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Sample records for activity ratios range

  1. Relationship between active cervical range of motion and flexion-relaxation ratio in asymptomatic computer workers.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu; Park, Se-Yeon; Lee, Mi-Ra

    2011-01-01

    A high prevalence and incidence of neck and shoulder pain is present in the working population, especially sedentary workers. Recent findings have indicated that the flexion-relaxation (FR) ratio in the cervical erector spinae (CES) muscles might be a significant criteria of neuromuscular impairment and function. Additionally, the active cervical range of motion (ROM) is frequently used for discriminating between individuals with pain and those who are asymptomatic. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the active cervical ROM and the FR ratio in a sample of regular visual display terminal (VDT) workers. In total, 20 asymptomatic male VDT workers were recruited. Active cervical ROM was measured by a cervical ROM (CROM) instrument. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to collect myoelectrical signals from the CES muscles, and the FR ratio was calculated for statistical analysis. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quantify the linear relationship between the active cervical ROM and the FR ratio. The values obtained for the FR ratio in the right CES muscles correlated significantly with the active cervical ROM measured in flexion (r=0.73, p<0.01), left lateral flexion (r=0.64, p<0.01), and left rotation (r=0.60, p<0.01). Flexion (r=0.74, p<0.01) and right lateral flexion (r=0.61, p<0.01) positively correlated with the left FR ratio. Extension and right rotation showed either a very weak or no correlation with the mean value of the right and left FR ratio. Our findings suggested that the cervical FR ratio had a positive correlation with cervical movements, and that changes of the activation patterns in CES demonstrated as cervical FR ratio are associated with reduction of the cervical range of motion including flexion and lateral flexion. In addition, muscular dysfunction of the CES could occur in regular computer workers prior to occurrence of pain; this means that the FR ratio could be used to evaluate the potential

  2. Floral ratios in the figs of Ficus montana span the range from actively to passively pollinated fig trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleman, Nazia; Quinnell, Rupert J.; Compton, Stephen G.

    2014-05-01

    Fig trees (Ficus spp., Moraceae) and their associated obligate pollinator fig wasps (Agaonidae) are partners in what is often a pair-wise species-specific association. Their interaction centres on the unique enclosed inflorescence of Ficus species - the fig. Among dioecious fig tree species, only pollinated ovules in figs on female trees develop into seeds. On male trees, galled ovules support development of the fig wasp offspring that will transport their pollen, but no seeds develop. Some fig wasp species actively collect and disperse pollen, whereas others are typical insect pollinators in that pollen is transferred passively. Active pollination is associated with improved larval survivorship in pollinated figs. Because active pollination is much more efficient, their host figs need to contain far fewer male flowers and across numerous Ficus species anther-ovule ratios are a good predictor of pollination mode. We examined variation in inflorescence size and floral ratios among male figs of the Asian Ficus montana and its consequences for the amounts of pollen that would be available for each pollinator to collect. Inflorescence size (total flower number) was highly variable, and female pollinator offspring production was higher in figs with more female flowers. Pollinator offspring numbers and anther-ovule ratios were also highly variable, and encompassed the range typical of both actively and passively pollinated fig tree species. In combination, this variation resulted in large differences in the extent to which pollinators were competing for access to pollen, with potential fitness consequences for both partners in the mutualism.

  3. {alpha}/{beta} ratio: A dose range dependence study

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Lourdes M. . E-mail: logarcia@ottawahospital.on.ca; Wilkins, David E.; Raaphorst, Gijsbert P.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dependence of the {alpha}/{beta} ratio determined from in vitro survival curves on the dose ranges. Methods: Detailed clonogenic cell survival experiments were used to determine the least squares estimators for the linear quadratic model for different dose ranges. The cell lines used were CHO AA8, a Chinese hamster fibroblast cell line; U-373 MG, a human glioblastoma cell line; and CP3 and DU-145, two human prostate carcinoma cell lines. The {alpha}, {beta}, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio behaviors, combined with a goodness-of-fit analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of the experiments, were assessed within different dose regions. Results: Including data from the low-dose region has a significant influence on the determination of the {alpha}, {beta}, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio from in vitro survival curve data. In this region, the values are poorly determined and have significant variability. The mid-dose region is characterized by more precise and stable values and is in agreement with the linear quadratic model. The high-dose region shows relatively small statistical error in the fitted parameters but the goodness-of-fit and Monte Carlo analyses showed poor quality fits. Conclusion: The dependence of the fitted {alpha} and {beta} on the dose range has an impact on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio determined from the survival data. The low-dose region had a significant influence that could be a result of a strong linear, rather than quadratic, component, hypersensitivity, and adaptive responses. This dose dependence should be interpreted as a caution against using inadequate in vitro cell survival data for {alpha}/{beta} ratio determination.

  4. Range indices of geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.F.; Green, A.W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The simplest index of geomagnetic activity is the range in nT from maximum to minimum value of the field in a given time interval. The hourly range R was recommended by IAGA for use at observatories at latitudes greater than 65??, but was superceded by AE. The most used geomagnetic index K is based on the range of activity in a 3 h interval corrected for the regular daily variation. In order to take advantage of real time data processing, now available at many observatories, it is proposed to introduce a 1 h range index and also a 3 h range index. Both will be computed hourly, i.e. each will have a series of 24 per day, the 3 h values overlapping. The new data will be available as the range (R) of activity in nT and also as a logarithmic index (I) of the range. The exponent relating index to range in nT is based closely on the scale used for computing K values. The new ranges and range indices are available, from June 1987, to users in real time and can be accessed by telephone connection or computer network. Their first year of production is regarded as a trial period during which their value to the scientific and commercial communities will be assessed, together with their potential as indicators of regional and global disturbances' and in which trials will be conducted into ways of eliminating excessive bias at quiet times due to the rate of change of the daily variation field. ?? 1988.

  5. Ranging performance of active laser detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Huayan; Xiong, Fei; Gu, Suolin

    2006-06-01

    Ranging performance is described for photoelectric equipment reconnaissance using an active laser detection system that is based on the 'cat's eyes' effect of optical windows. Active laser detection systems have an advantage over passive systems because they can measure target velocity and spatial coordinates. However, there are several challenging problems here because of the great distances involved, the low returned power of the uncooperative target, and the optical aberrations induced by the atmosphere. In the design of this system, the principle of detection is based on the 'cat's eyes' effect according to which the optical windows of photoelectric equipments have a strong reflect character towards incident laser beam. With 'cat's eyes' effect, the detection of uncooperative target can be translated into one of a cooperative target, so the ratio of returned laser can be increased. In this paper, the ranging performance presented here takes into account all the various elements of the system, from the laser emission, target, atmospheric propagation to the detector. The characteristics of back-reflected laser and an estimate of the laser Cross Section (LCS) from 'cat's eyes target' are investigated in theory and simulation. The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is calculated by combining the probability of detection of the system for given electronic characteristics of the system and for a given probability of false alarms. On the basis of analysis of SNR, minimum detectable signal power, operating distance of the system and factors affecting the ranging performance is analyzed. Results indicate that system has characters of long range, and high sensitivity. It can be used to detect the aerial targets such as reconnaissance drone, navigate missile, reconnaissance satellite etc.

  6. Flame Inhibition by Phosphorus-Containing Compounds over a Range of Equivalence Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaweera, T M; Melius, C F; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Korobeinichev, O P; Shvartsberg, V M; Shmakov, A G; Rybitskaya, I V; Curran, H

    2004-03-17

    There is much interest in the combustion mechanism of organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) due to their role as potential halon replacements in fire suppression. A continuing investigation of the inhibition activity of organophosphorus compounds under a range of equivalence ratios was performed experimentally and computationally, as measured by the burning velocity. Updates to a previous mechanism were made by the addition and modification of reactions in the mechanism for a more complete description of the recombination reactions. In this work, the laminar flame speed is measured experimentally and calculated numerically for a premixed propane/air flame, under a range of equivalence ratios, undoped and doped with dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). A detailed investigation of the catalytic cycles involved in the recombination of key flame radicals is made for two equivalence ratios, lean and rich. From this, the importance of different catalytic cycles involved in the lean versus rich case is discussed. Although the importance of certain cycles is different under different stoichiometries, the OPCs are similarly effective across the range, demonstrating the robustness of OPCs as flame suppressants. In addition, it is shown that the phosphorus compounds are most active in the high temperature region of the flame. This may, in part, explain their high level of inhibition effectiveness.

  7. Simulation of signal-to-noise ratio for the laser range-gated imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weiwei; Chen, Qianrong; Hao, Yongwang; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Wenpan

    2015-10-01

    The laser active imaging system is widely used in night vision, underwater imaging, three-dimension scene imaging and other civilian applications, and the system's detected range increase greatly comparing with the passive imaging system. In recent years, with rapid development of sensor and laser source technique, the laser range-gated imaging system is achieved based on high peak power pulsed laser and gated intensified CCD(ICCD), and it is well known for its properties such as high suppression of backscatter noise from fog and other obscurants, high resolution, long detection range and direct visualization. However, the performance of the laser range-gated imaging system is seriously affected by many factors, and the relationships between system's Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and influence factors are not further elaborated. In this paper, the simulation of SNR for the laser range-gated imaging system is studied. The principle of the laser range-gated imaging system is shown firstly, and the range equation is derived by means of deducing laser illuminating model according to the principle of laser radar and the characters of objects and the detectors. And then, the sources of noise are analyzed by accurately modeling all noise sources in the detection system, the model of SNR for laser range-gated imaging system is established. Finally, the relationships between SNR of system and influence factors such as gating time, laser pulse width and repetition frequency are discussed, and correspondingly the solutions are proposed.

  8. Activity ratios of thorium daughters in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Toohey, R.E.; Rundo, J.; Sha, J.Y.; Essling, M.A.; Pedersen, J.C.; Slane, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized method of least squares has been used to analyze the /sup 228/Ac and /sup 212/Pb-/sup 212/Bi and daughter ..gamma..-ray spectra obtained in vivo from 133 former workers at a thorium refinery. In addition, the exhalation rate of /sup 220/Rn was determined for each subject and expressed as pCi of emanating /sup 224/Ra. This value was added to the /sup 212/Pb value determined from the ..gamma..-ray measurements to obtain the total /sup 224/Ra present, and the ratio of /sup 224/Ra to /sup 228/Ac was calculated. Values of the ratio ranged from 0.52 +- 0.32 to 2.1 +- 1.7, with a weighted mean of 0.92 +- 0.17. However, it appears that the ratio observed in a given case is characteristic for that case alone; the computed mean value may not be meaningful. The least squares fitting procedure and the overall calibration of the counting system were validated by measurements of /sup 224/Ra in the lungs of one subject postmortem, compared with results obtained from the same subject in vivo. 6 references, 5 figures.

  9. Stable isotope ratio analysis to differentiate temporal diets of a free-ranging herbivore.

    PubMed

    Walter, W D; Leslie, D M

    2009-07-01

    Stable isotope ratio analysis (SIRA) of carbon (delta13C) and nitrogen (delta15N) in tissue samples of herbivores can identify photosynthetic pathways (C3 vs. C4) of plants consumed. We present results from free-ranging Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) that highlight the ability to differentiate diets using tissue delta13C and delta15N. The signatures of delta13C and delta15N differed in tissues of varying metabolic activity: muscle, a short-term dietary indicator (i.e., 1-2 months) and hoof, a long-term dietary indicator (i.e., 3-12 months). We also documented that delta13C and delta15N values along elk hooves (proximal, middle, distal sections) elucidated temporal shifts in dietary selection. The carbon isotopes of the composite hoof were similar to those of the middle section, but the composite hoof differed in delta(13)C from the distal and proximal sections. The delta13C and delta15N signatures also differed among elk populations, indicating temporal dietary shifts of individuals occupying disparate native range and human-derived agricultural landscapes. Analyses of stable isotopes in various tissues highlighted carbon and nitrogen assimilation through time and differences in the foraging ecology of a rangeland herbivore. PMID:19530151

  10. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy of cylinders over the full range of Poisson's ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaglinski, Tim; Lakes, Roderic S.

    2011-03-01

    Mode structure maps for freely vibrating cylinders over a range of Poisson's ratio, ν, are desirable for the design and interpretation of experiments using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). The full range of isotropic ν (-1 to +0.5) is analyzed here using a finite element method to accommodate materials with a negative Poisson's ratio. The fundamental torsional mode has the lowest frequency provided ν is between about -0.24 and +0.5. For any ν, the torsional mode can be identified utilizing the polarization sensitivity of the shear transducers. RUS experimental results for materials with Poisson's ratio +0.3, +0.16, and -0.3 and a previous numerical study for ν = 0.33 are compared with the present analysis. Interpretation of results is easiest if the length/diameter ratio of the cylinder is close to 1. Slight material anisotropy leads to splitting of the higher modes but not of the fundamental torsion mode.

  11. How do climate-linked sex ratios and dispersal limit range boundaries?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Geographic ranges of ectotherms such as reptiles may be determined strongly by abiotic factors owing to causal links between ambient temperature, juvenile survival and individual sex (male or female). Unfortunately, we know little of how these factors interact with dispersal among populations across a species range. We used a simulation model to examine the effects of dispersal, temperature-dependent juvenile survival and sex determining mechanism (temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) and genotypic sex determination (GSD)) and their interactions, on range limits in populations extending across a continuous range of air temperatures. In particular, we examined the relative importance of these parameters for population persistence to recommend targets for future empirical research. Results Dispersal influenced the range limits of species with TSD to a greater extent than in GSD species. Whereas male dispersal led to expanded species ranges across warm (female-producing) climates, female dispersal led to expanded ranges across cool (male-producing) climates. Two-sex dispersal eliminated the influence of biased sex ratios on ranges. Conclusion The results highlight the importance of the demographic parameter of sex ratio in determining population persistence and species range limits. PMID:25011492

  12. Generalized weighted ratio method for accurate turbidity measurement over a wide range.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Ping; Song, Hong; Guo, Yilu; Zhan, Shuyue; Huang, Hui; Wang, Hangzhou; Tao, Bangyi; Mu, Quanquan; Xu, Jing; Li, Dejun; Chen, Ying

    2015-12-14

    Turbidity measurement is important for water quality assessment, food safety, medicine, ocean monitoring, etc. In this paper, a method that accurately estimates the turbidity over a wide range is proposed, where the turbidity of the sample is represented as a weighted ratio of the scattered light intensities at a series of angles. An improvement in the accuracy is achieved by expanding the structure of the ratio function, thus adding more flexibility to the turbidity-intensity fitting. Experiments have been carried out with an 850 nm laser and a power meter fixed on a turntable to measure the light intensity at different angles. The results show that the relative estimation error of the proposed method is 0.58% on average for a four-angle intensity combination for all test samples with a turbidity ranging from 160 NTU to 4000 NTU. PMID:26699060

  13. Dispersal, niche breadth and population extinction: colonization ratios predict range size in North American dragonflies.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Shannon J; Davis, Christopher J; Werner, Earl E; Robeson, Michael S

    2014-07-01

    negative relationship between North American range size and species' extinction-to-colonization ratios. Our results indicate that metapopulation dynamics act to shape the extent of species' continental distributions. These population dynamics are likely to interact with dispersal behaviour, particularly at species range margins, to determine range limits and ultimately species range sizes. PMID:24237364

  14. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  15. Statewide Analysis of the Drainage-Area Ratio Method for 34 Streamflow Percentile Ranges in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.; Vrabel, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The drainage-area ratio method commonly is used to estimate streamflow for sites where no streamflow data are available using data from one or more nearby streamflow-gaging stations. The method is intuitive and straightforward to implement and is in widespread use by analysts and managers of surface-water resources. The method equates the ratio of streamflow at two stream locations to the ratio of the respective drainage areas. In practice, unity often is assumed as the exponent on the drainage-area ratio, and unity also is assumed as a multiplicative bias correction. These two assumptions are evaluated in this investigation through statewide analysis of daily mean streamflow in Texas. The investigation was made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. More than 7.8 million values of daily mean streamflow for 712 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Texas were analyzed. To account for the influence of streamflow probability on the drainage-area ratio method, 34 percentile ranges were considered. The 34 ranges are the 4 quartiles (0-25, 25-50, 50-75, and 75-100 percent), the 5 intervals of the lower tail of the streamflow distribution (0-1, 1-2, 2-3, 3-4, and 4-5 percent), the 20 quintiles of the 4 quartiles (0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-20, 20-25, 25-30, 30-35, 35-40, 40-45, 45-50, 50-55, 55-60, 60-65, 65-70, 70-75, 75-80, 80-85, 85-90, 90-95, and 95-100 percent), and the 5 intervals of the upper tail of the streamflow distribution (95-96, 96-97, 97-98, 98-99 and 99-100 percent). For each of the 253,116 (712X711/2) unique pairings of stations and for each of the 34 percentile ranges, the concurrent daily mean streamflow values available for the two stations provided for station-pair application of the drainage-area ratio method. For each station pair, specific statistical summarization (median, mean, and standard deviation) of both the exponent and bias-correction components of the drainage-area ratio

  16. Species–genus ratios reflect a global history of diversification and range expansion in marine bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Andrew Z; Jablonski, David; Valentine, James W

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of marine bivalve species among genera and higher taxa takes the form of the classic hollow curve, wherein few lineages are species rich and many are species poor. The distribution of species among genera (S/G ratio) varies with latitude, with temperate S/G's falling within the null expectation, and tropical and polar S/G's exceeding it. Here, we test several hypotheses for this polar overdominance in the species richness of small numbers of genera. We find a significant positive correlation between the latitudinal range of a genus and its species richness, both globally and within regions. Genus age and species richness are also positively related, but this relationship breaks down when the analysis is limited to genera endemic to climate zones or with narrow latitudinal ranges. The data suggest a link between speciation and range-expansion, with genera expanding out of the tropical latitudinal bins tending to speciate more prolifically, both globally and regionally. These genera contain more species within climate zones than taxa endemic to that zone. Range expansion thus appears to be fundamentally coupled with speciation, producing the skewed distribution of species among genera, both globally and regionally, whereas clade longevity is achieved through extinction—resistance conferred by broad geographical ranges. PMID:18270156

  17. Preliminary core design studies for the advanced burner reactor over a wide range of conversion ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E. A.; Yang, W. S.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-05-05

    A consistent set of designs for 1000 MWt commercial-scale sodium-cooled Advance Burner Reactors (ABR) have been developed for both metal and oxide-fueled cores with conversion ratios from breakeven (CR=1.0) to fertile-free (CR=0.0). These designs are expected to satisfy thermal and irradiation damage limits based on the currently available data. The very low conversion ratio designs require fuel that is beyond the current fuel database, which is anticipated to be qualified by and for the Advanced Burned Test Reactor. Safety and kinetic parameters were calculated, but a safety analysis was not performed. Development of these designs was required to achieve the primary goal of this study, which was to generate representative fuel cycle mass flows for system studies of ABRs as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). There are slight variations with conversion ratio but the basic ABR configuration consists of 144 fuel assemblies and between 9 and 22 primary control assemblies for both the metal and oxide-fueled cores. Preliminary design studies indicated that it is feasible to design the ABR to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratio by employing different assembly designs and including sufficient control assemblies to accommodate the large reactivity swing at low conversion ratios. The assemblies are designed to fit within the same geometry, but the size and number of fuel pins within each assembly are significantly different in order to achieve the target conversion ratio while still satisfying thermal limits. Current irradiation experience would allow for a conversion ratio of somewhat below 0.75. The fuel qualification for the first ABR should expand this experience to allow for much lower conversion ratios and higher bunrups. The current designs were based on assumptions about the performance of high and very high enrichment fuel, which results in significant uncertainty about the details of the designs. However, the basic fuel cycle performance

  18. Long-range dismount activity classification: LODAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garagic, Denis; Peskoe, Jacob; Liu, Fang; Cuevas, Manuel; Freeman, Andrew M.; Rhodes, Bradley J.

    2014-06-01

    Continuous classification of dismount types (including gender, age, ethnicity) and their activities (such as walking, running) evolving over space and time is challenging. Limited sensor resolution (often exacerbated as a function of platform standoff distance) and clutter from shadows in dense target environments, unfavorable environmental conditions, and the normal properties of real data all contribute to the challenge. The unique and innovative aspect of our approach is a synthesis of multimodal signal processing with incremental non-parametric, hierarchical Bayesian machine learning methods to create a new kind of target classification architecture. This architecture is designed from the ground up to optimally exploit correlations among the multiple sensing modalities (multimodal data fusion) and rapidly and continuously learns (online self-tuning) patterns of distinct classes of dismounts given little a priori information. This increases classification performance in the presence of challenges posed by anti-access/area denial (A2/AD) sensing. To fuse multimodal features, Long-range Dismount Activity Classification (LODAC) develops a novel statistical information theoretic approach for multimodal data fusion that jointly models multimodal data (i.e., a probabilistic model for cross-modal signal generation) and discovers the critical cross-modal correlations by identifying components (features) with maximal mutual information (MI) which is efficiently estimated using non-parametric entropy models. LODAC develops a generic probabilistic pattern learning and classification framework based on a new class of hierarchical Bayesian learning algorithms for efficiently discovering recurring patterns (classes of dismounts) in multiple simultaneous time series (sensor modalities) at multiple levels of feature granularity.

  19. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) has demonstrated and modelled the usefulness of barometric pumping induced soil gas sampling during On-Site inspections. Gas transport has been widely studied with different numerical codes. However, gas transport of all radioxenons in the post-detonation regime and their possible fractionation is still neglected in the open literature. Atmospheric concentrations of the radioxenons Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-131m can be used to discriminate between civilian releases (nuclear power plants or medical isotope facilities), and nuclear explosion sources. It is based on the isotopic activity ratio method. Yet it is not clear whether subsurface migration of the radioxenons, with eventual release into the atmosphere, can affect the activity ratios due to fractionation. Fractionation can be caused by different diffusivities due to mass differences between the radioxenons. A previous study showed surface arrival time of a chemically inert gaseous tracer is affected by its diffusivity. They observed detectable amount for SF6 50 days after detonation and 375 days for He-3. They predict 50 and 80 days for Xe-133 and Ar-37 respectively. Cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can drive subsurface gas transport. This barometric pumping phenomenon causes an oscillatoric flow in upward trending fractures which, combined with diffusion into the porous matrix, leads to a net transport of gaseous components - a ratcheting effect. We use a general purpose reservoir simulator (Complex System Modelling Platform, CSMP++) which has been applied in a range of fields such as deep geothermal systems, three-phase black oil simulations , fracture propagation in fractured, porous media, Navier-Stokes pore-scale modelling among others. It is specifically designed to account for structurally complex geologic situation of fractured, porous media. Parabolic differential equations are solved by a continuous Galerkin finite-element method, hyperbolic

  20. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) has demonstrated and modelled the usefulness of barometric pumping induced gas transport and subsequent soil gas sampling during On-Site inspections. Generally, gas transport has been widely studied with different numerical codes. However, gas transport of radioxenons and radioiodines in the post-detonation regime and their possible fractionation is still neglected in the open peer-reviewed literature. Atmospheric concentrations of the radioxenons Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-131m can be used to discriminate between civilian releases (nuclear power plants or medical isotope facilities), and nuclear explosion sources. It is based on the multiple isotopic activity ratio method. Yet it is not clear whether subsurface migration of the radionuclides, with eventual release into the atmosphere, can affect the activity ratios due to fractionation. Fractionation can be caused by different mass diffusivities due to mass differences between the radionuclides. Cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can drive subsurface gas transport. This barometric pumping phenomenon causes an oscillatoric flow in upward trending fractures or highly conductive faults which, combined with diffusion into the porous matrix, leads to a net transport of gaseous components - a so-called ratcheting effect. We use a general purpose reservoir simulator (Complex System Modelling Platform, CSMP++) which is recognized by the oil industry as leading in Discrete Fracture-Matrix (DFM) simulations. It has been applied in a range of fields such as deep geothermal systems, three-phase black oil simulations, fracture propagation in fractured, porous media, and Navier-Stokes pore-scale modelling among others. It is specifically designed to account for structurally complex geologic situation of fractured, porous media. Parabolic differential equations are solved by a continuous Galerkin finite-element method, hyperbolic differential equations by a complementary finite

  1. Long-range forces affecting equilibrium inertial focusing behavior in straight high aspect ratio microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Amy E.; Oakey, John

    2016-04-01

    The controlled and directed focusing of particles within flowing fluids is a problem of fundamental and technological significance. Microfluidic inertial focusing provides passive and precise lateral and longitudinal alignment of small particles without the need for external actuation or sheath fluid. The benefits of inertial focusing have quickly enabled the development of miniaturized flow cytometers, size-selective sorting devices, and other high-throughput particle screening tools. Straight channel inertial focusing device design requires knowledge of fluid properties and particle-channel size ratio. Equilibrium behavior of inertially focused particles has been extensively characterized and the constitutive phenomena described by scaling relationships for straight channels of square and rectangular cross section. In concentrated particle suspensions, however, long-range hydrodynamic repulsions give rise to complex particle ordering that, while interesting and potentially useful, can also dramatically diminish the technique's effectiveness for high-throughput particle handling applications. We have empirically investigated particle focusing behavior within channels of increasing aspect ratio and have identified three scaling regimes that produce varying degrees of geometrical ordering between focused particles. To explore the limits of inertial particle focusing and identify the origins of these long-range interparticle forces, we have explored equilibrium focusing behavior as a function of channel geometry and particle concentration. Experimental results for highly concentrated particle solutions identify equilibrium thresholds for focusing that scale weakly with concentration and strongly with channel geometry. Balancing geometry mediated inertial forces with estimates for interparticle repulsive forces now provide a complete picture of pattern formation among concentrated inertially focused particles and enhance our understanding of the fundamental limits of

  2. Testing copper-speciation predictions in freshwaters over a wide range of metal-organic matter ratios.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Imad A M; Hamilton Taylor, John; Lofts, Stephen; Meeussen, Johannes C L; Lin, Chun; Zhang, Hao; Davison, William

    2013-02-01

    The harsh chemical conditions involved in the isolation of fulvic acids (FA) and humic acids (HA) have been identified as a possible contributing factor to the significant mismatch between in situ measurements and model predictions of trace metal speciation in freshwaters, resulting from the use of isolated FA and HA in model calibration. A set of experimental assays were developed to enable Cu binding to DOM to be measured over the full range of [Cu]/[DOC] ratios (∼1-460 μmol g(-1)) observed in surface freshwaters. They were applied to the widely used and traditionally isolated Suwannee River HA and FA and to DOM isolated from headwater streams by a mild procedure using minimal chemical treatment. Good agreement was observed between measured free ion activities and those predicted using both WHAM/Model VII and NICA-Donnan speciation models for both traditionally and mildly isolated DOM. Agreement to within a factor of 2 for WHAM/Model VII contrasts with 100-fold differences previously reported between in situ Cu(2+) measurements and model predictions for a wide range of conditions. The results demonstrate that (a) existing speciation models are capable of accurately predicting Cu-humic binding in natural waters at environmentally realistic [Cu]/[DOC] ratios, under equilibrium conditions, and (b) that the isolation procedures traditionally used for HA and FA do not appreciably affect their binding characteristics. PMID:23286231

  3. Activity ratios of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase accurately reflect carbamylation ratios. [Phaseolus vulgaris, Spinacla oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, N.D.; Sharkey, T.D. )

    1989-03-01

    Activity ratios and carbamylation ratios of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) were determined for leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris and Spinacia oleracea exposed to a variety of partial pressures of CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} and photon flux densities (PFD). It was found that activity ratios accurately predicted carbamylation ratios except in extracts from leaves held in low PFD. In particular, it was confirmed that the loss of FuBPCase activity in low partial pressure of O{sub 2} and high PFD results from reduced carbamylation. Activity ratios of RuBPCase were lower than carbamylation ratios for Phaseolus leaves sampled in low PFD, presumably because of the presence of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate. Spinacia leaves sampled in darkness also exhibited lower activity ratios than carbamylation ratios indicating that this species may also have an RuBPCase inhibitor even though carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate has not been detected in this species in the past.

  4. Relief Evolution in Tectonically Active Mountain Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, Kelin X.

    2004-01-01

    The overall aims of this 3-yr project, as originally proposed were to: (1) investigate quantitatively the roles of fluvial and glacial erosion in the evolution of relief in mountainous regions, and (2) test rigorously the quality and accuracy of SRTM topographic data in areas of rugged relief - both the most challenging and of greatest interest to geomorphic, neotectonic, and hazards applications. Natural laboratories in both the western US and the Southern Alps of New Zealand were identified as most promising. The project has been both successful and productive, despite the fact that no SRTM data for our primary field sites in New Zealand were released on the time frame of the work effort. Given the delayed release of SRTM data, we pursued the scientific questions of the roles of fluvial and, especially, glacial erosion in the evolution of relief in mountainous regions using available digital elevation models (DEMs) for the Southern Alps of New Zealand (available at both 25m and 50m pixel sizes), and USGS 10m and 30m DEMs within the Western US. As emphasized in the original proposal, we chose the emphasis on the role of glacial modification of topographic relief because there has been little quantitative investigation of glacial erosion processes at landscape scale. This is particularly surprising considering the dramatic sculpting of most mid- and high-latitude mountain ranges, the prodigious quantities of glacially-derived sediment in terrestrial and marine basins, and the current cross-disciplinary interest in the role of denudational processes in orogenesis and the evolution of topography in general. Moreover, the evolution of glaciated landscapes is not only a fundamental problem in geomorphology in its own right, but also is at the heart of the debate over Late Cenozoic linkages between climate and tectonics.

  5. Peanut Oil Stability and Physical Properties Across a Range of Industrially Relevant O/L Ratios

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High oleic cultivars are becoming increasing prevalent in the peanut industry due to their increased shelf life compared to conventional cultivars. High oleic peanuts are typically defined as having oleic acid/linoleic acid (O/L) ratios = 9, whereas most traditional varieties have O/L ratios near 1...

  6. Peanut Oil Stability and Physical Properties Across a Range of Industrially Relevant O/L Ratios

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High oleic cultivars are becoming increasing prevalent in the peanut industry due to their increased shelf life compared to conventional cultivars. High oleic peanuts are typically defined as having oleic acid/linoleic acid (O/L) ratios = 9, whereas most traditional varieties have O/L ratios near 1....

  7. Gas-to-dust mass ratios in local galaxies over a 2 dex metallicity range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Madden, S. C.; Galliano, F.; Galametz, M.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Asano, R. S.; Zhukovska, S.; Lebouteiller, V.; Cormier, D.; Jones, A.; Bocchio, M.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; DeLooze, I.; Doublier-Pritchard, V.; Hughes, T.; Karczewski, O. Ł.; Spinoglio, L.

    2014-03-01

    Aims: The goal of this paper is to analyse the behaviour of the gas-to-dust mass ratio (G/D) of local Universe galaxies over a wide metallicity range. We especially focus on the low-metallicity part of the G/D vs metallicity relation and investigate several explanations for the observed relation and scatter. Methods: We assembled a total of 126 galaxies, covering a 2 dex metallicity range and with 30% of the sample with 12 + log(O/H)≤ 8.0. We homogeneously determined the dust masses with a semi-empirical dust model including submm constraints. The atomic and molecular gas masses have been compiled from the literature. We used two XCO scenarios to estimate the molecular gas mass: the Galactic conversion factor, XCO,MW, and a XCO that depends on the metallicity XCO,Z (∝Z-2). We modelled the observed trend of the G/D with metallicity using two simple power laws (slope of -1 and free) and a broken power law. Correlations with morphological type, stellar masses, star formation rates, and specific star formation rates are also discussed. We then compared the observed evolution of the G/D with predictions from several chemical evolution models and explored different physical explanations for the observed scatter in the G/D values. Results: We find that out of the five tested galactic parameters, metallicity is the main physical property of the galaxy driving the observed G/D. The G/D versus metallicity relation cannot be represented by a single power law with a slope of -1 over the whole metallicity range. The observed trend is steeper for metallicities lower than ~8.0. A large scatter is observed in the G/D values for a given metallicity: in metallicity bins of ~0.1 dex, the dispersion around the mean value is ~0.37 dex. On average, the broken power law reproduces the observed G/D best compared to the two power laws (slope of -1 or free) and provides estimates of the G/D that are accurate to a factor of 1.6. The good agreement of observed values of the G/D and its

  8. Composite flexible skin with large negative Poisson’s ratio range: numerical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Scarpa, F.; Farrow, I. R.; Liu, Y. J.; Leng, J. S.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the manufacturing, characterization and parametric modeling of a novel fiber-reinforced composite flexible skin with in-plane negative Poisson’s ratio (auxetic) behavior. The elastic mechanical performance of the auxetic skin is evaluated using a three-dimensional analytical model based on the classical laminate theory (CLT) and Sun’s thick laminate theory. Good agreement is observed between in-plane Poisson’s ratios and Young’s moduli of the composite skin obtained by the theoretical model and the experimental results. A parametric analysis carried out with the validated model shows that significant changes in the in-plane negative Poisson’s ratio can be achieved through different combinations of matrix and fiber materials and stacking sequences. It is also possible to identify fiber-reinforced composite skin configurations with the same in-plane auxeticity but different orthotropic stiffness performance, or the same orthotropic stiffness performance but different in-plane auxeticity. The analysis presented in this work provides useful guidelines to develop and manufacture flexible skins with negative Poisson’s ratio for applications focused on morphing aircraft wing designs.

  9. Accuracy of Linear Depolarisation Ratios in Clean Air Ranges Measured with POLIS-6 at 355 and 532 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthaler, Volker; Seefeldner, Meinhard; Groß, Silke; Wandinger, Ulla

    2016-06-01

    Linear depolarization ratios in clean air ranges were measured with POLIS-6 at 355 and 532 nm. The mean deviation from the theoretical values, including the rotational Raman lines within the filter bandwidths, amounts to 0.0005 at 355 nm and to 0.0012 at 532 nm. The mean uncertainty of the measured linear depolarization ratio of clean air is about 0.0005 at 355 nm and about 0.0006 at 532 nm.

  10. Significance of normal range urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in Chinese subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jing; Zhang, Jin-ping; Xie, Ling-ting; He, Yi-fan; Lv, Yan-yu; Jiang, Hong; Xing, Xiao-Yan

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate clinical features of Chinese metabolic syndrome (MS) subjects with normal urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) and to estimate independent correlation factor for UACR. Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey in participants having MS. The patients with different grade of albuminuria were divided into 4 groups according to the value of UACR (<10, 10-20, 21-30, >30 mg/g). All underwent biochemical tests. Bioelectrical impedance body fat content, islet β-cell function and insulin sensitivity were measured. Multivariable linear regression models were applied to further determine association between UACR and clinical factors with adjustment. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), TG, fat mass, fat content and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were significantly higher in the group with UACR at 10-20 mg/g than those in the group with UACA lower than 10 mg/g (P<0.05). Multivariable linear regression showed that TG, HbA1c, waist-hip ratio (WHR) and SBP were independently associated with UACR. The patients with normal UACR had abnormal levels of MS components. The factors independently associated with UACR were TG, HbA1c, WHR and SBP. PMID:26670437

  11. Signal-to-noise ratio in neuro activation PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Votaw, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    It has become commonplace to compare scanner sensitivity characteristics by comparing noise equivalent count rate curves. However, because a 20-cm diameter uniform phantom is drastically difference from a human brain, these curves give misleading information when planning a neuro activation PET experiment. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) calculations have been performed using measured data (Siemens 921 scanner) from the three-dimensional (3-D) Hoffman brain phantom for the purpose of determining the optimal injection and scanning protocol for [{sup 15}O] labeled activation experiments. Region of interest (ROI) values along with the variance due to prompt (trues plus randoms) and random events were determined for various regions and radioactivity concentrations. Calculated attenuation correction was used throughout. Scatter correction was not used when calculating the SNR in activation studies because the number of scattered events is almost identical in each data acquisition and hence cancels. The results indicate that randoms correction should not be performed and that rather than being limited by the scanner capabilities, neuro activation experiments are limited by the amount of radioactivity that can be injected and the length of time the patient can stay in the scanner.

  12. Abundance ratios of oxygen, neon, and magnesium in solar active regions and flares: The FIP effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widing, K. G.; Feldman, U.

    1995-01-01

    Relative abundances of oxygen, neon, and magnesium have been derived for a sample of nine solar active regions, flares, and an erupting prominance by combining plots of the ion differential emission measures. The observations were photographed in the 300-600 A range by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) spectroheliograph on Skylab. Methods for deriving the Mg/Ne abundance ratio-which measures the separation between the low- first ionization potential (FIP) and high-FIP abundnace plateaus-have been described in previous papers. In this paper we describe the spectroscopic methods for deriving the O/Ne abundance ratio, which gives the ratio between two high-FIP elements. The plot of the O/Ne ratio versus the Mg/Ne ratio in the sample of nine Skylab events is shown. The variation in the Mg/Ne ratio by a factor of 6 is associated with a much smaller range in the O/Ne ratio. This is broadly consistent with the presence of the standard FIP pattern of abundances in the outer atmosphere of the Sun. However, a real change in the relative abundances of oxygen and neon by a factor of 1.5 cannot be excluded.

  13. Determination of Urinary Neopterin/Creatinine Ratio to Distinguish Active Tuberculosis from Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael; Hargreaves, Dougal S.; Scott, Anne; Housley, David; Walters, Andrew; Mulla, Rohinton

    2016-01-01

    Background. Biomarkers to distinguish latent from active Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis infection in clinical practice are lacking. The urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio can quantify the systemic interferon-gamma effect in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. Methods. In a prospective observational study, urinary neopterin levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with active tuberculosis, in people with latent M. tuberculosis infection, and in healthy controls and the urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio was calculated. Results. We included a total of 44 patients with M. tuberculosis infection and nine controls. 12 patients had active tuberculosis (8 of them culture-confirmed). The median age was 15 years (range 4.5 to 49). Median urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio in patients with active tuberculosis was 374.1 micromol/mol (129.0 to 1072.3), in patients with latent M. tuberculosis infection it was 142.1 (28.0 to 384.1), and in controls it was 146.0 (40.3 to 200.0), with significantly higher levels in patients with active tuberculosis (p < 0.01). The receiver operating characteristics curve had an area under the curve of 0.84 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.97) (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Urinary neopterin/creatinine ratios are significantly higher in patients with active tuberculosis compared to patients with latent infection and may be a significant predictor of active tuberculosis in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:27433370

  14. A SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC ASSAY TO MEASURE RUBISCO ACTIVASE ACTIVATION ACTIVITY UNDER VARYING ATP:ADP RATIOS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratio of ATP to ADP in the stroma is an important regulatory mechanism for controlling the activation state of Rubisco via Rubisco activase (activase). Understanding the response of activase to a varying ATP:ADP ratio should reveal insights into the regulation of photosynthesis. However, the cur...

  15. Fast range estimation based on active range-gated imaging for coastal surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Qingshan; Cao, Yinan; Wang, Xinwei; Tong, Youwan; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Yuliang

    2012-11-01

    Coastal surveillance is very important because it is useful for search and rescue, illegal immigration, or harbor security and so on. Furthermore, range estimation is critical for precisely detecting the target. Range-gated laser imaging sensor is suitable for high accuracy range especially in night and no moonlight. Generally, before detecting the target, it is necessary to change delay time till the target is captured. There are two operating mode for range-gated imaging sensor, one is passive imaging mode, and the other is gate viewing mode. Firstly, the sensor is passive mode, only capturing scenes by ICCD, once the object appears in the range of monitoring area, we can obtain the course range of the target according to the imaging geometry/projecting transform. Then, the sensor is gate viewing mode, applying micro second laser pulses and sensor gate width, we can get the range of targets by at least two continuous images with trapezoid-shaped range intensity profile. This technique enables super-resolution depth mapping with a reduction of imaging data processing. Based on the first step, we can calculate the rough value and quickly fix delay time which the target is detected. This technique has overcome the depth resolution limitation for 3D active imaging and enables super-resolution depth mapping with a reduction of imaging data processing. By the two steps, we can quickly obtain the distance between the object and sensor.

  16. Surrogate immiscible liquid pairs with refractive indexes matchable over a wide range of density and viscosity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksena, Rajat; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    2015-08-01

    In liquid-liquid flows, use of optical diagnostics is limited by interphase refractive index mismatch, which leads to optical distortion and complicates data interpretation, and sometimes also by opacity. Both problems can be eliminated using a surrogate pair of immiscible index-matched transparent liquids, whose density and viscosity ratios match corresponding ratios for the original liquid pair. We show that a wide range of density and viscosity ratios is accessible using aqueous solutions of 1,2-propanediol and CsBr (for which index, density, and viscosity are available), and solutions of light and heavy silicone oils and 1-bromooctane (for which we measured the same properties at 119 compositions). For each liquid phase, polynomials in the composition variables, least-squares fitted to index and density and to the logarithm of kinematic viscosity, were used to determine accessible density and viscosity ratios for each matchable index. Index-matched solution pairs can be prepared with density and viscosity ratios equal to those for water-liquid CO2 at 0 °C over a range of pressure (allowing water-liquid CO2 behavior at inconveniently high pressure to be simulated by 1-bar experiments), and for water-crude oil and water-trichloroethylene (avoiding opacity and toxicity problems, respectively), each over a range of temperature. For representative index-matched solutions, equilibration changes index, density, and viscosity only slightly, and mass spectrometry and elemental analysis show that no component of either phase has significant interphase solubility. Finally, procedures are described for iteratively reducing the residual index mismatch in surrogate solution pairs prepared on the basis of approximate polynomial fits to experimental data, and for systematically dealing with nonzero interphase solubility.

  17. Acute effects of static stretching on peak and end-range hamstring-to-quadriceps functional ratios

    PubMed Central

    Sekir, Ufuk; Arabaci, Ramiz; Akova, Bedrettin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate if static stretching influences peak and end-range functional hamstring-to-quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios in elite women athletes. METHODS: Eleven healthy female athletes in an elite competitive level participated to the study. All the participants fulfilled the static stretching or non-stretching (control) intervention protocol in a randomized design on different days. Two static unassisted stretching exercises, one in standing and one in sitting position, were used to stretch both the hamstring and quadriceps muscles during these protocols. The total time for the static stretching was 6 ± 1 min. The isokinetic peak torque measurements for the hamstring and quadriceps muscles in eccentric and concentric modes and the calculations for the functional H/Q strength ratios at angular velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s were made before (pre) and after (post) the control or stretching intervention. The strength measurements and functional strength ratio calculations were based during the entire- and end-range of knee extension. RESULTS: The pre-test scores for quadriceps and hamstring peak torque and end range values were not significantly different between the groups (P > 0.05). Subsequently, although the control group did not exhibit significant changes in quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength (P > 0.05), static stretching decreased eccentric and concentric quadriceps muscle strength at both the 60°/s and 180°/s test speeds (P < 0.01). Similarly, static stretching also decreased eccentric and concentric hamstring muscle strength at both the 60°/s and 180°/s test speeds (P < 0.01). On the other hand, when the functional H/Q strength ratios were taken into consideration, the pre-intervention values were not significant different between the groups both during the entire and end range of knee extension (P > 0.05). Furthermore, the functional H/Q strength ratios exhibited no significant alterations during the entire and end ranges of knee extension

  18. Optimization of natural laminar flow airfoils for high section lift-to-drag ratios in the lower Reynolds number range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, Werner; Vemuru, Chandra S.

    1989-01-01

    Relatively thin natural-laminar-flow airfoils were arranged optimally for different design lift coefficients in the wing chord Reynolds number ranges of 200,000-600,00 and 0.875 x 10 to the 6th to 2 x 10 to the 6th. The 9.5 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-010, the 7.9 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-012, the 10.4 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-015, and the 8.2 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-017 were designed for high lift-to-drag ratios using Drela's design and analysis.

  19. Transition temperature range of thermally activated nickel-titanium archwires

    PubMed Central

    SPINI, Tatiana Sobottka; VALARELLI, Fabrício Pinelli; CANÇADO, Rodrigo Hermont; de FREITAS, Karina Maria Salvatore; VILLARINHO, Denis Jardim

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The shape memory resulting from the superelasticity and thermoelastic effect is the main characteristic of thermally activated NiTi archwires and is closely related to the transition temperature range (TTR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the TTR of thermally activated NiTi archwires commercially available. Material and Methods Seven different brands of 0.019"x0.025" thermally activated nickel-titanium archwires were tested as received by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) over the temperature range from -100°C to 150°C at 10°C/min. Results All thermally activated NiTi archwires analyzed presented stage transformation during thermal scanning with final austenitic temperature (Af) ranging from 20.39°C to 45.42°C. Three brands of NiTi archwires presented Af close to the room temperature and, this way, do not present properties of shape memory and pseudoelasticity that are desirable in clinical applications. Conclusions The thermally activated NiTi archwires present great variability in the TTR and the elastic parameters of each NiTi archwire should be provided by the manufacturers, to allow achievement of the best clinical performance possible. PMID:24676581

  20. Short-range correlations control the G/K and Poisson ratios of amorphous solids and metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Zaccone, Alessio; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2014-01-21

    The bulk modulus of many amorphous materials, such as metallic glasses, behaves nearly in agreement with the assumption of affine deformation, namely that the atoms are displaced just by the amount prescribed by the applied strain. In contrast, the shear modulus behaves as for nonaffine deformations, with additional displacements due to the structural disorder which induce a marked material softening to shear. The consequence is an anomalously large ratio of the bulk modulus to the shear modulus for disordered materials characterized by dense atomic packing, but not for random networks with point atoms. We explain this phenomenon with a microscopic derivation of the elastic moduli of amorphous solids accounting for the interplay of nonaffinity and short-range particle correlations due to excluded volume. Short-range order is responsible for a reduction of the nonaffinity which is much stronger under compression, where the geometric coupling between nonaffinity and the deformation field is strong, whilst under shear this coupling is weak. Predictions of the Poisson ratio based on this model allow us to rationalize the trends as a function of coordination and atomic packing observed with many amorphous materials.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to patient stopping-power-ratio estimation using the stoichiometric calibration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, M; Zhu, X R; Park, PC; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, R; Virshup, G; Clayton, J; Dong, L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze factors affecting proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimations and range uncertainties in proton therapy planning using the standard stoichiometric calibration. The SPR uncertainties were grouped into five categories according to their origins and then estimated based on previously published reports or measurements. For the first time, the impact of tissue composition variations on SPR estimation was assessed and the uncertainty estimates of each category were determined for low-density (lung), soft, and high-density (bone) tissues. A composite, 95th percentile water-equivalent-thickness uncertainty was calculated from multiple beam directions in 15 patients with various types of cancer undergoing proton therapy. The SPR uncertainties (1σ) were quite different (ranging from 1.6% to 5.0%) in different tissue groups, although the final combined uncertainty (95th percentile) for different treatment sites was fairly consistent at 3.0–3.4%, primarily because soft tissue is the dominant tissue type in human body. The dominant contributing factor for uncertainties in soft tissues was the degeneracy of Hounsfield Numbers in the presence of tissue composition variations. To reduce the overall uncertainties in SPR estimation, the use of dual-energy computed tomography is suggested. The values recommended in this study based on typical treatment sites and a small group of patients roughly agree with the commonly referenced value (3.5%) used for margin design. By using tissue-specific range uncertainties, one could estimate the beam-specific range margin by accounting for different types and amounts of tissues along a beam, which may allow for customization of range uncertainty for each beam direction. PMID:22678123

  2. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to patient stopping-power-ratio estimation using the stoichiometric calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming; Zhu, X. Ronald; Park, Peter C.; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe; Virshup, Gary; Clayton, James E.; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze factors affecting proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimations and range uncertainties in proton therapy planning using the standard stoichiometric calibration. The SPR uncertainties were grouped into five categories according to their origins and then estimated based on previously published reports or measurements. For the first time, the impact of tissue composition variations on SPR estimation was assessed and the uncertainty estimates of each category were determined for low-density (lung), soft, and high-density (bone) tissues. A composite, 95th percentile water-equivalent-thickness uncertainty was calculated from multiple beam directions in 15 patients with various types of cancer undergoing proton therapy. The SPR uncertainties (1σ) were quite different (ranging from 1.6% to 5.0%) in different tissue groups, although the final combined uncertainty (95th percentile) for different treatment sites was fairly consistent at 3.0-3.4%, primarily because soft tissue is the dominant tissue type in the human body. The dominant contributing factor for uncertainties in soft tissues was the degeneracy of Hounsfield numbers in the presence of tissue composition variations. To reduce the overall uncertainties in SPR estimation, the use of dual-energy computed tomography is suggested. The values recommended in this study based on typical treatment sites and a small group of patients roughly agree with the commonly referenced value (3.5%) used for margin design. By using tissue-specific range uncertainties, one could estimate the beam-specific range margin by accounting for different types and amounts of tissues along a beam, which may allow for customization of range uncertainty for each beam direction.

  3. Detectability of active triangulation range finder: a solar irradiance approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huizhe; Gao, Jason; Bui, Viet Phuong; Liu, Zhengtong; Lee, Kenneth Eng Kian; Peh, Li-Shiuan; Png, Ching Eng

    2016-06-27

    Active triangulation range finders are widely used in a variety of applications such as robotics and assistive technologies. The power of the laser source should be carefully selected in order to satisfy detectability and still remain eye-safe. In this paper, we present a systematic approach to assess the detectability of an active triangulation range finder in an outdoor environment. For the first time, we accurately quantify the background noise of a laser system due to solar irradiance by coupling the Perez all-weather sky model and ray tracing techniques. The model is validated with measurements with a modeling error of less than 14.0%. Being highly generic and sufficiently flexible, the proposed model serves as a guide to define a laser system for any geographical location and microclimate. PMID:27410637

  4. Northeast Basin and Range province active tectonics: An alternative view

    SciTech Connect

    Westaway, R. )

    1989-09-01

    Slip rates and slip vector azimuths on major active oblique normal faults are used to investigate whether circulation associated with the Yellowstone upwelling plume is driving tectonic deformation in the northeast Basin and Range province. Observed deformation is consistent with this suggestion; the plume is sheared to the southwest by motion of the North American plate. Testable predictions are made for structure and evolution of the region.

  5. Climate dominated topography in a tectonically active mountain range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, B. A.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tests of the interactions between tectonic and climate forcing on Earth's topography often focus on the concept of steady-state whereby processes of rock deformation and erosion are opposing and equal. However, when conditions change such as the climate or tectonic rock uplift, then surface processes act to restore the balance between rock deformation and erosion by adjusting topography. Most examples of canonical steady-state mountain ranges lie within the northern hemisphere, which underwent a radical change in the Quaternary due to the onset of widespread glaciation. The activity of glaciers changed erosion rates and topography in many of these mountain ranges, which likely violates steady-state assumptions. With new topographic analysis, and existing patterns of climate and rock uplift, we explore a mountain range previously considered to be in steady-state, the Olympic Mountains, USA. The broad spatial trend in channel steepness values suggests that the locus of high rock uplift rates is coincident with the rugged range core, in a similar position as high temperature and pressure lithologies, but not in the low lying foothills as has been previously suggested by low-temperature thermochronometry. The details of our analysis suggest the dominant topographic signal in the Olympic Mountains is a spatial, and likely temporal, variation in erosional efficiency dictated by orographic precipitation, and Pleistocene glacier ELA patterns. We demonstrate the same topographic effects are recorded in the basin hypsometries of other Cenozoic mountain ranges around the world. The significant glacial overprint on topography makes the argument of mountain range steadiness untenable in significantly glaciated settings. Furthermore, our results suggest that most glaciated Cenozoic ranges are likely still in a mode of readjustment as fluvial systems change topography and erosion rates to equilibrate with rock uplift rates.

  6. Extended use of ISO 15739 incremental signal-to-noise ratio as reliability criterion for multiple-slope wide dynamic range image capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    In the emerging field of automotive vision, video capture is the critical front-end of driver assistance and active safety systems. Previous photospace measurements have shown that light levels in natural traffic scenes may contain an extremely wide intra-scene intensity range. This requires the camera to have a wide dynamic range (WDR) for it to adapt quickly to changing lighting conditions and to reliably capture all scene detail. Multiple-slope CMOS technology offers a cost-effective way of adaptively extending dynamic range by partially resetting (recharging) the CMOS pixel once or more often within each frame time. This avoids saturation and leads to a response curve with piecewise linear slopes of progressively increasing compression. It was observed that the image quality from multiple-slope image capture is strongly dependent on the control (height and time) of each reset barrier. As compression and thus dynamic range increase there is a trade-off against contrast and detail loss. Incremental signal-to-noise ratio (iSNR) is proposed in ISO 15739 for determining dynamic range. Measurements and computer simulations revealed that the observed trade-off between WDR extension and the loss of local detail could be explained by a drop in iSNR at each reset point. If a reset barrier is not optimally placed then iSNR may drop below the detection limit so that an 'iSNR hole' appears in the dynamic range. Thus ISO 15739 iSNR has gained extended utility: it not only measures the dynamic range limits but also defines dynamic range as the intensity range where detail detection is reliable. It has become a critical criterion when designing adaptive barrier control algorithms that maximize dynamic range while maintaining the minimum necessary level of detection reliability.

  7. Extending the energy range of materials activation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, R. A.

    2004-08-01

    Activation calculations are an essential contribution to understanding the interactions of fusion materials with neutrons. The existing state-of-the-art tools such as EASY-2003 enable calculations to be carried out with neutrons up to 20 MeV. Plans to expose fusion components to high neutron fluxes include the IFMIF materials testing facility. This accelerator-based device will produce neutrons with a high-energy tail up to about 55 MeV. In order to carry out activation calculations on materials exposed to such neutrons it is necessary to extend the energy range of the data libraries. An extension of the European Activation System (EASY) to a new version, EASY-2004, for testing has been completed. The existing reactions have been extended up to 60 MeV and new classes of reactions added using calculated cross sections. Results of preliminary calculations in an IFMIF relevant neutron field are given.

  8. Growth and activity of black holes in galaxy mergers with varying mass ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelo, Pedro R.; Volonteri, Marta; Dotti, Massimo; Bellovary, Jillian M.; Mayer, Lucio; Governato, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    We study supermassive black holes (BHs) in merging galaxies, using a suite of hydrodynamical simulations with very high spatial (˜10 pc) and temporal (˜1 Myr) resolution, where we vary the initial mass ratio, the orbital configuration, and the gas fraction. (i) We address the question of when and why, during a merger, increased BH accretion occurs, quantifying gas inflows and BH accretion rates. (ii) We also quantify the relative effectiveness in inducing active galactic nuclei activity of merger-related versus secular-related causes, by studying different stages of the encounter: the stochastic (or early) stage, the (proper) merger stage, and the remnant (or late) stage. (iii) We assess which galaxy mergers preferentially enhance BH accretion, finding that the initial mass ratio is the most important factor. (iv) We study the evolution of the BH masses, finding that the BH mass contrast tends to decrease in minor mergers and to increase in major mergers. This effect hints at the existence of a preferential range of mass ratios for BHs in the final pairing stages. (v) In both merging and dynamically quiescent galaxies, the gas accreted by the BH is not necessarily the gas with low angular momentum, but the gas that loses angular momentum.

  9. Glacial reorganization of topography in a tectonically active mountain range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Byron; Ehlers, Todd

    2016-04-01

    Tests of the interactions between tectonic and climate forcing on Earth's topography often focus on the concept of steady-state whereby processes of rock deformation and erosion are opposing and equal. However, when conditions change such as the climate or tectonic rock uplift, then surface processes act to restore the balance between rock deformation and erosion by adjusting topography. Most examples of canonical steady-state mountain ranges lie within the northern hemisphere, which underwent a radical change in the Quaternary due to the onset of widespread glaciation. The activity of glaciers changed erosion rates and topography in many of these mountain ranges, which likely violates steady-state assumptions. With new topographic analysis, and existing patterns of climate and rock uplift, we explore a mountain range previously considered to be in steady-state, the Olympic Mountains, USA. The details of our analysis suggest the dominant topographic signal in the Olympic Mountains is a spatial, and likely temporal, variation in erosional efficiency dictated by orographic precipitation, and Pleistocene glacier ELA patterns, and not tectonic rock uplift rates. Alpine glaciers drastically altered the relief structure of the Olympic Mountains. The details of these relief changes are recorded in channel profiles as overdeepenings, reduced slopes, and associated knickpoints. We find the position of these relief changes within the orogen is dependent on the position of the Pleistocene ELA. While alpine glaciers overdeepened valleys in regions near the Pleistocene ELA (which has a tendency to increase relief), headward erosion of west and north flowing glacier systems captured significant area from opposing systems and caused drainage divide lowering. This divide lowering reduced relief throughout the range. We demonstrate similar topographic effects recorded in the basin hypsometries of other Cenozoic mountain ranges around the world. The significant glacial overprint on

  10. Research on range-gated laser active imaging seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Mu; Wang, PengHui; Tan, DongJie

    2013-09-01

    Compared with other imaging methods such as millimeter wave imaging, infrared imaging and visible light imaging, laser imaging provides both a 2-D array of reflected intensity data as well as 2-D array of range data, which is the most important data for use in autonomous target acquisition .In terms of application, it can be widely used in military fields such as radar, guidance and fuse. In this paper, we present a laser active imaging seeker system based on range-gated laser transmitter and sensor technology .The seeker system presented here consist of two important part, one is laser image system, which uses a negative lens to diverge the light from a pulse laser to flood illuminate a target, return light is collected by a camera lens, each laser pulse triggers the camera delay and shutter. The other is stabilization gimbals, which is designed to be a rotatable structure both in azimuth and elevation angles. The laser image system consists of transmitter and receiver. The transmitter is based on diode pumped solid-state lasers that are passively Q-switched at 532nm wavelength. A visible wavelength was chosen because the receiver uses a Gen III image intensifier tube with a spectral sensitivity limited to wavelengths less than 900nm.The receiver is image intensifier tube's micro channel plate coupled into high sensitivity charge coupled device camera. The image has been taken at range over one kilometer and can be taken at much longer range in better weather. Image frame frequency can be changed according to requirement of guidance with modifiable range gate, The instantaneous field of views of the system was found to be 2×2 deg. Since completion of system integration, the seeker system has gone through a series of tests both in the lab and in the outdoor field. Two different kinds of buildings have been chosen as target, which is located at range from 200m up to 1000m.To simulate dynamic process of range change between missile and target, the seeker system has

  11. Compact laser sources for laser designation, ranging and active imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Lew; Nettleton, John; Schilling, Brad; Trussel, Ward; Hays, Alan

    2007-04-01

    Recent advances in compact solid sate lasers for laser designation, eye-safe range finding and active imaging are described. Wide temperature operation of a compact Nd:YAG laser was achieved by end pumping and the use of multi-λ diode stacks. Such lasers enabled construction of fully operational 4.7 lb laser designator prototypes generating over 50 mJ at 10-20 Hz PRF. Output pulse energy in excess of 100 mJ was demonstrated in a breadboard version of the end-pumped laser. Eye-safe 1.5 μm lasers based on flash-pumped, low PRF, Monoblock lasers have enabled compact STORM laser range finders that have recently been put into production. To achieve higher optical and electrical efficiency needed for higher PRF operation, Monoblock lasers were end-pumped by a laser diode stack. Laser diode end-pumped Monoblock lasers were operated at 10-20 Hz PRF over a wide temperature range (-20 to +50 °C). Compared with bulk compact solid state lasers, fiber lasers are characterized by lower pulse energy, higher PRF's, shorter pulses and higher electrical efficiency. An example of fiber lasers suitable for LIDAR, and atmospheric measurement applications is described. Eye-safe, low intensity diode pumped solid state green warning laser developed for US Army checkpoint and convoy applications is also described.

