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Sample records for activity p53 expression

  1. MIF family members cooperatively inhibit p53 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Stephanie E; Rendon, Beatriz E; Xin, Dan; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Mitchell, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is induced by genotoxic stress in both normal and transformed cells and serves to transcriptionally coordinate cell cycle checkpoint control and programmed cell death responses. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an autocrine and paracrine acting cytokine/growth factor that promotes lung adenocarcinoma cell motility, anchorage-independence and neo-angiogenic potential. Several recent studies indicate that the only known homolog of MIF, D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT - also referred to as MIF-2), has functionally redundant activities with MIF and cooperatively promotes MIF-dependent pro-tumorigenic phenotypes. We now report that MIF and D-DT synergistically inhibit steady state p53 phosphorylation, stabilization and transcriptional activity in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. The combined loss of MIF and D-DT by siRNA leads to dramatically reduced cell cycle progression, anchorage independence, focus formation and increased programmed cell death when compared to individual loss of MIF or D-DT. Importantly, p53 mutant and p53 null lung adenocarcinoma cell lines were only nominally rescued from the cell growth effects of MIF/D-DT combined deficiency suggesting only a minor role for p53 in these transformed cell growth phenotypes. Finally, increased p53 activation was found to be independent of aberrantly activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) that occurs in response to MIF/D-DT-deficiency but is dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) that mediate aberrant AMPK activation in these cells. Combined, these findings suggest that both p53 wildtype and mutant human lung adenocarcinoma tumors rely on MIF family members for maximal cell growth and survival.

  2. Substrate Stiffness Influences Doxorubicin-Induced p53 Activation via ROCK2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ebata, Takahiro; Mitsui, Yasumasa; Sugimoto, Wataru; Maeda, Miho; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Harada, Ichiro; Sawada, Yasuhiro; Fujita, Hideaki; Hirata, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    The physical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), such as stiffness, are involved in the determination of the characteristics of cancer cells, including chemotherapy sensitivity. Resistance to chemotherapy is often linked to dysfunction of tumor suppressor p53; however, it remains elusive whether the ECM microenvironment interferes with p53 activation in cancer cells. Here, we show that, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, extracellular stiffness influences p53 activation induced by the antitumor drug doxorubicin. Cell growth inhibition by doxorubicin was increased in response to ECM rigidity in a p53-dependent manner. The expression of Rho-associated coiled coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK) 2, which induces the activation of myosin II, was significantly higher when cells were cultured on stiffer ECM substrates. Knockdown of ROCK2 expression or pharmacological inhibition of ROCK decreased doxorubicin-induced p53 activation. Our results suggest that a soft ECM causes downregulation of ROCK2 expression, which drives resistance to chemotherapy by repressing p53 activation. PMID:28191463

  3. p53/PUMA expression in human pulmonary fibroblasts mediates cell activation and migration in silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Haijun; Dai, Xiaoniu; Fang, Shencun; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Yingming; Yao, Honghong; Zhang, Xilong; Chao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis of SiO2 into the lung causes an inflammatory cascade that results in fibroblast proliferation and migration, followed by fibrosis. Clinical evidence has indicated that the activation of alveolar macrophages by SiO2 produces rapid and sustained inflammation characterized by the generation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1, which, in turn, induces fibrosis. However, the details of events downstream of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 activity in pulmonary fibroblasts remain unclear. Here, to elucidate the role of p53 in fibrosis induced by silica, both the upstream molecular mechanisms and the functional effects on cell proliferation and migration were investigated. Experiments using primary cultured adult human pulmonary fibroblasts led to the following results: 1) SiO2 treatment resulted in a rapid and sustained increase in p53 and PUMA protein levels; 2) the MAPK and PI3K pathways were involved in the SiO2-induced alteration of p53 and PUMA expression; and 3) RNA interference targeting p53 and PUMA prevented the SiO2-induced increases in fibroblast activation and migration. Our study elucidated a link between SiO2-induced p53/PUMA expression in fibroblasts and cell migration, thereby providing novel insight into the potential use of p53/PUMA in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for silicosis treatment. PMID:26576741

  4. Influenza A Viruses Control Expression of Proviral Human p53 Isoforms p53β and Δ133p53α

    PubMed Central

    Marcel, Virginie; Cartet, Gaëlle; Lane, David P.; Lina, Bruno; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have described the role of p53 isoforms, including p53β and Δ133p53α, in the modulation of the activity of full-length p53, which regulates cell fate. In the context of influenza virus infection, an interplay between influenza viruses and p53 has been described, with p53 being involved in the antiviral response. However, the role of physiological p53 isoforms has never been explored in this context. Here, we demonstrate that p53 isoforms play a role in influenza A virus infection by using silencing and transient expression strategies in human lung epithelial cells. In addition, with the help of a panel of different influenza viruses from different subtypes, we also show that infection differentially regulates the expressions of p53β and Δ133p53α. Altogether, our results highlight the role of p53 isoforms in the viral cycle of influenza A viruses, with p53β and Δ133p53α acting as regulators of viral production in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:22647703

  5. Interleukin-13 interferes with activation-induced t-cell apoptosis by repressing p53 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Gui; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Mo, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The etiology and the underlying mechanism of CD4+ T-cell polarization are unclear. This study sought to investigate the mechanism by which interleukin (IL)-13 prevents the activation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T cells. Here we report that CD4+ T cells expressed IL-13 receptor α2 in the intestine of sensitized mice. IL-13 suppressed both the activation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T cells and the expression of p53 and FasL. Exposure to recombinant IL-13 inhibited activation-induced cell death (AICD) along with the expression of p53, caspase 3, and tumor necrosis factor-α in CD4+ T cells. Administration of an anti-IL-13 antibody enhanced the effect of specific immunotherapy on allergic inflammation in the mouse intestine, enforced the expression of p53 in intestinal CD4+ T cells, and enhanced the frequency of CD4+ T-cell apoptosis upon challenge with specific antigens. In summary, blocking IL-13 enhances the therapeutic effect of antigen-specific immunotherapy by regulating apoptosis and thereby enforcing AICD in CD4+ T cells. PMID:26189367

  6. Decreasing CNPY2 Expression Diminishes Colorectal Tumor Growth and Development through Activation of p53 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; Gong, Hui; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Feng, Yi; Wu, Jun; He, Sheng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Xiaoxia; Guo, Rui; Xie, Jun; Li, Ren-Ke

    2016-04-01

    Neovascularization drives tumor development, and angiogenic factors are important neovascularization initiators. We recently identified the secreted angiogenic factor CNPY2, but its involvement in cancer has not been explored. Herein, we investigate CNPY2's role in human colorectal cancer (CRC) development. Tumor samples were obtained from CRC patients undergoing surgery. Canopy 2 (CNPY2) expression was analyzed in tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Stable lines of human HCT116 cells expressing CNPY2 shRNA or control shRNA were established. To determine CNPY2's effects on tumor xenografts in vivo, human CNPY2 shRNA HCT116 cells and controls were injected into nude mice, separately. Cellular apoptosis, growth, and angiogenesis in the xenografts were evaluated. CNPY2 expression was significantly higher in CRC tissues. CNPY2 knockdown in HCT116 cells inhibited growth and migration and promoted apoptosis. In xenografts, CNPY2 knockdown prevented tumor growth and angiogenesis and promoted apoptosis. Knockdown of CNPY2 in the HCT116 CRC cell line reversibly increased p53 activity. The p53 activation increased cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and decreased cyclin-dependent kinase 2, thereby inhibiting tumor cell growth, inducing cell apoptosis, and reducing angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. CNPY2 may play a critical role in CRC development by enhancing cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis and by inhibiting apoptosis through negative regulation of the p53 pathway. Therefore, CNPY2 may represent a novel CRC therapeutic target and prognostic indicator.

  7. p53 Degradation Activity, Expression, and Subcellular Localization of E6 Proteins from 29 Human Papillomavirus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mesplède, Thibault; Gagnon, David; Bergeron-Labrecque, Fanny; Azar, Ibrahim; Sénéchal, Hélène; Coutlée, François

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the etiological agents of cervical cancer and other human malignancies. HPVs are classified into high- and low-risk genotypes according to their association with cancer. Host cell transformation by high-risk HPVs relies in part on the ability of the viral E6 protein to induce the degradation of p53. We report the development of a cellular assay that accurately quantifies the p53 degradation activity of E6 in vivo, based on the fusion of p53 to Renilla luciferase (RLuc-p53). This assay was used to measure the p53 degradation activities of E6 proteins from 29 prevalent HPV types and variants of HPV type 16 (HPV16) and HPV33 by determining the amount of E6 expression vector required to reduce by half the levels of RLuc-p53 (50% effective concentration [EC50]). These studies revealed an unexpected variability in the p53 degradation activities of different E6 proteins, even among active types whose EC50s span more than 2 log units. Differences in activity were greater between types than between variants and did not correlate with differences in the intracellular localization of E6, with most being predominantly nuclear. Protein and mRNA expression of the 29 E6 proteins was also examined. For 16 high-risk types, spliced transcripts that encode shorter E6*I proteins of variable sizes and abundances were detected. Mutation of the splice donor site in five different E6 proteins increased their p53 degradation activity, suggesting that mRNA splicing can limit the activity of some high-risk E6 types. The quantification of p53 degradation in vivo represents a novel tool to systematically compare the oncogenic potentials of E6 proteins from different HPV types and variants. PMID:22013048

  8. p53 regulates thymic Notch1 activation.

    PubMed

    Laws, Amy M; Osborne, Barbara A

    2004-03-01

    Notch is crucial for multiple stages of T cell development, including the CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP)/CD8+ single positive (SP) transition, but regulation of Notchactivation is not well understood. p53 regulates Presenilin1 (PS1) expression, and PS1 cleaves Notch, releasing its intracellular domain (NIC), leading to the expression of downstream targets, e.g. the HES1 gene. We hypothesize that p53 regulates Notch activity during T cell development. We found that Notch1 expression and activation were negatively regulated by p53in several thymoma lines. Additionally, NIC was elevated in Trp53(-/-) thymocytes as compared to Trp53(+/+) thymocytes. To determine if elevated Notch1 activation in Trp53(-/-) thymocytes had an effect on T cell development, CD4 and CD8 expression were analyzed. The CD4+ SP/CD8+ SP T cell ratio was decreased in Trp53(-/-) splenocytes and thymocytes. This alteration in T cell development correlated with the increased Notch1 activation observed in the absence of p53. These data indicate that p53 negatively regulates Notch1 activation during T cell development. Skewing of T cell development toward CD8+SP T cells in Trp53(-/-) mice is reminiscent of the phenotype of NIC-overexpressing mice. Thus, we suggest that p53 plays a role in T cell development, in part by regulating Notch1 activation.

  9. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation.

  10. Loss of VHL promotes progerin expression, leading to impaired p14/ARF function and suppression of p53 activity

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youn-Sang; Lee, Su-Jin; Lee, Sun-Hye; Chung, Ji-Yun; Jung, Youn Jin; Hwang, Sang Hyun; Ha, Nam-Chul; Park, Bum-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are frequently occurring genitourinary malignancies in the aged population. A morphological characteristic of RCCs is an irregular nuclear shape, which is used to index cancer grades. Other features of RCCs include the genetic inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau gene, VHL, and p53 genetic-independent inactivation. An aberrant nuclear shape or p53 suppression has not yet been demonstrated. We examined the effect of progerin (an altered splicing product of the LMNA gene linked to Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome; HGPS) on the nuclear deformation of RCCs in comparison to that of HGPS cells. In this study, we showed that progerin was suppressed by pVHL and was responsible for nuclear irregularities as well as p53 inactivation. Thus, progerin suppression can ameliorate nuclear abnormalities and reactivate p53 in response to genotoxic addition. Furthermore, we found that progerin was a target of pVHL E3 ligase and suppressed p53 activity by p14/ARF inhibition. Our findings indicate that the elevated expression of progerin in RCCs results from the loss of pVHL and leads to p53 inactivation through p14/ARF suppression. Interestingly, we showed that progerin was expressed in human leukemia and primary cell lines, raising the possibility that the expression of this LMNA variant may be a common event in age-related cancer progression. PMID:24067370

  11. Lysine methylation represses p53 activity in teratocarcinoma cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiajun; Dou, Zhixun; Sammons, Morgan A.; Levine, Arnold J.; Berger, Shelley L.

    2016-01-01

    TP53 (which encodes the p53 protein) is the most frequently mutated gene among all human cancers, whereas tumors that retain the wild-type TP53 gene often use alternative mechanisms to repress the p53 tumor-suppressive function. Testicular teratocarcinoma cells rarely contain mutations in TP53, yet the transcriptional activity of wild-type p53 is compromised, despite its high expression level. Here we report that in the teratocarcinoma cell line NTera2, p53 is subject to lysine methylation at its carboxyl terminus, which has been shown to repress p53’s transcriptional activity. We show that reduction of the cognate methyltransferases reactivates p53 and promotes differentiation of the NTera2 cells. Furthermore, reconstitution of methylation-deficient p53 mutants into p53-depleted NTera2 cells results in elevated expression of p53 downstream targets and precocious loss of pluripotent gene expression compared with re-expression of wild-type p53. Our results provide evidence that lysine methylation of endogenous wild-type p53 represses its activity in cancer cells and suggest new therapeutic possibilities of targeting testicular teratocarcinoma. PMID:27535933

  12. MG132 plus apoptosis antigen-1 (APO-1) antibody cooperate to restore p53 activity inducing autophagy and p53-dependent apoptosis in HPV16 E6-expressing keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Lagunas-Martínez, Alfredo; García-Villa, Enrique; Arellano-Gaytán, Magaly; Contreras-Ochoa, Carla O; Dimas-González, Jisela; López-Arellano, María E; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Gariglio, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    The E6 oncoprotein can interfere with the ability of infected cells to undergo programmed cell death through the proteolytic degradation of proapoptotic proteins such as p53, employing the proteasome pathway. Therefore, inactivation of the proteasome through MG132 should restore the activity of several proapoptotic proteins. We investigated whether in HPV16 E6-expressing keratinocytes (KE6 cells), the restoration of p53 levels mediated by MG132 and/or activation of the CD95 pathway through apoptosis antigen-1 (APO-1) antibody are responsible for the induction of apoptosis. We found that KE6 cells underwent apoptosis mainly after incubation for 24 h with MG132 alone or APO-1 plus MG132. Both treatments activated the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. Autophagy was also activated, principally by APO-1 plus MG132. Inhibition of E6-mediated p53 proteasomal degradation by MG132 resulted in the elevation of p53 protein levels and its phosphorylation in Ser46 and Ser20; the p53 protein was localized mainly at nucleus after treatment with MG132 or APO-1 plus MG132. In addition, induction of its transcriptional target genes such as p21, Bax and TP53INP was observed 3 and 6 h after treatment. Also, LC3 mRNA was induced after 3 and 6 h, which correlates with lipidation of LC3B protein and induction of autophagy. Finally, using pifithrin alpha we observed a decrease in apoptosis induced by MG132, and by APO-1 plus MG132, suggesting that restoration of APO-1 sensitivity occurs in part through an increase in both the levels and the activity of p53. The use of small molecules to inhibit the proteasome pathway might permit the activation of cell death, providing new opportunities for CC treatment.

  13. The Transcription Factor p53 Influences Microglial Activation Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Nesser, Nicole K.; Hopkins, Stephanie; Myers, Scott J.; Case, Amanda; Lee, Rona J.; Seaburg, Luke A.; Uo, Takuma; Murphy, Sean P.; Morrison, Richard S.; Garden, Gwenn A.

    2011-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are influenced by the innate immune response in the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia, have pro-inflammatory and subsequently neurotoxic actions as well as anti-inflammatory functions that promote recovery and repair. Very little is known about the transcriptional control of these specific microglial behaviors. We have previously shown that in HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), the transcription factor p53 accumulates in microglia and that microglial p53 expression is required for the in vitro neurotoxicity of the HIV coat glycoprotein gp120. These findings suggested a novel function for p53 in regulating microglial activation. Here we report that in the absence of p53, microglia demonstrate a blunted response to interferon-γ, failing to increase expression of genes associated with classical macrophage activation or secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. Microarray analysis of global gene expression profiles revealed increased expression of genes associated with anti-inflammatory functions, phagocytosis and tissue repair in p53 knockout (p53−/−) microglia compared with those cultured from strain matched p53 expressing (p53+/+) mice. We further observed that p53−/− microglia demonstrate increased phagocytic activity in vitro and expression of markers for alternative macrophage activation both in vitro and in vivo. In HAND brain tissue, the alternative activation marker CD163 was expressed in a separate subset of microglia than those demonstrating p53 accumulation. These data suggest that p53 influences microglial behavior, supporting the adoption of a pro-inflammatory phenotype, while p53 deficiency promotes phagocytosis and gene expression associated with alternative activation and anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:21598312

  14. SUMOylation of p53 mediates interferon activities

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Villar, Laura; Pérez-Girón, José V; Vilas, Jéssica M; Soto, Atenea; de la Cruz-Hererra, Carlos F; Lang, Valerie; Collado, Manuel; Vidal, Anxo; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Rivas, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that many host proteins involved in innate and intrinsic immunity are regulated by SUMOylation, and that SUMO contributes to the regulatory process that governs the initiation of the type I interferon (IFN) response. The tumor suppressor p53 is a modulator of the IFN response that plays a role in virus-induced apoptosis and in IFN-induced senescence. Here we demonstrate that IFN treatment increases the levels of SUMOylated p53 and induces cellular senescence through a process that is partially dependent upon SUMOylation of p53. Similarly, we show that vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection induces p53 SUMOylation, and that this modification favors the control of VSV replication. Thus, our study provides evidence that IFN signaling induces p53 SUMOylation, which results in the activation of a cellular senescence program and contributes to the antiviral functions of interferon. PMID:23966171

  15. Restoring expression of wild-type p53 suppresses tumor growth but does not cause tumor regression in mice with a p53 missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxing; Suh, Young-Ah; Fuller, Maren Y; Jackson, James G; Xiong, Shunbin; Terzian, Tamara; Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Bankson, James A; El-Naggar, Adel K; Lozano, Guillermina

    2011-03-01

    The transcription factor p53 is a tumor suppressor. As such, the P53 gene is frequently altered in human cancers. However, over 80% of the P53 mutations found in human cancers are missense mutations that lead to expression of mutant proteins that not only lack p53 transcriptional activity but exhibit new functions as well. Recent studies show that restoration of p53 expression leads to tumor regression in mice carrying p53 deletions. However, the therapeutic efficacy of restoring p53 expression in tumors containing p53 missense mutations has not been evaluated. Here we demonstrate that restoring wild-type p53 expression halted tumor growth in mice inheriting a p53(R172H) missense mutation that is equivalent to a P53 missense mutation detected in approximately 6% of human cancers. However, it did not lead to tumor regression, as was observed in mice lacking p53. We further showed that the dominant-negative effect of the mutant p53 encoded by p53(R172H) dampened the activity of the restored wild-type p53. We therefore conclude that in a mutant p53 background, p53 restoration has the therapeutic potential to suppress tumor progression. Our findings support using p53 restoration as a strategy to treat human cancers with P53 missense mutations and provide direction for optimizing p53 restoration in cancer therapy.

  16. Restoring expression of wild-type p53 suppresses tumor growth but does not cause tumor regression in mice with a p53 missense mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongxing; Suh, Young-Ah; Fuller, Maren Y.; Jackson, James G.; Xiong, Shunbin; Terzian, Tamara; Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Bankson, James A.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Lozano, Guillermina

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 is a tumor suppressor. As such, the P53 gene is frequently altered in human cancers. However, over 80% of the P53 mutations found in human cancers are missense mutations that lead to expression of mutant proteins that not only lack p53 transcriptional activity but exhibit new functions as well. Recent studies show that restoration of p53 expression leads to tumor regression in mice carrying p53 deletions. However, the therapeutic efficacy of restoring p53 expression in tumors containing p53 missense mutations has not been evaluated. Here we demonstrate that restoring wild-type p53 expression halted tumor growth in mice inheriting a p53R172H missense mutation that is equivalent to a P53 missense mutation detected in approximately 6% of human cancers. However, it did not lead to tumor regression, as was observed in mice lacking p53. We further showed that the dominant-negative effect of the mutant p53 encoded by p53R172H dampened the activity of the restored wild-type p53. We therefore conclude that in a mutant p53 background, p53 restoration has the therapeutic potential to suppress tumor progression. Our findings support using p53 restoration as a strategy to treat human cancers with P53 missense mutations and provide direction for optimizing p53 restoration in cancer therapy. PMID:21285512

  17. Regulation of neuronal P53 activity by CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Z.; Shimizu, Saori; Patel, Jeegar P.; Nelson, Autumn; Le, My-Thao; Mullen-Przeworski, Anna; Brandimarti, Renato; Fatatis, Alessandro; Meucci, Olimpia

    2009-01-01

    Abnormal activation of CXCR4 during inflammatory/infectious states may lead to neuronal dysfunction or damage. The major goal of this study was to determine the coupling of CXCR4 to p53-dependent survival pathways in primary neurons. Neurons were stimulated with the HIV envelope protein gp120IIIB or the endogenous CXCR4 agonist, SDF-1α. We found that gp120 stimulates p53 activity and induces expression of the p53 pro-apoptotic target Apaf-1 in cultured neurons. Inhibition of CXCR4 by AMD3100 abrogates the effect of gp120 on both p53 and Apaf-1. Moreover, gp120 neurotoxicity is markedly reduced by the p53-inhibitor, pifithrin-α. The viral protein also regulates p53 phosphorylation and expression of other p53-responsive genes, such as MDM2 and p21. Conversely, SDF-1α, which can promote neuronal survival, increases p53 acetylation and p21 expression in neurons. Thus, the stimulation of different p53 targets could be instrumental in determining the outcome of CXCR4 activation on neuronal survival in neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:16005638

  18. Dial 9-1-1 for p53: Mechanisms of p53 Activation by Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ljungman, Mats

    2000-01-01

    Abstract The tumor suppressor protein, p53, is part of the cell's emergency team that is called upon following cellular insult. How do cells sense DNA damage and other cellular stresses and what signal transduction pathways are used to alert p53? How is the resulting nuclear accumulation of p53 accomplished and what determines the outcome of p53 induction? Many posttranslational modifications of p53, such as phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, acetylation and ribosylation, have been shown to occur following cellular stress. Some of these modifications may activate the p53 protein, interfere with MDM2 binding and/or dictate cellular localization of p53. This review will focus on recent findings about how the p53 response may be activated following cellular stress. PMID:10935507

  19. p53 inhibits the expression of p125 and the methylation of POLD1 gene promoter by downregulating the Sp1-induced DNMT1 activities in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Yang, Weiping; Zhu, Xiao; Wei, Changyuan

    2016-01-01

    p125 is one of four subunits of human DNA polymerases – DNA Pol δ as well as one of p53 target protein encoded by POLD1. However, the function and significance of p125 and the role that p53 plays in regulating p125 expression are not fully understood in breast cancer. Tissue sections of human breast cancer obtained from 70 patients whose median age was 47.6 years (range: 38–69 years) with stage II–III breast cancer were studied with normal breast tissue from the same patients and two human breast cell lines (MCF-7 and MCF-10A). p53 expression levels were reduced, while p125 protein expression was increased in human breast cancer tissues and cell line detected by Western blot and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The methylation level of the POLD1 gene promoter was greater in breast cancer tissues and cells when compared with normal tissues and cells. In MCF-7 cell model, p53 overexpression caused a decrease in the level of p125 protein, while the methylation level of the p125 gene promoter was also inhibited by p53 overexpression. To further investigate the regulating mechanism of p53 on p125 expression, our study focused on DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and transcription factor Sp1. Both DNMT1 and Sp1 protein expression were reduced when p53 was overexpressed in MCF-7 cells. The Sp1 binding site appears to be important for DNMT1 gene transcription; Sp1 and p53 can bind together, which means that DNMT1 gene expression may be downregulated by p53 through binding to Sp1. Because DNMT1 methylation level of the p125 gene promoter can affect p125 gene transcription, we propose that p53 may indirectly regulate p125 gene promoter expression through the control of DNMT1 gene transcription. In conclusion, the data from this preliminary study have shown that p53 inhibits the methylation of p125 gene promoter by downregulating the activities of Sp1 and DNMT1 in breast cancer. PMID:27022290

  20. Activated p53 with Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Enhances L-Fucose-Mediated Drug Delivery through Induction of Fucosyltransferase 8 Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arihara, Yohei; Kikuchi, Shohei; Osuga, Takahiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Kamihara, Yusuke; Hayasaka, Naotaka; Usami, Makoto; Murase, Kazuyuki; Miyanishi, Koji; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognosis of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is dismal, underscoring the need for novel effective treatments. The α1,6-fucosyltransferase (fucosyltransferase 8, FUT8) has been reported to accelerate malignant potential in HCC. Our study aimed to investigate the regulation of FUT8 expression by p53 and develop a novel therapeutic strategy for targeting HCC cells using L-fucose-mediated drug delivery. Methods Binding sites for p53 were searched for within the FUT8 promoter region. FUT8 expression was assessed by immunoblotting. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were performed to analyze p53 binding to the FUT8 promoter. The delivery of Cy5.5-encapsulated L-fucose-liposomes (Fuc-Lip-Cy5.5) to a Lens Culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of α-fetoprotein (AFP-L3)-expressing HCC cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. The induction of FUT8 by histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) -inducing acetylated -p53 was evaluated by immunoblotting. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to assess whether the activation of p53 by HDACi affected the uptake of Fuc-Lip-Cy5.5 by HCC cells. The cytotoxicity of an L-fucose-bound liposome carrying sorafenib (Fuc-Lip-sorafenib) with HDACi was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Results The knock down of p53 with siRNA led to decreased FUT8 expression. ChIP assays revealed p53 binds to the FUT8 promoter region. Flow cytometric analyses demonstrated the specific uptake of Fuc-Lip-Cy5.5 into AFP-L3-expressing HCC cells in a p53- and FUT8-dependent manner. HDACi upregulated the uptake of Fuc-Lip-Cy5.5 by HCC cells by increasing FUT8 via acetylated -p53. The addition of a HDACi increased apoptosis induced by Fuc-Lip-sorafenib in HCC cells. Conclusions Our findings reveal that FUT8 is a p53 target gene and suggest that p53 activated by HDACi induces Fuc-Lip-sorafenib uptake by HCC cells, highlighting this pathway as a promising therapeutic intervention for HCC. PMID:27977808

  1. 11R-P53 and GM-CSF Expressing Oncolytic Adenovirus Target Cancer Stem Cells with Enhanced Synergistic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Sai-qun; Ye, Zhen-long; Liu, Pin-yi; Huang, Yao; Li, Lin-fang; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Hai-li; Jin, Hua-jun; Qian, Qi-jun

    2017-01-01

    Targeting cancer stem cells with oncolytic virus (OV) holds great potential for thorough elimination of cancer cells. Based on our previous studies, we here established 11R-P53 and mGM-CSF carrying oncolytic adenovirus (OAV) SG655-mGMP and investigated its therapeutic effect on hepatocellular carcinoma stem cells Hep3B-C and teratoma stem cells ECCG5. Firstly, the augmenting effect of 11R in our construct was tested and confirmed by examining the expression of EGFP with Fluorescence and FCM assays after transfecting Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells with OVA SG7605-EGFP and SG7605-11R-EGFP. Secondly, the expressions of 11R-P53 and GM-CSF in Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells after transfection with OAV SG655-mGMP were detected by Western blot and Elisa assays, respectively. Thirdly, the enhanced growth inhibitory and augmented apoptosis inducing effects of OAV SG655-mGMP on Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells were tested with FCM assays by comparing with the control, wild type 5 adenovirus, 11R-P53 carrying OVA in vitro. Lastly, the in vivo therapeutic effect of OAV SG655-mGMP toward ECCG5 cell-formed xenografts was studied by measuring tumor volumes post different treatments with PBS, OAV SG655-11R-P53, OAV SG655-mGM-CSF and OAV SG655-mGMP. Treatment with OAV SG655-mGMP induced significant xenograft growth inhibition, inflammation factor AIF1 expression and immune cells infiltration. Therefore, our OAV SG655-mGMP provides a novel platform to arm OVs to target cancer stem cells. PMID:28243324

  2. Ectopic AP4 expression induces cellular senescence via activation of p53 in long-term confluent retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiping; Wong, Matthew Man-Kin; Zhang, Xiaojian; Chiu, Sung-Kay

    2015-11-15

    When cells are grown to confluence, cell-cell contact inhibition occurs and drives the cells to enter reversible quiescence rather than senescence. Confluent retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells exhibiting contact inhibition was used as a model in this study to examine the role of overexpression of transcription factor AP4, a highly expressed transcription factor in many types of cancer, in these cells during long-term culture. We generated stable inducible RPE cell clones expressing AP4 or AP4 without the DNA binding domain (DN-AP4) and observed that, when cultured for 24 days, RPE cells with a high level of AP4 exhibit a large, flattened morphology and even cease proliferating; these changes were not observed in DN-AP4-expressing cells or non-induced cells. In addition, AP4-expressing cells exhibited senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. We demonstrated that the induced cellular senescence was mediated by enhanced p53 expression and that AP4 regulates the p53 gene by binding directly to two of the three E-boxes present on the promoter of the p53 gene. Moreover, we showed that serum is essential for AP4 in inducing p53-associated cellular senescence. Collectively, we showed that overexpression of AP4 mediates cellular senescence involving in activation of p53 in long-term post-confluent RPE cells.

  3. Ferroptosis as a p53-mediated activity during tumour suppression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Le; Kon, Ning; Li, Tongyuan; Wang, Shang-Jui; Su, Tao; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Baer, Richard; Gu, Wei

    2015-04-02

    Although p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis serve as critical barriers to cancer development, emerging evidence suggests that the metabolic activities of p53 are also important. Here we show that p53 inhibits cystine uptake and sensitizes cells to ferroptosis, a non-apoptotic form of cell death, by repressing expression of SLC7A11, a key component of the cystine/glutamate antiporter. Notably, p53(3KR), an acetylation-defective mutant that fails to induce cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, fully retains the ability to regulate SLC7A11 expression and induce ferroptosis upon reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced stress. Analysis of mutant mice shows that these non-canonical p53 activities contribute to embryonic development and the lethality associated with loss of Mdm2. Moreover, SLC7A11 is highly expressed in human tumours, and its overexpression inhibits ROS-induced ferroptosis and abrogates p53(3KR)-mediated tumour growth suppression in xenograft models. Our findings uncover a new mode of tumour suppression based on p53 regulation of cystine metabolism, ROS responses and ferroptosis.

  4. p53 facilitates pRb cleavage in IL-3-deprived cells: novel pro-apoptotic activity of p53.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, E; Oren, M

    1998-01-01

    In the interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent lymphoid cell line DA-1, functional p53 is required for efficient apoptosis in response to IL-3 withdrawal. Activation of p53 in these cells, by either DNA damage or p53 overexpression, results in a vital growth arrest in the presence of IL-3 and in accelerated apoptosis in its absence. Thus, IL-3 can control the choice between p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Here we report that the cross-talk between p53 and IL-3 involves joint control of pRb cleavage and degradation. Depletion of IL-3 results in caspase-mediated pRb cleavage, occurring preferentially within cells which express functional p53. Moreover, pRb can be cleaved efficiently by extracts prepared from DA-1 cells but not from their derivatives which lack p53 function. Inactivation of pRb through expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncogene overrides the effect of IL-3 in a p53-dependent manner. Our data suggest a novel role for p53 in the regulation of cell death and a novel mechanism for the cooperation between p53 and survival factor deprivation. Thus, p53 makes cells permissive to pRb cleavage, probably by controlling the potential activity of a pRb-cleaving caspase, whereas IL-3 withdrawal provides signals that turn on this potential activity and lead to the actual cleavage and subsequent degradation of pRb. Elimination of a presumptive anti-apoptotic effect of pRb may then facilitate conversion of p53-mediated growth arrest into apoptosis. PMID:9649429

  5. Isolation of 10 differentially expressed cDNAs in p53-induced apoptosis: activation of the vertebrate homologue of the drosophila seven in absentia gene.

    PubMed Central

    Amson, R B; Nemani, M; Roperch, J P; Israeli, D; Bougueleret, L; Le Gall, I; Medhioub, M; Linares-Cruz, G; Lethrosne, F; Pasturaud, P; Piouffre, L; Prieur, S; Susini, L; Alvaro, V; Millasseau, P; Guidicelli, C; Bui, H; Massart, C; Cazes, L; Dufour, F; Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, H; Owadi, H; Hennion, C; Charpak, G; Telerman, A

    1996-01-01

    We report the isolation of 10 differentially expressed cDNAs in the process of apoptosis induced by the p53 tamor suppressor. As a global analytical method, we performed a differential display of mRNA between mouse M1 myeloid leukemia cells and derived clone LTR6 cells, which contain a stably transfected temperature-sensitive mutant of p53. At 32 degrees C wild-type p53 function is activated in LTR6 cells, resulting in programmed cell death. Eight genes are activated (TSAP; tumor suppressor activated pathway), and two are inhibited (TSIP, tumor suppressor inhibited pathway) in their expression. None of the 10 sequences has hitherto been recognized as part of the p53 signaling pathway. Three TSAPs are homologous to known genes. TSAP1 corresponds to phospholipase C beta 4. TSAP2 has a conserved domain homologous to a multiple endocrine neoplasia I (ZFM1) candidate gene. TSAP3 is the mouse homologue of the Drosophila seven in absentia gene. These data provide novel molecules involved in the pathway of wild-type p53 activation. They establish a functional link between a homologue of a conserved developmental Drosophila gene and signal transduction in tumor suppression leading to programmed cell death. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8632996

  6. DJ-1 restores p53 transcription activity inhibited by Topors/p53BP3.

    PubMed

    Shinbo, Yumi; Taira, Takahiro; Niki, Takeshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2005-03-01

    DJ-1 is a multi-functional protein that plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress, and loss of its function is thought to result in onset of Parkinson's disease. Here, we report that DJ-1 bound to Topors/p53BP3, a ring finger protein binding to both topoisomerase I and p53, in vitro and in vivo and that both proteins were colocalized in cells. DJ-1 and p53 were then found to be sumoylated by Topors in cells. It was also found that DJ-1 bound to p53 in vitro and in vivo and that colocalization with and its binding to p53 were stimulated by UV irradiation of cells. Transcription activity of p53 was found to be abrogated by Topors concomitant with sumoylation of p53 in a dose-dependent manner, and DJ-1 restored its repressed activity by releasing the sumoylated form of p53. These findings suggest that DJ-1 positively regulates p53 through Topors-mediated sumoylation.

  7. Activation and activities of the p53 tumour suppressor protein

    PubMed Central

    Bálint, É; Vousden, K H

    2001-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor protein inhibits malignant progression by mediating cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or repair following cellular stress. One of the major regulators of p53 function is the MDM2 protein, and multiple forms of cellular stress activate p53 by inhibiting the MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. Mutations in p53, or disruption of the pathways that allow activation of p53, seem to be a general feature of all cancers. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the pathways that regulate p53 and the pathways that are induced by p53, as well as their implications for cancer therapy. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747320

  8. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed. PMID:26618142

  9. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed.

  10. Knockdown of p53 suppresses Nanog expression in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelalim, Essam Mohamed; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We investigate the role of p53 in ESCs in the absence of DNA damage. •p53 knockdown suppresses ESC proliferation. •p53 knockdown downregulates Nanog expression. •p53 is essential for mouse ESC self-renewal. -- Abstract: Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) express high levels of cytoplasmic p53. Exposure of mouse ESCs to DNA damage leads to activation of p53, inducing Nanog suppression. In contrast to earlier studies, we recently reported that chemical inhibition of p53 suppresses ESC proliferation. Here, we confirm that p53 signaling is involved in the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 induced downregulation of p21 and defects in ESC proliferation. Furthermore, p53 knockdown resulted in a significant downregulation in Nanog expression at 24 and 48 h post-transfection. p53 knockdown also caused a reduction in Oct4 expression at 48 h post-transfection. Conversely, exposure of ESCs to DNA damage caused a higher reduction of Nanog expression in control siRNA-treated cells than in p53 siRNA-treated cells. These data show that in the absence of DNA damage, p53 is required for the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal by regulating Nanog expression.

  11. Regulation of Human p53 Activity and Cell Localization by Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anirban; Stewart, Deborah; Matlashewski, Greg

    2004-01-01

    The development of cancer is a multistep process involving mutations in proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and other genes which control cell proliferation, telomere stability, angiogenesis, and other complex traits. Despite this complexity, the cellular pathways controlled by the p53 tumor suppressor protein are compromised in most, if not all, cancers. In normal cells, p53 controls cell proliferation, senescence, and/or mediates apoptosis in response to stress, cell damage, or ectopic oncogene expression, properties which make p53 the prototype tumor suppressor gene. Defining the mechanisms of regulation of p53 activity in normal and tumor cells has therefore been a major priority in cell biology and cancer research. The present study reveals a novel and potent mechanism of p53 regulation originating through alternative splicing of the human p53 gene resulting in the expression of a novel p53 mRNA. This novel p53 mRNA encodes an N-terminally deleted isoform of p53 termed p47. As demonstrated within, p47 was able to effectively suppress p53-mediated transcriptional activity and impair p53-mediated growth suppression. It was possible to select for p53-null cells expressing p47 alone or coexpressing p53 in the presence of p47 but not cells expressing p53 alone. This showed that p47 itself does not suppress cell viability but could control p53-mediated growth suppression. Interestingly, p47 was monoubiquitinated in an Mdm2-independent manner, and this was associated with its export out of the nucleus. In the presence of p47, there was a reduction in Mdm2-mediated polyubiquitination and degradation of p53, and this was also associated with increased monoubiquitination and nuclear export of p53. The expression of p47 through alternative splicing of the p53 gene thus has a major influence over p53 activity at least in part through controlling p53 ubiquitination and cell localization. PMID:15340061

  12. Activation of p53-dependent responses in tumor cells treated with a PARC-interacting peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali, Roberta; Cesi, Vincenzo; Tanno, Barbara; Ferrari-Amorotti, Giovanna; Dominici, Carlo; Calabretta, Bruno; Raschella, Giuseppe

    2008-04-04

    We tested the activity of a p53 carboxy-terminal peptide containing the PARC-interacting region in cancer cells with wild type cytoplasmic p53. Peptide delivery was achieved by fusing it to the TAT transduction domain (TAT-p53-C-ter peptide). In a two-hybrid assay, the tetramerization domain (TD) of p53 was necessary and sufficient to bind PARC. The TAT-p53-C-ter peptide disrupted the PARC-p53 complex. Peptide treatment caused p53 nuclear relocation, p53-dependent changes in gene expression and enhancement of etoposide-induced apoptosis. These studies suggest that PARC-interacting peptides are promising candidates for the enhancement of p53-dependent apoptosis in tumors with wt cytoplasmic p53.

  13. BAC transgenic mice provide evidence that p53 expression is highly regulated in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Zhang, G X; Zhou, Y; Zhang, C X; Xie, Y Y; Xiang, C; He, X Y; Zhang, Q; Liu, G

    2015-09-17

    p53 is an important tumor suppressor and stress response mediator. Proper control of p53 level and activity is tightly associated with its function. Posttranslational modifications and the interactions with Mdm2 and Mdm4 are major mechanisms controlling p53 activity and stability. As p53 protein is short-lived and hardly detectable in unstressed situations, less is known on its basal level expression and the corresponding controlling mechanisms in vivo. In addition, it also remains obscure how p53 expression might contribute to its functional regulation. In this study, we established bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic E.coli β-galactosidase Z gene reporter mice to monitor p53 expression in mouse tissues and identify important regulatory elements critical for the expression in vivo. We revealed preferentially high level of p53 reporter expressions in the proliferating, but not the differentiated compartments of the majority of tissues during development and tissue homeostasis. In addition, tumors as well as regenerating tissues in the p53 reporter mice also expressed high level of β-gal. Furthermore, both the enhancer box sequence (CANNTG) in the p53 promoter and the 3' terminal untranslated region element were critical in mediating the high-level expression of the reporter. We also provided evidence that cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene was a critical player regulating p53 mRNA expression in proliferating cells and tissues. Finally, we found robust p53 activation preferentially in the proliferating compartment of mouse tissues upon DNA damage and the proliferating cells exhibited an enhanced p53 response as compared with cells in a quiescent state. Together, these results suggested a highly regulated expression pattern of p53 in the proliferating compartment controlled by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, and such regulated p53 expression may impose functional significance upon stress by setting up a precautionary mode in defense

  14. Benzyl Isothiocyanate potentiates p53 signaling and antitumor effects against breast cancer through activation of p53-LKB1 and p73-LKB1 axes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bei; Nagalingam, Arumugam; Kuppusamy, Panjamurthy; Muniraj, Nethaji; Langford, Peter; Győrffy, Balázs; Saxena, Neeraj K.; Sharma, Dipali

    2017-01-01

    Functional reactivation of p53 pathway, although arduous, can potentially provide a broad-based strategy for cancer therapy owing to frequent p53 inactivation in human cancer. Using a phosphoprotein-screening array, we found that Benzyl Isothiocynate, (BITC) increases p53 phosphorylation in breast cancer cells and reveal an important role of ERK and PRAS40/MDM2 in BITC-mediated p53 activation. We show that BITC rescues and activates p53-signaling network and inhibits growth of p53-mutant cells. Mechanistically, BITC induces p73 expression in p53-mutant cells, disrupts the interaction of p73 and mutant-p53, thereby releasing p73 from sequestration and allowing it to be transcriptionally active. Furthermore, BITC-induced p53 and p73 axes converge on tumor-suppressor LKB1 which is transcriptionally upregulated by p53 and p73 in p53-wild-type and p53-mutant cells respectively; and in a feed-forward mechanism, LKB1 tethers with p53 and p73 to get recruited to p53-responsive promoters. Analyses of BITC-treated xenografts using LKB1-null cells corroborate in vitro mechanistic findings and establish LKB1 as the key node whereby BITC potentiates as well as rescues p53-pathway in p53-wild-type as well as p53-mutant cells. These data provide first in vitro and in vivo evidence of the integral role of previously unrecognized crosstalk between BITC, p53/LKB1 and p73/LKB1 axes in breast tumor growth-inhibition. PMID:28071670

  15. Expression of P53 protein after exposure to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, A. M.; Salvador, C.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Ostrosky, P.; Brandan, M. E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the most important tumor suppressor genes is p53 gene, which is involved in apoptotic cell death, cell differentiation and cell cycle arrest. The expression of p53 gene can be evaluated by determining the presence of P53 protein in cells using Western Blot assay with a chemiluminescent method. This technique has shown variabilities that are due to biological factors. Film developing process can influence the quality of the p53 bands obtained. We irradiated tumor cell lines and human peripheral lymphocytes with 137Cs and 60Co gamma rays to standardize irradiation conditions, to compare ionizing radiation with actinomycin D and to reduce the observed variability of P53 protein induction levels. We found that increasing radiation doses increase P53 protein induction while it decreases viability. We also conclude that ionizing radiation could serve as a positive control for Western Blot analysis of protein P53. In addition, our results show that the developing process may play an important role in the quality of P53 protein bands and data interpretation.

  16. SCH529074, a small molecule activator of mutant p53, which binds p53 DNA binding domain (DBD), restores growth-suppressive function to mutant p53 and interrupts HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of wild type p53.

    PubMed

    Demma, Mark; Maxwell, Eugene; Ramos, Robert; Liang, Lianzhu; Li, Cheng; Hesk, David; Rossman, Randall; Mallams, Alan; Doll, Ronald; Liu, Ming; Seidel-Dugan, Cynthia; Bishop, W Robert; Dasmahapatra, Bimalendu

    2010-04-02

    Abrogation of p53 function occurs in almost all human cancers, with more than 50% of cancers harboring inactivating mutations in p53 itself. Mutation of p53 is indicative of highly aggressive cancers and poor prognosis. The vast majority of mutations in p53 occur in its core DNA binding domain (DBD) and result in inactivation of p53 by reducing its thermodynamic stability at physiological temperature. Here, we report a small molecule, SCH529074, that binds specifically to the p53 DBD in a saturable manner with an affinity of 1-2 microm. Binding restores wild type function to many oncogenic mutant forms of p53. This small molecule reactivates mutant p53 by acting as a chaperone, in a manner similar to that previously reported for the peptide CDB3. Binding of SCH529074 to the p53 DBD is specifically displaced by an oligonucleotide with a sequence derived from the p53-response element. In addition to reactivating mutant p53, SCH529074 binding inhibits ubiquitination of p53 by HDM2. We have also developed a novel variant of p53 by changing a single amino acid in the core domain of p53 (N268R), which abolishes binding of SCH529074. This amino acid change also inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of p53. Our novel findings indicate that through its interaction with p53 DBD, SCH529074 restores DNA binding activity to mutant p53 and inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination.

  17. Cell cycle regulation and p53 activation by protein phosphatase 2C alpha.

    PubMed

    Ofek, Paula; Ben-Meir, Daniella; Kariv-Inbal, Zehavit; Oren, Moshe; Lavi, Sara

    2003-04-18

    Protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) dephosphorylates a broad range of substrates, regulating stress response and growth-related pathways in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We now demonstrate that PP2C alpha, a major mammalian isoform, inhibits cell growth and activates the p53 pathway. In 293 cell clones, in which PP2C alpha expression is regulated by a tetracycline-inducible promoter, PP2C alpha overexpression led to G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Furthermore, PP2C alpha induced the expression of endogenous p53 and the p53-responsive gene p21. Activation of the p53 pathway by PP2C alpha took place both in cells harboring endogenous p53, as well as in p53-null cells transfected with exogenous p53. Induction of PP2C alpha resulted in an increase in the overall levels of p53 protein as well as an augmentation of p53 transcription activity. The dephosphorylation activity of PP2C alpha is essential to the described phenomena, as none of these effects was detected when an enzymatically inactive PP2C alpha mutant was overexpressed. p53 plays an important role in PP2C alpha-directed cell cycle arrest and apoptosis because perturbation of p53 expression in human 293 cells by human papillomavirus E6 led to a significant increase in cell survival. The role of PP2C alpha in p53 activation is discussed.

  18. p53 and MDM2 protein expression in actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Maria da Conceição Andrade; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino; Moreira, André Luis Gomes; Reis, Sílvia Regina Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially malignant lip lesion caused by excessive and prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation, which can lead to histomorphological alterations indicative of abnormal cell differentiation. In this pathology, varying degrees of epithelial dysplasia may be found. There are few published studies regarding the p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis. Fifty-eight cases diagnosed with actinic cheilitis were histologically evaluated using Banóczy and Csiba (1976) parameters, and were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using the streptavidin-biotin method in order to assess p53 and MDM2 protein expression. All studied cases expressed p53 proteins in basal and suprabasal layers. In the basal layer, the nuclei testing positive for p53 were stained intensely, while in the suprabasal layer, cells with slightly stained nuclei were predominant. All cases also tested positive for the MDM2 protein, but with varying degrees of nuclear expression and a predominance of slightly stained cells. A statistically significant correlation between the percentage of p53 and MDM2-positive cells was established, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia. The expression of p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis can be an important indicator in lip carcinogenesis, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia.

  19. C23 promotes tumorigenesis via suppressing p53 activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Hu, Guilin; Fang, Xing; Hu, Yamin; Tao, Tingting; Wei, Xin; Tang, Haitao; Huang, Baojun; Hu, Wanglai

    2016-01-01

    C23 is an abundant and multi-functional protein, which plays an important role in various biological processes, including ribosome biogenesis and maturation, cell cycle checkpoints and transcriptional regulation [1, 2]. However, the role of C23 in controlling tumorigenesis has not been well defined. Here we report that C23 is highly expressed in cancer cells and the elevated expression of C23 facilitates cancer cell proliferation in vitro and tumor xenograft growth in vivo. Notably, C23 binds to p53 through its GAR domain and suppresses the transcriptional activity of p53 under DNA damage and hypoxia. Moreover, the GAR domain is critical for C23-mediated tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings reveal a novel role of C23 in tumorigenesis and suggest that C23 may represent a potential therapeutic target for treating malignancy. PMID:27506938

  20. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fuqiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Yiduo; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Sailing; Wang, Guanyu

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant). Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor) and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:27689798

  1. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fuqiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Yiduo; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Sailing; Wang, Guanyu

    Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant). Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor) and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis.

  2. The long non-coding RNA maternally expressed gene 3 activates p53 and is downregulated in esophageal squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Lv, Desheng; Sun, Run; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Xuefei

    2016-10-24

    Esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) is an aggressive malignancy with poor survival. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in tumorigenesis and cancer progression; hence, lncRNAs are also involved in the development and progression of ESCC. In this study, we used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to investigate expression of lncRNA, maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) in ESCC. Ectopic expression of MEG3 was performed in ESCC cell lines. Proliferation and apoptosis of ESCC cell lines were analyzed after ectopic expression of MEG3. We found MEG3 was significantly downregulated in ESCC tissues compared with normal tissues by qRT-PCR. Low expression of MEG3 was correlated with lymph node metastasis and advanced TNM stages of ESCC patients and indicated shorter survival (HR = 0.471, 95 % CI 0.234-0.950, P = 0.035), which was confirmed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) esophageal cancer dataset. DNA-demethylating agent (5-aza-2-deoxy-cytidine (5-aza-CdR)) treatment significantly increased MEG3 expression level in ESCC cells, and TCGA esophageal cancer dataset also showed that DNA methylation of MEG3 predicted survival. Ectopic expression of MEG3 in ESCC cells inhibited cell proliferation, promoted apoptosis, and suppressed metastasis. Further investigation showed enforced expression of MEG3 activated p53 and its target genes by downregulation of mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2). Overall, our study indicated that MEG3 expression loss is common in ESCC and MEG3 could activate p53 and predict prognosis in ESCC.

  3. Expression of the human tumor suppressor p53 induces cell death in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoula-Souissi, Salma; Mabrouk, Imed; Gargouri, Ali; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2012-02-01

    The human tumor suppressor p53 is known as guardian of genome because of its involvement in many signals related to cell life or death. In this work, we report that human p53 induces cell death in the yeast Pichia pastoris. We showed a growth inhibition effect, which increased with the p53 protein expression level in recombinant Mut(s) (methanol utilization slow) strain of Pichia. However, no effect of p53 was observed in recombinant strain of Mut(+) (methanol utilization plus) phenotype. Interestingly, human p53 induces cell death in recombinant strains Mut(s) with characteristic markers of apoptosis such as DNA fragmentation, exposure of phosphatidylserine, and reactive oxygen species generation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that human p53 is biologically active in this heterologous context. Thus, we propose that P. pastoris could be a useful tool to better understand the biological function of human p53.

  4. Development of an adenoviral vector with robust expression driven by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Strauss, Bryan E.

    2008-02-05

    Here we introduce a new adenoviral vector where transgene expression is driven by p53. We first developed a synthetic promoter, referred to as PGTx{beta}, containing a p53-responsive element, a minimal promoter and the first intron of the rabbit {beta}-globin gene. Initial assays using plasmid-based vectors indicated that expression was tightly controlled by p53 and was 5-fold stronger than the constitutive CMV immediate early promoter/enhancer. The adenoviral vector, AdPG, was also shown to offer p53-responsive expression in prostate carcinoma cells LNCaP (wt p53), DU-145 (temperature sensitive mutant of p53) and PC3 (p53-null, but engineered to express temperature-sensitive p53 mutants). AdPG served as a sensor of p53 activity in LNCaP cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. Since p53 can be induced by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, this new vector could be further developed for use in combination with conventional therapies to bring about cooperation between the genetic and pharmacologic treatment modalities.

  5. Regulation of p53 and MDM2 activity by MTBP.

    PubMed

    Brady, Mark; Vlatkovic, Nikolina; Boyd, Mark T

    2005-01-01

    p53 is a critical coordinator of a wide range of stress responses. To facilitate a rapid response to stress, p53 is produced constitutively but is negatively regulated by MDM2. MDM2 can inhibit p53 in multiple independent ways: by binding to its transcription activation domain, inhibiting p53 acetylation, promoting nuclear export, and probably most importantly by promoting proteasomal degradation of p53. The latter is achieved via MDM2's E3 ubiquitin ligase activity harbored within the MDM2 RING finger domain. We have discovered that MTBP promotes MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of p53 and also MDM2 stabilization in an MDM2 RING finger-dependent manner. Moreover, using small interfering RNA to down-regulate endogenous MTBP in unstressed cells, we have found that MTBP significantly contributes to MDM2-mediated regulation of p53 levels and activity. However, following exposure of cells to UV, but not gamma-irradiation, MTBP is destabilized as part of the coordinated cellular response. Our findings suggest that MTBP differentially regulates the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of MDM2 towards two of its most critical targets (itself and p53) and in doing so significantly contributes to MDM2-dependent p53 homeostasis in unstressed cells.

  6. REGgamma modulates p53 activity by regulating its cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Yu, Guowu; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhao, Dengpan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jiang; Li, Lei; Zeng, Yu; Dang, Yongyan; Wang, Chuangui; Gao, Guang; Long, Weiwen; Lonard, David M; Qiao, Shanlou; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Zhang, Bianhong; Luo, Honglin; Li, Xiaotao

    2010-12-01

    The proteasome activator REGγ mediates a shortcut for the destruction of intact mammalian proteins. The biological roles of REGγ and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we provide evidence that REGγ regulates cellular distribution of p53 by facilitating its multiple monoubiquitylation and subsequent nuclear export and degradation. We also show that inhibition of p53 tetramerization by REGγ might further enhance cytoplasmic relocation of p53 and reduce active p53 in the nucleus. Furthermore, multiple monoubiquitylation of p53 enhances its physical interaction with HDM2 and probably facilitates subsequent polyubiquitylation of p53, suggesting that monoubiquitylation can act as a signal for p53 degradation. Depletion of REGγ sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptosis, validating its crucial role in the control of apoptosis, probably through regulation of p53 function. Using a mouse xenograft model, we show that REGγ knockdown results in a significant reduction of tumor growth, suggesting an important role for REGγ in tumor development. Our study therefore demonstrates that REGγ-mediated inactivation of p53 is one of the mechanisms involved in cancer progression.

  7. p53 tumour suppressor gene expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, C; Ziske, C; Wiedenmann, B; Moelling, K

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumours grow slower and metastasise later than ductal and acinar carcinomas. The expression of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells is unknown. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cell lines (n = 5) and human tumour tissues (n = 19) were studied for changed p53 coding sequence, transcription, and translation. Proliferative activity of tumour cells was determined analysing Ki-67 expression. No mutation in the p53 nucleotide sequence of neuroendocrine tumour cell was found. However, an overexpression of p53 could be detected in neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines at a protein level. As no p53 mutations were seen, it is suggested that post-translational events can also lead to an overexpression of p53. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8675094

  8. Nuclear interactor of ARF and Mdm2 regulates multiple pathways to activate p53

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sara M; Hagen, Jussara; Tompkins, Van S; Thies, Katie; Quelle, Frederick W; Quelle, Dawn E

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is controlled by an interactive network of factors that stimulate or inhibit its transcriptional activity. Within that network, Mdm2 functions as the major antagonist of p53 by promoting its ubiquitylation and degradation. Conversely, Tip60 activates p53 through direct association on target promoters as well as acetylation of p53 at lysine 120 (K120). This study examines the functional relationship between Mdm2 and Tip60 with a novel p53 regulator, NIAM (nuclear interactor of ARF and Mdm2). Previous work showed NIAM can suppress proliferation and activate p53 independently of ARF, indicating that other factors mediate those activities. Here, we demonstrate that NIAM is a chromatin-associated protein that binds Tip60. NIAM can promote p53 K120 acetylation, although that modification is not required for NIAM to inhibit proliferation or induce p53 transactivation of the p21 promoter. Notably, Tip60 silencing showed it contributes to but is not sufficient for NIAM-mediated p53 activation, suggesting other mechanisms are involved. Indeed, growth-inhibitory forms of NIAM also bind to Mdm2, and increased NIAM expression levels disrupt p53–Mdm2 association, inhibit p53 polyubiquitylation, and prevent Mdm2-mediated inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity. Importantly, loss of NIAM significantly impairs p53 activation. Together, these results show that NIAM activates p53 through multiple mechanisms involving Tip60 association and Mdm2 inhibition. Thus, NIAM regulates 2 critical pathways that control p53 function and are altered in human cancers, implying an important role for NIAM in tumorigenesis. PMID:24621507

  9. Mutant p53 expression in fallopian tube epithelium drives cell migration.

    PubMed

    Quartuccio, Suzanne M; Karthikeyan, Subbulakshmi; Eddie, Sharon L; Lantvit, Daniel D; Ó hAinmhire, Eoghainín; Modi, Dimple A; Wei, Jian-Jun; Burdette, Joanna E

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death among US women. Evidence supports the hypothesis that high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSC) may originate in the distal end of the fallopian tube. Although a heterogeneous disease, 96% of HGSC contain mutations in p53. In addition, the "p53 signature," or overexpression of p53 protein (usually associated with mutation), is a potential precursor lesion of fallopian tube derived HGSC suggesting an essential role for p53 mutation in early serous tumorigenesis. To further clarify p53-mutation dependent effects on cells, murine oviductal epithelial cells (MOE) were stably transfected with a construct encoding for the R273H DNA binding domain mutation in p53, the most common mutation in HGSC. Mutation in p53 was not sufficient to transform MOE cells but did significantly increase cell migration. A similar p53 mutation in murine ovarian surface epithelium (MOSE), another potential progenitor cell for serous cancer, was not sufficient to transform the cells nor change migration suggesting tissue specific effects of p53 mutation. Microarray data confirmed expression changes of pro-migratory genes in p53(R273H) MOE compared to parental cells, which could be reversed by suppressing Slug expression. Combining p53(R273H) with KRAS(G12V) activation caused transformation of MOE into high-grade sarcomatoid carcinoma when xenografted into nude mice. Elucidating the specific role of p53(R273H) in the fallopian tube will improve understanding of changes at the earliest stage of transformation. This information can help develop chemopreventative strategies to prevent the accumulation of additional mutations and reverse progression of the "p53 signature" thereby, improving survival rates.

  10. Repression of p53 activity by Smyd2-mediated methylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Perez-Burgos, Laura; Placek, Brandon J; Sengupta, Roopsha; Richter, Mario; Dorsey, Jean A; Kubicek, Stefan; Opravil, Susanne; Jenuwein, Thomas; Berger, Shelley L

    2006-11-30

    Specific sites of lysine methylation on histones correlate with either activation or repression of transcription. The tumour suppressor p53 (refs 4-7) is one of only a few non-histone proteins known to be regulated by lysine methylation. Here we report a lysine methyltransferase, Smyd2, that methylates a previously unidentified site, Lys 370, in p53. This methylation site, in contrast to the known site Lys 372, is repressing to p53-mediated transcriptional regulation. Smyd2 helps to maintain low concentrations of promoter-associated p53. We show that reducing Smyd2 concentrations by short interfering RNA enhances p53-mediated apoptosis. We find that Set9-mediated methylation of Lys 372 inhibits Smyd2-mediated methylation of Lys 370, providing regulatory cross-talk between post-translational modifications. In addition, we show that the inhibitory effect of Lys 372 methylation on Lys 370 methylation is caused, in part, by blocking the interaction between p53 and Smyd2. Thus, similar to histones, p53 is subject to both activating and repressing lysine methylation. Our results also predict that Smyd2 may function as a putative oncogene by methylating p53 and repressing its tumour suppressive function.

  11. PML IV/ARF interaction enhances p53 SUMO-1 conjugation, activation, and senescence.

    PubMed

    Ivanschitz, Lisa; Takahashi, Yuki; Jollivet, Florence; Ayrault, Olivier; Le Bras, Morgane; de Thé, Hugues

    2015-11-17

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) recruit multiple partners, including p53 and many of its regulators. NBs are believed to facilitate several posttranslational modifications and are key regulators of senescence. PML, the organizer of NBs, is expressed as a number of splice variants that all efficiently recruit p53 partners. However, overexpression of only one of them, PML IV, triggers p53-driven senescence. Here, we show that PML IV specifically binds ARF, a key p53 regulator. Similar to ARF, PML IV enhances global SUMO-1 conjugation, particularly that of p53, resulting in p53 stabilization and activation. ARF interacts with and stabilizes the NB-associated UBC9 SUMO-conjugating enzyme, possibly explaining PML IV-enhanced SUMOylation. These results unexpectedly link two key tumor suppressors, highlighting their convergence for global control of SUMO conjugation, p53 activation, and senescence induction.

  12. p53 elevation in human cells halt SV40 infection by inhibiting T-ag expression

    PubMed Central

    Drayman, Nir; Ben-nun-Shaul, Orly; Butin-Israeli, Veronika; Srivastava, Rohit; Rubinstein, Ariel M.; Mock, Caroline S.; Elyada, Ela; Ben-Neriah, Yinon; Lahav, Galit; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2016-01-01

    SV40 large T-antigen (T-ag) has been known for decades to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 by sequestration and additional mechanisms. Our present study revealed that the struggle between p53 and T-ag begins very early in the infection cycle. We found that p53 is activated early after SV40 infection and defends the host against the infection. Using live cell imaging and single cell analyses we found that p53 dynamics are variable among individual cells, with only a subset of cells activating p53 immediately after SV40 infection. This cell-to-cell variabilty had clear consequences on the outcome of the infection. None of the cells with elevated p53 at the beginning of the infection proceeded to express T-ag, suggesting a p53-dependent decision between abortive and productive infection. In addition, we show that artificial elevation of p53 levels prior to the infection reduces infection efficiency, supporting a role for p53 in defending against SV40. We further found that the p53-mediated host defense mechanism against SV40 is not facilitated by apoptosis nor via interferon-stimulated genes. Instead p53 binds to the viral DNA at the T-ag promoter region, prevents its transcriptional activation by Sp1, and halts the progress of the infection. These findings shed new light on the long studied struggle between SV40 T-ag and p53, as developed during virus-host coevolution. Our studies indicate that the fate of SV40 infection is determined as soon as the viral DNA enters the nucleus, before the onset of viral gene expression. PMID:27462916

  13. Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yull; Jo, Hong Jae; Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Young Chul

    2008-01-25

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

  14. Genotoxic stress-induced expression of p53 and apoptosis in leukemic clam hemocytes with cytoplasmically sequestered p53.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Stefanie; Jerszyk, Emily; Low, Ben; Walker, Charles

    2008-02-01

    In nature, the soft shell clam, Mya arenaria, develops a fatal blood cancer in which a highly conserved homologue for wild-type human p53 protein is rendered nonfunctional by cytoplasmic sequestration. In untreated leukemic clam hemocytes, p53 is complexed throughout the cytoplasm with overexpressed variants for both clam homologues (full-length variant, 1,200-fold and truncated variant, 620-fold above normal clam hemocytes) of human mortalin, an Hsp70 family protein. In vitro treatment with etoposide only and in vivo treatment with either etoposide or mitoxantrone induces DNA damage, elevates expression (600-fold) and promotes nuclear translocation of p53, and results in apoptosis of leukemic clam hemocytes. Pretreatment with wheat germ agglutinin followed by etoposide treatment induces DNA damage and elevates p53 expression (893-fold) but does not overcome cytoplasmic sequestration of p53 or induce apoptosis. We show that leukemic clam hemocytes have an intact p53 pathway, and that maintenance of this tumor phenotype requires nuclear absence of p53, resulting from its localization in the cytoplasm of leukemic clam hemocytes. The effects of these topoisomerase II poisons may result as mortalin-based cytoplasmic tethering is overwhelmed by de novo expression of p53 protein after DNA damage induced by genotoxic stress. Soft shell clam leukemia provides excellent in vivo and in vitro models for developing genotoxic and nongenotoxic cancer therapies for reactivating p53 transcription in human and other animal cancers displaying mortalin-based cytoplasmic sequestration of the p53 tumor suppressor, such as colorectal cancers and primary and secondary glioblastomas, though not apparently leukemias or lymphomas.

  15. ID4 regulates transcriptional activity of wild type and mutant p53 via K373 acetylation.

    PubMed

    Morton, Derrick J; Patel, Divya; Joshi, Jugal; Hunt, Aisha; Knowell, Ashley E; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2017-01-10

    Given that mutated p53 (50% of all human cancers) is over-expressed in many cancers, restoration of mutant p53 to its wild type biological function has been sought after as cancer therapy. The conformational flexibility has allowed to restore the normal biological function of mutant p53 by short peptides and small molecule compounds. Recently, studies have focused on physiological mechanisms such as acetylation of lysine residues to rescue the wild type activity of mutant p53. Using p53 null prostate cancer cell line we show that ID4 dependent acetylation promotes mutant p53 DNA-binding capabilities to its wild type consensus sequence, thus regulating p53-dependent target genes leading to subsequent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Specifically, by using wild type, mutant (P223L, V274F, R175H, R273H), acetylation mimics (K320Q and K373Q) and non-acetylation mimics (K320R and K373R) of p53, we identify that ID4 promotes acetylation of K373 and to a lesser extent K320, in turn restoring p53-dependent biological activities. Together, our data provides a molecular understanding of ID4 dependent acetylation that suggests a strategy of enhancing p53 acetylation at sites K373 and K320 that may serve as a viable mechanism of physiological restoration of mutant p53 to its wild type biological function.

