell death. Further, presence of nanoparticles in the bacterial membrane and the breakage of cell wall were also observed using SEM. Thus, the obtained results clearly reveal that these antimicrobial nanoparticles could be explored as promising candidates for a variety of biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:26686609

  5. Housefly larvae hydrolysate: orthogonal optimization of hydrolysis, antioxidant activity, amino acid composition and functional properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antioxidant, one of the most important food additives, is widely used in food industry. At present, antioxidant is mostly produced by chemical synthesis, which would accumulate to be pathogenic. Therefore, a great interest has been developed to identify and use natural antioxidants. It was showed that there are a lot of antioxidative peptides in protein hydrolysates, possessing strong capacity of inhibiting peroxidation of macro-biomolecular and scavenging free redicals in vivo. Enzymatic hydrolysis used for preparation of antioxidative peptides is a new hot-spot in the field of natural antioxidants. It reacts under mild conditions, with accurate site-specific degradation, good repeatability and few damages to biological activity of protein. Substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis are usually plants and aqua-animals. Insects are also gaining attention because of their rich protein and resource. Antioxidative peptides are potential to be exploited as new natural antioxidant and functional food. There is a huge potential market in medical and cosmetic field as well. Result Protein hydrolysate with antioxidant activity was prepared from housefly larvae, by a two-step hydrolysis. Through orthogonal optimization of the hydrolysis conditions, the degree of hydrolysis was determined to be approximately 60%. Fractionated hydrolysate at 25 mg/mL, 2.5 mg/mL and 1 mg/mL exhibited approximately 50%, 60% and 50% of scavenging capacity on superoxide radicals, 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Hydrolysate did not exhibit substantial ion chelation. Using a linoneic peroxidation system, the inhibition activity of hydrolysate at 20 mg/mL was close to that of 20 μg/mL tertiary butylhydroquinone, suggesting a potential application of hydrolysate in the oil industry as an efficient antioxidant. The lyophilized hydrolysate presented almost 100% solubility at pH 3-pH 9, and maintained nearly 100% activity at pH 5-pH 8 at 0

  6. Extraction optimization, structure and antioxidant activities of Fortunella margarita Swingle polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongliang; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Yingting; Tian, Yuting; Miao, Song; Zheng, Baodong

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to maximize the yield of polysaccharides extracted from Fortunella margarita Swingle (FMPS) and investigate the relationship between the structure and antioxidant activities. The optimal conditions for ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) of FMPS were ultrasonic power 171W, extraction temperature 50°C, water volume to raw material weight (W/M) ratio 32 ml/g and extraction time 87 min. Under these conditions, the yield of FMPS was 4.15±0.11% (w/w), which was increased by 129.28% compared to hot water extraction. FMPS3, the main fraction of FMPS, was isolated by DEAE Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography. According to size-exclusion chromatography, multi-angle laser light-scattering and refractive index (SEC-MALLS-RI), the molecular weight (Mw), polydispersity index (Mw/Mn) and root-mean-square turning radius (Rg) of FMPS3 were 4.58×10(5) (±2.02%) Da, 1.08 (±1.23%), 28.13 (±1.73%) nm, respectively. FMPS3, linked mainly by β-glycosidic bonds, consisted of galactose, galacturonic acid, glucose, mannose and rhamnose as shown by HPLC, FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR. Furthermore, FMPS3 displayed strong scavenging ability against hydroxyl, superoxide and DPPH radicals. The activity was affected by the monosaccharide composition, molecular weight and proportion of β-glycosidic bonds and was a result of a combination of multiple structural factors. FMPS3 is potentially a novel natural antioxidant agent.

  7. Extraction optimization, structure and antioxidant activities of Fortunella margarita Swingle polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongliang; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Yingting; Tian, Yuting; Miao, Song; Zheng, Baodong

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to maximize the yield of polysaccharides extracted from Fortunella margarita Swingle (FMPS) and investigate the relationship between the structure and antioxidant activities. The optimal conditions for ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) of FMPS were ultrasonic power 171W, extraction temperature 50°C, water volume to raw material weight (W/M) ratio 32 ml/g and extraction time 87 min. Under these conditions, the yield of FMPS was 4.15±0.11% (w/w), which was increased by 129.28% compared to hot water extraction. FMPS3, the main fraction of FMPS, was isolated by DEAE Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography. According to size-exclusion chromatography, multi-angle laser light-scattering and refractive index (SEC-MALLS-RI), the molecular weight (Mw), polydispersity index (Mw/Mn) and root-mean-square turning radius (Rg) of FMPS3 were 4.58×10(5) (±2.02%) Da, 1.08 (±1.23%), 28.13 (±1.73%) nm, respectively. FMPS3, linked mainly by β-glycosidic bonds, consisted of galactose, galacturonic acid, glucose, mannose and rhamnose as shown by HPLC, FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR. Furthermore, FMPS3 displayed strong scavenging ability against hydroxyl, superoxide and DPPH radicals. The activity was affected by the monosaccharide composition, molecular weight and proportion of β-glycosidic bonds and was a result of a combination of multiple structural factors. FMPS3 is potentially a novel natural antioxidant agent. PMID:25542164

  8. Clinical NECR in 18F-FDG PET scans: optimization of injected activity and variable acquisition time. Relationship with SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, T.; Ferrer, L.; Necib, H.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Rousseau, C.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.

    2014-10-01

    The injected activity and the acquisition time per bed position for 18F-FDG PET scans are usually optimized by using metrics obtained from phantom experiments. However, optimal activity and time duration can significantly vary from a phantom set-up and from patient to patient. An approach using a patient-specific noise equivalent count rate (NECR) modelling has been previously proposed for optimizing clinical scanning protocols. We propose using the clinical NECR on a large population as a function of the body mass index (BMI) for deriving the optimal injected activity and acquisition duration per bed position. The relationship between the NEC and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was assessed both in a phantom and in a clinical setting. 491 consecutive patients were retrospectively evaluated and divided into 4 BMI subgroups. Two criteria were used to optimize the injected activity and the time per bed position was adjusted using the NECR value while keeping the total acquisition time constant. Finally, the relationship between NEC and SNR was investigated using an anthropomorphic phantom and a population of 507 other patients. While the first dose regimen suggested a unique injected activity (665 MBq) regardless of the BMI, the second dose regimen proposed a variable activity and a total acquisition time according to the BMI. The NEC improvement was around 35% as compared with the local current injection rule. Variable time per bed position was derived according to BMI and anatomical region. NEC and number of true events were found to be highly correlated with SNR for the phantom set-up and partially confirmed in the patient study for the BMI subgroup under 28 kg m-2 suggesting that for the scanner, the nonlinear reconstruction algorithm used in this study and BMI < 28 kg m-2, NEC, or the number of true events linearly correlated with SNR2.

  9. Optimization of synergism of a recombinant auxiliary activity 9 from Chaetomium globosum with cellulase in cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jung; Nam, Ki Hyun; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Sooah; Youn, Hak Jin; Lee, Hee Jin; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-10-01

    Auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9, formerly known as glycoside hydrolase family 61 or polysaccharide monooxygenase) is a group of fungal proteins that were recently found to have a significant synergism with cellulase in cellulose hydrolysis via the oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds of cellulose chains. In this study, we report the active expression of a recombinant fungal AA9 from Chaetomium globosum (CgAA9) in a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, and the optimization of its synergistic activity in cellulose hydrolysis by using cellulase. The recombinant CgAA9 (0.9 mg/g cellulose) exhibited 1.7-fold synergism in the hydrolysis of Avicel when incubated with 0.9 filter paper units of Celluclast 1.5 L/g cellulose. The first study of the active expression of AA9 using a bacterial host and its synergistic optimization could be useful for the industrial application of AA9 for the saccharification of lignocellulose.

  10. Optimization for ultrasound-assisted extraction of polysaccharides with antioxidant activity in vitro from the aerial root of Ficus microcarpa.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changxing; Li, Xia; Jiao, Yunpeng; Jiang, Dingyun; Zhang, Ling; Fan, Benxia; Zhang, Qianghua

    2014-09-22

    In this study, optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction and antioxidant activity of polysaccharides from the aerial root of Ficus microcarpa (FMPS) were investigated. The optimal conditions for extraction of FMPS were determined as followings: ultrasound power 200 W, ultrasound temperature 70°C, extraction temperature 74°C, liquid-solid ratio 35, extraction time 238 min, ultrasound time 49 min. The experimental yield of FMPS (3.44%) obtained under these conditions was well agreement with the value predicted by the model. In addition, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and antioxidant activity assays revealed that FMPS were acidic polysaccharides and had strong Fe2+ chelating activity and moderate hydrogen peroxide scavenging effect. Further work on the purification, structure characterization and antioxidant activity in vivo of FMPS is in progress. PMID:24906722

  11. Optimization of enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides and its activities on antioxidant and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qingfang; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Huaguo

    2014-10-13

    In the present study, enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides (FMPS) from F. mori using four kinds of enzymes and three compound enzymes were examined. Research found that glucose oxidase offered a better performance in enhancement of the extraction yields of FMPS, antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The glucose oxidase assisted extraction process was further optimized by using response surface method (RSM) to obtain maximum yield of crude FMPS. The results showed that optimized extraction conditions were ratio of enzyme amount 0.40%, enzyme treated time 38 min, treated temperature 58 °C and liquid-solid radio 11.0. Under these conditions, the mean experimental value of extraction yield (16.16 ± 0.14%) corresponded well with the predicted values and increased 160% than none enzyme treated ones. Pharmacological verification tests showed that F. mori crude polysaccharides had good antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities in vitro. PMID:25037415

  12. Optimization of enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides and its activities on antioxidant and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qingfang; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Huaguo

    2014-10-13

    In the present study, enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides (FMPS) from F. mori using four kinds of enzymes and three compound enzymes were examined. Research found that glucose oxidase offered a better performance in enhancement of the extraction yields of FMPS, antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The glucose oxidase assisted extraction process was further optimized by using response surface method (RSM) to obtain maximum yield of crude FMPS. The results showed that optimized extraction conditions were ratio of enzyme amount 0.40%, enzyme treated time 38 min, treated temperature 58 °C and liquid-solid radio 11.0. Under these conditions, the mean experimental value of extraction yield (16.16 ± 0.14%) corresponded well with the predicted values and increased 160% than none enzyme treated ones. Pharmacological verification tests showed that F. mori crude polysaccharides had good antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities in vitro.

  13. Industrial tracer application in People's Republic of China

    SciTech Connect

    Maoyi, S.

    1988-01-01

    A number of important applications of radioisotopes and their compounds used as tracers in petroleum industry, metallurgical industry, mechanical industry, chemical industry, electronic industry, hydrology and water conservancy in China are introduced in this paper. The tracer technique applied to entomology is also mentioned. The industrial tracer applications are successful and beneficial in People's Republic of China from the examples given.

  14. Analysis of unit mobility ratio well-to-well tracer flow to determine reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Abbaszadeh-Dehghani, M.

    1982-01-01

    This study was carried out in two related sections. In the first section, exact analytic equations were derived to define breakthrough curves (displacing fluid cut versus pore volumes injected, or area swept versus pore volume injected) for different developed flooding patterns for unit mobility ratio. The breakthrough curves were correlated into a single curve. Because of this correlation, it was concluded that the breakthrough curve for any other repeating pattern should also lie near this same correlating curve. The first section also includes an analytical definition of breakthrough curves for a developed five-spot at various mobility ratios. In the derivations, it was assumed that the streamlines were independent of mobility ratio. The results of the analysis showed that the breakthrough areal sweep efficiencies at various mobility ratios were nearly independent of mobility ratios, while the post-breakthrough performance differed for each mobility ratio. The second part discusses flow of a tracer slug in various developed patterns. In each system, an expression was derived to define the concentration of tracer in a streamtube. These expressions integrated over all the streamlines produced a set of equations describing tracer production curves from homogeneous patterns. The study shows that the effluent tracer concentration depends upon the pattern geometry and size, and the dispersion constant of the formation. A computer program based on a non-linear optimization technique was developed which analyzes a tracer breakthrough profile from a stratified reservoir. The program computes porosity-thickness and fractional permeability-thickness for each layer. The algorithm utilizes the equations of a developed five-spot pattern and the parameters obtained in correlating the tracer production curves.

  15. Heat tracer test in an alluvial aquifer: Field experiment and inverse modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepikova, Maria; Wildemeersch, Samuel; Hermans, Thomas; Jamin, Pierre; Orban, Philippe; Nguyen, Frédéric; Brouyère, Serge; Dassargues, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Using heat as an active tracer for aquifer characterization is a topic of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate the potential of using heat tracer tests for characterization of a shallow alluvial aquifer. A thermal tracer test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River, Belgium. The tracing experiment consisted in simultaneously injecting heated water and a dye tracer in an injection well and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and tracer concentration in the pumping well and in measurement intervals. To get insights in the 3D characteristics of the heat transport mechanisms, temperature data from a large number of observation wells closely spaced along three transects were used. Temperature breakthrough curves in observation wells are contrasted with what would be expected in an ideal layered aquifer. They reveal strongly unequal lateral and vertical components of the transport mechanisms. The observed complex behavior of the heat plume is explained by the groundwater flow gradient on the site and heterogeneities in the hydraulic conductivity field. Moreover, due to high injection temperatures during the field experiment a temperature-induced fluid density effect on heat transport occurred. By using a flow and heat transport numerical model with variable density coupled with a pilot point approach for inversion of the hydraulic conductivity field, the main preferential flow paths were delineated. The successful application of a field heat tracer test at this site suggests that heat tracer tests is a promising approach to image hydraulic conductivity field. This methodology could be applied in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) projects for assessing future efficiency that is strongly linked to the hydraulic conductivity variability in the considered aquifer.

  16. A Multiple-Tracer Approach for Identifying Sewage Sources to an Urban Stream System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyer, Kenneth Edward

    2007-01-01

    sampling approach, 149 sites were sampled at least one time for indicator tracers; 52 of these sites also were sampled for confirmatory tracers at least one time. Through the analysis of multiple-tracer levels in the synoptic samples, three major sewage sources to the Accotink Creek stream network were identified, and several other minor sewage sources to the Accotink Creek system likely deserve additional investigation. Near the end of the synoptic sampling activities, three additional sampling methods were used to gain better understanding of the potential for sewage sources to the watershed. These additional sampling methods included optical brightener monitoring, intensive stream sampling using automated samplers, and additional sampling of several storm-drain networks. The samples obtained by these methods provided further understanding of possible sewage sources to the streams and a better understanding of the variability in the tracer concentrations at a given sampling site. Collectively, these additional sampling methods were a valuable complement to the synoptic sampling approach that was used for the bulk of this study. The study results provide an approach for local authorities to use in applying a relatively simple and inexpensive collection of tracers to locate sewage sources to streams. Although this multiple-tracer approach is effective in detecting sewage sources to streams, additional research is needed to better detect extremely low-volume sewage sources and better enable local authorities to identify the specific sources of the sewage once it is detected in a stream reach.