  12. Experimental validation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov scaling law over large density ratio and shock strength ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Bradley; Oakley, Jason; Ranjan, Devesh; Weber, Chris; Anderson, Mark; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2009-12-01

    A universal scaling law for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is validated with experimental results covering a wide range of density ratios and shock strengths. These results include the first membraneless, gas-phase, interface experiments for A >0.5 and M >1.5. The shock-accelerated, sinusoidal interface experiments are conducted in a vertical shock tube with a large square cross section and cover the experimental parameter space: 0.29

  13. Active laser ranging with frequency transfer using frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Yang, Honglei; Li, Yan

    2016-05-01

    A comb-based active laser ranging scheme is proposed for enhanced distance resolution and a common time standard for the entire system. Three frequency combs with different repetition rates are used as light sources at the two ends where the distance is measured. Pulse positions are determined through asynchronous optical sampling and type II second harmonic generation. Results show that the system achieves a maximum residual of 379.6 nm and a standard deviation of 92.9 nm with 2000 averages over 23.6 m. Moreover, as for the frequency transfer, an atom clock and an adjustable signal generator, synchronized to the atom clock, are used as time standards for the two ends to appraise the frequency deviation introduced by the proposed system. The system achieves a residual fractional deviation of 1.3 × 10-16 for 1 s, allowing precise frequency transfer between the two clocks at the two ends.

  14. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaher, B.M.; Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Benjamin, T.M.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-10-01

    For more than three decades, Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. By measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate that the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1,000-fold along a 3,000-ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory-derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicate off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  15. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaher, B.M.; Benjamin, T.M.; Rokop, D.J.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-09-22

    For more than three decades Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. Be measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1000 fold along a 3000 ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicates off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  16. Surface compositional mapping by spectral ratioing of ERTS-1 MSS data in the Wind River Basin and Range, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K. (Principal Investigator); Salmon, B. C.; Pillars, W. W.; Harris, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS data collected in August and October 1972 were processed on digital and special purpose analog recognition computers using ratio enhancement and pattern recognition. Ratios of band-averaged laboratory reflectances of some minerals and rock types known to be in the scene compared favorably with ratios derived from the data by ratio normalization procedures. A single ratio display and density slice of the visible channels of ERTS MSS data, Channel 5/Channel 4 (R5,4), separated the Triassic Chugwater formation (redbeds) from other formations present and may have enhanced iron oxide minerals present at the surface in abundance. Comparison of data sets collected over the same area at two different times of the year by digital processing indicated that spectral variation due to environmental factors was reduced by ratio processing.

  17. Active resonant subwavelength grating for scannerless range imaging sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Nellums, Robert O.; Boye, Robert R.; Peters, David William

    2006-11-01

    In this late-start LDRD, we will present a design for a wavelength-agile, high-speed modulator that enables a long-term vision for the THz Scannerless Range Imaging (SRI) sensor. It takes the place of the currently-utilized SRI micro-channel plate which is limited to photocathode sensitive wavelengths (primarily in the visible and near-IR regimes). Two of Sandia's successful technologies--subwavelength diffractive optics and THz sources and detectors--are poised to extend the capabilities of the SRI sensor. The goal is to drastically broaden the SRI's sensing waveband--all the way to the THz regime--so the sensor can see through image-obscuring, scattering environments like smoke and dust. Surface properties, such as reflectivity, emissivity, and scattering roughness, vary greatly with the illuminating wavelength. Thus, objects that are difficult to image at the SRI sensor's present near-IR wavelengths may be imaged more easily at the considerably longer THz wavelengths (0.1 to 1mm). The proposed component is an active Resonant Subwavelength Grating (RSG). Sandia invested considerable effort on a passive RSG two years ago, which resulted in a highly-efficient (reflectivity greater than gold), wavelength-specific reflector. For this late-start LDRD proposal, we will transform the passive RSG design into an active laser-line reflector.

  18. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON AND EMISSION LINE RATIOS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sales, Dinalva A.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Riffel, R. E-mail: pastoriza@ufrgs.b

    2010-12-10

    We study the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands, ionic emission lines, and mid-infrared continuum properties in a sample of 171 emission line galaxies taken from the literature plus 15 new active galactic nucleus (AGN) Spitzer spectra. We normalize the spectra at {lambda} = 23 {mu}m and grouped them according to the type of nuclear activity. The continuum shape steeply rises for longer wavelengths and can be fitted with a warm blackbody distribution of T {approx} 150-300 K. The brightest PAH spectral bands (6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 {mu}m) and the forbidden emission lines of [Si II] 34.8 {mu}m, [Ar II] 6.9 {mu}m, [S III] 18.7 and 33.4 {mu}m were detected in all the starbursts and in {approx}80% of the Seyfert 2. Taking under consideration only the PAH bands at 7.7 {mu}m, 11.3 {mu}m, and 12.7 {mu}m, we find that they are present in {approx}80% of the Seyfert 1, while only half of this type of activity show the 6.2 {mu}m and 8.6 {mu}m PAH bands. The observed intensity ratios for neutral and ionized PAHs (6.2 {mu}m/7.7 {mu}m x 11.3 {mu}m/7.7 {mu}m) were compared to theoretical intensity ratios, showing that AGNs have higher ionization fraction and larger PAH molecules ({>=}180 carbon atoms) than SB galaxies. The ratio between the ionized (7.7 {mu}m) and the neutral PAH bands (8.6 {mu}m and 11.3 {mu}m) are distributed over different ranges for AGNs and SB galaxies, suggesting that these ratios could depend on the ionization fraction, as well as on the hardness of the radiation field. The ratio between the 7.7 {mu}m and 11.3 {mu}m bands is nearly constant with the increase of [Ne III]15.5 {mu}m/[Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m, indicating that the fraction of ionized to neutral PAH bands does not depend on the hardness of the radiation field. The equivalent width of both PAH features show the same dependence (strongly decreasing) with [Ne III]/[Ne II], suggesting that the PAH molecules, emitting either ionized (7.7 {mu}m) or neutral (11.3 {mu}m) bands, may be destroyed

  19. Experiences from long range passive and active imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grönwall, Christina; Gustafsson, David; Steinvall, Ove; Tolt, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    We present algorithm evaluations for ATR of small sea vessels. The targets are at km distance from the sensors, which means that the algorithms have to deal with images affected by turbulence and mirage phenomena. We evaluate previously developed algorithms for registration of 3D-generating laser radar data. The evaluations indicate that some robustness to turbulence and mirage induced uncertainties can be handled by our probabilistic-based registration method. We also assess methods for target classification and target recognition on these new 3D data. An algorithm for detecting moving vessels in infrared image sequences is presented; it is based on optical flow estimation. Detection of moving target with an unknown spectral signature in a maritime environment is a challenging problem due to camera motion, background clutter, turbulence and the presence of mirage. First, the optical flow caused by the camera motion is eliminated by estimating the global flow in the image. Second, connected regions containing significant motions that differ from camera motion is extracted. It is assumed that motion caused by a moving vessel is more temporally stable than motion caused by mirage or turbulence. Furthermore, it is assumed that the motion caused by the vessel is more homogenous with respect to both magnitude and orientation, than motion caused by mirage and turbulence. Sufficiently large connected regions with a flow of acceptable magnitude and orientation are considered target regions. The method is evaluated on newly collected sequences of SWIR and MWIR images, with varying targets, target ranges and background clutter. Finally we discuss a concept for combining passive and active imaging in an ATR process. The main steps are passive imaging for target detection, active imaging for target/background segmentation and a fusion of passive and active imaging for target recognition.

  20. In-line process control for laser welding of titanium by high dynamic range ratio pyrometry and plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Baselt, T.; Rudek, F.; Maschke, R.; Basan, F.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    The production of complex titanium components for various industries using laser welding processes has received growing attention in recent years. It is important to know whether the result of the cohesive joint meets the quality requirements of standardization and ultimately the customer requirements. Erroneous weld seams can have fatal consequences especially in the field of car manufacturing and medicine technology. To meet these requirements, a real-time process control system has been developed which determines the welding quality through a locally resolved temperature profile. By analyzing the resulting weld plasma received data is used to verify the stability of the laser welding process. The determination of the temperature profile is done by the detection of the emitted electromagnetic radiation from the material in a range of 500 nm to 1100 nm. As detectors, special high dynamic range CMOS cameras are used. As the emissivity of titanium depends on the wavelength, the surface and the angle of radiation, measuring the temperature is a problem. To solve these a special pyrometer setting with two cameras is used. That enables the compensation of these effects by calculating the difference between the respective pixels on simultaneously recorded images. Two spectral regions with the same emissivity are detected. Therefore the degree of emission and surface effects are compensated and canceled out of the calculation. Using the spatially resolved temperature distribution the weld geometry can be determined and the laser process can be controlled. The active readjustment of parameters such as laser power, feed rate and inert gas injection increases the quality of the welding process and decreases the number of defective goods.

  1. Active regulation of receptor ratios controls integration of quorum-sensing signals in Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shu-Wen; Schaffer, Jessica N; Tu, Kimberly C; Mehta, Pankaj; Lu, Wenyun; Ong, N P; Bassler, Bonnie L; Wingreen, Ned S

    2011-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a chemical signaling mechanism used by bacteria to communicate and orchestrate group behaviors. Multiple feedback loops exist in the quorum-sensing circuit of the model bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Using fluorescence microscopy of individual cells, we assayed the activity of the quorum-sensing circuit, with a focus on defining the functions of the feedback loops. We quantitatively investigated the signaling input–output relation both in cells with all feedback loops present as well as in mutants with specific feedback loops disrupted. We found that one of the feedback loops regulates receptor ratios to control the integration of multiple signals. Together, the feedback loops affect the input–output dynamic range of signal transmission and the noise in the output. We conclude that V. harveyi employs multiple feedback loops to simultaneously control quorum-sensing signal integration and to ensure signal transmission fidelity. PMID:21613980

  2. Assessment of uranium exposure from total activity and 234U:238U activity ratios in urine.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, T; Bingham, D

    2011-03-01

    Radiation workers at Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) are monitored for uranium exposure by routine bioassay sampling (primarily urine sampling). However, the interpretation of uranium in urine and faecal results in terms of occupational intakes is difficult because of the presence of uranium due to intakes from environmental (dietary) sources. For uranium in urine data obtained using current analytical techniques at AWE, the mean, median and standard deviation of excreted uranium concentrations were 0.006, 0.002 and 0.012 μg per g creatinine, respectively. These values are consistent with what might be expected from local dietary intakes and the knowledge that occupational exposures at AWE are likely to be very low. However, some samples do exceed derived investigation levels (DILs), which have been set up taking account of the likely contribution from environmental sources. We investigate how the activity and isotopic composition of uranium in the diet affects the sensitivity of uranium in urine monitoring for occupational exposures. We conclude that DILs based on both total uranium in urine activity and also (234)U:(238)U ratios are useful given the likely variation in dietary contribution for AWE workers. Assuming a background excretion rate and that the enrichment of the likely exposure is known, it is possible to assess exposures using (234)U:(238)U ratios and/or total uranium activity. The health implications of internalised uranium, enriched to <5-8 % by mass (235)U, centre on its nephrotoxicity; the DILs for bioassay samples at AWE are an order of magnitude below the conservative recommendations made by the literature. PMID:21036806

  3. Stability Characteristics of Two Missiles of Fineness Ratios 12 and 18 with Six Rectangular Fins of Very Low Aspect Ratio Over a Mach Number Range of 1.4 to 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henning, Allen B.

    1959-01-01

    Two rocket-propelled missiles have been test flown by the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Division in order to study the stability characteristics of a body with six rectangular fins of very low aspect ratio. The fins, which had exposed aspect ratios of approximately o.o4 and 0.02 per fin, were mounted on bodies of fineness ratios of 12 and 18, respectively. Each body had a nose with a fineness ratio of 3.5 and a cylindrical afterbody. The body and the fin chord of the model having a fineness ratio of 12 were extended the length of 6 body diameters to produce the model with a fineness ratio of 18. The missiles were disturbed in flight by pulse rockets in order to obtain the stability data. The tests were performed over a Mach number range of 1.4 to 3.2 and a Reynolds number range of 2 x 10(exp 6) to 21 x l0(exp 6). The results of these tests indicate that these configurations with the long rectangular fins of very low aspect ratio showed little induced roll" with the missile of highest fineness ratio and longest fin chord exhibiting the least amount. Extending the body and fin chord of the shorter missile six body diameters and thereby increasing the fin area approximately 115 percent increased the lift-curve slope based on body cross-sectional area approximately 40 to 55 percent, increased the dynamic stability by a substantial amount, and increased the drag from 14 to 33 percent throughout the comparable Mach number range. The center-of-pressure location of both missiles remained constant over the Mach number range.

  4. Prediction of the effect of fine grit on the MLVSS/MLSS ratio of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianping; Ji, Fangying; Xu, Xiaoyi; Wang, Ying; Yan, Dachao; Xu, Xuan; Chen, Qingkong; Xiong, Jingzhong; He, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigated the suspension properties of fine grit with different particle sizes in a bioreactor and developed a model to predict its effect on the ratio of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids to the mixed liquor suspended solids (MLVSS/MLSS) of activated sludge. The experimental results revealed that a smaller particle size corresponds to a larger suspension ratio, defined as the proportion of fine grit brought in by influent that is suspended in the activated sludge, and a smaller MLVSS/MLSS ratio. The model demonstrated that the effect of fine grit on the MLVSS/MLSS ratio is related to the fine grit concentration and chemical oxygen demand in influent and the observed sludge yield. However, fine grit has no influence on the activity of microorganisms. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) can adjust MLSS based on the MLVSS/MLSS ratio to ensure the stability of MLVSS, which can achieve the stable operation of WWTPs. PMID:25919937

  5. INFLUENCE OF SUBSTRATE-COFACTOR RATIOS ON PARTIALLY PURIFIED INORGANIC PYROPHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES.

    PubMed

    MATHEMEIER, P F; MORITA, R Y

    1964-12-01

    Mathemeier, Paul F. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Richard Y. Morita. Influence of substrate-cofactor ratios on partially purified inorganic pyrophosphatase activity at elevated temperatures. J. Bacteriol. 88:1661-1666. 1964.-Inorganic pyrophosphatase of Bacillus stearothermophilus was studied for optimal substrate-cofactor ratios at 60 to 100 C. Mg(++) was the primary cofactor, and Co(++) resulted in 50% enzyme activity at 60 C. The pH optima differed for the Mg(++) activated and Co(++) activated pyrophosphatase. At 80 C and above, Co(++) replaced Mg(++) as the optimal cofactor in the enzyme reaction. The optimal ratio of pyrophosphate to Mg(++) varied from 2 to 0.25, dependent on enzyme concentration. The optimal pyrophosphate-cobalt ratio was constant at 1.0. The enzyme catalyzed appreciable pyrophosphate hydrolysis at 95 C. PMID:14240954

  6. Optical Activity of Chiral Nanomaterials: Effects of Short Range and Long Range Electromagnetic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhiyuan

    In this dissertation, chiral nanomaterials with new plasmonic properties have been investigated. Electromagnetic interactions between well-defined building blocks in nanomaterials are modeled using classical and quantum mechanical theories. We predict several new mechanisms of plasmonic circular dichroism (CD) signals in chiral nanomaterials. The predicted CD mechanisms include plasmon-plasmon interactions of nanoparticle assemblies, plasmon-exciton interactions of molecule-nanoparticle conjugates, multipole plasmon mixing in chiral metal nanocrystals and electrodynamic effect of long range plasmon-exciton interactions. It is efficient and accurate to simulate light-matter interactions with analytic solutions. However, only a limited number of geometries can be solved analytically. Many numerical tools based on finite element methods, discrete dipole approximation or finite-difference time-domain methods are available currently. These methods are capable of simulating nanostructures with arbitrary shapes. Numerical simulations using such software have shown agreements with analytical results of our models. Hence, this study may offer a new approach to design of complex nanostructures for sensing of chiral molecules. This dissertation also reviews several experimental papers that have demonstrated successful fabrications of chiral nanostructures and nano-assemblies with new plasmonic CD signals. Our theories strongly motivated the field and have been used in many experimental studies for interpretation and understanding of observations.

  7. Emergent Ultra-Long-Range Interactions Between Active Particles in Hybrid Active-Inactive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range and magnitude of such interactions has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless, immobile objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our system is a two dimensional colloidal monolayer composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids and a very small fraction of active (sinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction between active particles induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation time scale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials.

  8. 45 CFR 1614.3 - Range of activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for Recipients and Auditors and 45 CFR part 1627; (iv) Other such actual costs as may be incurred by... concerning transfer of LSC funds for PAI activities shall require that such funds be accounted for by...

  9. 45 CFR 1614.3 - Range of activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for Recipients and Auditors and 45 CFR part 1627; (iv) Other such actual costs as may be incurred by... concerning transfer of LSC funds for PAI activities shall require that such funds be accounted for by...

  10. 45 CFR 1614.3 - Range of activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for Recipients and Auditors and 45 CFR part 1627; (iv) Other such actual costs as may be incurred by... concerning transfer of LSC funds for PAI activities shall require that such funds be accounted for by...

  11. Some features of active regions and bursts in millimetric range.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xingfeng; Yao, Jinxing

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics of active regions and bursts at mm wavelengths, observed with the 13.7 m radio telescope at Quinghai from Nov 16 to Dec 1, 1993, are analyzed. It appears that the active region collapsed and vanished while there occurred a coronal loop with two polarities. GRE bursts at mm wavelength may be interpreted by thermal gyro-resonance radiation and are part of the chromospheric eruption. There is no indication of FFS in 10 ms recordings.

  12. [Effect of different nitrogen forms and ratio on growth and active ingredient content of Platycodon grandiflorum].

    PubMed

    Duan, Yun-jing; Wang, Kang-cai; Niu, Ling-hui; Li, Ke; Su, Yun-yun

    2015-10-01

    To providing evidence about nitrogen adequate application of Platycodon grandiflorum, the pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of nitrogen on the growth, physiological metabolism and the quality of P. grandiflorum. The activity of NR, GS and SOD, POD and CAT were determined. And the nitrate and ammonium nitrogen content, photosynthetic characteristics, active components of P. grandiflorum were determined. The results showed that the nitrate nitrogen content and P. biomass reached its maximum value, when NH4(+)-N/NO3(-) -N was 0: 100, the activity of NR. The activity of GS was the highest at the NH4(+) -N/NO3(-) -N ratio of 25:75 and ammonium nitrogen content was the highest at 75:25. The activity of SOD decreased and then increased with the increasing of NO3(-) -N. At the NH4(+) -N/NO3(-) -N ratio of 25: 75, the activity of CAT had its maximum value and the content of MDA had the minimum value. At the same time, the content of platycodon D was the highest at this treatment. The studies had shown that different nitrogen forms and ratio had a significant effect on the characteristics of photosynthetic physiology, nitrogen metabolism and resistance adjustment, growth and the quality of P. grandiflorum. The NH4(+) -N/NO3(-) -N ratio of 25: 75 was a suitable ratio of nitrogen forms for the growth of P. Grandiflorum and accumulating the content of platycodon D. PMID:26975097

  13. Emergent ultra-long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active-inactive systems.

    PubMed

    Steimel, Joshua P; Aragones, Juan L; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-04-26

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials. PMID:27071096

  14. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2013-05-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the difference in the behavior of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to that of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e., insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e., highly soluble regime) for typical atmospheric cloud life cycles.

  15. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the differences of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to the behavior of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e. insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e. highly soluble regime).

  16. Stimulated Emission of Active Media in the Red Spectral Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, T. N.; Gadirov, R. M.; Nikonov, S. Yu.; Valiev, R. R.; Tel'minov, E. N.; Nikonova, E. N.; Solodova, T. A.; Alekseeva, V. I.; Marinina, L. E.; Savvina, L. P.

    2016-05-01

    Spectral, luminescent, and lasing characteristics of chromene dyes and their julolidine analogs emitting in the red spectral range are investigated experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that the cause for a low lasing efficiency of oxochromene compared with iminochromene is a high intersystem crossing to the T 1 state and the presence of the induced T 1→T n absorption in the region of the luminescence band.

  17. Labor Supply and Consumption of Food in a Closed Economy under a Range of Fixed- and Random-Ratio Schedules: Tests of Unit Price

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Gregory J.; Dake, Jamie M.; Mauel, Ellie C.; Rowe, Ryan R.

    2005-01-01

    The behavioral economic concept of unit price predicts that consumption and response output (labor supply) are determined by the unit price at which a good is available regardless of the value of the cost and benefit components of the unit price ratio. Experiment 1 assessed 4 pigeons' consumption and response output at a range of unit prices. In…

  18. Sensory processing and world modeling for an active ranging device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Tsai-Hong; Wu, Angela Y.

    1991-01-01

    In this project, we studied world modeling and sensory processing for laser range data. World Model data representation and operation were defined. Sensory processing algorithms for point processing and linear feature detection were designed and implemented. The interface between world modeling and sensory processing in the Servo and Primitive levels was investigated and implemented. In the primitive level, linear features detectors for edges were also implemented, analyzed and compared. The existing world model representations is surveyed. Also presented is the design and implementation of the Y-frame model, a hierarchical world model. The interfaces between the world model module and the sensory processing module are discussed as well as the linear feature detectors that were designed and implemented.

  19. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    du Rose, Alister; Breen, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) and surface electromyography (sEMG). Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES), Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES), and Multifidus (LMU). Normalised root mean square (RMS) sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.47 to 0.59). The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.53). The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain. PMID:27417592

  20. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    du Rose, Alister; Breen, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) and surface electromyography (sEMG). Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES), Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES), and Multifidus (LMU). Normalised root mean square (RMS) sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.47 to 0.59). The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.53). The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain.

  1. Scapular Muscle-Activation Ratios in Patients With Shoulder Injuries During Functional Shoulder Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Chad R.; Bliven, Kellie C. Huxel; Valier, Alison R. Snyder

    2014-01-01

    Context: Alterations in scapular muscle activation, which are common with glenohumeral (GH) injuries, affect stability and function. Rehabilitation aims to reestablish activation between muscles for stability by progressing to whole-body movements. Objective: To determine scapular muscle-activation ratios and individual muscle activity (upper trapezius [UT], middle trapezius [MT], lower trapezius [LT], serratus anterior [SA]) differences between participants with GH injuries and healthy control participants during functional rehabilitation exercises. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-nine participants who had GH injuries (n = 20; age = 23.6 ± 3.2 years, height = 170.7 ± 11.5 cm, mass = 74.7 ± 13.1 kg) or were healthy (n = 19; age = 24.4 ± 3.3 years, height = 173.6 ± 8.6 cm, mass = 74.7 ± 14.8 kg) were tested. Intervention(s): Clinical examination confirmed each participant's classification as GH injury or healthy control. Participants performed 4 exercises (bow and arrow, external rotation with scapular squeeze, lawnmower, robbery) over 3 seconds with no load while muscle activity was recorded. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used surface electromyography to measure UT, MT, LT, and SA muscle activity. Scapular muscle-activation ratios (UT:MT, UT:LT, and UT:SA) were calculated (normalized mean electromyography of the UT divided by normalized mean electromyography of the MT, LT, and SA). Exercise × group analyses of variance with repeated measures were conducted. Results: No group differences for activation ratios or individual muscle activation amplitude were found (P > .05). Similar UT:MT and UT:LT activation ratios during bow-and-arrow and robbery exercises were seen (P > .05); both had greater activation than external-rotation-with-scapular-squeeze and lawnmower exercises (P < .05). The bow-and-arrow exercise elicited the highest activation from the UT, MT, and LT muscles; SA activation was greatest

  2. Activity ratios in soil contaminated by the source of different reactor condition in the FDNPP accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Yukihiko; Sueki, Keisuke; Sasa, Kimikazu; Matsunaka, Tetsuya; Shibayama, Nao; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Norikazu

    2014-05-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident caused radioactive contamination on the surface soil at Fukushima and its adjacent prefectures. Substantial contamination has been found in the northwestern area from the FDNPP, according to the airborne monitoring and ground base survey by the Japanese government. Activity ratios would have characteristic information on emission sources because each relevant reactor had different amount of radionuclide and different activity ratio. The ratios can be used to clarify more detailed source and process in the contamination. We have addressed to consider them in Namie town, northwestern region from the FDNPP. This study focused on the gamma-ray emitting radionuclides of 134Cs, 137Cs, and 110mAg. The activities were decay-corrected as of 11th March, 2011 when all nuclear reactors scrammed. Data of activity ratios by our results and the Japanese official report classified the investigated northwestern region into 3 groups. Ratios of 0.02 for 110mAg/137Cs and 0.90 for 134Cs/137Cs were observed in the northern region of 15 km inside from the FDNPP. On the other hand, two kinds of 110mAg/137Cs ratios of 0.005 and 0.002 were distributed broadly in the region 60 km away from the plant. The 134Cs/137Cs ratio was 0.98 there. The activity ratios of 110mAg/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs in the northern region from the FDNPP correspond to those of nuclear fuel in Unit 1 according to estimation using the ORIGEN code. The 134Cs/137Cs in the northwestern area from FDNPP agrees with that of Unit 2 and 3. The 110mAg/137Cs ratios of 0.005 and0.002 are 1/5 - 1/10 of the Unit 2 and 3. Official report has announced that discharges of the radionuclides from Unit 2 and 3 occurred on 14th March, 2011. It is known that contamination in the northwestern region from the FDNPP took place on 15th March, 2011. Plausible species for silver in reactor core, metal, and halide etc. have higher boiling point than those species for cesium. The core would

  3. Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project: water-resources activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.; Heiny, Janet S.

    1998-01-01

    Infrastructure, such as roads, buildings, airports, and dams, is built and maintained by use of large quantities of natural resources such as aggregate (sand and gravel), energy, and water. As urban area expand, local sources of these resource are becoming inaccessible (gravel cannot be mined from under a subdivision, for example), or the cost of recovery of the resource becomes prohibitive (oil and gas drilling in urban areas is costly), or the resources may become unfit for some use (pollution of ground water may preclude its use as a water supply). Governmental land-use decision and environmental mandates can further preclude development of natural resources. If infrastructure resources are to remain economically available. current resource information must be available for use in well-reasoned decisions bout future land use. Ground water is an infrastructure resource that is present in shallow aquifers and deeper bedrock aquifers that underlie much of the 2,450-square-mile demonstration area of the Colorado Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project. In 1996, mapping of the area's ground-water resources was undertaken as a U.S. Geological Survey project in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources, and the Colorado Water Conservation Board.

  4. Extended use of incremental signal-to-noise ratio as reliability criterion for multiple-slope wide-dynamic-range image capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Mobile applications present new image quality challenges. Automotive vision requires reliable capture of scene detail. Photospace measurements have shown that the extremely wide intrascene dynamic range of traffic scenes necessitates wide-dynamic-range (WDR) technology. Multiple-slope complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology adaptively extends dynamic range by partially resetting the pixel, resulting in a response curve with piecewise linear slopes of progressively increasing compression. As compression and thus dynamic range increase, a trade-off against detail loss is observed. Incremental signal-to-noise ratio (iSNR) has been proposed in ISO/TC42 standards for determining dynamic range, and this work describes how to adapt these to WDR. Measurements and computer simulations reveal that the observed trade-off between WDR extension and the loss of local detail can be explained by a drop in iSNR at each reset point. If a reset is not timed optimally, then iSNR may drop below the detection limit causing an iSNR hole to appear within the dynamic range. Thus iSNR has extended utility: it not only determines the dynamic range limits but also defines dynamic range as the luminance range where detail detection is reliable. It has become the critical criterion when maximizing dynamic range to maintain the minimum necessary level of detection reliability.

  5. The Effect of the CO32- to Ca2+ Ion activity ratio on calcite precipitation kinetics and Sr2+ partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Tsigabu Gebrehiwet; Mikala S. Beig; George Redden; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Engineering the precipitation of calcium carbonate, which can co-precipitate trace metal contaminants, is a proposed strategy for remediating toxic or radioactive metals in subsurface environments. Engineering precipitation of multi-component minerals will involve injection of chemical amendments that must be mixed at a molecular level to supersaturated conditions that are sufficient to promote rapid mineral precipitation relative to natural systems. In subsurface systems this often means reactant mixing zones will be formed that are characterized by gradients in solute concentrations, saturation state, and solute activity ratios. To better understand the effect of ion activity ratios on CaCO{sub 3} precipitation kinetics and Sr{sup 2+} co-precipitation we experiments were conducted under constant composition conditions where the supersaturation state ({Omega}) with respect to calcite was held constant at 9.4, but the ion activity ratio (r = a{sub co{sub 3}{sup 2-}}/a{sub Ca{sup 2+}}) ranged from 0.003 to 4.15. Results: Under the chosen experimental conditions the CaCO{sub 3} phase formed was calcite and initial precipitation rates varied from a maximum rate of 84.7 {mu}mol/ m{sup 2}/min for a carbonate to calcium activity ratio of (0.21). However, precipitation rates were found to vary with time which could be indicative of variations in precipitation mechanisms that are related to the ion activity ratio. The observed trends in the distribution coefficients for co-precipitated Sr2+ (D{sup P}{sub Sr}{sup 2+}) relative to the calcite precipitation rate (i.e. a positive correlation) indicate that increasing calcite precipitation rates increase the incorporation of Sr{sup 2+}. Conclusion: The observed variation between the rate maxima and minima based on the ion activity ratio could have great deal of implication for sequestering radionuclides (e.g. {sup 90}Sr) and other toxic metals in engineered systems at contaminated sites. Extending our data plot range allowed us

  6. Origin of enhanced photocatalytic activity and photoconduction in high aspect ratio ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Leelavathi, A; Madras, Giridhar; Ravishankar, N

    2013-07-14

    Faceted ZnO nanorods with different aspect ratios were synthesized by a solvothermal method by tuning the reaction time. Increased reaction leads to the formation of high aspect ratio ZnO nanorods largely bound by the prism planes. The high aspect ratio rods showed significantly higher visible light photocatalytic activity when compared to the lower aspect ratio structures. It is proposed that the higher activity is due to better charge separation in the elongated 1D structure. In addition, the fraction of unsaturated Zn(2+) sites is higher on the {1010} facets, leading to better adsorption of oxygen-containing species. These species enhance the production of reactive radicals that are responsible for photodegradation. The photocurrent for these ZnO nanostructures under solar light was measured and a direct correlation between photocurrent and aspect ratio was observed. Since the underlying mechanisms for photodegradation and photocurrent generation are directly related to the efficiency of electron-hole creation and separation, this observation corroborates that the charge separation processes are indeed enhanced in the high aspect ratio structures. The efficiency of photoconduction (electron-hole pair separation) could be further improved by attaching Au nanoparticles on ZnO, which can act as a sink for the electrons. This heterostructure exhibits a high chemisorption of oxygen, which facilitates the production of highly reactive radicals contributing to the high photoreactivity. The suggested mechanisms are applicable to other n-type semiconductor nanostructures with important implications for applications relating to energy and the environment. PMID:23694926

  7. Sex ratio and reproductive activity of benthic copepods in bathyal Sagami Bay (1430 m), central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimanaga, Motohiro; Shirayama, Yoshihisa

    2003-04-01

    Sex ratios and reproductive activity of benthic copepod assemblages were investigated at the bathyal site (depth 1430 m) in Sagami Bay, central Japan. The ratio of adult females to adult males was approximately 3.5:1, significantly different from 1:1, although this parameter did not show a seasonal pattern. On the other hand, the percentage of ovigerous females among adult females and the ratio of nauplii to total copepods appeared to fluctuate seasonally in 1997 and 1998. Statistical tests, however, could not detect significant difference in either parameter. We discuss the possibility that the reproductive activity of copepods was enhanced by the increased supply of fresh phytodetritus to the sea floor.

  8. Influence of Solids-to-liquid and Activator Ratios on Calcined Kaolin Cement Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Y. M.; Kamarudin, H.; Bakri, A. M. Mustafa Al; Binhussain, M.; Luqman, M.; Nizar, I. Khairul; Ruzaidi, C. M.; Heah, C. Y.

    This paper summarizes the effect of activator ratio on the processing of cement powder. Geopolymer slurry was produced via alkaline activation of calcined kaolin. Once the geopolymer slurry solidified, it was crushed and ground to obtain cement powder. Ultilizing the concept of "just adding water", hardened cement paste could be produced from cement powder. This paper concluded that solids-to-liquid and sodium silicate-to-sodium hydroxide ratios have a significant effect on compressive strength of hardened cement paste. The optimum solids-to-liquid and sodium silicate-to-sodium hydroxide ratios were 0.80 and 0.20, respectively. SEM micrographs showed that a processing route to produce cement powder by "just adding water" was possible, and the structure became denser and fewer unreacted particles were observed.

  9. BrO/SO2 ratios at Popocatepetl volcano during increased activity in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fickel, M.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2012-12-01

    Since its reactivation in 1994 after many decades of inactivity, Popocatepetl volcano has been showing long periods of quiescent degassing and some events of intensified activity in connection with dome building and destruction processes. During a period of increased activity of the volcano, which began in April 2012, mobile ultraviolet DOAS measurements and stationary DOAS scans were performed to quantify SO2 fluxes and BrO/SO2 ratios within the volcanic plume. The results of these measurements are presented in the context of the volcanic activity, which consisted of increased emission of gas and ash and Vulcanian type explosions. In general, SO2 emissions were high during the period April-June 2012 and so the BrO emissions, however, the BrO/SO2 ratios did not change strongly before, during and after the increased activity.

  10. Results of an Advanced Fan Stage Operating Over a Wide Range of Speed and Bypass Ratio. Part 2; Comparison of CFD and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celestina, Mark L.; Suder, Kenneth L.; Kulkarni, Sameer

    2010-01-01

    NASA and GE teamed to design and build a 57 percent engine scaled fan stage for a Mach 4 variable cycle turbofan/ramjet engine for access to space with multipoint operations. This fan stage was tested in NASA's transonic compressor facility. The objectives of this test were to assess the aerodynamic and aero mechanic performance and operability characteristics of the fan stage over the entire range of engine operation including: 1) sea level static take-off; 2) transition over large swings in fan bypass ratio; 3) transition from turbofan to ramjet; and 4) fan wind-milling operation at high Mach flight conditions. This paper will focus on an assessment of APNASA, a multistage turbomachinery analysis code developed by NASA, to predict the fan stage performance and operability over a wide range of speeds (37 to 100 percent) and bypass ratios.

  11. K{beta}/K{alpha} X-Ray Transition-Probability Ratios for 8 Elements in the range 69 {<=} Z {<=} 76

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, N.; Tirasoglu, E.; Aylikci, V.; Cengiz, E.

    2007-04-23

    K{beta}/K{alpha} X-ray transition-probabilitiy ratios for 8 elements in the range 69 {<=} Z {<=} 76 were measured with an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The characteristic K X-rays were produced by a 25 mCi 57Co annular source. Experimental results have been compared with theoretically calculated values and other available experimental results.

  12. Long-Range Solar Activity Predictions: A Reprieve from Cycle #24's Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richon, K.; Schatten, K.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the field of long-range solar activity predictions and provide an outlook into future solar activity. Orbital predictions for satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) depend strongly on exospheric densities. Solar activity forecasting is important in this regard, as the solar ultra-violet (UV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiations inflate the upper atmospheric layers of the Earth, forming the exosphere in which satellites orbit. Rather than concentrate on statistical, or numerical methods, we utilize a class of techniques (precursor methods) which is founded in physical theory. The geomagnetic precursor method was originally developed by the Russian geophysicist, Ohl, using geomagnetic observations to predict future solar activity. It was later extended to solar observations, and placed within the context of physical theory, namely the workings of the Sun s Babcock dynamo. We later expanded the prediction methods with a SOlar Dynamo Amplitude (SODA) index. The SODA index is a measure of the buried solar magnetic flux, using toroidal and poloidal field components. It allows one to predict future solar activity during any phase of the solar cycle, whereas previously, one was restricted to making predictions only at solar minimum. We are encouraged that solar cycle #23's behavior fell closely along our predicted curve, peaking near 192, comparable to the Schatten, Myers and Sofia (1996) forecast of 182+/-30. Cycle #23 extends from 1996 through approximately 2006 or 2007, with cycle #24 starting thereafter. We discuss the current forecast of solar cycle #24, (2006-2016), with a predicted smoothed F10.7 radio flux of 142+/-28 (1-sigma errors). This, we believe, represents a reprieve, in terms of reduced fuel costs, etc., for new satellites to be launched or old satellites (requiring reboosting) which have been placed in LEO. By monitoring the Sun s most deeply rooted magnetic fields; long-range solar activity can be predicted. Although a degree of uncertainty

  13. Activity ratios of 137Cs, 90Sr and 239+240Pu in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Bossew, P; Lettner, H; Hubmer, A; Erlinger, C; Gastberger, M

    2007-01-01

    Both global and Chernobyl fallout have resulted in environmental contamination with radionuclides such as 137Cs, 90Sr and 239+240Pu. In environmental samples, 137Cs and 239+240Pu can be divided into the contributions of either source, if also the isotopes 134Cs and 238Pu are measurable, based on the known isotopic ratios in global and Chernobyl fallout. No analogous method is available for 90Sr. The activity ratios of Sr to Cs and Pu, respectively, are known for the actual fallout mainly from air filter measurements; but due to the high mobility of Sr in the environment, compared to Cs and Pu, these ratios generally do not hold for the inventory many years after deposition. In this paper we suggest a method to identify the mean contributions of global and Chernobyl fallout to total Sr in soil, sediment and cryoconite samples from Alpine and pre-Alpine regions of Austria, based on a statistical evaluation of Sr/Cs/Pu radionuclide activity ratios. Results are given for Sr:Cs, Sr:Pu and Cs:Pu ratios. Comparison with fallout data shows a strong depletion of Sr against Cs and Pu. PMID:17407799

  14. The Intrinsic Eddington Ratio Distribution of Active Galactic Nuclei in Young Galaxies from SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Mackenzie L.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Black, Christine; Hainline, Kevin Nicholas; DiPompeo, Michael A.

    2016-04-01

    An important question in extragalactic astronomy concerns the distribution of black hole accretion rates, i.e. the Eddington ratio distribution, of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Specifically, it is matter of debate whether AGN follow a broad distribution in accretion rates, or if the distribution is more strongly peaked at characteristic Eddington ratios. Using a sample of galaxies from SDSS DR7, we test whether an intrinsic Eddington ratio distribution that takes the form of a broad Schechter function is in fact consistent with previous work that suggests instead that young galaxies in optical surveys have a more strongly peaked lognormal Eddington ratio distribution. Furthermore, we present an improved method for extracting the AGN distribution using BPT diagnostics that allows us to probe over one order of magnitude lower in Eddington ratio, counteracting the effects of dilution by star formation. We conclude that the intrinsic Eddington ratio distribution of optically selected AGN is consistent with a power law with an exponential cutoff, as is observed in the X-rays. This work was supported in part by a NASA Jenkins Fellowship.

  15. Enhanced electrorheological activity of polyaniline coated mesoporous silica with high aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jungchul; Yoon, Chang-Min; Jang, Jyongsik

    2016-05-15

    Polyaniline-coated mesoporous silica (PANI/mSiO2) materials with different aspect ratios (L/D=1, 5, and 10) were fabricated by a vapor deposition polymerization (VDP) method to investigate the geometric effect on electrorheological (ER) activity. The PANI/mSiO2 materials were dedoped by a facile NH4OH treatment to reduce the conductivity to a level appropriate for ER applications. Notably, the PANI/mSiO2-based ER fluids exhibited enhanced ER performance with increasing aspect ratio. In particular, the PANI/mSiO2 material with the highest aspect ratio manifested the highest ER activity, which was attributed to geometric effects on flow resistance and mechanical stability. Moreover, the ER materials with higher aspect ratios showed improved dielectric properties of large achievable polarizability and short relaxation time. Hence, the synergistic contribution of geometric effects and dielectric properties resulted in enhanced ER activity. Consequently, this study provides insight into an effective method to improve ER performance by simple manipulation of the particle geometry. PMID:26950396

  16. Radium content and the 226Ra /228Ra activity ratio in groundwater from bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asikainen, Matti

    1981-08-01

    The relative abundance of 226Ra and 228Ra were determined in the groundwater from 125 drilled wells containing from < 0.1 to 51.3 pCi/l of 226Ra. The determination of 228Ra was carried out with a liquid scintillation counter by measuring only the weakly energetic β particles emitted from 228Ra. Thus the interference from the daughter nuclides of 226Ra was avoided, without specific separation of 228Ac. The direct measurement of 228Ra made the method decisively simpler and faster in terms of the chemistry involved. The concentration of 228Ra was found to be independent of the amount of 226Ra present in the samples. The concentrations of 228Ra were nearly the same over the whole range of 226Ra concentrations and the average sol 226Ra /228Ra ratio sharply increased as the 226Ra content of water increased. The 226Ra /228Ra ratio in the drilled wells varied from 0.3 to 26. Abnormally high 226Ra /228Ra ratios were found in areas with known uranium deposits as well as in several drilled wells at other locations. The abnormally high 226Ra /228Ra ratios present in groundwater suggest that the radioactivity anomaly is caused by uranium deposits and not by common rocks. In samples with a low radioactivity level the average 226Ra /228Ra ratio was slightly below unity, corresponding to the typical U/ Th ratio of granite, the most common kind of rock in the study area. The samples from the rapakivi area proved to be exceptional in that they had a low 226Ra /228Ra ratio independent of the concentration of 226Ra.

  17. Effect of aspect ratio and surface defects on the photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyu; Qin, Jiaqian; Xue, Yanan; Yu, Pengfei; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Limin; Liu, Riping

    2014-01-01

    ZnO, aside from TiO2, has been considered as a promising material for purification and disinfection of water and air, and remediation of hazardous waste, owing to its high activity, environment-friendly feature and lower cost. However, their poor visible light utilization greatly limited their practical applications. Herein, we demonstrate the fabrication of different aspect ratios of the ZnO nanorods with surface defects by mechanical-assisted thermal decomposition method. The experiments revealed that ZnO nanorods with higher aspect ratio and surface defects show significantly higher photocatalytic performances. PMID:24699790

  18. Effect of aspect ratio and surface defects on the photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Qin, Jiaqian; Xue, Yanan; Yu, Pengfei; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Limin; Liu, Riping

    2014-04-01

    ZnO, aside from TiO2, has been considered as a promising material for purification and disinfection of water and air, and remediation of hazardous waste, owing to its high activity, environment-friendly feature and lower cost. However, their poor visible light utilization greatly limited their practical applications. Herein, we demonstrate the fabrication of different aspect ratios of the ZnO nanorods with surface defects by mechanical-assisted thermal decomposition method. The experiments revealed that ZnO nanorods with higher aspect ratio and surface defects show significantly higher photocatalytic performances.

  19. A High Aspect Ratio Microelectrode Array for Mapping Neural Activity in-vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kibler, Andrew B.; Jamieson, Brian G.; Durand, Dominique M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel high-aspect-ratio penetrating microelectrode array was designed and fabricated for the purpose of recording neural activity. The array allows two dimensional recording of 64 sites in vitro with high aspect ratio penetrating electrodes. Traditional surface electrode arrays, although easy to fabricate, do not penetrate to the viable tissue such as central hippocampus slices and thus have a lower signal/noise ratio and lower selectivity than a penetrating array. In the unfolded hippocampus preparation, the CA1–CA3 pyramidal cell layer in the whole unfolded rodent hippocampus preparation is encased by the alveus on one side and the Schaffer tract on the other and requires penetrating electrodes for high signal to noise ratio recording. An array of 64 electrode spikes, each with a target height of 200 μm and diameter of 20μm, was fabricated in silicon on a transparent glass substrate. The impedance of the individual electrodes was measured to be approximately 1.5MΩ± 497kΩ. The signal to noise ratio was measured and found to be 19.4 ± 3 dB compared to 3.9 ± 0.8 dB S/N for signals obtained with voltage sensitive dye RH414. A mouse unfolded hippocampus preparation was bathed in solution containing 50 micro-molar 4-Amino Pyridine and a complex two dimensional wave of activity was recorded using the array. These results indicate that this novel penetrating electrode array is able to obtain data superior to that of voltage sensitive dye techniques for broad field two-dimensional neuronal activity recording. When used with the unfolded hippocampus preparation, the combination forms a uniquely capable tool for imaging hippocampal network activity in the entire hippocampus. PMID:22179041

  20. Range-gated intensified spectrographic imager: an instrument for active hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Jean-Robert; Mathieu, Pierre; Fournier, Georges R.; Larochelle, Vincent; Babey, Stephen K.

    2000-09-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has demonstrated impressive capabilities in airborne surveys, particularly for mineral and biomass characterizations. Based on this success, it is believed that other applications like search and rescue operations, and detection/identification of various ground military targets could greatly benefit from this technology. The strength of hyperspectral imaging comes from the access to another dimension of information: the spectral content of the detected return signal for each spatial pixel. In the case of conventional hyperspectral imaging, the return signal depicts the spectral reflectance of the day irradiance from the scene within the field of view of each pixel. However, by inserting a range-gated intensifier into a hyperspectral camera and by combining the camera with selected pulsed lasers, it becomes possible to relate the returned spectral information to specific light/matter interactions like induced fluorescence. This new technique may be referred to as 'active hyperspectral imaging.' Among its advantages, this approach is independent of the ambient lighting conditions and can be customized in excitation wavelengths. Moreover, by using a range-gated intensified camera, it is possible to survey limited area with a significant increase in signal-to-noise ratio. A camera of this type has been built by our group in collaboration with private industry and is described in this paper. The internal design of the camera is discussed, new issues concerning the calibration of the camera are depicted and a model based on signal-to-noise ratio analysis is presented. From the fluorescent characteristics of surrogate land mines measured in the laboratory, this model is used to predict the capabilities of detecting surface-laid mines from an aerial platform based scenario.

  1. Development of acoustically lined ejector technology for multitube jet noise suppressor nozzles by model and engine tests over a wide range of jet pressure ratios and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atvars, J.; Paynter, G. C.; Walker, D. Q.; Wintermeyer, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental program comprising model nozzle and full-scale engine tests was undertaken to acquire parametric data for acoustically lined ejectors applied to primary jet noise suppression. Ejector lining design technology and acoustical scaling of lined ejector configurations were the major objectives. Ground static tests were run with a J-75 turbojet engine fitted with a 37-tube, area ratio 3.3 suppressor nozzle and two lengths of ejector shroud (L/D = 1 and 2). Seven ejector lining configurations were tested over the engine pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 2.40 with corresponding jet velocities between 305 and 610 M/sec. One-fourth scale model nozzles were tested over a pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 4.0 with jet total temperatures between ambient and 1088 K. Scaling of multielement nozzle ejector configurations was also studied using a single element of the nozzle array with identical ejector lengths and lining materials. Acoustic far field and near field data together with nozzle thrust performance and jet aerodynamic flow profiles are presented.

  2. Chemically active reduced graphene oxide with tunable C/O ratios.

    PubMed

    Compton, Owen C; Jain, Bonny; Dikin, Dmitriy A; Abouimrane, Ali; Amine, Khalil; Nguyen, Sonbinh T

    2011-06-28

    Organic dispersions of graphene oxide can be thermally reduced in polar organic solvents under reflux conditions to afford electrically conductive, chemically active reduced graphene oxide (CARGO) with tunable C/O ratios, dependent on the boiling point of the solvent. The reductions are achieved after only 1 h of reflux, and the corresponding C/O ratios do not change upon further thermal treatment. Hydroxyl and carboxyl groups can be removed when the reflux is carried out above 155 °C, while epoxides are removable only when the temperature is higher than 200 °C. The increasing hydrophobic nature of CARGO, as its C/O ratio increases, improves the dispersibility of the nanosheets in a polystyrene matrix, in contrast to the aggregates formed with CARGO having lower C/O ratios. The excellent processability of the obtained CARGO dispersions is demonstrated via free-standing CARGO papers that exhibit tunable electrical conductivity/chemical activity and can be used as lithium-ion battery anodes with enhanced Coulombic efficiency. PMID:21473647

  3. Ratio of Active Matrix Metalloproteinases and Proenzymes during Growth and Metastasizing of Mouse Lewis Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kisarova, Ya A; Kaledin, V I; Bogdanova, L A; Korolenko, T A

    2015-08-01

    Ratio between proMMP and active MMP was studied in the dynamics of growth of the Lewis lung adenocarcinoma with lung metastasis. It was shown that tumor growth is associated with an increase in the content of proMMP (day 20; terminal stage), but the level of active MMP in tumor tissue did not signifi cantly change. The development of lung metastasis was accompanied by accumulation of active MMP (days 7, 15, and 20) and a decrease in the content of pro-MMP (days 7, and 20) in comparison with the control. In the spleen of these mice (metastasis-free organ), an increase in the levels of proMMP (day 20) and especially active MMP (days 7, 15, and 20) were found. The results suggest that tumor development shifts the proportion between active MMP and proenzymes in the tumor, lungs with metastasis, and spleen without metastasis. PMID:26392281

  4. Estimation of the front-to-total activity ratio for wire screens using CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Zhuo, W

    2015-11-01

    Wire screens are widely used for sampling radioactive aerosols. The front-to-total activity ratio is a critical factor in describing the self-shielding effect of the wire screens. In this study, computational fluid dynamic method was applied to simulate the deposition of aerosols on the surface of the wire screens. Four different types of screens were investigated for particle size varying from 1 nm to 10 µm. Experimental verification was carried out in a radon chamber. The results showed good agreement between experimental data interception and the simulation. Significant differences on the front-to-total activity ratio for the different types of screens were observed when the size of particle was <20 nm. PMID:25920787

  5. [Antiviral activity of the complexes obtained at different ratios of complementary homopolyribonucleotides].

    PubMed

    Novokhatskiĭ, A S; Kogan, E M; Timkovskiĭ, A L

    1978-05-01

    Antiviral activity of the complexes of synthetic polyribonucleotides, i.e. poly (I).poly (C) and poly (G).poly (C) obtained at non-equimolar ratios of homopolymers was studied. The system of chick embryon fibroblasts and horse Venezuellan eguine encephalitis virus served as the model. It was shown that the active and stable complexes poly (I).poly (C) and poly (G).poly (C) were formed at some excess of poly (C), i.e. at the ratio of poly G) or poly (I) to poly (C) equal to 40/60 to 20/80 molar per cent. The role of the excessive poly (C) in formation of the stable secondary structure of the nucleotide complexes and its significance as one of the means for affecting the fine structure of double-stranded RNA were discussed. PMID:655685

  6. Results of an Advanced Fan Stage Operating Over a Wide Range of Speed and Bypass Ratio. Part 1; Fan Stage Design and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Prahst, Patricia S.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program is investigating turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion systems for access to space because it provides the potential for aircraft-like, space-launch operations that may significantly reduce launch costs and improve safety. To this end, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and General Electric (GE) teamed to design a Mach 4 variable cycle turbofan/ramjet engine for access to space. To enable the wide operating range of a Mach 4+ variable cycle turbofan ramjet required the development of a unique fan stage design capable of multi-point operation to accommodate variations in bypass ratio (10 ), fan speed (7 ), inlet mass flow (3.5 ), inlet pressure (8 ), and inlet temperature (3 ). In this paper, NASA has set out to characterize a TBCC engine fan stage aerodynamic performance and stability limits over a wide operating range including power-on and hypersonic-unique "windmill" operation. Herein, we will present the fan stage design, and the experimental test results of the fan stage operating from 15 to 100 percent corrected design speed. Whereas, in the companion paper, we will provide an assessment of NASA s APNASA code s ability to predict the fan stage performance and operability over a wide range of speed and bypass ratio.

  7. Estimation of ground water residence times in the Critical zone: insight from U activity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, Francois; Ackerer, Julien; Lucas, Yann; viville, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The use of radioactive disequilibria as tracers and chronometers of weathering processes and related mass transfers has been recognized since the 60'. The development, over the last two decades, of analytical methods for measuring very precisely U-series nuclides (especially, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra) in environmental samples has opened up new scientific applications in Earth Surface Sciences. Here, we propose to present the potential of U activity ratios in surface waters as chronometer of water transfers at a watershed scale. This will be illustrated from studies performed at different scales, with the analysis of U activity ratios in surface waters from small watersheds (Strengbach and Ringelbach watersheds in the Vosges Mountain, France) but also from watersheds of much more regional extension (e.g., the Upper Rhine basin or the Ganges basin). These various studies show that variations of U activity ratios in surface waters are mainly associated with 234U-238U fractionations occurring during the water transfer within the bedrock, which intensity depends on two main parameters: the petro-physical characteristics of the aquifer, principally the geometry of water-rock interfaces and the duration of the water-rock interactions. This readily explains why different U activity ratios (UAR) can be observed in the different aquifers of a continental hydrosystem and hence why UAR can be used to trace the source of river waters. For a hydrological system developed on a substratum marked by fairly homogeneous petro-physical characteristics, the main parameter controlling the UAR in waters draining such a system would be the duration of the water-rock interactions. Variations of UAR in stream or spring waters of such a system can therefore be modeled using simple reactive transport model, which allows the estimation of both the dissolution rate of the bedrock and the residence time of the waters within the aquifer.

  8. Feasible muscle activation ranges based on inverse dynamics analyses of human walking.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Cole S; Sohn, M Hongchul; Allen, Jessica L; Ting, Lena H

    2015-09-18

    Although it is possible to produce the same movement using an infinite number of different muscle activation patterns owing to musculoskeletal redundancy, the degree to which observed variations in muscle activity can deviate from optimal solutions computed from biomechanical models is not known. Here, we examined the range of biomechanically permitted activation levels in individual muscles during human walking using a detailed musculoskeletal model and experimentally-measured kinetics and kinematics. Feasible muscle activation ranges define the minimum and maximum possible level of each muscle's activation that satisfy inverse dynamics joint torques assuming that all other muscles can vary their activation as needed. During walking, 73% of the muscles had feasible muscle activation ranges that were greater than 95% of the total muscle activation range over more than 95% of the gait cycle, indicating that, individually, most muscles could be fully active or fully inactive while still satisfying inverse dynamics joint torques. Moreover, the shapes of the feasible muscle activation ranges did not resemble previously-reported muscle activation patterns nor optimal solutions, i.e. static optimization and computed muscle control, that are based on the same biomechanical constraints. Our results demonstrate that joint torque requirements from standard inverse dynamics calculations are insufficient to define the activation of individual muscles during walking in healthy individuals. Identifying feasible muscle activation ranges may be an effective way to evaluate the impact of additional biomechanical and/or neural constraints on possible versus actual muscle activity in both normal and impaired movements. PMID:26300401

  9. Research on long-range laser active imaging system applied in adverse weather conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Zhi-gang; Liu, Meng-de; Yang, Li; Kabanov, V. V.; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Jie; Chu, Shi-bo; Yang, Jun-xian; Zhou, Yang

    2013-09-01

    A low-light level night vision device or thermal infrared imager belonging to passive imaging system is generally used in daily target detection and identification. But in adverse weather conditions of dark of night, poor atmospheric transmission characteristics or strong backscattering (fog, dust, rain, snow, etc.), even the most sensitive low-light level night vision could not provide enough image resolution for detecting and identifying targets, and the thermal infrared imager is also limited by low temperature contrast. A long-range laser active imaging system, in combination with high-power semiconductor pulsed lasers with collimation technology, receiving objective lens of large diameter, long focal length and narrow viewing angle, high-gain image intensifier CCD (ICCD) camera and range-gated synchronization control technology, is developed for long distance target detection and high resolution imaging in adverse weather conditions. The system composition and operating principle are introduced. The extremely powerful and efficient illuminators with collimation technology are able to deliver uniform beams, which are essential for illuminating targets at a distance and generating high-quality images. The particular receiving objective lens, ICCD camera and range-gated synchronization control technology could reduce strong backscattering signal and improve imaging signal-to-noise ratio. The laboratory and outfield experiments have been done to validate imaging effect and imaging quality. The results show that the minimum resolution is about 3-5cm, 10cm, and greater than 20 cm for target far from 1100m, 4700m, and 6700m respectively in dark of night. Furthermore, the minimum resolution could reach to 10cm and 20cm for target far from 2500m and 4800m respectively and the image is too blurred to accurately identify the target when observing the target far from 7200m in rainy condition.

  10. Microbial activities and phosphorus cycling: An application of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Lisa M.; Joshi, Sunendra R.; Kana, Todd M.; Jaisi, Deb P.