  16. Activation of p53 by MEG3 non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunli; Zhong, Ying; Wang, Yingying; Zhang, Xun; Batista, Dalia L; Gejman, Roger; Ansell, Peter J; Zhao, Jing; Weng, Catherine; Klibanski, Anne

    2007-08-24

    MEG3 is a maternally expressed imprinted gene suggested to function as a non-coding RNA. Our previous studies suggest that MEG3 has a function of tumor suppression. The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor suppression and mediates the functions of many other tumor suppressors. Therefore, we hypothesized that MEG3 functions through activation of p53. We found that transfection of expression constructs for MEG3 and its isoforms results in a significant increase in p53 protein levels and dramatically stimulates p53-dependent transcription from a p53-responsive promoter. Using this as the functional assay, we demonstrated that the open reading frames encoded by MEG3 transcripts are not required for MEG3 function, and the folding of MEG3 RNA is critical to its function, supporting the concept that MEG3 functions as a non-coding RNA. We further found that MEG3 stimulates expression of the growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) by enhancing p53 binding to the GDF15 gene promoter. Interestingly, MEG3 does not stimulate p21(CIP1) expression, suggesting that MEG3 can regulate the specificity of p53 transcriptional activation. p53 degradation is mainly mediated by the mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2). We found that MDM2 levels were down-regulated in cells transfected with MEG3, suggesting that MDM2 suppression contributes at least in part to p53 accumulation induced by MEG3. Finally, we found that MEG3 is able to inhibit cell proliferation in the absence of p53. These data suggest that MEG3 non-coding RNA may function as a tumor suppressor, whose action is mediated by both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways.

  17. Immunohistochemical expression of protein p53 in neoplasms of the mammary gland in bitches.

    PubMed

    Rodo, A; Malicka, E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of protein p53 in correlation with other tumor traits: histological type, tumor grade and proliferative activity. Material for the investigation comprised mammary gland tumours collected from dogs, the patients of veterinary clinics, during surgical procedures, and archival samples. Alltogether 21 adenomas, 31 complex carcinomas, 35 simple carcinomas and 12 solid carcinomas were qualified for further investigation. No protein p53 expression was found in adenomas. Cancers show positive reaction in 32.5%. The highest percent of p53 positive neoplasms was observed in solid carcinomas and neoplasms with the highest degree of histological malignancy. The smallest number showing this expression was observed in adenomas and the highest was characteristic for solid carcinomas. Considering the tumour grading, it was found that an increase in neoplasm malignancy was positively correlated with the number of the cells showing the expression of protein p53. The differences were statistically significant. Statistically significant positive correlations were observed between the proliferative activity and protein p53 expression. Higher accumulation of protein p53 in more malignant neoplasms suggests that mutations of protein p53 can be responsible for higher proliferation in neoplasms with advanced progression of malignancy.

  18. p53 activates miR-192-5p to mediate vancomycin induced AKI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinwen; Wang, Juan; Li, Huiling; Wang, Shixuan; Xiang, Xudong; Zhang, Dongshan

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic role of p53 in AKI remains controversial and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we tested whether the inhibition of p53 may ameliorate vancomycin (VAN) induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Mice with p53 knock out (p53-KO) were resistant to VAN induced AKI, indicated by the analysis of renal function, histology, and apoptosis. Mechanistically, AKI was associated with the upregulation of several known p53 target genes, including Bax and p21, and this association was attenuated in p53-KO mice. Furthermore, the expression of miR-192-5p was significantly decreased in the p53-KO kidney tissues. In human renal tubular epithelial cell line (HK-2), VAN induced p53 accumulation and miR-192-5p expression. Both apoptosis of HK-2 cells and expression of miR-192-5p were also suppressed by pifithrin-α. Anti-miR-192-5p significantly blocked VAN-induced apoptosis and caspase activity in HK-2 cells. Consistently, in vivo inhibition of miR-192-5p also suppressed VAN induced AKI. Thus, we provided clinical and genetic evidence that p53 was associated with the development of VAN induced AKI through upregulation of miR-192-5p. PMID:27941921

  19. AAVPG: A vigilant vector where transgene expression is induced by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Medrano, Ruan F.V.; Carvalho, Anna Carolina P.V.; Strauss, Bryan E.

    2013-12-15

    Using p53 to drive transgene expression from viral vectors may provide on demand expression in response to physiologic stress, such as hypoxia or DNA damage. Here we introduce AAVPG, an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector where a p53-responsive promoter, termed PG, is used to control transgene expression. In vitro assays show that expression from the AAVPG-luc vector was induced specifically in the presence of functional p53 (1038±202 fold increase, p<0.001). The AAVPG-luc vector was an effective biosensor of p53 activation in response to hypoxia (4.48±0.6 fold increase in the presence of 250 µM CoCl{sub 2}, p<0.001) and biomechanical stress (2.53±0.4 fold increase with stretching, p<0.05). In vivo, the vigilant nature of the AAVPG-luc vector was revealed after treatment of tumor-bearing mice with doxorubicin (pre-treatment, 3.4×10{sup 5}±0.43×10{sup 5} photons/s; post-treatment, 6.6×10{sup 5}±2.1×10{sup 5} photons/s, p<0.05). These results indicate that the AAVPG vector is an interesting option for detecting p53 activity both in vitro and in vivo. - Highlights: • AAV vector where transgene expression is controlled by the tumor suppressor p53. • The new vector, AAVPG, shown to function as a biosensor of p53 activity, in vitro and in vivo. • The p53 activity monitored by the AAVPG vector is relevant to cancer and other diseases. • AAVPG reporter gene expression was activated upon DNA damage, hypoxia and mechanical stress.

  20. Regulation of p53, nuclear factor {kappa}B and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by bromelain through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Neetu; Bhui, Kulpreet; Roy, Preeti; Srivastava, Smita; George, Jasmine; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and immature fruits of pineapples (Ananas cosmosus), which has been shown to have anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-metastatic properties. In the present study, antitumorigenic activity of bromelain was recorded in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted 2-stage mouse skin model. Results showed that bromelain application delayed the onset of tumorigenesis and reduced the cumulative number of tumors, tumor volume and the average number of tumors/mouse. To establish a cause and effect relationship, we targeted the proteins involved in the cell death pathway. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in mouse skin. Since persistent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is frequently implicated in tumorigenesis and is regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), we also investigated the effect of bromelain on Cox-2 and NF-{kappa}B expression. Results showed that bromelain application significantly inhibited Cox-2 and inactivated NF-{kappa}B by blocking phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. In addition, bromelain treatment attenuated DMBA-TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Taken together, we conclude that bromelain induces apoptosis-related proteins along with inhibition of NF-{kappa}B-driven Cox-2 expression by blocking the MAPK and Akt/protein kinase B signaling in DMBA-TPA-induced mouse skin tumors, which may account for its anti-tumorigenic effects.

  1. Regulation of p53, nuclear factor kappaB and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by bromelain through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Neetu; Bhui, Kulpreet; Roy, Preeti; Srivastava, Smita; George, Jasmine; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and immature fruits of pineapples (Ananas cosmosus), which has been shown to have anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-metastatic properties. In the present study, antitumorigenic activity of bromelain was recorded in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted 2-stage mouse skin model. Results showed that bromelain application delayed the onset of tumorigenesis and reduced the cumulative number of tumors, tumor volume and the average number of tumors/mouse. To establish a cause and effect relationship, we targeted the proteins involved in the cell death pathway. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in mouse skin. Since persistent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is frequently implicated in tumorigenesis and is regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB), we also investigated the effect of bromelain on Cox-2 and NF-kappaB expression. Results showed that bromelain application significantly inhibited Cox-2 and inactivated NF-kappaB by blocking phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IkappaBalpha. In addition, bromelain treatment attenuated DMBA-TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Taken together, we conclude that bromelain induces apoptosis-related proteins along with inhibition of NF-kappaB-driven Cox-2 expression by blocking the MAPK and Akt/protein kinase B signaling in DMBA-TPA-induced mouse skin tumors, which may account for its anti-tumorigenic effects.

  2. Lack of p53 Affects the Expression of Several Brain Mitochondrial Proteins: Insights from Proteomics into Important Pathways Regulated by p53

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, Ada; Sultana, Rukhsana; Barone, Eugenio; Cenini, Giovanna; Perluigi, Marzia; Mancuso, Cesare; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; St. Clair, Daret; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 has been described “as the guardian of the genome” for its crucial role in regulating the transcription of numerous genes responsible for cells cycle arrest, senescence, or apoptosis in response to various stress signals. Although p53 promotes longevity by decreasing the risk of cancer through activation of apoptosis or cellular senescence, several findings suggest that an increase of its activity may have deleterious effects leading to selected aspects of the aging phenotype and neurodegenerative diseases. There is the link between p53 and oxidative stress, the latter a crucial factor that contributes to neurodegenerative processes like Alzheimer disease (AD). In the present study, using a proteomics approach, we analyzed the impact of lack of p53 on the expression of several brain mitochondrial proteins involved in different pathways, and how lack of p53 may present a target to restore neuronal impairments. Our investigation on isolated brain mitochondria from p53(−/−) mice also provides a better understanding of the p53-mitochondria relationship and its involvement in the development of many diseases. PMID:23209608

  3. p53-dependent expression of CXCR5 chemokine receptor in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mitkin, Nikita A; Hook, Christina D; Schwartz, Anton M; Biswas, Subir; Kochetkov, Dmitry V; Muratova, Alisa M; Afanasyeva, Marina A; Kravchenko, Julia E; Bhattacharyya, Arindam; Kuprash, Dmitry V

    2015-03-19

    Elevated expression of chemokine receptors in tumors has been reported in many instances and is related to a number of survival advantages for tumor cells including abnormal activation of prosurvival intracellular pathways. In this work we demonstrated an inverse correlation between expression levels of p53 tumor suppressor and CXCR5 chemokine receptor in MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. Lentiviral transduction of MCF-7 cells with p53 shRNA led to elevated CXCR5 at both mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of CXCR5 in p53-knockdown MCF-7 cells was also increased as shown by activation of target gene expression and chemotaxis in response to B-lymphocyte chemoattractant CXCL13. Using deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of the cxcr5 gene promoter and enhancer elements, we demonstrated that p53 appears to act upon cxcr5 promoter indirectly, by repressing the activity of NFκB transcription factors. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter gene analysis, we further demonstrated that p65/RelA was able to bind the cxcr5 promoter in p53-dependent manner and to directly transactivate it when overexpressed. Through the described mechanism, elevated CXCR5 expression may contribute to abnormal cell survival and migration in breast tumors that lack functional p53.

  4. Endopolyploidy in irradiated p53-deficient tumour cell lines: Persistence of cell division activity in giant cells expressing Aurora B- kinase

    PubMed Central

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Ivanov, Andrei; Wheatley, Sally P; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; Ianzini, Fiorenza; Anisimov, Alim P; Mackey, Michael; Davis, Paul J; Plakhins, Grigorijs; Illidge, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings including computerized live imaging suggest that polyploidy cells transiently emerging after severe genotoxic stress (and named ‘endopolyploid cells’) may have a role in tumour regrowth after anti-cancer treatment. Until now, mostly the factors enabling metaphase were studied in them. Here we investigate the mitotic activities and the role of Aurora B, in view of potential de-polyploidisation of these cells, because Aurora B- kinase is responsible for coordination and completion of mitosis. We observed that endopolyploid giant cells are formed in irradiated p53 tumours in several ways: (1) by division/fusion of daughter cells creating early multi-nucleated cells; (2) by asynchronous division/fusion of sub-nuclei of these multinucleated cells; (3) by a series of polyploidising mitoses reverting replicative interphase from aborted metaphase and forming giant cells with a single nucleus; (4) by micronucleation of arrested metaphases enclosing genome fragments; or (5) by incomplete division in the multipolar mitoses forming late multi-nucleated giant cells. We also observed that these activities are able to release para-diploid cells, although they do so infrequently. Although after a substantial delay, apoptosis typically occurs in these cells, we also found that roughly 2% of endopolyploid cells evade apoptosis and senescence arrest and continue mitotic activities. In this article we describe that catalytically active aurora B-kinase is expressed in the nuclei of many interphase endopolyploid cells, as well as being present at the centromeres, mitotic spindle and cleavage furrow during their mitotic efforts. The totally micronucleated giant cells (containing subgenomic fragments in multiple micronuclei) represented the only minor fraction, which failed to undergo mitosis and Aurora B was absent from it. These observations suggest that most endopolyploid tumour cells are not reproductively inert and that aurora B may contribute to the establishment

  5. TP53 drives invasion through expression of its Δ133p53β variant

    PubMed Central

    Gadea, Gilles; Arsic, Nikola; Fernandes, Kenneth; Diot, Alexandra; Joruiz, Sébastien M; Abdallah, Samer; Meuray, Valerie; Vinot, Stéphanie; Anguille, Christelle; Remenyi, Judit; Khoury, Marie P; Quinlan, Philip R; Purdie, Colin A; Jordan, Lee B; Fuller-Pace, Frances V; de Toledo, Marion; Cren, Maïlys; Thompson, Alastair M

    2016-01-01

    TP53 is conventionally thought to prevent cancer formation and progression to metastasis, while mutant TP53 has transforming activities. However, in the clinic, TP53 mutation status does not accurately predict cancer progression. Here we report, based on clinical analysis corroborated with experimental data, that the p53 isoform Δ133p53β promotes cancer cell invasion, regardless of TP53 mutation status. Δ133p53β increases risk of cancer recurrence and death in breast cancer patients. Furthermore Δ133p53β is critical to define invasiveness in a panel of breast and colon cell lines, expressing WT or mutant TP53. Endogenous mutant Δ133p53β depletion prevents invasiveness without affecting mutant full-length p53 protein expression. Mechanistically WT and mutant Δ133p53β induces EMT. Our findings provide explanations to 2 long-lasting and important clinical conundrums: how WT TP53 can promote cancer cell invasion and reciprocally why mutant TP53 gene does not systematically induce cancer progression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14734.001 PMID:27630122

  6. The PIDDosome activates p53 in response to supernumerary centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Luca L.; Schuler, Fabian; Sladky, Valentina; Haschka, Manuel D.; Soratroi, Claudia; Eiterer, Lisa; Demetz, Egon; Weiss, Guenter; Geley, Stephan; Nigg, Erich A.; Villunger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Centrosomes, the main microtubule-organizing centers in animal cells, are replicated exactly once during the cell division cycle to form the poles of the mitotic spindle. Supernumerary centrosomes can lead to aberrant cell division and have been causally linked to chromosomal instability and cancer. Here, we report that an increase in the number of mature centrosomes, generated by disrupting cytokinesis or forcing centrosome overduplication, triggers the activation of the PIDDosome multiprotein complex, leading to Caspase-2-mediated MDM2 cleavage, p53 stabilization, and p21-dependent cell cycle arrest. This pathway also restrains the extent of developmentally scheduled polyploidization by regulating p53 levels in hepatocytes during liver organogenesis. Taken together, the PIDDosome acts as a first barrier, engaging p53 to halt the proliferation of cells carrying more than one mature centrosome to maintain genome integrity. PMID:28130345

  7. Effect of topical tretinoin, chemical peeling and dermabrasion on p53 expression in facial skin.

    PubMed

    El-Domyati, Moetaz M; Attia, Sameh K; Saleh, Fatma Y; Ahmad, Hesham M; Gasparro, Frances P; Uitto, Jouni J

    2003-01-01

    The tumour suppressor protein p53 is a phosphoprotein that is activated by DNA damage. It is involved in the decision whether the cells should stop replication and proceed to repair their DNA, or to die by apoptosis. In the present study, we evaluate the effect of some treatment modalities on the expression of p53 in facial skin. Biopsy specimens were obtained from the facial skin of 20 patients before and after treatment using topical tretinoin (11 cases), TCA chemical peeling (5 cases) and dermabrasion (4 cases). Biopsy specimens were also obtained from 12 control subjects representing the same age groups of the patients. Topical tretinoin therapy was found to induce a significant decrease in the expression of p53 up to 6 months of therapy followed by a significant increase after 10 months of therapy. On the contrary, superficial TCA peeling did not induce any statistically significant change in the expression of p53. On the other hand dermabrasion was found to induce a significant decrease in the level of expression of p53 in biopsies obtained after complete re-epithelialization followed by a significant increase. These changes in the expression of p53 may play a role in mediating the effects of such treatment modalities on the epidermis, as well as prevention of actinic neoplasia by adjusting any disturbance in the proliferation/apoptosis balance observed in photoaged facial skin.

  8. Loss of p53 expression is accompanied by upregulation of beta-catenin in meningiomas: a concomitant reciprocal expression.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Vladušić, Tomislav; Tomas, Davor; Logara, Monika; Skoko, Josip; Hrašćan, Reno

    2016-04-01

    Crosstalk between Wnt and p53 signalling pathways in cancer has long been suggested. Therefore in this study we have investigated the involvement of these pathways in meningiomas by analysing their main effector molecules, beta-catenin and p53. Cellular expression of p53 and beta-catenin proteins and genetic changes in TP53 were analysed by immunohistochemistry, PCR/RFLP and direct sequencing of TP53 exon 4. All the findings were analysed statistically. Our analysis showed that 47.5% of the 59 meningiomas demonstrated loss of expression of p53 protein. Moderate and strong p53 expression in the nuclei was observed in 8.5% and 6.8% of meningiomas respectively. Gross deletion of TP53 gene was observed in one meningioma, but nucleotide alterations were observed in 35.7% of meningiomas. In contrast, beta-catenin, the main Wnt signalling molecule, was upregulated in 71.2%, while strong expression was observed in 28.8% of meningiomas. The concomitant expressions of p53 and beta-catenin were investigated in the same patients. In the analysed meningiomas, the levels of the two proteins were significantly negatively correlated (P = 0.002). This indicates that meningiomas with lost p53 upregulate beta-catenin and activate Wnt signalling. Besides showing the reciprocal relationship between proteins, we also showed that the expression of p53 was significantly (P = 0.021) associated with higher meningioma grades (II and III), while beta-catenin upregulation was not associated with malignancy grades. Additionally, women exhibited significantly higher values of p53 loss when compared to males (P = 0.005). Our findings provide novel information about p53 involvement in meningeal brain tumours and reveal the complex relationship between Wnt and p53 signalling, they suggest an important role for beta-catenin in these tumours.

  9. Induction of p53-dependent activation of the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene in chromatin by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bin; Xu, Jin; Zhuo, Ying; Morris, Cindy A; Morris, Gilbert F

    2003-11-07

    A human fibroblast cell line with conditional p53 expression displayed a p53-dependent increase in both the protein and mRNA levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The combination of p53 induction and IR cooperated to activate a transiently expressed human PCNA promoter-reporter gene via a p53-responsive element. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with antibodies specific for p53 or p300/CREB-binding protein revealed specific p53-dependent enrichment of PCNA promoter sequences in immunoprecipitates of sheared chromatin prepared from irradiated cells. Maximal and specific association of acetylated histone H4 with the PCNA promoter also depended on p53 induction and exposure to IR. These data demonstrate p53 binding to a target site in the PCNA promoter, recruitment of p300/CREB-binding protein, and localized acetylation of histone H4 in an IR-dependent manner. These molecular events are likely to play a role in mediating activation of PCNA gene expression by p53 during the cellular response to DNA damage. The analyses indicate that the combination of p53 induction and IR activate the PCNA gene via mechanisms similar to that of p21/wild-type p53-activated factor but to a lesser extent. This differential regulation of PCNA and p21/wild-type p53-activated factor may establish the proper ratio of the two proteins to coordinate DNA repair with cell cycle arrest.

  10. ATM/CHK/p53 Pathway Dependent Chemopreventive and Therapeutic Activity on Lung Cancer by Pterostilbene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hani; Kim, Yonghwan; Jeong, Ji Hye; Ryu, Jae-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Among the many stilbenoids found in a variety of berries, resveratrol and pterostilbene are of particular interest given their potential for use in cancer therapeutics and prevention. We purified four stilbenoids from R. undulatum and found that pterostilbene inhibits cancer cell proliferation more efficiently than rhapontigenin, piceatannol and resveratrol. To investigate the underlying mechanism of this superior action of pterostilbene on cancer cells, we utilized a reverse-phase protein array followed by bioinformatic analysis and found that the ATM/CHK pathway is modified by pterostilbene in a lung cancer cell line. Given that ATM/CHK signaling requires p53 for its biological effects, we hypothesized that p53 is required for the anticancer effect of pterostilbene. To test this hypothesis, we used two molecularly defined precancerous human bronchial epithelial cell lines, HBECR and HBECR/p53i, with normal p53 and suppressed p53 expression, respectively, to represent premalignant states of squamous lung carcinogenesis. Pterostilbene inhibited the cell cycle more efficiently in HBECR cells compared to HBECR/p53i cells, suggesting that the presence of p53 is required for the action of pterostilbene. Pterostilbene also activated ATM and CHK1/2, which are upstream of p53, in both cell lines, though pterostilbene-induced senescence was dependent on the presence of p53. Finally, pterostilbene more effectively inhibited p53-dependent cell proliferation compared to the other three stilbenoids. These results strongly support the potential chemopreventive effect of pterostilbene on p53-positive cells during early carcinogenesis. PMID:27612029

  11. The absence of Ser389 phosphorylation in p53 affects the basal gene expression level of many p53-dependent genes and alters the biphasic response to UV exposure in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bruins, Wendy; Bruning, Oskar; Jonker, Martijs J; Zwart, Edwin; van der Hoeven, Tessa V; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Rauwerda, Han; de Vries, Annemieke; Breit, Timo M

    2008-03-01

    Phosphorylation is important in p53-mediated DNA damage responses. After UV irradiation, p53 is phosphorylated specifically at murine residue Ser389. Phosphorylation mutant p53.S389A cells and mice show reduced apoptosis and compromised tumor suppression after UV irradiation. We investigated the underlying cellular processes by time-series analysis of UV-induced gene expression responses in wild-type, p53.S389A, and p53(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The absence of p53.S389 phosphorylation already causes small endogenous gene expression changes for 2,253, mostly p53-dependent, genes. These genes showed basal gene expression levels intermediate to the wild type and p53(-/-), possibly to readjust the p53 network. Overall, the p53.S389A mutation lifts p53-dependent gene repression to a level similar to that of p53(-/-) but has lesser effect on p53-dependently induced genes. In the wild type, the response of 6,058 genes to UV irradiation was strictly biphasic. The early stress response, from 0 to 3 h, results in the activation of processes to prevent the accumulation of DNA damage in cells, whereas the late response, from 12 to 24 h, relates more to reentering the cell cycle. Although the p53.S389A UV gene response was only subtly changed, many cellular processes were significantly affected. The early response was affected the most, and many cellular processes were phase-specifically lost, gained, or altered, e.g., induction of apoptosis, cell division, and DNA repair, respectively. Altogether, p53.S389 phosphorylation seems essential for many p53 target genes and p53-dependent processes.

  12. Prevention of mammalian DNA reduplication, following the release from the mitotic spindle checkpoint, requires p53 protein, but not p53-mediated transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Notterman, D; Young, S; Wainger, B; Levine, A J

    1998-11-26

    The tumor suppressor p53 has been identified as a component of a mitotic spindle checkpoint. When exposed to a spindle-disrupting drug such as nocodazole, fibroblasts derived from mice having wild-type p53 are blocked with a 4N content of DNA. Conversely, fibroblasts from p53-deficient mice become polyploid. To learn if transcriptional activation of downstream genes by p53 plays a role in this putative checkpoint, three cell lines were exposed to nocodazole. In one line, p53 protein is not expressed, while the other two cell lines over-express p53. In one of these two lines, the N-terminal transactivation domain is wild-type and in the second, this region contains a mutation that eliminates the ability of the protein to act as a transcription factor. Incubation with nocodazole of cells containing wild-type p53 results in accumulation of both 2N and 4N populations of cells. Under the same conditions, cells containing a transactivation-deficient mutant of p53 accumulate a 4N population of cells, but not a 2N population of cells. Cells entirely deficient in p53 protein become hyperdiploid, and display 8N to 16N DNA content. In all three cell lines, nocodazole elicited an initial increase in mitotic cells, but within 24 h the mitotic index returned to baseline. Expression patterns of cyclins B and D indicated that following entry into mitosis, the cells returned to a G1 state but with 4N DNA content. Subsequent re-duplication of DNA beyond 4N is prevented in cells containing either wild-type or transcriptionally inactive p53 protein. In cells entirely lacking p53 protein, DNA is re-duplicated (without an intervening mitosis) and the cells become hyperdiploid. These experiments indicate that p53 does not participate in the transient mitotic arrest that follows spindle disruption, but is essential to prevent subsequent reduplication of DNA and the resulting hyperdiploid state. This function is intact in a mutant that is transcriptionally inactive.

  13. Excess beta-catenin promotes accumulation of transcriptionally active p53.

    PubMed Central

    Damalas, A; Ben-Ze'ev, A; Simcha, I; Shtutman, M; Leal, J F; Zhurinsky, J; Geiger, B; Oren, M

    1999-01-01

    beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein, acting both as a structural component of the cell adhesion machinery and as a transducer of extracellular signals. Deregulated beta-catenin protein expression, due to mutations in the beta-catenin gene itself or in its upstream regulator, the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, is prevalent in colorectal cancer and in several other tumor types, and attests to the potential oncogenic activity of this protein. Increased expression of beta-catenin is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis, and is usually followed by a later mutational inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. To examine whether these two key steps in carcinogenesis are interrelated, we studied the effect of excess beta-catenin on p53. We report here that overexpression of beta-catenin results in accumulation of p53, apparently through interference with its proteolytic degradation. This effect involves both Mdm2-dependent and -independent p53 degradation pathways, and is accompanied by augmented transcriptional activity of p53 in the affected cells. Increased p53 activity may provide a safeguard against oncogenic deregulation of beta-catenin, and thus impose a pressure for mutational inactivation of p53 during the later stages of tumor progression. PMID:10357817

  14. Borna Disease Virus Phosphoprotein Represses p53-Mediated Transcriptional Activity by Interference with HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guoqi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kamitani, Wataru; Komoto, Satoshi; Yamashita, Makiko; Baba, Satoko; Yanai, Hideyuki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2003-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a noncytolytic, neurotropic RNA virus that has a broad host range in warm-blooded animals, probably including humans. Recently, it was demonstrated that a 24-kDa phosphoprotein (P) of BDV directly binds to a multifunctional protein, amphoterin-HMGB1, and inhibits its function in cultured neural cells (W. Kamitani, Y. Shoya, T. Kobayashi, M. Watanabe, B. J. Lee, G. Zhang, K. Tomonaga, and K. Ikuta, J. Virol. 75:8742-8751, 2001). This observation suggested that expression of BDV P may cause deleterious effects in cellular functions by interference with HMGB1. In this study, we further investigated the significance of the binding between P and HMGB1. We demonstrated that P directly binds to the A-box domain on HMGB1, which is also responsible for interaction with a tumor suppression factor, p53. Recent works have demonstrated that binding between HMGB1 and p53 enhances p53-mediated transcriptional activity. Thus, we examined whether BDV P affects the transcriptional activity of p53 by interference with HMGB1. Mammalian two-hybrid analysis revealed that p53 and P competitively interfere with the binding of each protein to HMGB1 in a p53-deficient cell line, NCI-H1299. In addition, P was able to significantly decrease p53-mediated transcriptional activation of the cyclin G promoter. Furthermore, we showed that activation of p21waf1 expression was repressed in cyclosporine-treated BDV-infected cells, as well as p53-transduced NCI-H1299 cells. These results suggested that BDV P may be a unique inhibitor of p53 activity via binding to HMGB1. PMID:14581561

  15. c-Abl inhibits breast cancer tumorigenesis through reactivation of p53-mediated p21 expression

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Cheryl L.; Gilmore, Hannah L.; Chang, Jenny C.; Keri, Ruth A.; Schiemann, William P.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that constitutive c-Abl activity (CST-Abl) abrogates the tumorigenicity of triple-negative breast cancer cells through the combined actions of two cellular events: downregulated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and upregulated p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. We now find decreased c-Abl expression to be significantly associated with diminished relapse-fee survival in breast cancer patients, particularly those exhibiting invasive and basal phenotypes. Moreover, CST-Abl expression enabled 4T1 cells to persist innocuously in the mammary glands of mice, doing so by exhausting their supply of cancer stem cells. Restoring MMP-9 expression and activity in CST-Abl-expressing 4T1 cells failed to rescue their malignant phenotypes; however, rendering these same cells deficient in p21 expression not only delayed their acquisition of senescent phenotypes, but also partially restored their tumorigenicity in mice. Although 4T1 cells lacked detectable expression of p53, those engineered to express CST-Abl exhibited robust production and secretion of TGF-β1 that engendered the reactivated expression of p53. Mechanistically, TGF-β-mediated p53 expression transpired through the combined actions of Smad1/5/8 and Smad2, leading to the dramatic upregulation of p21 and its stimulation of TNBC senescence. Collectively, we identified a novel c-Abl:p53:p21 signaling axis that functions as a powerful suppressor of mammary tumorigenesis and metastatic progression. PMID:27626309

  16. Activation of p53 Transcriptional Activity by SMRT: a Histone Deacetylase 3-Independent Function of a Transcriptional Corepressor

    PubMed Central

    Adikesavan, Anbu Karani; Karmakar, Sudipan; Pardo, Patricia; Wang, Liguo; Liu, Shuang; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) is an established histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent transcriptional corepressor. Microarray analyses of MCF-7 cells transfected with control or SMRT small interfering RNA revealed SMRT regulation of genes involved in DNA damage responses, and the levels of the DNA damage marker γH2AX as well as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage were elevated in SMRT-depleted cells treated with doxorubicin. A number of these genes are established p53 targets. SMRT knockdown decreased the activity of two p53-dependent reporter genes as well as the expression of p53 target genes, such as CDKN1A (which encodes p21). SMRT bound directly to p53 and was recruited to p53 binding sites within the p21 promoter. Depletion of GPS2 and TBL1, components of the SMRT corepressor complex, but not histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) decreased p21-luciferase activity. p53 bound to the SMRT deacetylase activation domain (DAD), which mediates HDAC3 binding and activation, and HDAC3 could attenuate p53 binding to the DAD region of SMRT. Moreover, an HDAC3 binding-deficient SMRT DAD mutant coactivated p53 transcriptional activity. Collectively, these data highlight a biological role for SMRT in mediating DNA damage responses and suggest a model where p53 binding to the DAD limits HDAC3 interaction with this coregulator, thereby facilitating SMRT coactivation of p53-dependent gene expression. PMID:24449765

  17. Acute DNA damage activates the tumour suppressor p53 to promote radiation-induced lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Castle, Katherine D.; Moding, Everett J.; Blum, Jordan M.; Williams, Nerissa; Luo, Lixia; Ma, Yan; Borst, Luke B.; Kim, Yongbaek; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic cancer therapies, such as chemoradiation, cause haematological toxicity primarily by activating the tumour suppressor p53. While inhibiting p53-mediated cell death during cancer therapy ameliorates haematologic toxicity, whether it also impacts carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here we utilize a mouse model of inducible p53 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to show that temporarily blocking p53 during total-body irradiation (TBI) not only ameliorates acute toxicity, but also improves long-term survival by preventing lymphoma development. Using KrasLA1 mice, we show that TBI promotes the expansion of a rare population of thymocytes that express oncogenic KrasG12D. However, blocking p53 during TBI significantly suppresses the expansion of KrasG12D-expressing thymocytes. Mechanistically, bone marrow transplant experiments demonstrate that TBI activates p53 to decrease the ability of bone marrow cells to suppress lymphoma development through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism. Together, our results demonstrate that the p53 response to acute DNA damage promotes the development of radiation-induced lymphoma. PMID:26399548

  18. ZIKA virus elicits P53 activation and genotoxic stress in human neural progenitors similar to mutations involved in severe forms of genetic microcephaly and p53

    PubMed Central

    Ghouzzi, Vincent El; Bianchi, Federico T; Molineris, Ivan; Mounce, Bryan C; Berto, Gaia E; Rak, Malgorzata; Lebon, Sophie; Aubry, Laetitia; Tocco, Chiara; Gai, Marta; Chiotto, Alessandra MA; Sgrò, Francesco; Pallavicini, Gianmarco; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Passemard, Sandrine; Vignuzzi, Marco; Gressens, Pierre; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence from the current outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) and recent studies in animal models indicate a strong causal link between ZIKV and microcephaly. ZIKV infection induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in proliferating neural progenitors. However, the mechanisms leading to these phenotypes are still largely obscure. In this report, we explored the possible similarities between transcriptional responses induced by ZIKV in human neural progenitors and those elicited by three different genetic mutations leading to severe forms of microcephaly in mice. We found that the strongest similarity between all these conditions is the activation of common P53 downstream genes. In agreement with these observations, we report that ZIKV infection increases total P53 levels and nuclear accumulation, as well as P53 Ser15 phosphorylation, correlated with genotoxic stress and apoptosis induction. Interestingly, increased P53 activation and apoptosis are induced not only in cells expressing high levels of viral antigens but also in cells showing low or undetectable levels of the same proteins. These results indicate that P53 activation is an early and specific event in ZIKV-infected cells, which could result from cell-autonomous and/or non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. Moreover, we highlight a small group of P53 effector proteins that could act as critical mediators, not only in ZIKV-induced microcephaly but also in many genetic microcephaly syndromes. PMID:27787521

  19. Activation of SAT1 engages polyamine metabolism with p53-mediated ferroptotic responses.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yang; Wang, Shang-Jui; Li, Dawei; Chu, Bo; Gu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Although p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis remain critical barriers to cancer development, the emerging role of p53 in cell metabolism, oxidative responses, and ferroptotic cell death has been a topic of great interest. Nevertheless, it is unclear how p53 orchestrates its activities in multiple metabolic pathways into tumor suppressive effects. Here, we identified the SAT1 (spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1) gene as a transcription target of p53. SAT1 is a rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine catabolism critically involved in the conversion of spermidine and spermine back to putrescine. Surprisingly, we found that activation of SAT1 expression induces lipid peroxidation and sensitizes cells to undergo ferroptosis upon reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced stress, which also leads to suppression of tumor growth in xenograft tumor models. Notably, SAT1 expression is down-regulated in human tumors, and CRISPR-cas9-mediated knockout of SAT1 expression partially abrogates p53-mediated ferroptosis. Moreover, SAT1 induction is correlated with the expression levels of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15), and SAT1-induced ferroptosis is significantly abrogated in the presence of PD146176, a specific inhibitor of ALOX15. Thus, our findings uncover a metabolic target of p53 involved in ferroptotic cell death and provide insight into the regulation of polyamine metabolism and ferroptosis-mediated tumor suppression.

  20. NIR is a novel INHAT repressor that modulates the transcriptional activity of p53

    PubMed Central

    Hublitz, Philip; Kunowska, Natalia; Mayer, Ulrich P.; Müller, Judith M.; Heyne, Kristina; Yin, Na; Fritzsche, Claudia; Poli, Cecilia; Miguet, Laurent; Schupp, Ingo W.; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Potiers, Noëlle; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Metzger, Eric; Roemer, Klaus; Schüle, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Most transcriptional repression pathways depend on the targeted deacetylation of histone tails. In this report, we characterize NIR, a novel transcriptional corepressor with inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase (INHAT) activity. NIR (Novel INHAT Repressor) is ubiquitously expressed throughout embryonic development and adulthood. NIR is a potent transcriptional corepressor that is not blocked by histone deacetylase inhibitors and is capable of silencing both basal and activator-driven transcription. NIR directly binds to nucleosomes and core histones and prevents acetylation by histone acetyltransferases, thus acting as a bona fide INHAT. Using a tandem affinity purification approach, we identified the tumor suppressor p53 as a NIR-interacting partner. Association of p53 and NIR was verified in vitro and in vivo. Upon recruitment by p53, NIR represses transcription of both p53-dependent reporters and endogenous target genes. Knock-down of NIR by RNA interference significantly enhances histone acetylation at p53-regulated promoters. Moreover, p53-dependent apoptosis is robustly increased upon depletion of NIR. In summary, our findings describe NIR as a novel INHAT that plays an important role in the control of p53 function. PMID:16322561

  1. A PTCH1 Homolog Transcriptionally Activated by p53 Suppresses Hedgehog Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jon H.; Larsen, Andrew R.; Chen, Evan; Bunz, Fred

    2014-01-01

    The p53-mediated responses to DNA damage and the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway are each recurrently dysregulated in many types of human cancer. Here we describe PTCH53, a p53 target gene that is homologous to the tumor suppressor gene PTCH1 and can function as a repressor of Hh pathway activation. PTCH53 (previously designated PTCHD4) was highly responsive to p53 in vitro and was among a small number of genes that were consistently expressed at reduced levels in diverse TP53 mutant cell lines and human tumors. Increased expression of PTCH53 inhibited canonical Hh signaling by the G protein-coupled receptor SMO. PTCH53 thus delineates a novel, inducible pathway by which p53 can repress tumorigenic Hh signals. PMID:25296753

  2. Cellular localization of human p53 expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: effect of NLSI deletion.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoula-Souissi, Salma; Delahodde, Agnès; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Gargouri, Ali; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2011-07-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in the regulation of cellular growth and apoptosis. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, over-expression of the human wtp53 leads to growth inhibition and cell death on minimal medium. In the present work, we showed that deletion of the nuclear localization signal (NLSI) of p53 restores the yeast growth. In this heterologous context, the level of p53∆NLSI was low and the protein mainly located in the cytoplasm while the wtp53 was observed in both the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. Interestingly, the wtp53 protein was observed in the mitochondria, whereas the p53∆NLSI protein failed to localize in mitochondria. Moreover, mitochondrial morphology defect and release of cytochrome c in the cytosol were noticed only in the yeast strain expressing the wtp53. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that the human wtp53 is active in S. cerevisiae probably through dependent and independent transcriptional mechanisms leading to cell death. The deletion of the NLSI sequence decreases p53 nuclear translocation as well as its mitochondrial localization and consequently its effect on yeast growth.

  3. p53 controls colorectal cancer cell invasion by inhibiting the NF-κB-mediated activation of Fascin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haimei; Wang, Chan; Zhou, Jichun; Han, Weidong; Wang, Xian; Fang, Yong; Xu, Yinghua; Li, Da; Chen, Rui; Ma, Junhong; Jing, Zhao; Gu, Xidong; Pan, Hongming; He, Chao

    2015-01-01

    p53 mutation is known to contribute to cancer progression. Fascin is an actin-bundling protein and has been recently identified to promote cancer cell migration and invasion through its role in formation of cellular protrusions such as filopodia and invadopodia. However, the relationship between p53 and Fascin is not understood. Here, we have found a new link between them. In colorectal adenocarcinomas, p53 mutation correlated with high NF-κB, Fascin and low E-cadherin expression. Moreover, this expression profile was shown to contribute to poor overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer. Wild-type p53 could inhibit NF-κB activity that repressed the expression of Fascin and cancer cell invasiveness. In contrast, in p53-deficient primary cultured cells, NF-κB activity was enhanced and then activation of NF-κB increased the expression of Fascin. In further analysis, we showed that NF-κB was a key determinant for p53 deletion-stimulated Fascin expression. Inhibition of NF-κB /p65 expression by pharmacological compound or p65 siRNA suppressed Fascin activity in p53-deficient cells. Moreover, restoration of p53 expression decreased the activation of Fascin through suppression of the NF-κB pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that a negative-feedback loop exists, whereby p53 can suppress colorectal cancer cell invasion by inhibiting the NF-κB-mediated activation of Fascin. PMID:26362504

  4. Clinical and pathological correlations of marrow PUMA and P53 expressions in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Ozlen; Uner, Aysegul; Buyukasik, Yahya; Uz, Burak; Bozkurt, Sureyya; Eliacik, Eylem; Işik, Ayse; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Goker, Hakan; Demiroglu, Haluk; Aksu, Salih; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Sayinalp, Nilgun

    2015-05-01

    p53 is a key regulator of apoptosis. p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is a critical mediator of p53-dependent and independent apoptosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship of p53 and PUMA to the prognosis of MDS. Bone marrow biopsies of MDS patients at the time of diagnosis (n = 76) and at the time of transformation (n = 19) were included in the study group. The expression of p53 and PUMA was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. When compared to the control group, both p53 (p < 0.001) and PUMA (p = 0.012) expression levels were significantly higher in MDS group. In MDS group, there was a moderate positive correlation between p53 and PUMA expressions. PUMA expression was not correlated with event free and overall survival. However, overall survival was significantly lower in cases with p53 expression in more than 50% of the cells. There was an increase in PUMA expression in cases that showed transformation as compared to the initial diagnostic bone marrows but was not statistically significant. The correlation that existed between p53 and PUMA was lost in transformed cases. Our results showed that PUMA and p53 expressions are increased in MDS marrows compared to normal marrows. PUMA expression increases further during transformation while the expression of p53 is not significantly altered which suggests that PUMA alterations might be a late event during the evolution of MDS.

  5. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Su, Chun-Li; Chen, Kwun-Min; Fang, Kang

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  6. p53-dependent NDRG1 expression induces inhibition of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation but not apoptosis after polyamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Hong; Rao, Jaladanki N; Zou, Tongtong; Liu, Lan; Marasa, Bernard S; Xiao, Lan; Chen, Jie; Turner, Douglas J; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2007-07-01

    Normal intestinal mucosal growth requires polyamines that regulate expression of various genes involved in cell proliferation, growth arrest, and apoptosis. Our previous studies have shown that polyamine depletion stabilizes p53, resulting in inhibition of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation, but the exact downstream targets of induced p53 are still unclear. The NDRG1 (N-myc downregulated gene-1) gene encodes a growth-related protein, and its transcription can be induced in response to stress. The current study tests the hypothesis that induced p53 inhibits IEC proliferation by upregulating NDRG1 expression following polyamine depletion. Depletion of cellular polyamines by inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) with alpha-difluoromethylornithine not only induced p53 but also increased NDRG1 transcription as indicated by induction of the NDRG1 promoter activity and increased levels of NDRG1 mRNA and protein, all of which were prevented by using specific p53 siRNA and in cells with a targeted deletion of p53. In contrast, increased levels of cellular polyamines by ectopic expression of the ODC gene decreased p53 and repressed expression of NDRG1. Consistently, polyamine depletion-induced activation of the NDRG1-promoter was decreased when p53-binding sites within the NDRG1 proximal promoter region were deleted. Ectopic expression of the wild-type NDRG1 gene inhibited DNA synthesis and decreased final cell numbers regardless of the presence or absence of endogenous p53, whereas silencing NDRG1 promoted cell growth. However, overexpression of NDRG1 failed to directly induce cell death and to alter susceptibility to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha/cycloheximide. These results indicate that NDRG1 is one of the direct mediators of induced p53 following polyamine depletion and that p53-dependent NDRG1 expression plays a critical role in the negative control of IEC proliferation.

  7. Regulation of p53 Activity by Reversible-Acetylation in Prostate Tumor Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    localization of HDAC1. A. The subcellular localization of endogenous HDAC1 was determined in p300 expressing H1299 cells by immunostaining with an antibody...p53 following transfection into p53 (-/-) H1299 cells. Cells were transfected with p53wt alone (a, g, m), p53wt and myc-p300 (b, d, h, j, n, p), p53wt...signal that promotes p53 export to the cytoplasm. Materials and Methods Cell lines and transfection - H1299 human cells, p53(-/-), MDM2(-/-) mouse

  8. p53 directly suppresses BNIP3 expression to protect against hypoxia-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xi; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Wuhan

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia stabilizes the tumour suppressor p53, allowing it to function primarily as a transrepressor; however, the function of p53 during hypoxia remains unclear. In this study, we showed that p53 suppressed BNIP3 expression by directly binding to the p53-response element motif and recruiting corepressor mSin3a to the BNIP3 promoter. The DNA-binding site of p53 must remain intact for the protein to suppress the BNIP3 promoter. In addition, taking advantage of zebrafish as an in vivo model, we confirmed that zebrafish nip3a, a homologous gene of mammalian BNIP3, was indeed induced by hypoxia and p53 mutation/knockdown enhanced nip3a expression under hypoxia resulted in cell death enhancement in p53 mutant embryos. Furthermore, p53 protected against hypoxia-induced cell death mediated by p53 suppression of BNIP3 as illustrated by p53 knockdown/loss assays in both human cell lines and zebrafish model, which is in contrast to the traditional pro-apoptotic role of p53. Our results suggest a novel function of p53 in hypoxia-induced cell death, leading to the development of new treatments for ischaemic heart disease and cerebral stoke. PMID:21792176

  9. Tetramerization-defects of p53 result in aberrant ubiquitylation and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Valérie; Pallara, Chiara; Zabala, Amaia; Lobato-Gil, Sofia; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Farrás, Rosa; Hjerpe, Roland; Torres-Ramos, Monica; Zabaleta, Lorea; Blattner, Christine; Hay, Ronald T; Barrio, Rosa; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Aillet, Fabienne

    2014-07-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression, senescence and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effect of single point mutations in the oligomerization domain (OD) on tetramerization, transcription, ubiquitylation and stability of p53. As predicted by docking and molecular dynamics simulations, p53 OD mutants show functional defects on transcription, Mdm2-dependent ubiquitylation and 26S proteasome-mediated degradation. However, mutants unable to form tetramers are well degraded by the 20S proteasome. Unexpectedly, despite the lower structural stability compared to WT p53, p53 OD mutants form heterotetramers with WT p53 when expressed transiently or stably in cells wild type or null for p53. In consequence, p53 OD mutants interfere with the capacity of WT p53 tetramers to be properly ubiquitylated and result in changes of p53-dependent protein expression patterns, including the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and PUMA under basal and adriamycin-induced conditions. Importantly, the patient derived p53 OD mutant L330R (OD1) showed the more severe changes in p53-dependent gene expression. Thus, in addition to the well-known effects on p53 stability, ubiquitylation defects promote changes in p53-dependent gene expression with implications on some of its functions.

  10. Effect of Thymoquinone on P53 Gene Expression and Consequence Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Dastjerdi, Mehdi Nikbakht; Mehdiabady, Ebrahim Momeni; Iranpour, Farhad Golshan; Bahramian, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nigella sativa has been a nutritional flavoring factor and natural treatment for many ailments for so many years in medical science. Earlier studies have been reported that thymoquinone (TQ), an active compound of its seed, contains anticancer properties. Previous studies have shown that TQ induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells but it is unclear the role of P53 in the apoptotic pathway. Hereby, this study reports the potency of TQ on expression of tumor suppressor gene P53 and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cell line Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7). Methods: MCF-7 cell line was cultured and treated with TQ, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was carried out for evaluating the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values after 24 h of treatment. The percentage of apoptotic cells was measured by flow cytometry. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to estimate the messenger RNA expression of P53 in MCF-7 cell line at different times. Results: The IC50 value for the TQ in MCF-7 cells was 25 μM that determined using MTT assay. The flow cytometry and real-time PCR results showed that TQ could induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, and the P53 gene expression was dramatically up-regulated by ascending time, respectively. Hence, there was significant difference in 48 and 72 h. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that TQ could induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells through up-regulation of P53 expression in breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) by time-dependent manner. PMID:27141285

  11. Liver p53 expression in patients with HCV-related chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Loguercio, C; Cuomo, A; Tuccillo, C; Gazzerro, P; Cioffi, M; Molinari, A M; Del Vecchio Blanco, C

    2003-07-01

    Mutated p53 acts as a dominant oncogene and alterations in the p53 gene are described in a large number of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been demonstrated that hepatitis C virus (HCV)-core protein regulates transcriptionally cellular genes, as well as cell growth and apoptosis. This study was undertaken to evaluate whether p53 may be expressed also in a precocious stage of HCV-related liver damage. We studied p53 expression by immunoluminometric assay on liver samples from 40 patients (M/F 18/ 22, median age 44 years, range 13-64 years) with biopsy-proven HCV-related chronic hepatitis. We considered the following factors: degree of liver damage, liver iron content and HCV-RNA titre. We also evaluated as possible co-factors alcohol and food intake in the last 3 years. p53 was over-expressed in seven of 40 (17.5%) patients. Liver histology documented the presence of unexpected cirrhosis in two patients among the p53 positive subjects. The p53 positive group had a daily ethanol intake significantly higher in respect to that of the p53 negative group (P < 0.05). Alimentary history documented that patients with a p53 over-expression had a lower intake of total calories, monounsaturated fatty acids, vitamin C and riboflavin. Data indicate that p53 over-expression can occur even in initial stages of HCV-related liver disease.

  12. Selective inhibition of microRNA accessibility by RBM38 is required for p53 activity

    PubMed Central

    Léveillé, Nicolas; Elkon, Ran; Davalos, Veronica; Manoharan, Vijayalaxmi; Hollingworth, Dave; Vrielink, Joachim Oude; le Sage, Carlos; Melo, Carlos A.; Horlings, Hugo M.; Wesseling, Jelle; Ule, Jernej; Esteller, Manel; Ramos, Andres; Agami, Reuven

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with 3′-untranslated regions of messenger RNAs to restrict expression of most protein-coding genes during normal development and cancer. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) can control the biogenesis, stability and activity of miRNAs. Here we identify RBM38 in a genetic screen for RBPs whose expression controls miRNA access to target mRNAs. RBM38 is induced by p53 and its ability to modulate miRNA-mediated repression is required for proper p53 function. In contrast, RBM38 shows lower propensity to block the action of the p53-controlled miR-34a on SIRT1. Target selectivity is determined by the interaction of RBM38 with uridine-rich regions near miRNA target sequences. Furthermore, in large cohorts of human breast cancer, reduced RBM38 expression by promoter hypermethylation correlates with wild-type p53 status. Thus, our results indicate a novel layer of p53 gene regulation, which is required for its tumour suppressive function. PMID:22027593

  13. Inhibition of Wild-Type p53-Expressing AML by the Novel Small Molecule HDM2 Inhibitor CGM097.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Ellen; Halilovic, Ensar; Cooke, Vesselina G; Nonami, Atsushi; Ren, Tao; Sanda, Takaomi; Simkin, Irene; Yuan, Jing; Antonakos, Brandon; Barys, Louise; Ito, Moriko; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Cowens, Kristen; Nelson, Erik; Sattler, Martin; Jeay, Sebastien; Wuerthner, Jens U; McDonough, Sean M; Wiesmann, Marion; Griffin, James D

    2015-10-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a key regulator of apoptosis and functions upstream in the apoptotic cascade by both indirectly and directly regulating Bcl-2 family proteins. In cells expressing wild-type (WT) p53, the HDM2 protein binds to p53 and blocks its activity. Inhibition of HDM2:p53 interaction activates p53 and causes apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Here, we investigated the ability of the novel HDM2 inhibitor CGM097 to potently and selectively kill WT p53-expressing AML cells. The antileukemic effects of CGM097 were studied using cell-based proliferation assays (human AML cell lines, primary AML patient cells, and normal bone marrow samples), apoptosis, and cell-cycle assays, ELISA, immunoblotting, and an AML patient-derived in vivo mouse model. CGM097 potently and selectively inhibited the proliferation of human AML cell lines and the majority of primary AML cells expressing WT p53, but not mutant p53, in a target-specific manner. Several patient samples that harbored mutant p53 were comparatively unresponsive to CGM097. Synergy was observed when CGM097 was combined with FLT3 inhibition against oncogenic FLT3-expressing cells cultured both in the absence as well as the presence of cytoprotective stromal-secreted cytokines, as well as when combined with MEK inhibition in cells with activated MAPK signaling. Finally, CGM097 was effective in reducing leukemia burden in vivo. These data suggest that CGM097 is a promising treatment for AML characterized as harboring WT p53 as a single agent, as well as in combination with other therapies targeting oncogene-activated pathways that drive AML.

  14. p53 coordinates DNA repair with nucleotide synthesis by suppressing PFKFB3 expression and promoting the pentose phosphate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Derek A.; He, Yizhou; Leslie, Patrick L.; Tikunov, Andrey P.; Fenger, Nick; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Zhang, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    Activation of p53 in response to DNA damage is essential for tumor suppression. Although previous studies have emphasized the importance of p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis for tumor suppression, recent studies have suggested that other areas of p53 regulation, such as metabolism and DNA damage repair (DDR), are also essential for p53-dependent tumor suppression. However, the intrinsic connections between p53-mediated DDR and metabolic regulation remain incompletely understood. Here, we present data suggesting that p53 promotes nucleotide biosynthesis in response to DNA damage by repressing the expression of the phosphofructokinase-2 (PFK2) isoform 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3), a rate-limiting enzyme that promotes glycolysis. PFKFB3 suppression increases the flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) to increase nucleotide production, which results in more efficient DNA damage repair and increased cell survival. Interestingly, although p53-mediated suppression of PFKFB3 could increase the two major PPP products, NADPH and nucleotides, only nucleotide production was essential to promote DDR. By identifying the novel p53 target PFKFB3, we report an important mechanistic connection between p53-regulated metabolism and DDR, both of which play crucial roles in tumor suppression. PMID:27901115

  15. Downregulation of LRRC8A protects human ovarian and alveolar carcinoma cells against Cisplatin-induced expression of p53, MDM2, p21Waf1/Cip1, and Caspase-9/-3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Nielsen, Dorthe; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur Arna; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2016-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat containing 8A (LRRC8A) protein is an essential component of the volume-sensitive organic anion channel (VSOAC), and using pharmacological anion channel inhibitors (NS3728, DIDS) and LRRC8A siRNA we have investigated its role in development of Cisplatin resistance in human ovarian (A2780) and alveolar (A549) carcinoma cells. In Cisplatin-sensitive cells Cisplatin treatment increases p53-protein level as well as downstream signaling, e.g., expression of p21Waf1/Cip1, Bax, Noxa, MDM2, and activation of Caspase-9/-3. In contrast, Cisplatin-resistant cells do not enter apoptosis, i.e., their p53 and downstream signaling are reduced and caspase activity unaltered following Cisplatin exposure. Reduced LRRC8A expression and VSOAC activity are previously shown to correlate with Cisplatin resistance, and here we demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition and transient knockdown of LRRC8A reduce the protein level of p53, MDM2, and p21Waf1/Cip1 as well as Caspase-9/-3 activation in Cisplatin-sensitive cells. Cisplatin resistance is accompanied by reduction in total LRRC8A expression (A2780) or LRRC8A expression in the plasma membrane (A549). Activation of Caspase-3 dependent apoptosis by TNFα-exposure or hyperosmotic cell shrinkage is almost unaffected by pharmacological anion channel inhibition. Our data indicate 1) that expression/activity of LRRC8A is essential for Cisplatin-induced increase in p53 protein level and its downstream signaling, i.e., Caspase-9/-3 activation, expression of p21Waf1/Cip1 and MDM2; and 2) that downregulation of LRRC8A-dependent osmolyte transporters contributes to acquirement of Cisplatin resistance in ovarian and lung carcinoma cells. Activation of LRRC8A-containing channels is upstream to apoptotic volume decrease as hypertonic cell shrinkage induces apoptosis independent of the presence of LRRC8A. PMID:26984736

  16. Akt phosphorylates myc-associated zinc finger protein (MAZ), releases P-MAZ from the p53 promoter, and activates p53 transcription.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Ping; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2016-05-28

    The p53 protein is a cell cycle regulator. When the cell cycle progresses, p53 plays an important role in putting a brake on the G1 phase to prevent unwanted errors during cell division. Akt is a downstream kinase of receptor tyrosine kinase. Upon activation, Akt phorphorylates IKK that then phosphorylates IκB and releases NF-κB, leading to transcriptional activation of Dmp1. Dmp1 is a transcriptional activator of Arf. It has been known that oncogene activation stabilizes p53 through transcriptional activation of Arf, which then binds and inhibits Mdm2. In the current study, we show that myc-associated zinc finger protein (MAZ) is a transcriptional repressor of the p53 promoter. Akt phosphorylates MAZ at Thr385, and the phosphorylated MAZ is released from the p53 promoter, leading to transcriptional activation of p53, a new mechanism that contributes to increased p53 protein pool during oncogene activation.

  17. Wild-type p53 controls cell motility and invasion by dual regulation of MET expression

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Matoso, Andres; Corney, David C.; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Körner, Stefanie; Wang, Wei; Boccaccio, Carla; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Hermeking, Heiko; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that p53 mutations are responsible not only for growth of primary tumors but also for their dissemination. However, mechanisms involved in p53-mediated control of cell motility and invasion remain poorly understood. By using the primary ovarian surface epithelium cell culture, we show that conditional inactivation of p53 or expression of its mutant forms results in overexpression of MET receptor tyrosine kinase, a crucial regulator of invasive growth. At the same time, cells acquire increased MET-dependent motility and invasion. Wild-type p53 negatively regulates MET expression by two mechanisms: (i) transactivation of MET-targeting miR-34, and (ii) inhibition of SP1 binding to MET promoter. Both mechanisms are not functional in p53 absence, but mutant p53 proteins retain partial MET promoter suppression. Accordingly, MET overexpression, cell motility, and invasion are particularly high in p53-null cells. These results identify MET as a critical effector of p53 and suggest that inhibition of MET may be an effective antimetastatic approach to treat cancers with p53 mutations. These results also show that the extent of advanced cancer traits, such as invasion, may be determined by alterations in individual components of p53/MET regulatory network. PMID:21831840

  18. Temperature sensitivity of human wild-type and mutant p53 proteins expressed in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Ponchel, F.; Milner, J.

    1998-01-01

    p53 is activated in response to DNA damage and functions in the maintenance of genetic integrity. Loss of p53 function because of mutation of the p53 gene is associated with over half all human cancers. Certain human p53 mutants are conformationally flexible in vitro and are temperature sensitive, with partial or complete recovery of wild-type (wt) properties at 32 degrees C. We have now tested the functional capacities of selected p53 mutants in vivo, by transfection into established human cell lines. Unexpectedly, we found that wt p53 can be temperature sensitive for transactivation of a co-transfected target gene in vivo. Flexible mutants retained varying degrees of functional capacity in transfected cells, and the recipient cell line appeared to be a significant determinant of both wt and mutant p53 function; importantly, two p53 null cell lines commonly used to study p53 function (Saos-2 and Hep3B) differed markedly in this latter respect. We also show that the p53 mutant V272M, which exhibits sequence-specific DNA binding in vitro, is nonetheless defective for transactivation and is unable to induce apoptosis in vivo. The valine 272 residue may thus be crucial for properties (other than sequence-specific DNA binding) that are important for p53 function(s) in vivo. Images Figure 4 PMID:9635828

  19. Jasmonates induce nonapoptotic death in high-resistance mutant p53-expressing B-lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fingrut, Orit; Reischer, Dorit; Rotem, Ronit; Goldin, Natalia; Altboum, Irit; Zan-Bar, Israel; Flescher, Eliezer

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in p53, a tumor suppressor gene, occur in more than half of human cancers. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that jasmonates (novel anticancer agents) can induce death in mutated p53-expressing cells. Two clones of B-lymphoma cells were studied, one expressing wild-type (wt) p53 and the other expressing mutated p53. Jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate (0.25–3 mM) were each equally cytotoxic to both clones, whereas mutant p53-expressing cells were resistant to treatment with the radiomimetic agent neocarzinostatin and the chemotherapeutic agent bleomycin. Neocarzinostatin and bleomycin induced an elevation in the p53 levels in wt p53-expressing cells, whereas methyl jasmonate did not. Methyl jasmonate induced mostly apoptotic death in the wt p53-expressing cells, while no signs of early apoptosis were detected in mutant p53-expressing cells. In contrast, neocarzinostatin and bleomycin induced death only in wt p53-expressing cells, in an apoptotic mode. Methyl jasmonate induced a rapid depletion of ATP in both clones. In both clones, oligomycin (a mitochondrial ATP synthase inhibitor) did not increase ATP depletion induced by methyl jasmonate, whereas inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxyglucose did. High glucose levels protected both clones from methyl jasmonate-induced ATP depletion (and reduced methyl jasmonate-induced cytotoxicity), whereas high levels of pyruvate did not. These results suggest that methyl jasmonate induces ATP depletion mostly by compromising oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. In conclusion, jasmonates can circumvent the resistance of mutant p53-expressing cells towards chemotherapy by inducing a nonapoptotic cell death. PMID:16170329

  20. Y14 governs p53 expression and modulates DNA damage sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chia-Chen; Lee, Chi-Chieh; Tseng, Ching-Tzu; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2017-01-01

    Y14 is a core component of the exon junction complex (EJC), while it also exerts cellular functions independent of the EJC. Depletion of Y14 causes G2/M arrest, DNA damage and apoptosis. Here we show that knockdown of Y14 induces the expression of an alternative spliced isoform of p53, namely p53β, in human cells. Y14, in the context of the EJC, inhibited aberrant exon inclusion during the splicing of p53 pre-mRNA, and thus prevent p53β expression. The anti-cancer agent camptothecin specifically suppressed p53β induction. Intriguingly, both depletion and overexpression of Y14 increased overall p53 protein levels, suggesting that Y14 governs the quality and quantity control of p53. Moreover, Y14 depletion unexpectedly reduced p21 protein levels, which in conjunction with aberrant p53 expression accordingly increased cell sensitivity to genotoxic agents. This study establishes a direct link between Y14 and p53 expression and suggests a function for Y14 in DNA damage signaling. PMID:28361991

  1. Gene expression profiling analysis reveals arsenic-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in p53-proficient and p53-deficient cells through differential gene pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xiaozhong Robinson, Joshua F.; Gribble, Elizabeth; Hong, Sung Woo; Sidhu, Jaspreet S.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2008-12-15

    Arsenic (As) is a well-known environmental toxicant and carcinogen as well as an effective chemotherapeutic agent. The underlying mechanism of this dual capability, however, is not fully understood. Tumor suppressor gene p53, a pivotal cell cycle checkpoint signaling protein, has been hypothesized to play a possible role in mediating As-induced toxicity and therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we found that arsenite (As{sup 3+}) induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner in both p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). There was, however, a distinction between genotypes in the apoptotic response, with a more prominent induction of caspase-3 in the p53{sup -/-} cells than in the p53{sup +/+} cells. To examine this difference further, a systems-based genomic analysis was conducted comparing the critical molecular mechanisms between the p53 genotypes in response to As{sup 3+}. A significant alteration in the Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway was found in both genotypes. In p53{sup +/+} MEFs, As{sup 3+} induced p53-dependent gene expression alterations in DNA damage and cell cycle regulation genes. However, in the p53{sup -/-} MEFs, As{sup 3+} induced a significant up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes (Noxa) and down-regulation of genes in immune modulation. Our findings demonstrate that As-induced cell death occurs through a p53-independent pathway in p53 deficient cells while apoptosis induction occurs through p53-dependent pathway in normal tissue. This difference in the mechanism of apoptotic responses between the genotypes provides important information regarding the apparent dichotomy of arsenic's dual mechanisms, and potentially leads to further advancement of its utility as a chemotherapeutic agent.

  2. Gene expression in the lung of p53 mutant mice exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Izzotti, Alberto; Cartiglia, Cristina; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Bagnasco, Maria; Merello, Andrea; You, Ming; Lubet, Ronald A; De Flora, Silvio

    2004-12-01

    We showed previously that p53 mutations play a role in cigarette smoke-related carcinogenesis not only in humans but also in A/J mice. In fact, (UL53-3 x A/J)F(1) mice, carrying a dominant-negative germ-line p53 mutation, responded to exposure to environmental cigarette smoke more efficiently than their wild-type (wt) littermate controls in terms of molecular alterations, cytogenetic damage, and lung tumor yield. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we analyzed by cDNA array the expression of 1,185 cancer-related genes in the lung of the same mice. Neither environmental cigarette smoke nor the p53 status affected the expression of the p53 gene, but the p53 mutation strikingly increased the basal levels of p53 nuclear protein in the lung. Environmental cigarette smoke increased p53 protein levels in wt mice only. The p53 mutation enhanced the expression of positive cell cycle regulators in sham-exposed mice, which suggests a physiologic protective role of p53. In environmental cigarette smoke-exposed mice, the p53 mutation resulted in a lack of induction of proapoptotic genes and in overexpression of genes involved in cell proliferation, signal transduction, angiogenesis, inflammation, and immune response. Mutant mice and wt mice reacted to environmental cigarette smoke in a similar manner regarding genes involved in metabolism of xenobiotics, multidrug resistance, and protein repair. Irrespective of the p53 status, environmental cigarette smoke poorly affected the expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and DNA repair genes. Taken together, these findings may explain the increased susceptibility of p53 mutant mice to smoke-related alterations of intermediate biomarkers and lung carcinogenesis.

  3. Comparative study of p63 and p53 expression in tissue microarrays of malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Brinck, Ulrich; Ruschenburg, Ilka; Di Como, Charles J; Buschmann, Nadine; Betke, Herbert; Stachura, Jerzy; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Korabiowska, Monika

    2002-12-01

    p63 is a known homologue of p53. In contrast to p53, however, p63 mutations are rarely seen in tumours. There have been several reports that p63 plays a regulatory role in the normal differentiation of cells, whereas its role in tumour biology must still be elucidated. The main aim of this study was to compare p63 and p53 expression in tissue microarrays of malignant melanomas and to establish any prognostic significance. p63 expression was found in 2 out of 59 tumours, both pT4. The p63 index did not exceed 30%. p53 expression was found in 27 out of 59 melanomas, with maximal expression in up to 80% of tumour cells. There were no correlations observed between the two markers. Multivariate analysis confirmed the prognostically independent role of p53. This study also confirmed that tissue microarrays can be used effectively for evaluation of the expression of certain tumour markers.

