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Sample records for activity programme establishing

  1. Establishing a national universal vaccination programme.

    PubMed

    Duma, R

    1995-01-01

    The collaborative efforts of healthcare providers, governmental policy and law makers and the public are often needed to provide the pressure necessary to establish a national universal vaccination programme. Key initiatives for those beginning to establish such a programme are the following: secure a scientific consensus or base of support; clarify relevance of the subject to all concerned; increase awareness of everyone (providers and consumers); recruit and involve influential people (angels) for support; seek out agendas within which to review the topic; generate cost-benefit data; encourage a consensus to be reached; identify legislative pathways to be used; convince politicians of the value of such a programme; request budgeting and funding; and, finally, follow up with surveillance studies to demonstrate the benefits of the programme.

  2. Establishment of a cancer surveillance programme: the South African experience

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Elvira; Ruff, Paul; Babb, Chantal; Sengayi, Mazvita; Beery, Moira; Khoali, Lerato; Kellett, Patricia; Underwood, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is projected to become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in low-income and middle-income countries in the future. However, cancer incidence in South Africa is largely under-reported because of a lack of nationwide cancer surveillance networks. We describe present cancer surveillance activities in South Africa, and use the International Agency for Research on Cancer framework to propose the development of four population-based cancer registries in South Africa. These registries will represent the ethnic and geographical diversity of the country. We also provide an update on a cancer surveillance pilot programme in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan District, and the successes and challenges in the implementation of the IARC framework in a local context. We examine the development of a comprehensive cancer surveillance system in a middle-income country, which might serve to assist other countries in establishing population-based cancer registries in a resource-constrained environment. PMID:26248849

  3. Establishing a workplace antiretroviral therapy programme in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, S; Grant, A D; Day, J H; Pemba, L; Chaisson, R E; Kruger, P; Martin, D; Wood, R; Brink, B; Churchyard, G J

    2007-01-01

    Ways to expand access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in low income settings are being sought. We describe an HIV care programme including ART in an industrial setting in South Africa. The programme uses guidelines derived from local and international best practice. The training component aims to build capacity among health care staff. Nurses and doctors are supported by experienced HIV clinicians through telephone consultation and site visits. Patients undergo a three-stage counselling procedure prior to starting ART. Drug regimens and monitoring are standardised and prophylaxis against opportunistic infections (isoniazid and cotrimoxazole) is offered routinely. Laboratory and pharmacy services, using named-patient dispensing, are centralized. The programme is designed to ensure that data on clinical and economic outcomes will be available for programme evaluation. Between November 2002-December 2004, ART delivery has been established at 70 ART workplace ART sites. The sites range from 200 to 12000 employees, and from small occupational health clinics and general practitioner rooms to larger hospital clinics. During this period, 2456 patients began ART. Of those on treatment for at least three months, 1728 (78%) have been retained on the programme and only 38 (1.7%) patients have failed the first-line ART regimen. This model for delivery of ART is feasible and successful in an industrial setting. The model may be generalizable to other employment health services in settings of high HIV prevalence, and as a model for implementing ART in other types of health-care settings.

  4. Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) Programme - 12397

    SciTech Connect

    Pether, Colin; Carrol, Phil; Birkett, Eddie; Kibble, Matthew

    2012-07-01

    Waste material from the reprocessing of irradiated fuel has been stored under water for several decades leading to the water becoming highly radioactive. As a critical enabler to the decommissioning strategy for the Sellafield site, the Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) programme has been established to provide a processing route for this highly radioactive liquor. This paper reviews the progress that has been made since the start of routine LAR transfer cycles (July 2010) and follows on from the earlier paper presented at WM2011. The paper focuses on the learning from the first full year of routine LAR transfer cycles and the application of this learning to the wider strategies for the treatment of further radioactive liquid effluents on the Sellafield site. During this period over 100,000 Curies of radioactivity has been safely removed and treated. The past year has witnessed the very successful introduction of the LAR programme. This has lead to hazard reduction at MSSS and demonstration that the SIXEP facility can meet the significantly increased challenge that the LAR programme represents. Part of the success has been the ability to predict and deliver a realistic production schedule with the availability of the MSSS, EDT and SIXEP facilities being central to this. Most importantly, the LAR programme has been successful in bringing together key stakeholders to deliver this work while integrating with the existing, day to day, demands of the Sellafield site. (authors)

  5. Opportunities and barriers to establishing a cell therapy programme in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carlo Stephan; Pepper, Michael S

    2013-05-29

    The establishment of a cell therapy programme in South Africa has the potential to contribute to the alleviation of the country's high disease burden and also to contribute to economic growth. South Africa has various positive attributes that favour the establishment of such a high-profile venture; however, there are also significant obstacles which need to be overcome. We discuss the positive and negative features of the current health biotechnology sector. The positive factors include a strong market pull and a highly innovative scientific and medical community, while the most problematic features include the lack of human resources and education and limited funding. The South African Government has undertaken to strengthen the biotechnology sector in general, but a focus on cell therapy is lacking. The next important step would be to provide financial, legal/ethical and other support for groups that are active and productive in this field through the development of a local cell therapy programme.

  6. Establishing a pharmacotherapy induced ototoxicity programme within a service-learning approach.

    PubMed

    Schellack, Natalie; Wium, Anna M; Ehlert, Katerina; van Aswegen, Yolande; Gous, Andries

    2015-06-17

    Pharmacotherapy-induced ototoxicity is growing, especially in developing countries such as South Africa. This highlights the importance of ototoxicity monitoring and management of hearing loss. This article focuses on the establishment of an ototoxicity clinic as a site for the implementation of a service-learning module in the Audiology programme. The clinic offers a unique opportunity of collaboration between pharmacists and an audiologist where pharmacotherapy-induced ototoxicity is uniquely monitored. The Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University (SMU) provides training to both the disciplines, audiology and pharmacy. The main aim of this article is to describe how ototoxicity monitoring is implemented in the curriculum within such an academic service-learning approach. Through service learning students develop a deeper understanding of course content, acquire new knowledge and engage in civic activity. It simultaneously provides a unique opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration between the disciplines of audiology and pharmacy. The objectives for this programme are therefore to facilitate learning and to provide a service to the local community by identifying, preventing and monitoring medicine-induced hearing loss in in-hospital and out-patients; as well as to establish inter-disciplinary collaboration between the disciplines and stakeholders for more effective service delivery. The constant interdisciplinary teamwork between the audiologist, pharmacist, physician and nursing staff in the wards results in best practice and management of patients with ototoxic damage.

  7. An international training and support programme for the establishment of neonatal screening in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, M

    2007-08-01

    We report our experience in developing and implementing a training programme aimed at introducing neonatal screening to health care professionals in developing countries. It was originally envisioned as a 10-year programme but was later extended to 15. Our institute initially began offering the training course in neonatal screening on an annual basis in 1990, under the auspices of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The aims of the programme were to enhance the participants' technical knowledge and skills, as well as deepen their understanding of the principles involved in neonatal screening. Over the 15 years that the programme ran, up to March 2005, a total of 130 participants originating from 36 countries completed the course, the participants comprising some 85 paediatricians, 4 obstetricians, 34 biochemists and 7 administrative officers or public health specialists, a number of whom have subsequently implemented neonatal screening programmes in their respective institutes, regions or countries. Having thus completed the initial 15-year phase of the training course, after a thorough evaluation we initiated the second phase of our international training and support programme for neonatal screening in 2006. With the objective of supporting the establishment of a neonatal screening system for congenital hypothyroidism, the new programme consists of not only specialist training in Japan but also financial and technical assistance for helping to establish neonatal screening in the participants' respective countries.

  8. Digitally Programmable Active Switched Capacitor Filters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California n FILE WRY In THESIS DIGITALLY PROGRAMMABLE ACTIVE SWITCHED CAPACITOR FILTERS by Yalkin, Cengiz March 1987 Thesis ...COVERED 14 DATE OF REPORT (Year. Month. Day) 15 PAGE (OkNTMaster’s Thesis FROM ’O 1987 March 89 𔄀 SLP-ILENIENTARY NOTATION COSArI CODES 18 SUBJECT...Sheri chael, Thesis Advisor Roberto Cristi, Second Reader "harriet Rigas, Clirman, Department of Electrical and Computer En’ ineering Gordon E

  9. A Programmable Calculator Activity, x = 1/x + 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snover, Stephen L.; Spikell, Mark A.

    An activity for secondary schools is presented and discussed which may be explored with a programmable calculator. The activity is non-standard and could not be easily explored without the use of a programmable calculator. Related activities are also discussed. Flow charts and programs for different programmable calculators are presented. (MP)

  10. Establishing a Korean Language Programme in a European Higher Education Context: Rationale, Curriculum and Assessment Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Lorna; Do, Eunjee

    2013-01-01

    A growth in interest in Korean contemporary culture in Europe has benefitted Korean language studies in Higher Education. This article describes an innovative Korean language programme in the School of Linguistic, Speech and Communication Sciences at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. Since its establishment as a pilot project in 2010, the Korean…

  11. Establishing a Korean Language Programme in a European Higher Education Context: Rationale, Curriculum and Assessment Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Lorna; Do, Eunjee

    2013-01-01

    A growth in interest in Korean contemporary culture in Europe has benefitted Korean language studies in Higher Education. This article describes an innovative Korean language programme in the School of Linguistic, Speech and Communication Sciences at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. Since its establishment as a pilot project in 2010, the Korean…

  12. Establishing an active patient partnership.

    PubMed

    Herrier, R N; Boyce, R W

    1995-04-01

    Pharmacists face many changes in the coming decade, some of which threaten their professional survival. Although uncertainty may currently prevail, one of these changes, the shift in the patient-health care professional relationship from the patient taking a passive role to an active partnering role, provides pharmacists with many opportunities to realize the vision of patient-centered care that has been advocated by pharmacy innovators and leaders for almost three decades. To take advantage of these changes, pharmacists must modify their practice paradigms and use their existing strengths, such as easy patient access and high levels of patient trust, to help develop a new model of pharmaceutical care. The concern that the magnitude of these changes will prevent successful practice transformations may be exaggerated. In reality, these proposed "new" roles have been in existence for much of this century. Most pharmacists can expand and enhance their traditional roles as self-care advisors and patient educators simply by incremental improvements in interpersonal and clinical skills. Rather than a Star Trek approach to "go where no man has gone before," the profession needs only a pharmaceutical sequel to Back to the Future.

  13. Who Attends Physical Activity Programmes in Deprived Neighbourhoods?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withall, J.; Jago, R.; Fox, K. R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Physical activity can reduce the risk of several chronic diseases. Such diseases are most prevalent in economically-disadvantaged groups where physical activity levels are consistently lower. There is a need to engage disadvantaged groups in programmes to increase physical activity. This case study examined programmes on offer in a…

  14. Who Attends Physical Activity Programmes in Deprived Neighbourhoods?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withall, J.; Jago, R.; Fox, K. R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Physical activity can reduce the risk of several chronic diseases. Such diseases are most prevalent in economically-disadvantaged groups where physical activity levels are consistently lower. There is a need to engage disadvantaged groups in programmes to increase physical activity. This case study examined programmes on offer in a…

  15. An Irish Experience in Establishing and Evaluating an Intern Led Teaching Programme.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, A; Kelleher, E; Moneley, D; Offiah, G

    2017-03-10

    Near-Peer Teaching is a relatively new and expanding area of medical education. The benefit to medical students has been demonstrated in numerous contexts around the world. Our aim was to establish a structured Intern-Led Teaching (ILT) programme in the context of an Irish Intern Training Network affiliated to an Irish Medical School. We then sought to evaluate the success of this programme. Seventy interns were enrolled in the ILT programme and completed a Train the Trainer course involving teaching methods and skills of effective feedback. Following this, the intern tutors delivered several one-hour teaching sessions in small groups to final year medical students on a weekly basis. At the end of each teaching block, a feedback questionnaire was distributed to participating students to evaluate their experiences of this new teaching modality. Tutorial topics were varied. They included clinical examination, history taking, prescribing, and emergencies. Eighty-one percent of students found the intern-led tutorials to be beneficial compared to tutorials run by more senior doctors. Additionally, students felt that with intern led tutorials they could ask questions they otherwise would not. There was a more comfortable environment, and information taught was considered more relevant. A significant number of students felt less nervous about the final medical examinations after the intern-led tutorials. The establishment of a structured intern-led teaching programme was well received by final year medical students. This project shows that interns are a valuable teaching resource in the medical school and should be included in medical schools' curricula.

  16. Design of a programmable active acoustics metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoker, Jason J.

    Metamaterials are artificial materials engineered to provide properties which may not be readily available in nature. The development of such class of materials constitutes a new area of research that has grown significantly over the past decade. Acoustic metamaterials, specifically, are even more novel than their electromagnetic counterparts arising only in the latter half of the decade. Acoustic metamaterials provide a new tool in controlling the propagation of pressure waves. However, physical design and frequency tuning, is still a large obstacle when creating a new acoustic metamaterial. This dissertation describes active and programmable design for acoustic metamaterials which allows the same basic physical design principles to be used for a variety of application. With cloaking technology being of a great interest to the US Navy, the proposed design approach would enable the development of a metamaterial with spatially changing effective parameters while retaining a uniform physical design features. The effective parameters would be controlled by tuning smart actuators embedded inside the metamaterial structure. Since this design is based on dynamic effective parameters that can be electrically controlled, material property ranges of several orders of magnitude could potentially be achieved without changing any physical parameters. With such unique capabilities, physically realizable acoustic cloaks can be achieved and objects treated with these active metamaterials can become acoustically invisible.

  17. Characterization of the plastid-specific germination and seedling establishment transcriptional programme.

    PubMed

    Demarsy, E; Buhr, F; Lambert, E; Lerbs-Mache, S

    2012-01-01

    Upon imbibition, dry seeds rapidly gain metabolic activity and the switching on of a germination-specific transcriptional programme in the nucleus goes ahead, with the induction of many nucleus-encoded transcripts coding for plastid-localized proteins. Dedifferentiated plastids present in dry seeds differentiate into chloroplasts in cotyledons and into amyloplasts in the root and in the hypocotyl, raising the question of whether the beginning of a new plant's life cycle is also characterized by specific changes in the plastid transcriptional programme. Here the plastid transcriptome is characterized during imbibition/stratification, germination, and early seedling outgrowth. It is shown that each of these three developmental steps is characterized by specific changes in the transcriptome profile, due to differential activities of the three plastid RNA polymerases and showing the integration of plastids into a germination-specific transcriptional programme. All three RNA polymerases are active during imbibition; that is, at 4 °C in darkness. However, activity of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) is restricted to the rrn operon. After cold release, PEP changes specificity by also transcribing photosynthesis-related genes. The period of germination and radicle outgrowth is further characterized by remarkable antisense RNA production that diminishes during greening when photosynthesis-related mRNAs accumulate to their highest but to very different steady-state levels. During stratification and germination mRNA accumulation is not paralleled by protein accumulation, indicating that plastid transcription is more important for efficient germination than translation.

  18. Students' Attitudes toward an After-School Physical Activity Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Though considerable research on student attitudes has been conducted in physical education, little information exists concerning student attitudes toward after-school physical activity programmes. This study assessed students' attitudes toward their after-school physical activity programme located in southwest Texas, USA. Participants included 158…

  19. Students' Attitudes toward an After-School Physical Activity Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Though considerable research on student attitudes has been conducted in physical education, little information exists concerning student attitudes toward after-school physical activity programmes. This study assessed students' attitudes toward their after-school physical activity programme located in southwest Texas, USA. Participants included 158…

  20. Stated Uptake of Physical Activity Rewards Programmes Among Active and Insufficiently Active Full-Time Employees.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Semra; Bilger, Marcel; Finkelstein, Eric A

    2017-04-22

    Employers are increasingly relying on rewards programmes in an effort to promote greater levels of activity among employees; however, if enrolment in these programmes is dominated by active employees, then they are unlikely to be a good use of resources. This study uses a stated-preference survey to better understand who participates in rewards-based physical activity programmes, and to quantify stated uptake by active and insufficiently active employees. The survey was fielded to a national sample of 950 full-time employees in Singapore between 2012 and 2013. Participants were asked to choose between hypothetical rewards programmes that varied along key dimensions and whether or not they would join their preferred programme if given the opportunity. A mixed logit model was used to analyse the data and estimate predicted uptake for specific programmes. We then simulated employer payments based on predictions for the percentage of each type of employee likely to meet the activity goal. Stated uptake ranged from 31 to 67% of employees, depending on programme features. For each programme, approximately two-thirds of those likely to enrol were insufficiently active. Results showed that insufficiently active employees, who represent the majority, are attracted to rewards-based physical activity programmes, and at approximately the same rate as active employees, even when enrolment fees are required. This suggests that a programme with generous rewards and a modest enrolment fee may have strong employee support and be within the range of what employers may be willing to spend.

  1. International guidance on the establishment of quality assurance programmes for radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, B E; Herbst, C; Norenberg, J P; Woods, M J

    2006-01-01

    A new guidance document for the implementation of quality assurance (QA) programmes for nuclear medicine radioactivity measurement, produced by the International Atomic Energy Agency, is described. The proposed programme is based on the principles of ISO 17025 and will enable laboratories, particularly in developing countries, to provide consistent, safe and effective radioactivity measurement services to the nuclear medicine community.

  2. An infant oral health programme in Goiânia-GO, Brazil: results after 3 years of establishment.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marina Batista Borges; do Carmo Matias Freire, Maria

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the outcomes of an infant oral health programme 3 years after implementation, a programme focused on health education for parents and caries prevention methods for children in a baby clinic. A retrospective cohort study was carried out. The setting was the Infant Oral Health Programme developed at the baby clinic of the State Department of Health, Goiânia-GO, Brazil. The sample comprised 100 children who entered the programme from birth to 12 months and were followed for 2 to 3 years. Variables investigated were caries experience, caries risk, and children's behaviour in the dental clinic. The number of children with caries experience was 1 at the initial visit and 8 after the follow-up. There was a dramatic decrease in the number of children in the high risk group, from 51% at the initial visit to only 1% after 2 to 3 years. Children's behaviour in the dental clinic was according to their psychological development. It was concluded that the Infant Oral Health Programme in Goiânia showed positive outcomes after 3 years of establishment. Further investigations should evaluate the cost-benefit, as well as the effectiveness of the procedures used in the programme.

  3. Effectiveness of balance training programme in reducing the frequency of falling in established osteoporotic women: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mikó, Ibolya; Szerb, Imre; Szerb, Anna; Poor, Gyula

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of a 12-month sensomotor balance exercise programme on postural control and the frequency of falling in women with established osteoporosis. Randomized controlled trial where the intervention group was assigned the 12-month Balance Training Programme and the control group did not undertake any intervention beyond regular osteoporosis treatment. A total of 100 osteoporotic women - at least with one osteoporotic fracture - aged 65 years old and above. Balance was assessed in static and dynamic posture both with performance-based measures of balance, such as the Berg Balance Scale and the Timed Up and Go Test, and with a stabilometric computerized platform. Patients in the intervention group completed the 12-month sensomotor Balance Training Programme in an outpatient setting, guided by physical therapists, three times a week, for 30 minutes. The Berg Balance Scale and the Timed Up and Go Test showed a statistically significant improvement of balance in the intervention group ( p = 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Balance tests using the stabilometer also showed a statistically significant improvement in static and dynamic postural balance for osteoporotic women after the completion of the Balance Training Programme. As a consequence, the one-year exercise programme significantly decreased the number of falls in the exercise group compared with the control group. The Balance Training Programme significantly improved the balance parameters and reduced the number of falls in postmenopausal women who have already had at least one fracture in the past.

  4. Introducing an enhanced recovery programme to an established totally intracorporeal robot-assisted radical cystectomy service.

    PubMed

    Collins, Justin W; Adding, Christofer; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Nyberg, Tommy; Pini, Giovannalberto; Dey, Linda; Wiklund, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of introducing an enhanced recovery programme (ERP) to an established robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) service. Data were prospectively collected on 221 consecutive patients undergoing totally intracorporeal RARC between December 2003 and May 2014. The ERP was specifically designed to support an evolving RARC service, where increasing proportions of patients requiring radical cystectomy underwent RARC. Patient demographics and outcomes before and after implementation of the ERP were compared. The primary endpoint was length of stay (LOS). Secondary outcomes included age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, preoperative staging, operative time, complications and readmissions. Differences in outcomes between patients before and after implementation of ERP were tested with the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test and quantile regression with backward selection. Following implementation of the ERP, the demographics of the patients (n = 135) changed, with median age increasing from 66 to 70 years (p < 0.01), higher ASA grade (p < 0.001), higher preoperative stage cancer (pT ≥ 2, p < 0.05) and increased likelihood of undergoing an ileal conduit diversion (p < 0.001). Median LOS before ERP was 9 days [interquartile range (IQR) 8-13 days] and after ERP was 8 days (IQR 6-10 days) (p < 0.001). ASA grade and neoadjuvant chemotherapy also affected LOS (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). There was no significant difference in 30 day complication rates, readmission rates or 90 day mortality, with 59% experiencing complications before ERP implementation and 57% after implementation. The majority of complications were low grade. Patient demographics changed as the RARC service evolved from selected patients to a general service. Despite worsening demographics, LOS decreased following ERP implementation. This evidence-based ERP safely standardized perioperative care, resulting in decreased LOS and decreased

  5. Global SOFC activities and evaluation programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Noboru

    1994-04-01

    Perhaps there are a few hundred organizations worldwide at present such as universities, research institutes or companies where the research and development of SOFC is carried out, including basic research on materials for SOFCs. This paper, will not refer to the status of basic R&D materials similarities or on a single cell, but will observe developmental activities in Europe, USA and Japan, focusing on the development which has already the stage of fabrication and operation of a SOFC cell stack. Information will also include detailed operation and evaluation of the 25 kW class systems of Westinghouse.

  6. Yugoslavia. "Migration" -- programme activities targeting men.

    PubMed

    Dzeletovic, A; Matovic-miljanovic, S

    1999-01-01

    In Yugoslavia, companies send their workers to different parts of the world, including countries with a high incidence of AIDS. It has been noted that it is characteristic for migrants to accommodate themselves to foreign conditions, which subsequently lead to health problems, especially with regards to reproductive and sexual health. Often, in the case of partner separation, men may seek sexual relations with an unknown partner and/or neglect to use proper protection. According to research carried out in Yugoslavia, there are critical gaps in workers' knowledge on sexual and reproductive health. Based on research results, an educational program for migrants, designed to train and strengthen individuals¿ capabilities and modify their risky behavior, was created. Program activities include production of brochures targeting those people travelling to countries with a high incidence of HIV/AIDS. In addition, a process for creating more cooperation between the state and other organizations at regional and local levels was initiated.

  7. Poliomyelitis eradication in Europe: programme and activities.

    PubMed

    Oblapenko, G

    The WHO Regional Office for Europe is committed to the eradication of poliomyelitis in Europe, as a part of the WHO effort to achieve the world eradication of polio by the year 2000. The European Advisory Group on EPI has adapted in 1993 the operational targets for the regional eradication of polio, which focus on surveillance, outbreak response, and immunization coverage. Policies recommended by WHO have been translated into plans for action by 9 European countries among those which still reported cases of polio. The Regional Office for Europe of WHO has concentrated its efforts in the following areas: 1. Implementation of essential strategies on immunization (mopping-up or national immunization days) in countries having high-risk areas with endemic transmission of wild poliovirus. 2. Improvement of surveillance, which is a major strategic component. Its key element is the surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis. Its implementation started in Europe in 1991. 3. Development of a regional laboratory network involved in the routine diagnosis of poliomyelitis. The network began to be operational in 1991. In 1992 polio morbidity, reported by 17 countries, has shown a downward trend as compared to 1991. Anyhow, some foci of wild poliovirus activity still persist in the Balkan countries, the Trans-Caucasian region, and several Central Asia republics of the former Soviet Union. The main limitations to progress in polio eradication in Europe are: absence of strong political support at the national level; lack of financial support, which may delay the translation of WHO recommendations into proper action at the national level; availability of polio vaccine, which may become a problem in the absence of adequate support; and the unsatisfactory pace of improvement of the polio surveillance.

  8. Certain aspects of the psychological analysis of programmer activity. [selection of computer programmers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bondarovskaya, V. M.

    1975-01-01

    The psychological analysis of programmer activity showed that one of its basic characteristics is the need to employ formal languages. In determining ways of effectively mastering the capacity to write algorithms in the algorithmic language, it is expedient to proceed from its similarity to the living languages and the language of mathematical formulas, and to choose certain psychological principles of mastering foreign languages and mathematical symbols in teaching the algorithmic language. General models of the input language significantly increase the effectiveness of its mastery and permit the development of thinking on the part of the students.

  9. Certain aspects of the psychological analysis of programmer activity. [selection of computer programmers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bondarovskaya, V. M.

    1975-01-01

    The psychological analysis of programmer activity showed that one of its basic characteristics is the need to employ formal languages. In determining ways of effectively mastering the capacity to write algorithms in the algorithmic language, it is expedient to proceed from its similarity to the living languages and the language of mathematical formulas, and to choose certain psychological principles of mastering foreign languages and mathematical symbols in teaching the algorithmic language. General models of the input language significantly increase the effectiveness of its mastery and permit the development of thinking on the part of the students.

  10. Establishing an Online HIV Peer Helping Programme: A Review of Process Challenges and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Gregory E.; Corcoran, Valerie; Myles, Adam; Lundrigan, Philip; White, Robert; Greidanus, Elaine; Savage, Stephanie L.; Pope, Leslie; McDonald, James; Yetman, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background: Online peer support can be a valuable approach to helping people living with HIV, especially in regions with large rural populations and relatively centralised HIV services. Design: This paper focuses on a community-university partnership aimed at developing an online peer support programme in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and…

  11. Establishing an Online HIV Peer Helping Programme: A Review of Process Challenges and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Gregory E.; Corcoran, Valerie; Myles, Adam; Lundrigan, Philip; White, Robert; Greidanus, Elaine; Savage, Stephanie L.; Pope, Leslie; McDonald, James; Yetman, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background: Online peer support can be a valuable approach to helping people living with HIV, especially in regions with large rural populations and relatively centralised HIV services. Design: This paper focuses on a community-university partnership aimed at developing an online peer support programme in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and…

  12. A model for integrating strategic planning and competence-based curriculum design in establishing a public health programme: the UNC Charlotte experience

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michael E; Harver, Andrew; Eure, Marquis

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, a doctoral/research-intensive university, is the largest institution of higher education in the Charlotte region. The university currently offers 18 doctoral, 62 master's and 90 baccalaureate programmes. Fall 2008 enrolment exceeded 23 300 students, including more than 4900 graduate students. The university's Department of Health Behavior and Administration was established on 1 July 2002 as part of a transformed College of Health & Human Services. Case description In 2003, the Department initiated a series of stakeholder activities as part of its strategic planning and programmatic realignment efforts. The Department followed an empirically derived top-down/bottom-up strategic planning process that fostered community engagement and coordination of efforts across institutional levels. This process culminated in a vision to transform the unit into a Council on Education for Public Health accredited programme in public health and, eventually, an accredited school of public health. To date, the Department has revised its Master of Science in health promotion into an Master of Science in Public Health programme, renamed itself the Department of Public Health Sciences, launched a Bachelor of Science in Public Health major, laid plans for a doctoral programme, and received accreditation from the Council on Education for Public Health as a public health programme. Furthermore, the campus has endorsed the programme's growth into a school of public health as one of its priorities. Discussion and Evaluation It is only through this rigorous and cyclical process of determining what society needs, designing a curriculum specifically to prepare graduates to meet those needs, ensuring that those graduates meet those needs, and reassessing society's needs that we can continue to advance the profession and ensure the public's health. Community stakeholders should be active contributors to programme innovation. Lessons

  13. A model for integrating strategic planning and competence-based curriculum design in establishing a public health programme: the UNC Charlotte experience.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael E; Harver, Andrew; Eure, Marquis

    2009-08-11

    The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, a doctoral/research-intensive university, is the largest institution of higher education in the Charlotte region. The university currently offers 18 doctoral, 62 master's and 90 baccalaureate programmes. Fall 2008 enrolment exceeded 23,300 students, including more than 4900 graduate students. The university's Department of Health Behavior and Administration was established on 1 July 2002 as part of a transformed College of Health & Human Services. In 2003, the Department initiated a series of stakeholder activities as part of its strategic planning and programmatic realignment efforts. The Department followed an empirically derived top-down/bottom-up strategic planning process that fostered community engagement and coordination of efforts across institutional levels. This process culminated in a vision to transform the unit into a Council on Education for Public Health accredited programme in public health and, eventually, an accredited school of public health. To date, the Department has revised its Master of Science in health promotion into an Master of Science in Public Health programme, renamed itself the Department of Public Health Sciences, launched a Bachelor of Science in Public Health major, laid plans for a doctoral programme, and received accreditation from the Council on Education for Public Health as a public health programme. Furthermore, the campus has endorsed the programme's growth into a school of public health as one of its priorities. It is only through this rigorous and cyclical process of determining what society needs, designing a curriculum specifically to prepare graduates to meet those needs, ensuring that those graduates meet those needs, and reassessing society's needs that we can continue to advance the profession and ensure the public's health. Community stakeholders should be active contributors to programme innovation. Lessons learnt from this process include: being connected to your

  14. Attitudes towards establishing a daily supervised school-based toothbrushing programme--determined by Q-sort methodology.

    PubMed

    Trubey, R J; Chestnutt, I G

    2013-03-01

    This study used Q-sort methodology to determine the views of staff involved in a national school-based daily toothbrushing programme. Q-methodology is a mixed-method approach in which participants are asked to sort a collection of statements according to degree of agreement with them. Factor analysis identified subgroups of like-minded participants and revealed areas of consensus and disagreement. 24 Community Dental Service staff managing or delivering the toothbrushing programme were asked to rank 49 statements derived from previous qualitative interviews. Varimax rotation produced a three-factor solution with five/six participants loading significantly into each group. Groups divided largely according to staff role: Factor 1, mainly support workers (assistants with no oral-health background); Factor 2, managers; and factor 3, oral health educators (dental nurses with teaching qualifications). As staff new to the area of oral-health, the views of support workers were of particular interest. Unlike others, this group saw Designed to Smile as a unique health promotion scheme and wanted to involve as many children as possible, regardless of oral-disease risk. Managers' perceptions of issues affecting the establishment of the programme differed from those staff in day-to-day contact with the 515 schools in which the toothbrushing took place. This study used a long established but little used technique to ascertain the commonality of views of staff These data may be of value not only in managing the current programme, but for anyone who may be considering developing such a toothbrushing scheme.

  15. Sport activity and eating habits of people who were attending special obesity treatment programme.

    PubMed

    Videmsek, Mateja; Stihec, Joze; Karpljuk, Damir; Starman, Anja

    2008-09-01

    The aims of the study were to analyse the sport activity and eating habits of obese people in their childhood and adulthood. The research was underpinned by a survey questionnaire containing 37 variables which was completed by 71 people attending the obesity programme. The frequencies and contingency tables were calculated, whereas statistical significance was established at a 5% significance level. The analysis of the results showed that more than one-half of the survey respondents joined the obesity programme primarily for reasons of health and well-being. Most obese people did not engage in any organised sport activity in their childhood, nor did most of their parents. The respondents practiced sport in their childhood to a greater extent if their parents were also physically active and if they guided and encouraged their children. No less than one-third of the respondents were overweight in their childhood, of whom two-thirds did not participate in any organised sport activity. The majority of the respondents (85.9%) are currently engaged in an organised sport activity in their adulthood, mainly due to their participation in the weight reduction programme; most of them practice sport twice a week. Their eating habits are encouraging; the share of skipped meals is considerably lower and practically negligible compared to that in childhood. It has to be emphasized that most of them are of opinion that obese people have difficulties finding expert information on obesity, nutrition and sport activities as well as weight management centers and institutions.

  16. Evaluating the delivery, impact, costs and benefits of an active lives programme for older people living in the community.

    PubMed

    Gandy, Rob; Bell, Amelia; McClelland, Bob; Roe, Brenda

    2017-03-01

    Aim Age UK Lancashire received Big Lottery funding to deliver an active lives programme from January 2012 to December 2014 to the population of West Lancashire aged over 50 years. The overall aims of the associated evaluation were to measure older people's experiences of participating in the programme, identify the impacts on their health and well-being and their suggestions for services development, and establish the costs and benefits of the programme. The World Health Organisation recommends older people should be able to achieve physical, social and mental well-being throughout their lives, and that international, national and local policies should be developed to support older adults, promote their independence and well-being, and encourage physical exercise. Consequently, the West Lancashire programme was to establish preventative community support for older people to assist in improving their well-being and physical and mental health, particularly those isolated due to age-related illness or disability. It was to provide interventions not available from local social care providers. A mixed methods approach was adopted, with the qualitative evaluation utilising focus groups to establish people's experiences, identify impacts on their health and well-being, and suggestions for services development. This paper describes the quantitative evaluation, which involved three surveys and a costs analysis. The surveys were scheduled to give timely feedback to management about programme delivery and content, and overall benefits of participation. Findings The active lives programme and groups offered a wide range of flexible and local activities that provided benefits for older people in terms of health and well-being, social well-being and quality of life, and reducing social isolation. There was interconnectivity between these benefits. The programme was delivered in an affordable and flexible manner. Such programmes should be made more widely available.

  17. Translating group programmes into online formats: establishing the acceptability of a parents' sex and relationships communication serious game.

    PubMed

    Bayley, Julie E; Brown, Katherine E

    2015-12-09

    With ongoing concerns about the sexual health and wellbeing of young people, there is increasing need to innovate intervention approaches. Engaging parents as agents to support their children, alongside capitalising on increasingly sophisticated technological options could jointly enhance support. Converting existing programmes into interactive game based options has the potential to broaden learning access whilst preserving behaviour change technique fidelity. However the acceptability of this approach and viability of adapting resources in this way is yet to be established. This paper reports on the process of converting an existing group programme ("What Should We Tell the Children?") and tests the acceptability within a community setting. Translation of the original programme included selecting exercises and gathering user feedback on character and message framing preferences. For acceptability testing, parents were randomised to either the game (n = 106) or a control (non-interactive webpage) condition (n = 76). At time 1 all participants completed a survey on demographics, computer literacy and Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) items. Post intervention (time 2) users repeated the TPB questions in addition to acceptability items. Interviews (n = 17) were conducted 3 months post intervention to gather qualitative feedback on transfer of learning into real life. The process of conversion identified clear preferences for first person role play, home setting and realistic characters alongside positively phrased feedback. Evaluation results show that the game was acceptable to parents on cognitive and emotional dimensions, particularly for parents of younger children. Acceptability was not influenced by baseline demographics, computer skills or baseline TPB variables. MANOVA analysis and qualitative feedback suggest potential for effective translation of learning into real life. However attrition was more likely in the game condition, potentially due

  18. Programme costing of a physical activity programme in primary prevention: should the costs of health asset assessment and participatory programme development count?

    PubMed

    Wolfenstetter, Silke B; Schweikert, Bernd; John, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    This analysis aims to discuss the implications of the "health asset concept", introduced by the WHO, and the "investment for health model" requiring a "participatory approach" of cooperative programme development applied on a physical activity programme for socially disadvantaged women and to demonstrate the related costing issues as well as the relevant decision context. The costs of programme implementation amounted to €48,700. Adding the costs for developing the programme design of €48,800 results in total costs of €97,500; adding on top of that the costs of asset assessment running to €35,600 would total €133,100. These four different cost figures match four different types of potentially relevant decisions contexts. Depending on the decision context the total costs, and hence the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of a health promotion intervention, could differ considerably. Therefore, a detailed cost assessment and the identification of the decision context are of crucial importance.

  19. Active ingredients in anti-stigma programmes in mental health.

    PubMed

    Pinfold, Vanessa; Thornicroft, Graham; Huxley, Peter; Farmer, Paul

    2005-04-01

    This paper draws upon a review of the relevant literature and the results of the recent Mental Health Awareness in Action (MHAA) programme in England to discuss the current evidence base on the active ingredients in effective anti-stigma interventions in mental health. The MHAA Programme delivered educational interventions to 109 police officers, 78 adults from different community groups whose working lives involved supporting people with mental health problems but who had received no mental health training and 472 schools students aged 14-15. Each adult target group received two intervention sessions lasting two hours. The two school lessons were 50 minutes each. Knowledge, attitudes and behavioural intent were assessed at baseline and follow-up. In addition focus groups were held with mental health service users to explore the impact of stigma on their lives and facilitators of educational workshops were interviewed to provide expert opinion on 'what works' to reduce psychiatric stigma. Personal contact was predictive of positive changes in knowledge and attitudes for the school students but not the police officers or community adult group. The key active ingredient identified by all intervention groups and workshop facilitators were the testimonies of service users. The statements of service users (consumers) about their experience of mental health problems and of their contact with a range of services had the greatest and most lasting impact on the target audiences in terms of reducing mental health stigma.

  20. An inexpensive programmable illumination microscope with active feedback

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Nathan; Fraden, Seth

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a programmable illumination system capable of tracking and illuminating numerous objects simultaneously using only low-cost and reused optical components. The active feedback control software allows for a closed-loop system that tracks and perturbs objects of interest automatically. Our system uses a static stage where the objects of interest are tracked computationally as they move across the field of view allowing for a large number of simultaneous experiments. An algorithmically determined illumination pattern can be applied anywhere in the field of view with simultaneous imaging and perturbation using different colors of light to enable spatially and temporally structured illumination. Our system consists of a consumer projector, camera, 35-mm camera lens, and a small number of other optical and scaffolding components. The entire apparatus can be assembled for under $4,000. PMID:27642182

  1. Establishment of an HIV/sexually transmitted disease programme and prevalence of infection among incarcerated men in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Andrinopoulos, K; Kerrigan, D; Figueroa, J P; Reese, R; Gaydos, C A; Bennett, L; Bloomfield, B; Plunkett, L; Maru, C; Ellen, J M

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to describe the establishment of an HIV testing and treatment programme in the Jamaican correctional system and to estimate the prevalence of HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) among adult incarcerated men in this country. A demonstration project was implemented by the Jamaican Department of Correctional Services and Ministry of Health in the nation’s largest correctional centre. All inmates were offered HIV and syphilis testing, and a subset was offered chlamydia, gonorrhoea and trichomoniasis testing. Cross-sectional data from the project were reviewed to determine the prevalence and correlates of HIV/STD. HIV test acceptance was 63% for voluntary testers (n = 1200). The prevalence of HIV was 3.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.33–4.64) (n = 1017) and the prevalence syphilis was 0.7% (95% CI 0.29–1.49) (n = 967). Among the subset tested (n = 396) the prevalence of chlamydia was 2.5% (95% CI 1.22–4.49) and for trichomoniasis it was 1.8% (95% CI 0.01–3.60), but no cases of gonorrhoea were detected (n = 396). The prevalence of HIV was significantly higher at 25% (95% CI 13.64–39.60) for persons located in a separate section where individuals labelled as men who have sex with men (MSM) are separated. HIV/STD testing is important and feasible in Jamaica. A special focus should be placed on providing services to inmates labelled as MSM. Other Caribbean nations may also benefit from similar programmes. PMID:20089997

  2. Programme Costing of a Physical Activity Programme in Primary Prevention: Should the Costs of Health Asset Assessment and Participatory Programme Development Count?

    PubMed Central

    Wolfenstetter, Silke B.; Schweikert, Bernd; John, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    This analysis aims to discuss the implications of the “health asset concept”, introduced by the WHO, and the “investment for health model” requiring a “participatory approach” of cooperative programme development applied on a physical activity programme for socially disadvantaged women and to demonstrate the related costing issues as well as the relevant decision context. The costs of programme implementation amounted to €48,700. Adding the costs for developing the programme design of €48,800 results in total costs of €97,500; adding on top of that the costs of asset assessment running to €35,600 would total €133,100. These four different cost figures match four different types of potentially relevant decisions contexts. Depending on the decision context the total costs, and hence the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of a health promotion intervention, could differ considerably. Therefore, a detailed cost assessment and the identification of the decision context are of crucial importance. PMID:22536517

  3. 'Many voices, one song': a model for an oral health programme as a first step in establishing a health promoting school.

    PubMed

    Macnab, Andrew; Kasangaki, Arabat

    2012-03-01

    Four health promoting (HP) schools were established in rural communities in Uganda by a joint Ugandan/Canadian university team. The model was based on a successful Canadian health promotion initiative designed to address poor oral health in Aboriginal children in rural and remote communities. Careful situation analysis, orientation of partner schools and collaborative development of educational materials and evaluation methodology preceded implementation. The intervention had three elements: inclusion of health topics by teachers in regular classroom activities; health education delivered by the university team to reinforce key educational concepts; and daily in-school tooth brushing to develop healthy practices. All children entering Grade 1 at four schools were recruited for 4 years; evaluation included year 1 pre-intervention and annual end-of-year data collection of quantitative and qualitative measures. Principal findings at 4 years included: an increase from baseline in the original cohort (n = 600) in those brushing at least once daily (p < 0.05) and before bed (p < 0.05); improved oral health (less 'bad breath', pain and absences for emergency dental treatment); more comprehensive health knowledge. Other positive observations were change in the schools' health culture; children sharing new health knowledge and advocating for health practices learned; and evolution of health promotion activity to address other community-identified issues following success with the initial oral health component. University faculty and students learned from participation in programme delivery and community-based educational opportunities. School-based health promotion using this oral health model was readily accepted, implemented, sustained and evaluated; all communities took ownership, and all schools continue their programmes. Addressing oral health through HP schools is novel in Africa, and several lessons learned are of potential value for similar health promotion

  4. Cash transfer programme, productive activities and labour supply: Evidence from randomized experiment in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Asfaw, Solomon; Davis, Benjamin; Dewbre, Josh; Handa, Sudhanshu; Winters, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports analysis of the impact of Kenya’s Cash Transfer for Orphans and Vulnerable Children Programme on the household decisions on productive activities using data from a randomized experimental design. Results show that the programme had a positive and significant impact on food consumption coming from home production, accumulation of productive assets, especially on the ownership of small livestock and on formation of nonfarm enterprise, especially for females. The programme has provided more flexibility to families in terms of labour allocation decisions, particularly for those who are geographically isolated. The programme was also found to have reduced child labour, an important objective of the programme. However we find very little impact of the programme on direct indicators of crop production. PMID:25663712

  5. Cash transfer programme, productive activities and labour supply: Evidence from randomized experiment in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Asfaw, Solomon; Davis, Benjamin; Dewbre, Josh; Handa, Sudhanshu; Winters, Paul

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports analysis of the impact of Kenya's Cash Transfer for Orphans and Vulnerable Children Programme on the household decisions on productive activities using data from a randomized experimental design. Results show that the programme had a positive and significant impact on food consumption coming from home production, accumulation of productive assets, especially on the ownership of small livestock and on formation of nonfarm enterprise, especially for females. The programme has provided more flexibility to families in terms of labour allocation decisions, particularly for those who are geographically isolated. The programme was also found to have reduced child labour, an important objective of the programme. However we find very little impact of the programme on direct indicators of crop production.

  6. [Worksite physical activity and nutrition programmes: beneficial to our health and wallet?].

    PubMed

    van Wier, Marieke F; van Dongen, J M Hanneke; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2013-01-01

    The unhealthy lifestyle of many Dutch employees may negatively influence their health in general as well as their ability to work. Worksite physical activity, nutrition or combination programmes could improve employee health and, as a consequence of this, reduce costs due to illness absenteeism, early retirement, and health care use. In this article, we present current scientific research in terms of health-related effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and the financial return of these programmes. There is moderate evidence that programmes aimed at nutrition, as well as combined nutrition-and-physical activity programmes, do result in modest improvements in weight-related outcomes and the consumption of fruit, vegetables and fat after 6-12 months. There is also moderate evidence that physical fitness programmes improve physical activity and fitness in the short term. The programmes result in financial returns for the employer, but this conclusion is based on non-randomised studies. No firm conclusions can be drawn regarding their cost-effectiveness. Wide implementation of singular worksite physical activity, nutrition or combination programmes is therefore currently discouraged. It would probably be more effective and economical to set up a broad range of interventions and measures. This requires more research, however, as well as more opportunities for offering tailor-made programmes.

  7. Gardening with Huntington's disease clients--creating a programme of winter activities.

    PubMed

    Spring, Josephine Anne; Baker, Mark; Dauya, Loreane; Ewemade, Ivie; Marsh, Nicola; Patel, Prina; Scott, Adrienne; Stoy, Nicholas; Turner, Hannah; Viera, Marc; Will, Diana

    2011-01-01

    A programme of garden-related indoor activities was developed to sustain a gardening group for people with mid to late stage Huntington's disease during the winter. The activities were devised by the horticulturist, working empirically, involving the services occupational therapist, physiotherapist, occupational therapy art technician, computer room, recreation and leisure staff. The programme was strongly supported by the nursing and care staff. Feedback on the effectiveness of the activities was sought from the clients, team members and unit staff. The clients' interest in gardening was sustained by a multidisciplinary programme of indoor growing and using plant products in creative activities, computing and group projects. The clients enjoyed all activities except one that they said lacked contact with plants. The inexpensive programme of activities enabled creativity and self-expression, stimulated social contact and helped with therapeutic goals of the clients. In addition, it engaged the multi-disciplinary team and the unit staff, was practical and enhanced the environment.

  8. Missed opportunities in the evaluation of public health interventions: a case study of physical activity programmes.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sarah; Jones, Andy

    2017-08-22

    Evidence-based approaches are requisite in evaluating public health programmes. Nowhere are they more necessary than physical activity interventions where evidence of effectiveness is often poor, especially within hard to reach groups. Our study reports on the quality of the evaluation of a government funded walking programme in five 'Walking Cities' in England. Cities were required to undertake a simple but robust evaluation using the Standard Evaluation Framework (SEF) for physical activity interventions to enable high quality, consistent evaluation. Our aim was not to evaluate the outcomes of this programme but to evaluate whether the evaluation process had been effective in generating new and reliable evidence on intervention design and what had worked in 'real world' circumstances. Funding applications and final reports produced by the funder and the five walking cities were obtained. These totalled 16 documents which were systematically analysed against the 52 criteria in the SEF. Data were cross checked between the documents at the bid and reporting stage with reference to the SEF guidance notes. Generally, the SEF reporting requirements were not followed well. The rationale for the interventions was badly described, the target population was not precisely specified, and neither was the method of recruitment. Demographics of individual participants, including socio-economic status were reported poorly, despite being a key criterion for funding. Our study of the evaluations demonstrated a missed opportunity to confidently establish what worked and what did not work in walking programmes with particular populations. This limited the potential for evidence synthesis and to highlight innovative practice warranting further investigation. Our findings suggest a mandate for evaluability assessment. Used at the planning stage this may have ensured the development of realistic objectives and crucially may have identified innovative practice to implement and evaluate

  9. Piloting a physical activity centred education programme for adults with a brain injury.

    PubMed

    Driver, Simon; Irwin, Kelley; Woolsey, Anne; Warren, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    To pilot test a physical activity centred education (PACE) programme for adults with a brain injury. Purposive sampling was utilized from a convenience sample of nine adults with a brain injury (five female; four male). The sample completed an 8-week health promotion programme focused on improving physical activity behaviours. Participants completed measures of self-efficacy, stage of change and rehabilitation outcomes pre- and post-programme. Descriptive analysis, effect sizes (ES) and percentage change in variables were assessed. Results indicated improved rehabilitation outcomes as participants decreased from moderate to mild limitation (ES = 1.67). Furthermore, participants reported increased self-efficacy (ES = 0.41) and intention to be active. Specialists are challenged to find modes of rehabilitation that improve the health of individuals with a brain injury. Pilot results from the PACE programme indicate that education about physical activity may play an important role in the rehabilitation process and lead to improved health outcomes.

  10. Cost implications, deprivation and geodemographic segmentation analysis of non-attenders (DNA) in an established diabetic retinopathy screening programme.

    PubMed

    Waqar, Salman; Bullen, Gill; Chant, Simon; Salman, Rabia; Vaidya, Bijay; Ling, Roland

    2012-01-01

    To ascertain the relationship between socioeconomic status and non attendance alongside the role of geodemographic analysis in identifying reasons for non attendance. To also ascertain the financial implications of non attendance on the service. Retrospective analysis of DNA patients between April 2009 and March 2010. Cost to the service was calculated based on Devon Primary Care Trust tariffs. Deprivation Analysis was based on the Indices of Multiple Deprivation 2007 for England. Geodemographic analysis was done using a commercially available software (MOSAIC Public Sector, Experian Information Solutions Inc.). 22,651 patients were invited for screening with 20,514 screened and 2137 (9.4%) DNA's. Of these, 1757 (82.2%) were DNA 1's while 380 (17.7%) were DNA 2's. Mean age of screened patients was 68 (SD ±14.2), DNA 1's was 62 (SD ±17.3) and DNA 2's was 57 (SD ±18.7).1269 (59%) of DNA's were males and 868 (41%) were females. Cost to the service as calculated by lost earnings from missed appointments came to £78,259. Deprivation analysis showed increasing non attendance rates with increasing deprivation. Geodemographic segmentation analysis revealed that the lowest DNA rates were seen in successful professionals and active retired communities and the highest rates were seen in areas of social housing. The study demonstrates an association between non attendance and socioeconomic deprivation. The use of geodemographic analysis programmes can help identify groups that do not respond to traditional postal reminders. More focused and customised strategies can then be developed for these groups to eliminate nonattendance. Copyright © 2012 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recordkeeping practices of beef grinding activities at retail establishments.

    PubMed

    Gould, L Hannah; Seys, Scott; Everstine, Karen; Norton, Dawn; Ripley, Danny; Reimann, David; Dreyfuss, Moshe; Chen, Wu San; Selman, Carol A

    2011-06-01

    Ground beef has been implicated as a transmission vehicle in foodborne outbreaks of infection with pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella. During outbreak investigations, traceback of contaminated beef to the producing facility is often unsuccessful because of inadequate recordkeeping at retail establishments that grind beef products. We conducted a survey in three states participating in the Environmental Health Specialists Network to describe beef grinding and recordkeeping practices at retail establishments. In each establishment that maintained grinding logs, three randomly selected records were reviewed to determine whether important data elements for traceback investigations were recorded. One hundred twenty-five stores were surveyed, of which 60 (49%) kept grinding logs, including 54 (74%) of 73 chain stores and 6 (12%) of 51 independent stores. One hundred seventy-six grinding records from 61 stores were reviewed. Seventy-three percent of the records included the establishment code of the source beef, 72% included the grind date and time, and 59% included the lot number of the source beef. Seventy-five percent of records noted whether trimmings were included in grinds, and 57% documented cleanup activities. Only 39 (22%) records had all of these variables completed. Of stores that did not keep grinding logs, 40% were unaware of their purpose. To facilitate effective and efficient traceback investigations by regulatory agencies, retail establishments should maintain records more detailed and complete of all grinding activities.

  12. Utilisation of Wearable Computing for Space Programmes Test Activities Optimasation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, V.; Lazzari, D.; Alemanni, M.

    2004-08-01

    New technologies are assuming a relevant importance in the Space business domain also in the Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) activities allowing process optimization and capability that were unthinkable only few years ago. This paper has the aim to describe Alenia Spazio (ALS) gained experience on the remote interaction techniques as a results of collaborations established both on European Communities (EC) initiatives, with Alenia Aeronautica (ALA) and Politecnico of Torino (POLITO). The H/W and S/W components performances increase and costs reduction due to the home computing massive utilization (especially demanded by the games business) together with the network technology possibility (offered by the web as well as the hi-speed links and the wireless communications) allow today to re-think the traditional AIT process activities in the light of the multimedia data exchange: graphical, voice video and by sure more in the future. Aerospace business confirm its innovation vocation which in the year '80 represents the cradle of the CAD systems and today is oriented to the 3D data visualization/ interaction technologies and remote visualisation/ interaction in collaborative way on a much more user friendly bases (i.e. not for specialists). Fig. 1 collects AIT extended scenario studied and adopted by ALS in these years. ALS experimented two possibilities of remote visualization/interaction: Portable [e.g. Fig.2 Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), Wearable] and walls (e.g.VR-Lab) screens as both 2D/3D visualisation and interaction devices which could support many types of traditional (mainly based on EGSE and PDM/CAD utilisation/reports) company internal AIT applications: 1. design review support 2. facility management 3. storage management 4. personnel training 5. integration sequences definition 6. assembly and test operations follow up 7. documentation review and external access to AIT activities for remote operations (e.g. tele-testing) EGSE Portable Clean room

  13. Oxytocin discontinuation after the active phase of labor is established.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Dimitrios-Efthymios G; Pergialiotis, Vasilios; Papantoniou, Nikolaos; Trompoukis, Stamoulis; Vlachos, Georgios D

    2015-08-01

    Despite the widespread usage of oxytocin, there is still no consensus on its mode of administration. The scope of the present meta-analysis was to assess the effect of oxytocin discontinuation after the active phase of labor is established on maternal fetal and neonatal outcomes. We searched Medline, Scopus, Popline, ClinicalTrials.gov and Google Scholar databases. Eight studies were finally retrieved, which involved 1232 parturient. We observed significantly decreased rates of cesarean sections among parturient that discontinued oxytocin (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.35, 0.74) as well as decreased rates of uterine hyperstimulation (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.19, 0.58). Similarly, cases of non-reassuring fetal heart rates were fewer among women that did not receive oxytocin after the establishment of the active phase of labor (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.41, 0.97). Keeping in mind the aforementioned maternal and neonatal adverse effects that seem to result from infusion of oxytocin until delivery, future practice should aim towards its discontinuation after the establishment of the active phase of labor, as it does not seem to influence the total duration of labor. Future studies should aim towards specific populations of parturient in order to clarify whether different approaches are needed.

  14. Effect of a physical activity programme in the aquatic environment on haemodynamic constants in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Lara, Juana María; Ruiz-Frutos, Carlos; Rodríguez-Díaz, Luciano; Ramírez-Rodrigo, Jesús; Villaverde-Gutiérrez, Carmen; Torres-Luque, Gema

    2017-09-20

    To evaluate the effect of a physical activity programme in the aquatic environment with immersion up to the neck, of six weeks duration, on haemodynamic constants in pregnant women. A six-week physical activity programme in the aquatic environment was carried out with a total of 46 pregnant women, who were distributed into an experimental group (n = 18), which participated in the programme, and a control group (n = 28), which followed routine care. In both groups different haemodynamic measurements were evaluated before and after the program. At the beginning of the programme the mean systolic blood pressure was similar between groups, but diastolic blood pressure was slightly higher in the experimental group. When the measurements at the last session were compared, arterial pressures (systolic, diastolic and mean) were significantly higher in the control group (p <.050). Similarly, the initial plasma volume values did not differ between groups, but after the intervention, the control group women showed a higher mean (p <.010). The fraction of sodium excretion (FENa) increased significantly in the experimental group, after the programme, with a mean three times higher (p <.050). Aldosterone plasma levels did not show significant differences between the groups in the different measurements. A programme of swimming and immersion exercises in pregnant women contributes to hydrosaline balance, preventing an excessive increase in usual plasma volume during pregnancy and in the activity of the renin-aldosterone axis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Establishing New Cut-Off Limits for Galactose 1-Phosphate-Uridyltransferase Deficiency for the Dutch Newborn Screening Programme.

    PubMed

    Kemper, E A; Boelen, A; Bosch, A M; van Veen-Sijne, M; van Rijswijk, C N; Bouva, M J; Fingerhut, R; Schielen, P C J I

    2017-01-01

    Newborn screening for classical galactosemia in the Netherlands is performed by five laboratories and is based on the measurement of galactose 1-phosphate-uridyltransferase (GALT) activity and total galactose (TGAL) in heel prick blood spots. Unexpected problems with the GALT assay posed a challenge to switch to a new assay. The aim of this study was to make an analytical and clinical evaluation of GALT assays to replace the current assay and to establish new cut-off values (COVs).First, the manual assay from PerkinElmer (NG-1100) and the GSP assay were compared by analyzing 626 anonymous heel prick samples in parallel. Secondly, a manual GSP method was evaluated and 2,052 samples were compared with the automated GSP assay. Finally, a clinical evaluation was performed by collecting data from 93 referred newborns.No satisfactory correlation was observed between GALT activity measured with the manual NG-1100 assay and the automated GSP assay. An acceptable correlation was found between the manual and automated GSP assay. Intra- and inter-assay variation of the automated GSP were 1.8-10.0% and 3.1-13.9%, respectively. Evaluation of clinical data demonstrated that adjusting the COVs for GALT to 2.0 U/dl and TGAL to 1,100 μmol/l improved specificity of screening for classical galactosemia.An assay designed for automated processing to measure GALT activity in heel prick samples works equally well when processed manually. We therefore adopted both methods in the Dutch screening laboratories. As a result of this evaluation new COVs for GALT and TGAL have been introduced and are valid from July 2015.

  16. Objects prompt authentic scientific activities among learners in a museum programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achiam, Marianne; Simony, Leonora; Kramer Lindow, Bent Erik

    2016-04-01

    Although the scientific disciplines conduct practical work in different ways, all consider practical work as the essential way of connecting objects and phenomena with ideas and the abstract. Accordingly, practical work is regarded as central to science education as well. We investigate a practical, object-based palaeontology programme at a natural history museum to identify how palaeontological objects prompt scientific activity among upper secondary school students. We first construct a theoretical framework based on an analysis of the programme's palaeontological content. From this, we build our reference model, which considers the specimens used in the programme, possible palaeontological interpretations of these specimens, and the conditions inherent in the programme. We use the reference model to analyse the activities of programme participants, and illustrate how these activities are palaeontologically authentic. Finally, we discuss our findings, examining the mechanism by which the specimens prompt scientific activities. We also discuss our discipline-based approach, and how it allows us to positively identify participants' activities as authentic. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings.

  17. The Victorian Active Script Programme: promising signs for general practitioners, population health, and the promotion of physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Sims, J; Huang, N; Pietsch, J; Naccarella, L

    2004-01-01

    Background: The Active Script Programme (ASP) aimed to increase the number of general practitioners (GPs) in Victoria, Australia who deliver appropriate, consistent, and effective advice on physical activity to patients. To maximise GP participation, a capacity building strategy within Divisions of General Practice (DGPs) was used. The objectives of the programme were to (a) train and support GPs in advising sedentary patients, and (b) develop tools and resources to assist GPs. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the ASP. Methods: A systems approach was used to promote capacity in Victorian general practice. Economic analyses were incorporated into the programme's evaluation. Participants were selected DGPs and their GP members. The programme worked with DGPs to train GPs and provide relevant resources. The main outcome measures were (a) changes in GP knowledge and behaviour and (b) cost effectiveness, based on modelled estimates of numbers of patients advised and adopting physical activity and gaining the associated health benefits. Results: GP awareness and provision of physical activity advice increased. Although the programme's reach was modest, based on actual GP involvement, the cost effectiveness figures ($138 per patient to become sufficiently active to gain health benefits, and $3647 per disability adjusted life year saved) are persuasive. Conclusions: The ASP increased DGPs' capacity to support GPs to promote physical activity. There is a strong economic argument for governments to invest in such programmes. However, caution is warranted about the maintenance of patients' activity levels. Programme refinement to encourage GPs to use community supports more effectively will guide future development. Further research on long term patient adherence through a multisectorial approach is warranted. PMID:14751940

  18. How to develop a business case to establish a neonatal pulse oximetry programme for screening of congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Ewer, Andrew K

    2012-12-01

    Pulse oximetry screening for critical congenital heart defects (CCHDs) is a highly specific, moderately sensitive test which is cost effective, acceptable to both clinical staff and parents and meets the criteria for universal screening. Pulse oximetry screening is gaining considerable worldwide support and last year was added to the recommended uniform screening panel in the USA following endorsement by the Health and Human Services Secretary. There is significant heterogeneity in published screening protocols and it is important to consider all available evidence and also take local factors into account when developing a screening programme, whether it is within an individual hospital, neonatal network or even at a national level. This paper presents available options based both on the published evidence and personal practice experience which will aid those considering the introduction of screening to make the right decisions both from a clinical and financial perspective.

  19. MBNL1 and RBFOX2 cooperate to establish a splicing programme involved in pluripotent stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Venables, Julian P; Lapasset, Laure; Gadea, Gilles; Fort, Philippe; Klinck, Roscoe; Irimia, Manuel; Vignal, Emmanuel; Thibault, Philippe; Prinos, Panagiotis; Chabot, Benoit; Abou Elela, Sherif; Roux, Pierre; Lemaitre, Jean-Marc; Tazi, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has provided huge insight into the pathways, mechanisms and transcription factors that control differentiation. Here we use high-throughput RT-PCR technology to take a snapshot of splicing changes in the full spectrum of high- and low-expressed genes during induction of fibroblasts, from several donors, into iPSCs and their subsequent redifferentiation. We uncover a programme of concerted alternative splicing changes involved in late mesoderm differentiation and controlled by key splicing regulators MBNL1 and RBFOX2. These critical splicing adjustments arise early in vertebrate evolution and remain fixed in at least 10 genes (including PLOD2, CLSTN1, ATP2A1, PALM, ITGA6, KIF13A, FMNL3, PPIP5K1, MARK2 and FNIP1), implying that vertebrates require alternative splicing to fully implement the instructions of transcriptional control networks.

  20. Transcriptional Activators of Human Genes with Programmable DNA-Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Simone; Streubel, Jana; Bonas, Ulla; Behrens, Sven-Erik; Boch, Jens

    2011-01-01

    TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors are translocated by Xanthomonas bacteria into plant cells where they activate transcription of target genes. DNA target sequence recognition occurs in a unique mode involving a central domain of tandem repeats. Each repeat recognizes a single base pair in a contiguous DNA sequence and a pair of adjacent hypervariable amino acid residues per repeat specifies which base is bound. Rearranging the repeats allows the design of novel TAL proteins with predictable DNA-recognition specificities. TAL protein-based transcriptional activation in plant cells is mediated by a C-terminal activation domain (AD). Here, we created synthetic TAL proteins with designed repeat compositions using a novel modular cloning strategy termed “Golden TAL Technology”. Newly programmed TAL proteins were not only functional in plant cells, but also in human cells and activated targeted expression of exogenous as well as endogenous genes. Transcriptional activation in different human cell lines was markedly improved by replacing the TAL-AD with the VP16-AD of herpes simplex virus. The creation of TAL proteins with potentially any desired DNA-recognition specificity allows their versatile use in biotechnology. PMID:21625585

  1. Re-engaging Disaffected Youth through Physical Activity Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandford, Rachel A.; Armour, Kathleen M.; Warmington, Paul C.