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms carry out biochemical transformations of nutrients that make up their cells. Therefore, understanding how these nutrients are transformed or cycled in natural environments requires knowledge of microbial activity. Commonly used indicators for microbial activity typically include determining microbial respiration by O2/CO2 measurements, cell counts, and measurement of enzyme activities. However, coupled studies on nutrient cycling and microbial activity are not given enough emphasis. Here we apply phosphate oxygen isotope ratios (δ18OP) as a tool for measurement of microbial activity and compare the rate of isotope exchange with methods of measuring microbial activities that are more commonly applied in environmental studies including respiration, dehydrogenase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and cell counts. Our results show that different bacteria may have different strategies for P uptake, storage and release, their respiration and consequently expression of DHA and APase activities, but in general the trend of their enzyme activities are comparable. Phosphate δ18OP values correlated well with these other parameters used to measure microbial activity with the strongest linear relationships between δ18OP and CO2 evolution (r = -0.99). Even though the rate of isotope exchange for each microorganism used in this study is different, the rate per unit CO2 respiration showed one general trend, where δ18OP values move towards equilibrium while CO2 is generated. While this suggests that P cycling among microorganisms used in this study can be generalized, further research is needed to determine whether the microorganism-specific isotope exchange trend may occur in natural environments. In summary, phosphate oxygen isotope measurements may offer an alternative for use as a tracer to measure microbial activity in soils, sediments, and many other natural environments.

  11. Atmospheric residence time of (210)Pb determined from the activity ratios with its daughter radionuclides (210)Bi and (210)Po.

    PubMed

    Semertzidou, P; Piliposian, G T; Appleby, P G

    2016-08-01

    The residence time of (210)Pb created in the atmosphere by the decay of gaseous (222)Rn is a key parameter controlling its distribution and fallout onto the landscape. These in turn are key parameters governing the use of this natural radionuclide for dating and interpreting environmental records stored in natural archives such as lake sediments. One of the principal methods for estimating the atmospheric residence time is through measurements of the activities of the daughter radionuclides (210)Bi and (210)Po, and in particular the (210)Bi/(210)Pb and (210)Po/(210)Pb activity ratios. Calculations used in early empirical studies assumed that these were governed by a simple series of equilibrium equations. This approach does however have two failings; it takes no account of the effect of global circulation on spatial variations in the activity ratios, and no allowance is made for the impact of transport processes across the tropopause. This paper presents a simple model for calculating the distributions of (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po at northern mid-latitudes (30°-65°N), a region containing almost all the available empirical data. By comparing modelled (210)Bi/(210)Pb activity ratios with empirical data a best estimate for the tropospheric residence time of around 10 days is obtained. This is significantly longer than earlier estimates of between 4 and 7 days. The process whereby (210)Pb is transported into the stratosphere when tropospheric concentrations are high and returned from it when they are low, significantly increases the effective residence time in the atmosphere as a whole. The effect of this is to significantly enhance the long range transport of (210)Pb from its source locations. The impact is illustrated by calculations showing the distribution of (210)Pb fallout versus longitude at northern mid-latitudes. PMID:27132252

  12. Temporal variability of local abundance, sex ratio and activity in the Sardinian chalk hill blue butterfly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casula, P.; Nichols, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    When capturing and marking of individuals is possible, the application of newly developed capture-recapture models can remove several sources of bias in the estimation of population parameters such as local abundance and sex ratio. For example, observation of distorted sex ratios in counts or captures can reflect either different abundances of the sexes or different sex-specific capture probabilities, and capture-recapture models can help distinguish between these two possibilities. Robust design models and a model selection procedure based on information-theoretic methods were applied to study the local population structure of the endemic Sardinian chalk hill blue butterfly, Polyommatus coridon gennargenti. Seasonal variations of abundance, plus daily and weather-related variations of active populations of males and females were investigated. Evidence was found of protandry and male pioneering of the breeding space. Temporary emigration probability, which describes the proportion of the population not exposed to capture (e.g. absent from the study area) during the sampling process, was estimated, differed between sexes, and was related to temperature, a factor known to influence animal activity. The correlation between temporary emigration and average daily temperature suggested interpreting temporary emigration as inactivity of animals. Robust design models were used successfully to provide a detailed description of the population structure and activity in this butterfly and are recommended for studies of local abundance and animal activity in the field.

  13. Use of polarization to improve signal to clutter ratio in an outdoor active imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontoura, Patrick F.; Giles, Michael K.; Padilla, Denise D.

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the methodology and presents the results of the design of a polarization-sensitive system used to increase the signal-to-clutter ratio in a robust outdoor structured lighting sensor that uses standard CCD camera technology. This lighting sensor is intended to be used on an autonomous vehicle, looking down to the ground and horizontal to obstacles in an 8 foot range. The kinds of surfaces to be imaged are natural and man-made, such as asphalt, concrete, dirt and grass. The main problem for an outdoor eye-safe laser imaging system is that the reflected energy from background clutter tends to be brighter than the reflected laser energy. A narrow-band optical filter does not reduce significantly the background clutter in bright sunlight, and problems also occur when the surface is highly absorptive, like asphalt. Therefore, most of applications are limited to indoor and controlled outdoor conditions. A series of measurements was made for each of the materials studied in order to find the best configuration for the polarizing system and also to find out the potential improvement in the signal-to-clutter ratio (STC). This process was divided into three parts: characterization of the reflected sunlight, characterization of the reflected laser light, and measurement of the improvement in the STC. The results show that by using polarization properties it is possible to design an optical system that is able to increase the signal-to-clutter ratio from approximately 30% to 100% in the imaging system, depending on the kind of surface and on the incidence angle of the sunlight. The technique was also analyzed for indoor use, with the background clutter being the room illumination. For this specific case, polarization did not improve the signal-to-clutter ratio.

  14. Radiolead (210)Pb and (210)Po/(210)Pb activity ratios in dogs' hair.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I; Szymańska, Karolina; Skwarzec, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine activity concentrations of radiolead (210)Pb as well as (210)Po/(210)Pb activity ratios in dog hair. The objectives of this research were also to investigate the utility of domestic animal hair as a noninvasive indicator of metal exposure for radiotoxic, naturally occurring (210)Pb and find the correlations between (210)Pb concentration in hair and age, gender, hair type or diet of analyzed animals. The highest (210)Pb concentrations were measured in a 2-year-old Shih Tzus (9.82 ± 0.53 Bq kg(-1) dw(-1)) and a 2-year-old Bichon Maltese (8.09 ± 0.42 Bq kg(-1) dw(-1)), both longhair males, while the lowest was found in a 15-year-old Yorkshire Terrier (0.44 ± 0.02 Bq kg(-1) dw(-1)), small longhair male as well. As results showed, mainly dog hair color as well as their age and gender influenced the differences in the values of (210)Pb concentrations in analyzed hair samples. Also the values of activity ratios of (210)Po/(210)Pb in analyzed dog hair samples were calculated and obtained results were similar to those observed in human hair. PMID:26191992

  15. DUST IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: ANOMALOUS SILICATE TO OPTICAL EXTINCTION RATIOS?

    SciTech Connect

    Lyu, Jianwei; Hao, Lei; Li, Aigen

    2014-09-01

    Dust plays a central role in the unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). However, little is known about the nature (e.g., size, composition) of the dust that forms a torus around the AGN. In this Letter, we report a systematic exploration of the optical extinction (A{sub V} ) and the silicate absorption optical depth (Δτ{sub 9.7}) of 110 type 2 AGNs. We derive A{sub V} from the Balmer decrement based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, and Δτ{sub 9.7} from the Spitzer/InfraRed Spectrograph data. We find that with a mean ratio of (A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7}) ≲ 5.5, the optical-to-silicate extinction ratios of these AGNs are substantially lower than that of the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) for which A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7} ≈ 18.5. We argue that the anomalously low A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7} ratio could be due to the predominance of larger grains in the AGN torus compared to that in the Galactic diffuse ISM.

  16. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Kerr, Matthew D.; Amos, Richard A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Marom, Edith M.; Truong, Mylene T.; Palacio, Diana M.; Betancourt, Sonia L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; DeGroot, Patricia M.; Carter, Brett W.; Gladish, Gregory W.; Sabloff, Bradley S.; Benveniste, Marcelo F.; Godoy, Myrna C.; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2016-06-01

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials (18O, Cu, and 68Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm‑3) and beef (~1.0 g cm‑3) were embedded with Cu or 68Zn foils of several volumes (10–50 mm3). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1–5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20–40 min of scan time using various delay times (30–150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils’ PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers.

  17. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Kerr, Matthew D; Amos, Richard A; Stingo, Francesco C; Marom, Edith M; Truong, Mylene T; Palacio, Diana M; Betancourt, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J; DeGroot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Gladish, Gregory W; Sabloff, Bradley S; Benveniste, Marcelo F; Godoy, Myrna C; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2016-06-01

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials ((18)O, Cu, and (68)Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm(-3)) and beef (~1.0 g cm(-3)) were embedded with Cu or (68)Zn foils of several volumes (10-50 mm(3)). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1-5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20-40 min of scan time using various delay times (30-150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils' PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers. PMID:27203621

  18. Wide range bandgap modulation based on ZnO-based alloys and fabrication of solar blind UV detectors with high rejection ratio.

    PubMed

    Su, Longxing; Zhu, Yuan; Yong, Dingyu; Chen, Mingming; Ji, Xu; Su, Yuquan; Gui, Xuchun; Pan, Bicai; Xiang, Rong; Tang, Zikang

    2014-08-27

    Theoretical calculations on formation energies of MgZnO, BeZnO and BeMgZnO alloys are presented. The ternary alloy MgZnO (BeZnO) is found to be unstable with high Mg (Be) contents. However, the quaternary system BeMgZnO is predicted to be stable with small Be/Mg atom ratio. Subsequently, a wurtzite Be0.17Mg0.54Zn0.29O alloy with a bandgap of 5.15 eV has been acquired experimentally. Its bandgap is in the middle of solar blind region and thus it is an ideal material for realizing a high rejection ratio solar blind ultraviolet (UV) detector, which has long been a problem. A metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) structured solar blind UV detector based on this material is then fabricated, realizing a much higher rejection ratio than reported MgZnO-based detectors. One more interesting thing is, as a complicated quaternary system, BeMgZnO can maintain its crystal quality in a wide compositional range, which is not happening in MgZnO and BeZnO. To get some microscopic insight into the Be-Mg mutual stabilizing mechanism, more calculations on the lattice constants of BeZnO and MgZnO alloys, and the coordination preference of Be ions in alloy were conducted. The a-axis lattice compensation and 4-fold coordination preference of Be atom are confirmed the major origins for Be-Mg mutual stabilizing in ZnO lattice. PMID:25089951

  19. Increased NR2A:NR2B ratio compresses long-term depression range and constrains long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenzhong; Feng, Ruiben; Jacobs, Stephanie; Duan, Yanhong; Wang, Huimin; Cao, Xiaohua; Tsien, Joe Z

    2013-01-01

    The NR2A:NR2B subunit ratio of the NMDA receptors is widely known to increase in the brain from postnatal development to sexual maturity and to aging, yet its impact on memory function remains speculative. We have generated forebrain-specific NR2A overexpression transgenic mice and show that these mice had normal basic behaviors and short-term memory, but exhibited broad long-term memory deficits as revealed by several behavioral paradigms. Surprisingly, increased NR2A expression did not affect 1-Hz-induced long-term depression (LTD) or 100 Hz-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, but selectively abolished LTD responses in the 3-5 Hz frequency range. Our results demonstrate that the increased NR2A:NR2B ratio is a critical genetic factor in constraining long-term memory in the adult brain. We postulate that LTD-like process underlies post-learning information sculpting, a novel and essential consolidation step in transforming new information into long-term memory. PMID:23301157

  20. Assessment of anaerobic toluene biodegradation activity by bssA transcript/gene ratios.

    PubMed

    Brow, Christina N; O'Brien Johnson, Reid; Johnson, Richard L; Simon, Holly M

    2013-09-01

    Benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) genes associated with toluene degradation were profiled across a groundwater contaminant plume under nitrate-reducing conditions and were detected in significant numbers throughout the plume. However, differences between groundwater and core sediment samples suggested that microbial transport, rather than local activity, was the underlying cause of the high copy numbers within the downgradient plume. Both gene transcript and reactant concentrations were consistent with this hypothesis. Expression of bssA genes from denitrifying toluene degraders was induced by toluene but only in the presence of nitrate, and transcript abundance dropped rapidly following the removal of either toluene or nitrate. The drop in bssA transcripts following the removal of toluene could be described by an exponential decay function with a half-life on the order of 1 h. Interestingly, bssA transcripts never disappeared completely but were always detected at some level if either inducer was present. Therefore, the detection of transcripts alone may not be sufficient evidence for contaminant degradation. To avoid mistakenly associating basal-level gene expression with actively degrading microbial populations, an integrated approach using the ratio of functional gene transcripts to gene copies is recommended. This approach minimizes the impact of microbial transport on activity assessment and allows reliable assessments of microbial activity to be obtained from water samples. PMID:23811506

  1. Active compensation of large dispersion of femtosecond pulses for precision laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Lee, Keunwoo; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2011-02-28

    We describe an active way of compensation for large dispersion induced in the femtosecond light pulses travelling in air for laser ranging. The pulse duration is consistently regulated at 250 fs by dispersion control, allowing sub-micrometer resolution in measuring long distances by means of time-of-flight measurement. This method could facilitate more reliable applications of femtosecond pulses for satellite laser ranging, laser altimetry and active LIDAR applications. PMID:21369227

  2. Field Demonstrations of Active Laser Ranging with Sub-mm Precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yijiang; Birnbaum, Kevin M.; Hemmati, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Precision ranging between planets will provide valuable information for scientific studies of the solar system and fundamental physics. Current passive ranging techniques using retro-reflectors are limited to the Earth-Moon distance due to the 1/R? losses. We report on a laboratory realization and field implementation of active laser ranging in real-time with two terminals, emulating interplanetary distance. Sub-millimeter accuracy is demonstrated.

  3. Measured branching ratios for O II2D and 2P transitions in the wavelength range 530 to 800 A. [airglow spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.; Cunningham, A. J.; Christensen, A. B.

    1981-01-01

    Branching ratios for four sets of extreme ultraviolet transitions terminating on the 2D0 and 2P0 metastable levels of ionized oxygen have been measured. The emissions were excited in both an open window hollow cathode and a capillary discharge lamp, and the branching ratios were derived from the observed intensity ratios of the multiplet pairs. The results are in good agreement with theoretical values and compare favorably, within experimental uncertainties, with line ratios obtained by EUV spectroscopy of the airglow.

  4. Relationship between spinal range of motion and trunk muscle activity during trunk rotation

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Tomoaki; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Nakazawa, Rie; Wada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between spinal range of motion and trunk muscle activity during trunk rotation using a three-dimensional motion analysis system and surface electromyography. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects comprised 11 healthy men. A three-dimensional motion analysis system measured the trunk rotational angle of 4 segments of the thoracic vertebrae and 2 segments of the lumbar vertebrae. Surface electromyography measured the activities of the unilateral latissimus dorsi, lumbar multifidus, rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis muscles. [Results] During ipsilateral rotation at thoracic vertebral levels, the muscle activity of the latissimus dorsi and external oblique was significantly increased compared with the activity in the 0–10% range of trunk rotation. During early ipsilateral rotation at lumbar vertebral levels, the muscle activity of the internal oblique and transversus abdominis was significantly increased compared with that in the 0–10% range of trunk rotation. During contralateral rotation at both thoracic and lumbar vertebral levels, the muscle activity of the external oblique was significantly increased compared with that in the 0–10% range of trunk rotation. [Conclusion] This study indicates that it is important to consider vertebral segments and spinal range of motion during trunk rotation. PMID:27065549

  5. Use of Dynamic Geometry as a Support to Paper and Pencil Activities for Comprehension of Ratio and Proportion Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Elena Fabiola; Lupianez, Jose Luis

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The present paper shows the importance of a joint use of pencil and paper activities and of technology so that students may develop a complete understanding of ratio and proportion. A previous experience with strategy use when solving ratio and proportion problems provided background. Prompted by a recognition of the cognitive…

  6. Use of plutonium isotope activity ratios in dating recent sediments. [/sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu + /sup 240/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    The majority of plutonium presently in the biosphere has come from the testing of nuclear devices. In the early 1950s, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratio of fallout debris was > 0.04; in the more extensive test series of 1961 to 1962, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratios were quite consistent at 0.02 to 0.03 and maximum fallout delivery occurred in mid-1963. A significant perturbation in Pu isotope activity ratios occurred in mid-1966 with the deposition of Pu-238 from the SNAP-9A reentry and burn-up. Recently deposited sediments have recorded these events and where accumulation rates are rapid (> 1 cm/y), changes in Pu isotope activity ratios can be used as a geochronological tool.

  7. Evaluation of flurbiprofen urinary ratios as in vivo indices for CYP2C9 activity

    PubMed Central

    Zgheib, N K; Frye, R F; Tracy, T S; Romkes, M; Branch, R A

    2007-01-01

    Aims We investigated flurbiprofen pharmacokinetics in 12 volunteers to develop a phenotypic trait measure that correlates with the fractional clearance to 4′-hydroxyflurbiprofen. The effect of the CYP2C9 inhibitor fluconazole on flurbiprofen metabolism was also evaluated. Methods Flurbiprofen pharmacokinetics were evaluated before and after the first and seventh doses of fluconazole. The urinary recovery ratio was calculated as FLRR = 4′-OHF/ [4′-OHF + Ftot] and the urinary metabolic ratio was calculated as FLMR = 4′-OHF/Ftot, where 4′-OHF and Ftot represent total (conjugated and unconjugated) amounts recovered in urine. Results There was a statistically significant relationship between the 4′-OHF formation clearance (4OHCLf) and both the 8-h FLRR and the 8-h FLMR with and without administration of fluconazole. The flurbiprofen apparent oral clearance (CL/F) was decreased by 53% [90% confidence interval (CI) −58, −48] and 64% (90% CI −69, −59), respectively, after administration of one and seven doses of fluconazole when compared with administration of flurbiprofen alone; similarly, the 4OHCLf decreased by 69% (90% CI −74, −64) and 78% (90% CI −83, −73), the 8-h FLRR decreased by 35% (90% CI −41, −29) and 40% (90% CI −46, −35) and the 8-h FLMR decreased by 61% (90% CI −65, −58) and 67% (90% CI −70, −63). The magnitude of decrease in CL/F and 4OHCLf was greater after seven doses compared with after one dose of fluconazole (P < 0.005). Conclusions This study provides strong evidence that both the 8-h FLRR and the 8-h FLMR are suitable phenotypic indices for CYP2C9 activity. PMID:17054666

  8. Network feedback regulates motor output across a range of modulatory neuron activity.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Robert M; Blitz, Dawn M

    2016-06-01

    Modulatory projection neurons alter network neuron synaptic and intrinsic properties to elicit multiple different outputs. Sensory and other inputs elicit a range of modulatory neuron activity that is further shaped by network feedback, yet little is known regarding how the impact of network feedback on modulatory neurons regulates network output across a physiological range of modulatory neuron activity. Identified network neurons, a fully described connectome, and a well-characterized, identified modulatory projection neuron enabled us to address this issue in the crab (Cancer borealis) stomatogastric nervous system. The modulatory neuron modulatory commissural neuron 1 (MCN1) activates and modulates two networks that generate rhythms via different cellular mechanisms and at distinct frequencies. MCN1 is activated at rates of 5-35 Hz in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, network feedback elicits MCN1 activity time-locked to motor activity. We asked how network activation, rhythm speed, and neuron activity levels are regulated by the presence or absence of network feedback across a physiological range of MCN1 activity rates. There were both similarities and differences in responses of the two networks to MCN1 activity. Many parameters in both networks were sensitive to network feedback effects on MCN1 activity. However, for most parameters, MCN1 activity rate did not determine the extent to which network output was altered by the addition of network feedback. These data demonstrate that the influence of network feedback on modulatory neuron activity is an important determinant of network output and feedback can be effective in shaping network output regardless of the extent of network modulation. PMID:27030739

  9. Doppler and range determination for deep space vehicles using active optical transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes two types of laser system employing active transponders that could accurately determine Doppler and range to deep space vehicles from earth-orbiting satellites. The first is a noncoherent optical system in which the Doppler effect on an intensity-modulating subcarrier is measured. The second is a coherent optical system in which the Doppler effect of the optical carrier itself is measured. Doppler and range measurement errors are mathematically modeled and, for three example systems, numerically evaluated.

  10. Evaluating the performance of close-range 3D active vision systems for industrial design applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Gaiani, Marco

    2004-12-01

    In recent years, active three-dimensional (3D) active vision systems or range cameras for short have come out of research laboratories to find niche markets in application fields as diverse as industrial design, automotive manufacturing, geomatics, space exploration and cultural heritage to name a few. Many publications address different issues link to 3D sensing and processing but currently these technologies pose a number of challenges to many recent users, i.e., "what are they, how good are they and how do they compare?". The need to understand, test and integrate those range cameras with other technologies, e.g. photogrammetry, CAD, etc. is driven by the quest for optimal resolution, accuracy, speed and cost. Before investing, users want to be certain that a given range camera satisfy their operational requirements. The understanding of the basic theory and best practices associated with those cameras are in fact fundamental to fulfilling the requirements listed above in an optimal way. This paper addresses the evaluation of active 3D range cameras as part of a study to better understand and select one or a number of them to fulfill the needs of industrial design applications. In particular, object material and surface features effect, calibration and performance evaluation are discussed. Results are given for six different range cameras for close range applications.

  11. Evaluating the performance of close-range 3D active vision systems for industrial design applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Gaiani, Marco

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, active three-dimensional (3D) active vision systems or range cameras for short have come out of research laboratories to find niche markets in application fields as diverse as industrial design, automotive manufacturing, geomatics, space exploration and cultural heritage to name a few. Many publications address different issues link to 3D sensing and processing but currently these technologies pose a number of challenges to many recent users, i.e., "what are they, how good are they and how do they compare?". The need to understand, test and integrate those range cameras with other technologies, e.g. photogrammetry, CAD, etc. is driven by the quest for optimal resolution, accuracy, speed and cost. Before investing, users want to be certain that a given range camera satisfy their operational requirements. The understanding of the basic theory and best practices associated with those cameras are in fact fundamental to fulfilling the requirements listed above in an optimal way. This paper addresses the evaluation of active 3D range cameras as part of a study to better understand and select one or a number of them to fulfill the needs of industrial design applications. In particular, object material and surface features effect, calibration and performance evaluation are discussed. Results are given for six different range cameras for close range applications.

  12. Signal-to-noise ratio improvements in laser flow diagnostics using time-resolved image averaging and high dynamic range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giassi, Davide; Long, Marshall B.

    2016-08-01

    Two alternative image readout approaches are demonstrated to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in temporally resolved laser-based imaging experiments of turbulent phenomena. The first method exploits the temporal decay characteristics of the phosphor screens of image intensifiers when coupled to an interline-transfer CCD camera operated in double-frame mode. Specifically, the light emitted by the phosphor screen, which has a finite decay constant, is equally distributed and recorded over the two sequential frames of the detector so that an averaged image can be reconstructed. The characterization of both detector and image intensifier showed that the technique preserves the correct quantitative information, and its applicability to reactive flows was verified using planar Rayleigh scattering and tested with the acquisition of images of both steady and turbulent partially premixed methane/air flames. The comparison between conventional Rayleigh results and the averaged ones showed that the SNR of the averaged image is higher than the conventional one; with the setup used in this work, the gain in SNR was seen to approach 30 %, for both the steady and turbulent cases. The second technique uses the two-frame readout of an interline-transfer CCD to increase the image SNR based on high dynamic range imaging, and it was tested in an unsteady non-reactive flow of Freon-12 injected in air. The result showed a 15 % increase in the SNR of the low-pixel-count regions of an image, when compared to the pixels of a conventionally averaged one.

  13. Fast and accurate dating of nuclear events using La-140/Ba-140 isotopic activity ratio.

    PubMed

    Yamba, Kassoum; Sanogo, Oumar; Kalinowski, Martin B; Nikkinen, Mika; Koulidiati, Jean

    2016-06-01

    This study reports on a fast and accurate assessment of zero time of certain nuclear events using La-140/Ba-140 isotopic activity ratio. For a non-steady nuclear fission reaction, the dating is not possible. For the hypothesis of a nuclear explosion and for a release from a steady state nuclear fission reaction the zero-times will differ. This assessment is fast, because we propose some constants that can be used directly for the calculation of zero time and its upper and lower age limits. The assessment is accurate because of the calculation of zero time using a mathematical method, namely the weighted least-squares method, to evaluate an average value of the age of a nuclear event. This was done using two databases that exhibit differences between the values of some nuclear parameters. As an example, the calculation method is applied for the detection of radionuclides La-140 and Ba-140 in May 2010 at the radionuclides station JPP37 (Okinawa Island, Japan). PMID:27058322

  14. Concentrations and activity ratios of uranium isotopes in groundwater from Donana National Park, South of Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, J. P.; Olias, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, F.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2008-08-07

    The levels and distribution of natural radionuclides in groundwaters from the unconfined Almonte-Marismas aquifer, upon which Donana National Park is located, have been analysed. Most sampled points were multiple piezometers trying to study the vertical distribution of the hydrogeochemical characteristics in the aquifer. Temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen and redox potential were determined in the field. A large number of parameters, physico-chemical properties, major and minor ions, trace elements and natural radionuclides (U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, Ra-isotopes and {sup 210}Po), were also analysed. In the southern zone, where aeolian sands crop out, water composition is of the sodium chloride type, and the lower U-isotopes concentrations have been obtained. As water circulates through the aquifer, bicarbonate and calcium concentrations increase slightly, and higher radionuclides concentrations were measured. Finally, we have demonstrated that {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios can be used as markers of the type of groundwater and bedrock, as it has been the case for old waters with marine origin confined by a marsh in the south-east part of aquifer.

  15. Range degradation and distal edge behavior of proton radiotherapy beams using 11C activation and Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmekawy, Ahmed Farouk

    The distal edge of therapeutic proton radiation beams was investigated by different methods. Proton beams produced at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute (HUPTI) were used to irradiate a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom for three different ranges (13.5, 17.0 and 21.0 cm) to investigate the distal slope dependence of the Bragg peak. The activation of 11 C was studied by scanning the phantom less than 10 minutes post-irradiation with a Philips Big Bore Gemini(c) PET/CT. The DICOM images were imported into the Varian Eclipse(c) Treatment Planning System (TPS) for analysis and then analyzed by ImageJ(c) . The distal slope ranged from ?0.1671 +/- 0.0036 to -0.1986 +/- 0.0052 (pixel intensity/slice number) for ranges 13.5 to 21.0 cm respectively. A realistic description of the setup was modeled using the GATE 7.0 Monte Carlo simulation tool and compared to the experiment data. The results show the distal slope ranged from -0.1158+/-0.0133 to -0.0787+/-0.002 (Gy/mm). Additionally, low activity, 11C were simulated to study the 11C reconstructed half-life dependence versus the initial activity for six ranges chosen around the previous activation study. The results of the expected/nominal half-life vs. activity ranged from -5 x 10-4 +/- 2.8104 x 10-4 to 1.6 x 10-3 +/- 9.44 x 10-4 (%diff./Bq). The comparison between two experiments with proton beams on a PMMA phantom and multi-layer ion chamber, and two GATE simulations of a proton beam incident on a water phantom and 11C PET study show that: (i) the distal fall-off variation of the steepness of the slopes are found to be similar thus validating the sensitivity of the PET technique to the range degradation and (ii) the average of the super-ratios difference between all studies observed is primarily due to the difference in the dose deposited in the media.

  16. Emergent ultra–long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active–inactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua P.; Aragones, Juan L.; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser

    2016-04-01

    Particle–particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra–long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials.

  17. Phosphate oxygen isotope ratio proxy for specific microbial activity in marine sediments (Peru Margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Blake, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    Oxygen (O) isotope ratios of biogenic apatites have been widely used as paleotemperature and environmental geochemical proxies. With improved knowledge of the phosphate O isotope effects of different P cycling pathways, the δ18O value of inorganic phosphate (δ18OP) has been proposed as a useful proxy and tracer of biological reactions and P cycling in natural environments[1,2,3,4]. Being the only way of removing P from oceanic water, sedimentary P burial is one of the most important processes during biogeochemical cycling of P. The high concentrations of organic matter and pronounced microbial activity at ODP Site 1230 along the Peru Margin result in unusually high interstitial water phosphate concentrations, which provides a unique opportunity to use δ18OP to investigate inorganic phosphate (Pi) regeneration and P cycling pathways in marine sediments. The isotopic measurements of both dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) and bulk sediment Pi show that DIP δ18OP values are affected by three different processes, which are all induced by specific microbial activities present in the sediments. In sediments at ~ 65 to 120 mbsf, porewater DIP is derived from dissolved organophosphorus compounds (DOP) through enzymatic degradation pathways, evidenced by both DIP δ18OP values and interstitial water chemistry. Measured porewater DIP δ18OP values also suggest that 4 to 8% of interstitial water DIP reflects regeneration of Pi from Porg by microbially-synthesized enzymes. Throughout the sediment column and especially at ~ 120 to 150 mbsf, DIP is released from the sediments by microbially-induced reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides, which contributes to the overall high DIP concentrations at Site 1230. The third and dominant process controlling measured DIP δ18OP values is microbial turnover of regenerated Pi. The presence of high microbial activities in organic-rich Site 1230 sediments promotes the remobilization of P and affects marine P cycling by potentially enhancing

  18. Modern Tectonic Deformation in the Active Basin-and-Range Province Northwest of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Suting; Wen, Xueze

    2013-04-01

    Our study region is the northwest of Beijing, northern north China. The most typical extensional active tectonic area of the China continent, called the active basin-and-range province northwest of Beijing, exist there. This active tectonic province is made up of several NE-trending Quaternary graben basins and horst ranges between basins. An about 1500-year-long written historical record has suggested that there have been no major earthquakes with magnitude 7 or greater occurred in most of the study region since AD 512. So, the characteristic of modern tectonic deformation of the study region and its implication for the future seismic potential of major earthquakes are important scientific issues. In this study, based on data of regional GPS station velocities and active tectonics, combining relocated earthquake distribution, we make a preliminary analysis on the characteristic of the modern tectonic deformation of the study region. We design three zones across deferent segments of the active basin-and-range province to analyze both the present tectonic deformation from the GPS velocity profiles and the major fault's downward-extents from the relocated hypocenters. Our analyses reveal that: (1) Significant NNW-ward and SSE-ward horizontal extension exists on different segments of the active basin-and-range province northwest of Beijing at rates of 2 to 3mm /yr, accompanied with right-lateral shear deformation at 1 to 2mm/yr. (2) On the western and middle segments of the active basin and range province, most of the total horizontal extension and shear deformation happen in the width from the Huangqihai basin to the Datong-Yanggao basin , suggesting that some major faults in this width could have had relatively-high strain build-up. (3) It is possible that one or more basement detachment belts exist under the active basins, and it or they possibly dip(s) southeastern-ward. (4) The modern tectonic extensional rate is up to 2 to 3mm /yr in the study region. However

  19. Long-range night/day human identification using active-SWIR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoff, Brian E.; Martin, Robert B.; Sluch, Mikhail; Kafka, Kristopher M.; McCormick, William; Ice, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Positive identification of personnel from a safe distance is a long-standing need for security and defense applications. Advances in computer face recognition have made this a reliable means of identification when facial imagery of sufficient resolution is available to be matched against a database of mug shots. Long-range identification at night requires that the face be actively illuminated; however, for visible and NIR illumination, the intensity required to produce high-resolution long-range imagery typically creates an eye-safety hazard. SWIR illumination makes active- SWIR imaging a promising approach to long-range night-time identification. We will describe an active-SWIR imaging system that is being developed to covertly detect, track, zoom in on, and positively identify a human target, night or day, at hundreds of meters range. The SWIR illuminator pans, tilts, and zooms with the imager to always just fill the imager field of view. The illuminator meets Class 1 eye-safety limits (safe even with magnifying optics) at the intended target, and meets Class 1M eye-safety limits (safe to the naked eye) at point-blank range. Close-up night-time facial imagery will be presented along with experimental face recognition performance results for matching SWIR imagery to a database of visible mug shots at distance.

  20. In-situ measurement of dust devil activity at La Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We document observations of dust devil vortices using a linear array of 10 miniature pressure- and sunlight-logging stations in summer 2013 at La Jornada Experimental Range in the southwestern USA. These data provide a census of vortex and dust-devil activity at this site. The simultaneous spatial...

  1. Wide tuning-range CMOS VCO based on a tunable active inductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei Kia, Hojjat; Khari A'ain, Abu; Grout, Ian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a wide tuning-range CMOS voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) with high output power using an active inductor circuit is presented. In this VCO design, the coarse frequency is achieved by tuning the integrated active inductor. The circuit has been simulated using a 0.18-µm CMOS fabrication process and presents output frequency range from 100 MHz to 2.5 GHz, resulting in a tuning range of 96%. The phase noise is -85 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz frequency offset. The output power is from -3 dBm at 2.55 GHz to +14 dBm at 167 MHz. The active inductor power dissipation is 6.5 mW and the total power consumption is 16.27 mW when operating on a 1.8 V supply voltage. By comparing this active inductor architecture VCO with general VCO topology, the result shows that this topology, which employs the proposed active inductor, produces a better performance.

  2. Drug effects on aldosterone/plasma renin activity ratio in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Mulatero, Paolo; Rabbia, Franco; Milan, Alberto; Paglieri, Cristina; Morello, Fulvio; Chiandussi, Livio; Veglio, Franco

    2002-12-01

    Primary aldosteronism is a specifically treatable and potentially curable form of secondary hypertension. The aldosterone/plasma renin activity ratio (ARR) is routinely used as a screening test. Antihypertensive therapy can interfere with the interpretation of this parameter, but a correct washout period can be potentially harmful. We have investigated the effects of therapy with atenolol, amlodipine, doxazosin, fosinopril, and irbesartan on the ARR in a group of 230 patients with suspected primary aldosteronism. The percent change from control of ARR in patients taking amlodipine was -17%+/-32; atenolol, 62%+/-82; doxazosin, -5%+/-26; fosinopril, -30%+/-24; and irbesartan, -43%+/-27. The ARR change induced by atenolol was significantly higher compared with that induced by all other drugs (P<0.0001), and the ARR change induced by irbesartan was significantly lower than that induced by doxazosin (P<0.0001). One of 55 patients from the group taking amlodipine (1.8%) and 4/17 of the patients taking irbesartan (23.5%) gave a false-negative ARR (<50). None of the patients of the groups taking fosinopril, doxazosin, and atenolol displayed a false-negative ARR. Doxazosin and fosinopril can be used in hypertensive patients who need to undergo aldosterone and PRA measurement for the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism; amlodipine gave a very small percentage of false-negative diagnoses. beta-Blockers also do not interfere with the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism, but they can be responsible for an increased rate of false-positive ARRs. The high rate of false-negative diagnoses in patients undergoing irbesartan treatment requires confirmation in a higher number of patients. PMID:12468576

  3. Peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles stabilized by hyperbranched polyglycidol derivatives over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Parzuchowski, Paweł; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, Marta; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2015-12-11

    The aim of this work was to carry out comparative studies on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized with low molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycidol (HBPG-OH) and its derivative modified with maleic acid residues (HBPG-COOH). The influence of the stabilizer to gold precursor ratio on the size and morphology of nanoparticles obtained was checked, and prepared nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results indicated the divergent effect of increasing the concentration of stabilizers (HBPG-OH or HBPG-COOH) on the size of the nanostructures obtained. The gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized as having intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and the mechanism of catalysis in acidic and alkaline mediums was consistent with the standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, revealing a strong affinity of AuNPs with 2, 2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and significantly lower affinity towards phenol. By comparing the kinetic parameters, a negligible effect of polymeric ligand charge on activity against various types of substrates (anionic or cationic) was indicated. The superiority of steric stabilization via the application of tested low-weight hyperbranched polymers over typical stabilizers in preventing salt-induced aggregation and maintaining high catalytic activity in time was proved. The applied hyperbranched stabilizers provide a good tool for manufacturing gold-based nanozymes, which are highly stable and active over a wide pH range. PMID:26567596

  4. Metal ion activated lipase from halotolerant Bacillus sp. VITL8 displays broader operational range.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Lavanya; Jayaraman, Gurunathan

    2014-06-01

    Lipase producing halo tolerant Bacillus sp. VITL8 was isolated from oil contaminated areas of Vellore. The identity of the organism was established by 16S rDNA sequence, in addition to the morphological and biochemical characterization. The purified enzyme (22kDa, 8680U/mg) exhibited optimal activity at pH 7.0 and 40°C and retained more than 50% of its activity in the NaCl concentration range of 0-3.0M, pH 6.0-10.0 and 10-60°C. Secondary structure analysis, using circular dichroism, revealed that the enzyme is composed of 38% α-helix and 29% β-turns. The lipase activity significantly increased in the presence of (1mM) Mn(2+) (139%), Ca(2+) (134%) and Mg(2+) (130%). Organic solvents such as butanol and acetonitrile (25%, v/v) enhanced the activity whereas DMSO (25% v/v) retained the activity. The Km of enzyme-p-Nitrophenyl palmitate complex was determined to be 191μM with a Vmax of 68μM/mg/min. Though halotolerant Bacillus sp. has been explored for hydrocarbon degradation, to our knowledge this is the first report on the lipase activity of the isolate. The characteristics of the enzyme presented in this report, imply broader operational range of the enzyme and therefore could be suitable for many of the industrial chemical processes. PMID:24704541

  5. Low noise signal-to-noise ratio enhancing readout circuit for current-mediated active pixel sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Ottaviani, Tony; Karim, Karim S.; Nathan, Arokia; Rowlands, John A.

    2006-05-15

    Diagnostic digital fluoroscopic applications continuously expose patients to low doses of x-ray radiation, posing a challenge to both the digital imaging pixel and readout electronics when amplifying small signal x-ray inputs. Traditional switch-based amorphous silicon imaging solutions, for instance, have produced poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) at low exposure levels owing to noise sources from the pixel readout circuitry. Current-mediated amorphous silicon pixels are an improvement over conventional pixel amplifiers with an enhanced SNR across the same low-exposure range, but whose output also becomes nonlinear with increasing dosage. A low-noise SNR enhancing readout circuit has been developed that enhances the charge gain of the current-mediated active pixel sensor (C-APS). The solution takes advantage of the current-mediated approach, primarily integrating the signal input at the desired frequency necessary for large-area imaging, while adding minimal noise to the signal readout. Experimental data indicates that the readout circuit can detect pixel outputs over a large bandwidth suitable for real-time digital diagnostic x-ray fluoroscopy. Results from hardware testing indicate that the minimum achievable C-APS output current that can be discerned at the digital fluoroscopic output from the enhanced SNR readout circuit is 0.341 nA. The results serve to highlight the applicability of amorphous silicon current-mediated pixel amplifiers for large-area flat panel x-ray imagers.

  6. Doppler and range determination for deep space vehicles using active optical transponders.

    PubMed

    Kinman, P W; Gagliardi, R M

    1988-11-01

    This paper describes and analyzes two types of laser system employing active transponders that could accurately determine Doppler and range to deep space vehicles from earth-orbiting satellites. The first is a noncoherent optical system in which the Doppler effect on an intensity-modulating subcarrier is measured. The second is a coherent optical system in which the Doppler effect of the optical carrier itself is measured. Doppler and range measurement errors are mathematically modeled and, for three example systems, numerically evaluated. PMID:20539597

  7. A plastic scintillator-based activity monitor for tritiated water in the GBq/ℓ range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köllő, Zoltán

    2015-10-01

    The measurement of tritium activity in water in the GBq / ℓ range is an important topic in fusion and other areas. In this work a scintillator detector based on the BC-408 plastic scintillator was built up and tested in the mentioned range. The structure of the detector was simplified to ease maintenance. Memory effect and scintillator damage were investigated by means of experiment and simulation. The results are analyzed in view of further detector development, and conclusions are drawn concerning the scintillator material.

  8. Exploring the active galactic nuclei population with extreme X-ray-to-optical flux ratios (fx/fo > 50)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Ceca, R.; Carrera, F. J.; Caccianiga, A.; Severgnini, P.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Corral, A.; Del Moro, A.; Mateos, S.; Ruiz, A.; Watson, M. G.

    2015-03-01

    The cosmic history of the growth of supermassive black holes in galactic centres parallels that of star formation in the Universe. However, an important fraction of this growth occurs inconspicuously in obscured objects, where ultraviolet/optical/near-infrared emission is heavily obscured by dust. Since the X-ray flux is less attenuated, a high X-ray-to-optical flux ratio (fx/fo) is expected to be an efficient tool to find out these obscured accreting sources. We explore here via optical spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and infrared photometry the most extreme cases of this population (those with fx/fo > 50, EXO50 sources hereafter), using a well-defined sample of seven X-ray sources extracted from the 2XMM catalogue. Five EXO50 sources (˜70 per cent of the sample) in the bright flux regime explored by our survey (f(2-10 keV) ≥ 1.5 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1) are associated with obscured AGN (NH > 1022 cm-2), spanning a redshift range between 0.75 and 1 and characterized by 2-10 keV intrinsic luminosities in the QSO regime (e.g. well in excess to 1044 erg s-1). We did not find compelling evidence of Compton thick active galacic nuclei (AGN). Overall, the EXO50 type 2 QSOs do not seem to be different from standard X-ray-selected type 2 QSOs in terms of nuclear absorption; a very high AGN/host galaxy ratio seems to play a major role in explaining their extreme properties. Interestingly, three out of five EXO50 type 2 QSO objects can be classified as extreme dust-obscured galaxies (EDOGs, f24 μm/fR ≥ 2000), suggesting that a very high AGN/host ratios (along with the large amount of dust absorption) could be the natural explanation also for a part of the EDOG population. The remaining two EXO50 sources are classified as BL Lac objects, having rather extreme properties, and which are good candidates for TeV emission.

  9. Feasibility of proton-activated implantable markers for proton range verification using PET

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Gillin, Michael; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Titt, Uwe; Paganetti, Harald; Kerr, Matthew; Mawlawi, Osama

    2014-01-01

    Proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) currently relies on proton activation of tissue, the products of which decay with a short half-life and necessitate an on-site PET scanner. Tissue activation is, however, negligible near the distal dose fall-off region of the proton beam range due to their high interaction energy thresholds. Therefore Monte Carlo simulation is often supplemented for comparison with measurement; however, this also may be associated with systematic and statistical uncertainties. Therefore, we sought to test the feasibility of using long-lived proton-activated external materials that are inserted or infused into the target volume for more accurate proton beam range verification that could be performed at an off-site PET scanner. We irradiated samples of ≥98% 18O-enriched water, natural Cu foils, and ≥97% 68Zn-enriched foils as candidate materials, along with samples of tissue-equivalent materials including 16O water, heptane (C7H16), and polycarbonate (C16H14O3)n, at 4 depths (ranging from 100% to 3% of center of modulation (COM) dose) along the distal fall-off of a modulated 160-MeV proton beam. Samples were irradiated either directly or after being embedded in Plastic Water® or balsa wood. We then measured the activity of the samples using PET imaging for 20 or 30 min after various delay times. Measured activities of candidate materials were up to 100 times greater than those of the tissue-equivalent materials at the 4 distal dose fall-off depths. The differences between candidate materials and tissue-equivalent materials became more apparent after longer delays between irradiation and PET imaging, due to the longer half-lives of the candidate materials. Furthermore, the activation of the candidate materials closely mimicked the distal dose fall-off with offsets of 1 to 2 mm. Also, signals from the foils were clearly visible compared to the background from the activated Plastic Water® and balsa wood

  10. Feasibility of proton-activated implantable markers for proton range verification using PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Gillin, Michael; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Titt, Uwe; Paganetti, Harald; Kerr, Matthew; Mawlawi, Osama

    2013-11-01

    Proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) currently relies on proton activation of tissue, the products of which decay with a short half-life and necessitate an on-site PET scanner. Tissue activation is, however, negligible near the distal dose fall-off region of the proton beam range due to their high interaction energy thresholds. Therefore Monte Carlo simulation is often supplemented for comparison with measurement; however, this also may be associated with systematic and statistical uncertainties. Therefore, we sought to test the feasibility of using long-lived proton-activated external materials that are inserted or infused into the target volume for more accurate proton beam range verification that could be performed at an off-site PET scanner. We irradiated samples of ≥98% 18O-enriched water, natural Cu foils, and >97% 68Zn-enriched foils as candidate materials, along with samples of tissue-equivalent materials including 16O water, heptane (C7H16), and polycarbonate (C16H14O3)n, at four depths (ranging from 100% to 3% of center of modulation (COM) dose) along the distal fall-off of a modulated 160 MeV proton beam. Samples were irradiated either directly or after being embedded in Plastic Water® or balsa wood. We then measured the activity of the samples using PET imaging for 20 or 30 min after various delay times. Measured activities of candidate materials were up to 100 times greater than those of the tissue-equivalent materials at the four distal dose fall-off depths. The differences between candidate materials and tissue-equivalent materials became more apparent after longer delays between irradiation and PET imaging, due to the longer half-lives of the candidate materials. Furthermore, the activation of the candidate materials closely mimicked the distal dose fall-off with offsets of 1 to 2 mm. Also, signals from the foils were clearly visible compared to the background from the activated Plastic Water® and balsa wood

  11. In-situ measurement of dust devil activity at La Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Neakrase, Lynn D.; Anderson, John D.

    2015-12-01

    We document observations of dust devil vortices using a linear array of 10 miniature pressure- and sunlight-logging stations in summer 2013 at La Jornada Experimental Range in the southwestern USA. These data provide a census of vortex and dust-devil activity at this site. The simultaneous spatially-distributed measurements resolve the horizontal pressure structure of several dust devil encounters, and the data can be fit well with an analytic model, giving independent measures of vortex size and intensity.

  12. Ranging, Activity and Habitat Use by Tigers in the Mangrove Forests of the Sundarban.

    PubMed

    Naha, Dipanjan; Jhala, Yadvendradev V; Qureshi, Qamar; Roy, Manjari; Sankar, Kalyansundaram; Gopal, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The Sundarban of India and Bangladesh (about 6000 km²) are the only mangrove forests inhabited by a sizeable population of tigers. The adjoining area also supports one of the highest human densities and experiences severe human-tiger conflicts. We used GPS-Satellite and VHF radio-collars on 6 (3 males and 3 female) tigers to study their ranging patterns and habitat preference. The average home range (95% Fixed Kernel) for resident females was 56.4 (SE 5.69) and for males it was 110 (SE 49) km². Tigers crossed an average of 5 water channels > 30 meters per day with a mean width of 54 meters, whereas channels larger than 400 meters were rarely crossed. Tigers spent over 58% of their time within Phoenix habitat but compositional analysis showed a habitat preference of the order Avicennia-Sonneratia > Phoenix > Ceriops > Barren > Water. Average daily distance moved was 4.6 km (range 0.1-23). Activity of tigers peaked between 05:00 hours and 10:00 hours showing some overlap with human activity. Territory boundaries were demarcated by large channels which tigers intensively patrolled. Extra caution should be taken while fishing or honey collection during early morning in Avicennia-Sonneratia and Phoenix habitat types along wide channels to reduce human-tiger conflict. Considering home-range core areas as exclusive, tiger density was estimated at 4.6 (SE range 3.6 to 6.7) tigers/100 km2 giving a total population of 76 (SE range 59-110) tigers in the Indian Sundarban. Reluctance of tigers to cross wide water channels combined with increasing commercial boat traffic and sea level rise due to climate change pose a real threat of fragmenting the Sundarban tiger population. PMID:27049644

  13. Ranging, Activity and Habitat Use by Tigers in the Mangrove Forests of the Sundarban

    PubMed Central

    Naha, Dipanjan; Jhala, Yadvendradev V.; Qureshi, Qamar; Roy, Manjari; Sankar, Kalyansundaram; Gopal, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The Sundarban of India and Bangladesh (about 6000 km²) are the only mangrove forests inhabited by a sizeable population of tigers. The adjoining area also supports one of the highest human densities and experiences severe human-tiger conflicts. We used GPS-Satellite and VHF radio-collars on 6 (3 males and 3 female) tigers to study their ranging patterns and habitat preference. The average home range (95% Fixed Kernel) for resident females was 56.4 (SE 5.69) and for males it was 110 (SE 49) km². Tigers crossed an average of 5 water channels > 30 meters per day with a mean width of 54 meters, whereas channels larger than 400 meters were rarely crossed. Tigers spent over 58% of their time within Phoenix habitat but compositional analysis showed a habitat preference of the order Avicennia-Sonneratia > Phoenix > Ceriops > Barren > Water. Average daily distance moved was 4.6 km (range 0.1–23). Activity of tigers peaked between 05:00 hours and 10:00 hours showing some overlap with human activity. Territory boundaries were demarcated by large channels which tigers intensively patrolled. Extra caution should be taken while fishing or honey collection during early morning in Avicennia-Sonneratia and Phoenix habitat types along wide channels to reduce human-tiger conflict. Considering home-range core areas as exclusive, tiger density was estimated at 4.6 (SE range 3.6 to 6.7) tigers/100 km2 giving a total population of 76 (SE range 59–110) tigers in the Indian Sundarban. Reluctance of tigers to cross wide water channels combined with increasing commercial boat traffic and sea level rise due to climate change pose a real threat of fragmenting the Sundarban tiger population. PMID:27049644

  14. Effect of F/O atomic ratio on photocatalytic activity of BixOyFz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wenhao; Zhang, Guoliang; Teng, Fei; Teng, Yiran; Zhao, Zhengyang; Fan, Wenzheng

    2016-08-01

    We have, for the first time, prepared BiO0.9F2.35 as a new photocatalyst by a simple hydrothermal method. It is found that at different ratios of fluorine to oxygen (F/O), the BixOyFz samples have the varied internal electric field (IEF) and electrical conductivities, thus showing different photochemistry properties for the degradation of RhB. The bulk IEF and conductivity can be conveniently controlled by the F/O ratio, thus improving the photochemistry properties of layered BixOyFz. This study provides a new strategy to develop efficient photocatalysts.

  15. Long Range Order of Motile Defects in Active Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, Stephen; Redner, Gabriel; Hagan, Michael; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-03-01

    Active 2D nematic liquid crystals exist in a dynamical steady state in which +1/2 and -1/2 defects are spontaneously generated and annihilated at a constant rate. Active stresses in the material are thought to destroy nematic order through the generation of these defects. We present an active nematic mesophase in which motile defects of charge +1/2 spontaneously acquire long range order. The system is composed of microtubule filaments and kinesin motor protein clusters which are confined to a flat, 2D oil-water interface. The addition of ATP results in microtubule bundles which exhibit kinesin-driven extensile motion. By tuning the density of the nematic material at the 2D interface, we can tune the order parameter of the +1/2 defect ordered mesophase. Additionally, the defect alignment persists over samples at the centimeter scale.

  16. Activity Patterns of Free-Ranging Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) Revealed by Accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michelle A.; Whisson, Desley A.; Holland, Greg J.; Arnould, John P. Y.

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of koala activity patterns is important for measuring the behavioral response of this species to environmental change, but to date has been limited by the logistical challenges of traditional field methodologies. We addressed this knowledge gap by using tri-axial accelerometer data loggers attached to VHF radio collars to examine activity patterns of adult male and female koalas in a high-density population at Cape Otway, Victoria, Australia. Data were obtained from 27 adult koalas over two 7-d periods during the breeding season: 12 in the early-breeding season in November 2010, and 15 in the late-breeding season in January 2011. Multiple 15 minute observation blocks on each animal were used for validation of activity patterns determined from the accelerometer data loggers. Accelerometry was effective in distinguishing between inactive (sleeping, resting) and active (grooming, feeding and moving) behaviors. Koalas were more active during the early-breeding season with a higher index of movement (overall dynamic body acceleration [ODBA]) for both males and females. Koalas showed a distinct temporal pattern of behavior, with most activity occurring from mid-afternoon to early morning. Accelerometry has potential for examining fine-scale behavior of a wide range of arboreal and terrestrial species. PMID:24224050

  17. Tectonic activity revealed by morphostructural analysis: Development of the Sierra de la Candelaria range, northwestern Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelona, H.; Peri, G.; Tobal, J.; Sagripanti, L.; Favetto, A.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonically active broken foreland of NW Argentina is a recent analog of the eastern margin of the Puna plateau during Mio-Pliocene times and likely of other broken forelands worldwide. In order to evaluate active tectonism in the broken foreland of the NW Argentine Andes, we examined the complex geomorphology in the vicinity of the basement-cored Sierra de la Candelaria range at ˜26°S and deciphered multiple episodes of crustal deformation spanning the Pliocene to the Quaternary. Digital elevation models, satellite images and geological data within a GIS environment allowed us to analyze the terrain, drainage networks, river dynamics and structure, as well as to obtain detailed geomorphological mapping, active tectonic indices, longitudinal river profiles and structural sections. Three morphostructural segments were defined based on the structural features, the differential vertical dissection pattern over the basement, the faulted Pliocene to recent deposits, the stepwise propagation of anticlines and the distortion over the fluvial system. By combining the several lines of evidence, we concluded that the Sierra de la Candelaria range was subjected to a multi-stage development. The first stage uplifted the central segment concomitant with the formation of the surrounding ranges and with the main partition phase of the foreland. After a significant time lapse, the mountain range was subjected to southward thick-skinned growth and northward growth via stepwise thin-skinned deformation and exerted control over the dynamics of the Río Rosario. Taking into account the surrounding basins and ranges of the Sierra de la Candelaria, the southern Santa Bárbara System is characterized by partially isolated intramontane basins (Choromoro and Rosario) limited by shielded ranges that caused moisture block and shows continuous deformation. These features were related to early stages of a broken foreland evolution model and modern analogs were found at the northern

  18. The Effect of the CO32- to Ca2+ Ion activity ratio on calcite precipitation kinetics and Sr2+ partitioning

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A proposed strategy for immobilizing trace metals in the subsurface is to stimulate calcium carbonate precipitation and incorporate contaminants by co-precipitation. Such an approach will require injecting chemical amendments into the subsurface to generate supersaturated conditions that promote mineral precipitation. However, the formation of reactant mixing zones will create gradients in both the saturation state and ion activity ratios (i.e., aCO32-/aCa2+). To better understand the effect of ion activity ratios on CaCO3 precipitation kinetics and Sr2+ co-precipitation, experiments were conducted under constant composition conditions where the supersaturation state (Ω) for calcite was held constant at 9.4, but the ion activity ratio (r=aCO32-/aCa2+) was varied between 0.0032 and 4.15. Results Calcite was the only phase observed, by XRD, at the end of the experiments. Precipitation rates increased from 41.3 ± 3.4 μmol m-2 min-1 at r = 0.0315 to a maximum rate of 74.5 ± 4.8 μmol m-2 min-1 at r = 0.306 followed by a decrease to 46.3 ± 9.6 μmol m-2 min-1 at r = 1.822. The trend was simulated using a simple mass transfer model for solute uptake at the calcite surface. However, precipitation rates at fixed saturation states also evolved with time. Precipitation rates accelerated for low r values but slowed for high r values. These trends may be related to changes in effective reactive surface area. The aCO32-/aCa2+ ratios did not affect the distribution coefficient for Sr in calcite (DPSr2+), apart from the indirect effect associated with the established positive correlation between DPSr2+ and calcite precipitation rate. Conclusion At a constant supersaturation state (Ω = 9.4), varying the ion activity ratio affects the calcite precipitation rate. This behavior is not predicted by affinity-based rate models. Furthermore, at the highest ion ratio tested, no precipitation was observed, while at the lowest ion ratio precipitation occurred immediately

  19. Ultra-long-range hydroacoustic observations of submarine volcanic activity at Monowai, Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, D.; Watts, A. B.; Grevemeyer, I.; Rodgers, M.; Paulatto, M.

    2016-02-01

    Monowai is an active submarine volcanic center in the Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific Ocean. During May 2011, it erupted over a period of 5 days, with explosive activity directly linked to the generation of seismoacoustic T phases. We show, using cross-correlation and time-difference-of-arrival techniques, that the eruption is detected as far as Ascension Island, equatorial South Atlantic Ocean, where a bottom moored hydrophone array is operated as part of the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. Hydroacoustic phases from the volcanic center must therefore have propagated through the Sound Fixing and Ranging channel in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans, a source-receiver distance of ~15,800 km. We believe this to be the furthest documented range of a naturally occurring underwater signal above 1 Hz. Our findings, which are consistent with observations at regional broadband stations and long-range, acoustic parabolic equation modeling, have implications for submarine volcano monitoring.

  20. Activities of Pu and Am isotopes and isotopic ratios in a soil contaminated by weapons-grade plutonium.

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Clark, S B

    2005-08-01

    An accident and fire at the former McGuire Air Force Base and Boeing Michigan Aeronautical Research Center (BOMARC) site in New Jersey resulted in dispersion of weapons-grade plutonium in particulate form to the local environment. Soil samples collected at the BOMARC site were measured for their activities and isotopic ratios of Pu and Am isotopes by radioanalytical techniques. The activities of the Pu and Am isotopes in the BOMARC soil were markedly higher than fallout levels, and they decreased nearly exponentially with increasing particle size of the soil. The measured (241)Am activity was compared to calculated values based on decay of (241)Pu. The activity ratios of (238)Pu/(239,240)Pu, (241)Pu/(239,240)Pu, and (241)Am/(239,240)Pu observed in the BOMARC soil were much lower than those attributed to nuclear reprocessing plants and Chernobyl fallout. From the activity ratios of (241)Pu/(239,240)Pu and (241)Am/(239,240)Pu, the origin of the Pu isotopes was identified as weapons-grade and the time since production of the material was estimated. Furthermore, the atomic ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu in the BOMARC soil was remarkably lower than the fallout value influenced by nuclear weapons testing and the Chernobyl accident. The atomic ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu was very close to the value of the weapons-grade Pu detected from the Thule accident in Greenland. This work demonstrates the utility of radioanalytical measurements and decay calculations for defining characteristics of the source term and discriminating multiple processes that contribute to a source. Such an approach would also be needed to respond to a terrorist event involving an improvised nuclear device or radiological dispersal device. PMID:16124281

  1. The Intrinsic Eddington Ratio Distribution of Active Galactic Nuclei in Star-forming Galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Mackenzie L.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Black, Christine S.; Hainline, Kevin N.; DiPompeo, Michael A.; Goulding, Andy D.