  17. Interpreting tracer breakthrough tailing from different forced-gradient tracer experiment configurations in fractured bedrock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.W.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual and mathematical models are presented that explain tracer breakthrough tailing in the absence of significant matrix diffusion. Model predictions are compared to field results from radially convergent, weak-dipole, and push-pull tracer experiments conducted in a saturated crystalline bedrock. The models are based upon the assumption that flow is highly channelized, that the mass of tracer in a channel is proportional to the cube of the mean channel aperture, and the mean transport time in the channel is related to the square of the mean channel aperture. These models predict the consistent -2 straight line power law slope observed in breakthrough from radially convergent and weak-dipole tracer experiments and the variable straight line power law slope observed in push-pull tracer experiments with varying injection volumes. The power law breakthrough slope is predicted in the absence of matrix diffusion. A comparison of tracer experiments in which the flow field was reversed to those in which it was not indicates that the apparent dispersion in the breakthrough curve is partially reversible. We hypothesize that the observed breakthrough tailing is due to a combination of local hydrodynamic dispersion, which always increases in the direction of fluid velocity, and heterogeneous advection, which is partially reversed when the flow field is reversed. In spite of our attempt to account for heterogeneous advection using a multipath approach, a much smaller estimate of hydrodynamic dispersivity was obtained from push-pull experiments than from radially convergent or weak dipole experiments. These results suggest that although we can explain breakthrough tailing as an advective phenomenon, we cannot ignore the relationship between hydrodynamic dispersion and flow field geometry at this site. The design of the tracer experiment can severely impact the estimation of hydrodynamic dispersion and matrix diffusion in highly heterogeneous geologic media.

  18. Use of tracer tests to evaluate the impact of enhanced-solubilization flushing on in-situ biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Alter, S R; Brusseau, M L; Piatt, J J; Ray-Maitra, A; Wang, J-M; Cain, R B

    2003-07-01

    Tracer tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of a complexing sugar flush (CSF) on in-situ biodegradation potential at a site contaminated by jet fuel, solvents, and other organic compounds. Technical-grade hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin was used during the CSF study, which was conducted in a hydraulically isolated cell emplaced in a surficial aquifer. In-situ biodegradation potential was assessed with the use of tracer tests, which were conducted prior to and immediately following the CSF study. Ethanol, hexanol, and benzoate were used as the biodegradable tracers, while bromide was used as a nonreactive tracer. The results indicate that the biodegradation of benzoate was similar for both tracer tests. Conversely, the biodegradation of ethanol (23% increase) and hexanol (41% increase) was greater for the post-CSF tracer test. In addition, analysis of core samples collected from within the test cell indicates that the population density of aerobic jet-fuel degraders increased in the vicinity of the injection wells during the CSF. These results indicate that the cyclodextrin flush did not deleteriously affect the indigenous microbial community. This study illustrates that tracer tests can be used to evaluate the impact of remediation activities on in-situ biodegradation potential.

  19. Optimizing the Intralayer and Interlayer Compatibility for High-Efficiency Blue Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Chunbo; Fan, Chaochao; Wei, Ying; Han, Fuquan; Huang, Wei; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A series of phosphine oxide hosts, 4,6-bis(diphenylphosphoryl) dibenzothiophene (DBTDPO) and 4- diphenylphosphoryldibenzothiophene (DBTSPO), and electron transporting materials (ETM), 2-(diphenylphosphoryl)dibenzothiophene sulfone (2DBSOSPO), 3-(diphenylphosphoryl)dibenzothiophene sulfone (3DBSOSPO) and 4-(diphenylphosphoryl)dibenzothiophene sulfone (4DBSOSPO) were developed to support blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) devices with high performance through optimizing intralayer and interlayer compatibility of emissive layers. On the basis of the triplet energy of ~3.0 eV for the hosts and ETMs, excitons can be effectively confined on DMAC-DPS. Compared to DBTSPO, DBTDPO can support the excellent distribution uniformity to blue TADF dye bis[4-(9,9-dimethyl–9,10-dihydroacridine) phenyl] sulfone (DMAC-DPS), owing to their configuration similarity; while 3DBSOSPO and 4DBSOSPO are superior in compatibility with the hosts due to the similar molecular polarity or configuration. Through adjusting the molecular configuration, the electrical performance of ETMs can be feasibly tuned, including the excellent electron mobility (μe) by the order of 10−3 cm2 V−1 s−1. As the result, DBTDPO and 4DBSOSPO endowed their four-layer blue TADF devices with the maximum current efficiency of 33.5 cd A−1 and the maximum external quantum efficiency more than 17%, which are impressive among the best blue TADF devices. It is showed that intralayer compatibility determines the maximum efficiencies, while interlayer compatibility influences efficiency stability. PMID:26822524

  20. Optimizing vermistabilization of waste activated sludge using vermicompost as bulking material.

    PubMed

    Hait, Subrata; Tare, Vinod

    2011-03-01

    An integrated composting-vermicomposting system has been developed for stabilization of waste activated sludge (WAS) using matured vermicompost as bulking material and Eisenia fetida as earthworm species. Composting was considered as the main processing unit and vermicomposting as polishing unit. The integrated system was optimized by successive recycling and mixing of bulking material with WAS during composting and examining the effects of environmental condition (i.e. temperature: 10-30°C and relative humidity: 50 and 90%) and stocking density (0-5 kg/m(2)) on vermicomposting. The composting stage resulted in sufficient enrichment of bulking material with organic matter after 20 cycles of recycling and mixing with WAS and produced materials acceptable for vermicomposting. Vermicomposting of composted material caused significant reduction in pH, volatile solids (VS), specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR), total carbon (TC), total organic carbon (TOC), C/N ratio and pathogens and a substantial increase in electrical conductivity (EC), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP). The environmental conditions (i.e. temperature: 10-30°C and relative humidity: 50 and 90%) and stocking density (0-5 kg/m(2)) have profound effects on vermicomposting. Temperature of 20°C with high humidity is the best suited environmental condition for vermicomposting employing E. fetida. The favorable stocking density range for vermiculture is 0.5-2.0 kg/m(2) (optimum: 0.5 kg/m(2)) and for vermicomposting is 2.0-4.0 kg/m(2) (optimum: 3.0 kg/m(2)), respectively. The integrated composting-vermicomposting system potentially stabilizes and converts the hazardous WAS into quality organic manure for agronomic applications without any adverse effects.

  1. Radium and radon tracers in aquatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. B.

    2012-10-01

    Fourth International Ra-Rn Workshop;Narragansett, Rhode Island, 3-8 June 2012 Radium (Ra) and radon (Rn) are widely recognized as important geochemical tracers in the estimation of dispersion in aquatic environments, submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to the coastal ocean, water mass residence times, and air-sea and water- sediment exchange. More than 50 scientists, including graduate students and early- career scientists from 10 countries, recently participated in a workshop on Ra and Rn in Narragansett, R. I. The workshop was hosted by the University of Rhode Island and sponsored by the U.S. National Science Foundation Chemical Oceanography Program, ORTEC, Eichrom, and Durridge Company. The workshop provided a forum for presentations and open discussions regarding the latest developments and new directions in the application and measurement of isotopes 223Ra, 224Ra, 226Ra, 228Ra, and 222Rn, as well as models used in the application of these tracers to a range of environmental problems.

  2. Direct Quantification of Microbial Community Respiration along a Contamination Gradient using a novel Hydrologic Smart Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanaway, D. J.; Haggerty, R.; Feris, K. P.

    2010-12-01

    Heavy metal contamination in lotic ecosystems is a major health and environmental concern worldwide. The Resazurin Resorufin (Raz Rru) Smart Tracer system (Haggerty et al., 2008) provides a novel approach to test current models of microbial ecosystem response to chronic stressors such as heavy metals. These models predict that functional redundancy of metabolic capabilities of community members (e.g. respiration rate and enzyme activity) will compensate for decreases in species diversity until a stress threshold is reached. At this point, species diversity and function are expected to decline rapidly. Contrary to this model, microbial communities of the Clark Fork River (CF), Montana, demonstrate high levels of species diversity along the contamination gradient, whereas community function is inversely proportional to the level of contamination. The Raz Rru tool, a metabolically reactive hydrologic tracer, allows for direct quantification of in-situ microbial respiration rates. Therefore, this tool provides an opportunity to build upon studies of ecosystem response to contamination previously limited to extrapolation of point scale measurements to reach scale processes. The Raz Rru tool is used here to quantify the magnitude of metal induced limits on heterotrophic microbial respiration in communities that have evolved to different levels of chronic metal exposure. In this way we propose to be able to test a novel hypothesis concerning the nature of evolution of community processes to chronic stress and persistent environmental pollutants. Specifically, we hypothesize that metal contamination produces a measureable metabolic cost to both tolerant and intolerant communities. To test this hypothesis, rates of respiration associated with hyporheic sediments, supporting intact microbial communities, were quantified in the presence and absence of an acute Cd exposure in column experiments. Hyporheic sediment was collected from differently contaminated locations within

  3. 90Sr liquid scintillation urine analysis utilizing different approaches for tracer recovery.

    SciTech Connect

    Piraner, Olga; Preston, Rose T.; Shanks, Sonoya Toyoko; Jones, Robert

    2010-08-01

    90Sr is one of the isotopes most commonly produced by nuclear fission. This medium lived isotope presents serious challenges to radiation workers, the environment, and following a nuclear event, the general public. Methods of identifying this nuclide have been in existence for a number of years (e.g. Horwitz, E.P. [1], Maxwell, S.L.[2], EPA 905.0 [3]) which are time consuming, requiring a month or more for full analysis. This time frame is unacceptable in the present security environment. It is therefore important to have a dependable and rapid method for the determination of Sr. The purposes of this study are to reduce analysis time to less than half a day by utilizing a single method of radiation measurement while continuing to yield precise results. This paper presents findings on three methods that can meet this criteria; (1) stable Sr carrier, (2) 85Sr by gamma spectroscopy, and (3) 85Sr by LSC. Two methods of analyzing and calculating the 85Sr tracer recovery were investigated (gamma spectroscopy and a low energy window-Sr85LEBAB by LSC) as well as the use of two different types of Sr tracer (85Sr and stable Sr carrier). Three separate stock blank urine samples were spiked with various activity levels of 239Pu, 137Cs, 90Sr /90Y to determine the effectiveness of the Eichrome Sr-spec resin 2mL extractive columns. The objective was to compare the recoveries of 85Sr versus a stable strontium carrier, attempt to compare the rate at which samples can be processed by evaluating evaporation, neutralization, and removing the use of another instrument (gamma spectrometer) by using the LSC spectrometer to obtain 85Sr recovery. It was found that when using a calibration curve comprised of a different cocktail and a non-optimum discriminator setting reasonable results (bias of « 25%) were achieved. The results from spiked samples containing 85Sr demonstrated that a higher recovery is obtained when using gamma spectroscopy (89-95%) than when using the LEB window

  4. Efficacy of seven retrograde tracers, compared in multiple-labelling studies of feline motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Richmond, F J; Gladdy, R; Creasy, J L; Kitamura, S; Smits, E; Thomson, D B

    1994-07-01

    The labelling efficacies of 7 retrograde tracers were evaluated following cut nerve exposure or intramuscular injection into the serially compartmentalized neck muscle, biventer cervicis. Tested tracers included Fast Blue (FB), Fluorogold (FG), dextran conjugated to fluorescein (FD), dextran conjugated to rhodamine (Fluororuby (FR), 3000 and 10,000 MW), fluorescent latex microspheres, horseradish peroxidase coupled to colloidal gold, and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl indocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI). In 2 animals, horseradish peroxidase was also employed and spinal cords were processed for peroxidase activity to evaluate its effect on the appearance of cells labelled with fluorescent tracers. Four tracers, FB, FG, FD and FR, could be observed in motoneurones under the conditions of our study. FB and FG labelled comparable numbers of motoneurones following cut nerve exposure, but dissimilar numbers following intramuscular injection. FG diffused extensively following injection and was found in motoneurones not only in the appropriate ipsilateral segment but also adjacent ipsilateral and contralateral segments. Intramuscular injections of FB usually labelled fewer cells than cut nerve exposure, but evidence for spurious labelling following intramuscular injection could also be found. FD or FR labelled motoneurones following cut nerve exposure but not following intramuscular injection. The conjugated dextrans labelled more variable numbers of cells than FB or FG, but the labelled cells had similar patterns of distribution. The remaining tracers were ineffective as retrograde markers in our study, and the possible reasons for these failures are discussed.

  5. Hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase forms oligomeric structures that exhibit optimal DNA unwinding activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Bartek; Chen, Yingfeng; Lichti, Cheryl F; Harrison, Melody K; Jennings, Thomas A; Tang, Yong; Tackett, Alan J; Jordan, John B; Sakon, Joshua; Cameron, Craig E; Raney, Kevin D

    2008-04-25

    HCV NS3 helicase exhibits activity toward DNA and RNA substrates. The DNA helicase activity of NS3 has been proposed to be optimal when multiple NS3 molecules are bound to the same substrate molecule. NS3 catalyzes little or no measurable DNA unwinding under single cycle conditions in which the concentration of substrate exceeds the concentration of enzyme by 5-fold. However, when NS3 (100 nm) is equimolar with the substrate, a small burst amplitude of approximately 8 nm is observed. The burst amplitude increases as the enzyme concentration increases, consistent with the idea that multiple molecules are needed for optimal unwinding. Protein-protein interactions may facilitate optimal activity, so the oligomeric properties of the enzyme were investigated. Chemical cross-linking indicates that full-length NS3 forms higher order oligomers much more readily than the NS3 helicase domain. Dynamic light scattering indicates that full-length NS3 exists as an oligomer, whereas NS3 helicase domain exists in a monomeric form in solution. Size exclusion chromatography also indicates that full-length NS3 behaves as an oligomer in solution, whereas the NS3 helicase domain behaves as a monomer. When NS3 was passed through a small pore filter capable of removing protein aggregates, greater than 95% of the protein and the DNA unwinding activity was removed from solution. In contrast, only approximately 10% of NS3 helicase domain and approximately 20% of the associated DNA unwinding activity was removed from solution after passage through the small pore filter. The results indicate that the optimally active form of full-length NS3 is part of an oligomeric species in vitro.