    2006-01-01

    It is a cherished belief within physical education and sport communities that participation in sport/physical activity has the potential to offer young people a range of physical, psychological and social benefits. More recently in the UK, this belief has become prominent in government policies that, among other things, are seeking to re-engage…

  2. Research Active Programme: A Pilot Inclusive Research Curriculum in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Nancy; García Iriarte, Edurne; Burns, Emma Q.

    2017-01-01

    Participation of people with disabilities in producing and using research is critical for monitoring the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The Research Active Programme (RAP) is a module designed to build research capacity of students with intellectual disabilities. RAP was…

  3. Developing L2 Listening Fluency through Extended Listening-Focused Activities in an Extensive Listening Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Anna C-S.; Millett, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects on developing L2 listening fluency through doing extended listening-focused activities after reading and listening to audio graded readers. Seventy-six EFL university students read and listened to a total of 15 graded readers in a 15-week extensive listening programme. They were divided into three groups (Group…

  4. Research Active Programme: A Pilot Inclusive Research Curriculum in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Nancy; García Iriarte, Edurne; Burns, Emma Q.

    2017-01-01

    Participation of people with disabilities in producing and using research is critical for monitoring the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The Research Active Programme (RAP) is a module designed to build research capacity of students with intellectual disabilities. RAP was…

  5. Effectiveness of a physical activity programme based on the Pilates method in pregnancy and labour.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Luciano; Ruiz-Frutos, Carlos; Vázquez-Lara, Juana María; Ramírez-Rodrigo, Jesús; Villaverde-Gutiérrez, Carmen; Torres-Luque, Gema

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of a physical activity programme based on use of the Pilates method, over eight weeks in pregnant women, on functional parameters, such as weight, blood pressure, strength, flexibility and spinal curvature, and on labour parameters, such as, type of delivery, episiotomy, analgesia and newborn weight. A randomized clinical trial was carried out on pregnant women, applying a programme of physical activity using the Pilates method, designed specifically for this population. A sample consisting of a total of 105 pregnant women was divided into two groups: intervention group (n=50) (32.87±4.46 years old) and control group (n=55) (31.52±4.95 years old). The intervention group followed a physical activity programme based on the Pilates method, for 2 weekly sessions, whereas the control group did not follow the program. Significant improvements (p<0.05) in blood pressure, hand grip strength, hamstring flexibility and spinal curvature, in addition to improvements during labour, decreasing the number of Caesareans and obstructed labour, episiotomies, analgesia and the weight of the newborns were found at the end of the intervention. A physical activity programme of 8 weeks based on the Pilates method improves functional parameters in pregnant women and benefits delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of physical activity programmes for elderly people - a descriptive study using the EFQM' criteria.

    PubMed

    Marques, Ana I; Rosa, Maria J; Soares, Pedro; Santos, Rute; Mota, Jorge; Carvalho, Joana

    2011-02-21

    In the past years, there has been a growing concern in designing physical activity (PA) programmes for elderly people, because evidence suggests that such health promotion interventions may reduce the deleterious effects of the ageing process. Quality is an important issue when designing a PA programme for older people. Some studies support the Excellence Model of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) as an operational framework for evaluating the quality of an organization. Within this context, the aim of this study was to characterize the quality management models of the PA programmes developed by Portuguese Local Administration to enhance quality of life for elderly people, according to the criteria of the EFQM Excellence Model. A methodological triangulation was conducted in 26 PA programmes using questionnaire surveys, semi-structured interviews and document analysis. We used standard approaches to the statistical analysis of data including frequencies and percentages for the categorical data. Results showed that Processes (65,38%), Leadership (61,03%), Customer results (58,46) and People (51,28%) had high percentage occurrences of quality practices. In contrast, Partnerships and resources (45,77%), People results (41,03%), Policy and strategy (37,91%), Key performance results (19,23%) and Society results (19,23%) had lower percentage occurrences. Our findings suggest that although there are some good practices in PA programmes, there are still relevant areas that require improvement.

  7. Evaluation of physical activity programmes for elderly people - a descriptive study using the EFQM' criteria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the past years, there has been a growing concern in designing physical activity (PA) programmes for elderly people, because evidence suggests that such health promotion interventions may reduce the deleterious effects of the ageing process. Quality is an important issue when designing a PA programme for older people. Some studies support the Excellence Model of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) as an operational framework for evaluating the quality of an organization. Within this context, the aim of this study was to characterize the quality management models of the PA programmes developed by Portuguese Local Administration to enhance quality of life for elderly people, according to the criteria of the EFQM Excellence Model. Methods A methodological triangulation was conducted in 26 PA programmes using questionnaire surveys, semi-structured interviews and document analysis. We used standard approaches to the statistical analysis of data including frequencies and percentages for the categorical data. Results Results showed that Processes (65,38%), Leadership (61,03%), Customer results (58,46) and People (51,28%) had high percentage occurrences of quality practices. In contrast, Partnerships and resources (45,77%), People results (41,03%), Policy and strategy (37,91%), Key performance results (19,23%) and Society results (19,23%) had lower percentage occurrences. Conclusions Our findings suggest that although there are some good practices in PA programmes, there are still relevant areas that require improvement. PMID:21338497

  8. Do preschools differ in promoting children’s physical activity? An instrument for the assessment of preschool physical activity programmes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preschools offer high potential for preventive interventions. However, little is known about the structure of preschool programmes to promote physical activity (PA) in preschoolers although almost all children aged three to six years spend one third of the day at preschool. The aim of this study was to determine whether and to what extent preschools implement systematic PA promotion measures using an instrument specifically developed to assess and systematize preschool PA programmes. Methods In the cross-sectional study a baseline survey of preschool education policies was conducted to identify and assess the type and extent of PA programmes and opportunities in preschools in the State of Lower Saxony, Germany. An assessment instrument was developed to identify preschools with systematic PA programmes (type 1) and those without PA programmes (type 2) based on the following quality criteria: A) written PA policy, B) structured weekly PA offerings for all children; C) at least one qualified physical education teacher; D) PA-friendly indoor and outdoor facilities (exercise room, situational PA opportunities, outdoor areas, play equipment etc.), and E) structured PA promotion in place for at least two years. A third type of preschool that promotes PA in children to some extent (i.e., that meets the criteria partially but not completely) was classified as “preschools with limited PA programmes”. Results 2415 preschools participated in the survey (response rate: 59%). The results show that 26% (n = 554) have a systematic PA programme while 3% (n = 64) have no PA programme. Most (71%, n = 1514) were classified as limited PA programme preschools. All three types of preschools differed significantly (p = .000) from each other in terms of size (small vs. large). Most of the preschools without PA programmes are small half-day preschools. Conclusions The study investigated an assessment-instrument providing extensive insight into the nature

  9. Evaluation of physical activity programmes for the elderly - exploring the lessons from other sectors and examining the general characteristics of the programmes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In Portugal, there are several physical activity (PA) programmes for elderly people developed by the local government. The importance of these programmes has been increasing since the evidence has shown that this type of health promotion interventions may reduce the deleterious effects of the ageing process. However, no study has already identified the general characteristics of these programmes nor if they use any scheme to assess the quality of the service provided. A widely-used scheme is the EFQM Excellence Model, which will be in the core of our present work. Thus, the main aims of this preliminary study were 1) to identify the general characteristics of the PA programmes developed by the Portuguese Local Public Administration 2) to determine the extent of implementation of quality initiatives in these programmes. Methods Data were collected by an on-line questionnaire sent to all Continental Municipalities (n = 278). Categorical data were expressed as absolute counts and percentages. Continuous data were expressed as the mean and SD. An open-ended question was analysed using qualitative content analysis with QSR NVivo software. Associations between categorical variables were tested by the use of contingency tables and the calculation of chi-square tests. Significance level was set at p ≤ 0.05. Results Results showed: i) a total of 125 PA programmes were identified in the 18 districts of the Portugal mainland; ii) the main goal of the majority (95.2%) was the participants' health promotion; iii) different characteristics of the programmes were found according to different regions of the country; iv) certain characteristics of the programmes were associated to the existence of other features; v) only one PA programme developed quality initiatives. Conclusions In conclusion, although there are many PA programmes for elderly people spread throughout the country, aiming at improving the health of participants, the overwhelming majority does not adopt

  10. Oncogenic programmes and Notch activity: an 'organized crime'?

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Maria

    2014-04-01

    The inappropriate Notch signalling can influence virtually all aspect of cancer, including tumour-cell growth, survival, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, although it does not do this alone. Hence, elucidating the partners of Notch that are active in cancer is now the focus of much intense research activity. The genetic toolkits available, coupled to the small size and short life of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, makes this an inexpensive and effective animal model, suited to large-scale cancer gene discovery studies. The fly eye is not only a non-vital organ but its stereotyped size and disposition also means it is easy to screen for mutations that cause tumours and metastases and provides ample opportunities to test cancer theories and to unravel unanticipated nexus between Notch and other cancer genes, or to discover unforeseen Notch's partners in cancer. These studies suggest that Notch's oncogenic capacity is brought about not simply by increasing signal strength but through partnerships, whereby oncogenes gain more by cooperating than acting individually, as in a ring 'organized crime'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Establishment and implementation of common product assurance and safety requirements for the contractors of the Columbus programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, H.; Stephan, H. J.

    1991-08-01

    When establishing the Columbus Product Assurance (PA)/safety requirements, the international environment of the Space Station Freedom program has to be taken into account. Considerations given to multiple ways of requirement definition and stages within the European Space Agency (ESA) Procedures, Specifications, and Standards (PSS-01) series of documents and the NASA Space Station requirements are discussed. A series of adaptations introduced by way of tailoring the basic ESA and NASA requirement sets to the Columbus program's needs are described. For the implementation of these tailored requirements, a scheme is developed, which recognizes the PA/safety approach within the European industries by way of various company handbooks and manuals. The changes introduced in the PSS-01 series and the applicable NASA Space Station requirements in recent years, has coincided with the establishment of Columbus PA/safety requirements. To achieve the necessary level of cooperation between ESA and the Columbus industries, a PA Working Group (PAWG) is established. The PAWG supervises the establishement of the Common PA/Safety Plan and the Standards to be used. Due to the high number of European industries participating in the Columbus program, a positive influence on the evolution of the industrial approaches in PA/safety can be expected. Cooperation in the PAWG has brought issues to light which are related to the ESA PSS-01 series and its requirements. Due to the rapid changes of recent years, basic company documentation has not followed the development, specifically as various recent ESA projects use different project specifc issues of the evolving PSS-01 documents.

  12. Establishing a reproducible protocol for measuring index active extension strength.

    PubMed

    Matter-Parrat, V; Hidalgo Diaz, J J; Collon, S; Salazar Botero, S; Prunières, G; Ichihara, S; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study was to establish a reproducible protocol to measure active extension strength in the index finger. The secondary objectives consisted in correlating the independent or associated index extension strength to the other fingers force of contraction of the extensor indicis propius with hand dominance. The population studied consisted of 24 healthy volunteers, including 19 women and 20 right-handed individuals. The independent and dependent index extension strength in each hand was measured three times with a dynamometer by three examiners at Day 0 and again at Day 7. Intra and inter-examiner reproducibility were, respectively, >0.90 and >0.75 in all cases. The independent extension strength was lower than the dependent one. There was no difference between the independent index extension strength on the dominant and non-dominant sides. The same was true for the dependent strength. Our results show that our protocol is reproducible in measuring independent and dependent index extension strength. Dominance did not come into account.

  13. Do children's health resources differ according to preschool physical activity programmes and parental behaviour? A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Sterdt, Elena; Pape, Natalie; Kramer, Silke; Liersch, Sebastian; Urban, Michael; Werning, Rolf; Walter, Ulla

    2014-02-26

    Preschool can have positive effects on the development of a healthy lifestyle. The present study analysed to what extent different conditions, structures and behavioural models in preschool and family-children's central social microsystems-can lead to differences in children's health resources. Using a cross-sectional mixed methods approach, contrast analyses of "preschools with systematic physical activity programmes" versus "preschools without physical activity programmes" were conducted to assess the extent to which children's physical activity, quality of life and social behaviour differ between preschools with systematic and preschools without physical activity programmes. Differences in children's physical activity according to parental behaviour were likewise assessed. Data on child-related outcomes and parent-related factors were collected via parent questionnaires and child interviews. A qualitative focused ethnographic study was performed to obtain deeper insight into the quantitative survey data. Two hundred and twenty seven (227) children were interviewed at 21 preschools with systematic physical activity programmes, and 190 at 25 preschools without physical activity programmes. There was no significant difference in children's physical activity levels between the two preschool types (p = 0.709). However, the qualitative data showed differences in the design and quality of programmes to promote children's physical activity. Data triangulation revealed a strong influence of parental behaviour. The triangulation of methods provided comprehensive insight into the nature and extent of physical activity programmes in preschools and made it possible to capture the associations between systematic physical activity promotion and children's health resources in a differential manner.

  14. Effects of a 12-week physical activities programme on sleep in female university students.

    PubMed

    Hurdiel, Rémy; Watier, Timothée; Honn, Kimberly; Pezé, Thierry; Zunquin, Gautier; Theunynck, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Lack of sleep is known to negatively affect adolescent's health and the links between regular physical activity and sleep are unclear.This pilot study investigated whether the regular practice of physical activities among sedentary female students would improve their sleep. Nineteen female students, identified as sedentary and having poor subjective sleep quality were assigned in two groups to a 12-week university physical activities programme in accordance with the recommendations of World Health Organisation (N = 10) or to a control condition (N = 9). Sleep was assessed with actigraphy before and after the study and with the Pittsburg Sleep Quality 15 Index (PSQI) at the beginning, middle, and end of the study. The intensity of physical activities was controlled by heart rate monitor. The analysis showed that sleep quality in the physical activities group improved, with the mean ± SD PSQI score decreasing from 9.1 ± 1.7 to 4.8 ± 2.0. Despite some limitations, these pilot data indicate that a physical activities programme is feasible to implement in students, and that participation in such a programme improves sleep in 18- 24 -year-old female adolescents. Further potential benefits remain to be investigated in follow-up research.

  15. Costing of physical activity programmes in primary prevention: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This literature review aims to analyse the costing methodology in economic analyses of primary preventive physical activity programmes. It demonstrates the usability of a recently published theoretical framework in practice, and may serve as a guide for future economic evaluation studies and for decision making. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all relevant studies published before December 2009. All studies were analysed regarding their key economic findings and their costing methodology. In summary, 18 international economic analyses of primary preventive physical activity programmes were identified. Many of these studies conclude that the investigated intervention provides good value for money compared with alternatives (no intervention, usual care or different programme) or is even cost-saving. Although most studies did provide a description of the cost of the intervention programme, methodological details were often not displayed, and savings resulting from the health effects of the intervention were not always included sufficiently. This review shows the different costing methodologies used in the current health economic literature and compares them with a theoretical framework. The high variability regarding the costs assessment and the lack of transparency concerning the methods limits the comparability of the results, which points out the need for a handy minimal dataset of cost assessment. PMID:22827967

  16. Heart failure management programmes in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, T; Strömberg, A; De Geest, S; Fridlund, B; Heikkila, J; Mårtensson, J; Moons, P; Scholte op Reimer, W; Smith, K; Stewart, S; Thompson, D R

    2006-09-01

    The ESC guidelines recommend that an organised system of specialist heart failure (HF) care should be established to improve outcomes of HF patients. The aim of this study was therefore to identify the number and the content of HF management programmes in Europe. A two-phase descriptive study was conducted: an initial screening to identify the existence of HF management programmes; and a survey to describe the content in countries where at least 30% of the hospitals had a programme. Of the 43 European countries approached, 26 (60%) estimated the percentage of HF management programmes. Seven countries reported that they had such programmes in more than 30% of their hospitals. Of the 673 hospitals responding to the questionnaire, 426 (63%) had a HF management programme. Half of the programmes (n = 205) were located in an outpatient clinic. In the UK a combination of hospital and home-based programmes was common (75%). The most programmes included physical examination, telephone consultation, patient education, drug titration and diagnostic testing. Most (89%) programmes involved nurses and physicians. Multi-disciplinary teams were active in 56% of the HF programmes. The most prominent differences between the 7 countries were the degree of collaboration with home care and GP's, the role in palliative care and the funding. Only a few European countries have a large number of organised programmes for HF care and follow up. To improve outcomes of HF patients throughout Europe more effort should be taken to increase the number of these programmes in all countries.

  17. Corporate sponsorship of physical activity promotion programmes: part of the solution or part of the problem?

    PubMed

    Jane, B; Gibson, K

    2017-06-07

    Parklives is a programme intended to raise levels of physical activity across the UK, funded by Coca-Cola GB and delivered in association with Local Authorities and other organizations. Such public-private partnerships have been advocated by many however critics suggest that the conflict between stakeholder motives is too great. This study conducted a content analysis of twitter content related to the ParkLives physical activity programme. Images and text were analysed from two separate weeks, one from the school vacation period and one during school term time. Three hundred and eighteen tweets were analysed. Content analysis revealed 79% of images contained children and 45% of these images contained prominent Coca-Cola branding, a level of exposure that suggests ParkLives simultaneously provides opportunities for children's physical activity and for targeted marketing. Content analysis also demonstrated that the programme allowed increased access to policy-makers. The sponsorship of a physical activity promotion campaign can allow a corporation to target its marketing at children and gain access to health-related policy development networks. This study reinforces the need for independent evaluation of all potential impacts of such a partnership and calls on those responsible for community health to fully consider the ethical implications of such relationships.

  18. Experimental demonstration of one-dimensional active plate-type acoustic metamaterial with adaptive programmable density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Ahmed; Elsabbagh, Adel; Akl, Wael

    2017-03-01

    A class of active acoustic metamaterials (AMMs) with a fully controllable effective density in real-time is introduced, modeled, and experimentally verified. The density of the developed AMM can be programmed to any value ranging from -100 kg/m3 to 100 kg/m3 passing by near zero density conditions. This is achievable for any frequency between 500 and 1500 Hz. The material consists of clamped piezoelectric diaphragms with air as the background fluid. The dynamics of the diaphragms are controlled by connecting a closed feedback control loop between the piezoelectric layers of the diaphragm. The density of the material is adjustable through an outer adaptive feedback loop that is implemented by the real-time evaluation of the density using the 4-microphone technique. Applications for the new material include programmable active acoustic filters, nonsymmetric acoustic transmission, and programmable acoustic superlens.

  19. Design of the iPlay study: systematic development of a physical activity injury prevention programme for primary school children.

    PubMed

    Collard, Dorine C M; Chinapaw, Mai J M; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert A L M

    2009-01-01

    Health benefits of physical activity in children are well known. However, a drawback is the risk of physical activity-related injuries. Children are at particular risk for these injuries, because of a high level of exposure. Because of the high prevalence of physical activity injuries and the negative short- and long-term consequences, prevention of these injuries in children is important. This article describes how we systematically developed a school-based physical activity injury prevention programme using the intervention mapping (IM) protocol. IM describes a process for developing theory- and evidence-based health promotion programmes. The development can be described in six steps: (i) perform a needs assessment; (ii) identify programme and performance objectives; (iii) select methods and strategies; (iv) develop programme; (v) adopt and implement; and (vi) evaluate. First, the results of the needs assessment showed the injury problem in children and the different risk factors for physical activity injuries. Based on the results of the needs assessment the main focus of the injury prevention programme was described. Second, the overall programme objective of the injury prevention programme was defined as reducing the incidence of lower extremity physical activity injuries. Third, theoretical methods and practical strategies were selected to accomplish a decrease in injury incidence. The theoretical methods used were active learning, providing cues and scenario-based risk information, and active processing of information. The practical strategy of the injury prevention programme was an 8-month course about injury prevention to be used in physical education classes in primary schools. Fourth, programme materials that were used in the injury prevention programme were developed, including newsletters for children and parents, posters, exercises to improve motor fitness, and an information website. Fifth, an implementation plan was designed in order to ensure that

  20. Etanercept, infliximab, and leflunomide in established rheumatoid arthritis: clinical experience using a structured follow up programme in southern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Geborek, P; Crnkic, M; Petersson, I; Saxne, T

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of prospectively monitoring treatment efficacy and tolerability of infliximab, etanercept, and leflunomide over a two year period in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice using a structured protocol. Methods: All patients with RA at seven centres in southern Sweden, for whom at least two disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, including methotrexate, had failed or not been tolerated, who started treatment with either infliximab, etanercept, or leflunomide were included. They were evaluated at predefined times using a standardised protocol including items required for evaluating response to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or EULAR criteria. All adverse events were recorded using World Health Organisation terminology. Concomitant treatment and survival while receiving a drug were recorded. Results: During the study 166 patients were treated with etanercept, 135 with infliximab, and 103 with leflunomide. Treatment response as determined by the ACR and EULAR response criteria was similar for the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. The TNF blockers performed significantly better than leflunomide both as determined by the response criteria and by survival on drug analysis. Thus 79% and 75% continued to receive etanercept or infliximab compared with 22% of patients who started leflunomide after 20 months. The spectrum of side effects did not differ from those previously reported in the clinical trials. The initial two year experience of a protocol for postmarketing surveillance of etanercept, infliximab, and leflunomide shows that a structured protocol with central data handling can be used in clinical practice for documenting the performance of newly introduced drugs. Conclusions: Efficacy data for the TNF blockers comply with results in clinical trials, whereas leflunomide appeared to perform worse than in clinical trials. Prolonged monitoring is required to identify possible rare side

  1. Planetary protection R&D activities in the ESA exploration programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kminek, G.

    Since the begin of the Aurora exploration programme in 2001 the Human Spaceflight Microgravity and Exploration Directorate HME of ESA has invested in research and development activities related to planetary protection Some of these activities are focused on the recently approved ExoMars mission others are applicable to Mars missions in general including MSR the technology development of the latter one being part of the exploration core programme The proposed activities have been approved and initiated An overview of the activities and first results will be presented The main activities are begin itemize item Bioburden and Biodiversity evaluation in S C Facilities this activity will cover a period of almost two years and include the standard assay extension of the standard assay culture conditions identification of isolates using 16S rDNA via PCR and test of a rapid spore assay Protocols are developed in coordination with NASA-JPL item Extension of dry heat microbial reduction process to higher temperatures this activity will include a detailed study of the humidity effect on the inactivation kinetics This activity is in coordination with efforts at NASA-JPL item Validation of a dry heat sterilization process item Development of a low-temperature sterilization method the focus of this activity is on vapor hydrogen peroxide item Robotic capabilities for clean AIV AIT item Decontamination of man-rated systems item Definition of functional requirements for a Mars Sample Return Biological Containment Facility end itemize In

  2. Talking Techne: Techniques to Establish an Active Online Discussion Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palenque, Stephanie Maher; DeCosta, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Discussion forums are critically important to the online classroom, as they virtually take the place of a classroom discussion and become a stage on which active learning takes place. Active learning occurs when instructors practice certain techniques in the discussion that are carefully and thoughtfully crafted and guided. The authors propose the…

  3. [Effect of a physical activity programme in patients with fibromyalgia: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Cadenas-Sánchez, Cristina; Ruiz-Ruiz, Jonatan

    2014-12-23

    The aim of this review was to determine what type of physical activity programmes have been developed in patients with fibromyalgia and what are its effects and benefits on the degree of pain and quality of life. The search was performed in MEDLINE, Web of Science and SPORTDiscus databases. The word "fibromyalgia" was always used as a criterion for combined search (using "AND" connector) with physical activity, exercise, physical therapy and training (MeSH terms). Of the 2,531 initial results, 33 papers were selected for review. The studies reviewed focus primarily on dance activities, water activities, multidisciplinary, mind-body work, fitness and stretching. After applying the intervention program, the pain level was reduced between 10 and 44.2%, and the impact of the disease between 5.3 and 17.9%, improving the symptoms of these patients. In conclusion, a multidisciplinary programme (in which physical activity is included) may have positive effects on the quality of life of people with fibromyalgia.

  4. The role of community programmes and mass events in promoting physical activity to patients.

    PubMed

    Bauman, A; Murphy, N; Lane, A

    2009-01-01

    The challenge for physical activity promotion in clinical contexts is finding ways of encouraging patients to become more active. Brief advice in primary care is effective, in the short term, in increasing physical activity, but is only provided by a few clinicians on a regular basis. The possibilities for public health approaches include others in the practice providing brief advice, or referral to community facilities and programmes. Even these have limited evidence regarding their population reach. Therefore, innovative and alternative solutions are required. This review discusses three potential contributors: clinician advocacy for and engagement in physical activity as role models, referral to mass community participation events, and encouraging attendance at health fairs. These will not solve the inactivity crisis, but could add new approaches for clinicians, in advising their patients to initiate and try to become more physically active.

  5. Impact of x-ray screening programmes for active tuberculosis in homeless populations: a systematic review of original studies.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis prevalence is generally low in industrialized countries, but many cities now operate surveillance programmes to actively screen for tuberculosis in known risk groups including homeless people. While several studies have reported on individual screening programmes, this study is the first known systematic review specifically looking at chest x-ray screening programmes for tuberculosis in homeless populations. Systematic review of relevant studies published in the last 20 years using the PRISMA checklist. Fourteen studies were reviewed: 12 cross-sectional studies, 1 retrospective cohort study and 1 'data-linkage' study. The studies were heterogenous in terms of the objectives, measured outcomes and methodological quality. Active tuberculosis prevalence was found to be higher in homeless populations and screening programmes appear to identify tuberculosis earlier, reduce prevalence and transmission, and increase treatment compliance. Active x-ray surveillance programmes in homeless communities appear to be cost-effective in reducing prevalence within the homeless population particularly in related strains and may have some benefits over passive finding. While there is a need for high-quality research to further assess the impact of these programmes, this study has outlined the benefits and limitations of existing programmes and included recommendations to achieve maximum coverage, uptake and cost-benefit. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. 29 CFR 784.155 - Activities performed in wholesale establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... employment in “marketing * * * storing, or distributing” the named aquatic products or byproducts, as applied to the wholesaling of fish and seafood, affords exemption to such activities as unloading the aquatic... & Company, Inc., N.D. Ga., 47 F. Supp. 650). Office and clerical employees of a wholesaler who...

  7. 29 CFR 784.155 - Activities performed in wholesale establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... employment in “marketing * * * storing, or distributing” the named aquatic products or byproducts, as applied to the wholesaling of fish and seafood, affords exemption to such activities as unloading the aquatic... & Company, Inc., N.D. Ga., 47 F. Supp. 650). Office and clerical employees of a wholesaler who...

  8. 29 CFR 784.155 - Activities performed in wholesale establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... employment in “marketing * * * storing, or distributing” the named aquatic products or byproducts, as applied to the wholesaling of fish and seafood, affords exemption to such activities as unloading the aquatic... & Company, Inc., N.D. Ga., 47 F. Supp. 650). Office and clerical employees of a wholesaler who...

  9. Changes in anabolic and catabolic activity among women taking part in an alternative labour market programme.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Hugo; Bergström, Anna; Theorell, Töres

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-two female participants in a mobilising labour market programme offering temporary, alternative employment in Sweden were followed longitudinally for one year, including a six month post participation follow-up period. It can be hypothesised that an important aspect of the physiological effects of unemployment is a change in the balance between anabolic and catabolic activities in the body and that re-employment should lead to a shift towards anabolism. An earlier study of a smaller subset of the data, however, including both men and women, showed increased prolactin and decreased dehydroepiadrosterone sulphate (DHEA-s) levels, contrary to the initial hypothesis. In the present analysis, intended to elucidate these results, psychophysiological data were summarised in two indices, one connected with anabolism (made up of testosterone and DHEA-s) and one with catabolism (prolactin, gamma-glutamyl transferase, aspartate amino transferase, alpha levuline amino transferase, and body mass index). In addition, self-rated anxiety, depression, hopelessness and personal control were analysed. The results indicate that the effect of 'better' activities within the programme was a temporary increase in anabolism, possibly indicating lower stress levels, and the effect of 'worse' activities, on the one hand, a temporary decrease in the catabolic index, probably reflecting repressed alcohol consumption, and, on the other hand, impaired anabolism. There was also a general but transient decrease in depressiveness measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The results seem to imply that it is difficult to achieve lasting effects through a relatively short participation in a mobilising programme.

  10. Balanced Ero1 activation and inactivation establishes ER redox homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunghwan; Sideris, Dionisia P.; Sevier, Carolyn S.

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) provides an environment optimized for oxidative protein folding through the action of Ero1p, which generates disulfide bonds, and Pdi1p, which receives disulfide bonds from Ero1p and transfers them to substrate proteins. Feedback regulation of Ero1p through reduction and oxidation of regulatory bonds within Ero1p is essential for maintaining the proper redox balance in the ER. In this paper, we show that Pdi1p is the key regulator of Ero1p activity. Reduced Pdi1p resulted in the activation of Ero1p by direct reduction of Ero1p regulatory bonds. Conversely, upon depletion of thiol substrates and accumulation of oxidized Pdi1p, Ero1p was inactivated by both autonomous oxidation and Pdi1p-mediated oxidation of Ero1p regulatory bonds. Pdi1p responded to the availability of free thiols and the relative levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione in the ER to control Ero1p activity and ensure that cells generate the minimum number of disulfide bonds needed for efficient oxidative protein folding. PMID:22412017

  11. The Integrated Women's Empowering Programme (IWEP) as an Example for Establishing Basic Structures of a Nationwide Adult Education System in a Poor Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandhaas, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Within Ethiopia's overall development strategy, the Integrated Women's Empowerment Programme (IWEP) aims to develop, test and implement a comprehensive nationwide approach to empower women and their households in selected areas of all regions/national states of Ethiopia. The programme provides functional literacy education and livelihood skills…

  12. The Integrated Women's Empowering Programme (IWEP) as an Example for Establishing Basic Structures of a Nationwide Adult Education System in a Poor Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandhaas, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Within Ethiopia's overall development strategy, the Integrated Women's Empowerment Programme (IWEP) aims to develop, test and implement a comprehensive nationwide approach to empower women and their households in selected areas of all regions/national states of Ethiopia. The programme provides functional literacy education and livelihood skills…

  13. Can a workplace 'sit less, move more' programme help Spanish office employees achieve physical activity targets?

    PubMed

    Puig-Ribera, Anna; Bort-Roig, Judit; Giné-Garriga, Maria; González-Suárez, Angel M; Martínez-Lemos, Iván; Fortuño, Jesús; Milà, Raimon; Muñoz-Ortiz, Laura; Gilson, Nicholas D; McKenna, Jim

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the impact of a workplace 'sit less, move more' programme (Walk@WorkSpain, W@WS, 19-week) on self-reported activity-related energy expenditure (AREE) in Spanish office employees (n = 264; 42 ± 10 years; 171 female) randomly assigned to Intervention (IG; used W@WS; n = 129) or comparison groups (CGs; n = 135). A linear mixed model assessed changes in METs-min/wk of total, vigorous, moderate and light physical activity (IPAQ short form) between baseline and 2 months follow-up. Over the CG, IG significantly increased light intensity AREE (P = 0.027). W@WS secured sustained increases on AREE-but not on achieving PA recommendations-providing translational evidence that active living in office employees can be increased. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  14. The B'Active programme for overweight primary school children in Glasgow: determining the prevalence of overweight and obesity and piloting an activity intervention.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne R; McLaughlin, Ruth; McKay, Jane; Lafferty, Kevin; McKay, Tony; Mutrie, Nanette

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in primary school children in Glasgow and to evaluate a pilot activity programme for overweight and obese children. BMI was measured in 1548 children. Overweight, obesity and severe obesity were defined as BMI > or =85th, 95th and 98th centile, respectively. Overweight and obese children were then invited to participate in a 10-week school-based activity programme. The programme was evaluated by recording weekly attendance, intensity (using the Children's Effort Rating Scale) and enjoyment (scale 1-10). Focus groups were used to explore the experiences and views of the children, teachers, coaches and parents. Of the 1548 children, 31.4% were overweight, 19.1% were obese and 12.4% were severely obese; 38% of those invited attended the activity programme. Weekly programme attendance was 83% (range 56-99%). Mean enjoyment rating (scale 1-10) was 8 for boys and 9 for girls. The intensity of activity sessions were rated 'very easy' by boys and 'just feeling a strain' by girls. Common themes emerging from the focus groups related to perceived positive and negative aspects of the programme (fun, concerns about stigmatising children); physical and psychological outcomes (fitter, more confident); and future recommendations (involve parents). In summary, the prevalence of overweight and obesity was high. The activity programme was successful in terms of attendance and enjoyment, and overall views of the initiative were positive and there was compelling support for its continuation.

  15. The effect of a structured programme to increase patient activity during inpatient stroke rehabilitation: a Phase I cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tyson, S F; Burton, L; McGovern, A

    2016-02-01

    To develop an intervention and undertake a proof-of-concept evaluation of its feasibility, acceptability, and impact on recorded patient activity levels during inpatient stroke rehabilitation. A longitudinal cohort design. Three inpatient stroke rehabilitation services. Stroke survivors receiving inpatient rehabilitation. A programme designed to increase patient activity, including individualised patient timetables, independent practice, therapeutic group work, and structured social activities was developed and implemented without additional resource. Patients' recorded activity levels were compared for two weeks before and after implementation of the programme. Data regarding the estimated time spent in different types of activity were extracted from patient treatment records, patients' and therapists' diaries, or timetables (if used) to measure patient activity levels At baseline, recorded activity levels were low; patients undertook a mean of 61 minutes (SD = 39) of activity per day. After implementation of the programme, recorded activity levels significantly increased to a mean of 123 minutes (SD = 88) per day (p = 0.0001). The time spent in all types of recorded activity increased (p = 0.0001-0.002), except psychology where the increase did not reach significance (p = 0.670). A structured programme can significantly increase recorded patient activity levels during inpatient stroke rehabilitation without additional resource. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Establishment of a proficiency panel for an external quality assessment programme for the detection of bacterial contamination in platelet concentrates using rapid and cultural detection methods.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T; Schmidt, M; Hourfar, K; Schottstedt, V; Pichl, L; Gubbe, K; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

    2016-05-01

    Platelet concentrates (PCs) are the main focus regarding the residual risk of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections. Rapid screening methods for bacterial detection in platelets have been optimized over the last decade, but their external evaluation represents a complicated process. We developed a new type of proficiency panel for bacterial detection in PCs using currently available screening methods (especially rapid methods) suitable for external quality assessment programmes (EQAP). PC samples were inoculated with different bacteria at two concentrations (10E+03 CFU/ml, 10E+05 CFU/ml) and stored under temperature-controlled conditions (1-5 days). Bacterial growth was further prevented by the addition of 0-20 μg/ml cotrimoxazole. Samples were analysed prior to and after storage using rapid detection methods (Bactiflow (BF), bacteria-generic NAT) and cultural methods to determine the influence of storage and antibiotic treatment on bacterial counts and the result outcome. A pilot EQAP was performed with four participants. Testing under the evaluated conditions demonstrated that bacterial counts remained constant prior to and after storage. The supplementation of 10 μg/ml cotrimoxazole did not influence bacterial detection using the two rapid detection methods BF and NAT. Furthermore, the detection of bacteria using cultural methods is still possible despite of antibiotic supplementation. The pilot EQAP confirmed these results. A storage time of up to 3 days proved practicable, showing no considerable influence on bacterial count and outcome of test results. The established proficiency panel provided PC matrix-conform samples with stabilized bacterial counts which can be analysed in parallel by rapid and cultural detection methods. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  17. Motor programme activating therapy influences adaptive brain functions in multiple sclerosis: clinical and MRI study.

    PubMed

    Rasova, Kamila; Prochazkova, Marie; Tintera, Jaroslav; Ibrahim, Ibrahim; Zimova, Denisa; Stetkarova, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    There is still little scientific evidence for the efficacy of neurofacilitation approaches and their possible influence on brain plasticity and adaptability. In this study, the outcome of a new kind of neurofacilitation approach, motor programme activating therapy (MPAT), was evaluated on the basis of a set of clinical functions and with MRI. Eighteen patients were examined four times with standardized clinical tests and diffusion tensor imaging to monitor changes without therapy, immediately after therapy and 1 month after therapy. Moreover, the strength of effective connectivity was analysed before and after therapy. Patients underwent a 1-h session of MPAT twice a week for 2 months. The data were analysed by nonparametric tests of association and were subsequently statistically evaluated. The therapy led to significant improvement in clinical functions, significant increment of fractional anisotropy and significant decrement of mean diffusivity, and decrement of effective connectivity at supplementary motor areas was observed immediately after the therapy. Changes in clinical functions and diffusion tensor images persisted 1 month after completing the programme. No statistically significant changes in clinical functions and no differences in MRI-diffusion tensor images were observed without physiotherapy. Positive immediate and long-term effects of MPAT on clinical and brain functions, as well as brain microstructure, were confirmed.

  18. Physical activity on prescription schemes (PARS): do programme characteristics influence effectiveness? Results of a systematic review and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Arsenijevic, Jelena; Groot, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Background Physical activity on prescription schemes (PARS) are health promotion programmes that have been implemented in various countries. The aim of this study was to outline the differences in the design of PARS in different countries. This study also explored the differences in the adherence rate to PARS and the self-reported level of physical activity between PARS users in different countries. Method A systematic literature review and meta-analyses were conducted. We searched PubMed and EBASCO in July 2015 and updated our search in September 2015. Studies that reported adherence to the programme and self-reported level of physical activity, published in the English language in a peer-reviewed journal since 2000, were included. The difference in the pooled adherence rate after finishing the PARS programme and the adherence rate before or during the PARS programme was 17% (95% CI 9% to 24%). The difference in the pooled physical activity was 0.93 unit score (95 CI −3.57 to 1.71). For the adherence rate, a meta-regression was conducted. Results In total, 37 studies conducted in 11 different countries met the inclusion criteria. Among them, 31 reported the adherence rate, while the level of physical activity was reported in 17 studies. Results from meta-analyses show that PARS had an effect on the adherence rate of physical activity, while the results from the meta-regressions show that programme characteristics such as type of chronic disease and the follow-up period influenced the adherence rate. Conclusions The effects of PARS on adherence and self-reported physical activity were influenced by programme characteristics and also by the design of the study. Future studies on the effectiveness of PARS should use a prospective longitudinal design and combine quantitative and qualitative data. Furthermore, future evaluation studies should distinguish between evaluating the adherence rate and the self-reported physical activity among participants with different

  19. Field validation of listings of food stores and commercial physical activity establishments from secondary data

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Catherine; Daniel, Mark; Kestens, Yan; Léger, Karine; Gauvin, Lise

    2008-01-01

    Background Food- and activity-related establishments are increasingly viewed as neighbourhood resources that potentially condition health-related behaviour. The primary objective of the current study was to establish, using ground truthing (on-site verification), the validity of measures of availability of food stores and physical activity establishments that were obtained from commercial database and Internet searches. A secondary objective was to examine differences in validity results according to neighbourhood characteristics and commercial establishment categories. Methods Lists of food stores and physical activity-related establishments in 12 census tracts within the Montreal metropolitan region were compiled using a commercial database (n = 171 establishments) and Internet search engines (n = 123 establishments). Ground truthing through field observations was performed to assess the presence of listed establishments and identify those absent. Percentage agreement, sensitivity (proportion of establishments found in the field that were listed), and positive predictive value (proportion of listed establishments found in the field) were calculated and contrasted according to data sources, census tracts characteristics, and establishment categories. Results Agreement with field observations was good (0.73) for the commercial list, and moderate (0.60) for the Internet-based list. The commercial list was superior to the Internet-based list for correctly listing establishments present in the field (sensitivity), but slightly inferior in terms of the likelihood that a listed establishment was present in the field (positive predictive value). Agreement was higher for food stores than for activity-related establishments. Conclusion Commercial data sources may provide a valid alternative to field observations and could prove a valuable tool in the evaluation of commercial environments relevant to eating behaviour. In contrast, this study did not find strong evidence in

  20. Do Children’s Health Resources Differ According to Preschool Physical Activity Programmes and Parental Behaviour? A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Sterdt, Elena; Pape, Natalie; Kramer, Silke; Liersch, Sebastian; Urban, Michael; Werning, Rolf; Walter, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Preschool can have positive effects on the development of a healthy lifestyle. The present study analysed to what extent different conditions, structures and behavioural models in preschool and family—children’s central social microsystems—can lead to differences in children’s health resources. Using a cross-sectional mixed methods approach, contrast analyses of “preschools with systematic physical activity programmes” versus “preschools without physical activity programmes” were conducted to assess the extent to which children’s physical activity, quality of life and social behaviour differ between preschools with systematic and preschools without physical activity programmes. Differences in children’s physical activity according to parental behaviour were likewise assessed. Data on child-related outcomes and parent-related factors were collected via parent questionnaires and child interviews. A qualitative focused ethnographic study was performed to obtain deeper insight into the quantitative survey data. Two hundred and twenty seven (227) children were interviewed at 21 preschools with systematic physical activity programmes, and 190 at 25 preschools without physical activity programmes. There was no significant difference in children’s physical activity levels between the two preschool types (p = 0.709). However, the qualitative data showed differences in the design and quality of programmes to promote children’s physical activity. Data triangulation revealed a strong influence of parental behaviour. The triangulation of methods provided comprehensive insight into the nature and extent of physical activity programmes in preschools and made it possible to capture the associations between systematic physical activity promotion and children’s health resources in a differential manner. PMID:24577283

  1. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations.

  2. Chd7 is indispensable for mammalian brain development through activation of a neuronal differentiation programme.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weijun; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Körkel-Qu, Huiqin; Deng, Huan; Serger, Elisabeth; Sieber, Laura; Lieberman, Jenna Ariel; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Lambo, Sander; Hanna, Bola S; Harim, Yassin; Jansen, Malin; Neuerburg, Anna; Friesen, Olga; Zuckermann, Marc; Rajendran, Vijayanad; Gronych, Jan; Ayrault, Olivier; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A; Lichter, Peter; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Pfister, Stefan M; Liu, Hai-Kun

    2017-03-20

    Mutations in chromatin modifier genes are frequently associated with neurodevelopmental diseases. We herein demonstrate that the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (Chd7), frequently associated with CHARGE syndrome, is indispensable for normal cerebellar development. Genetic inactivation of Chd7 in cerebellar granule neuron progenitors leads to cerebellar hypoplasia in mice, due to the impairment of granule neuron differentiation, induction of apoptosis and abnormal localization of Purkinje cells, which closely recapitulates known clinical features in the cerebella of CHARGE patients. Combinatory molecular analyses reveal that Chd7 is required for the maintenance of open chromatin and thus activation of genes essential for granule neuron differentiation. We further demonstrate that both Chd7 and Top2b are necessary for the transcription of a set of long neuronal genes in cerebellar granule neurons. Altogether, our comprehensive analyses reveal a mechanism with chromatin remodellers governing brain development via controlling a core transcriptional programme for cell-specific differentiation.

  3. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations. PMID:25985872

  4. Chd7 is indispensable for mammalian brain development through activation of a neuronal differentiation programme

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Weijun; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Körkel-Qu, Huiqin; Deng, Huan; Serger, Elisabeth; Sieber, Laura; Lieberman, Jenna Ariel; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Lambo, Sander; Hanna, Bola S.; Harim, Yassin; Jansen, Malin; Neuerburg, Anna; Friesen, Olga; Zuckermann, Marc; Rajendran, Vijayanad; Gronych, Jan; Ayrault, Olivier; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T. W.; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Lichter, Peter; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Pfister, Stefan M.; Liu, Hai-Kun

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in chromatin modifier genes are frequently associated with neurodevelopmental diseases. We herein demonstrate that the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (Chd7), frequently associated with CHARGE syndrome, is indispensable for normal cerebellar development. Genetic inactivation of Chd7 in cerebellar granule neuron progenitors leads to cerebellar hypoplasia in mice, due to the impairment of granule neuron differentiation, induction of apoptosis and abnormal localization of Purkinje cells, which closely recapitulates known clinical features in the cerebella of CHARGE patients. Combinatory molecular analyses reveal that Chd7 is required for the maintenance of open chromatin and thus activation of genes essential for granule neuron differentiation. We further demonstrate that both Chd7 and Top2b are necessary for the transcription of a set of long neuronal genes in cerebellar granule neurons. Altogether, our comprehensive analyses reveal a mechanism with chromatin remodellers governing brain development via controlling a core transcriptional programme for cell-specific differentiation. PMID:28317875

  5. The SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme: Current activities and future key tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, A. A.; Lamoureux, S. F.; Decaulne, A.

    2012-04-01

    Projected climate change in cold regions is expected to alter melt season duration and intensity, along with the number of extreme rainfall events, total annual precipitation and the balance between snowfall and rainfall. Similarly, changes to the thermal balance are expected to reduce the extent of permafrost and seasonal ground frost and increase active layer depths. These effects will undoubtedly change surface environments in cold regions and alter the fluxes of sediments, nutrients and solutes, but the absence of quantitative data and coordinated process monitoring and analysis to understand the sensitivity of the Earth surface environment is acute in cold climate environments. The International Association of Geomorphologists (I.A.G./A.I.G.)SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme was formed in 2005 to address this existing key knowledge gap. SEDIBUD currently has about 400 members worldwide and the Steering Committee of this international programme is composed of ten scientists from eight different countries: Achim A. Beylich (Chair) (Norway), Armelle Decaulne (Secretary) (France), John C. Dixon (USA), Scott F. Lamoureux (Vice-Chair) (Canada), John F. Orwin (Canada), Jan-Christoph Otto (Austria), Irina Overeem (USA), Thorsteinn Saemundsson (Iceland), Jeff Warburton (UK), Zbigniew Zwolinski (Poland). The central research question of this global group of scientists is to: Assess and model the contemporary sedimentary fluxes in cold climates, with emphasis on both particulate and dissolved components. Initially formed as European Science Foundation (ESF) Network SEDIFLUX (2004-2006), SEDIBUD has further expanded to a global group of researchers with field research sites located in polar and alpine regions in the northern and southern hemisphere. Research carried out at each of the close to 50 defined SEDIBUD key test sites varies by programme, logistics and available resources, but typically represent interdisciplinary collaborations of

  6. A primary school active break programme (ACTI-BREAK): study protocol for a pilot cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda; Timperio, Anna; Brown, Helen; Hesketh, Kylie D

    2017-09-19

    Levels of overall physical activity have been shown to decline across childhood. Schools are considered ideal settings to promote physical activity as children spend a large amount of their waking hours at school. Time-efficient physical activity strategies that demonstrate a positive impact on academic-related outcomes are needed to enable physical activity to be prioritised in the school day. The ACTI-BREAK programme requires classroom teachers to integrate active breaks; 5-min bursts of moderate-intensity physical activity into their classroom routine. Active breaks have been shown to be effective in improving academic-related outcomes, a potentially appealing aspect for teachers and schools. The primary aim of this study is to assess the feasibility and potential efficacy of the ACTI-BREAK programme on children's academic achievement. Secondary aims are to explore the impact of ACTI-BREAK on children's on-task behaviour and objectively measured physical activity levels. ACTI-BREAK is a 6-week, classroom-based, physical activity intervention. This pilot trial of the programme will be evaluated using a cluster randomised controlled design. Government primary schools in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia will be invited to participate in the programme in 2017. Randomisation will occur at the school level, with the aim to recruit six schools (three intervention and three control). The ACTI-BREAK programme is theoretically grounded, and was developed with input and guidance from current primary school teachers. Teachers from the intervention schools will receive a 45-min training session and be asked to incorporate ACTI-BREAKS into their classroom routine three times per day for 6 weeks. Intervention support will be provided via assisted delivery. The primary outcomes will be children's academic achievement in mathematics and reading. Children's on-task behaviour and school-day physical activity will be assessed as secondary outcomes. Process evaluation will also be

  7. A programmable laboratory testbed in support of evaluation of functional brain activation and connectivity.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Randall L; Graber, Harry L; Xu, Yong; Pei, Yaling; Schmitz, Christoph H; Pfeil, Douglas S; Tyagi, Anandita; Andronica, Randy; Lee, Daniel C; Barbour, San-Lian S; Nichols, J David; Pflieger, Mark E

    2012-03-01

    An important determinant of the value of quantitative neuroimaging studies is the reliability of the derived information, which is a function of the data collection conditions. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencelphalography are independent sensing domains that are well suited to explore principal elements of the brain's response to neuroactivation, and whose integration supports development of compact, even wearable, systems suitable for use in open environments. In an effort to maximize the translatability and utility of such resources, we have established an experimental laboratory testbed that supports measures and analysis of simulated macroscopic bioelectric and hemodynamic responses of the brain. Principal elements of the testbed include 1) a programmable anthropomorphic head phantom containing a multisignal source array embedded within a matrix that approximates the background optical and bioelectric properties of the brain, 2) integrated translatable headgear that support multimodal studies, and 3) an integrated data analysis environment that supports anatomically based mapping of experiment-derived measures that are directly and not directly observable. Here, we present a description of system components and fabrication, an overview of the analysis environment, and findings from a representative study that document the ability to experimentally validate effective connectivity models based on NIRS tomography.

  8. A multichannel integrated circuit for electrical recording of neural activity, with independent channel programmability.

    PubMed

    Mora Lopez, Carolina; Prodanov, Dimiter; Braeken, Dries; Gligorijevic, Ivan; Eberle, Wolfgang; Bartic, Carmen; Puers, Robert; Gielen, Georges

    2012-04-01

    Since a few decades, micro-fabricated neural probes are being used, together with microelectronic interfaces, to get more insight in the activity of neuronal networks. The need for higher temporal and spatial recording resolutions imposes new challenges on the design of integrated neural interfaces with respect to power consumption, data handling and versatility. In this paper, we present an integrated acquisition system for in vitro and in vivo recording of neural activity. The ASIC consists of 16 low-noise, fully-differential input channels with independent programmability of its amplification (from 100 to 6000 V/V) and filtering (1-6000 Hz range) capabilities. Each channel is AC-coupled and implements a fourth-order band-pass filter in order to steeply attenuate out-of-band noise and DC input offsets. The system achieves an input-referred noise density of 37 nV/√Hz, a NEF of 5.1, a CMRR > 60 dB, a THD < 1% and a sampling rate of 30 kS/s per channel, while consuming a maximum of 70 μA per channel from a single 3.3 V. The ASIC was implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology and has a total area of 5.6 × 4.5 mm². The recording system was successfully validated in in vitro and in vivo experiments, achieving simultaneous multichannel recordings of cell activity with satisfactory signal-to-noise ratios.

  9. Study protocol: using the Q-STEPS to assess and improve the quality of physical activity programmes for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Marques, Ana I; Rosa, Maria J; Amorim, Marlene; Soares, Pedro; Oliveira-Tavares, António; Santos, Rute; Mota, Jorge; Carvalho, Joana

    2012-07-09

    Aging is one of the most important and obvious phenomenon observed in our society. In the past years, there has been a growing concern in designing physical activity (PA) programmes for elderly people, because evidence suggests that such health promotion interventions may reduce the deleterious effects of the ageing process. Accordingly, a growing body of literature points to the importance of a sound approach to planning and evaluation in order to improve the quality of PA programmes. However, while numerous PA programmes have been designed for the elderly in recent years, their evaluation has been scarce. Quality management processes and tools provide a practical way for organisations to assess, identify and shed light on the areas requiring improvement. The Quality Self-assessment Tool for Exercise Programmes for Seniors (Q-STEPS) seems to provide a framework tailored to evaluate PA programmes for the elderly. The primary purpose of this study is 1) to determine feasibility, acceptability and usability of the Q-STEPS. Secondary purposes of the study are: 2) to examine the quality of the PA programmes for elderly people developed by the Portuguese Local Administration over a three-year period of self-assessments in terms of: a) Enabler domains (Leadership, Policy and Strategy, People, Partnership and Resources, Processes); b) Result domains (Customer Results, People Results, Society Results and Key Performance Results); 3) to estimate the association between the use of Q-STEPS and some indicators relating to the elderly participants, during the three self-assessments, such as: attendance rates, physical fitness, health-related quality of life and the elderly's perceived quality of the programme. The study will be conducted in PA programmes for elderly adults from mainland Portuguese municipalities over a three-year period. The project will adopt a participative quality improvement approach that features annual learning cycles of: 1) self-assessment with the Q

  10. Indian Solar Cities Programme: An Overview of Major Activities and Accomplishments; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper details the Indian Solar City Programme, provides an overview of one city's Master Plan and implementation progress, describes NREL's support of the Indian Solar City Programme, and outlines synergies and differences between the Indian and American programs including unique challenges and opportunities India is facing.

  11. Establishment of a family-centred care programme with follow-up home visits: implications for clinical care and economic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hüning, B M; Reimann, M; Beerenberg, U; Stein, A; Schmidt, A; Felderhoff-Müser, U

    2012-11-01

    Elternberatung Frühstart is a family-centred care programme for very preterm infants and seriously ill neonates and their parents. The uniqueness of this programme is in its consistency and continuity in parental counselling from pregnancy at risk to follow-up home visits. Family-centred care is provided by specialised nurses, a social education worker, a case manager, a psychologist and neonatologists. They give support and information to parents and facilitate transition to home including co-ordination of health care services and support networks. The programme starts with information for parents at risk of preterm delivery to lessen their anxieties and worries. After birth, parental bonding is encouraged and parents are involved in daily care procedures. The following weeks focus on communication, information and education in order to enhance parental competence. Discharge planning and coordinated follow-up visits involve the family doctor and several members of the welfare and health care system. One of the key objectives is to prevent re-hospitalisation. Over a 4 year period 330 families participated. Funding is provided by: 1) the hospital, from admission to discharge equivalent to one full-time nursing staff, 2) charity donations for follow-up visits and 3) health care insurance for social medical aftercare (Bunter Kreis) following §43, 2 SGB V in severe cases. As a result of this programme, the median length of stay was reduced by 24 days; the number of patients that stayed longer than average were reduced by 64% in the group of patients born < 1 500 g. At the same time the patient throughput increased from 243 to 413. To conclude, a family-centred care programme with coordinated follow-up increases parental satisfaction, reduces the length of the hospital stay and is therefore profitable. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. From Passive to Active Learners: The "Lived Experience" of Nurses in a Specialist Nephrology Nursing Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridger, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the lived experience of learning for a group of staff nurses in the Middle East, who undertook a post-registration nursing education programme in the speciality of nephrology nursing (the NNP) between 2001 and 2002. The broad-based curriculum seeks to develop the staff nurses into active learners, able to…

  13. Effects of Leisure Education Programme Including Sportive Activities on Perceived Freedom in Leisure of Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertuzun, Ezgi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to determine the effect of leisure education programme including sportive activities on the perceived freedom in leisure of adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities. The research was designed with an experimental group (n = 37) and a control group (n = 34), and was conducted among a total of 71…

  14. From Passive to Active Learners: The "Lived Experience" of Nurses in a Specialist Nephrology Nursing Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridger, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the lived experience of learning for a group of staff nurses in the Middle East, who undertook a post-registration nursing education programme in the speciality of nephrology nursing (the NNP) between 2001 and 2002. The broad-based curriculum seeks to develop the staff nurses into active learners, able to…

  15. Impact of a Six-Month Empowerment-Based Exercise Intervention Programme in Non-Physically Active Adolescent Swedish Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Eva-Carin; Baigi, Amir; Apitzsch, Erwin; Bergh, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated changes in self-efficacy in non-physically active adolescent girls (13-19 years old) who participated in a six-month, empowerment-based exercise intervention programme (EIP). Design: The study used a pre- and post-test randomized group design and included one pre- and one post-test (at six months) and non-physically…

  16. Active optics null test system based on a liquid crystal programmable spatial light modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ares, Miguel; Royo, Santiago; Sergievskaya, Irina; Riu, Jordi

    2010-11-10

    We present an active null test system adapted to test lenses and wavefronts with complex shapes and strong local deformations. This system provides greater flexibility than conventional static null tests that match only a precisely positioned, individual wavefront. The system is based on a cylindrical Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, a commercial liquid crystal programmable phase modulator (PPM), which acts as the active null corrector, enabling the compensation of large strokes with high fidelity in a single iteration, and a spatial filter to remove unmodulated light when steep phase changes are compensated. We have evaluated the PPM's phase response at 635 nm and checked its performance by measuring its capability to generate different amounts of defocus aberration, finding root mean squared errors below {lambda}/18 for spherical wavefronts with peak-to-valley heights of up to 78.7{lambda}, which stands as the limit from which diffractive artifacts created by the PPM have been found to be critical under no spatial filtering. Results of a null test for a complex lens (an ophthalmic customized progressive addition lens) are presented and discussed.

  17. Active optics null test system based on a liquid crystal programmable spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Ares, Miguel; Royo, Santiago; Sergievskaya, Irina; Riu, Jordi

    2010-11-10

    We present an active null test system adapted to test lenses and wavefronts with complex shapes and strong local deformations. This system provides greater flexibility than conventional static null tests that match only a precisely positioned, individual wavefront. The system is based on a cylindrical Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, a commercial liquid crystal programmable phase modulator (PPM), which acts as the active null corrector, enabling the compensation of large strokes with high fidelity in a single iteration, and a spatial filter to remove unmodulated light when steep phase changes are compensated. We have evaluated the PPM's phase response at 635 nm and checked its performance by measuring its capability to generate different amounts of defocus aberration, finding root mean squared errors below λ/18 for spherical wavefronts with peak-to-valley heights of up to 78.7λ, which stands as the limit from which diffractive artifacts created by the PPM have been found to be critical under no spatial filtering. Results of a null test for a complex lens (an ophthalmic customized progressive addition lens) are presented and discussed.

  18. Active learning of geriatric rehabilitation: deliberations of an undergraduate occupational therapy programme.

    PubMed

    Chung, J C

    2001-01-01

    Occupational therapists working in geriatric rehabilitation must possess skills of self-directed learning and critical thinking, but conventional teaching-learning strategies are limited in acquiring the said skills. This action research aimed at developing in students an ability for active learning and problem solving. An inquiry-based learning (IBL) methodology was introduced to two geriatric-related subjects of an undergraduate occupational therapy (OT) programme. Students worked on four real-life problems in tutorials and participated in service learning. Lectures were carefully structured to consolidate theoretical knowledge generated from the problems. This study was evaluated qualitatively through interviews of both students and clinical educators, and reflective journals. Students found the problems and service learning stimulating enough to encourage active learning and develop basic study skills. Likewise, clinical educators noted students to be more competent when working with geriatric clients than former students who learned through a conventional curriculum. However, the IBL methodology was stressful in areas related to consistency of teaching-learning strategies across curriculum, workload and time constraints. Curriculum review, development of resource files and provision of systematic support are some of the recommendations to the challenges encountered. To conclude, the IBL approach provides appropriate learning environments that foster in students a self-directed learning attitude in the study of geriatric rehabilitation.

  19. Care of older people in nursing homes: an Intensive Programme as an educational activity within Erasmus-Socrates.

    PubMed

    Kotzabassaki, Stella; Alabaster, Erica S; And, Kati; Larsson, Ulla; de Vree, Willem

    2003-02-01

    The paper describes and discusses an Intensive Programme as a European educational activity within Erasmus-Socrates. As nurses and European citizens, it is important to know and understand each other's culture and to be able to work within a united Europe. Education plays a leading role in the preparation of professionals who will have to develop these skills. Based on the aims of Erasmus-Socrates, an Intensive Programme entitled 'Care of Older People in Nursing Homes' was designed, sponsored, and implemented over three continuous academic years with the participation of five European countries. The topic was selected due to its importance for Europe, as it is a region with an ageing population. A wide range of themes was covered using lectures, group discussion, exercises and study visits as teaching strategies. Evaluation suggests that the aims of the programme were achieved.

  20. Study protocol: using the Q-STEPS to assess and improve the quality of physical activity programmes for the elderly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aging is one of the most important and obvious phenomenon observed in our society. In the past years, there has been a growing concern in designing physical activity (PA) programmes for elderly people, because evidence suggests that such health promotion interventions may reduce the deleterious effects of the ageing process. Accordingly, a growing body of literature points to the importance of a sound approach to planning and evaluation in order to improve the quality of PA programmes. However, while numerous PA programmes have been designed for the elderly in recent years, their evaluation has been scarce. Quality management processes and tools provide a practical way for organisations to assess, identify and shed light on the areas requiring improvement. The Quality Self-assessment Tool for Exercise Programmes for Seniors (Q-STEPS) seems to provide a framework tailored to evaluate PA programmes for the elderly. Findings The primary purpose of this study is 1) to determine feasibility, acceptability and usability of the Q-STEPS. Secondary purposes of the study are: 2) to examine the quality of the PA programmes for elderly people developed by the Portuguese Local Administration over a three-year period of self-assessments in terms of: a) Enabler domains (Leadership, Policy and Strategy, People, Partnership and Resources, Processes); b) Result domains (Customer Results, People Results, Society Results and Key Performance Results); 3) to estimate the association between the use of Q-STEPS and some indicators relating to the elderly participants, during the three self-assessments, such as: attendance rates, physical fitness, health-related quality of life and the elderly’s perceived quality of the programme. The study will be conducted in PA programmes for elderly adults from mainland Portuguese municipalities over a three-year period. The project will adopt a participative quality improvement approach that features annual learning cycles of: 1) self

  1. A Structured Physical Activity and Fitness Programme for Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Results of a Cluster-Randomised Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Schijndel-Speet, M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; van Wijck, R.; van Montfort, K. C. A. G. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The physical activity level of older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) is extremely low, and their fitness levels are far beneath accepted norms for older people with normal intelligence and comparable with frail older people. A physical activity programme, including an education programme, was developed for older adults with…

  2. A Structured Physical Activity and Fitness Programme for Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Results of a Cluster-Randomised Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Schijndel-Speet, M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; van Wijck, R.; van Montfort, K. C. A. G. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The physical activity level of older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) is extremely low, and their fitness levels are far beneath accepted norms for older people with normal intelligence and comparable with frail older people. A physical activity programme, including an education programme, was developed for older adults with…

  3. Sexual and reproductive health activities in HIV programmes: can we monitor progress?

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Ryuichi; Lee, Donna; Lusti-Narasimhan, Manjula; Martineau, Tim; Vinh-Thomas, Elmar; Beer, Daniel Low; Atun, Rifat

    2011-03-01

    Resource allocation and integration of services have been of interest recently to achieve health-related Millennium Development Goals. This paper analyses the extent to which countries receiving funding in HIV were able to invest in activities in the area of sexual and reproductive health (SRH). The authors screened the Global Fund grants data with an aggregate investment of US$16 billion in 140 countries to identify indicators revealing typical SRH services. The analysis focused on the 'Top Ten' internationally agreed indicators and used international guidelines and frameworks to define services for SRH and opportunities for 'linkage' between HIV and SRH services. As of December 2008, 238 of all HIV grants (n = 252) from 133 countries included 1620 service delivery indicators related to SRH. The budgets amounted to US$9.1 billion with US$5.9 billion committed and US$4 billion disbursed. Services included (1) prevention of mother to child transmission for 445,000 HIV-positive pregnant women, (2) 5.7 million care and support services, (3) 1.2 billion condoms delivered, (4) 4.4 million episodes of sexually transmitted infections treated, (5) 61 million counselling and testing encounters, and (6) 11.6 million behavioural change communication (BCC) outreach services for people at high risk and 64.5 million BCC activities for the general population, including youth. Information on the linkage and integration of SRH-HIV services was limited. Around 94% of HIV programmes supported SRH-related activities. However, there is a need to systematically capture data on SRH-HIV service integration to understand the benefits of linking these services.