    2016-07-01

    An important question in extragalactic astronomy concerns the distribution of black hole accretion rates of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Based on observations at X-ray wavelengths, the observed Eddington ratio distribution appears as a power law, while optical studies have often yielded a lognormal distribution. There is increasing evidence that these observed discrepancies may be due to contamination by star formation and other selection effects. Using a sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we test whether or not an intrinsic Eddington ratio distribution that takes the form of a Schechter function is consistent with previous work suggesting that young galaxies in optical surveys have an observed lognormal Eddington ratio distribution. We simulate the optical emission line properties of a population of galaxies and AGNs using a broad, instantaneous luminosity distribution described by a Schechter function near the Eddington limit. This simulated AGN population is then compared to observed galaxies via their positions on an emission line excitation diagram and Eddington ratio distributions. We present an improved method for extracting the AGN distribution using BPT diagnostics that allows us to probe over one order of magnitude lower in Eddington ratio, counteracting the effects of dilution by star formation. We conclude that for optically selected AGNs in young galaxies, the intrinsic Eddington ratio distribution is consistent with a possibly universal, broad power law with an exponential cutoff, as this distribution is observed in old, optically selected galaxies and X-rays.

  2. Peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles stabilized by hyperbranched polyglycidol derivatives over a wide pH range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Parzuchowski, Paweł; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, Marta; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to carry out comparative studies on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized with low molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycidol (HBPG-OH) and its derivative modified with maleic acid residues (HBPG-COOH). The influence of the stabilizer to gold precursor ratio on the size and morphology of nanoparticles obtained was checked, and prepared nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results indicated the divergent effect of increasing the concentration of stabilizers (HBPG-OH or HBPG-COOH) on the size of the nanostructures obtained. The gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized as having intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and the mechanism of catalysis in acidic and alkaline mediums was consistent with the standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, revealing a strong affinity of AuNPs with 2, 2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 3, 3‧, 5, 5‧-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and significantly lower affinity towards phenol. By comparing the kinetic parameters, a negligible effect of polymeric ligand charge on activity against various types of substrates (anionic or cationic) was indicated. The superiority of steric stabilization via the application of tested low-weight hyperbranched polymers over typical stabilizers in preventing salt-induced aggregation and maintaining high catalytic activity in time was proved. The applied hyperbranched stabilizers provide a good tool for manufacturing gold-based nanozymes, which are highly stable and active over a wide pH range.

  3. Paralleling power MOSFETs in their active region: Extended range of passively forced current sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    1989-01-01

    A simple passive circuit that improves current balance in parallelled power MOSFETs that are not precisely matched and that are operated in their active region from a common gate drive are exhibited. A nonlinear circuit consisting of diodes and resistors generates the differential gate potential required to correct for unbalance while maintaining low losses over a range of current. Also application of a thin tape wound magnetic core to effect dynamic current balance is reviewed, and a simple theory is presented showing that for operation in the active region the branch currents tend to revert to their normal unbalanced values even if the core is not driven into saturation. Results of several comparative experiments are given.

  4. Modeling the ratio of photosynthetically active radiation to broadband global solar radiation using ground and satellite-based data in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjai, S.; Wattan, R.; Sripradit, A.

    2015-12-01

    Data from four stations in Thailand are used to model the ratio of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) to broadband global solar radiation. The model expresses the ratio of PAR-to-broadband global solar radiation as a function of cloud index, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water, total ozone column and solar zenith angle. Data from the MTSAT-1R and OMI/AURA satellites are used to estimate the cloud index and total ozone column, respectively at each of the four stations, while aerosol optical depth and precipitable water are retrieved from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sunphotometer measurements, also available at each station. When tested against hourly measurements, the model exhibits a coefficient of variance (R2) equal to or better than 0.96, and root mean square difference (RMSD) in the range of 7.3-7.9% and mean bias difference (MBD) of -4.5% to 3.5%. The model compares favorably with other existing models.

  5. Emergence of long-range correlations and bursty activity patterns in online communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarasa, Pietro; Bonaventura, Moreno

    2015-12-01

    Research has suggested that the activity occurring in a variety of social, economic, and technological systems exhibits long-range fluctuations in time. Pronounced levels of rapidly occurring events are typically observed over short periods of time, followed by long periods of inactivity. Relatively few studies, however, have shed light on the degree to which inhomogeneous temporal processes can be detected at, and emerge from, different levels of analysis. Here we investigate patterns of human activity within an online forum in which communication can be assessed at three intertwined levels: the micro level of the individual users; the meso level of discussion groups and continuous sessions; and the macro level of the whole system. To uncover the relation between different levels, we conduct a number of numerical simulations of a zero-crossing model in which users' behavior is constrained by progressively richer and more realistic rules of social interaction. Results indicate that, when users are solipsistic, their bursty behavior is not sufficient for generating heavy-tailed interevent time distributions at a higher level. However, when users are socially interdependent, the power spectra and interevent time distributions of the simulated and real forums are remarkably similar at all levels of analysis. Social interaction is responsible for the aggregation of multiple bursty activities at the micro level into an emergent bursty activity pattern at a higher level. We discuss the implications of the findings for an emergentist account of burstiness in complex systems.

  6. Biocatalyst activity in nonaqueous environments correlates with centisecond-range protein motions

    PubMed Central

    Eppler, Ross K.; Hudson, Elton P.; Chase, Shannon D.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Reimer, Jeffrey A.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies exploring the relationship between enzymatic catalysis and protein dynamics in the aqueous phase have yielded evidence that dynamics and enzyme activity are strongly correlated. Given that protein dynamics are significantly attenuated in organic solvents and that proteins exhibit a wide range of motions depending on the specific solvent environment, the nonaqueous milieu provides a unique opportunity to examine the role of protein dynamics in enzyme activity. Variable-temperature kinetic measurements, X-band electron spin resonance spectroscopy, 1H NMR relaxation, and 19F NMR spectroscopy experiments were performed on subtilisin Carlsberg colyophilized with several inorganic salts and suspended in organic solvents. The results indicate that salt activation induces a greater degree of transition-state flexibility, reflected by a more positive ΔΔS†, for the more active biocatalyst preparations in organic solvents. In contrast, ΔΔH† was negligible regardless of salt type or salt content. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy and 1H NMR relaxation measurements, including spin-lattice relaxation, spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame, and longitudinal magnetization exchange, revealed that the enzyme's turnover number (kcat) was strongly correlated with protein motions in the centisecond time regime, weakly correlated with protein motions in the millisecond regime, and uncorrelated with protein motions on the piconanosecond timescale. In addition, 19F chemical shift measurements and hyperfine tensor measurements of biocatalyst formulations inhibited with 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl fluoride and 4-ethoxyfluorophosphinyl-oxy-TEMPO, respectively, suggest that enzyme activation was only weakly affected by changes in active-site polarity. PMID:18840689

  7. Biocatalyst activity in nonaqueous environments correlates with centisecond-range protein motions.

    PubMed

    Eppler, Ross K; Hudson, Elton P; Chase, Shannon D; Dordick, Jonathan S; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Clark, Douglas S

    2008-10-14

    Recent studies exploring the relationship between enzymatic catalysis and protein dynamics in the aqueous phase have yielded evidence that dynamics and enzyme activity are strongly correlated. Given that protein dynamics are significantly attenuated in organic solvents and that proteins exhibit a wide range of motions depending on the specific solvent environment, the nonaqueous milieu provides a unique opportunity to examine the role of protein dynamics in enzyme activity. Variable-temperature kinetic measurements, X-band electron spin resonance spectroscopy, (1)H NMR relaxation, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy experiments were performed on subtilisin Carlsberg colyophilized with several inorganic salts and suspended in organic solvents. The results indicate that salt activation induces a greater degree of transition-state flexibility, reflected by a more positive DeltaDeltaS(dagger), for the more active biocatalyst preparations in organic solvents. In contrast, DeltaDeltaH(dagger) was negligible regardless of salt type or salt content. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy and (1)H NMR relaxation measurements, including spin-lattice relaxation, spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame, and longitudinal magnetization exchange, revealed that the enzyme's turnover number (k(cat)) was strongly correlated with protein motions in the centisecond time regime, weakly correlated with protein motions in the millisecond regime, and uncorrelated with protein motions on the piconanosecond timescale. In addition, (19)F chemical shift measurements and hyperfine tensor measurements of biocatalyst formulations inhibited with 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl fluoride and 4-ethoxyfluorophosphinyl-oxy-TEMPO, respectively, suggest that enzyme activation was only weakly affected by changes in active-site polarity. PMID:18840689

  8. Critical evaluation of changes in the ratio of insoluble bound to soluble phenolics on antioxidant activity of lentils during germination.

    PubMed

    Yeo, JuDong; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2015-01-21

    A new indicator, the ratio of insoluble bound phenolics (IBPs) to soluble phenolics (SPs), is suggested as an effective means to monitor changes in the antioxidant activity of lentils during germination. This indicator may be used to monitor other process-induced changes in antioxidant potential of food phenolics in other foods. The antioxidant activity of SPs, IBPs, and total value, the sum of both free and esterified phenolics, of germinated CDC Richlea lentil variety was evaluated for 4 days. Total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation scavenging ability were employed to record antioxidant activities. An incremental increase in IBPs was found in TPC, TFC, DPPH, and ABTS radical cation scavenging ability, whereas SPs showed a declining trend in TFC, DPPH, and ABTS, except TPC during 4 days of germination. The ratio of IBPs to SPs increased using most methods, and this may be possibly due to the changes of phenolic compound formation from soluble into insoluble bound form during germination process. The ratio can be used as a novel method for monitoring process-induced changes in the antioxidant activity of foods. PMID:25560637

  9. Locked and loading megathrust linked to active subduction beneath the Indo-Burman Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckler, Michael S.; Mondal, Dhiman Ranjan; Akhter, Syed Humayun; Seeber, Leonardo; Feng, Lujia; Gale, Jonathan; Hill, Emma M.; Howe, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The Indo-Burman mountain ranges mark the boundary between the Indian and Eurasian plates, north of the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone. Whether subduction still occurs along this subaerial section of the plate boundary, with 46 mm yr-1 of highly oblique motion, is contentious. About 21 mm yr-1 of shear motion is taken up along the Sagaing Fault, on the eastern margin of the deformation zone. It has been suggested that the remainder of the relative motion is taken up largely or entirely by horizontal strike-slip faulting and that subduction has stopped. Here we present GPS measurements of plate motions in Bangladesh, combined with measurements from Myanmar and northeast India, taking advantage of a more than 300 km subaerial accretionary prism spanning the Indo-Burman Ranges to the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta. They reveal 13-17 mm yr-1 of plate convergence on an active, shallowly dipping and locked megathrust fault. Most of the strike-slip motion occurs on a few steep faults, consistent with patterns of strain partitioning in subduction zones. Our results strongly suggest that subduction in this region is active, despite the highly oblique plate motion and thick sediments. We suggest that the presence of a locked megathrust plate boundary represents an underappreciated hazard in one of the most densely populated regions of the world.

  10. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, M.; Anaxagoras, T.; Evans, P. M.; Green, S.; Manolopoulos, S.; Nieto-Camero, J.; Parker, D. J.; Poludniowski, G.; Price, T.; Waltham, C.; Allinson, N. M.

    2015-06-01

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs.

  11. Photodynamic treatment with BPD-MA (verteporfin) activated with light within different spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Anna M.; Jain, Ashok K.; Canaan, Alice J.; Bower, Robert D.; North, Janice; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Levy, Julia G.

    1997-12-01

    Benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A [BPD-MA (verteporfin) or BPD], a second generation photosensitizer tested in clinical trials in combination with red light was compared for its PDT efficiency in vitro and in vivo upon activation with light in the UVA, blue and red spectral ranges. PDT efficiency, calculated based on the BPD absorption spectrum and spectral output of the different light sources, was compared with actual PDT efficiency determined in vitro and in vivo. Results obtained in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay, in which aliquots of murine P815 cells, pre-incubated for 1 h with BPD at 5 ng/mL, were exposed simultaneously to various light doses delivered within UVA, blue and red spectral ranges showed that in this test system PDT efficiency was governed by BPD absorption and light source emission spectra. Similar results were obtained in an in vitro BPD photobleaching test. Thus in vitro, values for calculated, theoretical PDT efficiency corresponded to the actual PDT efficiency. However, in vivo factors, such as depth of tissue penetration with light and localization of the target, had an important influence on PDT efficiency. In mouse models of skin photosensitivity and the cutaneous hypersensitivity immune response (CHS) assay, because of the thinness of mouse skin, PDT efficiency approximated the theoretical PDT efficiency, although blue light was somewhat more efficient in PDT than UVA, and red light was somewhat more efficient than blue or UVA. In a pig skin photosensitivity model, red light induced the highest skin response manifested by erythema and swelling, while blue light caused erythema and minimal swelling and UVA caused only erythema. These differences could be related to the thickness of pig skin and the depth of tissue penetration characteristic of each spectral range. Fluence rate was found to be an additional factor which modifies the effect of BPD and light. In conclusion, BPD can be efficiently activated with light within the UVA

  12. ESA activities on satellite laser ranging to non-cooperative objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flohrer, Tim; Krag, Holger; Funke, Quirin; Jilete, Beatriz; Mancas, Alexandru

    2016-07-01

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) to non-cooperative objects is an emerging technology that can contribute significantly to operational, modelling and mitigation needs set by the space debris population. ESA is conducting various research and development activities in SLR to non-cooperative objects. ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) program supports specific activities in the Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) segment. Research and development activities with operational aspects are run by ESA's Space Debris Office. At ESA SSA/SST comprises detecting, cataloguing and predicting the objects orbiting the Earth, and the derived applications. SST aims at facilitating research and development of sensor and data processing technologies and of related common components while staying complementary with, and in support of, national and multi-national European initiatives. SST promotes standardisation and interoperability of the technology developments. For SLR these goals are implemented through researching, developing, and deploying an expert centre. This centre shall coordinate the contribution of system-external loosely connected SLR sensors, and shall provide back calibration and expert evaluation support to the sensors. The Space Debris Office at ESA is responsible for all aspects related to space debris in the Agency. It is in charge of providing operational support to ESA and third party missions. Currently, the office studies the potential benefits of laser ranging to space debris objects to resolve close approaches to active satellites, to improve re-entry predictions of time and locations, and the more general SLR support during contingency situations. The office studies the determination of attitude and attitude motion of uncooperative objects with special focus on the combination of SLR, light-curve, and radar imaging data. Generating sufficiently precise information to allow for the acquisition of debris objects by a SLR sensor in a stare

  13. Nitrogen removal from wastewater and bacterial diversity in activated sludge at different COD/N ratios and dissolved oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Bernat, Katarzyna; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Sobolewska, Joanna; Wojnowska-Baryła, Irena

    2012-01-01

    The impact of the organic carbon to nitrogen ratio (chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N) in wastewater and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on carbon and nitrogen removal efficiency, and total bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) communities in activated sludge in constantly aerated sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) was determined. At DO of 0.5 and 1.5 mg O2/L during the aeration phase, the efficiency of ammonia oxidation exceeded 90%, with nitrates as the main product. Nitrification and denitrification achieved under the same operating conditions suggested the simultaneous course of these processes. The most effective nitrogen elimination (above 50%) was obtained at the COD/N ratio of 6.8 and DO of 0.5 mg O2/L. Total bacterial diversity was similar in all experimental series, however, for both COD/N ratios of 6.8 and 0.7, higher values were observed at DO of 0.5 mg O2/L. The diversity and abundance of AOB were higher in the reactors with the COD/N ratio of 0.7 in comparison with the reactors with the COD/N of 6.8. For both COD/N ratios applied, the AOB population was not affected by oxygen concentration. Amplicons with sequences indicating membership of the genus Nitrosospira were the determinants of variable technological conditions. PMID:23505865

  14. An investigation of several NACA 1 series axisymmetric inlets at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.29. [wind tunnel tests over range of mass-flow ratios and at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to determine the performance of seven inlets having NACA 1-series contours and one inlet having an elliptical contour over a range of mass-flow ratios and at angle of attack. The inlet diameter ratio varied from 0.81 to 0.89; inlet length ratio varied from 0.75 to 1.25; and internal contraction ratio varied from 1.009 to 1.093. Reynolds number based on inlet maximum diameter varied from 3.4 million at a Mach number of 0.4 to 5.6 million at a Mach number of 1.29.

  15. Long-range signaling in growing neurons after local elevation of cyclic AMP-dependent activity

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-dependent activity at the growth cone or the soma of cultured Xenopus spinal neurons was elevated by local extracellular perfusion of the neuron with culture medium containing 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-br-cAMP) or forskolin. During local perfusion of one of the growth cones of multipolar neurons with these drugs, the perfused growth cone showed further extension, while the distant, unperfused growth cones were inhibited in their growth. Local perfusion of the growth cone with culture medium or local perfusion with 8-br-cAMP at a cell-free region 100 microns away from the growth cone did not produce any effect on the extension of the growth cone. Reduced extension of all growth cones was observed when the perfusion with 8-br-cAMP was restricted to the soma. The distant inhibitory effect does not depend on the growth of the perfused growth cone since local coperfusion of the growth cone with 8-br-cAMP and colchicine inhibited growth on both perfused and unperfused growth cones, while local perfusion with colchicine alone inhibited only the perfused growth cone. The distant inhibitory effect was abolished when the perfusion of 8-br-cAMP was carried out together with kinase inhibitor H- 8, suggesting the involvement of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and/or its downstream factors in the long-range inhibitory signaling. Uniform exposure of the entire neuron to bath-applied 8-br-cAMP, however, led to enhanced growth activity at all growth cones. Thus, local elevation of cAMP-dependent activity produces long-range and opposite effects on distant parts of the neuron, and a cytosolic gradient of second messengers may produce effects distinctly different from those following uniform global elevation of the messenger, leading to differential growth regulation at different regions of the same neuron. PMID:7798321

  16. Operational Limits and MHD Activity at Near-Unity Aspect Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterberg, E. A.; Diem, S. J.; Fonck, R. J.; Garstka, G. D.; Lewicki, B. T.; Ostrander, C. N.; Sontag, A. C.; Thorson, T. A.; Winz, G. R.

    2000-10-01

    Experiments on the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment are focusing on the limits of plasma operation at ultralow aspect ratio (A<1.2). Plasmas have been produced with I_p/I_TF=1, with q_98 ≈ 4-6; no external kink stability boundary is evident at that level. Studies of the q-limit have been constrained by the incomplete status of the OH power supply; the recent completion of this supply allows further exploration of this limit. Electron densities approaching the Greenwald limit have been observed. An n=1 mode is often observed during startup and is commonly associated with fast current ramps (>30 MA/s). This mode often limits the discharge evolution. There is also evidence that double tearing modes are present during the current ramp. Internal reconnection events have been observed with characteristics similar to those observed on other ST experiments.

  17. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of ultra-high aspect ratio ZnO nanowires due to Cu induced defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasupathi Sugavaneshwar, Ramu; Duy Dao, Thang; Nanda, Karuna Kar; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hishita, Shunichi; Sakaguchi, Isao

    2015-12-01

    We report the synthesis of ZnO nanowires in ambient air at 650°C by a single-step vapor transport method using two different sources Zn (ZnO nanowires-I) and Zn:Cu (ZnO nanowires-II). The Zn:Cu mixed source co-vaporize Zn with a small amount of Cu at temperatures where elemental Cu source does not vaporize. This method provides us a facile route for Cu doping into ZnO. The aspect ratio of the grown ZnO nanowires-II was found to be higher by more than five times compared ZnO nanowires-I. Photocatalytic activity was measured by using a solar simulator and its ultraviolet-filtered light. The ZnO nanowires-II shows higher catalytic activity due to increased aspect ratio and higher content of surface defects because of incorporation of Cu impurities.

  18. U Activity Ratios in Surface Waters as Tracers and Chronometers of Water Transfers in the Critical zone;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, F.

    2015-12-01

    The use of radioactive disequilibria as tracers and chronometers of weathering processes and related mass transfers has been recognized since the 60'. The development, over the last two decades, of analytical methods for measuring very precisely U-series nuclides (especially, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra) in environmental samples has opened up new scientific applications in Earth Surface Sciences. Here, we propose to present the potential of U activity ratios in surface waters as geochemical tracer and chronometer of water transfers at a watershed scale. This will be illustrated from studies performed at different scales, with the analysis of U activity ratios in surface waters from small watersheds (Strengbach and Ringelbach watersheds in the Vosges Mountain, France) but also from watersheds of much more regional extension (e.g., the Upper Rhine basin or the Ganges basin). These various studies show that variations of U activity ratios in surface waters are mainly associated with 234U-238U fractionations occurring during the water transfer within the bedrock, which intensity depends on two main parameters: the petro-physical characteristics of the aquifer, principally the geometry of water-rock interfaces and the duration of the water-rock interactions. This readily explains why different U activity ratios (UAR) can be observed in the different aquifers of a continental hydrosystem and hence why UAR can be used to trace the source of river waters. For a hydrological system developed on a substratum marked by fairly homogeneous petro-physical characteristics, the main parameter controlling the UAR in waters draining such a system would be the duration of the water-rock interactions. Variations of UAR in stream or spring waters of such a system can therefore be modeled using simple reactive transport model, which allows the estimation of both the dissolution rate of the bedrock and the residence time of the waters within the aquifer.

  19. Enhancer-like long-range transcriptional activation by λ CI-mediated DNA looping

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lun; Murchland, Iain; Shearwin, Keith E.; Dodd, Ian B.

    2013-01-01

    How distant enhancer elements regulate the assembly of a transcription complex at a promoter remains poorly understood. Here, we use long-range gene regulation by the bacteriophage λ CI protein as a powerful system to examine this process in vivo. A 2.3-kb DNA loop, formed by CI bridging its binding sites at OR and OL, is known already to enhance repression at the lysogenic promoter PRM, located at OR. Here, we show that CI looping also activates PRM by allowing the C-terminal domain of the α subunit of the RNA polymerase bound at PRM to contact a DNA site adjacent to the distal CI sites at OL. Our results establish OL as a multifaceted enhancer element, able to activate transcription from long distances independently of orientation and position. We develop a physicochemical model of our in vivo data and use it to show that the observed activation is consistent with a simple recruitment mechanism, where the α–C-terminal domain to DNA contact need only provide ∼2.7 kcal/mol of additional binding energy for RNA polymerase. Structural modeling of this complete enhancer–promoter complex reveals how the contact is achieved and regulated, and suggests that distal enhancer elements, once appropriately positioned at the promoter, can function in essentially the same way as proximal promoter elements. PMID:23382214

  20. Nematic long-range ordering of topological defects in active liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jorn; Oza, Anand

    2015-11-01

    Identifying the ordering principles of intracellular matter is key to understanding the physics of microbiological systems. Recent experiments demonstrated that ATP-driven microtubule-kinesin bundles can self-assemble into two-dimensional active liquid crystals that exhibit a rich creation and annihilation dynamics of topological defects, reminiscent of particle-pair production processes in quantum systems. This remarkable discovery has sparked considerable theoretical and experimental interest, yet a satisfactory mathematical description remains elusive. Here, we present and validate a continuum theory for this new class of active matter systems by merging universality ideas with the classical Landau-de Gennes theory. The resulting model agrees quantitatively with recently published data and, in particular, predicts correctly a previously unexplained regime of long-range nematic ordering of defects observed in experiments. Our analysis implies that active liquid crystals are governed by the same generic ordering principles that determine the non-equilibrium dynamics of dense bacterial suspensions and elastic bilayer materials. Moreover, the theory suggests an energetic analogy with strongly interacting quantum gases.

  1. Enhancer-like long-range transcriptional activation by λ CI-mediated DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lun; Murchland, Iain; Shearwin, Keith E; Dodd, Ian B

    2013-02-19

    How distant enhancer elements regulate the assembly of a transcription complex at a promoter remains poorly understood. Here, we use long-range gene regulation by the bacteriophage λ CI protein as a powerful system to examine this process in vivo. A 2.3-kb DNA loop, formed by CI bridging its binding sites at OR and OL, is known already to enhance repression at the lysogenic promoter PRM, located at OR. Here, we show that CI looping also activates PRM by allowing the C-terminal domain of the α subunit of the RNA polymerase bound at PRM to contact a DNA site adjacent to the distal CI sites at OL. Our results establish OL as a multifaceted enhancer element, able to activate transcription from long distances independently of orientation and position. We develop a physicochemical model of our in vivo data and use it to show that the observed activation is consistent with a simple recruitment mechanism, where the α-C-terminal domain to DNA contact need only provide ∼2.7 kcal/mol of additional binding energy for RNA polymerase. Structural modeling of this complete enhancer-promoter complex reveals how the contact is achieved and regulated, and suggests that distal enhancer elements, once appropriately positioned at the promoter, can function in essentially the same way as proximal promoter elements. PMID:23382214

  2. Turbulence modelling of low Reynolds number flow effects around a vertical axis turbine at a range of tip-speed ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaughton, J.; Billard, F.; Revell, A.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional numerical investigation of a vertical axis turbine with focus on the prediction from two different turbulence modelling schemes. The three bladed turbine configuration tested is that of Roa et al. (2010) which has a high solidity of 1.1 and is tested at a chord-based Reynolds number of 1.5 × 105. Results are provided at three different tip speed ratios: the optimal value, and values 25% higher and lower. A detailed investigation of the flow ensues and results are presented as obtained from the original SST model and a modified version for low Reynolds number effects, recently tested by Wang et al. (2010) for a similar flow. Post-processing includes the evolution of the skin-friction coefficient over the blade throughout a cycle which enables a better understanding of the flow structure and the dynamic stall effects, as well as blade-vortex interaction. The low Reynolds number version of the model acts to reduce turbulence viscosity, leading to laminar flow at various parts of the cycle, which is seen to correctly enable the formation of leading edge vortices observed in the literature.

  3. Effects of F/G-actin ratio and actin turn-over rate on NADPH oxidase activity in microglia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most in vivo studies that have addressed the role of actin dynamics in NADPH oxidase function in phagocytes have used toxins to modulate the polymerization state of actin and mostly effects on actin has been evaluated by end point measurements of filamentous actin, which says little about actin dynamics, and without consideration for the subcellular distribution of the perturbed actin cytoskeleton. Results Here, we in addition to toxins use conditional expression of the major actin regulatory protein LIM kinase-1 (LIMK1), and shRNA knock-down of cofilin to modulate the cellular F/G-actin ratio in the Ra2 microglia cell line, and we use Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) in β-actin-YFP-transduced cells to obtain a dynamic measure of actin recovery rates (actin turn-over rates) in different F/G-actin states of the actin cytoskeleton. Our data demonstrate that stimulated NADPH oxidase function was severely impaired only at extreme actin recovery rates and F/G-actin ratios, and surprisingly, that any moderate changes of these parameters of the actin cytoskeleton invariably resulted in an increased NADPH oxidase activity. Conclusion moderate actin polymerization and depolymerization both increase the FMLP and PMA-stimulated NADPH oxidase activity of microglia, which is directly correlated with neither actin recovery rate nor F/G- actin ratio. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase functions in an enhanced state of activity in stimulated phagocytes despite widely different states of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:20825680

  4. Cholesterol 26-hydroxylase activity of hamster liver mitochondria: Isotope ratio analysis using deuterated 26-hydroxycholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, E.; Javitt, N.B. )

    1990-04-01

    Deuterated 26-hydroxycholesterol prepared from diosgenin by modifications of existing methods permitted the determination of mitochondrial cholesterol 26-hydroxylase using endogenous cholesterol as the substrate. Enzyme activity in a group of Syrian hamsters was found to be 10.3 +/- 3.7 pmol.min-1.mg protein-1.

  5. Active Learning Strategies to Teach Renal-Cardiovascular Integration with High Student-to-Teacher Ratios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brands, Michael W.; Schumacher, Lori

    2009-01-01

    To address the challenge of increasing opportunities for active learning into a medical physiology course with 190 students enrolled, we chose an integrated approach. This was facilitated by the availability of a patient simulator facility at the School of Nursing at the Medical College of Georgia, and an 20-min simulation of acute hemorrhage on…

  6. A spectroscopic and computational study of Al(III) complexes in sodium cryolite melts: Ionic composition in a wide range of cryolite ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.; Vassiliev, Sergey Yu.; Glukhov, Dmitri V.; Tsirlina, Galina A.; Probst, Michael

    2010-04-01

    The structure of sodium cryolite melts was studied using Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations performed at the density functional theory level. The existence of bridged forms in the melts was argued first from the analysis of experimental Raman spectra. In the quantum chemical modelling emphasis was put on the construction of potential energy surfaces describing the formation/dissociation of certain complex species. Effects of the ionic environment were found to play a crucial role in the energetics of model processes. The structure of the simplest possible polymeric forms involving two Al centres linked through F atoms ("dimers") was thoroughly investigated. The calculated equilibrium constants and model Raman spectra yield additional evidence in favour of the dimers. This agrees with a self-consistent analysis of a series of Raman spectra for a wide range of the melt composition.

  7. A spectroscopic and computational study of Al(III) complexes in sodium cryolite melts: ionic composition in a wide range of cryolite ratios.

    PubMed

    Nazmutdinov, Renat R; Zinkicheva, Tamara T; Vassiliev, Sergey Yu; Glukhov, Dmitri V; Tsirlina, Galina A; Probst, Michael

    2010-04-01

    The structure of sodium cryolite melts was studied using Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations performed at the density functional theory level. The existence of bridged forms in the melts was argued first from the analysis of experimental Raman spectra. In the quantum chemical modelling emphasis was put on the construction of potential energy surfaces describing the formation/dissociation of certain complex species. Effects of the ionic environment were found to play a crucial role in the energetics of model processes. The structure of the simplest possible polymeric forms involving two Al centres linked through F atoms ("dimers") was thoroughly investigated. The calculated equilibrium constants and model Raman spectra yield additional evidence in favour of the dimers. This agrees with a self-consistent analysis of a series of Raman spectra for a wide range of the melt composition. PMID:20149721

  8. Effect of glass composition on activation energy of viscosity in glass-melting-temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Han, Sang Soo

    2012-08-01

    In the high-temperature range, where the viscosity (Eta) of molten glass is <10{sup 3} Pa s, the activation energy (B) is virtually ln(Eta) = A + B/T, is nearly independent of melt composition. Hence, the viscosity-composition relationship for Eta < 10{sup 3} Pa s is defined by B as a function of composition. Using a database encompassing over 1300 compositions of high-level waste glasses with nearly 7000 viscosity data, we developed mathematical models for B(x), where x is the composition vector in terms of mass fractions of components. In this paper, we present 13 versions of B(x) as first- and second-order polynomials with coefficients for 15 to 39 components, including Others, a component that sums constituents having little effect on viscosity.

  9. Microbial community proteomics for characterizing the range of metabolic functions and activities of human gut microbiota

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, Weili; Abraham, Paul E.; Li, Zhou; Pan, Chongle; Robert L. Hettich

    2015-01-01

    We found that the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that consists of a carefully tuned balance of human host and microbiota membership. The microbiome component is not insignificant, but rather provides important functions that are absolutely critical to many aspects of human health, including nutrient transformation and absorption, drug metabolism, pathogen defense, and immune system development. Microbial community proteomics (sometimes referred to as metaproteomics) provides a powerful approach to measure the range and details of human gut microbiota functions and metabolic activities, revealing information about microbiome development and stability especially with regard to human health vs.more » disease states. In most cases, both microbial and human proteins are extracted from fecal samples and then measured by the high performance MS-based proteomics technology. We review the field of human gut microbiome community proteomics, with a focus on the experimental and informatics considerations involved in characterizing systems that range from low complexity defined model gut microbiota in gnotobiotic mice, to the simple gut microbiota in the GI tract of newborn infants, and finally to the complex gut microbiota in adults. Moreover, the current state-of-the-art in experimental and bioinformatics capabilities for community proteomics enable a detailed measurement of the gut microbiota, yielding valuable insights into the broad functional profiles of even complex microbiota. Future developments are likely to expand into improved analysis throughput and coverage depth, as well as post-translational modification characterizations.« less

  10. Microbial community proteomics for characterizing the range of metabolic functions and activities of human gut microbiota

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Weili; Abraham, Paul E.; Li, Zhou; Pan, Chongle; Robert L. Hettich

    2015-01-01

    We found that the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that consists of a carefully tuned balance of human host and microbiota membership. The microbiome component is not insignificant, but rather provides important functions that are absolutely critical to many aspects of human health, including nutrient transformation and absorption, drug metabolism, pathogen defense, and immune system development. Microbial community proteomics (sometimes referred to as metaproteomics) provides a powerful approach to measure the range and details of human gut microbiota functions and metabolic activities, revealing information about microbiome development and stability especially with regard to human health vs. disease states. In most cases, both microbial and human proteins are extracted from fecal samples and then measured by the high performance MS-based proteomics technology. We review the field of human gut microbiome community proteomics, with a focus on the experimental and informatics considerations involved in characterizing systems that range from low complexity defined model gut microbiota in gnotobiotic mice, to the simple gut microbiota in the GI tract of newborn infants, and finally to the complex gut microbiota in adults. Moreover, the current state-of-the-art in experimental and bioinformatics capabilities for community proteomics enable a detailed measurement of the gut microbiota, yielding valuable insights into the broad functional profiles of even complex microbiota. Future developments are likely to expand into improved analysis throughput and coverage depth, as well as post-translational modification characterizations.

  11. Is there long-range memory in solar activity on timescales shorter than the sunspot period?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypdal, M.; Rypdal, K.

    2012-04-01

    The sunspot number (SSN), the total solar irradiance (TSI), a TSI reconstruction, and the solar flare index (SFI) are analyzed for long-range persistence (LRP). Standard Hurst analysis yields H ≈ 0.9, which suggests strong LRP. However, solar activity time series are nonstationary because of the almost-periodic 11 year smooth component, and the analysis does not give the correct H for the stochastic component. Better estimates are obtained by detrended fluctuation analysis, but estimates are biased and errors are large because of the short time records. These time series can be modeled as a stochastic process of the form x(t) = y(t) + σy(t)wH(t), where y(t) is the smooth component and wH(t) is a stationary fractional noise with Hurst exponent H. From ensembles of numerical solutions to the stochastic model and application of Bayes' theorem, we can obtain bias and error bars on H and also a test of the hypothesis that a process is uncorrelated (H = 1/2). The conclusions from the present data sets are that SSN, TSI, and TSI reconstruction almost certainly are long-range persistent, but with the most probable value H ≈ 0.7. The SFI process, however, is either very weakly persistent (H < 0.6) or completely uncorrelated on timescales longer than a few solar rotations. Differences between stochastic properties of the TSI and its reconstruction indicate some error in the reconstruction scheme.

  12. Numerical analysis of the effect of the kind of activating agent and the impregnation ratio on the parameters of the microporous structure of the active carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Mirosław

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the results of the research on the application of the LBET class adsorption models with the fast multivariant identification procedure as a tool for analysing the microporous structure of the active carbons obtained by chemical activation using potassium and sodium hydroxides as an activator. The proposed technique of the fast multivariant fitting of the LBET class models to the empirical adsorption data was employed particularly to evaluate the impact of the used activator and the impregnation ratio on the obtained microporous structure of the carbonaceous adsorbents.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF REFERENCE RANGES FOR PLASMA TOTAL CHOLINESTERASE AND BRAIN ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN FREE-RANGING CARNABY'S BLACK-COCKATOOS (CALYPTORHYNCHUS LATIROSTRIS).

    PubMed

    Vaughan-Higgins, Rebecca; Vitali, Simone; Reiss, Andrea; Besier, Shane; Hollingsworth, Tom; Smith, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    Published avian reference ranges for plasma cholinesterase (ChE) and brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) are numerous. However, a consistently reported recommendation is the need for species- and laboratory-specific reference ranges because of variables, including assay methods, sample storage conditions, season, and bird sex, age, and physiologic status. We developed normal reference ranges for brain AChE and plasma total ChE (tChE) activity for Carnaby's Black-Cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) using a standardized protocol (substrate acetylthiocholine at 25 C). We report reference ranges for brain AChE (19-41 μmol/min per g, mean 21±6.38) and plasma tChE (0.41-0.53 μmol/min per mL, mean 0.47±0.11) (n=15). This information will be of use in the ongoing field investigation of a paresis-paralysis syndrome in the endangered Carnaby's Black-Cockatoos, suspected to be associated with exposure to anticholinesterase compounds and add to the paucity of reference ranges for plasma tChE and brain AChE in Australian psittacine birds. PMID:27195690

  14. A Lactobacillus plantarum Esterase Active on a Broad Range of Phenolic Esters

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Torres, María; Landete, José María; Reverón, Inés; Santamaría, Laura; de las Rivas, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is the lactic acid bacterial species most frequently found in the fermentation of food products of plant origin on which phenolic compounds are abundant. L. plantarum strains showed great flexibility in their ability to adapt to different environments and growth substrates. Of 28 L. plantarum strains analyzed, only cultures from 7 strains were able to hydrolyze hydroxycinnamic esters, such as methyl ferulate or methyl caffeate. As revealed by PCR, only these seven strains possessed the est_1092 gene. When the est_1092 gene was introduced into L. plantarum WCFS1 or L. lactis MG1363, their cultures acquired the ability to degrade hydroxycinnamic esters. These results support the suggestion that Est_1092 is the enzyme responsible for the degradation of hydroxycinnamic esters on the L. plantarum strains analyzed. The Est_1092 protein was recombinantly produced and biochemically characterized. Surprisingly, Est_1092 was able to hydrolyze not only hydroxycinnamic esters, since all the phenolic esters assayed were hydrolyzed. Quantitative PCR experiments revealed that the expression of est_1092 was induced in the presence of methyl ferulate, an hydroxycinnamic ester, but was inhibited on methyl gallate, an hydroxybenzoic ester. As Est_1092 is an enzyme active on a broad range of phenolic esters, simultaneously possessing feruloyl esterase and tannase activities, its presence on some L. plantarum strains provides them with additional advantages to survive and grow on plant environments. PMID:25746986

  15. Range of Motion Requirements for Upper-Limb Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Lisa Smurr; Cowley, Jeffrey; Wilken, Jason M.; Resnik, Linda

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We quantified the range of motion (ROM) required for eight upper-extremity activities of daily living (ADLs) in healthy participants. METHOD. Fifteen right-handed participants completed several bimanual and unilateral basic ADLs while joint kinematics were monitored using a motion capture system. Peak motions of the pelvis, trunk, shoulder, elbow, and wrist were quantified for each task. RESULTS. To complete all activities tested, participants needed a minimum ROM of −65°/0°/105° for humeral plane angle (horizontal abduction–adduction), 0°–108° for humeral elevation, −55°/0°/79° for humeral rotation, 0°–121° for elbow flexion, −53°/0°/13° for forearm rotation, −40°/0°/38° for wrist flexion–extension, and −28°/0°/38° for wrist ulnar–radial deviation. Peak trunk ROM was 23° lean, 32° axial rotation, and 59° flexion–extension. CONCLUSION. Full upper-limb kinematics were calculated for several ADLs. This methodology can be used in future studies as a basis for developing normative databases of upper-extremity motions and evaluating pathology in populations. PMID:26709433

  16. Streptolysin S of Streptococcus anginosus exhibits broad-range hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Asam, Daniela; Mauerer, Stefanie; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is a commensal of mucous membranes and an emerging human pathogen. Some strains, including the type strain, display a prominent β-hemolytic phenotype. A gene cluster (sag), encoding a variant of streptolysin S (SLS) has recently been identified as the genetic background for β-hemolysin production in S. anginosus. In this study, we further characterized the hemolytic and cytolytic activity of the S. anginosus hemolysin in comparison with other streptococcal hemolysins. The results indicate that SLS of S. anginosus is a broad-range hemolysin able to lyse erythrocytes of different species, including horse, bovine, rabbit and even chicken. The hemolytic activity is temperature dependent, and a down-regulation of the hemolysin expression is induced in the presence of high glucose levels. Survival assays indicate that in contrast to other streptococcal species, S. anginosus does not require SLS for survival in the presence of human granulocytes. Cross-complementation studies using the sagB and sagD genes of Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis demonstrated functional similarities to the S. anginosus SLS. Nevertheless, distinct differences to other streptolysin S variants were noted and provide further insights into the molecular mechanisms of SLS pathogen host interactions. PMID:25381594

  17. Reliability of the universal goniometer for assessing active cervical range of motion in asymptomatic healthy persons

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad Nazim; Bandpei, Mohammad A. Mohseni; Ali, Mudassar; Khan, Ghazanfar Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine within-rater and between-rater reliability of the universal goniometer (UG) for measuring active cervical range of motion (ACROM) in asymptomatic healthy subjects. Methods: Nineteen healthy subjects were tested in an identical seated position. Two raters used UG to measure active cervical movements of flexion, extension, right side flexion, left side flexion, right rotation and left rotation. Each motion was measured twice by each of the two raters and was re-measured all over again after one week. Data analysis was performed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The results demonstrated excellent within-session (ICC2,1 = 0.83 to 0.98) and between-session (ICC2,2 = 0.79 to 0.97) intra-rater reliability and excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC2,2 = 0.79 to 0.92). Conclusion: Considering above results it is concluded that UG is a reliable tool for assessing ACROM in a clinical setting for healthy subjects. PMID:27182261

  18. A Lactobacillus plantarum esterase active on a broad range of phenolic esters.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Torres, María; Landete, José María; Reverón, Inés; Santamaría, Laura; de las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario

    2015-05-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is the lactic acid bacterial species most frequently found in the fermentation of food products of plant origin on which phenolic compounds are abundant. L. plantarum strains showed great flexibility in their ability to adapt to different environments and growth substrates. Of 28 L. plantarum strains analyzed, only cultures from 7 strains were able to hydrolyze hydroxycinnamic esters, such as methyl ferulate or methyl caffeate. As revealed by PCR, only these seven strains possessed the est_1092 gene. When the est_1092 gene was introduced into L. plantarum WCFS1 or L. lactis MG1363, their cultures acquired the ability to degrade hydroxycinnamic esters. These results support the suggestion that Est_1092 is the enzyme responsible for the degradation of hydroxycinnamic esters on the L. plantarum strains analyzed. The Est_1092 protein was recombinantly produced and biochemically characterized. Surprisingly, Est_1092 was able to hydrolyze not only hydroxycinnamic esters, since all the phenolic esters assayed were hydrolyzed. Quantitative PCR experiments revealed that the expression of est_1092 was induced in the presence of methyl ferulate, an hydroxycinnamic ester, but was inhibited on methyl gallate, an hydroxybenzoic ester. As Est_1092 is an enzyme active on a broad range of phenolic esters, simultaneously possessing feruloyl esterase and tannase activities, its presence on some L. plantarum strains provides them with additional advantages to survive and grow on plant environments. PMID:25746986

  19. Extrasynaptic Glutamate Receptor Activation as Cellular Bases for Dynamic Range Compression in Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Short, Shaina M.; Rich, Matthew T.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive synaptic stimulation overcomes the ability of astrocytic processes to clear glutamate from the extracellular space, allowing some dendritic segments to become submerged in a pool of glutamate, for a brief period of time. This dynamic arrangement activates extrasynaptic NMDA receptors located on dendritic shafts. We used voltage-sensitive and calcium-sensitive dyes to probe dendritic function in this glutamate-rich location. An excess of glutamate in the extrasynaptic space was achieved either by repetitive synaptic stimulation or by glutamate iontophoresis onto the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Two successive activations of synaptic inputs produced a typical NMDA spike, whereas five successive synaptic inputs produced characteristic plateau potentials, reminiscent of cortical UP states. While NMDA spikes were coupled with brief calcium transients highly restricted to the glutamate input site, the dendritic plateau potentials were accompanied by calcium influx along the entire dendritic branch. Once initiated, the glutamate-mediated dendritic plateau potentials could not be interrupted by negative voltage pulses. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cellular compartments void of spines is sufficient to initiate and support plateau potentials. The only requirement for sustained depolarizing events is a surplus of free glutamate near a group of extrasynaptic receptors. Highly non-linear dendritic spikes (plateau potentials) are summed in a highly sublinear fashion at the soma, revealing the cellular bases of signal compression in cortical circuits. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors provide pyramidal neurons with a function analogous to a dynamic range compression in audio engineering. They limit or reduce the volume of “loud sounds” (i.e., strong glutamatergic inputs) and amplify “quiet sounds” (i.e., glutamatergic inputs that barely cross the dendritic threshold for local spike initiation). Our data also explain why consecutive cortical UP

  20. Long-range enhancer activity determines Myc sensitivity to Notch inhibitors in T cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; Wang, Hongfang; Zang, Chongzhi; Arnett, Kelly L.; Bailis, Will; Ho, Yugong; Knoechel, Birgit; Lanauze, Claudia; Louis, Lumena; Forsyth, Katherine S.; Chen, Sujun; Chung, Yoonjie; Schug, Jonathan; Blobel, Gerd A.; Liebhaber, Stephen A.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Liu, Xiaole Shirley; Aster, Jon C.; Pear, Warren S.

    2014-01-01

    Notch is needed for T-cell development and is a common oncogenic driver in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The protooncogene c-Myc (Myc) is a critical target of Notch in normal and malignant pre-T cells, but how Notch regulates Myc is unknown. Here, we identify a distal enhancer located >1 Mb 3′ of human and murine Myc that binds Notch transcription complexes and physically interacts with the Myc proximal promoter. The Notch1 binding element in this region activates reporter genes in a Notch-dependent, cell-context–specific fashion that requires a conserved Notch complex binding site. Acute changes in Notch activation produce rapid changes in H3K27 acetylation across the entire enhancer (a region spanning >600 kb) that correlate with Myc expression. This broad Notch-influenced region comprises an enhancer region containing multiple domains, recognizable as discrete H3K27 acetylation peaks. Leukemia cells selected for resistance to Notch inhibitors express Myc despite epigenetic silencing of enhancer domains near the Notch transcription complex binding sites. Notch-independent expression of Myc in resistant cells is highly sensitive to inhibitors of bromodomain containing 4 (Brd4), a change in drug sensitivity that is accompanied by preferential association of the Myc promoter with more 3′ enhancer domains that are strongly dependent on Brd4 for function. These findings indicate that altered long-range enhancer activity can mediate resistance to targeted therapies and provide a mechanistic rationale for combined targeting of Notch and Brd4 in leukemia. PMID:25369933

  1. UV activation of polymeric high aspect ratio microstructures: ramifications in antibody surface loading for circulating tumor cell selection†

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua M.; Witek, Małgorzata A.; Hupert, Mateusz L.; Brady, Charles; Pullagurla, Swathi; Kamande, Joyce; Aufforth, Rachel D.; Tignanelli, Christopher J.; Torphy, Robert J.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2014-01-01

    The need to activate thermoplastic surfaces using robust and efficient methods has been driven by the fact that replication techniques can be used to produce microfluidic devices in a high production mode and at low cost, making polymer microfluidics invaluable for in vitro diagnostics, such as circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis, where device disposability is critical to mitigate artifacts associated with sample carryover. Modifying the surface chemistry of thermoplastic devices through activation techniques can be used to increase the wettability of the surface or to produce functional scaffolds to allow for the covalent attachment of biologics, such as antibodies for CTC recognition. Extensive surface characterization tools were used to investigate UV activation of various surfaces to produce uniform and high surface coverage of functional groups, such as carboxylic acids in microchannels of different aspect ratios. We found that the efficiency of the UV activation process is highly dependent on the microchannel aspect ratio and the identity of the thermoplastic substrate. Colorimetric assays and fluorescence imaging of UV-activated microchannels following EDC/NHS coupling of Cy3-labeled oligonucleotides indicated that UV-activation of a PMMA microchannel with an aspect ratio of ∼3 was significantly less efficient toward the bottom of the channel compared to the upper sections. This effect was a consequence of the bulk polymer's damping of the modifying UV radiation due to absorption artifacts. In contrast, this effect was less pronounced for COC. Moreover, we observed that after thermal fusion bonding of the device's cover plate to the substrate, many of the generated functional groups buried into the bulk rendering them inaccessible. The propensity of this surface reorganization was found to be higher for PMMA compared to COC. As an example of the effects of material and microchannel aspect ratios on device functionality, thermoplastic devices for the

  2. UV activation of polymeric high aspect ratio microstructures: ramifications in antibody surface loading for circulating tumor cell selection.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Joshua M; Witek, Małgorzata A; Hupert, Mateusz L; Brady, Charles; Pullagurla, Swathi; Kamande, Joyce; Aufforth, Rachel D; Tignanelli, Christopher J; Torphy, Robert J; Yeh, Jen Jen; Soper, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    The need to activate thermoplastic surfaces using robust and efficient methods has been driven by the fact that replication techniques can be used to produce microfluidic devices in a high production mode and at low cost, making polymer microfluidics invaluable for in vitro diagnostics, such as circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis, where device disposability is critical to mitigate artifacts associated with sample carryover. Modifying the surface chemistry of thermoplastic devices through activation techniques can be used to increase the wettability of the surface or to produce functional scaffolds to allow for the covalent attachment of biologics, such as antibodies for CTC recognition. Extensive surface characterization tools were used to investigate UV activation of various surfaces to produce uniform and high surface coverage of functional groups, such as carboxylic acids in microchannels of different aspect ratios. We found that the efficiency of the UV activation process is highly dependent on the microchannel aspect ratio and the identity of the thermoplastic substrate. Colorimetric assays and fluorescence imaging of UV-activated microchannels following EDC/NHS coupling of Cy3-labeled oligonucleotides indicated that UV-activation of a PMMA microchannel with an aspect ratio of ~3 was significantly less efficient toward the bottom of the channel compared to the upper sections. This effect was a consequence of the bulk polymer's damping of the modifying UV radiation due to absorption artifacts. In contrast, this effect was less pronounced for COC. Moreover, we observed that after thermal fusion bonding of the device's cover plate to the substrate, many of the generated functional groups buried into the bulk rendering them inaccessible. The propensity of this surface reorganization was found to be higher for PMMA compared to COC. As an example of the effects of material and microchannel aspect ratios on device functionality, thermoplastic devices for the

  3. The effect of large aspect ratio wing yaw on active separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewes, Philipp; Taubert, Lutz; Wygnanski, Israel

    2014-11-01

    The applicability of the boundary layer independence principle to turbulent boundary layers developing on infinitely yawed wings, suggested that active separation control might be carried out differently to the two presumably independent developing boundary layers. At low incidence or flap deflection the control of the spanwise component of the flow is effective provided the aggregate number of actuators is small. In this case the actuator jets provide jet-curtains that virtually eliminate the spanwise flow component of the flow in their vicinity. At higher incidence or flap deflection, the focus of the active separation control has to shift to the chordwise component that has to overcome a high adverse pressure gradient. The idea was proven experimentally on a flapped wing based on a NACA 0012 airfoil that could be swept back and forward while being suspended from a ceiling of a wind tunnel connected to a six-component balance. The experiments were carried out at Reynolds numbers varying between 300,000 and 500,000. The project was supported in part by a grant from AFOSR.

  4. Determination of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios in Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) Collected from Amchitka Island, Alaska.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

    2005-05-02

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) activity concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) collected from the littoral zone of Amchitka Island (Alaska) and at a control site on the Alaskan peninsula. Plutonium isotope measurements were performed in replicate using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio observed in dried Fucus d. collected from Amchitka Island was 0.227 {+-} 0.007 (n=5) and compares with the expected {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in integrated worldwide fallout deposition in the Northern Hemisphere of 0.1805 {+-} 0.0057 (Cooper et al., 2000). In general, the characteristically high {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu content of Fucus d. analyzed in this study appear to indicate the presence of a discernible basin-wide secondary source of plutonium entering the marine environment. Of interest to the study of plutonium source terms within the Pacific basin are reports of elevated {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in fallout debris from high-yield atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands during the 1950s (Diamond et al., 1960), the wide range of {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio values (0.19 to 0.34) observed in sea water, sediments, coral and other environmental media from the North Pacific Ocean (Hirose et al., 1992; Buesseler, 1997) and updated estimates of the relative contributions of close-in and intermediate fallout deposition on oceanic inventories of radionuclidies, especially in the Northern Pacific Ocean (Hamilton, 2004).

  5. Discrimination between active and latent tuberculosis based on ratio of antigen-specific to mitogen-induced IP-10 production.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun Hee; Hur, Yun-Gyoung; Lee, Hyejon; Kim, Sunghyun; Cho, Jang-Eun; Chang, Jun; Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Hyeyoung; Kang, Young Ae; Cho, Sang-Nae; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). The gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA) has been widely used to diagnose TB by testing cell-mediated immune responses but has no capacity for distinguishing between active TB and latent TB infection (LTBI). This study aims to identify a parameter that will help to discriminate active TB and LTBI. Whole-blood samples from 33 active TB patients, 20 individuals with LTBI, and 26 non-TB controls were applied to the commercial IFN-γ release assay, QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube, and plasma samples were analyzed for interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), IFN-γ, monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG), interferon gamma inducible protein 10 (IP-10), interferon-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC), and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) by using a commercial cytometric bead array. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-specific production of most of the assayed cytokines and chemokines was higher in the active TB than in the LTBI group. The mitogen-induced responses were lower in the active TB than in the LTBI group. When the ratio of TB-specific to mitogen-induced responses was calculated, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MIG, and IP-10 were more useful in discriminating active TB from LTBI. In particular, most patients showed higher IP-10 production to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens than to mitogen at the individual level, and the ratio for IP-10 was the strongest indicator of active infection versus LTBI with 93.9% sensitivity and 90% specificity. In conclusion, the ratio of the TB-specific to the mitogen-induced IP-10 responses showed the most promising accuracy for discriminating active TB versus LTBI and should be further studied to determine whether it can serve as a biomarker that might help clinicians administer appropriate treatments. PMID:25428147

  6. Resveratrol Regulates the Quiescence-Like Induction of Activated Stellate Cells by Modulating the PPARγ/SIRT1 Ratio.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Izabel Cristina Custódio; Martins, Leo Anderson Meira; de Vasconcelos, Mariana; de Oliveira, Cleverson Moraes; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia; Andrade, Cláudia Balbinotti; Pettenuzzo, Letícia Ferreira; Borojevic, Radovan; Margis, Rogério; Guaragna, Regina; Guma, Fátima Costa Rodrigues

    2015-10-01

    The activation of hepatic stellate cell (HSC), from a quiescent cell featuring cytoplasmic lipid droplets to a proliferative myofibroblast, plays an important role in liver fibrosis development. The GRX line is an activated HSC model that can be induced by all-trans-retinol to accumulate lipid droplets. Resveratrol is known for activating Sirtuin1 (SIRT1), a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that suppresses the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), an important adipogenic transcription factor involved in the quiescence maintenance of HSC. We evaluated the effects of 0.1 μM of resveratrol in retinol-induced GRX quiescence by investigating the interference of SIRT1 and PPARγ on cell lipogenesis. GRX lipid accumulation was evaluated through Oil-red O staining, triacylglycerides quantification, and [(14)C] acetate incorporation into lipids. mRNA expression and protein content of SIRT1 and PPARγ were measured by RT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Resveratrol-mediated SIRT1 stimuli did not induce lipogenesis and reduced the retinol-mediated fat-storing capacity in GRX. In order to support our results, we established a cell culture model of transgenic super expression of PPARγ in GRX cells (GRXPγ). Resveratrol reduced lipid droplets accumulation in GRXPγ cells. These results suggest that the PPARγ/SIRT1 ratio plays an important role in the fate of HSC. Thus, whenever the PPARγ activity is greater than SIRT1 activity the lipogenesis is enabled. PMID:25833683

  7. Assessing potential modifications to the activated sludge process to improve simultaneous removal of a diverse range of micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Bruce; McAdam, Ewan J; Lester, John N; Cartmell, Elise

    2014-10-01

    It is proposed that wastewater treatment facilities meet legislated discharge limits for a range of micropollutants. However, the heterogeneity of these micropollutants in wastewaters make removal difficult to predict since their chemistry is so diverse. In this study, a range of organic and inorganic micropollutants known to be preferentially removed via different mechanisms were selected to challenge the activated sludge process (ASP) and determine its potential to achieve simultaneous micropollutant removal. At a fixed hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h, the influence of an increase in solids retention time (SRT) on removal was evaluated. Maximum achievable micropollutant removal was recorded for all chemicals (estrogens, nonylphenolics and metals) at the highest SRT studied (27 days). Also, optimisation of HRT by extension to 24 h further augmented organic biodegradation. Most notable was the enhancement in removal of the considerably recalcitrant synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol which increased to 65 ± 19%. Regression analysis indicates that this enhanced micropollutant behaviour is ostensibly related to the concomitant reduction in food: microorganism ratio. Interestingly, extended HRT also initiated nonylphenol biodegradation which has not been consistently observed previously in real wastewaters. However, extending HRT increased the solubilisation of particulate bound metals, increasing effluent aqueous metals concentrations (i.e., 0.45 μm filtered) by >100%. This is significant as only the aqueous metal phase is to be considered for environmental compliance. Consequently, identification of an optimum process condition for generic micropollutant removal is expected to favour a more integrated approach where upstream process unit optimisation (i.e., primary sedimentation) is demanded to reduce loading of the particle bound metal phase onto the ASP, thereby enabling longer HRT in the ASP to be considered for optimum removal of organic

  8. Fat/carbohydrate ratio but not energy density determines snack food intake and activates brain reward areas.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Tobias; Kreitz, Silke; Gaffling, Simone; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Hess, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The snack food potato chips induces food intake in ad libitum fed rats, which is associated with modulation of the brain reward system and other circuits. Here, we show that food intake in satiated rats is triggered by an optimal fat/carbohydrate ratio. Like potato chips, an isocaloric fat/carbohydrate mixture influenced whole brain activity pattern of rats, affecting circuits related e.g. to reward/addiction, but the number of modulated areas and the extent of modulation was lower compared to the snack food itself. PMID:25973686

  9. Evaluation of the suitability of neural network method for prediction of uranium activity ratio in environmental alpha spectra.