  6. Commercial applications of perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.

    1991-06-01

    Tracer technology can be successfully applied to many leak-checking and monitoring evaluations of operating systems (e.g., building HVACs), manufacturing processes and products (e.g., air conditioners), and subsurface components and systems (e.g., underground storage tanks). Perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology is the most sensitive of all tracer technologies because the ambient background levels of the five (5) routinely-used PFTs are in the range of parts per 10{sup 15} parts of air (i.e., parts per quadrillion-ppq) and this technology's instrumentation can measure down to those levels. The effectiveness of this technology is achieved both in terms of cost (very little PFT need to be used) and detectability; for example, very small leaks can be rapidly detected. The PFT compounds, which are environmentally and biologically safe to use, are commercially available as are the sampling and analysis instrumentation. This presentation concerns (1) the steps being taken to commercialize this technology, (2) new applications of processes currently under study, and (3) applications in areas of use that will be particularly beneficial to the environment. 21 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. PERKINSUS-"CIDAL" ACTIVITY OF OYSTER HEMOCYTES USING A TETRAZOLIUM DYE REDUCTION ASSAY: OPTIMIZATION AND APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bactericidal assay developed to assess the ability of oyster (Crassostrea virginica) hemocytes to kill the human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus was optimized to estimate killing of the oyster parasite Perkinsus marinus. Assay variables, temperature, hemocyte:parasite ratio, i...

  8. An Integrated Approach to Characterizing Bypassed Oil in Heterogeneous and Fractured Reservoirs Using Partitioning Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Akhil Datta-Gupta

    2006-12-31

    approach is very fast and avoids much of the subjective judgments and time-consuming trial-and-errors associated with manual history matching. We demonstrate the power and utility of our approach using a synthetic example and two field examples. We have also explored the use of a finite difference reservoir simulator, UTCHEM, for field-scale design and optimization of partitioning interwell tracer tests. The finite-difference model allows us to include detailed physics associated with reactive tracer transport, particularly those related with transverse and cross-streamline mechanisms. We have investigated the potential use of downhole tracer samplers and also the use of natural tracers for the design of partitioning tracer tests. Finally, we discuss several alternative ways of using partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITTs) in oil fields for the calculation of oil saturation, swept pore volume and sweep efficiency, and assess the accuracy of such tests under a variety of reservoir conditions.

  9. Evaluation of Parameter Uncertainty Reduction in Groundwater Flow Modeling Using Multiple Environmental Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, B. W.; Gardner, P.

    2013-12-01

    Calibration of groundwater flow models for the purpose of evaluating flow and aquifer heterogeneity typically uses observations of hydraulic head in wells and appropriate boundary conditions. Environmental tracers have a wide variety of decay rates and input signals in recharge, resulting in a potentially broad source of additional information to constrain flow rates and heterogeneity. A numerical study was conducted to evaluate the reduction in uncertainty during model calibration using observations of various environmental tracers and combinations of tracers. A synthetic data set was constructed by simulating steady groundwater flow and transient tracer transport in a high-resolution, 2-D aquifer with heterogeneous permeability and porosity using the PFLOTRAN software code. Data on pressure and tracer concentration were extracted at well locations and then used as observations for automated calibration of a flow and transport model using the pilot point method and the PEST code. Optimization runs were performed to estimate parameter values of permeability at 30 pilot points in the model domain for cases using 42 observations of: 1) pressure, 2) pressure and CFC11 concentrations, 3) pressure and Ar-39 concentrations, and 4) pressure, CFC11, Ar-39, tritium, and He-3 concentrations. Results show significantly lower uncertainty, as indicated by the 95% linear confidence intervals, in permeability values at the pilot points for cases including observations of environmental tracer concentrations. The average linear uncertainty range for permeability at the pilot points using pressure observations alone is 4.6 orders of magnitude, using pressure and CFC11 concentrations is 1.6 orders of magnitude, using pressure and Ar-39 concentrations is 0.9 order of magnitude, and using pressure, CFC11, Ar-39, tritium, and He-3 concentrations is 1.0 order of magnitude. Data on Ar-39 concentrations result in the greatest parameter uncertainty reduction because its half-life of 269

  10. Design and optimization of voice coil actuator for six degree of freedom active vibration isolation system using Halbach magnet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MyeongHyeon; Kim, Hyunchang; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes the design, modeling, optimization, and validation of an active vibration isolation system using a voice coil motor. The active vibration isolating method was constructed with a passive isolator and an active isolator. A spring was used for passive isolating; an actuator was used for active isolating. The proposed active vibration isolation system (AVIS) can isolate disturbances for many kinds of instruments. Until now, developed AVIS were able to isolate a six degree-of-freedom disturbance effectively. This paper proposes the realization of such a six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system that can work as a bench top device for precision measuring machines such as atomic force microscope, scanning probe microscope, etc.

  11. Design and optimization of voice coil actuator for six degree of freedom active vibration isolation system using Halbach magnet array.

    PubMed

    Kim, MyeongHyeon; Kim, Hyunchang; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes the design, modeling, optimization, and validation of an active vibration isolation system using a voice coil motor. The active vibration isolating method was constructed with a passive isolator and an active isolator. A spring was used for passive isolating; an actuator was used for active isolating. The proposed active vibration isolation system (AVIS) can isolate disturbances for many kinds of instruments. Until now, developed AVIS were able to isolate a six degree-of-freedom disturbance effectively. This paper proposes the realization of such a six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system that can work as a bench top device for precision measuring machines such as atomic force microscope, scanning probe microscope, etc.

  12. Development of a Dual Tracer PET Method for Imaging Dopaminergic Neuromodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Converse, Alexander K.; Dejesus, Onofre T.; Flores, Leo G.; Holden, James E.; Kelley, Ann E.; Moirano, Jeffrey M.; Nickles, Robert J.; Oakes, Terrence R.; Roberts, Andrew D.; Ruth, Thomas J.; Vandehey, Nicholas T.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2006-04-01

    The modulatory neurotransmittor dopamine (DA) is involved in movement and reward behaviors, and malfunctions in the dopamine system are implicated in a variety of prevalent and debilitating pathologies including Parkinson's disease, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and addiction. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to separately measure changes in DA receptor occupancy and blood flow in response to various interventions. Here we describe a dual tracer PET method to simultaneously measure both responses with the aim of comparing DA release in particular areas of the brain and associated alterations in neural activity throughout the brain. Significant correlations between reductions in DA receptor occupancy and blood flow alterations would be potential signs of dopaminergic modulation, i.e. modifications in signal processing due to increased levels of extracellular DA. Methodological development has begun with rats undergoing an amphetamine challenge while being scanned with the blood flow tracer [17F]fluoromethane and the dopamine D2 receptor tracer [18F]desmethoxyfallypride.

  13. Design of aquifer remediation systems: (1) describing hydraulic structure and NAPL architecture using tracers.

    PubMed

    Enfield, Carl G; Wood, A Lynn; Espinoza, Felipe P; Brooks, Michael C; Annable, Michael; Rao, P S C

    2005-12-01

    Aquifer heterogeneity (structure) and NAPL distribution (architecture) are described based on tracer data. An inverse modelling approach that estimates the hydraulic structure and NAPL architecture based on a Lagrangian stochastic model where the hydraulic structure is described by one or more populations of lognormally distributed travel times and the NAPL architecture is selected from eight possible assumed distributions. Optimization of the model parameters for each tested realization is based on the minimization of the sum of the square residuals between the log of measured tracer data and model predictions for the same temporal observation. For a given NAPL architecture the error is reduced with each added population. Model selection was based on a fitness which penalized models for increasing complexity. The technique is demonstrated under a range of hydrologic and contaminant settings using data from three small field-scale tracer tests: the first implementation at an LNAPL site using a line-drive flow pattern, the second at a DNAPL site with an inverted five-spot flow pattern, and the third at the same DNAPL site using a vertical circulation flow pattern. The Lagrangian model was capable of accurately duplicating experimentally derived tracer breakthrough curves, with a correlation coefficient of 0.97 or better. Furthermore, the model estimate of the NAPL volume is similar to the estimates based on moment analysis of field data.

  14. Science Fair Projects. LC Science Tracer Bullet. TB 07-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howland, Joyce, Comp.

    2007-01-01

    Selected sources in this bibliography provide guidance to students, parents, and teachers throughout the process of planning, developing, implementing and competing in science fair activities. Sources range in suitability from elementary to high school levels. This guide updates "Library of Congress Science Tracer Bullet" 01-4. More specialized…

  15. Comparison of faecal and optimal growth conditions on in vitro pharmacodynamic activity of marbofloxacin against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pellet, T; Gicquel-Bruneau, M; Sanders, P; Laurentie, M

    2006-06-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the in vitro activity of marbofloxacin against Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains with differing marbofloxacin susceptibility levels under optimal growth conditions and under condition mimicking faecal environment in time-kill kinetic studies. Under optimal growth conditions, marbofloxacin exerted a bactericidal concentration-dependent activity against all E. coli strains with bactericidal concentrations equal to 1 or 4 times MIC. Under faecal growth conditions, marbofloxacin maintained a bactericidal concentration-dependent activity but a 4- to 16-fold increase in bactericidal concentration was required to produce a similar magnitude of effect at 8 h. The bactericidal activity decreased between 8 and 24 h and allowed a residual bacterial population to subsist with a significant regrowth for some of them. Under no-growth conditions, marbofloxacin produced a very low decrease of non-dividing bacteria during a short time. No concentration produced a reduction > or = 3log10 in viable count excepted for two susceptible strains at concentration > or = 64 x MIC after 4 h exposure. The pharmacodynamic parameters from time-kill kinetic studies provide a useful means of studying antimicrobial activity. The importance of using different growth conditions is indicated by the difference in the killing of E. coli in the absence of active dividing cells and in the presence of autoclaved faecal content, both of which have a detrimental effect on the activity of marbofloxacin.

  16. Enhancement of Cellulase Activity from a New Strain of Bacillus subtilis by Medium Optimization and Analysis with Various Cellulosic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Deepmoni; Bhargavi, P.; Sharma, Ashish; Goyal, Dinesh; Jawed, M.; Goyal, Arun

    2011-01-01

    The cellulase activity of Bacillus subtilis AS3 was enhanced by optimizing the medium composition by statistical methods. The enzyme activity with unoptimised medium with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was 0.07 U/mL and that was significantly enhanced by CMC, peptone, and yeast extract using Placket-Burman design. The combined effects of these nutrients on cellulase activity were studied using 22 full factorial central composite design. The optimal levels of medium components determined were CMC (1.8%), peptone (0.8%), and yeast extract (0.479%). The maximum enzyme activity predicted by the model was 0.49 U/mL which was in good agreement with the experimental value 0.43 U/mL showing 6-fold increase as compared to unoptimised medium. The enzyme showed multisubstrate specificity, showing significantly higher activity with lichenan and β-glucan and lower activity with laminarin, hydroxyethylcellulose, and steam exploded bagasse. The optimised medium with lichenan or β-glucan showed 2.5- or 2.8-fold higher activity, respectively, at same concentration as of CMC. PMID:21637325

  17. Behavior of a surface applied radionuclide and a dye tracer in structured and repacked soil monoliths.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, A; Schultze, U; Bugallo, P Bello; Wydler, H; Frossard, E; Flühler, H

    2003-01-01

    There has been increasing evidence in recent years about the impact of soil structure on vadose zone hydrology and the distribution of surface applied chemical substances. We have carried out a combined dye and radionuclide tracer study on two monoliths from the same location, one structured and one repacked, as part of an ongoing study to investigate the link between preferential flow, leaching of surface applied substances and their distribution within the soil.A tracer solution containing 1300 Bq/L (58)Co and 0.31 micromol/L Sulforhodamine B (SB) was added with roughly constant irrigation during a period of three weeks. The dye served as a tracer for water movement within the soil and thus allowed linkage of the radiotracer ((58)Co) with the flow pattern. Both were monitored in the outflow and measured within profile sections after monolith disassembly. Preferential flow in the structured monolith promoted the bypass and transport of both tracers, although transport was impeded at depths greater than 30 cm by compacted soil and reduced hydraulic conductivity. Eighty four percent of radiocobalt and 8% of SB were found in the upper 4 cm of the structured monolith. The homogenized monolith, on the other hand, showed mostly chromatographic infiltration and a more efficient soil filtering capacity with 91% of radiocobalt and 20% SB residing in the upper 4 cm. Furthermore no tracer was found in the outflow of the homogenized monolith during normal to high irrigation or at greater depth within the monolith. We have related flow characteristics and sorption of radiotracers by quantifying dye distributions and radionuclide activities throughout the profiles. Activities within the flow paths are up to 20-times higher than those measured in the soil matrix, and a fraction of radiocobalt follows the dye tracer in spite of cobalt's low mobility. The dye can thus be used to trace radionuclide distribution within the soil block.

  18. Shaping frequency response of a vibrating plate for passive and active control applications by simultaneous optimization of arrangement of additional masses and ribs. Part II: Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2016-03-01

    It was shown in Part I that an ability to shape frequency response of a vibrating plate according to precisely defined demands has a very high practical potential. It can be used to improve acoustic radiation of the plate for required frequencies or enhance acoustic isolation of noise barriers and device casings. It can be used for both passive and active control. The proposed method is based on mounting several additional ribs and masses (passive and/or active) to the plate surface at locations followed from an optimisation process. In Part I a relevant model of such structure, as a function of arrangement of the additional elements was derived and validated. The model allows calculating natural frequencies and mode-shapes of the whole structure. The aim of this companion paper, Part II, is to present the second stage of the method. This is an optimization process that results in arrangement of the elements guaranteeing desired plate frequency response, and enhancement of controllability and observability measures. For that purpose appropriate cost functions, and constraints followed from technological feasibility are defined. Then, a memetic algorithm is employed to obtain a numerical solution with parameters of the arrangement. The optimization results are initially presented for simple cases to validate the method. Then, more complex scenarios are analysed with very special demands concerning the frequency response to present the full potential of the method. Subsequently, a laboratory experiment is presented and discussed. Finally, other areas of applications of the proposed method are shown and conclusions for future research are drawn.