  4. Short- and long-term effects of a physical activity counselling programme in COPD: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Altenburg, Wytske A; ten Hacken, Nick H T; Bossenbroek, Linda; Kerstjens, Huib A M; de Greef, Mathieu H G; Wempe, Johan B

    2015-01-01

    We were interested in the effects of a physical activity (PA) counselling programme in three groups of COPD patients from general practice (primary care), outpatient clinic (secondary care) and pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). In this randomized controlled trial 155 COPD patients, 102 males, median (IQR) age 62 (54-69) y, FEV1predicted 60 (40-75) % were assigned to a 12-weeks' physical activity counselling programme or usual care. Physical activity (pedometer (Yamax SW200) and metabolic equivalents), exercise capacity (6-min walking distance) and quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire and Clinical COPD Questionnaire) were assessed at baseline, after three and 15 months. A significant difference between the counselling and usual care group in daily steps (803 steps, p = 0.001) and daily physical activity (2214 steps + equivalents, p = 0.001)) from 0 to 3 months was found in the total group, as well as in the outpatient (1816 steps, 2616 steps + equivalents, both p = 0.007) and PR (758 steps, 2151 steps + equivalents, both p = 0.03) subgroups. From 0 to 15 months no differences were found in physical activity. However, when patients with baseline physical activity>10,000 steps per day (n = 8), who are already sufficiently active, were excluded, a significant long-term effect of the counselling programme on daily physical activity existed in the total group (p = 0.02). Differences in exercise capacity and quality of life were found only from 0 to 3 months, in the outpatient subgroup. Our PA counselling programme effectively enhances PA level in COPD patients after three months. Sedentary patients at baseline still benefit after 15 months. ClinicalTrials.gov: registration number NCT00614796. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A programmable broadband low frequency active vibration isolation system for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Biao; Zhou, Lin; Xiong, Zongyuan; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2014-09-01

    Vibration isolation at low frequency is important for some precision measurement experiments that use atom interferometry. To decrease the vibrational noise caused by the reflecting mirror of Raman beams in atom interferometry, we designed and demonstrated a compact stable active low frequency vibration isolation system. In this system, a digital control subsystem is used to process and feedback the vibration measured by a seismometer. A voice coil actuator is used to control and cancel the motion of a commercial passive vibration isolation platform. With the help of field programmable gate array-based control subsystem, the vibration isolation system performed flexibly and accurately. When the feedback is on, the intrinsic resonance frequency of the system will change from 0.8 Hz to about 0.015 Hz. The vertical vibration (0.01-10 Hz) measured by the in-loop seismometer is reduced by an additional factor of up to 500 on the basis of a passive vibration isolation platform, and we have proved the performance by adding an additional seismometer as well as applying it in the atom interferometry experiment.

  6. A programmable broadband low frequency active vibration isolation system for atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Biao; Zhou, Lin; Xiong, Zongyuan; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2014-09-01

    Vibration isolation at low frequency is important for some precision measurement experiments that use atom interferometry. To decrease the vibrational noise caused by the reflecting mirror of Raman beams in atom interferometry, we designed and demonstrated a compact stable active low frequency vibration isolation system. In this system, a digital control subsystem is used to process and feedback the vibration measured by a seismometer. A voice coil actuator is used to control and cancel the motion of a commercial passive vibration isolation platform. With the help of field programmable gate array-based control subsystem, the vibration isolation system performed flexibly and accurately. When the feedback is on, the intrinsic resonance frequency of the system will change from 0.8 Hz to about 0.015 Hz. The vertical vibration (0.01-10 Hz) measured by the in-loop seismometer is reduced by an additional factor of up to 500 on the basis of a passive vibration isolation platform, and we have proved the performance by adding an additional seismometer as well as applying it in the atom interferometry experiment.

  7. National Report Germany: Sounding Rocket and Balloon Research Activities Supported by the German Space Programme in 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, R.; Gritzner, C.; Friedrichs, D.

    2015-09-01

    Mainly sounding rockets but also stratospheric balloons have played a crucial role in implementing the German Space Programme since many years. Research activities were conducted in the fields of Microgravity Research, Space Science, Earth Observation, Space Technology Development, and Education. Currently, the mesosphere and ionosphere of the Earth and the photosphere and chromosphere of the Sun are in the focus of German research activities in the field of Space Science. Microgravity related topics are studied in the disciplines of Life and Physical Sciences during ballistic TEXUS and MAPHEUS rocket flights. A lot of student activities are currently supported by the agencies SNSB and DLR under the auspices of the Swedish-German programme REXUS/BEXUS.

  8. Effectiveness of a hospital-based vascular screening programme (SMART) for risk factor management in patients with established vascular disease or type 2 diabetes: a parallel-group comparative study.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, B G; Visseren, F L J; Algra, A; van Bockel, J H; Bollen, E L E M; Doevendans, P A; Greving, J P; Kappelle, L J; Moll, F L; Pijl, H; Romijn, J A; van der Wall, E E; van der Graaf, Y

    2010-07-01

    Modification of vascular risk factors is effective in reducing mortality and morbidity in patients with symptomatic atherosclerosis; however, it is difficult to achieve and maintain. The aim of the Risk management in Utrecht and Leiden Evaluation (RULE) study was to assess risk factor status after referral in patients with established vascular disease or type 2 diabetes who took part in the multidisciplinary hospital-based vascular screening programme, Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease, compared with a group who did not participate in such a programme. Patients with type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease or peripheral arterial disease referred by general practitioners to the medical specialist at the University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht (a setting with a vascular screening programme of systematic screening of risk factors followed by treatment advice) and the Leiden UMC (a setting without such a screening programme), were enrolled in the study. Blood pressure, levels of lipids, glucose and creatinine, weight, waist circumference and smoking status were measured in patients 12-18 months after referral to the two hospitals. A total of 604 patients were treated in the setting with a vascular screening programme and 566 in the setting without such a programme; 70% of all patients were male, with a mean age of 61 +/- 10 years. Amongst screened patients, systolic blood pressure [2.5 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.3-4.6] and the level of LDL cholesterol (0.3 mmol L(-1), 95% CI 0.2-0.4) were lower compared with the group that received usual care, after a median of 16 months from referral. Systematic screening of risk factors, followed by evidence-based, tailored treatment advice contributed to slightly better risk factor reduction in patients with established vascular disease or type 2 diabetes. However, a large proportion of patients did not reach the treatment goals according to (inter)national guidelines. Systematic screening

  9. The mass miniature chest radiography programme in Cape Town, South Africa, 1948 - 1994: The impact of active tuberculosis case finding.

    PubMed

    Hermans, S M; Andrews, J R; Bekker, L-G; Wood, R

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) control programmes rely mainly on passive detection of symptomatic individuals. The resurgence of TB has rekindled interest in active case finding. Cape Town (South Africa) had a mass miniature radiography (MMR) screening programme from 1948 to 1994. To evaluate screening coverage, yield and secular trends in TB notifications during the MMR programme. We performed an ecological analysis of the MMR programme and TB notification data from the City of Cape Town Medical Officer of Health reports for 1948 - 1994. Between 1948 and 1962, MMR screening increased to 12% of the population per annum with yields of 14 cases per 1 000 X-rays performed, accounting for >20% of total annual TB notifications. Concurrent with increasing coverage (1948 - 1965), TB case notification decreased in the most heavily TB-burdened non-European population from 844/100 000 population to 415/100 000. After 1966, coverage declined and TB notifications that initially remained stable (1967 - 1978) subsequently increased to 525/100 000. MMR yields remained low in the European population but declined rapidly in the non-European population after 1966, coincidental with forced removals from District 6. An inverse relationship between screening coverage and TB notification rates was observed in the non-European adult population. Similar secular trends occurred in infants and young children who were not part of the MMR screening programme. MMR of a high-burdened population may have significantly contributed to TB control and was temporally associated with decreased transmission to infants and children. These historical findings emphasise the importance of re-exploring targeted active case finding strategies as part of population TB control.

  10. Developmental programming of energy balance regulation: is physical activity more 'programmable' than food intake?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaoyu; Eclarinal, Jesse; Baker, Maria S; Li, Ge; Waterland, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Extensive human and animal model data show that environmental influences during critical periods of prenatal and early postnatal development can cause persistent alterations in energy balance regulation. Although a potentially important factor in the worldwide obesity epidemic, the fundamental mechanisms underlying such developmental programming of energy balance are poorly understood, limiting our ability to intervene. Most studies of developmental programming of energy balance have focused on persistent alterations in the regulation of energy intake; energy expenditure has been relatively underemphasised. In particular, very few studies have evaluated developmental programming of physical activity. The aim of this review is to summarise recent evidence that early environment may have a profound impact on establishment of individual propensity for physical activity. Recently, we characterised two different mouse models of developmental programming of obesity; one models fetal growth restriction followed by catch-up growth, and the other models early postnatal overnutrition. In both studies, we observed alterations in body-weight regulation that persisted to adulthood, but no group differences in food intake. Rather, in both cases, programming of energy balance appeared to be due to persistent alterations in energy expenditure and spontaneous physical activity (SPA). These effects were stronger in female offspring. We are currently exploring the hypothesis that developmental programming of SPA occurs via induced sex-specific alterations in epigenetic regulation in the hypothalamus and other regions of the central nervous system. We will summarise the current progress towards testing this hypothesis. Early environmental influences on establishment of physical activity are likely an important factor in developmental programming of energy balance. Understanding the fundamental underlying mechanisms in appropriate animal models will help determine whether early life

  11. [Establishment of a method for determining the sphingosine kinase activity and its initial application].

    PubMed

    Duan, Hai-Feng; Jia, Xiang-Xu; Cai, Xiang-Sheng; Lu, Ying; Wang, Li-Sheng; Wu, Zu-Ze

    2005-11-01

    To establish the methods for determining the activity of sphingosine kinase(SPK) and the content of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in biological samples. The ECV304 cells were transfected with pcDNA3 vector encoding Flag-labeled SPK gene. The expression of SPK was measured by Western blot assay and the activity of SPK was determined by enzymatic reaction, isotope incorporation and thin-layer chromatography methods. The S1P in biological samples was extracted, digested by alkaline phosphatase and then catalyzed by SPK. The S1P contents were determined according to the amounts of products. SPK gene transfection could enhance the expression and activity of SPK in cells markedly, and the cellular S1P was also increased obviously. HGF stimulation could increase the activity of SPK and cellular S1P in ECV304 cells. Methods for determining the activity of SPK and the content of SPK in biological samples were established.

  12. The UK Midwifery Study System (UKMidSS): a programme of work to establish a research infrastructure to carry out national studies of uncommon conditions and events in midwifery units.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Rachel E; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; Hollowell, Jennifer; Knight, Marian

    2016-04-14

    Midwifery-led care during labour and birth in the UK is increasingly important given national commitments to choice of place of birth, reduction of unnecessary intervention and improving women's experience of care, and evidence on safety and benefits for 'low risk' women. Further evidence is needed on safety and potential benefits of midwifery-led care for some groups of 'higher risk' women and about uncommon adverse outcomes or 'near-miss' events. Uncommon obstetric events and conditions have been investigated since 2005 using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System. This programme of research will establish the UK Midwifery Study System (UKMidSS) in all UK alongside midwifery units (AMUs) and carry out the first two UKMidSS studies investigating: (i) outcomes in severely obese women admitted to AMUs, and (ii) risk factors for neonatal unit admission following birth in an AMU. We will carry out national cohort and case-control studies using UKMidSS, a national data collection platform which we will establish to collect anonymised information from all UK AMUs. Reporting midwives in each AMU will actively report cases or nil returns in response to monthly notification emails. Denominator data on the number of women admitted to and giving birth in each AMU will also be collected. Anonymised data on risk factors, management and outcomes for cases and controls/comparators as appropriate for each study, will be collected electronically using information from medical records. We will calculate incidence and prevalence with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), tabulate descriptive data using frequencies and proportions, and use logistic regression to estimate odds ratios with 95% CIs comparing specific outcomes in case and comparison women and to investigate risk factors for conditions or outcomes. As the first national infrastructure facilitating research into uncommon events and conditions in women starting labour in midwifery-led settings, UKMidSS builds on the success of

  13. The special programme of research in human reproduction: forty years of activities to achieve reproductive health for all.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; d'Arcangues, Catherine; Harris Requejo, Jennifer; Schafer, Alessandra; Say, Lale; Merialdi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Special Programme of Research in Human Reproduction (HRP), co-sponsored by the UNDP, UNFPA, WHO, and the World Bank, is celebrating 40 years of activities with an expansion of its mandate and new co-sponsors. When it began, in 1972, the main focus was on evaluating the acceptability, effectiveness, and safety of existing fertility-regulating methods, as well as developing new, improved modalities for family planning. In 1994, HRP not only made major contributions to the Plan of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD); it also broadened its scope of work to include other aspects of health dealing with sexuality and reproduction, adding a specific perspective on gender issues and human rights. In 2002, HRP's mandate was once again broadened to include sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS and in 2003 it was further expanded to research activities on preventing violence against women and its many dire health consequences. Today, the work of the Programme includes research on: the sexual and reproductive health of adolescents, women, and men; maternal and perinatal health; reproductive tract and sexually transmitted infections (including HIV/AIDS); family planning; infertility; unsafe abortion; sexual health; screening for cancer of the cervix in developing countries, and gender and reproductive rights. Additional activities by the Programme have included: fostering international cooperation in the field of human reproduction; the elaboration of WHO's first Global Reproductive Health Strategy; work leading to the inclusion of ICPD's goal 'reproductive health for all by 2015' into the Millennium Development Goal framework; the promotion of critical interagency statements on the public health, legal, and human rights implications of female genital mutilation and gender-biased sex selection. Finally, HRP has been involved in the creation of guidelines and tools, such as the 'Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use

  14. Indian Solar Cities Programme: An Overview of Major Activities and Accomplishments (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.

    2012-05-01

    Indian Solar Cities Programme supports 60 Indian cities in the development of EE and RE projects. Aims to reduce conventional energy demand by 10% by 2013, compared to a baseline year of 2008, and support is provided to municipal corporations for preparing and implementing a master plan.

  15. Go Edvin! Pedagogical Structuring of Activities to Support Toddler Participation in an Early Childcare Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kultti, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The present paper addresses children's participation through pedagogical structuring in an early childcare programme in Australia. Research shows inequality in participatory opportunities depending on skills in the spoken (majority) language. Against this background, the focus in the present study is on participatory opportunities for toddlers…

  16. 78 FR 16520 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application To Establish a Centralized Examination Station

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ..., Office of Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the OMB Desk Officer for U.S. Customs... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Application To Establish a Centralized Examination Station AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department...

  17. A Guide to Establishing an Activity Center for Mentally Retarded Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Allan

    The guide contains basic information for establishing a work activity center, a work-oriented facility providing compensatory pre-vocational and vocational education and training programs for men and women of post-school age. The center serves those mentally retarded adults not developmentally prepared to enter a sheltered workshop program. The…

  18. Activities That Increase Germination and Establishment of Longleaf Pine Seedlings in Containers

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett

    2002-01-01

    Critical to the successful production of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) container stock is use of high quality seeds that are properly prepared and sown. Uniformity in germination and establishment in containers makes nursery production easier and more profitable for the grower. Activities that affect seedling performance include: time of seed...

  19. The UNESCO Bioethics Programme: a review.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Adéle

    2014-01-01

    UNESCO's Bioethics Programme was established in 1993. In twenty years it has adopted three international declarations, on the human genome (1997), human genetic data (2003) and bioethics (2005); produced reports on a wide range of bioethics issues; and developed capacity building and public education programmes in bioethics. Yet UNESCO has sometimes struggled to assert its authority in the wider bioethics world. Some bioethicists have criticized the 2005 declaration and suggested that the World Health Organization might be better placed to advance bioethics. In 2011, after four years of debate, UNESCO decided not to draft a convention on human reproductive cloning, because consensus on the issue proved impossible. This article reviews the standard setting and capacity building activities of the UNESCO Bioethics Programme. While the Programme faces challenges common to most intergovernmental organizations, its achievements in expanding international law and building bioethics capacity should not be underestimated.

  20. The UNESCO Bioethics Programme: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Adèle

    2017-01-01

    UNESCO’s Bioethics Programme was established in 1993. In twenty years it has adopted three international declarations, on the human genome (1997), human genetic data (2003) and bioethics (2005); produced reports on a wide range of bioethics issues; and developed capacity building and public education programmes in bioethics. Yet UNESCO has sometimes struggled to assert its authority in the wider bioethics world. Some bioethicists have criticized the 2005 declaration and suggested that the World Health Organization might be better placed to advance bioethics. In 2011, after four years of debate, UNESCO decided not to draft a convention on human reproductive cloning, because consensus on the issue proved impossible. This article reviews the standard setting and capacity building activities of the UNESCO Bioethics Programme. While the Programme faces challenges common to most intergovernmental organizations, its achievements in expanding international law and building bioethics capacity should not be underestimated. PMID:24979873

  1. [Active Health Promotion among the Aged--Transfer of a Programme from an Urban to a Rural Area].

    PubMed

    Mnich, E; Hofreuter-Gätgens, K; von dem Knesebeck, O

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the programme "active health promotion in old age" is to improve physical activity, healthy nutrition and the social integration of older people. The intervention has been successfully implemented in an urban setting and was then transferred to a rural area. Although the rural area has a major impact on recruitment, access, and factors of implementation, results demonstrate that overall the intervention was implemented successfully. Moreover, structural conditions (e.g., availability of fitness clubs) are essential for a successful transfer. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Protocol of a longitudinal cohort study on physical activity behaviour in physically disabled patients participating in a rehabilitation counselling programme: ReSpAct

    PubMed Central

    Alingh, Rolinde A; Hoekstra, Femke; van der Schans, Cees P; Hettinga, Florentina J; Dekker, Rienk; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stimulating physical activity behaviour in persons with a physical disability is important, especially after discharge from rehabilitation. A tailored counselling programme covering both the period of the rehabilitation treatment and the first months at home seems on the average effective. However, a considerable variation in response is observed in the sense that some patients show a relevant beneficial response while others show no or only a small response on physical activity behaviour. The Rehabilitation, Sports and Active lifestyle (ReSpAct) study aims to estimate the associations of patient and programme characteristics with patients’ physical activity behaviour after their participation in a tailored counselling programme. Methods and analysis A questionnaire-based nationwide longitudinal prospective cohort study is conducted. Participants are recruited from 18 rehabilitation centres and hospitals in The Netherlands. 2000 participants with a physical disability or chronic disease will be followed during and after their participation in a tailored counselling programme. Programme outcomes on physical activity behaviour and patient as well as programme characteristics that may be associated with differences in physical activity behaviour after programme completion are being assessed. Data collection takes place at baseline and 14, 33 and 52 weeks after discharge from rehabilitation. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol has been approved by the Medical Ethics Committee of the University Medical Centre Groningen and at individual participating institutions. All participants give written informed consent. The study results will provide new insights into factors that may help explain the differences in physical activity behaviour of patients with a physical disability after they have participated in the same physical activity and sports stimulation programme. Thereby, it will support healthcare professionals to tailor their guidance and

  3. Protocol of a longitudinal cohort study on physical activity behaviour in physically disabled patients participating in a rehabilitation counselling programme: ReSpAct.

    PubMed

    Alingh, Rolinde A; Hoekstra, Femke; van der Schans, Cees P; Hettinga, Florentina J; Dekker, Rienk; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2015-01-29

    Stimulating physical activity behaviour in persons with a physical disability is important, especially after discharge from rehabilitation. A tailored counselling programme covering both the period of the rehabilitation treatment and the first months at home seems on the average effective. However, a considerable variation in response is observed in the sense that some patients show a relevant beneficial response while others show no or only a small response on physical activity behaviour. The Rehabilitation, Sports and Active lifestyle (ReSpAct) study aims to estimate the associations of patient and programme characteristics with patients' physical activity behaviour after their participation in a tailored counselling programme. A questionnaire-based nationwide longitudinal prospective cohort study is conducted. Participants are recruited from 18 rehabilitation centres and hospitals in The Netherlands. 2000 participants with a physical disability or chronic disease will be followed during and after their participation in a tailored counselling programme. Programme outcomes on physical activity behaviour and patient as well as programme characteristics that may be associated with differences in physical activity behaviour after programme completion are being assessed. Data collection takes place at baseline and 14, 33 and 52 weeks after discharge from rehabilitation. The study protocol has been approved by the Medical Ethics Committee of the University Medical Centre Groningen and at individual participating institutions. All participants give written informed consent. The study results will provide new insights into factors that may help explain the differences in physical activity behaviour of patients with a physical disability after they have participated in the same physical activity and sports stimulation programme. Thereby, it will support healthcare professionals to tailor their guidance and care to individual patients in order to stimulate physical

  4. Effects of self-management support programmes on activities of daily living of older adults: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Het Bolscher-Niehuis, Marian J T; den Ouden, Marjolein E M; de Vocht, Hilde M; Francke, Anneke L

    2016-09-01

    The ability of older adults to carry out activities of daily living and to adapt and to manage their own life decreases due to deterioration of their physical and cognitive condition. Nurses and other health care professionals should support the self-management ability of older adults to prevent activities of daily living dependence and increase the ability to adapt and to self-manage the consequences of living with a chronic condition. To gain insight into the evidence of the effects of self-management support programmes on the activities of daily living of older adults living at home. A systematic literature review of original research publications. Searches were performed in PubMed, CINAHL, PsychInfo, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (in February 2016). No limitations were applied regarding date of publication, language or country. Publications were eligible for this review on condition that they described a self-management support programme directed at adults of on average 65 years or older, and living in the community; used a randomized control group design; and presented information about the effects on activities of daily living. The methodological quality of the included studies was independently assessed by the authors using the quality criteria for reviews of the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Review Group. A best evidence synthesis was performed using guidelines provided by the Cochrane Collaboration Back Review Group. A total of 6246 potentially relevant references were found. After screening the references, 12 studies with a randomized controlled trial design were included. The methodological assessment of the 12 studies indicated variations in the risk of bias from low (n=1) to unclear (n=3) and high (n=8). Although there was considerable variation in study population, intervention characteristics and measurement instruments used, most studies (n=11) showed effects of self-management support

  5. Programmable active memories in real-time tasks: implementing data-driven triggers for LHC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belosloudtsev, D.; Bertin, P.; Bock, R. K.; Boucard, P.; Dörsing, V.; Kammel, P.; Khabarov, S.; Klefenz, F.; Krischer, W.; Kugel, A.; Lundheim, L.; Männer, R.; Moll, L.; Noffz, K. H.; Reinsch, A.; Ronein, D.; Shand, M.; Vuillemin, J.; Zoz, R.

    1995-02-01

    The future Large Hadron Collider (LHC), to be built at CERN, presents among other technological challenges a formidable problem of real-time data analysis. At a primary event rate of 40 MHz, a multi-stage trigger system has to analyze data to decide which is the fraction of events that should be preserved on permanent storage for further analysis. We report on implementations of local algorithms for feature extraction as part of triggering, using the detectors of the proposed ATLAS experiment as a model. The algorithms were implemented for a decision frequency of 100 kHz, on different data-driven programmable devices based on structures of field-programmable gate arrays and memories. The implementations were demonstrated at full speed with emulated input, and were also integrated into a prototype detector running in a test beam at CERN, in June 1994.

  6. Efficiency of the home parental programme in visual-motor home activity among first-grade children.

    PubMed

    Ratzon, N Z; Zabaneh-Tannas, K; Ben-Hamo, L; Bart, Orit

    2010-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy of the home parental programme (HPP) in improving children's visual-motor skills, and to assess parent satisfaction with the programme. Forty-five children and their parents participated in the study: 23 children and their parents in the study group (children receiving consultation in the classroom and whose parents participated in the HPP) and 22 children and their parents in the control group (children receiving consultation in the classroom only). All children were recruited based on their scores on the Visual Motor Integration test or upon teacher referral. The Developmental Test of Visual Perception-2 administered before and after intervention served as an outcome measure. HPP lasted approximately 12 weeks and included relevant visual-motor activities carried out at home by the parents with their children. The study failed to prove that HPP improved children's visual-motor skills beyond the other service delivery methods used in the present study. Parent satisfaction was significantly higher among those who participated in the HPP. Parents showed high compliance with the friendly programme despite their low socio-economic status.

  7. [Analysis of fourteen French national programmes on physical activity and sports as determinants of health from 2001 to 2006].

    PubMed

    Bréchat, Pierre-Henri; Vogel, Thomas; Berthel, Marc; Kaltenbach, Georges; Le Divenah, Aude; Segouin, Christophe; Rymer, Roland; Lonsdorfer, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity and sports are considered as one of the determinants of health. The aim of this study is to review the rationale for the formulation of this public health issue and its integration in national action plans. The study shows that fourteen national programmes were drafted and implemented between 2001 and 2006 by seven institutions. The research methodology was based on crossing data obtained from semi-directed interviews and documents regarding the design, implementation and follow-up of these programmes. For the conditions of the success, the fourteen actions scored an average of 175.0 +/- 66.9 out of 300%. Public health actors and professionals must be given more opportunities to involve themselves and engage in developing stronger relationships and linkages, in particular with the institutional and community settings. In general, the most invested parts of a programme are the structural and operational aspects of activities. Six significant points surfaced from the study: consideration of drug use as an addictive behaviour; recognition of the psychological stress of professional athletes; acknowledgment of youth as being at high risk for doping behaviour; integration of the concept that physical activity and sports must take the benefit/risk perspective into account; and the necessity to promote health. Through the exchange of numerous local and regional experiences, an optimisation of their synergistic connections was made possible on a continuum extending from "health promotion through physical activity and sports" to "prevention of drug-use and doping behaviours". Professionals have been able to develop actions in the above-mentioned domains across this continuum that have, to date, remained isolated. Proposals are made to strengthen these dynamics. Other health determinants and public health priorities could be investigated with the same methodology.

  8. Epsin2 promotes polarity establishment and meiotic division through activating Cdc42 in mouse oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaqi; Liu, Xiaohui; Ma, Rujun; Hou, Xiaojing; Ge, Juan; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Epsins are a conserved family of endocytic adaptors essential for diverse biological events. However, its role in oocytes remains completely unknown. Here, we report that specific depletion of Epsin2 in mouse oocytes significantly disrupts meiotic progression. Confocal microscopy reveals that Epsin2 knockdown results in the failure of actin cap formation and polar body extrusion during meiosis, indicative of the importance of Epsin2 in polarity establishment and cytokinesis. In addition, spindle defects and chromosome misalignment are readily observed in oocytes depleted of Epsin2. Moreover, we find that Epsin2 knockdown markedly decreases the activity of Cdc42 in oocytes and importantly, that the dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42 (Cdc42Q61L) is capable of partially rescuing the deficient phenotypes of Epsin2-knockdown oocytes. Together, our data identify Epsin2 as a novel player in regulating oocyte maturation, and demonstrate that Epsin2 promotes polarity establishment and meiotic division via activating Cdc42. PMID:27463009

  9. Effects of a one-year physical activity programme for women with systemic lupus erythematosus - a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Boström, C; Elfving, B; Dupré, B; Opava, C H; Lundberg, I E; Jansson, E

    2016-05-01

    To study the effects of a one-year physical activity programme on aerobic capacity, physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by a randomized control design. Thirty-five women with low or moderate disease activity and organ damage were randomized to intervention (I) or control (C) group. The intervention during months 0-3 consisted of education, supervised aerobic exercise at high intensity and individual coaching, as well as self-managed physical activity at low-to-moderate intensity. During months 4-12, the physical activity was self-managed and the coaching was successively reduced over time. Outcome measures included: maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) from a bicycle ergometer test, self-reported physical activity and HRQL (SF-36). VO2 at sub-max. and max. increased, independent of group, during the one-year study period (main effect of time p < 0.0001). VO2 max. increased between baseline and month 3 (p < 0.0001), between months 3 and 6 (p = 0.01) and the increase was sustained at month 12 (ns). Frequency of physical activity at high intensity also increased, independent of group, during the study period. It was increased at months 3, 6 and 12 compared to baseline (p = 0.02, p < 0.001, p = 0.03). Improvement in mental health between baseline and month 6 (p = 0.002) was seen for the I-group, not the C-group (p = 0.03). Disease activity and organ damage did not change. Physical activity and aerobic capacity increased after supervised exercise and coaching, and the improvement was sustained during the one-year programme. However, no interactions between the group differences were seen, which suggests that repeated measurements could motivate to increased physical activity and thereby to increased aerobic capacity. As sub-max. VO2 increased over time, training-induced changes in VO2 on-kinetics could be another explanation. Little influence on HRQL was seen after the

  10. Have guidelines addressing physical activity been established in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease?

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Carmine; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to highlight, in relation to the currently accepted pathophysiology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the known exercise habits of patients with NAFLD and to detail the benefits of lifestyle modification with exercise (and/or physical activity) on parameters of metabolic syndrome. More rigorous, controlled studies of longer duration and defined histopathological end-points comparing exercise alone and other treatment are needed before better, evidence-based physical activity modification guidelines can be established, since several questions remain unanswered. PMID:23239917

  11. A cluster-randomised controlled trial of a physical activity and nutrition programme in retirement villages: a study protocol.

    PubMed

    Holt, Anne-Marie; Jancey, Jonine; Lee, Andy H; Kerr, Deborah A; Hills, Andrew P; Anderson, Annie S; Howat, Peter A

    2014-09-25

    Physical activity levels of Australia's ageing population are declining and coincidentally rates of overweight and obesity are increasing. Adequate levels of physical activity and a healthy diet are recognised as important lifestyle factors for the maintenance of a healthy weight and prevention of chronic diseases. Retirement village (RV) residents rarely engage in physical activity and nutrition programmes offered, with poor attendance and low use of existing facilities such as on-site fitness centres and classes and nutrition seminars. The RV provides a unique setting to access and engage with this older target group, to test the effectiveness of strategies to increase levels of physical activity, improve nutrition and maintain a healthy weight. This cluster-randomised controlled trial will evaluate a physical activity, nutrition and healthy weight management intervention for insufficiently active ('not achieving 150 min of moderate-intensity physical activity per week') adults aged 60-75 residing in RV's. A total of 400 participants will be recruited from 20 randomly selected RV's in Perth, Western Australia. Villages will be assigned to either the intervention group (n=10) or the control group (n=10) each containing 200 participants. The Retirement Village Physical Activity and Nutrition for Seniors (RVPANS) programme is a home-based physical activity and nutrition programme that includes educational resources, along with facilitators who will motivate and guide the participants during the 6-month intervention. Descriptive statistics and mixed regression models will be performed to assess the intervention effects. This trial will evaluate an intervention for the modification of health risk factors in the RV setting. Such research conducted in RV's has been limited. Curtin University Human Research Ethics Committee (approval number: HR128/2012). Dissemination of the study results will occur through publications, reports, conference presentations and community

  12. Prospective randomized study of oxytocin discontinuation after the active stage of labor is established.

    PubMed

    Ustunyurt, Emin; Ugur, Mustafa; Ustunyurt, Basak Ozlem; Iskender, Tekin Can; Ozkan, Ovgu; Mollamahmutoglu, Leyla

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the effects of discontinuing oxytocin infusion on labor outcomes once the active stage of labor is established. This is a prospective study involving 342 pregnant women who underwent labor induction at our institution. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. In the first group oxytocin was discontinued at the beginning of the active phase of labor, and in the other group, oxytocin was administered until delivery. Duration of the active phase and the second stage of labor were longer in the oxytocin-discontinued group; however, this was not statistically significant. The rate of uterine hyperstimulation was significantly higher in oxytocin-continued group (P < 0.05). The total cesarean delivery rate for the oxytocin-continued group was 6.9%, compared with 4.8% in the oxytocin-discontinued group (P > 0.05). Discontinuing oxytocin infusion once the active stage of labor is established may be an alternative protocol in developing countries where the conditions for fetal monitoring and emergency cesarean section are less available.

  13. The F-GAMMA programme: multi-frequency study of active galactic nuclei in the Fermi era. Programme description and the first 2.5 years of monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Zensus, J. A.; Nestoras, I.; Marchili, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Karamanavis, V.; Ungerechts, H.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Larsson, S.; Lee, S. S.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Myserlis, I.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Richards, J. L.; Sievers, A.; Sohn, B. W.

    2016-11-01

    Context. To fully exploit the scientific potential of the Fermi mission for the physics of active galactic nuclei (AGN), we initiated the F-GAMMA programme. Between 2007 and 2015 the F-GAMMA was the prime provider of complementary multi-frequency monitoring in the radio regime. Aims: We quantify the radio variability of γ-ray blazars. We investigate its dependence on source class and examine whether the radio variability is related to the γ-ray loudness. Finally, we assess the validity of a putative correlation between the two bands. Methods: The F-GAMMA performed monthly monitoring of a sample of about 60 sources at up to twelve radio frequencies between 2.64 and 228.39 GHz. We perform a time series analysis on the first 2.5-yr data set to obtain variability parameters. A maximum likelihood analysis is used to assess the significance of a correlation between radio and γ-ray fluxes. Results: We present light curves and spectra (coherent within ten days) obtained with the Effelsberg 100 m and IRAM 30 m telescopes. All sources are variable across all frequency bands with amplitudes increasing with frequency up to rest frame frequencies of around 60-80 GHz as expected by shock-in-jet models. Compared to flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) show systematically lower variability amplitudes, brightness temperatures, and Doppler factors at lower frequencies, while the difference vanishes towards higher ones. The time scales appear similar for the two classes. The distribution of spectral indices appears flatter or more inverted at higher frequencies for BL Lacs. Evolving synchrotron self-absorbed components can naturally account for the observed spectral variability. We find that the Fermi-detected sources show larger variability amplitudes, brightness temperatures, and Doppler factors than non-detected ones. Flux densities at 86.2 and 142.3 GHz correlate with 1 GeV fluxes at a significance level better than 3σ, implying that γ rays are

  14. A collaborative study to establish the 3rd International Standard for tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Sands, Dawn; Whitton, Colin M; Merton, R Elizabeth; Longstaff, Colin

    2002-08-01

    An international collaborative study was organised to replace the 2nd International Standard (IS) for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). The 2nd IS for tPA (86/670) was used to calibrate the replacement Standard, which was selected from two candidate materials included in the collaborative study. Participants were provided with five sets of four samples (A, B, C, D) and asked to use sample A (2nd IS, 86/670, 850 IU/ml) to determine the activity of B (86/624, approximately 850 IU/ml), C and D (coded duplicates of the same material, 98/714 approximately 11,000 IU/ml). A total of 14 laboratories returned results from Europe, USA, Japan and Australia, providing data from 60 independent assays. Four laboratories used a reference method based on a published monograph from the European Pharmacopoeia for Alteplase for Injection, 1998, and the remaining 10 used their own method. Fibrin was used as promoter of tPA activity by 12 out of the 14 laboratories, the remaining two used kits where fibrinogen fragments were the promoter. Data from this collaborative study and the previous study to establish the 2nd IS for tPA show that tPA from melanoma cells and recombinant tPA from CHO cells are both suitable materials as International Standards. It was agreed that sample C, D, recombinant tPA, 98/714, be established as the 3rd International Standard for tPA with a potency of 10,000 IU per ampoule, calculated as the mean value from laboratories using fibrin as a promoter of tPA activity. The standard was established by WHO in November 2000.

  15. Establishing a faith-based organisation nursing school within a national primary health care programme in rural Tanzania: an auto-ethnographic case study

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2007, the Tanzanian government called for improvements in its primary health care services. Part of this initiative was to accelerate the training rate for nurses qualified to work in rural areas. The aim of this study was to reflect on the issues experienced whilst establishing and implementing a faith-based organisation (FBO) nursing school and make recommendations for other similar initiatives. Design This paper describes an auto-ethnographic case study design to identify the key difficulties involved with establishing and implementing a new nursing school, and which factors helped the project achieve its goals. Results Six themes emerged from the experiences that shaped the course of the project: 1) Motivation can be sustained if the rationale of the project is in line with its aims. Indeed, the project's primary health care focus was to strengthen the nursing workforce and build a public–private partnership with an FBO. All these were strengths, which helped in the midst of all the uncertainties. 2) Communication was an important and often underrated factor for all types of development projects. 3) Managing the unknown and 4) managing expectations characterised the project inception. Almost all themes had to do with 5) handling conflicts. With so many participants having their own agendas, tensions were unavoidable. A final theme was 6) the need to adjust to ever-changing targets. Conclusions This retrospective auto-ethnographic manuscript serves as a small-scale case study, to illustrate how issues that can be generalised to other settings can be deconstructed to demonstrate how they influence health development projects in developing countries. From this narrative of experiences, key recommendations include the following: 1) Find the right ratio of stakeholders, participants, and agendas, and do not overload the project; 2) Be alert and communicate as much as possible with staff and do not ignore issues hoping they will solve themselves; 3

  16. Establishing a faith-based organisation nursing school within a national primary health care programme in rural Tanzania: an auto-ethnographic case study.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2007, the Tanzanian government called for improvements in its primary health care services. Part of this initiative was to accelerate the training rate for nurses qualified to work in rural areas. The aim of this study was to reflect on the issues experienced whilst establishing and implementing a faith-based organisation (FBO) nursing school and make recommendations for other similar initiatives. Design This paper describes an auto-ethnographic case study design to identify the key difficulties involved with establishing and implementing a new nursing school, and which factors helped the project achieve its goals. Results Six themes emerged from the experiences that shaped the course of the project: 1) Motivation can be sustained if the rationale of the project is in line with its aims. Indeed, the project's primary health care focus was to strengthen the nursing workforce and build a public-private partnership with an FBO. All these were strengths, which helped in the midst of all the uncertainties. 2) Communication was an important and often underrated factor for all types of development projects. 3) Managing the unknown and 4) managing expectations characterised the project inception. Almost all themes had to do with 5) handling conflicts. With so many participants having their own agendas, tensions were unavoidable. A final theme was 6) the need to adjust to ever-changing targets. Conclusions This retrospective auto-ethnographic manuscript serves as a small-scale case study, to illustrate how issues that can be generalised to other settings can be deconstructed to demonstrate how they influence health development projects in developing countries. From this narrative of experiences, key recommendations include the following: 1) Find the right ratio of stakeholders, participants, and agendas, and do not overload the project; 2) Be alert and communicate as much as possible with staff and do not ignore issues hoping they will solve themselves; 3

  17. Establishing a faith-based organisation nursing school within a national primary health care programme in rural Tanzania: an auto-ethnographic case study.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, the Tanzanian government called for improvements in its primary health care services. Part of this initiative was to accelerate the training rate for nurses qualified to work in rural areas. The aim of this study was to reflect on the issues experienced whilst establishing and implementing a faith-based organisation (FBO) nursing school and make recommendations for other similar initiatives. This paper describes an auto-ethnographic case study design to identify the key difficulties involved with establishing and implementing a new nursing school, and which factors helped the project achieve its goals. Six themes emerged from the experiences that shaped the course of the project: 1) Motivation can be sustained if the rationale of the project is in line with its aims. Indeed, the project's primary health care focus was to strengthen the nursing workforce and build a public-private partnership with an FBO. All these were strengths, which helped in the midst of all the uncertainties. 2) Communication was an important and often underrated factor for all types of development projects. 3) Managing the unknown and 4) managing expectations characterised the project inception. Almost all themes had to do with 5) handling conflicts. With so many participants having their own agendas, tensions were unavoidable. A final theme was 6) the need to adjust to ever-changing targets. This retrospective auto-ethnographic manuscript serves as a small-scale case study, to illustrate how issues that can be generalised to other settings can be deconstructed to demonstrate how they influence health development projects in developing countries. From this narrative of experiences, key recommendations include the following: 1) Find the right ratio of stakeholders, participants, and agendas, and do not overload the project; 2) Be alert and communicate as much as possible with staff and do not ignore issues hoping they will solve themselves; 3) Think flexibly and do not stubbornly

  18. A Technology-Enriched Active Learning Space for a New Gateway Education Programme in Hong Kong: A Platform for Nurturing Student Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Pit Ho Patrio

    A Gateway Education Programme is established in Hong Kong that aims to broaden students' interdisciplinary knowledge and nurture student innovations under the Discovery-enriched Curriculum. To support the initiative, a novel idea was proposed for the creation of a Gateway Education Laboratory (GE Lab) with a highly configurable layout equipped…

  19. Evaluation of Antibiotics Active against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Based on Activity in an Established Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, Daniel G.; Beenken, Karen E.; Mills, Weston B.; Loughran, Allister J.; Spencer, Horace J.; Lynn, William B.

    2016-01-01

    We used in vitro and in vivo models of catheter-associated biofilm formation to compare the relative activity of antibiotics effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the specific context of an established biofilm. The results demonstrated that, under in vitro conditions, daptomycin and ceftaroline exhibited comparable activity relative to each other and greater activity than vancomycin, telavancin, oritavancin, dalbavancin, or tigecycline. This was true when assessed using established biofilms formed by the USA300 methicillin-resistant strain LAC and the USA200 methicillin-sensitive strain UAMS-1. Oxacillin exhibited greater activity against UAMS-1 than LAC, as would be expected, since LAC is an MRSA strain. However, the activity of oxacillin was less than that of daptomycin and ceftaroline even against UAMS-1. Among the lipoglycopeptides, telavancin exhibited the greatest overall activity. Specifically, telavancin exhibited greater activity than oritavancin or dalbavancin when tested against biofilms formed by LAC and was the only lipoglycopeptide capable of reducing the number of viable bacteria below the limit of detection. With biofilms formed by UAMS-1, telavancin and dalbavancin exhibited comparable activity relative to each other and greater activity than oritavancin. Importantly, ceftaroline was the only antibiotic that exhibited greater activity than vancomycin when tested in vivo in a murine model of catheter-associated biofilm formation. These results emphasize the need to consider antibiotics other than vancomycin, most notably, ceftaroline, for the treatment of biofilm-associated S. aureus infections, including by the matrix-based antibiotic delivery methods often employed for local antibiotic delivery in the treatment of these infections. PMID:27401574

  20. Efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children: the healthy homework pilot study.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Scott; McPhee, Julia C; Schluter, Philip J; Zinn, Caryn; Smith, Richard; Schofield, Grant

    2011-11-15

    Most physical activity and nutrition interventions in children focus on the school setting; however, evidence suggests that children are less active and have greater access to unhealthy food at home. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children. The six-week 'Healthy Homework' programme and complementary teaching resource was developed under the guidance of an intersectoral steering group. Eight senior classes (year levels 5-6) from two diverse Auckland primary schools were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. A total of 97 children (57 intervention, 40 control) aged 9-11 years participated in the evaluation of the intervention. Daily step counts were monitored immediately before and after the intervention using sealed multiday memory pedometers. Screen time, sports participation, active transport to and from school, and the consumption of fruits, vegetables, unhealthy foods and drinks were recorded concurrently in a 4-day food and activity diary. Healthy Homework resulted in a significant intervention effect of 2,830 steps.day-1 (95% CI: 560, 5,300, P = 0.013). This effect was consistent between sexes, schools, and day types (weekdays and weekend days). In addition, significant intervention effects were observed for vegetable consumption (0.83 servings.day-1, 95% CI: 0.24, 1.43, P = 0.007) and unhealthy food consumption (-0.56 servings.day-1, 95% CI: -1.05, -0.07, P = 0.027) on weekends but not weekdays, with no interactions with sex or school. Effects for all other variables were not statistically significant regardless of day type. Compulsory health-related homework appears to be an effective approach for increasing physical activity and improving vegetable and unhealthy food consumption in children. Further research in a larger study is required to confirm these initial results.

  1. Efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children: the healthy homework pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most physical activity and nutrition interventions in children focus on the school setting; however, evidence suggests that children are less active and have greater access to unhealthy food at home. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children. Methods The six-week 'Healthy Homework' programme and complementary teaching resource was developed under the guidance of an intersectoral steering group. Eight senior classes (year levels 5-6) from two diverse Auckland primary schools were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. A total of 97 children (57 intervention, 40 control) aged 9-11 years participated in the evaluation of the intervention. Daily step counts were monitored immediately before and after the intervention using sealed multiday memory pedometers. Screen time, sports participation, active transport to and from school, and the consumption of fruits, vegetables, unhealthy foods and drinks were recorded concurrently in a 4-day food and activity diary. Results Healthy Homework resulted in a significant intervention effect of 2,830 steps.day-1 (95% CI: 560, 5,300, P = 0.013). This effect was consistent between sexes, schools, and day types (weekdays and weekend days). In addition, significant intervention effects were observed for vegetable consumption (0.83 servings.day-1, 95% CI: 0.24, 1.43, P = 0.007) and unhealthy food consumption (-0.56 servings.day-1, 95% CI: -1.05, -0.07, P = 0.027) on weekends but not weekdays, with no interactions with sex or school. Effects for all other variables were not statistically significant regardless of day type. Conclusions Compulsory health-related homework appears to be an effective approach for increasing physical activity and improving vegetable and unhealthy food consumption in children. Further research in a larger study is required to confirm these initial results. PMID:22085440

  2. Genome-scale definition of the transcriptional programme associated with compromised PU.1 activity in acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Sive, J I; Basilico, S; Hannah, R; Kinston, S J; Calero-Nieto, F J; Göttgens, B

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional dysregulation is associated with haematological malignancy. Although mutations of the key haematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 are rare in human acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), they are common in murine models of radiation-induced AML, and PU.1 downregulation and/or dysfunction has been described in human AML patients carrying the fusion oncogenes RUNX1-ETO and PML-RARA. To study the transcriptional programmes associated with compromised PU.1 activity, we adapted a Pu.1-mutated murine AML cell line with an inducible wild-type PU.1. PU.1 induction caused transition from leukaemia phenotype to monocytic differentiation. Global binding maps for PU.1, CEBPA and the histone mark H3K27Ac with and without PU.1 induction showed that mutant PU.1 retains DNA-binding ability, but the induction of wild-type protein dramatically increases both the number and the height of PU.1-binding peaks. Correlating chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Seq with gene expression data, we found that PU.1 recruitment coupled with increased histone acetylation induces gene expression and activates a monocyte/macrophage transcriptional programme. PU.1 induction also caused the reorganisation of a subgroup of CEBPA binding peaks. Finally, we show that the PU.1 target gene set defined in our model allows the stratification of primary human AML samples, shedding light on both known and novel AML subtypes that may be driven by PU.1 dysfunction. PMID:26126967

  3. Genome-scale definition of the transcriptional programme associated with compromised PU.1 activity in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sive, J I; Basilico, S; Hannah, R; Kinston, S J; Calero-Nieto, F J; Göttgens, B

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional dysregulation is associated with haematological malignancy. Although mutations of the key haematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 are rare in human acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), they are common in murine models of radiation-induced AML, and PU.1 downregulation and/or dysfunction has been described in human AML patients carrying the fusion oncogenes RUNX1-ETO and PML-RARA. To study the transcriptional programmes associated with compromised PU.1 activity, we adapted a Pu.1-mutated murine AML cell line with an inducible wild-type PU.1. PU.1 induction caused transition from leukaemia phenotype to monocytic differentiation. Global binding maps for PU.1, CEBPA and the histone mark H3K27Ac with and without PU.1 induction showed that mutant PU.1 retains DNA-binding ability, but the induction of wild-type protein dramatically increases both the number and the height of PU.1-binding peaks. Correlating chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Seq with gene expression data, we found that PU.1 recruitment coupled with increased histone acetylation induces gene expression and activates a monocyte/macrophage transcriptional programme. PU.1 induction also caused the reorganisation of a subgroup of CEBPA binding peaks. Finally, we show that the PU.1 target gene set defined in our model allows the stratification of primary human AML samples, shedding light on both known and novel AML subtypes that may be driven by PU.1 dysfunction.

  4. Establishing the Impact of Model Surfactants on Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activation of Sea Spray Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, S.; Cappa, C. D.; Ruehl, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosol impacts on cloud properties, also known as indirect effects, remain a major source of uncertainty in modeling global radiative forcing. To reduce this uncertainty necessitates better understanding of how aerosol chemical composition impacts the cloud-forming ability of aerosols. It is well established that both size and hygroscopicity impact the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols. Previous studies demonstrate that the presence of surface-active organic material in aerosols can also reduce the surface tension of activating droplets, thereby enhancing CCN activity. We quantified surface tension of microscopic droplets using a continuous-flow stream-wise thermal gradient chamber at humidities close to activation for multi-component lab-generated sea spray aerosol (SSA) proxies. The SSA proxies used were atomized NaCl or synthetic sea salt coated with one to many various fatty acids found in nascent SSA particles. Observed surface tension values near the point of activation as a function of chemical composition for various SSA proxies will be presented.

  5. Establishment and Activity of the D Quadrant Organizer in the Marine Gastropod Crepidula fornicata.

    PubMed

    Henry, Jonathan Q; Lyons, Deirdre C; Perry, Kimberly J; Cornelia Osborne, Chen

    2017-09-05

    During development in metazoan embryos, the fundamental embryonic axes are established by organizing centers that influence the fates of nearby cells. Among the spiralians, a large and diverse branch of protostome metazoans, studies have shown that an organizer sets up the dorsal-ventral axis, which arises from one of the four basic cell quadrants during development (the dorsal, D quadrant). Studies in a few species have also revealed variation in terms of how and when the D quadrant and the organizer are established. In some species the D quadrant is specified conditionally, via cell-cell interactions, while in others it is specified autonomously, via asymmetric cell divisions (such as those involving the formation of polar lobes). The third quartet macromere (3D) typically serves as the spiralian organizer; however, other cells born earlier or later in the D quadrant lineage can serve as the organizer, such as the 2d micromere in the annelid Capitella teleta or the 4d micromere in the mollusc Crepidula fornicata. Here we present work carried out in the snail C. fornicata to show that establishment of a single D quadrant appears to rely on a combination of both autonomous (via inheritance of the polar lobe) and conditional mechanisms (involving induction via the progeny of the first quartet micromeres). Through systematic ablation of cells, we show that D quadrant identity is established between 5th and 6th cleavage stages, as it is in other spiralians that use conditional specification. Subsequently, following the next cell cycle, organizer activity takes place soon after the birth of the 4d micromere. Therefore, unlike the case in other spiralians that use conditional specification, the specification of the D quadrant and the activity of the dorso-ventral organizer are temporally and spatially uncoupled. We also present data on organizer function in naturally-occurring and experimentally-induced twin embryos, which possess multiple D quadrants. We show that

  6. Active Residents in Care Homes (ARCH): study protocol to investigate the implementation and outcomes of a whole-systems activity programme in residential care homes for older people.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Sian A; Jones, Fiona; Clarke, Natasha; Anderson, Liezl; Kennedy, Bernadette; Grant, Robert; Gage, Heather; Hurley, Michael V

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness, acceptability and costs of Active Residents in Care Homes, ARCH - a programme aiming to increase opportunities for activity in older care home residents. Feasibility study. Residential care homes for older people. 10-15 residents, staff and family members will be recruited in each of the three participating care homes. ARCH is a 12-month 'whole-systems' programme implemented by occupational therapists and physiotherapists. They will conduct a comprehensive assessment of each care home, considering the physical environment, working practices and organisation structure as well as residents' individual needs, and recommend ways to address barriers and increase residents' activity levels. The therapists will then work with staff to improve understanding of the issues, instigate training, environmental, organisational and working practice changes as necessary. Residents' activity levels, health and quality of life will be tested using several measures to see which are practicable and appropriate for this population in this context. This includes: Assessment of Physical Activity in Frail Older People; Pool Activity Level Checklist; Dementia Care Mapping observations; and EQ-5D-5L. Residents will be assessed prior to programme implementation then 4- and 12-months post-implementation. Semi-structured interviews will explore the experiences of residents, staff, family members and therapists. Providing evidence of effectiveness and acceptability of ARCH, and documenting factors that impede/facilitate implementation will help us identify ways to enhance the care and quality of life of older people in residential care, and our understanding of how to implement them. ISRCTN24000891. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The efficacy of self-management programmes for increasing physical activity in community-dwelling adults with acquired brain injury (ABI): a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jones, Taryn M; Hush, Julia M; Dear, Blake F; Titov, Nickolai; Dean, Catherine M

    2014-04-21

    Acquired brain injury (ABI), often arising from stroke or trauma, is a common cause of long-term disability, physical inactivity and poor health outcomes globally. Individuals with ABI face many barriers to increasing physical activity, such as impaired mobility, access to services and knowledge regarding management of physical activity. Self-management programmes aim to build skills to enable an individual to manage their condition, including their physical activity levels, over a long period of time. Programme delivery modes can include traditional face-to-face methods, or remote delivery, such as via the Internet. However, it is unknown how effective these programmes are at specifically improving physical activity in community-dwelling adults with ABI, or how effective and acceptable remote delivery of self-management programmes is for this population. We will conduct a comprehensive search for articles indexed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PEDro and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) databases that assess the efficacy of a self-management intervention, which aims to enhance levels of physical activity in adults living in the community with ABI. Two independent reviewers will screen studies for eligibility, assess risk of bias, and extract relevant data. Where possible, a meta-analysis will be performed to calculate the overall effect size of self-management interventions on physical activity levels and on outcomes associated with physical activity. A comparison will also be made between face-to-face and remote delivery modes of self-management programmes, in order to examine efficacy and acceptability. A content analysis of self-management programmes will also be conducted to compare aspects of the intervention that are associated with more favourable outcomes. This systematic review aims to review the efficacy of self-management programmes aimed at increasing physical activity

  8. The efficacy of self-management programmes for increasing physical activity in community-dwelling adults with acquired brain injury (ABI): a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acquired brain injury (ABI), often arising from stroke or trauma, is a common cause of long-term disability, physical inactivity and poor health outcomes globally. Individuals with ABI face many barriers to increasing physical activity, such as impaired mobility, access to services and knowledge regarding management of physical activity. Self-management programmes aim to build skills to enable an individual to manage their condition, including their physical activity levels, over a long period of time. Programme delivery modes can include traditional face-to-face methods, or remote delivery, such as via the Internet. However, it is unknown how effective these programmes are at specifically improving physical activity in community-dwelling adults with ABI, or how effective and acceptable remote delivery of self-management programmes is for this population. Methods/Design We will conduct a comprehensive search for articles indexed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PEDro and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) databases that assess the efficacy of a self-management intervention, which aims to enhance levels of physical activity in adults living in the community with ABI. Two independent reviewers will screen studies for eligibility, assess risk of bias, and extract relevant data. Where possible, a meta-analysis will be performed to calculate the overall effect size of self-management interventions on physical activity levels and on outcomes associated with physical activity. A comparison will also be made between face-to-face and remote delivery modes of self-management programmes, in order to examine efficacy and acceptability. A content analysis of self-management programmes will also be conducted to compare aspects of the intervention that are associated with more favourable outcomes. Discussion This systematic review aims to review the efficacy of self-management programmes

  9. An approach to establish the uncertainty budget of catalytic activity concentration measurements in a reference laboratory.

    PubMed

    Rami, Laura; Canalias, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    Reference laboratories providing reference services recognized by the Joint Committee for Traceability in Laboratory Medicine (JCTLM) must be accredited as calibration laboratories according to ISO 17025 and ISO 15195. These standards require laboratories to establish an uncertainty budget, in which the uncertainty contributions of the relevant uncertainty components are specified. We present a model to estimate the measurement uncertainty of creatine kinase catalytic activity concentration results obtained by IFCC primary reference measurement procedure. The measurement uncertainty has been estimated by following the next steps: 1) specification of the measurand; 2) identification of the most relevant uncertainty sources; 3) estimation of standard uncertainties by either type A or type B evaluation; 4) estimation of combined uncertainty while taking into account sensitivity coefficients, as well as existence of correlated uncertainty sources; and 5) estimation of expanded uncertainty with a defined coverage probability. The estimated expanded uncertainty was 2.2% (k=2). Uncertainty sources with a significant contribution to the measurement uncertainty were the following: pH adjustment (0.68%), absorbance accuracy (0.48%), wavelength adjustment (0.20%), reaction temperature (0.19%), volume fraction of sample (0.15%) and absorbance linearity (0.06%). The present model is an approach to establish the uncertainty budget of primary reference procedures for the measurement of the catalytic activity concentration of enzymes, and aims at being an example to be followed by other reference laboratories, as well as by laboratories that carry out primary reference measurement procedures.

  10. A logical molecular circuit for programmable and autonomous regulation of protein activity using DNA aptamer-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Han, Da; Zhu, Zhi; Wu, Cuichen; Peng, Lu; Zhou, Leiji; Gulbakan, Basri; Zhu, Guizhi; Williams, Kathryn R; Tan, Weihong

    2012-12-26

    Researchers increasingly envision an important role for artificial biochemical circuits in biological engineering, much like electrical circuits in electrical engineering. Similar to electrical circuits, which control electromechanical devices, biochemical circuits could be utilized as a type of servomechanism to control nanodevices in vitro, monitor chemical reactions in situ, or regulate gene expressions in vivo. (1) As a consequence of their relative robustness and potential applicability for controlling a wide range of in vitro chemistries, synthetic cell-free biochemical circuits promise to be useful in manipulating the functions of biological molecules. Here, we describe the first logical circuit based on DNA-protein interactions with accurate threshold control, enabling autonomous, self-sustained and programmable manipulation of protein activity in vitro. Similar circuits made previously were based primarily on DNA hybridization and strand displacement reactions. This new design uses the diverse nucleic acid interactions with proteins. The circuit can precisely sense the local enzymatic environment, such as the concentration of thrombin, and when it is excessively high, a coagulation inhibitor is automatically released by a concentration-adjusted circuit module. To demonstrate the programmable and autonomous modulation, a molecular circuit with different threshold concentrations of thrombin was tested as a proof of principle. In the future, owing to tunable regulation, design modularity and target specificity, this prototype could lead to the development of novel DNA biochemical circuits to control the delivery of aptamer-based drugs in smart and personalized medicine, providing a more efficient and safer therapeutic strategy.

  11. The Sheffield outreach teaching programme.

    PubMed

    Smith, M; Lennon, M A; Robinson, P G

    2010-11-27

    Sheffield's School of Clinical Dentistry has developed a year-round dental outreach teaching programme of 20 weeks for each student in two or three of six already established general practices and five PCT clinics. On the programme, under local supervision, students provide comprehensive care for patients and complete associated projectwork. This paper first describes the development and management of the programme then the learning experiences of recent students.

  12. Localized serine protease activity and the establishment of Drosophila embryonic dorsoventral polarity

    PubMed Central

    Stein, David; Cho, Yong Suk; Stevens, Leslie M

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila embryo dorsoventral polarity is established by a maternally encoded signal transduction pathway in which three sequentially acting serine proteases, Gastrulation Defective, Snake and Easter, generate the ligand that activates the Toll receptor on the ventral side of the embryo. The spatial regulation of this pathway depends upon ventrally restricted expression of the Pipe sulfotransferase in the ovarian follicle during egg formation. Several recent observations have advanced our understanding of the mechanism regulating the spatially restricted activation of Toll. First, several protein components of the vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell have been determined to be targets of Pipe-mediated sulfation. Second, the processing of Easter by Snake has been identified as the first Pipe-dependent, ventrally-restricted processing event in the pathway. Finally, Gastrulation Defective has been shown to undergo Pipe-dependent, ventral localization within the perivitelline space and to facilitate Snake-mediated processing of Easter. Together, these observations suggest that Gastrulation Defective, localized on the interior ventral surface of the eggshell in association with Pipe-sulfated eggshell proteins, recruits and mediates an interaction between Snake and Easter. This event leads to ventrally-restricted processing and activation of Easter and consequently, localized formation of the Toll ligand, and Toll activation. PMID:24047959

  13. Localized serine protease activity and the establishment of Drosophila embryonic dorsoventral polarity.

    PubMed

    Stein, David; Cho, Yong Suk; Stevens, Leslie M

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila embryo dorsoventral polarity is established by a maternally encoded signal transduction pathway in which three sequentially acting serine proteases, Gastrulation Defective, Snake and Easter, generate the ligand that activates the Toll receptor on the ventral side of the embryo. The spatial regulation of this pathway depends upon ventrally restricted expression of the Pipe sulfotransferase in the ovarian follicle during egg formation. Several recent observations have advanced our understanding of the mechanism regulating the spatially restricted activation of Toll. First, several protein components of the vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell have been determined to be targets of Pipe-mediated sulfation. Second, the processing of Easter by Snake has been identified as the first Pipe-dependent, ventrally-restricted processing event in the pathway. Finally, Gastrulation Defective has been shown to undergo Pipe-dependent, ventral localization within the perivitelline space and to facilitate Snake-mediated processing of Easter. Together, these observations suggest that Gastrulation Defective, localized on the interior ventral surface of the eggshell in association with Pipe-sulfated eggshell proteins, recruits and mediates an interaction between Snake and Easter. This event leads to ventrally-restricted processing and activation of Easter and consequently, localized formation of the Toll ligand, and Toll activation.

  14. Toward Active-Matrix Lab-On-A-Chip: Programmable Electrofluidic control Enaled by Arrayed Oxide Thin Film Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Joo Hyon; Noh, Jiyong; Kreit, Eric; Heikenfeld, Jason; Rack, Philip D

    2012-01-01

    Agile micro- and nano-fluidic control is critical to numerous life science and chemical science synthesis as well as kinetic and thermodynamic studies. To this end, we have demonstrated the use of thin film transistor arrays as an active matrix addressing method to control an electrofluidic array. Because the active matrix method minimizes the number of control lines necessary (m + n lines for the m x n element array), the active matrix addressing method integrated with an electrofluidic platform can be a significant breakthrough for complex electrofluidic arrays (increased size or resolution) with enhanced function, agility and programmability. An amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) semiconductor active layer is used because of its high mobility of 1-15 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, low-temperature processing and transparency for potential spectroscopy and imaging. Several electrofluidic functionalities are demonstrated using a simple 2 x 5 electrode array connected to a 2 x 5 IGZO thin film transistor array with the semiconductor channel width of 50 {mu}m and mobility of 6.3 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Additionally, using the TFT device characteristics, active matrix addressing schemes are discussed as the geometry of the electrode array can be tailored to act as a storage capacitor element. Finally, requisite material and device parameters are discussed in context with a VGA scale active matrix addressed electrofluidic platform.