  4. Mdm2 is a novel activator of ApoCIII promoter which is antagonized by p53 and SHP inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yuxia; Wang, Li

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mdm2 enhances HNF4{alpha} activation of the ApoCIII promoter via interaction with HNF4{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 antagonizes the effect of Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SHP strengthens p53 inhibition but abolishes Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mdm2 alters the enrichment of HNF4{alpha}, p53 and SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. -- Abstract: We examined the effect of Mdm2 on regulation of the ApoCIII promoter and its cross-talk with p53 and nuclear receptor SHP. Overexpression of Mdm2 markedly enhanced ApoCIII promoter activity by HNF4{alpha}. A direct association of Mdm2 protein with the HNF4{alpha} protein was observed by co-immunoprecipitation. Ectopic expression of p53 decreased HNF4{alpha} activation of the ApoCIII promoter and antagonized the effect of Mdm2. Co-expression of SHP further strengthened p53 inhibition and abolished Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Mdm2 inhibited p53-mediated enrichment of HNF4{alpha} to the ApoCIII promoter while simultaneously reducing p53 binding and increasing recruitment of SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. The results from this study implicate a potentially important function of Mdm2 in regulation of lipoprotein metabolism.

  5. Combined CSL and p53 downregulation promotes cancer-associated fibroblast activation

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, Maria-Giuseppina; Laszlo, Csaba; Labban, Dania Al; Kim, Dong Eun; Bordignon, Pino; Jo, Seunghee; Goruppi, Sandro; Menietti, Elena; Ostano, Paola; Ala, Ugo; Provero, Paolo; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Neel, Victor; Kilarski, Witek; Swartz, Melody A.; Brisken, Cathrin; Lefort, Karine; Dotto, G. Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Stromal fibroblast senescence has been linked to aging-associated cancer risk. However, density and proliferation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are frequently increased. Loss or down-modulation of the Notch effector CSL/RBP-Jκ in dermal fibroblasts is sufficient for CAF activation and ensuing keratinocyte-derived tumors. We report that CSL silencing induces senescence of primary fibroblasts from dermis, oral mucosa, breast and lung. CSL functions in these cells as direct repressor of multiple senescence- and CAF-effector genes. It also physically interacts with p53, repressing its activity. CSL is down-modulated in stromal fibroblasts of premalignant skin actinic keratosis lesions and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), while p53 expression and function is down-modulated only in the latter, with paracrine FGF signaling as likely culprit. Concomitant loss of CSL and p53 overcomes fibroblast senescence, enhances expression of CAF effectors and promotes stromal and cancer cell expansion. The findings support a CAF activation/stromal co-evolution model under convergent CSL/p53 control. PMID:26302407

  6. Reverting p53 activation after recovery of cellular stress to resume with cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Pedro A

    2017-05-01

    The activation of p53 in response to different types of cellular stress induces several protective reactions including cell cycle arrest, senescence or cell death. These protective effects are a consequence of the activation of p53 by specific phosphorylation performed by several kinases. The reversion of the cell cycle arrest, induced by p53, is a consequence of the phosphorylated and activated p53, which triggers its own downregulation and that of its positive regulators. The different down-regulatory processes have a sequential and temporal order of events. The mechanisms implicated in p53 down-regulation include phosphatases, deacetylases, and protein degradation by the proteasome or autophagy, which also affect different p53 protein targets and functions. The necessary first step is the dephosphorylation of p53 to make it available for interaction with mdm2 ubiquitin-ligase, which requires the activation of phosphatases targeting both p53 and p53-activating kinases. In addition, deacetylation of p53 is required to make lysine residues accessible to ubiquitin ligases. The combined action of these downregulatory mechanisms brings p53 protein back to its basal levels, and cell cycle progression can resume if cells have overcome the stress or damage situation. The specific targeting of these down-regulatory mechanisms can be exploited for therapeutic purposes in cancers harbouring wild-type p53.

  7. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Li; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang; Tong, Dewen

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • TGEV N protein reduces cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. • TGEV N protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by regulating p53 signaling. • TGEV N protein plays important roles in TGEV-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. - Abstract: Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence.

  8. Inactivation of p53 by HTLV type 1 and HTLV type 2 Tax trans-activators.

    PubMed

    Mahieux, R; Pise-Masison, C A; Nicot, C; Green, P; Hall, W W; Brady, J N

    2000-11-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-2) was originally isolated from a patient with a hairy T cell leukemia. It has been associated with rare cases of CD8(+) T lymphoproliferative disorders, and has a controversial role as a pathogen. The loss of p53 function, as a consequence of mutation or inactivation, increases the chances of genetic damage. Indeed, the importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor is evident from the fact that over 60% of all human cancers have a mutant or inactive p53. p53 status has been extensively studied in HTLV-1-infected cell lines. Interestingly, despite the fact that p53 mutations have been found in only a minority of cells, the p53 functions were found to be impaired. We have analyzed the functional activity of the p53 tumor suppressor in cells transformed with HTLV-2 subtypes A and B. As with HTLV-1-infected cells, abundant levels of the p53 protein are detected in HTLV-2 virus-infected cell lines. Using p53 reporter plasmid or induction of p53-responsive genes in response to gamma-irradiation, the p53 was found to be transcriptionally inhibited in HTLV-2-infected cells. Interestingly, although Tax-2A and-2B inactivate p53, the Tax-2A protein appears to inhibit p53 function less efficiently than either Tax-1 or Tax-2B in T cells, but not in fibroblasts.

  9. Inhibition of SIRT1 Catalytic Activity Increases p53 Acetylation but Does Not Alter Cell Survival following DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Jonathan M.; Pasupuleti, Rao; Xu, Lei; McDonagh, Thomas; Curtis, Rory; DiStefano, Peter S.; Huber, L. Julie

    2006-01-01

    Human SIRT1 is an enzyme that deacetylates the p53 tumor suppressor protein and has been suggested to modulate p53-dependent functions including DNA damage-induced cell death. In this report, we used EX-527, a novel, potent, and specific small-molecule inhibitor of SIRT1 catalytic activity to examine the role of SIRT1 in p53 acetylation and cell survival after DNA damage. Treatment with EX-527 dramatically increased acetylation at lysine 382 of p53 after different types of DNA damage in primary human mammary epithelial cells and several cell lines. Significantly, inhibition of SIRT1 catalytic activity by EX-527 had no effect on cell growth, viability, or p53-controlled gene expression in cells treated with etoposide. Acetyl-p53 was also increased by the histone deacetylase (HDAC) class I/II inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). EX-527 and TSA acted synergistically to increase acetyl-p53 levels, confirming that p53 acetylation is regulated by both SIRT1 and HDACs. While TSA alone reduced cell survival after DNA damage, the combination of EX-527 and TSA had no further effect on cell viability and growth. These results show that, although SIRT1 deacetylates p53, this does not play a role in cell survival following DNA damage in certain cell lines and primary human mammary epithelial cells. PMID:16354677

  10. p53, p63 and p73 expression and angiogenesis in keratocystic odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chandrangsu, Soranun

    2016-01-01

    Background Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTSs) are odontogenic tumors previously referred to as odontogenic keratocysts. Several studies have reported that KCOT behavior is more like that of a benign neoplasm than a cyst. KCOTs are locally destructive and exhibit a high recurrence rate. The objective of this study is to characterize the expression of p53, p63 and p73 in KCOTs together with the relationship between their expression and KCOT angiogenesis and recurrence. Material and Methods Standard indirect immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies specific to human p53, p63, p73 and CD105 was performed in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 39 KCOT samples. Grading of p53, p63 and p73 immunohistochemical staining was divided into three groups, whereas microvessel density (MVD) was presented as the mean +/- standard deviation. Associations between p53, p63 and p73 expression and clinical-pathological parameters were analyzed by Fisher’s exact test, whereas associations among MVD levels, clinical and pathological parameters and p53, p63 and p73 expression were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U test. Correlations among p53, p63, p73 and MVD levels were analyzed using Spearman’s correlation coefficients. For all analyses, p< 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Results p53, p63 and p73 expression was noted in 23, 32 and 26 of 39 KCOT cases, respectively. The mean MVD was 26.7 ± 15.8 per high-power field. In addition, correlations between the expression levels of p53, p63, p73 and MVD in KCOT were examined. Statistically significant positive relationships were noted for all proteins (p<0.001). Conclusions Three members of the p53 protein family are expressed in KCOTs, and their expression relates to angiogenesis in these tumors. Key words:p53, p63, p73, angiogenesis, keratocystic odontogenic tumors. PMID:27957261

  11. Mutant p53 upregulates alpha-1 antitrypsin expression and promotes invasion in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shakya, R; Tarulli, G A; Sheng, L; Lokman, N A; Ricciardelli, C; Pishas, K I; Selinger, C I; Kohonen-Corish, M R J; Cooper, W A; Turner, A G; Neilsen, P M; Callen, D F

    2017-04-03

    Missense mutations in the TP53 tumor-suppressor gene inactivate its antitumorigenic properties and endow the incipient cells with newly acquired oncogenic properties that drive invasion and metastasis. Although the oncogenic effect of mutant p53 transcriptome has been widely acknowledged, the global influence of mutant p53 on cancer cell proteome remains to be fully elucidated. Here, we show that mutant p53 drives the release of invasive extracellular factors (the ‘secretome’) that facilitates the invasion of lung cancer cell lines. Proteomic characterization of the secretome from mutant p53-inducible H1299 human non-small cell lung cancer cell line discovered that the mutant p53 drives its oncogenic pathways through modulating the gene expression of numerous targets that are subsequently secreted from the cells. Of these genes, alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) was identified as a critical effector of mutant p53 that drives invasion in vitro and in vivo, together with induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition markers expression. Mutant p53 upregulated A1AT transcriptionally through the involvement with its family member p63. Conditioned medium containing secreted A1AT enhanced cell invasion, while an A1AT-blocking antibody attenuated the mutant p53-driven migration and invasion. Importantly, high A1AT expression correlated with increased tumor stage, elevated p53 staining and shorter overall survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients. Collectively, these findings suggest that A1AT is an indispensable target of mutant p53 with prognostic and therapeutic potential in mutant p53-expressing tumors. Oncogene advance online publication, 3 April 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.66.

  12. Suppression of p53 activity through the cooperative action of Ski and histone deacetylase SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasumichi; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Miyazawa, Keiji; Imamura, Takeshi

    2011-02-25

    Ski was originally identified as an oncogene based on the fact that Ski overexpression transformed chicken and quail embryo fibroblasts. Consistent with these proposed oncogenic roles, Ski is overexpressed in various human tumors. However, whether and how Ski functions in mammalian tumorigenesis has not been fully investigated. Here, we show that Ski interacts with p53 and attenuates the biological functions of p53. Ski overexpression attenuated p53-dependent transactivation, whereas Ski knockdown enhanced the transcriptional activity of p53. Interestingly, Ski bound to the histone deacetylase SIRT1 and stabilized p53-SIRT1 interaction to promote p53 deacetylation, which subsequently decreased the DNA binding activity of p53. Consistent with the ability of Ski to inactivate p53, overexpressing Ski desensitized cells to genotoxic drugs and Nutlin-3, a small-molecule antagonist of Mdm2 that stabilizes p53 and activates the p53 pathway, whereas knocking down Ski increased the cellular sensitivity to these agents. These results indicate that Ski negatively regulates p53 and suggest that the p53-Ski-SIRT1 axis is an attractive target for cancer therapy.

  13. The maternal genes Ci-p53/p73-a and Ci-p53/p73-b regulate zygotic ZicL expression and notochord differentiation in Ciona intestinalis embryos.

    PubMed

    Noda, Takeshi

    2011-12-01

    I isolated a Ciona intestinalis homolog of p53, Ci-p53/p73-a, in a microarray screen of rapidly degraded maternal mRNA by comparing the transcriptomes of unfertilized eggs and 32-cell stage embryos. Higher expression of the gene in eggs and lower expression in later embryonic stages were confirmed by whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR); expression was ubiquitous in eggs and early embryos. Knockdown of Ci-p53/p73-a by injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) severely perturbed gastrulation cell movements and expression of notochord marker genes. A key regulator of notochord differentiation in Ciona embryos is Brachyury (Ci-Bra), which is directly activated by a zic-like gene (Ci-ZicL). The expression of Ci-ZicL and Ci-Bra in A-line notochord precursors was downregulated in Ci-p53/p73-a knockdown embryos. Maternal expression of Ci-p53/p73-b, a homolog of Ci-p53/p73-a, was also detected. In Ci-p53/p73-b knockdown embryos, gastrulation cell movements, expression of Ci-ZicL and Ci-Bra in A-line notochord precursors, and expression of notochord marker gene at later stages were perturbed. The upstream region of Ci-ZicL contains putative p53-binding sites. Cis-regulatory analysis of Ci-ZicL showed that these sites are involved in expression of Ci-ZicL in A-line notochord precursors at the 32-cell and early gastrula stages. These results suggest that p53 genes are maternal factors that play a crucial role in A-line notochord differentiation in C. intestinalis embryos by regulating Ci-ZicL expression.

  14. Activated AKT regulates NF-kappaB activation, p53 inhibition and cell survival in HTLV-1-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soo-Jin; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Radonovich, Michael F; Park, Hyeon Ung; Brady, John N

    2005-10-06

    AKT activation enhances resistance to apoptosis and induces cell survival signaling through multiple downstream pathways. We now present evidence that AKT is activated in HTLV-1-transformed cells and that Tax activation of AKT is linked to NF-kappaB activation, p53 inhibition and cell survival. Overexpression of AKT wild type (WT), but not a kinase dead (KD) mutant, resulted in increased Tax-mediated NF-kappaB activation. Blocking AKT with the PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 or AKT SiRNA prevented NF-kappaB activation and inhibition of p53. Treatment of C81 cells with LY294002 resulted in an increase in the p53-responsive gene MDM2, suggesting a role for AKT in the Tax-mediated regulation of p53 transcriptional activity. Further, we show that LY294002 treatment of C81 cells abrogates in vitro IKKbeta phosphorylation of p65 and causes a reduction of p65 Ser-536 phosphorylation in vivo, steps critical to p53 inhibition. Interestingly, blockage of AKT function did not affect IKKbeta phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha in vitro suggesting selective activity of AKT on the IKKbeta complex. Finally, AKT prosurvival function in HTLV-1-transformed cells is linked to expression of Bcl-xL. We suggest that AKT plays a role in the activation of prosurvival pathways in HTLV-1-transformed cells, possibly through NF-kappaB activation and inhibition of p53 transcription activity.

  15. CerS6 Is a Novel Transcriptional Target of p53 Protein Activated by Non-genotoxic Stress.

    PubMed

    Fekry, Baharan; Jeffries, Kristen A; Esmaeilniakooshkghazi, Amin; Ogretmen, Besim; Krupenko, Sergey A; Krupenko, Natalia I

    2016-08-05

    Our previous study suggested that ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6), an enzyme in sphingolipid biosynthesis, is regulated by p53: CerS6 was elevated in several cell lines in response to transient expression of p53 or in response to folate stress, which is known to activate p53. It was not clear, however, whether CerS6 gene is a direct transcriptional target of p53 or whether this was an indirect effect through additional regulatory factors. In the present study, we have shown that the CerS6 promoter is activated by p53 in luciferase assays, whereas transcriptionally inactive R175H p53 mutant failed to induce the luciferase expression from this promoter. In vitro immunoprecipitation assays and gel shift analyses have further demonstrated that purified p53 binds within the CerS6 promoter sequence spanning 91 bp upstream and 60 bp downstream of the transcription start site. The Promo 3.0.2 online tool for the prediction of transcription factor binding sites indicated the presence of numerous putative non-canonical p53 binding motifs in the CerS6 promoter. Luciferase assays and gel shift analysis have identified a single motif upstream of the transcription start as a key p53 response element. Treatment of cells with Nutlin-3 or low concentrations of actinomycin D resulted in a strong elevation of CerS6 mRNA and protein, thus demonstrating that CerS6 is a component of the non-genotoxic p53-dependent cellular stress response. This study has shown that by direct transcriptional activation of CerS6, p53 can regulate specific ceramide biosynthesis, which contributes to the pro-apoptotic cellular response.

  16. Nitric oxide-induced p53 accumulation and regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression by wild-type p53.

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, K; Ambs, S; Lupold, S E; Kapust, R B; Spillare, E A; Weinberg, W C; Felley-Bosco, E; Wang, X W; Geller, D A; Tzeng, E; Billiar, T R; Harris, C C

    1996-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene product p53 plays an important role in the cellular response to DNA damage from exogenous chemical and physical mutagens. Therefore, we hypothesized that p53 performs a similar role in response to putative endogenous mutagens, such as nitric oxide (NO). We report here that exposure of human cells to NO generated from an NO donor or from overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) results in p53 protein accumulation. In addition, expression of wild-type (WT) p53 in a variety of human tumor cell lines, as well as murine fibroblasts, results in down-regulation of NOS2 expression through inhibition of the NOS2 promoter. These data are consistent with the hypothesis of a negative feedback loop in which endogenous NO-induced DNA damage results in WT p53 accumulation and provides a novel mechanism by which p53 safeguards against DNA damage through p53-mediated transrepression of NOS2 gene expression, thus reducing the potential for NO-induced DNA damage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8637893

  17. TAp73 promotes cell survival upon genotoxic stress by inhibiting p53 activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongshi; Ming, Lihua; Zou, Fangdong; Peng, Ye; Houten, Bennett Van; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    p53 plays a key role in regulating DNA damage response by suppressing cell cycle progression or inducing apoptosis depending on extent of DNA damage. However, it is not clear why mild genotoxic stress favors growth arrest, whereas excessive lesions signal cells to die. Here we showed that TAp73, a p53 homologue thought to have a similar function as p53, restrains the transcriptional activity of p53 and prevents excessive activation of its downstream targets upon low levels of DNA damage, which results in cell cycle arrest. Extensive DNA damage triggers TAp73 depletion through ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated degradation of E2F1, leading to enhanced transcriptional activation by p53 and subsequent induction of apoptosis. These findings provide novel insights into the regulation of p53 function and suggest that TAp73 keeps p53 activity in check in regulating cell fate decisions upon genotoxic stress. PMID:25237903

  18. Molecular Signature of HPV-Induced Carcinogenesis: pRb, p53 and Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Pérez, Águeda; Garaulet, Guillermo; Vázquez-Carballo, Ana; Paramio, Jesús M; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2009-01-01

    The infection by mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with tumor development in cervix and oropharynx. The mechanisms responsible for this oncogenic potential are mainly due to the product activities of two early viral oncogenes: E6 and E7. Although a large number of cellular targets have been described for both oncoproteins, the interaction with tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma protein (pRb) emerged as the key functional activities. E6 degrades tumor suppressor p53, thus inhibiting p53-dependent functions, whereas E7 binds and degrades pRb, allowing the transcription of E2F-dependent genes. Since these two tumor suppressors exert their actions through transcriptional modulation, functional genomics has provided a large body of data that reflects the altered gene expression of HPVinfected cells or tissues. Here we will review the similarities and differences of these findings, and we also compare them with those obtained with transgenic mouse models bearing the deletion of some of the viral oncogene targets. The comparative analysis supports molecular evidences about the role of oncogenes E6 and E7 in the interference with the mentioned cellular functions, and also suggests that the mentioned transgenic mice can be used as models for HPV-associated diseases such as human cervical, oropharynx, and skin carcinomas. PMID:19721808

  19. Molecular Signature of HPV-Induced Carcinogenesis: pRb, p53 and Gene Expression Profiling.

    PubMed

    Buitrago-Pérez, Agueda; Garaulet, Guillermo; Vázquez-Carballo, Ana; Paramio, Jesús M; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2009-03-01

    The infection by mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with tumor development in cervix and oropharynx. The mechanisms responsible for this oncogenic potential are mainly due to the product activities of two early viral oncogenes: E6 and E7. Although a large number of cellular targets have been described for both oncoproteins, the interaction with tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma protein (pRb) emerged as the key functional activities. E6 degrades tumor suppressor p53, thus inhibiting p53-dependent functions, whereas E7 binds and degrades pRb, allowing the transcription of E2F-dependent genes. Since these two tumor suppressors exert their actions through transcriptional modulation, functional genomics has provided a large body of data that reflects the altered gene expression of HPVinfected cells or tissues. Here we will review the similarities and differences of these findings, and we also compare them with those obtained with transgenic mouse models bearing the deletion of some of the viral oncogene targets. The comparative analysis supports molecular evidences about the role of oncogenes E6 and E7 in the interference with the mentioned cellular functions, and also suggests that the mentioned transgenic mice can be used as models for HPV-associated diseases such as human cervical, oropharynx, and skin carcinomas.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C targets p53 and modulates its transcriptional and apoptotic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Fuming; Saha, Abhik; Murakami, Masanao; Kumar, Pankaj; Knight, Jason S.; Cai Qiliang; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Robertson, Erle S.

    2009-06-05

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancers and the corresponding encoded protein induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest at the G1/S checkpoint in response to DNA damage. To date, previous studies have shown that antigens encoded by human tumor viruses such as SV40 large T antigen, adenovirus E1A and HPV E6 interact with p53 and disrupt its functional activity. In a similar fashion, we now show that EBNA3C, one of the EBV latent antigens essential for the B-cell immortalization in vitro, interacts directly with p53. Additionally, we mapped the interaction of EBNA3C with p53 to the C-terminal DNA-binding and the tetramerization domain of p53, and the region of EBNA3C responsible for binding to p53 was mapped to the N-terminal domain of EBNA3C (residues 130-190), previously shown to interact with a number of important cell-cycle components, specifically SCF{sup Skp2}, cyclin A, and cMyc. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EBNA3C substantially represses the transcriptional activity of p53 in luciferase based reporter assays, and rescues apoptosis induced by ectopic p53 expression in SAOS-2 (p53{sup -/-}) cells. Interestingly, we also show that the DNA-binding ability of p53 is diminished in the presence of EBNA3C. Thus, the interaction between the p53 and EBNA3C provides new insights into the mechanism(s) by which the EBNA3C oncoprotein can alter cellular gene expression in EBV associated human cancers.

  1. Construction and expression of a bispecific single-chain antibody that penetrates mutant p53 colon cancer cells and binds p53.

    PubMed

    Weisbart, Richard H; Wakelin, Rika; Chan, Grace; Miller, Carl W; Koeffler, Phillip H

    2004-10-01

    A bispecific, single-chain antibody Fv fragment (Bs-scFv) was constructed from a single-chain Fv fragment of mAb 3E10 that penetrates living cells and localizes in the nucleus, and a single-chain Fv fragment of a non-penetrating antibody, mAb PAb421 that binds the C-terminal of p53. PAb421 binding restores wild-type functions of some p53 mutants, including those of SW480 human colon cancer cells. The Bs-scFv penetrated SW480 cells and was cytotoxic, suggesting an ability to restore activity to mutant p53. COS-7 cells (monkey kidney cells with wild-type p53) served as a control since they are unresponsive to PAb421 due to the presence of SV40 large T antigen that inhibits binding of PAb421 to p53. Bs-scFv penetrated COS-7 cells but was not cytotoxic, thereby eliminating non-specific toxicity of Bs-scFv unrelated to binding p53. A single mutation in CDR1 of PAb421 VH eliminated binding of the Bs-scFv to p53 and abrogated cytotoxicity for SW480 cells without altering cellular penetration, further supporting the requirement of PAb421 binding to p53 for cytotoxicity. Our study demonstrates the use of an antibody that penetrates living cells in the design of a bispecific single chain antibody to target and restore the function of an intracellular protein.

  2. Evaluation of p53 protein expression as a marker for long-term prognosis in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, J. W.; Baas, I. O.; Polak, M. M.; Goodman, S. N.; Offerhaus, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Mutation of the p53 gene is reported to be of prognostic importance in colorectal carcinomas. Immunohistochemical staining of the accumulated p53 gene product may be a simple alternative for p53 mutation analysis. Previous studies addressing the prognostic importance of p53 expression, however, yielded contradictory results. Therefore, we evaluated the importance of p53 expression as a marker for long-term prognosis in a well-characterised study population of 109 colorectal carcinomas. After antigen retrieval with target unmasking fluid (TUF), immunostaining of p53 was performed with both monoclonal antibody DO7 and polyclonal antibody CM1. Objective quantification of the p53 signal was assessed by a computerised image analyser. p53 expression was higher in non-mucinous tumours than in mucinous tumours (p53 labelling index = 30% and 17% respectively, P = 0.05), and in metastatic tumours compared with non-metastatic tumours (p53 labelling index = 37% and 22% respectively, P = 0.05). Other histopathological features were not related to p53 expression. In multivariate analysis, Dukes' stage (P = 0.02) and histological grade (P = 0.05) stood out as independent markers for prognosis. p53 expression was not an independent marker for prognosis. At present, p53 expression is not a useful marker for long-term prognosis. Further insight into the relationship between p53 mutations and p53 expression is needed to elucidate more precisely the clinical relevance of p53 alterations. PMID:7779721

  3. Magnetite Nanoparticles Inhibit Tumor Growth and Upregulate the Expression of P53/P16 in Ehrlich Solid Carcinoma Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bassiony, Heba; Sabet, Salwa; Salah El-Din, Taher A.; Mohamed, Mona M.; El-Ghor, Akmal A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) have been widely used as contrast agents and have promising approaches in cancer treatment. In the present study we used Ehrlich solid carcinoma (ESC) bearing mice as a model to investigate MNPs antitumor activity, their effect on expression of p53 and p16 genes as an indicator for apoptotic induction in tumor tissues. Method MNPs coated with ascorbic acid (size: 25.0±5.0 nm) were synthesized by co-precipitation method and characterized. Ehrlich mice model were treated with MNPs using 60 mg/Kg day by day for 14 injections; intratumorally (IT) or intraperitoneally (IP). Tumor size, pathological changes and iron content in tumor and normal muscle tissues were assessed. We also assessed changes in expression levels of p53 and p16 genes in addition to p53 protein level by immunohistochemistry. Results Our results revealed that tumor growth was significantly reduced by IT and IP MNPs injection compared to untreated tumor. A significant increase in p53 and p16 mRNA expression was detected in Ehrlich solid tumors of IT and IP treated groups compared to untreated Ehrlich solid tumor. This increase was accompanied with increase in p53 protein expression. It is worth mentioning that no significant difference in expression of p53 and p16 could be detected between IT ESC and control group. Conclusion MNPs might be more effective in breast cancer treatment if injected intratumorally to be directed to the tumor tissues. PMID:25375144

  4. Ki67, p27 and p53 Expression in Squamous Epithelial Lesions of Larynx.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Debashri; Saha, Kaushik; Datta, Chhanda; Chatterjee, Uttara; Sengupta, Arunabho

    2013-04-01

    Precise assessment of the biological behavior and progression of squamous epithelial lesions of the larynx with a view to predict the prognosis and therapeutic challenges remains an elusive goal. The knowledge and data regarding the expression of proliferative markers indicating the biological activity in different histological grades of squamous epithelial lesions are lacking till date. To evaluate the relationship between Ki67, p27 and p53 expression as well as topographic distribution of Ki67 with the histological subtypes or grades of laryngeal squamous intraepithelial and invasive lesions. Sixty-two consecutive cases with histologically documented intraepithelial and invasive squamous lesion were studied for Ki67, p27 and p53 expression. Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman's correlation tests were used for statistical analysis. The mean Ki67 labeling index in hyperplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma were 12.15, 22.03 and 35.53 % respectively and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). There was strong positive correlation between Ki67 labeling index and increasing grades of squamous lesions. p27 expression was progressively decreased and p53 expression was progressively increased as the lesions progressed from hyperplasia to dysplasia and dysplasia to carcinoma. The topographic distribution of Ki67 positive cells increased with progressive grades of dysplasia. The Ki67 labeling index correlates well with the histological grade of both intraepithelial and invasive lesions of the larynx. And the topographic distribution of Ki67 expression depends on the grade of the dysplasia. Hence, Ki67 expression has a definite role in predicting the biological behavior of the lesions.

  5. Increases in apoptosis, caspase activity and expression of p53 and bax, and the transition between two types of mitochondrion-rich cells, in the gills of the climbing perch, Anabas testudineus, during a progressive acclimation from freshwater to seawater

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Biyun; Chen, Xiu L.; Yong, Jing H. A.; Wilson, Jonathan M.; Hiong, Kum C.; Sim, Eugene W. L.; Wong, Wai P.; Lam, Siew H.; Chew, Shit F.; Ip, Yuen K.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis that branchial osmoregulatory acclimation involved increased apoptosis and replacement of mitochdonrion-rich cells (MRCs) in the climbing perch, Anabas testudineus, during a progressive acclimation from freshwater to seawater. A significant increase in branchial caspase-3/-7 activity was observed on day 4 (salinity 20), and an extensive TUNEL-positive apoptosis was detected on day 5 (salinity 25), indicating salinity-induced apoptosis had occurred. This was further supported by an up-regulation of branchial mRNA expression of p53, a key regulator of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, between day 2 (salinity 10) and day 6 (seawater), and an increase in branchial p53 protein abundance on day 6. Seawater acclimation apparently activated both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, as reflected by significant increases in branchial caspase-8 and caspase-9 activities. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was confirmed by the significant increase in branchial mRNA expression of bax between day 4 (salinity 20) and day 6 (seawater). Western blotting results revealed the presence of a freshwater Na+/K+-ATPase (Nka) α-isoform, Nka α1a, and a seawater isoform, Nka α1b, the protein abundance of which decreased and increased, respectively, during seawater acclimation. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed the presence of two types of MRCs distinctly different in sizes, and confirmed that the reduction in Nka α1a expression, and the prominent increases in expression of Nka α1b, Na+:K+:2Cl− cotransporter 1, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl− channel coincided with the salinity-induced apoptotic event. Since modulation of existing MRCs alone could not have led to extensive salinity-induced apoptosis, it is probable that some, if not all, freshwater-type MRCs could have been removed through increased apoptosis and subsequently replaced by seawater-type MRCs in the gills of A. testudineus during seawater

  6. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Matthias R.; Joerger, Andreas C.; Fersht, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53’s oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1MET(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells. PMID:27551077

  7. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells.

  8. A p53-independent role of Mdm2 in estrogen-mediated activation of breast cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Estrogen receptor positive breast cancers often have high levels of Mdm2. We investigated if estrogen signaling in such breast cancers occurred through an Mdm2 mediated pathway with subsequent inactivation of p53. Methods We examined the effect of long-term 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment (five days) on the p53-Mdm2 pathway in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positive breast cancer cell lines that contain wild-type p53 (MCF-7 and ZR75-1). We assessed the influence of estrogen by examining cell proliferation changes, activation of transcription of p53 target genes, p53-chromatin interactions and cell cycle profile changes. To determine the effects of Mdm2 and p53 knockdown on the estrogen-mediated proliferation signals we generated MCF-7 cell lines with inducible shRNA for mdm2 or p53 and monitored their influence on estrogen-mediated outcomes. To further address the p53-independent effect of Mdm2 in ERα positive breast cancer we generated cell lines with inducible shRNA to mdm2 using the mutant p53 expressing cell line T-47D. Results Estrogen increased the Mdm2 protein level in MCF-7 cells without decreasing the p53 protein level. After estrogen treatment of MCF-7 cells, down-regulation of basal transcription of p53 target genes puma and p21 was observed. Estrogen treatment also down-regulated etoposide activated transcription of puma, but not p21. Mdm2 knockdown in MCF-7 cells increased p21 mRNA and protein, decreased cell growth in 3D matrigel and also decreased estrogen-induced cell proliferation in 2D culture. In contrast, knockdown of p53 had no effect on estrogen-induced cell proliferation. In T-47D cells with mutant p53, the knockdown of Mdm2 decreased estrogen-mediated cell proliferation but did not increase p21 protein. Conclusions Estrogen-induced breast cancer cell proliferation required a p53-independent role of Mdm2. The combined influence of genetic and environmental factors on the tumor promoting effects of estrogen implicated Mdm2 as a

  9. Characterization and expression pattern of p53 during spermatogenesis in the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Cong-Cong; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2013-02-01

    p53, as a "Guardian of the Genome", plays an important role in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair and inhibition of angiogenesis in different tissues including testis. p53 gene and its protein perform many essential roles for mammalian spermatogenesis. To explore its functions during spermatogenesis in Eriocheir sinensis, we have cloned and sequenced the cDNA (1,218 bp) of p53 from the testis by degenerating primer PCR and rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. The protein alignment of p53 shows the conserved DNA binding domain, dimerization site and zinc binding site consisted of the predicted structures. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that p53 was more closer to Marsupenaeus japonicus and Tigriopus japonicus than other examined species. Tissue expression analysis of p53 mRNA showed p53 was distinctly expressed in accessory sexual gland, muscle, gill, heart, hepatopancreas and testis. In situ hybridization revealed that the p53 mRNA was weakly distributed around the nucleus, but stronger in the invaginated acrosomal tubule at the early stage. At the middle stage, p53 mRNA signal was increased than the early stage and the signal displayed dot-like pattern on the surface of cup-like nucleus. The signal on acrosomal cap is stronger than on the acrosomal tubule, despite acrosomal tubule signal was also distinct. At the late stage, the signal was still mainly located in acrosomal cap and acrosomal tubule. Sporadic signal were found surrounding the cup-like nucleus, but they were very weak. In the mature sperm, the signal was dramatically decreased. Even though the signal on cup-like nucleus and acrosomal tubule were distinct, they were weaker than those in middle stage. Based on these results, we concluded that p53 may play an important role in formation of acrosome biogenesis and nuclear shaping during spermiogenesis of E. sinensis.

  10. Requirement for MLL3 in p53 regulation of hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner and bile acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kim, Juhee; Lee, Jae W

    2011-12-01

    The histone H3-lysine-4 methyltransferase mixed-lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3) belongs to a large complex that functions as a coactivator of multiple transcription factors, including the bile acid (BA)-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a critical player in BA homeostasis. BA-activated FXR induces hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP), which in turn suppresses expression of BA synthesis genes, Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1. Thus, MLL3(Δ/Δ) mice that express a catalytically inactive mutant form of MLL3 display increased BA levels. Recently, we have discovered a distinct regulatory pathway for BA homeostasis, in which p53 independently up-regulates SHP expression in the liver. Here, we show that the MLL3 complex is also essential for p53 transactivation of SHP. Although activated p53 signaling in MLL3(+/+) mice results in decreased BA levels through hepatic up-regulation of SHP, these changes are abolished in MLL3(Δ/Δ) mice. For both HepG2 cells and mouse liver, we also demonstrate that p53 directs the recruitment of different components of the MLL3 complex to the p53-response elements of SHP and that p53-dependent H3-lysine-4-trimethylation of SHP requires MLL3. From these results, we conclude that both FXR- and p53-dependent regulatory pathways for SHP expression in BA homeostasis require the MLL3 complex; thus, the MLL3 complex is likely a master regulator of BA homeostasis. Using a common coregulator complex for multiple transcription factors, which independently control expression of the same gene, might be a prevalent theme in gene regulation and may also play critical roles in assigning a specific biological function to a coregulator complex.

  11. Expression of p53 in preneoplastic and early neoplastic bronchial lesions.

    PubMed

    Martin, B; Verdebout, J-M; Mascaux, C; Paesmans, M; Rouas, G; Verhest, A; Ninane, V; Sculier, J-P

    2002-01-01

    p53 alteration has been reported to be an early event in bronchial carcinogenesis. Our study purpose was to determine the rate of p53 expression in the various preneoplastic and early neoplastic bronchial lesions obtained by biopsy during fluorescence bronchoscopy and to analyse its association with patients characteristics. Various stages of preneoplastic lesions as well as radio-occult lung cancer were studied in biopsies obtained by fluorescence bronchoscopy. We assessed the expression of p53 by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody clone DO7. The p53 expression was considered as positive if > or = 1% of cells were positive and the level of positivity was expressed in percentage of positive cells. Fourteen patients were included in each category of preneoplastic lesions. At the threshold of 1% of positive cells p53 expression was observed in 28.5% of the patients with a histologically normal epithelium. This number of positive patients increased with the severity of preneoplastic lesions and reached 100% in the mild dysplasia. The mean rates of p53 positive cells for normal epithelium, hyperplasia, metaplasia, mild and severe dysplasia, carcinoma in situ and invasive radio-occult carcinoma were respectively 0.9, 3.4, 9.1, 20.5, 50.2, 34.7 and 42.5%. There was no statistically significant correlation between p53 expression and patient characteristics such as sex, age, smoking habits and indication for fluorescence bronchoscopy. The alteration of p53 expression in patients with high risk of lung cancer was an early event: this abnormality increased with the severity of the lesions, without significant correlation with patient characteristics.

  12. p53 expression and its relationship to DNA alterations in bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Wadayama, B.; Toguchida, J.; Yamaguchi, T.; Sasaki, M. S.; Yamamuro, T.

    1993-01-01

    The p53 gene is one of the best studied tumour suppressor genes. Recently we performed mutation analysis on the p53 gene in a large number of bone and soft tissue sarcomas, and found that approximately one-third of the sarcomas have some type of DNA alteration at the p53 locus (Toguchida et al., 1992). However, the expression of the p53 protein resulting from these alterations still remains to be clarified. In this study, p53 expression in the sarcoma tissues was analysed immunohistochemically using antibody PAb421 (Oncogene Science) and its relationship to DNA alterations was examined. Of 113 tumours, 29 (25.7%) showed positive staining for the p53 protein. These included 19 of 67 osteosarcomas, five of 20 chondrosarcomas, four of 11 malignant fibrous histiocytomas (MFHs) and one Ewing's sarcoma. In chondrosarcomas, most of the p53-positive tumours belonged to highly malignant and atypical tumour types (dedifferentiated or mesenchymal type), suggesting a role for p53 mutation in the progression of cartilaginous tumours. All the cases with a missense mutation showed strongly positive staining, while no immunoreactivity was observed in the remaining three-quarters with DNA alterations including gross rearrangement, frame-shift mutation, nonsense mutation or mutation at splicing site except in one case. These results demonstrated the dominance of the p53 mutations with null protein expression in bone and soft tissue sarcomas, showing a unique characteristic of these types of tumours compared with other malignancies such as colon carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8260365

  13. LASS5 Interacts with SDHB and Synergistically Represses p53 and p21 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z.; Li, F.; Wan, Y.; Han, Z.; Yuan, W.; Cao, L.; Deng, Y.; Peng, X.; Chen, F.; Fan, X.; Liu, X.; Dai, G.; Wang, Y.; Zeng, Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Chen, Y.; Xu, W.; Luo, S.; Chen, S.; Ye, X.; Mo, X.; Wu, X.; Li, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Longevity Assurance 5 (LASS5), a member of the LASS/Ceramide Synthases family, synthesizes C16-ceramide and is implicated in tumor biology. However, its precise role is not yet well understood. A yeast two-hybrid screen was performed using a human cDNA library to identify potential LASS5-interaction partners. One identified clone encodes succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB). Mammalian two-hybrid assays showed that LASS5 interacts with SDHB, and the result was also confirmed by GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. The C-terminal fragment of SDHB was required for the interaction. LASS5 and SDHB were co-localized in COS-7 cells. LASS5 and SDHB expressions were found to be up-regulated in neuroglioma tissue. Transfection assays showed that LASS5 or SDHB expression repressed p53 or p21 reporter activity, respectively. Simultaneous LASS5 and SDHB expression resulted in stronger repression of p53 and p21 reporter activity, suggesting that LASS5 and SDHB interaction may synergistically affect transcriptional regulation of p53 and p21. Our data provide new molecular insights into potential roles of LASS5 and SDHB in tumor biology. PMID:27280497

  14. Extensive Post-translational Modification of Active and Inactivated Forms of Endogenous p53*

    PubMed Central

    DeHart, Caroline J.; Chahal, Jasdave S.; Flint, S. J.; Perlman, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein accumulates to very high concentrations in normal human fibroblasts infected by adenovirus type 5 mutants that cannot direct assembly of the viral E1B 55-kDa protein-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets p53 for degradation. Despite high concentrations of nuclear p53, the p53 transcriptional program is not induced in these infected cells. We exploited this system to examine select post-translational modifications (PTMs) present on a transcriptionally inert population of endogenous human p53, as well as on p53 activated in response to etoposide treatment of normal human fibroblasts. These forms of p53 were purified from whole cell lysates by means of immunoaffinity chromatography and SDS-PAGE, and peptides derived from them were subjected to nano-ultra-high-performance LC-MS and MS/MS analyses on a high-resolution accurate-mass MS platform (data available via ProteomeXchange, PXD000464). We identified an unexpectedly large number of PTMs, comprising phosphorylation of Ser and Thr residues, methylation of Arg residues, and acetylation, ubiquitinylation, and methylation of Lys residues—for example, some 150 previously undescribed modifications of p53 isolated from infected cells. These modifications were distributed across all functional domains of both forms of the endogenous human p53 protein, as well as those of an orthologous population of p53 isolated from COS-1 cells. Despite the differences in activity, including greater in vitro sequence-specific DNA binding activity exhibited by p53 isolated from etoposide-treated cells, few differences were observed in the location, nature, or relative frequencies of PTMs on the two populations of human p53. Indeed, the wealth of PTMs that we have identified is consistent with a far greater degree of complex, combinatorial regulation of p53 by PTM than previously anticipated. PMID:24056736

  15. Unequal prognostic potentials of p53 gain-of-function mutations in human cancers associate with drug-metabolizing activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Wang, J; Hu, Y; Qian, J; Xu, B; Chen, H; Zou, W; Fang, J-Y

    2014-03-06

    Mutation of p53 is the most common genetic change in human cancer, causing complex effects including not only loss of wild-type function but also gain of novel oncogenic functions (GOF). It is increasingly likely that p53-hotspot mutations may confer different types and magnitudes of GOF, but the evidences are mainly supported by cellular and transgenic animal models. Here we combine large-scale cancer genomic data to characterize the prognostic significance of different p53 mutations in human cancers. Unexpectedly, only mutations on the Arg248 and Arg282 positions displayed significant association with shorter patient survival, but such association was not evident for other hotspot GOF mutations. Gene set enrichment analysis on these mutations revealed higher activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes, including the CYP3A4 cytochrome P450. Ectopic expression of p53 mutant R282W in H1299 and SaOS2 cells significantly upregulated CYP3A4 mRNA and protein levels, and cancer cell lines bearing mortality-associated p53 mutations display higher CYP3A4 expression and resistance to several CYP3A4-metabolized chemotherapeutic drugs. Our results suggest that p53 mutations have unequal GOF activities in human cancers, and future evaluation of p53 as a cancer biomarker should consider which mutation is present in the tumor, rather than having comparison between wild-type and mutant genotypes.

  16. Alpha-particle-induced p53 protein expression in a rat lung epithelial cell strain.

    PubMed

    Hickman, A W; Jaramillo, R J; Lechner, J F; Johnson, N F

    1994-11-15

    Other investigators have shown that both sparsely ionizing and UV radiation cause cell cycle arrest that is associated with increased expression of wild-type p53 protein. The effect of exposure to alpha-particles from 238Pu on the induction of the p53 protein has now been examined in cultured lung epithelial cells derived from male F344 rats. The number of cells having increased levels of p53 protein was determined by flow cytometry after the cells had been stained with a monoclonal antibody to p53. alpha-Particle irradiation caused a dose-dependent increase in p53 protein levels detectable at doses as low as 0.6 cGy, with no evidence of a threshold. An increase in p53 protein also occurred in X-irradiated cells. However, no increase was seen in cells exposed to less than 10 cGy of X-rays, indicating the existence of a relatively higher DNA damage threshold for sparsely ionizing radiation. In addition, more cells exposed to low doses of alpha radiation had increased p53 protein levels than would be predicted based on the number of nuclei expected to be traversed by an alpha-particle, suggesting that alpha-particles cause genetic damage by mechanisms in addition to direct interactions with DNA.

  17. Dynamic roles of p53-mediated metabolic activities in ROS-induced stress responses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Le; Hickman, Justin H; Wang, Shang-Jui; Gu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a multifaceted polypeptide that impedes tumorigenesis by regulating a diverse array of cellular processes. Triggered by a wide variety of stress stimuli, p53 transcriptionally regulates genes involved in the canonical tumor suppression pathways of apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and senescence. We recently discovered a novel mechanism whereby p53 inhibits cystine uptake through repression of the SLC7A11 gene to mediate ferroptosis. Importantly, this p53-SLC7A11 axis is preserved in the p53(3KR) mutant, and contributes to its ability to suppress tumorigenesis in the absence of the classical tumor suppression mechanisms. Here, we report that wild type p53 can induce both apoptosis and ferroptosis upon reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate that p53's functional N-terminal domain is required for its capacity to regulate oxidative stress responses and ferroptosis. Notably, activated p53 dynamically modulates intracellular ROS, causing an initial reduction and a subsequent increase of ROS levels. Taken together, these data implicate ferroptosis as an additional component of the cell death program induced by wild type p53 in human cancer cells, and reveal a complex and dynamic role of p53 in oxidative stress responses.

  18. Wild-type p53 induces diverse effects in 32D cells expressing different oncogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Soddu, S; Blandino, G; Scardigli, R; Martinelli, R; Rizzo, M G; Crescenzi, M; Sacchi, A

    1996-01-01

    Expression of exogenous wild-type (wt) p53 in different leukemia cell lines can induce growth arrest, apoptotic cell death, or cell differentiation. The hematopoietic cell lines that have been used so far to study wt p53 functions have in common the characteristic of not expressing endogenous p53. However, the mechanisms involved in the transformation of these cells are different, and the cells are at different stages of tumor progression. It can be postulated that each type of neoplastic cell offers a particular environment in which p53 might generate different effects. To test this hypothesis, we introduced individual oncogenes into untransformed, interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent myeloid precursor 32D cells to have a single transforming agent at a time. The effects induced by wt p53 overexpression were subsequently evaluated in each oncogene-expressing 32D derivative. We found that in not fully transformed, v-ras-expressing 32D cells, as already shown for the parental 32D cells, overexpression of the wt p53 gene caused no phenotypic changes and no reduction of the proliferative rate as long as the cells were maintained in their normal culture conditions (presence of IL-3 and serum). An accelerated rate of apoptosis was observed after IL-3 withdrawal. In contrast, in transformed, IL-3-independent 32D cells, wt p53 overexpression induced different effects. The v-abl-transformed cells manifested a reduction in growth rate, while the v-src-transformed cells underwent monocytic differentiation. These results show that the phenotype effects of wt p53 action(s) can vary as a function of the cellular environment. PMID:8552075

  19. Exercise Activates p53 and Negatively Regulates IGF-1 Pathway in Epidermis within a Skin Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Miao; King, Brenee; Ewert, Emily; Su, Xiaoyu; Mardiyati, Nur; Zhao, Zhihui; Wang, Weiqun

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been previously reported to lower cancer risk through reducing circulating IGF-1 and IGF-1-dependent signaling in a mouse skin cancer model. This study aims to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which exercise may down-regulate the IGF-1 pathway via p53 and p53-related regulators in the skin epidermis. Female SENCAR mice were pair-fed an AIN-93 diet with or without 10-week treadmill exercise at 20 m/min, 60 min/day and 5 days/week. Animals were topically treated with TPA 2 hours before sacrifice and the target proteins in the epidermis were analyzed by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Under TPA or vehicle treatment, MDM2 expression was significantly reduced in exercised mice when compared with sedentary control. Meanwhile, p53 was significantly elevated. In addition, p53-transcriptioned proteins, i.e., p21, IGFBP-3, and PTEN, increased in response to exercise. There was a synergy effect between exercise and TPA on the decreased MDM2 and increased p53, but not p53-transcripted proteins. Taken together, exercise appeared to activate p53, resulting in enhanced expression of p21, IGFBP-3, and PTEN that might induce a negative regulation of IGF-1 pathway and thus contribute to the observed cancer prevention by exercise in this skin cancer model. PMID:27509024

  20. Exercise Activates p53 and Negatively Regulates IGF-1 Pathway in Epidermis within a Skin Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; King, Brenee; Ewert, Emily; Su, Xiaoyu; Mardiyati, Nur; Zhao, Zhihui; Wang, Weiqun

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been previously reported to lower cancer risk through reducing circulating IGF-1 and IGF-1-dependent signaling in a mouse skin cancer model. This study aims to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which exercise may down-regulate the IGF-1 pathway via p53 and p53-related regulators in the skin epidermis. Female SENCAR mice were pair-fed an AIN-93 diet with or without 10-week treadmill exercise at 20 m/min, 60 min/day and 5 days/week. Animals were topically treated with TPA 2 hours before sacrifice and the target proteins in the epidermis were analyzed by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Under TPA or vehicle treatment, MDM2 expression was significantly reduced in exercised mice when compared with sedentary control. Meanwhile, p53 was significantly elevated. In addition, p53-transcriptioned proteins, i.e., p21, IGFBP-3, and PTEN, increased in response to exercise. There was a synergy effect between exercise and TPA on the decreased MDM2 and increased p53, but not p53-transcripted proteins. Taken together, exercise appeared to activate p53, resulting in enhanced expression of p21, IGFBP-3, and PTEN that might induce a negative regulation of IGF-1 pathway and thus contribute to the observed cancer prevention by exercise in this skin cancer model.

  1. A novel anticancer therapy that simultaneously targets aberrant p53 and Notch activities in tumors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuting; Wang, Li; Zhang, He; Wang, Haibo; Zhao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yidan; Zhang, Leilei; Fan, Xianqun; Qian, Guanxiang; Hu, Ji-Fan; Ge, Shengfang

    2012-01-01

    Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in tumorigenesis by maintaining the activity of self-renewal of cancer stem cells, and therefore, it is hypothesized that interference of Notch signaling may inhibit tumor formation and progression. H101 is a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus that is cytolytic in cells lacking intact p53, but it is unable to eradicate caner stem cells. In this study, we tested a new strategy of tumor gene therapy by combining a Notch1-siRNA with H101 oncolytic adenovirus. In HeLa-S3 tumor cells, the combined therapy blocked the Notch pathway and induced apoptosis in tumors that are p53-inactive. In nude mice bearing xenograft tumors derived from HeLa-S3 cells, the combination of H101/Notch1-siRNA therapies inhibited tumor growth. Moreover, Notch1-siRNA increased Hexon gene expression at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, and promoted H101 replication in tumors, thereby enhancing the oncolytic activity of H101. These data demonstrate the feasibility to combine H101 p53-targted oncolysis and anti-Notch siRNA activities as a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  2. Expression profiling of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with perineural invasion implicates the p53 pathway in the process

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Timothy A.; Broit, Natasa; Simmons, Jacinta L.; Pierce, Carly J.; Chawla, Sharad; Lambie, Duncan L. J.; Quagliotto, Gary; Brown, Ian S.; Parsons, Peter G.; Panizza, Benedict J.; Boyle, Glen M.

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common cancer worldwide and accounts for approximately 30% of all keratinocyte cancers. The vast majority of cutaneous SCCs of the head and neck (cSCCHN) are readily curable with surgery and/or radiotherapy unless high-risk features are present. Perineural invasion (PNI) is recognized as one of these high-risk features. The molecular changes during clinical PNI in cSCCHN have not been previously investigated. In this study, we assessed the global gene expression differences between cSCCHN with or without incidental or clinical PNI. The results of the analysis showed signatures of gene expression representative of activation of p53 in tumors with PNI compared to tumors without, amongst other alterations. Immunohistochemical staining of p53 showed cSCCHN with clinical PNI to be more likely to exhibit a diffuse over-expression pattern, with no tumors showing normal p53 staining. DNA sequencing of cSCCHN samples with clinical PNI showed no difference in mutation number or position with samples without PNI, however a significant difference was observed in regulators of p53 degradation, stability and activity. Our results therefore suggest that cSCCHN with clinical PNI may be more likely to contain alterations in the p53 pathway, compared to cSCCHN without PNI. PMID:27665737

  3. Senescence Process in Primary Wilms' Tumor Cell Culture Induced by p53 Independent p21 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Theerakitthanakul, Korkiat; Saetang, Jirakrit; Kruatong, Jirasak; Graidist, Potchanapond; Raungrut, Pritsana; Kayasut, Kanita; Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is an embryonal tumor occurring in developing kidney tissue. WT cells showing invasive cancer characteristics, also retain renal stem cell behaviours. In-vitro culture of WT is hampered by limited replicative potential. This study aimed to establish a longterm culture of WT cells to enable the study of molecular events to attempt to explain its cellular senescence. Methods: Primary cell cultures from fresh WT tumor specimen were established. Of 5 cultures tried, only 1 could be propagated for more than 7 passages. One culture, identified as PSU-SK-1, could be maintained > 35 passages and was then subjected to molecular characterization and evaluation for cancer characteristics. The cells consistently harbored concomitant mutations of CTNNB1 (Ser45Pro) and WT1 (Arg413Stop) thorough the cultivation. On Transwell invasion assays, the cells exhibited migration and invasion at 55% and 27% capability of the lung cancer cells, A549. On gelatin zymography, PSU-SK-1 showed high expression of the matrix metaloproteinase. The cells exhibited continuous proliferation with 24-hour doubling time until passages 28-30 when the growth slowed, showing increased cell size, retention of cells in G1/S proportion and positive β-galactosidase staining. As with those evidence of senescence in advanced cell passages, expression of p21 and cyclin D1 increased when the expression of β-catenin and its downstream protein, TCF, declined. There was also loss-of-expression of p53 in this cell line. In conclusion, cellular senescence was responsible for limited proliferation in the primary culture of WT, which was also associated with increased expression of p21 and was independent of p53 expression. Decreased activation of the Wnt signalling might explain the induction of p21 expression. PMID:27698927

  4. Cisplatin induced apoptosis of ovarian cancer A2780s cells by activation of ERK/p53/PUMA signals.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Wei, Mei; Liu, Wenfen; Shen, Shulin; Li, Jiaqun; Wang, Liming

    2017-03-13

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is one of the most effective anticancer agents widely used in the treatment of solid tumors, including ovarian cancer. It is generally considered as a cytotoxic drug which kills cancer cells by causing DNA damage, and subsequently inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to cell apoptosis remain obscure. In this study, the signaling pathways involved in CDDP -induced apoptosis were examined using CDDP-sensitive ovarian cancer A2780s cells. A2780s cells were treated with CDDP (1.5-3 μg/ml) for 6 h, 12 h and 24 h. Using siRNA targeting P53 and PUMA, and a selective MEK inhibitor, PD98059 to examine the relation between ERK1/2 activation, p53 and PUMA expression after exposure to CDDP, and the effect on CDDP-induced apoptosis. The results shown that treatment of A2780s cells with CDDP (3 μg/ml) for 6-24 h induced apoptosis, resulting in the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and accumulation of p53 and PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) protein. Knockdown of P53 or PUMA by siRNA transfection blocked CDDP-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of ERK1/2 using PD98059, a selective MEK inhibitor, blocked the apoptotic cell death but prevented CDDP-induced accumulation of p53 and PUMA. Knockdown of P53 by siRNA transfection also blocked CDDP-induced accumulation of PUMA. We therefore concluded that CDDP activated ERK1/2 and induced-p53-dependent PUMA upregulation, resulting in triggering apoptosis in A2780s cells. Our study clearly demonstrates that the ERK1/2/p53/PUMA axis is related to CDDP-induced cell death in A2780s cells.

  5. Clinicopathologic significance of histologic grade, pgp, and p53 expression in canine lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Ravinder S; Kitchell, Barbara E; Ehrhart, Ej; Valli, Victor E; Dervisis, Nikolaos G

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the expression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and p53 in different histologic grades of canine multicentric lymphosarcoma (LSA), 31 cases of LSA without prior treatment were studied. The expression levels of the Pgp and p53 proteins were evaluated for their clinicopathologic significance among standard histologic evaluation. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival samples of 31 previously untreated LSA cases to detect the expression of Pgp and p53. All dogs were subsequently treated with a combination chemotherapy protocol. Remission and survival durations were evaluated for correlation with histologic grade and presence of drug resistance markers. Of the 31 cases, 24 (80%) and 7 (22%) were positive for Pgp and p53, respectively. Overall, the median survival and duration of remission in the study was 246 days and 137 days, respectively. The National Cancer Institute working formulation histologic grade was not associated with either survival or duration of first remission (DOR). The Pgp protein expression and DOR and survival was not statistically significant. Expression of p53 was statistically correlated with survival.

  6. Suppressing activity of tributyrin on hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with inhibiting the p53-CRM1 interaction and changing the cellular compartmentalization of p53 protein

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Juliana F.; de Conti, Aline; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; Furtado, Kelly S.; Heidor, Renato; Horst, Maria Aderuza; Fernandes, Laura Helena Gasparini; Tavares, Paulo Eduardo Latorre Martins; Pogribna, Marta; Shpyleva, Svitlana; Beland, Frederick A.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Moreno, Fernando Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), an aggressive and the fastest growing life-threatening cancer worldwide, is often diagnosed at intermediate or advanced stages of the disease, which substantially limits therapeutic approaches for its successful treatment. This indicates that the prevention of hepatocarcinogenesis is probably the most promising approach to reduce both the HCC incidence and cancer-related mortality. In previous studies, we demonstrated a potent chemopreventive effect of tributyrin, a butyric acid prodrug, on experimental hepatocarcinogenesis. The cancer-inhibitory effect of tributyrin was linked to the suppression of sustained cell proliferation and induction of apoptotic cell death driven by an activation of the p53 apoptotic signaling pathway. The goal of the present study was to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms linked to tributyrin-mediated p53 activation. Using in vivo and in vitro models of liver cancer, we demonstrate that an increase in the level of p53 protein in nuclei, a decrease in the level of cytoplasmic p53, and, consequently, an increase in the ratio of nuclear/cytoplasmic p53 in rat preneoplastic livers and in rat and human HCC cell lines caused by tributyrin or sodium butyrate treatments was associated with a marked increase in the level of nuclear chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) protein. Mechanistically, the increase in the level of nuclear p53 protein was associated with a substantially reduced binding interaction between CRM1 and p53. The results demonstrate that the cancer-inhibitory activity of sodium butyrate and its derivatives on liver carcinogenesis may be attributed to retention of p53 and CRM1 proteins in the nucleus, an event that may trigger activation of p53-mediated apoptotic cell death in neoplastic cells. PMID:27013579

  7. Suppressing activity of tributyrin on hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with inhibiting the p53-CRM1 interaction and changing the cellular compartmentalization of p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Juliana F; de Conti, Aline; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; Furtado, Kelly S; Heidor, Renato; Horst, Maria Aderuza; Fernandes, Laura Helena Gasparini; Tavares, Paulo Eduardo Latorre Martins; Pogribna, Marta; Shpyleva, Svitlana; Beland, Frederick A; Pogribny, Igor P; Moreno, Fernando Salvador

    2016-04-26

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), an aggressive and the fastest growing life-threatening cancer worldwide, is often diagnosed at intermediate or advanced stages of the disease, which substantially limits therapeutic approaches for its successful treatment. This indicates that the prevention of hepatocarcinogenesis is probably the most promising approach to reduce both the HCC incidence and cancer-related mortality. In previous studies, we demonstrated a potent chemopreventive effect of tributyrin, a butyric acid prodrug, on experimental hepatocarcinogenesis. The cancer-inhibitory effect of tributyrin was linked to the suppression of sustained cell proliferation and induction of apoptotic cell death driven by an activation of the p53 apoptotic signaling pathway. The goal of the present study was to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms linked to tributyrin-mediated p53 activation. Using in vivo and in vitro models of liver cancer, we demonstrate that an increase in the level of p53 protein in nuclei, a decrease in the level of cytoplasmic p53, and, consequently, an increase in the ratio of nuclear/cytoplasmic p53 in rat preneoplastic livers and in rat and human HCC cell lines caused by tributyrin or sodium butyrate treatments was associated with a marked increase in the level of nuclear chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) protein. Mechanistically, the increase in the level of nuclear p53 protein was associated with a substantially reduced binding interaction between CRM1 and p53. The results demonstrate that the cancer-inhibitory activity of sodium butyrate and its derivatives on liver carcinogenesis may be attributed to retention of p53 and CRM1 proteins in the nucleus, an event that may trigger activation of p53-mediated apoptotic cell death in neoplastic cells.

  8. p53 Activity Dominates that of p73 upon Mdm4 Loss in Development and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tashakori, Mehrnoosh; Zhang, Yun; Xiong, Shunbin; You, M. James; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    Mdm4 negatively regulates the p53 tumor suppressor. Mdm4 loss in mice leads to an embryonic lethal phenotype that is p53-dependent. Biochemical studies indicate that Mdm4 also binds p73, a member of the p53 family, with higher affinity than p53. In this study, the significance of the Mdm4 and p73 interaction in vivo during embryogenesis and tumorigenesis was examined. The data revealed that p73 loss does not rescue either the early Mdm4-deficient embryonic lethality or the runted phenotype of Mdm4Δ2/Δ2 p53+/− embryos. Furthermore, studies in the developing central nervous system (CNS) wherein both genes have prominent roles indicated that loss of p73 also did not rescue the Mdm4-null brain phenotype as does p53 loss. This p53 dependency occurred despite evidence for p73-specific transcriptional activity. In tumor studies, the combination of Mdm4 overexpression and p73 loss did not alter survival of mice or the tumor spectrum as compared to Mdm4 overexpression alone. In summary, these data demonstrate that the Mdm4-p73 axis cannot override the dominant role of p53 in development and tumorigenesis. Implications Genetic characterization of the Mdm4 and p73 interaction during development and tumorigenesis suggests new insight into the role of p53 family members, which may influence treatment options for patients. PMID:26527653

  9. Distinctive patterns of p53 protein expression and microsatellite instability in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Nyiraneza, Christine; Jouret-Mourin, Anne; Kartheuser, Alex; Camby, Philippe; Plomteux, Olivier; Detry, Roger; Dahan, Karin; Sempoux, Christine

    2011-12-01

    Although evidence suggests an inverse relationship between microsatellite instability and p53 alterations in colorectal cancer, no study has thoroughly examined the use of p53 immunohistochemistry in phenotyping colorectal cancers. We investigated the value of p53 immunohistochemistry in microsatellite instability-positive colorectal cancers prescreening and attempted to clarify the relationship between DNA mismatch repair system and p53 pathway. In a series of 104 consecutive colorectal cancers, we performed p53 immunohistochemistry, TP53 mutational analysis, DNA mismatch repair system efficiency evaluation (DNA mismatch repair system immunohistochemistry, microsatellite instability status, MLH1/MSH2 germ line, and BRAF, murine double minute 2, and p21 immunohistochemistry. Microsatellite instability high was observed in 25 of 104 colorectal cancers, with DNA mismatch repair system protein loss (24/25) and germ line (8/25) or BRAF mutations (8/25). p53 immunohistochemistry revealed 3 distinct patterns of expression: complete negative immunostaining associated with truncating TP53 mutations (P < .0001), diffuse overexpression associated with missense TP53 mutations (P < .0001), and restricted overexpression characterized by a limited number of homogenously scattered strongly positive tumor cells in 36.5% of colorectal cancers. This latest pattern was associated with wild-type TP53 and microsatellite instability high colorectal cancers (P < .0001) including all Lynch tumors (8/8), but its presence among 22% of DNA mismatch repair system-competent colorectal cancers decreased its positive predictive value (55.2% [95% confidence interval, 45%-65%]). It was also correlated with murine double minute 2 overexpression (P < .0001) and inversely with p21 loss (P = .0002), independently of microsatellite instability status. In conclusion, a restricted pattern of p53 overexpression is preferentially associated with microsatellite instability high phenotype and could

  10. MDM2 expression during mouse embryogenesis and the requirement of p53.

    PubMed

    Léveillard, T; Gorry, P; Niederreither, K; Wasylyk, B

    1998-06-01

    We compared mouse embryonic expression of the MDM2 proto-oncogene, p21WAF1/CIP1 and their transcriptional regulator, p53. MDM2 expression is ubiquitous from 7.5 to 11.5 days post coitum (dpc) and more restricted from 12.5 dpc, with the highest levels in the testes and neural tube. From 14.5 to 18.5 dpc, the nasal respiratory epithelium expresses high levels of MDM2 RNA and protein and p21WAF1/CIP1 RNA, in both wild type and p53 null embryos. MDM2 expression during development is tissue-specific and, like p21WAF1/CIP1, is independent of p53. MDM2 may have a developmental role after 6.5 dpc, when MDM2 null mice die (Jones, S.N., Roe, A.E., Donehower, L.A., Bradley, A., 1995. Rescue of embryonic lethality in Mdm2-deficient mice by absence of p53. Nature 378, 206-208; Montes de Oca Luna, R., Wagner, D.S., Lozano, G., 1995. Rescue of early embryonic lethality in mdm2-deficient mice by deletion of p53. Nature 378, 203-206).