  19. Optimization of 2.5 μm VECSEL: influence of the QW active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, P.; Rattunde, M.; Adler, S.; Bächle, A.; Diwo-Emmer, E.; Aidam, R.; Manz, C.; Köhler, K.; Wagner, J.

    2016-03-01

    Using the (AlGaIn)(AsSb) material system, VECSELs covering the 2 - 3 μm wavelength range can be realized. The best laser performance of GaSb-based VECSELs was achieved so far at emission wavelengths around 2.0 μm with a slope efficiency of more than 30 %, a low threshold pump power density of 1.1 kW/cm2 at 20°C heatsink temperature and concomitant a high output power exceeding 7 W in CW operation (depending on the mounting technology). These parameters were degrading significantly for longer wavelength devices emitting around 2.5 μm and 2.8 μm. But for applications like the generation of MWIR light (3-8 μm) by pumping ZGP-OPOs, high-power VECSELs around 2.5 μm are required to suppress absorption losses, while for medical laser treatment, high-power operation near the water absorption peak at around 2.9 μm is desirable. We will present results of our ongoing research strand for further optimization of the semiconductor heterostructure design of >= 2.5 μm emitting GaSb-based VECSELs. By using a low quantum deficit design (i.e. optical pumping at around 1.5 μm) in combination with highly strained QWs (compressive strain 2.1 %) we were able to realize a 2.5 μm emitting VECSEL with a slope efficiency above 30 %, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency exceeding 50 %, and a low threshold pump power density of 0.8 kW/cm2. These values are as good as those for the best performing 2.0 μm VECSELs. With a frontside SiC heatspreader and operated in a standard linear cavity, over 7 W of CW output power were achieved for this 2.5 μm emitting VECSEL structure when operated at 20°C. Furthermore, we will compare laser structures with different emission wavelengths and discuss the role of the QW strain, band-offset and active region composition on laser performance.

  20. A Method of Evaluating Atmospheric Models Using Tracer Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korain, Darko; Frye, James; Isakov, Vlad

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed a method that uses tracer measurements as the basis for comparing and evaluating wind fields. An important advantage of the method is that the wind fields are evaluated from the tracer measurements without introducing dispersion calculations. The method can be applied to wind fields predicted by different atmospheric models or to wind fields obtained from interpolation and extrapolation of measured data. The method uses a cost function to quantify the success of wind fields in representing tracer transport. A cost function, `tracer potential,' is defined to account for the magnitude of the tracer concentration at the tracer receptors and the separation between each segment of a trajectory representing wind field transport and each of the tracer receptors. The tracer potential resembles a general expression for a physical potential because the success of a wind field trajectory is directly proportional to the magnitude of the tracer concentration and inversely proportional to its distance from this concentration. A reference tracer potential is required to evaluate the relative success of the wind fields and is defined by the initial location of any trajectory at the source. Then the method is used to calculate continuously the tracer potential along each trajectory as determined by the wind fields in time and space. Increased potential relative to the reference potential along the trajectory indicates good performance of the wind fields and vice versa. If there is sufficient spatial coverage of near and far receptors around the source, then the net tracer potential area can be used to infer the overall success of the wind fields. If there are mainly near-source receptors, then the positive tracer potential area should be used. If the vertical velocity of the wind fields is not available, then the success of the wind fields can be estimated from the vertically integrated area under the tracer potential curve. A trajectory with a maximum

  1. Using RFID and accelerometer-embedded tracers to measure probabilities of bed load transport, step lengths, and rest times in a mountain stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinde, Lindsay; Johnson, Joel P. L.

    2015-09-01

    We present new measurements of bed load tracer transport in a mountain stream over several snowmelt seasons. Cumulative displacements were measured using passive tracers, which consisted of gravel and cobbles embedded with radio frequency identification tags. The timing of bed load motion during 11 transporting events was quantified with active tracers, i.e., accelerometer-embedded cobbles. Probabilities of cobble transport increased with discharge above a threshold, and exhibited slight to moderate hysteresis during snowmelt hydrographs. Dividing cumulative displacements by the number of movements recorded by each active tracer constrained average step lengths. Average step lengths increased with discharge, and distributions of average step lengths and cumulative displacements were thin tailed. Distributions of rest times followed heavy-tailed power law scaling. Rest time scaling varied somewhat with discharge and with the degree to which tracers were incorporated into the streambed. The combination of thin-tailed displacement distributions and heavy-tailed rest time distributions predict superdiffusive dispersion.

  2. 3-D numerical evaluation of density effects on tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Beinhorn, M; Dietrich, P; Kolditz, O

    2005-12-01

    In this paper we present numerical simulations carried out to assess the importance of density-dependent flow on tracer plume development. The scenario considered in the study is characterized by a short-term tracer injection phase into a fully penetrating well and a natural hydraulic gradient. The scenario is thought to be typical for tracer tests conducted in the field. Using a reference case as a starting point, different model parameters were changed in order to determine their importance to density effects. The study is based on a three-dimensional model domain. Results were interpreted using concentration contours and a first moment analysis. Tracer injections of 0.036 kg per meter of saturated aquifer thickness do not cause significant density effects assuming hydraulic gradients of at least 0.1%. Higher tracer input masses, as used for geoelectrical investigations, may lead to buoyancy-induced flow in the early phase of a tracer test which in turn impacts further plume development. This also holds true for shallow aquifers. Results of simulations with different tracer injection rates and durations imply that the tracer input scenario has a negligible effect on density flow. Employing model cases with different realizations of a log conductivity random field, it could be shown that small variations of hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of the tracer injection well have a major control on the local tracer distribution but do not mask effects of buoyancy-induced flow. PMID:16183165

  3. Activating and optimizing MoS2 basal planes for hydrogen evolution through the formation of strained sulphur vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Tsai, Charlie; Koh, Ai Leen; Cai, Lili; Contryman, Alex W.; Fragapane, Alex H.; Zhao, Jiheng; Han, Hyun Soon; Manoharan, Hari C.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens K.; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    As a promising non-precious catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER; refs ,,,,), molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) is known to contain active edge sites and an inert basal plane. Activating the MoS2 basal plane could further enhance its HER activity but is not often a strategy for doing so. Herein, we report the first activation and optimization of the basal plane of monolayer 2H-MoS2 for HER by introducing sulphur (S) vacancies and strain. Our theoretical and experimental results show that the S-vacancies are new catalytic sites in the basal plane, where gap states around the Fermi level allow hydrogen to bind directly to exposed Mo atoms. The hydrogen adsorption free energy (ΔGH) can be further manipulated by straining the surface with S-vacancies, which fine-tunes the catalytic activity. Proper combinations of S-vacancy and strain yield the optimal ΔGH = 0 eV, which allows us to achieve the highest intrinsic HER activity among molybdenum-sulphide-based catalysts.

  4. Active Power Rescheduling for Avoiding Voltage Collapse Using Modified Bare Bones Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Rajesh; Purey, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    MW-generation rescheduling is being considered for voltage stability improvement under stressed operating condition. At times it can avoid voltage collapse. This paper describes an algorithm for determination of optimum MW-generation participation pattern for static voltage stability margin enhancement. The optimum search direction has been obtained by employing modified bare born particle swarm optimization technique. Optimum search direction is based on maximization of distance to point of collapse in generation space. Developed algorithm has been implemented on a standard 25 bus test system. Results obtained have been compared with those obtained using standard particle swarm optimization.

  5. Optimized dynamic framing for PET-based myocardial blood flow estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2013-08-01

    An optimal experiment design methodology was developed to select the framing schedule to be used in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) for estimation of myocardial blood flow using 82Rb. A compartment model and an arterial input function based on measured data were used to calculate a D-optimality criterion for a wide range of candidate framing schedules. To validate the optimality calculation, noisy time-activity curves were simulated, from which parameter values were estimated using an efficient and robust decomposition of the estimation problem. D-optimized schedules improved estimate precision compared to non-optimized schedules, including previously published schedules. To assess robustness, a range of physiologic conditions were simulated. Schedules that were optimal for one condition were nearly-optimal for others. The effect of infusion duration was investigated. Optimality was better for shorter than for longer tracer infusion durations, with the optimal schedule for the shortest infusion duration being nearly optimal for other durations. Together this suggests that a framing schedule optimized for one set of conditions will also work well for others and it is not necessary to use different schedules for different infusion durations or for rest and stress studies. The method for optimizing schedules is general and could be applied in other dynamic PET imaging studies.

  6. Nature-inspired design of tetraindoles: Optimization of the core structure and evaluation of structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Abdu-Allah, Hajjaj H M; Huang, Shih-Ting; Chang, Tzu Ting; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wu, Han-Chung; Li, Wen-Shan

    2016-09-15

    Building on the initial successful optimization of a novel series of tetraindoles, a second generation of the compounds with changes in the core phenyl ring was synthesized to improve anticancer properties. 17 new compounds with different rigidity, planarity, symmetry and degree of conjugation of their core structures to 5-hydroxyindole units were synthesized. All the compounds were fully characterized and tested against breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). The results revealed that the core structure is required for activity and it should be aromatic, rigid, planar, symmetrical and conjugated for optimal activity. Compound 29, which has strong anticancer activity against various tumor-derived cell lines, including Mahlavu (hepatocellular), SK-HEP-1 (hepatic), HCT116 (colon), MIA PaCa-2 (pancreatic), H441 (lung papillary), A549 (lung), H460 (non-small cell lung) and CL1-5 (lung carcinoma) with IC50 values ranging from 0.19 to 3.50μM, was generated after series of successive optimizations. It was found to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and inhibit tumor growth in the non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice bearing xenografted MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer. PMID:27503685

  7. Conservation tillage, optimal water and organic nutrient supply enhance soil microbial activities during wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.) cultivation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Singh, Geeta; Singh, Rana P

    2011-04-01

    The field experiments were conducted on sandy loam soil at New Delhi, during 2007 and 2008 to investigate the effect of conservation tillage, irrigation regimes (sub-optimal, optimal and supra-optimal water regimes), and integrated nutrient management (INM) practices on soil biological parameters in wheat cultivation. The conservation tillage soils has shown significant (p<0.05) increase in soil respiration (81.1%), soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) (104%) and soil dehydrogenase (DH) (59.2%) compared to the conventional tillage soil. Optimum water supply (3-irrigations) enhanced soil respiration over sub-optimum and supra-optimum irrigations by 13.32% and 79% respectively. Soil dehydrogenase (DH) activity in optimum water regime has also increased by 23.33% and 8.18% respectively over the other two irrigation regimes. Similarly, SMBC has also increased by 12.14% and 27.17% respectively in soil with optimum water supply compared to that of sub-optimum and supra-optimum water regime fields. The maximum increase in soil microbial activities is found when sole organic source (50% Farm Yard Manure+25% biofertilizer+25% Green Manure) has been used in combination with the conservation tillage and the optimum water supply. Study demonstrated that microbial activity could be regulated by tillage, water and nitrogen management in the soil in a sustainable manner.

  8. Effect of codon-optimized E. coli signal peptides on recombinant Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase periplasmic localization, yield and activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Shalaka; Gupta, Gunja; Karthikeyan, Subbulakshmi; Haq, Saiful F; Nair, Ayyappan; Sambasivam, Ganesh; Sukumaran, Sunilkumar

    2014-09-01

    Recombinant proteins can be targeted to the Escherichia coli periplasm by fusing them to signal peptides. The popular pET vectors facilitate fusion of target proteins to the PelB signal. A systematic comparison of the PelB signal with native E. coli signal peptides for recombinant protein expression and periplasmic localization is not reported. We chose the Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase (MA), an industrial enzyme widely used in the baking and brewing industry, as a model protein and analyzed the competence of seven, codon-optimized, E. coli signal sequences to translocate MA to the E. coli periplasm compared to PelB. MA fusions to three of the signals facilitated enhanced periplasmic localization of MA compared to the PelB fusion. Interestingly, these three fusions showed greatly improved MA yields and between 18- and 50-fold improved amylase activities compared to the PelB fusion. Previously, non-optimal codon usage in native E. coli signal peptide sequences has been reported to be important for protein stability and activity. Our results suggest that E. coli signal peptides with optimal codon usage could also be beneficial for heterologous protein secretion to the periplasm. Moreover, such fusions could even enhance activity rather than diminish it. This effect, to our knowledge has not been previously documented. In addition, the seven vector platform reported here could also be used as a screen to identify the best signal peptide partner for other recombinant targets of interest. PMID:25038884

  9. Sample site selection for tracer studies applying a unidirectional circulatory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, D.K.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The optimal arterial or venous sites for infusion and sampling during isotopic tracer studies have not been established. This study determined the relationship of plasma and tissue enrichment (E) when isotopes were infused in an artery and sampled from a vein (av mode) or infused in a vein and sampled from an artery (va mode). Adult dogs were given primed constant infusions of (3-/sup 13/C)lactate, (1-/sup 13/C)leucine, and /sup 14/C-labeled bicarbonate. Simultaneous samples were drawn from the vena cava, aortic arch, and breath. Tissue samples were removed from skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, and gut. Breath samples were analyzed for /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ by liquid scintillation counting and plasma isotopic enrichments of (/sup 13/C)lactate, (/sup 13/C)leucine, and alpha-(/sup 13/C)ketoisocaproate (KIC) were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. By using the va mode, the plasma E for lactate and leucine were 30-40% above tissue E. The av mode provided an accurate reflection of tissue E for lactate, which equilibrates rapidly with tissues, and a reasonable estimate for leucine, which exchanges more slowly. The isotopic enrichment of plasma KIC more directly reflected tissue leucine E than did plasma leucine E, and KIC enrichment was insensitive to sampling site. We also evaluated theoretically a circulatory model that predicts venous isotopic enrichments when the va mode is used. We conclude that the av mode is optimal but that the problems arising from use of the va mode can be overcome by use of a metabolic product (i.e., KIC) or by calculation of venous specific activity with our circulatory mode.