  15. Development and evaluation of a structured programme for promoting physical activity among seniors with intellectual disabilities: a study protocol for a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Older people with intellectual disabilities have very low physical activity levels. Well designed, theory-driven and evidence-based health promotion programmes for the target population are lacking. This paper describes the design of a cluster-randomised trial for a systematically developed health promotion programme aimed at improving physical activity and increasing fitness among seniors with intellectual disabilities. Methods and design The Intervention Mapping protocol was used for programme development. After defining the programme’s objectives, the following behavioural techniques were selected to achieve them: Tailoring, Education, Modelling, Mirroring, Feedback, Reinforcement and Grading. With professionals and managers of provider services for people with intellectual disabilities, we translated these strategies into a structured day-activity programme, that consisted of a physical activity and an education programme. The programme will be executed in five day-activity centres in groups of eight to ten seniors during eight months, whereas seniors in five other centres receive care as usual. The physical activity level, as measured in number of steps a day, will be used as primary outcome measurement. Secondary outcome measurements include motor fitness, cardio respiratory fitness, morphological and metabolic fitness, ADL, functional deterioration and depressive symptoms. Differences in the primary and secondary outcome measures between participants and controls will be analysed using generalized estimation equations, correcting for day-activity center as cluster. Discussion This paper provides insight into the development and content of a theory-driven intervention aimed at behavioural change in a population with a low intellectual level. Its evaluation design is described. The programme’s applicability to other populations is discussed. Trial registration Trial number: ISRCTN82341588 PMID:23938154

  16. Fostering transition to adulthood for young Australian males: an exploratory study of Men's Sheds' intergenerational mentoring programmes.

    PubMed

    Rahja, Miia; Scanlan, Justin Newton; Wilson, Nathan J; Cordier, Reinie

    2016-06-01

    Men's Sheds are community spaces where socialisation occurs alongside participation in meaningful activities. Shed activities and socialisation make them useful for supporting transition to adulthood of 'at-risk' young people through meaningful occupations. Many sheds have implemented intergenerational mentoring programmes. However, many programmes are established on an ad-hoc basis without specific attention to factors that may support effective and sustainable outcomes. We aimed to inform future programmes by exploring different programmes to provide insight into the purpose, design and programme characteristics that are perceived as beneficial for young males. Four Sydney-based sheds providing intergenerational mentoring programmes were selected. We interviewed shed coordinators, mentors and mentees to explore their perceptions of programme characteristics that supported mentees' transition to adulthood. Thematic analysis techniques were used to first analyse and understand the unique context of each programme and these were then merged and integrated to identify the most helpful aspects of these mentoring programmes. Mentor attitude towards the mentees, freedom to make independent choices and the nature and perceived usefulness of the project were considered the most significant characteristics of these programmes. This was the first known examination of the different characteristics of Men's Sheds intergenerational mentoring programmes. On the basis of our findings, we have made recommendations to help guide the planning and implementation of future programmes. While our findings largely support previous research on mentoring programmes, findings from this study suggest that 'expert skills' may not be as important as mentor attitude to working with the mentees. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  17. Reducing musculoskeletal injury and concussion risk in schoolboy rugby players with a pre-activity movement control exercise programme: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hislop, Michael D; Stokes, Keith A; Williams, Sean; McKay, Carly D; England, Mike E; Kemp, Simon P T; Trewartha, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Background Injury risk in youth rugby has received much attention, highlighting the importance of establishing evidence-based injury reduction strategies. Aim To determine the efficacy of a movement control exercise programme in reducing injuries in youth rugby players and to investigate the effect of programme dose on injury measures. Methods In a cluster-randomised controlled trial, 40 independent schools (118 teams, 3188 players aged 14–18 years) were allocated to receive either the intervention or a reference programme, both of which were to be delivered by school coaches. The intervention comprised balance training, whole-body resistance training, plyometric training, and controlled rehearsal of landing and cutting manoeuvres. Time-loss (>24 hours) injuries arising from school rugby matches were recorded by coaches and medical staff. Results 441 time-loss match injuries (intervention, 233; control, 208) were reported across 15 938 match exposure-hours (intervention, 9083; control, 6855). Intention-to-treat results indicated unclear effects of trial arm on overall match injury incidence (rate ratio (RR)=0.85, 90% confidence limits 0.61 to 1.17), although clear reductions were evident in the intervention arm for concussion incidence (RR=0.71, 0.48 to 1.05). When trial arm comparisons were limited to teams who had completed three or more weekly programme sessions on average, clear reductions in overall match injury incidence (RR=0.28, 0.14 to 0.51) and concussion incidence (RR=0.41, 0.17 to 0.99) were noted in the intervention group. Conclusion A preventive movement control exercise programme can reduce match injury outcomes, including concussion, in schoolboy rugby players when compared with a standardised control exercise programme, although to realise the greatest effects players should complete the programme at least three times per week. PMID:28515056

  18. Establishment of Epithelial Attachment on Titanium Surface Coated with Platelet Activating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Shiho; Maeno, Masahiko; Lee, Cliff; Nagai, Shigemi; Kim, David M.; Da Silva, John; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce epithelial attachment on a typical implant abutment surface of smooth titanium. A challenging complication that hinders the success of dental implants is peri-implantitis. A common cause of peri-implantitis may results from the lack of epithelial sealing at the peri-implant collar. Histologically, epithelial sealing is recognized as the attachment of the basement membrane (BM). BM-attachment is promoted by activated platelet aggregates at surgical wound sites. On the other hand, platelets did not aggregate on smooth titanium, the surface typical of the implant abutment. We then hypothesized that epithelial BM-attachment was produced when titanium surface was modified to allow platelet aggregation. Titanium surfaces were coated with a protease activated receptor 4-activating peptide (PAR4-AP). PAR4-AP coating yielded rapid aggregation of platelets on the titanium surface. Platelet aggregates released robust amount of epithelial chemoattractants (IGF-I, TGF-β) and growth factors (EGF, VEGF) on the titanium surface. Human gingival epithelial cells, when they were co-cultured on the platelet aggregates, successfully attached to the PAR4-AP coated titanium surface with spread laminin5 positive BM and consecutive staining of the epithelial tight junction component ZO1, indicating the formation of complete epithelial sheet. These in-vitro results indicate the establishment of epithelial BM-attachment to the titanium surface. PMID:27741287

  19. Block of glucocorticoid synthesis during re-activation inhibits extinction of an established fear memory

    PubMed Central

    Blundell, Jacqueline; Blaiss, Cory A.; Lagace, Diane C.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Powell, Craig M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The pharmacology of traumatic memory extinction has not been fully characterized despite its potential as a therapeutic target for established, acquired anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here we examine the role of endogenous glucocorticoids in traumatic memory extinction. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were injected with corticosterone (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or metyrapone (50 mg/kg, s.c.) during re-activation of a contextual fear memory, and compared to vehicle groups (N = 10–12 per group). To ensure that metyrapone was blocking corticosterone synthesis, we measured corticosterone levels following re-activation of a fear memory in metyrapone- and vehicle-treated animals. Results Corticosterone administration following extinction trials caused a long-lasting inhibition of the original fear memory trace. In contrast, blockade of corticosteroid synthesis with metyrapone prior to extinction trials enhanced retrieval and prevented extinction of context-dependent fear responses in mice. Further behavioral analysis suggested that the metyrapone enhancement of retrieval and prevention of extinction were not due to non-specific alterations in locomotor or anxiety-like behavior. In addition, the inhibition of extinction by metyrapone was rescued by exogenous administration of corticosterone following extinction trials. Finally, we confirmed that the rise in corticosterone during re-activation of a contextual fear memory was blocked by metyrapone. Conclusions We demonstrate that extinction of a classical contextual fear memory is dependent on endogenous glucocorticoid synthesis during re-activation of a fear memory. Our data suggest that decreased glucocorticoids during fear memory re-activation may contribute to the inability to extinguish a fear memory, thus contributing to one of the core symptoms of PTSD. PMID:21333745

  20. Block of glucocorticoid synthesis during re-activation inhibits extinction of an established fear memory.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Jacqueline; Blaiss, Cory A; Lagace, Diane C; Eisch, Amelia J; Powell, Craig M

    2011-05-01

    The pharmacology of traumatic memory extinction has not been fully characterized despite its potential as a therapeutic target for established, acquired anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here we examine the role of endogenous glucocorticoids in traumatic memory extinction. Male C57BL/6J mice were injected with corticosterone (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or metyrapone (50 mg/kg, s.c.) during re-activation of a contextual fear memory, and compared to vehicle groups (N=10-12 per group). To ensure that metyrapone was blocking corticosterone synthesis, we measured corticosterone levels following re-activation of a fear memory in metyrapone- and vehicle-treated animals. Corticosterone administration following extinction trials caused a long-lasting inhibition of the original fear memory trace. In contrast, blockade of corticosteroid synthesis with metyrapone prior to extinction trials enhanced retrieval and prevented extinction of context-dependent fear responses in mice. Further behavioral analysis suggested that the metyrapone enhancement of retrieval and prevention of extinction were not due to non-specific alterations in locomotor or anxiety-like behavior. In addition, the inhibition of extinction by metyrapone was rescued by exogenous administration of corticosterone following extinction trials. Finally, we confirmed that the rise in corticosterone during re-activation of a contextual fear memory was blocked by metyrapone. We demonstrate that extinction of a classical contextual fear memory is dependent on endogenous glucocorticoid synthesis during re-activation of a fear memory. Our data suggest that decreased glucocorticoids during fear memory re-activation may contribute to the inability to extinguish a fear memory, thus contributing to one of the core symptoms of PTSD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Design of a process evaluation of the implementation of a physical activity and sports stimulation programme in Dutch rehabilitation setting: ReSpAct.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Femke; Alingh, Roelina A; van der Schans, Cees P; Hettinga, Florentina J; Duijf, Marjo; Dekker, Rienk; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2014-09-20

    There is a growing interest to study the transfer of evidence-based information into daily practice. The evidence-based programme Rehabilitation, Sports and Exercise (RSE) that aims to stimulate an active lifestyle during and after a rehabilitation period in people with a disability and/or chronic disease is prepared for nationwide dissemination. So far, however, little is known about the implementation of a new programme to stimulate physical activity in people with a disability in a rehabilitation setting. Therefore, a process evaluation of the implementation of the RSE programme within 18 Dutch rehabilitation centres and hospitals is performed in order to gain more insight into the implementation process itself and factors that facilitate or hamper the implementation process. This paper describes the study design of this process evaluation. During a three-year period, the adoption, implementation and continuation of the RSE programme is monitored and evaluated in 12 rehabilitation centres and 6 hospitals with a rehabilitation department in The Netherlands. The main process outcomes are: recruitment, reach, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, satisfaction, maintenance and context. The process outcomes are evaluated at different levels (organisational and patient) and different time points. Data collection includes both quantitative (online registration system and questionnaires) and qualitative (focus groups and semi-structured interviews) methods. The nationwide dissemination of an evidence-based programme to stimulate physical activity and sports during and after a rehabilitation period is extensively monitored and evaluated on different levels (organization and patients) using mixed methods. The study will contribute to the science of translating evidence-based programmes into daily practice of the rehabilitation care. The results of the study can be used to further optimize the content of the RSE programme and to facilitate the implementation in other

  2. Inhibition of establishment of primary and micrometastatic tumors by a urokinase plasminogen activator receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ignar, D M; Andrews, J L; Witherspoon, S M; Leray, J D; Clay, W C; Kilpatrick, K; Onori, J; Kost, T; Emerson, D L

    1998-01-01

    Tumor establishment and metastasis are dependent on extracellular matrix proteolysis, tumor cell migration, and angiogenesis. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor are essential mediators of these processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a recombinant human uPAR antagonist on growth, establishment, and metastasis of tumors derived from human cancer cell lines. A noncatalytic recombinant protein, consisting of amino acids 1-137 of human uPA and the CH2 and CH3 regions of mouse IgG1 (uPA-IgG), was expressed, purified, and shown to bind specifically to human uPAR and to saturate the surface of human tumor cells which express uPAR. Daily i.p. administration of uPA-IgG to nude mice extended latencies of unstaged tumors derived from Lox melanoma and SW48 colon carcinoma cells by 7.7 and 5.5 days, respectively. uPA-IgG treatment did not affect the growth of Lox or KB tumors staged to 200 mg before antagonist treatment commenced. The effect of uPA-IgG on the establishment of micrometastases was assessed in SCID mice. KB head/neck tumor cells were injected in the tail vein and allowed to seed for 48 h before initiation of daily i.p. injections of uPA-IgG for 24 days. The number of lung colonies ranged between 5 and 30% of vehicle-treated mice in two separate experiments. Furthermore, a single 800 microg dose of uPA-IgG administered 1 h prior to tail vein injection of KB cells reduced lung colony formation to just 3.5% of vehicle-treated SCID mice. These data demonstrate that antagonism of uPAR arrested metastasis and inhibited the establishment of primary tumors and micrometastases. Thus, small molecule uPAR antagonists may serve as useful adjuvant agents in combination with existing cancer chemotherapy.

  3. The I.A.G. / A.I.G. SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme: Current and future activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.; Lamoureux, Scott; Decaulne, Armelle

    2013-04-01

    Projected climate change in cold regions is expected to alter melt season duration and intensity, along with the number of extreme rainfall events, total annual precipitation and the balance between snowfall and rainfall. Similarly, changes to the thermal balance are expected to reduce the extent of permafrost and seasonal ground frost and increase active layer depths. These effects will undoubtedly change surface environments in cold regions and alter the fluxes of sediments, nutrients and solutes, but the absence of quantitative data and coordinated geomorphic process monitoring and analysis to understand the sensitivity of the Earth surface environment is acute in cold climate environments. The International Association of Geomorphologists (I.A.G. / A.I.G. ) SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme was formed in 2005 to address this existing key knowledge gap. SEDIBUD currently has about 400 members worldwide and the Steering Committee of this international programme is composed of ten scientists from eight different countries: Achim A. Beylich (Chair) (Norway), Armelle Decaulne (Secretary) (France), John C. Dixon (USA), Scott F. Lamoureux (Vice-Chair) (Canada), John F. Orwin (Canada), Jan-Christoph Otto (Austria), Irina Overeem (USA), Thorsteinn Sæmundsson (Iceland), Jeff Warburton (UK) and Zbigniew Zwolinski (Poland). The central research question of this global group of scientists is to: Assess and model the contemporary sedimentary fluxes in cold climates, with emphasis on both particulate and dissolved components. Initially formed as European Science Foundation (ESF) Network SEDIFLUX (Sedimentary Source-to-Sink Fluxes in Cold Environments) (2004 - ), SEDIBUD has further expanded to a global group of researchers with field research sites located in polar and alpine regions in the northern and southern hemisphere. Research carried out at each of the close to 50 defined SEDIBUD key test sites varies by programme, logistics and available

  4. Establishment of ruminal enzyme activities and fermentation capacity in dairy calves from birth through weaning.

    PubMed

    Rey, M; Enjalbert, F; Monteils, V

    2012-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the establishment of ruminal fermentation and enzymatic activities in dairy calves from birth to weaning (d 83). Six Holstein calves, immediately separated from their mother at birth, were fed colostrum for 3 d after birth, and thereafter milk replacer, starter pelleted concentrate, and hay until d 83 of age. Ruminal samples were collected from each calf every day for the first 10 d, and additionally at d 12, 15, 19, 22, 26, 29, 33, 36, 40, 43, 47, 50, 55, 62, 69, and 83. Ruminal samples were collected 1h after milk feeding with a stomach tube. The pH and redox potential (E(h)) were immediately measured. Samples were kept for further determination of ammonia nitrogen (NH(3)-N) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations, and xylanase, amylase, urease, and protease activities. Ruminal pH averaged 6.69, 5.82, and 6.34, from d 1 to 9, d 10 to 40, and d 43 to 83 of age, respectively. At first day of life, the ruminal E(h) value was positive (+224 mV). From d 2 to 9, d 10 to 40, and d 43 to 83 of age, ruminal E(h) averaged -164, -115, and -141 mV, respectively. From d 1 to 3, d 4 to 22, and d 26 to 83 of age, NH(3)-N concentration averaged 60.1, 179.8, and 58.2 mg/L, respectively. No VFA were detected in ruminal samples collected on d 1 of life of calves. From d 2 to 10 and d 12 to 83 of age, ruminal total VFA concentration averaged 19.5 and 84.4mM, respectively. Neither ruminal xylanase or amylase activities were observed at d 1 of age. From d 5 to 15 and d 19 to 83 of age, the xylanase activity averaged 182.2 and 62.4 μmol of sugar released per hour per gram of ruminal content dry matter (DM), respectively. From d 5 to 83 of age, the amylase activity reached 35.4 μmol of sugar released per hour per gram of ruminal content DM. The ruminal ureolytic activity was observed with an average value of 6.9 μg of NH(3)-N released per minute per gram of ruminal content DM over the 83-d experimental period. From d 1 to 4 and d

  5. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors

  6. PPARγ activation blocks development and reduces established neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Morgenweck, J.; Griggs, R.B.; Donahue, R.R.; Zadina, J.E.; Taylor, B.K.

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is emerging as a new pharmacotherapeutic target for chronic pain. When oral (3–30 mg/kg/day in chow for 7 wk) or twice-daily intraperitoneal (1–10 mg/kg/day for 2 wk) administration began before spared nerve injury (SNI), pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, dose-dependently prevented multiple behavioral signs of somatosensory hypersensitivity. The highest dose of intraperitoneal pioglitazone did not produce ataxia or reductions in transient mechanical and heat nociception, indicating that inhibitory effects on hypersensitivity were not secondary to adverse drug-induced behaviors or antinociception. Inhibitory effects on hypersensitivity persisted at least one week beyond cessation of pioglitazone administration, suggestive of long-lasting effects on gene expression. Blockade of PPARγ with GW9662, an irreversible and selective PPARγ antagonist, dose-dependently reduced the inhibitory effect of pioglitazone on hypersensitivity, indicating a PPARγ-dependent action. Remarkably, a single preemptive injection of pioglitazone 15 min before SNI attenuated hypersensitivity for at least 2 weeks; this was enhanced with a second injection delivered 12 hr after SNI. Pioglitazone injections beginning after SNI also reduced hypersensitivity, albeit to a lesser degree than preemptive treatment. Intraperitoneal pioglitazone significantly reduced the nerve injury-induced up-regulation of cd11b, GFAP, and p-p38 in the dorsal horn, indicating a mechanism of action involving spinal microglia and/or astrocyte activation. Oral pioglitazone significantly reduced touch stimulus-evoked phospho-extracellular signal-related kinase (p-ERK) in lamina I-II, indicating a mechanism of action involving inhibition of central sensitization. We conclude that pioglitazone reduces spinal glial and stimulus-evoked p-ERK activation and that PPARγ activation blocks the development of and reduces established neuropathic pain. PMID:23415633

  7. Piloting a programme tool to evaluate malaria case investigation and reactive case detection activities: results from 3 settings in the Asia Pacific.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Chris; Sudathip, Prayuth; Herdiana, Herdiana; Cao, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yaobao; Luo, Alex; Ranasinghe, Neil; Bennett, Adam; Cao, Jun; Gosling, Roly D

    2017-08-22

    Case investigation and reactive case detection (RACD) activities are widely-used in low transmission settings to determine the suspected origin of infection and identify and treat malaria infections nearby to the index patient household. Case investigation and RACD activities are time and resource intensive, include methodologies that vary across eliminating settings, and have no standardized metrics or tools available to monitor and evaluate them. In response to this gap, a simple programme tool was developed for monitoring and evaluating (M&E) RACD activities and piloted by national malaria programmes. During the development phase, four modules of the RACD M&E tool were created to assess and evaluate key case investigation and RACD activities and costs. A pilot phase was then carried out by programme implementers between 2013 and 2015, during which malaria surveillance teams in three different settings (China, Indonesia, Thailand) piloted the tool over a period of 3 months each. This study describes summary results of the pilots and feasibility and impact of the tool on programmes. All three study areas implemented the RACD M&E tool modules, and pilot users reported the tool and evaluation process were helpful to identify gaps in RACD programme activities. In the 45 health facilities evaluated, 71.8% (97/135; min 35.3-max 100.0%) of the proper notification and reporting forms and 20.0% (27/135; min 0.0-max 100.0%) of standard operating procedures (SOPs) were available to support malaria elimination activities. The tool highlighted gaps in reporting key data indicators on the completeness for malaria case reporting (98.8%; min 93.3-max 100.0%), case investigations (65.6%; min 61.8-max 78.4%) and RACD activities (70.0%; min 64.7-max 100.0%). Evaluation of the SOPs showed that knowledge and practices of malaria personnel varied within and between study areas. Average monthly costs for conducting case investigation and RACD activities showed variation between study

  8. How does a physical activity programme in elementary school affect fracture risk? A prospective controlled intervention study in Malmo, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Cöster, Marcus E; Fritz, Jesper; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Karlsson, Caroline; Rosengren, Björn E; Dencker, Magnus; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Recent evidence from the 7-year follow-up of the Pediatric Osteoporosis Prevention (POP) study indicates an inverse correlation between years of participation in a physical activity (PA) intervention and fracture risk in children. However, we could not see a statistically significant reduction in fracture risk, which urged for an extension of the intervention. Setting The study was conducted in 4 neighbouring elementary schools, where 1 school functioned as intervention school. Participants We included all children who began first grade in these 4 schools between 1998 and 2012. This resulted in 1339 children in the intervention group and 2195 children in the control group, all aged 6–8 years at the state of the study. Intervention We launched an 8-year intervention programme with 40 min of moderate PA per school day, while the controls continued with the Swedish national standard of 60 min of PA per week. Primary outcome measure We used the regional radiographic archive to register objectively verified fractures and we estimated annual fracture incidences and incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Results During the first year after initiation of the intervention, the fracture IRR was 1.65 (1.05 to 2.08) (mean 95% CI). For each year of the study, the fracture incidence rate in the control group compared with the intervention group increased by 15.7% (5.6% to 26.8%) (mean 95% CI). After 8 years, the IRR of fractures was 52% lower in the intervention group than in the control group (IRR 0.48 (0.25 to 0.91) (mean 95% CI))]. Conclusions Introduction of the school-based intervention programme is associated with a higher fracture risk in the intervention group during the first year followed by a gradual reduction, so that during the eighth year, the fracture risk was lower in the intervention group. Trial registration number NCT00633828. PMID:28235964

  9. Establishment of Active Traces of Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone through an Integrated Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besana-Ostman, G. M.; Vilanova, S.; Flor, A.; Canora, C.; Heleno, S.; Domingues, A.; Narciso, J.; Pinheiro, P.; Pinto, L.; Fonseca, J. F.

    2013-05-01

    Despite the occurrence of at least two damaging earthquakes in historical times - the M~7 1531 and the M6 1909 earthquakes - the Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone (LTVFZ) has only recently been mapped (Besana-Ostman et al., 2012). In addition, a new set of active traces has been identified to the east during recent analysis and field inspections. The major challenges to the identification of active traces within Lower Tagus Valley (LTV) are both the presence of the very dynamic Tagus River (LTR) and the extensive urban and agricultural modifications introduced in the landscape. The detailed reports on the geological effects of the 1909 earthquake, while documenting extensively the secondary, shaking-related effects, provide no indication of surface rupture. The active traces of the northeast-southwest trending left-lateral LTVFZ within the LTV were established through integrated approaches as follows: aerial photo analysis, drainage system and satellite images examination, geomorphic feature identification, field mapping, geomorphic index measurements and trenching. The mapped traces extend to about 80 kilometers long and transect Quaternary and Holocene deposits. The mapped length of the western splay is compatible with an M7.2 earthquake. On the other hand, the newly mapped eastern traces plot almost parallel with the western splay, which may extend southwards to a comparable length. Preliminary analysis of satellite data show some evidence of additional splays located further east and south relative to the LTV. The new active traces suggest that the LTVFZ is a left-stepping left-lateral fault system with a regional NNE-SSW trend. Moreover, its extent and kinematics suggest magnitudes higher than previously assessed for the region. The location of the active traces displays a better correlation with the damage distribution of the historical events. Given the significance and implications of these findings for earthquake hazards assessment in Portugal, further studies

  10. Effect of the Great Activity Programme on healthy lifestyle behaviours in 7-11 year olds.

    PubMed

    Morris, John G; Gorely, Trish; Sedgwick, Matthew J; Nevill, Alan; Nevill, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of a school-based healthy lifestyles intervention on physical activity and dietary variables. In total 378 children (177 intervention, 201 control; age 9.75 ± 0.82 years (mean ± s)) took part in the 7-month intervention comprising: preparation for and participation in 3 highlight events (a dance festival, a walking event and a running event); an interactive website for pupils, teachers and parents; and vacation activity planners. Primary outcome measures were objectively measured physical activity (pedometers and accelerometers), endurance fitness and dietary variables. Multi-level modelling was employed for data analysis. The increase in physical activity was greater in the intervention group than the control group (steps: 1049 vs 632 daily steps each month; moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) total: 4.6 min · day(-1) · month(-1) vs 1.3 min · day(-1) · month(-1); MVPA bouts: 5.4 min · day(-1) · month(-1) vs 2.6 min · day(-1) · month(-1); all P < 0.05). The increase in multi-stage fitness test distance was greater for intervention participants (46 vs 29 m · month(-1) of intervention, group × month interaction, P < 0.05). There were no differences between groups in dietary variables, body composition, knowledge of healthy lifestyles or psychological variables. Thus an intervention centred around highlight events and including relatively few additional resources can impact positively on the objectively measured physical activity of children.

  11. Predictors of long-term change of a physical activity promotion programme in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Further research is needed to improve the evidence regarding determinants of physical activity (PA) as a crucial step to plan higher effective intervention strategies. The goal of the present study is to identify socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of primary care (PHC) insufficiently active patients that are associated with longitudinal changes in the level of physical activity. Methods Longitudinal analysis of baseline socio-demographic and clinical predictors of physical activity change in insufficiently active PHC patients who participated in a PA-promoting multi-centre randomized clinical trial conducted from October 2003 through March 2006. The primary outcome measure was the self-reported physical activity assessed with the 7-day Physical Activity Recall (PAR), at baseline, 6, 12 and 24 months. Baseline covariates included sex, age, social class, anthropometric measures and other cardiovascular risk factors or associated diseases (Diabetes, HTA, tobacco use, etc.), and stage of readiness to change PA. Generalized linear mixed models were used to estimate longitudinal association of studied variables on PA change over the three follow-up measurements. Results A total of 3691 patients (85% of the 4317 recruited in the trial) with at least one follow-up measurement were included in the longitudinal analysis. At baseline, analysed patients (mean age: 50.6 years; 64.6% women) devoted 34.7 minutes and 2.36 metabolic equivalent hours per week (MET.h/week) to moderate and vigorous physical activity. Older age, male gender, higher social class, lower BMI, diagnosis of diabetes or hypertension, and measurement season were significant predictors of PA longitudinal change. The effect of baseline readiness to change on PA dose was modified by time, showing a positive gradient in favour of those with more readiness to change that increases significantly at 12 and 24 months (p-value interaction < .0001). Conclusions Identified baseline

  12. Development of a training programme for home health care workers to promote preventive activities focused on a healthy lifestyle: an intervention mapping approach.

    PubMed

    Walters, Maaike E; Dijkstra, Arie; de Winter, Andrea F; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2015-07-09

    Lifestyle is an important aspect in maintaining good health in older adults, and home health care (HHC) workers can play an important role in promoting a healthy lifestyle. However, there is limited evidence in the literature regarding how to develop an effective training programme to improve the physical activity level and fruit and vegetable consumption of older adults within a HHC setting. The aim of this paper is to describe how Intervention Mapping (IM) was used to develop a training programme to promote preventive activities of HHC workers relating to the physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake of older adults living at home. IM, a systematic theory and evidence-based approach was used to develop, implement and evaluate the training programme. This entailed a literature search, a survey, semi-structured interviews and consultation with HHC workers and various field experts, and a pilot training session. The determinants associated with the provision of preventive activities were identified, and an overview was created of those objectives, matching methods and practical applications that could influence these determinants. The performance objectives for the HHC workers were early detection and monitoring, promoting a healthy lifestyle, informing colleagues, continuing allocated preventive activities and referring to other experts and facilities. Findings were translated into a comprehensive training programme for HHC workers focused on motivating older adults to adopt and maintain a healthier lifestyle. IM was a useful tool in the development of a theory-based training programme to promote preventive activities by HHC workers relating to fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity of older adults.

  13. A thin film active-lens with translational control for dynamically programmable optical zoom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sungryul; Park, Suntak; Park, Bongje; Nam, Saekwang; Park, Seung Koo; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a thin film active-lens for rapidly and dynamically controllable optical zoom. The active-lens is composed of a convex hemispherical polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) lens structure working as an aperture and a dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane actuator, which is a combination of a thin DE layer made with PDMS and a compliant electrode pattern using silver-nanowires. The active-lens is capable of dynamically changing focal point of the soft aperture as high as 18.4% through its translational movement in vertical direction responding to electrically induced bulged-up deformation of the DE membrane actuator. Under operation with various sinusoidal voltage signals, the movement responses are fairly consistent with those estimated from numerical simulation. The responses are not only fast, fairly reversible, and highly durable during continuous cyclic operations, but also large enough to impart dynamic focus tunability for optical zoom in microscopic imaging devices with a light-weight and ultra-slim configuration.

  14. Strategies to improve the implementation of healthy eating, physical activity and obesity prevention policies, practices or programmes within childcare services.

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, Luke; Jones, Jannah; Williams, Christopher M; Finch, Meghan; Wyse, Rebecca J; Kingsland, Melanie; Tzelepis, Flora; Wiggers, John; Williams, Amanda J; Seward, Kirsty; Small, Tameka; Welch, Vivian; Booth, Debbie; Yoong, Sze Lin

    2016-10-04

    Despite the existence of effective interventions and best-practice guideline recommendations for childcare services to implement policies, practices and programmes to promote child healthy eating, physical activity and prevent unhealthy weight gain, many services fail to do so. The primary aim of the review was to examine the effectiveness of strategies aimed at improving the implementation of policies, practices or programmes by childcare services that promote child healthy eating, physical activity and/or obesity prevention. The secondary aims of the review were to:1. describe the impact of such strategies on childcare service staff knowledge, skills or attitudes;2. describe the cost or cost-effectiveness of such strategies;3. describe any adverse effects of such strategies on childcare services, service staff or children;4. examine the effect of such strategies on child diet, physical activity or weight status. We searched the following electronic databases on 3 August 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, MEDLINE In Process, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ERIC, CINAHL and SCOPUS. We also searched reference lists of included trials, handsearched two international implementation science journals and searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (www.who.int/ictrp/) and ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov). We included any study (randomised or non-randomised) with a parallel control group that compared any strategy to improve the implementation of a healthy eating, physical activity or obesity prevention policy, practice or programme by staff of centre-based childcare services to no intervention, 'usual' practice or an alternative strategy. The review authors independently screened abstracts and titles, extracted trial data and assessed risk of bias in pairs; we resolved discrepancies via consensus. Heterogeneity across studies precluded pooling of data and undertaking quantitative

  15. International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Programme global emissions inventory activity: Sulfur emissions from volcanoes, current status

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitz, C.M.

    1995-07-01

    Sulfur emissions from volcanoes are located in areas of volcanic activity, are extremely variable in time, and can be released anywhere from ground level to the stratosphere. Previous estimates of global sulfur emissions from all sources by various authors have included estimates for emissions from volcanic activity. In general, these global estimates of sulfur emissions from volcanoes are given as global totals for an ``average`` year. A project has been initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory to compile inventories of sulfur emissions from volcanoes. In order to complement the GEIA inventories of anthropogenic sulfur emissions, which represent conditions circa specific years, sulfur emissions from volcanoes are being estimated for the years 1985 and 1990.

  16. Chromatin modifications that support acetylcholine receptor gene activation are established during muscle cell determination and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Carter A; Snell, Jeff; Fromm, Larry

    2011-02-01

    Localization of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) to the postsynaptic region of muscle is mediated in part by transcriptional mechanisms. An important way of regulating transcription is through targeting histone modifications on chromatin to distinct gene loci. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we examined the developmental regulation of certain histone modifications at the AChR epsilon subunit locus, including methylations at lysine residues K4 and K27 and acetylations at K9 and K14. We modeled various stages of muscle development in cell culture, including pre-determined cells, committed but undifferentiated myoblasts, and differentiated myotubes, and modeled synaptic myotube nuclei by stimulating myotubes with neuregulin (NRG) 1. We found that a pattern of histone modifications associated with transcriptional activation is targeted to the AChR epsilon subunit locus in myotubes prior to stimulation with NRG1 and does not change upon addition of NRG1. Instead, we found that during muscle cell determination and differentiation, specific histone modifications are targeted to the AChR epsilon subunit locus. Within the gene, at K4, dimethylation is induced during muscle cell determination, while trimethylation is induced during differentiation. At K27, loss of trimethylation and appearance of monomethylation occurs during determination and differentiation. In addition, in a region upstream of the gene, K4 di- and trimethylation, and K9/14 acetylation are induced in a distinct developmental pattern, which may reflect a functional regulatory element. These results suggest synaptic signaling does not directly target histone modifications but rather the histone modification pattern necessary for transcriptional activation is previously established in a series of steps during muscle development.

  17. Programme Evaluation: Maintaining Quality in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loots, A.

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of educational or social programmes is paramount for establishing success or impact in higher education. Evaluation questions about programme goals (e.g. better performance of first-year students) or about the quality of programme strategies (design and implementation) and effectiveness of delivery (coordinator inputs and…

  18. Programme Evaluation: Maintaining Quality in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loots, A.

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of educational or social programmes is paramount for establishing success or impact in higher education. Evaluation questions about programme goals (e.g. better performance of first-year students) or about the quality of programme strategies (design and implementation) and effectiveness of delivery (coordinator inputs and…

  19. Introduction, scenarios for establishment and seasonal activity of Aedes albopictus in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Takumi, Katsuhisa; Scholte, Ernst-Jan; Braks, Marieta; Reusken, Chantal; Avenell, David; Medlock, Jolyon M

    2009-04-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus was detected for the first time in the Netherlands in the summer of 2005. Aedes albopictus is a competent vector of several human viral diseases, and therefore the recent appearance of the vector is a concern to local public health authorities. In 2006 and 2007, the mosquito was found repeatedly and regularly at Lucky bamboo import companies. To assess whether imported Ae. albopictus could establish to produce subsequent generations in the following years or whether the winter conditions in the Netherlands would prove too cold to allow overwintering of diapausing eggs, predictions were made using a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) model based on January average temperature and the annual precipitation recorded in 2006. Seasonal activity of overwintering Ae. albopictus was estimated for temperate strains based on the weekly average temperature and weekly photoperiod using spring egg hatching thresholds of 10.5 degrees C and 11.25 hours, and egg diapause and adult survival thresholds of 9.5 degrees C and 13.5 hours. The analyses indicate that the climate conditions in the Netherlands over the past 10 years were favorable to allow overwintering of diapausing eggs of temperate strains of Ae. albopictus, particularly in the western coastal region. This region was also the area where adult Ae. albopictus were intercepted inside and surrounding plant glasshouses. The estimated number of weeks elapsing between first egg hatching in spring and the production of diapausing eggs in autumn ranged between 17 and 22 weeks in 2006.

  20. Active Agents of Health Promotion? The School's Role in Supporting the HPV Vaccination Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spratt, Jennifer; Shucksmith, Janet; Philip, Kate; McNaughton, Rebekah

    2013-01-01

    By providing a place in which children can be accessed, the school has long been a site for population-level health initiatives. Recent policy shifts towards health-promoting schools have however re-cast the school from passive host to active collaborator in public health. This paper examines secondary school teachers' views of their roles as…

  1. Positive Youth Development through an Outdoor Physical Activity Programme: Evidence from a Four-Year Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour, Kathleen; Sandford, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, Sandford, Armour and Warmington undertook a comprehensive review of the literature on the role of physical activity/sport and physical education in promoting positive development for disaffected youth. This paper revisits the findings of the literature review in light of data from a four-year evaluation of one corporate-sponsored physical…

  2. Male Adolescents' View on Sexual Activity as Basis for the Development of Aids-Prevention Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyn, Hester; Myburgh, Chris P.H.; Poggenpoel, Marie

    2005-01-01

    The world regards AIDS as the most disastrous health threat in the world. HIV/AIDS- related issues amongst adolescents were initially neglected due to the visible impact of this pandemic on babies and adults. Adolescents' behavior is however regarded as high-risk because of their involvement in sexual activities from a young age. The purpose of…

  3. Delivering Sustainable Practice? A Case Study of the Scottish Active Schools Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    Since 1999, concerns about Scotland's future health and economic performance have profoundly impacted on the new Scottish Executive. Research highlighting an obesity crisis facing young Scots has, together with the work of Scotland's Physical Activity Task Force and Physical Education Review Group, encouraged the education of all young Scots to be…

  4. Active Agents of Health Promotion? The School's Role in Supporting the HPV Vaccination Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spratt, Jennifer; Shucksmith, Janet; Philip, Kate; McNaughton, Rebekah

    2013-01-01

    By providing a place in which children can be accessed, the school has long been a site for population-level health initiatives. Recent policy shifts towards health-promoting schools have however re-cast the school from passive host to active collaborator in public health. This paper examines secondary school teachers' views of their roles as…

  5. Delivering Sustainable Practice? A Case Study of the Scottish Active Schools Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    Since 1999, concerns about Scotland's future health and economic performance have profoundly impacted on the new Scottish Executive. Research highlighting an obesity crisis facing young Scots has, together with the work of Scotland's Physical Activity Task Force and Physical Education Review Group, encouraged the education of all young Scots to be…

  6. The Effects of an Enhanced Quality Physical Education Programme on the Physical Activity Levels of Grade 7 Learners in Potchefstroom, South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Haili; du Toit, Dorita; Toriola, Abel L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The absence of Physical Education (PE) from the South African school curriculum before its reintroduction in recent years contributed to health concerns regarding the low physical activity (PA) levels of children and adolescents in South Africa. Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of a once-a-week enhanced quality PE programme on…

  7. An Activity Theoretical Perspective towards the Design of an ICT-Enhanced After-School Programme for Academically At-Risk Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Lee Yong; Lim, Cher Ping

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how a game-like 3D Multi-User Virtual Environment (MUVE), Quest Atlantis (QA), is used in an after-school programme to engage a group of 14 academically at-risk primary students in their learning. It adopts an activity theoretical perspective to identify the disturbances and contradictions during the implementation of the…

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of a Long-Term Internet-Delivered Worksite Health Promotion Programme on Physical Activity and Nutrition: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robroek, Suzan J. W.; Polinder, Suzanne; Bredt, Folef J.; Burdorf, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a long-term workplace health promotion programme on physical activity (PA) and nutrition. In total, 924 participants enrolled in a 2-year cluster randomized controlled trial, with departments (n = 74) within companies (n = 6) as the unit of randomization. The intervention was compared with a…

  9. The Effects of an Enhanced Quality Physical Education Programme on the Physical Activity Levels of Grade 7 Learners in Potchefstroom, South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Haili; du Toit, Dorita; Toriola, Abel L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The absence of Physical Education (PE) from the South African school curriculum before its reintroduction in recent years contributed to health concerns regarding the low physical activity (PA) levels of children and adolescents in South Africa. Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of a once-a-week enhanced quality PE programme on…

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of a Long-Term Internet-Delivered Worksite Health Promotion Programme on Physical Activity and Nutrition: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robroek, Suzan J. W.; Polinder, Suzanne; Bredt, Folef J.; Burdorf, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a long-term workplace health promotion programme on physical activity (PA) and nutrition. In total, 924 participants enrolled in a 2-year cluster randomized controlled trial, with departments (n = 74) within companies (n = 6) as the unit of randomization. The intervention was compared with a…

  11. An Activity Theoretical Perspective towards the Design of an ICT-Enhanced After-School Programme for Academically At-Risk Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Lee Yong; Lim, Cher Ping

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how a game-like 3D Multi-User Virtual Environment (MUVE), Quest Atlantis (QA), is used in an after-school programme to engage a group of 14 academically at-risk primary students in their learning. It adopts an activity theoretical perspective to identify the disturbances and contradictions during the implementation of the…

  12. Generative Adaptation and Reuse of Competence Development Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodero, Juan Manuel; Zarraonandia, Telmo; Fernandez, Camino; Diez, David

    2007-01-01

    Instructional engineering provides methods to conduct the design and adaptation of competence development programmes by the combination of diverse learning components (i.e. units of learning, learning activities, learning resources and learning services). It occurs through an established process workflow in which models with diverse levels of…

  13. Optoacoustic tweezers: a programmable, localized cell concentrator based on opto-thermally generated, acoustically activated, surface bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanhui; Li, Sixing; Rufo, Joseph; Yang, Shikuan; Guo, Feng; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    We present a programmable, biocompatible technique for dynamically concentrating and patterning particles and cells in a microfluidic device. Since our technique utilizes opto-thermally generated, acoustically activated, surface bubbles, we name it “optoacoustic tweezers.” The optoacoustic tweezers are capable of concentrating particles/cells at any prescribed locations in a microfluidic chamber without the use of permanent structures, rendering it particularly useful for the formation of flexible, complex cell patterns. Additionally, this technique has demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and can be conveniently integrated with other microfluidic units. In our experiments, micro-bubbles were generated by focusing a 405 nm diode laser onto a gold-coated glass chamber. By properly tuning the laser, we demonstrate precise control over the position and size of the generated bubbles. Acoustic waves were then applied to activate the surface bubbles, causing them to oscillate at an optimized frequency. The resulting acoustic radiation force allowed us to locally trap particles/cells, including 15 μm polystyrene beads and HeLa cells, around each bubble. Cell-adhesion tests were also conducted after cell concentrating to confirm the biocompatibility of this technique. PMID:23511348

  14. An initial evaluation of the clinical and fitness for work outcomes of a military group behavioural activation programme.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Matthew; Whybrow, Dean; Gould, Matthew; Greenberg, Neil

    2014-03-01

    Behavioural Activation (BA) is an evidence-based psychological treatment for depression based on behavioural theory. However, in common with other talking therapies, there is limited evidence about occupational factors related to treatment. This is an important gap in the research given the emphasis placed on employment considerations in recent service initiatives. A service evaluation to investigate the clinical and fitness to work outcomes of a group BA programme for serving military personnel. 46 patients experiencing moderate to severe depression attended a 12-session Military Behavioural Activation and Rehabilitation Course (MBARC). The primary outcomes were the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), a self-report measure of depression and the patient's medical employability category. Clinical and statistically significant changes were found on the PHQ-9 between pre-course and 3-month follow-up. Pretreatment 3 patients (6.5%) were psychologically fit to deploy on full operational duties in their primary role; this increased to 25 (56.8%) and 29 (65.9%) at 3 and 6-months respectively. Preliminary findings suggest that MBARC is a clinically and occupationally effective treatment for depression in military personnel. Further research is required to identify if BA delivered in a group setting would be effective in non-military settings and whether treatment benefits are maintained in the longer term.

  15. Origami-inspired active graphene-based paper for programmable instant self-folding walking devices

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Jiuke; Hou, Chengyi; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang; Zhang, Qinghong; Zhu, Meifang

    2015-01-01

    Origami-inspired active graphene-based paper with programmed gradients in vertical and lateral directions is developed to address many of the limitations of polymer active materials including slow response and violent operation methods. Specifically, we used function-designed graphene oxide as nanoscale building blocks to fabricate an all-graphene self-folding paper that has a single-component gradient structure. A functional device composed of this graphene paper can (i) adopt predesigned shapes, (ii) walk, and (iii) turn a corner. These processes can be remote-controlled by gentle light or heating. We believe that this self-folding material holds potential for a wide range of applications such as sensing, artificial muscles, and robotics. PMID:26601135

  16. Programmable Pulser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, Eric; Merolla, Anthony

    1988-01-01

    User controls number of clock pulses to prevent burnout. New digital programmable pulser circuit in three formats; freely running, counted, and single pulse. Operates at frequencies up to 5 MHz, with no special consideration given to layout of components or to terminations. Pulser based on sequential circuit with four states and binary counter with appropriate decoding logic. Number of programmable pulses increased beyond 127 by addition of another counter and decoding logic. For very large pulse counts and/or very high frequencies, use synchronous counters to avoid errors caused by propagation delays. Invaluable tool for initial verification or diagnosis of digital or digitally controlled circuity.

  17. Programmable Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division, formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc., incorporated Apollo technology into the development of the programmable pacemaker system. This consists of the implantable pacemaker together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Physician can communicate with patient's pacemaker by means of wireless telemetry signals transmitted through the communicating head held over the patient's chest. Where earlier pacemakers deliver a fixed type of stimulus once implanted, Programalith enables surgery free "fine tuning" of device to best suit the patient's changing needs.

  18. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications. PMID:26785682

  19. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-20

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 10(6) and 3.72 × 10(6) respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  20. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  1. The outcome of a functional restoration programme for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Sivan, M; Sell, B; Sell, P

    2009-12-01

    Multidisciplinary rehabilitation programmes have been successfully advocated for chronic low back pain. The aim of the study was to establish the functional and vocational outcome of a 3-week functional restoration programme. IV, Uncontrolled clinical series. One hundred and eighteen chronic low back pain patients underwent a 100-h programme consisting of back exercises, hydrotherapy, gymnasium work education and cognitive behavioural therapy. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Roland Morris (RM), 'patient global assessment tool' and work status scores were completed pre-programme and at least 1 year post programme. The ODI score improved by 15.6% (95% CI 11.8-19.4) and RM score by 4.6 points (95% CI 3.6-5.6). The proportion of patients who were seriously affected in the workplace had dropped from 59 to 22%. More than 85% of patients were satisfied with the outcome. Functional restoration programme improves the functional activity and vocational status of patients with chronic low back pain.

  2. Reduced rates of hospital-acquired UTI in medical patients. Prevalence surveys indicate effect of active infection control programmes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M; Jepsen, O B

    2001-01-01

    Prevalence surveys have been part of the Danish infection control programme since 1974. Nationwide surveys were carried out in 1978, 1979, 1980, 1991 and 1999. The results indicate a net reduction of approximately 25%, mainly due to a reduction of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in medical patients. Results from the nationwide surveys are validated by results of occasional independent surveys performed in regions or single hospitals. The reduction coincides with preventive programmes focused on catheter policy and UTI. We conclude that the prevalence survey is an important part of our strategic programme for infection control in hospitals.

  3. Establishment and activity of medical societies in Lower Styria - a review.

    PubMed

    Pivec, Gregor; Borko, Elko; Turk, Zmago

    2014-01-01

    In the 1860s, the medical societies in Habsburg Monarchy, undertook a part of the medical postgraduate training. Doctors and wound surgeons from Ljubljana established medical association in October 1861 («Ärztlicher Leseverein in Laibach»). At a meeting in October 1862 they decided to include all the doctors and wound surgeons from the Carniola region. Following the organization was renamed Medical Association in Carniola («Verein der Ärzte in Krain»). A similar provincial association was founded by the Styrian doctors in Graz as early as in May 1862 («Verein der Ärzte in Steiermark»). Similar medical associations were also established in the Lower Styria in the 1870s. The most important medical association was established in Maribor in 1876. Another medical association was established in Celje in 1877 and one in the Ptuj-Ljutomer region in 1877. As the associations were mostly communicating in German, this might have been the reason for the establishment of the Slovene medical society in Celje in 1906. The Slovenian national consciousness began to strengthen across the territory of today's Slovenia. Already after the First World War in 1918, they managed to achieve the establishment of the Slovene Medical Society. Due to the events during the Second World War, a uniform Slovene medical association was established in 1947.

  4. The National Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, Belete; Deribe, Kebede; Kebede, Fikreab; Martindale, Sarah; Hassan, Mohammed; Sime, Heven; Mackenzie, Charles; Mulugeta, Abate; Tamiru, Mossie; Sileshi, Mesfin; Hailu, Asrat; Gebre, Teshome; Fentaye, Amha; Kebede, Biruck

    2017-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is one of the most debilitating and disfiguring diseases common in Ethiopia and is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti. Mapping for LF has shown that 70 woredas (districts) are endemic and 5.9 million people are estimated to be at risk. The national government’s LF elimination programme commenced in 2009 in 5 districts integrated with the onchocerciasis programme. The programme developed gradually and has shown significant progress over the past 6 years, reaching 100% geographical coverage for mass drug administration (MDA) by 2016. To comply with the global LF elimination goals an integrated morbidity management and disability prevention (MMDP) guideline and a burden assessment programme has also been developed; MMDP protocols and a hydrocoele surgical handbook produced for country-wide use. In Ethiopia, almost all LF endemic districts are co-endemic with malaria and vector control aspects of the activities are conducted in the context of malaria programme as the vectors for both diseases are mosquitoes. In order to monitor the elimination, 11 sentinel and spot-check sites have been established and baseline information has been collected. Although significant achievements have been achieved in the scale up of the LF elimination programme, there is still a need to strengthen operational research to generate programme-relevant evidence, to increase access to morbidity management services, and to improve monitoring and evaluation of the LF programme. However, the current status of implementation of the LF national programme indicates that Ethiopia is poised to achieve the 2020 goal of elimination of LF. Nevertheless, to achieve this goal, high and sustained treatment coverage and strong monitoring and evaluation of the programme are essential. PMID:28878429

  5. 12 CFR 225.145 - Limitations established by the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987 on the activities and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limitations established by the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987 on the activities and growth of nonbank banks. 225.145 Section 225.145 Banks... activities and growth of nonbank banks. (a) Introduction. Effective August 10, 1987, the Competitive...

  6. 12 CFR 225.145 - Limitations established by the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987 on the activities and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Equality Banking Act of 1987 on the activities and growth of nonbank banks. 225.145 Section 225.145 Banks... Interpretations § 225.145 Limitations established by the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987 on the activities and growth of nonbank banks. (a) Introduction. Effective August 10, 1987, the Competitive...

  7. A lifestyle intervention as supplement to a physical activity programme in rehabilitation after stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lund, A; Michelet, M; Sandvik, L; Wyller, Tb; Sveen, U

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of lifestyle group intervention on well-being, occupation and social participation. A randomized controlled trial. Senior centres in the community. Of 204 stroke survivors screened, 99 (49%) were randomized three months after stroke whereby 86 (87%) participants (mean (SD) age 77.0 (7.1) years) completed all assessments (39 in the intervention group and 47 in the control group). A lifestyle course in combination with physical activity (intervention group) compared with physical activity alone (control group). Both programmes were held once a week for nine months. The Short Form Questionnaire (SF-36), addressing well-being and social participation. Assessments were performed at baseline and at nine months follow-up. We found no statistically significant differences between the groups at the nine months follow-up in the SF-36. Adjusted mean differences in change scores in the eight subscales of SF-36 were; 'mental health' (+1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.0, +7.6), 'vitality' (-3.0, 95% CI -9.6, +3.6), 'bodily pain' (+3.3, 95% CI -7.8, +14.4), 'general health' (-1.6, 95% CI -8.4, +5.1), 'social functioning' (-2.5, 95% CI -12.8, +7.8), 'physical functioning' (+1.0, 95% CI -6.7, +8.6), 'role physical' (-7.1, 95% CI -22.7, +8.4), 'role emotional' (+11.8, 95% CI -4.4, +28.0). Improvements were seen in both groups, but no statistically significant differences were found in the intervention group compared to controls. An intervention comprising regular group-based activity with peers may be sufficient in the long-term rehabilitation after stroke.

  8. Hibernation as a Far-Reaching Programme for Cell Nucleus Activity Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, M.; Biggiogera, M.; Zancanaro, C.

    Maintaining part of the crew under hypometabolic conditions could help with the problems associated with long-term space missions. In the natural world, hibernators represent the most suitable model for a hypometabolic state. These animals are, in fact, able to drastically reduce all metabolic and physiological activities under adverse environmental conditions, but they can rapidly leave the depressed metabolic state as soon as the environment becomes favourable. Hibernators' cellular machinery must therefore undergo adaptive morpho-functional modifications to allow survival. Our studies on tissues of hibernating dormice revealed that the cell nucleus undergoes an important structural reorganisation during the hypometabolic period. Interestingly, despite the drastic reduction in pre-mRNA transcriptional and processing rate, cell nuclei of hibernating dormice never showed features typical of quiescence. Recent analyses revealed that pre-mRNA processing factors undergo an intranuclear redistribution which varies in different tissues. This suggests a programmed intranuclear reorganization of such molecules aimed to an efficient and rapid restoration of pre-mRNA processing upon arousal. Natural hibernation therefore appears as a highly programmed hypometabolic state rather than a simple fall of metabolic and physiological functions.

  9. The SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme: Ongoing activities and selected key tasks for the coming years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Decaulne, Armelle

    2012-09-01

    Projected climate change in cold environments is expected to alter melt-season duration and intensity, along with the number of extreme rainfall events, total annual precipitation and the balance between snowfall and rainfall. In addition, changes to the thermal balance are expected to reduce the extent of permafrost and seasonal ground frost and increase active layer depths. The combined effects of these changes will alter surface environments in cold climate regions and change the fluxes of sediments, nutrients and solutes, but the absence of data, coordinated process monitoring and coordinated quantitative analysis to understand the sensitivity of the Earth surface environment are acute in cold climate environments. The International Association of Geomorphologists (I.A.G./A.I.G.) SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme has been formed to address this key knowledge gap and builds on the earlier European Science Foundation (ESF) SEDIFLUX (Sedimentary Source-to-Sink-Fluxes in Cold Environments) Network. Coordinated efforts are carried out to monitor, quantify, compare and model sedimentary fluxes and possible effects of predicted climate change in currently 44 selected SEDIBUD Key Test Sites (cold climate environment catchments) worldwide.

  10. Integrated control of active suspension system and electronic stability programme using hierarchical control strategy: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hansong; Chen, Wuwei; Zhou, HuiHui; Zu, Jean W.

    2011-02-01

    Integrated vehicle dynamics control has been an important research topic in the area of vehicle dynamics and control over the past two decades. The aim of integrated vehicle control is to improve the overall vehicle performance including handling, stability, and comfort through creating synergies in the use of sensor information, hardware, and control strategies. This paper proposes a two-layer hierarchical control architecture for integrated control of the active suspension system (ASS) and the electronic stability programme (ESP). The upper-layer controller is designed to coordinate the interactions between the ASS and the ESP. While in the lower layer, the two controllers including the ASS and the ESP are developed independently to achieve their local control objectives. Both a simulation investigation and a hardware-in-the-loop experimental study are performed. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed hierarchical control system is able to improve the multiple vehicle performance indices including both the ride comfort and the lateral stability, compared with the non-integrated control system. Moreover, the experimental results verify the effectiveness of the design of the hierarchical control system.

  11. How does a physical activity programme in elementary school affect fracture risk? A prospective controlled intervention study in Malmo, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Cöster, Marcus E; Fritz, Jesper; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Karlsson, Caroline; Rosengren, Björn E; Dencker, Magnus; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2017-02-23

    Recent evidence from the 7-year follow-up of the Pediatric Osteoporosis Prevention (POP) study indicates an inverse correlation between years of participation in a physical activity (PA) intervention and fracture risk in children. However, we could not see a statistically significant reduction in fracture risk, which urged for an extension of the intervention. The study was conducted in 4 neighbouring elementary schools, where 1 school functioned as intervention school. We included all children who began first grade in these 4 schools between 1998 and 2012. This resulted in 1339 children in the intervention group and 2195 children in the control group, all aged 6-8 years at the state of the study. We launched an 8-year intervention programme with 40 min of moderate PA per school day, while the controls continued with the Swedish national standard of 60 min of PA per week. We used the regional radiographic archive to register objectively verified fractures and we estimated annual fracture incidences and incidence rate ratios (IRRs). During the first year after initiation of the intervention, the fracture IRR was 1.65 (1.05 to 2.08) (mean 95% CI). For each year of the study, the fracture incidence rate in the control group compared with the intervention group increased by 15.7% (5.6% to 26.8%) (mean 95% CI). After 8 years, the IRR of fractures was 52% lower in the intervention group than in the control group (IRR 0.48 (0.25 to 0.91) (mean 95% CI))]. Introduction of the school-based intervention programme is associated with a higher fracture risk in the intervention group during the first year followed by a gradual reduction, so that during the eighth year, the fracture risk was lower in the intervention group. NCT00633828. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Intervention dose estimation in health promotion programmes: a framework and a tool. Application to the diet and physical activity promotion PRALIMAP trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the outcomes of health promotion and prevention programmes may depend on the level of intervention, studies and trials often fail to take it into account. The objective of this work was to develop a framework within which to consider the implementation of interventions, and to propose a tool with which to measure the quantity and the quality of activities, whether planned or not, relevant to the intervention under investigation. The framework and the tool were applied to data from the diet and physical activity promotion PRALIMAP trial. Methods A framework allowing for calculation of an intervention dose in any health promotion programme was developed. A literature reviews revealed several relevant concepts that were considered in greater detail by a multidisciplinary working group. A method was devised with which to calculate the dose of intervention planned and that is actually received (programme-driven activities dose), as well as the amount of non-planned intervention (non-programme-driven activities dose). Results Indicators cover the roles of all those involved (supervisors, anchor personnel as receivers and providers, targets), in each intervention-related groups (IRG: basic setting in which a given intervention is planned by the programme and may differ in implementation level) and for every intervention period. All indicators are described according to two domains (delivery, participation) in two declensions (quantity and quality). Application to PRALIMAP data revealed important inter- and intra-IRG variability in intervention dose. Conclusions A literature analysis shows that the terminology in this area is not yet consolidated and that research is ongoing. The present work provides a methodological framework by specifying concepts, by defining new constructs and by developing multiple information synthesis methods which must be introduced from the programme's conception. Application to PRALIMAP underlined the feasibility of measuring

  13. VIP in construction: systematic development and evaluation of a multifaceted health programme aiming to improve physical activity levels and dietary patterns among construction workers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of both overweight and musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) in the construction industry is high. Many interventions in the occupational setting aim at the prevention and reduction of these health problems, but it is still unclear how these programmes should be designed. To determine the effectiveness of interventions on these health outcomes randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are needed. The aim of this study is to systematically develop a tailored intervention for prevention and reduction of overweight and MSD among construction workers and to describe the evaluation study regarding its (cost-)effectiveness. Methods/Design The Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol was applied to develop and implement a tailored programme aimed at the prevention and reduction of overweight and MSD. The (cost-) effectiveness of the intervention programme will be evaluated using an RCT. Furthermore, a process evaluation will be conducted. The research population will consist of blue collar workers of a large construction company in the Netherlands. Intervention The intervention programme will be aimed at improving (vigorous) physical activity levels and healthy dietary behaviour and will consist of tailored information, face-to-face and telephone counselling, training instruction (a fitness "card" to be used for exercises), and materials designed for the intervention (overview of the company health promoting facilities, waist circumference measuring tape, pedometer, BMI card, calorie guide, recipes, and knowledge test). Main study parameters/endpoints The intervention effect on body weight and waist circumference (primary outcome measures), as well as on lifestyle behaviour, MSD, fitness, CVD risk indicators, and work-related outcomes (i.e. productivity, sick leave) (secondary outcome measures) will be assessed. Discussion The development of the VIP in construction intervention led to a health programme tailored to the needs of construction workers. This programme

  14. VIP in construction: systematic development and evaluation of a multifaceted health programme aiming to improve physical activity levels and dietary patterns among construction workers.

    PubMed

    Viester, Laura; Verhagen, Evert A L M; Proper, Karin I; van Dongen, Johanna M; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J

    2012-01-30

    The prevalence of both overweight and musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) in the construction industry is high. Many interventions in the occupational setting aim at the prevention and reduction of these health problems, but it is still unclear how these programmes should be designed. To determine the effectiveness of interventions on these health outcomes randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are needed. The aim of this study is to systematically develop a tailored intervention for prevention and reduction of overweight and MSD among construction workers and to describe the evaluation study regarding its (cost-)effectiveness. The Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol was applied to develop and implement a tailored programme aimed at the prevention and reduction of overweight and MSD. The (cost-) effectiveness of the intervention programme will be evaluated using an RCT. Furthermore, a process evaluation will be conducted. The research population will consist of blue collar workers of a large construction company in the Netherlands. The intervention programme will be aimed at improving (vigorous) physical activity levels and healthy dietary behaviour and will consist of tailored information, face-to-face and telephone counselling, training instruction (a fitness "card" to be used for exercises), and materials designed for the intervention (overview of the company health promoting facilities, waist circumference measuring tape, pedometer, BMI card, calorie guide, recipes, and knowledge test). MAIN STUDY PARAMETERS/ENDPOINTS: The intervention effect on body weight and waist circumference (primary outcome measures), as well as on lifestyle behaviour, MSD, fitness, CVD risk indicators, and work-related outcomes (i.e. productivity, sick leave) (secondary outcome measures) will be assessed. The development of the VIP in construction intervention led to a health programme tailored to the needs of construction workers. This programme, if proven effective, can be directly

  15. Impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' lifestyle programme on the activity- and diet-related parenting practices of fathers and mothers.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A B; Lubans, D R; Plotnikoff, R C; Morgan, P J

    2014-12-01

    The aim was to evaluate the impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' programme on fathers' and mothers' activity- and diet-related parenting practices. Overweight/obese fathers (n = 87) and their primary school-aged children (56% boys) were randomized to either (i) 7-week programme (n = 45) or (ii) control group (n = 42). The programme involved four sessions for fathers only and three for fathers/children. Mothers were not directly involved. Parenting practices of both fathers and mothers were measured using the parenting strategies for eating and activity scale at baseline and 14-week follow-up. Intention-to-treat analysis using linear mixed models revealed significant group-by-time effects for fathers' limit setting (P = 0.048, d = 0.36) and reinforcement for multiple lifestyle behaviours (P = 0.001, d = 0.79). No significant intervention effects were found for fathers' control, monitoring, discipline or mothers' parenting practices (P > 0.05). The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids programme had a positive impact on some parenting practices for fathers but not mothers. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2014 World Obesity.