  11. Altered expression of p53, but not Rb, is involved in canine prostatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pagliarone, Simone; Frattone, Luca; Pirocchi, Valeria; Della Salda, Leonardo; Palmieri, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Abnormalities in the retinoblastoma (Rb) and p53 tumour suppressor gene have been frequently detected in human and canine cancers, but never investigated in canine prostate cancer, considered a good model for the advanced and aggressive androgen-resistant prostate cancer in men. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of Rb and p53 in 6 normal canine prostates, 15 canine prostates with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 10 prostatic carcinomas (PCs). In all normal samples, p53 was expressed in low number of epithelial cells, while a greater number of positive cells were observed in BPH and PC. The mean number of positive cells was statistically significantly higher in PCs than normal and hyperplastic prostates. A cytoplasmic or nucleo-cytoplasmic staining was observed in 5 out of 10 PCs. Rb protein was expressed in high number of normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic cells without a statistically significant differences. Considering that Rb is frequently lost in human prostate cancer, we suggest that Rb is not involved in canine prostatic carcinogenesis. On the other hand, the increased expression of p53 that corresponds to genetic defects in the p53 gene may be associated with the malignant growth of canine prostate cancer, conferring an apoptosis-resistant phenotype.

  12. The expression of p73 is increased in lung cancer, independent of p53 gene alteration

    PubMed Central

    Tokuchi, Y; Hashimoto, T; Kobayashi, Y; Hayashi, M; Nishida, K; Hayashi, S; Imai, K; Nakachi, K; Ishikawa, Y; Nakagawa, K; Kawakami, Y; Tsuchiya, E

    1999-01-01

    p73 gene, a new p53 homologue, has been identified: it supposedly acts as tumour suppressor gene in neuroblastoma. To clarify whether p73 might be involved in lung carcinogenesis, we examined p73 expression in resected lung cancer and paired normal lung in 60 cases using semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We also examined p73 gene status in three representative cases using Southern blot, and p53 gene alteration in 49 cases using PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and direct sequence. In 87% of the cases (52/60) p73 expression in tumour was more than twice as high as that in paired normal lung tissues, and the difference between p73 expression in tumour and normal lung tissue was significant (P < 0.0001). However, Southern blot analysis revealed that none of the cases showed p73 gene amplification. Compared with clinicopathological characteristics, p73 expression correlates significantly with histological differences and age of patient, independently (P < 0.05). Concerning p53 gene status, 43% (21/49) showed p53 gene alteration, but there was no correlation between p73 overexpression and p53 gene alteration. Our results suggest that need for further functional analysis of the role of p73 in lung carcinogenesis. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408409

  13. The adenoviral E1B 55-kilodalton protein controls expression of immune response genes but not p53-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel L; Rickards, Brenden; Mashiba, Michael; Huang, Wenying; Flint, S J

    2009-04-01

    The human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55-kDa protein modulates several cellular processes, including activation of the tumor suppressor p53. Binding of the E1B protein to the activation domain of p53 inhibits p53-dependent transcription. This activity has been correlated with the transforming activity of the E1B protein, but its contribution to viral replication is not well understood. To address this issue, we used microarray hybridization methods to examine cellular gene expression in normal human fibroblasts (HFFs) infected by Ad5, the E1B 55-kDa-protein-null mutant Hr6, or a mutant carrying substitutions that impair repression of p53-dependent transcription. Comparison of the changes in cellular gene expression observed in these and our previous experiments (D. L. Miller et al., Genome Biol. 8:R58, 2007) by significance analysis of microarrays indicated excellent reproducibility. Furthermore, we again observed that Ad5 infection led to efficient reversal of the p53-dependent transcriptional program. As this same response was also induced in cells infected by the two mutants, we conclude that the E1B 55-kDa protein is not necessary to block activation of p53 in Ad5-infected cells. However, groups of cellular genes that were altered in expression specifically in the absence of the E1B protein were identified by consensus k-means clustering of the hybridization data. Statistical analysis of the enrichment of genes associated with specific functions in these clusters established that the E1B 55-kDa protein is necessary for repression of genes encoding proteins that mediate antiviral and immune defenses.

  14. A DNA damage signal is required for p53 to activate gadd45.

    PubMed

    Xiao, G; Chicas, A; Olivier, M; Taya, Y; Tyagi, S; Kramer, F R; Bargonetti, J

    2000-03-15

    We provide direct evidence that overexpression of p53 is not sufficient for robust p53-dependent activation of the endogenous gadd45 gene. When p53 was induced in TR9-7 cells in the absence of DNA damage, waf1/p21 and mdm2 mRNA levels were increased, but a change in gadd45 mRNA was barely detectable. Activation of the gadd45 gene was observed when camptothecin was added to cells containing p53 in the absence of a further increase in the p53 level. Phosphorylation of p53 at serine 15 and acetylation at lysine 382 were detected after drug treatment. It has been suggested that p53 posttranslational modification is critical during activation. However, inhibition of these modifications by wortmannin was not sufficient to block the transactivation of gadd45. Interestingly, after camptothecin treatment, increased DNase I sensitivity was detected at the gadd45 promoter, suggesting that an undetermined DNA damage signal is involved in inducing chromatin remodeling at the gadd45 promoter while cooperating with p53 to activate gadd45 transcription.

  15. Restoration of DNA-Binding and Growth-Suppressive Activity of Mutant Forms of p53 Via a PCAF-Mediated Acetylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    PEREZ, RICARDO E.; KNIGHTS, CHAD D.; SAHU, GEETARAM; CATANIA, JASON; KOLUKULA, VAMSI K.; STOLER, DANIEL; GRAESSMANN, ADOLF; OGRYZKO, VASILY; PISHVAIAN, MICHAEL; ALBANESE, CHRISTOPHER; AVANTAGGIATI, MARIA LAURA

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-derived mutant forms of p53 compromise its DNA binding, transcriptional, and growth regulatory activity in a manner that is dependent upon the cell-type and the type of mutation. Given the high frequency of p53 mutations in human tumors, reactivation of the p53 pathway has been widely proposed as beneficial for cancer therapy. In support of this possibility p53 mutants possess a certain degree of conformational flexibility that allows for re-induction of function by a number of structurally different artificial compounds or by short peptides. This raises the question of whether physiological pathways for p53 mutant reactivation also exist and can be exploited therapeutically. The activity of wild-type p53 is modulated by various acetyl-transferases and deacetylases, but whether acetylation influences signaling by p53 mutant is still unknown. Here, we show that the PCAF acetyl-transferase is down-regulated in tumors harboring p53 mutants, where its re-expression leads to p53 acetylation and to cell death. Furthermore, acetylation restores the DNA-binding ability of p53 mutants in vitro and expression of PCAF, or treatment with deacetylase inhibitors, promotes their binding to p53-regulated promoters and transcriptional activity in vivo. These data suggest that PCAF-mediated acetylation rescues activity of at least a set of p53 mutations. Therefore, we propose that dis-regulation of PCAF activity is a pre-requisite for p53 mutant loss of function and for the oncogenic potential acquired by neoplastic cells expressing these proteins. Our findings offer a new rationale for therapeutic targeting of PCAF activity in tumors harboring oncogenic versions of p53. PMID:20589832

  16. A Small Ras-like protein Ray/Rab1c modulates the p53-regulating activity of PRPK

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Yasuhito . E-mail: yasuhito@m.ehime-u.ac.jp; Takeuchi, Takashi; Imai, Yoshinori; Murase, Ryuichi; Kamei, Yoshiaki; Fujibuchi, Taketsugu; Matsumoto, Suguru; Ueda, Norifumi; Kito, Katsumi; Ogasawara, Masahito; Shigemoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-05-26

    PRPK phosphorylates serine-15 residue of p53 and enhances transcriptional activity. PRPK possesses a bipartite nuclear localization signal and localizes in nucleus when over-expressed in cells. However, intrinsic PRPK localizes mainly in the cytosol in situ. While studying the mechanisms in the distribution of intrinsic PRPK, we identified a PRPK binding protein, an ubiquitously expressed Small Ras-like GTPase, Rab1c, also named Ray or Rab35. The over-expressed Ray was distributed in the nucleus, cytosol, and cell membrane. Both Ray wild type and GTP-restrictively binding mutant Ray-Q67L, but not guanine nucleotide unstable binding mutant Ray-N120I, partially distributed the over-expressed PRPK to the cytosol and also suppressed the PRPK-induced p53-transcriptional activity profoundly. A Small Ras-like GTPase protein Ray was thus indicated to modulate p53 transcriptional activity of PRPK.

  17. Che-1 gene silencing induces osteosarcoma cell apoptosis by inhibiting mutant p53 expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Wang, Dan; Li, Ning

    2016-04-22

    The transcriptional cofactor Che-1 is an RNA polymerase II (Pol II) which is involved in tumorigenesis, such as breast cancer and multiple myeloma. Che-1 can also regulate mutant p53 expression, which plays roles in many types of cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects and specific mechanism of Che-1 in the regulation of osteosarcoma (OS) cell growth. We found that Che-1 is highly expressed in several kinds of OS cells compared with osteoblast hFOB1.19 cells. MTT and flow cytometry assays showed that Che-1 depletion by siRNA markedly suppressed MG-63 and U2OS cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay verified the presence of Che-1 on the p53 promoter in MG-63 and U2OS cells carrying mutant p53. Further studies showed that Che-1 depletion inhibited mutant p53 expression. Notably, our study showed that the loss of Che-1 inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis in MG-63 cells by decreasing the level of mutant p53. Therefore, these findings open the possibility that silencing of Che-1 will have therapeutic benefit in OS.

  18. Sirt 1 activator inhibits the AGE-induced apoptosis and p53 acetylation in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Lina; Zhou, Changyong; Lin, Nan; Liu, Aiguo

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by nonenzymatic glycation reactions are extremely accumulated in the diabetic vascular cells, neurons, and glia, and are confirmed to play important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus -induced cardiovascular complications. Sirt 1, known as mammalian sirtuin, has been recognized to regulate insulin secretion and protect cells against oxidative stress, which is promoted by the accumulated AGEs in cardiovascular cells. In the present study, we treated human endothelial Eahy926 cells with AGEs, and determined the apoptosis induction, caspase activation, the Sirt 1 activity, the expression and acetylation of p53. Then we manipulated Sirt 1 activity with a Sirt 1 activator, Resveratrol (RSV), and a Sirt 1 inhibitor, sirtinol, in the AGE-BSA-treated Eahy926 cells, and then re-evaluated the apoptosis induction, caspase activation, the expression and acetylation of p53. Results demonstrated that AGEs induced apoptosis in the human endothelial Eahy926 cells, by promoting the cytochrome c release, activation of caspase 9/3. Also, the AGE-BSA treatment promoted the total p53 level and acetylated (Ac) p53, but reduced the Sirt 1 level and activity. On the other hand, the Sirt 1 inhibitor/activator not only deteriorated/ameliorated the promotion to p53 level and Ac p53, but also aggravated/inhibited the AGE-induced apoptosis and the promotion to apoptosis-associated signaling molecules. In conclusion, the present study confirmed the apoptosis promotion by AGEs in endothelial Eahy926 cells, by regulating the Sirt 1 activity and p53 signaling, it also implies the protective role of Sirt 1 activator against the AGE-induced apoptosis.

  19. p53 oligomerization and DNA looping are linked with transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, J E; Tegtmeyer, P; Mayr, G A; Reed, M; Wang, Y; Wang, P; Hough, P V; Mastrangelo, I A

    1994-01-01

    We examined the role of p53 oligomerization in DNA binding and in transactivation. By conventional electron microscopy (EM) and scanning transmission EM, we find that wild-type tetramers contact 18-20 bp at single or tandem 19 bp consensus sequences and also stack in apparent register, tetramer on top of tetramer. Stacked tetramers link separated DNA binding sites with DNA loops. Interestingly, the p53(1-320) segment, which lacks the C-terminal tetramerization domain, binds DNA consensus sites as stacked oligomers. Although the truncated protein binds DNA with reduced efficiency, it nevertheless induces DNA looping by self-association. p53, therefore, has a C-terminal tetramerization domain that enhances DNA binding and a non-tetrameric oligomerization domain that stacks p53 at consensus sites and loops separated consensus sites via protein-protein interactions. Using model promoters, we demonstrate that wild-type and tetramerization-deficient p53s activate transcription well when tandem consensus sites are proximal to TATA sequences and poorly when tandem sites are distal. In the presence of proximal sites, however, stimulation by distal sites increases 25-fold. Tetramerization and stacking of tetramers, therefore, provide dual mechanisms to augment the number of p53 molecules available for activation through p53 response elements. DNA looping between separated response elements further increases the concentration of local p53 by translocating distally bound protein to the promoter. Images PMID:7813439

  20. p53 promotes cellular survival in a context-dependent manner by directly inducing the expression of haeme-oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Nam, S Y; Sabapathy, K

    2011-11-03

    A variety of cellular insults activate the tumour suppressor p53, leading generally to cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis. However, it is not inconceivable that cellular protective mechanisms may be required to keep cells alive while cell-fate decisions are made. In this respect, p53 has been suggested to perform functions that allow cells to survive, by halting of the cell-cycle, and thus preventing immediate cell death. Nonetheless, the existence of direct pro-survival p53 target genes regulating cellular survival is lacking. We show here evidence for p53-dependent cellular survival in a context-dependent manner. Both mouse and human cells lacking p53 are hypersensitive to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced cell death compared with their isogenic wild-type counterparts. By contrast, p53(-/-) cells are expectedly resistant to cell death upon exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as cisplatin (CDDP) and etoposide. Although p53 and its classical targets such as p21 and Mdm2 are activated by both H(2)O(2) and CDDP, we found that the expression of haeme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-an antioxidant and antiapoptotic protein-was directly induced only upon H(2)O(2) treatment in a p53-dependent manner. Consistently, p53, but not its homologue p73, activated HO-1 expression and was bound to the HO-1 promoter specifically only upon H(2)O(2) treatment. Moreover, silencing HO-1 expression enhanced cell death upon H(2)O(2) treatment only in p53-proficient cells. Finally, H(2)O(2)-mediated cell death was rescued significantly in p53-deficient cells by antioxidant treatment, as well as by bilirubin, a by-product of HO-1 metabolism. Taken together, these data demonstrate a direct role for p53 in promoting cellular survival in a context-specific manner through the activation of a direct transcriptional target, HO-1.

  1. Expression of p16 and p53 in Intraepithelial Periocular Sebaceous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bell, W. Robert; Singh, Kamaljeet; Rajan KD, Anand; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Identifying intraepithelial sebaceous carcinoma cells in small periocular biopsies can be difficult, particularly in the conjunctiva. The goal of this study was to evaluate p53 and p16 immunohistochemistry as potential markers of intraepithelial sebaceous carcinoma. Procedures A total of 25 tumors, including 4 recurrent lesions, were stained for p16 and p53, with intensity scored as negative, weak, moderate or strong. Results Expression of p16 was detected in intraepithelial sebaceous carcinoma cells in 24 of the 25 cases (96%), with only 1 case showing weak immunoreactivity. Intraepithelial p53 immunoreactivity was present in 17 of 25 tumors (68%), but was weak in 3 cases. Expression levels remained relatively stable in primary and recurrent tumors, but varied in a few cases between intraepithelial and subepithelial sites. Conclusions Intraepithelial sebaceous carcinomas stained for p53 and p16 demonstrated moderate to strong immunoreactivity in 100% of cases for at least one of these proteins, suggesting that together they are useful markers for determining the extent of tumor spread. Of the two, p16 was immunoreactive in more cases than p53. PMID:27171611

  2. Evaluation of microvessel density and p53 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jureidini, Ricardo; da Cunha, José Eduardo Monteiro; Takeda, Flavio; Namur, Guilherme Naccache; Ribeiro, Thiago Costa; Patzina, Rosely; Figueira, Estela RR; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Bacchella, Telesforo; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic significance of microvessel density and p53 expression in pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Between 2008 and 2012, 49 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma underwent resection with curative intention. The resected specimens were immunohistochemically stained with anti-p53 and anti-CD34 antibodies. Microvessel density was assessed by counting vessels within ten areas of each tumoral section a highpower microscope. RESULTS: The microvessel density ranged from 21.2 to 54.2 vessels/mm2. Positive nuclear staining for p53 was found in 20 patients (40.6%). The overall median survival rate after resection was 24.1 months and there were no differences in survival rates related to microvessel density or p53 positivity. Microvessel density was associated with tumor diameter greater than 3.0 cm and with R0 resection failure. CONCLUSIONS: Microvessel density was associated with R1 resection and with larger tumors. p53 expression was not correlated with intratumoral microvessel density in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27438564

  3. p53 Activation following Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection Contributes to Cell Death and Viral Production

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Lindsay; Shafagati, Nazly; Schoonmaker, Annalise; Narayanan, Aarthi; Popova, Taissia; Panthier, Jean Jacques; Kashanchi, Fatah; Bailey, Charles; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging viral zoonosis that is responsible for devastating outbreaks among livestock and is capable of causing potentially fatal disease in humans. Studies have shown that upon infection, certain viruses have the capability of utilizing particular cellular signaling pathways to propagate viral infection. Activation of p53 is important for the DNA damage signaling cascade, initiation of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and transcriptional regulation of multiple genes. The current study focuses on the role of p53 signaling in RVFV infection and viral replication. These results show an up-regulation of p53 phosphorylation at several serine sites after RVFV MP-12 infection that is highly dependent on the viral protein NSs. qRT-PCR data showed a transcriptional up-regulation of several p53 targeted genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis regulation following RVFV infection. Cell viability assays demonstrate that loss of p53 results in less RVFV induced cell death. Furthermore, decreased viral titers in p53 null cells indicate that RVFV utilizes p53 to enhance viral production. Collectively, these experiments indicate that the p53 signaling pathway is utilized during RVFV infection to induce cell death and increase viral production. PMID:22574148

  4. p53 Activation following Rift Valley fever virus infection contributes to cell death and viral production.

    PubMed

    Austin, Dana; Baer, Alan; Lundberg, Lindsay; Shafagati, Nazly; Schoonmaker, Annalise; Narayanan, Aarthi; Popova, Taissia; Panthier, Jean Jacques; Kashanchi, Fatah; Bailey, Charles; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging viral zoonosis that is responsible for devastating outbreaks among livestock and is capable of causing potentially fatal disease in humans. Studies have shown that upon infection, certain viruses have the capability of utilizing particular cellular signaling pathways to propagate viral infection. Activation of p53 is important for the DNA damage signaling cascade, initiation of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and transcriptional regulation of multiple genes. The current study focuses on the role of p53 signaling in RVFV infection and viral replication. These results show an up-regulation of p53 phosphorylation at several serine sites after RVFV MP-12 infection that is highly dependent on the viral protein NSs. qRT-PCR data showed a transcriptional up-regulation of several p53 targeted genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis regulation following RVFV infection. Cell viability assays demonstrate that loss of p53 results in less RVFV induced cell death. Furthermore, decreased viral titers in p53 null cells indicate that RVFV utilizes p53 to enhance viral production. Collectively, these experiments indicate that the p53 signaling pathway is utilized during RVFV infection to induce cell death and increase viral production.

  5. p53 modulation of TFIIH-associated nucleotide excision repair activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, X W; Yeh, H; Schaeffer, L; Roy, R; Moncollin, V; Egly, J M; Wang, Z; Freidberg, E C; Evans, M K; Taffe, B G

    1995-06-01

    p53 has pleiotropic functions including control of genomic plasticity and integrity. Here we report that p53 can bind to several transcription factor IIH-associated factors, including transcription-repair factors, XPD (Rad3) and XPB, as well as CSB involved in strand-specific DNA repair, via its C-terminal domain. We also found that wild-type, but not Arg273His mutant p53 inhibits XPD (Rad3) and XPB DNA helicase activities. Moreover, repair of UV-induced dimers is slower in Li-Fraumeni syndrome cells (heterozygote p53 mutant) than in normal human cells. Our findings indicate that p53 may play a direct role in modulating nucleotide excision repair pathways.

  6. Chemotherapy-induced Dkk-1 expression by primary human mesenchymal stem cells is p53 dependent.

    PubMed

    Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Fortney, James; Moses, Blake; Piktel, Debbie; Slone, William; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are abundant throughout the body and regulate signaling within tumor microenvironments. Wnt signaling is an extrinsically regulated pathway that has been shown to regulate tumorigenesis in many types of cancer. After evaluating a panel of Wnt activating and inhibiting molecules, we show that primary human MSCs increase the expression of Dkk-1, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, into the extracellular environment following chemotherapy exposure in a p53-dependent manner. Dkk-1 has been shown to promote tumor growth in several models of malignancy, suggesting that MSC-derived Dkk-1 could counteract the intent of cytotoxic chemotherapy, and that pharmacologic inhibition of Dkk-1 in patients receiving chemotherapy treatment for certain malignancies may be warranted.

  7. P53 Modulates The Activity Of The GLI1 Oncogene Through Interactions With The Shared Coactivator TAF9

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Joon Won; Lamm, Marilyn; Iannaccone, Stephen; Higashiyama, Nicole; Leong, King Fu; Iannaccone, Philip; Walterhouse, David

    2015-01-01

    The GLI1 oncogene and p53 tumor suppressor gene function in an inhibitory loop that controls stem cell and tumor cell numbers. Since GLI1 and p53 both interact with the coactivator TATA Binding Protein Associated Factor 9 (TAF9), we hypothesized that competition between these transcription factors for TAF9 in cancer cells may contribute to the inhibitory loop and directly affect GLI1 function and cellular phenotype. We showed that TAF9 interacts with the oncogenic GLI family members GLI1 and GLI2 but not GLI3 in cell-free pull-down assays and with GLI1 in rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma cell lines. Removal of the TAF9-binding acidic alpha helical transactivation domain of GLI1 produced a significant reduction in the ability of GLI1 to transform cells. We then introduced a point mutation into GLI1 (L1052I) that eliminates TAF9 binding and a point mutation into GLI3 (I1510L) that establishes binding. Wild-type and mutant GLI proteins that bind TAF9 showed enhanced transactivating and cell transforming activity compared with those that did not. Therefore, GLI-TAF9 binding appears important for oncogenic activity. We then determined whether wild-type p53 down-regulates GLI function by sequestering TAF9. We showed that p53 binds TAF9 with greater affinity than does GLI1 and that co-expression of p53 with GLI1 or GLI2 down-regulated GLI-induced transactivation, which could be abrogated using mutant forms of GLI1 or p53. This suggests that p53 sequesters TAF9 from GLI1, which may contribute to inhibition of GLI1 activity by p53 and potentially impact therapeutic success of agents targeting GLI-TAF9 interactions in cancer. PMID:26282181

  8. Inhaled asbestos fibers induce p53 expression in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Mishra, A; Liu, J Y; Brody, A R; Morris, G F

    1997-04-01

    Humans and rodents exposed to an aerosol of asbestos fibers develop lung injury that can lead to a fibroproliferative response culminating in excessive scarring and impaired lung function. To define the early events that precede asbestos-induced fibrotic lung disease, rats were exposed to an aerosol of chrysotile asbestos fibers for 5 h. At various times after exposure, the lungs of the asbestos-exposed animals were evaluated immunohistochemically for expression of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, a growth regulatory protein. p53 became detectable by immunostaining at the predicted sites of fiber deposition (the bronchiolar-alveolar duct bifurcations) by 24 h after exposure. The number of cells positive for p53 immunostaining increased to a maximal level at 8 days after exposure, decreased by 14 days and returned to a low basal level at the 30-day time point. Control groups of rats that were unexposed or exposed to an aerosol of iron beads were negative for p53 immunostaining throughout the 30-day assessment period. Simultaneous detection of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) at the sites of fiber deposition in the asbestos-exposed animals agrees with our previous finding that p53 binds and regulates the PCNA promoter.

  9. p53 expression in oral lichenoid lesions and oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Arreaza, A; Rivera, H; Correnti, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article was to compare the expression of p53 protein in oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid reaction (OLR). The study population consisted of 65 patients--31 diagnosed with OLP and 34 with OLR. The results showed more p53 positive cases in the OLP group than in the OLR group. However, the difference between the 2 groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.114). The most common immunolocalization was observed at the basal cell layer. Due to the chance of potential future malignancy, follow-up for all cases is recommended.

  10. Lack of association between p53 expression and betel nut chewing in oral cancers from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thongsuksai, P; Boonyaphiphat, P

    2001-04-01

    To elucidate whether betel-associated oral squamous cell carcinoma is associated with p53 protein expression, tumor samples from 156 patients with detailed histories of exposures were investigated immunohistochemically using CM1 antibody. The expression of p53 (>10% positive cells) was found in 38.5% of the cases. The frequency of expression in betel chewers alone and betel chewer with tobacco use were 37.9% (11/29) and 25%(9/36), respectively, whereas that in betel chewers with smoking/drinking it was 47.2%(17/36) and in smokers or drinkers without chewing was 42.0% (21/50). However, the differences were not statistically significant. Multivariate analysis also revealed with the no independent association of betel chewing with p53 expression (odds ratio [OR] 1.81, 95% confidence interval 0.50-6.49), whereas alcohol drinking and smokeless tobacco use were significant (OR 7.58, 2.01-28.53 and 0.39, 0.16-0.98, respectively). These results suggested that betel chewing with or without smokeless tobacco use may not induce oral cancers via a p53-dependent pathway. However, since this is an immunohistochemical study, further molecular analysis is needed.

  11. Impact of the Adenoviral E4 Orf3 Protein on the Activity and Posttranslational Modification of p53

    PubMed Central

    DeHart, Caroline J.; Perlman, David H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our previous studies have established that the p53 populations that accumulate in normal human cells exposed to etoposide or infected by an E1B 55-kDa protein-null mutant of human adenovirus type 5 carry a large number of posttranslational modifications at numerous residues (C. J. DeHart, J. S. Chahal, S. J. Flint, and D. H. Perlman, Mol Cell Proteomics 13:1–17, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/mcp.M113.030254). In the absence of this E1B protein, the p53 transcriptional program is not induced, and it has been reported that the viral E4 Orf3 protein inactivates p53 (C. Soria, F. E. Estermann, K. C. Espantman, and C. C. O'Shea, Nature 466:1076–1081, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature09307). As the latter protein disrupts nuclear Pml bodies, sites at which p53 is modified, we used mass spectrometry to catalogue the posttranscriptional modifications of the p53 population that accumulates when neither the E1B 55-kDa nor the E4 Orf3 protein is made in infected cells. Eighty-five residues carrying 163 modifications were identified. The overall patterns of posttranslational modification of this population and p53 present in cells infected by an E1B 55-kDa-null mutant were similar. The efficiencies with which the two forms of p53 bound to a consensus DNA recognition sequence could not be distinguished and were lower than that of transcriptionally active p53. The absence of the E4 Orf3 protein increased expression of several p53-responsive genes when the E1B protein was also absent from infected cells. However, expression of these genes did not attain the levels observed when p53 was activated in response to etoposide treatment and remained lower than those measured in mock-infected cells. IMPORTANCE The tumor suppressor p53, a master regulator of cellular responses to stress, is inactivated and destroyed in cells infected by species C human adenoviruses, such as type 5. It is targeted for proteasomal degradation by the action of a virus-specific E3

  12. Co-expression of p16 and p53 characterizes aggressive subtypes of ductal intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bechert, Charles; Kim, Jee-Yeon; Tramm, Trine; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A

    2016-12-01

    In the USA alone, approximately 61,000 new diagnoses of ductal intraepithelial neoplasia 1c-3 (DIN) are made each year. Around 10-20 % of the patients develop a recurrence, about 50 % of which are invasive. Prior studies have shown that invasive breast carcinomas positive for p16 or p53 have a higher frequency of recurrence and a more aggressive course; however, the co-expression of these markers across the entire spectrum of DIN and its potential correlation with grade of the lesions has not been studied previously. Immunohistochemical staining for p16 and p53 was evaluated on 262 DIN lesions from 211 cases diagnosed between 1991 and 2008. The lesions ranged from DIN1b (atypical intraductal hyperplasia) to DIN3 (DCIS, grade 3) and included 45 cases with associated invasive carcinoma. Frequency of staining for both p16 and p53 increased with increasing grade of DIN. Strong co-expression was found exclusively in higher grade DIN lesions (DIN2 and DIN3) particularly those associated with periductal stromal fibrosis and lymphocytic infiltrate. Strong co-expression was seen in 8 of 12 DIN3 lesions (67 %) associated with invasive carcinoma. In conclusion, co-expression of p16 and p53 increases with advancing grade of DIN and is maximal in high grade DIN lesions associated with invasive carcinoma, indicating a more aggressive phenotype. A distinctive variant of DIN with periductal fibrosis and lymphocytic infiltrate invariably falls into the high-grade category, based on either morphology or marker expression. Co-expression of p16/p53 may be of help in distinguishing between high-grade and low-grade DIN lesions.

  13. p53 activation contributes to patulin-induced nephrotoxicity via modulation of reactive oxygen species generation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Huan; Yin, Shutao; Song, Xinhua; Zhang, Enxiang; Fan, Lihong; Hu, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Patulin is a major mycotoxin found in fungal contaminated fruits and their derivative products. Previous studies showed that patulin was able to induce increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress was suggested to play a pivotal role in patulin-induced multiple toxic signaling. The objective of the present study was to investigate the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. Our study demonstrated that higher levels of ROS generation and DNA damage were induced in wild-type p53 cell lines than that found in either knockdown or knockout p53 cell lines in response to patulin exposure, suggesting p53 activation contributed to patulin-induced ROS generation. Mechanistically, we revealed that the pro-oxidant role of p53 in response to patulin was attributed to its ability to suppress catalase activity through up-regulation of PIG3. Moreover, these in vitro findings were further validated in the p53 wild-type/knockout mouse model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report addressing the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. The findings of the present study provided novel insights into understanding mechanisms behind oxidative stress in response to patulin exposure. PMID:27071452

  14. Activation of endogenous p53 by combined p19Arf gene transfer and nutlin-3 drug treatment modalities in the murine cell lines B16 and C6

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reactivation of p53 by either gene transfer or pharmacologic approaches may compensate for loss of p19Arf or excess mdm2 expression, common events in melanoma and glioma. In our previous work, we constructed the pCLPG retroviral vector where transgene expression is controlled by p53 through a p53-responsive promoter. The use of this vector to introduce p19Arf into tumor cells that harbor p53wt should yield viral expression of p19Arf which, in turn, would activate the endogenous p53 and result in enhanced vector expression and tumor suppression. Since nutlin-3 can activate p53 by blocking its interaction with mdm2, we explored the possibility that the combination of p19Arf gene transfer and nutlin-3 drug treatment may provide an additive benefit in stimulating p53 function. Methods B16 (mouse melanoma) and C6 (rat glioma) cell lines, which harbor p53wt, were transduced with pCLPGp19 and these were additionally treated with nutlin-3 or the DNA damaging agent, doxorubicin. Viral expression was confirmed by Western, Northern and immunofluorescence assays. p53 function was assessed by reporter gene activity provided by a p53-responsive construct. Alterations in proliferation and viability were measured by colony formation, growth curve, cell cycle and MTT assays. In an animal model, B16 cells were treated with the pCLPGp19 virus and/or drugs before subcutaneous injection in C57BL/6 mice, observation of tumor progression and histopathologic analyses. Results Here we show that the functional activation of endogenous p53wt in B16 was particularly challenging, but accomplished when combined gene transfer and drug treatments were applied, resulting in increased transactivation by p53, marked cell cycle alteration and reduced viability in culture. In an animal model, B16 cells treated with both p19Arf and nutlin-3 yielded increased necrosis and decreased BrdU marking. In comparison, C6 cells were quite susceptible to either treatment, yet p53 was further activated

  15. Expression of p53, Bax and Bcl-2 proteins in hepatocytes in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Panasiuk, Anatol; Dzieciol, Janusz; Panasiuk, Bozena; Prokopowicz, Danuta

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the protein expression essential for apoptosis in liver steatosis. METHODS: The expression of proapoptotic proteins p53, Bax, and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 in hepatocytes with steatosis (SH) and without steatosis (NSH) was evaluated in 84 patients at various stages of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). RESULTS: Immunohistochemical staining of liver tissue showed the activation of p53 protein in SH and NSH with increased liver steatosis, diminished Bcl-2 and slightly decreased Bax protein. Positive correlation was found between the stage of liver steatosis with p53 expression in SH (r = 0.54, P < 0.01) and NSH (r = 0.49, P < 0.01). The antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 was diminished together with the advancement of liver steatosis, especially in non-steatosed hepatocytes (r =0.43, P < 001). CONCLUSION: Apoptosis is one of the most important mechanisms leading to hepatocyte elimination in NAFLD. The intensification of inflammation in NAFLD induces proapoptotic protein p53 with the inhibition of antiapoptotic Bcl-2. PMID:17036395

  16. Effect of Mir-122 on Human Cholangiocarcinoma Proliferation, Invasion, and Apoptosis Through P53 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cuiping; Zhang, Jinmei; Cao, Xiangang; Yang, Qian; Xia, Dequan

    2016-01-01

    Background Bile duct carcinoma is a common digestive tract tumor with high morbidity and mortality. As a kind of important non-coding RNA, microRNA (miR) plays an important role in post-transcriptional regulation. MiR-122 is the most abundant miR in the liver. Multiple studies have shown that miR-122 level is reduced in a variety of liver tumors and can be used as a specific marker for liver injury. P53 is a classic tumor suppressor gene that can induce tumor cell apoptosis through various pathways. Whether miR-122 affects p53 in bile duct carcinoma still needs investigation. Material/Methods miR inhibitor or mimics was transfected to bile duct carcinoma cells to evaluate its function on proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, and p53 expression. Results MiR-122 overexpression reduced cell invasion and migration ability, and inhibited cell apoptosis and p53 expression. Inhibiting miR-122 caused the opposite results. Conclusions Upregulating miR-122 can suppress bile duct carcinoma cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. MiR-122 could be used as a target for bile duct carcinoma treatment, which provides a new strategy for cholangiocarcinoma patients. PMID:27472451

  17. DNA Damage-induced Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K SUMOylation Regulates p53 Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Federico; Pozzi, Berta; Risso, Guillermo; Muñoz, Manuel Javier; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that is a key player in the p53-triggered DNA damage response, acting as a cofactor for p53 in response to DNA damage. hnRNP K is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2 and, upon DNA damage, is de-ubiquitylated. In sharp contrast with the role and consequences of the other post-translational modifications, nothing is known about the role of SUMO conjugation to hnRNP K in p53 transcriptional co-activation. In the present work, we show that hnRNP K is modified by SUMO in lysine 422 within its KH3 domain, and sumoylation is regulated by the E3 ligase Pc2/CBX4. Most interestingly, DNA damage stimulates hnRNP K sumoylation through Pc2 E3 activity, and this modification is required for p53 transcriptional activation. Abrogation of hnRNP K sumoylation leads to an aberrant regulation of the p53 target gene p21. Our findings link the DNA damage-induced Pc2 activation to the p53 transcriptional co-activation through hnRNP K sumoylation. PMID:22825850

  18. Phosphorylation of Daxx by ATM Contributes to DNA Damage-Induced p53 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qian; Qu, Like; Brewer, Michael D.; Chen, Jiandong; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    p53 plays a central role in tumor suppression. It does so by inducing anti-proliferative processes as a response to various tumor-promoting stresses. p53 is regulated by the ubiquitin ligase Mdm2. The optimal function of Mdm2 requires Daxx, which stabilizes Mdm2 through the deubiquitinase Hausp/USP7 and also directly promotes Mdm2’s ubiquitin ligase activity towards p53. The Daxx-Mdm2 interaction is disrupted upon DNA damage. However, both the mechanisms and the consequence of the Daxx-Mdm2 dissociation are not understood. Here we show that upon DNA damage Daxx is phosphorylated in a manner that is dependent on ATM, a member of the PI 3-kinase family that orchestrates the DNA damage response. The main phosphorylation site of Daxx is identified to be Ser564, which is a direct target of ATM. Phosphorylation of endogenous Daxx at Ser564 occurs rapidly during the DNA damage response and precedes p53 activation. Blockage of this phosphorylation event prevents the separation of Daxx from Mdm2, stabilizes Mdm2, and inhibits DNA damage-induced p53 activation. These results suggest that phosphorylation of Daxx by ATM upon DNA damage disrupts the Daxx-Mdm2 interaction and facilitates p53 activation. PMID:23405218

  19. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-Gingerol in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, Madan L.B.; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26621832

  20. Expression of mouse Fbxw7 isoforms is regulated in a cell cycle- or p53-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Akinobu; Onoyama, Ichiro; Nakayama, Keiichi I. . E-mail: nakayak1@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2006-11-10

    Fbxw7 is the F-box protein component of an SCF-type ubiquitin ligase that contributes to the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of cell cycle activators and oncoproteins. Three isoforms ({alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma}) of Fbxw7 are produced from mRNAs with distinct 5' exons. We have now investigated regulation of Fbxw7 expression in mouse tissues. Fbxw7{alpha} mRNA was present in all tissues examined, whereas Fbxw7{beta} mRNA was detected only in brain and testis, and Fbxw7{gamma} mRNA in heart and skeletal muscle. The amount of Fbxw7{alpha} mRNA was high during quiescence (G phase) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and T cells, but it decreased markedly as these cells entered the cell cycle. The abundance of Fbxw7{alpha} mRNA was unaffected by cell irradiation or p53 status. In contrast, X-irradiation increased the amount of Fbxw7{beta} mRNA in wild-type MEFs but not in those from p53-deficient mice, suggesting that radiation-induced up-regulation of p53 leads to production of Fbxw7{beta} mRNA. Our results thus indicate that expression of Fbxw7 isoforms is differentially regulated in a cell cycle- or p53-dependent manner.

  1. Adjuvant chemotherapy, p53, carcinoembryonic antigen expression and prognosis after D2 gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Luo, Hui-Yan; Ren, Chao; Jin, Ying; Chen, Dong-Liang; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate adjuvant chemotherapy, p53 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expression and prognosis after D2 gastrectomy for stage II/III gastric adenocarcinoma. METHODS: A total of 286 patients with stage II or III gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent D2 radical gastrectomy between May 2007 and December 2010 were enrolled into this study. One hundred and sixty-nine of these patients received surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy, and 117 patients received surgery alone. Tumor expression of p53 and CEA proteins in all patients was evaluated immunohistochemically and correlated with clinicopathological parameters. The Kaplan-Meier curves for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) with log-rank testing were used to compare the survival difference. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used for multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Patients with adjuvant chemotherapy had a significantly better median OS (50.87 mo vs 30.73 mo, P = 0.000) and median DFS (36.30 mo vs 25.60 mo, P = 0.001) than patients with surgery alone in the entire cohort. Consistent results with the entire cohort were found in stage II (P = 0.006 and P = 0.047), stage III (P = 0.005 and P = 0.030), and stage IIIB/IIIC patients (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001). The median OS and DFS advantages were confirmed by multivariate analysis (P = 0.000 and P = 0.008) and maintained when the analyses were restricted to fluoropyrimidine monotherapy (P = 0.003 and P = 0.001) and fluoropyrimidine plus platinum regimen (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007), however, not the fluoropyrimidine plus taxane (P = 0.198 and P = 0.777) or platinum plus taxane (P = 0.666 and P = 0.687) regimens. Median OS and median DFS did not differ significantly between the patients with p53(+) and p53(-) tumors (P = 0.608 and P = 0.064), or between patients with CEA(+) and CEA(-) tumors (P = 0.052 and P = 0.989), which were maintained when the analyses were restricted to surgery alone (p53: P = 0.864 and P = 0.431; CEA: P = 0.142 and

  2. p53 status is a major determinant of effects of decreasing peroxiredoxin I expression on tumor growth and response of lung cancer cells to treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-F. . E-mail: miaofen@adm.cgmh.org.tw; Chen, W.-C.; Wu, C.-T.; Lin, P.-Y.; Shau Hungyi; Liao, S.-K.; Yang, C.-T.; Lee, K.-D.

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: The potential roles of peroxiredoxin (Prx) I in carcinogenesis and treatment have been explored. Our previous study revealed differences between A549 (functional p53) and H1299 (null p53) Prx I antisense transfectants. The discrepancy might have resulted from the p53 status. In this study, we further investigated the role of Prx I and p53 on lung cancer growth and the response to treatment in vitro and in vivo. Methods: We established stable A549 and H1299 transfectants with Prx I antisense and p53, respectively. We then examined their characteristics in vitro and used nude mice xenografts of these cell lines to compare their capacity for tumor invasion and spontaneous metastasis and their sensitivity to radiotherapy. Results: Increased reactive oxygen species caused by lower Prx I activity induced p53 expression. In lethal stress, the augmentation of reactive oxygen species was partially reversed by blocking p53 in A549 with Prx I antisense. We demonstrated the potential contribution of p53-dependent mechanisms to inhibit lung tumor growth and increase radiosensitization using H1299 transfected with p53 in vitro and in vivo. An increased p53 level attenuated the capacity of the cells for metastasis by decreasing vascular endothelial growth factor and induced radiosensitization by increased apoptosis and cell senescence and by regulating intracellular reactive oxygen species. Conclusion: These results suggest that p53 status has an important role in the tumor-inhibiting and radiosensitizing effects of decreasing Prx I. Both Prx I and p53 may be powerful prognosticators for lung cancer.

  3. A Novel Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) Inhibitor with p53-dependent Pro-apoptotic Activity in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Gesine; Breitenbücher, Frank; Schuler, Martin; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is an NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase whose targets include histone H4 lysine 16, p53, and α-tubulin. Because deacetylation of p53 regulates its effect on apoptosis, pharmacological inhibition of SIRT2-dependent p53 deacetylation is of great therapeutic interest for the treatment of cancer. Here, we have identified two structurally related compounds, AEM1 and AEM2, which are selective inhibitors of SIRT2 (IC50 values of 18.5 and 3.8 μm, respectively), but show only weak effects on other sirtuins such as SIRT1, SIRT3, and yeast Sir2. Interestingly, both compounds sensitized non-small cell lung cancer cell lines toward the induction of apoptosis by the DNA-damaging agent etoposide. Importantly, this sensitization was dependent on the presence of functional p53, thus establishing a link between SIRT2 inhibition by these compounds and p53 activation. Further, treatment with AEM1 and AEM2 led to elevated levels of p53 acetylation and to increased expression of CDKN1A, which encodes the cell cycle regulator p21WAF1, as well as the pro-apoptotic genes PUMA and NOXA, three transcriptional targets of p53. Altogether, our data suggest that inhibition of SIRT2 by these compounds causes increased activation of p53 by decreasing SIRT2-dependent p53 deacetylation. These compounds thus provide a good opportunity for lead optimization and drug development to target p53-proficient cancers. PMID:24379401

  4. Study of Arsenic Sulfide in Solid Tumor Cells Reveals Regulation of Nuclear Factors of Activated T-cells by PML and p53

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wenping; Tong, Yingying; Zhang, Xiuli; Pan, Minggui; Chen, Siyu

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic sulfide (AS) has excellent cytotoxic activity in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) but its activity in solid tumors remains to be explored. Here we show that AS and cyclosporine A (CsA) exerted synergistic inhibitory effect on cell growth and c-Myc expression in HCT116 cells. AS inhibited the expression of PML, c-Myc, NFATc1, NFATc3, and NFATc4, while stimulating the expression of p53 and NFATc2. Knockdown of PML reduced NFATc1, NFATc2, NFATc3 and NFATc4 expression while overexpression of p53 stimulated NFATc2-luciferase activity that was further augmented by AS by binding to a set of p53 responsive elements (PREs) on the NFATc2 promoter. Additionally, overexpression of p53 suppressed NFATc3 and NFATc4. Reciprocally, NFATc3 knockdown enhanced p53 while reducing MDM2 expression indicating that NFATc3 is a negative regulator of p53 while a positive regulator of MDM2, consistent with its tumor-promoting property as knockdown of NFATc3 retarded cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in xenograft. In patients with colon cancer, tumor expression of NFATc2 correlated with superior survival, while nuclear NFATc1 with inferior survival. These results indicate that AS differentially regulates NFAT pathway through PML and p53 and reveal an intricate reciprocal regulatory relationship between NFAT proteins and p53 pathway. PMID:26795951

  5. The activating transcription factor 3 protein suppresses the oncogenic function of mutant p53 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-03-28

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer.

  6. Arecoline-induced phosphorylated p53 and p21(WAF1) protein expression is dependent on ATM/ATR and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase in clone-9 cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Wen; Guh, Jinn-Yuh; Tsai, Jung-Fa; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Chiou, Shean-Jaw; Chuang, Lea-Yea

    2009-06-01

    Betel-quid use is associated with liver cancer whereas its constituent arecoline is cytotoxic, genotoxic, and induces p53-dependent p21(WAF1) protein expression in Clone-9 cells (rat hepatocytes). The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)/rad3-related (ATR)-p53-p21(WAF1) and the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways are involved in the DNA damage response and the pathogenesis of cancers. Thus, we studied the role of ATM/ATR and PI3K in arecoline-induced p53 and p21(WAF1) protein expression in Clone-9 cells. We found that arecoline (0.5 mM) activated the ATM/ATR kinase at 30 min. The arecoline-activated ATM/ATR substrate contained p-p53Ser15. Moreover, arecoline only increased the levels of the p-p53Ser6, p-p53Ser15, and p-p53Ser392 phosphorylated p53 isoforms among the known isoforms. ATM shRNA attenuated arecoline-induced p-p53Ser15 and p21(WAF1) at 24 h. Arecoline (0.5 mM) increased phosphorylation levels of p-AktSer473 and p-mTORSer2448 at 30-60 min. Dominant-negative PI3K plasmids attenuated arecoline-induced p21(WAF1), but not p-p53Ser15, at 24 h. Rapamycin attenuated arecoline-induced phosphrylated p-p53Ser15, but not p21(WAF1), at 24 h. ATM shRNA, but not dominant-negative PI3K plasmids, attenuated arecoline-induced p21(WAF1) gene transcription. We conclude that arecoline activates the ATM/ATR-p53-p21(WAF1) and the PI3K/Akt-mTOR-p53 pathways in Clone-9 cells. Arecoline-induced phosphorylated p-p53Ser15 expression is dependent on ATM whereas arecoline-induced p21(WAF1) protein expression is dependent on ATM and PI3K. Moreover, p21(WAF1) gene is transcriptionally induced by arecoline-activated ATM.

  7. Aerobic glycolysis suppresses p53 activity to provide selective protection from apoptosis upon loss of growth signals or inhibition of BCR-Abl

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Emily F.; Zhao, Yuxing; Goraksha-Hicks, Pankuri; Coloff, Jonathan L.; Gannon, Hugh; Jones, Stephen N.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Unlike the growth factor-dependence of normal cells, cancer cells can maintain growth factor-independent glycolysis and survival through expression of oncogenic kinases, such as BCR-Abl. While targeted kinase inhibition can promote cancer cell death, therapeutic resistance develops frequently and further mechanistic understanding is needed. Cell metabolism may be central to this cell death pathway, as we have shown that growth factor deprivation leads to decreased glycolysis that promotes apoptosis via p53 activation and induction of the pro-apoptotic protein Puma. Here, we extend these findings to demonstrate that elevated glucose metabolism, characteristic of cancer cells, can suppress PKCδ-dependent p53 activation to maintain cell survival after growth factor withdrawal. In contrast, DNA damage-induced p53 activation was PKCδ-independent and was not metabolically sensitive. Both stresses required p53 serine 18 phosphorylation for maximal activity but led to unique patterns of p53 target gene expression, demonstrating distinct activation and response pathways for p53 that were differentially regulated by metabolism. Consistent with oncogenic kinases acting to replace growth factors, treatment of BCR-Abl-expressing cells with the kinase inhibitor imatinib led to reduced metabolism and p53- and Puma-dependent cell death. Accordingly, maintenance of glucose uptake inhibited p53 activation and promoted imatinib resistance. Furthermore, inhibition of glycolysis enhanced imatinib sensitivity in BCR-Abl-expressing cells with wild type p53 but had little effect on p53 null cells. These data demonstrate that distinct pathways regulate p53 after DNA damage and metabolic stress and that inhibiting glucose metabolism may enhance the efficacy of and overcome resistance to targeted molecular cancer therapies. PMID:20876800

  8. The PTTG1-Binding Factor (PBF/PTTG1IP) regulates p53 activity in thyroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Read, Martin L.; Seed, Robert I.; Fong, Jim C.W.; Modasia, Bhavika; Ryan, Gavin A.; Watkins, Rachel J; Gagliano, Teresa; Smith, Vicki E.; Stratford, Anna L.; Kwan, Perkin K; Sharma, Neil; Dixon, Olivia M.; Watkinson, John C.; Boelaert, Kristien; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Turnell, Andrew S.; McCabe, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The PTTG1-Binding Factor (PBF/PTTG1IP) has an emerging repertoire of roles, especially in thyroid biology, and functions as a proto-oncogene. High PBF expression is independently associated with poor prognosis and lower disease-specific survival in human thyroid cancer. However, the precise role of PBF in thyroid tumorigenesis is unclear. Here, we present extensive evidence demonstrating that PBF is a novel regulator of p53, a tumor suppressor protein with a key role in maintaining genetic stability, which is infrequently mutated in differentiated thyroid cancer. By coimmunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays, we show that PBF binds specifically to p53 in thyroid cells, and significantly represses transactivation of responsive promoters. Further, we identify that PBF decreases p53 stability by enhancing ubiquitination, which appears dependent on the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2. Impaired p53 function was evident in a transgenic mouse model with thyroid-specific PBF over-expression (PBF-Tg), which had significantly increased genetic instability as indicated by FISSR-PCR analysis. Consistent with this, ~40% of all DNA repair genes examined were repressed in PBF-Tg primary cultures, including genes with critical roles in maintaining genomic integrity such as Mgmt, Rad51 and Xrcc3. Our data also revealed that PBF induction resulted in upregulation of the E2 enzyme Rad6 in murine thyrocytes, and was associated with Rad6 expression in human thyroid tumors. Overall, this work provides novel insights into the role of the proto-oncogene PBF as a negative regulator of p53 function in thyroid tumorigenesis, where PBF is generally over-expressed and p53 mutations are rare compared to other tumor types. PMID:24506068

  9. UVB-mediated activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase enhances resistance of normal human keratinocytes to apoptosis by stabilizing cytoplasmic p53.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Nadine; Valerie, Kristoffer; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Huot, Jacques

    2002-07-01

    Human keratinocytes respond to UV rays by developing a fast adaptive response that contributes to maintaining their functions and survival. We investigated the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in transducing the UV signals in normal human keratinocytes. We found that UVA, UVB or UVC induced a marked and persistent activation of p38, whereas c-Jun N-terminal kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase were less or not activated respectively. Inhibition of p38 activity by expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p38 or with SB203580 impaired cell viability and led to an increase in UVB-induced apoptosis. This sensitization to apoptosis was independent of caspase activities. Inhibition of p38 did not sensitize transformed HaCaT keratinocytes to UVB-induced apoptosis. In normal keratinocytes, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p53 increased UVB-induced cell death, pointing to a role for p53. In these cells, UVB triggered a p38-dependent phosphorylation of p53 on Ser-15. This phosphorylation was associated with an SB203580-sensitive accumulation of p53, even in the presence of a serine phosphatase inhibitor. Accumulated p53 was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, independently of CRM1 nuclear export. In HaCaT cells, p53 was localized exclusively in the nucleus and its distribution and level were not affected by UVB or p38 inhibition. However, UVB induced an SB203580-insensitive phosphorylation on Ser-15 of mutated p53. Overall, our results suggest that, in normal human keratinocytes, protection against UVB depends on p38-mediated phosphorylation and stabilization of p53 and is tightly associated with the cytoplasmic sequestration of wild-type p53. We conclude that the p38/p53 pathway plays a key role in the adaptive response of normal human keratinocytes against UV stress.

  10. p53 activation by Ni(II) is a HIF-1α independent response causing caspases 9/3-mediated apoptosis in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Victor C.; Morse, Jessica L.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2013-06-15

    Hypoxia mimic nickel(II) is a human respiratory carcinogen with a suspected epigenetic mode of action. We examined whether Ni(II) elicits a toxicologically significant activation of the tumor suppressor p53, which is typically associated with genotoxic responses. We found that treatments of H460 human lung epithelial cells with NiCl{sub 2} caused activating phosphorylation at p53-Ser15, accumulation of p53 protein and depletion of its inhibitor MDM4 (HDMX). Confirming the activation of p53, its knockdown suppressed the ability of Ni(II) to upregulate MDM2 and p21 (CDKN1A). Unlike DNA damage, induction of GADD45A by Ni(II) was p53-independent. Ni(II) also increased p53-Ser15 phosphorylation and p21 expression in normal human lung fibroblasts. Although Ni(II)-induced stabilization of HIF-1α occurred earlier, it had no effect on p53 accumulation and Ser15 phosphorylation. Ni(II)-treated H460 cells showed no evidence of necrosis and their apoptosis and clonogenic death were suppressed by p53 knockdown. The apoptotic role of p53 involved a transcription-dependent program triggering the initiator caspase 9 and its downstream executioner caspase 3. Two most prominently upregulated proapoptotic genes by Ni(II) were PUMA and NOXA but only PUMA induction required p53. Knockdown of p53 also led to derepression of antiapoptotic MCL1 in Ni(II)-treated cells. Overall, our results indicate that p53 plays a major role in apoptotic death of human lung cells by Ni(II). Chronic exposure to Ni(II) may promote selection of resistant cells with inactivated p53, providing an explanation for the origin of p53 mutations by this epigenetic carcinogen. - Highlights: • Ni(II) is a strong activator of the transcription factor p53. • Apoptosis is a principal form of death by Ni(II) in human lung epithelial cells. • Ni(II)-activated p53 triggers caspases 9/3-mediated apoptotic program. • NOXA and PUMA are two main proapoptotic genes induced by Ni(II). • HIF-1α and p53 are independent

  11. FHL2 mediates p53-induced transcriptional activation through a direct association with HIPK2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Wang . E-mail: umsj@sejong.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    To understand the molecular mechanism underlying HIPK2 regulation of the transcriptional activation by p53, we sought to identify the protein that interacts with HIPK2. From our yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) could bind to the C-terminal half of HIPK2. Further assays in yeast mapped the minimal interaction domain to amino acids 812-907 in HIPK2. The interaction was confirmed using a GST pull-down assay in vitro, and an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay and fluorescence microscopy in vivo. FHL2 alone spread throughout both the cytoplasm and nucleus but was redistributed to dot-like structures in the nucleus when HIPK2 was coexpressed in HEK293 cells. When tethered to the Gal4-responsive promoter through the Gal4 DBD fusion, FHL2 showed autonomous transcriptional activity that was enhanced by wild-type HIPK2, but not by the kinase-defective mutant. In addition, FHL2 increased the p53-dependent transcriptional activation and had an additive effect on the activation when coexpressed with HIPK2, which was again not observed with the kinase-defective mutant of HIPK2. Finally, we found a ternary complex of p53, HIPK2, and FHL2 using IP, and their recruitment to the p53-responsive p21Waf1 promoter in chromatin IP assays. Overall, our findings indicate that FHL2 can also regulate p53 via a direct association with HIPK2.

  12. Olaquindox induces DNA damage via the lysosomal and mitochondrial pathway involving ROS production and p53 activation in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jiang, Liping; She, Yan; Chen, Min; Li, Qiujuan; Yang, Guang; Geng, Chengyan; Tang, Liyun; Zhong, Laifu; Jiang, Lijie; Liu, Xiaofang

    2015-11-01

    Olaquindox (OLA) is a potent antibacterial agent used as a feed additive and growth promoter. In this study, the genotoxic potential of OLA was investigated in the human embryonic kidney cell line 293 (HEK293). Results showed that OLA caused significant increases of DNA migration. Lysosomal membrane permeability and mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced after treatment with OLA. OLA was shown to induce ROS production and GSH depletion. The expression of p53 protein is increased in cells incubated with OLA. The activation of p53 and ATM gene was assessed by exposure to OLA. Furthermore, NAC reduced DNA migration, ROS formation, GSH depletion and the expression of the p53 protein and gene. And desipramine significantly decreased AO fluorescence intensity and the expression of the p53 protein and gene. These results support the assumption that OLA exerted genotoxic effects and induced DNA strand breaks in HEK293 cells, possibly through lysosomal-mitochondrial pathway involving ROS production and p53 activation.

  13. Immunohistochemical Assessment of O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase (MGMT) and Its Relationship with p53 Expression in Endometrial Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Eun

    2013-12-01

    O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a DNA repair protein, the loss of MGMT expression was commonly known due to hypermethylation of CpG islands in its promoter region. Overexpression of p53 protein may be associated with downregulated MGMT expression in brain tumors. The aims of this study were to investigate the role of MGMT expression loss and its correlation with p53 overexpression in endometrial cancers. MGMT and p53 expression was examined in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 36 endometrial cancer cases using immnunohistochemical staining. The loss of MGMT expression was detected in 11 (30.6%) out of the 36 endometrial cancers and p53 immunoreactivity was detected in 23 (63.9%) out of the 36 endometrial cancers. Ten (90.9%) of the 11 cases with negative MGMT immunoreactivity showed positive p53 expression, so the loss of MGMT expression was significantly associated with the p53 overexpression (P=0.03). These findings suggest that the loss of MGMT expression may be one of factors capable of p53 overexpression in endometrial cancer. Further studies are needed to define the relation between MGMT and p53 for examining the mechanisms of tissue-specific MGMT expression.

  14. The PTTG1-binding factor (PBF/PTTG1IP) regulates p53 activity in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Read, Martin L; Seed, Robert I; Fong, Jim C W; Modasia, Bhavika; Ryan, Gavin A; Watkins, Rachel J; Gagliano, Teresa; Smith, Vicki E; Stratford, Anna L; Kwan, Perkin K; Sharma, Neil; Dixon, Olivia M; Watkinson, John C; Boelaert, Kristien; Franklyn, Jayne A; Turnell, Andrew S; McCabe, Christopher J

    2014-04-01

    The PTTG1-binding factor (PBF/PTTG1IP) has an emerging repertoire of roles, especially in thyroid biology, and functions as a protooncogene. High PBF expression is independently associated with poor prognosis and lower disease-specific survival in human thyroid cancer. However, the precise role of PBF in thyroid tumorigenesis is unclear. Here, we present extensive evidence demonstrating that PBF is a novel regulator of p53, a tumor suppressor protein with a key role in maintaining genetic stability, which is infrequently mutated in differentiated thyroid cancer. By coimmunoprecipitation and proximity-ligation assays, we show that PBF binds specifically to p53 in thyroid cells and significantly represses transactivation of responsive promoters. Further, we identify that PBF decreases p53 stability by enhancing ubiquitination, which appears dependent on the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2. Impaired p53 function was evident in a transgenic mouse model with thyroid-specific PBF overexpression (transgenic PBF mice), which had significantly increased genetic instability as indicated by fluorescent inter simple sequence repeat-PCR analysis. Consistent with this, approximately 40% of all DNA repair genes examined were repressed in transgenic PBF primary cultures, including genes with critical roles in maintaining genomic integrity such as Mgmt, Rad51, and Xrcc3. Our data also revealed that PBF induction resulted in up-regulation of the E2 enzyme Rad6 in murine thyrocytes and was associated with Rad6 expression in human thyroid tumors. Overall, this work provides novel insights into the role of the protooncogene PBF as a negative regulator of p53 function in thyroid tumorigenesis, in which PBF is generally overexpressed and p53 mutations are rare compared with other tumor types.

  15. No Influence of bcl-2, p53, and p21waf1 protein expression on the outcome of pediatric Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Chabay, Paola; Pesce, Pablo; De Matteo, Elena; Lombardi, Mercedes García; Rey, Guadalupe; Preciado, María Victoria

    2006-09-01

    In Argentina, lymphomas account for 13.6% of all pediatric tumors and 47% of them are Hodgkin lymphoma. Previous studies of lymphoma series have reported the expression of apoptotic and cell cycle proteins. Our aim was to study these markers in our pediatric patients and correlate them with their outcome. Immunohistochemical staining with monoclonal antibodies anti-p53, bcl-2, p21, and mdm2 were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded Hodgkin lymphoma lymph node biopsies from 54 pediatric patients. The analyzed oncogenes p53, bcl-2, p21, and mdm2 exhibited 81%, 44%, 76%, and 90% positive staining, respectively. The most prevalent p53/p21 expression pattern was p53+/p21+, in 57% of cases, whereas concerning p53/mdm2 expression pattern p53+/mdm2+ was observed in 61% of cases. We failed to find any statistically significant correlation between oncogene expression and patient's survival. It seems that p53 plays an important role in lymphomagenesis in our studied population, because it is overexpressed in 81% of Hodgkin lymphoma cases and in more than 50% of cases, it might be able to activate its cellular effectors. Bcl-2 staining observed in 44% of our cases could represent a failure in bcl-2 down-regulation that leads to a rescue event in defective germinal center B-cells, that allows them to develop into Reed-Sternberg and Hodgkin cells.

  16. Chk1 inhibition activates p53 through p38 MAPK in tetraploid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Ilio; Senovilla, Laura; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Criollo, Alfredo; Vivet, Sonia; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-07-01

    We have previously shown that tetraploid cancer cells succumb through a p53-dependent apoptotic pathway when checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is depleted by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or inhibited with 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01). Here, we demonstrate that Chk1 inhibition results in the activating phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Depletion of p38 MAPK by transfection with a siRNA targeting the alpha isoform of p38 MAPK (p38alpha MAPK) abolishes the phosphorylation of p53 on serines 15 and 46 that is induced by Chk1 knockdown. The siRNA-mediated downregulation and pharmacological inhibition of p38alpha MAPK (with SB 203580) also reduces cell death induced by Chk1 knockdown or UCN-01. These results underscore the role of p38 MAPK as a pro-apoptotic kinase in the p53-dependant pathway for the therapeutic elimination of polyploidy cells.

  17. Regulation of p53 expression and apoptosis by vault RNA2-1-5p in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lu; Hao, Qi; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Ping; Zou, Binbin; Zhang, Yu-xiang

    2015-01-01

    nc886 or VRNA2-1 has recently been identified as a noncoding RNA instead of a vault RNA or a pre-microRNA. Several studies have reported that pre-miR-886 plays a tumor-suppressive role in a wide range of cancer cells through its activity as a cellular protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR) ligand and repressor. However, by sequencing stem-PCR products, we found that a microRNA originating from this precursor, vault RNA2-1-5p (VTRNA2-1-5p), occurs in cervical cancer cells. The expression levels of the predicted targets of VTRNA2-1-5p are negatively correlated with VTRNA2-1-5p levels by quantitative reversion transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Previous results have shown that VTRNA2-1-5p is overexpressed in human cervical squamous cell carcinomas (CSCCs) compared with adjacent healthy tissues. Inhibition of VTRNA2-1-5p increases Bax protein expression and apoptotic cell death in cervical cancer cells. Our findings suggest that VTRNA2-1-5p has oncogenic activity related to the progression of cervical cancer. Here, we report that VTRNA2-1-5p directly targeted p53 expression and functioned as an oncomir in cervical cancer. VTRNA2-1-5p inhibition decreased cervical cancer cell invasion, proliferation, and tumorigenicity while increasing apoptosis and p53 expression. Interestingly, VTRNA2-1-5p inhibition also increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HeLa and SiHa cells. In human clinical cervical cancer specimens, low p53 expression and high VTRNA2-1-5p expression were positively associated. In addition, VTRNA2-1-5p was found to directly target the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of p53. We propose that VTRNA2-1-5p is a direct regulator of p53 and suggest that it plays an essential role in the apoptosis and proliferation of cervical cancer cells. PMID:26318295

  18. A new invertebrate member of the p53 gene family is developmentally expressed and responds to polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed Central

    Jessen-Eller, Kathryn; Kreiling, Jill A; Begley, Gail S; Steele, Marjorie E; Walker, Charles W; Stephens, Raymond E; Reinisch, Carol L

    2002-01-01

    The cell-cycle checkpoint protein p53 both directs terminal differentiation and protects embryos from DNA damage. To study invertebrate p53 during early development, we identified three differentially expressed p53 family members (p53, p97, p120) in the surf clam, Spisula solidissima. In these mollusks, p53 and p97 occur in both embryonic and adult tissue, whereas p120 is exclusively embryonic. We sequenced, cloned, and characterized p120 cDNA. The predicted protein, p120, resembles p53 across all evolutionarily conserved regions and contains a C-terminal extension with a sterile alpha motif (SAM) as in p63 and p73. These vertebrate forms of p53 are required for normal inflammatory, epithelial, and neuronal development. Unlike clam p53 and p97, p120 mRNA and protein levels are temporally expressed in embryos, with mRNA levels decreasing with increasing p120 protein (R(2) = 0.97). Highest surf clam p120 mRNA levels coincide with the onset of neuronal growth. In earlier work we have shown that neuronal development is altered by exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a neurotoxic environmental contaminant. In this study we show that PCBs differentially affect expression of the three surf clam p53 family members. p120 mRNA and protein are reduced the most and earliest in development, p97 protein shows a smaller and later reduction, and p53 protein levels do not change. For the first time we report that unlike p53 and p97, p120 is specifically embryonic and expressed in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, p120 responds to PCBs by 48 hr when PCB-induced suppression of the serotonergic nervous system occurs. PMID:11940455

  19. MicroRNA 203 expression in keratinocytes is dependent on regulation of p53 levels by E6.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Declan J; McDade, Simon S; Patel, Daksha; McCance, Dennis J

    2010-10-01

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miRNA 203 (miR-203), which has previously been shown to play an important role in epithelial cell biology by regulating p63 levels. We investigated how expression of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) oncoproteins E6 and E7 affected miR-203 expression during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We demonstrated that miR-203 expression is reduced in HFKs where p53 function is compromised, either by the viral oncoprotein E6 or by knockout of p53 using short hairpin RNAs (p53i). We show that the induction of miR-203 observed during calcium-induced differentiation of HFKs is significantly reduced in HFKs expressing E6 and in p53i HFKs. Induction of miR-203 in response to DNA damage is also reduced in the absence of p53. We report that proliferation of HFKs is dependent on the level of miR-203 expression and that overexpression of miR-203 can reduce overproliferation in E6/E7-expressing and p53i HFKs. In summary, these results indicate that expression of miR-203 is dependent on p53, which may explain how expression of HPV16 E6 can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation, as well as the response to DNA damage, in keratinocytes.