    PubMed

    Einian, Mohammad Reza; Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmood Reza; Ghaderi, Reza

    2015-11-01

    Applying Artificial Neural Network to an alpha spectrometry system is a good idea to discriminate the composition of environmental and non-environmental materials by the estimation of the (234)U/(238)U activity ratio. Because it eliminates limitations of classical approaches by the extraction the desired information from the average of a partial uranium raw spectrum. The network was trained by an alpha spectrum library which was developed in this work. The results indicated that there was a small difference between the target values and the predictions. These results were acceptable, because the thickness of samples and the inferring elements were different in the real library. PMID:26340268

  10. Fat/carbohydrate ratio but not energy density determines snack food intake and activates brain reward areas

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Tobias; Kreitz, Silke; Gaffling, Simone; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Hess, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The snack food potato chips induces food intake in ad libitum fed rats, which is associated with modulation of the brain reward system and other circuits. Here, we show that food intake in satiated rats is triggered by an optimal fat/carbohydrate ratio. Like potato chips, an isocaloric fat/carbohydrate mixture influenced whole brain activity pattern of rats, affecting circuits related e.g. to reward/addiction, but the number of modulated areas and the extent of modulation was lower compared to the snack food itself. PMID:25973686

  11. Active-SWIR signatures for long-range night/day human detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert B.; Sluch, Mikhail; Kafka, Kristopher M.; Ice, Robert; Lemoff, Brian E.

    2013-05-01

    The capability to detect, observe, and positively identify people at a distance is important to numerous security and defense applications. Traditional solutions for human detection and observation include long-range visible imagers for daytime and thermal infrared imagers for night-time use. Positive identification, through computer face recognition, requires facial imagery that can be repeatably matched to a database of visible facial signatures (i.e. mug shots). Nighttime identification at large distance is not possible with visible imagers, due to lack of light, or with thermal infrared imagers, due to poor correlation with visible facial imagery. An active-SWIR imaging system was developed that is both eye-safe and invisible, capable of producing close-up facial imagery at distances of several hundred meters, even in total darkness. The SWIR facial signatures correlate well to visible signatures, allowing for biometric face recognition night or day. Night-time face recognition results for several distances will be presented. Human detection and observation results at larger distances will also be presented. Example signatures will be presented and discussed.

  12. Long-range active retroreflector to measure the rotational orientation in conjunction with a laser tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofherr, O.; Wachten, Christian; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2014-11-01

    High precision optical non-contact position measurement is a key technology in modern engineering. Laser trackers (LT) accurately determine x-y-z coordinates of passive retroreflectors. Next-generation systems answer the need to measure an object`s rotational orientation (pitch, yaw, roll). So far, these devices are based either on photogrammetry or on enhanced retroreflectors. Here we present a new method to measure all six degrees of freedom in conjunction with a LT. The basic principle is to analyze the orientation to the LT's beam path by coupling-out laser radiation. The optical design is inspired by a cat's eye retroreflector equipped with an integrated beam splitter layer. The optical spherical aberration is compensated, which reduces the divergence angle for the reflected beam by one order of magnitude compared to an uncompensated standard system of the same size. The wave front distortion is reduced to less than 0.1 λ @ 633 nm for beam diameters up to 8 mm. Our active retroreflector is suitable for long-range measurements for a distance > 10 m.

  13. Challenge testing the lactoperoxidase system against a range of bacteria using different activation agents.

    PubMed

    Fweja, L W T; Lewis, M J; Grandison, A S

    2008-07-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LP) exerts antimicrobial effects in combination with H(2)O(2) and either thiocyanate (SCN(-)) or a halide (e.g., I(-)). Garlic extract in the presence of ethanol has also been used to activate the LP system. This study aimed to determine the effects of 3 LP activation systems (LP+SCN(-)+H(2)O(2); LP+I(-)+H(2)O(2); LP + garlic extract + ethanol) on the growth and activity of 3 test organisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus cereus). Sterilized milk was used as the reaction medium, and the growth pattern of the organisms and a range of keeping quality (KQ) indicators (pH, titratable acidity, ethanol stability, clot on boiling) were monitored during storage at the respective optimum growth temperature for each organism. The LP+I(-)+ H(2)O(2) system reduced bacterial counts below the detection limit shortly after treatment for all 3 organisms, and no bacteria could be detected for the duration of the experiment (35 to 55 h). The KQ data confirmed that the milk remained unspoiled at the end of the experiments. The LP + garlic extract + ethanol system, on the other hand, had no effect on the growth or KQ with P. aeruginosa, but showed a small retardation of growth of the other 2 organisms, accompanied by small increases (5 to 10 h) in KQ. The effects of the LP+SCN(-)+H(2)O(2) system were intermediate between those of the other 2 systems and differed between organisms. With P. aeruginosa, the system exerted total inhibition within 10 h of incubation, but the bacteria regained viability after a further 5 h, following a logarithmic growth curve. This was reflected in the KQ indicators, which implied an extension of 15 h. With the other 2 bacterial species, LP+SCN(-)+H(2)O(2) exerted an obvious inhibitory effect, giving a lag phase in the growth curve of 5 to 10 h and KQ extension of 10 to 15 h. When used in combination, I(-) and SCN(-) displayed negative synergy. PMID:18565914

  14. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series Xt . The branching ratio bx is defined as bx=E[ξx/x] . The random variable ξx is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x , so ξx={Xt+1∣Xt=x} . If bx>1 , the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x , while if bx<1 , it is subcritical. For stock prices we find bx=1 within statistical uncertainty, for all x , consistent with an “efficient market hypothesis.” For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, bx is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where bx≃1 , which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for Xt and for ξx . For the BTW model the distribution of ξx is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x . Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where bx is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model—supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality.

  15. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series X(t). The branching ratio b(x) is defined as b(x)=E[xi(x)/x]. The random variable xi(x) is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x, so xi(x)=[X(t+1) | X(t)=x]. If b(x)>1, the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x, while if b(x)<1, it is subcritical. For stock prices we find b(x)=1 within statistical uncertainty, for all x, consistent with an "efficient market hypothesis." For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, b(x) is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where b(x) approximately equal 1, which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for X(t) and for xi(x). For the BTW model the distribution of xi(x) is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x. Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where b(x) is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model-supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality. PMID:20365434

  16. Specific activity and activity ratios of radionuclides in soil collected about 20 km from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant: Radionuclide release to the south and southwest.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Uchihori, Yukio; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki

    2011-10-15

    Soil samples at different depths (0-2, 5-7 and 10-12cm) were collected from J Village, about 20km south of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) to determine their radionuclide specific activities and activity ratios. The concentrations and activity ratios of (131)I, (134, 136, 137)Cs and (129m)Te were obtained, but only trace amounts of (95)Nb, (110m)Ag and (140)La were detected which were too low to provide accurate concentrations. Radionuclides such as (95)Zr, (103, 106)Ru and (140)Ba that were found in Chernobyl fallout, were not found in these soil samples. This suggests that noble gasses and volatile radionuclides predominated in the releases from FNPP to the terrestrial environment. The average activity ratios of (131)I/(137)Cs, (134)Cs/(137)Cs, (136)Cs/(137)Cs and (129m)Te/(137)Cs were 55, 0.90, 0.22 and 4.0 (corrected to March 11, 2011) in the 0-2cm soil samples of April 20 and 28, 2011. PMID:21906779

  17. Active uplift and normal faulting in the eastern flank of Taiwan Central Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chung-Pai; Hsu, Yi-Chun; Kang, Chu-Chun

    2015-04-01

    As the backbone range of Taiwan orogen, the highest peaks of the Central Range have been uplifted to nearly 4 km above sea level. A rapid exhumation rate of about 6 mm/yr over the past several million years has been determined by many previous thermochronological studies in the eastern flank of the Central Range. However, the uplift mechanism of the Central Range is still in debate. Especially, the most important structural component, the Central Range Fault in the eastern boundary of the Central Range, has never been clearly observed in the previous studies. An east-vergent "backthrusting" or "backfolding" was firstly proposed by Ernst in 1977. However, normal faulting and oblique faulting with a normal component were also proposed by the following field workers (e.g., Crespi et al., 1996; Fisher, 1999). In this study, we use the geomorphic, stratigraphic, and structural analyses to figure out the near surface geometry of the Central Range Fault, and as well use the recent earthquake data to understand the deeper structures beneath the Central Range. By combining these results, we propose a doubly vergent model with a roll-back Central Range fault to explain the local structure and the rapid uplift of the eastern flank of the Central Range. The normal faults along the eastern flank of Central Range can also be separated into three segments form the north to the south. This late-stage structure suggests that the rotation-accommodating structure is extensional in nature.

  18. Application of frequency ratio and logistic regression to active rock glacier occurrence in the Andes of San Juan, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angillieri, María Yanina Esper

    2010-01-01

    This study employs statistical modeling techniques and geomorphological mapping to analyze the distribution of active rock glaciers in relation to altitude, aspect, slope, lithology and solar radiation using optical remote sensing techniques with GIS. The study area includes a portion of the Dry Andes of the Cordillera Frontal of San Juan around 30°S latitude, where few geomorphological studies have been conducted. Over 155 rock glaciers have been identified, and 85 are considered active. The relationship between the variables and the rock glaciers distribution was analyzed using the frequency ratio method and logistic regression models. The analytical results show that elevations > 3824 m a.s.l., a south-facing or east-facing aspect, areas with relatively low solar radiation, and slope between 2° and 20° favor the existence of the rock glaciers, and demonstrate that lithology and slope exert major influences.

  19. The biosynthesis of brain gangliosides. Separation of membranes with different ratios of ganglioside sialylating activity to gangliosides.

    PubMed Central

    Landa, C A; Maccioni, H J; Arce, A; Caputto, R

    1977-01-01

    Brain subcellular fractions were analysed for ganglioside-sialylating activity by measuring the incorporation of N-[3H]acetylneuraminic acid from CMP-N-[3H]acetylneuraminic acid into endogenous ganglioside acceptors (endogenous incorporation) and into exogenous lactosyceramide (haematoside synthetase activity). The ratios of endogenous incorporation to gangliosides and of haematoside synthetase to gangliosides for the synaptosomal and mitochondrial fractions from a washed crude mitochondrial fraction were lower than those obtained for other membrane fractions. The differences appear to reflect intrinsic characteristics of each membrane fraction. The results of labelling in vitro and the time course of labelling of gangliosides of the different subcellular fractions in vivo after injection of N-[3H]acetylmannosamine are consistent with the possibility of a subcellular site for synthesis of gangliosides different from that of ganglioside deposition. PMID:606237

  20. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  1. Export of earthquake-triggered landslides in active mountain ranges: insights from 2D morphodynamic modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croissant, Thomas; Lague, Dimitri; Davy, Philippe; Steer, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    In active mountain ranges, large earthquakes (Mw > 5-6) trigger numerous landslides that impact river dynamics. These landslides bring local and sudden sediment piles that will be eroded and transported along the river network causing downstream changes in river geometry, transport capacity and erosion efficiency. The progressive removal of landslide materials has implications for downstream hazards management and also for understanding landscape dynamics at the timescale of the seismic cycle. The export time of landslide-derived sediments after large-magnitude earthquakes has been studied from suspended load measurements but a full understanding of the total process, including the coupling between sediment transfer and channel geometry change, still remains an issue. Note that the transport of small sediment pulses has been studied in the context of river restoration, but the magnitude of sediment pulses generated by landslides may make the problem different. Here, we study the export of large volumes (>106 m3) of sediments with the 2D hydro-morphodynamic model, Eros. This model uses a new hydrodynamic module that resolves a reduced form of the Saint-Venant equations with a particle method. It is coupled with a sediment transport and lateral and vertical erosion model. Eros accounts for the complex retroactions between sediment transport and fluvial geometry, with a stochastic description of the floods experienced by the river. Moreover, it is able to reproduce several features deemed necessary to study the evacuation of large sediment pulses, such as river regime modification (single-thread to multi-thread), river avulsion and aggradation, floods and bank erosion. Using a synthetic and simple topography we first present how granulometry, landslide volume and geometry, channel slope and flood frequency influence 1) the dominance of pulse advection vs. diffusion during its evacuation, 2) the pulse export time and 3) the remaining volume of sediment in the catchment

  2. Metabolic changes in summer active and anuric hibernating free-ranging brown bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter; Fröbert, Ole; Anderstam, Björn; Palm, Fredrik; Eriksson, Monica; Bragfors-Helin, Ann-Christin; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Larsson, Tobias; Friebe, Andrea; Zedrosser, Andreas; Josefsson, Johan; Svensson, My; Sahdo, Berolla; Bankir, Lise; Johnson, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    The brown bear (Ursus arctos) hibernates for 5 to 6 months each winter and during this time ingests no food or water and remains anuric and inactive. Despite these extreme conditions, bears do not develop azotemia and preserve their muscle and bone strength. To date most renal studies have been limited to small numbers of bears, often in captive environments. Sixteen free-ranging bears were darted and had blood drawn both during hibernation in winter and summer. Samples were collected for measurement of creatinine and urea, markers of inflammation, the calcium-phosphate axis, and nutritional parameters including amino acids. In winter the bear serum creatinine increased 2.5 fold despite a 2-fold decrease in urea, indicating a remarkable ability to recycle urea nitrogen during hibernation. During hibernation serum calcium remained constant despite a decrease in serum phosphate and a rise in FGF23 levels. Despite prolonged inactivity and reduced renal function, inflammation does not ensue and bears seem to have enhanced antioxidant defense mechanisms during hibernation. Nutrition parameters showed high fat stores, preserved amino acids and mild hyperglycemia during hibernation. While total, essential, non-essential and branched chain amino acids concentrations do not change during hibernation anorexia, changes in individual amino acids ornithine, citrulline and arginine indicate an active, although reduced urea cycle and nitrogen recycling to proteins. Serum uric acid and serum fructose levels were elevated in summer and changes between seasons were positively correlated. Further studies to understand how bears can prevent the development of uremia despite minimal renal function during hibernation could provide new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of human kidney disease. PMID:24039826

  3. Metabolic Changes in Summer Active and Anuric Hibernating Free-Ranging Brown Bears (Ursus arctos)

    PubMed Central

    Stenvinkel, Peter; Fröbert, Ole; Anderstam, Björn; Palm, Fredrik; Eriksson, Monica; Bragfors-Helin, Ann-Christin; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Larsson, Tobias; Friebe, Andrea; Zedrosser, Andreas; Josefsson, Johan; Svensson, My; Sahdo, Berolla; Bankir, Lise; Johnson, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    The brown bear (Ursus arctos) hibernates for 5 to 6 months each winter and during this time ingests no food or water and remains anuric and inactive. Despite these extreme conditions, bears do not develop azotemia and preserve their muscle and bone strength. To date most renal studies have been limited to small numbers of bears, often in captive environments. Sixteen free-ranging bears were darted and had blood drawn both during hibernation in winter and summer. Samples were collected for measurement of creatinine and urea, markers of inflammation, the calcium-phosphate axis, and nutritional parameters including amino acids. In winter the bear serum creatinine increased 2.5 fold despite a 2-fold decrease in urea, indicating a remarkable ability to recycle urea nitrogen during hibernation. During hibernation serum calcium remained constant despite a decrease in serum phosphate and a rise in FGF23 levels. Despite prolonged inactivity and reduced renal function, inflammation does not ensue and bears seem to have enhanced antioxidant defense mechanisms during hibernation. Nutrition parameters showed high fat stores, preserved amino acids and mild hyperglycemia during hibernation. While total, essential, non-essential and branched chain amino acids concentrations do not change during hibernation anorexia, changes in individual amino acids ornithine, citrulline and arginine indicate an active, although reduced urea cycle and nitrogen recycling to proteins. Serum uric acid and serum fructose levels were elevated in summer and changes between seasons were positively correlated. Further studies to understand how bears can prevent the development of uremia despite minimal renal function during hibernation could provide new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of human kidney disease. PMID:24039826

  4. Activity Patterns of Eurasian Lynx Are Modulated by Light Regime and Individual Traits over a Wide Latitudinal Range

    PubMed Central

    Heurich, Marco; Hilger, Anton; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Andrén, Henrik; Bufka, Luděk; Krofel, Miha; Mattisson, Jenny; Odden, John; Persson, Jens; Rauset, Geir R.; Schmidt, Krzysztof; Linnell, John D. C.

    2014-01-01

    The activity patterns of most terrestrial animals are regarded as being primarily influenced by light, although other factors, such as sexual cycle and climatic conditions, can modify the underlying patterns. However, most activity studies have been limited to a single study area, which in turn limit the variability of light conditions and other factors. Here we considered a range of variables that might potentially influence the activity of a large carnivore, the Eurasian lynx, in a network of studies conducted with identical methodology in different areas spanning latitudes from 49°7′N in central Europe to 70°00′N in northern Scandinavia. The variables considered both light conditions, ranging from a day with a complete day–night cycle to polar night and polar day, as well as individual traits of the animals. We analysed activity data of 38 individual free-ranging lynx equipped with GPS-collars with acceleration sensors, covering more than 11,000 lynx days. Mixed linear additive models revealed that the lynx activity level was not influenced by the daily daylight duration and the activity pattern was bimodal, even during polar night and polar day. The duration of the active phase of the activity cycle varied with the widening and narrowing of the photoperiod. Activity varied significantly with moonlight. Among adults, males were more active than females, and subadult lynx were more active than adults. In polar regions, the amplitude of the lynx daily activity pattern was low, likely as a result of the polycyclic activity pattern of their main prey, reindeer. At lower latitudes, the basic lynx activity pattern peaked during twilight, corresponding to the crepuscular activity pattern of the main prey, roe deer. Our results indicated that the basic activity of lynx is independent of light conditions, but is modified by both individual traits and the activity pattern of the locally most important prey. PMID:25517902

  5. Activity patterns of Eurasian lynx are modulated by light regime and individual traits over a wide latitudinal range.

    PubMed

    Heurich, Marco; Hilger, Anton; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Andrén, Henrik; Bufka, Luděk; Krofel, Miha; Mattisson, Jenny; Odden, John; Persson, Jens; Rauset, Geir R; Schmidt, Krzysztof; Linnell, John D C

    2014-01-01

    The activity patterns of most terrestrial animals are regarded as being primarily influenced by light, although other factors, such as sexual cycle and climatic conditions, can modify the underlying patterns. However, most activity studies have been limited to a single study area, which in turn limit the variability of light conditions and other factors. Here we considered a range of variables that might potentially influence the activity of a large carnivore, the Eurasian lynx, in a network of studies conducted with identical methodology in different areas spanning latitudes from 49°7'N in central Europe to 70°00'N in northern Scandinavia. The variables considered both light conditions, ranging from a day with a complete day-night cycle to polar night and polar day, as well as individual traits of the animals. We analysed activity data of 38 individual free-ranging lynx equipped with GPS-collars with acceleration sensors, covering more than 11,000 lynx days. Mixed linear additive models revealed that the lynx activity level was not influenced by the daily daylight duration and the activity pattern was bimodal, even during polar night and polar day. The duration of the active phase of the activity cycle varied with the widening and narrowing of the photoperiod. Activity varied significantly with moonlight. Among adults, males were more active than females, and subadult lynx were more active than adults. In polar regions, the amplitude of the lynx daily activity pattern was low, likely as a result of the polycyclic activity pattern of their main prey, reindeer. At lower latitudes, the basic lynx activity pattern peaked during twilight, corresponding to the crepuscular activity pattern of the main prey, roe deer. Our results indicated that the basic activity of lynx is independent of light conditions, but is modified by both individual traits and the activity pattern of the locally most important prey. PMID:25517902

  6. Lidar multi-range integrated Dewar assembly (IDA) for active-optical vision navigation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayner, Philip; Clemet, Ed; Asbrock, Jim; Chen, Isabel; Getty, Jonathan; Malone, Neil; De Loo, John; Giroux, Mark

    2013-09-01

    A multi-range focal plane was developed and delivered by Raytheon Vision Systems for a docking system that was demonstrated on STS-134. This required state of the art focal plane and electronics synchronization to capture nanosecond length laser pulses to determine ranges with an accuracy of less than 1 inch.

  7. Use of ICP/MS with ultrasonic nebulizer for routine determination of uranium activity ratios in natural water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraemer, T.F.; Doughten, M.W.; Bullen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    A method is described that allows precise determination of 234U/238U activity ratios (UAR) in most natural waters using commonly available inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) instrumentation and accessories. The precision achieved by this technique (??0.5% RSD, 1 sigma) is intermediate between thermal ionization mass spectrometry (??0.25% RSID, 1 sigma) and alpha particle spectrometry (??5% RSD, 1 sigma). It is precise and rapid enough to allow analysis of a large number of samples in a short period of time at low cost using standard, commercially available quadrupole instrumentation with ultrasonic nebulizer and desolvator accessories. UARs have been analyzed successfully in fresh to moderately saline waters with U concentrations of from less than 1 ??g/L to nearly 100 ??g/L. An example of the uses of these data is shown for a study of surface-water mixing in the North Platte River in western Nebraska. This rapid and easy technique should encourage the wider use of uranium isotopes in surface-water and groundwater investigations, both for qualitative (e.g. identifying sources of water) and quantitative (e.g. determining end-member mixing ratios purposes.

  8. Tracing of the Water Pathways by the U Activity Ratios in the Granitic Ringelbach Catchment (Vosges Mountain, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, F. J.; Schaffhauser, T.; Ambroise, B.; Lucas, Y.; Stille, P.; Perrone, T.; Fritz, B.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of major element concentrations and U and Sr isotope ratios in waters collected from the main springs located in the small (0.36 km2) granitic Ringelbach catchment, indicates important spatial variations of the chemical and (Sr, U) isotopic compositions of the spring waters on granitic lithology. Especially, the alkalinity, the cationic concentrations and the pH of the granitic spring waters increase with decreasing spring elevation, as well as the (234U/238U) activity ratios (AR), which increase from approximately 1 in the upslope springs to 1.3 in the downslope springs. The spatial and temporal geochemical variations observed in the Ringelbach spring waters suggest that the spring waters are supplied by water flowing through surface formations. They also indicate that in the Ringelbach catchment, the different granitic springs are most likely supplied by waters with more or less independent water pathways, which are controlled by the geometry of the fracture network structure in the Ringelbach regolith. Based on this interpretation, the (234U/238U) AR in spring waters can be modeled by simple 1D reactive transport taking into account dissolution, precipitation and alpha recoil. By estimating the alpha recoil factor and the length of the water path for each spring, both the dissolution rate of the bedrock and the water residence time within the catchment can be estimated.

  9. Familial influences on the full range of variability in attention and activity levels during adolescence: A longitudinal twin study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chun-Zi; Grant, Julia D; Heath, Andrew C; Reiersen, Angela M; Mulligan, Richard C; Anokhin, Andrey P

    2016-05-01

    To investigate familial influences on the full range of variability in attention and activity across adolescence, we collected maternal ratings of 339 twin pairs at ages 12, 14, and 16, and estimated the transmitted and new familial influences on attention and activity as measured by the Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Normal Behavior Scale. Familial influences were substantial for both traits across adolescence: genetic influences accounted for 54%-73% (attention) and 31%-73% (activity) of the total variance, and shared environmental influences accounted for 0%-22% of the attention variance and 13%-57% of the activity variance. The longitudinal stability of individual differences in attention and activity was largely accounted for by familial influences transmitted from previous ages. Innovations over adolescence were also partially attributable to familial influences. Studying the full range of variability in attention and activity may facilitate our understanding of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder's etiology and intervention. PMID:26612434

  10. 78 FR 33809 - Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Roper Corporation; Subzone 26G (Kitchen Ranges...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ...-free to 5.7%) for the foreign status inputs noted below and in the existing scope of authority. Customs... lamp assemblies (duty rate ranges from duty-free to 8.6%). Public comment is invited from...

  11. pH-susceptibility of HLA-DO tunes DO/DM ratios to regulate HLA-DM catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Strohman, Michael J.; Somasundaram, Sriram; Ayyangar, Sashi; Hou, Tieying; Wang, Nan; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    The peptide-exchange catalyst, HLA-DM, and its inhibitor, HLA-DO control endosomal generation of peptide/class II major histocompatibility protein (MHC-II) complexes; these complexes traffic to the cell surface for inspection by CD4+ T cells. Some evidence suggests that pH influences DO regulation of DM function, but pH also affects the stability of polymorphic MHC-II proteins, spontaneous peptide loading, DM/MHC-II interactions and DM catalytic activity, imposing challenges on approaches to determine pH effects on DM-DO function and their mechanistic basis. Using optimized biochemical methods, we dissected pH-dependence of spontaneous and DM-DO-mediated class II peptide exchange and identified an MHC-II allele-independent relationship between pH, DO/DM ratio and efficient peptide exchange. We demonstrate that active, free DM is generated from DM-DO complexes at late endosomal/lysosomal pH due to irreversible, acid-promoted DO destruction rather than DO/DM molecular dissociation. Any soluble DM that remains in complex with DO stays inert. pH-exposure of DM-DO in cell lysates corroborates such a pH-regulated mechanism, suggesting acid-activated generation of functional DM in DO-expressing cells. PMID:26610428

  12. pH Measurement Using Dual-Wavelength Fluorescent Ratio by Two-Photon Excitation for Mitochondrial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazashi, Yasuaki; Li, Yongbo; Onojima, Takumi; Iwami, Kentaro; Ohta, Yoshihiro; Umeda, Norihiro

    2012-11-01

    A mitochondrion has a pH gradient between the two sides of its inner membrane in order to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Because ATP depletion causes numerous diseases, the measurement of the pH value around the mitochondrion is expected to clarify the mechanism of these diseases. In this study, a dual-wavelength pH-sensitive dye was excited by two-photon absorption initiated using a femtosecond pulse laser. In addition, fluorescence from the dye was directly collected from the fluorescent point using the collection-mode probe of a scanning near-field optical microscope. By this proposed method, a pH calibration curve was obtained from the fluorescent intensity ratio of the dye solution, and temporal pH variations with 0.1 s time resolution following the addition of acid were observed. Moreover, mitochondrial activity on the basis of the pH changes was successfully observed in three different mitochondrial densities.

  13. Seasonal variation in daily activity patterns of free-ranging European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus).

    PubMed

    Everts, Lammina G; Strijkstra, Arjen M; Hut, Roelof A; Hoffmann, Ilse E; Millesi, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Daily aboveground activity of European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus) in their natural habitat was recorded with a visual scanning procedure during the active seasons of 1992 and 1993. Activity patterns were analyzed with respect to time of year and to the animal's reproductive state. Aboveground activity started on average 3.9 h (SD 0.6 h, n = 37 days) after civil twilight at dawn and ended on average 3.2 h (SD 0.9 h, n = 37 days) before civil twilight at dusk. Between onset and offset of activity, 54% was spent aboveground, of which 73% was spent foraging. Activity patterns were influenced by photoperiod, rainfall, and by reproductive state. During mating, reproductively active males started activity earlier than females and reproductively inactive males. For females, time spent foraging was high during lactation. The midpoint of daily activity was at 12:16 h (SD 0.37 h, n = 37 days). Activity patterns of European ground squirrels thus appear robustly positioned in the middle of the photoperiod. PMID:15129824

  14. Long-range neural activity evoked by premotor cortex stimulation: a TMS/EEG co-registration study

    PubMed Central

    Zanon, Marco; Battaglini, Piero P.; Jarmolowska, Joanna; Pizzolato, Gilberto; Busan, Pierpaolo

    2013-01-01

    The premotor cortex is one of the fundamental structures composing the neural networks of the human brain. It is implicated in many behaviors and cognitive tasks, ranging from movement to attention and eye-related activity. Therefore, neural circuits that are related to premotor cortex have been studied to clarify their connectivity and/or role in different tasks. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the propagation of the neural activity evoked in the dorsal premotor cortex using transcranial magnetic stimulation/electroencephalography (TMS/EEG). Toward this end, interest was focused on the neural dynamics elicited in long-ranging temporal and spatial networks. Twelve healthy volunteers underwent a single-pulse TMS protocol in a resting condition with eyes closed, and the evoked activity, measured by EEG, was compared to a sham condition in a time window ranging from 45 ms to about 200 ms after TMS. Spatial and temporal investigations were carried out with sLORETA. TMS was found to induce propagation of neural activity mainly in the contralateral sensorimotor and frontal cortices, at about 130 ms after delivery of the stimulus. Different types of analyses showed propagated activity also in posterior, mainly visual, regions, in a time window between 70 and 130 ms. Finally, a likely “rebounding” activation of the sensorimotor and frontal regions, was observed in various time ranges. Taken together, the present findings further characterize the neural circuits that are driven by dorsal premotor cortex activation in healthy humans. PMID:24324426

  15. The effect of exercise mode and intensity of sub-maximal physical activities on salivary testosterone to cortisol ratio and α-amylase in young active males

    PubMed Central

    AZARBAYJANI, MOHAMMAD ALI; FATOLAHI, HOSEYN; RASAEE, MOHAMMAD JAVAD; PEERI, MAGHSOD; BABAEI, ROHOLAH

    2011-01-01

    We examined the effect of exercise intensity and mode on the acute responses of free testosterone to cortisol ratio and salivary α-amylase. We also evaluated the relationship between cortisol and salivary α-amylase. Ten healthy young active males participated voluntarily in this study in six single sessions. They exercised on a cycle ergo meter, treadmill, and elliptical instrument at intensities of 70% and 85% maximum heart rate for 25 minutes. Saliva samples were collected 5 minutes before and 5 minutes after each exercise session. No significant changes were observed for cortisol. Free testosterone to cortisol ratio increased during each exercise session (F5, 45=3.15, P=0.02). However, these changes are only significant after exercise on the treadmill at 70% maximum heart rate (t=2.94, P=0.02) and 85% maximum heart rate (t=0.53, P=0.03). Salivary α-amylase significantly varied among exercise sessions (F5, 45=3.97, P=0.005), and a significant decline was observed after exercise on the elliptical instrument (t=2.38, P=0.04) and treadmill (t=3.55, P=0.006) at 85% maximum heart rate. We found that the free testosterone to cortisol ratio is dependent on the exercise mode, while the salivary α-amylase response is dependent on the intensity of exercise. The increase of free testosterone to cortisol ratio in this study may indicate lower physiological stress in response to performing these exercises. Applying muscular strength with moderate intensity weight-bearing exercises possibly activates the anabolic pathways. Although the cortisol and salivary α-amylase responses were opposite in the majority of the exercise sessions, no significant inverse relationship was observed. PMID:27182369

  16. Application of MLE method to range determination with induced β + activity in hadron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kohno, T.; Tomitani, T.; Kanazawa, M.; Sato, S.; Urakabe, E.; Kanai, T.

    2006-06-01

    We proposed to apply the MLE method for determining the range of heavy ions and demonstrated the effectiveness of this method by experiments with 12C beams. We performed irradiation experiments with stable 12C ions of mono-energetic 290 MeV/u to a water, a polyethylene and a PMMA target. The theoretical ranges for 12C ions of 290 MeV/u in these targets are 160.5, 157.9 and 139.8 mm, respectively. The annihilation events from positron emitters generated by 12C ions were detected with a positron camera for 500 s just after the irradiation. To evaluate the range of 12C ions, the MLE method was applied to the annihilation gamma ray distribution. The derived ranges for the three targets were 160.6, 158.9 and 140.4 mm, respectively. Therefore, we can conclude that the range of 12C ions was determined within an accuracy of 1.0 mm for all targets.

  17. An Evaluation of a Wide Range of Job-Generating Activities for Rural Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finsterbusch, Kurt; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examines the job-generating activities in 15 rural counties in Maryland through 175 interviews and field work. Those ranking high included industrial park development, economic development activities, and tourism. Special financial arrangements for relocating and new businesses also received high marks. Includes 48 references. (JOW)

  18. Long-Range Temporal Correlations in the Spontaneous in vivo Activity of Interneuron in the Mouse Hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Sheng-Bo; Wang, Ying; Yan, Xing; Lin, Longnian; Tsien, Joe; Huang, De-Shuang

    The spontaneous in vivo firings of neuron in mouse hippocampus are generally considered as neuronal noise, where there is no any correlation in the inter-spike interval (ISI) sequences. In the present study, we investigate the nature of the ISI sequences of neuron in CA1 area of mouse hippocampus. By using the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), we calculated the fluctuation or scaling exponent of the ISI sequences. The results indicated that there exists the long-range power-law correlation over large time scale in the ISI sequences. To further investigate the long-range correlation of ISI, we studied the long-range correlation of ISI sequences from different types of neurons in mouse hippocampus, which are four types of interneurons categorized by their firing patterns. Our results show the presence of long-range correlations in the ISI sequence of different types of neurons. Furthermore, the shuffle surrogate data achieved by randomly shuffle the original ISI sequence is used to verify our conclusion. The application of shuffle surrogate shows that the long-range correlation is destroyed by randomly shuffle, which demonstrates that there is actually the long-range correlation in the ISI sequence. Furthermore, we also compare the long-range correlations of ISI sequence when mice are in different behavioral states, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and active exploration (AE). Our results indicated that the ISI sequences exhibit different extent of long-range correlations: the long-range correlation is significantly stronger when mice are in AE than that of ISI sequence when mice are in SWS, which demonstrated that the varied long-range correlations exhibiting in ISIs of interneurons might be associated with activities of neuronal network regulating the ongoing neuronal activity of different interneurons.

  19. Improved Active Clamp Converter By Resonance Blanking Used For Wide Input Voltage Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strixner, E.; Godzik, S.

    2011-10-01

    The GPS line receiver as a standard product line of Astrium GmbH Ottobrunn shall operate according to customer requirements on different power busses with no or only minor modifications. Consequently there is an up coming demand to develop a power converter with a wide input voltage range. The hardware shall work with minor adaptation on all standard bus voltages of 28V, 50V and 100V. Themainfocuswas to cover the unregulated 28V bus and the regulated 50V bus without any modifications on the converter module and providing performance data being similar to low input voltage range converters.

  20. Structural Characterizations of Glycerol Kinase: Unraveling Phosphorylation-Induced Long-Range Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Kettering, Regina; Saxl, Ruth; Bourand, Alexa; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Joly, Nathalie; Briozzo, Pierre; Deutscher, Josef

    2009-09-11

    Glycerol metabolism provides a central link between sugar and fatty acid catabolism. In most bacteria, glycerol kinase plays a crucial role in regulating channel/facilitator-dependent uptake of glycerol into the cell. In the firmicute Enterococcus casseliflavus, this enzyme's activity is enhanced by phosphorylation of the histidine residue (His232) located in its activation loop, approximately 25 A from its catalytic cleft. We reported earlier that some mutations of His232 altered enzyme activities; we present here the crystal structures of these mutant GlpK enzymes. The structure of a mutant enzyme with enhanced enzymatic activity, His232Arg, reveals that residues at the catalytic cleft are more optimally aligned to bind ATP and mediate phosphoryl transfer. Specifically, the position of Arg18 in His232Arg shifts by approximately 1 A when compared to its position in wild-type (WT), His232Ala, and His232Glu enzymes. This new conformation of Arg18 is more optimally positioned at the presumed gamma-phosphate location of ATP, close to the glycerol substrate. In addition to structural changes exhibited at the active site, the conformational stability of the activation loop is decreased, as reflected by an approximately 35% increase in B factors ('thermal factors') in a mutant enzyme displaying diminished activity, His232Glu. Correlating conformational changes to alteration of enzymatic activities in the mutant enzymes identifies distinct localized regions that can have profound effects on intramolecular signal transduction. Alterations in pairwise interactions across the dimer interface can communicate phosphorylation states over 25 A from the activation loop to the catalytic cleft, positioning Arg18 to form favorable interactions at the beta,gamma-bridging position with ATP. This would offset loss of the hydrogen bonds at the gamma-phosphate of ATP during phosphoryl transfer to glycerol, suggesting that appropriate alignment of the second substrate of glycerol kinase

  1. 78 FR 59649 - Subzone 26G, Authorization of Production Activity, Roper Corporation, (Kitchen Ranges), Lafayette...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ..., Georgia. The notification was processed in accordance with the regulations of the FTZ Board (15 CFR part 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 33809, June 5, 2013... Ranges), Lafayette, Georgia On May 21, 2013, Roper Corporation submitted a notification of...

  2. Plutonium and Uranium Atom Ratios and Activity Levels in Cochiti Lake Bottom Sediments Provided by Pueblo de Cochiti

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaher, B.M.; Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Benjamin, T.M.

    1999-05-01

    Historical operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory have contaminated stream sediments with plutonium and other radionuclides. A small portion of these contaminated sediments has been carried by floods into the Rio Grande drainage system, eventually to be trapped by Cochiti Lake located on Pueblo de Cochiti lands approximately 8 km downstream of the Laboratory. In this study, lake bottom sediment samples provided by the Pueblo de Cochiti were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry to determine plutonium and uranium activity levels and isotopic atom ratios. This specialized analytical method allows us to take isotopic fingerprints of radionuclides found in the sediment and to determine how much plutonium and uranium came from the Laboratory and how much was deposited by worldwide fallout or is natural. Two distinct types of samples were processed: segments of a continuous vertical core of the entire accumulated sediment sequence and other samples from across the lake bottom at the water/sediment interface. Based on measurement of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio, Laboratory-derived plutonium is present in eight of nine samples at the core site. On a depth-weighted basis, approximately one-half of the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu came from early operations at the Laboratory; the remaining plutonium came from fallout dispersed by above-ground nuclear tests. In contrast to the core site, the samples from the other locations showed little or no evidence of Laboratory-derived plutonium, with more than 90 percent of the plutonium attributable to fallout. The overall amount of plutonium in all the samples is of the same magnitude as other reservoirs in the region. The net increase in plutonium over upstream reservoirs unaffected by Laboratory activities is a maximum of 0.014 pCi/g or 3.5 times. All of the samples reflect natural uranium compositions. Laboratory-derived uranium is not identifiable, presumably because the sediment contains abundant

  3. Ecto-phosphatase activity on the external surface of Rhodnius prolixus salivary glands: modulation by carbohydrates and Trypanosoma rangeli.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Suzete A O; Fonseca de Souza, André L; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Dick, Claudia F; dos Santos, André L A; Meyer-Fernandes, José R

    2008-05-01

    The salivary glands of insect's vectors are target organs to study the vectors-pathogens interactions. Rhodnius prolixus an important vector of Trypanosoma cruzi can also transmit Trypanosoma rangeli by bite. In the present study we have investigated ecto-phosphatase activity on the surface of R. prolixus salivary glands. Ecto-phosphatases are able to hydrolyze phosphorylated substrates in the extracellular medium. We characterized these ecto-enzyme activities on the salivary glands external surface and employed it to investigate R. prolixus-T. rangeli interaction. Salivary glands present a low level of hydrolytic activity (4.30+/-0.35 nmol p-nitrophenol (p-NP)xh(-1)xgland pair(-1)). The salivary glands ecto-phosphatase activity was not affected by pH variation; and it was insensitive to alkaline inhibitor levamisole and inhibited approximately 50% by inorganic phosphate (Pi). MgCl2, CaCl2 and SrCl2 enhanced significantly the ecto-phosphatase activity detected on the surface of salivary glands. The ecto-phosphatase from salivary glands surface efficiently releases phosphate groups from different phosphorylated amino acids, giving a higher rate of phosphate release when phospho-tyrosine is used as a substrate. This ecto-phosphatase activity was inhibited by carbohydrates as d-galactose and d-mannose. Living short epimastigotes of T. rangeli inhibited salivary glands ecto-phosphatase activity at 75%, while boiled parasites did not. Living long epimastigote forms induced a lower, but significant inhibitory effect on the salivary glands phosphatase activity. Interestingly, boiled long epimastigote forms did not loose the ability to modulate salivary glands phosphatase activity. Taken together, these data suggest a possible role for ecto-phosphatase on the R. prolixus salivary glands-T. rangeli interaction. PMID:18407240

  4. Stepwise error-prone PCR and DNA shuffling changed the pH activity range and product specificity of the cyclodextrin glucanotransferase from an alkaliphilic Bacillus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Susanne; Sonnendecker, Christian; Föllner, Christina; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (EC 2.4.1.19) from the alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. G-825-6 converts starch mainly to γ-cyclodextrin (CD8). A combination of error-prone PCR and DNA shuffling was used to obtain variants of this enzyme with higher product specificity for CD8 and a broad pH activity range. The variant S54 with seven amino acid substitutions showed a 1.2-fold increase in CD8-synthesizing activity and the product ratio of CD7:CD8 was shifted to 1:7 compared to 1:3 of the wild-type enzyme. Nine amino acid substitutions of the cyclodextrin glucanotransferase were performed to generate the variant S35 active in a pH range 4.0–10.0. Compared to the wild-type enzyme which is inactive below pH 6.0, S35 retained 70% of its CD8-synthesizing activity at pH 4.0. PMID:26155461

  5. The carboxyl-terminal domain of large T antigen rescues SV40 host range activity in trans independent of acetylation.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Danielle L; DeCaprio, James A

    2006-05-25

    The host range activity of SV40 has been described as the inability of mutant viruses with deletions in the C terminal region of large T Ag to replicate in certain types of African green monkey kidney cells. We constructed new mutant viruses expressing truncated T Ag proteins and found that these mutant viruses exhibited the host range phenotype. The host range phenotype was independent of acetylation of T Ag at lysine 697. Co-expression of the C terminal domain of T Ag (aa 627-708) in trans increased both T Ag and VP1 mRNA as well as protein levels for host range mutant viruses in the restrictive cell type. In addition, the T Ag 627-708 fragment promoted the productive lytic infection of host range mutant viruses in the nonpermissive cell type. The carboxyl-terminal region of T Ag contains a biological function essential for the SV40 viral life cycle. PMID:16510165

  6. A Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity on the external surface of Trypanosoma rangeli modulated by exogenous inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-de-Souza, André L; Dick, Claudia Fernanda; Dos Santos, André Luiz Araújo; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2008-08-01

    In this work, we characterized a Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity present in live Trypanosoma rangeli epimastigotes. This enzyme showed capacity to hydrolyze the artificial substrate for phosphatases, p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP). At saturating concentration of p-NPP, half-maximal p-NPP hydrolysis was obtained with 0.23mM Mg(2+). Ca(2+) had no effect on the basal phosphatase activity, could not substitute Mg(2+) as an activator and in contrast inhibited the p-NPP hydrolysis stimulated by Mg(2+). The dependence on p-NPP concentration showed a normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics for this phosphatase activity with values of V(max) of 8.94+/-0.36 nmol p-NP x h(-1) x 10(-7) cells and apparent K(m) of 1.04+/-0.16 mM p-NPP. Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity was stimulated by the alkaline pH range. Experiments using inhibitors, such as, sodium fluoride, sodium orthovanadate and ammonium molybdate, inhibited the Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity. Inorganic phosphate (Pi), a product of phosphatases, inhibited reversibly in 50% this activity. Okadaic acid and microcystin-LR, specific phosphoserine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors, inhibited significantly the Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity. In addition, this phosphatase activity was able to recognize as substrates only o-phosphoserine and o-phosphothreonine, while o-phosphotyrosine was not a good substrate for this phosphatase. Epimastigote forms of T. rangeli exhibit a typical growth curve, achieving the stationary phase around fifth or sixth day and the Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity decreased around 10-fold with the cell growth progression. Cells maintained at Pi-deprived medium (2 mM Pi) present Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-phosphatase activity approximately threefold higher than that maintained at Pi-supplemented medium (50 mM Pi). PMID:18599005

  7. A study of tectonic activity in the Basin-Range Province and on the San Andreas Fault. No. 1: Kinematics of Basin-Range intraplate extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddington, P. K.; Smith, R. B.; Renggli, C.

    1986-01-01

    Strain rates assessed from brittle fracture and total brittle-ductile deformation measured from geodetic data were compared to estimates of paleo-strain from Quaternary geology for the intraplate Great Basin part of the Basin-Range, western United States. These data provide an assessment of the kinematics and mode of lithospheric extension that the western U.S. Cordillera has experienced from the past few million years to the present. Strain and deformation rates were determined by the seismic moment tensor method using historic seismicity and fault plane solutions for sub-regions of homogeneous strain. Contemporary deformation in the Great Basin occurs principally along the active seismic zones. The integrated opening rate across the entire Great Basin is accommodated by E-E extension at 8 to 10 mm/a in the north that diminishes to NW-SE extension of 3.5 mm/a in the south. Zones of maximum lithospheric extension correspond to belts of thin crust, high heat flow, and Quaternary basaltic volcanism, suggesting that these parameters are related through mechanism of extension such as a stress relaxation, allowing bouyant uplift and ascension of magmas.

  8. Single substitution in bacteriophage T4 RNase H alters the ratio between its exo- and endonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Kholod, Natalia; Sivogrivov, Dmitry; Latypov, Oleg; Mayorov, Sergey; Kuznitsyn, Rafail; Kajava, Andrey V; Shlyapnikov, Mikhail; Granovsky, Igor

    2015-11-01

    The article describes substitutions in bacteriophage T4 RNase H which provide so called das-effect. Phage T4 DNA arrest suppression (das) mutations have been described to be capable of partially suppressing the phage DNA arrest phenotype caused by a dysfunction in genes 46 and/or 47 (also known as Mre11/Rad50 complex). Genetic mapping of das13 (one of the das mutations) has shown it to be in the region of the rnh gene encoding RNase H. Here we report that Das13 mutant of RNase H has substitutions of valine 43 and leucine 242 with isoleucines. To investigate the influence of these mutations on RNase H nuclease properties we have designed a novel in vitro assay that allows us to separate and quantify exo- or endonuclease activities of flap endonuclease. The nuclease assay in vitro showed that V43I substitution increased the ratio between exonuclease/endonuclease activities of RNase H whereas L242I substitution did not affect the nuclease activity of RNase H in vitro. However, both mutations were necessary for the full das effect in vivo. Molecular modelling of the nuclease structure suggests that V43I substitution may lead to disposition of H4 helix, responsible for the interaction with the first base pairs of 5'end of branched DNA. These structural changes may affect unwinding of the first base pairs of gapped or nicked DNA generating a short flap and therefore may stabilize the DNA-enzyme complex. L242I substitution did not affect the structure of RNase H and its role in providing das-effect remains unclear. PMID:26432500

  9. Human ankle joint stiffness over the full range of muscle activation levels.

    PubMed

    Weiss, P L; Hunter, I W; Kearney, R E

    1988-01-01

    System identification techniques have been used to track changes in dynamic stiffness of the human ankle joint over a wide range of muscle contraction levels. Subjects lay supine on an experimental table with their left foot encased in a rigid, low-inertia cast which was fixed to an electro-hydraulic actuator operating as a position servo. Subjects generated tonic plantarflexor or dorsiflexor torques of different magnitudes ranging from rest to maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) during repeated presentations of a stochastic ankle angular position perturbation. Compliance impulse response functions (IRF) were determined from every 2.5 s perturbation sequence. The gain (G), natural frequency (omega n), and damping (zeta) parameters of the second-order model providing the best fit to each IRF were determined and used to compute the corresponding inertial (I), viscous (B) and elastic (K) stiffness parameters. The behaviour of these parameters with mean torque was found to follow two simple rules. First, the elastic parameter (K) increased in proportion to mean ankle torque as it was varied from rest to MVC; these changes were considerable involving increases of more than an order of magnitude. Second, the damping parameter (zeta) remained almost invariant over the entire range of contractions despite the dramatic changes in K. PMID:3410857

  10. SU-E-P-08: Alarming Range of Seed Activities Ordered for I-125 Plaque Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the variation in I-125 seed activities ordered by various clinics for their plaque brachytherapy cases under a standardized set of assumptions. Methods: A majority of the plaque programs in North America were contacted and a survey was designed to give a few standardized cases to allow inter-comparison of seed activities ordered. Tumor dose, treatment duration, number of seeds, plaque, and tumor apex were held constant in order to reveal differences in prescription point, seed type, and seed activity. Results: While the survey is presently underway, preliminary results show alarmingly wide variations between centers. Differences up to 45% have been found with 15% differences being common. Conclusion: Though knowledge of the TG-43 dose calculation formalism is common, a number of factors in the field of plaque brachytherapy lead to alarming differences in activity of I-125 seeds being ordered for a given tumor. Knowledge of the present reality of widely varying treatment activities, and thus doses to tumor and normal structures, should serve as motivation for centers involved in this modality to review their programs with others in the community and share their experiences.

  11. Active and inactive enhancers co-operate to exert localized and long-range control of gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Proudhon, Charlotte; Snetkova, Valentina; Raviram, Ramya; Lobry, Camille; Badri, Sana; Jiang, Tingting; Hao, Bingtao; Trimarchi, Thomas; Kluger, Yuval; Aifantis, Iannis; Bonneau, Richard; Skok, Jane A

    2016-01-01

    V(D)J recombination relies on the presence of proximal enhancers that activate the antigen receptor (AgR) loci in a lineage and stage specific manner. Unexpectedly we find that both active and inactive AgR enhancers co-operate to disseminate their effects in a localized and long-range manner. Here we demonstrate the importance of short-range contacts between active enhancers that constitute an Igk super-enhancer in B cells. Deletion of one element reduces the interaction frequency between other enhancers in the hub, which compromises the transcriptional output of each component. We further establish that in T cells long-range contact and co-operation between the inactive Igk enhancer, MiEκ and the active Tcrb enhancer, Eβ, alters enrichment of CBFβ binding in a manner that impacts Tcrb recombination. These findings underline the complexities of enhancer regulation and point to a role for localized and long-range enhancer-sharing between active and inactive elements in lineage and stage specific control. PMID:27239026

  12. Comparison of the isotopic abundance of U235 and U238 and the radium activity ratios in Colorado Plateau uranium ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Stieff, L.; Cuttitta, F.; Kuroda, P.K.

    1957-01-01

    The isotopic abundances of uranium and the radium activity ratios of eleven samples of uranium ore from the Colorado Plateau have been measured. No significant variation in the isotopic abundance of the uranium was noted; with'in the experimental error, the average U235/U238 ratio is 137.7. There is a significant variation in the Ra226/Ra223 activity ratios (0.048-0.143), which indicates a relatively recent alteration of the ore samples. The variations do not, however, explain the lead-uranium and lead-lead age discrepancies. ?? 1957.

  13. Electrically driven plasmon chip: Active plasmon lens in the visible range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Kenzo; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Ohtsu, Tomoya; Ishii, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    We propose an active plasmon lens (APL) consisting of a nanoslit array with an electrically tunable focal profile. Since the transmission phase of a nanoslit is a function of the slit width, applying bias to the nanoslit mechanically alters the nanoslit width and hence shifts the phase front. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrates that applying a bias voltage of 5 V at 633 nm tunes the transmission profile of the fabricated APL. Our active lens is planar and only 400 nm thick, which gives it advantages for fabrication and integration.

  14. Characterizing the spatial and temporal activities of free-ranging cows from GPS data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electronic tracking provides a unique way to document animal behavior on a continuous basis. This manuscript describes how uncorrected 1 s GPS fixes can be used to characterize the rate of cow travel (m·s-1) into stationary, foraging and walking activities. Cows instrumented with GPS devices were ...

  15. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratios following thermodenuder treatment of organic particles grown by α-pinene ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Mikinori; Chen, Qi; Martin, Scot T

    2011-08-28

    The effects of thermodenuder treatment on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and elemental composition of organic particles grown by α-pinene ozonolysis were investigated. The secondary organic material (SOM) was produced in a continuous-flow chamber, with steady-state organic particle mass concentrations M(org) ranging from 1.4 to 37 μg m(-3). Particles exiting in the outflow were heated to temperatures T of up to 100 °C in a thermodenuder. The oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) and hydrogen-to-carbon (H:C) ratios were measured by on-line mass spectrometry. The observed elemental ratios were fit by a linear function, given by (H:C) = -0.8 (O:C) +1.8 for 0.38 < O:C < 0.50. This fit included the dependence on both M(org) and T, meaning that the single variable of post-thermodenuder M(org) was sufficient as an accurate predictor for O:C(M(org)(T)) and H:C(M(org)(T)). This result suggests that equilibrium partitioning theory largely governed the initial volatilization in the thermodenuder. By comparison, the CCN activity had a different dependence on thermodenuder treatment. At 25 °C, the CCN activity was independent of M(org), having an effective hygroscopicity parameter κ(org) of 0.103 ± 0.002. At 100 °C, however, κ(org) varied from 0.105 for M(org) = 1.4 μg m(-3) to 0.079 for M(org) = 37 μg m(-3), indicating that for high mass concentration the CCN activity decreased with heat treatment. The interpretation is that the oligomer fraction of the SOM increased at elevated T, both because of particle-phase reactions that produced oligomers under those conditions and because of the relative enrichment of lower-volatility oligomers in the SOM accompanying the evaporation of higher-volatility monomers from the SOM. Oligomers have high effective molecular weights and thereby significantly influence CCN activity. The production rates of different types of oligomers depend on the types and concentrations of functional groups present in the SOM, which in turn are

  16. Community design and policies for free-range children: creating environments that support routine physical activity.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Growing concern over childhood obesity has prompted a focus on underlying epidemics of physical inactivity and poor nutrition. Regarding the former, there is increasing understanding that behavior change promotion alone has not increased population physical activity levels and that an ecological approach is necessary. Therefore, the public health profession has moved beyond traditional behavior change campaigns toward a growing focus on altering policies and the built environment to create settings that support increases in routine, not just exercise or leisure time, physical activity among children. A survey of the literature suggests four broad factors that define settings where routine physical activity, especially active transportation, is more likely to occur: • a compact variety of land uses, with a mix of destinations in close proximity; • a comprehensive network of bicycle, pedestrian, and transit facilities; • inviting and functional site designs for pedestrians, cyclists, and transit users; • safety and access for users of all ages, incomes, abilities and disabilities. Although these principles are increasingly accepted as beneficial, not just to health but to a community's economic, environmental, and social well-being, many contemporary ordinances and development practices undermine these outcomes. Therefore, five specific policy and intervention approaches are recommended to guide communities to these outcomes: 1. zoning and development policies to protect open space, contain sprawl, and focus investment toward thriving, mixed downtowns and village centers; 2. Complete Streets policies, which require roadways that are safe and functional for pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit users, as well as motor vehicles; 3. a transportation- (not just recreation-) oriented trail network; 4. creation of bicycle- and transit-friendly infrastructure and incentive policies; 5. development of policy-based Safe Routes to School interventions. This proposed

  17. Active modulation of refractive index by stress in the terahertz frequency range: erratum.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-03-20

    A previous paper [Appl. Opt.52, 6364 (2013)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.52.006364] presented experimental work on the stress-optical effect in the terahertz frequency range. Although the theoretical model of experimental measurement is correct, there are two errors in the original version. As a result, the presented experimentally measured value of the refractive index-stress coefficient A of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is erroneous. This erratum points out the errors in the original paper and reports the correct values. PMID:27140555

  18. Enhancing nitrogen removal efficiency and reducing nitrate liquor recirculation ratio by improving simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) process.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    An integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) process (G1) and an activated sludge anoxic-oxic process (G2) were operated at nitrate liquor recirculation ratio (R) of 100, 200 and 300% to investigate the feasibility of enhancing nitrogen removal efficiency (RTN) and reducing R by improving simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) in the IFAS process. The results showed that the effluent NH4(+)-N and total nitrogen (TN) of G1 at R of 200% were less than 1.5 and 14.5 mg/L, satisfying the Chinese discharge standard (NH4(+)-N < 5 mg/L; TN < 15 mg/L). However, the effluent NH4(+)-N and TN of G2 at R of 300% were higher than 8.5 and 15.3 mg/L. It indicated that better RTN could be achieved at a lower R in the IFAS process. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis results implied that nitrifiers and denitrifiers co-existed in one microbial community, facilitating the occurrence of SND in the aerobic reactor of G1, and the contribution of SND to TN removal efficiency ranged 15-19%, which was the main reason that the RTN was improved in the IFAS process. Therefore, the IFAS process was an effective method for improving RTN and reducing R. In practical application, this advantage of the IFAS process can decrease the electricity consumption for nitrate liquor recirculation flow, thereby saving operational costs. PMID:26901725

  19. Occipital MEG Activity in the Early Time Range (<300 ms) Predicts Graded Changes in Perceptual Consciousness.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lau M; Pedersen, Michael N; Sandberg, Kristian; Overgaard, Morten

    2016-06-01

    Two electrophysiological components have been extensively investigated as candidate neural correlates of perceptual consciousness: An early, occipitally realized component occurring 130-320 ms after stimulus onset and a late, frontally realized component occurring 320-510 ms after stimulus onset. Recent studies have suggested that the late component may not be uniquely related to perceptual consciousness, but also to sensory expectations, task associations, and selective attention. We conducted a magnetoencephalographic study; using multivariate analysis, we compared classification accuracies when decoding perceptual consciousness from the 2 components using sources from occipital and frontal lobes. We found that occipital sources during the early time range were significantly more accurate in decoding perceptual consciousness than frontal sources during both the early and late time ranges. These results are the first of its kind where the predictive values of the 2 components are quantitatively compared, and they provide further evidence for the primary importance of occipital sources in realizing perceptual consciousness. The results have important consequences for current theories of perceptual consciousness, especially theories emphasizing the role of frontal sources. PMID:26009612

  20. Effect of lipid/polysaccharide ratio on surface activity of model root mucilage in its solid and liquid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fengxian; Arye, Gilboa

    2016-04-01

    The rhizosphere can be defined as the volume of soil around living roots, which is influenced by root activity. The biological, chemical and physical conditions that prevail in the rhizosphere are significantly different from those of the bulk soil. Plant roots can release diverse organic materials in the rhizosphere which may have different effects on its bio-chemo-physical activity. Among these exudates is the root mucilage which can play a role on the maintenance of root-soil contact, lubrication of the root tip, protection of roots from desiccation and disease, stabilization of soil micro-aggregates and the selective absorption and storage of ions. The surface activity of the root mucilage at the liquid-air interface deduced from its surface tension depression relative to water, implying on its amphiphilic nature. Consequently as the rhizosphere dry out, hydrophobic functional groups may exhibit orientation at the solid-air interface and thus, the wettability of the rhizosphere may temporarily decrease. The major fraction of the root mucilage comprise of polysaccharides and to a much lesser extent, amino acids, organic acids, and phospholipids. The most frequent polysaccharide and phospholipids detected in root mucilage are polygalacturonic acid (PGA) and Phosphatidylcholine (PC), respectively. The latter, is thought to be main cause for the surface active nature of root mucilage. Nevertheless, the role and function of root mucilage in the rhizosphere is commonly studied based on model root mucilage that comprise of only one component, where the most frequent ones are PGA or PC (or lecithin). The main objective of this study was to quantify the effect of concentration and PGA/PC ratios on the wettability of a model rhizosphere soil and the surface tension of the model root mucilage at the liquid-air interface. The PGA/PC mixtures were measured for their equilibrium and dynamic surface tension using the Wilhelmy-Plate method. Quartz sand or glass slides were

  1. Temporal evolution of lead isotope ratios in sediments of the Central Portuguese Margin: a fingerprint of human activities.