  16. Reducing musculoskeletal injury and concussion risk in schoolboy rugby players with a pre-activity movement control exercise programme: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hislop, Michael D; Stokes, Keith A; Williams, Sean; McKay, Carly D; England, Mike E; Kemp, Simon P T; Trewartha, Grant

    2017-08-01

    Injury risk in youth rugby has received much attention, highlighting the importance of establishing evidence-based injury reduction strategies. To determine the efficacy of a movement control exercise programme in reducing injuries in youth rugby players and to investigate the effect of programme dose on injury measures. In a cluster-randomised controlled trial, 40 independent schools (118 teams, 3188 players aged 14-18 years) were allocated to receive either the intervention or a reference programme, both of which were to be delivered by school coaches. The intervention comprised balance training, whole-body resistance training, plyometric training, and controlled rehearsal of landing and cutting manoeuvres. Time-loss (>24 hours) injuries arising from school rugby matches were recorded by coaches and medical staff. 441 time-loss match injuries (intervention, 233; control, 208) were reported across 15 938 match exposure-hours (intervention, 9083; control, 6855). Intention-to-treat results indicated unclear effects of trial arm on overall match injury incidence (rate ratio (RR)=0.85, 90% confidence limits 0.61 to 1.17), although clear reductions were evident in the intervention arm for concussion incidence (RR=0.71, 0.48 to 1.05). When trial arm comparisons were limited to teams who had completed three or more weekly programme sessions on average, clear reductions in overall match injury incidence (RR=0.28, 0.14 to 0.51) and concussion incidence (RR=0.41, 0.17 to 0.99) were noted in the intervention group. A preventive movement control exercise programme can reduce match injury outcomes, including concussion, in schoolboy rugby players when compared with a standardised control exercise programme, although to realise the greatest effects players should complete the programme at least three times per week. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted

  17. Patient-experienced effect of an active implementation of a disease management programme for COPD - a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Smidth, Margrethe; Olesen, Frede; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-10-03

    People living with chronic disease currently account for the majority of the total healthcare costs. The Central Denmark Region implemented a disease management programme (DMP) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 2008. This presented an opportunity to examine the effect of an evidence-based, planned and proactive implementation of a DMP compared to the usual implementation strategy. We performed a block- and cluster-randomised controlled trial with two groups and an extra external control group. The primary outcome was patients' assessment of their care after using an active implementation model for a DMP for COPD measured with the Patient-Assessment-of-Chronic-Illness-Care (PACIC) instrument. At baseline, questionnaires were sent to 2,895 patients identified by an algorithm based on health registry data on lung-related contacts to the healthcare system. Patients were asked to confirm or refute their diagnosis of COPD. Of those who responded, 1,445 (72.8%) confirmed their diagnosis. PACIC data were collected at baseline and at a 12-month follow-up for 744 (51.1%) patients. Comparing the three groups after the implementation of the DMP, we found a statistically significantly higher change in the PACIC score in the intervention group than in the control groups. No statistically significant differences were found between the control and the external control groups in any of the dimensions. Reinforcing the role of general practice as coordinator for care-and self-management-support with an active implementation of a DMP for COPD made patients score higher on the PACIC instrument, which indicates a better experience of the received healthcare. NCT01228708.

  18. Feasibility of an after-school group-based exercise and lifestyle programme to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and health in less-active Pacific and Maori adolescents.

    PubMed

    Chansavang, Yongchie; Elley, C Raina; McCaffrey, Brighid; Davidson, Chloe; Dewes, Ofa; Dalleck, Lance

    2015-03-01

    Obesity and low levels of physical activity are increasing among Pacific and Maori adolescents in New Zealand. To assess the feasibility of an after-school exercise and lifestyle programme to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, health and usual activity in less-active Pacific and Maori adolescents over six weeks. Eighteen less-active secondary school students participated. The six-week programme included 3 x 1.5 hour exercise and healthy lifestyle sessions per week. Outcomes included estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), insulin resistance (Homeostasis Model Assessment), physical activity, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure, waist circumference and fasting lipids, measured at baseline and six weeks. Programme attendance and qualitative comments were also recorded. Student's t-tests were used. Of the 18 students enrolled, 16 (89%) completed six-week follow-up, 14 (78%) were female, 13 (72%) were Pacific ethnicity and 5 (28%) were Maori . At baseline, mean age was 16.3 (standard deviation [SD] 1.0) years, body mass index (BMI) 35.2 (SD 6.7) kg/m2, VO2max 31.5 (SD 4.3) mL/kg/min, systolic blood pressure 125.0 (SD 12.9) mm Hg, HbA1c 39.9 (SD 3.8) mmol/mol, fasting serum insulin 28.3 (SD 27.8) μU/mL. At follow-up, improvements had occurred in VO2max (3.2 mL/kg/min; p=0.02), systolic blood pressure (-10.6 mm Hg; p=0.003), HbA1c (-1.1 mmol/mol; p=0.03) and weekly vigorous (4 hours, p=0.002) and moderate (2 hours, p=0.006) physical activity, although waist circumference increased (p=0.005). Programme attendance was over 50%. Comments were mostly positive. The after-school exercise and lifestyle programme and study methods were feasible. Such programmes have the potential to improve health outcomes for Pacific and Maori adolescents.

  19. Conceptualizing Programme Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Salochana

    2013-01-01

    The main thrust of this paper deals with the conceptualization of theory-driven evaluation pertaining to a tutor training programme. Conceptualization of evaluation, in this case, is an integration between a conceptualization model as well as a theoretical framework in the form of activity theory. Existing examples of frameworks of programme…

  20. Work Programme, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Cedefop's work programme 2014 constitutes an ambitious attempt to preserve its core activities, respond to new requests and ensure previous quality standards while respecting resource constraints. Nevertheless, it also reflects the risk that the Centre's ability to deliver its mission and increasing demands may be affected by further budgetary…

  1. 76 FR 52015 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Establishment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... Requested; Establishment and Distribution of National Fingerprint Examiners Questionnaire ACTION: 30-Day... fingerprint comparisons. (2) The title of the form/collection: National Fingerprint Examiners Questionnaire... fingerprint comparison. (5) An estimate of the total number of respondents and the amount of time estimated...

  2. Techniques of Play Activity at Physical Education Classes at Specialized Secondary Educational Establishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martynova, Victoria A.; Kapustin, Aleksandr G.

    2016-01-01

    The issue is urgent today because at present the organization and content of Physical Education (PE) classes at specialized secondary educational establishments (SSEEs) do not completely meet contemporary requirements. The following negative trends prove that, namely: the physical and psychological health decline in school leavers and students,…

  3. Using intervention mapping to develop a culturally appropriate intervention to prevent childhood obesity: the HAPPY (Healthy and Active Parenting Programme for Early Years) study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Interventions that make extensive use of theory tend to have larger effects on behaviour. The Intervention Mapping (IM) framework incorporates theory into intervention design, implementation and evaluation, and was applied to the development of a community-based childhood obesity prevention intervention for a multi-ethnic population. Methods IM was applied as follows: 1) Needs assessment of the community and culture; consideration of evidence-base, policy and practice; 2) Identification of desired outcomes and change objectives following identification of barriers to behaviour change mapped alongside psychological determinants (e.g. knowledge, self-efficacy, intention); 3) Selection of theory-based methods and practical applications to address barriers to behaviour change (e.g., strategies for responsive feeding); 4) Design of the intervention by developing evidence-based interactive activities and resources (e.g., visual aids to show babies stomach size). The activities were integrated into an existing parenting programme; 5) Adoption and implementation: parenting practitioners were trained by healthcare professionals to deliver the programme within Children Centres. Results HAPPY (Healthy and Active Parenting Programme for Early Years) is aimed at overweight and obese pregnant women (BMI > 25); consists of 12 × 2.5 hr. sessions (6 ante-natal from 24 weeks; 6 postnatal up to 9 months); it addresses mother’s diet and physical activity, breast or bottle feeding, infant diet and parental feeding practices, and infant physical activity. Conclusion We have demonstrated that IM is a feasible and helpful method for providing an evidence based and theoretical structure to a complex health behaviour change intervention. The next stage will be to assess the impact of the intervention on behaviour change and clinical factors associated with childhood obesity. The HAPPY programme is currently being tested as part of a randomised controlled feasibility

  4. Using intervention mapping to develop a culturally appropriate intervention to prevent childhood obesity: the HAPPY (Healthy and Active Parenting Programme for Early Years) study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Natalie J; Sahota, Pinki; Sargent, Judith; Barber, Sally; Loach, Jackie; Louch, Gemma; Wright, John

    2013-12-28

    Interventions that make extensive use of theory tend to have larger effects on behaviour. The Intervention Mapping (IM) framework incorporates theory into intervention design, implementation and evaluation, and was applied to the development of a community-based childhood obesity prevention intervention for a multi-ethnic population. IM was applied as follows: 1) Needs assessment of the community and culture; consideration of evidence-base, policy and practice; 2) Identification of desired outcomes and change objectives following identification of barriers to behaviour change mapped alongside psychological determinants (e.g. knowledge, self-efficacy, intention); 3) Selection of theory-based methods and practical applications to address barriers to behaviour change (e.g., strategies for responsive feeding); 4) Design of the intervention by developing evidence-based interactive activities and resources (e.g., visual aids to show babies stomach size). The activities were integrated into an existing parenting programme; 5) Adoption and implementation: parenting practitioners were trained by healthcare professionals to deliver the programme within Children Centres. HAPPY (Healthy and Active Parenting Programme for Early Years) is aimed at overweight and obese pregnant women (BMI > 25); consists of 12 × 2.5 hr. sessions (6 ante-natal from 24 weeks; 6 postnatal up to 9 months); it addresses mother's diet and physical activity, breast or bottle feeding, infant diet and parental feeding practices, and infant physical activity. We have demonstrated that IM is a feasible and helpful method for providing an evidence based and theoretical structure to a complex health behaviour change intervention. The next stage will be to assess the impact of the intervention on behaviour change and clinical factors associated with childhood obesity. The HAPPY programme is currently being tested as part of a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

  5. A community-based strength training programme increases muscle strength and physical activity in young people with Down syndrome: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shields, Nora; Taylor, Nicholas F; Wee, Elin; Wollersheim, Dennis; O'Shea, Simone D; Fernhall, Bo

    2013-12-01

    This randomised controlled trial investigated the effects of a student-led progressive resistance training (PRT) programme in adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome. Sixty-eight young people with Down syndrome (30 female, 38 male; mean age 17.9±2.6 years) and mild to moderate intellectual disability were randomly allocated to a PRT programme (n=34) or a social group (n=34). Participants in the PRT group trained twice a week for 10 weeks at a community gymnasium with a physiotherapy student mentor using pin-loaded weight machines. Participants in the social group completed a 10-week programme of social activities also with a student mentor once a week for 90 min. Work performance, muscle strength and physical activity levels were assessed at weeks 0, 11 and 24 by an assessor blind to group allocation. Data were analysed using ANCOVA with baseline measures as covariate. Participants attended 92% of their scheduled sessions. There was no difference between the groups on work task performance. The PRT group increased their upper and lower limb strength at week 11 compared to the control group, but only their lower limb muscle strength at week 24. There was a significant difference in physical activity levels in favour of the PRT group at week 24 but not at week 11. PRT using a student mentor model helps young people with Down syndrome become stronger and more physically active but its effect on work task performance is unclear. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Active safety monitoring of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine in the National Immunisation Programme of Sri Lanka

    PubMed

    Sanchayan, K; Fernandopulle, R; Amarasinghe, A; Thiyahiny, S N; Sri Ranganathan, S

    2017-03-31

    This study was designed to report incidence and characteristics of selected adverse events following immunisation which have consistent causal association (AEFIc) with Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccination given at the age of one year in the National Immunisation Programme of Sri Lanka. The data presented here were obtained from a cohort event monitoring study. It was carried out in the Jaffna Regional Directorate of Health Services area from November 2012 to December 2014. A representative sample of 3002 infants who received MMR immunisation were actively followed up for adverse events (AE) using over the phone interviews, self-reporting, and home or hospital visits up to 45 days. All AEs were reviewed by two investigators independently in two step-wise processes to detect the AEFIc. Seven AEFIc were detected using standard case definitions and onset time limit criteria. They were subjected to further analysis to describe the incidence rates and characteristics. Of the 2398 (80%) infants who completed follow up of 45 days, 1321 infants experienced 2621 AEFI. Of them 209 were classified as AEFIc. Incidence of AEFIc was 87/ 1000 immunisation. They were mainly nonserious and resolved completely. There were no fatal or life threatening AEFIs. Incidence per 1000 immunisations; allergic reactions 0.83, injection site reactions 4.58, fever100.4° F or lasting more than  3 days 9.59, macular papular rash 2.92, parotitis 2.92 and generalised convulsions 1.25. The MMR vaccine used in NIP of Sri Lanka had low incidence of AEFIc and were mainly non-serious in nature.

  7. Effects of 6-month soccer and traditional physical activity programmes on body composition, cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory, oxidative stress markers and cardiorespiratory fitness in obese boys.

    PubMed

    Seabra, André; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Carvalho, Maria José; Seabra, Ana; Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel; Abreu, Sandra; Vale, Susana; Póvoas, Susana; Nascimento, Henrique; Belo, Luís; Torres, Sandra; Oliveira, José; Mota, Jorge; Santos-Silva, Alice; Rêgo, Carla; Malina, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Physical activity is important in obesity prevention, but the effectiveness of different physical activity modalities remains to be determined among children. The main purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a 6-month soccer programme and a traditional physical activity programme on changes in body composition, cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory and oxidative markers, cardiorespiratory fitness and perceived psychological status in obese boys. Eighty-eight boys (8-12 years; BMI > +2 standard deviations of WHO reference values) participated in one of three groups: soccer, traditional activity and control. Soccer and traditional activity programmes involved 3 sessions per week for 60-90 min at an average intensity of 70-80% of maximal heart rate. Control group participated in activities of normal daily living. All boys participated in school physical education, two sessions per week of 45-90-min. Measurements were taken at baseline and after 6 months, and included body size and composition, cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory and oxidative markers, cardiorespiratory fitness and perceived psychological status. Physical activity and dietary intake were assessed before and immediately following the intervention. The three groups had similar characteristics at baseline. After 6 months, both intervention groups had significantly lower relative fatness (% fat), waist circumference and total cholesterol, and higher cardiorespiratory fitness, self-esteem, perceived physical competence and attraction to physical activity compared with control group. In conclusion, physical activity interventions over 6 months positively influenced several indicators of health status among obese boys. The results also suggested that soccer has the potential as an effective tool for the prevention and reduction of childhood obesity and associated consequences.

  8. Feasibility and acceptability of a midwife-led intervention programme called 'Eat Well Keep Active' to encourage a healthy lifestyle in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Eating a diet that is high in fat and sugar and having a sedentary lifestyle during pregnancy is understood to increase the risk of excessive gestational weight gain and obesity following the birth of the baby. However, there are no clinical guidelines in the UK on what is considered to be appropriate gestational weight gain. Indeed, clinical recommendations discourage the routine re-weighing of pregnant women, stating instead that women should be advised regarding their diet and activity levels, in order to prevent excessive weight gain. Pregnancy is seen as a time when many women may have an increased motivation to improve their lifestyle behaviours for the benefit of the fetus. However, it is evident that many women have difficulty in both maintaining a healthy balanced diet and remaining active through pregnancy. It would seem that midwives may be ideally placed to assist women to make and maintain healthier lifestyle choices during pregnancy. Methods/design This study will look at the feasibility and acceptability of a newly devised intervention programme called 'Eat Well Keep Active'. Participants will complete a questionnaire prior to the programme to obtain baseline data on food frequency, physical activity and to gauge their perception of personal ability to improve/maintain healthy lifestyle. The programme comprises client centred techniques; motivational interviewing and goal setting delivered early in pregnancy (12-16 weeks) with the aim of supporting a healthy well balanced diet and either continuing or commencing appropriate levels of physical activity. Participants will then be followed up six weeks following the intervention with a one-to-one interview, and a further brief questionnaire. The interview will provide preliminary data regarding perceived effectiveness and acceptability of the 'Eat Well Keep Active' programme whilst the questionnaire will provide data regarding changes in the confidence of participants to lead a healthy

  9. 12 CFR 225.145 - Limitations established by the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987 on the activities and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Equality Banking Act of 1987 on the activities and growth of nonbank banks. 225.145 Section 225.145 Banks... Companies Interpretations § 225.145 Limitations established by the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987... Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987 (“CEBA”) redefined the term “bank” in the Bank Holding Company...

  10. 12 CFR 225.145 - Limitations established by the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987 on the activities and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Equality Banking Act of 1987 on the activities and growth of nonbank banks. 225.145 Section 225.145 Banks... Companies Interpretations § 225.145 Limitations established by the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987... Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987 (“CEBA”) redefined the term “bank” in the Bank Holding Company...

  11. Twelve-week physical and leisure activity programme improved cognitive function in community-dwelling elderly subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kamegaya, Tadahiko; Araki, Yumi; Kigure, Hanami; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2014-03-01

    Japan is one of the most rapidly ageing societies in the world. A number of municipalities have started services for the prevention of cognitive decline for community-dwelling elderly individuals, but the effectiveness of these services is currently insufficient. Our study explored the efficacy of a comprehensive intervention programme consisting of physical and leisure activities to prevent cognitive decline in community-dwelling elderly subjects. We administered a 12-week intervention programme consisting of physical and leisure activities aimed at enhancing participants' motivation to participate and support one another by providing a pleasant atmosphere, empathetic communication, praise, and errorless support. This programme for the prevention of cognitive decline was conducted as a service by the city of Maebashi. All participants underwent the Five-Cog test, which evaluated the cognitive domains of attention, memory, visuospatial function, language, and reasoning. Executive function was evaluated by the Wechsler Digit Symbol Substitution Test and Yamaguchi Kanji-Symbol Substitution Test. Subjective health status, level of social support, functional capacity, subjective quality of life, and depressive symptoms were assessed with a questionnaire. Grip strength test, timed up-and-go test, 5-m maximum walking times test, and functional reach test were performed to evaluate physical function. Fifty-two participants were randomly allocated to intervention (n = 26) and control (n = 26) groups. Twenty-six participants, aged between 65-87 years, received intervention once a week at a community centre. The programme was conducted by health-care professionals, with the help of senior citizen volunteers. The intervention group (n = 19) showed significant improvement on the analogy task of the Five-Cog test (F(1,38) = 4.242, P = 0.046) and improved quality of life (F(1,38) = 4.773, P = 0.035) as compared to the control group (n = 24). A community-based 12-week

  12. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient

  13. A social cognitive theory-based programme for eating patterns and sedentary activity among overweight adolescents in Makassar, South Sulawesi : a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hidayanty, Healthy; Bardosono, Saptawati; Khusun, Helda; Damayanti, Rita; Kolopaking, Risatianti

    2016-12-01

    Social cognitive theory provides the opportunity for program development to enhance healthy personal behvioural characteristics. We devised study to employ social cognitive theory to reduce snacking habits and sedentary activity among overweight adolescents . Eight junior high schools in Makassar city were randomly assigned as intervention and control schools. A total of 238 overweight students aged 11-15 years (BMI z-score >=1 SD, according to a 2007 report from the WHO) were recruited. Adolescents from the intervention schools attended 12 weekly 75-min nutrition education group sessions, which focused on behavioural modification assisted by trained facilitators; furthermore, their parents received weekly nutrition education leaflets. Adolescents from the control schools, but not their parents, received leaflets on evidenced-based nutrition information. The BMI z-scores, waist circumference, snacking habits, sedentary activity, and the adolescents' self-efficacy data were assessed prior to and after 3 months of intervention. The outcomes were analysed on an intent-to-treat basis. Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed a higher reduction in BMI z-scores (-0.08; p<0.05) and waist circumference (-1.5; p<0.05) at 3 months. Significant between-group differences were also observed for decreased snacking habits, but not for sedentary activity. Additionally, the programme improved self-efficacy for reducing these behaviours. Mean compliance and satisfaction with the programme were 95% and 92%, respectively. These high reduction rates suggest that the programme is promising and may address the problem of overweightness in adolescents. Additional studies are required to develop the programme in community settings.

  14. HIV Latency Is Established Directly and Early in Both Resting and Activated Primary CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Leonard; Calvanese, Vincenzo; Verdin, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication to undetectable levels but cannot fully eradicate the virus because a small reservoir of CD4+ T cells remains latently infected. Since HIV efficiently infects only activated CD4+ T cells and since latent HIV primarily resides in resting CD4+ T cells, it is generally assumed that latency is established when a productively infected cell recycles to a resting state, trapping the virus in a latent state. In this study, we use a dual reporter virus—HIV Duo-Fluo I, which identifies latently infected cells immediately after infection—to investigate how T cell activation affects the estab-lishment of HIV latency. We show that HIV latency can arise from the direct infection of both resting and activated CD4+ T cells. Importantly, returning productively infected cells to a resting state is not associated with a significant silencing of the integrated HIV. We further show that resting CD4+ T cells from human lymphoid tissue (tonsil, spleen) show increased latency after infection when compared to peripheral blood. Our findings raise significant questions regarding the most commonly accepted model for the establishment of latent HIV and suggest that infection of both resting and activated primary CD4+ T cells produce latency. PMID:26067822

  15. Auditing emergency management programmes: Measuring leading indicators of programme performance.

    PubMed

    Tomsic, Heather

    Emergency Management Programmes benefit from review and measurement against established criteria. By measuring current vs required programme elements for their actual currency, completeness and effectiveness, the resulting timely reports of achievements and documentation of identified gaps can effectively be used to rationally support prioritised improvement. Audits, with their detailed, triangulated and objectively weighted processes, are the ultimate approach in terms of programme content measurement. Although Emergency Management is often presented as a wholly separate operational mechanism, distinct and functionally different from the organisation's usual management structure, this characterisation is only completely accurate while managing an emergency itself. Otherwise, an organisation's Emergency Management Programme is embedded within that organisation and dependent upon it. Therefore, the organisation's culture and structure of management, accountability and measurement must be engaged for the programme to exist, much less improve. A wise and successful Emergency Management Coordinator does not let the separate and distinct nature of managing an emergency obscure their realisation of the need for an organisation to understand and manage all of the other programme components as part of its regular business practices. This includes its measurement. Not all organisations are sufficiently large or capable of supporting the use of an audit. This paper proposes that alternate, less formal, yet effective mechanisms can be explored, as long as they reflect and support organisational management norms, including a process of relatively informal measurement focused on the organisation's own perception of key Emergency Management Programme performance indicators.

  16. [Vaccination programmes].

    PubMed

    Varela, M Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Immunization is a highly cost-effective intervention that saves many lives. Its objective is to control and eliminate vaccine-preventable diseases (when the characteristics of the disease and the vaccine make it possible), resulting in improvements in the health of the population. In Spain, the first vaccination schedule was introduced in 1975 and currently coverages > 95% are achieved in children aged < 2 years of age. Before deciding to introduce a vaccination programme in a community or country, a series of aspects should be considered, including the disease burden in the population, the effectiveness and safety of the vaccine, the changes in the dynamics of the infection when the vaccine is introduced, the cost-effectiveness of the vaccine, the theoretical potential of elimination/eradication of the disease and the existence of other preventive or therapeutic measures. Once the programme has been introduced it should be subject to evaluation, considering aspects such as the coverage, effectiveness, safety and the impact on the population. This work defines different vaccination strategies for three diseases for which efficacious and safe vaccines are available: hepatitis A, influenza and varicella.

  17. Effects of a self-guided, web-based activity programme for patients with persistent musculoskeletal pain in primary healthcare: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Calner, T; Nordin, C; Eriksson, M K; Nyberg, L; Gard, G; Michaelson, P

    2017-07-01

    Web-based interventions for pain management are increasingly used with possible benefits, but never used in addition to multimodal rehabilitation (MMR). MMR is recommended treatment for persistent pain in Sweden. The aim was to evaluate the effects of a self-guided, web-based programme added to MMR for work ability, pain, disability and health-related quality of life. We included 99 participants with persistent musculoskeletal pain in a randomized study with two intervention arms: (1) MMR and web-based intervention, and (2) MMR. Data was collected at baseline, 4 and 12 months. Outcome measures were work ability, working percentage, average pain intensity, pain-related disability, and health-related quality of life. There were no significant effects of adding the web-based intervention to MMR regarding any of the outcome variables. This trial provides no support for adding a self-guided, web-based activity programme to MMR for patients with persistent musculoskeletal pain. The comprehensive self-guided, web-based programme for activity, Web-BCPA, added to multimodal treatment in primary health care had no effect on work ability, pain, disability or health-related quality of life. Future web-based interventions should be tailored to patients' individual needs and expectations. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  18. Systematic review on the financial return of worksite health promotion programmes aimed at improving nutrition and/or increasing physical activity.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, J M; Proper, K I; van Wier, M F; van der Beek, A J; Bongers, P M; van Mechelen, W; van Tulder, M W

    2011-12-01

    This systematic review summarizes the current evidence on the financial return of worksite health promotion programmes aimed at improving nutrition and/or increasing physical activity. Data on study characteristics and results were extracted from 18 studies published up to 14 January 2011. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies. Three metrics were (re-)calculated per study: the net benefits, benefit cost ratio (BCR) and return on investment (ROI). Metrics were averaged, and a post hoc subgroup analysis was performed to compare financial return estimates between study designs. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs), 13 non-randomized studies (NRSs) and one modelling study were included. Average financial return estimates in terms of absenteeism benefits (NRS: ROI 325%, BCR 4.25; RCT: ROI -49%, BCR 0.51), medical benefits (NRS: ROI 95%, BCR 1.95; RCT: ROI -112%, BCR -0.12) or both (NRS: ROI 387%, BCR 4.87; RCT: ROI -92%, BCR 0.08) were positive in NRSs, but negative in RCTs. Worksite health promotion programmes aimed at improving nutrition and/or increasing physical activity generate financial savings in terms of reduced absenteeism costs, medical costs or both according to NRSs, whereas they do not according to RCTs. Since these programmes are associated with additional types of benefits, conclusions about their overall profitability cannot be made. © 2011 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2011 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  19. Data for action: the use of formative research to design a school-based intervention programme to increase physical activity in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Murillo Pardo, Berta; Camacho-Miñano, Maria José; Generelo Lanaspa, Eduardo; Julián Clemente, José Antonio; Novais, Carina; Maia Santos, Maria Paula

    2015-09-01

    Formative research is a critical step for the development of interventions aimed at changing behaviours, as is the case of physical activity. This process permits obtaining detailed information about the programme application context. 'Follow the Footstep' is a quasi-experimental and longitudinal study in secondary schools, the aim of which is to increase levels of physical activity among adolescents. To inform the design of the intervention programme, formative research has been carried out to analyse the perceptions of parents, teachers and students, through six focus groups.The social-ecological model was used both to carry out the formative research and then to design the programme, including five levels of influence on behaviour (individual, interpersonal, organizational, community and political), which are important when it comes to adopting a comprehensive intervention approach. The authors describe how the results of formative research were transferred to guide the design and development of the intervention. As results indicate, parents, teachers and students agreed on a need to intervene by engaging adolescents and their close social environment. The school centre is the key organizational structure to implement this intervention, supported by professionals and the community.

  20. ESTABLISHING DERIVED TEXTUAL CONTROL IN ACTIVITY SCHEDULES WITH CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Caio F; Yang, Heejean G; Finn, Heather E; Ahearn, William H

    2009-01-01

    Activity schedules are often used to facilitate task engagement and transition for children with autism. This study evaluated whether conditional discrimination training would serve to transfer the control from activity-schedule pictures to printed words (i.e., derived textual control). Two preschoolers with autism were taught to select pictures and printed words given their dictated names. Following training, participants could respond to printed words by completing the depicted task, match printed words to pictures, and read printed words without explicit training (i.e., emergent relations). PMID:20190932

  1. Reasearch Activities for the Establishment of The Center for Sustainable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Michael Seliger

    2005-08-08

    In 2003, Bronx Community College received a grant of $481,000 through the United States Department of Energy for the purpose of conducting research- related activities leading to the creation of the Center for Sustainable Energy at Bronx Community College. The award, which was administered on behalf of Bronx Community College by the Research Foundation of the City University of New York, was initially for one year, from October 2003 through September 30, 2004. It received a no-cost extension to June 30, 2005. This report presents a summary of the activities and accomplishments attributable to the award.

  2. Outcomes and process evaluation of a programme integrating physical activity into the primary school mathematics curriculum: The EASY Minds pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Riley, Nicholas; Lubans, David R; Morgan, Philip J; Young, Myles

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of the 'Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young (EASY) Minds' programme, a school-based intervention for integrating physical activity (PA) into mathematics lessons. Randomised controlled trial. Two classes from a single school (n = 54) were randomised to receive either the 6-week EASY Minds intervention (n = 27) or follow their usual school programme (n = 27). The intervention involved the embedding of PA across the pre-existing mathematics programme for 3 × 60 min sessions per week. Changes in PA were measured using accelerometers and 'on task' behaviour was measured using momentary time sampling observation. Using intention-to-treat analysis, significant intervention effects were found for MVPA (9.7%, 95%CI = 7.6, 11.8, p ≤ 0.001) and sedentary time (-22.4%, CI = -24.9, -12.2, p ≤ 0.001) for the intervention group during Mathematics lessons (9.30 am-10.30 am). Significant intervention effects were also shown for MVPA 8.7% (95% CI = 5.8, 11.6, p ≤ 0.001 and sedentary time -18.6% (95% CI = -24.9, -12.2, p ≤ 0.001) across the whole school day. Furthermore, children displayed significantly greater 'on-task' behaviour across the intervention period with a 19.9% (95%CI = 2.4, 37.4, p ≤ 0.03) mean difference between groups. The EASY Minds programme demonstrated that integrating movement across the primary mathematics syllabus is feasible and efficacious in enhancing school based-PA and improving on-task behaviour in mathematics lessons. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the first 5 years of a national eye health programme in Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Williams, Carmel; Szetu, John L; Ramke, Jacqueline; Palagyi, Anna; du Toit, Renee; Brian, Garry

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate against its objectives the achievements of the first 5 years of a national eye health programme in Vanuatu. Programme clinical activity data were collated from surgical logs, clinic and outreach reports, and patient register books. Cataract surgical outcomes were retrieved from monitoring software. Programme annual reports provided information about management, infrastructure improvements, equipment supplied, repaired or replaced, the supply and use of consumables, and human resource development and deployment. Costs were determined from project budgets and acquittals. The programme promoted eye health, including through the integration of eye care into existing health services; established adequate facilities, at referral hospitals, provincial hospitals and rural health clinics, with equipment and manpower to provide eye care appropriate to the location; established a primary eye care programme; strengthened cataract services, although its effect on any cataract backlog is unknown; developed a diabetic eye disease diagnosis and treatment service, but its reach and effectiveness are unknown; provided accessible comprehensive eye care, but its effect on the prevalence of vision impairment is unknown; and established medical records and data collection systems, but these need more attention. This programme achieved much. However, the evaluation highlighted the limitations of inadequate project design and that, without addressing further human resource development and the Ministry of Health's wavering financial commitment, there are potential risks to ongoing services. That revenue generating capacity was not incorporated into this programme may prove to be a flaw that will limit ongoing access to eye care, especially in rural areas.

  4. The effects of a home-based arm ergometry exercise programme on physical fitness, fatigue and activity in polio survivors: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many Polio survivors have reduced mobility, pain and fatigue, which make access to conventional forms of aerobic exercise difficult. Inactivity leads to increased risk of health problems, many of which are prevalent among Polio survivors. Aerobic exercise programmes in Polio survivors should utilise stable muscle groups and should be designed to minimise exacerbation of pain and fatigue. A home-based arm ergometry aerobic exercise programme may represent an affordable and accessible exercise modality, incorporating exercise prescription principles in this group. Methods/design This is a prospective, single blinded, randomised controlled trial. There are two arms; exercise intervention using arm ergometers and control. Polio survivors meeting eligibility criteria will be recruited and randomly allocated to intervention or control groups. Participants allocated to the intervention group will receive a small arm ergometer and a polar heart rate monitor. They will carry out a home-based moderate intensity (50-70% HRMax) aerobic exercise programme for eight weeks, following instruction by the treating physiotherapist. Assessments will occur at baseline and after eight weeks and will include tests of physical fitness, activity, energy cost of walking, fatigue and quality of life. Clinically feasible assessment tools including the Six Minute Arm Test, the Physical Activity Scale for People with Physical Disabilities questionnaire, the Physiological Cost Index, Fatigue Severity Scale and the SF-36v2 will be utilised. Discussion The efficacy of a home-based arm ergometry programme in Polio survivors will be examined. No previous trial has examined such a programme using a wide range of outcome measures pertinent to Polio survivors. This study will provide new information on the impact of arm ergometry on physical fitness, activity, body composition, fatigue, pain, muscle strength, and health related quality of life. Also, the study will provide information, which

  5. A switch from low to high Shh activity regulates establishment of limb progenitors and signaling centers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The patterning and growth of the embryonic vertebrate limb is dependent on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a morphogen that regulates the activity of Gli transcription factors. However, "Shh" expression is not observed during the first 12 hours of limb development. During this phase, the limb bud is prepatter...

  6. A Guide to Establishing and Directing a Family Oriented Structured Preschool Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maethner, Judith A.

    This is the teacher's manual of the Family Oriented Structured Preschool Activity, a Title III Elementary and Secondary Education Act Developer/Demonstration Project in Saint Cloud, Minnesota. The program attempts to mold the expertise of the parent with the expertise of the professional educator in order to enhance the child's development. It is…

  7. The challenges and successes of implementing a sustainable antimicrobial resistance surveillance programme in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Malla, Sarala; Dumre, Shyam Prakash; Shakya, Geeta; Kansakar, Palpasa; Rai, Bhupraj; Hossain, Anowar; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish; Albert, M John; Sack, David; Baker, Stephen; Rahman, Motiur

    2014-03-21

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major global public health concern and its surveillance is a fundamental tool for monitoring the development of AMR. In 1998, the Nepalese Ministry of Health (MOH) launched an Infectious Disease (ID) programme. The key components of the programme were to establish a surveillance programme for AMR and to develop awareness among physicians regarding AMR and rational drug usage in Nepal. An AMR surveillance programme was established and implemented by the Nepalese MOH in partnership with the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR, B) from 1998 to 2003. From 2004 to 2012, the programme was integrated and maintained as a core activity of the National Public Health Laboratory (NPHL) and resulted in an increased number of participating laboratories and pathogens brought under surveillance. The main strategies were to build national capacity on isolation, identification and AMR testing of bacterial pathogens, establish laboratory networking and an External Quality Assessment (EQA) programme, promote standardised recording and reporting of results, and to ensure timely analysis and dissemination of data for advocacy and national policy adaptations. The programme was initiated by nine participating laboratories performing AMR surveillance on Vibrio cholerae, Shigella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The number of participating laboratories was ultimately increased to 13 and the number of pathogens under surveillance was increased to seven (Salmonella spp. was added to the surveillance programme in 2002 and extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli in 2011). From 1999 to 2012, data were available on 17,103 bacterial isolates. During the AMR programme, we observed changing trends in serovars/species for Salmonella spp., Shigella spp. and V. cholerae and changing AMR trend for all organisms. Notably, N. gonorrhoeae isolates demonstrated

  8. Establishment and characterization of a novel human cholangiocarcinoma cell line with high metastatic activity.

    PubMed

    Uthaisar, Kwuntida; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Seubwai, Wunchana; Talabnin, Chutima; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Obchoei, Sumalee; Kraiklang, Ratthaphol; Okada, Seiji; Wongkham, Sopit

    2016-09-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly metastatic tumor, and the lung is a common site of metastasis. A greater understanding of the biology of metastases is needed to improve treatment outcomes. Herein, a highly metastatic human CCA subline, KKU-213L5 from an original cell line, KKU-213 that has marginally metastatic ability, was established and characterized. KKU-213L5 was selected in vivo through the fifth serial passage of pulmonary metastasized tissues via tail-vein injection in NOD/scid/Jak3 mice. The metastatic abilities of the KKU-213L5 cells were compared with the parental line in vitro and in vivo. The expression profile of this metastatic cell line was determined using real-time PCR. KKU-213L5 cells were found to possess higher metastatic phenotypes, i.e., growth rates, stem cell surface markers (CD133), migration and invasion characteristics when compared with the parental cells. Compared to the KKU-213 cells, KKU-213L5 cells formed larger tumors in subcutaneous xenografted mice and had a >10-fold increase in lung metastases in the tail-vein injected metastatic mouse model. Mice injected intravenously with KKU-213L5 cells had a significantly shorter survival. Analysis of the expressed genes related to progression of cancer revealed significant upregulation of anterior gradient protein-2 (AGR2) and suppression of KiSS-1 in the KKU-213L5 cells. The association of these two genes with metastasis was affirmed in CCA patient tissues since increased AGR2 expression and decreased KiSS-1 expression were found in higher stage patient tumors. In conclusion, a highly metastatic human CCA cell line was established and characterized. It is plausible that the differential expression between the parental KKU-213 and highly metastatic KKU-213L5 cells may be beneficial to classify novel genes associated with metastasis. The KKU-213L5 cell line should serve as a valued device for discovering the molecular mechanisms of CCA metastasis and enabling the search for an

  9. A chemical screen in zebrafish embryonic cells establishes that Akt activation is required for neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Ciarlo, Christie; Kaufman, Charles K; Kinikoglu, Beste; Michael, Jonathan; Yang, Song; D Amato, Christopher; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Zhou, Yi; Liao, Eric; Zon, Leonard I

    2017-08-23

    The neural crest is a dynamic progenitor cell population that arises at the border of neural and non-neural ectoderm. The inductive roles of FGF, Wnt, and BMP at the neural plate border are well established, but the signals required for subsequent neural crest development remain poorly characterized. Here, we conducted a screen in primary zebrafish embryo cultures for chemicals that disrupt neural crest development, as read out by crestin:EGFP expression. We found that the natural product caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) disrupts neural crest gene expression, migration, and melanocytic differentiation by reducing Sox10 activity. CAPE inhibits FGF-stimulated PI3K/Akt signaling, and neural crest defects in CAPE-treated embryos are suppressed by constitutively active Akt1. Inhibition of Akt activity by constitutively active PTEN similarly decreases crestin expression and Sox10 activity. Our study has identified Akt as a novel intracellular pathway required for neural crest differentiation.

  10. A chemical screen in zebrafish embryonic cells establishes that Akt activation is required for neural crest development

    PubMed Central

    Ciarlo, Christie; Kaufman, Charles K; Kinikoglu, Beste; Michael, Jonathan; Yang, Song; D′Amato, Christopher; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Zhou, Yi; Liao, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest is a dynamic progenitor cell population that arises at the border of neural and non-neural ectoderm. The inductive roles of FGF, Wnt, and BMP at the neural plate border are well established, but the signals required for subsequent neural crest development remain poorly characterized. Here, we conducted a screen in primary zebrafish embryo cultures for chemicals that disrupt neural crest development, as read out by crestin:EGFP expression. We found that the natural product caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) disrupts neural crest gene expression, migration, and melanocytic differentiation by reducing Sox10 activity. CAPE inhibits FGF-stimulated PI3K/Akt signaling, and neural crest defects in CAPE-treated embryos are suppressed by constitutively active Akt1. Inhibition of Akt activity by constitutively active PTEN similarly decreases crestin expression and Sox10 activity. Our study has identified Akt as a novel intracellular pathway required for neural crest differentiation. PMID:28832322

  11. An Antibody Biosensor Establishes the Activation of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor during Learning and Memory.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Adrian J; Bradley, Sophie J; Prihandoko, Rudi; Brooke, Simon M; Mogg, Adrian; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer M; Bottrill, Andrew R; Challiss, R A John; Broad, Lisa M; Felder, Christian C; Tobin, Andrew B

    2016-04-22

    Establishing the in vivo activation status of G protein-coupled receptors would not only indicate physiological roles of G protein-coupled receptors but would also aid drug discovery by establishing drug/receptor engagement. Here, we develop a phospho-specific antibody-based biosensor to detect activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) in vitro and in vivo Mass spectrometry phosphoproteomics identified 14 sites of phosphorylation on the M1 mAChR. Phospho-specific antibodies to four of these sites established that serine at position 228 (Ser(228)) on the M1 mAChR showed extremely low levels of basal phosphorylation that were significantly up-regulated by orthosteric agonist stimulation. In addition, the M1 mAChR-positive allosteric modulator, 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid, enhanced acetylcholine-mediated phosphorylation at Ser(228) These data supported the hypothesis that phosphorylation at Ser(228) was an indicator of M1 mAChR activation. This was further supported in vivo by the identification of phosphorylated Ser(228) on the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus of mice following administration of the muscarinic ligands xanomeline and 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid. Finally, Ser(228) phosphorylation was seen to increase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following memory acquisition, a response that correlated closely with up-regulation of CA1 neuronal activity. Thus, determining the phosphorylation status of the M1 mAChR at Ser(228) not only provides a means of establishing receptor activation following drug treatment both in vitro and in vivo but also allows for the mapping of the activation status of the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus following memory acquisition thereby establishing a link between M1 mAChR activation and hippocampus-based memory and learning.

  12. An Antibody Biosensor Establishes the Activation of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor during Learning and Memory*♦

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Adrian J.; Bradley, Sophie J.; Prihandoko, Rudi; Brooke, Simon M.; Mogg, Adrian; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer M.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Challiss, R. A. John; Broad, Lisa M.; Felder, Christian C.; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the in vivo activation status of G protein-coupled receptors would not only indicate physiological roles of G protein-coupled receptors but would also aid drug discovery by establishing drug/receptor engagement. Here, we develop a phospho-specific antibody-based biosensor to detect activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) in vitro and in vivo. Mass spectrometry phosphoproteomics identified 14 sites of phosphorylation on the M1 mAChR. Phospho-specific antibodies to four of these sites established that serine at position 228 (Ser228) on the M1 mAChR showed extremely low levels of basal phosphorylation that were significantly up-regulated by orthosteric agonist stimulation. In addition, the M1 mAChR-positive allosteric modulator, 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid, enhanced acetylcholine-mediated phosphorylation at Ser228. These data supported the hypothesis that phosphorylation at Ser228 was an indicator of M1 mAChR activation. This was further supported in vivo by the identification of phosphorylated Ser228 on the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus of mice following administration of the muscarinic ligands xanomeline and 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid. Finally, Ser228 phosphorylation was seen to increase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following memory acquisition, a response that correlated closely with up-regulation of CA1 neuronal activity. Thus, determining the phosphorylation status of the M1 mAChR at Ser228 not only provides a means of establishing receptor activation following drug treatment both in vitro and in vivo but also allows for the mapping of the activation status of the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus following memory acquisition thereby establishing a link between M1 mAChR activation and hippocampus-based memory and learning. PMID:26826123

  13. Establishing a definition of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) health: A guide to research and management activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patyk, Kelly A.; Duncan, Colleen G.; Nol, Pauline; Sonne, C.; Laidre, Kristin L.; Obbard, Martyn E.; Wiig, Øystein; Aars, Jon; Regehr, Eric V.; Gustafson, L.; Atwood, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    The meaning of health for wildlife and perspectives on how to assess and measure health, are not well characterized. For wildlife at risk, such as some polar bear (Ursus maritimus) subpopulations, establishing comprehensive monitoring programs that include health status is an emerging need. Environmental changes, especially loss of sea ice habitat, have raised concern about polar bear health. Effective and consistent monitoring of polar bear health requires an unambiguous definition of health. We used the Delphi method of soliciting and interpreting expert knowledge to propose a working definition of polar bear health and to identify current concerns regarding health, challenges in measuring health, and important metrics for monitoring health. The expert opinion elicited through the exercise agreed that polar bear health is defined by characteristics and knowledge at the individual, population, and ecosystem level. The most important threats identified were in decreasing order: climate change, increased nutritional stress, chronic physiological stress, harvest management, increased exposure to contaminants, increased frequency of human interaction, diseases and parasites, and increased exposure to competitors. Fifteen metrics were identified to monitor polar bear health. Of these, indicators of body condition, disease and parasite exposure, contaminant exposure, and reproductive success were ranked as most important. We suggest that a cumulative effects approach to research and monitoring will improve the ability to assess the biological, ecological, and social determinants of polar bear health and provide measurable objectives for conservation goals and priorities and to evaluate progress.

  14. Photosynthetic activity of cotyledons is critical during post-germinative growth and seedling establishment.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Valle; Nájera, Victoria A; González, Maricruz; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2017-07-10

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) play a relevant role in thiol-dependent redox regulation, which allows the rapid adaptation of chloroplast metabolism to unpredictable environmental conditions. In chloroplasts, Trxs use reducing equivalents provided by photoreduced ferredoxin (Fdx) via the action of a ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR), thus linking redox regulation to light. In addition, these organelles contain an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase, NTRC, with a Trx domain at the C-terminus. NTRC efficiently reduces 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (Prxs), hence having antioxidant function. However, NTRC also participates in the redox regulation of processes, such as starch and chlorophyll biosynthesis, which are known to be regulated by Trxs. Thus, the question arising is whether there is a cross-talk between the 2 redox systems. Arabidopsis mutants simultaneously devoid of NTRC and Trx x or Trxs f show a dramatic growth inhibition phenotype, indicating that NTRC is required for the function of these unrelated Trxs. Remarkably, both the ntrc-trxx double mutant and, to a higher extent, the ntrc-trxf1f2 triple mutant show high mortality at the seedling stage, which is rescued by sucrose. These findings show the relevant role of redox regulation for chloroplast performance and uncover the key function of cotyledons chloroplasts at the transition to autotrophic metabolism during seedling establishment.

  15. Establishing a definition of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) health: a guide to research and management activities.

    PubMed

    Patyk, Kelly A; Duncan, Colleen; Nol, Pauline; Sonne, Christian; Laidre, Kristin; Obbard, Martyn; Wiig, Øystein; Aars, Jon; Regehr, Eric; Gustafson, Lori L; Atwood, Todd

    2015-05-01

    The meaning of health for wildlife and perspectives on how to assess and measure health, are not well characterized. For wildlife at risk, such as some polar bear (Ursus maritimus) subpopulations, establishing comprehensive monitoring programs that include health status is an emerging need. Environmental changes, especially loss of sea ice habitat, have raised concern about polar bear health. Effective and consistent monitoring of polar bear health requires an unambiguous definition of health. We used the Delphi method of soliciting and interpreting expert knowledge to propose a working definition of polar bear health and to identify current concerns regarding health, challenges in measuring health, and important metrics for monitoring health. The expert opinion elicited through the exercise agreed that polar bear health is defined by characteristics and knowledge at the individual, population, and ecosystem level. The most important threats identified were in decreasing order: climate change, increased nutritional stress, chronic physiological stress, harvest management, increased exposure to contaminants, increased frequency of human interaction, diseases and parasites, and increased exposure to competitors. Fifteen metrics were identified to monitor polar bear health. Of these, indicators of body condition, disease and parasite exposure, contaminant exposure, and reproductive success were ranked as most important. We suggest that a cumulative effects approach to research and monitoring will improve the ability to assess the biological, ecological, and social determinants of polar bear health and provide measurable objectives for conservation goals and priorities and to evaluate progress.

  16. Establishing bounding internal dose estimates for thorium activities at Rocky Flats.

    PubMed

    Ulsh, Brant A; Rich, Bryce L; Chew, Melton H; Morris, Robert L; Sharfi, Mutty; Rolfes, Mark R

    2008-07-01

    As part of an evaluation of a Special Exposure Cohort petition filed on behalf of workers at the Rocky Flats Plant, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was required to demonstrate that bounding values could be established for radiation doses due to the potential intake of all radionuclides present at the facility. The main radioactive elements of interest at Rocky Flats were plutonium and uranium, but much smaller quantities of several other elements, including thorium, were occasionally handled at the site. Bounding potential doses from thorium has proven challenging at other sites due to the early historical difficulty in detecting this element through urinalysis methods and the relatively high internal dose delivered per unit intake. This paper reports the results of NIOSH's investigation of the uses of thorium at Rocky Flats and provides bounding dose reconstructions for these operations. During this investigation, NIOSH reviewed unclassified reports, unclassified extracts of classified materials, material balance and inventory ledgers, monthly progress reports from various groups, and health physics field logbooks, and conducted interviews with former Rocky Flats workers. Thorium operations included: (1) an experimental metal forming project with 240 kg of thorium in 1960; (2) the use of pre-formed parts in weapons mockups; (3) the removal of Th from U; (4) numerous analytical procedures involving trace quantities of thorium; and (5) the possible experimental use of thorium as a mold coating compound. The thorium handling operations at Rocky Flats were limited in scope, well-monitored and documented, and potential doses can be bounded.

  17. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis and its effect on uterine activity during established premature labor in sheep.

    PubMed

    Scott, J E; Grigsby, P L; Hirst, J J; Jenkin, G

    2001-01-01

    Continuous infusion of the selective prostaglandin synthase type-2 inhibitor nimesulide, together with the oxytocin receptor antagonist atosiban, inhibits glucocorticoid induction of labor in sheep. We evaluated the effectiveness of this treatment commencing after the onset of premature labor when prostaglandin concentrations are already significantly elevated. Premature labor was induced in chronically cannulated fetuses by constant fetal dexamethasone infusion. After the onset of active labor in each ewe, defined as uterine electromyographic (EMG) activity twice basal levels, ewes received combined nimesulide and atosiban (20.0 and 4.12 mg/kg per day, respectively; n = 6) or vehicle (n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone and saline each 1 mL/hour; n = 4) infusions for 48 hours. Maternal and fetal plasma PGFM (13,14-dihydro-15-keto PGF2alpha, the stable metabolite of prostaglandin (PG) F2alpha) and PGE2 concentrations were measured before, during, and after infusions. Four nimesulide- and atosiban-treated ewes successfully completed the 48-hour infusion period with no deliveries occurring during inhibitor treatment, or up to 6 hours after inhibitor treatment. Delivery was delayed in two other ewes, compared with control animals. Uterine EMG activity in nimesulide- and atosiban-treated ewes (n = 4) was significantly reduced during the 48-hour inhibitor treatment period. Maternal and fetal prostaglandin concentrations were significantly decreased in inhibitor-treated ewes during and after the infusions. The combination of nimesulide and atosiban treatment for 48 hours successfully inhibited the progression of active premature labor to delivery. This study further supports the potential value of this treatment regime for the inhibition of premature labor.

  18. Antimalarial activity of Syzygium guineense during early and established Plasmodium infection in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Solomon Asmamaw; Wubneh, Zewdu Birhanu

    2017-01-05

    In Ethiopia, the leaves of Syzygium guineense have been found useful for the prevention and cure of malaria, and demonstrated antiplasmodial activity in vitro. Nevertheless, no scientific study has been conducted to confirm its antimalarial activity in vivo. Therefore, the objective of the study was to evaluate the antimalarial effect of Syzygium guineense leaf extract in mice. Inoculation of the study mice was carried out by using the malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei. The plant extract was prepared at 200, 400 and 600 mg/kg. Chloroquine and distilled water was administered to the positive and negative control groups respectively. Parameters like parasitaemia, survival time and body weight were determined following standard tests (4-day suppressive, Rane's and repository tests). Syzygium guineense crude leaf extract displayed considerable (p < 0.05) parasite suppression at doses of 600 and 400 mg/kg in a 4-day suppressive test with chemosuppressive value of 59.39 and 49.09% respectively. S. guineense crude leaf extract also showed dose-dependent schizontocidal activity in both the repository and curative tests. The extract also prevented body weight loss and prolonged survival date of mice significantly (P < 0.05) at the highest dose employed in the study. Qualitative chemical assay for S. guineense methanolic leaf extract revealed that the plant is endowed with different plant secondary metabolites exemplified by terpenoids, alkaloids, triterpenes, flavonoids, anthraquinones, tannins, glycosides, saponins and phenols. Syzygium guineense leaf extract possess antimalarial activity in mice. The test substance was found to be safe with no observable signs of toxicity in the study mice. The results of the present work confirmed the in vitro antiplasmodial finding and traditional claims in vivo in mice. Therefore, Syzygium guineense could be regarded as a potential source to develop safe, effective and affordable antimalarial agent.

  19. Establishing a network of specialist Porphyria centres - effects on diagnostic activities and services.

    PubMed

    Tollånes, Mette C; Aarsand, Aasne K; Villanger, Jørild Haugen; Støle, Egil; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Marsden, Joanne; To-Figueras, Jordi; Sandberg, Sverre

    2012-12-10

    The porphyrias are a heterogeneous group of rare metabolic diseases. The full spectrum of porphyria diagnostics is usually performed by specialized porphyria laboratories or centres. The European Porphyria Initiative (EPI), a collaborative network of porphyria centres formed in 2001, evolved in 2007 into the European Porphyria Network (EPNET), where participating centres are required to adhere to agreed quality criteria. The aim of this study was to examine the state and distribution of porphyria diagnostic services in 2009 and to explore potential effects of increased international collaboration in the field of these rare diseases in the period 2006-2009. Data on laboratory, diagnostic and clinical activities and services reported to EPI/EPNET in yearly activity reports during 2006 through 2009 were compared between reporting centres, and possible time trends explored. Thirty-five porphyria centres from 22 countries, five of which were non-European associate EPNET members, filed one or more activity reports to EPI/EPNET during the study period. Large variations between centres were observed in the analytical repertoire offered, numbers of analyses performed and type and number of staff engaged. The proportion of centres fulfilling the minimum criteria set by EPNET to be classified as a specialist porphyria centre increased from 80% to 94% during the study period. Porphyria services are unevenly distributed, and some areas are probably still lacking in specialized porphyria services altogether. However, improvements in the quality of diagnostic services provided by porphyria centres participating in EPI/EPNET were observed during 2006 through 2009.

  20. The Role of Reproductive Phenology, Seedling Emergence and Establishment of Perennial Salix gordejevii in Active Sand Dune Fields

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qiaoling; Liu, Zhimin; Ma, Junling; Jiang, Deming

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The function of sexual reproduction of perennials in restoration of vegetation of active dune fields frequently has been underestimated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of sexual reproduction of the perennial Salix gordejevii in the revegetation of active dunes. Methods Seedling emergence and establishment of S. gordejevii were examined both in controlled experiments (germination at different burial depths with different watering regimes) and in field observations in three dune slacks. The reproductive phenology and soil seed bank of S. gordejevii, the dynamics of soil moisture, the groundwater table and the landform level of three dune slacks were monitored. Key Results Seeds of S. gordejevii began maturation on 1 May, and seed dispersal lasted from 8 May to 20 May. Seeds on the soil surface germinated significantly faster than those buried in soil (P<0·05). Seedling emergence was negatively correlated with landform level. When most seedlings emerged, there was a significantly positive correlation between soil moisture and seedling emergence (P<0·01). Rainfall was negatively correlated with seedling emergence. Seedling establishment was significantly and positively correlated with seedling emergence (P<0·05), and 72·3 % of the emergent seedlings were established at the end of the growing season. These results indicated that (a) seeds matured and dispersed before the rainy season; (b) seeds germinated as soon as they contacted a moist surface and relied more on soil moisture than on rainfall; and (c) more seedlings emerged at lower sampling points in dune slacks. Conclusions In natural conditions, restoration of active sand dune fields generally commences with revegetation of dune slacks where sexual reproduction of perennials contributes greatly to species encroachment and colonization and hence plays an important role in restoration of active dune fields. Furthermore, aeolian erosion in dune slacks, leading to good

  1. Establishing a network of specialist Porphyria centres - effects on diagnostic activities and services

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The porphyrias are a heterogeneous group of rare metabolic diseases. The full spectrum of porphyria diagnostics is usually performed by specialized porphyria laboratories or centres. The European Porphyria Initiative (EPI), a collaborative network of porphyria centres formed in 2001, evolved in 2007 into the European Porphyria Network (EPNET), where participating centres are required to adhere to agreed quality criteria. The aim of this study was to examine the state and distribution of porphyria diagnostic services in 2009 and to explore potential effects of increased international collaboration in the field of these rare diseases in the period 2006–2009. Methods Data on laboratory, diagnostic and clinical activities and services reported to EPI/EPNET in yearly activity reports during 2006 through 2009 were compared between reporting centres, and possible time trends explored. Results Thirty-five porphyria centres from 22 countries, five of which were non-European associate EPNET members, filed one or more activity reports to EPI/EPNET during the study period. Large variations between centres were observed in the analytical repertoire offered, numbers of analyses performed and type and number of staff engaged. The proportion of centres fulfilling the minimum criteria set by EPNET to be classified as a specialist porphyria centre increased from 80% to 94% during the study period. Conclusions Porphyria services are unevenly distributed, and some areas are probably still lacking in specialized porphyria services altogether. However, improvements in the quality of diagnostic services provided by porphyria centres participating in EPI/EPNET were observed during 2006 through 2009. PMID:23227998

  2. Establishment and analysis of in vitro biomass from Salvia corrugata Vahl. and evaluation of antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Angela; Fraternale, Daniele; Schito, Anna Maria; Parricchi, Anita; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Ricci, Donata; Giacomini, Mauro; Ruffoni, Barbara; De Tommasi, Nunziatina

    2016-02-01

    Demethylfruticuline A and fruticuline A, the most abundant compounds from the surface extract of Salvia corrugata Vahl., have shown antibacterial, antitumor and cytotoxic activities. In order to obtain these icetexane diterpenes from in vitro cultures of S. corrugata, protocols were developed for callus production, micropropagation and shoot regeneration. Analysis of the regenerated shoots showed the presence of both icetexanes, micropropagated plants contained only fruticuline A, while the callus contained trace amounts of both diterpenes. The yield of fruticuline A was higher in the methanolic extract of regenerated shoots than in those of fresh leaves and fresh shoot tips. In addition to these diterpenes, the regenerated shoot and micropropagated plant extracts afforded seven other diterpenes, one icetexane and six abietanes, identified by UV, IR, 1D- and 2D-NMR and HR-MS analysis. Five compounds (19-acetoxy-7α-hydroxyroyleanone, 7β,20-epoxy-11,12,19-trihydroxyabieta-8,11,13-triene, 7,20-dihydrofruticuline A, 7β-acetoxy-20-hydroxy-19,20-epoxyroyleanone, 7β-ethoxy-6β,20:19,20-diepoxyroyleanone) were previously undescribed. Although the crude plant surface extract did not possess any antibacterial activity, methanolic extracts of in vitro tissues and two compounds, namely 7β-acetoxy-20-hydroxy-19,20-epoxyroyleanone and 7β-ethoxy-6β,20:19,20-diepoxyroyleanone, isolated in suitable amounts, were active in varying degrees against multidrug resistant clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, displaying MIC values ranging from 32, 64 to 128μg/mL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adapted physical activity programme and self-perception in obese adolescents with intellectual disability: between morphological awareness and positive illusory bias.

    PubMed

    Salaun, Laureline; Reynes, Eric; Berthouze-Aranda, Sophie E

    2014-03-01

    In adolescent with intellectual disability, the management of obesity is a crucial issue, yet also quite complex because of their particular perception of themselves. This study investigated the relationship between self-perception variables and morphological variables and their changes after a 9-month Adapted Physical Activity (APA) programme. Twenty-three adolescents with intellectual disability responded to an adapted questionnaire, including the PSI-VSF-ID and a nine-drawing body silhouette scale. Anthropometric and body composition indicators were measured before and after the APA programme. The main predictor of the adolescents' self-perceptions was the inclination towards positive illusory bias before the intervention; obesity awareness ranked second. Morphological measurements did not contribute in the same way to self-perceptions in the initial and final data. This study confirms the interest of weight management programmes for adolescents with intellectual disability and points to the need to take positive illusory bias more fully into account in the study of self-perception. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Association between Activity Space Exposure to Food Establishments and Individual Risk of Overweight

    PubMed Central

    Kestens, Yan; Lebel, Alexandre; Chaix, Basile; Clary, Christelle; Daniel, Mark; Pampalon, Robert; Theriault, Marius; p Subramanian, S. V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Environmental exposure to food sources may underpin area level differences in individual risk for overweight. Place of residence is generally used to assess neighbourhood exposure. Yet, because people are mobile, multiple exposures should be accounted for to assess the relation between food environments and overweight. Unfortunately, mobility data is often missing from health surveys. We hereby test the feasibility of linking travel survey data with food listings to derive food store exposure predictors of overweight among health survey participants. Methods Food environment exposure measures accounting for non-residential activity places (activity spaces) were computed and modelled in Montreal and Quebec City, Canada, using travel surveys and food store listings. Models were then used to predict activity space food exposures for 5,578 participants of the Canadian Community Health Survey. These food exposure estimates, accounting for daily mobility, were used to model self-reported overweight in a multilevel framework. Median Odd Ratios were used to assess the proportion of between-neighborhood variance explained by such food exposure predictors. Results Estimates of food environment exposure accounting for both residential and non-residential destinations were significantly and more strongly associated with overweight than residential-only measures of exposure for men. For women, residential exposures were more strongly associated with overweight than non-residential exposures. In Montreal, adjusted models showed men in the highest quartile of exposure to food stores were at lesser risk of being overweight considering exposure to restaurants (OR = 0.36 [0.21–0.62]), fast food outlets (0.48 [0.30–0.79]), or corner stores (0.52 [0.35–0.78]). Conversely, men experiencing the highest proportion of restaurants being fast-food outlets were at higher risk of being overweight (2.07 [1.25–3.42]). Women experiencing higher residential exposures were at

  5. Fucosyltransferase activities in human pancreatic tissue: comparative study between cancer tissues and established tumoral cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mas, E; Pasqualini, E; Caillol, N; El Battari, A; Crotte, C; Lombardo, D; Sadoulet, M O

    1998-06-01

    Human pancreatic cancer is characterized by an alteration in fucose-containing surface blood group antigens such as H antigen, Lewis b, Lewis y, and sialyl-Lewis. These carbohydrate determinants can be synthesized by sequential action of alpha(2,3) sialyltransferases or alpha(1,2) fucosyltransferases (Fuc-T) and alpha(1,3/1,4) fucosyltransferases on (poly)N-acetyllactosamine chains. Therefore, the expression and the function of seven fucosyltransferases were investigated in normal and cancer pancreatic tissues and in four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Transcripts of FUT1, FUT2, FUT3, FUT4, FUT5, and FUT7 were detected by RT-PCR in carcinoma cell lines as well as in normal and tumoral tissues. Interestingly, the FUT6 message was only detected in tumoral tissues. Analysis of the acceptor substrate specificity for fucosyltransferases indicated that alpha(1,2) Fuc-T, alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, and alpha(1,4) Fuc-T were expressed in microsome preparations of all tissues as demonstrated by fucose incorporation into phenyl beta-d-galactoside, 2'-fucosyllactose, N-acetyllactosamine, 3'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, and lacto-N-biose. However, these fucosyltransferase activities varied between tissues. A substantial decrease of alpha(1,2) Fuc-T activity was observed in tumoral tissues and cell lines compared to normal tissues. Conversely, the activity of alpha(1,4) Fuc-T, which generates Lewis a and sialyl-Lewis a structures, and that of alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, able to generate a lactodifucotetraose structure, were very important in SOJ-6 and BxPC-3 cell lines. These increases correlated with an enhanced expression of Lewis a, sialyl-Lewis a, and Lewis y on the cell surface. The activity of alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, which participates in the synthesis of the sialyl-Lewis x structure, was not significantly modified in cell lines compared to normal tissues. However, the sialyl-Lewis x antigen was expressed preferentially on the surface of SOJ-6 and BxPC-3 cell lines but was not detected on Panc-1

  6. Self-reported physical activity and major adverse events in patients with atrial fibrillation: a report from the EURObservational Research Programme Pilot Survey on Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) General Registry.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Marco; Boriani, Giuseppe; Laroche, Cécile; Diemberger, Igor; Popescu, Mircea I; Rasmussen, Lars H; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-04-01

    Physical activity is protective against cardiovascular (CV) events, both in general population and in high-risk CV cohorts. However, the relationship between physical activity with major adverse outcomes in atrial fibrillation (AF) is not well-established. Our aim was to analyse this relationship in a 'real-world' AF population. Second, we investigated the influence of physical activity on arrhythmia progression. We studied all patients enrolled in the EURObservational Research Programme on AF (EORP-AF) Pilot Survey. Physical activity was defined as 'none', 'occasional', 'regular', and 'intense', based on patient self-reporting. Data on physical activity were available for 2442 patients: 38.9% reported none, 34.7% occasional, 21.7% regular, and 4.7% intense physical activity. Prevalence of the principal CV risk factors progressively decreased from none to intense physical activity. Lower rates of CV death, all-cause death, and composite outcomes were found in AF patients who reported regular and intense physical activity (P < 0.0001). Increasing physical activity was inversely associated with CV death/any thromboembolic event (TE)/bleeding in the whole cohort, irrespective of gender, paroxysmal AF, elderly age, or high stroke risk. Any level of physical activity intensity was significantly associated with lower risk of CV death/any TE/bleeding at 1-year follow-up. Physical activity was not significantly associated with arrhythmia progression. Atrial fibrillation patients taking regular exercise were associated with a lower risk of all-cause death, even when we considered various subgroups, including gender, elderly age, symptomatic status, and stroke risk class. Efforts to increase physical activity among AF patients may improve outcomes in these patients.