  20. Activation of PPARγ/P53 signaling is required for curcumin to induce hepatic stellate cell senescence

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H; Lian, N; Zhang, F; Chen, L; Chen, Q; Lu, C; Bian, M; Shao, J; Wu, L; Zheng, S

    2016-01-01

    Activation of quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the major event in hepatic fibrogenesis, along with enhancement of cell proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix. Although inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis are potential strategies to block the activation of HSCs, a better understanding of the senescence of activated HSCs can provide a new therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of liver fibrosis. The antioxidant curcumin, a phytochemical from turmeric, has been shown to suppress HSC activation in vitro and in vivo. The current work was aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin on senescence of activated HSCs and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In this study, curcumin promoted the expression of senescence marker Hmga1 in rat fibrotic liver. In addition, curcumin increased the number of senescence-associated β-galactosidase-positive HSCs in vitro. At the same time, curcumin induced HSC senescence by elevating the expression of senescence markers P16, P21 and Hmga1, concomitant with reduced abundance of HSC activation markers α-smooth muscle actin and α1(I)-procollagen in cultured HSCs. Moreover, curcumin affected the cell cycle and telomerase activity. We further demonstrated that P53 pharmacological inhibitor pifithrin-α (PFT-α) or transfection with P53 siRNA abrogated the curcumin-induced HSC senescence in vitro. Meanwhile, curcumin disruption of P53 leading to increased senescence of activated HSCs was further verified in vivo. Further studies indicated that curcumin promoted the expression of P53 through a PPARγ activation-dependent mechanism. Moreover, promoting PPARγ transactivating activity by a PPARγ agonist 15d-PGJ2 markedly enhanced curcumin induction of senescence of activated HSCs. However, the PPARγ antagonist PD68235 eliminated curcumin induction of HSC senescence. Taken together, our results provided a novel insight into the mechanisms underlying curcumin inhibition of HSC

  1. Inhibition of NAMPT pathway by FK866 activates the function of p53 in HEK293T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Basant Kumar; Dittrich, Tino; Chandra, Prakash; Becker, Annette; Lippka, Yannick; Selvakumar, Divakarvel; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Reinhardt, Dirk; Welte, Karl

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In 293T cells, p53 is considered to be inactive due to its interaction with the large T-antigen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation of p53 at lysine 382 is important for its functional activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First evidence to document the presence of a functional p53 in 293T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of NAMPT/SIRT pathway by FK866 in 293T cells increases the functional activity of p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This activation of p53 involves reversible acetylation of p53 at lysine 382. -- Abstract: Inactivation of p53 protein by endogenous and exogenous carcinogens is involved in the pathogenesis of different human malignancies. In cancer associated with SV-40 DNA tumor virus, p53 is considered to be non-functional mainly due to its interaction with the large T-antigen. Using the 293T cell line (HEK293 cells transformed with large T antigen) as a model, we provide evidence that p53 is one of the critical downstream targets involved in FK866-mediated killing of 293T cells. A reduced rate of apoptosis and an increased number of cells in S-phase was accompanied after knockdown of p53 in these cells. Inhibition of NAMPT by FK866, or inhibition of SIRT by nicotinamide decreased proliferation and triggered death of 293T cells involving the p53 acetylation pathway. Additionally, knockdown of p53 attenuated the effect of FK866 on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. The data presented here shed light on two important facts: (1) that p53 in 293T cells is active in the presence of FK866, an inhibitor of NAMPT pathway; (2) the apoptosis induced by FK866 in 293T cells is associated with increased acetylation of p53 at Lys382, which is required for the functional activity of p53.

  2. Characterization of gene expression of a p53 homologue in the soft-shell clam (Mya arenaria).

    PubMed

    Van Beneden, R J; Walker, C W; Laughner, E S

    1997-06-01

    Expression of a clam p53 homologue was examined in tissues of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria, from Beal's Island, Maine. Southern analysis reveals that p53, in this population, is a single copy gene. A 1.7 to 1.9-kb p53 mRNA was detected at very low levels in normal adult gonadal tissue. This transcript is similar in size to that of vertebrate p53 genes. RNAs were harvested from several tissues, including individual clam gonads during gametogenesis. These were hybridized in ribonuclease (RNase) protection assays to a p53 antisense probe designed from the clam p53 cDNA sequence. RNase protection profiles indicate that p53 mRNA is expressed in adductor muscle, gill, and gonads of both sexes. Although p53 mRNA is expressed throughout gametogenesis in mature male and female gonads, ovaries have significantly higher levels of expression. The significance of our findings to the study of normal clam gametogenesis and to etiology of gonadal tumors is discussed.

  3. Targeting RING domains of Mdm2-MdmX E3 complex activates apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Xu, C; Ling, X; Fan, C; Buckley, B P; Chernov, M V; Ellis, L; Li, F; Muñoz, I G; Wang, X

    2015-12-31

    Reactivation of tumor-suppressor p53 for targeted cancer therapy is an attractive strategy for cancers bearing wild-type (WT) p53. Targeting the Mdm2-p53 interface or MdmX ((MDM4), mouse double minute 4)-p53 interface or both has been a focus in the field. However, targeting the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2-MdmX really interesting new gene (RING)-RING interaction as a novel anticancer strategy has never been explored. In this report, we describe the identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors targeting Mdm2-MdmX RING-RING interaction as a new class of E3 ligase inhibitors. With a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based E3 activity assay in high-throughput screening of a chemical library, we identified inhibitors (designated as MMRis (Mdm2-MdmX RING domain inhibitors)) that specifically inhibit Mdm2-MdmX E3 ligase activity toward Mdm2 and p53 substrates. MMRi6 and its analog MMRi64 are capable of disrupting Mdm2-MdmX interactions in vitro and activating p53 in cells. In leukemia cells, MMRi64 potently induces downregulation of Mdm2 and MdmX. In contrast to Nutlin3a, MMRi64 only induces the expression of pro-apoptotic gene PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) with minimal induction of growth-arresting gene p21. Consequently, MMRi64 selectively induces the apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells. Owing to the distinct mechanisms of action of MMRi64 and Nutlin3a, their combination synergistically induces p53 and apoptosis. Taken together, this study reveals that Mdm2-MdmX has a critical role in apoptotic response of the p53 pathway and MMRi64 may serve as a new pharmacological tool for p53 studies and a platform for cancer drug development.

  4. p53 directly activates cystatin D/CST5 to mediate mesenchymal-epithelial transition: a possible link to tumor suppression by vitamin D3

    PubMed Central

    Hünten, Sabine; Hermeking, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Cystatin D (CST5) encodes an inhibitor of cysteine proteases of the cathepsin family and is directly induced by the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Interestingly, vitamin D3 exerts tumor suppressive effects in a variety of tumor types. In colorectal cancer (CRC) cells CST5 was shown to mediate mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). We recently performed an integrated genomic and proteomic screen to identify targets of the p53 tumor suppressor in CRC cells. Thereby, we identified CST5 as a putative p53 target gene. Here, we validated and characterized CST5 as a direct p53 target gene. After activation of a conditional p53 allele, CST5 was upregulated on mRNA and protein levels. Treatment with nutlin-3a or etoposide induced CST5 in a p53-dependent manner. These regulations were direct, since ectopic and endogenous p53 occupied a conserved binding site in the CST5 promoter region. In addition, treatment with calcitriol, the active vitamin D3 metabolite, and simultaneous activation of p53 resulted in enhanced CST5 induction and increased repression of SNAIL, an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) inducing transcription factor. Furthermore, CST5 inactivation decreased p53-induced mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) as evidenced by decreased inhibition of SNAIL and of migration by p53. Furthermore, CST5 expression was directly repressed by SNAIL. In summary, these results imply CST5 as an important mediator of tumor suppression by p53 in colorectal cancer. In addition, they suggest that a combined treatment activating p53 and the vitamin D3 pathway may function via induction of CST5. PMID:26158294

  5. Mitochondrial STAT3 contributes to transformation of Barrett's epithelial cells that express oncogenic Ras in a p53-independent fashion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunhua; Huo, Xiaofang; Agoston, Agoston T; Zhang, Xi; Theiss, Arianne L; Cheng, Edaire; Zhang, Qiuyang; Zaika, Alexander; Pham, Thai H; Wang, David H; Lobie, Peter E; Odze, Robert D; Spechler, Stuart J; Souza, Rhonda F

    2015-08-01

    Metaplastic epithelial cells of Barrett's esophagus transformed by the combination of p53-knockdown and oncogenic Ras expression are known to activate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). When phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 (Tyr705), STAT3 functions as a nuclear transcription factor that can contribute to oncogenesis. STAT3 phosphorylated at serine 727 (Ser727) localizes in mitochondria, but little is known about mitochondrial STAT3's contribution to carcinogenesis in Barrett's esophagus, which is the focus of this study. We introduced a constitutively active variant of human STAT3 (STAT3CA) into the following: 1) non-neoplastic Barrett's (BAR-T) cells; 2) BAR-T cells with p53 knockdown; and 3) BAR-T cells that express oncogenic H-Ras(G12V). STAT3CA transformed only the H-Ras(G12V)-expressing BAR-T cells (evidenced by loss of contact inhibition, formation of colonies in soft agar, and generation of tumors in immunodeficient mice), and did so in a p53-independent fashion. The transformed cells had elevated levels of both mitochondrial (Ser727) and nuclear (Tyr705) phospho-STAT3. Introduction of a STAT3CA construct with a mutated tyrosine phosphorylation site into H-Ras(G12V)-expressing Barrett's cells resulted in high levels of mitochondrial phospho-STAT3 (Ser727) with little or no nuclear phospho-STAT3 (Tyr705), and the cells still formed tumors in immunodeficient mice. Thus tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 is not required for tumor formation in Ras-expressing Barrett's cells. We conclude that mitochondrial STAT3 (Ser727) can contribute to oncogenesis in Barrett's cells that express oncogenic Ras. These findings suggest that agents targeting STAT3 might be useful for chemoprevention in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

  6. p53 induces miR199a-3p to suppress SOCS7 for STAT3 activation and renal fibrosis in UUO

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruhao; Xu, Xuan; Li, Huiling; Chen, Jinwen; Xiang, Xudong; Dong, Zheng; Zhang, Dongshan

    2017-01-01

    The role of p53 in renal fibrosis has recently been suggested, however, its function remains controversial and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of p53 attenuated renal interstitial fibrosis, apoptosis, and inflammation in mice with unilateral urethral obstruction (UUO). Interestingly, p53 blockade was associated with the suppression of miR-215-5p, miR-199a-5p&3p, and STAT3. In cultured human kidney tubular epithelial cells (HK-2), TGF-β1 treatment induced fibrotic changes, including collagen I and vimentin expression, being associated with p53 accumulation, p53 Ser15 phosphorylation, and miR-199a-3p expression. Inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α blocked STAT3 activation and the expression of miR-199a-3p, collagen I, and vimentin during TGF-β1 treatment. Over-expression of miR-199a-3p increased TGFβ1-induced collagen I and vimentin expression and restored SOCS7 expression. Furthermore, SOCS7 was identified as a target gene of miR-199a-3p, and silencing of SOCS7 promoted STAT3 activation. ChIp analyses indicated the binding of p53 to the promoter region of miR-199a-3p. Consistently, kidney biopsies from patients with IgA nephropathy and diabetic nephropathy exhibited substantial activation of p53 and STAT3, decreased expression of SOCS7, and increase in profibrotic proteins and miR-199a-3p. Together, these results demonstrate the novel p53/miR-199a-3p/SOCS7/STAT3 pathway in renal interstitial fibrosis. PMID:28240316

  7. FGF1 nuclear translocation is required for both its neurotrophic activity and its p53-dependent apoptosis protection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Enfedaque, Aida; Bouleau, Sylvina; Laurent, Maryvonne; Courtois, Yves; Mignotte, Bernard; Vayssière, Jean-Luc; Renaud, Flore

    2009-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) is a differentiation and survival factor for neuronal cells both in vitro and in vivo. FGF1 activities can be mediated not only by paracrine and autocrine pathways involving FGF receptors but also by an intracrine pathway, which is an underestimated mode of action. Indeed, FGF1 lacks a secretion signal peptide and contains a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), which is consistent with its usual intracellular and nuclear localization. To progress in the comprehension of the FGF1 intracrine pathway in neuronal cells, we examined the role of the nuclear translocation of FGF1 for its neurotrophic activity as well as for its protective activity against p53-dependent apoptosis. Thus, we have transfected PC12 cells with different FGF1 expression vectors encoding wild type or mutant (Delta NLS) FGF1. This deletion inhibited both FGF1 nuclear translocation and FGF1 neurotrophic activity (including differentiation and serum-free cell survival). We also show that endogenous FGF1 protection of PC12 cells against p53-dependent cell death requires FGF1 nuclear translocation. Strikingly, wild type FGF1 is found interacting with p53, in contrast to the mutant FGF1 deleted of its NLS, suggesting the presence of direct and/or indirect interactions between FGF1 and p53 pathways. Thus, we present evidences that FGF1 may act by a nuclear pathway to induce neuronal differentiation and to protect the cells from apoptosis whether cell death is induced by serum depletion or p53 activation.

  8. Changes in O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Homeostasis Activate the p53 Pathway in Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Rafaela Muniz; Madan, Rashna; Chien, Jeremy; Dias, Wagner Barbosa; Slawson, Chad

    2016-09-02

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic post-translational modification consisting of the addition of a single N-acetylglucosamine sugar to serine and threonine residues in proteins by the enzyme O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), whereas the enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) removes the modification. In cancer, tumor samples present with altered O-GlcNAcylation; however, changes in O-GlcNAcylation are not consistent between tumor types. Interestingly, the tumor suppressor p53 is modified by O-GlcNAc, and most solid tumors contain mutations in p53 leading to the loss of p53 function. Because ovarian cancer has a high frequency of p53 mutation rates, we decided to investigate the relationship between O-GlcNAcylation and p53 function in ovarian cancer. We measured a significant decrease in O-GlcNAcylation of tumor tissue in an ovarian tumor microarray. Furthermore, O-GlcNAcylation was increased, and OGA protein and mRNA levels were decreased in ovarian tumor cell lines not expressing the protein p53. Treatment with the OGA inhibitor Thiamet-G (TMG), silencing of OGA, or overexpression of OGA and OGT led to p53 stabilization, increased nuclear localization, and increased protein and mRNA levels of p53 target genes. These data suggest that changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the p53 pathway. Combination treatment of the chemotherapeutic cisplatin with TMG decreased tumor cell growth and enhanced cell cycle arrest without impairing cytotoxicity. The effects of TMG on tumor cell growth were partially dependent on wild type p53 activation. In conclusion, changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the wild type p53 pathway in ovarian cancer cells, and OGA inhibition has the potential as an adjuvant treatment for ovarian carcinoma.

  9. Hepatitis B virus X protein inhibits p53 sequence-specific DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and association with transcription factor ERCC3.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X W; Forrester, K; Yeh, H; Feitelson, M A; Gu, J R; Harris, C C

    1994-01-01

    Chronic active hepatitis caused by infection with hepatitis B virus, a DNA virus, is a major risk factor for human hepatocellular carcinoma. Since the oncogenicity of several DNA viruses is dependent on the interaction of their viral oncoproteins with cellular tumor-suppressor gene products, we investigated the interaction between hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX) and human wild-type p53 protein. HBX complexes with the wild-type p53 protein and inhibits its sequence-specific DNA binding in vitro. HBX expression also inhibits p53-mediated transcriptional activation in vivo and the in vitro association of p53 and ERCC3, a general transcription factor involved in nucleotide excision repair. Therefore, HBX may affect a wide range of p53 functions and contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images PMID:8134379

  10. Abrogation of p53 by its antisense in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells increases cyclin D1 via activation of Akt and promotion of cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Kumari, Ratna; Upadhyay, Ankur Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2007-11-15

    The p53 protein has been a subject of intense research interest since its discovery as about 50% of human cancers carry p53 mutations. Mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequent genetic lesions in breast cancers suggesting a critical role of p53 in breast cancer development, growth and chemosensitivity. This report describes the derivation and characterization of MCF-7As53, an isogenic cell line derived from MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells in which p53 was abrogated by antisense p53 cDNA. Similar to MCF-7 and simultaneously selected hygromycin resistant MCF-7H cells, MCF-7As53 cells have consistent basal epithelial phenotype, morphology, and estrogen receptor expression levels at normal growth conditions. Present work documents investigation of molecular variations, growth kinetics, and cell cycle related studies in relation to absence of wild-type p53 protein and its transactivation potential as well. Even though wild-type tumor suppressor p53 is an activator of cell growth arrest and apoptosis-mediator genes such as p21, Bax, and GADD45 in MCF-7As53 cells, no alterations in expression levels of these genes were detected. The doubling time of these cells decreased due to depletion of G0/G1 cell phase because of constitutive activation of Akt and increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. This proliferative property was abrogated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3-K/Akt signaling pathway. Therefore this p53 null cell line indicates that p53 is an indispensable component of cellular signaling system which is regulated by caveolin-1 expression, involving Akt activation and increase in cyclin D1, thereby promoting proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  11. P53 and Murine Double Mimute 2 (MDM2) Expression Changes and Significance in Different Types of Endometrial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhongyong; Xu, Wanqing; Dan, Gang; Liu, Yuan; Xiong, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometrial lesions are common in obstetrics and gynecology, including endometrial polyps, uterine adenomyosis, and malignant endometrial adenocarcinoma. Endometrial lesions seriously affect women’s health, fertility, quality of life, and life safety. As a pro-apoptosis gene, p53 is considered to be closely related with human tumors. Murine double mimute 2 (MDM2) is an oncogene that can promote tumor occurrence and development. P53 and MDM2 expression and significance in different types of endometrial lesions have not been fully elucidated. Material/Methods Normal endometrium, endometrial polyps, uterine adenomyosis, and endometrial adenocarcinoma tissue samples were collected. Real-time PCR was used to detect p53 and MDM2 mRNA expression. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis were applied to test p53 and MDM2 protein expression. Their correlation with clinical staging of endometrial adenocarcinoma was analyzed. Results P53 and MDM2 mRNA and protein expression were significantly elevated in the endometrial polyps group and the endometrial adenocarcinoma group compared with the normal control group (P<0.05). Their levels increased more obviously in endometrial adenocarcinoma compared with endometrial polyps (P<0.05). P53 and MDM2 mRNA and protein expression were slightly enhanced in uterine adenomyosis compared with normal controls, but this difference lacked statistical significance (P>0.05). P53 and MDM2 mRNA and protein level showed a positive correlation. Significantly higher expression of p53 or MDM2 was observed in patients with stage III compared to those in patients with stage II. Higher expression was also observed in patients with stage II than in patients with stage I. Conclusions P53 and MDM2 mRNA and protein were elevated in endometrial polyps and endometrial adenocarcinoma and their expressions were correlated with clinical staging of endometrial adenocarcinoma. They can promote cancer occurrence and development, and can

  12. Concordant p53 and mdm-2 protein expression in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma and adjacent lichen sclerosus.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J A; Amin, S; Malfetano, J; Tien, A T; Selkin, B; Hou, J; Goncharuk, V; Wilson, V L; Rohwedder, A; Ambros, R; Ross, J S

    2001-06-01

    To determine if carcinogenic events in vulvar skin precede the onset of morphologic atypia, the authors investigated for derangements in DNA content, cell proliferation, and cell death in vulvar carcinomas and surrounding skin in 140 samples of tumor and surrounding skin collected from 35 consecutive vulvectomy specimen for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) 3. Vulvar non-cancer excisions were used as controls. Investigations consisted of histologic classification and measurement of 9 variables--epidermal thickness (acanthosis and rete ridge length), immunolabeling index (LI) for 3 proteins (p53 protein, Ki-67, and mdm-2), pattern of p53 expression (dispersed vs. compact), DNA content index, and presence of aneuploidy by image analysis and apoptotic rate by Apotag labeling. Significant positive correlations were found for all nine variables studied versus increasing histologic severity in two proposed histologic stepwise models of vulvar carcinogenesis (lichen sclerosus (LS) and VIN 3 undifferentiated associated SCC groups). High p53 LI (>25) and the compact pattern of p53 expression (suspected oncoprotein) significantly correlated with LS and its associated vulvar samples compared with samples not associated with LS (P < or = 0.001). Furthermore, p53 LI, mdm-2 LI, and pattern of p53 expression were concordant between patient matched samples of LS and SCC. In addition, mdm-2 LI significantly correlated with dispersed pattern p53 LI suggesting a response to wild-type p53 protein accumulation. These findings support the hypothesis that neoplastic transformation occurs in sequential steps and compromises proteins involved in the cell cycle control. Concordance of p53 and mdm-2 protein expression in LS and adjacent SCC provides evidence that LS can act as a precursor lesion in the absence of morphologic atypia. Overexpression of mdm-2 with stabilization and inactivation of p53 protein may provide an alternate pathway for vulvar

  13. P53 tumor suppressor gene and protein expression is altered in cell lines derived from spontaneous and alpha-radiation-induced canine lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, L.A.; Johnson, N.F.; Lechner, J.F.

    1994-11-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequently occurring gene alterations in malignant human cancers, including lung cancer. In lung cancer, common point mutations within conserved exons of the p53 gene result in a stabilized form of mutant protein which is detectable in most cases by immunohistochemistry. In addition to point mutations, allelic loss, rearrangements, and deletions of the p53 gene have also been detected in both human and rodent tumors. It has been suggested that for at least some epithelial neoplasms, the loss of expression of wild-type p53 protein may be more important for malignant transformation than the acquisition of activating mutations. Mechanisms responsible for the loss of expression of wild-type protein include gene deletion or rearrangement, nonsense or stop mutations, mutations within introns or upstream regulatory regions of the gene, and accelerated rates of degradation of the protein by DNA viral oncoproteins.

  14. Phosphorylation of p53 on Ser15 during cell cycle caused by Topo I and Topo II inhibitors in relation to ATM and Chk2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Traganos, Frank; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    The DNA topoisomerase I (topo1) inhibitor topotecan (TPT) and topo2 inhibitor mitoxantrone (MXT) damage DNA inducing formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We have recently examined the kinetics of ATM and Chk2 activation as well as histone H2AX phosphorylation, the reporters of DNA damage, in individual human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells treated with these drugs. Using a phospho-specific Ab to tumor suppressor protein p53 phosphorylated on Ser15 (p53-Ser15P) combined with an Ab that detects p53 regardless of the phosphorylation status and multiparameter cytometry we correlated the TPT- and MXT- induced p53-Ser15P with ATM and Chk2 activation as well as with H2AX phosphorylation in relation to the cell cycle phase. In untreated interphase cells, p53-Ser15P had “patchy” localization throughout the nucleoplasm while mitotic cells showed strong p53-Ser15P cytoplasmic immunofluorescence (IF). The intense phosphorylation of p53-Ser15, combined with activation of ATM and Chk2 (involving centrioles) as well as phosphorylation of H2AX seen in the untreated mitotic cells, suggest mobilization of the DNA damage detection/repair machinery in controlling cytokinesis. In the nuclei of cells treated with TPT or MXT, the expression of p53-Ser15P appeared as closely packed foci of intense IF. Following TPT treatment, the induction of p53-Ser15P was most pronounced in S-phase cells while no significant cell cycle phase differences were seen in cells treated with MXT. The maximal increase in p53-Ser15P expression, rising up to 2.5-fold above the level of its constitutive expression, was observed in cells treated with TPT or MXT for 4–6 h. This maximum expression of p53-Ser15P coincided in time with the peak of Chk2 activation but not with ATM activation and H2AX phosphorylation, both of which crested 1–2 h after the treatment with TPT or MXT. The respective kinetics of p53-Ser15 phosphorylation versus ATM and Chk2 activation suggest that in response to DNA damage by

  15. Effects of HDM2 antagonism on sunitinib resistance, p53 activation, SDF-1 induction, and tumor infiltration by CD11b+/Gr-1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The studies reported herein were undertaken to determine if the angiostatic function of p53 could be exploited as an adjunct to VEGF-targeted therapy in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods Nude/beige mice bearing human RCC xenografts were treated with various combinations of sunitinib and the HDM2 antagonist MI-319. Tumors were excised at various time points before and during treatment and analyzed by western blot and IHC for evidence of p53 activation and function. Results Sunitinib treatment increased p53 levels in RCC xenografts and transiently induced the expression of p21waf1, Noxa, and HDM2, the levels of which subsequently declined to baseline (or undetectable) with the emergence of sunitinib resistance. The development of resistance and the suppression of p53-dependent gene expression temporally correlated with the induction of the p53 antagonist HDMX. The concurrent administration of MI-319 markedly increased the antitumor and anti-angiogenic activities of sunitinib and led to sustained p53-dependent gene expression. It also suppressed the expression of the chemokine SDF-1 (CXCL12) and the influx of CD11b+/Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) otherwise induced by sunitinib. Although p53 knockdown markedly reduced the production of the angiostatic peptide endostatin, the production of endostatin was not augmented by MI-319 treatment. Conclusions The evasion of p53 function (possibly through the expression of HDMX) is an essential element in the development of resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy in RCC. The maintenance of p53 function through the concurrent administration of an HDM2 antagonist is an effective means of delaying or preventing the development of resistance. PMID:23497256

  16. Transcription factor p53 can regulate proliferation, apoptosis and secretory activity of luteinizing porcine ovarian granulosa cell cultured with and without ghrelin and FSH.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, A V; Benco, A; Tandlmajerova, A; Vasícek, D; Kotwica, J; Darlak, K; Valenzuela, F

    2008-11-01

    The aim of our in vitro experiments was to examine the role of transcription factor p53 in controlling the basic functions of ovarian cells and their response to hormonal treatments. Porcine ovarian granulosa cells, transfected and non-transfected with a gene construct encoding p53, were cultured with ghrelin and FSH (all at concentrations of 0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/ml). Accumulation of p53, of apoptosis-related (MAP3K5) and proliferation-related (cyclin B1) substances was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. The secretion of progesterone (P(4)), oxytocin (OT), prostaglandin F (PGF), and E (PGE) was measured by RIA. Transfection with the p53 gene construct promoted accumulation of this transcription factor within cells. It also stimulated the expression of a marker of apoptosis (MAP3K5). Over-expression of p53 resulted in reduced accumulation of a marker of proliferation (cyclin B1), P(4), and PGF secretion and increased OT and PGE secretion. Ghrelin, when added alone, did not affect p53 or P(4), but reduced MAP3K5 and increased PGF and PGE secretion. Over-expression of p53 reversed the effect of ghrelin on OT, caused it to be inhibitory to P(4) secretion, but did not modify its action on MAP3K5, PGF, or PGE. FSH promoted the accumulation of p53, MAP3K5, and cyclin B1; these effects were unaffected by p53 transfection. These multiple effects of the p53 gene construct on luteinizing granulosa cells, cultured with and without hormones 1) demonstrate the effects of ghrelin and FSH on porcine ovarian cell apoptosis and secretory activity, 2) confirm the involvement of p53 in promoting apoptosis and inhibiting P(4) secretion in these cells, 3) provide the first evidence that p53 suppress proliferation of ovarian cells, 4) provide the first evidence that p53 is involved in the control of ovarian peptide hormone (OT) and prostaglandin (PGF and PGE) secretion, and 5) suggest that p53 can modulate, but probably not mediate, the effects of ghrelin and FSH on the ovary.

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor activation inhibits p53-induced apoptosis of MCF10Amyc cells via induction of protein kinase Cε.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Moammir H; Shen, Hong; Maki, Carl G

    2012-08-24

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that can promote apoptosis or survival in a cell-specific manner. Activated GR has been reported to inhibit apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells by increasing pro-survival gene expression. In this study, activated GR inhibited p53-dependent apoptosis in MCF10A cells and human mammary epithelial cells that overexpress the MYC oncogene. Specifically, GR agonists hydrocortisone or dexamethasone inhibited p53-dependent apoptosis induced by cisplatin, ionizing radiation, or the MDM2 antagonist Nutlin-3. In contrast, the GR antagonist RU486 sensitized the cells to apoptosis by these agents. Apoptosis inhibition was associated with maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, diminished caspase-3 and -7 activation, and increased expression at both the mRNA and protein level of the anti-apoptotic PKC family member PKCε. Knockdown of PKCε via siRNA targeting reversed the protective effect of dexamethasone and restored apoptosis sensitivity. These data provide evidence that activated GR can inhibit p53-dependent apoptosis through induction of the anti-apoptotic factor PKCε.

  18. Dihydromyricetin promotes hepatocellular carcinoma regression via a p53 activation-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingyu; Liu, Jie; Liu, Bin; Xia, Juan; Chen, Nianping; Chen, Xiaofeng; Cao, Yi; Zhang, Chen; Lu, CaiJie; Li, Mingyi; Zhu, Runzhi

    2014-01-01

    The development of antitumor chemotherapy drugs remains a key goal for oncologists, and natural products provide a vast resource for anti-cancer drug discovery. In the current study, we found that the flavonoid dihydromyricetin (DHM) exhibited antitumor activity against liver cancer cells, including primary cells obtained from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In contrast, DHM was not cytotoxic to immortalized normal liver cells. Furthermore, DHM treatment resulted in the growth inhibition and remission of xenotransplanted tumors in nude mice. Our results further demonstrated that this antitumor activity was caused by the activation of the p53-dependent apoptosis pathway via p53 phosphorylation at serine (15Ser). Moreover, our results showed that DHM plays a dual role in the induction of cell death when administered in combination with cisplatin, a common clinical drug that kills primary hepatoma cells but not normal liver cells. PMID:24717393

  19. Dihydromyricetin promotes hepatocellular carcinoma regression via a p53 activation-dependent mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingyu; Liu, Jie; Liu, Bin; Xia, Juan; Chen, Nianping; Chen, Xiaofeng; Cao, Yi; Zhang, Chen; Lu, Caijie; Li, Mingyi; Zhu, Runzhi

    2014-04-01

    The development of antitumor chemotherapy drugs remains a key goal for oncologists, and natural products provide a vast resource for anti-cancer drug discovery. In the current study, we found that the flavonoid dihydromyricetin (DHM) exhibited antitumor activity against liver cancer cells, including primary cells obtained from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In contrast, DHM was not cytotoxic to immortalized normal liver cells. Furthermore, DHM treatment resulted in the growth inhibition and remission of xenotransplanted tumors in nude mice. Our results further demonstrated that this antitumor activity was caused by the activation of the p53-dependent apoptosis pathway via p53 phosphorylation at serine (15Ser). Moreover, our results showed that DHM plays a dual role in the induction of cell death when administered in combination with cisplatin, a common clinical drug that kills primary hepatoma cells but not normal liver cells.

  20. The Enigma of p53.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Guillermina

    2016-12-08

    This perspective will focus on the physiological impact of wild-type and mutant p53 activities. In particular, the tissue-specific nature of activation of p53 targets and their subsequent effects on cell behavior will be discussed. Because mutations in p53 are common in human cancers, the regulation and physiological consequences of mutant p53 proteins will also be discussed.

  1. MiRNA-621 sensitizes breast cancer to chemotherapy by suppressing FBXO11 and enhancing p53 activity

    PubMed Central

    Xue, J; Chi, Y; Chen, Y; Huang, S; Ye, X; Niu, J; Wang, W; Pfeffer, L M; Shao, Z-m; Wu, Z-H; Wu, J

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been demonstrated to have critical roles in regulating cancer cell proliferation, survival and sensitivity to chemotherapy. The potential application of using miRNAs to predict therapeutic response to cancer treatment holds high promise, but miRNAs with predictive value remain to be identified and underlying mechanisms have not been completely understood. Here, we show a strong correlation between miR-621 expression and chemosensitivity to paclitaxel plus carboplatin (PTX/CBP) regimen, an effective neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer patients. High level of miR-621 predicts better response to PTX/CBP regimen neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients, who also tend to achieve pathological complete response. Ectopic overexpression of miR-621 promoted apoptosis and increased chemosensitivity to PTX and CBP both in cultured breast cancer cells and in xenograft tumor model. We further show that FBXO11 is a direct functional target of miR-621 and miR-621 level is negatively correlated with FBXO11 expression in breast cancer patients. Ectopic expression of FBXO11 attenuated increased apoptosis in breast cancer cells overexpressing miR-621 upon PTX or CBP treatment. Consistently, high FBXO11 expression significantly correlated with poor survival in breast cancer patients. Mechanistically, we found in breast cancer cells FBXO11 interacts with p53 and promotes its neddylation, which suppressed the p53 transactivity. Accordingly, miR-621-dependent FBXO11 suppression enhanced p53 activity and increased apoptosis in breast cancer cells exposed to chemotherapeutics. Taken together, our data suggest that miR-621 enhances chemosensitivity of breast cancer cells to PTX/CBP chemotherapy by suppressing FBXO11-depedent inhibition of p53. miR-621 may serve as a predictive biomarker and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment. PMID:25867061

  2. Loss of p53 enhances the function of the endoplasmic reticulum through activation of the IRE1α/XBP1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Rika; Byun, Sanguine; Yoon, Kyoung Wan; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Mandinova, Anna; Lee, Sam W.

    2015-01-01

    Altered regulation of ER stress response has been implicated in a variety of human diseases, such as cancer and metabolic diseases. Excessive ER function contributes to malignant phenotypes, such as chemoresistance and metastasis. Here we report that the tumor suppressor p53 regulates ER function in response to stress. We found that loss of p53 function activates the IRE1α/XBP1 pathway to enhance protein folding and secretion through upregulation of IRE1α and subsequent activation of its target XBP1. We also show that wild-type p53 interacts with synoviolin (SYVN1)/HRD1/DER3, a transmembrane E3 ubiquitin ligase localized to ER during ER stress and removes unfolded proteins by reversing transport to the cytosol from the ER, and its interaction stimulates IRE1α degradation. Moreover, IRE1α inhibitor suppressed protein secretion, induced cell death in p53-deficient cells, and strongly suppressed the formation of tumors by p53-deficient human tumor cells in vivo compared with those that expressed wild-type p53. Therefore, our data imply that the IRE1α/XBP1 pathway serves as a target for therapy of chemoresistant tumors that express mutant p53. PMID:26254280

  3. A natural small molecule harmine inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumour growth through activation of p53 in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fujun; Chen, Yihua; Song, Yajuan; Huang, Li; Zhai, Dong; Dong, Yanmin; Lai, Li; Zhang, Tao; Li, Dali; Pang, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingyao; Yi, Zhengfang

    2012-01-01

    Activation of p53 effectively inhibits tumor angiogenesis that is necessary for tumor growth and metastasis. Reactivation of the p53 by small molecules has emerged as a promising new strategy for cancer therapy. Several classes of small-molecules that activate the p53 pathway have been discovered using various approaches. Here, we identified harmine (β-carboline alkaloid) as a novel activator of p53 signaling involved in inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor growth. Harmine induced p53 phosphorylation and disrupted the p53-MDM2 interaction. Harmine also prevented p53 degradation in the presence of cycloheximide and activated nuclear accumulation of p53 followed by increasing its transcriptional activity in endothelial cells. Moreover, harmine not only induced endothelial cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, but also suppressed endothelial cell migration and tube formation as well as induction of neovascularity in a mouse corneal micropocket assay. Finally, harmine inhibited tumor growth by reducing tumor angiogenesis, as demonstrated by a xenograft tumor model. Our results suggested a novel mechanism and bioactivity of harmine, which inhibited tumor growth by activating the p53 signaling pathway and blocking angiogenesis in endothelial cells.

  4. Soluble egg antigens of Schistosoma japonicum induce senescence in activated hepatic stellate cells by activation of the STAT3/p53/p21 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinling; Pan, Jing; Wang, Jianxin; Song, Ke; Zhu, Dandan; Huang, Caiqun; Duan, Yinong

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Recent findings suggest that senescence of activated HSCs might limit the development of liver fibrosis. Based on previously observed anti-fibrotic effects of soluble egg antigens from Schistosoma japonicum in vitro, we hypothesized that SEA might play a crucial role in alleviating liver fibrosis through promoting senescence of activated HSCs. We show here that SEA inhibited expression of α-SMA and pro-collagen I and promoted senescence of activated HSCs in vitro. In addition, SEA induced an increased expression of P-p53 and p21. Knockdown of p53 inhibited the expression of p21 and failed to induce senescence of activated-HSCs. Phosphorylated STAT3 was elevated upon SEA stimulation, while loss of STAT3 decreased the level of p53 and senescence of HSCs. Results from immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that SOCS3 might be involved in the SEA-induced senescence in HSCs through its interaction with p53. This study demonstrates the potential capacity of SEA in restricting liver fibrosis through promoting senescence in HSCs. Furthermore, a novel STAT3-p53-p21 pathway might participate in the observed SEA-mediated senescence of HSCs. Our results suggest that SEA might carry potential therapeutic effects of restraining liver fibrosis through promoting senescence. PMID:27489164

  5. Phosphorylated STAT5 regulates p53 expression via BRCA1/BARD1-NPM1 and MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhuo; Aerts, Joeri L; Vandenplas, Hugo; Wang, Jiance A; Gorbenko, Olena; Chen, Jack P; Giron, Philippe; Heirman, Carlo; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Minden, Mark D; Stambolic, Vuk; Breckpot, Karine; De Grève, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and nucleophosmin (NPM1) are critical regulators of multiple biological and pathological processes. Although a reciprocal regulatory relationship was established between STAT5A and a NPM–ALK fusion protein in T-cell lymphoma, no direct connection between STAT5 and wild-type NPM1 has been documented. Here we demonstrate a mutually regulatory relationship between STAT5 and NPM1. Induction of STAT5 phosphorylation at Y694 (P-STAT5) diminished NPM1 expression, whereas inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation enhanced NPM1 expression. Conversely, NPM1 not only negatively regulated STAT5 phosphorylation but also preserved unphosphorylated STAT5 level. Mechanistically, we show that NPM1 downregulation by P-STAT5 is mediated by impairing the BRCA1-BARD1 ubiquitin ligase, which controls the stability of NPM1. In turn, decreased NPM1 levels led to suppression of p53 expression, resulting in enhanced cell survival. This study reveals a new STAT5 signaling pathway regulating p53 expression via NPM1 and uncovers new therapeutic targets for anticancer treatment in tumors driven by STAT5 signaling. PMID:28005077

  6. Phosphorylated STAT5 regulates p53 expression via BRCA1/BARD1-NPM1 and MDM2.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhuo; Aerts, Joeri L; Vandenplas, Hugo; Wang, Jiance A; Gorbenko, Olena; Chen, Jack P; Giron, Philippe; Heirman, Carlo; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Minden, Mark D; Stambolic, Vuk; Breckpot, Karine; De Grève, Jacques

    2016-12-22

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and nucleophosmin (NPM1) are critical regulators of multiple biological and pathological processes. Although a reciprocal regulatory relationship was established between STAT5A and a NPM-ALK fusion protein in T-cell lymphoma, no direct connection between STAT5 and wild-type NPM1 has been documented. Here we demonstrate a mutually regulatory relationship between STAT5 and NPM1. Induction of STAT5 phosphorylation at Y694 (P-STAT5) diminished NPM1 expression, whereas inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation enhanced NPM1 expression. Conversely, NPM1 not only negatively regulated STAT5 phosphorylation but also preserved unphosphorylated STAT5 level. Mechanistically, we show that NPM1 downregulation by P-STAT5 is mediated by impairing the BRCA1-BARD1 ubiquitin ligase, which controls the stability of NPM1. In turn, decreased NPM1 levels led to suppression of p53 expression, resulting in enhanced cell survival. This study reveals a new STAT5 signaling pathway regulating p53 expression via NPM1 and uncovers new therapeutic targets for anticancer treatment in tumors driven by STAT5 signaling.

  7. p53 and bcl-2 expression in high-grade B-cell lymphomas: correlation with survival time.

    PubMed Central

    Piris, M. A.; Pezzella, F.; Martinez-Montero, J. C.; Orradre, J. L.; Villuendas, R.; Sanchez-Beato, M.; Cuena, R.; Cruz, M. A.; Martinez, B.; Pezella F [corrected to Pezzella, F. ].

    1994-01-01

    B-cell high-grade lymphomas are heterogeneous in terms of histology, clinical presentation, treatment response and prognosis. As bcl-2 and p53 gene deregulations are frequently involved in several types of lymphoid malignancies, we aimed our investigation at the study of the relation between bcl-2 and p53 expression and survival probability in a group of 119 patients with B-cell high-grade lymphoma. These were obtained from the Virgen de la Salud Hospital, Toledo, Spain (73 cases), John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK (31 cases), and the Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy (15 cases). The relation between bcl-2 protein expression and survival was small, depending on the primary localisation of the tumour (in lymph node of mucosae), and lacked a significant correlation with overall survival. In contrast with this, p53 expression was related to survival probability in our series, this relation being both significant and independent of histological diagnosis. p53-positive patients showed a sudden decrease in life expectancy in the first months after diagnosis. Multivariant regression analysis confirmed that the only parameters significantly related with survival were extranodal origin, which is associated with a better prognosis, and p53 expression, which indicates a poor prognosis. Simultaneous expression of bcl-2 and p53 was associated with a poorer prognosis than p53 alone. This is particularly significant for large B-cell lymphomas presenting in lymph nodes. The cumulative poor effect of both p53 and bcl-2 in large B-cell lymphomas, which is more significant in nodal tumours, could confirm the existence of a multistep genetic deregulation in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This indicates that the genetic mechanisms controlling apoptosis and their disregulation are critical steps in the progression of lymphomas. PMID:8297731

  8. Co-expression of ING4 and P53 enhances hypopharyngeal cancer chemosensitivity to cisplatin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xin; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Mingjie; Wang, Mengjun; Ma, Shiyin

    2016-01-01

    Hypopharyngeal cancer is a distinct type of malignant head and neck tumor, which exhibits low sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs. The importance of developing methods for reducing chemotherapy resistance, and improving and enhancing prognosis has previously been emphasized and is considered a challenge for effective clinical treatment of hypopharyngeal cancer. The current study investigated the effects of co-expression of inhibitor of growth protein 4 (ING4) and P53, a tumor suppressor gene, on chemosensitivity to cisplatin in human hypopharyngeal cancer xenografts in vivo, and the potential molecular mechanisms involved. A tumor model was established by injecting athymic nude mice with FADU human hypopharyngeal cancer cells. Five days after intratumoral and peritumoral injections of an empty adenoviral vector (Ad), Ad-ING4-P53, cisplatin, or a combination of Ad-ING4-P53 and cisplatin (Ad-ING4-P53 + cisplatin) every other day for 5 days, the mice were euthanized and their tumors, livers, and kidneys were removed. The tumor weights were used to calculate the inhibition rate, and the expression levels of ING4 and P53 were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Additionally, apoptotic cells were detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, and immunohistochemistry determined the levels ING4, P53, B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) protein expression. The results demonstrated increased expression of ING4 and P53 in the Ad-ING4-P53 groups compared with PBS and Ad groups, indicating successful introduction of the genes into the tumor cells. Notably, the Ad-ING4-P53 + cisplatin group exhibited a higher inhibition rate compared with the four other groups. The results of immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that Bax expression was increased and Bcl-2 was decreased in the Ad-ING4-P53 + cisplatin group. This suggested that the enhanced cisplatin chemosensitivity with Ad-ING4-P53 gene therapy

  9. High prevalence of expression of p53 oncoprotein in oral carcinomas from India associated with betel and tobacco chewing.

    PubMed

    Kuttan, N A; Rosin, M P; Ambika, K; Priddy, R W; Bhakthan, N M; Zhang, L

    1995-05-01

    A recent study reported a low prevalence of p53 expression (11%) in oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) from South Asia, in contrast to a high prevalence (averaging 52%) in other studies. It was proposed that the different aetiologies for oral SCCs in the South Asia population, i.e. betel and tobacco chewing in combination with smoking and alcohol consumption as compared to smoking and alcohol consumption alone in other populations, may account for the low prevalence of p53 expression. To confirm this hypothesis, we examined p53 expression immunohistochemically in 23 cases of oral SCC from patients in Southern India. Thirteen of the 23 SCCs (56.5%) demonstrated nuclear p53 staining. The expression of p53 was strongly correlated with the number of tobacco-containing quids chewed per day (r = 0.8). These data support the hypothesis that carcinogens derived from tobacco and betel chewing may induce p53 mutations, which in turn are involved in the development of oral cancer.

  10. Selective apoptotic effect of Zelkova serrata twig extract on mouth epidermoid carcinoma through p53 activation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoe-Jin; Jang, Young-Joo

    2012-06-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death plays an essential role in chemotherapy-induced tumor cell killing, and inducers of apoptosis are commonly used in cancer therapy. Treatment with Zelkova serrata extracts was performed in human gingival fibroblast (HGF), mouth epidermoid carcinoma cell (KB), lower gingival squamous cancer cell (YD38) and tongue mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells (YD15). We observed that extract prepared from Zelkova serrata twig selectively inhibited proliferation of various oral cancer cells, but not normal gingival fibroblasts, in a dose-dependent manner. Caspase-8-mediated apoptosis was induced by treatment with the extract only in mouth epidermoid carcinoma and not in other types of cancer cells, including lower gingival squamous cell carcinoma. The selective apoptotic effect of Zelkova serrata twig extract in mouth epidermoid carcinoma was dependent on normal p53 status. Apoptosis was not remarkably induced by treatment with the extract in either lower gingival squamous or tongue mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells, both of which contain abnormalities of p53. Upon treatment with Zelkova serrata twig extract, mouth epidermoid carcinoma cells accumulated in S phase by activation of p21. These data indicate that Zelkova serrata twig extract exerted a cancer type-specific, p53-dependent apoptotic effect and disturbed the cell cycle, which suggests that herbal medicine could be a treatment for specific types of cancers.

  11. Inhibition of AKT/FoxO3a signaling induced PUMA expression in response to p53-independent cytotoxic effects of H1: A derivative of tetrandrine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin-Xu; Liu, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Jing; Li, Jun; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Hua; Yu, Xue-Wen; Wei, Ning

    2015-01-01

    PUMA (p53 unregulated modulator of apoptosis), a BH3-only Bcl-2 family member, can be induced by p53-dependent and p53-independent manners. It plays an important role as regulator of cellular apoptosis. Herein, we evaluate the effects of H1 (a derivative of tetrandrine) on induction of PUMA and underlie its potential mechanism in p53-independent cytotoxic response. Anti-proliferative activity and evidently cytotoxic activity of H1 were observed in wild-type and p53 null cells. Further studies demonstrated that H1 resulted in an increase of cleaved PARP, decease of survivin and elevation of p-H2AX. What is more, H1 significantly induced PUMA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and caused an increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in p53 null cells. Of note, knockdown of PUMA attenuated cytotoxic activity of H1. Further studies demonstrated that inhibition of AKT/FoxO3a signaling contributed to H1-mediated PUMA induction. Targeted suppression of AKT/FoxO3a signaling by siRNA could overcome H1-mediated PUMA induction. In addition, H1 significantly suppressed NF-κB activity and caused an increase of early apoptotic and late apoptotic cells, and elevated caspase-3 activity. Taken together, we found that inhibition of AKT/FoxO3a signaling may contribute to H1-mediated PUMA induction, suggesting that inhibition of AKT/FoxO3a signaling result in PUMA expression in response to p53-independent cytotoxic effects of H1.

  12. Deficiency in p53 is required for doxorubicin induced transcriptional activation of NF-κB target genes in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalmases, Alba; González, Irene; Menendez, Silvia; Arpí, Oriol; Corominas, Josep Maria; Servitja, Sonia; Tusquets, Ignasi; Chamizo, Cristina; Rincón, Raúl; Espinosa, Lluis; Bigas, Anna; Eroles, Pilar; Furriol, Jessica; Lluch, Anna; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan; Rojo, Federico

    2014-01-01

    NF-κB has been linked to doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer patients. NF-κB nuclear translocation and DNA binding in doxorubicin treated-breast cancer cells have been extensively examined; however its functional relevance at transcriptional level on NF-κB -dependent genes and the biological consequences are unclear. We studied NF-κB -dependent gene expression induced by doxorubicin in breast cancer cells and fresh human cancer specimens with different genetic backgrounds focusing on their p53 status. NF-κB -dependent signature of doxorubicin was identified by gene expression microarrays in breast cancer cells treated with doxorubicin and the IKKβ-inhibitor MLN120B, and confirmed ex vivo in human cancer samples. The association with p53 was functionally validated. Finally, NF-κB activation and p53 status was determined in a cohort of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant doxorubicin-based chemotherapy. Doxorubicin treatment in the p53-mutated MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in NF NF-κB driven-gene transcription signature. Modulation of genes related with invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance (ICAM-1, CXCL1, TNFAIP3, IL8) were confirmed in additional doxorubicin-treated cell lines and fresh primary human breast tumors. In both systems, p53-defcient background correlated with the activation of the NF-κB -dependent signature. Furthermore, restoration of p53WT in the mutant p53 MDA-MB-231 cells impaired NF-κB driven transcription induced by doxorubicin. Moreover, a p53 deficient background and nuclear NF-κB /p65 in breast cancer patients correlated with reduced disease free-survival. This study supports that p53 deficiency is necessary for a doxorubicin driven NF-κB -response that limits doxorubicin cytotoxicity in breast cancer and is linked to an aggressive clinical behavior. PMID:24344116

  13. Deficiency in p53 is required for doxorubicin induced transcriptional activation of NF-кB target genes in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalmases, Alba; González, Irene; Menendez, Silvia; Arpí, Oriol; Corominas, Josep Maria; Servitja, Sonia; Tusquets, Ignasi; Chamizo, Cristina; Rincón, Raúl; Espinosa, Lluis; Bigas, Anna; Eroles, Pilar; Furriol, Jessica; Lluch, Anna; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan; Rojo, Federico

    2014-01-15

    NF-кB has been linked to doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer patients. NF-кB nuclear translocation and DNA binding in doxorubicin treated-breast cancer cells have been extensively examined; however its functional relevance at transcriptional level on NF-кB-dependent genes and the biological consequences are unclear. We studied NF-кB-dependent gene expression induced by doxorubicin in breast cancer cells and fresh human cancer specimens with different genetic backgrounds focusing on their p53 status. NF-кB-dependent signature of doxorubicin was identified by gene expression microarrays in breast cancer cells treated with doxorubicin and the IKKβ-inhibitor MLN120B, and confirmed ex vivo in human cancer samples. The association with p53 was functionally validated. Finally, NF-кB activation and p53 status was determined in a cohort of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant doxorubicin-based chemotherapy. Doxorubicin treatment in the p53-mutated MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in NF-кB driven-gene transcription signature. Modulation of genes related with invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance (ICAM-1, CXCL1, TNFAIP3, IL8) were confirmed in additional doxorubicin-treated cell lines and fresh primary human breast tumors. In both systems, p53-deficient background correlated with the activation of the NF-кB-dependent signature. Furthermore, restoration of p53WT in the mutant p53 MDA-MB-231 cells impaired NF-кB driven transcription induced by doxorubicin. Moreover, a p53 deficient background and nuclear NF-кB/p65 in breast cancer patients correlated with reduced disease free-survival. This study supports that p53 deficiency is necessary for a doxorubicin driven NF-кB-response that limits doxorubicin cytotoxicity in breast cancer and is linked to an aggressive clinical behavior.

  14. HSP72 depletion suppresses gammaH2AX activation by genotoxic stresses via p53/p21 signaling.

    PubMed

    Gabai, V L; Sherman, M Y; Yaglom, J A

    2010-04-01

    Knockout of heat shock protein Hsp72 was shown to promote chromosomal instability and increase radiation sensitivity of mouse fibroblasts. Here, we report that downregulation of Hsp72 in human tumor cells leads to suppression of a specific branch of the DNA damage response (DDR) that facilitates DNA repair following genotoxic insults, that is, reduced accumulation of the phosphorylated form of histone H2AX (gammaH2AX). This inhibition was due to decreased expression of H2AX as well as higher rate of gammaH2AX dephosphorylation. Formation of gammaH2AX and MDC1 radiation-induced foci was impaired in Hsp72-depleted cells, which in turn enhanced DNA damage, resulting in sensitization of cells to gamma-radiation and doxorubicin. These effects of Hsp72 knockdown were dependent on activation of the p53/p21-signaling pathway. Overall, permanent activation of the p53/p21 signaling in Hsp72-depleted cells specifically impaired the gammaH2AX pathway of the DDR, enhanced DNA damage following genotoxic insults, and led to further stimulation of the p53/p21 pathway, thus creating a positive feedback loop. The resulting strong induction of p21 precipitated senescence following exposure to DNA-damaging agents, thus accounting for higher sensitivity of cells to genotoxic stresses.

  15. KAI-1 and p53 expression in oral squamous cell carcinomas: Markers of significance in future diagnostics and possibly therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Namrata N; Wadhwan, Vijay; Chaudhary, Minal; Nayyar, Abhishek Singh

    2016-01-01

    Context: KAI-1/CD82 is a tumor suppressor gene with decreased gene expression being associated with increased invasive ability of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). p53 protein functions in the G1-S phase of the cell cycle to allow repair of damaged DNA. In the present study, p53 and KAI-1 expression was investigated using monoclonal antibodies in OSCC. Aims: The aim of this study was to detect KAI-1 and p53 expression in OSCCs and to assess the relation between both in OSCCs. Materials and Methods: The present study included histopathologically diagnosed thirty cases of well- and moderately differentiated OSCCs to study the expression of KAI-1 and p53 antibodies. Statistical Analysis: The results obtained were tabulated and statistically analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis; one-way ANOVA; least square difference method and independent t-test. Results: OSCCs exhibited 41.62% positivity for KAI-1 while p53 positive cells were recorded to an extent of 60.82%. A significant positive correlation was observed between KAI-1 and p53 expression in OSCCs. Conclusions: Although a significant amount of work is still required to uncover the mechanisms of action and regulation of KAI-1 and p53 expression, control of the complex metastatic processes would be of interest in controlling the tumor biology in OSCCs as well as other types of malignancies to enhance prognosis in the affected patients and to help protect against future metastasis in the going to be treated and treated patients. PMID:27721601

  16. Localized adenocarcinoma of the lung: oncogene expression of erbB-2 and p53 in 150 patients.

    PubMed

    Harpole, D H; Marks, J R; Richards, W G; Herndon, J E; Sugarbaker, D J

    1995-06-01

    Historical information and pathological material from 150 consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the lung was collected to evaluate oncogene expression of erbB-2 and p53, and erbB-2 gene amplification. Pathological material after resection was reviewed to verify histological staging, and patient follow-up was complete in all cases for at least 68 months. Immunohistochemistry of erbB-2 (HER-2/neu) and p53 oncogene expression was performed on two separate paraffin tumor blocks for each patient with normal lung as control. Gene amplification of erbB-2 was measured after DNA extraction from 20-micrometer sections of erbB-2-positive and -negative tumors. All analyses were blinded and included Kaplan-Meier survival estimates with Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Two adequate blocks of tumor and normal lung were available for 138 (92%) patients. Immunohistochemical identification of expression of p53 was observed in 49 (37%) patients and erbB-2 in 17 (13%) patients. DNA dot blot analyses were performed on 17 erbB-2-positive and 13 randomly selected erbB-2-negative tumors. There was 1 (6%) of 17 erbB-2-positve tumors with 4-fold erbB-2 gene amplification. Actual 5-year survival was 63% and actuarial 10-year survival was 59% for the entire population of 150 patients. Significant univariate predictors (P < 0.05) of cancer death were the presence of symptoms, tumor size >3 cm, poor differentiation, visceral pleural invasion, and p53 expression. Multivariate analysis associated symptoms and p53 expression as independent factors with decreased survival. Thus, this project examined p53 and erbB-2 expression in patients with localized adenocarcinoma and associated p53 status with survival. Multicenter collection of data should allow the development of a model of cancer recurrence in this most common lung cancer.

  17. The expression of p21 is upregulated by forkhead box A1/2 in p53-null H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    An, Joo-Hee; Jang, Sang-Min; Kim, Jung-Woong; Kim, Chul-Hong; Song, Peter I; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2014-11-03

    The expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 is increased in response to various stimuli and stress signals through p53-dependent and independent pathways. We demonstrate in this study that forkhead box A1/2 (FOXA1/2) is a crucial transcription factor in the activation of p21 transcription via direct binding to the p21 promoter in p53-null H1299 lung carcinoma cells. In addition, histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA)-mediated upregulation of p21 expression was repressed by knockdown of FOXA1/2 in H1299 cells. Consequently, these results suggest that FOXA1/2 is required for p53-independent p21 expression.

  18. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Trichostatin a Promotes the Apoptosis of Osteosarcoma Cells through p53 Signaling Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhantao; Liu, Xiaozhou; Jin, Jiewen; Xu, Haidong; Gao, Qian; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Jianning

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the profile of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and expression in osteosarcoma cells and tissues from osteosarcoma patients and to examine the mechanism by which a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, Trichostatin A (TSA), promotes the apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells. Methods: HDAC activity and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity were determined in nuclear extracts of MG63 cells, hFOB 1.19 cells and tissues from 6 patients with primary osteosarcoma. The protein expression of Class I HDACs (1, 2, 3 and 8) and the activation of the p53 signaling pathway were examined by Western blot. Cell growth and apoptosis were determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Results: Nuclear HDAC activity and class I HDAC expression were significantly higher in MG63 cells than in hFOB 1.19 cells, and a similar trend was observed in the human osteosarcoma tissues compared with the paired adjacent non-cancerous tissues. TSA significantly inhibited the growth of MG63 cells and promoted apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner through p53 signaling pathway activation. Conclusion: Class I HDACs play a central role in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma, and HDAC inhibitors may thus have promise as new therapeutic agents against osteosarcoma. PMID:27877082

  19. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Activates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor in a p53-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Seiko; Oda, Tomoyuki; Nishi, Kenichiro; Takabuchi, Satoshi; Wakamatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Adachi, Takehiko; Fukuda, Kazuhiko; Semenza, Gregg L.; Hirota, Kiichi

    2008-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is not only a cytokine which has a critical role in several inflammatory conditions but also has endocrine and enzymatic functions. MIF is identified as an intracellular signaling molecule and is implicated in the process of tumor progression, and also strongly enhances neovascularization. Overexpression of MIF has been observed in tumors from various organs. MIF is one of the genes induced by hypoxia in an hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)-dependent manner. Methods/Principal Findings The effect of MIF on HIF-1 activity was investigated in human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, and osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells. We demonstrate that intracellular overexpression or extracellular administration of MIF enhances activation of HIF-1 under hypoxic conditions in MCF-7 cells. Mutagenesis analysis of MIF and knockdown of 53 demonstrates that the activation is not dependent on redox activity of MIF but on wild-type p53. We also indicate that the MIF receptor CD74 is involved in HIF-1 activation by MIF at least when MIF is administrated extracellularly. Conclusion/Significance MIF regulates HIF-1 activity in a p53-dependent manner. In addition to MIF's potent effects on the immune system, MIF is linked to fundamental processes conferring cell proliferation, cell survival, angiogenesis, and tumor invasiveness. This functional interdependence between MIF and HIF-1α protein stabilization and transactivation activity provide a molecular mechanism for promotion of tumorigenesis by MIF. PMID:18493321

  20. Mutant p53 uses p63 as a molecular chaperone to alter gene expression and induce a pro-invasive secretome.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, Paul M; Noll, Jacqueline E; Suetani, Rachel J; Schulz, Renee B; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Evdokiou, Andreas; Lane, David P; Callen, David F

    2011-12-01

    Mutations in the TP53 gene commonly result in the expression of a full-length protein that drives cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Herein, we have deciphered the global landscape of transcriptional regulation by mutant p53 through the application of a panel of isogenic H1299 derivatives with inducible expression of several common cancer-associated p53 mutants. We found that the ability of mutant p53 to alter the transcriptional profile of cancer cells is remarkably conserved across different p53 mutants. The mutant p53 transcriptional landscape was nested within a small subset of wild-type p53 responsive genes, suggesting that the oncogenic properties of mutant p53 are conferred by retaining its ability to regulate a defined set of p53 target genes. These mutant p53 target genes were shown to converge upon a p63 signalling axis. Both mutant p53 and wild-type p63 were co-recruited to the promoters of these target genes, thus providing a molecular basis for their selective regulation by mutant p53. We demonstrate that mutant p53 manipulates the gene expression pattern of cancer cells to facilitate invasion through the release of a pro-invasive secretome into the tumor microenvironment. Collectively, this study provides mechanistic insight into the complex nature of transcriptional regulation by mutant p53 and implicates a role for tumor-derived p53 mutations in the manipulation of the cancer cell secretome.

  1. Interference with p53 protein inhibits hematopoietic and muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The involvement of p53 protein in cell differentiation has been recently suggested by some observations made with tumor cells and the correlation found between differentiation and increased levels of p53. However, the effect of p53 on differentiation is in apparent contrast with the normal development of p53-null mice. To test directly whether p53 has a function in cell differentiation, we interfered with the endogenous wt-p53 protein of nontransformed cells of two different murine histotypes: 32D myeloid progenitors, and C2C12 myoblasts. A drastic inhibition of terminal differentiation into granulocytes or myotubes, respectively, was observed upon expression of dominant- negative p53 proteins. This inhibition did not alter the cell cycle withdrawal typical of terminal differentiation, nor p21(WAF1/CIP1) upregulation, indicating that interference with endogenous p53 directly affects cell differentiation, independently of the p53 activity on the cell cycle. We also found that the endogenous wt-p53 protein of C2C12 cells becomes transcriptionally active during myogenesis, and this activity is inhibited by p53 dominant-negative expression. Moreover, we found that p53 DNA-binding and transcriptional activities are both required to induce differentiation in p53-negative K562 cells. Taken together, these data strongly indicate that p53 is a regulator of cell differentiation and it exerts this role, at least in part, through its transcriptional activity. PMID:8698814

  2. Overexpression of the wip1 gene abrogates the p38 MAPK/p53/Wip1 pathway and silences p16 expression in human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Eunsil; Ahn, Yeon Sun; Jang, Se Jin; Kim, Mi-Jung; Yoon, Ho Sung; Gong, Gyungyub; Choi, Jene

    2007-03-01

    Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase (Wip1 or PPM1D) is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase expressed under various stress conditions, which selectively inactivates p38 MAPK. The finding that this gene is amplified in association with frequent gain of 17q21-24 in breast cancers supports its role as a driver oncogene. However, the pathogenetic mechanism of the wip1 gene expression in breast carcinogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we examine Wip1 mRNA and protein expression in 20 breast cancer tissues and six cell lines. We additionally investigate the relationship among Wip1, active p38 MAPK, p53, and p16 proteins. In our experiments, Wip1 mRNA was significantly upregulated in 7 of 20 (35%) invasive breast cancer samples. Overexpression of Wip1 was inversely correlated with that of active (phosphor-) p38 MAPK (P = 0.007). Furthermore, Wip1-overexpressing tumors exhibited no or low levels of p16, which normally accumulates upon p38 MAPK activation (P = 0.057). Loss of p16 expression was not associated with hypermethylation of its promoter or loss of heterozygosity on 9p21. Among the 135 primary breast carcinomas further examined, a significant association was found between the Wip1 overexpression and negative staining for p53 (P value = 0.057), indicating that the tumors are wild-type for p53. This is first report showing that Wip1 overexpression abrogates the homeostatic balance maintained through the p38-p53-Wip1 pathway, and contributes to malignant progression by inactivating wild-type p53 and p38 MAPK as well as decreasing p16 protein levels in human breast tissues.

  3. Expression of the apoptosis inducer gene head involution defective in primordial germ cells of the Drosophila embryo requires eiger, p53, and loki function.

    PubMed

    Maezawa, Takanobu; Arita, Kayo; Shigenobu, Shuji; Kobayashi, Satoru

    2009-05-01

    Nanos (Nos) is an evolutionarily conserved protein essential for the maintenance of primordial germ cells (PGCs). In Drosophila, the PGCs or pole cells express head involution defective (hid), which is required for caspase activation, but its translation is repressed by maternal Nos. In the absence of Nos activity, translation of hid mRNA into protein induces apoptosis in pole cells. However, it remains unclear how hid mRNA is regulated in pole cells. Here, we report that hid expression requires eiger (egr), a tumor necrosis factor ligand (TNF) homologue, which is induced in pole cells by decapentaplegic (dpp). In addition, we demonstrate that p53 and loki (lok), a damage-activated kinase known to be required for p53 phosphorylation, are both required for hid expression in pole cells. Since maternal lok mRNA is enriched in pole cells, it is possible that ubiquitously distributed p53 is activated in pole cells by maternal Lok. We propose that hid expression is activated in a pole cell-specific manner by loki/p53 and dpp/egr during embryogenesis.