  10. Using predictive uncertainty analysis to optimise tracer test design and data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Ilka; Moore, Catherine; Post, Vincent; Wolf, Leif; Martens, Evelien; Prommer, Henning

    2014-07-01

    processes, followed by methane. Temperature data was assessed as the least informative of the solute tracers. However, taking costs of data acquisition into account, it could be shown that temperature data when used in conjunction with other tracers was a valuable and cost-effective marker species due to temperatures low cost to worth ratio. In contrast, the high costs of acquisition of methane data compared to its muted worth, highlighted methanes unfavourable return on investment. Areas of optimal monitoring bore position as well as optimal numbers of bores for the investigated injection site were also established. The proposed tracer test optimisation is done through the application of common use groundwater flow and transport models in conjunction with publicly available tools for predictive uncertainty analysis to provide modelers and practitioners with a powerful yet efficient and cost effective tool which is generally applicable and easily transferrable from the present study to many applications beyond the case study of injection of treated CSG produced water.

  11. Optimizing Structural Active Control Force Using the Exterior Penalty Function Method

    SciTech Connect

    Tavassoli, Mohammad Reza; Amini, Fereidoun

    2008-07-08

    A new method for optimizing the control force in a closed-open loop control system has been developed. In this method which applies the complete feedback, structural responses including displacement, velocity, acceleration and also the excitation forces are used to determine the required control forces. In a closed-open loop control system, applying control force is equivalent to making changes in the mass, damping and stiffness matrices of the structure and the external force vector. Assuming these changes are linear and proportional to their initial values, the minimization of control force depends on the optimal values of the proportion coefficients. This idea leads to a constrained optimization problem of n-variable, which has been solved by using the exterior penalty function method and the Powell's search algorithm. The peak control force is the objective function of this optimization problem and the proportion coefficients are the design variables. The supposed limitation of the structural responses comprises the constraints of the problem. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by some numerical examples.

  12. Optimizing Structural Active Control Force Using the Exterior Penalty Function Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, Mohammad Reza; Amini, Fereidoun

    2008-07-01

    A new method for optimizing the control force in a closed-open loop control system has been developed. In this method which applies the complete feedback, structural responses including displacement, velocity, acceleration and also the excitation forces are used to determine the required control forces. In a closed-open loop control system, applying control force is equivalent to making changes in the mass, damping and stiffness matrices of the structure and the external force vector. Assuming these changes are linear and proportional to their initial values, the minimization of control force depends on the optimal values of the proportion coefficients. This idea leads to a constrained optimization problem of n-variable, which has been solved by using the exterior penalty function method and the Powell's search algorithm. The peak control force is the objective function of this optimization problem and the proportion coefficients are the design variables. The supposed limitation of the structural responses comprises the constraints of the problem. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by some numerical examples.

  13. Radon as a Tracer for Lunar Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, Larry Jay

    1992-01-01

    Radon and its decay product polonium can be used as tracers to search for lunar volatiles. One effective technique to look for them would be by using alpha-particle spectrometers from lunar orbit. Alpha spectrometers were flown in the Apollo Service Modules during the Apollo 15 and 16 missions, and did observe Rn-222 and its decay product Po-210 on the lunar surface from orbit. This demonstrates that radon and polonium can be observed from orbit; what must next be shown is that such observations can reveal something about the locations of volatiles on the Moon.

  14. Prostate Cancer Imaging with Novel PET Tracers.

    PubMed

    Lindenberg, Liza; Choyke, Peter; Dahut, William

    2016-03-01

    Molecular imaging of prostate cancer is in a dynamic phase of development. Currently approved techniques are limited and researchers have been working on novel agents to improve accuracy in targeting and detecting prostate tumors. In addition, the complexity of various prostate cancer states also contributes to the challenges in evaluating suitable radiotracer candidates. We have highlighted nuclear medicine tracers that focus on mechanisms involved in bone metastasis, prostate cancer cell membrane synthesis, amino acid analogs, androgen analogs, and the prostate specific membrane antigen. Encouraging results with many of these innovative radiotracer compounds will not only advance diagnostic capabilities for prostate cancer but open opportunities for theranostic applications to treat this worldwide malignancy.

  15. Associations of chemical tracers and faecal indicator bacteria in a tropical urban catchment.

    PubMed

    Ekklesia, E; Shanahan, P; Chua, L H C; Eikaas, H S

    2015-05-15

    Surface water contamination by human faecal wastes is a widespread hazard for human health. Faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are the most widely used indicators to assess surface water quality but are less-human-specific and have the potential to survive longer and/or occur naturally in tropical areas. In this study, 13 wastewater chemicals (chloride, boron, orthosphophate, detergents as methylene blue active substances, cholesterol, cholestanol, coprostanol, diethylhexyl phthalate, caffeine, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, sucralose and saccharin) were investigated in order to evaluate tracers for human faecal and sewage contamination in tropical urban catchments. Surface water samples were collected at an hourly interval from sampling locations with distinct major land uses: high-density residential, low-density residential, commercial and industrial. Measured concentrations were analysed to investigate the association among indicators and tracers for each land-use category. Better correlations were found between different indicators and tracers in each land-use dataset than in the dataset for all land uses, which shows that land use is an important determinant of drain water quality. Data were further segregated based on the hourly FIB concentrations. There were better correlations between FIB and chemical tracers when FIB concentrations were higher. Therefore, sampling programs must be designed carefully to take the time of sampling and land use into account in order to effectively assess human faecal and sewage contamination in urban catchments. FIB is recommended as the first tier in assessment of surface water quality impairment and chemical tracers as the second tier. Acetaminophen and coprostanol are recommended as chemical tracers for high-density residential areas, while chloride, coprostanol and caffeine are recommended for low-density residential areas. PMID:25770447

  16. Multiple-tracer tests for contaminant transport process identification in saturated municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Woodman, N.D. Rees-White, T.C.; Stringfellow, A.M.; Beaven, R.P.; Hudson, A.P.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Multiple tracers were applied to saturated MSW to test dual-porosity properties. • Lithium demonstrated to be non-conservative as a tracer. • 260 mm diameter column too small to test transport properties of MSW. • The classical advection-dispersion mode was rejected due to high dispersivity. • Characteristic diffusion times did not vary with the tracer. - Abstract: Two column tests were performed in conditions emulating vertical flow beneath the leachate table in a biologically active landfill to determine dominant transport mechanisms occurring in landfills. An improved understanding of contaminant transport process in wastes is required for developing better predictions about potential length of the long term aftercare of landfills, currently measured in timescales of centuries. Three tracers (lithium, bromide and deuterium) were used. Lithium did not behave conservatively. Given that lithium has been used extensively for tracing in landfill wastes, the tracer itself and the findings of previous tests which assume that it has behaved conservatively may need revisiting. The smaller column test could not be fitted with continuum models, probably because the volume of waste was below a representative elemental volume. Modelling compared advection-dispersion (AD), dual porosity (DP) and hybrid AD–DP models. Of these models, the DP model was found to be the most suitable. Although there is good evidence to suggest that diffusion is an important transport mechanism, the breakthrough curves of the different tracers did not differ from each other as would be predicted based on the free-water diffusion coefficients. This suggested that solute diffusion in wastes requires further study.

  17. Associations of chemical tracers and faecal indicator bacteria in a tropical urban catchment.

    PubMed

    Ekklesia, E; Shanahan, P; Chua, L H C; Eikaas, H S

    2015-05-15

    Surface water contamination by human faecal wastes is a widespread hazard for human health. Faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are the most widely used indicators to assess surface water quality but are less-human-specific and have the potential to survive longer and/or occur naturally in tropical areas. In this study, 13 wastewater chemicals (chloride, boron, orthosphophate, detergents as methylene blue active substances, cholesterol, cholestanol, coprostanol, diethylhexyl phthalate, caffeine, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, sucralose and saccharin) were investigated in order to evaluate tracers for human faecal and sewage contamination in tropical urban catchments. Surface water samples were collected at an hourly interval from sampling locations with distinct major land uses: high-density residential, low-density residential, commercial and industrial. Measured concentrations were analysed to investigate the association among indicators and tracers for each land-use category. Better correlations were found between different indicators and tracers in each land-use dataset than in the dataset for all land uses, which shows that land use is an important determinant of drain water quality. Data were further segregated based on the hourly FIB concentrations. There were better correlations between FIB and chemical tracers when FIB concentrations were higher. Therefore, sampling programs must be designed carefully to take the time of sampling and land use into account in order to effectively assess human faecal and sewage contamination in urban catchments. FIB is recommended as the first tier in assessment of surface water quality impairment and chemical tracers as the second tier. Acetaminophen and coprostanol are recommended as chemical tracers for high-density residential areas, while chloride, coprostanol and caffeine are recommended for low-density residential areas.

  18. Optimization of ligand and lipophilic efficiency to identify an in vivo active furano-pyrimidine Aurora kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Shiao, Hui-Yi; Coumar, Mohane Selvaraj; Chang, Chun-Wei; Ke, Yi-Yu; Chi, Ya-Hui; Chu, Chang-Ying; Sun, Hsu-Yi; Chen, Chun-Hwa; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Fung, Ka-Shu; Kuo, Po-Chu; Huang, Chin-Ting; Chang, Kai-Yen; Lu, Cheng-Tai; Hsu, John T A; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Jiaang, Weir-Torn; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang

    2013-07-11

    Ligand efficiency (LE) and lipophilic efficiency (LipE) are two important indicators of "drug-likeness", which are dependent on the molecule's activity and physicochemical properties. We recently reported a furano-pyrimidine Aurora kinase inhibitor 4 (LE = 0.25; LipE = 1.75), with potent activity in vitro; however, 4 was inactive in vivo. On the basis of insights obtained from the X-ray co-crystal structure of the lead 4, various solubilizing functional groups were introduced to optimize both the activity and physicochemical properties. Emphasis was placed on identifying potential leads with improved activity as well as better LE and LipE by exercising tight control over the molecular weight and lipophilicity of the molecules. Rational optimization has led to the identification of Aurora kinase inhibitor 27 (IBPR001; LE = 0.26; LipE = 4.78), with improved in vitro potency and physicochemical properties, resulting in an in vivo active (HCT-116 colon cancer xenograft mouse model) anticancer agent. PMID:23808327

  19. Determination of stream reaeration coefficients by use of tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Rathbun, R.E.; Yotsukura, Nobuhiro; Parker, G.W.; DeLong, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Stream reaeration is the physical absorption of oxygen from the atmosphere by a flowing stream. This is the primary process by which a stream replenishes the oxygen consumed in the biodegradation of organic wastes. Prior to 1965, reaeration rate coefficients could be estimated only by indirect methods. In 1965, a direct method of measuring stream reaeration coefficients was developed in which a radioactive tracer gas was injected into a stream--the tracer gas being desorbed from the stream inversely to how oxygen would be absorbed. The technique has since been modified by substituting hydrocarbon gases for the radioactive tracer gas. The slug-injection and constant-rate injection methods of performing gas tracer desorption measurements are described. Emphasis is on the use of rhodamine WT dye as a relatively conservative tracer and propane as the nonconservative gas tracer, on planning field tests, methods of injection, sampling and analysis, and computational techniques to compute desorption and reaeration coefficients. (Author 's abstract)

  20. Chloride Activated Halophilic α-Amylase from Marinobacter sp. EMB8: Production Optimization and Nanoimmobilization for Efficient Starch Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Khare, S K

    2015-01-01

    Halophiles have been perceived as potential source of novel enzymes in recent years. The interest emanates from their ability to catalyze efficiently under high salt and organic solvents. Present work encompasses production optimization and nanoimmobilization of an α-amylase from moderately halophilic Marinobacter sp. EMB8. Media ingredients and culture conditions were optimized by "one-at-a-time approach." Starch was found to be the best carbon source at 5% (w/v) concentration. Glucose acted as catabolic repressor for amylase production. Salt proved critical for amylase production and maximum production was attained at 5% (w/v) NaCl. Optimization of various culture parameters resulted in 48.0 IU/mL amylase production, a 12-fold increase over that of unoptimized condition (4.0 IU/mL). α-Amylase was immobilized on 3-aminopropyl functionalized silica nanoparticles using glutaraldehyde as cross-linking agent. Optimization of various parameters resulted in 96% immobilization efficiency. Starch hydrolyzing efficiency of immobilized enzyme was comparatively better. Immobilized α-amylase retained 75% of its activity after 5th cycle of repeated use. PMID:25667773

  1. Chloride Activated Halophilic α-Amylase from Marinobacter sp. EMB8: Production Optimization and Nanoimmobilization for Efficient Starch Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumit; Khare, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Halophiles have been perceived as potential source of novel enzymes in recent years. The interest emanates from their ability to catalyze efficiently under high salt and organic solvents. Present work encompasses production optimization and nanoimmobilization of an α-amylase from moderately halophilic Marinobacter sp. EMB8. Media ingredients and culture conditions were optimized by “one-at-a-time approach.” Starch was found to be the best carbon source at 5% (w/v) concentration. Glucose acted as catabolic repressor for amylase production. Salt proved critical for amylase production and maximum production was attained at 5% (w/v) NaCl. Optimization of various culture parameters resulted in 48.0 IU/mL amylase production, a 12-fold increase over that of unoptimized condition (4.0 IU/mL). α-Amylase was immobilized on 3-aminopropyl functionalized silica nanoparticles using glutaraldehyde as cross-linking agent. Optimization of various parameters resulted in 96% immobilization efficiency. Starch hydrolyzing efficiency of immobilized enzyme was comparatively better. Immobilized α-amylase retained 75% of its activity after 5th cycle of repeated use. PMID:25667773

  2. Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

  3. Tracer Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; van Heel, Ton; Shan, Chao

    2004-05-12

    A key parameter governing the performance and life-time of a Hot Fractured Rock (HFR) reservoir is the effective heat transfer area between the fracture network and the matrix rock. We report on numerical modeling studies into the feasibility of using tracer tests for estimating heat transfer area. More specifically, we discuss simulation results of a new HFR characterization method which uses surface-sorbing tracers for which the adsorbed tracer mass is proportional to the fracture surface area per unit volume. Sorption in the rock matrix is treated with the conventional formulation in which tracer adsorption is volume-based. A slug of solute tracer migrating along a fracture is subject to diffusion across the fracture walls into the adjacent rock matrix. Such diffusion removes some of the tracer from the fluid in the fractures, reducing and retarding the peak in the breakthrough curve (BTC) of the tracer. After the slug has passed the concentration gradient reverses, causing back-diffusion from the rock matrix into the fracture, and giving rise to a long tail in the BTC of the solute. These effects become stronger for larger fracture-matrix interface area, potentially providing a means for estimating this area. Previous field tests and modeling studies have demonstrated characteristic tailing in BTCs for volatile tracers in vapor-dominated reservoirs. Simulated BTCs for solute tracers in single-phase liquid systems show much weaker tails, as would be expected because diffusivities are much smaller in the aqueous than in the gas phase, by a factor of order 1000. A much stronger signal of fracture-matrix interaction can be obtained when sorbing tracers are used. We have performed simulation studies of surface-sorbing tracers by implementing a model in which the adsorbed tracer mass is assumed proportional to the fracture-matrix surface area per unit volume. The results show that sorbing tracers generate stronger tails in BTCs, corresponding to an effective

  4. Increasing the antioxidant activity, total phenolic and flavonoid contents by optimizing the germination conditions of amaranth seeds.