  7. Toward establishing structure-activity relationships for oxygenated coumarins as differentiation inducers of promonocytic leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Riveiro, María E; Maes, Dominick; Vázquez, Ramiro; Vermeulen, Monica; Mangelinckx, Sven; Jacobs, Jan; Debenedetti, Silvia; Shayo, Carina; De Kimpe, Norbert; Davio, Carlos

    2009-09-15

    The presumption that some coumarins might be lead compounds in the search for new differentiation agents against leukemia is based on the fact that natural coumarins, 5-(3-methyl-2-butenyloxy)-6,7-methylenedioxycoumarin (C-2) and 5-methoxy-6,7-methylenedioxycoumarin (C-1) inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation in U-937 cells [Riveiro, M. E.; Shayo, C.; Monczor, F.; Fernandez, N.; Baldi, A.; De Kimpe, N.; Rossi, J.; Debenedetti, S.; Davio, C. Cancer Lett.2004, 210, 179-188]. These promising findings prompted us to investigate the anti-leukemia activity of a broader range of related polyoxygenated coumarins. Twenty related natural or synthetically prepared coumarins, including a range of 5-substituted ayapin derivatives which have become easy accessible via newly developed synthesis methods, were evaluated, where treatments with 5-(2,3-dihydroxy-3-methylbutoxy)-6,7-methylenedioxycoumarin (D-3) and 5-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxy-3-methylbutoxy)-6,7-methylenedioxycoumarin (D-2) were able to inhibit the cell growth and induce the differentiation of U-937 cells after 48 h treatment. These results provide insight into the correlation between some structural properties of polyoxygenated coumarins and their in vitro leukemic differentiation activity.

  8. Selection in backcross programmes

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    Backcrossing is a well-known and long established breeding scheme where a characteristic is introgressed from a donor parent into the genomic background of a recurrent parent. The various uses of backcrossing in modern genetics, particularly with the help of molecular markers, are reviewed here. Selection in backcross programmes is used to either improve the genetic value of plant and animal populations or fine map quantitative trait loci. Both cases are helpful in our understanding of the genetic bases of quantitative traits variation. PMID:16048792

  9. Establishing `fields of care': teaching settings as active participants in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatt, Erica N.

    2014-03-01

    In their article, "Space, relations, and the learning of science," Wolff-Michael Roth and Pei-Ling Hsu draw our attention to the importance of field in the teaching and learning of science. While the Roth and Hsu study is focused on the scientific research laboratory as an internship setting for the teaching of science, this response to their paper expands the discussion of the settings where science is taught in order to bring to the fore some of the affordances and challenges associated with teaching science in specific fields. By extending our thinking about the settings where science is taught/learned and the active role these settings play in teaching our students, we can re-envision how to better utilize a variety of fields in the teaching of science. The notion of `field of care' is explored as a way of both finding and building connections between students and the settings where science is experienced.

  10. Extravehicular activities limitations study. Volume 2: Establishment of physiological and performance criteria for EVA gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, John M.; Briganti, Michael; Cleland, John; Winfield, Dan

    1988-01-01

    One of the major probelms faced in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) glove development has been the absence of concise and reliable methods to measure the effects of EVA gloves on human hand capabilities. This report describes the development of a standardized set of tests designed to assess EVA-gloved hand capabilities in six measurement domains: Range of Motion, Strength, Tactile Perception, Dexterity, Fatigue, and Comfort. Based on an assessment of general human hand functioning and EVA task requirements several tests within each measurement domain were developed to provide a comprehensive evaluation. All tests were designed to be conducted in a glove box with the bare hand as a baseline and the EVA glove at operating pressure. A test program was conducted to evaluate the tests using a representative EVA glove. Eleven test subjects participated in a repeated-measures design. The report presents the results of the tests in each capability domain.

  11. Leishmania lipophosphoglycan: how to establish structure-activity relationships for this highly complex and multifunctional glycoconjugate?

    PubMed Central

    Forestier, Claire-Lise; Gao, Qi; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2015-01-01

    A key feature of many pathogenic microorganisms is the presence of a dense glycocalyx at their surface, composed of lipid-anchored glycoproteins and non-protein-bound polysaccharides. These surface glycolipids are important virulence factors for bacterial, fungal and protozoan pathogens. The highly complex glycoconjugate lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is one of the dominant surface macromolecules of the promastigote stage of all Leishmania parasitic species. LPG plays critical pleiotropic roles in parasite survival and infectivity in both the sandfly vector and the mammalian host. Here, we review the composition of the Leishmania glycocalyx, the chemical structure of LPG and what is currently known about its effects in the mammalian host, specifically. We will then discuss the current approaches employed to elucidate LPG functions. Finally, we will provide a viewpoint on future directions that this area of investigation could take to unravel in detail the biological activity of the specific molecular elements composing the structurally complex LPG. PMID:25653924

  12. Empirical criteria for establishing a classification of singing activity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Michael; Meuret, Sylvia; Geister, Daniela; Pfohl, Walter; Thiel, Susanne; Dietz, Andreas; Gelbrich, Götz

    2008-11-01

    This study evaluated a proposed classification system to assess the nature and extent of voice use in young singers to support diagnostic routines, the treatment of voice disorders, and future research in children and adolescents. A classification system was developed and studied in 186 children and adolescents (age range 6-19 years, M=13.5 years). The system was based on three parameters previously shown to contribute to the development of voice disorders in young singers: amount of voice strain, amount of voice training, and the amount of wind instrument use. The subjects were selected on the basis of information from schools and choirs. After this selection, they were interviewed in detail by seven phoniatricians, logopaedists, and voice teachers. The standardized interviews were recorded and used for classification. Afterward, 124 physicians/logopaedists, choirmasters, music teachers, and lay people classified the singing activity by means of six randomized interviews, resulting in a total of 744 second appraisals. The agreement concerning the classification on the part of the interviewers was evaluated for each preselection and each second appraisal result for all three dimensions of the classification for each subject. All of the second appraiser groups showed moderately strong agreement with the interviewers (kappa=0.65-0.83). In the selection in which the test subjects were not interviewed, there was significantly less agreement (kappa=0.29-0.47). However, the additional strain caused by the instrument was already appraised with a very high degree of agreement in the preliminary selection (kappa=0.88-0.93). This classification system is a practical instrument for evaluating singing activity in young singers. It is accessible to lay persons, simplifying and standardizing communication among physicians, logopaedists, and singing teachers. It can be used at the level of a group comparison in scientific investigations.

  13. A strategy to establish a gene-activated matrix on titanium using gene vectors protected in a polylactide coating.

    PubMed

    Kolk, Andreas; Haczek, Cornelia; Koch, Christian; Vogt, Stephan; Kullmer, Martin; Pautke, Christoph; Deppe, Herbert; Plank, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Bioactive implants are promising tools in regenerative medicine. Here we describe a versatile procedure for preparing a gene-activated matrix on titanium. Lyophilized copolymer-protected gene vectors (COPROGs) suspended in poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA) solutions in ethyl acetate were used to varnish solid surfaces. The gene-activated PDLLA surfaces were first established on polypropylene 96-well plates. Vector release from these surfaces in aqueous buffer, cell viability and gene transfer efficiency to NIH 3T3 fibroblasts was strongly dependent on the vector dose and its ratio to PDLLA film thickness. A detailed analysis of these relationships allowed establishing correlations which can be used to calculate suitable combinations of COPROGs and PDLLA yielding optimal gene transfer efficiency. This was verified with COPROG-activated PDLLA coatings on titanium foils. HEK 293 and mesenchymal stem cells expressed the BMP-2 gene comprised in the gene-activated surface in a manner that was consistent with the predicted dose-response and toxicity profiles found in NIH 3T3 cells. The systematic procedure presented here for identifying optimal coating compositions can be applied to any combination of vector type and coating material.

  14. The South Pacific Forestry Development Programme

    Treesearch

    Tang Hon Tat

    1992-01-01

    Only a few countries in the South Pacific are large enough for industrial forestry to be a key component of the national economy, but forests provide benefits to many people. The United Nations FA0 South Pacific Forestry Development Programme was established in April 1988, at Port Vila, Vanuatu, with a $385,000 budget, and 14 nations participating. The Programme's...

  15. The new FDA combination products programme.

    PubMed

    Donawa, Maria

    2002-10-01

    The United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Combination Products Programme and developed a new internal procedure to increase its effectiveness in regulating products consisting of combinations of drugs, devices and biological products. This article provides a brief overview of the FDA regulation of combination products and discusses the new Programme.

  16. B Lineage–specific Regulation of V(D)J Recombinase Activity Is Established in Common Lymphoid Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Borghesi, Lisa; Hsu, Lih-Yun; Miller, Juli P.; Anderson, Michael; Herzenberg, Leonard; Herzenberg, Leonore; Schlissel, Mark S.; Allman, David; Gerstein, Rachel M.

    2004-01-01

    Expression of V(D)J recombinase activity in developing lymphocytes is absolutely required for initiation of V(D)J recombination at antigen receptor loci. However, little is known about when during hematopoietic development the V(D)J recombinase is first active, nor is it known what elements activate the recombinase in multipotent hematopoietic progenitors. Using mice that express a fluorescent transgenic V(D)J recombination reporter, we show that the V(D)J recombinase is active as early as common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) but not in the upstream progenitors that retain myeloid lineage potential. Evidence of this recombinase activity is detectable in all four progeny lineages (B, T, and NK, and DC), and rag2 levels are the highest in progenitor subsets immediately downstream of the CLP. By single cell PCR, we demonstrate that V(D)J rearrangements are detectable at IgH loci in ∼5% of splenic natural killer cells. Finally, we show that recombinase activity in CLPs is largely controlled by the Erag enhancer. As activity of the Erag enhancer is restricted to the B cell lineage, this provides the first molecular evidence for establishment of a lineage-specific transcription program in multipotent progenitors. PMID:14769852

  17. The effect of an active implementation of a disease management programme for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on healthcare utilization--a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Smidth, Margrethe; Christensen, Morten Bondo; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-10-03

    The growing population living with chronic conditions calls for efficient healthcare-planning and effective care. Implementing disease-management-programmes is one option for responding to this demand. Knowledge is scarce about the effect of implementation processes and their effect on patients; only few studies have reported the effectiveness of disease-management-programmes targeting patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective of this paper was to determine the effect on healthcare-utilization of an active implementation model for a disease-management-programme for patients with one of the major multimorbidity diseases, COPD. The standard implementation of a new disease-management-programme for COPD was ongoing during the study-period from November 2008 to November 2010 in the Central Denmark Region. We wanted to test a strategy using Breakthrough Series, academic detailing and lists of patients with COPD. It targeted GPs and three hospitals serving approx. 60,000 inhabitants aged 35 or older and included interventions directed at professionals, organisations and patients. The study was a non-blinded block- and cluster-randomised controlled trial with GP-practices as the unit of randomisation. In Ringkoebing-Skjern Municipality, Denmark, 16 GP-practices involving 38 GPs were randomised to either the intervention-group or the control-group. A comparable neighbouring municipality acted as an external-control-group which included nine GP-practices with 25 GPs. An algorithm based on health-registry-data on lung-related contacts to the healthcare-system identified 2,736 patients who were alive at the end of the study-period. The population included in this study counted 1,372 (69.2%) patients who responded to the baseline questionnaire and confirmed their COPD diagnosis; 458 (33.4%) patients were from the intervention-group, 376 (27.4%) from the control-group and 538(39.2%) from the external-control-group. The primary outcome was

  18. The effect of an active implementation of a disease management programme for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on healthcare utilization - a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The growing population living with chronic conditions calls for efficient healthcare-planning and effective care. Implementing disease-management-programmes is one option for responding to this demand. Knowledge is scarce about the effect of implementation processes and their effect on patients; only few studies have reported the effectiveness of disease-management-programmes targeting patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective of this paper was to determine the effect on healthcare-utilization of an active implementation model for a disease-management-programme for patients with one of the major multimorbidity diseases, COPD. Methods The standard implementation of a new disease-management-programme for COPD was ongoing during the study-period from November 2008 to November 2010 in the Central Denmark Region. We wanted to test a strategy using Breakthrough Series, academic detailing and lists of patients with COPD. It targeted GPs and three hospitals serving approx. 60,000 inhabitants aged 35 or older and included interventions directed at professionals, organisations and patients. The study was a non-blinded block- and cluster-randomised controlled trial with GP-practices as the unit of randomisation. In Ringkoebing-Skjern Municipality, Denmark, 16 GP-practices involving 38 GPs were randomised to either the intervention-group or the control-group. A comparable neighbouring municipality acted as an external-control-group which included nine GP-practices with 25 GPs. An algorithm based on health-registry-data on lung-related contacts to the healthcare-system identified 2,736 patients who were alive at the end of the study-period. The population included in this study counted 1,372 (69.2%) patients who responded to the baseline questionnaire and confirmed their COPD diagnosis; 458 (33.4%) patients were from the intervention-group, 376 (27.4%) from the control-group and 538(39.2%) from the external-control-group. The primary

  19. Notch activity induces Nodal expression and mediates the establishment of left–right asymmetry in vertebrate embryos

    PubMed Central

    Raya, Ángel; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Rodríguez-Esteban, Concepción; Büscher, Dirk; Koth, Christopher M.; Itoh, Tohru; Morita, Masanobu; Raya, R. Marina; Dubova, Ilir; Bessa, Joaquín Grego; de la Pompa, José Luis; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisúa

    2003-01-01

    Left-sided expression of Nodal in the lateral plate mesoderm is a conserved feature necessary for the establishment of normal left–right asymmetry during vertebrate embryogenesis. By using gain- and loss-of-function experiments in zebrafish and mouse, we show that the activity of the Notch pathway is necessary and sufficient for Nodal expression around the node, and for proper left–right determination. We identify Notch-responsive elements in the Nodal promoter, and unveil a direct relationship between Notch activity and Nodal expression around the node. Our findings provide evidence for a mechanism involving Notch activity that translates an initial symmetry-breaking event into asymmetric gene expression. PMID:12730123

  20. Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors establish CD8(+) T cell identity through intrinsic HDAC activity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shaojun; Li, Fengyin; Zeng, Zhouhao; Zhao, Yunjie; Yu, Shuyang; Shan, Qiang; Li, Yalan; Phillips, Farrah C; Maina, Peterson K; Qi, Hank H; Liu, Chengyu; Zhu, Jun; Pope, R Marshall; Musselman, Catherine A; Zeng, Chen; Peng, Weiqun; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell dichotomy is essential for effective cellular immunity. How individual T cell identity is established remains poorly understood. Here we show that the high-mobility group (HMG) transcription factors Tcf1 and Lef1 are essential for repressing CD4(+) lineage-associated genes including Cd4, Foxp3 and Rorc in CD8(+) T cells. Tcf1- and Lef1-deficient CD8(+) T cells exhibit histone hyperacetylation, which can be ascribed to intrinsic histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in Tcf1 and Lef1. Mutation of five conserved amino acids in the Tcf1 HDAC domain diminishes HDAC activity and the ability to suppress CD4(+) lineage genes in CD8(+) T cells. These findings reveal that sequence-specific transcription factors can utilize intrinsic HDAC activity to guard cell identity by repressing lineage-inappropriate genes.

  1. Dendritic cell type-specific HIV-1 activation in effector T cells: implications for latent HIV-1 reservoir establishment.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Renée M; van Capel, Toni M M; Speijer, Dave; Sanders, Rogier W; Berkhout, Ben; de Jong, Esther C; Jeeninga, Rienk E; van Montfort, Thijs

    2015-06-01

    Latent HIV type I (HIV-1) infections can frequently occur in short-lived proliferating effector T lymphocytes. These latently infected cells could revert into resting T lymphocytes and thereby contribute to the establishment of the long-lived viral reservoir. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells can revert latency in effector T cells in vitro. Here we investigated the latency activation properties of tissue-specific immune cells, including a large panel of dendritic cell subsets, to explore in which body compartments effector T cells are most likely to maintain latent HIV-1 provirus and thus potentially contribute to the long-lived reservoir. Our results demonstrate that blood or genital tract dendritic cells do not activate latent provirus in effector T cells, whereas gut or lymphoid dendritic cells induce virus production from latently infected effector T cells in our in-vitro model for latency. Toll-like receptor 3-induced interferon production by myeloid dendritic cells abolished the dendritic cells' ability to induce viral gene expression. In this study, we show that HIV-1 provirus residing in effector T cells is activated from latency by tissue-specific dendritic cell subsets and other immune cells with remarkably different efficiencies.Our new assay system points to an important, neglected aspect of HIV-1 research: the ability of other immune cells, especially dendritic cells, to differentially affect latency establishment as well as virus reactivation.

  2. The HAT TRICK programme for improving physical activity, healthy eating and connectedness among overweight, inactive men: study protocol of a pragmatic feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Caperchione, Cristina M; Bottorff, Joan L; Oliffe, John L; Johnson, Steven T; Hunt, Kate; Sharp, Paul; Fitzpatrick, Kayla M; Price, Ryley; Goldenberg, S Larry

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity, healthy eating and maintaining a healthy weight are associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer and with improved mental health. Despite these benefits, many men do not meet recommended physical activity guidelines and have poor eating behaviours. Many health promotion programmes hold little appeal to men and consequently fail to influence men’s health practices. HAT TRICK was designed as a 12-week face-to-face, gender-sensitised intervention for overweight and inactive men focusing on physical activity, healthy eating and social connectedness and was delivered in collaboration with a major junior Canadian ice hockey team (age range 16–20 years). The programme was implemented and evaluated to assess its feasibility. This article describes the intervention design and study protocol of HAT TRICK. Methods and analysis HAT TRICK participants (n=60) were men age 35 years, residing in the Okanagan Region of British Columbia, who accumulate 150 min of moderate to vigorous physical activity a week, with a body mass index of >25 kg/m2 and a pant waist size of >38’. Each 90 min weekly session included targeted health education and theory-guided behavioural change techniques, as well as a progressive (ie, an increase in duration and intensity) group physical activity component. Outcome measures were collected at baseline, 12 weeks and 9 months and included the following: objectively measured anthropometrics, blood pressure, heart rate, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, as well as self-reported physical activity, sedentary behaviour, diet, smoking, alcohol consumption, sleep habits, risk of depression, health-related quality of life and social connectedness. Programme feasibility data (eg, recruitment, satisfaction, adherence, content delivery) were assessed at 12 weeks via interviews and self-report. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from the University of British

  3. The HAT TRICK programme for improving physical activity, healthy eating and connectedness among overweight, inactive men: study protocol of a pragmatic feasibility trial.

    PubMed

    Caperchione, Cristina M; Bottorff, Joan L; Oliffe, John L; Johnson, Steven T; Hunt, Kate; Sharp, Paul; Fitzpatrick, Kayla M; Price, Ryley; Goldenberg, S Larry

    2017-09-06

    Physical activity, healthy eating and maintaining a healthy weight are associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer and with improved mental health. Despite these benefits, many men do not meet recommended physical activity guidelines and have poor eating behaviours. Many health promotion programmes hold little appeal to men and consequently fail to influence men's health practices. HAT TRICK was designed as a 12-week face-to-face, gender-sensitised intervention for overweight and inactive men focusing on physical activity, healthy eating and social connectedness and was delivered in collaboration with a major junior Canadian ice hockey team (age range 16-20 years). The programme was implemented and evaluated to assess its feasibility. This article describes the intervention design and study protocol of HAT TRICK. HAT TRICK participants (n=60) were men age 35 years, residing in the Okanagan Region of British Columbia, who accumulate 150 min of moderate to vigorous physical activity a week, with a body mass index of >25 kg/m(2) and a pant waist size of >38'. Each 90 min weekly session included targeted health education and theory-guided behavioural change techniques, as well as a progressive (ie, an increase in duration and intensity) group physical activity component. Outcome measures were collected at baseline, 12 weeks and 9 months and included the following: objectively measured anthropometrics, blood pressure, heart rate, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, as well as self-reported physical activity, sedentary behaviour, diet, smoking, alcohol consumption, sleep habits, risk of depression, health-related quality of life and social connectedness. Programme feasibility data (eg, recruitment, satisfaction, adherence, content delivery) were assessed at 12 weeks via interviews and self-report. Ethical approval was obtained from the University of British Columbia Okanagan Behavioural Research Ethics Board (reference no H

  4. Student responses to the introduction of case-based learning and practical activities into a theoretical obstetrics and gynaecology teaching programme.

    PubMed

    Massonetto, Júlio Cesar; Marcellini, Cláudio; Assis, Paulo Sérgio Ribeiro; de Toledo, Sérgio Floriano

    2004-11-29

    The fourth-year Obstetrics and Gynaecology course at our institution had previously been taught using theory classes alone. A new teaching model was introduced to provide a better link with professional practice. We wished to evaluate the impact of the introduction of case discussions and other practical activities upon students' perceptions of the learning process. Small-group discussions of cases and practical activities were introduced for the teaching of a fourth-year class in 2003 (Group II; 113 students). Comparisons were made with the fourth-year class of 2002 (Group I; 108 students), from before the new programme was introduced. Students were asked to rate their satisfaction with various elements of the teaching programme. Statistical differences in their ratings were analysed using the chi-square and Bonferroni tests. Group II gave higher ratings to the clarity of theory classes and lecturers' teaching abilities (p < 0.05) and lecturers' punctuality (p < 0.001) than did Group I. Group II had greater belief that the knowledge assessment tests were useful (p < 0.001) and that their understanding of the subject was good (p < 0.001) than did Group I. Group II gave a higher overall rating to the course (p < 0.05) than did Group I. However, there was no difference in the groups' assessments of the use made of the timetabled hours available for the subject or lecturers' concern for students' learning. Students were very receptive to the new teaching model.

  5. Student responses to the introduction of case-based learning and practical activities into a theoretical obstetrics and gynaecology teaching programme

    PubMed Central

    Massonetto, Júlio Cesar; Marcellini, Cláudio; Assis, Paulo Sérgio Ribeiro; de Toledo, Sérgio Floriano

    2004-01-01

    Background The fourth-year Obstetrics and Gynaecology course at our institution had previously been taught using theory classes alone. A new teaching model was introduced to provide a better link with professional practice. We wished to evaluate the impact of the introduction of case discussions and other practical activities upon students' perceptions of the learning process. Methods Small-group discussions of cases and practical activities were introduced for the teaching of a fourth-year class in 2003 (Group II; 113 students). Comparisons were made with the fourth-year class of 2002 (Group I; 108 students), from before the new programme was introduced. Students were asked to rate their satisfaction with various elements of the teaching programme. Statistical differences in their ratings were analysed using the chi-square and Bonferroni tests. Results Group II gave higher ratings to the clarity of theory classes and lecturers' teaching abilities (p < 0.05) and lecturers' punctuality (p < 0.001) than did Group I. Group II had greater belief that the knowledge assessment tests were useful (p < 0.001) and that their understanding of the subject was good (p < 0.001) than did Group I. Group II gave a higher overall rating to the course (p < 0.05) than did Group I. However, there was no difference in the groups' assessments of the use made of the timetabled hours available for the subject or lecturers' concern for students' learning. Conclusions Students were very receptive to the new teaching model. PMID:15569385

  6. Guidance for establishment and implementation of field sample management programs in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-18

    The role of the National Sample Management Program (NSMP) proposed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to be a resource for EM programs and for local Field Sample Management Programs (FSMPs). It will be a source of information on sample analysis and data collection within the DOE complex. The purpose of this document is to establish the suggested scope of the FSMP activities to be performed under each Operations Office, list the drivers under which the program will operate, define terms and list references. This guidance will apply only to EM sampling and analysis activities associated with project planning, contracting, laboratory selection, sample collection, sample transportation, laboratory analysis and data management.

  7. Smart programmable wireless microaccelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Subramanian, Hareesh; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1998-07-01

    The integration of MEMS, SAW devices and required microelectronics and conformal antenna to realize a programmable wireless accelerometer is presented in this paper. This unique combination of technologies results in a novel accelerometer that can be remotely sensed by a microwave system with the advantage of no power requirements at the sensor site. The microaccelerometer presented is simple in construction and easy to manufacture with existing silicon micromachining techniques. Programmable accelerometers can be achieved with splitfinger interdigital transducers (IDTs) as reflecting structures. If IDTs are short circuited or capacitively loaded, the wave propagates without any reflection whereas in an open circuit configuration, the IDTs reflect the incoming SAW signal. The programmable accelerometers can thus be achieved by using an external circuitry on a semiconductor chip using hybrid technology. The relatively small size of the sensor makes it an ideal conformal sensor. The accelerometer finds application as air bag deployment sensors, vibration sensors for noise control, deflection and strain sensors, inertial and dimensional positioning systems, ABS/traction control, smart suspension, active roll stabilization and four wheel steering. The wireless accelerometer is very attractive to study the response of a `dummy' in automobile crash test.

  8. Biomechanical evaluation of novel ultrasound-activated bioresorbable pins for the treatment of osteochondral fractures compared to established methods.

    PubMed

    Kienast, Benjamin; Mohsen, Hellal; Wendlandt, Robert; Reimers, Nils; Schulz, Arndt P; Heuer, Hinrich; Gille, Justus; Neumann, Hanjo

    2017-08-28

    Osteochondral injuries often lead to osteoarthritis of the affected joint. All established systems for refixation of osteochondral defects show certain disadvantages. To address the problem of reduced stability in resorbable implants, ultrasound-activated pins were developed. By ultrasound-activated melting of the tip of these implants, a more secure anchoring is assumed. The aim of the study was to investigate if ultrasound-activated pins can provide secure fixation of osteochondral fragments compared to screws and conventional resorbable pins. In a biomechanical laboratory setting, osteochondral fragments of the medial femoral condyle of sheep were refixated with ultrasound-activated pins [US fused poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) (PLDLLA) pins], polydioxanone (PDA) pins and conventional titanium screws. Anchoring forces of the different fixation methods were examined, registered and compared concerning shear force and tensile force. Concerning the pull out test, the US fused PLDLLA pins and titanium screws (~122 N and ~203 N) showed comparable good results, while the PDA pins showed significantly lower anchoring forces (~18 N). Examination of shear forces showed a significantly higher anchoring of the screws (~248 N) than the US fused PLDLLA pins (~218 N). Nevertheless, the US fused PLDLLA pins could significantly outperform the PDA pins (~68 N) concerning shear forces. The US fused PLDLLA pins demonstrated a comparable anchorage to the fixation with screws, but were free from the disadvantages of metal implants, i.e. the need for implant removal. The PDA pin application showed inferior biomechanical properties.

  9. The LIM protein complex establishes a retinal circuitry of visual adaptation by regulating Pax6 α-enhancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeha; Lim, Soyeon; Ha, Taejeong; Song, You-Hyang; Sohn, Young-In; Park, Dae-Jin; Paik, Sun-Sook; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Leung, Amanda; Levine, Edward M; Kim, In-Beom; Goo, Yong Sook; Lee, Seung-Hee; Kang, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Jin Woo

    2017-01-01

    The visual responses of vertebrates are sensitive to the overall composition of retinal interneurons including amacrine cells, which tune the activity of the retinal circuitry. The expression of Paired-homeobox 6 (PAX6) is regulated by multiple cis-DNA elements including the intronic α-enhancer, which is active in GABAergic amacrine cell subsets. Here, we report that the transforming growth factor ß1-induced transcript 1 protein (Tgfb1i1) interacts with the LIM domain transcription factors Lhx3 and Isl1 to inhibit the α-enhancer in the post-natal mouse retina. Tgfb1i1-/- mice show elevated α-enhancer activity leading to overproduction of Pax6ΔPD isoform that supports the GABAergic amacrine cell fate maintenance. Consequently, the Tgfb1i1-/- mouse retinas show a sustained light response, which becomes more transient in mice with the auto-stimulation-defective Pax6ΔPBS/ΔPBS mutation. Together, we show the antagonistic regulation of the α-enhancer activity by Pax6 and the LIM protein complex is necessary for the establishment of an inner retinal circuitry, which controls visual adaptation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21303.001 PMID:28139974

  10. Establishment of an activated peroxide system for low-temperature cotton bleaching using N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]butyrolactam chloride.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changhai; Hinks, David; Sun, Chang; Wei, Qufu

    2015-03-30

    Cotton bleaching is traditionally carried out in strongly alkaline solution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at temperatures close to the boil. Such harsh processing conditions can result in extensive water and energy consumptions as well as severe chemical damage to textiles. In this study, an activated peroxide system was established for low-temperature cotton bleaching by incorporating a bleach activator, namely N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]butyrolactam chloride (TBBC) into an aqueous H2O2 solution. Experimental results showed that the TBBC-activated peroxide system exhibited the most effective bleaching performance in a pH range of 6-8 which could be approximated by adding sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). The TBBC/H2O2/NaHCO3 system led to rapid bleaching of cotton at a temperature as low as 50°C. In comparison with the hot alkaline peroxide bleaching system, the TBBC/H2O2/NaHCO3 system provided cotton fabric with an equivalent degree of whiteness, higher degree of polymerization, and slightly lower water absorbency. The new activated peroxide system may provide a more environmentally benign approach to cotton bleaching.

  11. A Self-Management Programme of Activity Coping and Education - SPACE for COPD(C) - in primary care: The protocol for a pragmatic trial.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Claire LA; Kanabar, Pratiksha; Mitchell, Katy; Schreder, Sally; Houchen-Wolloff, Linzy; Bankart, M John G; Apps, Lindsay; Hewitt, Stacey; Harvey-Dunstan, Theresa; Singh, Sally J

    2017-07-10

    National guidance for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) suggests that self-management support be provided for patients. Our institution has developed a standardised, manual-based, supported self-management programme: Self-Management Programme of Activity Coping and Education (SPACE for COPD(C)). SPACE was previously piloted on a 1-2-1 basis, delivered by researchers, to individuals with COPD. Discussions with stakeholders highlighted considerable interest in delivering the SPACE for COPD(C) intervention as a group-based self-management programme facilitated by healthcare professionals (HCPs) in primary care settings. The study aims are to explore the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy for the intervention to be delivered and supported by HCPs and to examine whether group-based delivery of SPACE for COPD(C), with sustained support, improves patient outcomes following the SPACE for COPD(C) intervention. A prospective, multi-site, single-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted, with follow-up at 6 and 9 months. Participants will be randomly assigned to either the control group (usual care) or intervention group (a six-session, group-based SPACE for COPD(C)self-management programme delivered over 5 months). The primary outcome is change in COPD assessment test at 6 months.A discussion session will be conducted with HCPs who deliver the intervention to discuss and gain insight into any potential facilitators/barriers to implementing the intervention in practice. Furthermore, we will conduct semi-structured focus groups with intervention participants to understand feasibility and acceptability. All qualitative data will be analysed thematically. The project has received a favourable opinion from South Hampshire B Research Ethics Committee, REC reference: 14/SC/1169 and full R&D approval from the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust: 152408.Study results will be disseminated through appropriate peer-reviewed journals, national

  12. Establishing a Proficiency Testing Scheme for Drinking Water Radiochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brookman, Brian

    2008-08-14

    As part of its international water proficiency testing (PT) scheme, 'Aquacheck', the LGC Proficiency Testing Group has established a new water radiochemistry PT scheme. The PT scheme is aimed at laboratories who undertake radiochemical analysis on drinking water samples as part of an environmental monitoring programme. Following a scheme design and feasibility study, the new scheme was established to monitor the laboratory performance of participants undertaking the determination of gross alpha, gross beta and tritium activity. Three rounds of the new water radiochemistry PT scheme are now complete. This paper explains the process of establishing such a scheme, reviews the results so far, and addresses future development of the scheme.

  13. The (cost-)effectiveness of an individually tailored long-term worksite health promotion programme on physical activity and nutrition: design of a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Robroek, Suzan J W; Bredt, Folef J; Burdorf, Alex

    2007-09-21

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disability and mortality in most Western countries. The prevalence of several risk factors, most notably low physical activity and poor nutrition, is very high. Therefore, lifestyle behaviour changes are of great importance. The worksite offers an efficient structure to reach large groups and to make use of a natural social network. This study investigates a worksite health promotion programme with individually tailored advice in physical activity and nutrition and individual counselling to increase compliance with lifestyle recommendations and sustainability of a healthy lifestyle. The study is a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial with the worksite as the unit of randomisation. All workers will receive a standard worksite health promotion program. Additionally, the intervention group will receive access to an individual Health Portal consisting of four critical features: a computer-tailored advice, a monitoring function, a personal coach, and opportunities to contact professionals at request. Participants are employees working for companies in the Netherlands, being literate enough to read and understand simple Internet-based messages in the Dutch language.A questionnaire to assess primary outcomes (compliance with national recommendations on physical activity and on fruit and vegetable intake) will take place at baseline and after 12 and 24 months. This questionnaire also assesses secondary outcomes including fat intake, self-efficacy and self-perceived barriers on physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake. Other secondary outcomes, including a cardiovascular risk profile and physical fitness, will be measured at baseline and after 24 months. Apart from the effect evaluation, a process evaluation will be carried out to gain insight into participation and adherence to the worksite health promotion programme. A cost-effectiveness analysis and sensitivity analysis will be carried out as well. The

  14. A pilot study on the motivational effects of an internet-delivered physical activity behaviour change programme in Nova Scotian cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Cynthia C; Blanchard, Chris M; Mummery, W Kerry; Courneya, Kerry S

    2017-02-01

    To examine the effects of an internet-delivered, distance-based physical activity (PA) behaviour change programme on motivation to perform PA in cancer survivors. Breast, prostate and colorectal cancer survivors (N = 95) were randomized to either an online Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB)-based PA behaviour change programme (UCAN) or usual care. Motivational variables from the TPB including intention, planning, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control and underlying beliefs. UCAN had significant negative effects on self-efficacy (-.7; 95% CI = -1.2 to -.1; d = -.53, p = .019), affective attitude (-.4; 95% CI = -.8 to -.0; d = -.45, p = .044), instrumental attitude (-.5; 95% CI = -.9 to -.1; d = -.43, p = .026) and confidence to perform PA in bad weather (-.8; 95% CI = -1.6 to -.1; d = -.49, p = .030), despite health issues (-.7; 95% CI = -1.3 to -.1; d = -.48, p = .031), despite pain/soreness (-.7; 95% CI = -1.4 to -.1; d = -.52, p = .020), despite family responsibilities (-1.0; 95% CI = -1.7 to -.3; d = -.62, p = .005) and when PA is boring (-.8; 95% CI = -1.4 to -.1; d = -.54, p = .016). UCAN had negative effects on motivational variables in cancer survivors. These findings may be explained by methodological issues related to measuring motivation and/or the absence of post-intentional constructs.

  15. Evaluation of national malaria control programmes in Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Bryce, J.; Roungou, J. B.; Nguyen-Dinh, P.; Naimoli, J. F.; Breman, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    Evaluation is an essential management tool for the improvement of public health programmes or projects. As malaria morbidity and mortality continue to increase in most countries in Africa, international agencies and malaria control programme managers have identified the strengthening of programme evaluation as an important strategy for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of malaria control programmes. Managers can develop an evaluation strategy only after they have defined programme objectives and planned specific programme activities. Indicators should be directly related to programme objectives and should be selected on the basis of the following criteria: their validity; reliability; ability to detect change within a reasonable time period and as a result of successful programme implementation; ability to be interpreted; and usefulness in guiding programme change. Only those indicators that can be measured with available programme resources should be selected. Managers will also need to identify the sources of indicator data and to determine how often each indicator will be measured. Programme managers should develop criteria or indicators for the following: programme policies and plans; the process of programme implementation; the outcomes of malaria control interventions in disease management and prevention; and programme impact in terms of reductions in malaria-related mortality and morbidity. Key issues related to the management of evaluation activities within a national programme include the need to begin with available resources and build incrementally; to explore options for administering evaluation activities; to select, train and supervise staff who carry out evaluation activities; to develop quality control strategies; and to ensure that data are managed and communicated in ways that support effective programme decision-making. For evaluation to lead to improvements in malaria control programmes it must be clearly defined as a part of the

  16. TCF/Lef1 activity controls establishment of diverse stem and progenitor cell compartments in mouse epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, Monika; Brylka, Heike; Kraus, Andreas; John, Susan; Rappl, Gunter; Schettina, Peter; Niemann, Catherin

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian epidermis consists of the interfollicular epidermis, hair follicles (HFs) and associated sebaceous glands (SGs). It is constantly renewed by stem and progenitor cell populations that have been identified and each compartment features a distinct mechanism of cellular turnover during renewal. The functional relationship between the diverse stem cell (SC) pools is not known and molecular signals regulating the establishment and maintenance of SC compartments are not well understood. Here, we performed lineage tracing experiments to demonstrate that progeny of HF bulge SCs transit through other SC compartments, suggesting a hierarchy of competent multipotent keratinocytes contributing to tissue renewal. The bulge was identified as a bipotent SC compartment that drives both cyclic regeneration of HFs and continuous renewal of SGs. Our data demonstrate that aberrant signalling by TCF/Lef1, transcription factors crucial for bulge SC activation and hair differentiation, results in development of ectopic SGs originating from bulge cells. This process of de novo SG formation is accompanied by the establishment of new progenitor niches. Detailed molecular analysis suggests the recapitulation of steps of tissue morphogenesis. PMID:21694721

  17. TCF/Lef1 activity controls establishment of diverse stem and progenitor cell compartments in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Monika; Brylka, Heike; Kraus, Andreas; John, Susan; Rappl, Gunter; Schettina, Peter; Niemann, Catherin

    2011-06-21

    Mammalian epidermis consists of the interfollicular epidermis, hair follicles (HFs) and associated sebaceous glands (SGs). It is constantly renewed by stem and progenitor cell populations that have been identified and each compartment features a distinct mechanism of cellular turnover during renewal. The functional relationship between the diverse stem cell (SC) pools is not known and molecular signals regulating the establishment and maintenance of SC compartments are not well understood. Here, we performed lineage tracing experiments to demonstrate that progeny of HF bulge SCs transit through other SC compartments, suggesting a hierarchy of competent multipotent keratinocytes contributing to tissue renewal. The bulge was identified as a bipotent SC compartment that drives both cyclic regeneration of HFs and continuous renewal of SGs. Our data demonstrate that aberrant signalling by TCF/Lef1, transcription factors crucial for bulge SC activation and hair differentiation, results in development of ectopic SGs originating from bulge cells. This process of de novo SG formation is accompanied by the establishment of new progenitor niches. Detailed molecular analysis suggests the recapitulation of steps of tissue morphogenesis.

  18. Programme news: agencies report on their activities in nutrition. How is interagency coordination in countries actually meant to work?

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    United Nations Administrative Committee on Coordination representatives have been urged to establish thematic groups to facilitate interagency coordination in their countries. By 1996, there were only six countries--Angola, Kuwait, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, and North Korea--that had not yet established such groups. In addition to information exchange and networking, thematic groups have focused on joint programming, development of sector plans, and resource mobilization. Four clusters of themes exist: food security and agriculture, health and population, poverty, and HIV. Remaining is a need to operationalize technical strategies and agency agendas, translate cross-sectoral priorities into sectoral priorities, and evaluate ongoing programs.

  19. Modelling Landscape Dynamics in a Highland Mediterranean Catchment: Establishing the impact of Climate Variation and Human Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, L. P. H.; Feiken, H.; van Asch, T. W. J.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2012-04-01

    The close link between human occupancy and the Mediterranean landscape has long been recognized. Through the exploitation of the various but fragmented resources that these landscapes have to offer, man has been able to secure a living. However, these activities are often marginal and small shifts in population pressure, corresponding land use patterns or climatic variability can have large consequences on the redistribution of water and sediment in these areas. The meso-scale landscape dynamics model, CALEROS, has been developed to simulate the interactions between climate, soil production and erosion, vegetation and land use on geomorphological to human time scales in Mediterranean environments. Starting from an initial landscape consisting of a DTM, soil distribution and underlying lithology, the landscape is free to develop in response to the imposed climate variability and seismicity. In addition to changes in soil distribution and bedrock lowering, this includes the establishment of vegetation as conditioned by a selection of plant functional types and, optionally, population and land use dynamics as conditioned by land use scenarios specifying technological and dietary constraints for different periods. As such CALEROS is well-suited to investigate the relative impacts of climate, land cover and human activities on the hydrological catchment response and the associated sediment fluxes due to soil erosion and mass movements. Within the context of a geo-archeological study on the conservation potential of settlement history in the Contrada Maddalena (~14km2, Calabria, Italy), we apply CALEROS to investigate the relative contributions of climate and man from Neolithic times onwards (5000 BP-present). Model results allow to establish when human impacts become significant over natural variations and to discern shifts in catchment functioning as a result of sudden or climatic variations (e.g., Little Ice Age) as reflected in vegetation patterns and water and

  20. Going global in physical therapist education: International Service-Learning in US-based programmes.

    PubMed

    Pechak, Celia; Thompson, Mary

    2011-12-01

     Internationalization is expanding its presence in higher education in the United States. Reflecting this trend that includes incorporating global perspectives in the curricula, physical therapist education programmes increasingly offer international opportunities such as International Service-Learning (ISL) to their students. Service-learning, a teaching strategy that integrates community service with structured learning activities, has gained broad acceptance in health professions education including physical therapy, and is therefore the focus of this paper. The specific purposes of this paper were to identify and analyse the commonalities that existed among established ISL programmes within physical therapist education programmes in terms of structures and processes, and to consider its broader implications for physical therapist education.   A descriptive, exploratory study was performed using grounded theory. Snowball and purposive, theoretical sampling yielded 14 faculty members with experience in international service, international learning or ISL in physical therapist education programmes. Faculty were interviewed by phone. Interview transcriptions and course documents were analysed applying grounded theory methodology. Data from eight programmes which met the operational definition of established ISL were used to address the purposes of this paper.   Five phases of establishing an ISL programme were identified: development, design, implementation, evaluation, and enhancement. Although no single model exists for ISL in physical therapist education; commonalities in structures and processes were identified in each phase. However, attention to service objectives and outcomes is lacking.   While analysis revealed that each programme shared commonalities and demonstrated differences in structures and processes compared with the other programmes, the study demonstrated a general lack of focus on formal community outcomes which raises ethical

  1. Antitumor activities of a new indolocarbazole substance, NB-506, and establishment of NB-506-resistant cell lines, SBC-3/NB.

    PubMed

    Kanzawa, F; Nishio, K; Kubota, N; Saijo, N

    1995-07-01

    The novel anticancer glucosyl derivative of indolo-carbazole (NB-506), an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase I, exhibited strong in vitro cytotoxicity against various human cancer cell lines. In order to elucidate its cytotoxic mechanisms, we established nine NB-506-resistant sublines with different resistance ratios from human small cell lung cancer cells (SBC-3/P) by stepwise and brief exposure (24 h) to NB-506. Among them, SBC-3/NB#9 was 454 times more resistant to NB-506 than the parent cell line. The SBC-3/NB#9 cells showed cross-resistance only to topoisomerase I inhibitors, such as 11,7-ethyl-10-[4-(1-piperidino)-1-piperidino] carbonyloxycamptothecia and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin, and not to other anticancer drugs, such as vincristine, vinblastine, Adriamycin, etoposide, and teniposide. These results indicate that the difference on the effect of topoisomerase I was considered to be related to a resistance mechanism. The topoisomerase I activities of nuclear extracts eluted from SBC-3/NB#9 cells was only one-tenth of the parent cell activity. A Western blotting study indicated that this lower activity was due to a lower amount of DNA topoisomerase I. Furthermore, we found correlations between topoisomerase I activity and sensitivity to NB-506 in sublines with different degrees of resistance. Accumulation of 3H-labeled NB-506 by SBC-3/NB#9 cells was only one-fifth of that by the parent cells, whereas intracellular accumulation of 3H-labeled camptothecin by both cell lines did not differ. The reduction of accumulation was specific to NB-506, and this result may explain why the resistance ratio for NB-506 was higher than those for 11,7-ethyl-10-[4-(1-piperidino)-1-piperidino] carbonyloxycamptothecin and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin.

  2. A Recently Established Murine Model of Nasal Polyps Demonstrates Activation of B Cells, as Occurs in Human Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Sun Hye; Carter, Roderick G; Kato, Atsushi; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2016-08-01

    Animal model systems are invaluable for examining human diseases. Our laboratory recently established a mouse model of nasal polyps (NPs) and investigated similarities and differences between this mouse model and human NPs. We especially focus on the hypothesis that B cell activation occurs during NP generation in the murine model. After induction of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinosinusitis, 6% ovalbumin and Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (10 ng) were instilled into the nasal cavity of mice three times per week for 8 weeks. The development of structures that somewhat resemble NPs (which we will refer to as NPs) was confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The mRNA and protein levels of various inflammatory cell markers and mediators were measured by real-time PCR in nasal tissue and by ELISA in nasal lavage fluid (NLF), respectively. Total Ig isotype levels in NLF were also quantitated using the Mouse Ig Isotyping Multiplex kit (EMD Millipore, Billerica, MA) on a Luminex 200 instrument (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY). Similar to human NPs, there were significant increases in gene expression of inflammatory cell markers, such as CD19, CD138, CD11c, and mast cell protease-6 in nasal tissue samples of the NP group compared with those of the control group. In further investigations of B cell activation, mRNA expressions of B cell activating factor and a proliferation-inducing ligand were found to be significantly increased in mouse NP tissue. B cell-activating factor protein concentration and IgA and IgG1 levels in NLF were significantly higher in the NP group compared with the control group. In this study, the NP mouse model demonstrated enhanced B cell responses, which are reminiscent of B cell responses in human NPs.

  3. Professional Education for Library and Information Work in the Socialist Republic of Macedonia. Yugoslavia: Establishment and Development of National and Regional Training Programmes in the Field of Information. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Wilfred L.

    Based on a 1982 study trip to the Socialist Republic (SR) of Macedonia in Yugoslavia, this report describes the need for professional library education in Macedonia and presents recommendations for the establishment of a master's degree program in information studies at the University of Skopje. Sections cover the trip itinerary; professional…

  4. Current status of the radioactive waste management programme in Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Lang-Lenton Leon, Jorge; Garcia Neri, Emilio

    2007-07-01

    Since 1984, ENRESA is responsible of the radioactive waste management and the decommissioning of nuclear installations in Spain. The major recent challenge has been the approval of the Sixth General Radioactive Waste Plan (GRWP) as 'master plan' of the activities to be performed by ENRESA. Regarding the LILW programme, the El Cabril LILW disposal facility will be described highlighting the most relevant events especially focused on optimizing the existing capacity and the start-up of a purpose -built disposal area for VLLW. Concerning the HLW programme, two aspects may be distinguished in the direct management of spent fuel: temporary storage and long-term management. In this regards, a major challenge has been the decision adopted by the Spanish Government to set up a Inter-ministerial Committee for the establishment of the criteria that must be met by the site of the Centralized Intermediate Storage (CTS) facility as the first and necessary step for the process. Also the developments of the long-term management programme will be presented in the frame of the ENRESA's R and D programme. Finally, in the field of decommissioning they will be presented the PIMIC project at the CIEMAT centre and the activities in course for the decommissioning of Jose Cabrera NPP. (authors)

  5. A survey of radiation treatment planning peer-review activities in a provincial radiation oncology programme: current practice and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Brundage, Michael; Foxcroft, Sophie; McGowan, Tom; Gutierrez, Eric; Sharpe, Michael; Warde, Padraig

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe current patterns of practice of radiation oncology peer review within a provincial cancer system, identifying barriers and facilitators to its use with the ultimate aim of process improvement. Design A survey of radiation oncology programmes at provincial cancer centres. Setting All cancer centres within the province of Ontario, Canada (n=14). These are community-based outpatient facilities overseen by Cancer Care Ontario, the provincial cancer agency. Participants A delegate from each radiation oncology programme filled out a single survey based on input from their multidisciplinary team. Outcome measures Rated importance of peer review; current utilisation; format of the peer-review process; organisation and timing; case attributes; outcomes of the peer-review process and perceived barriers and facilitators to expanding peer-review processes. Results 14 (100%) centres responded. All rated the importance of peer review as at least 8/10 (10=extremely important). Detection of medical error and improvement of planning processes were the highest rated perceived benefits of peer review (each median 9/10). Six centres (43%) reviewed at least 50% of curative cases; four of these centres (29%) conducted peer review in more than 80% of cases treated with curative intent. Fewer than 20% of cases treated with palliative intent were reviewed in most centres. Five centres (36%) reported usually conducting peer review prior to the initiation of treatment. Five centres (36%) recorded the outcomes of peer review on the medical record. Thirteen centres (93%) planned to expand peer-review activities; a critical mass of radiation oncologists was the most important limiting factor (median 6/10). Conclusions Radiation oncology peer-review practices can vary even within a cancer system with provincial oversight. The application of guidelines and standards for peer-review processes, and monitoring of implementation and outcomes, will require effective knowledge

  6. The effectiveness of a physical activity stimulation programme for children with cerebral palsy on social participation, self-perception and quality of life: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Van Wely, Leontien; Balemans, Astrid Cj; Becher, Jules G; Dallmeijer, Annet J

    2014-10-01

    To determine the effects of a six-month physical activity stimulation programme on social participation, self-perception and quality of life in children with cerebral palsy. Multicentre randomized controlled trial with concealed allocation, blinded assessments and intention-to-treat analysis. Paediatric physiotherapy practices, special schools for children with a disability, and the child's own home. Forty-nine children with spastic cerebral palsy (28 male), aged 7-13 years, able to walk with and without walking aids. The intervention group followed a six-month physical activity stimulation programme involving counselling through motivational interviewing, home-based physiotherapy and four months of fitness training. The control group continued regular paediatric physiotherapy. Outcomes included social participation in domestic life, social participation in recreation and leisure (Life-Habits for Children questionnaire and Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment questionnaire), self-perception (Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Children) and parent-reported quality of life (Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire). Assessments were performed at baseline, at six months (except quality of life) and at twelve months. Intervention resulted in a positive effect on social participation in domestic life at twelve months (mean between-group difference = 0.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.1 to 1.7 [1-10 scale], P = 0.03), but not at six months. No significant effects were found for social participation in recreation and leisure, self-perception at six months and twelve months or for quality of life at twelve months. The combination of counselling, home-based physiotherapy and fitness training was not effective in improving social participation in recreation and leisure, self-perception or quality of life, but did show a potential for improving social participation in domestic life over the longer term. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. PPARδ agonism induces a change in fuel metabolism and activation of an atrophy programme, but does not impair mitochondrial function in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Constantin, Despina; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Layfield, Robert; Tsintzas, Kostas; Bennett, Andrew J; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2007-01-01

    PPARα agonism impairs mitochondrial function, but the effect of PPARδ agonism on mitochondrial function is equivocal. Furthermore, PPARα and δ agonism increases muscle fatty acid oxidation, potentially via activation of FOXO1 signalling and PDK4 transcription. Since FOXO1 activation has also been suggested to increase transcription of MAFbx and MuRF-1, and thereby the activation of ubiquitin–proteasome mediated muscle proteolysis, this raises the possibility that muscle fuel selection and the induction of a muscle atrophy programme could be regulated by a single common signalling pathway. We therefore investigated the effect of PPARδ (delta) agonist, GW610742, administration on muscle mitochondrial function, fuel regulation, and atrophy and growth related signalling pathways in vivo. Twenty-four male Wistar rats received vehicle or GW610742 (5 and 100 mg per kg body mass (bm)) orally for 6 days. Soleus muscle was used to determine maximal rates of ATP production (MRATP) in isolated mitochondria, gene and protein expression, and enzyme activities. MRATP were unchanged by GW610742. Muscle PDK2 and PDK4 mRNA expression increased with GW610742 (100 mg (kg bm)−1) compared to vehicle (P < 0.05), and was paralleled by a twofold increase in PDK4 protein expression (P < 0.05). The activity of β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase increased with GW610742 (P < 0.05). Muscle MuRF1 and MAFbx mRNA expression was increased by GW610742 (100 mg (kg bm)−1) compared to vehicle (P < 0.05), and was matched by increased protein expression (P < 0.001), whilst Akt1 protein declined (P < 0.05). There was no effect of GW610742 on 20S proteasome activity and mRNA expression, or the muscle DNA: protein ratio. GW610742 switched muscle fuel metabolism towards decreased carbohydrate use and enhanced lipid utilization, but did not induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, GW610742 initiated a muscle atrophy programme, possibly via changes in the Akt1/FOXO/MAFbx and MuRF1 signalling

  8. Improving the outcome of established therapies for osteoporosis by adding the active D-hormone analog alfacalcidol.

    PubMed

    Ringe, J D; Schacht, E

    2007-12-01

    While in other chronic diseases combined treatment regimens are the rule there is a lack of reported experience or study data on combining different specific drugs to treat osteoporosis. Significant differences in the mode of action (MOA) of the substances to be combined may be important for achieving optimal therapeutic results. Recognising that today bisphosphonates are the leading therapy for osteoporosis we suggest that the active D-hormone analog alfacalcidol with its completely different mechanisms of action could be an interesting combination to improve the therapeutic outcome of the pure antiresoptive action of bisphosphonates. Alfacalcidol is activated by the enzyme 25-hydroxylase in the liver for systemic and in osteoblasts for local D-hormone actions. It possesses a unique pattern of pleiotropic effects on, e.g. gut, bone, pararthyroids, muscle and brain. Alfacalcidol is superior to plain vitamin D (cholecalciferol) because the final kidney activation of the latter is regulated by a negative feedback mechanism. In vitamin D replete patients or patients with impaired kidney function no increased D-hormone action at the target tissues can be achieved. Animal studies and several trials in humans with alendronate plus calcitriol or alfacalcidol proved that the combination induced significantly higher increases of bone mineral density (BMD) than the respective mono-therapies. The results of the 2-year AAC-trial from our group indicate that the combination alendronate and alfacalcidol is also superior in terms of falls, fractures and back pain. From the review of the literature and the own new results we conclude that this combined therapeutic regimen is a very promising option for treating established osteoporosis and propose a differentiated use of alfacalcidol alone or the combination with alendronate in different stages and clinical situations of osteoporosis.

  9. [New challenge for social activities in the Japanese Society of Child Neurology--establishment of Social Activity and Public Relations Committee: introductory remarks].

    PubMed

    Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Konishi, Yukuo

    2004-05-01

    The Japanese Society of Child Neurology newly established Social Activity and Public Relations Committee for the purpose of flexible response to the social event publicity. The committee consists of more than 36 members and is divided into the following sub-committees: Sub-committee 1 is intended to support the management and care of patients with developmental disabilities from infancy to adolescence, Sub-committee 2 devoted to the acquisition of research grants and the communication of basic scientific research, and Sub-committee 3 to coordinate and support medical-educational relationship. These three sub-committees achieved many of their goals during their stated first year of existence.

  10. An Example of Continuous Information on the Basic Activities of a University. Programme on Institutional Management in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jadot, Jean

    The dangers in abstract management within the university setting are described and considered in terms of the development of techniques that would enable the university to fully comprehend the content of its activities. The "Report on Unit Activities" at the Catholic University of Louvain is reviewed, dealing with the two-yearly…

  11. Role Models of Australian Female Adolescents: A Longitudinal Study to Inform Programmes Designed to Increase Physical Activity and Sport Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Janet A.; Symons, Caroline M.; Pain, Michelle D.; Harvey, Jack T.; Eime, Rochelle M.; Craike, Melinda J.; Payne, Warren R.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the importance attributed to the presence of positive role models in promoting physical activity during adolescence, this study examined role models of adolescent girls and their influence on physical activity. Seven hundred and thirty two girls in Years 7 and 11 from metropolitan and non-metropolitan regions of Victoria, Australia,…

  12. Impact of an Extra-Curricular School Sport Programme on Determinants of Objectively Measured Physical Activity among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubans, David; Morgan, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify potential determinants of objectively measured physical activity in the "Learning to Enjoy Activity with Friends" (LEAF) study. Design: This study involved a quasi-experimental design and students (N = 116) were assigned to an intervention group (n = 50) or a comparison group (n = 66)…

  13. A Mixed-Methods Evaluation of the "Move It Move It!" Before-School Incentive-Based Physical Activity Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnett, Bernice R.; Becker, Kelly; Vierling, Danielle; Gleason, Cara; DiCenzo, Danielle; Mongeon, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Less than half of young people in the USA are meeting the daily physical activity requirements of at least 60 minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity. A mixed-methods pilot feasibility assessment of "Move it Move it!" was conducted in the Spring of 2014 to assess the impact of a before-school physical activity…

  14. A Mixed-Methods Evaluation of the "Move It Move It!" Before-School Incentive-Based Physical Activity Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnett, Bernice R.; Becker, Kelly; Vierling, Danielle; Gleason, Cara; DiCenzo, Danielle; Mongeon, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Less than half of young people in the USA are meeting the daily physical activity requirements of at least 60 minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity. A mixed-methods pilot feasibility assessment of "Move it Move it!" was conducted in the Spring of 2014 to assess the impact of a before-school physical activity…

  15. Role Models of Australian Female Adolescents: A Longitudinal Study to Inform Programmes Designed to Increase Physical Activity and Sport Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Janet A.; Symons, Caroline M.; Pain, Michelle D.; Harvey, Jack T.; Eime, Rochelle M.; Craike, Melinda J.; Payne, Warren R.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the importance attributed to the presence of positive role models in promoting physical activity during adolescence, this study examined role models of adolescent girls and their influence on physical activity. Seven hundred and thirty two girls in Years 7 and 11 from metropolitan and non-metropolitan regions of Victoria, Australia,…

  16. Evaluation of a school-based intervention programme to promote physical activity: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos

    2005-12-01

    The Theory of Planned Behavior provides a useful framework to study attitudes toward participation in physical activity. The objective of the study was to test the effectiveness of an intervention in manipulating the variables of the Theory of Planned Behavior and exercise habits with 366 high school students (M = 14.2 yr., SD = .7; 201 boys and 165 girls). The students were divided into intervention and control groups. A questionnaire to measure components of the theory, and the Baecke Questionnaire of Habitual Activity measuring exercise habits, were administered. The intervention lasted 12 wk. and included posters and lectures promoting participation in physical activity. Analyses showed the intervention was effective in improving attitudes towards physical activity, perceived behavioral control, intention, and self-reported actual behavior, but it was ineffective for improving attitude strength, subjective norms, and role identity. The results provide useful information for physical education teachers interested in promoting students' positive attitudes towards physical activity.