  4. Antiproliferation and apoptosis induced by tamoxifen in human bile duct carcinoma QBC939 cells via upregulated p53 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Peng; Kang, Jin-He; Li, Hua-Liang; Hu, Su-Xian; Lian, Hui-Hui; Qiu, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Jian; Li, Wen-Gang; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2009-07-24

    Tamoxifen (TAM) is a nonsteroidal antiestrogen that has been used in the treatment of breast cancer for over 30 years. Recently, it was shown that TAM also has efficacy on gastrointestinal neoplasms such as hepatocarcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma, and that the chemopreventive activities of TAM might be due to its abilities to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of tamoxifen on growth and apoptosis in the human bile duct carcinoma (BDC) cell line QBC939 using MTT assay, inverted microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, classic DNA fragmentation agarose gel electrophoresis assay, PI single- and FITC/PI double-staining flow cytometry, and Western blotting. Our data revealed that TAM could significantly inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in QBC939 cells. Increased expression of p53 was observed in TAM-treated cells, indicating that p53 might play an important role in TAM-induced apoptosis in QBC939 cells. These results provide significant insight into the anticarcinogenic action of TAM on BDC.

  5. Xeroderma pigmentosum group C gene expression is predominantly regulated by promoter hypermethylation and contributes to p53 mutation in lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y-H; Tsai Chang, J-H; Cheng, Y-W; Wu, T-C; Chen, C-Y; Lee, H

    2007-07-19

    Reduced DNA repair capability is associated with developing lung cancer, especially in nonsmokers. XPC participates in the initial recognition of DNA damage during the DNA nucleotide excision repair process. We hypothesize that inactivation of XPC by promoter hypermethylation may play an important role in the reduction of DNA repair capability to cause p53 mutation during lung carcinogenesis. In this report we demonstrate that hypermethylation of 17 CpG islands between -175 and -1 of the XPC promoter correlates very well with XPC expression levels in eight lung cancer cell lines. When cells with hypermethylated XPC promoters were treated with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, XPC expression was de-repressed. Interestingly, XPC hypermethylation was found in 4 of 5 (80%) lung cancer cell lines harbored p53 mutation, but not observed in two lung cancer cells which had a wild-type p53 gene. Among the analysis of the hypermethylation status of 158 lung tumors, XPC hypermethylation is more common in nonsmokers (39 of 94, 41%) than in smokers (14 of 64, 22%; P=0.010). Additionally, XPC hypermethylation is more often with G --> T or G --> C mutations in the p53 gene. To verify whether XPC inactivation is involved in the occurrence of p53 mutation, XPC gene of A549 cells was knockdown by a small interference RNA and then XPC-inactivated cells were treated with benzo[a]pynrene for different passages. Surprisingly, G --> T mutation in p53 gene at codon 215 was indeed detected in XPC-inactivated A549 cells of passages 15 and confirmed by loss of transcription activity of mdm2. These results show that hypermethylation of the XPC promoter may play a crucial role in XPC inactivation, which may partly contribute to the occurrence of p53 mutations during lung tumorigenesis, especially nonsmokers.

  6. Transcriptional inhibition of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} gene (CDKN1) expression by survivin is at least partially p53-dependent: Evidence for survivin acting as a transcription factor or co-factor

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lei; Ling, Xiang; Liu, Wensheng; Das, Gokul M.; Li, Fengzhi

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin inhibits the expression of p21 protein, mRNA and promoter activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin neutralizes p53-induced p21 expression and promoter activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin physically interacts with p53 in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genetic silencing of endogenous survivin upregulates p21 in p53 wild type cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both p53 and survivin interacts on the two p53-binding sites in the p21 promoter. -- Abstract: Growing evidence suggests a role for the antiapoptotic protein survivin in promotion of cancer cell G1/S transition and proliferation. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Further, although upregulation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} by p53 plays an important role in p53-mediated cell G1 arrests in response to various distresses, it is unknown whether survivin plays a role in the regulation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression. Here, we report that exogenous expression of survivin in p53-wild type MCF-7 breast cancer cells inhibits the expression of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} protein, mRNA and promoter activity, while the survivin C84A mutant and antisense failed to do so. Cotransfection experiments in the p53 mutant H1650 lung cancer cell line showed that survivin neutralizes p53-induced p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression and promoter activity. Importantly, genetically silencing of endogenous survivin using lentiviral survivin shRNA also enhances endogenous p21 in p53 wild type cancer cells, suggesting the physiological relevance of the fining. We further demonstrated that both p53 and survivin interacts on the two p53-binding sites in the p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} promoter (-2313 to -2212; -1452 to -1310), and survivin physically interacts with p53 in cancer cells. Together, we propose that survivin may act as a transcription factor or cofactor to interact with p53 on the p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} promoter leading to the inhibition of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1

  7. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and p53 in neighboring invasive and in situ components of breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Serra, Katia Piton; Sarian, Luis Otavio; Rodrigues-Peres, Raquel Mary; Vassallo, José; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Pinto, Glauce Aparecida; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Shinzato, Julia Yoriko; Derchain, Sophie F M

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between the expression of COX-2 and p53, hormone receptors and HER-2 in the in situ (DCIS) and invasive components of ductal carcinomas (IDC) of the same breast. The expression of COX-2, p53, and hormone receptors was assessed in 87 cases of IDC with contiguous areas of DCIS. Results showed that there was no difference in COX-2 expression comparing the in situ and invasive components of the tumors. In the in situ component, there was a statistically borderline increase in p53 expression in tumors that also expressed COX-2. ER-positive specimens were more common in the group of tumors that expressed COX-2 in the invasive component. From this study we conclude that the expression of COX-2 was similar in the in situ and invasive components of the breast carcinomas. COX-2 positivity was marginally related with the expression of p53 in the in situ components, and with the ER expression in the invasive components.

  8. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  9. Delayed expression of apoptosis in X-irradiated human leukemic MOLT-4 cells transfected with mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Hisako; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Shinohara, Kunio

    2003-06-01

    The effects of X-rays on cell survival, apoptosis, and long-term response in the development of cell death as measured by the dye exclusion test were studied in human leukemic MOLT-4 cells (p53 wild-type) stably transfected with a mutant p53 cDNA expression vector. Cell survival, as determined from colony-forming ability, was increased in an expression level dependent manner, but the increase was partial even with the highest-expressing clone (B3). This contrasts with the prior observation that cell death and apoptosis in B3 are completely inhibited at 24 h after irradiation with 1.8 Gy of X-rays. The examination of B3 cells incubated for longer than 24 h after X-irradiation showed a delay in the induction of cell death and apoptosis. Western blot analysis revealed that the time required to reach the highest level of wild-type p53 protein in B3 was longer than the time in MOLT-4 and that the p53 may be stabilized by the phosphorylation at Ser-15. These results suggest that the introduction of mutant p53 into MOLT-4 merely delays the development of apoptosis, during which the cells could repair the damage induced by X-rays, and results in the partial increase in cell survival.

  10. Connection between Cell Phone use, p53 Gene Expression in Different Zones of Glioblastoma Multiforme and Survival Prognoses

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan-Sigari, Reza; Baf, Morteza Mazloum Farsi; Ariabod, Vahid; Rohde, Veit; Rahighi, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate p53 gene expression in the central and peripheral zones of glioblastoma multiforme using a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique in patients who use cell phones ≥3 hours a day and determine its relationship to clinicopathological findings and overall survival. Sixty-three patients (38 males and 25 females), diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), underwent tumor resection between 2008 and 2011. Patient ages ranged from 25 to 88 years, with a mean age of 55. The levels of expression of p53 in the central and peripheral zone of the GBM were quantified by RT-PCR. Data on p53 gene expression from the central and peripheral zone, the related malignancy and the clinicopatholagical findings (age, gender, tumor location and size), as well as overall survival, were analyzed. Forty-one out of 63 patients (65%) with the highest level of cell phone use (≥3 hours/day) had higher mutant type p53 expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma; the difference was statistically significant (P=0.034). Results from the present study on the use of mobile phones for ≥3 hours a day show a consistent pattern of increased risk for the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma, and that this increase was significantly correlated with shorter overall survival time. The risk was not higher for ipsilateral exposure. We found that the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma was increased in 65% of patients using cell phones ≥3 hours a day. PMID:25276320

  11. A naturally occurring 4-bp deletion in the intron 4 of p53 creates a spectrum of novel p53 isoforms with anti-apoptosis function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hui; Tao, Ting; Huang, Delai; Ou, Zhao; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    p53 functions as a tumor suppressor by transcriptionally regulating the expression of genes involved in controlling cell proliferation or apoptosis. p53 and its isoform Δ133p53/Δ113p53 form a negative regulation loop in that p53 activates the expression of Δ133p53/Δ113p53 while Δ133p53/Δ113p53 specifically antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity. This pathway is especially important to safeguard the process of embryogenesis because sudden activation of p53 by DNA damage signals or developmental stress is detrimental to a developing embryo. Here we report the identification of five novel p53 isoforms. p53β is generated due to alternative splicing of the intron 8 of p53 while the other four, namely, TA2p53, TA3p53, TA4p53 and TA5p53, result from the combination of alternative splicing of intron 1 (within intron 4 of the p53 gene) of the Δ113p53 gene and a naturally occurring CATT 4 bp deletion within the alternative splicing product in zebrafish. The CATT 4 bp deletion creates four translation start codons which are in-frame to the open reading frame of Δ113p53. We also show that TAp53 shares the same promoter with Δ113p53 and functions to antagonize p53 apoptotic activity. The identification of Δ113p53/TA2/3/4/5p53 reveals a pro-survival mechanism which operates robustly during embryogenesis in response to the DNA-damage condition.

  12. Porcine parvovirus infection induces apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongling; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Luo, Xiaomao; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Xiaomin; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • PPV reduces PK-15 cells viability by inducing apoptosis. • PPV infection induces apoptosis through mitochondria-mediated pathway. • PPV infection activates p53 to regulate the mitochondria apoptotic signaling. - Abstract: Porcine parvovirus (PPV) infection has been reported to induce the cytopathic effects (CPE) in some special host cells and contribute the occurrence of porcine parvovirus disease, but the molecular mechanisms underlying PPV-induced CPE are not clear. In this study, we investigated the morphological and molecular changes of porcine kidney cell line (PK-15 cells) infected with PPV. The results showed that PPV infection inhibited the viability of PK-15 cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. PPV infection induced typical apoptotic features including chromatin condensation, apoptotic body formation, nuclear fragmentation, and Annexin V-binding activity. Further studies showed that Bax was increased and translocated to mitochondria, whereas Bcl-2 was decreased in PPV-infected cells, which caused mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization, resulting in the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, followed by caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. However, the expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) did not appear significant changes in the process of PPV-induced apoptosis. Moreover, PPV infection activated p53 signaling, which was involved in the activation of apoptotic signaling induced by PPV infection via regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PPV infection induced apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. This study may contribute to shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of PPV infection.

  13. In vivo expression of p53 and Bcl-2 and their role in programmed cell death in premalignant and malignant lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Koty, Patrick P; Zhang, Haifan; Franklin, Wilbur A; Yousem, Samuel A; Landreneau, Rodney; Levitt, Mark L

    2002-02-01

    Forty-four specimens of non-malignant and malignant human lung tissue, taken from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), were examined for the expression of wild-type p53, mutant p53, and bcl-2 and the occurrence of programmed cell death (apoptosis). Wild-type p53 expression peaked in peritumoral and metaplastic samples, whereas mutant p53, bcl-2 and apoptosis were first detected in metaplasia and increased with progression to carcinoma. Bcl-2 positive samples had lower levels of apoptosis than bcl-2 negative samples and was independent of wild-type or mutant p53 expression. These results suggest that the over-expression of wild-type p53 may be an early cellular response to an alteration in normal cellular homeostasis. The ensuing increase in apoptosis appears to be relatively independent of mutant or wild-type p53 expression, but does not occur in cells expressing bcl-2.

  14. Human papillomavirus oncogenic E6 protein regulates human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) expression via the tumor suppressor protein p53

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Hong; Wang, Liming; Jin, Jessica; Ghosh, Santosh K.; Kawsar, Hameem I.; Zender, Chad; Androphy, Elliot J.; Weinberg, Aaron; McCormick, Thomas S.; Jin, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Human β-defensin-3 (hBD3) is an epithelial cell-derived innate immune regulatory molecule overexpressed in oral dysplastic lesions and fosters a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Expression of hBD3 is induced by the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway. Here we describe a novel pathway through which the high-risk human papillomavirus type-16 (HPV-16) oncoprotein E6 induces hBD3 expression in mucosal keratinocytes. Ablation of E6 by siRNA induces the tumor suppressor p53 and diminishes hBD3 in HPV-16 positive CaSki cervical cancer cells and UM-SCC-104 head and neck cancer cells. Malignant cells in HPV-16-associated oropharyngeal cancer overexpress hBD3. HPV-16 E6 induces hBD3 mRNA expression, peptide production and gene promoter activity in mucosal keratinocytes. Reduction of cellular levels of p53 stimulates hBD3 expression, while activation of p53 by doxorubicin inhibits its expression in primary oral keratinocytes and CaSki cells, suggesting that p53 represses hBD3 expression. A p53 binding site in the hBD3 gene promoter has been identified by using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). In addition, the p63 protein isoform ΔNp63α, but not TAp63, stimulated transactivation of the hBD3 gene and was co-expressed with hBD3 in head and neck cancer specimens. Therefore, high-risk HPV E6 oncoproteins may stimulate hBD3 expression in tumor cells to facilitate tumorigenesis of HPV-associated head and neck cancer. PMID:27034006

  15. The Selective Activation of p53 Target Genes Regulated by SMYD2 in BIX-01294 Induced Autophagy-Related Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jia-Dong; Lei, Pin-Ji; Zheng, Jun-Yi; Wang, Xiang; Li, Shangze; Liu, Huan; He, Yi-Lei; Wang, Zhao-Ning; Wei, Gang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Lian-Yun; Wu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Transcription regulation emerged to be one of the key mechanisms in regulating autophagy. Inhibitors of H3K9 methylation activates the expression of LC3B, as well as other autophagy-related genes, and promotes autophagy process. However, the detailed mechanisms of autophagy regulated by nuclear factors remain elusive. In this study, we performed a drug screen of SMYD2-/- cells and discovered that SMYD2 deficiency enhanced the cell death induced by BIX01294, an inhibitor of histone H3K9 methylation. BIX-01294 induces accumulation of LC3 II and autophagy-related cell death, but not caspase-dependent apoptosis. We profiled the global gene expression pattern after treatment with BIX-01294, in comparison with rapamycin. BIX-01294 selectively activates the downstream genes of p53 signaling, such as p21 and DOR, but not PUMA, a typical p53 target gene inducing apoptosis. BIX-01294 also induces other autophagy-related genes, such as ATG4A and ATG9A. SMYD2 is a methyltransferase for p53 and regulates its transcription activity. Its deficiency enhances the BIX-01294-induced autophagy-related cell death through transcriptionally promoting the expression of p53 target genes. Taken together, our data suggest BIX-01294 induces autophagy-related cell death and selectively activates p53 target genes, which is repressed by SMYD2 methyltransferase. PMID:25562686

  16. Autoregulated expression of p53 from an adenoviral vector confers superior tumor inhibition in a model of prostate carcinoma gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Rodrigo Esaki; da Silva Soares, Rafael Bento; Costanzi-Strauss, Eugenia; Strauss, Bryan E

    2016-12-01

    Alternative treatments for cancer using gene therapy approaches have shown promising results and some have even reached the marketplace. Even so, additional improvements are needed, such as employing a strategically chosen promoter to drive expression of the transgene in the target cell. Previously, we described viral vectors where high-level transgene expression was achieved using a p53-responsive promoter. Here we present an adenoviral vector (AdPGp53) where p53 is employed to regulate its own expression and which outperforms a traditional vector when tested in a model of gene therapy for prostate cancer. The functionality of AdPGp53 and AdCMVp53 were compared in human prostate carcinoma cell lines. AdPGp53 conferred greatly enhanced levels of p53 protein and induction of the p53 target gene, p21, as well as superior cell killing by a mechanism consistent with apoptosis. DU145 cells were susceptible to induction of death with AdPGp53, yet PC3 cells were quite resistant. Though AdCMVp53 was shown to be reliable, extremely high-level expression of p53 offered by AdPGp53 was necessary for tumor suppressor activity in PC3 and DU145. In situ gene therapy experiments revealed tumor inhibition and increased overall survival in response to AdPGp53, but not AdCMVp53. Upon histologic examination, only AdPGp53 treatment was correlated with the detection of both p53 and TUNEL-positive cells. This study points to the importance of improved vector performance for gene therapy of prostate cancer.

  17. p53, c-myc p62 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Korkolopoulou, P; Oates, J; Kittas, C; Crocker, J

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the immunohistochemical expression of p53 protein in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) and its relation to that of c-myc p62 oncoprotein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). METHODS--Paraffin wax embedded tissue from 90 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (72 B cell and 18 T cell) was stained immunohistochemically for p53 protein, c-myc p62 oncoprotein, and PCNA using the monoclonal antibodies DO7, c-myc 1-9 E10, and PC-10, respectively. RESULTS--Of the non-Hodgkin's lymphomas studied, 55 (61%) stained positively for p53 protein. The proportion of positive cases increased from low grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and was higher in tumours of T cell origin. The percentage of positive cells (labelling index or LI) was significantly lower in low grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, but no difference was established between intermediate and high grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In a large proportion of low grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma the LI was below 1%. c-myc p62 immunoreactivity was identified in all cases. A significant positive correlation was established between p53 LI and c-myc p62 LI (rs = 0.453) as well as between p53 LI and PCNA LI (rs = 0.338). CONCLUSIONS--p53 immunoreactivity was present in about half the cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and was related to the grade of malignancy and possibly to the B or T cell origin of the tumour. It was also associated with the proliferation state as expressed by PCNA LI and c-myc p62 expression, indicating that the expression of these three cell cycle-related genes might be interrelated. Images PMID:7907610

  18. p53 protein expression independently predicts outcome in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q)

    PubMed Central

    Saft, Leonie; Karimi, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Mehran; Matolcsy, András; Mufti, Ghulam J.; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Göhring, Gudrun; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Muus, Petra; Sanz, Guillermo; Mittelman, Moshe; Bowen, David; Porwit, Anna; Fu, Tommy; Backstrom, Jay; Fenaux, Pierre; MacBeth, Kyle J.; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System as low- or intermediate-1-risk (lower-risk) are considered to have an indolent course; however, recent data have identified a subgroup of these patients with more aggressive disease and poorer outcomes. Using deep sequencing technology, we previously demonstrated that 18% of patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes carry TP53 mutated subclones rendering them at higher risk of progression. In this study, bone marrow biopsies from 85 patients treated with lenalidomide in the MDS-004 clinical trial were retrospectively assessed for p53 expression by immunohistochemistry in association with outcome. Strong p53 expression in ≥1% of bone marrow progenitor cells, observed in 35% (30 of 85) of patients, was significantly associated with higher acute myeloid leukemia risk (P=0.0006), shorter overall survival (P=0.0175), and a lower cytogenetic response rate (P=0.009), but not with achievement or duration of 26-week transfusion independence response. In a multivariate analysis, p53-positive immunohistochemistry was the strongest independent predictor of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.0035). Pyrosequencing analysis of laser-microdissected cells with strong p53 expression confirmed the TP53 mutation, whereas cells with moderate expression predominantly had wild-type p53. This study validates p53 immunohistochemistry as a strong and clinically useful predictive tool in patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. This study was based on data from the MDS 004 trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00179621). PMID:24682512

  19. Terpenoids from Zingiber officinale (Ginger) induce apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells through the activation of p53.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Whelan, Rebecca J; Pattnaik, Bikash R; Ludwig, Kai; Subudhi, Enkateswar; Rowland, Helen; Claussen, Nick; Zucker, Noah; Uppal, Shitanshu; Kushner, David M; Felder, Mildred; Patankar, Manish S; Kapur, Arvinder

    2012-01-01

    Novel strategies are necessary to improve chemotherapy response in advanced and recurrent endometrial cancer. Here, we demonstrate that terpenoids present in the Steam Distilled Extract of Ginger (SDGE) are potent inhibitors of proliferation of endometrial cancer cells. SDGE, isolated from six different batches of ginger rhizomes, consistently inhibited proliferation of the endometrial cancer cell lines Ishikawa and ECC-1 at IC(50) of 1.25 µg/ml. SDGE also enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of radiation and cisplatin. Decreased proliferation of Ishikawa and ECC-1 cells was a direct result of SDGE-induced apoptosis as demonstrated by FITC-Annexin V staining and expression of cleaved caspase 3. GC/MS analysis identified a total of 22 different terpenoid compounds in SDGE, with the isomers neral and geranial constituting 30-40%. Citral, a mixture of neral and geranial inhibited the proliferation of Ishikawa and ECC-1 cells at an IC(50) 10 µM (2.3 µg/ml). Phenolic compounds such as gingerol and shogaol were not detected in SDGE and 6-gingerol was a weaker inhibitor of the proliferation of the endometrial cancer cells. SDGE was more effective in inducing cancer cell death than citral, suggesting that other terpenes present in SDGE were also contributing to endometrial cancer cell death. SDGE treatment resulted in a rapid and strong increase in intracellular calcium and a 20-40% decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Ser-15 of p53 was phosphorylated after 15 min treatment of the cancer cells with SDGE. This increase in p53 was associated with 90% decrease in Bcl2 whereas no effect was observed on Bax. Inhibitor of p53, pifithrin-α, attenuated the anti-cancer effects of SDGE and apoptosis was also not observed in the p53(neg) SKOV-3 cells. Our studies demonstrate that terpenoids from SDGE mediate apoptosis by activating p53 and should be therefore be investigated as agents for the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  20. RGS6 is an essential tumor suppressor that prevents bladder carcinogenesis by promoting p53 activation and DNMT1 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianqi; Platt, Lance T; Maity, Biswanath; Ahlers, Katelin E; Luo, Zili; Lin, Zhibo; Chakravarti, Bandana; Ibeawuchi, Stella-Rita; Askeland, Ryan W; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Fisher, Rory A

    2016-10-25

    Urinary bladder cancer (UBC) is largely caused by exposure to toxic chemicals including those in cigarette smoke (i.e. BBN). An activating SNP in RGS6 is associated with a pronounced reduction in UBC risk, especially among smokers. However, the mechanism underlying this reduction remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that RGS6 is robustly expressed in human urothelium, where urothelial cell carcinoma originates, and is downregulated in human UBC. Utilizing RGS6-/- mice we interrogated a possible role for RGS6 as a tumor suppressor using the BBN-induced bladder carcinogenesis model that closely recapitulates human disease. As in humans, RGS6 is robustly expressed in mouse urothelium. RGS6 loss dramatically accelerates BBN-induced bladder carcinogenesis, with RGS6-/- mice consistently displaying more advanced pathological lesions than RGS6+/+ mice. Furthermore, BBN treatment promotes urothelial RGS6 mRNA and protein downregulation. RGS6 loss impairs p53 activation and promotes aberrant accumulation of oncogenic protein DNMT1 in urothelium. Tumor suppressor RASSF1A, a DNMT1-regulated gene, is also silenced, likely via methylation of its promoter during BBN exposure. We hypothesize that this BBN-induced RGS6 loss represents a critical hit in UBC as it irrevocably impairs the anti-proliferative actions of the ATM/p53 and RASSF1A pathways. Consistent with these findings, RGS6-/- mice treated with CP-31398, a p53-stablizing agent, and/or 5-Aza, a DNMT1 inhibitor, are protected from BBN-induced tumorigenesis. Together, our data identify RGS6 as a master tumor suppressor modulating two critical signaling pathways that are often dysregulated in UBC; therefore, RGS6 represents a potential novel biomarker for UBC diagnosis/prognosis and an appealing new target in its treatment.

  1. RGS6 is an essential tumor suppressor that prevents bladder carcinogenesis by promoting p53 activation and DNMT1 downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianqi; Platt, Lance T.; Maity, Biswanath; Ahlers, Katelin E.; Luo, Zili; Lin, Zhibo; Chakravarti, Bandana; Ibeawuchi, Stella-Rita; Askeland, Ryan W.; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; Fisher, Rory A.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer (UBC) is largely caused by exposure to toxic chemicals including those in cigarette smoke (i.e. BBN). An activating SNP in RGS6 is associated with a pronounced reduction in UBC risk, especially among smokers. However, the mechanism underlying this reduction remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that RGS6 is robustly expressed in human urothelium, where urothelial cell carcinoma originates, and is downregulated in human UBC. Utilizing RGS6−/− mice we interrogated a possible role for RGS6 as a tumor suppressor using the BBN-induced bladder carcinogenesis model that closely recapitulates human disease. As in humans, RGS6 is robustly expressed in mouse urothelium. RGS6 loss dramatically accelerates BBN-induced bladder carcinogenesis, with RGS6−/− mice consistently displaying more advanced pathological lesions than RGS6+/+ mice. Furthermore, BBN treatment promotes urothelial RGS6 mRNA and protein downregulation. RGS6 loss impairs p53 activation and promotes aberrant accumulation of oncogenic protein DNMT1 in urothelium. Tumor suppressor RASSF1A, a DNMT1-regulated gene, is also silenced, likely via methylation of its promoter during BBN exposure. We hypothesize that this BBN-induced RGS6 loss represents a critical hit in UBC as it irrevocably impairs the anti-proliferative actions of the ATM/p53 and RASSF1A pathways. Consistent with these findings, RGS6−/− mice treated with CP-31398, a p53-stablizing agent, and/or 5-Aza, a DNMT1 inhibitor, are protected from BBN-induced tumorigenesis. Together, our data identify RGS6 as a master tumor suppressor modulating two critical signaling pathways that are often dysregulated in UBC; therefore, RGS6 represents a potential novel biomarker for UBC diagnosis/prognosis and an appealing new target in its treatment. PMID:27713144

  2. SIGNALING TO THE P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR THROUGH PATHWAYS ACTIVATED BY GENOTOXIC AND NON-GENOTOXIC STRESSES.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2002-07-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is post-translational modified at {approx}18 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review the posttranslational modifications to p53 and the pathways that produce them in response to both genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses.

  3. Changes in expression of p53, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and bcl-2 in recurrent laryngeal cancer after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, B-J; Wang, S-G; Roh, H-J; Goh, E-K; Chon, K-M; Park, D-Y

    2006-07-01

    The biological changes in recurrent laryngeal cancer following radiotherapy are not fully understood. The authors investigated differences in the expression of p53, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bcl-2 in laryngeal cancer specimens before radiotherapy and in recurrent laryngeal cancer specimens following radiotherapy in the same patients. The authors investigated the expression of p53, PCNA and bcl-2 by immunohistochemical stain in 30 specimens from 15 patients with primary laryngeal cancer and recurrent laryngeal cancer after radiotherapy. The expression of p53 protein was significantly different in laryngeal cancer before radiotherapy (4/15, 26.7 per cent) compared with recurrent laryngeal cancer after radiotherapy (8/15, 53.3 per cent) (p<0.05). The PCNA index was also significantly different in laryngeal cancer specimens before radiotherapy (mean, 11.9 per cent) compared with recurrent laryngeal cancer after radiotherapy (mean, 18.0 per cent) (p<0.05). However, there was no statistically significant alteration of bcl-2 expression in primary compared with recurrent laryngeal cancer. The expression of p53 and PCNA increased in recurrent laryngeal cancers after radiotherapy, compared with that in laryngeal cancers before radiotherapy. Recurrent laryngeal cancers arising following radiotherapy became biologically aggressive.

  4. p53 regulates cyclophosphamide teratogenesis by controlling caspases 3, 8, 9 activation and NF-kappaB DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Pekar, Olga; Molotski, Nataly; Savion, Shoshana; Fein, Amos; Toder, Vladimir; Torchinsky, Arkady

    2007-08-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 regulates the sensitivity of embryos to such human teratogens as ionizing radiation, diabetes, and cytostatics. Yet, the molecular mechanisms whereby it fulfills this function remain undefined. We used p53 heterozygous (p53(+/-)) female mice mated with p53(+/-) males and then exposed to cyclophosphamide (CP) to test whether caspases 3, 8, and 9 and the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB may serve as p53 targets. Mice were exposed to CP on day 12 of pregnancy and killed on days 15 and 18 of pregnancy to evaluate CP-induced teratogenic effect. The brain and limbs of embryos harvested 24 h after CP treatment were used to evaluate NF-kappaB (p65) DNA-binding activity by an ELISA-based method, the activity of the caspases by appropriate colorimetric kits, apoptosis, and cell proliferation by TUNEL, and 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation respectively. We observed that the activation of caspases 3, 8, and 9 and the suppression of NF-kappaB DNA binding following CP-induced teratogenic insult took place only in teratologically sensitive organs of p53(+/+) but not p53(-/-) embryos. CP-induced apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation were also more intensive in the former, and they exhibited a higher incidence of structural anomalies, such as open eyes, digit, limb, and tail anomalies. The analysis of the correlations between the p53 embryonic genotype, the activity of the tested molecules, and the CP-induced dysmorphic events at the cellular and organ level suggests caspases 3, 8, and 9 and NF-kappaB as components of p53-targeting mechanisms in embryos exposed to the teratogen.

  5. Down-regulation of wild-type p53 activity interferes with apoptosis of IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells following IL-3 withdrawal.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, E; Haffner, R; von Rüden, T; Wagner, E F; Oren, M

    1994-01-01

    Overexpression of wild-type p53 in p53-deficient leukemic cells induces apoptosis, which can be inhibited by hematopoietic survival factors. This suggests that p53 may contribute to survival factor dependence. To assess the role of wild-type p53 in mediating apoptosis following survival factor withdrawal, we interfered with endogenous p53 activity in interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent cells. Extended survival without IL-3 was conferred by recombinant retroviruses encoding either a full-length p53 mutant or a C-terminal p53 miniprotein, both of which can act as negative-dominant inhibitors of wild-type p53. On the other hand, excess wild-type p53 activity failed to elicit apoptosis as long as IL-3 was present. We propose that p53 is a positive, though not exclusive, mediator of survival factor dependence in hematopoietic cells. Images PMID:8137820

  6. Deconstructing p53 transcriptional networks in tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    Bieging, Kathryn T; Attardi, Laura D

    2012-02-01

    p53 is a pivotal tumor suppressor that induces apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest and senescence in response to stress signals. Although p53 transcriptional activation is important for these responses, the mechanisms underlying tumor suppression have been elusive. To date, no single or compound mouse knockout of specific p53 target genes has recapitulated the dramatic tumor predisposition that characterizes p53-null mice. Recently, however, analysis of knock-in mice expressing p53 transactivation domain mutants has revealed a group of primarily novel direct p53 target genes that may mediate tumor suppression in vivo. We present here an overview of well-known p53 target genes and the tumor phenotypes of the cognate knockout mice, and address the recent identification of new p53 transcriptional targets and how they enhance our understanding of p53 transcriptional networks central for tumor suppression.

  7. Loss of Sparc in p53-null Astrocytes Promotes Macrophage Activation and Phagocytosis Resulting in Decreased Tumor Size and Tumor Cell Survival.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stacey L; Schultz, Chad R; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Golembieski, William A; El Naili, Reima; Radakrishnan, Archanna; Lemke, Nancy; Poisson, Laila M; Gutiérrez, Jorge A; Cottingham, Sandra; Rempel, Sandra A

    2015-07-01

    Both the induction of SPARC expression and the loss of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are changes that occur early in glioma development. Both SPARC and p53 regulate glioma cell survival by inverse effects on apoptotic signaling. Therefore, during glioma formation, the upregulation of SPARC may cooperate with the loss of p53 to enhance cell survival. This study determined whether the loss of Sparc in astrocytes that are null for p53 would result in reduced cell survival and tumor formation and increased tumor immunogenicity in an in vivo xenograft brain tumor model. In vitro, the loss of Sparc in p53-null astrocytes resulted in an increase in cell proliferation, but a loss of tumorigenicity. At 7 days after intracranial implantation, Sparc-null tumors had decreased tumor cell survival, proliferation and reduced tumor size. The loss of Sparc promoted microglia/macrophage activation and phagocytosis of tumor cells. Our results indicate that the loss of p53 by deletion/mutation in the early stages of glioma formation may cooperate with the induction of SPARC to potentiate cancer cell survival and escape from immune surveillance.

  8. Prediction of P53 Mutants (Multiple Sites) Transcriptional Activity Based on Structural (2D&3D) Properties

    PubMed Central

    Geetha Ramani, R.; Jacob, Shomona Gracia

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of secondary site mutations that reinstate mutated p53 to normalcy has been the focus of intense research in the recent past owing to the fact that p53 mutants have been implicated in more than half of all human cancers and restoration of p53 causes tumor regression. However laboratory investigations are more often laborious and resource intensive but computational techniques could well surmount these drawbacks. In view of this, we formulated a novel approach utilizing computational techniques to predict the transcriptional activity of multiple site (one-site to five-site) p53 mutants. The optimal MCC obtained by the proposed approach on prediction of one-site, two-site, three-site, four-site and five-site mutants were 0.775,0.341,0.784,0.916 and 0.655 respectively, the highest reported thus far in literature. We have also demonstrated that 2D and 3D features generate higher prediction accuracy of p53 activity and our findings revealed the optimal results for prediction of p53 status, reported till date. We believe detection of the secondary site mutations that suppress tumor growth may facilitate better understanding of the relationship between p53 structure and function and further knowledge on the molecular mechanisms and biological activity of p53, a targeted source for cancer therapy. We expect that our prediction methods and reported results may provide useful insights on p53 functional mechanisms and generate more avenues for utilizing computational techniques in biological data analysis. PMID:23468845

  9. Amino-terminal p53 mutations lead to expression of apoptosis proficient p47 and prognosticate better survival, but predispose to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Phang, Beng Hooi; Othman, Rashidah; Bougeard, Gaelle; Chia, Ren Hui; Frebourg, Thierry; Tang, Choong Leong; Cheah, Peh Yean; Sabapathy, Kanaga

    2015-11-17

    Whereas most mutations in p53 occur in the DNA-binding domain and lead to its functional inactivation, their relevance in the amino-terminal transactivation domain is unclear. We show here that amino-terminal p53 (ATp53) mutations often result in the abrogation of full-length p53 expression, but concomitantly lead to the expression of the amino-terminally truncated p47 isoform. Using genetically modified cancer cells that only express p47, we demonstrate it to be up-regulated in response to various stimuli, and to contribute to cell death, through its ability to selectively activate a group of apoptotic target genes. Target gene selectivity is influenced by K382 acetylation, which depends on the amino terminus, and is required for recruitment of selective cofactors. Consistently, cancers capable of expressing p47 had a better overall survival. Nonetheless, retention of the apoptotic function appears insufficient for tumor suppression, because these mutations are also found in the germ line and lead to Li-Fraumeni syndrome. These data from ATp53 mutations collectively demonstrate that p53's apoptosis proficiency is dispensable for tumor suppression, but could prognosticate better survival.

  10. Wild-type and mutated presenilins 2 trigger p53-dependent apoptosis and down-regulate presenilin 1 expression in HEK293 human cells and in murine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Alves da Costa, Cristine; Paitel, Erwan; Mattson, Mark P.; Amson, Robert; Telerman, Adam; Ancolio, Karine; Checler, Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    Presenilins 1 and 2 are two homologous proteins that, when mutated, account for most early onset Alzheimer's disease. Several lines of evidence suggest that, among various functions, presenilins could modulate cell apoptotic responses. Here we establish that the overexpression of presenilin 2 (PS2) and its mutated form Asn-141-Ile-PS2 alters the viability of human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells as established by combined trypan blue exclusion, sodium 3′-[1-(phenylamino-carbonyl)-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzene sulfonic acid hydrate assay, and propidium iodide incorporation FACS analyses. The two parent proteins increase the acetyl-DEVD-al-sensitive caspase-3-like activity in both HEK293 cells and Telencephalon specific murine neurons, modulate Bax and bcl-2 expressions, and enhance cytochrome C translocation into the cytosol. We show that overexpression of both wild-type and mutated PS2 increases p53-like immunoreactivity and transcriptional activity. We also establish that wild-type- and mutated PS2-induced caspase activation is reduced by p53 antisense approach and by pifithrin-α, a chemical inhibitor of p53. Furthermore, mouse fibroblasts in which the PS2 gene has been knocked out exhibited strongly reduced p53-transcriptional activity. Finally, we establish that the overexpression of both wild-type and mutated PS2 is accompanied by a drastic reduction of endogenous presenilin 1 (PS1) expression. Interestingly, pifithrin-α diminished endogenous PS2 immunoreactivity, whereas the inhibitor increases PS1 expression. Altogether, our data demonstrate that wild-type and familial Alzheimer's disease-linked PS2 trigger apoptosis and down-regulate PS1 expression through p53-dependent mechanisms. PMID:11904448

  11. Cadherin-6 type 2, K-cadherin (CDH6) is regulated by mutant p53 in the fallopian tube but is not expressed in the ovarian surface.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Subbulakshmi; Lantvit, Daniel D; Chae, Dam Hee; Burdette, Joanna E

    2016-10-25

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and may arise in either the fallopian tube epithelium (FTE) or ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). A mutation in p53 is reported in 96% of HGSOC, most frequently at R273 and R248. The goal of this study was to identify specific gene targets in the FTE that are altered by mutant p53, but not in the OSE. Gene analysis revealed that both R273 and R248 mutant p53 reduces CDH6 expression in the oviduct, but CDH6 was not detected in murine OSE cells. p53R273H induced SLUG and FOXM1 while p53R248W did not induce SLUG and only modestly increased FOXM1, which correlated with less migration as compared to p53R273H. An oviduct specific PAX8Cre/+/p53R270H/+ mouse model was created and confirmed that in vivo mutant p53 repressed CDH6 but was not sufficient to stabilize p53 expression alone. Overexpression of mutant p53 in the p53 null OVCAR5 cells decreased CDH6 levels indicating this was a gain-of-function. SLUG knockdown in murine oviductal cells with p53R273H restored CDH6 repression and a ChIP analysis revealed direct binding of mutant p53 on the CDH6 promoter. NSC59984, a small molecule that degrades mutant p53R273H, rescued CDH6 expression. In summary, CDH6 is expressed in the oviduct, but not the ovary, and is repressed by mutant p53. CDH6 expression with further validations may aide in establishing markers that inform upon the cell of origin of high grade serous tumors.

  12. TGF-β induces p53/Smads complex formation in the PAI-1 promoter to activate transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kawarada, Yuki; Inoue, Yasumichi; Kawasaki, Fumihiro; Fukuura, Keishi; Sato, Koichi; Tanaka, Takahito; Itoh, Yuka; Hayashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling facilitates tumor development during the advanced stages of tumorigenesis, but induces cell-cycle arrest for tumor suppression during the early stages. However, the mechanism of functional switching of TGF-β is still unknown, and it is unclear whether inhibition of TGF-β signaling results amelioration or exacerbation of cancers. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 cooperates with Smad proteins, which are TGF-β signal transducers, to selectively activate plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) transcription. p53 forms a complex with Smad2/3 in the PAI-1 promoter to recruit histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein (CBP) and enhance histone H3 acetylation, resulting in transcriptional activation of the PAI-1 gene. Importantly, p53 is required for TGF-β-induced cytostasis and PAI-1 is involved in the cytostatic activity of TGF-β in several cell lines. Our results suggest that p53 enhances TGF-β-induced cytostatic effects by activating PAI-1 transcription, and the functional switching of TGF-β is partially caused by p53 mutation or p53 inactivation during cancer progression. It is expected that these findings will contribute to optimization of TGF-β-targeting therapies for cancer. PMID:27759037

  13. Methotrexate induces apoptosis through p53/p21-dependent pathway and increases E-cadherin expression through downregulation of HDAC/EZH2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yu; Yang, Pei-Ming; Chang, Yu-Fan; Marquez, Victor E; Chen, Ching-Chow

    2011-02-15

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitor widely used as an anticancer drug in different kinds of human cancers. Here we investigated the anti-tumor mechanism of MTX against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells. MTX not only inhibited in vitro cell growth via induction of apoptosis, but also inhibited tumor formation in animal xenograft model. RNase protection assay (RPA) and RT-PCR demonstrated its induction of p53 target genes including DR5, p21, Puma and Noxa. Moreover, MTX promoted p53 phosphorylation at Ser15 and acetylaion at Lys373/382, which increase its stability and expression. The apoptosis and inhibition of cell viability induced by MTX were dependent on p53 and, partially, on p21. In addition, MTX also increased E-cadherin expression through inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and downregulation of polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2). Therefore, the anticancer mechanism of MTX acts through initiation of p53-dependent apoptosis and restoration of E-cadherin expression by downregulation of HDAC/EZH2.

  14. Depletion of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptotic sensitization of radioresistant A549 cells via reactive oxygen species-dependent p53 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Hong Shik; Hong, Eun-Hee; Lee, Su-Jae; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Chang-Woo; Yim, Ji-Hye; Um, Hong-Duck; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •HRP-3 is a radiation- and anticancer drug-responsive protein in A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 induces apoptosis of radio- and chemoresistant A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 promotes ROS generation via inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. •Depletion of HRP-3 enhances ROS-dependent p53 activation and PUMA expression. -- Abstract: Biomarkers based on functional signaling have the potential to provide greater insight into the pathogenesis of cancer and may offer additional targets for anticancer therapeutics. Here, we identified hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (HRP-3) as a radioresistance-related gene and characterized the molecular mechanism by which its encoded protein regulates the radio- and chemoresistant phenotype of lung cancer-derived A549 cells. Knockdown of HRP-3 promoted apoptosis of A549 cells and potentiated the apoptosis-inducing action of radio- and chemotherapy. This increase in apoptosis was associated with a substantial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was attributable to inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway and resulted in enhanced ROS-dependent p53 activation and p53-dependent expression of PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis). Therefore, the HRP-3/Nrf2/HO-1/ROS/p53/PUMA cascade is an essential feature of the A549 cell phenotype and a potential radiotherapy target, extending the range of targets in multimodal therapies against lung cancer.

  15. Mitomycin C and decarbamoyl mitomycin C induce p53-independent p21WAF1/CIP1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shu-Yuan; Seo, Jiwon; Huang, Bik Tzu; Napolitano, Tanya; Champeil, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MC), a commonly used anticancer drug, induces DNA damage via DNA alkylation. Decarbamoyl mitomycin C (DMC), another mitomycin lacking the carbamate at C10, generates similar lesions as MC. Interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are believed to be the lesions primarily responsible for the cytotoxicity of MC and DMC. The major ICL generated by MC (α-ICL) has a trans stereochemistry at the guanine-drug linkage whereas the major ICL from DMC (β-ICL) has the opposite, cis, stereochemistry. In addition, DMC can provoke strong p53-independent cell death. Our hypothesis is that the stereochemistry of the major unique β-ICL generated by DMC is responsible for this p53-independent cell death signaling. p53 gene is inactively mutated in more than half of human cancers. p21WAF1/CIP1 known as a major effector of p53 is involved in p53-dependent and -independent control of cell proliferation and death. This study revealed the role of p21WAF1/CIP1 on MC and DMC triggered cell damage. MCF-7 (p53-proficient) and K562 (p53-deficient) cells were used. Cell cycle distributions were shifted to the G1/S phase in MCF-7 treated with MC and DMC, but were shifted to the S phase in K562. p21WAF1/CIP1 activation was observed in both cells treated with MC and DMC, and DMC triggered more significant activation. Knocking down p53 in MCF-7 did not attenuate MC and DMC induced p21WAF1/CIP1 activation. The α-ICL itself was enough to cause p21WAF1/CIP1 activation. PMID:27666201

  16. Inflammatory stimuli induce inhibitory S-nitrosylation of the deacetylase SIRT1 to increase acetylation and activation of p53 and p65

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Shohei; Chang, Kyungho; Sakai, Michihiro; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Marina; Tanaka, Tomokazu; Nakazawa, Harumasa; Ichinose, Fumito; Yamada, Yoshitsugu; Ishigami, Akihito; Ito, Hideki; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Starr, Marlene E.; Saito, Hiroshi; Shimokado, Kentaro; Stamler, Jonathan S.; Kaneki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation increases the abundance of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), leading to enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO), which can modify proteins by S-nitrosylation. Enhanced NO production increases the activities of the transcription factors p53 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) in several models of disease-associated inflammation. S-Nitrosylation inhibits the activity of the protein deacetylase SIRT1. SIRT1 limits apoptosis and inflammation by deacetylating p53 and p65 (also known as RelA), a subunit of NF-κB. We showed in multiple cultured mammalian cell lines that NO donors or inflammatory stimuli induced S-nitrosylation of SIRT1 within CXXC motifs, which inhibited SIRT1 by disrupting its ability to bind zinc. Inhibition of SIRT1 reduced deacetylation and promoted activation of p53 and p65, leading to apoptosis and increased expression of proinflammatory genes. In rodent models of systemic inflammation, Parkinson’s disease, or aging-related muscular atrophy, S-nitrosylation of SIRT1 correlated with increased acetylation of p53 and p65 and activation of p53 and NF-κB target genes, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of SIRT1 may represent a proinflammatory switch common to many diseases and aging. PMID:25389371

  17. Activation of p53/miR-34a Tumor Suppressor Axis by Chinese Herbal Formula JP-1 in A549 Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jyh-Ming; Lin, Pei-Chun; Hu, Tsai-Shu; Kuo, Hui-Ching; Huang, Jhy-Shrian

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide; the most common pathologic type is lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). In spite of the recent progress in targeted therapy, most LADC patients eventually expired due to the inevitable recurrence and drug resistance. New complementary agent with evidence-based molecular mechanism is urgently needed. MiR-34a is an important p53 downstream tumor suppressor, which regulates apoptosis, cell-cycle, EMT (epithelial mesenchymal transition), and so forth. Its expression is deficient in many types of cancers including LADC. Here, we show that a Chinese herbal formula JP-1 activates p53/miR-34a axis in A549 human LADC cells (p53 wild-type). Treatment with JP-1 induces p53 and its downstream p21 and BAX proteins as well as the miR-34a, resulting in growth inhibition, colony formation reduction, migration repression, and apoptosis induction. Accordingly, the decreases of miR-34a downstream targets such as CDK6, SIRT1, c-Myc, survivin, Snail, and AXL were observed. Moreover, JP-1 activates AMPKα and reduces mTOR activity, implying its inhibitory effect on the energy-sensitive protein synthesis and cell proliferation signaling. Our results show that JP-1 activates p53/miR-34a tumor suppressor axis and decreases proteins related to proliferation, apoptosis resistance, and metastasis, suggesting its potential as a complementary medicine for LADC treatment. PMID:28074102

  18. Expression of p21 is dependent on or independent of p53 in carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (undifferentiated and adenocarcinoma types).

    PubMed

    Tarakji, Bassel; Baroudi, Kusai; Hanouneh, Salah; Nassani, Mohammad Z; Alotaibi, Abdullah M; Kharma, M Yaser; Azzeghaiby, Saleh N

    2012-12-01

    Our study is aimed to characterize alteration in the immunohistochemical expression of p21 and p53 in normal tissue of the salivary gland surrounding carcinoma arising in pleomorphic adenoma, and the tumor cells of carcinoma arising in pleomorphic adenoma as well as to identify whether the induction of expression p21 is dependent on or independent of p53 in carcinoma arising in pleomorphic adenoma. A selected series of 27 cases of carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (undifferentiated and adenocarcinoma types) was examined. The results showed that p21 and p53 expression was negative in the most components of normal tissue of the salivary gland surrounding carcinoma arising in pleomorphic adenoma. p21 was strongly expressed in carcinoma cells in 9 (33.3%) cases out of 27. p53 was strongly expressed in carcinoma cells in 10 (37%) cases out of 27. Also a co-expression of p21 and p53 showed negative nuclear staining in 9 cases, while 8 cases expressed positive staining. p21 expressed negative nuclear staining in 4 cases but p53 expressed positive staining in the same cases. p21 expressed positive nuclear staining in 6 cases but p53 expressed negative nuclear staining in the same cases. Our data suggest that inactivation of p53 and p21 may play an important role in the evolution of carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma. Also p21 behaves as dependent on or independent of p53 in carcinoma arising in pleomorphic adenoma.

  19. High-grade fimbrial-ovarian carcinomas are unified by altered p53, PTEN and PAX2 expression.

    PubMed

    Roh, Michael H; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Mehra, Karishma K; Mehrad, Mitra; Monte, Nicolas M; Mutter, George L; Nucci, Marisa R; Ning, Geng; Mckeon, Frank D; Hirsch, Michelle S; Wa, Xian; Crum, Christopher P

    2010-10-01

    High-grade endometrioid and serous carcinomas of the ovary and fallopian tube are responsible for the majority of cancer deaths and comprise a spectrum that includes early or localized (tubal intraepithelial carcinoma) and advanced (invasive or metastatic) disease. We subdivided a series of these tumors into three groups, (1) classic serous, (2) mixed serous and endometrioid and (3) endometrioid carcinomas and determined: (1) the frequencies of coexisting tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, (2) frequency of a dominant ovarian mass suggesting an ovarian origin and (3) immuno-localization of WT-1, p53, PTEN, PAX2 and p16(ink4). All tumors were analyzed for p53 mutations. Thirty six, 25 and 8% of groups 1-3 were associated with tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (P=0.09) and 34, 45 and 62% predominated in one ovary (P=0.028), respectively. Differences in frequencies of diffuse p53 immunostaining (85-93%), WT-1 (70-98%) and p16(ink4) positivity (69-75%) were not significant for all groups. Greater than 95% reduction in PAX2 and PTEN occurred in 67-75 and 5-12%, respectively; however, PAX2 and PTEN staining intensity, when present, was often heterogeneous, highlighting different tumor populations. PAX2 and PTEN expression were markedly reduced or absent in 12 of 12 and 4 of 12 tubal intraepithelial carcinomas. In summary, high-grade müllerian carcinomas share identical frequencies of altered or reduced expression of p53, PTEN and PAX2, all of which can be appreciated in tubal intraepithelial carcinomas. Because only a subset of these tumors appears to arise in the fallopian tube, attention to expression of these biomarkers in the ovary and other müllerian sites might facilitate the identification of other carcinogenic pathways. PAX2 and PTEN, in addition to p53 and p16(ink4), comprise a potentially important gene combination in high-grade pelvic carcinogenesis.

  20. FBXW7-mutated colorectal cancer cells exhibit aberrant expression of phosphorylated-p53 at Serine-15

    PubMed Central

    Normatova, Makhliyo; Babaei-Jadidi, Roya; Tomlinson, Ian; Nateri, Abdolrahman S.

    2015-01-01

    FBXW7 mutations occur in a variety of human cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). Elucidating its mechanism of action has become crucial for cancer therapy; however, it is also complicated by the fact that FBXW7 can influence many pathways due to its role as an E3-ubiquitin ligase in proteasome degradation. FBXW7 and TP53 are tumour suppressors intensively implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Deletion mutations in these two genes in animal models mark the progression from adenoma to carcinoma. Although still largely unknown, the last defense mechanism against CRC at the molecular level could be through a synergistic effect of the two genes. The underlying mechanism requires further investigation. In our laboratory, we have used a phospho-kinase profiler array to illustrate a potential molecular link between FBXW7 and p53 in CRC cells. In vitro and in vivo assessments demonstrated aberrant induction of phosphorylated p53 at Serine 15 [phospho-p53(Ser15)] in human FBXW7-deficient CRC cells as compared to their FBXW7-wild-type counterparts. FBXW7 loss in HCT116 cells promoted resistance to oxaliplatin. Immunoblotting data further confirmed that reduction of phospho-p53(Ser15) may contribute to the decreased efficacy of therapy in FBXW7-mutated CRC cells. The findings may suggest the applicability of phospho-p53(Ser15) as an indicative marker of FBXW7-mutations. Phospho-p53(Ser15) regulation by FBXW7 E3-ligase activity could provide important clues for understanding FBXW7 behavior in tumour progression and grounds for its clinical applicability thereafter. PMID:25860929

  1. Diagnostic value of progesterone receptor, p16, p53 and pHH3 expression in uterine atypical leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yun; Zhang, Xiaofei; Chen, Xiaoduan; Lü, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between atypical leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma may be hard based on morphological criterion at times. It would be helpful to find out biomarkers that can be used to distinguish them. The aim of the study was to investigate the diagnostic value of progesterone receptor (PR), p16, p53 and pHH3 expression in a series of uterine smooth muscle tumors. Immunohistochemical expression of PR, p16, p53 and pHH3 was investigated on 32 atypical leiomyomas, 15 leiomyosarcomas and 15 usual leomyomas. The difference in expression was compared between atypical leiomyoma and other groups. The expression of PR, p16, and pHH3 was found significantly different between atypical leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, but lack of significant difference between atypical leiomyomas and usual leiomyomas. There was no significant difference with regard to p53 distribution among these uterine smooth muscle tumors. High p16, pHH3 expression and low PR expression preferred the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma. The panel of antibodies used in this study is a useful complementary analysis in the assessment of problematic uterine smooth muscle tumors. PMID:26261614

  2. Repeated PM2.5 exposure inhibits BEAS-2B cell P53 expression through ROS-Akt-DNMT3B pathway-mediated promoter hypermethylation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Tian, Dongdong; He, Jun; Wang, Yimei; Zhang, Lijun; Cui, Lan; Jia, Li; Zhang, Li; Li, Lizhong; Shu, Yulei; Yu, Shouzhong; Zhao, Jun; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Peng, Shuangqing

    2016-04-12

    Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been reported to be closely associated with the increased lung cancer risk in populations, but the mechanisms underlying PM-associated carcinogenesis are not yet clear. Previous studies have indicated that aberrant epigenetic alterations, such as genome-wide DNA hypomethylation and gene-specific DNA hypermethylation contribute to lung carcinogenesis. And silence or mutation of P53 tumor suppressor gene is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in lung cancer development. To explore the effects of PM2.5 on global and P53 promoter methylation changes and the mechanisms involved, we exposed human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to low concentrations of PM2.5 for 10 days. Our results indicated that PM2.5-induced global DNA hypomethylation was accompanied by reduced DNMT1 expression. PM2.5 also induced hypermethylation of P53 promoter and inhibited its expression by increasing DNMT3B protein level. Furthermore, ROS-induced activation of Akt was involved in PM2.5-induced increase in DNMT3B. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that repeated exposure to PM2.5 induces epigenetic silencing of P53 through ROS-Akt-DNMT3B pathway-mediated promoter hypermethylation, which not only provides a possible explanation for PM-induced lung cancer, but also may help to identify specific interventions to prevent PM-induced lung carcinogenesis.

  3. Over-expression of p53 mutants in LNCaP cells alters tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Perryman, L.A.; Blair, J.M.; Kingsley, E.A.; Szymanska, B.; Ow, K.T.; Wen, V.W.; MacKenzie, K.L.; Vermeulen, P.B.; Jackson, P.; Russell, P.J. . E-mail: p.russell@unsw.edu.au

    2006-07-07

    This study has investigated the impact of three specific dominant-negative p53 mutants (F134L, M237L, and R273H) on tumorigenesis by LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Mutant p53 proteins were associated with an increased subcutaneous 'take rate' in NOD-SCID mice, and increased production of PSA. Tumors expressing F134L and R273H grew slower than controls, and were associated with decreased necrosis and apoptosis, but not hypoxia. Interestingly, hypoxia levels were increased in tumors expressing M237L. There was less proliferation in F134L-bearing tumors compared to control, but this was not statistically significant. Angiogenesis was decreased in tumors expressing F134L and R273H compared with M237L, or controls. Conditioned medium from F134L tumors inhibited growth of normal human umbilical-vein endothelial cells but not telomerase-immortalized bone marrow endothelial cells. F134L tumor supernatants showed lower levels of VEGF and endostatin compared with supernatants from tumors expressing other mutants. Our results support the possibility that decreased angiogenesis might account for reduced growth rate of tumor cells expressing the F134L p53 mutation.

  4. SET1 and p300 Act Synergistically, through Coupled Histone Modifications, in Transcriptional Activation by p53

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhanyun; Chen, Wei-Yi; Shimada, Miho; Nguyen, Uyen T.T.; Kim, Jaehoon; Sun, Xiao-Jian; Sengoku, Toru; McGinty, Robert K.; Fernandez, Joseph P.; Muir, Tom W.; Roeder, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The H3K4me3 mark in chromatin is closely correlated with actively transcribed genes, although the mechanisms involved in its generation and function are not fully understood. In vitro studies with recombinant chromatin and purified human factors demonstrate a robust SET1 complex (SET1C)-mediated H3K4 trimethylation that is dependent upon p53- and p300-mediated H3 acetylation, a corresponding SET1C-mediated enhancement of p53- and p300-dependent transcription that reflects a primary effect of SET1C through H3K4 trimethylation, and direct SET1C-p53 and SET1C-p300 interactions indicative of a targeted recruitment mechanism. Complementary cell-based assays demonstrate a DNA-damage-induced p53-SET1C interaction, a corresponding enrichment of SET1C and H3K4me3 on a p53 target gene (p21/WAF1), and a corresponding codependency of H3K4 trimethylation and transcription upon p300 and SET1C. These results establish a mechanism in which SET1C and p300 act cooperatively, through direct interactions and coupled histone modifications, to facilitate the function of p53. PMID:23870121

  5. Radiosensitivity profiles from a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines exhibiting genetic alterations in p53 and disparate DNA-dependent protein kinase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Langland, Gregory T.; Yannone, Steven M.; Langland, Rachel A.; Nakao, Aki; Guan, Yinghui; Long, Sydney B.T.; Vonguyen, Lien; Chen, David J.; Gray, Joe W; Chen, Fanqing

    2009-09-07

    The variability of radiation responses in ovarian tumors and tumor-derived cell lines is poorly understood. Since both DNA repair capacity and p53 status can significantly alter radiation sensitivity, we evaluated these factors along with radiation sensitivity in a panel of sporadic human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. We observed a gradation of radiation sensitivity among these sixteen lines, with a five-fold difference in the LD50 between the most radiosensitive and the most radioresistant cells. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is essential for the repair of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in human somatic cells. Therefore, we measured gene copy number, expression levels, protein abundance, genomic copy and kinase activity for DNA-PK in all of our cell lines. While there were detectable differences in DNA-PK between the cell lines, there was no clear correlation with any of these differences and radiation sensitivity. In contrast, p53 function as determined by two independent methods, correlated well with radiation sensitivity, indicating p53 mutant ovarian cancer cells are typically radioresistant relative to p53 wild-type lines. These data suggest that the activity of regulatory molecules such as p53 may be better indicators of radiation sensitivity than DNA repair enzymes such as DNAPK in ovarian cancer.

  6. Therapeutic Response to Non-genotoxic Activation of p53 by Nutlin3a Is Driven by PUMA-Mediated Apoptosis in Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Valente, Liz J; Aubrey, Brandon J; Herold, Marco J; Kelly, Gemma L; Happo, Lina; Scott, Clare L; Newbold, Andrea; Johnstone, Ricky W; Huang, David C S; Vassilev, Lyubomir T; Strasser, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Nutlin3a is a small-molecule antagonist of MDM2 that promotes non-genotoxic activation of p53 through p53 protein stabilization and transactivation of p53 target genes. Nutlin3a is the forerunner of a class of cancer therapeutics that have reached clinical trials. Using transgenic and gene-targeted mouse models lacking the critical p53 target genes, p21, Puma, and Noxa, we found that only loss of PUMA conferred profound protection against Nutlin3a-induced killing in both non-transformed lymphoid cells and Eμ-Myc lymphomas in vitro and in vivo. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeting of the PUMA gene rendered human hematopoietic cancer cell lines markedly resistant to Nutlin3a-induced cell death. These results demonstrate that PUMA-mediated apoptosis, but not p21-mediated cell-cycle arrest or senescence, is a critical determinant of the therapeutic response to non-genotoxic p53 activation by Nutlin3a. Importantly, in human cancer, PUMA expression may predict patient responses to treatment with MDM2 antagonists.

  7. Radiosensitivity profiles from a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines exhibiting genetic alterations in p53 and disparate DNA-dependent protein kinase activities

    PubMed Central

    Langland, Gregory T.; Yannone, Steven M.; Langland, Rachel A.; Nakao, Aki; Guan, Yinghui; Long, Sydney B.T.; Vonguyen, Lien; Chen, David J.; Gray, Joe W.; Chen, Fanqing

    2010-01-01

    The variability of radiation responses in ovarian tumors and tumor-derived cell lines is poorly understood. Since both DNA repair capacity and p53 status can significantly alter radiation sensitivity, we evaluated these factors along with radiation sensitivity in a panel of sporadic human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. We observed a gradation of radiation sensitivity among these sixteen lines, with a five-fold difference in the LD50 between the most radiosensitive and the most radioresistant cells. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is essential for the repair of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in human somatic cells. Therefore, we measured gene copy number, expression levels, protein abundance, genomic copy and kinase activity for DNA-PK in all of our cell lines. While there were detectable differences in DNA-PK between the cell lines, there was no clear correlation with any of these differences and radiation sensitivity. In contrast, p53 function as determined by two independent methods, correlated well with radiation sensitivity, indicating p53 mutant ovarian cancer cells are typically radioresistant relative to p53 wild-type lines. These data suggest that the activity of regulatory molecules such as p53 may be better indicators of radiation sensitivity than DNA repair enzymes such as DNA-PK in ovarian cancer. PMID:20204287

  8. p53-dependent ceramide response to genotoxic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Dbaibo, G S; Pushkareva, M Y; Rachid, R A; Alter, N; Smyth, M J; Obeid, L M; Hannun, Y A

    1998-01-01

    Both p53 and ceramide have been implicated in the regulation of growth suppression. p53 has been proposed as the "guardian of the genome" and ceramide has been suggested as a "tumor suppressor lipid. " Both molecules appear to regulate cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the relationship between p53 and ceramide. We found that treatment of Molt-4 cells with low concentrations of actinomycin D or gamma-irradiation, which activate p53-dependent apoptosis, induces apoptosis only in cells expressing normal levels of p53. In these cells, p53 activation was followed by a dose- and time-dependent increase in endogenous ceramide levels which was not seen in cells lacking functional p53 and treated similarly. Similar results were seen in irradiated L929 cells whereby the p53-deficient clone was significantly more resistant to irradiation and exhibited no ceramide response. However, in p53-independent systems, such as growth suppression induced by TNF-alpha or serum deprivation, ceramide accumulated irrespective of the upregulation of p53, indicating that p53 regulates ceramide accumulation in only a subset of growth-suppressive pathways. Finally, ceramide did not increase p53 levels when used at growth-suppressive concentrations. Also, when cells lacking functional p53, either due to mutation or the expression of the E6 protein of human papilloma virus, were treated with exogenous ceramide, there was equal growth suppression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis as compared with cells expressing normal p53. These results indicate that p53 is unlikely to function "downstream" of ceramide. Instead, they suggest that, in situations where p53 performs a critical regulatory role, such as the response to genotoxic stress, it functions "upstream" of ceramide. These studies begin to define a relationship between these two pathways of growth inhibition. PMID:9664074

  9. Arenobufagin activates p53 to trigger esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Junhong; Lin, Shaohuan; Peng, Panli; Cai, Changqing; Deng, Jianming; Wang, Mingzhi; Li, Xuejun; Lin, Rongsheng; Lin, Yu; Fang, Ailing; Li, Qiling

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is often diagnosed at late incurable stage and lacks effective treatment strategy. Bufadienolides are cardiotonic steroids isolated from the skin and parotid venom glands of the toad Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor with novel anticancer activity. However, there is little information about the effects and action mechanisms of bufadienolides on ESCC cells. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo anti-ESCC activities of bufadienolides, including bufalin (Bu) and arenobufagin (ArBu), were examined and the underlying molecular mechanisms were elucidated. The results showed that ArBu exhibited higher anticancer efficacy than Bu against a panel of five ESCC cells, with IC50 values ranging from 0.8 μM to 3.6 μM. However, ArBu showed lower toxicity toward Het-1A human normal esophageal squamous cells, indicating its great selectivity between cancer and normal cells. Moreover, ArBu effectively induced ESCC cell apoptosis mainly by triggering caspase activation through intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Treatment of ESCC cells also significantly activated p53 signaling by enhancing its phosphorylation. Interestingly, transfection of cells with p53 small interfering RNA significantly inhibited the ArBu-induced p53 phosphorylation and the overall apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, ArBu also demonstrated novel in vivo anticancer efficacy by inhibiting the tumor growth through activation of p53 pathway. Taken together, these results demonstrate the p53-targeting therapeutic potential of bufadienolides against ESCC. PMID:28280360

  10. Knockdown of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptosis of H1299 cells via ROS-dependent and p53-independent NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hong Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Yim, Ji-Hye; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Song, Jie-Young; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Park, In-Chul; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2014-07-11

    We previously identified hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (HRP-3) as a radioresistant biomarker in p53 wild-type A549 cells and found that p53-dependent induction of the PUMA pathway was a critical event in regulating the radioresistant phenotype. Here, we found that HRP-3 knockdown regulates the radioresistance of p53-null H1299 cells through a distinctly different molecular mechanism. HRP-3 depletion was sufficient to cause apoptosis of H1299 cells by generating substantial levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. Subsequent, ROS-dependent and p53-independent NF-κB activation stimulated expression of c-Myc and Noxa proteins, thereby inducing the apoptotic machinery. Our results thus extend the range of targets for the development of new drugs to treat both p53 wild-type or p53-null radioresistant lung cancer cells.