    PubMed

    Perales-Sánchez, Janitzio X K; Reyes-Moreno, Cuauhtémoc; Gómez-Favela, Mario A; Milán-Carrillo, Jorge; Cuevas-Rodríguez, Edith O; Valdez-Ortiz, Angel; Gutiérrez-Dorado, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the germination conditions of amaranth seeds that would maximize the antioxidant activity (AoxA), total phenolic (TPC), and flavonoid (TFC) contents. To optimize the germination bioprocess, response surface methodology was applied over three response variables (AoxA, TPC, TFC). A central composite rotable experimental design with two factors [germination temperature (GT), 20-45 ºC; germination time (Gt), 14-120 h] in five levels was used; 13 treatments were generated. The amaranth seeds were soaked in distilled water (25 °C/6 h) before germination. The sprouts from each treatment were dried (50 °C/8 h), cooled, and ground to obtain germinated amaranth flours (GAF). The best combination of germination bioprocess variables for producing optimized GAF with the highest AoxA [21.56 mmol trolox equivalent (TE)/100 g sample, dw], TPC [247.63 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/100 g sample, dw], and TFC [81.39 mg catechin equivalent (CAE)/100 g sample, dw] was GT = 30 ºC/Gt = 78 h. The germination bioprocess increased AoxA, TPC, and TFC in 300-470, 829, and 213%, respectively. The germination is an effective strategy to increase the TPC and TFC of amaranth seeds for enhancing functionality with improved antioxidant activity.

  5. Optimization of the whole-cell catalytic activity of recombinant Escherichia coli cells with surface-immobilized organophosphorus hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxing; Li, Qianqian; Ye, Ting; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Lin

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have verified the feasibility of using Escherichia coli systems that display organophosphorous hydrolase (OPH) on the cell surface as whole-cell catalysts. However, the inefficient display of the enzyme on cell surfaces remains unaddressed. In the present study, multiple optimization experiments on full-length and truncated ice nucleation protein anchors, E. coli host cells, culture media, and culture conditions were performed to optimize whole-cell OPH enzymatic activity. The results show that apart from the dramatic effect of isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside concentration and culture temperature, the coordination between the anchor protein, culture media, and host cells is essential for highly efficient OPH display. Under optimal conditions, namely, culturing in M9 medium, 20 degrees C induction temperature, 0.1 mmol l(-1) IPTG, and 100 micromol I(-1) Co2+, the engineered E. coli strain MB109-406 that expresses the fusion enzyme lnaK-N-OPH exhibited a whole-cell OPH activity of 0.62 U mg(-1) x cell d.wt. This result is much higher than that of several currently available OPH-displaying systems, which shows the potential of the current system for further large-scale industrial or environmental applications. PMID:24620599

  6. PET Tracers Based on Zirconium-89

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies has always been a dynamic area in molecular imaging. With decay half-life (3.3 d) well matched to the circulation half-lives of antibodies (usually on the order of days), 89Zr has been extensively studied over the last decade. This review article will give a brief overview on 89Zr isotope production, the radiochemistry generally used for 89Zr-labeling, and the PET tracers that have been developed using 89Zr. To date, 89Zr-based PET imaging has been investigated for a wide variety of cancer-related targets, which include human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, epidermal growth factor receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen, splice variant v6 of CD44, vascular endothelial growth factor, carbonic anhydrase IX, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, among others. With well-developed radiochemistry, commercial availability of chelating agents for 89Zr labeling, increasingly widely available isotope supply, as well as successful proof-of-principle in pilot human studies, it is expected that PET imaging with 89Zr-based tracers will be a constantly evolving and highly vibrant field in the near future. PMID:22191652

  7. Tracer exchange between tropics and middle latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard; Douglass, Anne; Weaver, Clark

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between the tropics and middle latitudes is studied using a tracer emitted at 50 hPa along a great circle route between Los Angeles, USA and Sydney, Australia. Though designed to examine the impact of stratospheric aircraft, the study more generally addresses the transport between tropics and middle latitudes for a three month period from January through March 1989. The results show that air is transported from the tropics to middle latitudes by planetary scale and tropospheric cyclonic scale waves. Except for intrusions by these wave events, the tropics are substantially isolated throughout the lower stratosphere. These waves draw material out of the tropics which ends up in the middle latitude westerly jets, with little material entering the winter polar latitudes prior to the springtime transition. The summer Southern Hemisphere is characterized by tracer being drawn out in streamers that extend from north and west to south and east. The material in the tropics is zonally asymmetric. The material that reaches the troposphere comes down in the synoptic scale eddies and is concentrated in the middle latitude jet stream. These characteristics are similar to those observed during the dispersion of volcanic clouds.

  8. Development of optimization models for the set behavior and compressive strength of sodium activated geopolymer pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillenwarth, Brian Albert

    As large countries such as China begin to industrialize and concerns about global warming continue to grow, there is an increasing need for more environmentally friendly building materials. One promising material known as a geopolymer can be used as a portland cement replacement and in this capacity emits around 67% less carbon dioxide. In addition to potentially reducing carbon emissions, geopolymers can be synthesized with many industrial waste products such as fly ash. Although the benefits of geopolymers are substantial, there are a few difficulties with designing geopolymer mixes which have hindered widespread commercialization of the material. One such difficulty is the high variability of the materials used for their synthesis. In addition to this, interrelationships between mix design variables and how these interrelationships impact the set behavior and compressive strength are not well understood. A third complicating factor with designing geopolymer mixes is that the role of calcium in these systems is not well understood. In order to overcome these barriers, this study developed predictive optimization models through the use of genetic programming with experimentally collected set times and compressive strengths of several geopolymer paste mixes. The developed set behavior models were shown to predict the correct set behavior from the mix design over 85% of the time. The strength optimization model was shown to be capable of predicting compressive strengths of geopolymer pastes from their mix design to within about 1 ksi of their actual strength. In addition to this the optimization models give valuable insight into the key factors influencing strength development as well as the key factors responsible for flash set and long set behaviors in geopolymer pastes. A method for designing geopolymer paste mixes was developed from the generated optimization models. This design method provides an invaluable tool for use in future geopolymer research as well as

  9. Minimizing metabolic activation during pharmaceutical lead optimization: progress, knowledge gaps and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kassahun, Kelem; Tschirret-Guth, Richard A; Mitra, Kaushik; Baillie, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    Minimizing the potential for drug candidates to form chemically reactive metabolites that can covalently modify cellular macromolecules represents a rational strategy to reduce the risk of drug-induced idiosyncratic toxicity in humans. In this review, the approaches that are currently available for addressing this issue during the lead optimization phase of drug discovery, their limitations, and future scientific directions that have the potential to address these limitations are discussed.

  10. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 3--Recommended Amounts of Physical Activity for Optimal Health)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    By promoting physical activities and incorporating them into their community-based programs, Extension professionals are improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the third in a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: (1) biological health benefits of…

  11. Optimal placement of active braces by using PSO algorithm in near- and far-field earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastali, M.; Kheyroddin, A.; Samali, B.; Vahdani, R.

    2016-03-01

    One of the most important issues in tall buildings is lateral resistance of the load-bearing systems against applied loads such as earthquake, wind and blast. Dual systems comprising core wall systems (single or multi-cell core) and moment-resisting frames are used as resistance systems in tall buildings. In addition to adequate stiffness provided by the dual system, most tall buildings may have to rely on various control systems to reduce the level of unwanted motions stemming from severe dynamic loads. One of the main challenges to effectively control the motion of a structure is limitation in distributing the required control along the structure height optimally. In this paper, concrete shear walls are used as secondary resistance system at three different heights as well as actuators installed in the braces. The optimal actuator positions are found by using optimized PSO algorithm as well as arbitrarily. The control performance of buildings that are equipped and controlled using the PSO algorithm method placement is assessed and compared with arbitrary placement of controllers using both near- and far-field ground motions of Kobe and Chi-Chi earthquakes.

  12. Analytical modeling and active vibration suppression of adaptive composite panels with optimal actuator configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Su; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, models of adaptive composite panels with surface-mounted/embedded piezoelectric patches are analytically built using the Lagrange-Rayleigh-Ritz method (LRRM), verified through experiments and finite element method (FEM), and used in piezoelectric actuator placement optimization and vibration control. Two panels are considered: a cantilevered adaptive composite beam (ACB) and an adaptive circular composite plate (ACCP) with complex boundaries. The inertia and stiffness of the surface-mounted/embedded piezoelectric patches are included in the developed models. To obtain the mode shapes of the ACCP, which are essential to the LRRM modeling, the method of separation of variables is employed and Bessel series and modified Bessel series are introduced. The built models are verified by experiments for the ACB and by the FEM for the ACCP. The actuation configurations of the piezoelectric patches in the panels are optimized based on the introduced analytical model. Finally, with the optimal locations of the piezoelectric patches, the vibration suppression of the ACB and the ACCP is experimentally and numerically carried out, and excellent vibration suppressions for both adaptive panels are obtained.

  13. A Investigation of Partially Extracted Tracers Used to Determine Myocardial Blood Flow with PET.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Bradley Thomas

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provides the ability to quantitatively measure mass-specific blood flow to myocardial tissue (ml/min/g tissue). The partially extracted tracers ^{62}Cu -PTSM and two single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) agents, teboroxime and sestamibi were studied. The latter two demonstrate the effectiveness of PET as a pharmacological tool for SPECT perfusion tracer development. The characteristics of these tracers were compared to commonly used partially extracted tracers ^{13}rm NH_3 and ^{82} Rb. Positron emitting ^{rm 94m}Tc was used to label ligands originally developed for ^{rm 99m} Tc labeling. ^{rm 94m }Tc can be produced by the bombardment of a natural molybdenum foil with an 11Mev proton beam, via the ^{94}rm Mo(p,n)^ {94m}Tc reaction. The production of ^{rm94m}Tc is accompanied by ^{92}Tc, ^ {94}Tc, ^{95} Tc, ^{rm 95m}Tc, ^{96}Tc, and ^{rm 99m}Tc due to the isotopic mixture of natural Mo. The presence of these radionuclidic impurities increase the radiation dose received by the patient and radio chemist. The elimination of these impurities was achieved by irradiating an isotopically enriched target material, ^{94}rm MoO_3. The ability to reclaim the enriched target is essential due to the high cost of the material. Recovery was accomplished by a solvent extraction technique yielding an activity recovery of 80% and target material recovery of 95%. Preliminary data was measured for the myocardial perfusion tracer ^{62}Cu -PTSM. It was found that the uptake of ^ {62}Cu-PTSM is linear for resting flows but a high degree of variability is observed at stress induced flows. This same result was found in the human studies when compared to ^{13} rm NH_3 measured myocardial perfusion values. The dynamic analysis of multiple tracers in the sequence of protocols: (1) acute canine prep ( ^{11}rm CO, ^{82 }Rb, ^{62}Cu-PTSM, ^{13}rm NH_3, ^{94m,99m}Tc-BATO, H_2 ^{14}rm O, ^{18 }FCH_3), (2) chronic canine prep ( ^{82}rm Rb, ^{13 }NH_3

  14. Hydrogeochemical and isotopic tracers for identification of seasonal and long-term over-exploitation of the Pleistocene thermal waters.

    PubMed

    Rman, Nina

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and test an optimal and cost-effective regional quality monitoring system in depleted transboundary low-temperature Neogene geothermal aquifers in the west Pannonian basin. Potential tracers for identification of seasonal and long-term quality changes of the Pleistocene thermal waters were investigated at four multiple-screened wells some 720 to 1570 m deep in Slovenia. These thermal waters are of great balneological value owing to their curative effects and were sampled monthly between February 2014 and January 2015. Linear correlation and regression analyses, ANOVA and Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test for two independent samples were used to determine their seasonal and long-term differences. Temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, redox potential and dissolved oxygen did not identify varying inflow conditions; however, they provided sufficient information to distinguish between the four end-members. Characteristic (sodium) and conservative (chloride) tracers outlined long-term trends in changes in quality but could not differentiate between the seasons. Stable isotopes of δ (18)O and δ (2)H were used to identify sequential monthly and long-term trends, and origin and mixing of waters, but failed to distinguish the difference between the seasons. A new local paleo-meteoric water line (δ (2)H = 9.2*δ (18)O + 26.3) was outlined for the active regional groundwater flow system in the Pannonian to Pliocene loose sandstone and gravel. A new regression line (δ (2)H = 2.3*δ (18)O-45.2) was calculated for thermomineral water from the more isolated Badenian to Lower Pannonian turbiditic sandstone, indicating dilution of formation water. Water composition was generally stable over the 1-year period, but long-term trends indicate that changes in quality occur, implying deterioration of the aquifers status.

  15. Characterization of solute transport properties of different types of constructed wetlands using multi-tracer data and transient storage modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Lange, Jens; Weiler, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Constructed wetlands in agricultural headwater catchments may serve as simple treatment systems to improve retention and mitigation of agricultural non-point-source pollution. To calculate and predict retention capacities of 6 different constructed wetland systems concerning micro-pollutants, we used a one-dimensional solute transport model to compare the results of a series of multi-tracer experiments. The investigated wetland systems consisted of two surface flow wetlands with permanent through flow, two vegetated ditches, a forest buffer zone and a flood detention pond. Transport behaviour was investigated using different tracers: salt and two differently sorptive fluorescent dyes (Sulphorhodamine B and fluoresceine). The hypothesis that shallow and vegetated systems offer the highest sorption capacity for sorptive but mobile pollutants was tested applying a solute transport model to the observed tracer breakthrough. The transport model OTIS (Runkel, 1998) which includes advection, dispersion and lateral exchange to a transient storage was optimized to observed breakthrough of applied tracers at defined cross-sections along the wetlands. Optimized model parameters include dispersivity, cross-sectional areas of both stream and transient storage, as well as an exchange coefficient. Sorption was included based on the KD value, mass of accessible sediment and a sorption coefficient. We assumed that each measurable cross-section is a combination of dead zones and flowing parts. For three of the wetland systems we could exclude lateral in- and outflows. For the other systems, a quantification of lateral flows was possible. We used the set of conservative tracer data to calculate conservative transport characteristics and cross-sections. Then we applied the calibrated model on the sorptive tracer data only using sorption capacity in the storage zone as a calibration parameter and observed KD values and mass of accessible sediment. The results for the different tracer

  16. Optimization of Muscle Activity for Task-Level Goals Predicts Complex Changes in Limb Forces across Biomechanical Contexts

    PubMed Central

    McKay, J. Lucas; Ting, Lena H.