  17. The impact of a bodyweight and physical activity intervention (BeWEL) initiated through a national colorectal cancer screening programme: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Annie S; Craigie, Angela M; Caswell, Stephen; Treweek, Shaun; Stead, Martine; Macleod, Maureen; Daly, Fergus; Belch, Jill; Rodger, Jackie; Kirk, Alison; Ludbrook, Anne; Rauchhaus, Petra; Norwood, Patricia; Thompson, Joyce; Wardle, Jane; Steele, Robert J C

    2014-03-07

    To evaluate the impact of a diet and physical activity intervention (BeWEL) on weight change in people with a body mass index >25 weight (kg)/height (m)(2) at increased risk of colorectal cancer and other obesity related comorbidities. Multicentre, parallel group, randomised controlled trial. Four Scottish National Health Service health boards. 329 overweight or obese adults (aged 50 to 74 years) who had undergone colonoscopy after a positive faecal occult blood test result, as part of the national bowel screening programme, and had a diagnosis of adenoma confirmed by histopathology. 163 were randomised to intervention and 166 to control. Participants were randomised to a control group (weight loss booklet only) or 12 month intervention group (three face to face visits with a lifestyle counsellor plus monthly 15 minute telephone calls). A goal of 7% reduction in body weight was set and participants received a personalised energy prescription (2508 kJ (600 kcal) below that required for weight maintenance) and bodyweight scales. Motivational interviewing techniques explored self assessed confidence, ambivalence, and personal values concerning weight. Behavioural strategies included goal setting, identifying intentions of implementation, self monitoring of body weight, and counsellor feedback about reported diet, physical activity, and weight change. The primary outcome was weight change over 12 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting cardiovascular biomarkers, and glucose metabolism variables, physical activity, diet, and alcohol consumption. At 12 months, data on the primary outcome were available for 148 (91%) participants in the intervention group and 157 (95%) in the control group. Mean weight loss was 3.50 kg (SD 4.91) (95% confidence interval 2.70 to 4.30) in the intervention group compared with 0.78 kg (SD 3.77) (0.19 to 1.38) in the control group. The group difference was 2.69 kg (95% confidence interval 1

  18. The impact of a bodyweight and physical activity intervention (BeWEL) initiated through a national colorectal cancer screening programme: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Craigie, Angela M; Caswell, Stephen; Treweek, Shaun; Stead, Martine; Macleod, Maureen; Daly, Fergus; Belch, Jill; Rodger, Jackie; Kirk, Alison; Ludbrook, Anne; Rauchhaus, Petra; Norwood, Patricia; Thompson, Joyce; Wardle, Jane; Steele, Robert J C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a diet and physical activity intervention (BeWEL) on weight change in people with a body mass index >25 weight (kg)/height (m)2 at increased risk of colorectal cancer and other obesity related comorbidities. Design Multicentre, parallel group, randomised controlled trial. Setting Four Scottish National Health Service health boards. Participants 329 overweight or obese adults (aged 50 to 74 years) who had undergone colonoscopy after a positive faecal occult blood test result, as part of the national bowel screening programme, and had a diagnosis of adenoma confirmed by histopathology. 163 were randomised to intervention and 166 to control. Intervention Participants were randomised to a control group (weight loss booklet only) or 12 month intervention group (three face to face visits with a lifestyle counsellor plus monthly 15 minute telephone calls). A goal of 7% reduction in body weight was set and participants received a personalised energy prescription (2508 kJ (600 kcal) below that required for weight maintenance) and bodyweight scales. Motivational interviewing techniques explored self assessed confidence, ambivalence, and personal values concerning weight. Behavioural strategies included goal setting, identifying intentions of implementation, self monitoring of body weight, and counsellor feedback about reported diet, physical activity, and weight change. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was weight change over 12 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting cardiovascular biomarkers, and glucose metabolism variables, physical activity, diet, and alcohol consumption. Results At 12 months, data on the primary outcome were available for 148 (91%) participants in the intervention group and 157 (95%) in the control group. Mean weight loss was 3.50 kg (SD 4.91) (95% confidence interval 2.70 to 4.30) in the intervention group compared with 0.78 kg (SD 3.77) (0.19 to 1.38) in

  19. Why some do but most don't. Barriers and enablers to engaging low-income groups in physical activity programmes: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The beneficial effect of physical activity for the prevention of a range of chronic diseases is widely acknowledged. These chronic conditions are most pronounced in economically disadvantaged groups where physical activity levels are consistently lower, yet this group is particularly difficult to recruit and retain in physical activity programmes. This study examined the perceptions of participants, non-participants, and exercise leaders in a low-income area regarding barriers, motives, and enabling factors for organised physical activity with a view to improving recruitment and retention. Methods A mixed methods research approach was adopted to guide data collection and analysis. A survey, incorporating the Motivation for Physical Activity Measure - Revised (MPAM-R), was used to assess the motivations of 152 physical activity session participants in a highly deprived suburban neighbourhood. The MPAM-R data were analysed using t tests, analyses of variance to estimate age, body mass index, and activity mode differences and Pearson's correlation coefficient to address associations. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted with 33 local residents who did not participate in activity sessions and with 14 activity session leaders. All interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using an inductive thematic approach. Results Participants reported cost, childcare, lack of time and low awareness as barriers to joining activity classes. The need for support, confidence and competence in order to take up activity was widely expressed, particularly among women. Once people are active, high levels of social interaction, interest and enjoyment are associated with improved levels of retention, with different types of physical activity scoring differently on these factors. Conclusions This study suggests that some factors such as cost, the fear of 'walking in alone', accessibility of facilities, and appropriate communication strategies may be of

  20. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency

  1. Equivalency Programmes (EPs) for Promoting Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Caroline, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Equivalency programmes (EPs) refers to alternative education programmes that are equivalent to the formal education system in terms of curriculum and certification, policy support mechanisms, mode of delivery, staff training, and other support activities such as monitoring, evaluation and assessment. The development of EPs is potentially an…

  2. Influences of establishment and maintenance of territory on reproductive activity in the male dwarf gourami Colisa lalia.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Youichi; Kobayashi, Makito

    2012-03-01

    We examined the importance of establishment and maintenance of territory on reproductive activity in the male dwarf gourami, Colisa lalia. After three males had been forced to fight for territory (five sets) for three weeks, social status was divided into three classes: the territorially dominant male, which guarded the territory under the floating nest; the second male which remained near the nest and occasionally attacked the dominant male; and the third male which was non-aggressive and remained at a distance from the other two males. Comparing testicular size by gonadosomatic indices (GSI) after three weeks of aggression, GSI of the dominant male (1.19 ± 0.07) was significantly larger than that of the second (0.81 ± 0.15) and the third (0.62 ± 0.08) males, as well as the initial control (not involved in any experiments: 0.85 ± 0.10, n = 5), indicating that the testes of the dominant males enlarge during territory defense. Histological observations of testes revealed that sperm production in the dominant males was more active compared to males of other classes, although spermatogenesis was confirmed in all males examined, suggesting that dominance accelerates sperm production. Social-status dependent development of testes suggests an absence of sperm competition due to the lack of sneaking by subordinate males. Since non-territorial males do not engage in alternative tactics (e.g., sneaking) leading to emission of semen, male C. lalia must obtain and defend territory if they are to increase their reproductive success.

  3. Leishmania donovani activates SREBP2 to modulate macrophage membrane cholesterol and mitochondrial oxidants for establishment of infection.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Madhuchhanda; Basu Ball, Writoban; Das, Pijush K

    2014-10-01

    Establishment of infection by an intracellular pathogen depends on successful internalization with a concomitant neutralization of host defense machinery. Leishmania donovani, an intramacrophage pathogen, targets host SREBP2, a critical transcription factor, to regulate macrophage plasma membrane cholesterol and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, favoring parasite invasion and persistence. Leishmania infection triggered membrane-raft reorientation-dependent Lyn-PI3K/Akt pathway activation which in turn deactivated GSK3β to stabilize nuclear SREBP2. Moreover, cells perceiving less available intracellular cholesterol due to its sequestration at the plasma membrane resulted in the deregulation of the ER-residing SCAP-SREBP2-Insig circuit thereby assisting increased nuclear translocation of SREBP2. Both increased nuclear transport and stabilization of SREBP2 caused HMGCR-catalyzed cholesterol biosynthesis-mediated plasma membrane cholesterol enrichment leading to decreased membrane-fluidity and plausibly assisting delay in phagosomal acidification. Parasite survival ensuing entry was further ensured by SREBP2-dependent transcriptional up-regulation of UCP2, which suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation, one of the primary microbicidal molecules in macrophages recognized for its efficacy against Leishmania. Functional knock-down of SREBP2 both in vitro and in vivo was associated with reduction in macrophage plasma membrane cholesterol, increased ROS production and lower parasite survival. To our knowledge, this study, for the first time, reveals that Leishmania exploits macrophage cholesterol-dependent SREBP2 circuit to facilitate its entry and survival within the host.

  4. The challenge and impact of engaging hard-to-reach populations in regular physical activity and health behaviours: an examination of an English Premier League 'Football in the Community' men's health programme.

    PubMed

    Curran, K; Drust, B; Murphy, R; Pringle, A; Richardson, D

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the challenges that men from hard-to-reach (HTR) populations encounter when attempting to commit to regular participation in physical activity and health behaviours, and to explore the psychological and social effects of participation in a twelve week football-led health improvement intervention. A twelve week football specific physical activity intervention targeting men from HTR populations was delivered by Everton Football Clubs' Football in the Community (FitC) scheme as part of a national programme of men's health delivered in/by English Premier League (EPL) football clubs. Men living in homeless shelters and/or recovering from substance misuse were recruited over a period of three months. The programme consisted of a two hour football session, twice weekly, alongside the dissemination of healthy living messages. Football sessions were conducted by a qualified FitC coach. This research was conducted during a twelve week period of immersed practitioner-research. Ethnographic and observational methodologies were adopted. Psychosocial issues were discussed with participants through informal client-researcher interactions and data were logged via field notes. Records of attendance were logged. Participants who failed to attend a session were contacted and their reason(s) for non-attendance were recorded. Data were analysed using deductive and inductive reasoning. Despite the apparent ambition of the participants to regularly participate in the FitC programme, adherence to the programme was poor. Economic, environmental and social barriers to engagement in the programme were apparent. Engagement in the programme resulted in positive psychosocial developments; the development of structure, social interaction and social capital. Community based football-led health improvement programmes endorsed by professional football clubs appear well positioned to connect with, and attract, men from HTR populations. The evidence suggests that such programmes can

  5. Community-based physical activity and nutrition programme for adults with metabolic syndrome in Vietnam: study protocol for a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Van Dinh; Lee, Andy H; Jancey, Jonine; James, Anthony P; Howat, Peter; Thi Phuong Mai, Le

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and type II diabetes. In Vietnam, more than one-quarter of its population aged 50–65 have MetS. This cluster-randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase levels of physical activity and improve dietary behaviours among Vietnamese adults aged 50–65 years with MetS. Method and analysis This 6-month community-based intervention includes a range of strategies to improve physical activity and nutrition for adults with MetS in Hanam, a province located in northern Vietnam. 600 participants will be recruited from 6 communes with 100 participants per commune. The 6 selected communes will be randomly allocated to either an intervention group (m=3; n=300) or a control group (m=3; n=300). The intervention comprises booklets, education sessions, resistance bands and attending local walking groups that provide information and encourage participants to improve their physical activity and healthy eating behaviours during the 6-month period. The control group participants will receive standard and 1-time advice. Social cognitive theory is the theoretical concept underpinning this study. Measurements will be taken at baseline and postintervention to evaluate programme effectiveness. Ethics and dissemination The research protocol was approved by the Curtin University Human Research Ethics Committee (approval number: HR139/2014). The results of the study will be disseminated through publications, reports and conference presentations. Trial registration number ACTRN12614000811606. PMID:27256094

  6. Twelve tips for running teaching programmes for newly qualified doctors.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Deborah; Baker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    A teaching programme for newly qualified doctors is necessary for their continuing professional development and education. However, guidelines for the logistics and content of such teaching programmes are limited. These 12 tips provide advice and guidance for the creation and development of a successful programme. This article is intended for readers who are involved in teaching; programme directors, administrators, tutors and trainee doctors themselves. The principles included will also be useful for those involved in developing other types of teaching programmes. Engagement of trainees, the education department and other staff in the hospital is crucial for the success of teaching programmes. A culture of attendance and feedback may take time and effort to establish but is absolutely essential for long-term programme viability. Innovative approaches to teaching, a range of teaching staff and coverage of varied clinical and non-clinical topics, all contribute to a strong programme.

  7. Responding To Changes in the Decommissioning Plans for Demolition of a Former Active Handling Building at The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Establishment Winfrith

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.; Parkinson, S.J.; Cornell, R.M.; Staples, A.T.

    2006-07-01

    The full decommissioning of the former Active Handling Building A59 at Winfrith in Dorset is being carried out by RWE NUKEM Limited under contract from the site owners and nuclear site licence holder, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA). Following recent government changes, the United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) has now set up contracts with UKAEA for delivery of the site clean-up programme. The building contains two heavily shielded suites of caves originally used to carry out remote examination of irradiated nuclear fuel elements together with other supporting facilities. The original intention was to demolish the caves ahead of the building but after detailed consideration it was concluded that demolition of the building in advance of the caves was more operationally effective. As a result, the original decommissioning plan had to be reworked to reflect these changes. The paper briefly explains how this situation arose and the means by which the problems experienced were overcome by a complete revision to the decommissioning programme. The updated plan has been adopted by UKAEA and work is now proceeding apace to clear the building of redundant items, to complete decontamination of all remaining areas and facilities and to carry out detailed radiological surveys to confirm that the building structure is clean and ready for demolition. Both cave lines have been completely decontaminated to low residual levels of activity and are essentially ready for controlled demolition. This paper describes some of the significant tasks undertaken during the past year with particular reference to the decommissioning techniques that gave the greatest success and the limitations of others originally considered. Some of these processes were aimed at minimising the volume of low level waste (LLW) generated by using standard off-the-shelf equipment to remove contamination from {approx}5 Ton concrete blocks recovered from both cave line structures. A

  8. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel

  9. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the

  10. Uptake of Space Technologies - An Educational Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacai, Hina; Zolotikova, Svetlana; Young, Mandy; Cowsill, Rhys; Wells, Alan; Monks, Paul; Archibald, Alexandra; Smith, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Earth Observation data and remote sensing technologies have been maturing into useful tools that can be utilised by local authorities and businesses to aid in activates such as monitoring climate change trends and managing agricultural land and water uses. The European Earth observation programme Copernicus, previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security), provides the means to collect and process multi-source EO and environmental data that supports policy developments at the European level. At the regional and local level, the Copernicus programme has been initiated through Regional Contact Office (RCO), which provide knowledge, training, and access to expertise both locally and at a European level through the network of RCOs established across Europe in the DORIS_Net (Downstream Observatory organised by Regions active In Space - Network) project (Grant Agreement No. 262789 Coordination and support action (Coordinating) FP7 SPA.2010.1.1-07 "Fostering downstream activities and links with regions"). In the East Midlands UK RCO, educational and training workshops and modules have been organised to highlight the wider range of tools and application available to businesses and local authorities in the region. Engagement with businesses and LRA highlighted the need to have a tiered system of training to build awareness prior to investigating innovative solutions and space technology uses for societal benefits. In this paper we outline education and training programmes which have been developed at G-STEP (GMES - Science and Technology Education Partnership), University of Leicester, UK to open up the Copernicus programme through the Regional Contact Office to downstream users such as local businesses and LRAs. Innovative methods to introduce the operational uses of Space technologies in real cases through e-learning modules and web-based tools will be described and examples of good practice for educational training in these sectors will be

  11. Effect of pilates mat exercises and conventional exercise programmes on transversus abdominis and obliquus internus abdominis activity: pilot randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Duncan J; Pierson, Zoe; Battersby, Gemma

    2011-04-01

    Pilates training is said to increase Transversus abdominis (TrA) and Obliquus internus (OI) activation during exercise and functional activities. 34 Pain-free health club members with no Pilates experience, mean (SD) age 30(7) years, were randomised to Pilates mat exercises or strength training. Participants exercised unsupervised twice-weekly for eight weeks. TrA and OI thickness (a proxy for muscle activity at the low-medium efforts of our exercises) were measured with ultrasound pre- and post-training during Pilates exercises 'Imprint' (an abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre) and 'Hundreds A' (lying supine, arms slightly raised, hips and knees flexed to 90°) and 'Hundreds B' (as A, with neck flexion) and functional postures sitting and standing. Pilates participants had increased TrA thickness in Hundreds A [all values mean (SD) mm]: 3.7(1.3) pre-intervention, 4.7(1.1) post-intervention (P = 0.007); and decreased OI muscle thickness during Imprint: 11.7(2.8) pre-intervention, 10.8(3.5) post-intervention (P = 0.008). Strength training participants had greater OI thickness during Imprint (P = 0.014), Hundreds A (P = 0.018) and Hundreds B (P = 0.004) than Pilates participants post-intervention. There were no changes in muscle thickness at rest or during functional postures. Pilates training appears to increase TrA activity but only when performing Pilates exercises. Further research is required into Pilates in clinical populations and how to increase deep abdominal activation during functional activities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of a male-only weight loss maintenance programme on social-cognitive determinants of physical activity and healthy eating: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Young, Myles D; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Collins, Clare E; Callister, Robin; Morgan, Philip J

    2015-11-01

    To examine the effect of a gender-tailored, Social Cognitive Theory (SCT)-based weight loss maintenance (WLM) intervention on men's physical activity and healthy eating cognitions and behaviours in the 12 months after completing a weight loss programme. A two-phase, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Ninety-two overweight/obese men (mean [SD] age: 49.2 years [10.1], BMI: 30.7 [3.3] kg/m(2) ) who lost at least 4 kg after completing the 3-month SCT-based SHED-IT Weight Loss Program were randomly allocated to receive (1) the SCT-based SHED-IT WLM Program; or (2) no additional resources (self-help control group). The 6-month gender-tailored SHED-IT WLM Program was completely self-administered and operationalized SCT behaviour change principles to assist men to increase moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and decrease energy-dense, nutrient-poor (discretionary) food consumption after initial weight loss. After randomization (WLM baseline), men were reassessed at 6 months (WLM post-test) and 12 months (6-month WLM follow-up). SCT cognitions (e.g., self-efficacy, goal setting), MVPA, and discretionary food consumption were assessed with validated measures. Following significant improvements in cognitions, MVPA and discretionary food consumption during the weight loss phase, intention-to-treat, linear mixed models revealed no significant group-by-time differences in cognitions or behaviours during the WLM phase. Initial improvements in MVPA and some cognitions (e.g., goal setting, planning, and social support) were largely maintained by both groups at the end of the study. Dietary effects were not as strongly maintained, with the intervention and control groups maintaining 57% and 75% of the Phase I improvements in discretionary food intake, respectively. An additional SCT-based WLM programme did not elicit further improvements over a self-help control in the cognitions or behaviours for MVPA or discretionary food intake of men who had lost weight

  13. Impact of a school-based intervention on nutritional education and physical activity in primary public schools in Chile (KIND) programme study protocol: cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Nelly; Olivares, Sonia; Leyton, Bárbara; Cano, Marcelo; Albala, Cecilia

    2016-12-03

    Chile has suffered a fast increase in childhood obesity in the last 10 years. As a result, several school programmes have been implemented, however the effectiveness of these needs to be evaluated to identify and prioritize strategies to curve this trend. Cluster randomized controlled trial. Twelve primary public schools chosen at random over three regions of the country will take part in this study. The sample size consisted of a total of 1,655 children. For each region one school will be selected for each of the three nutritional intervention modes and one school will be selected as the control group. The intervention modes consist of the following: Healthy Kiosk and nutritional education (KSEAN); Optimized physical activity (AFSO); Healthy Kiosk and nutritional education (KSEAN) + optimized physical activity (AFSO); Control group. The effectiveness of each intervention will be evaluated by determining the nutritional condition of each child by measuring percentage of body fat, BMI and the z-score of the BMI. This study will also identify the eating behaviours, nutritional knowledge and fitness of each child, along with the effective time of moderate activity during physical education classes. A protocol to evaluate the effectiveness of a school based intervention to control and/or reduce the rates of childhood obesity for children between 6 and 10 years of age was developed. The protocol was developed in line with the Declaration of Helsinski, the Nüremberg Code and the University of Chile Guidelines for ethical committees, and was approved by the INTA, Universidad de Chile ethical committee on Wednesday 12 March 2014. There is consensus among researchers and health and education personnel that schools are a favourable environment for actions to prevent and/or control childhood obesity. However a lack of evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to date has led some to question the wisdom of allocating resources to programmes. This is the first study

  14. Attitudes and Examination Performance of Female and Male Medical Students in an Active, Case-Based Learning Programme in Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peplow, Philip

    1998-01-01

    An active, case-based project (CBP) learning program in anatomy was evaluated to measure differences between male and female students in perception of the initial discussion sessions as developing deep learning skills, and also in performance on CBP and essay components of the written examination. Females responded more positively to discussion…

  15. Contribution of space platforms to a ground and airborne remote-sensing programme over active Italian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassinis, R.; Lechi, G. M.; Tonelli, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 imagery of the volcanic areas of southern Italy was used primarily for the evaluation of space platform capabilties in the domains of regional geology, soil and rock-type classification and, more generally, to study the environment of active volcanoes. The test sites were selected and equipped primarily to monitor thermal emission, but ground truth data was also collected in other domains (reflectance of rocks, soils and vegetation). The test areas were overflown with a two channel thermal scanner, while a thermo camera was used on the ground to monitor the hot spots. The primary goal of this survey was to plot the changes in thermal emission with time in the framework of a research program for the surveillance of active volcanoes. However, another task was an evaluation of emissivity changes by comparing the outputs of the two thermal channels. These results were compared with the reflectance changes observed on multispectral ERTS-1 imagery.

  16. Contribution of space platforms to a ground and airborne remote-sensing programme over active Italian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassinis, R.; Lechi, G. M.; Tonelli, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 imagery of the volcanic areas of southern Italy was used primarily for the evaluation of space platform capabilties in the domains of regional geology, soil and rock-type classification and, more generally, to study the environment of active volcanoes. The test sites were selected and equipped primarily to monitor thermal emission, but ground truth data was also collected in other domains (reflectance of rocks, soils and vegetation). The test areas were overflown with a two channel thermal scanner, while a thermo camera was used on the ground to monitor the hot spots. The primary goal of this survey was to plot the changes in thermal emission with time in the framework of a research program for the surveillance of active volcanoes. However, another task was an evaluation of emissivity changes by comparing the outputs of the two thermal channels. These results were compared with the reflectance changes observed on multispectral ERTS-1 imagery.

  17. Physical Activity and Quality of Life in Severely Obese Adults during a Two-Year Lifestyle Intervention Programme

    PubMed Central

    Kolotkin, Ronette L.; Natvig, Gerd Karin

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown how changes in physical activity may affect changes in quality of life (QoL) outcomes during lifestyle interventions for severely obese adults. The purpose of this study was to examine associations in the patterns of change between objectively assessed physical activity as the independent variable and physical, mental, and obesity-specific QoL and life satisfaction as the dependent variables during a two-year lifestyle intervention. Forty-nine severely obese adults (37 women; 43.6 ± 9.4 years; body mass index 42.1 ± 6.0 kg/m2) participated in the study. Assessments were conducted four times using Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), Obesity-Related Problems (OP) scale, a single item on life satisfaction, and accelerometers. The physical component summary (PCS) score and the mental component summary (MCS) score were used as SF-36 outcomes. Associations were determined using linear regression analyses and reported as standardized coefficients (stand. coeff.). Change in physical activity was independently associated with change in PCS (stand. coeff. = 0.35, P = .033), MCS (stand. coeff. = 0.51, P = .001), OP (stand. coeff. = −0.31,  P = .018), and life satisfaction (stand. coeff. = 0.39, P = .004) after adjustment for gender, age, and change in body mass index. PMID:25653871

  18. GCS programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Douglas S.; Withers, B. Edward; Shagnea, Anita M.; Dent, Leslie A.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of instructions to be used in the development of implementations of software for the Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project is described. This document fulfills the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics RTCA/DO-178A guidelines, 'Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification' requirements for document No. 4, which specifies the information necessary for understanding and programming the host computer, and document No. 12, which specifies the software design and implementation standards that are applicable to the software development and testing process. Information on the following subjects is contained: activity recording, communication protocol, coding standards, change management, error handling, design standards, problem reporting, module testing logs, documentation formats, accuracy requirements, and programmer responsibilities.

  19. The first nurse practitioner graduate programme in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Miyauchi, S; Tonai, M; Ono, M; Magilvy, J K; Murashima, S

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the establishment of the first Japanese nurse practitioner graduate programme and legislative activities to institutionalize nurse practitioners in Japan. To address the super-ageing population, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences initiated the first academic graduate level nurse practitioner programme in Japan, based upon the global standard defined by the International Council of Nurses. In 2010, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences graduated the first nurse practitioner. We believe that nurse practitioners will be highly valued in Japan for thoughtful nursing care to the fragile elders living in rural and urban Japan. © 2014 The Authors. International Nursing Review published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Council of Nurses.

  20. Factors affecting 210Po and 210Pb activity concentrations in mussels and implications for environmental bio-monitoring programmes.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fernando P; Oliveira, João M; Alberto, G

    2011-02-01

    The activity of (210)Po and (210)Pb was determined in mussels of the same size (3.5-4.0 cm shell length) sampled monthly over a 17-month period at the Atlantic coast of Portugal. Average radionuclide concentration values in mussels were 759±277 Bq kg(-1) for (210)Po (range 460-1470 Bq kg(-1) dry weight), and 45±19 Bq kg(-1) for (210)Pb (range 23-96 Bq kg(-1) dry weight). Environmental parameters and mussel biometric parameters were monitored during the same period. Although there was no seasonal variation of radionuclide concentrations in sea water during the study period, the concentration of radionuclide activity in mussels varied seasonally displaying peaks of high concentrations in winter and low concentrations in summer. Analysis of radionuclide data in relation to the physiological Condition Index of mussels revealed that (210)Po and (210)Pb activities in the mussel (average activity per individual) remained nearly constant during the investigation period, while mussel body weight fluctuated due to fat storage/expenditure in the soft tissues. Similar variation of radionuclide concentrations was observed in mussels transplanted from the sea coast into the Tejo Estuary. However, under estuarine environmental conditions and with higher food availability throughout the year, transplanted mussel Condition Index was higher than in coastal mussels and average radionuclide concentrations were 210±75 Bq kg(-1) (dry weight) for (210)Po and 10±4 Bq kg(-1) (dry weight) for (210)Pb, therefore lower than in coastal mussels with similar shell length. It is concluded that the apparent seasonal fluctuation and inter-site difference of radionuclide concentrations were mostly caused by mussel body weight fluctuation and not by radionuclide body burden fluctuation. This interpretation can be extended to the apparent seasonal fluctuation in concentrations of lipophilic and lipophobic contaminants in mussels, and provides an explanation for occasional high concentrations of

  1. Dotting the Three I's for collaborative TB-HIV activities: evaluation of a pilot programme in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Sah, S K; Sahu, S K; Lamichhane, B; Bhatta, G K; Bhandari, K B; Owiti, P; Majumdar, S S

    2016-09-01

    Setting: The three government tertiary care hospitals providing care for people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) in Kathmandu, Nepal. Objectives: To assess 1) the screening cascades for intensified case finding for tuberculosis (TB), 2) isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), including demographic and clinical factors associated with treatment interruption, and 3) TB infection control (IC) in the health facilities. Design: A cross-sectional study of new PLHIV enrolled from January 2012 to December 2014. Results: Among 572 registered PLHIV, 91% were on antiretroviral therapy. Of those registered, 561 (98%) were screened for TB and 73 (13%) were diagnosed with TB (17 [25%] sputum smear-positive, 17 [25%] smear-negative and 35 [51%] extra-pulmonary). Among the 488 (87%) PLHIV without active TB, 157 (32%) were initiated on IPT, of whom 136 (87%) completed treatment and 17 (11%) interrupted treatment. Those who experienced adverse events were 12 times more likely to interrupt IPT. TB IC showed gaps in personal control measures and supporting structures and policies. Conclusion: The implementation of the Three I's for collaborative TB-HIV activities in pilot sites in Nepal was successful and should be scaled up.

  2. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2

  3. Critical interactions between Global Fund-supported programmes and health systems: a case study in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Warakamin, Busaba; Coker, Richard

    2010-11-01

    As part of a series of case studies on the interactions between programmes supported by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and health systems, we assessed the extent of integration of national HIV, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria programmes with the general health system, the integration of the Global Fund-portfolios within the national disease programmes, and system-wide effects on the health system in Thailand. The study relied on a literature review and 34 interviews with key stakeholders using the Systemic Rapid Assessment Toolkit and thematic analysis. In Thailand, the HIV, TB and malaria programmes' structures and functions are well established in the general health care system, with the Department for Disease Control and the Ministry of Public Health's network of health providers at sub-national levels as the main responsible organizations for stewardship and governance, service delivery, monitoring and evaluation, planning, and to some extent, demand generation. Civil society groups are active in certain areas, particularly in demand generation for HIV/AIDS. Overall, the Global Fund-supported programmes were almost fully integrated and coordinated with the general health system. The extent of integration varied across disease portfolios because of different number of actors and the nature of programme activities. There were also specific requirements by Global Fund that limit integration for some health system functions namely financing and monitoring and evaluation. From the view of stakeholders in Thailand, the Global Fund has contributed significantly to the three diseases, particularly HIV/AIDS. Financial support from the early Global Fund rounds was particularly helpful to the disease programmes during the time of major structural change in the MoPH. It also promoted collaborative networks of stakeholders, especially civil societies. However, the impacts on the overall health system, which is relatively well developed, are seen as

  4. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many

  5. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being

  6. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period

  7. Drosophila Grainyhead specifies late programmes of neural proliferation by regulating the mitotic activity and Hox-dependent apoptosis of neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cenci, Caterina; Gould, Alex P

    2005-09-01

    The Drosophila central nervous system is generated by stem-cell-like progenitors called neuroblasts. Early in development, neuroblasts switch through a temporal series of transcription factors modulating neuronal fate according to the time of birth. At later stages, it is known that neuroblasts switch on expression of Grainyhead (Grh) and maintain it through many subsequent divisions. We report that the function of this conserved transcription factor is to specify the regionalised patterns of neurogenesis that are characteristic of postembryonic stages. In the thorax, Grh prolongs neural proliferation by maintaining a mitotically active neuroblast. In the abdomen, Grh terminates neural proliferation by regulating the competence of neuroblasts to undergo apoptosis in response to Abdominal-A expression. This study shows how a factor specific to late-stage neural progenitors can regulate the time at which neural proliferation stops, and identifies mechanisms linking it to the Hox axial patterning system.

  8. Positive affect as coercive strategy: conditionality, activation and the role of psychology in UK government workfare programmes.

    PubMed

    Friedli, Lynne; Stearn, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Eligibility for social security benefits in many advanced economies is dependent on unemployed and underemployed people carrying out an expanding range of job search, training and work preparation activities, as well as mandatory unpaid labour (workfare). Increasingly, these activities include interventions intended to modify attitudes, beliefs and personality, notably through the imposition of positive affect. Labour on the self in order to achieve characteristics said to increase employability is now widely promoted. This work and the discourse on it are central to the experience of many claimants and contribute to the view that unemployment is evidence of both personal failure and psychological deficit. The use of psychology in the delivery of workfare functions to erase the experience and effects of social and economic inequalities, to construct a psychological ideal that links unemployment to psychological deficit, and so to authorise the extension of state-and state-contracted-surveillance to psychological characteristics. This paper describes the coercive and punitive nature of many psycho-policy interventions and considers the implications of psycho-policy for the disadvantaged and excluded populations who are its primary targets. We draw on personal testimonies of people experiencing workfare, policy analysis and social media records of campaigns opposed to workfare in order to explore the extent of psycho-compulsion in workfare. This is an area that has received little attention in the academic literature but that raises issues of ethics and professional accountability and challenges the field of medical humanities to reflect more critically on its relationship to psychology. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Positive affect as coercive strategy: conditionality, activation and the role of psychology in UK government workfare programmes

    PubMed Central

    Friedli, Lynne; Stearn, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Eligibility for social security benefits in many advanced economies is dependent on unemployed and underemployed people carrying out an expanding range of job search, training and work preparation activities, as well as mandatory unpaid labour (workfare). Increasingly, these activities include interventions intended to modify attitudes, beliefs and personality, notably through the imposition of positive affect. Labour on the self in order to achieve characteristics said to increase employability is now widely promoted. This work and the discourse on it are central to the experience of many claimants and contribute to the view that unemployment is evidence of both personal failure and psychological deficit. The use of psychology in the delivery of workfare functions to erase the experience and effects of social and economic inequalities, to construct a psychological ideal that links unemployment to psychological deficit, and so to authorise the extension of state—and state-contracted—surveillance to psychological characteristics. This paper describes the coercive and punitive nature of many psycho-policy interventions and considers the implications of psycho-policy for the disadvantaged and excluded populations who are its primary targets. We draw on personal testimonies of people experiencing workfare, policy analysis and social media records of campaigns opposed to workfare in order to explore the extent of psycho-compulsion in workfare. This is an area that has received little attention in the academic literature but that raises issues of ethics and professional accountability and challenges the field of medical humanities to reflect more critically on its relationship to psychology. PMID:26052120

  10. The Case for Programmable Calculators in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Norman J.

    1981-01-01

    Programmable calculators are useful tools in the classroom that are often overlooked. This report gives examples of problems and activities that can be brought within the scope of such calculators. (MP)

  11. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP

  12. A Randomised Control Trial of the Impact of a Computer-Based Activity Programme upon the Fitness of Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The poor levels of fitness in children with autism are prompting concern for the children's future health. This study looked to assess if a computer-based activity programme could improve fitness levels (as reflected in cardiopulmonary function) of these children, and achieve a reduction in their body mass index. In a randomised controlled trial, 50 children with autism (of which 33 were under the age of 11 years and 39 were boys) were allocated to an intervention group which encouraged them to use the Nintendo Wii and the software package “Mario and Sonics at the Olympics” in addition to their routine physical education classes. 50 children with autism (34 under the age of 11 years and 40 being boys) acted as controls. At the end of one year, analysis of the changes in scores using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) on the Eurofit fitness tests showed that the intervention group had made statistically significant improvement on all tests other than flexibility. These improvements were also significantly better than controls. This type of intervention appears to be an effective addition to standard fitness training in order to help children with autism improve their fitness levels. PMID:25400946

  13. Establishing operations

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Jack

    1993-01-01

    The first two books on behavior analysis (Skinner, 1938; Keller & Schoenfeld, 1950) had chapter-length coverage of motivation. The next generation of texts also had chapters on the topic, but by the late 1960s it was no longer being given much treatment in the behavior-analytic literature. The present failure to deal with the topic leaves a gap in our understanding of operant functional relations. A partial solution is to reintroduce the concept of the establishing operation, defined as an environmental event, operation, or stimulus condition that affects an organism by momentarily altering (a) the reinforcing effectiveness of other events and (b) the frequency of occurrence of that part of the organism's repertoire relevant to those events as consequences. Discriminative and motivative variables can be distinguished as follows: The former are related to the differential availability of an effective form of reinforcement given a particular type of behavior; the latter are related to the differential reinforcing effectiveness of environmental events. An important distinction can also be made between unconditioned establishing operations (UEOs), such as food deprivation and painful stimulation, and conditioned establishing operations (CEOs) that depend on the learning history of the organism. One type of CEO is a stimulus that has simply been paired with a UEO and as a result may take on some of the motivative properties of that UEO. The warning stimulus in avoidance procedures is another important type of CEO referred to as reflexive because it establishes its own termination as a form of reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has accomplished such termination. Another CEO is closely related to the concept of conditional conditioned reinforcement and is referred to as a transitive CEO, because it establishes some other stimulus as a form of effective reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has produced that other stimulus. The multiple control of human

  14. The BGAN extension programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Juan J.; Trachtman, Eyal; Richharia, Madhavendra

    2005-11-01

    Mobile satellite telecommunications systems have undergone an enormous evolution in the last decades, with the interest in having advanced telecommunications services available on demand, anywhere and at any time, leading to incredible advances. The demand for braodband data is therefore rapidly gathering pace, but current solutions are finding it increasingly difficult to combine large bandwidth with ubiquitous coverage, reliability and portability. The BGAN (Broadband Global Area Network) system, designed to operate with the Inmarsat-4 satellites, provides breakthrough services that meet all of these requirements. It will enable broadband connection on the move, delivering all the key tools of the modern office. Recognising the great impact that Inmarsat's BGAN system will have on the European satellite communications industry, and the benefits that it will bring to a wide range of European industries, in 2003 ESA initiated the "BGAN Extension" project. Its primary goals are to provide the full range of BGAN services to truly mobile platforms, operating in aeronautical, vehicular and maritime environments, and to introduce a multicast service capability. The project is supported by the ARTES Programme which establishes a collaboration agreement between ESA, Inmarsat and a group of key industrial and academic institutions which includes EMS, Logica, Nera and the University of Surrey (UK).

  15. Managing nutritional programmes in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslam, R; Abdollahi, Z; Haghighi, F N

    2004-11-01

    Improving community nutrition in developing countries requires a detailed epidemiological picture of the prevalent nutritional problems in different regions and age groups. This makes it possible to identify priorities, sensitize policy-makers, establish political commitment and design appropriate community programmes for income generation and education for the best use of food resources. Experiences acquired from community-based nutritional programmes show that ownership of a programme by the community and using a tailor-made approach are essential factors in the successful implementation of programmes. A multifaceted approach is needed, involving a range of sectors-agriculture, commerce, education and health--and commitment at all levels from government to communities and individuals.

  16. Organizing and Establishing a Media and Research Services Center in a Secondary Vocational-Technical School: Procedures, Activities, Conclusions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, Anne

    Intended both as a report on an Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) Title IV project and as a guide for others wishing to initiate centralized media services in vocational-technical schools, this document describes the planning, funding, establishment, and the 1980 to 1983 operations of the Natchez Vocational Media and Research…

  17. Effects of a standard provision versus an autonomy supportive exercise referral programme on physical activity, quality of life and well-being indicators: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK has recommended that the effectiveness of ongoing exercise referral schemes to promote physical activity should be examined in research trials. Recent empirical evidence in health care and physical activity promotion contexts provides a foundation for testing the feasibility and impact of a Self Determination Theory-based (SDT) exercise referral consultation. Methods An exploratory cluster randomised controlled trial comparing standard provision exercise referral with an exercise referral intervention grounded in Self Determination Theory. Individuals (N = 347) referred to an exercise referral scheme were recruited into the trial from 13 centres. Outcomes and processes of change measured at baseline, 3 and 6-months: Minutes of self-reported moderate or vigorous physical activity (PA) per week (primary outcome), health status, positive and negative indicators of emotional well-being, anxiety, depression, quality of life (QOL), vitality, and perceptions of autonomy support from the advisor, need satisfaction (3 and 6 months only), intentions to be active, and motivational regulations for exercise. Blood pressure and weight were assessed at baseline and 6 months. Results Perceptions of the autonomy support provided by the health and fitness advisor (HFA) did not differ by arm. Between group changes over the 6-months revealed significant differences for reported anxiety only. Within arm contrasts revealed significant improvements in anxiety and most of the Dartmouth CO-OP domains in the SDT arm at 6 months, which were not seen in the standard exercise referral group. A process model depicting hypothesized relationships between advisor autonomy support, need satisfaction and more autonomous motivation, enhanced well being and PA engagement at follow up was supported. Conclusions Significant gains in physical activity and improvements in quality of life and well-being outcomes emerged

  18. A proposed adaptation of the European Foundation for Quality Management Excellence Model to physical activity programmes for the elderly - development of a quality self-assessment tool using a modified Delphi process

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been a growing concern in designing physical activity (PA) programmes for elderly people, since evidence suggests that such health promotion interventions may reduce the deleterious effects of the ageing process. Complete programme evaluations are a necessary prerequisite to continuous quality improvements. Being able to refine, adapt and create tools that are suited to the realities and contexts of PA programmes for the elderly in order to support its continuous improvement is, therefore, crucial. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a self-assessment tool for PA programmes for the elderly. Methods A 3-round Delphi process was conducted via the Internet with 43 national experts in PA for the elderly, management and delivery of PA programmes for the elderly, sports management, quality management and gerontology, asking experts to identify the propositions that they considered relevant for inclusion in the self-assessment tool. Experts reviewed a list of proposed statements, based on the criteria and sub-criteria from the European Foundation for Quality Management Excellence Model (EFQM) and PA guidelines for older adults and rated each proposition from 1 to 8 (disagree to agree) and modified and/or added propositions. Propositions receiving either bottom or top scores of greater than 70% were considered to have achieved consensus to drop or retain, respectively. Results In round 1, of the 196 originally-proposed statements (best practice principles), the experts modified 41, added 1 and achieved consensus on 93. In round 2, a total of 104 propositions were presented, of which experts modified 39 and achieved consensus on 53. In the last round, of 51 proposed statements, the experts achieved consensus on 19. After 3 rounds of rating, experts had not achieved consensus on 32 propositions. The resulting tool consisted of 165 statements that assess nine management areas involved in the development of PA programmes for the elderly. Conclusion

  19. School Inclusion Programmes (SIPS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drossinou-Korea, Maria; Matousi, Dimitra; Panopoulos, Nikolaos; Paraskevopoulou, Aikaterini

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to understand the school inclusion programmes (SIPs) for students with special educational needs (SEN). The methodology was conducted in the field of special education (SE) and focuses on three case studies of students who was supported by SIPs. The Targeted, Individual, Structured, Inclusion Programme for students…

  20. Programmable Logic Controllers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Insolia, Gerard; Anderson, Kathleen

    This document contains a 40-hour course in programmable logic controllers (PLC), developed for a business-industry technology resource center for firms in eastern Pennsylvania by Northampton Community College. The 10 units of the course cover the following: (1) introduction to programmable logic controllers; (2) DOS primer; (3) prerequisite…

  1. School Inclusion Programmes (SIPS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drossinou-Korea, Maria; Matousi, Dimitra; Panopoulos, Nikolaos; Paraskevopoulou, Aikaterini

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to understand the school inclusion programmes (SIPs) for students with special educational needs (SEN). The methodology was conducted in the field of special education (SE) and focuses on three case studies of students who was supported by SIPs. The Targeted, Individual, Structured, Inclusion Programme for students…

  2. Can a web-based community of practice be established and operated to lead falls prevention activity in residential care?

    PubMed

    Francis-Coad, Jacqueline; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Bulsara, Caroline; Nobre, Debbie; Hill, Anne-Marie

    2016-10-18

    The aims of this study were to evaluate establishing and operating a web-based community of practice (CoP) to lead falls prevention in a residential aged care (RAC) setting. A mixed methods evaluation was conducted in two phases using a survey and transcripts from interactive electronic sources. Nurses and allied health staff (n = 20) with an interest in falls prevention representing 13 sites of an RAC organization participated. In Phase 1, the CoP was developed, and the establishment of its structure and composition was evaluated using determinants of success reported in the literature. In Phase 2, all participants interacted using the web, but frequency of engagement by any participant was low. Participatory barriers, including competing demands from other tasks and low levels of knowledge about information communication technology (ICT) applications, were identified by CoP members. A web-based CoP can be established and operated across multiple RAC sites if RAC management support dedicated time for web-based participation and staff are given web-based training.

  3. "Not easy at all but I am trying": barriers and facilitators to physical activity in a South African cohort of people living with HIV participating in a home-based pedometer walking programme.

    PubMed

    Roos, Ronel; Myezwa, Hellen; van Aswegen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The promotion of physical activity is encouraged in people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) as a means of promoting wellness and health. Adherence to programmes that promote exercise is often reduced, and home-based programmes are suggested to improve adherence. This study investigated the personal and environmental factors that cause barriers and facilitators of physical activity in a home-based pedometer walking programme as a means of highlighting adherence challenges. An observational study nested in a randomised controlled trial was conducted in a cohort of South African PLWHA on antiretroviral therapy over a six-month period. Descriptive analysis and qualitative content analysis of 42 participants who underwent physical activity modification assisted with data review. The mean age of the sample was 38.7 (±8.9) years, consisted mostly of women (n = 35; 83.3%) who were employed (n = 19; 45.2%) but earning very little (less than R500 per month) and often single or widowed (n = 23; 54.8%). Barriers to physical activity identified included physical complaints, e.g., low-energy levels; psychological complaints, e.g., stress levels; family responsibility, e.g., being primary caregivers; the physical environment, e.g., adverse weather conditions; social environment, e.g., domestic abuse and crime; and workplace, e.g., being in a sedentary job. Facilitators of physical activity included support and encouragement from friends and family, religious practices during worship and community environment, e.g., having access to parks and sport fields. The study is of benefit as it highlights personal and environmental factors that need to be considered when developing or implementing a home-based walking programme in PLWHA.

  4. The Effects of Learning Activities Based on Argumentation on Conceptual Understanding of 7th Graders about "Force and Motion" Unit and Establishing Thinking Friendly Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buber, Ayse; Coban, Gul Unal

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of learning activities based on argumentation about "Force and Motion" unit on conceptual understanding and views about establishing thinking friendly classroom environment of 7th graders. The study was conducted with total 39 students (20 students in experimental group and 19…

  5. Establishing Teaching Staff Requirements for University Academic Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aduol, F. W. O.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a computational method used to predict faculty needs and distribution at the University of Nairobi (Kenya). The model is a function of the number of students taught, the hours taught, the manner in which students are grouped for lectures, and an adopted student-faculty ratio. (MSE)

  6. Leveraging a faculty fellowship programme to develop leaders in interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Robins, Lynne; Murphy, Nanci; Zierler, Brenda

    2016-07-01

    This article reports findings from an interprofessional education (IPE) study of a longitudinal faculty fellowship that aimed to develop IPE leaders at an academic institution based in the United States. Eight applicants were competitively selected to participate in an IPE track of the fellowship, alongside 14 faculty members who entered through a separate selection process. One year after graduation, a survey of the IPE fellows was undertaken to evaluate programme outcomes using open-ended questions based on an adaptation of Kirkpatrick's four-level training evaluation model. Results indicated that respondents valued participating in a longitudinal programme where they could learn about and practice teaching and leadership skills and conduct education scholarship. While learning on an interprofessional basis, the fellows reported establishing relationships that endured after graduation. This report suggests that adding IPE activities to existing faculty fellowship programmes can be an effective means of building faculty capacity to advance institutional IPE initiatives.

  7. The development and pilot testing of the self-management programme of activity, coping and education for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (SPACE for COPD).

    PubMed

    Apps, Lindsay D; Mitchell, Katy E; Harrison, Samantha L; Sewell, Louise; Williams, Johanna E; Young, Hannah Ml; Steiner, Michael; Morgan, Mike; Singh, Sally J

    2013-01-01

    There is no independent standardized self-management approach available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this project was to develop and test a novel self-management manual for individuals with COPD. Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of COPD were recruited from primary care. A novel self-management manual was developed with health care professionals and patients. Five focus groups were conducted with individuals with COPD (N = 24) during development to confirm and enhance the content of the prototype manual. The Self-management Programme of Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD) manual was developed as the focus of a comprehensive self-management approach facilitated by health care professionals. Preference for delivery was initial face-to-face consultation with telephone follow-up. The SPACE for COPD manual was piloted with 37 participants in primary care. Outcome measures included the Self-Report Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire, Incremental Shuttle Walk Test, and Endurance Shuttle Walking Test (ESWT); measurements were taken at baseline and 6 weeks. The pilot study observed statistically significant improvements for the dyspnea domain of the Self-Report Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire and ESWT. Dyspnea showed a mean change of 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.23-1.11, P = 0.005). ESWT score increased by 302.25 seconds (95% confidence interval 161.47-443.03, P < 0.001). This article describes the development and delivery of a novel self-management approach for COPD. The program, incorporating the SPACE for COPD manual, appears to provoke important changes in exercise capacity and breathlessness for individuals with COPD managed in primary care.

  8. Informationist programme in support of biomedical research: a programme description and preliminary findings of an evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Susan C.; Grefsheim, Suzanne F.; Rankin, Jocelyn A.

    2008-01-01

    Background The informationist programme at the Library of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, USA has grown to 14 informationists working with 40 clinical and basic science research teams. Purpose This case report, intended to contribute to the literature on informationist programmes, describes the NIH informationist programme including implementation experiences, the informationists' training programme, their job responsibilities and programme outcomes. Brief description The NIH informationist programme was designed to enhance the library's service capacity. Over time, the steps for introducing the service to new groups were formalized to ensure support by leadership, the team being served and the library. Job responsibilities also evolved from traditional library roles to a wide range of knowledge management activities. The commitment by the informationist, the team and the library to continuous learning is critical to the programme's success. Results/outcomes NIH scientists reported that informationists saved them time and contributed to teamwork with expert searching and point-of-need instruction. Process evaluation helped refine the programme. Evaluation method High-level, preliminary outcomes were identified from a survey of scientists receiving informationist services, along with key informant interviews. Process evaluation examined service implementation, informationists' training, and service components. Anecdotal evidence has also indicated a favorable response to the programme. PMID:18494648

  9. Informationist programme in support of biomedical research: a programme description and preliminary findings of an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Susan C; Grefsheim, Suzanne F; Rankin, Jocelyn A

    2008-06-01

    The informationist programme at the Library of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, USA has grown to 14 informationists working with 40 clinical and basic science research teams. This case report, intended to contribute to the literature on informationist programmes, describes the NIH informationist programme, including implementation experiences, the informationists' training programme, their job responsibilities and programme outcomes. The NIH informationist programme was designed to enhance the library's service capacity. Over time, the steps for introducing the service to new groups were formalized to ensure support by leadership, the team being served and the library. Job responsibilities also evolved from traditional library roles to a wide range of knowledge management activities. The commitment by the informationist, the team and the library to continuous learning is critical to the programme's success. RESULTS / OUTCOMES: NIH scientists reported that informationists saved them time and contributed to teamwork with expert searching and point-of-need instruction. Process evaluation helped refine the programme. High-level, preliminary outcomes were identified from a survey of scientists receiving informationist services, along with key informant interviews. Process evaluation examined service implementation, informationists' training and service components. Anecdotal evidence has also indicated a favourable response to the programme.

  10. 34 CFR 299.3 - What priority may the Secretary establish for activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? 299.3 Section 299.3 Education Regulations of the... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? For any ESEA discretionary grant program, the... significant portion of the program funds to address substantial problems in an Empowerment Zone, including...

  11. Establishment of a non-invasive mouse reporter model for monitoring in vivo pdx-1 promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Kaneto, Hideaki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Kato, Ken; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kawashima, Ayaha; Kajimoto, Yoshitaka; Matsuoka, Taka-Aki; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Fujitani, Yoshio

    2007-09-28

    It is well known that pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene-1 (PDX-1) plays a crucial role in beta-cell differentiation, and maintaining mature beta-cell function. Thus, it is important to understand how pdx-1 gene is regulated under various pathophysiological conditions in vivo. In this study, to non-invasively and quantitatively monitor pdx-1 promoter activity in vivo, we constructed a pdx-1 promoter-SEAP-IRES-GFP reporter plasmid. In this construct, the -4.6kb pdx-1 promoter region sufficient for driving beta-cell-selective PDX-1 expression was inserted to the upstream of the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene. It is noted here that the pdx-1 promoter-mediated SEAP activity can be distinguished from endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity. First, we transfected the construct in mouse beta-cell line MIN6 and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. SEAP activity was readily detected in the media of MIN6 cells, but not in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that this construct specifically reports beta-cell-specific pdx-1 promoter activity in a cell culture system. Based on these in vitro findings, we next generated transgenic mice using the same construct. SEAP activity was readily detected in serum of the transgenic mice, but not in their littermate mice. Furthermore, SEAP activity was detected in protein extract from the transgenic pancreas and slightly from the transgenic duodenum, but not from the liver, and brain. These results indicate that serum SEAP activity likely represents in vivo pdx-1 promoter activity. This transgenic mouse model would be useful to non-invasively monitor in vivo pdx-1 promoter activity and to screen new molecules which regulate PDX-1 expression.

  12. Integrating active restoration with environmental flows to improve native riparian tree establishment in the Colorado River Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlatter, Karen; Grabau, Matthew R.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Zamora-Arroyo, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Drastic alterations to river hydrology, land use change, and the spread of the nonnative shrub, tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), have led to the degradation of riparian habitat in the Colorado River Delta in Mexico. Delivery of environmental flows to promote native cottonwood (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.) recruitment in human-impacted riparian systems can be unsuccessful due to flow-magnitude constraints and altered abiotic–biotic feedbacks. In 2014, an experimental pulse flow of water was delivered to the Colorado River in Mexico as part of the U.S.-Mexico binational agreement, Minute 319. We conducted a field experiment to assess the effects of vegetation removal, seed augmentation, and environmental flows, separately and in combination, on germination and first-year seedling establishment of cottonwood, willow, and tamarisk at five replicate sites along 5 river km. The relatively low-magnitude flow deliveries did not substantively restore natural fluvial processes of erosion, sediment deposition, and vegetation scour, but did provide wetted surface soils, shallow groundwater, and low soil salinity. Cottonwood and willow only established in wetted, cleared treatments, and establishment was variable in these treatments due to variable site conditions and inundation duration and timing. Wetted soils, bare surface availability, soil salinity, and seed availability were significant factors contributing to successful cottonwood and willow germination, while soil salinity and texture affected seedling persistence over the growing season. Tamarisk germinated and persisted in a wider range of environmental conditions than cottonwood and willow, including in un-cleared treatment areas. Our results suggest that site management can increase cottonwood and willow recruitment success from low-magnitude environmental flow events, an approach that can be applied in other portions of the Delta and to other human-impacted riparian systems across the world with similar

  13. Perspectives on a Whole Class Mindfulness Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, George; Atkinson, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to establish pupil and teacher views about a six-hour, whole-class mindfulness programme called Paws.b. Pupil post-intervention focus groups and teacher semi-structured interviews were used to ascertain what was interesting and useful about Paws.b, and how it could be developed. Audio recordings were transcribed and thematically…

  14. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein activates Ras-GTP complex formation and establishes a Ras, Raf, MAP kinase signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Schneider, R J

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus produces a small (154-amino acid) transcriptional transactivating protein, HBx, which is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism for HBx activity and its possible influence on cell proliferation have remained obscure. A number of studies suggest that HBx may stimulate transcription by indirectly activating transcription factors, possibly by influencing cell signaling pathways. We now present biochemical evidence that HBx activates Ras and rapidly induces a cytoplasmic signaling cascade linking Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), leading to transcriptional transactivation. HBx strongly elevates levels of GTP-bound Ras, activated and phosphorylated Raf, and tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated MAP kinase. Transactivation of transcription factor AP-1 by HBx is blocked by inhibition of Ras or Raf activities but not by inhibition of Ca(2+)- and diacylglycerol-dependent protein kinase C. HBx was also found to stimulate DNA synthesis in serum-starved cells. The hepatitis B virus HBx protein therefore stimulates Ras-GTP complex formation and promotes downstream signaling through Raf and MAP kinases, and may influence cell proliferation. Images PMID:7937954

  15. Rett syndrome: establishing a novel outcome measure for walking activity in an era of clinical trials for rare disorders.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jenny; Leonard, Helen; Jacoby, Peter; Brisco, Lauren; Baikie, Gordon; Hill, Kylie

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a pervasive neurological disorder with impaired gait as one criterion. This study investigated the capacity of three accelerometer-type devices to measure walking activity in Rett syndrome. Twenty-six participants (mean 18 years, SD 8) wore an Actigraph, ActivPAL and StepWatch Activity Monitor (SAM) during a video-taped session of activities. Agreement was determined between step-counts derived from each accelerometer and observation. Repeatability of SAM-derived step counts was determined using pairs of one-minute epochs during which the same participant was observed to walk with the same cadence. The mean difference (limit of agreement) for the Actigraph, ActivPAL and SAM were -41 (SD 33), -16 (SD 21) and -1 (SD 16) steps/min, respectively. Agreement was influenced by a device/cadence interaction (p < 0.001) with greater under-recording at higher cadences. For SAM data, repeatability of step-count pairs was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.91, 95% CI 0.79-0.96). The standard error of measurement was 6 steps/min and we would be 95% confident that a change ≥17 steps/min would be greater than within-subject measurement error. The capacity of the SAM to measure physical activity in Rett syndrome allows focus on participation-based activities in clinical practice and clinical trials. Implications for Rehabilitation Many girls and women with Rett syndrome are able to walk on their own or with assistance but with altered movement patterns. Validated measures of physical activity, such as step counts, have potential to monitor function during daily life. Compared with other forms of accelerometer-type devices, such as ActiGraph and ActivPAL, the StepWatch Activity Monitor (SAM) measured step counts with good accuracy and repeatability. The capacity of the SAM to measure physical activity in Rett syndrome allows focus on participation-based activities in clinical practice and clinical trials.

  16. Microbial inoculants and organic amendment improves the establishment of autochtonous shrub species and microbial activity recovery in a semiarid soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengual, Carmen; Schoebitz, Mauricio; Azcon, Rosario; Torres, Pilar; Caravaca, Fuensanta; Roldan, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The re-establishment of autochthonous shrub species is an essential strategy for recovering degraded soils under semiarid Mediterranean conditions. A field assay was carried out to determine the combined effects of the inoculation with native rhizobacteria (B. megaterium, Enterobacter sp, B. thuringiensis and Bacillus sp) and the addition of composted sugar beet (SB) residue on physicochemical soil properties and Lavandula dentata L. establishment. One year after planting, Bacillus sp. and B. megaterium+SB were the most effective treatments for increasing shoot dry biomass (by 5-fold with respect to control) and Enterobacter sp+SB was the most effective treatments for increasing dry root biomass. All the treatments evaluated significantly increased the foliar nutrient content (NPK) compared to control values (except B. thuringiensis+SB). The organic amendment had significantly increased available phosphorus content in rhizosphere soil by 29% respect to the control. Enterobacter sp combined with sugar beet residue improved total N content in soil (by 46% respect to the control) as well as microbiological and biochemical properties. The selection of the most efficient rhizobacteria strains and their combined effect with organic residue seems to be a critical point that drives the effectiveness of using these biotechnological tools for the revegetation and rehabilitation of degraded soils under semiarid conditions.

  17. [Work organisation improvement methods applied to activities of Blood Transfusion Establishments (BTE): Lean Manufacturing, VSM, 5S].

    PubMed

    Bertholey, F; Bourniquel, P; Rivery, E; Coudurier, N; Follea, G

    2009-05-01

    Continuous improvement of efficiency as well as new expectations from customers (quality and safety of blood products) and employees (working conditions) imply constant efforts in Blood Transfusion Establishments (BTE) to improve work organisations. The Lean method (from "Lean" meaning "thin") aims at identifying wastages in the process (overproduction, waiting, over-processing, inventory, transport, motion) and then reducing them in establishing a mapping of value chain (Value Stream Mapping). It consists in determining the added value of each step of the process from a customer perspective. Lean also consists in standardizing operations while implicating and responsabilizing all collaborators. The name 5S comes from the first letter of five operations of a Japanese management technique: to clear, rank, keep clean, standardize, make durable. The 5S method leads to develop the team working inducing an evolution of the way in the management is performed. The Lean VSM method has been applied to blood processing (component laboratory) in the Pays de la Loire BTE. The Lean 5S method has been applied to blood processing, quality control, purchasing, warehouse, human resources and quality assurance in the Rhône-Alpes BTE. The experience returns from both BTE shows that these methods allowed improving: (1) the processes and working conditions from a quality perspective, (2) the staff satisfaction, (3) the efficiency. These experiences, implemented in two BTE for different processes, confirm the applicability and usefulness of these methods to improve working organisations in BTE.

  18. Methadone maintenance treatment programme reduces criminal activity and improves social well-being of drug users in China: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua-Min; Li, Xiao-Yan; Chow, Eric P F; Li, Tong; Xian, Yun; Lu, Yi-Hua; Tian, Tian; Zhuang, Xun; Zhang, Lei

    2015-01-08

    % CI 52.4% to 66.8%) and 75.0% (95% CI 69.0% to 80.2%) at 12 months after treatment initiation, respectively. MMT has significantly reduced criminal activity, and improved employment rate and social well-being, of clients of the MMT programme. MMT is an effective measure to help drug users to resume societal and familial functions in China. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Methadone maintenance treatment programme reduces criminal activity and improves social well-being of drug users in China: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hua-Min; Li, Xiao-Yan; Chow, Eric P F; Li, Tong; Xian, Yun; Lu, Yi-Hua; Tian, Tian; Zhuang, Xun; Zhang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    .2%) at 6 months, then to 59.8% (95% CI 52.4% to 66.8%) and 75.0% (95% CI 69.0% to 80.2%) at 12 months after treatment initiation, respectively. Conclusions MMT has significantly reduced criminal activity, and improved employment rate and social well-being, of clients of the MMT programme. MMT is an effective measure to help drug users to resume societal and familial functions in China. PMID:25573521

  20. Interventions for recruiting smokers into cessation programmes.

    PubMed

    Marcano Belisario, José S; Bruggeling, Michelle N; Gunn, Laura H; Brusamento, Serena; Car, Josip

    2012-12-12

    Tobacco control is a top public health priority around the globe due to the high prevalence of cigarette smoking and its associated morbidity and mortality. Much effort has been focused on establishing the effectiveness of different smoking cessation strategies. This review, however, aims to address the initial challenge faced by smoking cessation programmes: recruitment of smokers. The primary objective of this review was to determine the effectiveness of different strategies for recruiting smokers into cessation programmes. The secondary objective was to determine the impact that these strategies had on smoking cessation rates at least six months after enrolment into a cessation programme. We searched the specialised register of the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group using a search strategy which included the terms ('recruit$', 'invit$', 'enter', 'entry', 'enrolment') combined with ('smok$', 'cigarette', 'smoking cessation', 'tobacco') in the title, abstract or keyword fields. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and registers of current and ongoing trials. We also searched the reference lists of included studies. We included randomised controlled trials and cluster randomised controlled trials that compared at least two different methods of recruiting current smokers into a smoking cessation programme. We also included those studies which focused on the effectiveness of a smoking cessation programme as long as the study involved multiple recruitment methods and reported results of the recruitment phase. From each included study, we extracted data on the type of participants, type of recruitment strategies (i.e., setting, mode of communication used, intensity and duration) and comparisons, and on randomisation, allocation concealment, and blinding procedures.Our primary outcome was the proportion of smokers successfully recruited to each cessation programme compared to alternative modalities of recruitment. Our

  1. A programme for controlling acute respiratory infections in children: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The unacceptably high mortality related to acute respiratory infections (ARI) in children, recognition of the importance of bacteria in the causation of severe acute lower respiratory infection in developing countries, and the established effectiveness of antimicrobial and supportive treatment in averting death make a strong case for the initiation of an ARI control programme. This should be spearheaded by prototype ARI service activities, delivered through primary health care and backed up by well-coordinated health systems research. PMID:6609020

  2. National and regional asthma programmes in Europe.

    PubMed

    Selroos, Olof; Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr; Łacwik, Piotr; Bousquet, Jean; Brennan, David; Palkonen, Susanna; Contreras, Javier; FitzGerald, Mark; Hedlin, Gunilla; Johnston, Sebastian L; Louis, Renaud; Metcalf, Leanne; Walker, Samantha; Moreno-Galdó, Antonio; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Rosado-Pinto, José; Powell, Pippa; Haahtela, Tari

    2015-09-01

    This review presents seven national asthma programmes to support the European Asthma Research and Innovation Partnership in developing strategies to reduce asthma mortality and morbidity across Europe. From published data it appears that in order to influence asthma care, national/regional asthma programmes are more effective than conventional treatment guidelines. An asthma programme should start with the universal commitments of stakeholders at all levels and the programme has to be endorsed by political and governmental bodies. When the national problems have been identified, the goals of the programme have to be clearly defined with measures to evaluate progress. An action plan has to be developed, including defined re-allocation of patients and existing resources, if necessary, between primary care and specialised healthcare units or hospital centres. Patients should be involved in guided self-management education and structured follow-up in relation to disease severity. The three evaluated programmes show that, thanks to rigorous efforts, it is possible to improve patients' quality of life and reduce hospitalisation, asthma mortality, sick leave and disability pensions. The direct and indirect costs, both for the individual patient and for society, can be significantly reduced. The results can form the basis for development of further programme activities in Europe. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  3. Programmes in Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    The various types and forms of credit and non-credit university continuing education programmes are described in these extracts from a paper presented at the Hyderabad conference on university continuing education. (ABM)

  4. SOTANCP3 Scientific Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    The programme for the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics" which was held at the KGU (Kanto Gakuin University) Kannai Media Center (8th floor of Yokohoma Media Business Center (YMBC))

  5. IFLA's Programme of ISBDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dorothy

    1978-01-01

    The article outlines the evolution, development, and current operational programme of the ISBD's (International Standard Bibliographic Description) within the framework of IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations). (Author/JAB)

  6. FAST joins Breakthrough programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The 180m Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) - the world's largest single-aperture radio receiver - has become part of the Breakthrough Listen programme, which launched in July 2015 to look for intelligent life beyond Earth.