  11. The p53-Mdm2 interaction and the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2/Mdm4 are conserved from lampreys to humans.

    PubMed

    Coffill, Cynthia R; Lee, Alison P; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon M; Joseph, Thomas L; Tan, Yaw Sing; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Verma, Chandra S; Ghadessy, Farid J; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Lane, David P

    2016-02-01

    The extant jawless vertebrates, represented by lampreys and hagfish, are the oldest group of vertebrates and provide an interesting genomic evolutionary pivot point between invertebrates and jawed vertebrates. Through genome analysis of one of these jawless vertebrates, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), we identified all three members of the important p53 transcription factor family--Tp53, Tp63, and Tp73--as well as the Mdm2 and Mdm4 genes. These genes and their products are significant cellular regulators in human cancer, and further examination of their roles in this most distant vertebrate relative sheds light on their origin and coevolution. Their important role in response to DNA damage has been highlighted by the discovery of multiple copies of the Tp53 gene in elephants. Expression of lamprey p53, Mdm2, and Mdm4 proteins in mammalian cells reveals that the p53-Mdm2 interaction and the Mdm2/Mdm4 E3 ligase activity existed in the common ancestor of vertebrates and have been conserved for >500 million years of vertebrate evolution. Lamprey Mdm2 degrades human p53 with great efficiency, but this interaction is not blocked by currently available small molecule inhibitors of the human HDM2 protein, suggesting utility of lamprey Mdm2 in the study of the human p53 signaling pathway.

  12. The p53–Mdm2 interaction and the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2/Mdm4 are conserved from lampreys to humans

    PubMed Central

    Coffill, Cynthia R.; Lee, Alison P.; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon M.; Joseph, Thomas L.; Tan, Yaw Sing; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Verma, Chandra S.; Ghadessy, Farid J.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Lane, David P.

    2016-01-01

    The extant jawless vertebrates, represented by lampreys and hagfish, are the oldest group of vertebrates and provide an interesting genomic evolutionary pivot point between invertebrates and jawed vertebrates. Through genome analysis of one of these jawless vertebrates, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), we identified all three members of the important p53 transcription factor family—Tp53, Tp63, and Tp73—as well as the Mdm2 and Mdm4 genes. These genes and their products are significant cellular regulators in human cancer, and further examination of their roles in this most distant vertebrate relative sheds light on their origin and coevolution. Their important role in response to DNA damage has been highlighted by the discovery of multiple copies of the Tp53 gene in elephants. Expression of lamprey p53, Mdm2, and Mdm4 proteins in mammalian cells reveals that the p53–Mdm2 interaction and the Mdm2/Mdm4 E3 ligase activity existed in the common ancestor of vertebrates and have been conserved for >500 million years of vertebrate evolution. Lamprey Mdm2 degrades human p53 with great efficiency, but this interaction is not blocked by currently available small molecule inhibitors of the human HDM2 protein, suggesting utility of lamprey Mdm2 in the study of the human p53 signaling pathway. PMID:26798135

  13. Ovotoxic Effects of Galactose Involve Attenuation of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Bioactivity and Up-Regulation of Granulosa Cell p53 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sayani; Chakraborty, Pratip; Saha, Piyali; Bandyopadhyay, Soma Aditya; Banerjee, Sutapa; Kabir, Syed N.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests an association between galactosaemia and premature ovarian insufficiency (POI); however, the mechanism still remains unresolved. Experimental galactose toxicity in rats produces an array of ovarian dysfunction including ovarian development with deficient follicular reserve and follicular resistance to gonadotrophins that characterize the basic tenets of human POI. The present investigation explores if galactose toxicity in rats attenuates the bioactivity of gonadotrophins or interferes with their receptor competency, and accelerates the rate of follicular atresia. Pregnant rats were fed isocaloric food-pellets supplemented with or without 35% D-galactose from day-3 of gestation and continuing through weaning of the litters. The 35-day old female litters were autopsied. Serum galactose-binding capacity, galactosyltransferase (GalTase) activity, and bioactivity of FSH and LH together with their receptor competency were assessed. Ovarian follicular atresia was evaluated in situ by TUNEL. The in vitro effects of galactose were studied in isolated whole follicles in respect of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and expression of caspase 3, and in isolated granulosa cells in respect of mitochondrial membrane potential, expression of p53, and apoptosis. The rats prenatally exposed to galactose exhibited significantly decreased serum GalTase activity and greater degree of galactose-incorporation capacity of sera proteins. LH biopotency and LH-FSH receptor competency were comparable between the control and study population, but the latter group showed significantly attenuated FSH bioactivity and increased rate of follicular atresia. In culture, galactose increased follicular generation of ROS and expression of caspase 3. In isolated granulosa cells, galactose disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, stimulated p53 expression, and induced apoptosis in vitro; however co-treatment with either FSH or estradiol significantly prevented

  14. COH-203, a novel microtubule inhibitor, exhibits potent anti-tumor activity via p53-dependent senescence in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Huan; Zuo, Dai-Ying; Bai, Zhao-Shi; Xu, Jing-Wen; Li, Zeng-Qiang; Shen, Qi-Rong; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Wei-Ge; Wu, Ying-Liang

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • COH-203 exhibits anti-hepatoma effects in vitro and in vivo with low toxicity. • COH-203 inhibits tubulin polymerization. • COH-203 induces mitotic arrest followed by mitotic slippage in BEL-7402 cells. • COH-203 induces p53-dependent senescence in BEL-7402 cells. - Abstract: 5-(3-Hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-3H-1, 2-dithiol-3-one (COH-203) is a novel synthesized analogue of combretastatin A-4 that can be classified as a microtubule inhibitor. In this study, we evaluated the anti-hepatoma effect of COH-203 in vitro and in vivo and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. COH-203 was shown to be more effective in inhibiting the proliferation of liver cancer cells compared with normal liver cells. COH-203 also displayed potent anti-tumor activity in a hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft model without significant toxicity. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that treatment with COH-203 induced mitotic arrest by inhibiting tubulin polymerization in BEL-7402 liver cancer cells. Long-term COH-203 treatment in BEL-7402 cells led to mitotic slippage followed by senescence via the p14{sup Arf}–p53–p21 and p16{sup INK4α}–Rb pathways. Furthermore, suppression of p53 via pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor) and p53-siRNA attenuated COH-203-induced senescence in BEL-7402 cells, suggesting that COH-203 induced senescence p53-dependently. In conclusion, we report for the first time that COH-203, one compound in the combretastatin family, promotes anti-proliferative activity through the induction of p-53 dependent senescence. Our findings will provide a molecular rationale for the development of COH-203 as a promising anti-tumor agent.

  15. p53, Oxidative Stress, and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongping

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian aging is associated with elevated levels of oxidative damage of DNA, proteins, and lipids as a result of unbalanced prooxidant and antioxidant activities. Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidative stress is a major physiological inducer of aging. p53, the guardian of the genome that is important for cellular responses to oxidative stresses, might be a key coordinator of oxidative stress and aging. In response to low levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits antioxidant activities to eliminate oxidative stress and ensure cell survival; in response to high levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits prooxidative activities that further increase the levels of stresses, leading to cell death. p53 accomplishes these context-dependent roles by regulating the expression of a panel of genes involved in cellular responses to oxidative stresses and by modulating other pathways important for oxidative stress responses. The mechanism that switches p53 function from antioxidant to prooxidant remains unclear, but could account for the findings that increased p53 activities have been linked to both accelerated aging and increased life span in mice. Therefore, a balance of p53 antioxidant and prooxidant activities in response to oxidative stresses could be important for longevity by suppressing the accumulation of oxidative stresses and DNA damage. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1669–1678. PMID:21050134

  16. NORE1A is a double barreled Ras senescence effector that activates p53 and Rb.

    PubMed

    Donninger, Howard; Barnoud, Thibaut; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2016-09-01

    Although Ras is a potent oncogene in human tumors it has the paradoxical ability to promote Oncogene Induced Senescence (OIS). This appears to serve as a major barrier to Ras driven transformation in vivo. The signaling pathways used by Ras to promote senescence remain relatively poorly understood, but appear to invoke both the p53 and the Rb master tumor suppressors. Exactly how Ras communicates with p53 and Rb has remained something of a puzzle. NORE1A is a direct Ras effector that is frequently downregulated in human tumors. We have now found that it serves as a powerful Ras senescence effector. Moreover, we have defined signaling mechanisms that allows Ras to control both p53 and Rb post-translational modifications via the NORE1A scaffolding molecule. Indeed, NORE1A can be detected in complex with both p53 and Rb. Thus, by coupling Ras to both tumor suppressors, NORE1A forms a major component of the Ras senescence machinery and serves as the missing link between Ras and p53/Rb.

  17. PEG-b-PCL polymeric nano-micelle inhibits vascular angiogenesis by activating p53-dependent apoptosis in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tian; Dong, Qinglei; Shen, Yang; Wu, Wei; Wu, Haide; Luo, Xianglin; Liao, Xiaoling; Wang, Guixue

    2016-01-01

    Micro/nanoparticles could cause adverse effects on cardiovascular system and increase the risk for cardiovascular disease-related events. Nanoparticles prepared from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), namely PEG-b-PCL, a widely studied biodegradable copolymer, are promising carriers for the drug delivery systems. However, it is unknown whether polymeric PEG-b-PCL nano-micelles give rise to potential complications of the cardiovascular system. Zebrafish were used as an in vivo model to evaluate the effects of PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle on cardiovascular development. The results showed that PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle caused embryo mortality as well as embryonic and larval malformations in a dose-dependent manner. To determine PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle effects on embryonic angiogenesis, a critical process in zebrafish cardiovascular development, growth of intersegmental vessels (ISVs) and caudal vessels (CVs) in flk1-GFP transgenic zebrafish embryos using fluorescent stereomicroscopy were examined. The expression of fetal liver kinase 1 (flk1), an angiogenic factor, by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and in situ whole-mount hybridization were also analyzed. PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle decreased growth of ISVs and CVs, as well as reduced flk1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Parallel to the inhibitory effects on angiogenesis, PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle exposure upregulated p53 pro-apoptotic pathway and induced cellular apoptosis in angiogenic regions by qPCR and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) apoptosis assay. This study further showed that inhibiting p53 activity, either by pharmacological inhibitor or RNA interference, could abrogate the apoptosis and angiogenic defects caused by PEG-b-PCL nano-micelles, indicating that PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle inhibits angiogenesis by activating p53-mediated apoptosis. This study indicates that polymeric PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle could pose potential hazards

  18. PEG-b-PCL polymeric nano-micelle inhibits vascular angiogenesis by activating p53-dependent apoptosis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Dong, Qinglei; Shen, Yang; Wu, Wei; Wu, Haide; Luo, Xianglin; Liao, Xiaoling; Wang, Guixue

    Micro/nanoparticles could cause adverse effects on cardiovascular system and increase the risk for cardiovascular disease-related events. Nanoparticles prepared from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), namely PEG-b-PCL, a widely studied biodegradable copolymer, are promising carriers for the drug delivery systems. However, it is unknown whether polymeric PEG-b-PCL nano-micelles give rise to potential complications of the cardiovascular system. Zebrafish were used as an in vivo model to evaluate the effects of PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle on cardiovascular development. The results showed that PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle caused embryo mortality as well as embryonic and larval malformations in a dose-dependent manner. To determine PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle effects on embryonic angiogenesis, a critical process in zebrafish cardiovascular development, growth of intersegmental vessels (ISVs) and caudal vessels (CVs) in flk1-GFP transgenic zebrafish embryos using fluorescent stereomicroscopy were examined. The expression of fetal liver kinase 1 (flk1), an angiogenic factor, by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and in situ whole-mount hybridization were also analyzed. PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle decreased growth of ISVs and CVs, as well as reduced flk1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Parallel to the inhibitory effects on angiogenesis, PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle exposure upregulated p53 pro-apoptotic pathway and induced cellular apoptosis in angiogenic regions by qPCR and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) apoptosis assay. This study further showed that inhibiting p53 activity, either by pharmacological inhibitor or RNA interference, could abrogate the apoptosis and angiogenic defects caused by PEG-b-PCL nano-micelles, indicating that PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle inhibits angiogenesis by activating p53-mediated apoptosis. This study indicates that polymeric PEG-b-PCL nano-micelle could pose potential hazards

  19. Modification of tumor cell exosome content by transfection with wt-p53 and microRNA-125b expressing plasmid DNA and its effect on macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, M; Talekar, M; Shah, P; Ouyang, Q; Amiji, M

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are responsible for intercellular communication between tumor cells and others in the tumor microenvironment. These microvesicles promote oncogensis and can support towards metastasis by promoting a pro-tumorogenic environment. Modifying the exosomal content and exosome delivery are emerging novel cancer therapies. However, the clinical translation is limited due to feasibility of isolating and delivery of treated exosomes as well as an associated immune response in patients. In this study, we provide proof-of-concept for a novel treatment approach for manipulating exosomal content by genetic transfection of tumor cells using dual-targeted hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles. Following transfection with plasmid DNA encoding for wild-type p53 (wt-p53) and microRNA-125b (miR-125b), we evaluate the transgene expression in the SK-LU-1 cells and in the secreted exosomes. Furthermore, along with modulation of wt-p53 and miR-125b expression, we also show that the exosomes (i.e., wt-p53/exo, miR-125b/exo and combination/exo) have a reprogramed global miRNA profile. The miRNAs in the exosomes were mainly related to the activation of genes associated with apoptosis as well as p53 signaling. More importantly, these altered miRNA levels in the exosomes could mediate macrophage repolarization towards a more pro-inflammatory/antitumor M1 phenotype. However, further studies, especially in vivo studies, are warranted to assess the direct influence of such macrophage reprogramming on cancer cells and oncogenesis post-treatment. The current study provides a novel platform enabling the development of therapeutic strategies affecting not only the cancer cells but also the tumor microenvironment by utilizing the ‘bystander effect' through genetic transfer with secreted exosomes. Such modification could also support antitumor environment leading to decreased oncogenesis. PMID:27500388

  20. Individual variation in p53 and Cip1 expression profiles in normal human fibroblast strains following exposure to high-let radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, T.R.; Johnson, N.F.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1995-12-01

    Exposure to {alpha}-particles emitted by radon progeny appears to be the second-leading cause of lung cancer mortality. However, individual susceptibility to the carcinogenic effects of {alpha}-particles remains poorly characterized. Variation in susceptibility to cancer produced by certian classes of DNA-damaging chemicals is suspected to involve differences in metabolic activation and detoxication. Susceptibility to {alpha}-particle-induced cancer may involve variations in capacity or opportunity to repair DNA damage. Subtle variations in DNA repair capacity would more likely explain radon-related lung cancer susceptibility. The p53 tumor suppressor protein accumulates as a cellular response to DNA damage from ionizing radiation and regulates arrest in the G{sub 1} portion of the cell cycle. Arrest in G{sub 1} portion of the cell cycle. While upstream regulation of p53 protein stability is poorly understood, variations in the ability to accumulate p53 following DNA damage represent potential variations in lung cancer susceptibility related to radon progeny. Further, transcription of the cell-cycle regulatory gene Cip1 is regulated by p53 and increases following ionizing radiation. Therefore, variations in the expression of Cip1 following {alpha}-particle exposure may also be a susceptibility factor in radon-related lung cancers. The purpose of the present investigation was to measure p53 and Cip1 protein induction following {alpha}-particle exposure of fibroblast lines from nine individuals to determine if there were significant variations. The expression of Cip1 protein indicates the differences in response are biologically relevant.

  1. Gain of function mutant p53 proteins cooperate with E2F4 to transcriptionally downregulate RAD17 and BRCA1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Fabio; Ganci, Federica; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Sacconi, Andrea; Strano, Sabrina; Blandino, Giovanni; Di Agostino, Silvia

    2015-03-20

    Genomic instability (IN) is a common feature of many human cancers. The TP53 tumour suppressor gene is mutated in approximately half of human cancers. Here, we show that BRCA1 and RAD17 genes, whose derived proteins play a pivotal role in DNA damage repair, are transcriptional targets of gain-of-function mutant p53 proteins. Indeed, high levels of mutp53 protein facilitate DNA damage accumulation and severely impair BRCA1 and RAD17 expression in proliferating cancer cells. The recruitment of mutp53/E2F4 complex onto specific regions of BRCA1 and RAD17 promoters leads to the inhibition of their expression. BRCA1 and RAD17 mRNA expression is reduced in HNSCC patients carrying TP53 mutations when compared to those bearing wt-p53 gene. Furthermore, the analysis of gene expression databases for breast cancer patients reveals that low expression of DNA repair genes correlates significantly with reduced relapse free survival of patients carrying TP53 gene mutations. Collectively, these findings highlight the direct involvement of transcriptionally active gain of function mutant p53 proteins in genomic instability through the impairment of DNA repair mechanisms.

  2. Resveratrol reverses cadmium chloride-induced testicular damage and subfertility by downregulating p53 and Bax and upregulating gonadotropins and Bcl-2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Eleawa, Samy M; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud A; Alhashem, Fahaid H; Bin-Jaliah, Ismaeel; Sakr, Hussein F; Elrefaey, Hesham M; Elkarib, Abbas O; Alessa, Riyad M; Haidara, Mohammad A; Shatoor, Abdullah S; Khalil, Mohammad A

    2014-04-24

    This study was performed to investigate the protective and therapeutic effects of resveratrol (RES) against CdCl2-induced toxicity in rat testes. Seven experimental groups of adult male rats were formulated as follows: A) controls+NS, B) control+vehicle (saline solution of hydroxypropyl cyclodextrin), C) RES treated, D) CdCl2+NS, E) CdCl2+vehicle, F) RES followed by CdCl2 and M) CdCl2 followed by RES. At the end of the protocol, serum levels of FSH, LH and testosterone were measured in all groups, and testicular levels of TBARS and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured. Epididymal semen analysis was performed, and testicular expression of Bcl-2, p53 and Bax was assessed by RT-PCR. Also, histopathological changes of the testes were examined microscopically. Administration of RES before or after cadmium chloride in rats improved semen parameters including count, motility, daily sperm production and morphology, increased serum concentrations of gonadotropins and testosterone, decreased testicular lipid peroxidation and increased SOD activity. RES not only attenuated cadmium chloride-induced testicular histopathology but was also able to protect against the onset of cadmium chloride testicular toxicity. Cadmium chloride downregulated the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2 and upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. Resveratrol protected against and partially reversed cadmium chloride testicular toxicity via upregulation of Bcl2 and downregulation of p53 and Bax gene expression. The antioxidant activity of RES protects against cadmium chloride testicular toxicity and partially reverses its effect via upregulation of BCl2 and downregulation of p53 and Bax expression.

  3. p53 mutants induce transcription of NF-κB2 in H1299 cells through CBP and STAT binding on the NF-κB2 promoter and gain of function activity.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Catherine A; Singh, Shilpa; Windle, Brad; Sankala, Heidi M; Graves, Paul R; Andrew Yeudall, W; Deb, Swati P; Deb, Sumitra

    2012-02-01

    Cancer cells with p53 mutations, in general, grow more aggressively than those with wild-type p53 and show "gain of function" (GOF) phenotypes such as increased growth rate, enhanced resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, increased cell motility and tumorigenicity; although the mechanism for this function remains unknown. In this communication we report that p53-mediated NF-κB2 up-regulation significantly contributes to the aggressive oncogenic behavior of cancer cells. Lowering the level of mutant p53 in a number of cancer cell lines resulted in a loss of GOF phenotypes directly implicating p53 mutants in the process. RNAi against NF-κB2 in naturally occurring cancer cell lines also lowers GOF activities. In H1299 cells expressing mutant p53, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays indicate that mutant p53 induces histone acetylation at specific sites on the regulatory regions of its target genes. ChIP assays using antibodies against transcription factors putatively capable of interacting with the NF-κB2 promoter show increased interaction of CBP and STAT2 in the presence of mutant p53. Thus, we propose that in H1299 cells, mutant p53 elevates expression of genes capable of enhancing cell proliferation, motility, and tumorigenicity by inducing acetylation of histones via recruitment of CBP and STAT2 on the promoters causing CBP-mediated histone acetylation.

  4. The Δ133p53 Isoform Reduces Wtp53-induced Stimulation of DNA Pol γ Activity in the Presence and Absence of D4T

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Zang, Yunjin; Guo, Xianghua; Wei, Feili; Yin, Jiming; Pang, Lijun; Chen, Dexi

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial toxicity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) is due to the inhibition of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase γ (pol γ). Previous studies have shown that wild type p53 (wtp53) can interact with pol γ and mtDNA to enhance mitochondrial DNA base excision repair (mtBER) activity and increase the accuracy of DNA synthesis. The N-terminal transactivation domain and central specific DNA-binding domain of p53 play critical roles in the stimulation of BER. In this study, we identified the possible roles of wtp53, Δ40p53 and Δ133p53 in regulating mtDNA pol γ activity in cells with d4T treatment. The results show that Δ40p53 and Δ133p53 can exist in mitochondrial fragments and form polymers with themselves or wtp53. Unlike wtP53, Δ133p53 alone cannot increase DNA pol γ activity. More importantly, we found that Δ133p53 played a negative role in p53 stimulation of DNA pol γ activity when studied in d4T-treated and d4T-untreated mitochondrial extracts. Gel shift data also indicate that Δ40p53 and Δ133p53 cannot interact with APE. Wtp53 and Δ40p53 can act antagonize the effect of d4T inhibition of DNA pol γ activity. However, when wtp53 interacted with Δ133p53, DNA pol γ activity was significantly decreased. Conclusion: Δ133p53 negatively regulates p53’s stimulation of pol γ in the presence and absence of d4T.

  5. Activation of Notch Signaling Is Required for Cholangiocarcinoma Progression and Is Enhanced by Inactivation of p53 In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Palagani, Vindhya; Malek, Nisar P.; Wilkens, Ludwig; Plentz, Ruben R.

    2013-01-01

    Cholangiocacinoma (CC) is a cancer disease with rising incidence. Notch signaling has been shown to be deregulated in many cancers. However, the role of this signaling pathway in the carcinogenesis of CC is still not fully explored. In this study, we investigated the effects of Notch inhibition by γ-secretase inhibitor IX (GSI IX) in cultured human CC cell lines and we established a transgenic mouse model with liver specific expression of the intracellular domain of Notch (Notch-ICD) and inactivation of tumor suppressor p53. GSI IX treatment effectively impaired cell proliferation, migration, invasion, epithelial to mesenchymal transition and growth of softagar colonies. In vivo overexpression of Notch-ICD together with an inactivation of p53 significantly increased tumor burden and showed CC characteristics. Conclusion: Our study highlights the importance of Notch signaling in the tumorigenesis of CC and demonstrates that additional inactivation of p53 in vivo. PMID:24204826

  6. Regulation of p53 by activated protein kinase C-delta during nitric oxide-induced dopaminergic cell death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dong-Chan; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Ha, Hyunjung; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2006-01-27

    Selective cell death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra is the major cause of Parkinson disease. Current evidence suggests that this cell death could be mediated by nitric oxide by-products such as nitrate and peroxynitrite. Because protein kinase C (PKC)-delta is implicated in apoptosis of various cell types, we studied its roles and activation mechanisms in nitric oxide (NO)-induced apoptosis of SN4741 dopaminergic cells. When cells were treated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor, endogenous PKC-delta was nitrated and activated. Immunoprecipitation revealed that p53 co-immunoprecipitated with PKC-delta and was phosphorylated at the 15th serine residue in SNP-treated cells. An in vitro kinase assay revealed that p53 was directly phosphorylated by SNP-activated PKC-delta. The p53 Ser-15 phosphorylation was suppressed in SNP-treated cells when the NO-mediated activation of PKC-delta was inhibited by rottlerin or (-)-epigallocatechin gallate. Within 3 h of p53 phosphorylation, its protein levels increased because of decreased ubiquitin-dependent proteosomal proteolysis, whereas the protein levels of MDM2, ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase, were down-regulated in a p53 phosphorylation-dependent fashion. Taken together, these results demonstrate that nitration-mediated activation of PKC-delta induces the phosphorylation of the Ser-15 residue in p53, which increases its protein stability, thereby contributing to the nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis-like cell death pathway. These findings may be expanded to provide new insight into the cellular mechanisms of Parkinson disease.

  7. Correlations between p21 expression and clinicopathological findings, p53 gene and protein alterations, and survival in patients with endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Sasano, H; Matsunaga, G; Sato, S; Yajima, A; Nasim, S; Garret, C T

    1997-11-01

    The p21 protein inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases and mediates cell-cycle arrest and cell differentiation. It is induced by wild-type p53, but not by mutant p53. This study of 75 patients with endometrial carcinoma investigates the relationship between p21 expression and the functional status of p53, and the usefulness of p21 as a prognostic marker. Correlations were determined between p21 immunoreactivity, p53 overexpression as examined by immunohistochemistry, p53 DNA mutations as examined by polymerase chain reaction-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis, and clinicopathological features, including the clinical outcome. Immunoreactivity for p21 and p53 mutations were detected in 47 (62.7 per cent), 37 (49 per cent), and 23 (31 per cent) patients, respectively. There were no significant correlations between the presence or absence of p21 immunoreactivity and p53 overexpression and DNA mutations. Survival curves revealed that patients with p53 overexpression tended to have a poorer prognosis than those without p53 overexpression (P = 0.104), that patients with p53 mutations had a significantly worse prognosis than those without mutations (P = 0.035), and that patients with p21 expression tended to have a better prognosis than those without p21 expression (P = 0.074). Immunohistochemical analysis of p21 was not useful for evaluating the functional status of p53 in patients with endometrial carcinoma. Both p21 expression and p53 abnormalities were considered as prognostic indicators in patients with endometrioid endometrial carcinoma.

  8. The p53 co-activator Zac1 neither induces cell cycle arrest nor apoptosis in chicken Lim1 horizontal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Fard, S Shirazi; Blixt, Mke; Hallböök, F

    2015-01-01

    Chicken horizontal progenitor cells are able to enter their final mitosis even in the presence of DNA damage despite having a functional p53-p21 system. This suggests that they are resistant to DNA damage and that the regulation of the final cell cycle of horizontal progenitor cells is independent of the p53-p21 system. The activity of p53 is regulated by positive and negative modulators, including the zinc finger containing transcription factor Zac1 (zinc finger protein that regulates apoptosis and cell cycle arrest). Zac1 interacts with and enhances the activity of p53, thereby inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In this work, we use a gain-of-function assay in which mouse Zac1 (mZac1) is overexpressed in chicken retinal progenitor cells to study the effect on the final cell cycle of horizontal progenitor cells. The results showed that overexpression of mZac1 induced expression of p21 in a p53-dependent way and arrested the cell cycle as well as triggered apoptosis in chicken non-horizontal retinal progenitor cells. The negative regulation of the cell cycle by mZac1 is consistent with its proposed role as a tumour-suppressor gene. However, the horizontal cells were not affected by mZac1 overexpression. They progressed into S- and late G2/M-phase despite overexpression of mZac1. The inability of mZac1 to arrest the cell cycle in horizontal progenitor cells support the notion that the horizontal cells are less sensitive to events that triggers the p53 system during their terminal and neurogenic cell cycle, compared with other retinal cells. These properties are associated with a cell that has a propensity to become neoplastic and thus with a cell that may develop retinoblastoma.

  9. Induction of Bex genes by curcumin is associated with apoptosis and activation of p53 in N2a neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sidhar, Himakshi; Giri, Ranjit K.

    2017-01-01

    Brain expressed X-linked (Bex) genes are newer group of pro-apoptotic genes. Role of any Bex gene in neuroblastoma and Bex4 and Bex6 in any cancer is completely unknown. Re-expression of all endogenous Bex genes by any nutraceutical is also unknown. Therefore, we investigated the induction of all endogenous Bex genes and associated mechanisms by curcumin using N2a, an aggressive neuroblastoma cell line. Curcumin induced all endogenous Bex genes prior to apoptosis in N2a cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Wortmannin (PI-3Kinases inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor) and pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor) abrogated curcumin-mediated induction of Bex genes. Inhibition of curcumin-mediated induction of Bex genes by pifithrin-α also inhibited N2a cells apoptosis suggesting, a direct role of Bex genes in N2a cells apoptosis and involvement of p53 in Bex genes induction. Curcumin treatment activated p53 through hyperphosphorylation at serine 15 before Bex genes induction indicating Bex genes are novel downstream targets of p53. Collectively, curcumin, a safe nutraceutical has the potential to induce all endogenous Bex genes to harness their anti-cancer properties in neuroblastoma cells. Re-expression of Bex genes by curcumin acts as tumor suppressors and may provide alternate strategy to treat neuroblastomas and other cancers with silenced Bex genes. PMID:28145533

  10. Induction of Bex genes by curcumin is associated with apoptosis and activation of p53 in N2a neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sidhar, Himakshi; Giri, Ranjit K

    2017-02-01

    Brain expressed X-linked (Bex) genes are newer group of pro-apoptotic genes. Role of any Bex gene in neuroblastoma and Bex4 and Bex6 in any cancer is completely unknown. Re-expression of all endogenous Bex genes by any nutraceutical is also unknown. Therefore, we investigated the induction of all endogenous Bex genes and associated mechanisms by curcumin using N2a, an aggressive neuroblastoma cell line. Curcumin induced all endogenous Bex genes prior to apoptosis in N2a cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Wortmannin (PI-3Kinases inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor) and pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor) abrogated curcumin-mediated induction of Bex genes. Inhibition of curcumin-mediated induction of Bex genes by pifithrin-α also inhibited N2a cells apoptosis suggesting, a direct role of Bex genes in N2a cells apoptosis and involvement of p53 in Bex genes induction. Curcumin treatment activated p53 through hyperphosphorylation at serine 15 before Bex genes induction indicating Bex genes are novel downstream targets of p53. Collectively, curcumin, a safe nutraceutical has the potential to induce all endogenous Bex genes to harness their anti-cancer properties in neuroblastoma cells. Re-expression of Bex genes by curcumin acts as tumor suppressors and may provide alternate strategy to treat neuroblastomas and other cancers with silenced Bex genes.

  11. Regulation of The Tumor Suppressor Activity of P53 In Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    Lenglet, S., Moreau , V., Iggo, R., and Frehourg. T. Michael Datto and Xiao-Fan Wang (Duke University) for the p21 pro- (1998) Oncgene 16, 1369-1372...School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA Depending upon particular cellular conditions, the tumor suppressor protein p53

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ inhibits human neuroblastoma cell tumorigenesis by inducing p53- and SOX2-mediated cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pei-Li; Chen, Liping; Dobrzański, Tomasz P; Zhu, Bokai; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Müller, Rolf; Gonzalez, Frank J; Peters, Jeffrey M

    2016-12-20

    Neuroblastoma is a common childhood cancer typically treated by inducing differentiation with retinoic acid (RA). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ, (PPARβ/δ) is known to promote terminal differentiation of many cell types. In the present study, PPARβ/δ was over-expressed in three human neuroblastoma cell lines, NGP, SK-N-BE(2), and IMR-32, that exhibit high, medium, and low sensitivity, respectively, to retinoic acid-induced differentiation to determine if PPARβ/δ and retinoic acid receptors (RARs) could be jointly targeted to increase the efficacy of treatment. All-trans-RA (atRA) decreased expression of SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2 (SOX2), a stem cell regulator and marker of de-differentiation, in NGP and SK-N-BE(2) cells with inactive or mutant tumor suppressor p53, respectively. However, atRA did not suppress SOX2 expression in IMR-32 cells carrying wild-type p53. Over-expression and/or ligand activation of PPARβ/δ reduced the average volume and weight of ectopic tumor xenografts from NGP, SK-N-BE(2), or IMR-32 cells compared to controls. Compared with that found with atRA, PPARβ/δ suppressed SOX2 expression in NGP and SK-N-BE(2) cells and ectopic xenografts, and was also effective in suppressing SOX2 expression in IMR-32 cells that exhibit higher p53 expression compared to the former cell lines. Combined, these observations demonstrate that activating or over-expressing PPARβ/δ induces cell differentiation through p53- and SOX2-dependent signaling pathways in neuroblastoma cells and tumors. This suggests that combinatorial activation of both RARα and PPARβ/δ may be suitable as an alternative therapeutic approach for RA-resistant neuroblastoma patients.

  13. p73 Protein Expression Correlates With Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in the Lack of p53 Response to Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wakatsuki, Masaru; Ohno, Tatsuya Iwakawa, Mayumi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Noda, Shuhei; Ohta, Toshie; Kato, Shingo; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Imai, Takashi; Nakano, Takashi

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: p73 belongs to the p53 tumor suppressor family of genes and can inhibit cell growth in a p53-like manner by inducing apoptosis or cell cycle arrest. Here, we investigated whether p73 could compensate for impaired p53 function in apoptosis induced by radiation therapy (RT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixty-eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who received definitive RT combined with (n = 37) or without (n = 31) cisplatin were investigated. Biopsy specimens were excised from the cervical tumor before RT and after 9 Gy. Results: Mean apoptosis index (AI) was 0.93% before RT and 1.97% after 9 Gy with a significant increase (p < 0.001). For all patients, there was a significant correlation between p73 expression positivity after 9 Gy and AI ratio (AI after 9 Gy/AI before RT) (p = 0.021). Forty-one patients were regarded as the p53-responding group according to the expression of p53 after 9 Gy, whereas the remaining 27 patients were regarded as the p53-nonresponding group. A significant correlation between p73 expression after 9 Gy and AI ratio was observed in the p53-non-responding group (p < 0.001) but not in the p53-responding group (p = 0.940). Conclusion: Our results suggest that p73 plays an important role in compensating for the lack of p53 function in radiation-induced apoptosis of cervical cancer.

  14. Combined HDAC1 and HDAC2 Depletion Promotes Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival After Injury Through Reduction of p53 Target Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    Histones deacetylases (HDACs), besides their function as epigenetic regulators, deacetylate and critically regulate the activity of nonhistone targets. In particular, HDACs control partially the proapoptotic activity of p53 by balancing its acetylation state. HDAC inhibitors have revealed neuroprotective properties in different models, but the exact mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. We have generated a conditional knockout mouse model targeting retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to investigate specifically the functional role of HDAC1 and HDAC2 in an acute model of optic nerve injury. Our results demonstrate that combined HDAC1 and HDAC2 ablation promotes survival of axotomized RGCs. Based on global gene expression analyses, we identified the p53-PUMA apoptosis-inducing axis to be strongly activated in axotomized mouse RGCs. Specific HDAC1/2 ablation inhibited this apoptotic pathway by impairing the crucial acetylation status of p53 and reducing PUMA expression, thereby contributing to the ensuing enhanced neuroprotection due to HDAC1/2 depletion. HDAC1/2 inhibition and the affected downstream signaling components emerge as specific targets for developing therapeutic strategies in neuroprotection. PMID:26129908

  15. TP53 mutations in astrocytic gliomas: an association with histological grade, TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and p53 expression.

    PubMed

    Faria, Mario H G; Neves Filho, Eduardo H C; Alves, Markenia K S; Burbano, Rommel M R; de Moraes Filho, Manoel O; Rabenhorst, Silvia H B

    2012-11-01

    TP53 mutations and polymorphisms have been widely related to many cancers as long as these alterations may impair its capacity to induce cell cycle arrest, DNA repair mechanisms, and apoptosis. Although TP53 alterations have been studied in astrocytic tumors, there is a lack of analysis considering specific TP53 mutations and their associations with p53 immunostainning, polymorphisms and their significance among the histological grades. Thus, we analyzed TP53 alterations in exons 2-11, including the codon 72 polymorphism, using DNA sequencing in 96 astrocytic gliomas (18 grade I, 20 grade II, 14 grade III, and 44 grade IV). Also, immunohistochemistry was assessed to evaluate the p53 protein expression. In this study, we found that the higher histological grades were statistically associated with TP53 mutations. Some of these mutations, such as TP53 P98T and TP53 G244S, seemed to be a specific marker for the higher grades, and the TP53 E286K mutation appears to be a World Health Organization grade III-IV progression marker. Also, the TP53 P98T mutation, in exon 4, is very likely to be important on the stabilization of the p53 protein, leading to its immunopositivity and it is potentially associated with the TP53 72Pro/Pro genotype.

  16. Immunohistochemical expression of the p53, mdm2, p21/Waf-1, Rb, p16, Ki67, cyclin D1, cyclin A and cyclin B1 proteins and apoptotic index in T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kanavaros, P; Bai, M; Stefanaki, K; Poussias, G; Rontogianni, D; Zioga, E; Gorgoulis, V; Agnantis, N J

    2001-04-01

    Fifty-seven cases of T-cell lymphomas (TCL) including 5 lymphoblastic (T-LBL) and 52 peripheral TCL (PTCL) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the expression of p53, mdm2, p21, Rb, cyclin D1, cyclin A, cyclin B1, and Ki67/MIB1 proteins and 39/52 PTCL were also analyzed for the expression of p16 protein and for the presence of apoptotic cells by the TUNEL method. The aim was to search for abnormal immunoprofiles of p53 and Rb growth control pathways and to determine the proliferative activity and the apoptotic index of TCL. Abnormal overexpression of p53, p21 and mdm2, in comparison to normal lymph nodes, was found in 12/57, 10/57 and 2/57 cases of TCL, respectively. Abnormal loss of Rb and p16 expression was found in 1/57 and 2/39 cases, respectively, whereas abnormal overexpression of cyclin D1 was not detected in any of the 57 cases. Our data revealed entity-related p53/p21/mdm2 phenotypes. Indeed, most nodal and cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL) showed concomitant overexpression of p53 and p21 proteins (7/8 cases), and mdm2 was overexpressed in 2 p53-positive nodal ALCL. In contrast, overexpression of p53 was found in 3/17 cases of nodal peripheral TCL unspecified (PTCL-UC) and 2/7 non-ALCL cutaneous pleomorphic TCL. Overexpression of p21 protein was detected in 2/3 p53-positive PTCL-UC and in 1/2 p53-positive non-ALCL cutaneous pleomorphic TCL. Finally, all the remaining 25 cases of TCL did not show p53 and p21 overexpression. Overall, the p53+/p21+ phenotype in 10/57 TCL suggests wild-type p53 capable of inducing p21 expression. The highest apoptotic index (AI) was found in ALCL and a positive correlation between apoptotic index and Ki67 index (p<0.001) was detected. Ki67, cyclin A and cyclin B1 expression was found in all 57 TCL and on the basis of the combined use of these 3 variables, 3 groups of proliferative activity could be determined: a) high in ALCL and T-LBL, b) low in mycosis fungoides (MF) and gammadelta hepatosplenic TCL

  17. A stapled peptide antagonist of MDM2 carried by polymeric micelles sensitizes glioblastoma to temozolomide treatment through p53 activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xishan; Tai, Lingyu; Gao, Jie; Qian, Jianchang; Zhang, Mingfei; Li, Beibei; Xie, Cao; Lu, Linwei; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-11-28

    Antagonizing MDM2 and MDMX to activate the tumor suppressor protein p53 is an attractive therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, challenges remain with respect to the poor ability of p53 activators to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier and/or blood-brain tumor barrier and to specifically target tumor cells. To circumvent these problems, we developed a cyclic RGD peptide-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(lactic acid) polymeric micelle (RGD-M) that carried a stapled peptide antagonist of both MDM2 and MDMX (sPMI). The peptide-carrying micelle RGD-M/sPMI was prepared via film-hydration method with high encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity as well as ideal size distribution. Micelle encapsulation dramatically increased the solubility of sPMI, thus alleviating its serum sequestration. In vitro studies showed that RGD-M/sPMI efficiently inhibited the proliferation of glioma cells in the presence of serum by activating the p53 signaling pathway. Further, RGD-M/sPMI exerted potent tumor growth inhibitory activity against human glioblastoma in nude mouse xenograft models. Importantly, the combination of RGD-M/sPMI and temozolomide--a standard chemotherapy drug for GBM increased antitumor efficacy against glioblastoma in experimental animals. Our results validate a combination therapy using p53 activators with temozolomide as a more effective treatment for GBM.

  18. Nuclear inclusion bodies of mutant and wild-type p53 in cancer: a hallmark of p53 inactivation and proteostasis remodelling by p53 aggregation.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Frederik; Saiz Rubio, Mirian; Hompes, Daphne; Naus, Evelyne; De Baets, Greet; Langenberg, Tobias; Hipp, Mark S; Houben, Bert; Claes, Filip; Charbonneau, Sarah; Delgado Blanco, Javier; Plaisance, Stephane; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Ramkissoon, Lori; Simons, Colinda; van den Brandt, Piet; Weijenberg, Matty; Van England, Manon; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Amant, Frederic; D'Hoore, André; Ligon, Keith L; Sagaert, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2016-12-30

    Although p53 protein aggregates have been observed in cancer cell lines and tumour tissue, their impact in cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we extensively screened for p53 aggregation phenotypes in tumour biopsies, and identified nuclear inclusion bodies (nIBs) of transcriptionally inactive mutant or wild-type p53 as the most frequent aggregation-like phenotype across six different cancer types. p53-positive nIBs co-stained with nuclear aggregation markers, and shared molecular hallmarks of nIBs commonly found in neurodegenerative disorders. In cell culture, tumour-associated stress was a strong inducer of p53 aggregation and nIB formation. This was most prominent for mutant p53, but could also be observed in wild-type p53 cell lines, for which nIB formation correlated with the loss of p53's transcriptional activity. Importantly, protein aggregation also fuelled the dysregulation of the proteostasis network in the tumour cell by inducing a hyperactivated, oncogenic heat-shock response, to which tumours are commonly addicted, and by overloading the proteasomal degradation system, an observation that was most pronounced for structurally destabilized mutant p53. Patients showing tumours with p53-positive nIBs suffered from a poor clinical outcome, similar to those with loss of p53 expression, and tumour biopsies showed a differential proteostatic expression profile associated with p53-positive nIBs. p53-positive nIBs therefore highlight a malignant state of the tumour that results from the interplay between (1) the functional inactivation of p53 through mutation and/or aggregation, and (2) microenvironmental stress, a combination that catalyses proteostatic dysregulation. This study highlights several unexpected clinical, biological and therapeutically unexplored parallels between cancer and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Myrtenal ameliorates diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis through the activation of tumor suppressor protein p53 and regulation of lysosomal and mitochondrial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lingaiah, Hari Babu; Natarajan, Nandakumar; Thamaraiselvan, Rengarajan; Srinivasan, Perumal; Periyasamy, Balasubramanian Maruthaiveeran

    2013-08-01

    Myrtenal is a novel class of compound belongs to monoterpenes found predominantly in mint, pepper, etc., and it was shown to have excellent pharmacological activities against many diseases among which cancer is imperative. Hepatocellular carcinoma is a primary malignancy of the hepatocytes, which rapidly leads to death in short periods. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible therapeutic efficiency of myrtenal against diethylnitrosamine-induced experimental hepatocarcinogenesis by analyzing the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, lysosomal and mitochondrial TCA cycle enzymes, and also the possible role of tumor suppressor protein p53, and scanning electron microscopic studies. The results revealed that myrtenal significantly ameliorated the altered enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, lysosomal and mitochondrial enzymes, and interestingly the tumor suppressor protein p53 was found to be significantly accumulated in myrtenal-treated animals, which inevitably confirms that myrtenal has a prominent role in preventing the liver cancer during treatment. Furthermore, the antineoplastic property was well evidenced by the mRNA expression of p53 protein by the reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis. The observed anticancer property of myrtenal may be due to the involvement and expression of p53 and influence in the mitochondrial and lysosomal membrane integrity and also interference in the gluconeogenesis process of cancer cells. Our results suggest that myrtenal is very efficient and useful compound in the treatment of liver cancer in future.

  20. Tea polyphenols prevent lung from preneoplastic lesions and effect p53 and bcl-2 gene expression in rat lung tissues.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qihua; Hu, Chengping; Chen, Qiong; Xia, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the cancers that have the highest incidence and the highest mortality rate, and it is of great interest to identify ways to prevent its occurrence. We had established an animal model by using 3,4-benzopyrene intra-pulmonary injection in our previous study, and had observed that the rats lung carcinoma incidence and multiplicity were significantly reduced by green tea administration. This study further investigated the effect of tea polyphenols on rat lung preneoplastic lesions using the lung carcinoma model established by 3,4-benzopyrene intra-pulmonary injection. Sprague-Dawley rats of the same age were randomly divided into 10 groups and treated with 3,4-benzopyrene by intra-pulmonary injection. Five groups were given 0.3% solution of tea polyphenols (equivalent to 1.2% of green tea) in drinking water, while the other 5 groups were given pure drinking water. The rats were sacrificed at 0, 1, 4, 8 and 16 weeks after carcinogen treatment. In the control groups of rats, local bronchial inflammation were observed at 1 week after 3,4-benzopyrene treatment. From 4 weeks to 16 weeks after carcinogen treatment, hyperplasia, cell hyperproliferation, heterogeneity were observed in the bronchial epithelium. Meanwhile, the expression of p53 mRNA and protein, as well as the level of bcl-2, increased in the bronchial epithelial lesion. Tea polyphenols treatment significantly alleviated the bronchial epithelial lesions. At the same time, tea polyphenols treatment enhanced p53 expression, but reduced bcl-2 expression. These results indicated that tea polyphenols may have preventive effect against lung preneoplasm lesions, possibly through regulating the expression of some critical genes such as p53 and bcl-2.

  1. Requirement of nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of p53 for its targeting to the yolk syncytial layer (YSL) nuclei in zebrafish embryo and its use for apoptosis assay

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.-D.; Chou, C.-M.; Hwang, S.-P.L.; Wang, F.-F.; Chen, Y.-C.; Hung, C.-C.; Chen, Jeou-Yuan . E-mail: bmchen@ibms.sinica.edu.tw; Huang, C.-J. . E-mail: cjibc@gate.sinica.edu.tw

    2006-05-26

    We expressed zebrafish p53 protein fused to GFP by a neuron-specific HuC promoter in zebrafish embryos. Instead of displaying neuronal expression patterns, p53-GFP was targeted to zebrafish YSL nuclei. This YSL targeting is p53 sequence-specific because GFP fusion proteins of p63 and p73 displayed neuronal-specific patterns. To dissect the underlying mechanisms, various constructs encoding a series of p53 mutant proteins under the control of different promoters were generated. Our results showed that expression of p53, in early zebrafish embryo, is preferentially targeted to the nuclei of YSL, which is mediated by importin. Similarly, this targeting is abrogated when p53 nuclear localization signal is disrupted. In addition, the transcriptional activity of p53 is required for this targeting. We further showed that fusion of pro-apoptotic BAD protein to p53-GFP led to apoptosis of YSL cells, and subsequent imperfect microtubule formation and abnormal blastomere movements.

  2. Drosophila p53 controls Notch expression and balances apoptosis and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Simón, Rocío; Aparicio, Ricardo; Housden, Ben E; Bray, Sarah; Busturia, Ana

    2014-10-01

    A balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis is important for normal development and tissue homeostasis. Under stress conditions, the conserved tumor suppressor and transcription factor Dp53 induces apoptosis to contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis. However, in some cases Dp53-induced apoptosis results in the proliferation of surrounding non-apoptotic cells. To gain insight into the Dp53 function in the control of apoptosis and proliferation, we studied the interaction between the Drosophila Dp53 and Notch genes. We present evidence that simultaneous reduction of Dp53 and Notch function synergistically increases the wing phenotype of Notch heterozygous mutant flies. Further, we found that a Notch cis-regulatory element is responsive to loss and gain of Dp53 function and that over-expression of Dp53 up-regulates Notch mRNA and protein expression. These findings suggest not only that Dp53 and Notch act together to control wing development but also indicate that Dp53 transcriptionally regulates Notch expression. Moreover, using Notch  gain and loss of function mutations we examined the relevance of Dp53 and Notch interactions in the process of Dp53-apoptosis induced proliferation. Results show that proliferation induced by Dp53 over-expression is dependent on Notch, thus identifying Notch as a new player in Dp53-induced proliferation. Interestingly, we found that Dp53-induced Notch activation and proliferation occurs even under conditions where apoptosis was inhibited. Our findings highlight the conservation between flies and vertebrates of the Dp53 and Notch cross-talk and suggest that Dp53 has a dual role regulating cell death and proliferation gene networks to control the homeostatic balance between apoptosis and proliferation.

  3. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction inhibits telomerase activity independent of its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, M; Ogawa, T; Mizumoto, K; Ueno, H; Niiyama, H; Sato, N; Nakamura, M; Tanaka, M

    1999-08-01

    Evidence for a relationship between overexpression of wild-type p53 and telomerase activity remains controversial. We investigated whether p53 gene transduction could cause telomerase inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines, focusing on the relation of transduction to growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic cell death. The cells were infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing wild-type p53 or p21WAF1 at a multiplicity of infection of 100 or were continuously exposed to 10 microM VP-16, which is well known to induce apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction caused G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and resultant growth inhibition in MIA PaCa-2 cells; the cell number 2 days after infection was 50% of preinfection value, and 13% of the cells were dead. Moreover, the transduction resulted in complete depression of telomerase activity through down-regulation of hTERT mRNA expression. In contrast, p21WAF1 gene transduction only arrested cell growth and cell cycle at G1 phase, and VP-16 treatment inhibited cell growth with G2-M arrest and apoptosis; after treatment, the cell number was 73% of pretreatment, and 12% of the cells were dead. Neither p21WAF1 gene transduction nor VP-16 treatment caused telomerase inhibition. Similar results were obtained in two other pancreatic cancer cell lines, SUIT-2 and AsPC-1. Thus, our results demonstrate that the p53 gene transduction directly inhibits telomerase activity, independent of its effects on cell growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis.

  4. Mice deficient in poly(C)-binding protein 4 are susceptible to spontaneous tumors through increased expression of ZFP871 that targets p53 for degradation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wensheng; Scoumanne, Ariane; Jung, Yong-Sam; Xu, Enshun; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Yanhong; Ren, Cong; Sun, Pei; Chen, Xinbin

    2016-01-01

    Poly(C)-binding protein 4 (PCBP4), also called MCG10 and a target of p53, plays a role in the cell cycle and is implicated in lung tumor suppression. Here, we found that PCBP4-deficient mice are prone to lung adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, and kidney tumor and that PCBP4-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibit enhanced cell proliferation but decreased cellular senescence. We also found that p53 expression is markedly reduced in PCBP4-deficient MEFs and mouse tissues, suggesting that PCBP4 in turn regulates p53 expression. To determine how PCBP4 regulates p53 expression, PCBP4 targets were identified by RNA immunoprecipitation followed by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). We found that the transcript encoding ZFP871 (zinc finger protein 871; also called ZNF709 in humans) interacts with and is regulated by PCBP4 via mRNA stability. Additionally, we found that ZFP871 physically interacts with p53 and MDM2 proteins. Consistently, ectopic expression of ZFP871 decreases—whereas knockdown of ZFP871 increases—p53 protein stability through a proteasome-dependent degradation pathway. Moreover, loss of ZFP871 reverses the reduction of p53 expression by lack of PCBP4, and thus increased expression of ZFP871 is responsible for decreased expression of p53 in the PCBP4-deficient MEFs and mouse tissues. Interestingly, we found that, like PCBP4, ZFP871 is also regulated by DNA damage and p53. Finally, we showed that knockdown of ZFP871 markedly enhances p53 expression, leading to growth suppression and apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Thus, the p53–PCBP4–ZFP871 axis represents a novel feedback loop in the p53 pathway. Together, we hypothesize that PCBP4 is a potential tissue-specific tumor suppressor and that ZFP871 is part of MDM2 and possibly other ubiquitin E3 ligases that target p53 for degradation. PMID:26915821

  5. p53 missense but not truncation mutations are associated with low levels of p21CIP1/WAF1 mRNA expression in primary human sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Mousses, S; Gokgoz, N; Wunder, J S; Ozcelik, H; Bull, S; Bell, R S; Andrulis, I L

    2001-01-01

    Many growth-suppressing signals converge to control the levels of the CDK inhibitor p21CIP1/WAF1. Some human cancers exhibit low levels of expression of p21CIP1/WAF1and mutations in p53 have been implicated in this down-regulation. To evaluate whether the presence of p53 mutations was related to the in vivo expression of p21CIP1/WAF1 mRNA in sarcomas we measured the p21CIP1/WAF1 mRNA levels for a group of 71 primary bone and soft tissue tumours with known p53 status. As expected, most tumours with p53 mutations expressed low levels of p21CIP1/WAF1 mRNA. However, we identified a group of tumours with p53 gene mutations that exhibited normal or higher levels of p21CIP1/WAF1 mRNA. The p53 mutations in the latter group were not the common missense mutations in exons 4–9, but were predominantly nonsense mutations predicted to result in truncation of the p53 protein. The results of this study suggest that different types of p53 mutations can have different effects on the expression of downstream genes such as p21CIP1/WAF1 in human sarcomas. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11401317

  6. Reduced SOD2 expression is associated with mortality of hepatocellular carcinoma patients in a mutant p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren; Yin, Chen; Li, Xiao-Xing; Yang, Xian-Zi; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Mei-Yin; Wang, Hui-Yun; Zheng, X F Steven

    2016-06-01

    The development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is accompanied with persistent oxidative stress, but the molecular basis is not well defined. Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) is an important mitochondrial antioxidant and a key aging factor. Here we investigated the expression and clinical significance of SOD2 in a large cohort of HBV-positive HCC tumors. Both SOD2 mRNA and protein are reduced in human primary HCCs compared with matching liver tissues. Consistently, the SOD2 DNA copy numbers are decreased in HCCs, providing a genetic basis for the decrease in SOD2 mRNA expression. Reduced SOD2 expression in HCCs is correlated with older age, larger tumor size, multiple tumor nodules and tumor emboli, and cancer recurrence. Moreover, low SOD2 expression is strongly associated with poor overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses indicates that SOD2 is an independent prognostic predictor for OS and RFS. Intriguingly, reduced SOD2 mRNA is strongly associated with poor survival in a separate cohort of HCC patients carrying mutant p53. Altogether, our results provide clinical evidence for the importance of SOD2 in tumor progression and mortality, and the close relationship of SOD2 and p53 in HCC.

  7. Hepatic expression of the proliferative marker Ki-67 and p53 protein in HBV or HCV cirrhosis in relation to dysplastic liver cell changes and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koskinas, J; Petraki, K; Kavantzas, N; Rapti, I; Kountouras, D; Hadziyannis, S

    2005-11-01

    To evaluate hepatic expression of the nuclear proliferative marker Ki-67 and the p53 oncoprotein in hepatitis B virus (HBV)/HCV cirrhosis in relation to dysplastic liver cell changes and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We studied needle liver biopsies from 107 patients with cirrhosis and no HCC (52 HBV, 55 HCV) who had been assessed for protocol studies, and 57 cirrhotic patients with HCC (40 HBV, 17 HCV). We evaluated small and large cell dysplastic changes along with the expression of Ki-67 and p53 by immunohistochemistry. The labelling index (LI) was defined as the proportion (%) of positive-stained nuclei of the 500 measured. Large and small cell dysplastic changes were observed in 12 and 9% of specimens respectively. Only small cell changes were associated with Ki-67 expression. Ki-67 LI was 5.50 +/- 5.7 in cirrhosis (13.90 +/- 3.84 in those with small cell dysplastic changes vs 4.64 +/- 4.98 in those without, P < 0.01), 10.2 +/- 5.95 in cirrhosis with HCC (P < 0.05) and 18.56 +/- 10 in HCC (P < 0.01). Neither the presence of small cell dysplastic changes nor the expression of Ki-67 was related to severity or aetiology of cirrhosis. Expression of p53 was observed in 30% of the non-tumorous and in 53% of the neoplastic tissue obtained from patients with HCC, with no differences between HCV and HBV. Ki-67 and p53 expression was associated with the tumour grade (P < 0.001). Our observations clearly demonstrate the association between the proliferation activity and the morphological changes in the cirrhotic liver from the non-dysplastic to dysplastic lesion to HCC. They also support the hypothesis that p53 alterations are a rather late event in carcinogenesis and related to HCC grade. And finally, they suggest that the final steps of hepatocarcinogenesis are common and independent of the aetiology of the chronic viral infection.

  8. Association of p53/p21 expression and cigarette smoking with tumor progression and poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Deyao; Lan, Linhua; Huang, Kate; Chen, Lin; Xu, Cuicui; Wang, Rongrong; Shi, Yang; Wu, Xiaoyi; Wang, Lu; Liu, Yongzhang; Lu, Bin

    2014-12-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80-85% of all lung cancer cases. Cigarette smoking is the number one risk factor which is attributed to more than four out of five cases of lung cancers. The prognostic impact of cell cycle regulation-associated tumor suppressors including p53 and p21 for NSCLC is still controversial. In the present study, we examined p53 and p21 expression using immunoblotting in tumor and adjacent non-cancerous tissues from NSCLC patients. Moreover, tissue microarrays (TMAs) including 150 specimens was used to examine p53 and p21 expression by immunohistochemical staining (IHC). The association between p53/p21 and various clinicopathological characteristics was evaluated. Kaplan-Meier overall survival was used to analyze the association between p53/p21 expression and prognosis of NSCLC patients, as well as the association of cigarette smoking with p53/p21 expression and prognosis. The results of the immunoblotting showed that expression of p53 and p21 in tumor tissues was significantly higher than that in the matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues (P<0.001 and P<0.05, respectively). The IHC results showed that 50.67% of the cases had high expression of p21; however, the percentage of patients having high expression of p53 was 31.3%. Univariate and Cox regression models were used to evaluate the factors related to prognosis with p53 and p21 expression. Multivariate analysis indicated that p53 expression was an independent prognostic factor for NSCLC (P=0.005), while p21 could not serve as an independent prognostic factor (P=0.123). In addition, smoking history was closely related to lung cancer risk (P=0.041), but could not be an independent assessment factor (P=0.740). In this study, we further demonstrated the association of p53/p21 expression and cigarette smoking. Our results suggest that cigarette smoking and overexpression of p53 or p21 are associated with poor prognosis. The combination of p53/p21 expression and

  9. Ligand dependent restoration of human TLR3 signaling and death in p53 mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Daniel; Lowe, Julie M.; Snipe, Joyce; Resnick, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Diversity within the p53 transcriptional network can arise from a matrix of changes that include target response element sequences and p53 expression level variations. We previously found that wild type p53 (WT p53) can regulate expression of most innate immune-related Toll-like-receptor genes (TLRs) in human cells, thereby affecting immune responses. Since many tumor-associated p53 mutants exhibit change-of-spectrum transactivation from various p53 targets, we examined the ability of twenty-five p53 mutants to activate endogenous expression of the TLR gene family in p53 null human cancer cell lines following transfection with p53 mutant expression vectors. While many mutants retained the ability to drive TLR expression at WT levels, others exhibited null, limited, or change-of-spectrum transactivation of TLR genes. Using TLR3 signaling as a model, we show that some cancer-associated p53 mutants amplify cytokine, chemokine and apoptotic responses after stimulation by the cognate ligand poly(I:C). Furthermore, restoration of WT p53 activity for loss-of-function p53 mutants by the p53 reactivating drug RITA restored p53 regulation of TLR3 gene expression and enhanced DNA damage-induced apoptosis via TLR3 signaling. Overall, our findings have many implications for understanding the impact of WT and mutant p53 in immunological responses and cancer therapy. PMID:27533082

  10. Proteins involved in pRb and p53 pathways are differentially expressed in thin and thick superficial spreading melanomas.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Bianca Costa Soares; Fugimori, Melissa Lissae; Ribeiro, Karina de Cássia Braga; Duprat Neto, João Pedreira; Neves, Rogério Izar; Landman, Gilles

    2009-06-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Malignant transformation of epidermal melanocytes is a multifactorial process involving cell cycle and death control pathways. The purpose of this study was to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of cell-cycle-related and apoptosis-related proteins in cutaneous superficial spreading melanomas using the tissue microarray technique to further understand tumor development. A total of 20 samples of in-situ melanomas and 44 melanomas p53, and p21 cell cycle regulator (p21) using a streptavidine-biotin-peroxidase technique for immunohistochemistry. Thick melanomas (>1.0 mm) and metastases lost p16 expression in 100% of the cases and in-situ and thin melanomas (expression (7.9%). When comparing thin versus thick melanomas, thin melanomas showed higher expression of cyclin D1 and cytoplasmatic Cdk4, and thick melanomas had increased expression of nuclear Cdk4, tumor suppressor protein p53, and p21. Primary tumors, when compared with metastases, had higher cytoplasmatic Cdk4 expression. None of the studied proteins influenced overall or disease-free survival. Our results suggest that loss of p16 expression was a constant feature in primary and metastatic melanomas. Cyclin D1 expression seems to be related to initial phases of melanoma development. An increase in p21 expression could represent a cell cycle control in proliferating cells with reduced p16 and/or increased nuclear Cdk4 expression.