    2012-01-01

    Optimality principles have been proposed as a general framework for understanding motor control in animals and humans largely based on their ability to predict general features movement in idealized motor tasks. However, generalizing these concepts past proof-of-principle to understand the neuromechanical transformation from task-level control to detailed execution-level muscle activity and forces during behaviorally-relevant motor tasks has proved difficult. In an unrestrained balance task in cats, we demonstrate that achieving task-level constraints center of mass forces and moments while minimizing control effort predicts detailed patterns of muscle activity and ground reaction forces in an anatomically-realistic musculoskeletal model. Whereas optimization is typically used to resolve redundancy at a single level of the motor hierarchy, we simultaneously resolved redundancy across both muscles and limbs and directly compared predictions to experimental measures across multiple perturbation directions that elicit different intra- and interlimb coordination patterns. Further, although some candidate task-level variables and cost functions generated indistinguishable predictions in a single biomechanical context, we identified a common optimization framework that could predict up to 48 experimental conditions per animal (n = 3) across both perturbation directions and different biomechanical contexts created by altering animals' postural configuration. Predictions were further improved by imposing experimentally-derived muscle synergy constraints, suggesting additional task variables or costs that may be relevant to the neural control of balance. These results suggested that reduced-dimension neural control mechanisms such as muscle synergies can achieve similar kinetics to the optimal solution, but with increased control effort (≈2×) compared to individual muscle control. Our results are consistent with the idea that hierarchical, task-level neural control

  17. Optimization of muscle activity for task-level goals predicts complex changes in limb forces across biomechanical contexts.

    PubMed

    McKay, J Lucas; Ting, Lena H

    2012-01-01

    Optimality principles have been proposed as a general framework for understanding motor control in animals and humans largely based on their ability to predict general features movement in idealized motor tasks. However, generalizing these concepts past proof-of-principle to understand the neuromechanical transformation from task-level control to detailed execution-level muscle activity and forces during behaviorally-relevant motor tasks has proved difficult. In an unrestrained balance task in cats, we demonstrate that achieving task-level constraints center of mass forces and moments while minimizing control effort predicts detailed patterns of muscle activity and ground reaction forces in an anatomically-realistic musculoskeletal model. Whereas optimization is typically used to resolve redundancy at a single level of the motor hierarchy, we simultaneously resolved redundancy across both muscles and limbs and directly compared predictions to experimental measures across multiple perturbation directions that elicit different intra- and interlimb coordination patterns. Further, although some candidate task-level variables and cost functions generated indistinguishable predictions in a single biomechanical context, we identified a common optimization framework that could predict up to 48 experimental conditions per animal (n = 3) across both perturbation directions and different biomechanical contexts created by altering animals' postural configuration. Predictions were further improved by imposing experimentally-derived muscle synergy constraints, suggesting additional task variables or costs that may be relevant to the neural control of balance. These results suggested that reduced-dimension neural control mechanisms such as muscle synergies can achieve similar kinetics to the optimal solution, but with increased control effort (≈2×) compared to individual muscle control. Our results are consistent with the idea that hierarchical, task-level neural control

  18. Meltlets® of Soy Isoflavones: Process Optimization and the Effect of Extrusion Spheronization Process Parameters on Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Ketkee; Amin, Purnima

    2013-01-01

    In the current research work an attempt was made to develop “Melt in mouth pellets” (Meltlets®) containing 40% herbal extract of soy isoflavones that served to provide antioxidants activity in menopausal women. The process of extrusion–spheronization was optimized for extruder speed, extruder screen size, spheronization speed, and time. While doing so the herbal extract incorporated in the pellet matrix was subjected to various processing conditions such as the effect of the presence of other excipients, mixing or kneading to prepare wet mass, heat generated during the process of extrusion, spheronization, and drying. Thus, the work further investigates the effect of these processing parameters on the antioxidant activity of the soy isoflavone herbal extract incorporated in the formula. Thereby, the antioxidant activity of the soya bean herbal extract, Meltlets® and of the placebo pellets was evaluated using DPPH free radical scavenging assay and total reduction capacity. PMID:24302800

  19. Regional Groundwater Processes and Flow Dynamics from Age Tracer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Stewart, Mike K.; Matthews, Abby

    2016-04-01

    Age tracers are now used in New Zealand on regional scales for quantifying the impact and lag time of land use and climate change on the quantity and quality of available groundwater resources within the framework of the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2014. Age tracers provide measurable information on the dynamics of groundwater systems and reaction rates (e.g. denitrification), essential for conceptualising the regional groundwater - surface water system and informing the development of land use and groundwater flow and transport models. In the Horizons Region of New Zealand, around 200 wells have tracer data available, including tritium, SF6, CFCs, 2H, 18O, Ar, N2, CH4 and radon. Well depths range from shallower wells in gravel aquifers in the Horowhenua and Tararua districts, and deeper wells in the aquifers between Palmerston North and Wanganui. Most of the groundwater samples around and north of the Manawatu River west of the Tararua ranges are extremely old (>100 years), even from relatively shallow wells, indicating that these groundwaters are relatively disconnected from fresh surface recharge. The groundwater wells in the Horowhenua tap into a considerably younger groundwater reservoir with groundwater mean residence time (MRT) of 10 - 40 years. Groundwater along the eastern side of the Tararua and Ruahine ranges is significantly younger, typically <5 years MRT. Vertical groundwater recharge rates, as deduced from groundwater depth and MRT, are extremely low in the central coastal area, consistent with confined groundwater systems, or with upwelling of old groundwater close to the coast. Very low vertical recharge rates along the Manawatu River west of the Manawatu Gorge indicate upwelling groundwater conditions in this area, implying groundwater discharge into the river is more likely here than loss of river water into the groundwater system. High recharge rates observed at several wells in the Horowhenua area and in the area east of

  20. Optimization of the culture condition for an antitumor bacterium Serratia proteamacula 657 and identification of the active compounds.

    PubMed

    Miao, Li; Wang, Xueling; Jiang, Wei; Yang, Shengping; Zhou, Huiru; Zhai, Youpeng; Zhou, Xiaojian; Dong, Kunming

    2013-05-01

    Exploration of novel active anti-tumor compounds from marine microbes for pharmaceutical applications has been a continuously hot spot in natural product research. Bacterial growth and metabolites may greatly vary under different culture conditions. In this study, the effects of different culture conditions and medium components on the growth and bioactive metabolites of Serratia proteamacula 657, an anti-tumor bacterium found in our previous study, were investigated. The results showed that lower temperature, weak acidic condition and solid fermentation favored the bacterial growth and the production of active compounds. Four components in the culture medium, NaCl, peptone, yeast extract and MgSO4, were found important to the bacterial growth and active compounds production in medium optimization. Under the optimized condition of solid state fermentation at pH 6.0-7.0, 23-25 °C, with the MgSO4-free medium containing 10.0 g/L peptone, 1.0 g/L yeast extract and 19.45 g/L NaCl, the antitumor activity of S. proteamacula 657 and the yield of crude extracts increased about 15 times and 6 times than the sample obtained in the original liquid fermentation, respectively. The active components in the metabolites of S. proteamacula 657 were identified as a homolog of prodigiosin, a red bacterial pigment, based on the analysis of the NMR and GC-MS. The bacterium S. proteamacula 657, which is adapted to lower temperature, produced prodigiosin-like pigments with highly antitumor activity, suggesting the bacterium is a potential new source for prodigiosin production.

  1. Linear quadratic tracking problems in Hilbert space - Application to optimal active noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Silcox, R. J.; Keeling, S. L.; Wang, C.

    1989-01-01

    A unified treatment of the linear quadratic tracking (LQT) problem, in which a control system's dynamics are modeled by a linear evolution equation with a nonhomogeneous component that is linearly dependent on the control function u, is presented; the treatment proceeds from the theoretical formulation to a numerical approximation framework. Attention is given to two categories of LQT problems in an infinite time interval: the finite energy and the finite average energy. The behavior of the optimal solution for finite time-interval problems as the length of the interval tends to infinity is discussed. Also presented are the formulations and properties of LQT problems in a finite time interval.

  2. Tracer transport in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Y.; Richardson, M. I.; Newman, C. E.; Lee, C.; Toigo, A. D.; Campin, J.

    2011-12-01

    Transport is crucial to understanding and reproducing the Martian dust and water cycles, and to interpreting putative methane and other trace gas (e.g. Argon) observations. However, as quantified by comparing model predictions with Argon measurements made by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer [e.g. Sprague et al., 2004, 2007], current Mars general circulation models (GCM's) appear to do a poor job at tracer transport [e.g. Nelli et al., 2007]. This invalidates a core assumption of GCM modeling in the last decade - that transport is sufficiently well treated in models that we need focus only on improving physical parameterizations, and that differences between results from different GCM's stem purely from their treatment of physical processes. If instead it is the simulated dynamical processes that need better treatment we need to move towards higher-quality numerics, e.g. based on the finite volume formulation, and introduce a more sophisticated approach to advection following work done for terrestrial chemical transport modeling. Here we present the results of non-condensable tracer transport simulations using our newly developed Mars MITgcm, which has both of the aforementioned desirable attributes: a finite volume core and access to a range of sophisticated advection schemes. Our results are encouraging in that we are able to reproduce the observed peak polar Argon enhancement factor of six (about double that attainable with most other Mars GCMs). Our diagnostics show that the time-averaged zonal-mean advection produces net increases of Argon at the winter poles, while stationary and transient eddies transport Argon away from the poles. Using less diffusive nonlinear advection schemes with flux limiters tends to produce more advective fluxes of tracers into the southern winter pole than the more diffusive linear advection schemes, resulting in a greater net increase of polar Argon abundance. We further utilize a more realistic k-distribution radiative transfer model, an

  3. Optimization of the thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of pig manure, agriculture waste and inorganic additive through specific methanogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, J; Cisneros-Ortiz, M E; Guardia-Puebla, Y; Morgan-Sagastume, J M; Noyola, A

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic co-digestion of three wastes (manure, rice straw and clay residue, an inorganic additive) at different concentration levels and their interactive effects on methanogenic activity were investigated in this work at thermophilic conditions in order to enhance hydrolytic activity and methane production. A central composite design and the response surface methodology were applied for the optimization of specific methanogenic activity (SMA) by assessing their interaction effects with a reduced number of experiments. The results showed a significant interaction among the wastes on the SMA and confirmed that co-digestion enhances methane production. Rice straw apparently did not supply a significant amount of substrate to make a difference in SMA or methane yield. On the other hand, clay residue had a positive effect as an inorganic additive for stimulating the anaerobic process, based on its mineral content and its adsorbent properties for ammonia. Finally, the optimal conditions for achieving a thermophilic SMA value close to 1.4 g CH4-COD/g VSS · d(-1) were 20.3 gVSS/L of manure, 9.8 gVSS/L of rice straw and 3.3 gTSS/L of clay. PMID:24959998

  4. Investigation of Antimicrobial Activity and Statistical Optimization of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 Biosurfactant Production in Solid-State Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ghribi, Dhouha; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Mnif, Ines; Kammoun, Radhouan; Ayadi, Imen; Saadaoui, Imen; Maktouf, Sameh; Chaabouni-Ellouze, Semia

    2012-01-01

    During the last years, several applications of biosurfactants with medical purposes have been reported. Biosurfactants are considered relevant molecules for applications in combating many diseases. However, their use is currently extremely limited due to their high cost in relation to that of chemical surfactants. Use of inexpensive substrates can drastically decrease its production cost. Here, twelve solid substrates were screened for the production of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant and the maximum yield was found with millet. A Plackett-Burman design was then used to evaluate the effects of five variables (temperature, moisture, initial pH, inoculum age, and inoculum size). Statistical analyses showed that temperature, inoculum age, and moisture content had significantly positive effect on SPB1 biosurfactant production. Their values were further optimized using a central composite design and a response surface methodology. The optimal conditions of temperature, inoculum age, and moisture content obtained under the conditions of study were 37°C, 14 h, and 88%, respectively. The evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of this compound was carried out against 11 bacteria and 8 fungi. The results demonstrated that this biosurfactant exhibited an important antimicrobial activity against microorganisms with multidrug-resistant profiles. Its activity was very effective against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus xylosus, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumonia, and so forth. PMID:22536017

  5. Mapping the Homodimer Interface of an Optimized, Artificial, Transmembrane Protein Activator of the Human Erythropoietin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bears, Zachary; Barrera, Francisco N.; Alonso, Miriam; Engelman, Donald M.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins constitute a large fraction of cellular proteins, and specific interactions involving membrane-spanning protein segments play an important role in protein oligomerization, folding, and function. We previously isolated an artificial, dimeric, 44-amino acid transmembrane protein that activates the human erythropoietin receptor (hEPOR) in trans. This artificial protein supports limited erythroid differentiation of primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro, even though it does not resemble erythropoietin, the natural ligand of this receptor. Here, we used a directed-evolution approach to explore the structural basis for the ability of transmembrane proteins to activate the hEPOR. A library that expresses thousands of mutants of the transmembrane activator was screened for variants that were more active than the original isolate at inducing growth factor independence in mouse cells expressing the hEPOR. The most active mutant, EBC5-16, supports erythroid differentiation in human cells with activity approaching that of EPO, as assessed by cell-surface expression of glycophorin A, a late-stage marker of erythroid differentiation. EBC5-16 contains a single isoleucine to serine substitution at position 25, which increases its ability to form dimers. Genetic studies confirmed the importance of dimerization for activity and identified the residues constituting the homodimer interface of EBC5-16. The interface requires a GxxxG dimer packing motif and a small amino acid at position 25 for maximal activity, implying that tight packing of the EBC5-16 dimer is a crucial determinant of activity. These experiments identified an artificial protein that causes robust activation of its target in a natural host cell, demonstrated the importance of dimerization of this protein for engagement of the hEPOR, and provided the framework for future structure-function studies of this novel mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:24788775

  6. Optimal placement and active vibration control for piezoelectric smart flexible cantilever plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Xian-min; Wu, Hong-xin; Zhang, Hong-hua

    2007-04-01

    Some flexible appendages of spacecraft are cantilever plate structures, such as sun plate and satellite antenna. Thus, vibration problem will be caused by parameter uncertainties and environmental disturbances. In this paper, piezoelectric ceramics patches are used as sensors and actuators to suppress the vibration of the smart flexible clamped plate. Firstly, modal equations and piezoelectric control equations of cantilever plate are derived. Secondly, an optimal placement method for the locations of piezoelectric actuators and sensors is developed based on the degree of observability and controllability indices for cantilever plate. The bending and torsional modes are decoupled by the proposed method using bandwidth Butterworth filter. Thirdly, an efficient control method by combining positive position feedback and proportional-derivative control is proposed for vibration reduction. The analytical results for modal frequencies, transient responses and control responses are carried out. Finally, an experimental setup of piezoelectric smart plate is designed and built up. The modal frequencies and damping ratios of the plate setup are obtained by identification method. Also, the experimental studies on vibration control of the cantilever plate including bending modes and torsional modes are conducted. The analytical and experimental results demonstrate that the presented control method is feasible, and the optimal placement method is effective.