    PubMed

    Mil-Homens, Mário; Caetano, Miguel; Costa, Ana M; Lebreiro, Susana; Richter, Thomas; de Stigter, Henko; Trancoso, Maria A; Brito, Pedro

    2013-09-15

    Stable Pb isotope ratios ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(206)Pb), (210)Pb, Pb, Al, Ca, Fe, Mn and Si concentrations were measured in 7 sediment cores from the west coast of the Iberian Peninsula to assess the Pb contamination throughout the last 200 years. Independently of their locations, all cores are characterized by increasing Pb/Al rends not related to grain-size changes. Conversely, decreasing trends of (206)Pb/(207)Pb were found towards the present. This tendency suggest a change in Pb sources reflecting an increased proportion derived from anthropogenic activities. The highest anthropogenic Pb inventories for sediments younger than 1950s were found in the two shallowest cores of Cascais and Lisboa submarine canyons, reflecting the proximity of the Tagus estuary. Lead isotope signatures also help demonstrate that sediments contaminated with Pb are not constrained to estuarine-coastal areas and upper parts of submarine canyons, but are also to transferred to a lesser extent to deeper parts of the Portuguese Margin. PMID:23871578

  2. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Different Antimicrobial Peptides against a Range of Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ebbensgaard, Anna; Mordhorst, Hanne; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Nielsen, Claus Gyrup; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Hansen, Egon Bech

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of a Selected Set of Antimicrobial Peptides The rapid emergence of resistance to classical antibiotics has increased the interest in novel antimicrobial compounds. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent an attractive alternative to classical antibiotics and a number of different studies have reported antimicrobial activity data of various AMPs, but there is only limited comparative data available. The mode of action for many AMPs is largely unknown even though several models have suggested that the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) play a crucial role in the attraction and attachment of the AMP to the bacterial membrane in Gram-negative bacteria. We compared the potency of Cap18, Cap11, Cap11-1-18m2, Cecropin P1, Cecropin B, Bac2A, Bac2A-NH2, Sub5-NH2, Indolicidin, Melittin, Myxinidin, Myxinidin-NH2, Pyrrhocoricin, Apidaecin and Metalnikowin I towards Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Aeromonas salmonicida, Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter jejuni, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Salmonella typhimurium and Yersinia ruckeri by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) determinations. Additional characteristics such as cytotoxicity, thermo and protease stability were measured and compared among the different peptides. Further, the antimicrobial activity of a selection of cationic AMPs was investigated in various E. coli LPS mutants. Cap18 Shows a High Broad Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity Of all the tested AMPs, Cap18 showed the most efficient antimicrobial activity, in particular against Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, Cap18 is highly thermostable and showed no cytotoxic effect in a hemolytic assay, measured at the concentration used. However, Cap18 is, as most of the tested AMPs, sensitive to proteolytic digestion in vitro. Thus, Cap18 is an excellent candidate for further development into practical use; however, modifications that should reduce the protease sensitivity would be needed. In addition, our

  3. Magmatic activity beneath the quiescent Three Sisters volcanic center, central Oregon Cascade Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicks, Charles W., Jr.; Dzurisin, Daniel; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Lu, Zhong; Iverson, Justin

    2002-01-01

    Images from satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) reveal uplift of a broad ???10 km by 20 km area in the Three Sisters volcanic center of the central Oregon Cascade Range, ???130 km south of Mt. St. Helens. The last eruption in the volcanic center occurred ???1500 years ago. Multiple satellite images from 1992 through 2000 indicate that most if not all of ???100 mm of observed uplift occurred between September 1998 and October 2000. Geochemical (water chemistry) anomalies, first noted during 1990, coincide with the area of uplift and suggest the existence of a crustal magma reservoir prior to the uplift. We interpret the uplift as inflation caused by an ongoing episode of magma intrusion at a depth of ???6.5 km.

  4. Stratigraphic development and hydrothermal activity in the central western Cascade Range, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, M.L.; Bull, M.K. ); Pollock, J.M. ); Thompson, G.D. )

    1990-11-10

    Two volcanic sequences bounded by erosional unconformities compose the stratigraphy of the North Santiam mining district, Western Cascade Range, Oregon. Diorite, grandodiorite, and leucocratic quartz porphyry dikes, stocks, and sills intrude the breccias, flows, and tuffs of a volcanic center in the older Sardine Formation. Tourmaline-bearing breccia pipes are associated with the porphyritic granodiorite intrusions. An erosional unconformity separates the Sardine Formation from the overlying Elk Lake formation. The alteration patterns in the two formations are consistent with the development of hydrothermal systems during the eruption of each formation. However, the development of the two hydrothermal systems is separated by a period of erosion of the older volcanic pile. Early formation of mineralization that resembles porphyry copper deposits occurred within the Sardine Formation, and later, after eruption of the Elk Lake formation, epithermal veins and alteration developed along faults, fractures, and the margins of dikes in the Sardine Formation.

  5. Short-range remote detection of liquid surface contamination by active imaging Fourier transform spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Harig, Roland; Braun, René; Dyer, Chris; Howle, Chris; Truscott, Benjamin

    2008-04-14

    An imaging Fourier transform spectrometer developed at TUHH was used for short-range remote detection and identification of liquids on surfaces. The method is based on the measurement of infrared radiation emitted and reflected by the surface and the liquid. A radiative transfer model that takes both the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index of the materials into account has been developed. The model is applied for the detection and identification of potentially hazardous liquids. Measurements of various liquids on diverse surfaces were performed. The measured spectra depend on the optical properties of the background surface. However, using the radiative transfer model, automatic remote detection and identification of the liquids is possible. The agreement between measured spectra and spectra calculated using the radiative transfer model is excellent. PMID:18542678

  6. Surveillance photonic fence based on active range-gated imaging for night intrusion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Yan; He, Jun; Fan, Songtao; Liu, Yuliang

    2011-06-01

    We propose a surveillance photonic fence for night remote intrusion detection, especially in bad environmental conditions. The photonic fence is established by the synchronization of a pulsed infrared laser and a gated imaging sensor. Since the wavelength of the laser is invisible, the photonic fence is also invisible. Only when targets pass the fence, their image information can be collected. Objects and backgrounds out of the fence are all filtered directly which decreases the complexity of image processing about target extraction. For the fence, its location can be easily adjusted by the delay time between the laser pulse and the gate pulse, and its thickness can be set by changing the gate time and the laser pulse width. Furthermore, target space information can also be estimated in terms of the range information of the photonic fence.

  7. Relevance and use of the Ag-110m: Cs-137 activity ratio for tracking the dispersion of radioactive sediment within Fukushima coastal catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, Hugo; Evrard, Olivier; Onda, Yuichi; Chartin, Caroline; Lefèvre, Irène; Bonté, Philippe; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    Large quantities of fallout radionuclides emitted during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident were deposited on Japanese soils, thereby leading to the formation of a 3000 km² contamination plume. Because they are strongly sorbed by fine particles, those radionuclides are likely to be redistributed by hydrosedimentary processes across catchments. As Ag-110m: Cs-137 activity ratio showed a variation in soils across the main plume, we investigated the behaviour of Silver-110 metastable (Ag-110m) and compared it to the one of the more documented radiocesium (Cs-137) to check whether this ratio may be used to track the dispersion of contaminated sediment. We analysed soil and sediment drape deposits (i.e., mud drapes deposited on channel bed sand in rivers) collected in Nov 2011, April 2012, Nov 2012 and May 2013 within coastal catchments draining the main radioactive pollution plume of Fukushima Prefecture (Japan). Several field experiments were also conducted to document radiosilver behaviour in the terrestrial environment. Results show a similar and low mobility for both elements in soils and a strong affinity with the clay fraction. Measurements conducted on sediment sequences accumulated in reservoirs tend to confirm a comparable migration and deposition of both radionuclides even after their redistribution due to erosion and deposition processes. Use of a simple mixing model based on Ag-110m: Cs-137 activity ratio values in both soil and sediment demonstrated the strong reactivity of catchments to the succession of summer typhoons and spring snowmelt. We identified a two stage sediment export cycle with (1) a partial export of contaminated sediment from inland mountain ranges - exposed initially to the highest radionuclide fallout - to the coastal plains in summer and autumn after the occurrence of violent typhoons, and (2) an amplification of the sediment flush during the spring snowmelt. Our results suggest that this contamination export

  8. Pharmacokinetics and dose-range finding toxicity of a novel anti-HIV active integrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice; Mishra, Sanjay; Mirsalis, Jon; O'Loughlin, Kathleen; Zhong, Yu

    2014-08-01

    Integration of viral DNA into human chromosomal DNA catalyzed by HIV integrase represents the "point of no return" in HIV infection. For this reason, HIV integrase is considered a crucial target in the development of new anti-HIV therapeutic agents. We have discovered a novel HIV integrase inhibitor 1, that exhibits potent antiviral activity and a favorable metabolism profile. This paper reports on the pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics of compound 1 and the relevance of these findings with respect to further development of this integrase-targeted antiviral agent. Oral administration of compound 1 in Sprague Dawley rats revealed rapid absorption. Drug exposure increased with increasing drug concentration, indicative of appropriate dose-dependence correlation. Compound 1 exhibited suitable plasma half-life, extensive extravascular distribution and acceptable bioavailability. Toxicity studies revealed no compound-related clinical pathology findings. There were no changes in erythropoietic, white blood cell or platelet parameters in male and female rats. There was no test-article related change in other clinical chemistry parameters. In addition, there were no detectable levels of bilirubin in the urine and there were no treatment-related effects on urobilinogen or other urinalysis parameters. The preclinical studies also revealed that the no observed adverse effect level and the maximum tolerated dose were both high (>500mg/kg/day). The broad and significant antiviral activity and favorable metabolism profile of this integrase inhibitor, when combined with the in vivo pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic data and their pharmacological relevance, provide compelling and critical support for its further development as an anti-HIV therapeutic agent. PMID:24821255

  9. A new approach to determine the ratio of redox active species such as Se(IV)/Se(VI) and As(III)/As(V) in marine systems.

    PubMed

    Aksu, A; Balkis, N; Salihoglu, I

    2013-02-15

    The ratio of redox active species contributes to the researches about marine systems in many ways. Are marine systems reductant or oxidant? For this purpose, redox active species are analyzed by using high technology instrumental analyzers such as AAS, ICP, and HPLC. Then, all ion pair species are compared to each by calculating their ratios. These technologies are very expensive, and it takes long time to obtain the results. In this study, we suggested a basic method by using pH and Eh. Therefore, the Nernst equation expression was rearranged by using relative hydrogen (rH) and electrostatic activity coefficient (F(el)). Additionally, the ratio of the redox active ion pair species Se(IV)/Se(VI) and As(III)/As(V) was calculated. PMID:23201393

  10. Increasing the operating distance of a phase-shift laser range-finding system by using an active reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Pengcheng; Yu, Liang; Mei, Jianting; Tan, Jiubin

    2015-12-01

    A new phase-shift laser ranging method is developed by combining the conventional phase-shift ranging and the concept of transponder, in which the passive mirror in a phase-shift laser range-finding system is replaced with an active reflector whose light source power is the same as that at the measurement terminal. As a result, the power of the returned light is inversely proportional to the 2nd instead of the 4th power of the distance being measured. Section 3 indicate that by using the active reflector, the operating distance is dramatically increased without increasing the laser power or lens aperture. With a transmitted power of 20 mW and an aperture of 100 mm, the operating distance increased from 1.5 km to 9.4 km, and a 15-fold range gain can be forecasted for a transmitted power of 1 W. This strongly confirms the suitability of the developed phase-shift method with an active reflector for measuring longer distances.

  11. Activity patterns of marbled murrelets in Douglas-fir old-growth forests of the Oregon Coast Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jodice, Patrick G.; Collopy, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    We monitored activity patterns of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) on a near-dailyb asisu singa udio-visuasl urveys during three breeding seasons at five forest stands in the Oregon Coast Range. Three measures of activity were recorded: number of daily detections, number of daily vocalizations, and duration of daily activity. Each measure was highly variable within and among stands and years, and we recorded greater variability than has been previously reported for this species. The three measures of activity were strongly correlated within a day at each survey station, but correlative relationships at temporal and spatial scales greater than this were inconsistent. Activity varied greatly from one day to the next during all portions of the breeding season, and we did not identify any month when variability in activity was consistently higher or lower than any other month. Multivariate analyses revealed that weather and date variates explained little of the variability in daily activity. Given the extreme levels of variability in Marbled Murrelet activity and our lack of understanding as to which factors drive that variability, it is critical that conclusions about activity or behavior not be drawn from data sets not specifically designed to answer the questions of interest.

  12. DEEP, LOW-MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XII. CK BOOTIS WITH POSSIBLE CYCLIC MAGNETIC ACTIVITY AND ADDITIONAL COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.-G.; Qian, S.-B.; Soonthornthum, B. E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn

    2012-05-15

    We present precision CCD photometry, a period study, and a two-color simultaneous Wilson code solution of the short-period contact binary CK Bootis. The asymmetric light curves were modeled by a dark spot on the primary component. The result identifies that CK Boo is an A-type W UMa binary with a high fillout of f = 71.7({+-} 4.4)%. From the O - C curve, it is found that the orbital period changes in a complicated mode, i.e., a long-term increase with two sinusoidal variations. One cyclic oscillation with a period of 10.67({+-} 0.20) yr may result from magnetic activity cycles, which are identified by the variability of Max. I - Max. II. Another sinusoidal variation (i.e., A = 0.0131 days({+-} 0.0009 days) and P{sub 3} = 24.16({+-} 0.64) yr) may be attributed to the light-time effect due to a third body. This kind of additional companion can extract angular momentum from the central binary system. The orbital period secularly increases at a rate of dP/dt = +9.79 ({+-}0.80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} days yr{sup -1}, which may be interpreted by conservative mass transfer from the secondary to the primary. This kind of deep, low-mass ratio overcontact binaries may evolve into a rapid-rotating single star, only if the contact configuration do not break down at J{sub spin} > (1/3)J{sub orb}.

  13. High dynamic range active pixel sensor arrays for digital x-ray imaging using a-Si:H

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jackson; Nathan, Arokia; Rowlands, John

    2006-05-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) active matrix flat panel imagers have gained considerable significance in large area digital imaging applications, in view of their large area readout capability. Current interests lie in a multifaceted a-Si:H array which is compatible with multiple x-ray imaging modalities. This concept entails a single detector system with sufficient dynamic range and variable signal gain. This article reports on an active pixel sensor (APS) array with high dynamic range and programable gain for multimodality x-ray imaging. Initial results have demonstrated sensitivity from subpicoampere to nanoampere photocurrent, which proves amenable for both low-dosage dynamic imaging and high input static imaging. In addition, the programable system signal gain alleviates problems such as output saturation and ensures signal readout linearity to further improve the exploitable dynamic range. Together with external amplification, this APS circuit delivers the performance needed in terms of signal gain, dynamic range, and readout rate entailed by fluoroscopic and radiographic imaging applications.

  14. Mad linker phosphorylations control the intensity and range of the BMP-activity gradient in developing Drosophila tissues

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Abigail; Rios, Marlyn; Juarez, Matthew; Lee, Daniel; Chen, Annan; Eivers, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The BMP ligand Dpp, operates as a long range morphogen to control many important functions during Drosophila development from tissue patterning to growth. The BMP signal is transduced intracellularly via C-terminal phosphorylation of the BMP transcription factor Mad, which forms an activity gradient in developing embryonic tissues. Here we show that Cyclin dependent kinase 8 and Shaggy phosphorylate three Mad linker serines. We demonstrate that linker phosphorylations control the peak intensity and range of the BMP signal across rapidly developing embryonic tissues. Shaggy knockdown broadened the range of the BMP-activity gradient and increased high threshold target gene expression in the early embryo, while expression of a Mad linker mutant in the wing disc resulted in enhanced levels of C-terminally phosphorylated Mad, a 30% increase in wing tissue, and elevated BMP target genes. In conclusion, our results describe how Mad linker phosphorylations work to control the peak intensity and range of the BMP signal in rapidly developing Drosophila tissues. PMID:25377173

  15. CE-LIF determination of salivary cadaverine and lysine concentration ratio as an indicator of lysine decarboxylase enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Tábi, Tamás; Lohinai, Zsolt; Pálfi, Melinda; Levine, Martin; Szöko, Eva

    2008-05-01

    Salivary bacteria produce the enzyme lysine decarboxylase which converts lysine to cadaverine. In the absence of appropriate oral hygiene, overgrowth of these bacteria depletes lysine. This may contribute to gingival inflammation, while cadaverine contributes to oral malodor. A selective and sensitive capillary electrophoresis method with laser-induced fluorescence detection has been developed for the determination of cadaverine and lysine in saliva, as an indicator of lysine decarboxylase enzyme activity. The diamino compounds were separated in acidic background electrolyte in their mono-labeled form after derivatization with 4-fluoro-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-F). Linearity and reproducibility of the method in the range 1-50 μmol L(-1) have been demonstrated using saliva samples. The method was applied for the measurement of cadaverine and lysine in the saliva of healthy volunteers with or without proper oral hygiene. In the absence of oral hygiene, the mol fraction of cadaverine to cadaverine plus lysine in saliva increased significantly (0.65 ± 0.13 vs. 0.39 ± 0.18, P < 0.001), indicating the presence of higher amount of bacterial lysine decarboxylase, that may contribute to periodontal diseases. PMID:18389226

  16. Chinese Tallow Trees (Triadica sebifera) from the Invasive Range Outperform Those from the Native Range with an Active Soil Community or Phosphorus Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Yaojun; Wang, Hong; Zou, Jianwen; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    Two mechanisms that have been proposed to explain success of invasive plants are unusual biotic interactions, such as enemy release or enhanced mutualisms, and increased resource availability. However, while these mechanisms are usually considered separately, both may be involved in successful invasions. Biotic interactions may be positive or negative and may interact with nutritional resources in determining invasion success. In addition, the effects of different nutrients on invasions may vary. Finally, genetic variation in traits between populations located in introduced versus native ranges may be important for biotic interactions and/or resource use. Here, we investigated the roles of soil biota, resource availability, and plant genetic variation using seedlings of Triadica sebifera in an experiment in the native range (China). We manipulated nitrogen (control or 4 g/m2), phosphorus (control or 0.5 g/m2), soil biota (untreated or sterilized field soil), and plant origin (4 populations from the invasive range, 4 populations from the native range) in a full factorial experiment. Phosphorus addition increased root, stem, and leaf masses. Leaf mass and height growth depended on population origin and soil sterilization. Invasive populations had higher leaf mass and growth rates than native populations did in fresh soil but they had lower, comparable leaf mass and growth rates in sterilized soil. Invasive populations had higher growth rates with phosphorus addition but native ones did not. Soil sterilization decreased specific leaf area in both native and exotic populations. Negative effects of soil sterilization suggest that soil pathogens may not be as important as soil mutualists for T. sebifera performance. Moreover, interactive effects of sterilization and origin suggest that invasive T. sebifera may have evolved more beneficial relationships with the soil biota. Overall, seedlings from the invasive range outperformed those from the native range, however, an

  17. Chinese tallow trees (Triadica sebifera) from the invasive range outperform those from the native range with an active soil community or phosphorus fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Yaojun; Wang, Hong; Zou, Jianwen; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    Two mechanisms that have been proposed to explain success of invasive plants are unusual biotic interactions, such as enemy release or enhanced mutualisms, and increased resource availability. However, while these mechanisms are usually considered separately, both may be involved in successful invasions. Biotic interactions may be positive or negative and may interact with nutritional resources in determining invasion success. In addition, the effects of different nutrients on invasions may vary. Finally, genetic variation in traits between populations located in introduced versus native ranges may be important for biotic interactions and/or resource use. Here, we investigated the roles of soil biota, resource availability, and plant genetic variation using seedlings of Triadica sebifera in an experiment in the native range (China). We manipulated nitrogen (control or 4 g/m(2)), phosphorus (control or 0.5 g/m(2)), soil biota (untreated or sterilized field soil), and plant origin (4 populations from the invasive range, 4 populations from the native range) in a full factorial experiment. Phosphorus addition increased root, stem, and leaf masses. Leaf mass and height growth depended on population origin and soil sterilization. Invasive populations had higher leaf mass and growth rates than native populations did in fresh soil but they had lower, comparable leaf mass and growth rates in sterilized soil. Invasive populations had higher growth rates with phosphorus addition but native ones did not. Soil sterilization decreased specific leaf area in both native and exotic populations. Negative effects of soil sterilization suggest that soil pathogens may not be as important as soil mutualists for T. sebifera performance. Moreover, interactive effects of sterilization and origin suggest that invasive T. sebifera may have evolved more beneficial relationships with the soil biota. Overall, seedlings from the invasive range outperformed those from the native range, however

  18. Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2012-12-01

    Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students. PMID:23247874

  19. Antiviral Activity of Favipiravir (T-705) against a Broad Range of Paramyxoviruses In Vitro and against Human Metapneumovirus in Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Jochmans, D; van Nieuwkoop, S; Smits, S L; Neyts, J; Fouchier, R A M; van den Hoogen, B G

    2016-08-01

    The clinical impact of infections with respiratory viruses belonging to the family Paramyxoviridae argues for the development of antiviral therapies with broad-spectrum activity. Favipiravir (T-705) has demonstrated potent antiviral activity against multiple RNA virus families and is presently in clinical evaluation for the treatment of influenza. Here we demonstrate in vitro activity of T-705 against the paramyxoviruses human metapneumovirus (HMPV), respiratory syncytial virus, human parainfluenza virus, measles virus, Newcastle disease virus, and avian metapneumovirus. In addition, we demonstrate activity against HMPV in hamsters. T-705 treatment inhibited replication of all paramyxoviruses tested in vitro, with 90% effective concentration (EC90) values of 8 to 40 μM. Treatment of HMPV-challenged hamsters with T-705 at 200 mg/kg of body weight/day resulted in 100% protection from infection of the lungs. In all treated and challenged animals, viral RNA remained detectable in the respiratory tract. The observation that T-705 treatment had a significant effect on infectious viral titers, with a limited effect on viral genome titers, is in agreement with its proposed mode of action of viral mutagenesis. However, next-generation sequencing of viral genomes isolated from treated and challenged hamsters did not reveal (hyper)mutation. Polymerase activity assays revealed a specific effect of T-705 on the activity of the HMPV polymerase. With the reported antiviral activity of T-705 against a broad range of RNA virus families, this small molecule is a promising broad-range antiviral drug candidate for limiting the viral burden of paramyxoviruses and for evaluation for treatment of infections with (re)emerging viruses, such as the henipaviruses. PMID:27185803

  20. Denudation of Actively Growing Mountain Ranges in the Foreland of NE Tibet Inferred From in- Situ Produced Cosmogenic Be-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, L.; Hetzel, R.; Tao, M.; Li, X.

    2007-12-01

    At the northeastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau ranges bounded by active thrust faults offer the unique opportunity to study the competing effects of uplift and erosion during the early stages of mountain building. Owing to along- strike variations in relief, slope, and lithology, these ranges are an ideal target for studying the influence of topography, lithology, and active faulting on denudation. Here we report spatially-averaged erosion rates for catchments situated along two of these ranges based on Be-10 concentrations of quartz in stream sediments. The Yumu Shan and the western Long Shou Shan are about 60 km long and their overall shape as well as the presence of wind gaps illustrates their vertical-lateral growth during Plio-Quaternary thrust faulting (Hetzel et al. 2004a). Erosion rates determined so far for 20 small catchments are variable and range from 20 to 550 mm/kyr. The observed variability results from at least three factors: (1) the erosion rate in catchments exposing the same lithology is positively correlated with relief and mean slope, (2) weakly consolidated Cretaceous sediments generally erode faster than low-grade Paleozoic bedrock, and (3) the erosion rate seems to decrease from the centre of the fault-bounded ranges towards their propagating tips. As rates of thrust faulting and rock uplift in the region (600-1200 mm/kyr; Hetzel et al., 2004a, b) exceed the denudation rates, the active growth of mountains and the lateral growth of Tibet has not yet come to rest. References Hetzel, R., Tao, M., Niedermann, S., Strecker, M.R., Ivy-Ochs, S., Kubik, P.W., Gao, B. (2004a). Implications of the fault scaling law for the growth of topography: Mountain ranges in the broken foreland of NE Tibet, Terra Nova 16, 157-162. Hetzel, R., Tao, M., Stokes, S., Niedermann, S., Ivy-Ochs, S., Gao, B., Strecker, M.R., Kubik, P.W. (2004b). Late Pleistocene-Holocene slip rate of the Zhangye thrust (Qilian Shan, China) and implications for the active growth of the

  1. Urinary coproporphyrin I/(I + III) ratio as a surrogate for MRP2 or other transporter activities involved in methotrexate clearance

    PubMed Central

    Benz-de Bretagne, Isabelle; Zahr, Noël; Le Gouge, Amélie; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Houillier, Caroline; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Gyan, Emmanuel; Lissandre, Séverine; Choquet, Sylvain; Le Guellec, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Aims The urinary coproporphyrin I/(I + III) ratio may be a surrogate for MRP2 activity. We conducted a prospective study in patients receiving methotrexate (MTX) to examine the relationship between this ratio and the pharmacokinetics of a MRP2 substrate. Methods Three urine samples were collected from 81 patients for UCP I/(I + III) ratio determination: one before (P1), one at the end of MTX infusion (P2), and one on the day of hospital discharge (P3). Three polymorphisms of ABCC2 were analysed and their relationships with basal UCP I/(I + III) ratio values assessed. All associated drugs were recorded and a drug interaction score (DIS) was assigned. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted to assess whether MTX clearance (MTXCL) was associated with the basal UCP I/(I + III) ratio, its variation during MTX infusion, the DIS or other common covariates. Results The basal UCP I/(I + III) ratio was not associated with ABCC2 polymorphisms and did not differ according to the DIS. Significant changes in the ratio were observed over time, with an increase between P1 and P2 and a decrease at P3 (P < 0.001). No association was found between basal UCP I/(I + III) ratio and MTXCL. The final model indicates that MTXCL was dependent on the change in the ratio between P1 and P3, DIS and creatinine clearance. Conclusion The basal UCP I/(I + III) ratio is not predictive of MTXCL. However, it is sensitive to the presence of MTX, so it is plausible that it reflects a function modified in response to the drug. PMID:24433481

  2. Non-extensivity and long-range correlations in the earthquake activity at the West Corinth rift (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michas, G.; Vallianatos, F.; Sammonds, P.

    2013-09-01

    In the present work the statistical properties of the earthquake activity in a highly seismic region, the West Corinth rift (Central Greece), are being studied by means of generalized statistical physics. By using a dataset that covers the period 2001-2008, we investigate the earthquake energy distribution and the distribution of the time intervals (interevent times) between the successive events. As has been reported previously, these distributions exhibit complex statistical properties and fractality. By using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), a well-established method for detection of long-range correlations in non-stationary signals, it is shown that long-range correlations are also present in the earthquake activity. The existence of these properties motivates us to use non-extensive statistical physics (NESP) to investigate the statistical properties of the frequency-magnitude and the interevent time distributions, along with other well-known relations in seismology, such as the gamma distribution for interevent times. The results of the analysis indicate that the statistical properties of the earthquake activity can be successfully reproduced by means of NESP and that the earthquake activity at the West Corinth rift is correlated at all-time scales.

  3. Impact of a distance estimation error inducing a visualized zone gap on the target illuminance in range-gated active imaging.

    PubMed

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Some stand-alone airborne systems of target reconnaissance such as a missile seeker head use range-gated laser active imaging to visualize a target in the scene. To center the visualized zone on the target, it is important to know the distance between the active imaging system and the target. However, as this exact distance is not known before the detection of the target, it can be only estimated. This estimated distance can be erroneous (max≈500  m) with some technological drifts (gyrometric drift, accelerometric drift, missile position error, etc.). To be able to evaluate the impact of a distance estimation error on target illuminance in active imaging, the expressions of the illuminance attenuation ratio according to the decentered target position with regard to the visualized zone were determined. These different equations will be used to determine, in future stand-alone reconnaissance systems, the target signal-to-noise ratio as a function of the localization error. Generally speaking, two modes of visualization were used: first by using a fixed width of the visualized zone, and second by increasing the width of the visualized zone as a function of the distance. The defined different expressions allowed us to study the illuminance behavior of the target with regard to the value of the gap (difference between the estimated distance and the real distance) for each mode of visualization. The results showed that from a target distance of about 1 km, the visualization mode with variable zone width allowed us to decrease the target illuminance less during a gap caused by an estimation error of the target distance. PMID:24513988

  4. Extremely high proportions of male flowers and geographic variation in floral ratios within male figs of Ficus tikoua despite pollinators displaying active pollen collection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jun-Yin; Fu, Rong-Hua; Compton, Stephen G; Hu, Dai-Mei; Zhang, Lu-Shui; Yang, Fan; Chen, Yan; Kjellberg, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Most plants are pollinated passively, but active pollination has evolved among insects that depend on ovule fertilization for larval development. Anther-to-ovule ratios (A/O ratios, a coarse indicator of pollen-to-ovule ratios) are strong indicators of pollination mode in fig trees and are consistent within most species. However, unusually high values and high variation of A/O ratios (0.096-10.0) were detected among male plants from 41 natural populations of Ficus tikoua in China. Higher proportions of male (staminate) flowers were associated with a change in their distribution within the figs, from circum-ostiolar to scattered. Plants bearing figs with ostiolar or scattered male flowers were geographically separated, with scattered male flowers found mainly on the Yungui Plateau in the southwest of our sample area. The A/O ratios of most F. tikoua figs were indicative of passive pollination, but its Ceratosolen fig wasp pollinator actively loads pollen into its pollen pockets. Additional pollen was also carried on their body surface and pollinators emerging from scattered-flower figs had more surface pollen. Large amounts of pollen grains on the insects' body surface are usually indicative of a passive pollinator. This is the first recorded case of an actively pollinated Ficus species producing large amounts of pollen. Overall high A/O ratios, particularly in some populations, in combination with actively pollinating pollinators, may reflect a response by the plant to insufficient quantities of pollen transported in the wasps' pollen pockets, together with geographic variation in this pollen limitation. This suggests an unstable scenario that could lead to eventual loss of wasp active pollination behavior. PMID:26843943

  5. The importance of the electrode mass ratio in a Li-ion capacitor based on activated carbon and Li4Ti5O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dsoke, Sonia; Fuchs, Bettina; Gucciardi, Emanuele; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret

    2015-05-01

    This study shows how the simple modulation of the cathode/anode mass ratio, in a Li-ion capacitor based on activated carbon (AC) and Li4Ti5O12 (LTO), results in a drastic increase in performance. Starting with a device balanced in the classical way (with an AC/LTO mass ratio of 4.17), the cathode/anode mass ratio has been reduced to 1.54 and then to 0.72. At a high power density, the device with a cathode/anode mass ratio of 0.72 shows the highest energy density. In fact, at 2.3 kW L-1, it delivers an energy density of 31 Wh L-1, which is almost 10 times greater than the energy obtained with a capacitor balanced with an AC/LTO ratio of 4.17 (3.68 Wh L-1). Moreover, the reduction in the cathode/anode mass ratio from 4.17 to 0.72 improves the cycling stability with a factor of 4.8 after 1000 cycles at 10C. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals that the better power performance is due to reduced diffusion and charge transfer resistances. In addition, the anode polarization is less pronounced for the system with a lower AC/LTO mass ratio, leading to a minimization in electrolyte decomposition on the anode surface and therefore limiting the increase in the electrode resistance during cycles.

  6. Position surveillance using one active ranging satellite and time-of-arrival of a signal from an independent satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Frey, R. L.; Lewis, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A satellite-aided mobile communication service was tested for position surveillance, with an automatic responder circuit connected between the vehicle receiver and transmitter, and a receiver coded for signals from another satellite. Using the ATS-6 and GOES satellites, a tone-code ranging transponder was connected between the receiver and transmitter, and a 468 MHz receiver was connected to the responder unit for passive reception of the 100 bit per second timing and data signal. Results showed lines of position derived from the active ranging through ATS-6 to be accurate to approximately 0.1 nautical mile, while the NOAA-GOES signals were accurate to about 1.6 miles. The active ranging bandwidth was 2.44 kHz, and the integration time was 0.1 second, while the limitation on accuracy was the 100 Hz bandwidth. This technique of position surveillance was concluded to be feasible and simple to operate, providing needed, good quality communications to the inland waterways industry.

  7. Mediator facilitates transcriptional activation and dynamic long-range contacts at the IgH locus during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Claudepierre, Anne-Sophie; Robert, Isabelle; Rocha, Pedro P; Raviram, Ramya; Schiavo, Ebe; Heyer, Vincent; Bonneau, Richard; Luo, Vincent M; Reddy, Janardan K; Borggrefe, Tilman; Skok, Jane A; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by the transcription-coupled recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to Ig switch regions (S regions). During CSR, the IgH locus undergoes dynamic three-dimensional structural changes in which promoters, enhancers, and S regions are brought to close proximity. Nevertheless, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we show that Med1 and Med12, two subunits of the mediator complex implicated in transcription initiation and long-range enhancer/promoter loop formation, are dynamically recruited to the IgH locus enhancers and the acceptor regions during CSR and that their knockdown in CH12 cells results in impaired CSR. Furthermore, we show that conditional inactivation of Med1 in B cells results in defective CSR and reduced acceptor S region transcription. Finally, we show that in B cells undergoing CSR, the dynamic long-range contacts between the IgH enhancers and the acceptor regions correlate with Med1 and Med12 binding and that they happen at a reduced frequency in Med1-deficient B cells. Our results implicate the mediator complex in the mechanism of CSR and are consistent with a model in which mediator facilitates the long-range contacts between S regions and the IgH locus enhancers during CSR and their transcriptional activation. PMID:26903242

  8. Improving the catalytic activity of hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus prolidases for detoxification of organophosphorus nerve agents over a broad range of temperatures.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Du, Xuelian; Tove, Sherry R; Grunden, Amy M

    2010-08-01

    Prolidase isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has potential for application for decontamination of organophosphorus compounds in certain pesticides and chemical warfare agents under harsh conditions. However, current applications that use an enzyme-based cocktail are limited by poor long-term enzyme stability and low reactivity over a broad range of temperatures. To obtain a better enzyme for OP nerve agent decontamination and to investigate structural factors that influence protein thermostability and thermoactivity, randomly mutated P. furiosus prolidases were prepared by using XL1-red-based mutagenesis and error-prone PCR. An Escherichia coli strain JD1 (lambdaDE3) (auxotrophic for proline [DeltaproA] and having deletions in pepQ and pepP dipeptidases with specificity for proline-containing dipeptides) was constructed for screening mutant P. furiosus prolidase expression plasmids. JD1 (lambdaDE3) cells were transformed with mutated prolidase expression plasmids and plated on minimal media supplemented with 50 muM Leu-Pro as the only source of proline. By using this positive selection, Pyrococcus prolidase mutants with improved activity over a broader range of temperatures were isolated. The activities of the mutants over a broad temperature range were measured for both Xaa-Pro dipeptides and OP nerve agents, and the thermoactivity and thermostability of the mutants were determined. PMID:20422176

  9. Thermally activated band conduction and variable range hopping conduction in Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair Ansari, Mohd; Khare, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of electrical conductivity of the Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films has been measured in order to identify the dominant conduction mechanism. These CZTS film have been deposited by ultrasonic assisted chemical vapor deposition method at different substrate temperatures in a single step process. All the films exhibit p-type semiconducting behaviour. In the high temperature range (> 250 K), the dominance of thermally activated band conduction is observed, whereas in the lower temperature region (250-70 K), the hopping conduction is present. Detailed analysis of the temperature dependence of conductivity of the films reveals that in the temperature range from 250-170 K, nearest neighbour hopping dominates, whereas in the lower temperature region (170-70 K), the dominant hopping conduction is Mott's 3D variable range hopping and not Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping. The value of Mott's temperature is found to decrease for the CZTS films deposited at higher temperature, which has been attributed to enhanced density of states at the Fermi level.

  10. Position surveillance using one active ranging satellite and time-of-arrival of a signal from an independent satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Frey, R. L.; Lewis, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Position surveillance using one active ranging/communication satellite and the time-of-arrival of signals from an independent satellite was shown to be feasible and practical. A towboat on the Mississippi River was equipped with a tone-code ranging transponder and a receiver tuned to the timing signals of the GOES satellite. A similar transponder was located at the office of the towing company. Tone-code ranging interrogations were transmitted from the General Electric Earth Station Laboratory through ATS-6 to the towboat and to the ground truth transponder office. Their automatic responses included digital transmissions of time-of-arrival measurements derived from the GOES signals. The Earth Station Laboratory determined ranges from the satellites to the towboat and computed position fixes. The ATS-6 lines-of-position were more precise than 0.1 NMi, 1 sigma, and the GOES lines-of-position were more precise than 1.6 NMi, 1 sigma. High quality voice communications were accomplished with the transponders using a nondirectional antenna on the towboat. The simple and effective surveillance technique merits further evaluation using operational maritime satellites.

  11. Effects of Non-Guidance Activities, Supervision, and Student-to-Counselor Ratios on School Counselor Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    School counselors, like all mental health professionals are at high risk for burnout. High caseloads, job role ambiguity, and lack of supervision increase their propensity for burnout. Three areas were selected for study in this article due to their potential impact on burnout: supervision, student-to-counselor-ratios, and non-guidance related…

  12. Structural insights into Ca(2+)-activated long-range allosteric channel gating of RyR1.

    PubMed

    Wei, Risheng; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yan; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Xinrui; Jing, Shan; Liu, Congcong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Guangyu; Xu, Yaofang; Zhu, Sujie; Williams, Alan J; Sun, Fei; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a class of giant ion channels with molecular mass over 2.2 mega-Daltons. These channels mediate calcium signaling in a variety of cells. Since more than 80% of the RyR protein is folded into the cytoplasmic assembly and the remaining residues form the transmembrane domain, it has been hypothesized that the activation and regulation of RyR channels occur through an as yet uncharacterized long-range allosteric mechanism. Here we report the characterization of a Ca(2+)-activated open-state RyR1 structure by cryo-electron microscopy. The structure has an overall resolution of 4.9 Å and a resolution of 4.2 Å for the core region. In comparison with the previously determined apo/closed-state structure, we observed long-range allosteric gating of the channel upon Ca(2+) activation. In-depth structural analyses elucidated a novel channel-gating mechanism and a novel ion selectivity mechanism of RyR1. Our work not only provides structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of channel gating and regulation of RyRs, but also sheds light on structural basis for channel-gating and ion selectivity mechanisms for the six-transmembrane-helix cation channel family. PMID:27573175

  13. Recombinant broad-range phospholipase C from Listeria monocytogenes exhibits optimal activity at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiongying; Gershenson, Anne; Roberts, Mary F

    2016-06-01

    The broad-range phospholipase C (PLC) from Listeria monocytogenes has been expressed using an intein expression system and characterized. This zinc metalloenzyme, similar to the homologous enzyme from Bacillus cereus, targets a wide range of lipid substrates. With monomeric substrates, the length of the hydrophobic acyl chain has significant impact on enzyme efficiency by affecting substrate affinity (Km). Based on a homology model of the enzyme to the B. cereus protein, several active site residue mutations were generated. While this PLC shares many of the mechanistic characteristics of the B. cereus PLC, a major difference is that the L. monocytogenes enzyme displays an acidic pH optimum regardless of substrate status (monomer, micelle, or vesicle). This unusual behavior might be advantageous for its role in the pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. PMID:26976751

  14. 125,000 year vs. 10,000 year (Holocene) classification of active'' faults in the Basin and Range province

    SciTech Connect

    Depolo, C.M. . Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology and Geological Sciences Dept.); Slemmons, D.B. . Center for Neotectonic Studies)

    1993-04-01

    In the Basin and Range province (BRP), a Holocene criterion is commonly used to discriminate active'' faults. This time since the last event'' criterion is used to discern hazardous faults for considering setback distances and moderate risks similar to usage in California. Observations from the BRP, however, suggest that a longer time period is more appropriate, especially since most earthquake recurrence intervals are thousands to tens of thousands of years. The authors believe that the latest Pleistocene age criterion, specifically 125,000 years, should be used for active fault classification in the province. The 125,000 year activity criterion is appropriate for the BRP because: (1) it better encompasses typical recurrence intervals for faults in the BRP; (2) it helps account for temporal clustering of earthquake activity along a fault by allowing intercluster time periods to be captured; and (3) it is practical to use because it is linked with a climatic episode, Oxygen Isotope Stage 5, during which several prominent, identifiable geomorphic features and soils began forming (e.g., Sangamonian-aged soils). Another practical aspect of using a 125,000 year activity criterion is that it would allow most hazardous faults to have at least a few events and create discernible geomorphic expression, aiding in their identification and delineation. In Nevada, this latest Quaternary fault classification would include most significant faults that define the contemporary seismotectonic pattern.

  15. The effects of diet, mating duration , female to male ratios and temperature on ovary activation, mating success and fecundity of Aethina tumida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of natural diet, mating and temperature on the ovary activation and fecundity of small hive beetles (SHB) Aethina tumida Murray were studied. The natural diets evaluated were brood, pollen, honey and their various combinations. Duration of mating (1 day versus 2 days), ratio of female (F...

  16. Uranium concentrations and /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratios in fault-associated groundwater as possible earthquake precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Finkel, R.C.

    1981-05-01

    In order to assess the utility of uranium isotopes as fluid phase earthquake precursors, uranium concentrations and /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratios have been monitored on a monthly or bimonthly basis in water from 24 wells and springs associated with Southern California fault zones. Uranium concentrations vary from 0.002 ppb at Indian Canyon Springs on the San Jacinto fault to 8.3 ppb at Lake Hughes well on the San Andreas fault in the Palmdale area. /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratios vary from 0.88 at Agua Caliente Springs on the Elsinore fault to 5.4 at Niland Slab well on the San Andreas fault in the Imperial Valley. There was one large earthquake in the study area during 1979, the 15 October 1979 M = 6.6 Imperial Valley earthquake. Correlated with this event, uranium concentrations varied by a factor of more than 60 and activity ratios by a factor of 3 at the Niland Slab site, about 70 km from the epicenter. At the other sites monitored, uranium concentrations varied in time, but with no apparent pattern, while uranium activity ratios remained essentially constant throughout the monitoring period.

  17. Self-similar signature of the active solar corona within the inertial range of solar-wind turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kiyani, K; Chapman, S C; Hnat, B; Nicol, R M

    2007-05-25

    We quantify the scaling of magnetic energy density in the inertial range of solar-wind turbulence seen in situ at 1 AU with respect to solar activity. At solar maximum, when the coronal magnetic field is dynamic and topologically complex, we find self-similar scaling in the solar wind, whereas at solar minimum, when the coronal fields are more ordered, we find multifractality. This quantifies the solar-wind signature that is of direct coronal origin and distinguishes it from that of local MHD turbulence, with quantitative implications for coronal heating of the solar wind. PMID:17677760

  18. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of 51,48Cr, 48V, 48,47,46,44m,44g,43Sc and 43,42K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  19. Identification of a long-range protein network that modulates active site dynamics in extremophilic alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Zachary D; Cun, Shujian; Klinman, Judith P

    2013-05-17

    A tetrameric thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (ht-ADH) has been mutated at an aromatic side chain in the active site (Trp-87). The ht-W87A mutation results in a loss of the Arrhenius break seen at 30 °C for the wild-type enzyme and an increase in cold lability that is attributed to destabilization of the active tetrameric form. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are nearly temperature-independent over the experimental temperature range, and similar in magnitude to those measured above 30 °C for the wild-type enzyme. This suggests that the rigidification in the wild-type enzyme below 30 °C does not occur for ht-W87A. A mutation at the dimer-dimer interface in a thermolabile psychrophilic homologue of ht-ADH, ps-A25Y, leads to a more thermostable enzyme and a change in the rate-determining step at low temperature. The reciprocal mutation in ht-ADH, ht-Y25A, results in kinetic behavior similar to that of W87A. Collectively, the results indicate that flexibility at the active site is intimately connected to a subunit interaction 20 Å away. The convex Arrhenius curves previously reported for ht-ADH (Kohen, A., Cannio, R., Bartolucci, S., and Klinman, J. P. (1999) Nature 399, 496-499) are proposed to arise, at least in part, from a change in subunit interactions that rigidifies the substrate-binding domain below 30 °C, and impedes the ability of the enzyme to sample the catalytically relevant conformational landscape. These results implicate an evolutionarily conserved, long-range network of dynamical communication that controls C-H activation in the prokaryotic alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:23525111

  20. Assessment of Non-traditional Isotopic Ratios by Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Nuclear Activities: Annual Report Year 2

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, S; Buchholz, B

    2009-08-26

    The objective of this work is to identify isotopic ratios suitable for analysis via mass spectrometry that distinguish between commercial nuclear reactor fuel cycles, fuel cycles for weapons grade plutonium, and products from nuclear weapons explosions. Methods will also be determined to distinguish the above from medical and industrial radionuclide sources. Mass spectrometry systems will be identified that are suitable for field measurement of such isotopes in an expedient manner. Significant progress has been made with this project within the past year: (1) Isotope production from commercial nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear weapons fuel cycles have been modeled with the ORIGEN and MCNPX codes. (2) MCNPX has been utilized to calculate isotopic inventories produced in a short burst fast bare sphere reactor (to approximate the signature of a nuclear weapon). (3) Isotopic ratios have been identified that are good for distinguishing between commercial and military fuel cycles as well as between nuclear weapons and commercial nuclear fuel cycles. (4) Mass spectrometry systems have been assessed for analysis of the fission products of interest. (5) A short-list of forensic ratios have been identified that are well suited for use in portable mass spectrometry systems.

  1. Evaluation of a new range of light-activated surgical adhesives for tissue repair in a porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Jill N.; Hodges, Diane E.; March, Keith L.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2001-05-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using a new range of light-activated surgical adhesives for incision repair in a wide range of tissue types. Biodegradable polymer membranes of controlled porosity were fabricated with poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and salt particles using a solvent-casting and particulate- leaching technique. The porous membranes were doped with protein solder composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5 mg/ml indocyanine green (ICG) dye mixed in deionized water. Tissue incisions were repaired using the surgical adhesive in conjunction with an 805-nm diode laser. Nine organs were tested ranging from skin to liver to the small intestine, as well as the coronary, pulmonary, carotid, femoral and splenetic arteries. Acute breaking strengths were measured and the data were analyzed by Student's T-test. Repairs formed on the small intestine were most successful followed by spleen, atrium, kidney, muscle and skin. The strongest vascular repairs were achieved in the carotid artery and femoral artery. The new surgical adhesive could possibly be used as a simple and effective method to stop bleeding and repair tissue quickly in an emergency situation, or as a substitute to mechanical staples or sutures in many clinical applications.

  2. Immediate Effects of Inhibitive Distraction on Active Range of Cervical Flexion in Patients with Neck Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Briem, Kristín; Huijbregts, Peter; Thorsteinsdottir, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the immediate effects of a manual therapy technique called Inhibitive Distraction (ID) on active range of motion (AROM) for cervical flexion in patients with neck pain with or without concomitant headache. A secondary objective of this study was to see whether patient subgroups could be identified who might benefit more from ID by studying variables such as age, pain intensity, presence of headache, or pre-intervention AROM. We also looked at patients' ability to identify pre- to post-intervention changes in their ability to actively move through a range of motion. Forty subjects (mean age 34.7 years; range 16–48 years) referred to a physical therapy clinic due to discomfort in the neck region were randomly assigned to an experimental and a control group. We used the CROM goniometer to measure pre- and post-intervention cervical flexion AROM in the sagittal plane within a single treatment session. The between-group difference in AROM increase was not statistically significant at P<0.05 with a mean post-intervention increase in ROM of 2.4° (SD 6.2°) for the experimental group and 1.2° (SD 5.8°) for the placebo group. We were also unable to identify potential subgroups more likely to respond to ID, although a trend emerged for greater improvement in chronic patients with headaches, lower pain levels, and less pre-intervention AROM. In the experimental group and in both groups combined, subjects noting increased AROM indeed had a significantly greater increase in AROM than those subjects not noting improvement. In conclusion, this study did not confirm immediate effects of ID on cervical flexion AROM but did provide indications for potential subgroups likely to benefit from this technique. Recommendations are provided with regard to future research and clinical use of the technique studied. PMID:19066648

  3. Wide-range controllable n-doping of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) through thermal and optical activation.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung-Youl; Lim, Myung-Hoon; Jeon, Jeaho; Yoo, Gwangwe; Kang, Dong-Ho; Jang, Sung Kyu; Jeon, Min Hwan; Lee, Youngbin; Cho, Jeong Ho; Yeom, Geun Young; Jung, Woo-Shik; Lee, Jaeho; Park, Seongjun; Lee, Sungjoo; Park, Jin-Hong

    2015-03-24

    Despite growing interest in doping two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) for future layered semiconductor devices, controllability is currently limited to only heavy doping (degenerate regime). This causes 2D materials to act as metallic layers, and an ion implantation technique with precise doping controllability is not available for these materials (e.g., MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2, graphene). Since adjustment of the electrical and optical properties of 2D materials is possible within a light (nondegenerate) doping regime, a wide-range doping capability including nondegenerate and degenerate regimes is a critical aspect of the design and fabrication of 2D TMD-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we demonstrate a wide-range controllable n-doping method on a 2D TMD material (exfoliated trilayer and bulk MoS2) with the assistance of a phosphorus silicate glass (PSG) insulating layer, which has the broadest doping range among the results reported to date (between 3.6 × 10(10) and 8.3 × 10(12) cm(-2)) and is also applicable to other 2D semiconductors. This is achieved through (1) a three-step process consisting of, first, dopant out-diffusion between 700 and 900 °C, second, thermal activation at 500 °C, and, third, optical activation above 5 μW steps and (2) weight percentage adjustment of P atoms in PSG (2 and 5 wt %). We anticipate our widely controllable n-doping method to be a starting point for the successful integration of future layered semiconductor devices. PMID:25692499

  4. Optical engineering application of modeled photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for high-speed digital camera dynamic range optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, James; Gueymard, Christian A.

    2009-08-01

    As efforts to create accurate yet computationally efficient estimation models for clear-sky photosynthetically active solar radiation (PAR) have succeeded, the range of practical engineering applications where these models can be successfully applied has increased. This paper describes a novel application of the REST2 radiative model (developed by the second author) in optical engineering. The PAR predictions in this application are used to predict the possible range of instantaneous irradiances that could impinge on the image plane of a stationary video camera designed to image license plates on moving vehicles. The overall spectral response of the camera (including lens and optical filters) is similar to the 400-700 nm PAR range, thereby making PAR irradiance (rather than luminance) predictions most suitable for this application. The accuracy of the REST2 irradiance predictions for horizontal surfaces, coupled with another radiative model to obtain irradiances on vertical surfaces, and to standard optical image formation models, enable setting the dynamic range controls of the camera to ensure that the license plate images are legible (unsaturated with adequate contrast) regardless of the time of day, sky condition, or vehicle speed. A brief description of how these radiative models are utilized as part of the camera control algorithm is provided. Several comparisons of the irradiance predictions derived from the radiative model versus actual PAR measurements under varying sky conditions with three Licor sensors (one horizontal and two vertical) have been made and showed good agreement. Various camera-to-plate geometries and compass headings have been considered in these comparisons. Time-lapse sequences of license plate images taken with the camera under various sky conditions over a 30-day period are also analyzed. They demonstrate the success of the approach at creating legible plate images under highly variable lighting, which is the main goal of this

  5. Lithium and Isotopic Ratio Li6/Li7 in Magnetic roAp Stars as an Indicator of Active Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polosukhina, N.; Shavrina, A.; Lyashko, D.; Nesvacil, N.; Drake, N.; Smirnova, M.

    2015-04-01

    The lines of lithium at 6708 Å and 6103 Å are analyzed in high resolution spectra of some sharp-lined and slowly rotating roAp stars. Three spectral synthesis codes— STARSP, ZEEMAN2, and SYNTHM—were used. New lines of rare earth elements (REE) from the DREAM database and the lines calculated on the basis of the NIST energy levels were included. Magnetic splitting and other line broadening processes were taken into account. For both lithium lines, the enhanced abundances of lithium in the atmospheres of the stars studied are obtained. The lithium abundance determined from the Li 6103 Å line is higher than that from the Li 6708 Å for all the stars. This may be evidence of vertical lithium stratification, abnormal temperature distribution, or unidentified blending of the 6103 Å line. Our work on two roAp stars, HD 83368 and HD 60435 (Shavrina et al. 2001) provides evidence of an enhanced lithium abundance near the magnetic-field poles. We can expect similar effects in the sharp-lined roAp stars. High lithium abundance for all the stars and the estimates of the 6Li/7Li ratio (0.2-0.5) can be explained by production of Li in the cosmic ray spallation reactions in the interstellar medium where the stars were born, and by preservation of the original 6Li and 7Li by strong magnetic fields of these stars. The values of the 6Li/7Li ratio expected from production by cosmic rays are about 0.5-0.8 (Knauth et al. 2003; Webber et al. 2002). New laboratory and theoretical gf-values for REE lines are necessary in order to refine our estimates of lithium abundances and the isotopic ratio.

  6. Racing Ratios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Unit conversion need not be boring. If students see that the skill is necessary, both their motivation to learn and their appreciation of the process can be enhanced. As a result, students become actively engaged and construct understanding and computational skills that they will retain over time. The activity described here makes use of scale…

  7. The effect of whole-body vibration on jump height and active range of movement in female dancers.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Lucille C; Wyon, Matthew A

    2012-03-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been shown to have beneficial effects on strength and power indices in sedentary and moderately trained individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 4 weeks of WBV on jump height, active range of motion (AROM), and leg anthropometry in conservatoire dance students. Seventeen female dancers were randomly assigned to a control or intervention group. The intervention group trained for 30 seconds per position at a 35-Hz frequency, 8-mm displacement in the first 2 weeks, and 40 seconds at 40 Hz for the final 2 weeks, whereas the control group carried out the same exercises but without vibration stimulation. A significant (p < 0.01) difference in the intervention group was noted over time for vertical jump and active ROM. No significant changes over time were noted in the anthropometric data. In conclusion, WBV can be used as a beneficial supplemental training intervention to increase jump and active flexibility in highly trained dancers without corresponding increases in relative anthropometric data. PMID:22310513

  8. Versatile transformations of hydrocarbons in anaerobic bacteria: substrate ranges and regio- and stereo-chemistry of activation reactions†

    PubMed Central

    Jarling, René; Kühner, Simon; Basílio Janke, Eline; Gruner, Andrea; Drozdowska, Marta; Golding, Bernard T.; Rabus, Ralf; Wilkes, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons proceeds either via addition to fumarate or by hydroxylation in various microorganisms, e.g., sulfate-reducing or denitrifying bacteria, which are specialized in utilizing n-alkanes or alkylbenzenes as growth substrates. General pathways for carbon assimilation and energy gain have been elucidated for a limited number of possible substrates. In this work the metabolic activity of 11 bacterial strains during anaerobic growth with crude oil was investigated and compared with the metabolite patterns appearing during anaerobic growth with more than 40 different hydrocarbons supplied as binary mixtures. We show that the range of co-metabolically formed alkyl- and arylalkyl-succinates is much broader in n-alkane than in alkylbenzene utilizers. The structures and stereochemistry of these products are resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate that anaerobic hydroxylation of alkylbenzenes does not only occur in denitrifiers but also in sulfate reducers. We propose that these processes play a role in detoxification under conditions of solvent stress. The thermophilic sulfate-reducing strain TD3 is shown to produce n-alkylsuccinates, which are suggested not to derive from terminal activation of n-alkanes, but rather to represent intermediates of a metabolic pathway short-cutting fumarate regeneration by reverse action of succinate synthase. The outcomes of this study provide a basis for geochemically tracing such processes in natural habitats and contribute to an improved understanding of microbial activity in hydrocarbon-rich anoxic environments. PMID:26441848

  9. Bioinspired active whisker sensor for geometry detection of high aspect ratio microholes with simultaneous actuation and sensing capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a whisker transducer (WT)—inspired by a rat’s vibrissal tactile location perception—that can be used to detect the geometry of high aspect ratio microholes. The WT acts as both the actuator that generates whisking movement and the sensor that detects the mechanical impedance at its tip. This unique, simultaneous actuation-and-sensing capability is achieved through a 2 × 2 transduction matrix model that characterizes both the forward actuation and backward sensing functions of the transducer. The WT imitates a rat’s vibrissal location perception when driven by a special signal with a low-frequency component and a high-frequency component. The low-frequency component plays the role of the ‘whisking signal,’ encoding the whisker position over time, and the high-frequency component plays the role of the ‘touch signal,’ encoding the onset time of mechanical contact. The combination of these two signals allows the WT to detect the location of an object. The proposed transducer and location detection algorithm are validated using a miniature prototype fabricated through micro-EDM process. The achieved geometry measurement capability is of high linearity (R2 > 0.99) and low measurement uncertainty (200 nm). Its potential application in detecting the taper of high aspect ratio microholes is also demonstrated.