  11. A genome-wide siRNA screen for regulators of tumor suppressor p53 activity in human non-small lung cancer cells identifies components of the RNA splicing machinery as targets for anticancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Siebring-van Olst, Ellen; Blijlevens, Maxime; de Menezes, Renee X; van der Meulen-Muileman, Ida H; Smit, Egbert F; van Beusechem, Victor W

    2017-03-13

    Reinstating wild-type tumor suppressor p53 activity could be a valuable option for the treatment of cancer. To contribute to development of new treatment options for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we performed genome-wide siRNA screens for determinants of p53 activity in NSCLC cells. We identified many genes not previously known to be involved in regulating p53 activity. Silencing p53 pathway inhibitor genes was associated with loss of cell viability. The largest functional gene cluster influencing p53 activity was mRNA splicing. Prominent p53 activation was observed upon silencing of specific spliceosome components, rather than by general inhibition of the spliceosome. Ten genes were validated as inhibitors of p53 activity in multiple NSCLC cell lines: genes encoding the Ras-pathway activator SOS1, the zinc finger protein TSHZ3, the mitochondrial membrane protein COX16 and the spliceosome components SNRPD3, SF3A3, SF3B1, SF3B6, XAB2, CWC22 and HNRNPL. Silencing these genes generally increased p53 levels, with distinct effects on CDKN1A expression, induction of cell cycle arrest and cell death. Silencing spliceosome components was associated with alternative splicing of MDM4 mRNA, which could contribute to activation of p53. In addition, silencing splice factors was particularly effective in killing NSCLC cells, albeit in a p53-independent manner. Interestingly, silencing SNRPD3 and SF3A3 exerted much stronger cytotoxicity to NSCLC cells than to lung fibroblasts, suggesting that these genes could represent useful therapeutic targets. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Nicotine-induced damages in testicular tissue of rats; evidences for bcl-2, p53 and caspase-3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Mosadegh, Maryam; Hasanzadeh, Shapour; Razi, Mazdak

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Present study was performed in order to uncover new aspects for nicotine-induced damages on spermatogenesis cell lineage. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, 36 mature male Wistar rats were divided into three groups as; control-sham (0.2 ml, saline normal, IP), low dose (0.2 mg/kg BW-1, IP) nicotine-received and high dose (0.4 mg/kg BW-1, IP) nicotine-received groups. Following 7 weeks, the expression of bcl-2, p53 and caspase-3 at mRNA and protein levels were investigated by using reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses, respectively. Moreover, the serum level of FSH, LH and testosterone were evaluated. Finally, the mRNA damage was analyzed by using special fluorescent staining. Results: Nicotine, at both dose levels, decreased tubular differentiation, spermiogenesis and repopulation indices and enhanced cellular depletion. Animals in nicotine-received groups exhibited a significant (P<0.05) reduction at mRNA and protein levels of bcl-2. More analyses revealed a remarkable (P<0.05) enhancement in expression of p53 and caspase-3 in comparison to control-sham animals. Finally, nicotine resulted in a significant (P<0.05) reduction in serum level of testosterone and elevated mRNA damage. Conclusion: Our data showed that, nicotine by suppressing the testosterone biosynthesis, reducing mRNA and protein levels of bcl-2 and up regulating the p53 and caspase-3 mRNA and protein levels adversely affects the spermatogenesis and results in cellular depletion. PMID:28293398

  13. Gene expression profiling of mouse p53-deficient epidermal carcinoma defines molecular determinants of human cancer malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The epidermal specific ablation of Trp53 gene leads to the spontaneous development of aggressive tumors in mice through a process that is accelerated by the simultaneous ablation of Rb gene. Since alterations of p53-dependent pathway are common hallmarks of aggressive, poor prognostic human cancers, these mouse models can recapitulate the molecular features of some of these human malignancies. Results To evaluate this possibility, gene expression microarray analysis was performed in mouse samples. The mouse tumors display increased expression of cell cycle and chromosomal instability associated genes. Remarkably, they are also enriched in human embryonic stem cell gene signatures, a characteristic feature of human aggressive tumors. Using cross-species comparison and meta-analytical approaches, we also observed that spontaneous mouse tumors display robust similarities with gene expression profiles of human tumors bearing mutated TP53, or displaying poor prognostic outcome, from multiple body tissues. We have obtained a 20-gene signature whose genes are overexpressed in mouse tumors and can identify human tumors with poor outcome from breast cancer, astrocytoma and multiple myeloma. This signature was consistently overexpressed in additional mouse tumors using microarray analysis. Two of the genes of this signature, AURKA and UBE2C, were validated in human breast and cervical cancer as potential biomarkers of malignancy. Conclusions Our analyses demonstrate that these mouse models are promising preclinical tools aimed to search for malignancy biomarkers and to test targeted therapies of prospective use in human aggressive tumors and/or with p53 mutation or inactivation. PMID:20630075

  14. Metformin induces apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells by activating an AMPK/p53/miR-23a/FOXA1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yunpeng; Tao, Chonglin; Huang, Xiaming; He, Han; Shi, Hongqi; Zhang, Qiyu; Wu, Huanhuan

    2016-01-01

    The antidiabetic drug metformin has been shown to possess antitumor functions in many types of cancers. Although studies have revealed its beneficial effects on the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the detailed molecular mechanism underlying this event remains largely unknown. In this work, we showed that miR-23a was significantly induced upon metformin treatment; inhibition of miR-23a abrogated the proapoptotic effect of metformin in HepG2 cells. We next established forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) as the functional target of miR-23a, and silencing FOXA1 mimicked the effect of metformin. Moreover, the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the expression of p53 were increased upon metformin treatment, and the inhibition of p53 abrogated the induction of miR-23a by metformin, suggesting that AMPK/p53 signaling axis is responsible for the induction of miR-23a by metformin. In summary, we unraveled a novel AMPK/p53/miR-23a/FOXA1 axis in the regulation of apoptosis in HCC, and the application of metformin could, therefore, be effective in the treatment of HCC. PMID:27274280

  15. p53-Regulated Networks of Protein, mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA Expression Revealed by Integrated Pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling With Amino Acids in Cell Culture (pSILAC) and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Hünten, Sabine; Kaller, Markus; Drepper, Friedel; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Bonfert, Thomas; Erhard, Florian; Dueck, Anne; Eichner, Norbert; Friedel, Caroline C.; Meister, Gunter; Zimmer, Ralf; Warscheid, Bettina; Hermeking, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effect of p53 activation on de novo protein synthesis using quantitative proteomics (pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture/pSILAC) in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480. This was combined with mRNA and noncoding RNA expression analyses by next generation sequencing (RNA-, miR-Seq). Furthermore, genome-wide DNA binding of p53 was analyzed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-Seq). Thereby, we identified differentially regulated proteins (542 up, 569 down), mRNAs (1258 up, 415 down), miRNAs (111 up, 95 down) and lncRNAs (270 up, 123 down). Changes in protein and mRNA expression levels showed a positive correlation (r = 0.50, p < 0.0001). In total, we detected 133 direct p53 target genes that were differentially expressed and displayed p53 occupancy in the vicinity of their promoter. More transcriptionally induced genes displayed occupied p53 binding sites (4.3% mRNAs, 7.2% miRNAs, 6.3% lncRNAs, 5.9% proteins) than repressed genes (2.4% mRNAs, 3.2% miRNAs, 0.8% lncRNAs, 1.9% proteins), suggesting indirect mechanisms of repression. Around 50% of the down-regulated proteins displayed seed-matching sequences of p53-induced miRNAs in the corresponding 3′-UTRs. Moreover, proteins repressed by p53 significantly overlapped with those previously shown to be repressed by miR-34a. We confirmed up-regulation of the novel direct p53 target genes LINC01021, MDFI, ST14 and miR-486 and showed that ectopic LINC01021 expression inhibits proliferation in SW480 cells. Furthermore, KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT mRNAs were confirmed as direct targets of the p53-induced miR-34a, miR-205 and miR-486–5p, respectively. In line with the loss of p53 function during tumor progression, elevated expression of KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT was detected in advanced stages of cancer. In conclusion, the integration of multiple omics methods allowed the comprehensive identification of direct and indirect effectors of p53 that provide new insights and leads into the

  16. Assessment of p53 protein expression in normal mucosa and benign and malignant lesions of the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Fang, S Y; Yan, J J; Ohyama, M

    1998-01-01

    p53 gene mutation is documented in head and neck cancer. No reports exist relating this mutation to normal mucosa or benign and malignant lesions of the nasal cavity. We investigate p53 overexpression using immunohistochemical techniques improved by an antigen retrieval method. p53 protein was analyzed in the following cases: normal, benign [papilloma and inverted papilloma (IP)] and malignant [squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC) arising in IP, SCC alone, adenocarcinoma and small-cell carcinoma]. Both the intensity and rate of positive p53 immunostaining were evaluated using a quantitative Auto-CAD program. Overexpression of p53 protein was not identified in normal mucosa, benign or premalignant lesions; however, approximately 60% is correlated to nasal cancer. p53 overexpression correlates with heavy smoking. Both the IP and SCC portions of SCC synchronous with IP showed similar p53 immunoreactivity. SCC arising in IP shows a lower p53 immunoreactivity than SCC alone. Thus, smoking along with a p53 mutation may be a mutagenic agent in nasal cancers. Alteration of the p53 protein may play an important role in the early stages of the malignant transformation of IP. A low p53 immunoreactivity indicates the presence of wild-type p53 protein. This may show a better response to radiation therapy yielding a better prognosis for SCC arising in IP compared to SCC alone. However, further clinical trials are required to investigate this possibly worthwhile prognostic marker.

  17. p53 isoform profiling in glioblastoma and injured brain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, R; Giannini, C; Sarkaria, J N; Schroeder, M; Rogers, J; Mastroeni, D; Scrable, H

    2013-06-27

    The tumor suppressor p53 has been found to be the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers; however, the frequency of p53 mutations varies from 10 to 70% across different cancer types. This variability can partly be explained by inactivating mechanisms aside from direct genomic polymorphisms. The p53 gene encodes 12 isoforms, some of which can modulate full-length p53 activity in cancer. In this study, we characterized p53 isoform expression patterns in glioblastoma, gliosis, non-tumor brain and neural progenitor cells by SDS-PAGE, immunoblot, mass spectrometry and reverse transcription-PCR. We found that the most consistently expressed isoform in glioblastoma, Δ40p53, was uniquely expressed in regenerative processes, such as those involving neural progenitor cells and gliosis compared with tumor samples. Isoform profiling of glioblastoma tissues revealed the presence of both Δ40p53 and full-length p53, neither of which were detected in non-tumor cerebral cortex. Upon xenograft propagation of tumors, p53 levels increased. The variability of overall p53 expression and relative levels of isoforms suggest fluctuations in subpopulations of cells with greater or lesser capacity for proliferation, which can change as the tumor evolves under different growth conditions.

  18. The p53 isoform delta133p53ß regulates cancer cell apoptosis in a RhoB-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Arsic, Nikola; Ho-Pun-Cheung, Alexandre; Evelyne, Crapez; Assenat, Eric; Jarlier, Marta; Anguille, Christelle; Colard, Manon; Pezet, Mikaël

    2017-01-01

    The TP53 gene plays essential roles in cancer. Conventionally, wild type (WT) p53 is thought to prevent cancer development and metastasis formation, while mutant p53 has transforming abilities. However, clinical studies failed to establish p53 mutation status as an unequivocal predictive or prognostic factor of cancer progression. The recent discovery of p53 isoforms that can differentially regulate cell cycle arrest and apoptosis suggests that their expression, rather than p53 mutations, could be a more clinically relevant biomarker in patients with cancer. In this study, we show that the p53 isoform delta133p53ß is involved in regulating the apoptotic response in colorectal cancer cell lines. We first demonstrate delta133p53ß association with the small GTPase RhoB, a well-described anti-apoptotic protein. We then show that, by inhibiting RhoB activity, delta133p53ß protects cells from camptothecin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, we found that high delta133p53 mRNA expression levels are correlated with higher risk of recurrence in a series of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (n = 36). Our findings describe how a WT TP53 isoform can act as an oncogene and add a new layer to the already complex p53 signaling network. PMID:28212429

  19. Basal and copper-induced expression of metallothionein isoform 1,2 and 3 genes in epithelial cancer cells: The role of tumor suppressor p53.

    PubMed

    Ostrakhovitch, E A; Song, Y P; Cherian, M G

    2016-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a ubiquitous low-molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins with a high affinity for metal ions. The expression and induction of MTs have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Our past research had shown that p53 is an important factor in metal regulation of MTs. The present study was undertaken to explore further the interrelationship between p53 and MTs. We investigated whether silencing of p53 could affect expression pattern of basal and copper induced metallothioneins. The silencing of wild-type p53 (wt-p53) in epithelial breast cancer MCF7 cells affected the basal level of MT-2A RNA, whereas the levels of MT-1A and MT-1X RNA remained largely unchanged. The expression of MT-3 was undetectable in MCF7 with either functional or silenced p53. MCF7 cells with silenced wt-p53 failed to upregulate MT-2A in response to copper and showed a reduced sensitivity toward copper induced cell apoptotic death. Similarly in MCF7-E6 and MDA-MB-231 cells, the presence of inactive/mutated p53 halted MT-1A and MT-2A gene expression in response to copper. Constitutive expression of MT-3 RNA was detectable in the presence of mutated p53 (mtp53). Transient transfection of MDA-MB-231 cells with wt-p53 enabled copper induced upregulation of both MT-1A and MT-2A but not basal level of MT-2A, MT-1E, MT-1X and MT-3. Inactivation of p53 in HepG2 cells amplified the basal expression of studied MT isoforms, including MT-3, as well as copper-induced mRNA expression of MTs except MT-1H and MT-3. Presented data demonstrate a direct relation between p53 and MT-1A and MT-2A and they also indicate that wt-p53 might be a negative regulator of MT-3 in epithelial cancer cells.

  20. The Transactivation Domains of the p53 Protein.

    PubMed

    Raj, Nitin; Attardi, Laura D

    2017-01-03

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcriptional activator, with discrete domains that participate in sequence-specific DNA binding, tetramerization, and transcriptional activation. Mutagenesis and reporter studies have delineated two distinct activation domains (TADs) and specific hydrophobic residues within these TADs that are critical for their function. Knockin mice expressing p53 mutants with alterations in either or both of the two TADs have revealed that TAD1 is critical for responses to acute DNA damage, whereas both TAD1 and TAD2 participate in tumor suppression. Biochemical and structural studies have identified factors that bind either or both TADs, including general transcription factors (GTFs), chromatin modifiers, and negative regulators, helping to elaborate a model through which p53 activates transcription. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of the p53 TADs through phosphorylation also regulate TAD activity. Together, these studies on p53 TADs provide great insight into how p53 serves as a tumor suppressor.

  1. Evaluation of Barrett's esophagus with CK7, CK20, p53, Ki67, and COX2 expressions using chromoendoscopical examination.

    PubMed

    Çoban, Ş; Örmeci, N; Savaş, B; Ekiz, F; Ensari, A; Kuzu, I; Palabıyıkoğlu, M

    2013-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a complication of chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease and can be diagnosed when there is an endoscopically irregular Z-line and intestinal metaplasia (IM) in a biopsy obtained lower esophagus. It is still not clear whether IM in the gastric cardia or columnar mucosa without IM in the lower esophagus have any significance as BE, which is considered as preneoplastic. The aim of the study was to determine the immunohistochemical features of BE and columnar mucosa in the distal esophagus and also to evaluate the value of chromoendoscopy in the diagnosis of BE in a prospective manner. A total of 12 chromoendoscopic biopsies (six from normal-looking unstained esophagus and six from esophageal mucosa stained with methyl blue suspicious of BE) were taken from 111 cases who underwent endoscopy because of a variety of upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using CK7, CK20, p53, Ki67, and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). Of the 111 cases, 19 cases with carcinoma (nine adeno, six squamous, four undifferentiated carcinomas) and 17 cases with normal squamous epithelium were excluded, while 75 cases showing columnar epithelium, including 46 (61.3%) with IM and 29 (38,7%) without IM, were further evaluated immunohistochemically. CK7 was observed in surface, crypt, and glandular epithelium, whereas CK20 was expressed in surface and superficial crypt epithelium. No significant difference was observed between the Barrett and non-Barrett type of CK7/20 staining pattern (P > 0,05). Expression of p53 did not show any difference between BE and columnar mucosa without IM, whereas COX2 expression was significantly increased in BE (P < 0.05) in comparison with columnar mucosa without IM. Ki67 expression was significiantly higher both in upper and lower crypts in BE (P < 0.05). The present study showed that a Barrett pattern does not seem to exist; however, the analysis of COX2 expression and the Ki67 proliferation fraction by

  2. ATM-dependent telomere loss in aging human diploid fibroblasts and DNA damage lead to the post-translational activation of p53 protein involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, H; West, M D; Allsopp, R C; Davison, T S; Wu, Y S; Arrowsmith, C H; Poirier, G G; Benchimol, S

    1997-01-01

    Telomere loss has been proposed as a mechanism for counting cell divisions during aging in normal somatic cells. How such a mitotic clock initiates the intracellular signalling events that culminate in G1 cell cycle arrest and senescence to restrict the lifespan of normal human cells is not known. We investigated the possibility that critically short telomere length activates a DNA damage response pathway involving p53 and p21(WAF1) in aging cells. We show that the DNA binding and transcriptional activity of p53 protein increases with cell age in the absence of any marked increase in the level of p53 protein, and that p21(WAF1) promoter activity in senescent cells is dependent on both p53 and the transcriptional co-activator p300. Moreover, we detected increased specific activity of p53 protein in AT fibroblasts, which exhibit accelerated telomere loss and undergo premature senescence, compared with normal fibroblasts. We investigated the possibility that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is involved in the post-translational activation of p53 protein in aging cells. We show that p53 protein can associate with PARP and inhibition of PARP activity leads to abrogation of p21 and mdm2 expression in response to DNA damage. Moreover, inhibition of PARP activity leads to extension of cellular lifespan. In contrast, hyperoxia, an activator of PARP, is associated with accelerated telomere loss, activation of p53 and premature senescence. We propose that p53 is post-translationally activated not only in response to DNA damage but also in response to the critical shortening of telomeres that occurs during cellular aging. PMID:9312059

  3. Activation of Erk and p53 regulates copper oxide nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity in keratinocytes and fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Cheng; Li, Yan; Yang, Liang; Zheng, Yan; Long, Jiangang; Jia, Jinjing; Xiao, Shengxiang; Liu, Jiankang

    2014-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONP) have attracted increasing attention due to their unique properties and have been extensively utilized in industrial and commercial applications. For example, their antimicrobial capability endows CuONP with applications in dressings and textiles against bacterial infections. Along with the wide applications, concerns about the possible effects of CuONP on humans are also increasing. It is crucial to evaluate the safety and impact of CuONP on humans, and especially the skin, prior to their practical application. The potential toxicity of CuONP to skin keratinocytes has been reported recently. However, the underlying mechanism of toxicity in skin cells has remained unclear. In the present work, we explored the possible mechanism of the cytotoxicity of CuONP in HaCaT human keratinocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF). CuONP exposure induced viability loss, migration inhibition, and G2/M phase cycle arrest in both cell types. CuONP significantly induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (extracellular signal-regulated kinase [Erk], p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase [JNK]) activation in dose- and time-dependent manners. U0126 (an inhibitor of Erk), but not SB 239063 (an inhibitor of p38) or SP600125 (an inhibitor of JNK), enhanced CuONP-induced viability loss. CuONP also induced decreases in p53 and p-p53 levels in both cell types. Cyclic pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity, enhanced CuONP-induced viability loss. Nutlin-3α, a p53 stabilizer, prevented CuONP-induced viability loss in HaCaT cells, but not in MEF cells, due to the inherent toxicity of nutlin-3α to MEF. Moreover, the experiments on primary keratinocytes are in accordance with the conclusions acquired from HaCaT and MEF cells. These data demonstrate that the activation of Erk and p53 plays an important role in CuONP-induced cytotoxicity, and agents that preserve Erk or p53 activation may prevent CuONP-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:25336953

  4. Immunohistochemistry and scoring of Ki-67 proliferative index and p53 expression in gastric B cell lymphoma from Northern African population: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Zeggai, Soumia; Tou, Abdelnacer; Sellam, Feriel; Mrabent, Meriem N.; Salah, Rachida

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to clarify the Ki-67 distribution, p53 expression and their relationship with clinico-pathologic features of gastric B cell lymphoma from Northern African population. Methods Twenty paraffin blocks of gastric lymphoma were retrieved from the archival materials of Department of Pathology, Central University Hospital of Sidi Bel Abbes (Western Algeria) from 2007 to 2013. Four µm section specimens were stained by immunohistochemical (IHC) technique with Ki-67 and p53 tumor markers. P values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Expression of p53 proteins and the mean proliferative index (PI) were compared between high grade gastric B cell lymphomas (DLBCL) and low grade gastric B cell lymphomas (gastric MALTs). p53 overexpression (P=0.007) and a high proliferation index Ki-67 (P=0.001) were significantly associated with gastric DLBCL. We found also a statistically significant correlation between p53 and Ki-67 (P=0.007) but no obvious relationships were found between Ki-67 PI and p53 expression as well as clinico-pathological features (age, sex, location, macroscopic type). Conclusions The IHC studies of Ki-67 and p53 expression in gastric B cell lymphoma can help in monitoring of patients at risk, and to give suitable treatment and management of patients. PMID:27284480

  5. Discovery of Novel Isatin-Based p53 Inducers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of isatin Schiff base derivatives were identified during in silico screening of the small molecule library for novel activators of p53. The compounds selected based on molecular docking results were further validated by a high-content screening assay using U2OS human osteosarcoma cells with an integrated EGFP-expressing p53-dependent reporter. The hit compounds activated and stabilized p53, as shown by Western blotting, at higher rates than the well-known positive control Nutlin-3. Thus, the p53-activating compounds identified by this approach represent useful molecular probes for various cancer studies. PMID:26288684

  6. Gain of cellular adaptation due to prolonged p53 impairment leads to functional switchover from p53 to p73 during DNA damage in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Juni; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Ray, Pallab; Hossain, Dewan Md Sakib; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Adhikary, Arghya; Chattopadhyay, Sreya; Das, Tanya; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2010-10-22

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays the central role in regulating apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. From an evolutionary perspective, the activity of p53 has to be backed up by other protein(s) in case of any functional impairment of this protein, to trigger DNA damage-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. We adopted multiple experimental approaches to demonstrate that in p53-impaired cancer cells, DNA damage caused accumulation of p53 paralogue p73 via Chk-1 that strongly impacted Bax expression and p53-independent apoptosis. On the contrary, when p53 function was restored by ectopic expression, Chk-2 induced p53 accumulation that in turn overshadowed p73 activity, suggesting an antagonistic interaction between p53 family members. To understand such interaction better, p53-expressing cells were impaired differentially for p53 activity. In wild-type p53-expressing cancer cells that were silenced for p53 for several generations, p73 was activated, whereas no such trend was observed when p53 was transiently silenced. Prolonged p53 interference, even in functional p53 settings, therefore, leads to the "gain of cellular adaptation" in a way that alters the cellular microenvironment in favor of p73 activation by altering p73-regulatory proteins, e.g. Chk1 activation and dominant negative p73 down-regulation. These findings not only unveil a hitherto unexplained mechanism underlying the functional switchover from p53 to p73, but also validate p73 as a promising and potential target for cancer therapy in the absence of functional p53.

  7. Necdin, a p53-Target Gene, Is an Inhibitor of p53-Mediated Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lafontaine, Julie; Rodier, Francis; Ouellet, Véronique; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    In vitro, cellular immortalization and transformation define a model for multistep carcinogenesis and current ongoing challenges include the identification of specific molecular events associated with steps along this oncogenic pathway. Here, using NIH3T3 cells, we identified transcriptionally related events associated with the expression of Polyomavirus Large-T antigen (PyLT), a potent viral oncogene. We propose that a subset of these alterations in gene expression may be related to the early events that contribute to carcinogenesis. The proposed tumor suppressor Necdin, known to be regulated by p53, was within a group of genes that was consistently upregulated in the presence of PyLT. While Necdin is induced following p53 activation with different genotoxic stresses, Necdin induction by PyLT did not involve p53 activation or the Rb-binding site of PyLT. Necdin depletion by shRNA conferred a proliferative advantage to NIH3T3 and PyLT-expressing NIH3T3 (NIHLT) cells. In contrast, our results demonstrate that although overexpression of Necdin induced a growth arrest in NIH3T3 and NIHLT cells, a growing population rapidly emerged from these arrested cells. This population no longer showed significant proliferation defects despite high Necdin expression. Moreover, we established that Necdin is a negative regulator of p53-mediated growth arrest induced by nutlin-3, suggesting that Necdin upregulation could contribute to the bypass of a p53-response in p53 wild type tumors. To support this, we characterized Necdin expression in low malignant potential ovarian cancer (LMP) where p53 mutations rarely occur. Elevated levels of Necdin expression were observed in LMP when compared to aggressive serous ovarian cancers. We propose that in some contexts, the constitutive expression of Necdin could contribute to cancer promotion by delaying appropriate p53 responses and potentially promote genomic instability. PMID:22355404

  8. WNT16B is a new marker of cellular senescence that regulates p53 activity and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Binet, Romuald; Ythier, Damien; Robles, Ana I; Collado, Manuel; Larrieu, Delphine; Fonti, Claire; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Serrano, Manuel; Harris, Curtis C; Pedeux, Rémy

    2009-12-15

    Senescence is a tumor suppression mechanism that is induced by several stimuli, including oncogenic signaling and telomere shortening, and controlled by the p53/p21(WAF1) signaling pathway. Recently, a critical role for secreted factors has emerged, suggesting that extracellular signals are necessary for the onset and maintenance of senescence. Conversely, factors secreted by senescent cells may promote tumor growth. By using expression profiling techniques, we searched for secreted factors that were overexpressed in fibroblasts undergoing replicative senescence. We identified WNT16B, a member of the WNT family of secreted proteins. We found that WNT16B is overexpressed in cells undergoing stress-induced premature senescence and oncogene-induced senescence in both MRC5 cell line and the in vivo murine model of K-Ras(V12)-induced senescence. By small interfering RNA experiments, we observed that both p53 and WNT16B are necessary for the onset of replicative senescence. WNT16B expression is required for the full transcriptional activation of p21(WAF1). Moreover, WNT16B regulates activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. Overall, we identified WNT16B as a new marker of senescence that regulates p53 activity and the PI3K/AKT pathway and is necessary for the onset of replicative senescence.

  9. Immunohistochemistry Study of P53 and C-erbB-2 Expression in Trophoblastic Tissue and Their Predictive Values in Diagnosing Malignant Progression of Simple Molar Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzadeh, Malihe; Sharifi, Norrie; Farazestanian, Marjaneh; Nazemian, Seyed Saman; Madani Sani, Faezeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Finding a tumor marker to predict the aggressive behavior of molar pregnancy in early stages has yet been a topic for studies. Objectives In this survey we planned to study patients with molar pregnancy to 1) assess the p53 and c-erbB-2 expression in trophoblastic tissue, 2) to study the relationship between their expression intensity and progression of a molar pregnancy to gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, and 3) to determine a cut off value for the amount of p53 and c-erbB-2 expression which might correlate with aggressive behavior of molar pregnancy. Patients and Methods In a prospective cross sectional study by using a high accuracy technique EnVision Tm system for immunohistochemistry staining of molar pregnancy samples, we evaluated p53 and c-erbB-2 expression in cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast and the correlation of their expression with progression of molar pregnancy to gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN). Normal prostatic tissue and Breast cancer tissue were used as positive controls. Results We studied 28 patients with simple molar pregnancy (SMP) and 30 with GTN. Cytotrophobalst had significantly higher expression of p53 and c-erbB-2 and syncytiotrophoblast had greater expression of p53 in GTN group as compared to SMP group. The cut off values for percentage of p53 positive immunostained cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast were 5.5% and 2.5%. In c-erbB-2 positive membranous stained cytotrophoblast the cut off was 12.5%. Conclusions Our data suggests that over expression of p53 and c-erbB-2 is associated with malignant progression of molar pregnancy. We encountered that high expression of p53 and c-erbB-2 in trophoblastic cells could predict gestational trophoblastic neoplasia during the early stages. PMID:27703642

  10. A protease-activated receptor 2 agonist (AC-264613) suppresses interferon regulatory factor 5 and decreases interleukin-12p40 production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages: Role of p53.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has a key role in the production of interleukin (IL)-12 by macrophages. IRF5 is also a central mediator of toll-like receptor signaling and is a direct target of p53. Activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) upregulates p53 and suppresses apoptosis. This study investigated the influence of human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and PAR-2 agonists on expression of IRF5 and IL-12p40 by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophages showed upregulation of IRF5 expression, while HNE reduced expression of p53 and IRF5 in a concentration-dependent manner. HNE also caused a concentration-dependent decrease of IRF5 in macrophages transfected with small interfering RNA to silence p53, while silencing of β-arrestin 2 blunted the reduction of p53 or IRF5 by HNE. Incubation of macrophages with a PAR-2 agonist, AC-264613, caused a decrease of IRF5 expression and also significantly reduced p53 protein expression. HNE upregulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and caused transactivation of TLR4, while AC-264613 did not promote TLR4 transactivation. In conclusion, the PAR-2 agonist AC-264613 attenuated IRF5-associated IL-12p40 production by macrophages.

  11. Activation of the miR-34a/SIRT1/p53 Signaling Pathway Contributes to the Progress of Liver Fibrosis via Inducing Apoptosis in Hepatocytes but Not in HSCs

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao-Feng; Ji, Fu-Jian; Zang, Hong-Liang; Cao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis results from a sustained wound healing response to chronic liver injury, and the activation of nonparenchymal hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the pivotal process. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) is the direct target gene of p53 and activates p53 through sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) simultaneously. The miR-34a/SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway thus forms a positive feedback loop wherein p53 induces miR-34a and miR-34a activates p53 by inhibiting SIRT1, playing an important role in cell proliferation and apoptosis. miR-34a expression has been found to be increased in animal models or in human patients with different liver diseases, including liver fibrosis. However, the exact role of this classical miR-34a/SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway in liver fibrosis remains unclear. In the present study, using a CCl4-induced rat liver fibrosis model, we found that the miR-34a/SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway was activated and could be inhibited by SIRT1 activator SRT1720. Further studies showed that the miR-34a/SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway was activated in hepatocytes but not in HSCs. The activation of this pathway in hepatocytes resulted in the apoptosis of hepatocytes and thus activated HSCs. Our data indicate that the miR-34a/SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway might be a promising therapeutic target for liver fibrosis. PMID:27387128

  12. Activation of a Novel Death Pathway, Targeted Necrosis, by p53 Peptides to Circumvent Apoptotic Resistance in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    Virtually all chemotherapy agents, at clinically achievable concentrations, act by inducing cancer cell death via apoptosis, but cancer cells...prostate cancer cells by induction of ?targeted necrosis?. Targeted necrosis has potential clinical utility, since its cell death mechanism retains...Therefore, pretreatment with paclitaxel may prime the cells by induction of Fas ligand so that subsequent exposure to p53p-Ant efficiently activates the Fas/FADD cell death pathway.

  13. Precocious anaphase and expression of Securin and p53 genes as candidate biomarkers for the early detection in areca nut-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kurkalang, Sillarine; Banerjee, Atanu; Dkhar, Hughbert; Nongrum, Henry B; Ganguly, Buddha; Islam, Mohammad; Rangad, Gordon M; Chatterjee, Anupam

    2015-05-01

    Research over the years has generated enough evidence to implicate areca nut, as a carcinogen in humans. Besides oral, significant rise in the incidence of cancers of the oesophagus, liver and stomach was seen among areca nut chewers. Early diagnosis seems key to understand the initial processes of carcinogenesis which is highly curable. In North-East India, betel quid contains raw areca nut (RAN), lime and small portion of betel leaf without any other constituents. This study was not intended to isolate any active ingredients from the RAN and to look its action. The present objective is to validate the screening of precocious anaphase and analysis of expression of Securin and p53 in non-target cells like human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and mouse bone marrow cells (BMCs) as early indicative parameters of RAN + lime-induced cancers. A total of 35 mice were examined at different time points for following ad libitum administration of RAN extract in drinking water with lime. Peripheral blood was collected from 32 human donors of which, 24 were RAN + lime heavy chewers. Expression of genes was assessed by immunoblotting and/or by immunohistochemistry. Histological preparation of stomach tissue of mice revealed that RAN + lime induced stomach cancer. A gradual increase in the frequency of precocious anaphases and aneuploid cells was observed in both RAN + lime-treated mouse BMC and human PBL of RAN heavy chewers. Levels of p53 and Securin were increased in these cells during early days of RAN + lime exposure. The level of Securin was significantly higher in human tumour samples than their adjacent normal counterpart. The expression of Securin was increased significantly in RAN + lime-administered mice as well as in stomach tumour. Present study revealed that precocious anaphase and expression of p53 and Securin in non-target cells are significantly associated with an increased risk of RAN-induced cancer and thus these parameters can be of early diagnostic value.

  14. p53 isoform Δ113p53/Δ133p53 promotes DNA double-strand break repair to protect cell from death and senescence in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lu; Gong, Hongjian; Pan, Xiao; Chang, Changqing; Ou, Zhao; Ye, Shengfan; Yin, Le; Yang, Lina; Tao, Ting; Zhang, Zhenhai; Liu, Cong; Lane, David P; Peng, Jinrong; Chen, Jun

    2015-03-01

    The inhibitory role of p53 in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair seems contradictory to its tumor-suppressing property. The p53 isoform Δ113p53/Δ133p53 is a p53 target gene that antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity. However, information on its functions in DNA damage repair is lacking. Here we report that Δ113p53 expression is strongly induced by γ-irradiation, but not by UV-irradiation or heat shock treatment. Strikingly, Δ113p53 promotes DNA DSB repair pathways, including homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining and single-strand annealing. To study the biological significance of Δ113p53 in promoting DNA DSB repair, we generated a zebrafish Δ113p53(M/M) mutant via the transcription activator-like effector nuclease technique and found that the mutant is more sensitive to γ-irradiation. The human ortholog, Δ133p53, is also only induced by γ-irradiation and functions to promote DNA DSB repair. Δ133p53-knockdown cells were arrested at the G2 phase at the later stage in response to γ-irradiation due to a high level of unrepaired DNA DSBs, which finally led to cell senescence. Furthermore, Δ113p53/Δ133p53 promotes DNA DSB repair via upregulating the transcription of repair genes rad51, lig4 and rad52 by binding to a novel type of p53-responsive element in their promoters. Our results demonstrate that Δ113p53/Δ133p53 is an evolutionally conserved pro-survival factor for DNA damage stress by preventing apoptosis and promoting DNA DSB repair to inhibit cell senescence. Our data also suggest that the induction of Δ133p53 expression in normal cells or tissues provides an important tolerance marker for cancer patients to radiotherapy.

  15. Impact of G-quadruplex structures and intronic polymorphisms rs17878362 and rs1642785 on basal and ionizing radiation-induced expression of alternative p53 transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Perriaud, Laury; Marcel, Virginie; Sagne, Charlotte; Favaudon, Vincent; Guédin, Aurore; De Rache, Aurore; Guetta, Corinne; Hamon, Florian; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Hainaut, Pierre; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Hall, Janet

    2014-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) structures in intron 3 of the p53 pre-mRNA modulate intron 2 splicing, altering the balance between the fully spliced p53 transcript (FSp53, encoding full-length p53) and an incompletely spliced transcript retaining intron 2 (p53I2 encoding the N-terminally truncated Δ40p53 isoform). The nucleotides forming G4s overlap the polymorphism rs17878362 (A1 wild-type allele, A2 16-base pair insertion) which is in linkage disequilibrium with rs1642785 in intron 2 (c.74+38 G>C). Biophysical and biochemical analyses show rs17878362 A2 alleles form similar G4 structures as A1 alleles although their position is shifted with respect to the intron 2 splice acceptor site. In addition basal FSp53 and p53I2 levels showed allele specific differences in both p53-null cells transfected with reporter constructs or lymphoblastoid cell lines. The highest FSp53 and p53I2 levels were associated with combined rs1642785-GG/rs17878362-A1A1 alleles, whereas the presence of rs1642785-C with either rs17878362 allele was associated with lower p53 pre-mRNA, total TP53, FSp53 and p53I2 levels, due to the lower stability of transcripts containing rs1642785-C. Treatment of lymphoblastoid cell with the G4 binding ligands 360A or PhenDC3 or with ionizing radiation increased FSp53 levels only in cells with rs17878362 A1 alleles, suggesting that under this G4 configuration full splicing is favoured. These results demonstrate the complex effects of intronic TP53 polymorphisms on G4 formation and identify a new role for rs1642785 on mRNA splicing and stability, and thus on the differential expression of isoform-specific transcripts of the TP53 gene. PMID:25269805

  16. 5-Fluorouracil nanoparticles inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma via activation of the p53 pathway in the orthotopic transplant mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingrong; He, Bing; Wan, Tao; Zhu, Weiping; Han, Jiang; Zha, Bingbing; Chen, Houxiang; Yang, Fengxiao; Li, Qing; Wang, Wei; Xu, Hongzhi; Ye, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticle drug delivery systems provide targeted drug delivery, improved pharmacokinetic and biodistribution, enhanced drug stability and fewer side effects. These drug delivery systems are widely used for delivering cytotoxic agents. In the present study, we synthesized GC/5-FU nanoparticles by combining galactosylated chitosan (GC) material with 5-FU, and tested its effect on liver cancer in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro anti-cancer effects of this sustained release system were both dose- and time-dependent, and demonstrated higher cytotoxicity against hepatic cancer cells than against other cell types. The distribution of GC/5-FU in vivo revealed the greatest accumulation in hepatic cancer tissues. GC/5-FU significantly inhibited tumor growth in an orthotropic liver cancer mouse model, resulting in a significant reduction in tumor weight and increased survival time in comparison to 5-FU alone. Flow cytometry and TUNEL assays in hepatic cancer cells showed that GC/5-FU was associated with higher rates of G0-G1 arrest and apoptosis than 5-FU. Analysis of apoptosis pathways indicated that GC/5-FU upregulates p53 expression at both protein and mRNA levels. This in turn lowers Bcl-2/Bax expression resulting in mitochondrial release of cytochrome C into the cytosol with subsequent caspase-3 activation. Upregulation of caspase-3 expression decreased poly ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) at mRNA and protein levels, further promoting apoptosis. These findings indicate that sustained release of GC/5-FU nanoparticles are more effective at targeting hepatic cancer cells than 5-FU monotherapy in the mouse orthotropic liver cancer mouse model.

  17. Regulation of p53 during senescence in normal human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Kim, Terresa; Yang, Paul; Bae, Susan; Williams, Drake W; Phung, Samantha; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Hong, Christine; Park, No-Hee

    2015-01-01

    p53, the guardian of the genome, is a tumor suppressor protein and critical for the genomic integrity of the cells. Many studies have shown that intracellular level of p53 is enhanced during replicative senescence in normal fibroblasts, and the enhanced level of p53 is viewed as the cause of senescence. Here, we report that, unlike in normal fibroblasts, the level of intracellular p53 reduces during replicative senescence and oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). We found that the intracellular p53 level was also decreased in age-dependent manner in normal human epithelial tissues. Senescent NHKs exhibited an enhanced level of p16INK4A, induced G2 cell cycle arrest, and lowered the p53 expression and transactivation activity. We found that low level of p53 in senescent NHKs was due to reduced transcription of p53. The methylation status at the p53 promoter was not altered during senescence, but senescent NHKs exhibited notably lower level of acetylated histone 3 (H3) at the p53 promoter in comparison with rapidly proliferating cells. Moreover, p53 knockdown in rapidly proliferating NHKs resulted in the disruption of fidelity in repaired DNA. Taken together, our study demonstrates that p53 level is diminished during replicative senescence and OIS and that such diminution is associated with H3 deacetylation at the p53 promoter. The reduced intracellular p53 level in keratinocytes of the elderly could be a contributing factor for more frequent development of epithelial cancer in the elderly because of the loss of genomic integrity of cells. PMID:26138448

  18. Expression of JMJD2A in infiltrating duct carcinoma was markedly higher than fibroadenoma, and associated with expression of ARHI, p53 and ER in infiltrating duct carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei-Xu; Li, Jia; Luo, Cheng-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Chang; Li, Hui; Li, Li-Liang; Xu, Hong-Fei; Shen, Yi-Wen; Xue, Ai-Min; Zhao, Zi-Qin

    2013-03-01

    Jumonji Domain Containing 2A (JMJD2A) may be a cancer-associated gene involved in human breast cancer. With a view to investigating expression of JMJD2A in human breast cancer and benign lesion tissues as well as relationship between JMJD2A and tumor related proteins, histological and immunohistochemical analysis, Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR in infiltrating duct carcinoma and fibroadenoma for JMJD2A and immunohistochemical analysis and quantitative real-time PCR in infiltrating duct carcinoma for tumor related proteins (ARHI, p53, ER, PR and CerbB-2) were performed. Histological examination validated the clinical diagnosis. The JMJD2A positive rate of infiltrating duct carcinoma was significantly higher than fibroadenoma by immunohistochemical analysis. The mean optical density of JMJD2A in infiltrating duct carcinoma was higher than fibroadenoma by western blot. JMJD2A mRNA level in infiltrating duct carcinoma was higher than fibroadenoma by quantitative real-time PCR. Spearman correlation analysis revealed that the expression of JMJD2A was associated with ARHI, p53 and ER from immunohistochemical results respectively. Pearson correlation analysis revealed that the expression of JMJD2A was associated with ARHI, p53 and ER from quantitative real-time PCR results respectively. Expression of JMJD2A in infiltrating duct carcinoma was higher, and associated with ARHI, p53 and ER. The results may take JMJD2A as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target in human breast cancer.

  19. Y-box-binding protein-1 expression is not correlated with p53 expression but with proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Takashi; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Yashima, Yasunori; Gu, Chundong; Morita, Masaru; Sugio, Kenji; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Yasumoto, Kosei

    2005-01-01

    Transcription factor Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1), which binds to the inverted CCAAT box, is not only involved in the transcription of various genes, but also in cell proliferation and DNA repair. The aim of this study was to detect YB-1 and p53 expression and their relationship to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, and to evaluate the relationship between their expression levels and the prognosis of patients with NSCLC. Positive expressions of YB-1, p53 and PCNA were detected in NSCLC cells in 43 (45.7%), 33 (35.0%) and 45 (47.9%) out of 94 patients, respectively. No significant differences were observed between YB-1 expression and the patients' gender, age at surgery, pathological stage, pathological T status, pathological N status, or pathological M status. The mean PCNA-labelling index (LI) for cells was 40.7+/-2.6. Also, a significant correlation between YB-1 and PCNA-LI was found (p<0.01), but none was found between p53 expression and PCNA. The positive expression of YB-1 was associated with squamous cell carcinoma and large cell carcinoma, compared with adenocarcinomas (p<0.01), and higher levels of PCNA-LI were associated with large cell carcinoma compared with adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinoma (p<0.01). These results suggest that YB-1 expression is correlated with PCNA expression in NSCLC. In addition, the DNA repair pathway and tumor proliferation mediated by YB-1 linking to PCNA may be responsible for controlling the growth of NSCLC.

  20. Caspase-3 activation downstream from reactive oxygen species in heat-induced apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells carrying a mutant p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, D; Sasaki, M; Watanabe, N

    2001-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the intracellular signaling pathway leading to p53-independent activation of caspase-3 during heat-induced apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells. Induction of mutant p53 protein, but not p21/WAF-1, was observed after heat treatment of both heat-resistant (PANC-1) and heat-sensitive (MIAPaCa-2) cells. A specific inhibitor of caspase-3 (Ac-DMQD-CHO) caused 84% and 92% inhibition of apoptosis in MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, respectively. Caspase-3 mRNA expression was increased in both cell lines after heat treatment. Further, heat-induced caspase-3 activity detected by fluorogenic assay in MIAPaCa-2 cells was almost completely inhibited by addition of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. In contrast, Ac-DMQD-CHO had no inhibitory effect on amounts of reactive oxygen species in heat-treated MIAPaCa-2 cells. These results suggest a possible pathway by which reactive oxygen species lead to caspase-3 activation to cause heat-induced death of pancreatic carcinoma cells carrying mutant p53.

  1. Identification of two novel functional p53 responsive elements in the herpes simplex virus-1 genome.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Kuta, Ryan; Armour, Courtney R; Boehmer, Paul E

    2014-07-01

    Analysis of the herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) genome reveals two candidate p53 responsive elements (p53RE), located in proximity to the replication origins oriL and oriS, referred to as p53RE-L and p53RE-S, respectively. The sequences of p53RE-L and p53RE-S conform to the p53 consensus site and are present in HSV-1 strains KOS, 17, and F. p53 binds to both elements in vitro and in virus-infected cells. Both p53RE-L and p53RE-S are capable of conferring p53-dependent transcriptional activation onto a heterologous reporter gene. Importantly, expression of the essential immediate early viral transactivator ICP4 and the essential DNA replication protein ICP8, that are adjacent to p53RE-S and p53RE-L, are repressed in a p53-dependent manner. Taken together, this study identifies two novel functional p53RE in the HSV-1 genome and suggests a complex mechanism of viral gene regulation by p53 which may determine progression of the lytic viral replication cycle or the establishment of latency.

  2. Nano-SiO2 induces apoptosis via activation of p53 and Bax mediated by oxidative stress in human hepatic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yiyi; Liu, Jianwen; Xu, Jianhe; Sun, Lijuan; Chen, Mingcang; Lan, Minbo

    2010-04-01

    Nanoparticles such as nano-SiO(2) are increasingly used in food, cosmetics, diagnosis, imaging and drug delivery. However, toxicological data of nano-SiO(2) on hepatic cells in vitro and their detailed molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. In order to assess toxicity of nano-SiO(2), L-02 cells were exposed to 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg/ml of SiO(2) colloids (21, 48 and 86 nm) for 12, 24, 36 and 48h. Lactate dehydrogenase released from damaged cells were quantified, cellular ultrastructural organization was observed, and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation and glutathione were measured. Apoptosis induced by 21 nm SiO(2) was characterized by annexin V-FITC/PI staining and DNA ladder assay. Furthermore, apoptosis related proteins such as p53, Bax and Bcl-2 were analyzed by using western blot analysis. Our data indicated that nano-SiO(2) caused cytotoxicity in size, dose and time dependent manners. Oxidative stress and apoptosis were induced by exposure to 21 nm SiO(2). Moreover, the expression of p53 and Bax was increased in time and dose dependent patterns, whereas the expression of Bcl-2 was not significantly changed. In conclusion, ROS-mediated oxidative stress, the activation of p53 and up-regulation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio are involved in mechanistic pathways of 21 nm SiO(2) induced apoptosis in L-02 cells.

  3. The Polycomb group gene Bmi1 regulates antioxidant defenses in neurons by repressing p53 pro-oxidant activity

    PubMed Central

    Chatoo, Wassim; Abdouh, Mohamed; David, Jocelyn; Champagne, Marie-Pier; Ferreira, José; Rodier, Francis; Bernier, Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    Aging may be determined by a genetic program and/or by the accumulation rate of molecular damages. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the mitochondrial metabolism have been postulated to be the central source of molecular damages and imbalance between levels of intracellular ROS and antioxidant defenses is a characteristic of the aging brain. How aging modifies free radicals concentrations and increases the risk to develop most neurodegenerative diseases is poorly understood, however. Here we show that the Polycomb group and oncogene Bmi1 is required in neurons to suppress apoptosis and the induction of a premature aging-like program characterized by reduced antioxidant defenses. Before weaning, Bmi1−/− mice display a progeroid-like ocular and brain phenotype while Bmi1+/− mice, although apparently normal, have reduced lifespan. Bmi1 deficiency in neurons results in increased p19Arf/p53 levels, abnormally high ROS concentrations and hypersensitivity to neurotoxic agents. Most Bmi1 functions on neurons oxidative metabolism are genetically linked to repression of p53 pro-oxidant activity, which also operates in physiological conditions. In Bmi1−/− neurons, p53 and co-repressors accumulate at antioxidant gene promoters, correlating with a repressed chromatin state and antioxidant genes downregulation. These findings provide a molecular mechanism explaining how Bmi1 regulates free radical concentrations and reveal the biological impact of Bmi1 deficiency on neuronal survival and aging. PMID:19144853

  4. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Yen-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu; Chiu, Husan-Wen; Chang, Chuan-Hsun; Liang, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Jau-Ling; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  5. Targeting cancer stem cells with p53 modulators

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Ryo; Appella, Ettore; Kopelovich, Levy; DeLeo, Albert B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) typically over-express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Thus, ALDHbright tumor cells represent targets for developing novel cancer prevention/treatment interventions. Loss of p53 function is a common genetic event during cancer development wherein small molecular weight compounds (SMWC) that restore p53 function and reverse tumor growth have been identified. Here, we focused on two widely studied p53 SMWC, CP-31398 and PRIMA-1, to target ALDHbright CSC in human breast, endometrial and pancreas carcinoma cell lines expressing mutant or wild type (WT) p53. CP-31398 and PRIMA-1 significantly reduced CSC content and sphere formation by these cell lines in vitro. In addition, these agents were more effective in vitro against CSC compared to cisplatin and gemcitabine, two often-used chemotherapeutic agents. We also tested a combinatorial treatment in methylcholantrene (MCA)-treated mice consisting of p53 SMWC and p53-based vaccines. Yet using survival end-point analysis, no increased efficacy in the presence of either p53 SMWC alone or with vaccine compared to vaccine alone was observed. These results may be due, in part, to the presence of immune cells, such as activated lymphocytes expressing WT p53 at levels comparable to some tumor cells, wherein further increase of p53 expression by p53 SMWC may alter survival of these immune cells and negatively impact an effective immune response. Continuous exposure of mice to MCA may have also interfered with the action of these p53 SMWC, including potential direct interaction with MCA. Nonetheless, the effect of p53 SMWC on CSC and cancer treatment remains of great interest. PMID:27074569

  6. Activation of p38-MAPK by CXCL4/CXCR3 axis contributes to p53-dependent intestinal apoptosis initiated by 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Gao, Jin; Qian, Lan; Wang, Xia; Wu, Mingyuan; Zhang, Yang; Ye, Hao; Zhu, Shunying; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis (CIM) is a major does limiting side-effect of chemoagents such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Molecules involved in this disease process are still not fully understood. We proposed that the homeostatically regulated genes during CIM may participate in the disease. A cluster of such genes were previously identified by expression gene-array from the mouse jejunum in 5-FU-induced mucositis model. Here, we report that CXCL4 is such a homeostatically regulated gene and serves as a new target for the antibody treatment of CIM. CXCL4 and its receptor CXCR3 were confirmed at both the gene and protein levels to be homeostatically regulated during 5-FU-induced mucositis. Using of CXCL4 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (CXCL4mab) decreased the incidence, severity, and duration of the chemotherapy-induced diarrhea, the major symptom of CIM, in a 5-FU mouse CIM model. Mechanistically, CXCL4mab reduced the apoptosis of the crypt epithelia by suppression of the 5-FU-induced expression of p53 and Bax through its receptor CXCR3. The downstream signaling pathway of CXCL4 in activation of the epithelial apoptosis was identified in an intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6). CXCL4 activated the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, which mediated the stimulated expression of p53 and Bax, and resulted in the ultimate activation of Caspase-8, -9, and -3. Taken together, activation of CXCL4 expression by 5-FU in mice participates in 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis through upregulation of p53 via activation of p38-MAPK, and CXCL4mab is potentially beneficial in preventing CIM in the intestinal tract.

  7. Molecular cloning and in vitro expression of a cDNA clone for human cellular tumor antigen p53.

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, E; Williamson, N M; Ralston, R; Helfman, D M; Adams, T E

    1985-01-01

    Three clones for the human tumor antigen p53 were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from A431 cells. One of these clones, pR4-2, contains the entire coding region for human p53. This clone directs the synthesis of a polypeptide with the correct molecular weight and immunological epitopes of an authentic p53 molecule in an in vitro transcription-translation reaction. Although the pR4-2 clone contains the coding region for p53, it is not a full-length copy of the human p53 mRNA. Northern analysis showed that the p53 mRNA is approximately 2,500 nucleotides long, whereas the pR4-2 insert is only 1,760 base pairs in length. Analysis of the DNA sequence of this clone suggests that the human p53 polypeptide has 393 amino acids. We compared the predicted amino acid sequence of the pR4-2 clone with similar clones for the mouse p53 and found long regions of amino acid homology between these two molecules. Images PMID:3894933

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase-9, -10, and -12, MDM2 and p53 expression in mouse liver during dimethylnitrosamine-induced oxidative stress and genomic injury.

    PubMed

    Syed, Ismail; Rathod, Jasmine; Parmar, Mayur; Corcoran, George B; Ray, Sidhartha D

    2012-06-01

    Treatment during early tumor development has greater success because tissue growth remains largely confined to its original locus. At later stages, malignant cells migrate from their original location, invade surrounding normal areas, and can disseminate widely throughout the body. Remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) serves as a key facilitator of this dissemination. Proteolytic enzymes including plasmin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an integral role in degrading the surrounding ECM proteins and clearing a path for tumor cell migration. Specific MMPs are highly expressed late during malignant tumor invasion. It is not understood whether early changes in MMPs influence apoptotic and necrotic cell death, processes known to govern the early stages of carcinogenesis. Similarly, the interaction between MDM2 and p53 is tightly controlled by a complex array of post-translational modifications, which in turn dictates the stability and activity of both p53 and MDM2. The present studies examine the hypothesis that model hepatotoxin dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), which is also a model carcinogen, will induce the MMP family of proteins after administration in hepatotoxic doses. Doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg DMN were administered i.p. to male C3H mice. Changes in parameters associated with apoptotic and necrotic cell death, DNA damage, cell proliferation, and extracellular proteinases were examined in liver at 24 h. Serum ALT activity, oxidative stress [malondialdehyde], and caspase-activated DNAse mediated DNA laddering increased in a dose-dependent manner, as did the level of MDM2 protein. MMP-9, -10 and -12 (gelatinase-B, stromelysin-2, macrophage elastase), and p53 protein levels increased following 25 mg/kg DMN, but were successively decreased after higher DMN doses. The results of this study demonstrate changes in MDM2 and MMPs during DMN-induced acute liver injury and provide a plausible linkage between DMN-induced oxidative stress-mediated genomic

  9. Roscovitine-induced apoptosis of H1299 cells depends on functional status of p53.

    PubMed

    Slovackova, J; Smarda, J; Smardova, J

    2012-01-01

    Roscovitine, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, is promising anticancer agent. Its antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects can be mediated by the p53 signaling pathway. To define the role of p53 in roscovitine-induced cell response, we prepared H1299/p53 cell lines inducibly expressing specific variants of p53 (p53wt and hotspot R175H, temperature-dependent P98A, A159V, S215G, Y220C, Y234C mutants). In the presence of roscovitine, each cell line variant behaved in specific way reflecting activity of the p53 protein. Roscovitine decreased production of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 and induced apoptosis. This effect was the most efficient in cells expressing p53wt protein with full activity. The cell expressing partially and conditionally active p53 mutants responded to roscovitine less efficiently. The cells expressing p53 mutants A159V and Y234C were very sensitive to roscovitine but their response was clearly temperature-dependent. The cells expressing P98A, S215G and Y220C p53 mutants exhibited only weak sensitivity to roscovitine and underwent apoptosis in low frequency. In principle, each td p53 mutant responded to roscovitine in distinct way. We showed clearly that the impact of roscovitine on H1299 cells depends on functional status of p53 they produce. This suggests that patients with tumors exhibiting specific p53 variants can benefit from the roscovitine therapy.

  10. Altered expression profile of glycolytic enzymes during testicular ischemia reperfusion injury is associated with the p53/TIGAR pathway: effect of fructose 1,6-diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Renno, Waleed M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Testicular ischemia reperfusion injury (tIRI) is considered the mechanism underlying the pathology of testicular torsion and detorsion. Left untreated, tIRI can induce testis dysfunction, damage to spermatogenesis and possible infertility. In this study, we aimed to assess the activities and expression of glycolytic enzymes (GEs) in the testis and their possible modulation during tIRI. The effect of fructose 1,6-diphosphate (FDP), a glycolytic intermediate, on tIRI was also investigated. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham, unilateral tIRI, and tIRI + FDP (2 mg/kg). tIRI was induced by occlusion of the testicular artery for 1 h followed by 4 h of reperfusion. FDP was injected peritoneally 30 min prior to reperfusion. Histological and biochemical analyses were used to assess damage to spermatogenesis, activities of major GEs, and energy and oxidative stress markers. The relative mRNA expression of GEs was evaluated by real-time PCR. ELISA and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the expression of p53 and TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR). Results. Histological analysis revealed tIRI-induced spermatogenic damage as represented by a significant decrease in the Johnsen biopsy score. In addition, tIRI reduced the activities of hexokinase 1, phosphofructokinase-1, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and lactate dehydrogenase C. However, mRNA expression downregulation was detected only for hexokinase 1, phosphoglycerate kinase 2, and lactate dehydrogenase C. ATP and NADPH depletion was also induced by tIRI and was accompanied by an increased Malondialdehyde concentration, reduced glutathione level, and reduced superoxide dismutase and catalase enzyme activities. The immunoexpression of p53 and TIGAR was markedly increased after tIRI. The above tIRI-induced alterations were attenuated by FDP treatment. Discussion. Our findings indicate that tIRI-induced spermatogenic damage is associated with

  11. MEF/ELF4 transactivation by E2F1 is inhibited by p53.

    PubMed

    Taura, Manabu; Suico, Mary Ann; Fukuda, Ryosuke; Koga, Tomoaki; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Takashi; Morino-Koga, Saori; Okada, Seiji; Kai, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid elf-1-like factor (MEF) or Elf4 is an E-twenty-six (ETS)-related transcription factor with strong transcriptional activity that influences cellular senescence by affecting tumor suppressor p53. MEF downregulates p53 expression and inhibits p53-mediated cellular senescence by transcriptionally activating MDM2. However, whether p53 reciprocally opposes MEF remains unexplored. Here, we show that MEF is modulated by p53 in human cells and mice tissues. MEF expression and promoter activity were suppressed by p53. While we found that MEF promoter does not contain p53 response elements, intriguingly, it contains E2F consensus sites. Subsequently, we determined that E2F1 specifically binds to MEF promoter and transactivates MEF. Nevertheless, E2F1 DNA binding and transactivation of MEF promoter was inhibited by p53 through the association between p53 and E2F1. Furthermore, we showed that activation of p53 in doxorubicin-induced senescent cells increased E2F1 and p53 interaction, diminished E2F1 recruitment to MEF promoter and reduced MEF expression. These observations suggest that p53 downregulates MEF by associating with and inhibiting the binding activity of E2F1, a novel transcriptional activator of MEF. Together with previous findings, our present results indicate that a negative regulatory mechanism exists between p53 and MEF.

  12. Thrombospondin-1 expression in urothelial carcinoma: prognostic significance and association with p53 alterations, tumour angiogenesis and extracellular matrix components

    PubMed Central

    Ioachim, E; Michael, MC; Salmas, M; Damala, K; Tsanou, E; Michael, MM; Malamou-Mitsi, V; Stavropoulos, NE

    2006-01-01

    Background Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is an extracellular matrix component glycoprotein, which is known to be a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and may be important in cancer invasiveness. We examined the TSP-1 expression in correlation with conventional clinicopathological parameters to clarify its prognostic significance in bladder cancer. In addition, the possible correlation of TSP-1 expression with microvessel count, VEGF expression, p53 expression as well as with the expression of the extracellular matrix components was studied to explore its implication in vascularization and tumour stroma remodeling. Methods The immunohistochemical expression of TSP-1 in tumour cells and in the tumour stroma was studied in 148 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded urothelial cell carcinoma tissue samples. Results TSP-1 was detected in perivascular tissue, at the epithelial-stromal junction, in the stroma and in tumour cells in the majority of the cases. In tumour cells, low TSP-1 expression was observed in 43% of the cases, moderate and high in 7%, while 50% showed absence of TSP expression. A higher TSP-1 immunoreactivity in well and moderately differentiated tumours compared to poorly differentiated was noted. PT1 tumours showed decreased TSP-1 expression in comparison to pTa and pT2–4 tumours. Increased tumour cell TSP-1 expression was related to increased microvessel density. In the tumour stroma, 37% of the cases showed small amount of TSP-1 expression, 7.5% moderate and high, while 55% of the cases showed absence of TSP-1 stromal immunoreactivity. Stromal TSP-1 expression was inversely correlated with tumour stage and tumour size. This expression was also positively correlated with microvessel density, VEGF expression and extracellular matrix components tenascin and fibronectin. Using univariate and multivariate analysis we didn't find any significant correlation of TSP-1 expression in superficial tumours in both tumour cells and tumour stroma in terns of the risk of

  13. Flavonoids in Ginkgo biloba fallen leaves induce apoptosis through modulation of p53 activation in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jung; Kim, Moon-Moo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the apoptotic effect of flavonoids in methanol extracts of Ginkgo biloba fallen leaves (MEGFL) on melanoma cells. Ginkgo biloba is a deciduous castle chaplain and its leaves include various types of flavonoids such as flavonol-O-glycosides. Ginkgo biloba is known to have therapeutic properties against a number of diseases such as cerebrovascular diseases, blood circulation disease and hypertension. In the present study MEGFL exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect on melanoma cells than Ginkgo biloba leaves (MEGL). It was also found that MEGFL induced apoptotic cell death which was characterized by DNA fragmentation. During the cell death process following treatment with MEGFL, the expression of a variety of death-associated proteins including p53, caspase-3, caspase-9, cytochrome c and Bax were analyzed in the cytosol of melanoma cells. MEGFL significantly increased the expression levels of caspase-3, caspase-9 and p53 in a dose-dependent manner. Our results indicate that MEGFL induced apoptotic cell death by increasing the expression of cell death-associated proteins in melanoma cells.

  14. Expression pattern of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), p53, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the striatum of rats treated with 3-nitropropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Duran-Vilaregut, Joaquim; Manich, Gemma; Del Valle, Jaume; Camins, Antoni; Pallàs, Mercè; Vilaplana, Jordi; Pelegrí, Carme

    2012-09-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) is a mitochondrial toxin used in the laboratory to replicate neurodegenerative conditions that are accompanied by degeneration of the caudate-putamen. 3-NPA induces depletion in ATP production, reactive oxygen species production, and secondary excitotoxicity mediated by activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors that culminates in the triggering of cell death mechanisms, including apoptosis. We here examined by immunohistochemical methods whether cellular expression of phospho(Ser1981) -ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), phospho(Ser15) -p53, phospho(Ser473) -Akt, and phospho(Ser9) -glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), which are key signal molecules that play a critical role in regulating cellular processes related to cell survival and demise, were involved in the striatal neurodegeneration in the brains of rats treated with 3-NPA. Our results indicate that the toxin induced the activation of ATM and p53 only in astrocytes, and a role for these proteins in neuronal degeneration was ruled out. On the other hand, striatal neurons lost the active form of Akt as soon as they began to appear pyknotic, indicating impairment of the PI3K/Akt/GSK3 pathway in their degenerative process. The inactive form of GSK3β was detected extensively, mainly in the rim of the striatal lesions around degenerating neurons, which could be attributed to a cell death or cell survival response.

  15. PBK/TOPK interacts with the DBD domain of tumor suppressor p53 and modulates expression of transcriptional targets including p21.

    PubMed

    Hu, F; Gartenhaus, R B; Eichberg, D; Liu, Z; Fang, H-B; Rapoport, A P

    2010-10-07

    PBK/TOPK (PDZ-binding kinase, T-LAK-cell-originated protein kinase) is a serine-threonine kinase that is overexpressed in a variety of tumor cells but its role in oncogenesis remains unclear. Here we show, by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and yeast two-hybrid analysis, that PBK/TOPK physically interacts with the tumor suppressor p53 through its DNA-binding (DBD) domain in HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells that express wild-type p53. PBK also binds to p53 mutants carrying five common point mutations in the DBD domain. The PBK-p53 interaction appears to downmodulate p53 transactivation function as indicated by PBK/TOPK knockdown experiments, which show upregulated expression of the key p53 target gene and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 in HCT116 cells, particularly after genotoxic damage from doxorubicin. Furthermore, stable PBK/TOPK knockdown cell lines (derived from HCT116 and MCF-7 cells) showed increased apoptosis, G(2)/M arrest and slower growth as compared to stable empty vector-transfected control cell lines. Gene microarray studies identified additional p53 target genes involved in apoptosis or cell cycling, which were differentially regulated by PBK knockdown. Together, these data suggest that increased levels of PBK/TOPK may contribute to tumor cell development and progression through suppression of p53 function and consequent reductions in the cell-cycle regulatory proteins such as p21. PBK/TOPK may therefore be a valid target for antineoplastic kinase inhibitors to sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis and growth suppression.

  16. DICER1 regulated let-7 expression levels in p53-induced cancer repression requires cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin; Tang, Shou-Ching; Xu, Chongwen; Wang, Chenguang; Qin, Sida; Du, Ning; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Yiwen; Li, Xiang; Luo, Gang; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Fei; Ren, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Let-7 miRNAs act as tumour suppressors by directly binding to the 3′UTRs of downstream gene products. The regulatory role of let-7 in downstream gene expression has gained much interest in the cancer research community, as it controls multiple biological functions and determines cell fates. For example, one target of the let-7 family is cyclin D1, which promotes G0/S cell cycle progression and oncogenesis, was correlated with endoribonuclease DICER1, another target of let-7. Down-regulated let-7 has been identified in many types of tumours, suggesting a feedback loop may exist between let-7 and cyclin D1. A potential player in the proposed feedback relationship is Dicer, a central regulator of miRNA expression through sequence-specific silencing. We first identified that DICER1 is the key downstream gene for cyclin D1-induced let-7 expression. In addition, we found that let-7 miRNAs expression decreased because of the p53-induced cell death response, with deregulated cyclin D1. Our results also showed that cyclin D1 is required for Nutlin-3 and TAX-induced let-7 expression in cancer repression and the cell death response. For the first time, we provide evidence that let-7 and cyclin D1 form a feedback loop in regulating therapy response of cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and importantly, that alteration of let-7 expression, mainly caused by cyclin D1, is a sensitive indicator for better chemotherapies response. PMID:25702703

  17. Reduced ATM kinase activity and an attenuated p53 response to DNA damage in carcinogen-induced preneoplastic hepatic lesions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Silins, I; Finnberg, N; Ståhl, A; Högberg, J; Stenius, U

    2001-12-01

    In previous studies we have demonstrated that the p53 response to DNA damage in preneoplastic liver lesions, referred to as enzyme-altered foci (EAF), is attenuated. In the present investigation comparative quantitative RT-PCR revealed no major difference in the p53 mRNA levels in EAF and non-EAF tissue. When CoCl(2) was employed to induce hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1alpha), both non-EAF and EAF hepatocytes readily accumulated p53, whereas EAF hepatocytes did not accumulate p53 upon treatment with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). The p53 response was also induced in EAF hepatocytes by the inhibitor of nuclear export, leptomycin B. An inhibitor of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), wortmannin, blocked the DEN-induced p53 response in non-EAF hepatocytes. Assay of kinase activity in immunoprecipitated material from EAF and non-EAF tissue revealed attenuated ATM activity in EAF. Immunohistological and western blot analysis of the level of ATM protein was in agreement with the activity measurements and no phosphorylation of Ser15 in p53 was detected in EAF tissue 24 h after a challenging dose of DEN. Taken together with previously published data, these data indicate selective attenuation of the DNA damage pathway in EAF hepatocytes. Down-regulation of DNA damage-induced and ATM-mediated phosphorylation of p53 may confer a growth advantage on EAF hepatocytes.

  18. Immunohistochemical co-expression status of cytokeratin 5/6, androgen receptor, and p53 as prognostic factors of adjuvant chemotherapy for triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tetsuyo; Nakanishi, Yoko; Hirotani, Yukari; Fuchinoue, Fumi; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Sakurai, Kenichi; Amano, Sadao; Nemoto, Norimichi

    2016-03-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is immunohistochemically characterised by the lack of expression of the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2). TNBC is known for its poor prognosis and high recurrence probability. There is no effective targeted treatment for TNBC, but only adjuvant chemotherapies. There are two TNBC subtypes, basal-like and non-basal-like, which are defined based on positive cytokeratin (CK) 5/6 and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression. In particular, CK5/6 expression is reported to correlate with TNBC recurrence. TNBC lacks ER-α expression, but some TNBCs are known to express the androgen receptor (AR). Moreover, although p53 accumulation is detected in various malignant tumors, its influence on adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with TNBC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the combined immunohistochemical expression of CK 5/6, AR, and p53 as a potential prognostic marker of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with TNBC. The expression of CK5/6, AR, and p53 in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) surgical sections from 52 patients with TNBC was analysed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the co-expression patterns in individ