  7. Characteristics and applications of size-segregated biomass burning tracers in China's Pearl River Delta region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhisheng; Gao, Jian; Engling, Guenter; Tao, Jun; Chai, Fahe; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Renjian; Sang, Xuefang; Chan, Chuen-yu; Lin, Zejian; Cao, Junji

    2015-02-01

    Biomass burning activities in China are ubiquitous and the resulting smoke emissions may pose considerable threats to human health and the environment. In the present study, size-segregated biomass burning tracers, including anhydrosugars (levoglucosan (LG) and mannosan (MN)) and non-sea-salt potassium (nss-K+), were determined at an urban and a suburban site in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region. The size distributions of biomass burning tracers were generally characterized by a unimodal pattern peaking in the particle size range of 0.44-1.0 μm, except for MN during the wet season, for which a bimodal pattern (one in fine and one in coarse mode) was observed. These observed biomass burning tracers in the PRD region shifted towards larger particle sizes compared to the typical size distributions of fresh biomass smoke particles. Elevated biomass burning tracers were observed during the dry season when biomass burning activities were intensive and meteorological conditions favored the transport of biomass smoke particles from the rural areas in the PRD and neighboring areas to the sampling sites. The fine mode biomass burning tracers significantly correlated with each other, confirming their common sources. Rather high ΔLG/ΔMN ratios were observed at both sites, indicating limited influence from softwood combustion. High Δnss-K+/ΔLG ratios further suggested that biomass burning aerosols in the PRD were predominately associated with burning of crop residues. Using a simplified receptor-oriented approach with an emission factor of 0.075 (LG/TC) obtained from several chamber studies, average contributions of biomass burning emissions to total carbon in fine particles were estimated to be 23% and 16% at the urban and suburban site, respectively, during the dry season. In contrast, the relative contributions to total carbon were lower than 8% at both sites during the wet season.

  8. Optimizing the Role of Physical Education in Promoting Physical Activity: A Social-Ecological Approach.

    PubMed

    Solmon, Melinda A

    2015-01-01

    The benefits associated with being physically active are well documented, but a significant proportion of the population is insufficiently active. Physical inactivity is a major health risk factor in our society, and physical education programs are consistently identified as a means to address this concern. The purpose of this article is to use the social-ecological model as a framework to examine ways in which physical education programs can play an important role in promoting physical activity. Policies that require time allocations and resources for physical education and physical activity in schools and community designs that provide infrastructure that makes being physically active accessible and convenient are important factors in making schools and communities healthier spaces. It is clear, however, that policies alone are not sufficient to address concerns about physical inactivity. We must consider individual factors that influence decisions to be physically active in efforts to engage children in physical education programs that promote active lifestyles. The learning climate that teachers create determines what students do and learn in physical education classes. Ensuring that students see value in the content presented and structuring classes so that students believe they can experience success when they exert effort are key elements in an effective motivational climate. Efforts to address public health concerns about physical inactivity require a comprehensive approach including quality physical education. It is critical that kinesiology professionals emerge as leaders in these efforts to place physical education programs at the center of promoting children's physical activity. PMID:26558638

  9. A parametric sensitivity and optimization study for the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model flutter characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1991-01-01

    In this paper an effort is made to improve the analytical open-loop flutter predictions for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model using a sensitivity based optimization approach. The sensitivity derivatives of the flutter frequency and dynamic pressure of the model with respect to the lag terms appearing in the Roger's unsteady aerodynamics approximations are evaluated both analytical and by finite differences. Then, the Levenberg-Marquardt method is used to find the optimum values for these lag-terms. The results obtained here agree much better with the experimental (wind tunnel) results than those found in the previous studies.

  10. Numerical Simulations and Tracer Studies as a Tool to Support Water Circulation Modeling in Breeding Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zima, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    The article presents a proposal of a method for computer-aided design and analysis of breeding reservoirs in zoos and aquariums. The method applied involves the use of computer simulations of water circulation in breeding pools. A mathematical model of a pool was developed, and a tracer study was carried out. A simplified model of two-dimensional flow in the form of a biharmonic equation for the stream function (converted into components of the velocity vector) was adopted to describe the flow field. This equation, supplemented by appropriate boundary conditions, was solved numerically by the finite difference method. Next, a tracer migration equation was solved, which was a two-dimensional advection-dispersion equation describing the unsteady transport of a non-active, permanent solute. In order to obtain a proper solution, a tracer study (with rhodamine WT as a tracer) was conducted in situ. The results of these measurements were compared with numerical solutions obtained. The results of numerical simulations made it possible to reconstruct water circulation in the breading pool and to identify still water zones, where water circulation was impeded.

  11. High performance simulation of environmental tracers in heterogeneous domains.

    PubMed

    Gardner, William P; Hammond, Glenn; Lichtner, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow, and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, and the mean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2D and 3D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer to the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3D domains differ significantly from 2D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3D systems. PMID:24372403

  12. High performance simulation of environmental tracers in heterogeneous domains.

    PubMed

    Gardner, William P; Hammond, Glenn; Lichtner, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow, and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, and the mean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2D and 3D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer to the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3D domains differ significantly from 2D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3D systems.

  13. 76 FR 71610 - Market Test of First-Class Tracer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... Market Test of First-Class Tracer AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is noticing a recently-field Postal Service proposal to conduct a market test of a market dominant product, First- Class Tracer. This document describes the proposed test, addresses procedural aspects...

  14. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  15. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  16. ANALYTICAL METHOD DEVELOPMENTS TO SUPPORT PARTITIONING INTERWELL TRACER TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning Interwell Tracer Testing (PITT) uses alcohol tracer compounds in estimating subsurface contamination from non-polar pollutants. PITT uses the analysis of water samples for various alcohols as part of the overall measurement process. The water samples may contain many...

  17. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A.; van Swol, Frank; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083-4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer's enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics.

  18. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  19. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  20. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  1. Positron emission tomography tracers for imaging angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Ambros J.; Wang, Hui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Position emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis may provide non-invasive insights into the corresponding molecular processes and may be applied for individualized treatment planning of antiangiogenic therapies. At the moment, most strategies are focusing on the development of radiolabelled proteins and antibody formats targeting VEGF and its receptor or the ED-B domain of a fibronectin isoform as well as radiolabelled matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or αvβ3 integrin antagonists. Great efforts are being made to develop suitable tracers for different target structures. All of the major strategies focusing on the development of radiolabelled compounds for use with positron emission tomography are summarized in this review. However, because the most intensive work is concentrated on the development of radiolabelled RGD peptides for imaging αvβ3 expression, which has successfully made its way from bench to bedside, these developments are especially emphasized. PMID:20559632

  2. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  3. Prostate Cancer Imaging with Novel PET Tracers.

    PubMed

    Lindenberg, Liza; Choyke, Peter; Dahut, William

    2016-03-01

    Molecular imaging of prostate cancer is in a dynamic phase of development. Currently approved techniques are limited and researchers have been working on novel agents to improve accuracy in targeting and detecting prostate tumors. In addition, the complexity of various prostate cancer states also contributes to the challenges in evaluating suitable radiotracer candidates. We have highlighted nuclear medicine tracers that focus on mechanisms involved in bone metastasis, prostate cancer cell membrane synthesis, amino acid analogs, androgen analogs, and the prostate specific membrane antigen. Encouraging results with many of these innovative radiotracer compounds will not only advance diagnostic capabilities for prostate cancer but open opportunities for theranostic applications to treat this worldwide malignancy. PMID:26874530

  4. Tracer diffusion in silica inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Cherdhirankorn, Thipphaya; Retsch, Markus; Jonas, Ulrich; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2010-06-15

    We employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the diffusion of small fluorescence tracers in liquid filled silica inverse opals. The inverse opals consisted of a nanoporous silica scaffold spanning a hexagonal crystal of spherical voids of 360 nm diameter connected by circular pores of 70 nm diameter. The diffusion of Alexa Fluor 488 in water and of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) in toluene was studied. Three diffusion modes could be distinguished: (1) Free diffusion limited by the geometric constraints given by the inverse opal, where, as compared to the free solution, this diffusion is slowed down by a factor of 3-4, (2) slow diffusion inside the nanoporous matrix of the silica scaffold, and (3) diffusion limited by adsorption. On the length scale of the focus of a confocal microscope of roughly 400 nm diffusion was non-Fickian in all cases.

  5. Atmospheric tracer experiments for regional dispersion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Heffter, J.L.; Ferber, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    Tracer experiments are being conducted to verify atmospheric transport and dispersion calculations at distances from tens to hundreds of km from pollutant sources. In one study, a 2 1/2 year sampling program has been carried out at 13 sites located 30 to 140 km from a source of /sup 85/Kr at the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina. Average weekly concentrations as well as twice-daily concentrations were obtained. Sampling data and meteorological data, including surface, tower, and rawinsonde observations are available on magnetic tape for model verification studies. Some verification results for the Air Resources Laboratories Atmospheric Transort and Dispersion Model (ARL-ATAD) are shown for averaging periods from one week to two years.

  6. Optimized electrode arrangement and activation of bioelectrodes activity by carbon nanoparticles for efficient ethanol microfluidic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selloum, D.; Tingry, S.; Techer, V.; Renaud, L.; Innocent, C.; Zouaoui, A.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents the construction of an ethanol microfluidic biofuel cell based on a biocathode and a bioanode, and operating in a Y-shaped microfluidic channel. At the anode, ethanol was oxidized by alcohol dehydrogenase, whereas at the cathode, the oxygen was reduced by laccase. Fuel and oxidant streams moved in parallel laminar flow without turbulent mixing into a microchannel fabricated using soft lithography methods. The enzymes were immobilized in the presence of reactive species at gold electrode surfaces. Bioelectrocatalytic processes were enhanced by combination of enzymes and carbon nanoparticles, attributed to appropriate electron transport and high amount enzyme loading. The benefit of the nanoparticles with higher surface porosity was explained by the high porous structure that offered a closer proximity to the reactive species and improved diffusion of the substrates within the enzyme films. The microfluidic BFC was optimized as function of electrode patterns, showing that higher current and power densities were achieved for shorter and wider electrodes that allow for thinner boundary layer depletion at the electrodes surface resulting in efficient catalytic consumption of fuel and oxidant. This miniaturized device generated maximum power density of 90 μW cm-2 at 0.6 V for a flow rate 16 μL min-1.

  7. Study of novel mechano-chemical activation process of red mud to optimize nitrate removal from water.

    PubMed

    Alighardashi, A; Gharibi, H R; Raygan, Sh; Akbarzadeh, A

    2016-01-01

    Red mud (RM) is the industrial waste of alumina production and causes serious environmental risks. In this paper, a novel activation procedure for RM (mechano-chemical processing) is proposed in order to improve the nitrate adsorption from water. High-energy milling and acidification were selected as mechanical and chemical activation methods, respectively. Synthesized samples of adsorbent were produced considering two parameters of activation: acid concentrations and acidification time in two selected milling times. Optimization of the activation process was based on nitrate removal from a stock solution. Experimental data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis methods to verify and discover the accuracy and probable errors. Best conditions (acceptable removal percentage > 75) were 17.6% w/w for acid concentrate and 19.9 minutes for acidification time in 8 hours for milling time. A direct relationship between increase in nitrate removal and increasing the acid concentration and acidification time was observed. The adsorption isotherms were studied and compared with other nitrate adsorbents. Characterization tests (X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering, surface area analysis and scanning electron microscopy) were conducted for both raw and activated adsorbents. Results showed noticeable superiority in characteristics after activation: higher specific area and porosity, lower particle size and lower agglomeration in structure. PMID:26901734

  8. Study of novel mechano-chemical activation process of red mud to optimize nitrate removal from water.

    PubMed

    Alighardashi, A; Gharibi, H R; Raygan, Sh; Akbarzadeh, A

    2016-01-01

    Red mud (RM) is the industrial waste of alumina production and causes serious environmental risks. In this paper, a novel activation procedure for RM (mechano-chemical processing) is proposed in order to improve the nitrate adsorption from water. High-energy milling and acidification were selected as mechanical and chemical activation methods, respectively. Synthesized samples of adsorbent were produced considering two parameters of activation: acid concentrations and acidification time in two selected milling times. Optimization of the activation process was based on nitrate removal from a stock solution. Experimental data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis methods to verify and discover the accuracy and probable errors. Best conditions (acceptable removal percentage > 75) were 17.6% w/w for acid concentrate and 19.9 minutes for acidification time in 8 hours for milling time. A direct relationship between increase in nitrate removal and increasing the acid concentration and acidification time was observed. The adsorption isotherms were studied and compared with other nitrate adsorbents. Characterization tests (X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering, surface area analysis and scanning electron microscopy) were conducted for both raw and activated adsorbents. Results showed noticeable superiority in characteristics after activation: higher specific area and porosity, lower particle size and lower agglomeration in structure.

  9. Importance of the tuning of band position in optimizing the electronic coupling and photocatalytic activity of nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Xiaoyan; Mok, Eun Kyung; Baek, Ji-Won; Park, Sang-Hyun; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    <