  10. The activity ratio of 228Th to 228Ra in bone tissue of recently deceased humans: a new dating method in forensic examinations.

    PubMed

    Zinka, Bettina; Kandlbinder, Robert; Schupfner, Robert; Haas, Gerald; Wolfbeis, Otto S; Graw, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Reliable determination of time since death in human skeletons or single bones often is limited by methodically difficulties. Determination of the specific activity ratio of natural radionuclides, in particular of 232Th (Thorium), 228Th and 228Ra (Radium) seems to be a new appropriate method to calculate the post mortem interval. These radionuclides are incorporated by any human being, mainly from food. So with an individual's death the uptake of radionuclides ends. But the decay of 232Th produces 228Ra and 228Th due to its decay series, whereas 228Th is continuously built up in the human's bones. Thus, it can be concluded that in all deceased humans at different times after death different activity ratios of 228Th to 228Ra will develop in bone. According to this fact it should be possible to calculate time since death of an individual by first analysing the specific activities of 228Th and 228Ra in bones of deceased and then determining the 228Th/228Ra activity ratio, which can be assigned to a certain post-mortem interval. PMID:22606910

  11. R-carrying genotypes of serum paraoxonase (PON1) 192 polymorphism and higher activity ratio are related to susceptibility against ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mahrooz, Abdolkarim; Gohari, Ghorban; Hashemi, Mohammad-Bagher; Zargari, Mehryar; Musavi, Hadis; Abedini, Mahmoud; Alizadeh, Ahad

    2012-12-01

    The polymorphic gene of serum paraoxonase (PON1) and its activity involved in atherosclerosis. The purpose of the study was to analyze PON1 192 Q/R polymorphism and the enzyme activities in ischemic stroke. The polymorphism as the most common polymorphism in PON1 gene coding sequence is associated with variation in the enzyme activity and vascular disease. The study included 85 stroke patients and 71 control subjects. PON1 192 polymorphism was genotyped using PCR protocol. Paraoxonase activity (Para) and arylesterase activity (Aryl) were determined spectrophotometrically using paraoxon and phenylacetate as the substrates. The QR and RR genotypes were more frequent in stroke population compared to controls, resulting in a higher frequency of the R allele in patients (0.24 vs 0.18, OR = 1.41). Patients had significantly higher Para/Aryl ratio than that of controls (P = 0.016). In stroke patients, Para/Aryl and Para/HDL ratios increased with this order: QQ < QR < RR. Hypertension significantly increased the risk of ischemic stroke by 15-fold among R-containing people, while this was significantly increased 4-fold for QQ homozygotes. Smoking increased the risk of having ischemic stroke in both QQ homozygote and QR + RR group (OR = 2.84 and OR = 2.33, respectively). In conclusion, these data highlight the importance of PON1 192 R allele and high Para/Aryl ratio in susceptibility to ischemic stroke in the population. The presence of the 192 R allele potentiates the risk of stroke especially in hypertensive people. Decreased Aryl and increased Para/Aryl, Para/HDL and Aryl/HDL ratios may be markers indicated the increased susceptibility to ischemic stroke in the population. PMID:23054002

  12. Effect of carbon to nitrogen ratio of feed wastewater and sludge retention time on activated sludge in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Hanife Sari; Onkal Engin, Guleda; Ince, Mahir; Bayramoglu, Mahmut R

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigated the effects of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on the activated sludge rheology in a submerged membrane bioreactor (sMBR) operated at different sludge retention time (SRT) values and different carbon to nitrogen ratios (C/N) of feed wastewater. The C/N ratios of the feed were adjusted accordingly so that synthetic wastewaters prepared simulated municipal wastewater, non-toxic wastewater with high C/N ratio and non-toxic wastewater with low C/N ratio. A number of important operational parameters such as mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS), protein fraction of EPS (EPSp), carbohydrate fraction of EPS (EPSc), protein fraction of soluble microbial product (SMPp), carbohydrate fraction of SMP (SMPc), apparent viscosity, critical flux and hydrophobicity in mixed liquor and their correlations were investigated in the sMBR systems operated. The statistical analysis indicated that the C/N ratio of feed, SRT, MLSS and SMPc were found to have positive effects on apparent viscosity at three different shear rates. On the other hand, a negative impact was detected between the apparent viscosities and the critical fluxes. It was also observed that there is a significant positive correlation between hydrophobicity and both EPSp and SMPp. PMID:26888531

  13. Drought-inhibited ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity is mediated through increased release of ethylene and changes in the ratio of polyamines in pakchoi.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingxue; Zhou, Guolin; Yang, Wengang; Wang, Aihua; Hu, Zhenhua; Lin, Chufa; Chen, Xin

    2014-09-15

    To study the mechanisms of drought inhibiting photosynthesis and the role of PAs and ethylene, the photosynthetic rate (Pn), the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), the intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), photorespiratory rate (Pr), the amount of chlorophyll (chl), antioxidant enzyme activity, ethylene levels, RuBPC (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase) activity and endogenous polyamine levels of pakchoi were examined, and an inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) and an inhibitor of ethylene synthesis and spermidine (Spd) were used to induce the change of endogenous polyamine levels. The results show that drought induced a decrease in Pn and RuBPC activity, an increase in the intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), but no change in the actual photochemical efficiency of PSII (ΦPSII), and chlorophyll content. In addition, drought caused an increase in the free putrescine (fPut), the ethylene levels, a decrease in the Spd and spermine (Spm) levels, and the PAs/fPut ratio in the leaves. The exogenous application of Spd and amino oxiacetic acid (AOAA, an inhibitor of ethylene synthesis) markedly reversed these drought-induced effects on polyamine, ethylene, Pn, the PAs/fPut ratio and RuBPCase activity in leaves. Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), an inhibitor of SAMDC resulting in the inability of activated cells to synthesize Spd and Spm, exacerbates the negative effects induced by drought. These results suggest that the decrease in Pn is at least partially attributed to the decrease of RuBPC activity under drought stress and that drought inhibits RuBPC activity by decreasing the ratio of PAs/fPut and increasing the release of ethylene. PMID:25046760

  14. Long-range movement of humpback whales and their overlap with anthropogenic activity in the South Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Howard C; Maxwell, Sara M; Kershaw, Francine; Mate, Bruce

    2014-04-01

    Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) are managed by the International Whaling Commission as 7 primary populations that breed in the tropics and migrate to 6 feeding areas around the Antarctic. There is little information on individual movements within breeding areas or migratory connections to feeding grounds. We sought to better understand humpback whale habitat use and movements at breeding areas off West Africa, and during the annual migration to Antarctic feeding areas. We also assessed potential overlap between whale habitat and anthropogenic activities. We used Argos satellite-monitored radio tags to collect data on 13 animals off Gabon, a primary humpback whale breeding area. We quantified habitat use for 3 cohorts of whales and used a state-space model to determine transitions in the movement behavior of individuals. We developed a spatial metric of overlap between whale habitat and models of cumulative human activities, including oil platforms, toxicants, and shipping. We detected strong heterogeneity in movement behavior over time that is consistent with previous genetic evidence of multiple populations in the region. Breeding areas for humpback whales in the eastern Atlantic were extensive and extended north of Gabon late in the breeding season. We also observed, for the first time, direct migration between West Africa and sub-Antarctic feeding areas. Potential overlap of whale habitat with human activities was the highest in exclusive economic zones close to shore, particularly in areas used by both individual whales and the hydrocarbon industry. Whales potentially overlapped with different activities during each stage of their migration, which makes it difficult to implement mitigation measures over their entire range. Our results and existing population-level data may inform delimitation of populations and actions to mitigate potential threats to whales as part of local, regional, and international management of highly migratory marine species

  15. Range of motion and leg rotation affect electromyography activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen M; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-09-01

    Leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed 8 LE REP at their 8 repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP × ROM interaction was detected (p < 0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 (p ≤ 0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p < 0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p < 0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO, the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM. PMID:25148303

  16. Range of motion and leg rotation affect EMG activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-06-30

    The leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed eight LE REP at their 8-repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP x ROM interaction was detected (p<0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 (p<0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p<0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p<0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM, and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM. PMID:24983846

  17. Analysis and Comparison of Raw and Weather-corrected July Mean Ozone, Satellite-derived Tropospheric NO2 and Ozone, and Indicator Ratios from Space for the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, P. J.; Tonnesen, G.

    2012-12-01

    In order to evaluate the efficacy of emissions control strategies for reduction of ground-level ozone concentrations, it is important to determine how ozone sensitivity to NOx and VOC varies in space and time across a region. The Denver Non-attainment Area for ozone has several monitoring sites that exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for eight-hour ozone concentrations. Aside from emissions, weather is a major factor that affects year-to-year variations in surface ozone. For Colorado's Front Range region, it has been found that much of the year-to-year variance in the surface ozone concentration data can be explained by the effects of upper-level high pressure strength. Local July mean 500-millibar heights account for more than fifty percent of the year-to-year variation in July mean daily maximum eight-hour ozone concentrations for most sites. We compare tropospheric column ozone data from the NASA OMI/MLS with patterns of 500-millibar heights across the Western U.S. and surface ozone data. This comparison highlights the role of the Four Corners high in years with increased accumulation of local or regional background ozone. We also compare trends in weather-corrected ozone with mean tropospheric NO2 from the OMI and GOME 2 retrievals and explore statistical relationships between ground-level and satellite measurements for the period from 2005 through 2012. These analyses provide clues about the responses of ground-level ozone to meteorology and climate and the significant real-world changes in tropospheric NO2 that occurred during the period. Finally, we analyze ratios of satellite-derived formaldehyde to NO2 and compare these with the results of process analyses of VOC and NOx sensitivity from photochemical modeling of a specific ozone episode in July 2006. Taken together, this work can serve as a weight-of-evidence analysis for State Implementation Plan ozone model attainment demonstrations and help to constrain estimates of ozone responses to

  18. Thuringiensin: A Thermostable Secondary Metabolite from Bacillus thuringiensis with Insecticidal Activity against a Wide Range of Insects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Li, Lin; Sun, Ming; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-01-01

    Thuringiensin (Thu), also known as β-exotoxin, is a thermostable secondary metabolite secreted by Bacillus thuringiensis. It has insecticidal activity against a wide range of insects, including species belonging to the orders Diptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera, and Isoptera, and several nematode species. The chemical formula of Thu is C22H32O19N5P, and it is composed of adenosine, glucose, phosphoric acid, and gluconic diacid. In contrast to the more frequently studied insecticidal crystal protein, Thu is not a protein but a small molecule oligosaccharide. In this review, a detailed and updated description of the characteristics, structure, insecticidal mechanism, separation and purification technology, and genetic determinants of Thu is provided. PMID:25068925

  19. Activation cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on niobium in the 30-50 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Activation cross-sections of deuterons induced reactions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of different applications and comparison with theoretical models. We present the experimental excitation functions of 93Nb(d,x)93m,90Mo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 89,88Zr and 88,87m,87gY in the energy range of 30-50 MeV. The results were compared with earlier measurements and with the cross-sections calculated by means of the theoretical model codes ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and TALYS (on-line TENDL-2014 and TENDL-2015 libraries). Possible applications of the radioisotopes are discussed in detail.

  20. Insight on watershed development along the actively uplifting Mount Lebanon range (Lebanon) from marine and fluvial terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepley, S.; Gomez, F.; Nader, F.

    2005-12-01

    Active uplift in the Mt. Lebanon range results from regional transpression along a ~200-km-long restraining bend within the Dead Sea fault system. Thus, the resultant landscape is characterized by the combined influences of tectonic, eustatic, and climatic controls. Marine terraces in northern Mt. Lebanon range provide significant constraints on regional uplift and, consequently, base level control on watershed development. Detailed geologic mapping reveals at least six coastal terrace levels between the cities of Tripoli and Batroun in northern Lebanon, ranging in elevation from 5 m to 113 m above sea level. The marine terraces are primarily abrasional platforms with little to no sediment cover. However, at certain locations, the terraces comprise of a thick (up to 20 m towards the coast) sedimentary cover that are the result of episodic periods of cut and fill into older Pliocene deposits. The majority of these sediments are well-rounded, cobble-size clasts of limestone cemented by a calcite matrix with occasional clasts of basalt and marine fossils. Travertine formations, fossil remnants, and limestone clasts are available to constrain ages on terrace formations and, in turn, coastal uplift rates. Correlation of terrace heights with Pleistocene sea level variations suggests an average, regional uplift rate of 0.3 m/ka. Fluvial terraces in the northern Mt. Lebanon allow reconstruction of longitudinal profiles that grade into base levels represented by the corresponding marine terraces. Hence, this correlation constrains the ages of fluvial terraces and consequently permits estimates of fluvial erosion. Temporal variations in fluvial transport capacity are suggested by episodic aggradation of massive boulder-size clasts of basalt and dolomite that originate over 20 km upstream. Furthermore, knickpoints in the present-day drainage also appear to correlate with the former base levels. Hence, the retreat of these knickpoints permits assessing the lag time in the

  1. Active incremental Support Vector Machine for oil and gas pipeline defects prediction system using long range ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Akram, Nik Ahmad; Isa, Dino; Rajkumar, Rajprasad; Lee, Lam Hong

    2014-08-01

    This work proposes a long range ultrasonic transducers technique in conjunction with an active incremental Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification approach that is used for real-time pipeline defects prediction and condition monitoring. Oil and gas pipeline defects are detected using various techniques. One of the most prevalent techniques is the use of "smart pigs" to travel along the pipeline and detect defects using various types of sensors such as magnetic sensors and eddy-current sensors. A critical short coming of "smart pigs" is the inability to monitor continuously and predict the onset of defects. The emergence of permanently installed long range ultrasonics transducers systems enable continuous monitoring to be achieved. The needs for and the challenges of the proposed technique are presented. The experimental results show that the proposed technique achieves comparable classification accuracy as when batch training is used, while the computational time is decreased, using 56 feature data points acquired from a lab-scale pipeline defect generating experimental rig. PMID:24792683

  2. A Comparative Analysis between Active and Passive Techniques for Underwater 3D Reconstruction of Close-Range Objects

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms. PMID:23966193

  3. A comparative analysis between active and passive techniques for underwater 3D reconstruction of close-range objects.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms. PMID:23966193

  4. A Tape Method for Fast Characterization and Identification of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients in the 2-18 THz Spectral Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissi, Eric Ofosu; Bawuah, Prince; Silfsten, Pertti; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2015-03-01

    In order to find counterfeit drugs quickly and reliably, we have developed `tape method' a transmission spectroscopic terahertz (THz) measurement technique and compared it with a standard attenuated total reflection (ATR) THz spectroscopic measurement. We used well-known training samples, which include commercial paracetamol and aspirin tablets to check the validity of these two measurement techniques. In this study, the spectral features of some active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), such as aspirin and paracetamol are characterized for identification purpose. This work covers a wide THz spectral range namely, 2-18 THz. This proposed simple but novel technique, the tape method, was used for characterizing API and identifying their presence in their dosage forms. By comparing the spectra of the APIs to their dosage forms (powder samples), all distinct fingerprints present in the APIs are also present in their respective dosage forms. The positions of the spectral features obtained with the ATR techniques were akin to that obtained from the tape method. The ATR and the tape method therefore, complement each other. The presence of distinct fingerprints in this spectral range has highlighted the possibility of developing fast THz sensors for the screening of pharmaceuticals. It is worth noting that, the ATR method is applicable to flat faced tablets whereas the tape method is suitable for powders in general (e.g. curved surface tablets that require milling before measurement). Finally, we have demonstrated that ATR techniques can be used to screen counterfeit antimalarial tablets.

  5. Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities.

    PubMed

    Drollette, Brian D; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Warner, Nathaniel R; Darrah, Thomas H; Karatum, Osman; O'Connor, Megan P; Nelson, Robert K; Fernandez, Loretta A; Reddy, Christopher M; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L

    2015-10-27

    Hundreds of organic chemicals are used during natural gas extraction via high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF). However, it is unclear whether these chemicals, injected into deep shale horizons, reach shallow groundwater aquifers and affect local water quality, either from those deep HVHF injection sites or from the surface or shallow subsurface. Here, we report detectable levels of organic compounds in shallow groundwater samples from private residential wells overlying the Marcellus Shale in northeastern Pennsylvania. Analyses of purgeable and extractable organic compounds from 64 groundwater samples revealed trace levels of volatile organic compounds, well below the Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant levels, and low levels of both gasoline range (0-8 ppb) and diesel range organic compounds (DRO; 0-157 ppb). A compound-specific analysis revealed the presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, which is a disclosed HVHF additive, that was notably absent in a representative geogenic water sample and field blanks. Pairing these analyses with (i) inorganic chemical fingerprinting of deep saline groundwater, (ii) characteristic noble gas isotopes, and (iii) spatial relationships between active shale gas extraction wells and wells with disclosed environmental health and safety violations, we differentiate between a chemical signature associated with naturally occurring saline groundwater and one associated with alternative anthropogenic routes from the surface (e.g., accidental spills or leaks). The data support a transport mechanism of DRO to groundwater via accidental release of fracturing fluid chemicals derived from the surface rather than subsurface flow of these fluids from the underlying shale formation. PMID:26460018

  6. Associations between Physical Activity and Obesity Defined by Waist-To-Height Ratio and Body Mass Index in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, On; Lee, Duck-chul; Lee, Sukho; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the associations between physical activity and the prevalence of obesity determined by waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and body mass index (BMI). Methods This is the first study to our knowledge on physical activity and obesity using a nationally representative sample of South Korean population from The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We categorized individuals into either non-obese or obese defined by WHtR and BMI. Levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were classified as ‘Inactive’, ‘Active’, and ‘Very active’ groups based on the World Health Organization physical activity guidelines. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the associations between physical activity and the prevalence of obesity. Results Physical activity was significantly associated with a lower prevalence of obesity using both WHtR and BMI. Compared to inactive men, odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) for obesity by WHtR ≥0.50 were 0.69 (0.53–0.89) in active men and 0.76 (0.63–0.91) in very active men (p for trend = 0.007). The ORs (95% CIs) for obesity by BMI ≥25 kg/m2 were 0.78 (0.59–1.03) in active men and 0.82 (0.67–0.99) in very active men (p for trend = 0.060). The ORs (95% CIs) for obesity by BMI ≥30 kg/m2 were 0.40 (0.15–0.98) in active men and 0.90 (0.52–1.56) in very active men (p for trend = 0.978). Compared to inactive women, the ORs (95% CIs) for obesity by WHtR ≥0.50 were 0.94 (0.75–1.18) in active women and 0.84 (0.71–0.998) in very active women (p for trend = 0.046). However, no significant associations were found between physical activity and obesity by BMI in women. Conclusions We found more significant associations between physical activity and obesity defined by WHtR than BMI. However, intervention studies are warranted to investigate and compare causal associations between physical activity and different obesity measures in various populations

  7. Direct method of three-dimensional imaging using the multiple-wavelength range-gated active imaging principle.

    PubMed

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2016-05-10

    The tomography executed with mono-wavelength active imaging systems uses the recording of several images to restore a three-dimensional (3D) scene. Thus, in order to show the depth in the scene, a different color is attributed to each recorded image. Therefore, the 3D restoration depends on the video frame rate of the camera. By using a multiple-wavelength range-gated active imaging system, it is possible to restore the 3D scene directly in a single image at the moment of recording with a video camera. Each emitted light pulse with a different wavelength corresponds to a visualized zone at a different distance in the scene. The camera shutter opens just once during the emission of light pulses with the different wavelengths. Thus, the restoration can be executed in real time with regard to the video frame rate of the camera. From an analytical model and from a graphical approach, we demonstrated the feasibility of this new method of 3D restoration. The non-overlapping conditions between two consecutive visualized zones are analyzed. The experimental test results confirm these different conditions and validate the theoretical principle to directly restore the 3D scene in a color image with a multiple-wavelength laser source, an RGB filter, and a triggerable intensified camera. PMID:27168293

  8. Measurement, Ratios, and Graphing: Safety First. A Lesson Guide with Activities in Mathematics, Science, and Technology. NASA CONNECT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    NASA CONNECT is an annual series of free integrated mathematics, science, and technology instructional distance learning programs for students in grades 5-8. Each program has three components: (1) a 30-minute television broadcast which can be viewed live or taped for later use; (2) an interactive Web activity that allows teachers to integrate…

  9. Amplifiers of Developmental and Negative Experiences in Organized Activities: Dosage, Motivation, Lead Roles, and Adult-Youth Ratios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David M.; Larson, Reed W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated four sets of factors hypothesized to amplify adolescents' developmental and negative experience in organized youth activities. A representative sample of 1,822 eleventh grade students from 19 high schools completed the computer-administered Youth Experience Survey. Findings indicated that amount of time, motivation, holding a…

  10. Extension in the Colorado Plateau/Basin and Range Transition Zone, Central Utah: An Active or Passive Process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasterok, D.; Wannamaker, P. E.; Chapman, D. S.; Doerner, W.

    2007-12-01

    The Colorado Plateau-Great Basin transition zone (TZ) in central Utah is a presently extending lithospheric block composed of previously stable Proterozoic lithosphere. TZ extension may be driven by high topography resulting from overthickening during the Laramide Orogeny and passive plate boundary forces similar to the Great Basin. However, high TZ topography coupled with a thinned lithosphere may indicate dynamic mantle upwelling and active processes acting within the TZ. To investigate the active vs. passive rifting hypotheses we have collected 56 new broadband and 9 long-period MT stations to merge two existing MT lines for a combined length of 400~km (124 sites) covering the eastern Great Basin into the Colorado Plateau at a latitude of ~38.5°N. We have also collected over 300 new heat production and thermal conductivity measurements across the southwest to develop a thermal model of the eastern Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau. MT data show a semi-contiguous highly conductive body in the lower crust of the eastern Great Basin that rises to a shallow depth of <20~km beneath the TZ. This conductive layer appears to be connected to the surface by a series of symmetric rift related normal faults mapped at the surface. These normal faults may be acting as pathways for large-scale fluid connection between the upper and lower crust. MT inversion results suggest an electrical anisotropy factor >3 in the upper mantle with an enhanced conductivity in a N-S orientation that is in agreement with observations of fast seismic SKS split direction. We propose that anisotropy observations may be due to small degrees of interconnected partial melt aligned with a N-S geologic strike beneath the Basin and Range. A thermal model, combining measured thermophysical properties with existing heat flow data, MT measurements, and estimates of seismogenic depth is used to predict lithospheric thickness and mantle temperature variations along the MT profile. Lithospheric thicknesses

  11. High Aspect Ratio Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Crosby, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Buckling-induced surface undulations are widely found in living creatures, for instance, gut villi and the surface of flower petal cells. These undulations provide unique functionalities with their extremely high aspect ratios. For the synthetic systems, sinusoidal wrinkles that are induced by buckling a thin film attached on a soft substrate have been proposed to many applications. However, the impact of the synthetic wrinkles have been restricted by limited aspect ratios, ranging from 0 to 0.35. Within this range, wrinkle aspect ratio is known to increase with increasing compressive strain until a critical strain is reached, at which point wrinkles transition to localizations, such as folds or period doublings. Inspired by the living creatures, we propose that wrinkles can be stabilized in high aspect ratio by manipulating the strain energy in the substrate. We experimentally demonstrate this idea by forming a secondary crosslinking network in the wrinkled surface and successfully achieve aspect ratio as large as 0.8. This work not only provides insights for the mechanism of high aspect ratio structures seen in living creatures, but also demonstrates significant promise for future wrinkle-based applications.

  12. The relationship of nitrogen and C/N ratio with secondary metabolites levels and antioxidant activities in three varieties of Malaysian kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Blume).

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2011-01-01

    Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Blume), one of the most famous and widely used herbs, especially in Southeast Asia, is found to have interesting bioactive compounds and displays health promoting properties. In this study, the antioxidant activities of the methanol extracts of leaves, stems and roots of three varieties of L. pumila (var. alata, pumila and lanceolata) were evaluated in an effort to compare and validate the medicinal potential of this indigenous Malaysian herb species. The antioxidant activity determined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, as well as the total amount of phenolics and flavonoids were the highest in the leaves, followed by the stems and roots in all the varieties. A similar trend was displayed by the ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) activity, suggesting that the L. pumila varieties possess high foliar antioxidant properties. At low FRAP activity concentrations, the values of the leaves' inhibition activity in the three varieties were significantly higher than those of the stems and roots, with var. alata exhibiting higher antioxidant activities and total contents of phenolics and flavonoids compared to the varieties pumila and lanceolata. The high production of secondary metabolites and antioxidant activities in var. alata were firmly related to low nitrogen content and high C/N ratio in plant parts. The study also demonstrated a positive correlation between secondary metabolite content and antioxidant activities, and revealed that the consumption of L. pumila could exert several beneficial effects by virtue of its antioxidant activity. PMID:21716173

  13. Deterrence and arrest ratios.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Stephanie E; Piquero, Alex R

    2006-02-01

    In the limited research on the origins of sanction threat perceptions, researchers have focused on either the effects of actively engaging in crime or the effects of formal sanctioning but rarely on both (i.e., the arrest ratio or the number of arrests relative to the number of crimes committed). This article extends this line of research by using a sample of Colorado inmates and measures arrest ratios and sanction perceptions for eight different crime types. Analyses reveal that the offenders report both significant experiential and arrest ratio effects. Theoretical and policy implications, limitations, and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:16397123

  14. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing. Part 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    This is Part 2-Appendices of a study conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities, and load reductions were achieved.

  15. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities and load reductions are achieved.

  16. Quantifying sediment sources in a lowland agricultural catchment pond using (137)Cs activities and radiogenic (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Marion; Evrard, Olivier; Foucher, Anthony; Laceby, J Patrick; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien; Thil, François; Dapoigny, Arnaud; Lefèvre, Irène; Cerdan, Olivier; Ayrault, Sophie

    2016-10-01

    Soil erosion often supplies high sediment loads to rivers, degrading water quality and contributing to the siltation of reservoirs and lowland river channels. These impacts are exacerbated in agricultural catchments where modifications in land management and agricultural practices were shown to accelerate sediment supply. In this study, sediment sources were identified with a novel tracing approach combining cesium ((137)Cs) and strontium isotopes ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) in the Louroux pond, at the outlet of a lowland cultivated catchment (24km(2), Loire River basin, France) representative of drained agricultural areas of Northwestern Europe. Surface soil (n=36) and subsurface channel bank (n=17) samples were collected to characterize potential sources. Deposited sediment (n=41) was sampled across the entire surface of the pond to examine spatial variation in sediment deposits. In addition, a 1.10m sediment core was sampled in the middle of the pond to reconstruct source variations throughout time. (137)Cs was used to discriminate between surface and subsurface sources, whereas (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios discriminated between lithological sources. A distribution modeling approach quantified the relative contribution of these sources to the sampled sediment. Results indicate that surface sources contributed to the majority of pond (μ 82%, σ 1%) and core (μ 88%, σ 2%) sediment with elevated subsurface contributions modeled near specific sites close to the banks of the Louroux pond. Contributions of the lithological sources were well mixed in surface sediment across the pond (i.e., carbonate sediment contribution, μ 48%, σ 1% and non-carbonate sediment contribution, μ 52%, σ 3%) although there were significant variations of these source contributions modeled for the sediment core between 1955 and 2013. These fluctuations reflect both the progressive implementation of land consolidation schemes in the catchment and the eutrophication of the pond. This original sediment

  17. Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities

    PubMed Central

    Drollette, Brian D.; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Karatum, Osman; O’Connor, Megan P.; Nelson, Robert K.; Fernandez, Loretta A.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L.

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of organic chemicals are used during natural gas extraction via high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF). However, it is unclear whether these chemicals, injected into deep shale horizons, reach shallow groundwater aquifers and affect local water quality, either from those deep HVHF injection sites or from the surface or shallow subsurface. Here, we report detectable levels of organic compounds in shallow groundwater samples from private residential wells overlying the Marcellus Shale in northeastern Pennsylvania. Analyses of purgeable and extractable organic compounds from 64 groundwater samples revealed trace levels of volatile organic compounds, well below the Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum contaminant levels, and low levels of both gasoline range (0–8 ppb) and diesel range organic compounds (DRO; 0–157 ppb). A compound-specific analysis revealed the presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, which is a disclosed HVHF additive, that was notably absent in a representative geogenic water sample and field blanks. Pairing these analyses with (i) inorganic chemical fingerprinting of deep saline groundwater, (ii) characteristic noble gas isotopes, and (iii) spatial relationships between active shale gas extraction wells and wells with disclosed environmental health and safety violations, we differentiate between a chemical signature associated with naturally occurring saline groundwater and one associated with alternative anthropogenic routes from the surface (e.g., accidental spills or leaks). The data support a transport mechanism of DRO to groundwater via accidental release of fracturing fluid chemicals derived from the surface rather than subsurface flow of these fluids from the underlying shale formation. PMID:26460018

  18. Semimetallic MoP2: an active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst over the whole pH range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Zonghua; Saana Amiinu, Ibrahim; Wang, Min; Yang, Yushi; Mu, Shichun

    2016-04-01

    Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm-2, the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices.Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm-2, the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00820h

  19. 135Cs activity and 135Cs/137Cs atom ratio in environmental samples before and after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guosheng; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    (135)Cs/(137)Cs is a potential tracer for radiocesium source identification. However, due to the challenge to measure (135)Cs, there were no (135)Cs data available for Japanese environmental samples before the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. It was only 3 years after the accident that limited (135)Cs values could be measured in heavily contaminated environmental samples. In the present study, activities of (134)Cs, (135)Cs, and (137)Cs, along with their ratios in 67 soil and plant samples heavily and lightly contaminated by the FDNPP accident were measured by combining γ spectrometry with ICP-MS/MS. The arithmetic means of the (134)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio (1.033 ± 0.006) and (135)Cs/(137)Cs atom ratio (0.334 ± 0.005) (decay corrected to March 11, 2011), from old leaves of plants collected immediately after the FDNPP accident, were confirmed to represent the FDNPP derived radiocesium signature. Subsequently, for the first time, trace (135)Cs amounts before the FDNPP accident were deduced according to the contribution of global and FDNPP accident-derived fallout. Apart from two soil samples with a tiny global fallout contribution, contributions of global fallout radiocesium in other soil samples were observed to be 0.338%-52.6%. The obtained (135)Cs/(137)Cs database will be useful for its application as a geochemical tracer in the future. PMID:27052481

  20. 135Cs activity and 135Cs/137Cs atom ratio in environmental samples before and after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guosheng; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    135Cs/137Cs is a potential tracer for radiocesium source identification. However, due to the challenge to measure 135Cs, there were no 135Cs data available for Japanese environmental samples before the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. It was only 3 years after the accident that limited 135Cs values could be measured in heavily contaminated environmental samples. In the present study, activities of 134Cs, 135Cs, and 137Cs, along with their ratios in 67 soil and plant samples heavily and lightly contaminated by the FDNPP accident were measured by combining γ spectrometry with ICP-MS/MS. The arithmetic means of the 134Cs/137Cs activity ratio (1.033 ± 0.006) and 135Cs/137Cs atom ratio (0.334 ± 0.005) (decay corrected to March 11, 2011), from old leaves of plants collected immediately after the FDNPP accident, were confirmed to represent the FDNPP derived radiocesium signature. Subsequently, for the first time, trace 135Cs amounts before the FDNPP accident were deduced according to the contribution of global and FDNPP accident-derived fallout. Apart from two soil samples with a tiny global fallout contribution, contributions of global fallout radiocesium in other soil samples were observed to be 0.338%–52.6%. The obtained 135Cs/137Cs database will be useful for its application as a geochemical tracer in the future. PMID:27052481

  1. 135Cs activity and 135Cs/137Cs atom ratio in environmental samples before and after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guosheng; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2016-04-01

    135Cs/137Cs is a potential tracer for radiocesium source identification. However, due to the challenge to measure 135Cs, there were no 135Cs data available for Japanese environmental samples before the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. It was only 3 years after the accident that limited 135Cs values could be measured in heavily contaminated environmental samples. In the present study, activities of 134Cs, 135Cs, and 137Cs, along with their ratios in 67 soil and plant samples heavily and lightly contaminated by the FDNPP accident were measured by combining γ spectrometry with ICP-MS/MS. The arithmetic means of the 134Cs/137Cs activity ratio (1.033 ± 0.006) and 135Cs/137Cs atom ratio (0.334 ± 0.005) (decay corrected to March 11, 2011), from old leaves of plants collected immediately after the FDNPP accident, were confirmed to represent the FDNPP derived radiocesium signature. Subsequently, for the first time, trace 135Cs amounts before the FDNPP accident were deduced according to the contribution of global and FDNPP accident-derived fallout. Apart from two soil samples with a tiny global fallout contribution, contributions of global fallout radiocesium in other soil samples were observed to be 0.338%–52.6%. The obtained 135Cs/137Cs database will be useful for its application as a geochemical tracer in the future.

  2. Methods for voltage-sensitive dye imaging of rat cortical activity with high signal-to-noise ratio

    PubMed Central

    Lippert, Michael; Takagaki, Kentaroh; Xu, Weifeng; Huang, Xiaoying; Wu, Jian-Young

    2010-01-01

    We describe methods to achieve high sensitivity in voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging from rat barrel and visual cortices in vivo with the use of a blue dye RH1691 and a high dynamic range imaging device (photodiode array). With an improved staining protocol and an off-line procedure to remove pulsation artifact, the sensitivity of VSD recording is comparable to that of local field potential recording from the same location. With this sensitivity, one can record from ~500 individual detectors, each covering an area of cortical tissue 160 μm in diameter (total imaging field ~4 mm in diameter) and a temporal resolution of 1,600 frames/s, without multiple-trial averaging. We can record 80 to 100 trials of intermittent 10 s trials from each imaging field before the VSD signal reduces to one half of its initial amplitude due to bleaching and wash-out. Taken together, the methods described in this report provide a useful tool for visualizing evoked and spontaneous waves from rodent cortex. PMID:17493915

  3. Perturbation of long-range water dynamics as the mechanism for the antifreeze activity of antifreeze glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Mallajosyula, Sairam S; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-10-01

    Very little is known about the mechanism of antifreeze action of antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) present in Antarctic teleost fish. Recent NMR and CD studies assisted with total synthesis of synthetic AFGP variants have provided insight into the structure of short AFGP glycopeptides, though the observations did not yield information on the antifreeze mechanism of action. In this study, we use Hamiltonian replica exchange (HREX) molecular dynamics simulations to probe the structure and surrounding aqueous environments of both the natural (AFGP8) and synthetic (s-AFGP4) AFGPs. AFGPs can adopt both amphiphilic and pseudoamphiphilic conformations, the preference of which is related to the proline content of the peptide. The arrangement of carbohydrates allows the hydroxyl groups on terminal galactose units to form stable water bridges which in turn influence the hydrogen-bond network, structure, and dynamics of the surrounding solvent. Interestingly, these local effects lead to the perturbation of the tetrahedral environment for water molecules in hydration layers far (10.0-12.0 Å) from the AFGPs. This structure-induced alteration of long-range hydration dynamics is proposed to be the major contributor to antifreeze activity, a conclusion that is in line with terahertz spectroscopy experiments. The detailed structure-mechanism correlation provided in this study could lead to the design of better synthetic AFGP variants. PMID:25137353

  4. The flexion–rotation test performed actively and passively: a comparison of range of motion in patients with cervicogenic headache

    PubMed Central

    Bravo Petersen, Shannon M.; Vardaxis, Vassilios G.

    2015-01-01

    Limitation in cervical spine range of motion (ROM) is one criterion for diagnosis of cervicogenic headaches (CHs). The flexion–rotation test, when performed passively (FRT-P), has been shown to be a useful test in diagnosis of CH. Few investigations have examined the flexion-rotation test when performed actively (FRT-A) by the individual, and no studies have examined the FRT-A in a symptomatic population. The purpose of this study was to compare ROM during the FRT-A and FRT-P in patients with CH and asymptomatic individuals and to compare ROM between sides for these two versions of the test. Twelve patients with CH and 10 asymptomatic participants were included in the study. An eight-camera Motion Analysis system was used to measure head motion relative to the trunk during the FRT-P and the FRT-A. Cervical rotation ROM was measured in a position of full cervical flexion for both tests. No significant difference was observed between right and left sides for cervical rotation ROM during the FRT-P nor the FRT-A when performed by asymptomatic participants. In patients with CH, a significant difference was observed between sides for the FRT-P (P = 0.014); however, the FRT-A failed to reveal bilateral descrepancy in rotation ROM. PMID:26109826

  5. Effects of the active release technique on pain and range of motion of patients with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Ho; Lee, Han Suk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the influences of the active release technique (ART) and joint mobilization (JM) on the visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, pressure pain threshold (PPT), and neck range of motion (ROM) of patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects] Twenty-four individuals with chronic neck pain were randomly and equally assigned to 3 groups: an ART group, a joint mobilization (JM) group, and a control group. Before and after the intervention, the degree of pain, PPT, and ROM of the neck were measured using a VAS, algometer, and goniometer, respectively. [Results] The ART group and JM group demonstrated significant changes in VAS and ROM between pre and post-intervention, while no significant change was observed in the control group. Significant differences in the PPT of all muscles were found in the ART group, while significant differences in all muscles other than the trapezius were found in the JM group. No significant difference in PPT was observed in any muscle of the control group. The posthoc test indicated no statistically significant difference between the ART and JM group, but the differences of variation in VAS, PPT, and ROM were greater in the ART group than in the JM and control groups. [Conclusion] ART for the treatment of chronic neck pain may be beneficial for neck pain and movement. PMID:26357426

  6. Contrasted enzymatic cocktails reveal the importance of cellulases and hemicellulases activity ratios for the hydrolysis of cellulose in presence of xylans.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Eve; Aubry, Nathalie; Ben Chaabane, Fadhel; Cohen, Céline; Tayeb, Jean; Rémond, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Various enzymatic cocktails were produced from two Trichoderma reesei strains, a cellulase hyperproducer strain and a strain with β-glucosidase activity overexpression. By using various carbon sources (lactose, glucose, xylose, hemicellulosic hydrolysate) for strains growth, contrasted enzymatic activities were obtained. The enzymatic cocktails presented various levels of efficiency for the hydrolysis of cellulose Avicel into glucose, in presence of xylans, or not. These latter were also hydrolyzed with different extents according to cocktails. The most efficient cocktails (TR1 and TR3) on Avicel were richer in filter paper activity (FPU) and presented a low ratio FPU/β-glucosidase activity. Cocktails TR2 and TR5 which were produced on the higher amount of hemicellulosic hydrolysate, possess both high xylanase and β-xylosidase activities, and were the most efficient for xylans hydrolysis. When hydrolysis of Avicel was conducted in presence of xylans, a decrease of glucose release occurred for all cocktails compared to hydrolysis of Avicel alone. Mixing TR1 and TR5 cocktails with two different ratios of proteins (1/1 and 1/4) resulted in a gain of efficiency for glucose release during hydrolysis of Avicel in presence of xylans compared to TR5 alone. Our results demonstrate the importance of combining hemicellulase and cellulase activities to improve the yields of glucose release from Avicel in presence of xylans. In this context, strategies involving enzymes production with carbon sources comprising mixed C5 and C6 sugars or combining different cocktails produced on C5 or on C6 sugars are of interest for processes developed in the context of lignocellulosic biorefinery. PMID:27001439

  7. The urinary MHPG/creatinine ratio and its relationship to platelet monoamine oxidase activity in abstinent alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Farren, C K; Tipton, K F

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the baseline noradrenergic turnover of subgroups of postwithdrawal abstinent alcoholics and healthy controls. The method chosen was an overnight fasting urine sample of the breakdown product of norepinephrine, MHPG, related to urinary creatinine. A comparison was made with platelet monoamine oxidase activity and also within subgroups of the study population. This study found no difference between alcoholics and controls, nor between subgroups of postwithdrawal alcoholics in their level of urinary MHPG corrected for creatinine, and no significant correlation with major subject characteristics or with platelet monoamine oxidase. There was a trend, however, towards a significant correlation with duration of abstinence from alcohol, and there was a correlation with a history of fighting when drinking alcohol, but not with sociopathic traits overall. Within the type 2 alcoholics there was a significant correlation with a history of fighting when drinking and a negative correlation with behavioral tolerance to alcohol. It is possible that only the subset of type 2 alcoholics with certain antisocial characteristics have noradrenergic abnormalities. Although no statistical difference was found between the different groups under study, the information is helpful in increasing understanding of the noradrenergic system in abstinent alcoholics. PMID:20575773

  8. Oxygen isotope ratios of PO4: An inorganic indicator of enzymatic activity and P metabolism and a new biomarker in the search for life

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Ruth E.; Alt, Jeffrey C.; Martini, Anna M.

    2001-01-01

    The distinctive relations between biological activity and isotopic effect recorded in biomarkers (e.g., carbon and sulfur isotope ratios) have allowed scientists to suggest that life originated on this planet nearly 3.8 billion years ago. The existence of life on other planets may be similarly identified by geochemical biomarkers, including the oxygen isotope ratio of phosphate (δ18Op) presented here. At low near-surface temperatures, the exchange of oxygen isotopes between phosphate and water requires enzymatic catalysis. Because enzymes are indicative of cellular activity, the demonstration of enzyme-catalyzed PO4–H2O exchange is indicative of the presence of life. Results of laboratory experiments are presented that clearly show that δ18OP values of inorganic phosphate can be used to detect enzymatic activity and microbial metabolism of phosphate. Applications of δ18Op as a biomarker are presented for two Earth environments relevant to the search for extraterrestrial life: a shallow groundwater reservoir and a marine hydrothermal vent system. With the development of in situ analytical techniques and future planned sample return strategies, δ18Op may provide an important biosignature of the presence of life in extraterrestrial systems such as that on Mars. PMID:11226207

  9. A low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048 with high activity over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Meng, Kun; Wang, Yaru; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Tu, Tao; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2012-11-01

    Alkaline pectate lyases are favorable for the textile industry. Here, we report the gene cloning and expression of a low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase (PL D) from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048. Deduced PL D consists of a putative 27-residue signal peptide and a catalytic domain of 320 residues belonging to family PF09492. Recombinant PL D (r-PL D) produced in Escherichia coli was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity with a single step of Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography and showed an apparent molecular weight of ~38 kDa. The pH and temperature optima of r-PL D were found to be 9.0 °C and 30 °C, respectively. Compared with its microbial counterparts, r-PL D had higher activity over a wide pH range (>45 % of the maximum activity at pH 3.0-12.0) and at lower temperatures (>35 % of activity even at 0 °C). The K(m) and V(max) values of r-PL D for polygalacturonic acid were 4.9 gl(-1) and 30.1 μmolmin(-1) mg(-1), respectively. Compared with the commercial compound pectinase from Novozymes, r-PL D showed similar efficacy in reducing the intrinsic viscosity of polygalacturonic acid (35.1 % vs. 36.5 %) and in bioscouring of jute (10.25 % vs. 10.82 %). Thus, r-PL D is a valuable additive candidate for the textile industry. PMID:22983714

  10. Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) Measurements of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios In Soil Extracts Supplied by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

    2005-02-28

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-239+240 ({sup 239+240}Pu) activities concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for a series of chemically purified soil extracts received from the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC) in New Mexico. Samples were analyzed without further purification at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This report also includes a brief description of the AMS system and internal laboratory procedures used to ensure the quality and reliability of the measurement data.

  11. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  12. S-wave velocity and Poisson's ratio model in Southern Chile along a transect at 38°15'S from active and passive TIPTEQ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Catalina; Mechie, James

    2015-04-01

    Using active and passive seismology data from project TIPTEQ (from The Incoming Plate to mega-Thrust EarthQuake processes) we derive a shear (S) wave velocity and a Poisson's ratio (σ) model across the Chilean convergent margin along 38°15'S, where the Mw 9.5 Valdivia earthquake is believed to have occurred. The obtained S-wave velocity model consists of three different tomographic images that were merged together. In the upper part (0 - 5 km depth), controlled source data from explosions were used to obtain a S-wave travel-time tomography. In the middle part (5 - 20 km depth) a dispersion analysis and then a noise tomography were carried out in two different ways: one used the dispersion curves to obtain a 3D S-wave velocity model in one step and the other used the dispersion curves to obtain surface-wave velocity tomographic images for different periods and then used the surface-wave velocity values every 10 km along the profile to obtain 1D S-wave velocity profiles every 10 km that were then interpolated to obtain a 2D S-wave tomography. Both methods produce similar S-wave travel-times. In the lower part (20 - 75 km depth, depending on the longitude) an already existent S-wave velocity model from local earthquake tomography was merged with the other two sections. The final S-wave velocity model and already existent compressional (P) wave velocity models along the same transect allowed us to obtain a Poisson's ratio model. The results show that the velocities and Poisson's ratios in this part of the Chilean convergent margin can all be explained in terms of normal rock types. There is no requirement to call on the existence of significant amounts of present-day fluids in the continental lithosphere above the plate interface in this part of the Chilean convergent margin, to explain the derived velocities and Poisson's ratios.

  13. The Biases of Optical Line-Ratio Selection for Active Galactic Nuclei and the Intrinsic Relationship between Black Hole Accretion and Galaxy Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Sun, Mouyuan; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Luck, Cuyler; Bridge, Joanna S.; Grier, Catherine J.; Hagen, Alex; Juneau, Stephanie; Montero-Dorta, Antonio; Rosario, David J.; Brandt, W. Niel; Ciardullo, Robin; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-09-01

    We use 317,000 emission-line galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate line-ratio selection of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In particular, we demonstrate that “star formation (SF) dilution” by H ii regions causes a significant bias against AGN selection in low-mass, blue, star-forming, disk-dominated galaxies. This bias is responsible for the observed preference of AGNs among high-mass, green, moderately star-forming, bulge-dominated hosts. We account for the bias and simulate the intrinsic population of emission-line AGNs using a physically motivated Eddington ratio distribution, intrinsic AGN narrow line region line ratios, a luminosity-dependent {L}{bol}/L[{{O}} {{III}}] bolometric correction, and the observed {M}{BH}-σ relation. These simulations indicate that, in massive ({log}({M}*/{M}⊙ )≳ 10) galaxies, AGN accretion is correlated with specific star formation rate (SFR) but is otherwise uniform with stellar mass. There is some hint of lower black hole occupation in low-mass ({log}({M}*/{M}⊙ )≲ 10) hosts, although our modeling is limited by uncertainties in measuring and interpreting the velocity dispersions of low-mass galaxies. The presence of SF dilution means that AGNs contribute little to the observed strong optical emission lines (e.g., [{{O}} {{III}}] and {{H}}α ) in low-mass and star-forming hosts. However the AGN population recovered by our modeling indicates that feedback by typical (low- to moderate-accretion) low-redshift AGNs has nearly uniform efficiency at all stellar masses, SFRs, and morphologies. Taken together, our characterization of the observational bias and resultant AGN occupation function suggest that AGNs are unlikely to be the dominant source of SF quenching in galaxies, but instead are fueled by the same gas which drives SF activity.

  14. The High-Latitude Knee of the O/N2 Ratio Profile: Latitudinal Variations with UT, Local Time, Season, and Magnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, J. D.; Christensen, A. B.; Meier, R. R.; Paxton, L. J.; Strickland, D. J.

    2005-12-01

    Repeated observations with DE-1, TIMED, and other spacecraft have established that transient decreases in the thermospheric O/N2 ratio at subauroral latitudes in the morning sector are associated in increased auroral and geomagnetic activity. These composition changes then directly affect F-region electron densities. An investigation with the GUVI instrument in the TIMED mission has attempting to demonstrate by direct observation a causal relation between these altered compositions with air movements from the early morning hours, but it has proved difficult due in part to the nature of the spacecraft orbit. Early attempts have been replaced by a more global effort to first analyze the O/N2 ratio and its variations with UT, local time, season, and magnetic activity. It is anticipated that better understanding of the influence of the first three parameters will provide a cleaner database with which to seek out the original objective. The current effort and results, which will be discussed in this paper, focus on the analysis of GUVI observations spanning the first several years of the TIMED mission. The initial emphasis is on the most clearly defined signature of most O/N2 latitudinal profiles in each orbit, the reasonably sharp transition, or knee, from the low-latitude, relatively constant values of O/N2 to the much lower values poleward of the knee. The motion of the knee to lower latitudes with increased magnetic activity is well established in a qualitative sense. The objective is a more quantitative analysis for which the magnetic-activity-driven variations are unencumbered at a fixed local time, for example, by UT and season.

  15. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) Deacetylase Activity and NAD⁺/NADH Ratio Are Imperative for Capsaicin-Mediated Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hui; Chen, Huei-Yu; Su, Lilly J; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2015-08-26

    Capsaicin is considered a chemopreventive agent by virtue of its selective antigrowth activity, commonly associated with apoptosis, against cancer cells. However, noncancerous cells possess relatively higher tolerance to capsaicin, although the underlying mechanism for this difference remains unclear. Hence, this study aimed to elucidate the differential effects of capsaicin on cell lines from lung tissues by addressing the signal pathway leading to two types of cell death. In MRC-5 human fetal lung cells, capsaicin augmented silent mating type information regulation 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity and the intracellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio, decreasing acetylation of p53 and inducing autophagy. In contrast, capsaicin decreased the intracellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio, possibly through inhibition of tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX), and diminished SIRT1 expression leading to enhanced p53 acetylation and apoptosis. Moreover, SIRT1 depletion by RNA interference attenuated capsaicin-induced apoptosis in A549 cancer cells and autophagy in MRC-5 cells, suggesting a vital role for SIRT1 in capsaicin-mediated cell death. Collectively, these data not only explain the differential cytotoxicity of capsaicin but shed light on the distinct cellular responses to capsaicin in cancerous and noncancerous cell lines. PMID:26255724

  16. Long-term tissue distribution and steady state activity ratios of 232Th and its daughters in rats after intravascular injection of Thorotrast.

    PubMed

    Norimura, T; Tsuchiya, T; Hatakeyama, S; Yamamoto, H; Okajima, S

    1989-09-01

    To estimate the absorbed dose in the critical organs of Thorotrast patients, it is necessary to know not only the distribution and concentration of 232Th but also its daughter nuclides in the body. The present investigation was undertaken in order to clarify the long-term 232Th tissue distribution and steady state activity ratios between subsequent daughters in the critical tissues using about 30 Wister male rats, as a basis for estimating absorbed doses. The tissue distribution of thorium was examined by means of an autoradiography of the whole body and/or the gamma-ray spectrometry at various times during 2 to 24 months following injection. The concentrations of daughter nuclides in tissues were determined by repetitive gamma examination over a period from 1 hr to 35 days after being sacrificed. The data indicate (1) that approximately 90% of injected Thorotrast is retained in the body for a prolonged period, but about 50% of radium and 10% of radon produced from thorium are eliminated from the body, (2) that the mean steady state activity ratios of 224Ra and 212Pb to 228Th for liver are 0.56 and 0.28, and 0.54 and 0.16 for spleen, 0.58 and 0.82 for lungs, respectively, and (3) that the parent 228Th is translocated to the bone. PMID:2554457

  17. Developing an Active Play Resource for a Range of Australian Early Childhood Settings: Formative Findings and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riethmuller, Annaleise; McKeen, Kim; Okely, Anthony D.; Bell, Colin; de Silva Sanigorski, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity habits are established in early childhood. Increasing a child's fundamental movement skill confidence and competence may result in a trajectory of increased physical activity and a lower risk of becoming overweight. The evidence upon which the promotion of physical activity in early childhood settings is based is tenuous. This…

  18. Using Ratio Analysis to Evaluate Financial Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, John; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The ways in which ratio analysis can help in long-range planning, budgeting, and asset management to strengthen financial performance and help avoid financial difficulties are explained. Types of ratios considered include balance sheet ratios, net operating ratios, and contribution and demand ratios. (MSE)

  19. Test-retest reliability of an active range of motion test for the shoulder and hip joints by unskilled examiners using a manual goniometer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Gil; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze test-retest reliability of an active range of motion test using a manual goniometer by unskilled examiners. [Subjects and Methods] Active range of motion was measured in 30 students attending U university (4 males, 26 females). Range of motion during flexion and extension of the shoulder and hip joints were measured using a manual goniometer. [Results] Flexion and extension of the shoulder joint (ICC=0.906 and ICC=0.808) and (ICC=0.946 and ICC=0. 955) of the hip joint showed excellent reliabilities. [Conclusion] The active range of motion test using a manual goniometer showed very high test-retest reliability in unskilled examiners. When examiners are aware of the method of the test, an objective assessment can be conducted. PMID:27134347

  20. Effects of Bacterial Microflora of the Lower Digestive Tract of Free-Range Waterfowl on Influenza Virus Activation

    PubMed Central

    King, Marcus D.; Guentzel, M. Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Bodour, Adria A.; Brahmakshatriya, Vinayak; Lupiani, Blanca; Chambers, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage activation of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA0) is required for cell entry via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Despite numerous studies describing bacterial protease-mediated influenza A viral activation in mammals, very little is known about the role of intestinal bacterial flora of birds in hemagglutinin cleavage/activation. Therefore, the cloaca of wild waterfowl was examined for (i) representative bacterial types and (ii) their ability to cleave in a “trypsin-like” manner the precursor viral hemagglutinin molecule (HA0). Using radiolabeled HA0, bacterial secretion-mediated trypsin-like conversion of HA0 to HA1 and HA2 peptide products was observed to various degrees in 42 of 44 bacterial isolates suggestive of influenza virus activation in the cloaca of wild waterfowl. However, treatment of uncleaved virus with all bacterial isolates gave rise to substantially reduced emergent virus progeny compared with what was expected. Examination of two isolates exhibiting pronounced trypsin-like conversion of HA0 to HA1 and HA2 peptide products and low infectivity revealed lipase activity to be present. Because influenza virus possesses a complex lipid envelope, the presence of lipid hydrolase activity could in part account for the observed less-than-expected level of viable progeny. A thorough characterization of respective isolate protease HA0 hydrolysis products as well as other resident activities (i.e., lipase) is ongoing such that the role of these respective contributors in virus activation/inactivation can be firmly established. PMID:21531837

  1. Effects of neurofeedback and computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation on relative brain wave ratios and activities of daily living of stroke patients: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hwi-Young; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jung, Jin-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of neurofeedback (NFB) and computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation (CACR) on the relative brain wave ratios and activities of daily living (ADL) of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-four participants were randomly allocated to the NFB (n=14), CACR (n=14), or control (CON) (n=16) groups. Two expert therapists provided the NFB, CACR, and CON groups with traditional rehabilitation therapy in 30-minute sessions, 5 times a week, for 6 weeks. NFB training was provided only to the NFB group and CACR training was provided only to the CACR group. The CON group received traditional rehabilitation therapy only. Before and after 6 weeks of intervention, brain wave and ADL evaluations were performed, and the results were analyzed. [Results] The relative ratio of beta waves, only showed a significant increase in the frontal and parietal areas of the NFB group. Significant changes in ADL were shown by all three groups after the intervention. However, there were no significant differences between the NFB and CACR groups and the CON group. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that CACR and NFB are effective at improving cognitive function and ADL of stroke patients. PMID:27512287

  2. Effects of neurofeedback and computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation on relative brain wave ratios and activities of daily living of stroke patients: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hwi-Young; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jung, Jin-Hwa

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of neurofeedback (NFB) and computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation (CACR) on the relative brain wave ratios and activities of daily living (ADL) of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-four participants were randomly allocated to the NFB (n=14), CACR (n=14), or control (CON) (n=16) groups. Two expert therapists provided the NFB, CACR, and CON groups with traditional rehabilitation therapy in 30-minute sessions, 5 times a week, for 6 weeks. NFB training was provided only to the NFB group and CACR training was provided only to the CACR group. The CON group received traditional rehabilitation therapy only. Before and after 6 weeks of intervention, brain wave and ADL evaluations were performed, and the results were analyzed. [Results] The relative ratio of beta waves, only showed a significant increase in the frontal and parietal areas of the NFB group. Significant changes in ADL were shown by all three groups after the intervention. However, there were no significant differences between the NFB and CACR groups and the CON group. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that CACR and NFB are effective at improving cognitive function and ADL of stroke patients. PMID:27512287

  3. Isoliquiritigenin Inhibits Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell-induced Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin Ratio in Human Osteoblastic Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Kim, Ki Rim; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2015-12-01

    Bone destruction induced by the metastasis of breast cancer cells is a frequent complication that is caused by the interaction between cancer cells and bone cells. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and the endogenous soluble RANKL inhibitor, osteoprotegerin (OPG), directly play critical roles in the differentiation, activity, and survival of osteoclasts. In patients with bone metastases, osteoclastic bone resorption promotes the majority of skeletal-related events and propagates bone metastases. Therefore, blocking osteoclast activity and differentiation via RANKL inhibition can be a promising therapeutic approach for cancer-associated bone diseases. We investigated the potential of isoliquiritigenin (ISL), which has anti-proliferative, anti-angiogenic, and anti-invasive effects, as a preventive and therapeutic agent for breast cancer cell-induced bone destruction. ISL at non-toxicity concentrations significantly inhibited the RANKL/OPG ratio by reducing the production of RANKL and restoring OPG production to control levels in hFOB1.19 cells stimulated with conditioned medium (CM) of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, ISL reduced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in hFOB1.19 cells stimulated by CM of MDA-MB-231 cells. Therefore, ISL may have inhibitory potential on breast cancer-induced bone destruction. PMID:26734591

  4. Isoliquiritigenin Inhibits Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell-induced Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin Ratio in Human Osteoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Kim, Ki Rim; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Bone destruction induced by the metastasis of breast cancer cells is a frequent complication that is caused by the interaction between cancer cells and bone cells. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and the endogenous soluble RANKL inhibitor, osteoprotegerin (OPG), directly play critical roles in the differentiation, activity, and survival of osteoclasts. In patients with bone metastases, osteoclastic bone resorption promotes the majority of skeletal-related events and propagates bone metastases. Therefore, blocking osteoclast activity and differentiation via RANKL inhibition can be a promising therapeutic approach for cancer-associated bone diseases. We investigated the potential of isoliquiritigenin (ISL), which has anti-proliferative, anti-angiogenic, and anti-invasive effects, as a preventive and therapeutic agent for breast cancer cell-induced bone destruction. ISL at non-toxicity concentrations significantly inhibited the RANKL/OPG ratio by reducing the production of RANKL and restoring OPG production to control levels in hFOB1.19 cells stimulated with conditioned medium (CM) of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, ISL reduced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in hFOB1.19 cells stimulated by CM of MDA-MB-231 cells. Therefore, ISL may have inhibitory potential on breast cancer-induced bone destruction. PMID:26734591

  5. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators. PMID:27016583

  6. Phenotypic plasticity of post-fire activity and thermal biology of a free-ranging small mammal.

    PubMed

    Stawski, Clare; Körtner, Gerhard; Nowack, Julia; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-05-15

    Ecosystems can change rapidly and sometimes irreversibly due to a number of anthropogenic and natural factors, such as deforestation and fire. How individual animals exposed to such changes respond behaviourally and physiologically is poorly understood. We quantified the phenotypic plasticity of activity patterns and torpor use - a highly efficient energy conservation mechanism - in brown antechinus (Antechinus stuartii), a small Australian marsupial mammal. We compared groups in densely vegetated forest areas (pre-fire and control) with a group in a burned, open habitat (post-fire). Activity and torpor patterns differed among groups and sexes. Females in the post-fire group spent significantly less time active than the other groups, both during the day and night. However, in males only daytime activity declined in the post-fire group, although overall activity was also reduced on cold days in males for all groups. The reduction in total or diurnal activity in the post-fire group was made energetically possible by a ~3.4-fold and ~2.2-fold increase in the proportion of time females and males, respectively, used torpor in comparison to that in the pre-fire and control groups. Overall, likely due to reproductive needs, torpor was more pronounced in females than in males, but low ambient temperatures increased torpor bout duration in both sexes. Importantly, for both male and female antechinus and likely other small mammals, predator avoidance and energy conservation - achieved by reduced activity and increased torpor use - appear to be vital for post-fire survival where ground cover and refuges have been obliterated. PMID:27001165

  7. Nampt/PBEF/visfatin exerts neuroprotective effects against ischemia/reperfusion injury via modulation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and prevention of caspase-3 activation.