  7. Programmable Logic Application Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard

    1998-01-01

    This column will be provided each quarter as a source for reliability, radiation results, NASA capabilities, and other information on programmable logic devices and related applications. This quarter's column will include some announcements and some recent radiation test results and evaluations of interest. Specifically, the following topics will be covered: the Military and Aerospace Applications of Programmable Devices and Technologies Conference to be held at GSFC in September, 1998, proton test results, heavy ion test results, and some total dose results.

  8. Programmable Logic Application Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard

    1998-01-01

    This column will be provided each quarter as a source for reliability, radiation results, NASA capabilities, and other information on programmable logic devices and related applications. This quarter's column will include some announcements and some recent radiation test results and evaluations of interest. Specifically, the following topics will be covered: the Military and Aerospace Applications of Programmable Devices and Technologies Conference to be held at GSFC in September, 1998, proton test results, and some total dose results.

  9. Methadone maintenance treatment: outcomes from the Otago methadone programme.

    PubMed

    Dore, G M; Walker, J D; Paice, J R; Clarkson, S

    1999-11-26

    To provide information on methadone treatment outcomes for opiate-dependent individuals. Questionnaires and random urine tests were completed for 112 Otago clients comparing outcomes before and during methadone maintenance treatment. Treatment retention rates were high, with 86% of clients remaining on the programme six months or more. The number of clients on benefits reduced by almost 30% during treatment, with employment rates doubling from 19% to 40% (including attendance at educational programmes). For the 89 clients injecting opiates daily at initial presentation, 64% reported no opiate use in the three months prior to review. Of the remaining 36%, opiate use reduced significantly. Rates of sharing injecting equipment reduced by almost 90%. Almost 50% of cannabis users reduced their use from daily to less than daily use. Clients reporting no current use of illicit benzodiazepines increased by 85%. Heavy binge drinking weekly or more reduced by almost 75%. Use of other illicit drugs reduced by almost 90%. Drug-related convictions reduced by almost 60%, while accidental drug overdoses reduced by over 90%. The widespread benefits of methadone maintenance treatment demonstrated underline the importance of making quality methadone programmes readily accessible within the health system. Currently, there are long waiting lists and many individuals cannot gain access to active treatment. We believe the health system urgently needs to look at expanding existing services and/or establishing private methadone clinics similar to those in New South Wales.

  10. Educator Perspectives on the Use of Alternative Assessment Methods within Taught Masters Programmes: An Exploratory Study Using Activity Theory and Q Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deignan, Tim; Brown, Sally

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory two-stage sequential mixed methods research study that investigated the views of university educators on the introduction of assessment methods other than essays, exams and dissertations within taught Masters programmes. In the first stage, interviews were conducted internationally with 45 participants and…

  11. Educator Perspectives on the Use of Alternative Assessment Methods within Taught Masters Programmes: An Exploratory Study Using Activity Theory and Q Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deignan, Tim; Brown, Sally

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory two-stage sequential mixed methods research study that investigated the views of university educators on the introduction of assessment methods other than essays, exams and dissertations within taught Masters programmes. In the first stage, interviews were conducted internationally with 45 participants and…

  12. Programmable multi-chip module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2004-03-02

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  13. Programmable Multi-Chip Module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2005-05-24

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  14. Programmable Multi-Chip Module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2004-11-16

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  15. HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N at TNG . III. Flux-flux and activity-rotation relationships of early-M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J.; Scandariato, G.; Stelzer, B.; Biazzo, K.; Lanza, A. F.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; González-Álvarez, E.; Affer, L.; Claudi, R. U.; Cosentino, R.; Damasso, M.; Desidera, S.; González Hernández, J. I.; Gratton, R.; Leto, G.; Messina, S.; Molinari, E.; Pagano, I.; Perger, M.; Piotto, G.; Rebolo, R.; Ribas, I.; Sozzetti, A.; Suárez Mascareño, A.; Zanmar Sanchez, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Understanding stellar activity in M dwarfs is crucial for the physics of stellar atmospheres and for ongoing radial velocity exoplanet programmes. Despite the increasing interest in M dwarfs, our knowledge of the chromospheres of these stars is far from being complete. Aims: We test whether the relations between activity, rotation, and stellar parameters and flux-flux relationships previously investigated for main-sequence FGK stars and for pre-main-sequence M stars also hold for early-M dwarfs on the main-sequence. Although several attempts have been made so far, here we analyse a large sample of stars undergoing relatively low activity. Methods: We analyse in a homogeneous and coherent way a well-defined sample of 71 late-K/early-M dwarfs that are currently being observed in the framework of the HArps-N red Dwarf Exoplanet Survey (HADES). Rotational velocities are derived using the cross-correlation technique, while emission flux excesses in the Ca ii H & K and Balmer lines from Hα up to Hɛ are obtained by using the spectral subtraction technique. The relationships between the emission excesses and the stellar parameters (projected rotational velocity, effective temperature, kinematics, and age) are studied. Relations between pairs of fluxes of different chromospheric lines (flux-flux relationships) are also studied and compared with the literature results for other samples of stars. Results: We find that the strength of the chromospheric emission in the Ca ii H & K and Balmer lines is roughly constant for stars in the M0-M3 spectral range. Although our sample is likely to be biased towards inactive stars, our data suggest that a moderate but significant correlation between activity and rotation might be present, as well as a hint of kinematically selected young stars showing higher levels of emission in the calcium line and in most of the Balmer lines. We find our sample of M dwarfs to be complementary in terms of chromospheric and X-ray fluxes with

  16. Sustainable practice change: Professionals' experiences with a multisectoral child health promotion programme in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background New methods for prevention and health promotion and are constantly evolving; however, positive outcomes will only emerge if these methods are fully adopted and sustainable in practice. To date, limited attention has been given to sustainability of health promotion efforts. This study aimed to explore facilitators, barriers, and requirements for sustainability as experienced by professionals two years after finalizing the development and implementation of a multisectoral child health promotion programme in Sweden (the Salut programme). Initiated in 2005, the programme uses a 'Salutogenesis' approach to support health-promoting activities in health care, social services, and schools. Methods All professionals involved in the Salut Programme's pilot areas were interviewed between May and September 2009, approximately two years after the intervention package was established and implemented. Participants (n = 23) were midwives, child health nurses, dental hygienists/dental nurses, and pre-school teachers. Transcribed data underwent qualitative content analysis to illuminate perceived facilitators, barriers, and requirements for programme sustainability. Results The programme was described as sustainable at most sites, except in child health care. The perception of facilitators, barriers, and requirements were largely shared across sectors. Facilitators included being actively involved in intervention development and small-scale testing, personal values corresponding to programme intentions, regular meetings, working close with collaborators, using manuals and a clear programme branding. Existing or potential barriers included insufficient managerial involvement and support and perceived constraints regarding time and resources. In dental health care, barriers also included conflicting incentives for performance. Many facilitators and barriers identified by participants also reflected their perceptions of more general and forthcoming requirements for programme

  17. Sustainable practice change: professionals' experiences with a multisectoral child health promotion programme in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, Kristina; Garvare, Rickard; Ivarsson, Anneli; Eurenius, Eva; Mogren, Ingrid; Nyström, Monica E

    2011-03-22

    New methods for prevention and health promotion and are constantly evolving; however, positive outcomes will only emerge if these methods are fully adopted and sustainable in practice. To date, limited attention has been given to sustainability of health promotion efforts. This study aimed to explore facilitators, barriers, and requirements for sustainability as experienced by professionals two years after finalizing the development and implementation of a multisectoral child health promotion programme in Sweden (the Salut programme). Initiated in 2005, the programme uses a 'Salutogenesis' approach to support health-promoting activities in health care, social services, and schools. All professionals involved in the Salut Programme's pilot areas were interviewed between May and September 2009, approximately two years after the intervention package was established and implemented. Participants (n = 23) were midwives, child health nurses, dental hygienists/dental nurses, and pre-school teachers. Transcribed data underwent qualitative content analysis to illuminate perceived facilitators, barriers, and requirements for programme sustainability. The programme was described as sustainable at most sites, except in child health care. The perception of facilitators, barriers, and requirements were largely shared across sectors. Facilitators included being actively involved in intervention development and small-scale testing, personal values corresponding to programme intentions, regular meetings, working close with collaborators, using manuals and a clear programme branding. Existing or potential barriers included insufficient managerial involvement and support and perceived constraints regarding time and resources. In dental health care, barriers also included conflicting incentives for performance. Many facilitators and barriers identified by participants also reflected their perceptions of more general and forthcoming requirements for programme sustainability. These

  18. Establishment of a reference material for standardization of the anti-complementary activity test in intravenous immunoglobulin products used in Japan: A collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Kiyoko; Okuma, Kazu; Ochiai, Masaki; Kuramitsu, Madoka; Tezuka, Kenta; Ishii, Mieko; Ueda, Sadao; Miyamoto, Takashi; Kamimura, Koichiro; Kou, Enki; Uchida, Sanae; Watanabe, Yoshiharu; Okada, Yoshiaki; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2017-03-01

    Aggregates of human plasma-derived intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) carries a risk of severe adverse events after nonspecific complement activation induced in humans administrated. Therefore, the anti-complementary activity (ACA) test is legally required in every batch of IVIGs in Japan. However, due to the intrinsic nature of this bioassay, there might be large differences in the results of ACA tests from laboratories, even when the same batch of IVIGs was measured. Our six laboratories evaluated whether there were such differences and argued for establishment of a reference material (RM) for standardization of the ACA test. Our results revealed inter-laboratory differences in ACA values, indicating a need to establish an RM. Therefore, after ACA values in candidate RMs were measured collaboratively, one RM was selected from two candidates and unit value-assigned. The RM in fact normalized the ACA test values for samples measured in parallel at almost all the laboratories, when the values were calculated relative to the assigned unit value of the RM. Thus, we established a first RM to standardize the ACA test in Japan, which enabled each laboratory to normalize ACA values constantly for IVIGs. This indicates that the establishment of an RM can contribute to quality control of IVIGs. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Overview of the National Centralized Tokamak programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, M.; Tamai, H.; Matsukawa, M.; Fujita, T.; Takase, Y.; Sakurai, S.; Kizu, K.; Tsuchiya, K.; Kurita, G.; Morioka, A.; Hayashi, N.; Miura, Y.; Itoh, S.; Bialek, J.; Navratil, G.; Ikeda, Y.; Fujii, T.; Kurihara, K.; Kubo, H.; Kamada, Y.; Miya, N.; Suzuki, T.; Hamamatsu, K.; Kawashima, H.; Kudo, Y.; Masaki, K.; Takahashi, H.; Takechi, M.; Akiba, M.; Okuno, K.; Ishida, S.; Ichimura, M.; Imai, T.; Hashizume; Miura, Y. M.; Horiike, H.; Kimura, A.; Tsutsui, H.; Matsuoka, M.; Uesugi, Y.; Sagara, A.; Nishimura, A.; Shimizu, A.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakamura, K.; Sato, K.; Okano, K.; Ida, K.; Shimada, H. R.; Kishimoto, Y.; Azechi, H.; Tanaka, S.; Yatsu, K.; Yoshida, N.; Inutake, M.; Fujiwara, M.; Inoue, N.; Hosogane, N.; Kuriyama, M.; Ninomiya, H.

    2006-03-01

    An overview is given of the National Centralized Tokamak (NCT) programme as a research programme for advanced tokamak research to succeed JT-60U. The mission of NCT is to establish high beta steady-state operation for DEMO and to contribute to ITER. The machine flexibility is pursued in aspect ratio and shape controllability for the demonstration of the high-β steady-state, feedback control of resistive wall modes, wide current and pressure profile control capability and also very long pulse steady-state operation. Existing JT-60 infrastructure such as the heating and current drive system, power supplies and cooling systems will be best utilized for this modification.

  20. Mechanisms of change of a novel weight loss programme provided by a third sector organisation: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Naoimh E; Visram, Shelina; Connell, Louise A

    2016-05-10

    There is a need for theory-driven studies that explore the underlying mechanisms of change of complex weight loss programmes. Such studies will contribute to the existing evidence-base on how these programmes work and thus inform the future development and evaluation of tailored, effective interventions to tackle overweight and obesity. This study explored the mechanisms by which a novel weight loss programme triggered change amongst participants. The programme, delivered by a third sector organisation, addressed both diet and physical activity. Over a 26 week period participants engaged in three weekly sessions (education and exercise in a large group, exercise in a small group and a one-to-one education and exercise session). Novel aspects included the intensity and duration of the programme, a competitive selection process, milestone physical challenges (e.g. working up to a 5 K and 10 K walk/run during the programme), alumni support (face-to-face and online) and family attendance at exercise sessions. Data were collected through interviews with programme providers (n = 2) and focus groups with participants (n = 12). Discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using NVivo10. Published behaviour change frameworks and behaviour change technique taxonomies were used to guide the coding process. Clients' interactions with components of the weight loss programme brought about a change in their commitment, knowledge, beliefs about capabilities and social and environmental contexts. Intervention components that generated these changes included the competitive selection process, group and online support, family involvement and overcoming milestone challenges over the 26 week programme. The mechanisms by which these components triggered change differed between participants. There is an urgent need to establish robust interventions that can support people who are overweight and obese to achieve a healthy weight and maintain this change. Third

  1. Control programme for cystic echinococcosis in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Irabedra, Pilar; Ferreira, Ciro; Sayes, Julio; Elola, Susana; Rodríguez, Miriam; Morel, Noelia; Segura, Sebastian; dos Santos, Estela; Guisantes, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a highly endemic parasitic zoonosis that is present in the Southern Cone countries of America. For several decades, various prevention and control programmes have been implemented in different countries and regions, with varying results. In Uruguay, a new control programme was implemented in 2006 that employed new strategies for canine diagnosis and treatment, dog population control, diagnosis in humans, epidemiological surveillance, and health education, including community participation. The control programme in Uruguay addresses the control and surveillance of the disease from a holistic perspective based on Primary Health Care, which has strengthened the community’s participation in developing and coordinating activities in an interdisciplinary manner. Similarly, the control programme that is currently implemented is based on a risk-focused approach. The surveillance and control measures were focused on small villages and extremely poor urban areas. In this study, the strategies used and the results obtained from 2008-2013 are analysed and discussed. PMID:27223652

  2. Review of field-programmable analog arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulak, Glen; D'Mello, Dean R.

    1996-10-01

    The drive towards shorter design cycles for analog integrated circuits has given impetus to several developments in the area of field-programmable analog arrays (FPAAs). Various approaches have been taken in implementing topological and parametric programmability of analog circuits. Recent extensions of this work have married FPAAs to their digital counterparts (FPGAs) along with data conversion interfaces, to form field-programmable mixed signal arrays (FPMAs). This survey paper reviews work to data in the area of programmable analog and mixed signal circuits. The body of work reviewed includes university and industrial research, commercial products and patents. A time-line of important achievements in the area is drawn and the status of various activities is summarized.

  3. Control programme for cystic echinococcosis in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Irabedra, Pilar; Ferreira, Ciro; Sayes, Julio; Elola, Susana; Rodríguez, Miriam; Morel, Noelia; Segura, Sebastian; Santos, Estela Dos; Guisantes, Jorge A

    2016-05-24

    Cystic echinococcosis is a highly endemic parasitic zoonosis that is present in the Southern Cone countries of America. For several decades, various prevention and control programmes have been implemented in different countries and regions, with varying results. In Uruguay, a new control programme was implemented in 2006 that employed new strategies for canine diagnosis and treatment, dog population control, diagnosis in humans, epidemiological surveillance, and health education, including community participation. The control programme in Uruguay addresses the control and surveillance of the disease from a holistic perspective based on Primary Health Care, which has strengthened the community's participation in developing and coordinating activities in an interdisciplinary manner. Similarly, the control programme that is currently implemented is based on a risk-focused approach. The surveillance and control measures were focused on small villages and extremely poor urban areas. In this study, the strategies used and the results obtained from 2008-2013 are analysed and discussed.

  4. Case mix, outcome and activity for patients admitted to intensive care units requiring chronic renal dialysis: a secondary analysis of the ICNARC Case Mix Programme Database

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Colin A; Crowe, Alex V; Stevens, Paul E; Harrison, David A; Lipkin, Graham W

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This report describes the case mix, outcome and activity for admissions to intensive care units (ICUs) of patients who require prior chronic renal dialysis for end-stage renal failure (ESRF), and investigates the effect of case mix factors on outcome. Methods This was a secondary analysis of a high-quality clinical database, namely the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) Case Mix Programme Database, which includes 276,731 admissions to 170 adult ICUs across England, Wales and Northern Ireland from 1995 to 2004. Results During the eight year study period, 1.3% (n = 3,420) of all patients admitted to ICU were receiving chronic renal dialysis before ICU admission. This represents an estimated ICU utilization of six admissions (32 bed-days) per 100 dialysis patient-years. The ESRF group was younger (mean age 57.3 years versus 59.5 years) and more likely to be male (60.2% versus 57.9%) than those without ESRF. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score and Acute Physiology Score revealed greater severity of illness on admission in patients with ESRF (mean 24.7 versus 16.6 and 17.2 versus 12.6, respectively). Length of stay in ICU was comparable between groups (median 1.9 days versus 1.8 days) and ICU mortality was only slightly elevated in the ESRF group (26.3% versus 20.8%). However, the ESRF group had protracted overall hospital stay (median 25 days versus 17 days), and increased hospital mortality (45.3% versus 31.2%) and ICU readmission (9.0% vs. 4.7%). Multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for case mix identified the increased hospital mortality to be associated with increasing age, emergency surgery and nonsurgical cases, cardiopulmonary resuscitation before ICU admission and extremes of physiological norms. The adjusted odds ratio for ultimate hospital mortality associated with chronic renal dialysis was 1.24 (95% confidence interval 1.13 to 1.37). Conclusion Patients with ESRF admitted to UK ICUs are more

  5. Present status of the Copernicus programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutz, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The European Union (EU) has established the Copernicus Programme, formerly named GMES; an Earth monitoring user-driven initiative carried out in partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA) and EU/ESA Member States. Copernicus is designed to ensure continuous provision of reliable data and information on environment and security related services, primarily to users responsible for making, implementing and monitoring the relevant policies in the EU and its Member States. The Copernicus services rely on in-situ sensors and satellite data, the latter being provided by the Copernicus Space Component (CSC). ESA is responsible for coordinating the CSC, i.e. the Sentinel Missions and the access to data from Contributing Missions, in collaboration with EUMETSAT. The first dedicated Copernicus satellite mission, Sentinel-1A, was successfully launched on 3rd April 2014. After completion of the Commissioning Phase (23 September 2014), the operations ramp-up phase started. This phase consists of a gradual ground segment system deployment and user product quality verification/calibration. During this phase the data provision has been extended. The remaining activities will be achieved before the Sentinel-1A Routine Operations Readiness Review, expected to take place in May 2015. This milestone will mark the completion of the mission operations qualification and the start of the routine operations of the satellite. The Full Operational Capability will be reached when two units of Sentinel-1 will enter routine operations simultaneously. The next Sentinel missions, starting with the first unit of Sentinel-2 expected to be launched in May 2015, will be launched within the next years and will be progressively covering all domains of Earth Observation. The successful uptake of the operational phase of the Copernicus Space Component, and the full economic benefits of the Copernicus programme will materialise only when the wealth of data from the whole series of Sentinel satellites

  6. Serological evidence of continuing high Usutu virus (Flaviviridae) activity and establishment of herd immunity in wild birds in Austria.

    PubMed

    Meister, Tanja; Lussy, Helga; Bakonyi, Tamás; Sikutová, Silvie; Rudolf, Ivo; Vogl, Wolfgang; Winkler, Hans; Frey, Hans; Hubálek, Zdenek; Nowotny, Norbert; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2008-03-18

    Usutu virus (USUV), family Flaviviridae, has been responsible for avian mortality in Austria from 2001 to 2006. The proportion of USUV-positive individuals among the investigated dead birds decreased dramatically after 2004. To test the hypothesis that establishment of herd immunity might be responsible, serological examinations of susceptible wild birds were performed. Blood samples of 442 wild birds of 55 species were collected in 4 consecutive years (2003--2006). In addition, 86 individuals from a birds of prey rehabilitation centre were bled before, at the peak, and after the 2005 USUV transmission season in order to identify titre dynamics and seroconversions. The haemagglutination inhibition test was used for screening and the plaque reduction neutralization test for confirmation. While in the years 2003 and 2004 the proportion of seropositive wild birds was <10%, the percentage of seroreactors raised to >50% in 2005 and 2006. At the birds of prey centre, almost three quarters of the owls and raptors exhibited antibodies before the 2005 transmission season; this percentage dropped to less than half at the peak of USUV transmission and raised again to almost two thirds after the transmission season. These data show a from year to year continuously increasing proportion of seropositive wild birds. The owl and raptor data indicate significant viral exposure in the previous season(s), but also a number of new infections during the current season, despite the presence of antibodies in some of these birds. Herd immunity is a possible explanation for the significant decrease in USUV-associated bird mortalities in Austria during the recent years.

  7. Establishment of a transgenic yeast screening system for estrogenicity and identification of the anti-estrogenic activity of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Baowei; Yeung, Eric K C; Chan, Chi Bun; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2008-12-15

    Endocrine disruptors refer to chemical compounds in the environment which interfere with the endocrine systems of organisms. Among them, environmental estrogens pose serious problems to aquatic organisms, in particular fish. It is therefore important and necessary to have a fast and low-cost system to screen the large number of different chemical compounds in the aquatic environment for their potential endocrine disrupting actions. In this study, a screening platform was developed to detect xenoestrogens in the aquatic environment using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and applied for compound screening. The aim was to demonstrate any significant potential differences between the fish screening system and the human screening system. To this end, a yeast expression vector harboring a fish estrogen receptor alpha and a reporter vector containing the estrogen responsive element fused with the Escherichia coli LacZ gene were constructed. After transformation with these two vectors, the transformed yeast clones were confirmed by Western blotting and selected on the basis of the beta-galactosidase activity. In this transgenic yeast system, the natural estrogen (estradiol) and other known xenoestrogens such as diethylstilbestrol, bisphenol A, genistein and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane exhibited dose-dependent activities. Using this system, more than 40 putative endocrine disruptors including phytoestrogens, pesticides, herbicides, industrial dyes and other industrial chemicals were screened. Ten of them were demonstrated to exhibit estrogenic actions. Industrial dyes such as malachite green (MG) that disrupt thyroid hormone synthesis are extensively used and are widely distributed in the aquatic environment. Using this system, MG did not show any estrogenic action, but was demonstrated to exhibit anti-estrogenic activity.

  8. Histone Deacetylase Activity Represses Gamma Interferon-Inducible HLA-DR Gene Expression following the Establishment of a DNase I-Hypersensitive Chromatin Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Aaron; Zhang, Hongquan; Yang, Wen-Ming; Seto, Edward; Blanck, George

    2001-01-01

    Expression of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) is required for gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-inducible major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression and transcriptionally productive HLA-DRA promoter occupancy in several human tumor cell lines. Treatment of these Rb-defective tumor cell lines with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors rescued IFN-γ-inducible HLA-DRA and -DRB mRNA and cell surface protein expression, demonstrating repression of these genes by endogenous cellular HDAC activity. Additionally, Rb-defective, transcriptionally incompetent tumor cells retained the HLA-DRA promoter DNase I-hypersensitive site. Thus, HDAC-mediated repression of the HLA-DRA promoter occurs following the establishment of an apparent nucleosome-free promoter region and before transcriptionally productive occupancy of the promoter by the required transactivators. Repression of HLA-DRA promoter activation by HDAC activity likely involves a YY1 binding element located in the first exon of the HLA-DRA gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments localized YY1 to the HLA-DRA gene in Rb-defective tumor cells. Additionally, mutation of the YY1 binding site prevented repression of the promoter by HDAC1 and partially prevented activation of the promoter by trichostatin A. Mutation of the octamer element also significantly reduced the ability of HDAC1 to confer repression of inducible HLA-DRA promoter activation. Treatment of Rb-defective tumor cells with HDAC inhibitors greatly reduced the DNA binding activity of Oct-1, a repressor of inducible HLA-DRA promoter activation. These findings represent the first evidence that HDAC activity can repress IFN-γ-inducible HLA class II gene expression and also demonstrate that HDAC activity can contribute to promoter repression following the establishment of a DNase I-hypersensitive chromatin conformation. PMID:11533238

  9. Preliminary Screening of Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities and Establishment of an Efficient Callus Induction in Curculigo latifolia Dryand (Lemba)

    PubMed Central

    Farzinebrahimi, Reza; Mat Taha, Rosna; Rashid, Kamaludin A.; Ali Ahmed, Bakrudeen; Danaee, Mahmoud; Rozali, Shahril Efzueni

    2016-01-01

    Leaf, seed, and tuber explants of C. latifolia were inoculated on MS medium supplemented with various concentrations of BAP and IBA, alone or in combinations, to achieve in vitro plant regeneration. Subsequently, antioxidant and antibacterial activities were determined from in vitro and in vivo plant developed. No response was observed from seed culture on MS media with various concentrations of PGRs. The highest percentage of callus was observed on tuber explants (94%) and leaf explants (89%) when cultured on MS media supplemented with IBA in combination with BAP. A maximum of 88% shoots per tuber explant, with a mean number of shoots (8.8 ± 1.0), were obtained on MS medium supplemented with combinations of BAP and IBA (2.5 mg L−1). The best root induction (92%) and mean number (7.6 ± 0.5) from tuber explants were recorded on 2.5 mg L−1 IBA alone supplemented to MS medium. The higher antioxidant content (80%) was observed from in vivo tuber. However, tuber part from the intact plant showed higher inhibition zone in antibacterial activity compared to other in vitro and in vivo tested parts. PMID:27298625

  10. 'It's like a personal motivator that you carried around wi' you': utilising self-determination theory to understand men's experiences of using pedometers to increase physical activity in a weight management programme.

    PubMed

    Donnachie, Craig; Wyke, Sally; Mutrie, Nanette; Hunt, Kate

    2017-05-05

    Self-monitoring using pedometers is an effective behaviour change technique to support increased physical activity (PA). However, the ways in which pedometers operate as motivational tools in adoption and maintenance of PA is not well understood. This paper investigates men's experiences of pedometers as motivational tools both during and after their participation in a 12-week group-based, weight management programme for overweight/obese men, Football Fans in Training (FFIT). Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 28 men, purposively sampled to include men who did and did not achieve 5% weight loss during the programme. Data were analysed thematically utilising the framework approach, using Self-Determination Theory (SDT) - namely concepts of behavioural regulation and the basic needs of relatedness, competence and autonomy - as an analytical lens. During the programme, FFIT's context and fellow participants supported relatedness and encouraged use of the pedometer. The pedometer was seen to provide tangible proof of progress, thus increasing competence for change, whilst the ability to monitor one's own progress and take remedial action supported autonomy; these men portrayed the pedometer as an 'ally'. However, a minority found the pedometer 'dispiriting' or controlling when it evidenced their inability to meet their PA targets. After the programme, some men no longer used the device as they had fully internalised their motivations for increased PA. In contrast, others continued to use pedometers or progressed to other self-monitoring technologies because it was enjoyable and facilitated maintenance of their increased PA. However, the minority of men who experienced the pedometer as controlling no longer used it. They were less successful in achieving 5% weight loss and appeared reliant on external factors, including support from coach and group members, to maintain motivation. These findings show how self-monitoring using pedometers and

  11. Establishment of a luciferase assay-based screening system: Fumitremorgin C selectively inhibits cellular proliferation of immortalized astrocytes expressing an active form of AKT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lei; Sasai, Ken Akagi, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Shinya

    2008-08-29

    The AKT pathway is frequently activated in glioblastoma, and as such, inhibitors of this pathway could prove very useful as anti-glioblastoma therapies. Here we established immortalized astrocytes expressing Renilla luciferase as well as those expressing both an active form of AKT and firefly luciferase. Since both luciferase activities represent the numbers of corresponding cell lines, novel inhibitors of the AKT pathway can be identified by treating co-cultures containing the two types of luciferase-expressing cells with individual compounds. Indeed, such a screening system succeeded in identifying fumitremorgin C as an efficient inhibitor of the AKT pathway, which was further confirmed by the ability of fumitremorgin C to selectively inhibit the growth of immortalized astrocytes expressing an active form of AKT. The present study proposes a broadly applicable approach for identifying therapeutic agents that target the pathways and/or molecules responsible for cancer development.

  12. Anti-tumor efficacy of lymphokine-activated killer cells and recombinant interleukin 2 in vivo: direct correlation between reduction of established metastases and cytolytic activity of lymphokine-activated killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mule, J.J.; Yang, J.; Shu, S.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1986-05-15

    Our previous studies demonstrated that the incubation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes or murine splenocytes in recombinant interleukin 2 (RIL 2) resulted in the generation of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells capable of lysing a broad spectrum of fresh tumors in short-term chromium-release assays. Moreover, injections of LAK cells plus RIL 2 were highly effective in eliminating established 3 day metastases in the lung and liver. We have examined several parameters to define whether or not the cytolytic activity of LAK cells as measured in vitro correlated directly with the in vivo anti-tumor efficacy of adoptively transferred LAK cells. LAK cells plus RIL 2 could mediate marked reductions of established pulmonary metastases in mice rendered T cell deficient by adult thymectomy and lethal, total body irradiation followed by reconstitution with T cell-depleted bone marrow and spleen cells. Thus there was no requirement for additional T lymphocytes of host origin for successful therapy with adoptively transferred LAK cells plus RIL 2. Fresh splenocytes depleted of T cells by anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody plus complement generated LAK cells that were as highly lytic to fresh tumor in vitro and were as effective in reducing established pulmonary metastases as those generated from untreated or complement-treated splenocytes. Thus, the precursor to LAK cells with anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo did not express the Thy-1 antigenic marker. In contrast, treatment of LAK effector cells (those generated from a 3-day incubation of fresh, normal splenocytes in RIL 2) with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody plus complement reduced or abolished their in vitro cytolytic activity.

  13. The Impact of Four Family Support Programmes for People with a Disability in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Louise; Sharek, Danika; DeVries, Jan; Griffiths, Colin; Sheerin, Fintan; McBennett, Padraig; Higgins, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Background: This article reports on an evaluation of four family support programmes in Ireland for families of people with a physical or an intellectual disability or autism. The focus of the evaluation, which took place within a year of the programmes' completion, was on establishing whether the programmes had an impact on families' capacity to…

  14. The Impact of Four Family Support Programmes for People with a Disability in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Louise; Sharek, Danika; DeVries, Jan; Griffiths, Colin; Sheerin, Fintan; McBennett, Padraig; Higgins, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Background: This article reports on an evaluation of four family support programmes in Ireland for families of people with a physical or an intellectual disability or autism. The focus of the evaluation, which took place within a year of the programmes' completion, was on establishing whether the programmes had an impact on families' capacity to…

  15. Establishing the NeuroRecovery Network: multisite rehabilitation centers that provide activity-based therapies and assessments for neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Harkema, Susan J; Schmidt-Read, Mary; Behrman, Andrea L; Bratta, Amy; Sisto, Sue Ann; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2012-09-01

    The mission of the NeuroRecovery Network (NRN) is to provide support for the implementation of specialized centers at rehabilitation sites in the United States. Currently, there are 7 NRN centers that provide standardized activity-based interventions designed from scientific and clinical evidence for recovery of mobility, posture, standing, and walking and improvements in health and quality of life in individuals with spinal cord injury. Extensive outcome measures evaluating function, health, and quality of life are used to determine the efficacy of the program. NRN members consist of scientists, clinicians, and administrators who collaborate to achieve the goals and objectives of the network within an organizational structure by designing and implementing a clinical model that provides consistent interventions and evaluations and a general education and training program. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of a universal parental support programme to promote healthy dietary habits and physical activity and to prevent overweight and obesity in 6-year-old children: the Healthy School Start Study, a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Gisela; Sundblom, Elinor; Norman, Åsa; Bohman, Benjamin; Hagberg, Jan; Elinder, Liselotte Schäfer

    2015-01-01

    To develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a parental support programme to promote healthy dietary and physical activity habits and to prevent overweight and obesity in Swedish children. A cluster-randomised controlled trial was carried out in areas with low to medium socio-economic status. Participants were six-year-old children (n = 243) and their parents. Fourteen pre-school classes were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 7) and control groups (n = 7). The intervention lasted for 6 months and included: 1) Health information for parents, 2) Motivational Interviewing with parents and 3) Teacher-led classroom activities with children. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry, dietary and physical activity habits and parental self-efficacy through a questionnaire. Body weight and height were measured and BMI standard deviation score was calculated. Measurements were conducted at baseline, post-intervention and at 6-months follow-up. Group differences were examined using analysis of covariance and Poisson regression, adjusted for gender and baseline values. There was no significant intervention effect in the primary outcome physical activity. Sub-group analyses showed a significant gender-group interaction in total physical activity (TPA), with girls in the intervention group demonstrating higher TPA during weekends (p = 0.04), as well as in sedentary time, with boys showing more sedentary time in the intervention group (p = 0.03). There was a significantly higher vegetable intake (0.26 servings) in the intervention group compared to the control group (p = 0.003). At follow-up, sub-group analyses showed a sustained effect for boys. The intervention did not affect the prevalence of overweight or obesity. It is possible to influence vegetable intake in children and girls' physical activity through a parental support programme. The programme needs to be intensified in order to increase effectiveness and sustain the effects long-term. These findings are an

  17. An orally bioavailable synthetic analog of an active dehydroepiandrosterone metabolite reduces established disease in rodent models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Offner, Halina; Firestein, Gary S; Boyle, David L; Pieters, Raymond; Frincke, James M; Garsd, Armando; White, Steven K; Reading, Christopher L; Auci, Dominick L

    2009-06-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) treatment provides diverse anti-inflammatory benefits in rodent models of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but only limited benefits to patients. In rodents, DHEA is metabolized to (among others) androstene-3beta,7beta,17beta-triol (AET), which retains potent anti-inflammatory activity. 17Alpha-ethynyl-5-androstene-3beta,7beta,17beta-triol (HE3286) is a novel, metabolically stabilized, orally bioavailable derivative of AET. In the DBA mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), once-daily oral treatments (gavage) with HE3286 (40 mg/kg), beginning at onset of disease, significantly decreased disease. Benefit was associated with reduction in joint inflammation, erosion, and synovial proliferation as measured by histological analysis and mRNA of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1beta, and IL-23. Significant benefit was also observed in the CIA model even when treatments were delayed until 7 days after the onset of arthritis. Furthermore, dose-dependent benefit was observed in the DBA mouse model of collagen antibody-induced arthritis, as well as reductions in IL-6 and matrix metalloproteinase-3 mRNA levels in joints at the peak of disease and at the end of the study. HE3286, in contrast to dexamethasone, was not immune-suppressive in several classic animal models of immune function. Instead, HE3286 treatment was associated with reduced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and in our previous studies, with increased regulatory T cells. We hypothesize that HE3286 may represent a novel, perhaps first-in-class, anti-inflammatory agent and may more fully translate the benefits of DHEA, heretofore largely limited to rodents, into treatments for human diseases, including autoimmune disorders such as RA.

  18. Appetite for life: an evaluation of a primary care lifestyle programme.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Liz; King, Bronwen; McCarthy, Nicky; Hamilton, Greg; Cook, Lynley

    2010-12-01

    Appetite for Life is a six-week primary care-based programme for women who are overweight, and aims to achieve long-term health gain through establishing healthy eating and physical activity patterns and a healthier weight. To evaluate the outcomes of Appetite for Life, a primary care-based healthy lifestyle programme for women who are overweight. Two hundred and sixty-one women enrolled and consented to take part in the six-week Appetite for Life programme via general practice and were followed for 12 months. Eating behaviours and physical activity levels were measured at baseline, six weeks, six months and 12 months. Anthropometric and biomedical data was collected at visits to the participants' general practitioners at baseline and 12 months. Positive lifestyle changes were reported that were sustained for the duration of the 12-month follow-up period. Participants reported an increase in intake of fruit and vegetables, dairy products, healthy fats and an increased level of physical activity. There was also an increase in reported enjoyment and participation in exercise. Mean weight was maintained over this time period. There was a reduction in mean LDL and total plasma cholesterol. A healthy lifestyle programme offered through primary care that is based on a non-dieting approach may help overweight women develop and sustain positive lifestyle changes.

  19. ESO Fellowship Programme 2003/2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    THE EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY AWARDS SEVERAL POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS to provide young scientists opportunities and facilities to enhance their research programmes. Its goal is to bring them into close contact with the instruments, activities, and people at one of the world's foremost observatories. For more information about ESO's astronomical research activities please consult http://www.eso.org/science/

  20. [Effectiveness of Spanish tuberculosis control programmes].

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Teresa; Caylà, Joan A

    2003-09-27

    An assessment of tuberculosis programmes was carried out in Spain in 1996. The present article looks at trends in tuberculosis control since then. A questionnaire asking about indicators, referred to year 2000, was sent to Spain's 17 autonomous regions, as well as to the autonomous cities of Ceuta and Melilla. Results were compared with those obtained in 1996. Improvements, i.e. implementation of more activities, were observed in 77.8% of operative programmes. However, 16.7% of regions have no program yet, while in 27.8% of them, control activities remain scarce. Castilla-León, Catalunya, Ceuta, Madrid, Murcia, Valencia and Galicia were the regions exhibiting more control activities. Although the trend is positive, many programmes still have a limited effectiveness.

  1. Evaluation of service users' experiences of participating in an exercise programme at the Western Australian State Forensic Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    Wynaden, Dianne; Barr, Lesley; Omari, Omar; Fulton, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    Approximately 210 patients are admitted each year to the Western Australian State Forensic Mental Health Service, and most present with psychotic illness, along with other physical and mental comorbidities. In 2010, a healthy lifestyle programme, which included a formal exercise programme coordinated by an exercise physiologist, was introduced at the service. A self-report questionnaire was developed to obtain feedback on the programme, and 56 patients completed the questionnaire during the 6-month evaluation period. As well as providing patients with access to regular physical activity, the programme also supports the recovery philosophy, where patients work in partnership with forensic mental health staff. Overall, patients reported that the programme assisted them to manage their psychiatric symptoms, as well as improving their level of fitness, confidence, and self-esteem. In addition, patients received education about the importance of regular exercise to their mental health, and the role exercise plays in preventing chronic illness and obesity. While the benefits of exercise on mental health outcomes for people with depression and anxiety are well established, this evaluation adds to the evidence that such programmes provide similar benefits to people who have a psychotic illness and are hospitalized in an acute secure setting.

  2. Impact of a nurse-led programme on comorbidity management and impact of a patient self-assessment of disease activity on the management of rheumatoid arthritis: results of a prospective, multicentre, randomised, controlled trial (COMEDRA).

    PubMed

    Dougados, Maxime; Soubrier, Martin; Perrodeau, Elodie; Gossec, Laure; Fayet, Françoise; Gilson, Mélanie; Cerato, Marie-Hélène; Pouplin, Sophie; Flipo, René-Marc; Chabrefy, Laurent; Mouterde, Gael; Euller-Ziegler, Liana; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Fautrel, Bruno; Saraux, Alain; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Chales, Gérard; Dernis, Emmanuelle; Richette, Pascal; Mariette, Xavier; Berenbaum, Francis; Sibilia, Jean; Ravaud, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are at an increased risk of developing comorbid conditions. A close monitoring of the disease targeting a status of low disease activity is associated with a better outcome. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the impact of a nurse-led programme on comorbidities and the impact of patient self-assessment of disease activity on the management of RA. We enrolled 970 patients (mean age 58 years, 79% women) in a prospective, randomised, controlled, open-label, 6-month trial. In the comorbidity group (n=482), the nurse checked comorbidities and sent the programme results to the attending physicians. In the self-assessment group (n=488), the nurse taught the patient how to calculate his/her Disease Activity Score which had to be reported on a booklet to be shared with the treating rheumatologist. The number of measures taken for comorbidities and the percentage of patients recording a change (initiation, switch or increased dose) in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in the 6 months follow-up period of the study defined the outcomes of the trial. The number of measures taken per patient was statistically higher in the comorbidity group: 4.54±2.08 versus 2.65±1.57 (p<0.001); incidence rate ratio: 1.78 (1.61-1.96) and DMARD therapy was changed more frequently in the self-assessment group: 17.2% versus 10.9% (OR=1.70 (1.17; 2.49), p=0.006). This study demonstrates the short-term benefit of a nurse-led programme on RA comorbidity management and the impact of patient self-assessment of disease activity on RA treatment intensification. NCT #01315652. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Programmable Automated Welding System (PAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    An ambitious project to develop an advanced, automated welding system is being funded as part of the Navy Joining Center with Babcock & Wilcox as the prime integrator. This program, the Programmable Automated Welding System (PAWS), involves the integration of both planning and real-time control activities. Planning functions include the development of a graphical decision support system within a standard, portable environment. Real-time control functions include the development of a modular, intelligent, real-time control system and the integration of a number of welding process sensors. This paper presents each of these components of the PAWS and discusses how they can be utilized to automate the welding operation.

  4. Establishing a standard for assessing the appropriateness of trauma team activation: a retrospective evaluation of two outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Silvia; Franklin, Katherine L; Jowett, Helen E; King, Sebastian K; Oakley, Ed; Palmer, Cameron S

    2015-09-01

    Trauma team activation (TTA) is a well-recognised standard of care to provide rapid stabilisation of patients with time-critical, life-threatening injuries. TTA is associated with a substantial use of valuable hospital resources that may adversely impact upon the care of other patients if not carefully balanced. This study aimed to determine which of the two outcome measures would be a better standard for assessing the appropriateness of TTA at a paediatric centre: retrospective major trauma classification as defined within our state, and the use of emergency department high-level resources as recently published by Falcone et al (Falcone Interventions; FI). Trauma registry data and patients' charts between February 2011 and June 2013 were reviewed. Over-triage and under-triage rates for TTA, using both major trauma and FIs as outcome measures, were compared. Totally, 280 patients received TTA, 243 met major trauma definition and 102 received one or more FIs. The rates of over-triage and under-triage were 39.7% (95% CI 35.0 to 44.6%) and 30.5% (95% CI 26.2 to 35.2%), when the major trauma definition was used as the outcome measure, and 67.5% (95% CI 62.2 to 72.5%) and 10.8% (95% CI 7.9 to 14.8%) when FI was used. Only 17.1% (95% CI 11.4% to 24.7%) of the under-triaged patients using the major trauma definition received one or more FIs. Assessment of TTA appropriateness varied significantly based on the outcome measure used. FIs better reflected the use of acute-care TTA-related resources compared with the major trauma definition, and it should be used as the gold standard to prospectively assess and refine TTA criteria. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Organisation of Management Development Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markwell, D. S.; Roberts, T. J.

    The purpose of this book is to provide practical guidelines for planning and implementing management development activities. In Part 1 Markwell establishes the framework for designing and organizing management development programs. The section covers the following topics: Practical Starting-Point for Management Development, Establishing Management…

  6. Organisation of Management Development Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markwell, D. S.; Roberts, T. J.

    The purpose of this book is to provide practical guidelines for planning and implementing management development activities. In Part 1 Markwell establishes the framework for designing and organizing management development programs. The section covers the following topics: Practical Starting-Point for Management Development, Establishing Management…

  7. The Swedish space programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helger, Arne

    The Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) under the Ministry of Industry is the central governmental agency responsible for the goverment-funded Swedish national and international space and remote sensing activities. The technical implementation is mainly contracted by the Board to the state-owned Swedish Space Corporation (SSC). International cooperation is a cornerstone in the Swedish space activities, absorbing more than 80% of the total national budget. Within ESA, Sweden participates in practically all infrastructure and applications programs. Basic research, mainly concentrated to the near earth space physics, microgravity and remote sensing are important elements in the Swedish space program. Sweden participates in the French Spot program. At Esrange, data reception, and satellite control, and tracking, telemetry command (TT&C) are performed for many international satellite projects. An SSC subsidiary, SATELLITBILD, is archiving, processing and distributing remote sensing data worldwide. The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has established a portable TT&C station for JERS-1 at Esrange, Kiruna. A center for international research on the ozone problem has been established at Esrange and Kiruna. A new sounding rocket for 15 minutes of microgravity research, MAXUS, has been developed by SSC in cooperation with Germany. A national scientific satellite, FREJA, is planned to be launched late 1992.

  8. Indolone-N-oxide derivatives: in vitro activity against fresh clinical isolates of Plasmodium falciparum, stage specificity and in vitro interactions with established antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Tahar, Rachida; Vivas, Livia; Basco, Leonardo; Thompson, Eloise; Ibrahim, Hany; Boyer, Jérémie; Nepveu, Françoise

    2011-11-01

    Indolone-N-oxides are characterized by the presence of a highly reactive pharmacophore, the nitrone moiety (C=N(+)-O(-)), which undergoes oxidation-reduction reactions. The aims of the present study were to: (i) evaluate the in vitro activity of the parent compound, designated as compound 1, against 34 fresh clinical isolates of Plasmodium falciparum; (ii) compare the activity of compound 1 with that of chloroquine and dihydroartemisinin to assess the potential for cross-resistance; (iii) investigate drug interactions of indolone-N-oxides with standard antimalarials; and (iv) determine the stage-dependent activity of indolone-N-oxides. In vitro antimalarial activity was evaluated against clinical isolates collected from Cameroonian patients by the [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation assay. In vitro interactions between compound 1 or another analogue, compound 4, and established antimalarial drugs were assessed by the fixed ratio method. Stage specificity was evaluated by light microscopy using highly synchronized P. falciparum cultures. The geometric mean 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of compound 1 was 48.6 nM. Its activity did not differ between the chloroquine-susceptible and the chloroquine-resistant isolates. There was no correlation between chloroquine and compound 1 responses (r = 0.015; P > 0.05), but the in vitro responses of compound 1 and dihydroartemisinin were significantly and positively correlated (r = 0.444; P < 0.05). No significant in vitro interaction was observed between indolone-N-oxide derivatives and established antimalarial drugs (artemisinin and its derivatives, chloroquine, amodiaquine, quinine and mefloquine). Compound 1 and compound 4, as well as artesunate, inhibited parasite maturation at the ring stage. These findings suggest that other indolone-N-oxide derivatives with more potent activity than the parent compound may hold promise as antimalarials in the future.

  9. [Programmes against depression].

    PubMed

    Taleb, M; Rouillon, F; Hegerl, U; Hamdani, N; Gorwood, Ph

    2006-01-01

    frequently criticized, as this may reduce efficacy. A multilevel approach is crucial for the success of action programmes against depression, because synergistic effects can be expected. In Germany, the "Nürnberger Bündnis gegen Depression" project was based on four levels, and effectively reduced the suicide rate. These levels of action included "cooperation with GPs", such as training sessions based on video, and presence of a phone hotline, "public relations activities", "training sessions for multipliers", such as priests, social workers and media, and "special offers for high risk groups and self-help activities". In France, such a program is clearly required.

  10. Emergent programme theories of a national quality register - a longitudinal study in Swedish elderly care.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Annika; Andersson Gäre, Boel; Andersson, Ann-Christine

    2017-07-27

    This study aimed to explore programme theories of a national quality register. A programme theory is a bundle of assumptions underpinning how and why an improvement initiative functions. The purpose was to examine and establish programme theories of a national quality register widely used in Sweden: Senior alert. The paper reports on how programme theories among change recipients emerge in relation to the established programme theory of the initiator. A qualitative approach and a longitudinal research design were used. To develop programme theories among change recipients, individual semistructured interviews were conducted. Three sets of interviews were conducted in the period of 2011 to 2013, totalling 22 interviews. In addition, 4 participant observations were made. To develop the initiator's programme theory, an iterative multistage collaboration process between the researchers and the initiator was used. A directed content analysis was used to analyse data. The initiator and change recipients described similar programme logics, but differing programme theories. With time, change recipients' programme theories emerged. Their programme theories converged and became more like the programme theory of the initiator. This study has demonstrated the importance of making both the initiator's and change recipients' programme theories explicit. To learn about conditions for improvement initiatives, comparisons between their programme theories are valuable. Differences in programme theories provide information on how initiators can customize support for their improvement initiatives. Similar programme logics can be underpinned by different programme theories, which can be deceptive. Programme theories emerge over time and need to be understood as dynamic phenomena. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effective home programme intervention for adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Novak, Iona

    2011-12-01

    To summarize evidence on effective home programme intervention for adults and describe characteristics of successful home programmes. A search was conducted of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, DARE, The Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, OTSeeker and Google Scholar and references in manuscripts retrieved. Two independent reviewers determined whether retrieved study abstracts met inclusion criteria: human subjects; adults; home programme intervention; systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials or controlled trials. Included papers were appraised for study design, participants, type and intensity of intervention, and outcomes. Methodological quality of trials was rated using the PEDro scale (1-10 highest). Thirty-two papers were retrieved (6 systematic reviews, 26 trials). The 23 randomized controlled trials and 3 controlled trials were appraised. All the retrieved papers were level 1a, 1b or 2b evidence. Major findings were: (a) home programme intervention was more effective than no intervention at all; (b) home programme intervention was equally effective to expert-provided therapy, except when therapeutic modalities were used; and (c) different instruction formats produced similar outcomes. Home programmes with favourable outcomes were more likely to: involve the patients in establishing the programme; intervene on the person, task and environment; and provide feedback about progress. Dose did not appear to be related to outcome. There is grade 1A evidence supporting the effectiveness of home programmes for adults. Home programmes are as effective as expert-provided therapy.

  12. Chromodomain, Helicase and DNA-binding CHD1 protein, CHR5, are involved in establishing active chromatin state of seed maturation genes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuan; Devic, Martine; Lepiniec, Loïc; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2015-08-01

    Chromatin modification and remodelling are the basis for epigenetic regulation of gene expression. LEAFY COTYLEDON 1 (LEC1), LEAFY COTYLEDON 2 (LEC2), ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 3 (ABI3) and FUSCA3 (FUS3) are key regulators of embryo development and are repressed after seed maturation. The chromatin remodelling CHD3 protein PICKLE (PKL) is involved in the epigenetic silencing of the genes. However, the chromatin mechanism that establishes the active state of these genes during early embryo development is not clear. We show that the Arabidopsis CHD1-related gene, CHR5, is activated during embryo development. Mutation of the gene reduced expression of LEC1, ABI3 and FUS3 in developing embryo and accumulation of seed storage proteins. Analysis of double mutants revealed an antagonistic function between CHR5 and PKL in embryo gene expression and seed storage protein accumulation, which likely acted on the promoter region of the genes. CHR5 was shown to be associated with the promoters of ABI3 and FUS3 and to be required to reduce nucleosome occupancy near the transcriptional start site. The results suggest that CHR5 is involved in establishing the active state of embryo regulatory genes by reducing nucleosomal barrier, which may be exploited to enhance seed protein production.

  13. An oxidative burst and its attenuation by bacterial peroxidase activity is required for optimal establishment of the Arachis hypogaea-Bradyrhizobium sp. symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, V; Ibáñez, F; Figueredo, M S; Fabra, A

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine whether the Arachis hypogaea L. root oxidative burst, produced at early stages of its symbiotic interaction with Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA 6144, and the bacterial antioxidant system are required for the successful development of this interaction. Pharmacological approaches were used to reduce both plant oxidative burst and bacterial peroxidase enzyme activity. In plants whose H2 O2 levels were decreased, a low nodule number, a reduction in the proportion of red nodules (%) and an increase in the bacteroid density were found. The symbiotic phenotype of plants inoculated with a Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA 6144 culture showing decreased peroxidase activity was also affected, since the biomass production, nodule number and percentage of red nodules in these plants were lower than in plants inoculated with Bradyrhizobium sp. control cultures. We demonstrated for the first time that the oxidative burst triggered at the early events of the symbiotic interaction in peanut, is a prerequisite for the efficient development of root nodules, and that the antioxidant system of bradyrhizobial peanut symbionts, particularly the activity of peroxidases, is counteracting this oxidative burst for the successful establishment of the symbiosis. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the development of the symbiotic interaction established in A. hypogaea L. a legume infected in an intercellular way. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Programmable Logic Application Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard

    2000-01-01

    This column will be provided each quarter as a source for reliability, radiation results, NASA capabilities, and other information on programmable logic devices and related applications. This quarter will start a series of notes concentrating on analysis techniques with this issues section discussing worst-case analysis requirements.

  15. Programmable physiological infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.; Adachi, R. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A programmable physiological infusion device and method are provided wherein a program source, such as a paper tape, is used to actuate an infusion pump in accordance with a desired program. The system is particularly applicable for dispensing calcium in a variety of waveforms.

  16. Programmable Logic Application Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report will be provided each quarter as a source for reliability, radiation results, NASA capabilities, and other information on programmable logic devices and related applications. This quarter will continue a series of notes concentrating on analysis techniques with this issue's section discussing the use of Root-Sum-Square calculations for digital delays.

  17. Developing Online Doctoral Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chipere, Ngoni

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to identify best practices in online doctoral programming and to synthesise these practices into a framework for developing online doctoral programmes. The field of online doctoral studies is nascent and presents challenges for conventional forms of literature review. The literature was therefore reviewed using a…

  18. Computer Programmer/Analyst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 25 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of computer programmer/analyst, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 25 units are as…

  19. Computer Programmer/Analyst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 25 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of computer programmer/analyst, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 25 units are as…

  20. Backgrounder: The MAB Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Office of Public Information.

    The Man and the Biosphere Programme (MAB) was launched in November 1971 under the auspices of Unesco. Its aim is to help to develop scientific knowledge with a view to the rational management and conservation of natural resources, to train qualified personnel in this field, and to disseminate the knowledge acquired both to the decision-makers and…

  1. Farmers Functional Literacy Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education and Social Welfare, New Delhi (India).

    The Farmers Training and Functional Literacy Programme, initiated by the government of India in 1968, was an effort to translate into practice the concept of linking education (not only vocational training) to development, particularly for increasing production. The project, a joint enterprise of three government ministries, provides participating…

  2. Backgrounder: The MAB Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Office of Public Information.

    The Man and the Biosphere Programme (MAB) was launched in November 1971 under the auspices of Unesco. Its aim is to help to develop scientific knowledge with a view to the rational management and conservation of natural resources, to train qualified personnel in this field, and to disseminate the knowledge acquired both to the decision-makers and…

  3. Developing Online Doctoral Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chipere, Ngoni

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to identify best practices in online doctoral programming and to synthesise these practices into a framework for developing online doctoral programmes. The field of online doctoral studies is nascent and presents challenges for conventional forms of literature review. The literature was therefore reviewed using a…

  4. Programmable calculator stress analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gulick, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Advanced programmable alphanumeric calculators are well suited for closed-form calculation of pressure-vessel stresses. They offer adequate computing power, portability, special programming features, and simple interactive execution procedures. Representative programs that demonstrate calculator capabilities are presented. Problems treated are stress and strength calculations in thick-walled pressure vessels and the computation of stresses near head/pressure-vessel junctures.

  5. Evaluating the effectiveness of a schools-based programme to promote exercise self-efficacy in children and young people with risk factors for obesity: steps to active kids (STAK).

    PubMed

    Glazebrook, Cris; Batty, Martin J; Mullan, Nivette; Macdonald, Ian; Nathan, Dilip; Sayal, Kapil; Smyth, Alan; Yang, Min; Guo, Boliang; Hollis, Chris

    2011-10-26

    Low levels of physical activity in children have been linked to an increased risk of obesity, but many children lack confidence in relation to exercise (exercise self-efficacy). Factors which can impact on confidence include a chronic health condition such as asthma, poor motor skills and being overweight. Increasing levels of physical activity have obvious benefits for children with asthma and children who are overweight, but few activity interventions with children specifically target children with low exercise self-efficacy (ESE). This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a schools-based activity programme suitable for children with risk factors for adult obesity, including asthma, overweight and low exercise self-efficacy. A clustered (at the level of school) RCT will be used to compare a targeted, 10 week, stepped activity programme (activity diary, dance DVD, circuit-training and motivational interviewing) designed to promote ESE. We will recruit 20 primary schools to participate in the intervention and 9-11 year old children will be screened for low levels of ESE, asthma and overweight. In order to provide sufficient power to detect a difference in primary outcomes (Body Mass Index-BMI & ESE at 12 month follow-up) between children in the intervention schools and control schools, the target sample size is 396. Assessments of BMI, ESE, waist circumference, peak flow, activity levels and emotional and behavioural difficulties will be made at baseline, 4 months and 12 month follow-up. We aim to increase ESE and levels of physical activity in children with risk factors for adult obesity. The outcomes of this study will inform policy makers about the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of delivering targeted health interventions within a school setting. ISRCTN Register no. ISRCTN12650001.

  6. Framework Programmable Platform for the Advanced Software Development Workstation (FPP/ASDW). Demonstration framework document. Volume 1: Concepts and activity descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Richard J.; Blinn, Thomas M.; Dewitte, Paul S.; Crump, John W.; Ackley, Keith A.

    1992-01-01

    The Framework Programmable Software Development Platform (FPP) is a project aimed at effectively combining tool and data integration mechanisms with a model of the software development process to provide an intelligent integrated software development environment. Guided by the model, this system development framework will take advantage of an integrated operating environment to automate effectively the management of the software development process so that costly mistakes during the development phase can be eliminated. The Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) program is conducting research into development of advanced technologies for Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE).

  7. The immunisation programme in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Irons, B; Smith, H C; Carrasco, P A; De Quadros, C

    1999-10-01

    The Directing Council of Pan American Health Organization approved a resolution concerning the formal inauguration of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) in the Americas in October 1977. Subsequently, the EPI entered full implementation in those countries that were members of the Caribbean Epidemiology Center (CAREC) during 1978-80. All 19 CAREC Member Countries (CMC) were conducting routine immunization with diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, poliomyelitis, measles and BCG vaccines by 1980. The establishment of the program in these countries resulted in focused activities, including training and the development of operational guidelines. Health education has been primarily used to encourage mothers to have their children vaccinated at optimum age, and to advise parents and guardians about adverse reaction to vaccines. Great efforts have been made in immunization coverage in all the CMCs for the six vaccine preventable diseases. The eradication of poliomyelitis, the interruption of measles transmission (8 years measles-free), and the implementation of strategies for the elimination of rubella and CRS have presented many challenges to public health practitioners in the region. The success of all these initiatives is a reflection of the deep commitment and strong partnerships, which have been developed between the governments, health practitioners, and people of the region. Moreover, technical and financial support from both international agencies and service clubs played a major role in the success of the program.

  8. Adapting Nepal’s polio eradication programme

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Krishna P; Hampton, Lee M; Bohara, Rajendra; Rai, Indra K; Anaokar, Sameer; Swift, Rachel D; Cochi, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Problem Many countries have weak disease surveillance and immunization systems. The elimination of polio creates an opportunity to use staff and assets from the polio eradication programme to control other vaccine-preventable diseases and improve disease surveillance and immunization systems. Approach In 2003, the active surveillance system of Nepal’s polio eradication programme began to report on measles and neonatal tetanus cases. Japanese encephalitis and rubella cases were added to the surveillance system in 2004. Staff from the programme aided the development and implementation of government immunization policies, helped launch vaccination campaigns, and trained government staff in reporting practices and vaccine management. Local setting Nepal eliminated indigenous polio in 2000, and controlled outbreaks caused by polio importations between 2005 and 2010. Relevant changes In 2014, the surveillance activities had expanded to 299 sites, with active surveillance for measles, rubella and neonatal tetanus, including weekly visits from 15 surveillance medical officers. Sentinel surveillance for Japanese encephalitis consisted of 132 sites. Since 2002, staff from the eradication programme have helped to introduce six new vaccines and helped to secure funding from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Staff have also assisted in responding to other health events in the country. Lesson learnt By expanding the activities of its polio eradication programme, Nepal has improved its surveillance and immunization systems and increased vaccination coverage of other vaccine-preventable diseases. Continued donor support, a close collaboration with the Expanded Programme on Immunization, and the retention of the polio eradication programme’s skilled workforce were important for this expansion. PMID:28250536

  9. Quality audit programme for (99m)Tc and (131)I radioactivity measurements with radionuclide calibrators.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Leena; Anuradha, R; Kulkarni, D B

    2008-01-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine for diagnosis and therapy has increased over the years with (99m)Tc and (131)I being most widely used. Quality audit programmes for radioactivity measurements of (131)I have been ongoing and the 12th audit was recently conducted among seventy nuclear medicine centres (NMC) in India. An audit for the activity measurements of (99m)Tc was conducted for the first time among ten NMCs in Mumbai, India. These programmes for radioactivity measurements have become very important to establish traceability of measurements to national and international standards and ensure accurate calibration of radionuclide calibrators. The results of both the audits are very encouraging. Ninety-four percent of the NMCs for (131)I activity measurements were within a window of +/-10% and for (99m)Tc one NMC was deviating more than +/-10%. The methodology adopted for the audit and results are discussed in detail in this paper.

  10. Comparison of antifungal activities of gentian violet and povidone-iodine against clinical isolates of Candida s