    PubMed

    Erfani, Sohaila; Khaksari, Mehdi; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Shamsaei, Nabi; Aboutaleb, Nahid; Nikbakht, Farnaz

    2015-05-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase/pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor/visfatin (Nampt/PBEF/visfatin) is an adipocytokine. By synthesizing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), Nampt/PBEF/visfatin functions to maintain an energy supply that has critical roles in cell survival. Cerebral ischemia leads to energy depletion and eventually neuronal death by apoptosis in specific brain regions specially the hippocampus. However, the role of Nampt/PBEF/visfatin in brain and cerebral ischemia remains to be investigated. This study investigated the role of administration Nampt/PBEF/visfatin in hippocampal CA3 area using a transient global cerebral ischemia model. Both common carotid arteries were occluded for 20 min followed by reperfusion. Saline as a vehicle and Nampt/PBEF/visfatin at a dose of 100 ng were injected intracerebroventricularly (ICV) at the time of cerebral reperfusion. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of Nampt/PBEF/visfatin neuroprotection, levels of expression of apoptosis-related proteins (caspase-3 activation, Bax protein levels, and Bcl-2 protein levels) 96 h after ischemia were determined by immunohistochemical staining. The number of active caspase-3-positive neurons in CA3 was significantly increased in the ischemia group, compared with the sham group (P < 0.001), and treatment with Nampt/PBEF/visfatin significantly reduced the ischemia/reperfusion-induced caspase-3 activation, compared to the ischemia group (P < 0.05). Also, results indicated a significant increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the ischemia group, compared with the sham group (P < 0.01). However, treatment with Nampt/PBEF/visfatin significantly attenuated the ischemia/reperfusion-induced increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, compared with the ischemia group (P < 0.05). This study has indicated that Nampt/PBEF/visfatin entails neuroprotective effects against ischemia injury when used at the time of cerebral reperfusion. These neuroprotective mechanisms of Nampt

  8. Effect of solvent type and ratio on betacyanins and antioxidant activity of extracts from Hylocereus polyrhizus flesh and peel by supercritical fluid extraction and solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Fathordoobady, Farahnaz; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Selamat, Jinap; Manap, Mohd Yazid Abd

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of solvent type and ratio as well as the extraction techniques (i.e. supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and conventional solvent extraction) on betacyanins and antioxidant activity of the peel and fresh extract from the red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus). The peel and flesh extracts obtained by SFE at 25MPa pressure and 10% EtOH/water (v/v) mixture as a co-solvent contained 24.58 and 91.27mg/100ml total betacyanin, respectively; while the most desirable solvent extraction process resulted in a relatively higher total betacyanin in the peel and flesh extracts (28.44 and 120.28mg/100ml, respectively). The major betacyanins identified in the pitaya peel and flesh extracts were betanin, isobetanin, phyllocactin, butyrylbetanin, isophyllocactin and iso-butyrylbetanin. The flesh extract had the stronger antioxidant activity than the peel extract when the higher proportion of ethanol to water (E/W) was applied for the extraction. PMID:26920267

  9. The AKARI 2.5-5.0 μm Spectral Atlas of Type-1 Active Galactic Nuclei: Black Hole Mass Estimator, Line Ratio, and Hot Dust Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohyeong; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Ji Hoon; Jun, Hyunsung David; Woo, Jong-Hak; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Oyabu, Shinki; Takagi, Toshinobu; Ohyama, Youichi; Lee, Seong-Kook

    2015-01-01

    We present 2.5-5.0 μm spectra of 83 nearby (0.002 < z < 0.48) and bright (K < 14 mag) type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. The 2.5-5.0 μm spectral region contains emission lines such as Brβ (2.63 μm), Brα (4.05 μm), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (3.3 μm), which can be used for studying the black hole (BH) masses and star formation activity in the host galaxies of AGNs. The spectral region also suffers less dust extinction than in the ultra violet (UV) or optical wavelengths, which may provide an unobscured view of dusty AGNs. Our sample is selected from bright quasar surveys of Palomar-Green and SNUQSO, and AGNs with reverberation-mapped BH masses from Peterson et al. Using 11 AGNs with reliable detection of Brackett lines, we derive the Brackett-line-based BH mass estimators. We also find that the observed Brackett line ratios can be explained with the commonly adopted physical conditions of the broad line region. Moreover, we fit the hot and warm dust components of the dust torus by adding photometric data of SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, and ISO to the AKARI spectra, finding hot and warm dust temperatures of ~1100 K and ~220 K, respectively, rather than the commonly cited hot dust temperature of 1500 K.

  10. Protection of Hippocampal CA1 Neurons Against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury by Exercise Preconditioning via Modulation of Bax/Bcl-2 Ratio and Prevention of Caspase-3 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Aboutaleb, Nahid; Shamsaei, Nabi; Rajabi, Hamid; Khaksari, Mehdi; Erfani, Sohaila; Nikbakht, Farnaz; Motamedi, Pezhman; Shahbazi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ischemia leads to loss of neurons by apoptosis in specific brain regions, especially in the hippocampus. The purpose of this study was investigating the effects of exercise preconditioning on expression of Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 proteins in hippocampal CA1 neurons after induction of cerebral ischemia. Methods: Male rats weighing 260–300 g were randomly allocated into three groups (sham, exercise, and ischemia). The rats in exercise group were trained to run on a treadmill 5 days a week for 4 weeks. Ischemia was induced by the occlusion of both common carotid arteries (CCAs) for 20 min. Levels of expression of Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 proteins in CA1 area of hippocampus were determined by immunohistochemical staining . Results: The number of active caspase-3-positive neurons in CA1 area were significantly increased in ischemia group, compared to sham-operated group (P<0.001), and exercise preconditioning significantly reduced the ischemia/reperfusion-induced caspase-3 activation, compared to the ischemia group (P<0.05). Also, results indicated a significant increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in ischemia group, compared to sham-operated group (P<0.001). Discussion: This study indicated that exercise has a neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia when used as preconditioning stimuli. PMID:27303596

  11. Diurnal activity of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and beef cattle (Bos taurus) grazing a northeastern Oregon summer range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and beef cattle (Bos taurus) exist in a complex social environment that is marked by diurnal activities such as periods of foraging, ruminating, resting, and sheltering. Elk unlike cattle, must be continually alert to potential predators. We hypothesize that elk...

  12. Planarization of amorphous silicon thin film transistors for high-aperture-ratio and large-area active-matrix liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Je-Hsiung

    The reduction of the backlight power consumption and the improvement of the display image uniformity for future large-area and high-resolution active-matrix liquid- crystal displays (AM-LCDs) are very important. One possible method to achieve the former goal is to increase the pixel electrode aperture-ratio. This can be realized by overlapping the pixel electrode with both gate/data buslines. While for the latter, reduction of the RC-delay by using a low resistance gate metal line is the key. Both of these approaches can be realized by using planarization technology. In this dissertation, the planarization technology based on low dielectric constant organic polymer, benzocyclobutene (BCB), is demonstrated, and this technology has been successfully applied to hydrogenated amorphous-silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays and thick metal gate buslines/electrodes. Through the planarization technology, a high-aperture-ratio (HAR) pixel electrode structure has been fabricated. The parasitic capacitance and crosstalk issues in the HAR pixel electrode have been studied through interconnect analysis and circuit simulation. The impact of the parasitic capacitance on display performances, such as feedthrough voltage, vertical crosstalk, pixel electrode aperture-ratio, pixel charging behavior, and gate busline RC-delay issues, has been thoroughly discussed. Some key issues during the process integration of the HAR pixel electrode structure have been addressed. These include the BCB contact via formation, the patterning of the ITO pixel electrodes on BCB layer, the selection of Ar plasma treatment conditions for BCB surface, and the optical transmittance evaluation of the ITO/BCB double-layer structure. In addition, the BCB passivation effects on back-channel etched type a-Si:H TFTs have been investigated. It is found that there is no degradation in the TFT electrical performance and reliability after the BCB passivation. Finally, the planarization technology is

  13. Highly Active Au/δ-MoC and Cu/δ-MoC Catalysts for the Conversion of CO2: The Metal/C Ratio as a Key Factor Defining Activity, Selectivity, and Stability.

    PubMed

    Posada-Pérez, Sergio; Ramírez, Pedro J; Evans, Jaime; Viñes, Francesc; Liu, Ping; Illas, Francesc; Rodriguez, José A

    2016-07-01

    The ever growing increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere is one of the main causes of global warming. Thus, CO2 activation and conversion toward valuable added compounds is a major scientific challenge. A new set of Au/δ-MoC and Cu/δ-MoC catalysts exhibits high activity, selectivity, and stability for the reduction of CO2 to CO with some subsequent selective hydrogenation toward methanol. Sophisticated experiments under controlled conditions and calculations based on density functional theory have been used to study the unique behavior of these systems. A detailed comparison of the behavior of Au/β-Mo2C and Au/δ-MoC catalysts provides evidence of the impact of the metal/carbon ratio in the carbide on the performance of the catalysts. The present results show that this ratio governs the chemical behavior of the carbide and the properties of the admetal, up to the point of being able to switch the rate and mechanism of the process for CO2 conversion. A control of the metal/carbon ratio paves the road for an efficient reutilization of this environmental harmful greenhouse gas. PMID:27308923

  14. A Review of Solar-Powered Aircraft Flight Activity at the Pacific Missile Range Test Facility, Kauai, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehernberger, L. J.; Donohue, Casey; Teets, Edward H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    A series of solar-powered aircraft have been designed and operated by AeroVironment, Inc. (Monrovia, CA) as a part of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) objectives to develop energy-efficient high-altitude long-endurance platforms for earth observations and communications applications. Flight operations have been conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards CA and at the U.S. Navy Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) at Barking Sands, Kauai, HI. These aircraft flown at PMRF are named Pathfinder , Pathfinder Plus and Helios . Sizes of these three aircraft range from 560 lb with a 99-ft wingspan to 2300 lb with a 247-ft wingspan. Available payload capacity reaches approximately 200 lb. Pathfinder uses six engines and propellers: Pathfinder Plus 8; and Helios 14. The 2003 Helios fuel cell configurations used 10 engines and propellers. The PMRF was selected as a base of operations because if offers optimal summertime solar exposure, low prevailing wind-speeds on the runway, modest upper-air wind-speeds and the availability of suitable airspace. Between 1997 and 2001, successive altitude records of 71,530 ft, 80,200 ft, and 96,863 ft were established. Flight durations extended to 18 hours.

  15. Cellular interpretation of the long-range gradient of Four-jointed activity in the Drosophila wing

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Rosalind; Brittle, Amy L; Fisher, Katherine H; Monk, Nicholas A M; Strutt, David

    2015-01-01

    To understand how long-range patterning gradients are interpreted at the cellular level, we investigate how a gradient of expression of the Four-jointed kinase specifies planar polarised distributions of the cadherins Fat and Dachsous in the Drosophila wing. We use computational modelling to test different scenarios for how Four-jointed might act and test the model predictions by employing fluorescence recovery after photobleaching as an in vivo assay to measure the influence of Four-jointed on Fat-Dachsous binding. We demonstrate that in vivo, Four-jointed acts both on Fat to promote its binding to Dachsous and on Dachsous to inhibit its binding to Fat, with a bias towards a stronger effect on Fat. Overall, we show that opposing gradients of Fat and Dachsous phosphorylation are sufficient to explain the observed pattern of Fat–Dachsous binding and planar polarisation across the wing, and thus demonstrate the mechanism by which a long-range gradient is interpreted. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05789.001 PMID:25707557

  16. Oscillatory brain activity in the alpha range is modulated by the content of word-prompted mental imagery

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Felix; Hamuni, Gilava; Miskovic, Vladimir; Lang, Peter J.; Keil, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Mental imagery is a fundamental cognitive process of interest to basic scientists and clinical researchers. This study examined large-scale oscillatory brain activity in the alpha band (8–12 Hz) during language-driven mental imagery using dense-array EEG. Three experiments demonstrated relative increases in alpha amplitude (1) during imagery prompted by words compared to fixation without imagery instruction, (2) during imagery of word content compared to imagery of geometric shapes, and (3) during imagery of emotionally evocative words compared to imagery of less emotionally arousing content. Alpha increases for semantically loaded imagery were observed in parieto-occipital regions, sustained throughout the imagery period. Findings imply that alpha oscillations index active memory and internal cognitive processing, reflecting neural communication in cortical networks representing motor, semantic, and perceptual aspects of the imagined scene. PMID:25616004

  17. Automated Resource Sharing in Massachusetts: Activities, Functions and Policies Supporting the Long Range Program. Approved by the Board of Library Commissioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners, Boston.

    A revised and updated version of a 1983 automation plan, this report describes the long range program for resource sharing activities by the library network in Massachusetts, a program which is funded in part by the Library Services and Construction Act. The basis of the network--the development, continuation, and linking of machine-readable…

  18. Influence of gating and of the gate shape on the penetration capacity of range-gated active imaging in scattering environments.

    PubMed

    Christnacher, Frank; Schertzer, Stéphane; Metzger, Nicolas; Bacher, Emmanuel; Laurenzis, Martin; Habermacher, René

    2015-12-28

    Range-gated active imaging is a well-known technique used for night vision or for vision enhancement in scattering environments. A lot of papers have been published, in which the performance enhancement of range gating has been demonstrated. However, there are no studies which systematically investigate and quantify the real gain brought by range gating, in comparison with a classical imaging system, in controlled smoke densities. In this paper, a systematic investigation of the performance enhancement of range-gated viewing is presented in comparison with a color camera representing the human vision. The influence of range gating and of the gate shape is studied. We have been able to demonstrate that a short-wave infrared (SWIR) range-gated active imaging system can enhance by a factor of 6.9 the penetration depth in dense smoke. On the other hand, we have shown that the combination of a short pulse with a short integration time gives better contrasted images in dense scattering media. PMID:26831957

  19. At Odds: Concerns Raised by Using Odds Ratios for Continuous or Common Dichotomous Outcomes in Research on Physical Activity and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lovasi, Gina S.; Underhill, Lindsay J.; Jack, Darby; Richards, Catherine; Weiss, Christopher; Rundle, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Research on obesity and the built environment has often featured logistic regression and the corresponding parameter, the odds ratio. Use of odds ratios for common outcomes such obesity may unnecessarily hinder the validity, interpretation, and communication of research findings. Methods We identified three key issues raised by the use of odds ratios, illustrating them with data on walkability and body mass index from a study of 13,102 New York City residents. Results First, dichotomization of continuous measures such as body mass index discards theoretically relevant information, reduces statistical power, and amplifies measurement error. Second, odds ratios are systematically higher (further from the null) than prevalence ratios; this inflation is trivial for rare outcomes, but substantial for common outcomes like obesity. Third, odds ratios can lead to incorrect conclusions during tests of interactions. The odds ratio in a particular subgroup might higher simply because the outcome is more common (and the odds ratio inflated) compared with other subgroups. Conclusion Our recommendations are to take full advantage of continuous outcome data when feasible and to use prevalence ratios in place of odds ratios for common dichotomous outcomes. When odds ratios must be used, authors should document outcome prevalence across exposure groups. PMID:23002407

  20. Isotopic Ratio, Isotonic Ratio, Isobaric Ratio and Shannon Information Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2014-11-01

    The isoscaling and the isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) probes, both of which are constructed by yield ratio of fragment, provide cancelation of parameters. The information entropy theory is introduced to explain the physical meaning of the isoscaling and IBD probes. The similarity between the isoscaling and IBD results is found, i.e., the information uncertainty determined by the IBD method equals to β - α determined by the isoscaling (α (β) is the parameter fitted from the isotopic (isotonic) yield ratio).

  1. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, J Matthew; Titiz, Ali S; Hernan, Amanda E; Scott, Rod C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation. PMID:26866597

  2. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, J. Matthew; Titiz, Ali S.; Hernan, Amanda E.; Scott, Rod C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation. PMID:26866597

  3. A geochemical sampling technique for use in areas of active alpine glaciation: an application from the central Alaska Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, G.C.; Evenson, E.B.; Detra, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    In mountainous regions containing extensive glacier systems there is a lack of suitable material for conventional geochemical sampling. As a result, in most geochemical sampling programs a few stream-sediment samples collected at, or near, the terminus of valley glaciers are used to evaluate the mineral potential of the glaciated area. We have developed and tested a technique which utilizes the medial moraines of valley glaciers for systematic geochemical exploration of the glacial catchment area. Moraine sampling provides geochemical information that is site-specific in that geochemical anomalies can be traced directly up-ice to bedrock sources. Traverses were made across the Trident and Susitna glaciers in the central Alaska Range where fine-grained (clay to sand size) samples were collected from each medial moraine. These samples were prepared and chemically analyzed to determine the concentration of specific elements. Fifty pebbles were collected at each moraine for archival purposes and for subsequent lithologic identification. Additionally, fifty cobbles and fifty boulders were examined and described at each sample site to determine the nature and abundance of lithologies present in the catchment area, the extent and nature of visible mineralization, the presence and intensity of hydrothermal alteration and the existence of veins, dikes and other minor structural features. Results from the central Alaska Range have delineated four distinct multi-element anomalies which are a response to potential mineralization up-ice from the medial moraine traverse. By integrating the lithologic, mineralogical and geochemical data the probable geological setting of the geochemical anomalies is determined. ?? 1990.

  4. Torpor and activity in a free-ranging tropical bat: implications for the distribution and conservation of mammals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiser, Fritz; Stawski, Clare; Bondarenco, Artiom; Pavey, Chris R.

    2011-05-01

    Bats are most diverse in the tropics, but there are no quantitative data on torpor use for energy conservation by any tropical bat in the wild. We examined the thermal biology, activity patterns and torpor use of two tree-roosting long-eared bats ( Nyctophilus geoffroyi, 7.8 g) in tropical northern Australia in winter using temperature telemetry. Bats commenced activity about 20 min after sunset, ended activity about 2.5 h before sunrise and entered torpor everyday in the early morning even when minimum ambient temperatures ( T a) were as high as 23°C. On average, bats remained torpid for almost 5 h, mean minimum skin temperature ( T skin) measured was 22.8 ± 0.1°C and daily T skin minima were correlated with T a. Our study shows that even in the tropics, torpor is frequently employed by bats, suggesting that worldwide most bat species are heterothermic and use torpor for energy conservation. We propose that the ability of employing torpor and the resulting highly plastic energy requirements may partially explain why these small insectivorous bats can inhabit almost the entire Australian continent despite vastly different climatic and likely trophic conditions. Reduced energy requirements also may permit survival in degraded or modified habitats, reduce the need for foraging and reduce exposure to predators. Thus, the ability to employ torpor may be one important reason for why most Australian bats and other heterothermic mammals have not gone extinct whereas many obligatory homeothermic mammals that cannot employ torpor and have high energy and foraging requirements have suffered high rates of extinctions.

  5. Torpor and activity in a free-ranging tropical bat: implications for the distribution and conservation of mammals?

    PubMed

    Geiser, Fritz; Stawski, Clare; Bondarenco, Artiom; Pavey, Chris R

    2011-05-01

    Bats are most diverse in the tropics, but there are no quantitative data on torpor use for energy conservation by any tropical bat in the wild. We examined the thermal biology, activity patterns and torpor use of two tree-roosting long-eared bats (Nyctophilus geoffroyi, 7.8 g) in tropical northern Australia in winter using temperature telemetry. Bats commenced activity about 20 min after sunset, ended activity about 2.5 h before sunrise and entered torpor everyday in the early morning even when minimum ambient temperatures (T (a)) were as high as 23°C. On average, bats remained torpid for almost 5 h, mean minimum skin temperature (T (skin)) measured was 22.8 ± 0.1°C and daily T (skin) minima were correlated with T(a). Our study shows that even in the tropics, torpor is frequently employed by bats, suggesting that worldwide most bat species are heterothermic and use torpor for energy conservation. We propose that the ability of employing torpor and the resulting highly plastic energy requirements may partially explain why these small insectivorous bats can inhabit almost the entire Australian continent despite vastly different climatic and likely trophic conditions. Reduced energy requirements also may permit survival in degraded or modified habitats, reduce the need for foraging and reduce exposure to predators. Thus, the ability to employ torpor may be one important reason for why most Australian bats and other heterothermic mammals have not gone extinct whereas many obligatory homeothermic mammals that cannot employ torpor and have high energy and foraging requirements have suffered high rates of extinctions. PMID:21416134

  6. Variability of sulphur isotope ratios in pyrite and dissolved sulphate in granitoid fractures down to 1 km depth - Evidence for widespread activity of sulphur reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E.; Tullborg, Eva-Lena; Whitehouse, Martin; Fallick, Anthony E.

    2013-02-01

    Euhedral pyrite crystals in 46 open bedrock (granitoid) fractures at depths down to nearly 1 km were analysed for sulphur isotope ratios (δ34S) by the in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) technique and by conventional bulk-grain analysis, and were compared with groundwater data. Twenty nine of the fractures sampled for pyrite had corresponding data for groundwater, including chemistry and isotopic ratios of sulphate, which provided a unique opportunity to compare the sulphur-isotopic ratios of pyrite and dissolved sulphate both at site and fracture-specific scales. Assessment of pyrite age and formation conditions were based on the geological evolution of the area (Laxemar, SE Sweden), and on data on co-genetic calcite as follows: (1) the isotopic ratios of the calcite crystals (δ18O, δ13C, 87Sr/86Sr) were compared with previously defined isotopic features of fracture mineral assemblages precipitated during various geological periods, and (2) the δ18O of the calcites were compared with the δ18O of groundwater in fractures corresponding to those where the calcite/pyrite assemblages were sampled. Taken together, the data show that all the sampled fractures carried pyrite/calcite that are low-temperature and precipitated from the current groundwater or similar pre-existing groundwater, except at depths of -300 to -600 m where water with a glacial component dominates and the crystals are from pre-modern fluids. An age of <10 Ma are anticipated for the pre-modern fluids. The δ34Spyr showed huge variations across individual crystals (such as -32 to +73‰) and extreme minimum (-50‰) and maximum (+91‰) values. For this kind of extreme S-isotopic variation at earth-surface conditions there is no other explanation than activity of sulphur reducing bacteria coupled with sulphate-limited conditions. Indeed, the most common subgrain feature was an increase in δ34Spyr values from interior to rim of the crystal, which we interpret are related to successively

  7. Geological and geophysical evidences of late Quaternary activity of the range-front fault along the mid-segment of the Longmen Shan thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, J.; Xu, X.; Sun, X.; Tan, X.; Li, K.; Kang, W.; Liu, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Longmen Shan fault zone consists of three main Longmen Shan faults and the blind fault in the Chengdu Basin. Along the range front of the middle segment of the Longmen Shan, there is the lithological border in published geological maps. The existence and the latest active time of the range-front fault along the mid-segment of the Longmen Shan thrust belts are controversial for a long period. Petroleum seismic reflection and high-resolution shallow seismic reflection profile discovered the existence of the range-front fault and the fault offset the Quaternary strata. Based on detailed field observation, we found that there is an obvious linear feature along the mid-segment of the Longmen Shan front and the range-front fault displaced the late Quaternary fluvial terrace. Trench log indicates that a surface-rupture event occurred before ~1500a along the range-front fault. Differential GPS surveying and dating of fluvial terrace show that the range-front fault during late Quaternary underwent a vertical slip rate of bigger than 0.36mm/a, approximately equivalent to that along the main faults of the longmen Shan thrust belts, which demonstrates that the range-front fault also took an important role in accommodating the deformation of the Longmen Shan thrust zone. This study not only provides the fundamental data for seismic hazard assessment of the Chengdu Plain, but is helpful for the overall understanding of uplift mechanism of east Tibet.

  8. Input of UAV, DTM photo-interpretation and SAR interferometry on active tectonics applied on the Southern Coastal Range (SE Taiwan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffontaines, Benoit; Chang, Kuo-Jen; Champenois, Johann; Magalhaes, Samuel; Serries, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Taiwan is an excellent geomorphic laboratory where both extreme climatic events and high active tectonics compete. Moreover many Earth Sciences and Environmental data bases exist nowadays that help to better constrain both structural geology and active deformations. The latter unfortunately is still poorly known in the Cosatal Range of E.Taiwan in terms of geology due to access difficulties, high relief, paucity of roads, tropical vegetation and high climatic events (typhoons and heavy rainfall) and so on. Indirect methods such as photogrammetric survey using UAV's helps a lot to get high resolution topographic DEM and DTM, better than 10cm in planimetry, that helps a lot to get through careful photo-interpretation, a bird's eye view of the geology. Therefore we were able to much update the famous pre-existing geological maps (Wang and Chen, 1993). Moreover, by combining our high resolution topographic results with those of SAR interferometry (database of Champenois et al, EPSL, 2012), we were able to identify, characterise and quantify the differential active features toward the LOS of the Coastal Range (eastern Taiwan). In order to synthetise and to model the deformation of that famous place, we herein constructed more than 500 parallel projected profiles in order to locate, characterize and quantify the active tectonic features and compare them to the topography and the updated photo-interpreted geology (this work). We then were able to reconstruct the structural geometry of the Coastal Range and the Longitudinal Valley in SE Taiwan. Among our results, we reveal and prove : 1. the whole 2cm differential surrection of the Coastal Range ; 2. the differential displacement between both Central and Coastal Ranges ; 3. we explain the location of the Pinantashi river situated within the Lichi melange that correspond to the maximum surrection of the Coastal Range ; 4. we reveal the different units and their relative displacement within the Coastal Range itself ; 5. we

  9. Response to "No major active backthrust bounds the Pir Panjal Range near Kashmir basin, NW Himalaya" by Shah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, Reyaz Ahmad; Romshoo, Shakil Ahmad; Chandra, Rakesh; Ahmad, Ishtiaq

    2016-06-01

    This article presents a rebuttal to the entirely ambiguous and unwanted commentary made by Shah (JAES-D-15-00980) on Dar et al. (2014). The original article was aimed to evaluate the tectono-geomorphic evolution of the Kashmir Valley using geomorphic indices obtained from satellite images and detailed fieldwork. However, Shah while deviating from the core of the article has attempted to build an inexplicable tale about the structural configuration of the region. The comment is primarily based on the misinterpretation regarding the dip direction of a thrust fault. Pertinently, no major ∼SW dipping frontal fault bounding the Pir Panjal Range near Kashmir Valley is shown in the paper by Dar et al. (2014). The commentator has just recycled already documented text pertaining to general tectonic character of a few ∼NE dipping thrusts i.e., the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT) and Raisi Fault (RF). Moreover, some unknown structure named as Kashmir Basin Fault (KBF) by the commentator has been discussed, which does not even exist in the region. The commentary on the whole actually does not relate with the investigation reported by Dar et al. (2014), hence merits no consideration for publication.

  10. Induction of Laccase Activity in Rhizoctonia solani by Antagonistic Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains and a Range of Chemical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Jonathan D.; Olsson, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    Fungi often produce the phenoloxidase enzyme laccase during interactions with other organisms, an observation relevant to the development of biocontrols. By incorporating the laccase substrate 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) into agar, we analyzed laccase induction in the plant-pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani when paired against isolates of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Substantial induction of R. solani laccase was seen only in pairings with strains of P. fluorescens known to produce antifungal metabolites. To study laccase induction further, a range of chemical treatments was applied to R. solani liquid cultures. p-Anisidine, copper(II), manganese(II), calcium ionophore A23187, lithium chloride, calcium chloride, cyclic AMP (cAMP), caffeine, amphotericin B, paraquat, ethanol, and isopropanol were all found to induce laccase; however, the P. fluorescens metabolite viscosinamide did not do so at the concentrations tested. The stress caused by these treatments was assessed by measuring changes in lipid peroxidation levels and dry weight. The results indicated that the laccase induction seen in pairing plate experiments was most likely due to calcium or heat shock signaling in response to the effects of bacterial metabolites, but that heavy metal and cAMP-driven laccase induction was involved in sclerotization. PMID:11319086

  11. THE AKARI 2.5-5.0 μm SPECTRAL ATLAS OF TYPE-1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATOR, LINE RATIO, AND HOT DUST TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dohyeong; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Ji Hoon; Jun, Hyunsung David; Lee, Seong-Kook; Woo, Jong-Hak; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Takagi, Toshinobu; Oyabu, Shinki; Ohyama, Youichi E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2015-01-01

    We present 2.5-5.0 μm spectra of 83 nearby (0.002 < z < 0.48) and bright (K < 14 mag) type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. The 2.5-5.0 μm spectral region contains emission lines such as Brβ (2.63 μm), Brα (4.05 μm), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (3.3 μm), which can be used for studying the black hole (BH) masses and star formation activity in the host galaxies of AGNs. The spectral region also suffers less dust extinction than in the ultra violet (UV) or optical wavelengths, which may provide an unobscured view of dusty AGNs. Our sample is selected from bright quasar surveys of Palomar-Green and SNUQSO, and AGNs with reverberation-mapped BH masses from Peterson et al. Using 11 AGNs with reliable detection of Brackett lines, we derive the Brackett-line-based BH mass estimators. We also find that the observed Brackett line ratios can be explained with the commonly adopted physical conditions of the broad line region. Moreover, we fit the hot and warm dust components of the dust torus by adding photometric data of SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, and ISO to the AKARI spectra, finding hot and warm dust temperatures of ∼1100 K and ∼220 K, respectively, rather than the commonly cited hot dust temperature of 1500 K.

  12. 234U /238U and 230Th /234U activity ratios in the colloidal phases of aquifers in lateritic weathered zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Stephen A.; Lowson, Richard T.; Ellis, John

    1988-11-01

    A procedure was developed for comparing solute and colloid phases of groundwaters in contact with uranium ore bodies at Nabarlek and Koongarra in the Alligator Rivers region, Northern Territory, Australia. Single-pass ultrafiltration of large volumes with cut-offs of 18 nm and 1 μm was used. Colloids were composed of Fe and Si species with sorbed U and U daughters. Uranium isotopes were mostly present as soluble species. Thorium was significantly associated with the colloids. The 234U /238U activity ratios (ARs) were similar in solute and colloid phases close to the ore bodies but further down-gradient colloids were generally more depleted of 234U than the solute. The 230Th /234U ARs rose from very low values for both solute and colloid phases close to the ore bodies through several orders of magnitude to much higher values further down-gradient. Colloid 230Th /234U ARs were always significantly greater than solute ARs. Results were consistent with a systematic leaching of U from colloids going down-gradient and very little mobilization of ore-body 230Th relative to U. Ubiquitous complexed 232Th appeared to suppress the solubility of 230Th.

  13. sup 234 U/ sup 238 U and sup 230 Th/ sup 234 U activity ratios in the collidal phases of aquifers in lateritic weathered zones

    SciTech Connect

    Short, S.A.; Lowson, R.T. ); Ellis, J. )

    1988-11-01

    A procedure was developed for comparing solute and colloid phases of groundwaters in contact with uranium ore bodies at Nabarlek and Koongarra in the Alligator Rivers region, Northern Territory, Australia. Single-pass ultrafiltration of large volumes with cut-offs of 18 nm and 1 {mu}m was used. Colloids were composed of Fe and Si species with sorbed U and U daughters. Uranium isotopes were mostly present as soluble species. Thorium was significantly associated with the colloids. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios (ARs) were similar in solute and colloid phases close to the ore bodies but further down-gradient colloids were generally more depleted of {sup 234}U than the solute. The {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U ARs rose from very low values for both solute and colloid phases close to the ore bodies through several orders of magnitude to much higher values further down-gradient. Colloid {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U ARs were always significantly greater than solute ARs. Results were consistent with a systematic leaching of U from colloids going down-gradient and very little mobilization of ore body. {sup 230}Th relative to U. Ubiquitous complexes {sup 232}Th appeared to suppress the solubility of {sup 230}Th.

  14. 230Th/232Th activity ratios as a chronological marker complementing 210Pb dating in an estuarine system affected by industrial releases.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, E G; Bolívar, J P; García-Tenorio, R; Martín, J E

    2001-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to show the usefulness of the 230Th/232Th activity ratios as a chronological marker that can be helpful in the dating of sediment cores collected from an estuarine system located in the south west of Spain highly polluted by wastes from fertilizer plants. These wastes, being released for 30 years, and enriched in radionuclides from the uranium series including 210Pb, invalidate the application of the 210Pb dating technique in full extent to the sediment cores collected in this estuary. However, the evaluation and the interpretation of both 210Pb and 230Th/232Th profiles allows the determination of average sedimentation rates in different parts of the cores, contaminated and noncontaminated zone, that agree in the case analysed in this research. Through this approach, a confident chronology covering the last century, which is essential to analyse and reconstruct the historical evolution of other pollutants in this heavily contaminated system can be established. PMID:11291442

  15. Toxicity in relation to mode of action for the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: Acute-to-chronic ratios and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Ristau, Kai; Akgül, Yeliz; Bartel, Anna Sophie; Fremming, Jana; Müller, Marie-Theres; Reiher, Luise; Stapela, Frederike; Splett, Jan-Paul; Spann, Nicole

    2015-10-01

    Acute-to-chronic ratios (ACRs) and quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are of particular interest in chemical risk assessment. Previous studies focusing on the relationship between the size or variation of ACRs to substance classes and QSAR models were often based on data for standard test organisms, such as daphnids and fish. In the present study, acute and chronic toxicity tests were performed with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans for a total of 11 chemicals covering 3 substance classes (nonpolar narcotics: 1-propanol, ethanol, methanol, 2-butoxyethanol; metals: copper, cadmium, zinc; and carbamates: methomyl, oxamyl, aldicarb, dioxacarb). The ACRs were variable, especially for the carbamates and metals, although there was a trend toward small and less variable ACRs for nonpolar narcotic substances. The octanol-water partition coefficient was a good predictor for explaining acute and chronic toxicity of nonpolar narcotic substances to C. elegans, but not for carbamates. Metal toxicity could be related to the covalent index χm2r. Overall, the results support earlier results from ACR and QSAR studies with standard freshwater test animals. As such C. elegans as a representative of small soil/sediment invertebrates would probably be protected by risk assessment strategies already in use. To increase the predictive power of ACRs and QSARs, further research should be expanded to other species and compounds and should also consider the target sites and toxicokinetics of chemicals. PMID:25994998

  16. An efficient top-down approach for the fabrication of large-aspect-ratio g-C3N4 nanosheets with enhanced photocatalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jincheng; Zhang, Li; Li, Fei; Li, Mingming; Cao, Shaokui

    2015-09-28

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets with large aspect ratios were fabricated from bulk g-C3N4 through an efficient top-down approach of moderate disintegration-exfoliation using diluted H2SO4 as an "efficient knife". By prior disintegration in a diluted H2SO4 solution, the exfoliation of bulk g-C3N4 was effectively accelerated. The as-prepared g-C3N4 nanosheets possess a two-dimensional (2D) thin-layer structure with seven-atom thickness, a large lateral size of about 1 μm, and a high specific surface area of 80 m(2) g(-1). Compared with the bulk precursor, the g-C3N4 nanosheets showed much higher efficiency of photogenerated charge transfer and separation, and consequently exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity toward hydrogen evolution and pollutant decomposition under both full-sunlight and visible-light irradiation. PMID:26299637

  17. Range Ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After more than two hundred years, grazing remains California’s most extensive land use. The ‘Range Ecosystems’ chapter in the ‘Ecosystems of California’ sourcebook provides an integrated picture of the biophysical, social, and economic aspects of lands grazed by livestock in the state. Grazing mana...

  18. Analysis of Immune Responses against a Wide Range of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens in Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kassa, Desta; Ran, Leonie; Geberemeskel, Wudneh; Tebeje, Mekashaw; Alemu, Amelewerk; Selase, Alemayehu; Tegbaru, Belete; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Friggen, Annemieke H.; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Wolday, Dawit; Messele, Tsehaynesh

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing host immune responses to molecular targets of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essential to develop effective immunodiagnostics and better vaccines. We investigated the immune response against a large series of M. tuberculosis antigens, including 5 classical and 64 nonclassical (39 DosR regulon-encoded, 4 resuscitation-promoting factor [RPF], and 21 reactivation-associated) antigens in active-pulmonary-tuberculosis (TB) patients. Whole blood from TB patients (n = 34) was stimulated in vitro with M. tuberculosis antigens. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was measured after 7 days of stimulation, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The majority of the study participants responded to the classical M. tuberculosis antigens TB10.4 (84.8%), early secreted antigenic target-6 kDa (ESAT-6)/CFP-10 (70.6%), and purified protein derivative (PPD) (55.9%). However, only 26.5% and 24.2% responded to HSP65 and Ag85A/B, respectively. Of the 64 nonclassical antigens, 23 (33.3%) were immunogenic (IFN-γ levels, >62 pg/ml) and 8 were strong inducers of IFN-γ (IFN-γ levels, ≥100 pg/ml). The RPF antigens were the most immunogenic. In addition, we observed distinct cytokine expression profiles in response to several M. tuberculosis antigens by multiplex immunoassay. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and IL-6 were commonly detected at high levels after stimulation with 4/15 latency antigens (Rv0081, Rv2006, Rv2629, and Rv1733c) and were found especially in supernatants of the three strong IFN-γ inducers (Rv2629, Rv1009, and Rv2389c). IL-8, IL-6, and IL-17 were exclusively detected after stimulation with Rv0574c, Rv2630, Rv1998, Rv054c, and Rv2028c. In conclusion, in active-pulmonary-TB patients, we identified 23 new immunogenic M. tuberculosis antigens. The distinct expression levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 in response to specific subsets of M. tuberculosis antigens may be promising for the development of immunodiagnostics

  19. Quaternary tectonic activity of the Carboneras Fault in the La Serrata range (SE Iberia): Geomorphological and chronological constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ximena; Masana, Eulàlia; Pallàs, Raimon; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Rodés, Ángel; Bordonau, Jaume

    2015-11-01

    The Eastern Betic Shear Zone (EBSZ) in Southern Iberia is known to accommodate part of the 4-5 mm/yr convergence between Africa and Iberia, but its seismic hazard is not sufficiently understood for an accurate risk assessment. One of the main structures of the EBSZ, the left-lateral 150 km-long Carboneras Fault, displays no clear instrumental and historical activity despite being morphologically expressive. Detailed geomorphological mapping, geochronological analysis, and structural observation on the La Serrata segment of the Carboneras Fault were designed to investigate its recent evolution. Quaternary sediments and geomorphic features were targeted and 42 new numerical ages were obtained based on 66 samples (thermoluminescence, U-series, 14C, 10Be). The chronological framework of La Serrata was constructed by combining these numerical ages with a conceptual model previously developed in the region, which assumes that alluvial fan aggradation was produced during cold and dry periods (glacials and stadials), whereas stability and phases of calcrete formation were favored during warm and wetter periods (interglacials and interstadials). The spatial distribution of dated alluvial fans suggests an early phase of uplift that probably occurred between 1 Ma and 56.6 ka in the northeastern portion of the study area, whereas in the southwest sector the main uplift phase occurred later than 110.3 ka. A decline in fault activity would have taken place after 30.8 ka. Vertically offset dated units indicate minimum dip-slip rates of 0.05 mm/yr and 0.18 mm/yr, averaged for the last 1 Ma and the last 110.3 ka, respectively. Deflected channels and associated dated units yield a minimum left-lateral strike-slip rate of 1.31 mm/yr, averaged for the last 110.3 ka. The most recent fault movement of the fault could be younger than AD 637. Our results suggest therefore that the Carboneras Fault is among the fastest in Iberia, and should be considered in future hazard analyses.

  20. Purification of Pseudomonas putida acyl coenzyme A ligase active with a range of aliphatic and aromatic substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Valverde, M; Reglero, A; Martinez-Blanco, H; Luengo, J M

    1993-01-01

    Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) ligase (acyl-CoA synthetase [ACoAS]) from Pseudomonas putida U was purified to homogeneity (252-fold) after this bacterium was grown in a chemically defined medium containing octanoic acid as the sole carbon source. The enzyme, which has a mass of 67 kDa, showed maximal activity at 40 degrees C in 10 mM K2PO4H-NaPO4H2 buffer (pH 7.0) containing 20% (wt/vol) glycerol. Under these conditions, ACoAS showed hyperbolic behavior against acetate, CoA, and ATP; the Kms calculated for these substrates were 4.0, 0.7, and 5.2 mM, respectively. Acyl-CoA ligase recognizes several aliphatic molecules (acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric, hexanoic, heptanoic, and octanoic acids) as substrates, as well as some aromatic compounds (phenylacetic and phenoxyacetic acids). The broad substrate specificity of ACoAS from P. putida was confirmed by coupling it with acyl-CoA:6-aminopenicillanic acid acyltransferase from Penicillium chrysogenum to study the formation of several penicillins. Images PMID:8476289

  1. Phagocytic activity, respiratory burst, cytoplasmic free-Ca(2+) concentration and apoptotic cell ratio of haemocytes from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon under acute copper stress.

    PubMed

    Xian, Jian-An; Wang, An-Li; Ye, Chao-Xia; Chen, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular toxicity of copper-induced injury to the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. The 24h, 48h, 72h and 96h LC(50) (median lethal concentration) of Cu(2+) on P. monodon (11.63+/-1.14g) were found to be 3.49, 1.54, 0.73 and 0.40mgL(-1), respectively. Total haemocyte count (THC), phagocytic activity, respiratory burst (RB), cytoplasmic free-Ca(2+) (cf-Ca(2+)) concentration and apoptotic cell ratio of shrimp were determined after exposure to different concentrations of Cu(2+) (0, 0.05, 0.5, 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1)) for 0, 6, 12, 24 and 48h. There was no significant effect on the analytic indicator of shrimp exposed to 0.05mgL(-1) Cu(2+). THC decreased after Cu-exposure to 0.5mgL(-1) for 48h, 1.5mgL(-1) for 24h and 3.5mgL(-1) for 12h. Phagocytic activity decreased in P. monodon following 48h exposure to 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). RB was induced after 6h exposure to 0.5, 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). cf-Ca(2+) concentration increased after 48h exposure to 0.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+), and 12h exposure to 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). The percentage of apoptotic cells increased to 9.5%, 16.3% and 18.6% respectively following 48h exposure to 0.5, 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). These results indicate that Cu can induce oxidative stress, elevation of cf-Ca(2+) and cell apoptosis, and inhibit phagocytic activity in the shrimp P. monodon, and the lethal injury of Cu(2+) to P. monodon may be mainly due to the sharp reduction of THC caused by ROS-induced apoptosis. PMID:20398793

  2. Removal of a broad range of surfactants from municipal wastewater--comparison between membrane bioreactor and conventional activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    González, Susana; Petrovic, Mira; Barceló, Damià

    2007-02-01

    Elimination of alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEO) and their degradation products (alkylphenols and alkylphenoxy carboxylates), as well as linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) and coconut diethanol amides (CDEA), was studied in a pilot plant membrane bioreactor (MBR) working in parallel to a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) using conventional activated sludge (CAS). In the CAS system 87% of parent long ethoxy chain NPEOs were eliminated, but their decomposition yielded persistent acidic and neutral metabolites which were poorly removed. The elimination of short ethoxy chain NPEOs (NP(1)EO and NP(2)EO) averaged 50%, whereas nonylphenoxy carboxylates (NPECs) showed an increase in concentrations with respect to the ones measured in influent samples. Nonylphenol (NP) was the only nonylphenolic compound efficiently removed (96%) in the CAS treatment. On the other hand, MBR showed good performance in removing nonylphenolic compounds with an overall elimination of 94% for the total pool of NPEO derived compounds (in comparison of 54%-overall elimination in the CAS). The elimination of individual compounds in the MBR was as follows: 97% for parent, long ethoxy chain NPEOs, 90% for short ethoxy chain NPEOs, 73% for NPECs, and 96% for NP. Consequently, the residual concentrations were in the low mug/l level or below it. LAS and CDEA showed similar elimination in the both wastewater treatment systems that were investigated, and no significant differences were observed between the two treatment processes. Nevertheless, for all studied compounds the MBR effluent concentrations were consistently lower and independent of the influent concentrations. Additionally, MBR effluent quality in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH(4)(+) concentration and total suspended solids (TSS) was always superior to the ones of the CAS and also independent of the influent quality, which demonstrates high potential of MBRs in the treatment of municipal wastewaters. PMID:17123581

  3. Asymmetric Total Synthesis of Heronamides A-C: Stereochemical Confirmation and Impact of Long-Range Stereochemical Communication on the Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Kanoh, Naoki; Itoh, Shunya; Fujita, Kohei; Sakanishi, Kohei; Sugiyama, Ryosuke; Terajima, Yuta; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Nishimura, Shinichi; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2016-06-13

    Heronamides are biosynthetically related metabolites isolated from marine-derived actinomycetes. Heronamide C shows potent antifungal activity by targeting membrane phospholipids possessing saturated hydrocarbon chains with as-yet-unrevealed modes of action. In spite of their curious hypothesized biosynthesis and fascinating biological activities, there have been conflicts in regard to the reported stereochemistries of heronamides. Here, we describe the asymmetric total synthesis of the originally proposed and revised structures of heronamide C, which unambiguously confirmed the chemical structure of this molecule. We also demonstrated nonenzymatic synthesis of heronamides A and B from heronamide C, which not only proved the postulated biosynthesis, but also confirmed the correct structures of heronamides A and B. Investigation of the structure-activity relationship of synthetic and natural heronamides revealed the importance of both long-range stereochemical communication and the 20-membered macrolactam ring for the biological activity of these compounds. PMID:27171897

  4. Impact of wind erosion on detecting active tectonics from geomorphic indexes in extremely arid areas: a case study from the Hero Range, Qaidam Basin, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lei; Xiao, Ancheng; Yang, Shufeng

    2014-11-01

    Geomorphologic analysis has been used widely to detect active tectonics in regions where fluvial incision is the major erosional process. In this paper, however, we assess the feasibility of utilizing these frequently-used geomorphic indexes (e.g., hypsometric curves, longitudinal channel profiles, normalized stream length-gradient (SLK) index) to determine active tectonics in extremely arid areas where wind erosion also plays an important role. The case study is developed on the Hero Range in the western Qaidam Basin, one of the driest regions on Earth with severe wind erosion since late Pliocene. The result shows that in the west and south sectors, as well as the western part of the east sector, of the Hero Range where fluvial incision prevails, these geomorphic indexes are good indicators of active faulting and consistent with the geological result based on study of fault traces, scarps, faulted Holocene fans and historical seismicity within the past four decades. In contrast, along the northeastern margin (the NE and the SE parts of the east sector) of the range where wind erosion is also important, the results from the geomorphic indexes show quite active tectonics, contrary with the geological evidence favoring weakly active tectonics. Moreover, the positive SLK anomaly lies oblique to the fault trace and the anticline axis but parallel to the wind direction. To reconcile the contradiction, we propose that wind erosion caused by northwestern winds has a tendency to make geomorphic indexes exhibit anomalous values that indicate higher activities, by way of (1) lowering the base-level to generate knickpoints on the longitudinal channel profiles and therefore positive SLK anomalies, and (2) lateral erosion of the mountain front making the hypsometric curves and even the longitudinal channel profiles more convex, and producing obvious slope breaks.

  5. Defining torpor in free-ranging bats: experimental evaluation of external temperature-sensitive radiotransmitters and the concept of active temperature.

    PubMed

    Willis, C K R; Brigham, R M

    2003-07-01

    A variety of definitions involving body temperature (Tb), metabolic rate and behavior have been used to define torpor in mammals and birds. This problem is confounded in some studies of free-ranging animals that employ only skin temperature (Tsk), a measure that approximates but may not precisely reflect Tb. We assess the accuracy of Tsk in the context of a recent definition for torpor called active temperature. We compared the active temperatures of individual big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), which aggregate in cavities, with solitary, foliage-roosting hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus). In captive big brown bats, we compared Tsk and core Tb at a range of ambient temperatures for clustered and solitary roosting animals, compared Tsk and Tb during arousal from torpor, and quantified the effect of flight on warming from torpor. Hoary bats had significantly lower active temperatures than big brown bats despite having the same normothermic Tsk. Tsk was significantly lower than Tb during normothermia but often greater than Tb during torpor. Flight increased the rate of warming from torpor. This effect was more pronounced for Tsk than Tb. This suggests that bats could rely on heat generated by flight muscles to complete the final stages of arousal. Using active temperature to define torpor may underestimate torpor due to ambient cooling of external transmitters or animals leaving roosts while still torpid. Conversely, active temperature may also overestimate shallow torpor use if it is recorded during active arousal when shivering and non-shivering thermogenesis warm external transmitters. Our findings illuminate the need for laboratory studies that quantify the relationship between metabolic rate and Tsk over a range of ambient temperatures. PMID:12764630

  6. Range resolved mode mixing in a large volume for the mitigation of speckle and strategic target orientation requirements in active millimeter-wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Mark A; Holt, Jennifer A; Joye, Colin D; De Lucia, Frank C

    2015-04-01

    In spite of many reports of active millimeter-wave imaging in the literature, speckle and requirements for cooperative target orientation significantly reduce its practical usefulness. Here we report a new technique, range resolved mode mixing (RRMM), which significantly mitigates both of these issues. It also provides a three-dimensional (3D) image. RRMM accomplishes this by combining multimode illumination (which eliminates the requirement for cooperative target orientation) with range resolution (which provides statistical independence of speckle patterns for averaging and the 3D image). The use of a 5W extended interaction klystron amplifier results in large signal margins in the 50 m scale atrium of the Physics Department at Ohio State University. It appears that there are a number of scenarios out to a range of 1 km for which this approach is useful to provide 3D images, with minimal speckle, and no requirement for cooperative target orientation. PMID:26366774

  7. An alternative diagnostic test for active Ménière's disease and cochlear hydrops using high-pass noise masked responses: the complex amplitude ratio.

    PubMed

    Don, Manuel; Kwong, Betty; Tanaka, Chiemi

    2007-01-01

    We [Don et al.: Otol Neurotol 2005;26:711-722] previously demonstrated that patients diagnosed with an active case of Ménière's disease could be distinguished from non-Ménière's normal-hearing subjects by a special auditory brainstem response method involving clicks and ipsilateral high-pass masking pink noise. Specifically, auditory brainstem responses to clicks presented alone and clicks with masking noise high-pass filtered at 8, 4, 2, 1 and 0.5 kHz were recorded. It was shown that the level of masking noise sufficient to progressively mask the response to clicks in non-Ménière's normal-hearing subjects was insufficient to appropriately mask the responses in Ménière's disease subjects, resulting in an obvious undermasked component. A relative latency measure of wave V or the undermasked component in the response to clicks with 0.5 kHz high-pass masking noise and wave V in the response to clicks presented alone clearly distinguished these two groups on an individual level, thus making it a valuable clinical tool. However, determining the peak latency of wave V or the undermasked component can be difficult in some cases. In anticipation of this difficulty, we investigated and present in this paper several amplitude measures that may help in the evaluation of these cases. One amplitude measure, the 'complex amplitude ratio', appears to be a good alternative when the latency measure of the undermasked component is difficult to determine. PMID:17664867

  8. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals. PMID:12396200

  9. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements. PMID:26539103

  10. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements. PMID:26539103

  11. HIV-Infected Individuals with Low CD4/CD8 Ratio despite Effective Antiretroviral Therapy Exhibit Altered T Cell Subsets, Heightened CD8+ T Cell Activation, and Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Sainz, Talia; Lee, Sulggi A.; Hunt, Peter W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Ferre, April L.; Hayes, Timothy L.; Somsouk, Ma; Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Lederman, Michael M.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Jain, Vivek; Huang, Yong; Hecht, Frederick M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; McCune, Joseph M.; Moreno, Santiago; Deeks, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    A low CD4/CD8 ratio in elderly HIV-uninfected adults is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A subset of HIV-infected adults receiving effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) fails to normalize this ratio, even after they achieve normal CD4+ T cell counts. The immunologic and clinical characteristics of this clinical phenotype remain undefined. Using data from four distinct clinical cohorts and three clinical trials, we show that a low CD4/CD8 ratio in HIV-infected adults during otherwise effective ART (after CD4 count recovery above 500 cells/mm3) is associated with a number of immunological abnormalities, including a skewed T cell phenotype from naïve toward terminally differentiated CD8+ T cells, higher levels of CD8+ T cell activation (HLADR+CD38+) and senescence (CD28− and CD57+CD28−), and higher kynurenine/tryptophan ratio. Changes in the peripheral CD4/CD8 ratio are also reflective of changes in gut mucosa, but not in lymph nodes. In a longitudinal study, individuals who initiated ART within six months of infection had greater CD4/CD8 ratio increase compared to later initiators (>2 years). After controlling for age, gender, ART duration, nadir and CD4 count, the CD4/CD8 ratio predicted increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Hence, a persistently low CD4/CD8 ratio during otherwise effective ART is associated with increased innate and adaptive immune activation, an immunosenescent phenotype, and higher risk of morbidity/mortality. This ratio may prove useful in monitoring response to ART and could identify a unique subset of individuals needed of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:24831517

  12. Range and range rate system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Olin L. (Inventor); Russell, Jim K. (Inventor); Epperly, Walter L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A video controlled solid state range finding system which requires no radar, high power laser, or sophisticated laser target is disclosed. The effective range of the system is from 1 to about 200 ft. The system includes an opto-electric camera such as a lens CCD array device. A helium neon laser produces a source beam of coherent light which is applied to a beam splitter. The beam splitter applies a reference beam to the camera and produces an outgoing beam applied to a first angularly variable reflector which directs the outgoing beam to the distant object. An incoming beam is reflected from the object to a second angularly variable reflector which reflects the incoming beam to the opto-electric camera via the beam splitter. The first reflector and the second reflector are configured so that the distance travelled by the outgoing beam from the beam splitter and the first reflector is the same as the distance travelled by the incoming beam from the second reflector to the beam splitter. The reference beam produces a reference signal in the geometric center of the camera. The incoming beam produces an object signal at the camera.

  13. Characterization and potential of three temperature ranges for hydrogen fermentation of cellulose by means of activity test and 16s rRNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Gadow, Samir I; Jiang, Hongyu; Li, Yu-You

    2016-06-01

    A series of standardized activity experiments were performed to characterize three different temperature ranges of hydrogen fermentation from different carbon sources. 16S rRNA sequences analysis showed that the bacteria were close to Enterobacter genus in the mesophilic mixed culture (MMC) and Thermoanaerobacterium genus in the thermophilic and hyper-thermophilic mixed cultures (TMC and HMC). The MMC was able to utilize the glucose and cellulose to produce methane gas within a temperature range between 25 and 45 °C and hydrogen gas from 35 to 60°C. While, the TMC and HMC produced only hydrogen gas at all temperature ranges and the highest activity of 521.4mlH2/gVSSd was obtained by TMC. The thermodynamic analysis showed that more energy is consumed by hydrogen production from cellulose than from glucose. The experimental results could help to improve the economic feasibility of cellulosic biomass energy using three-phase technology to produce hythane. PMID:26954308

  14. ACTG 260: a Randomized, Phase I-II, Dose-Ranging Trial of the Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity of Delavirdine Monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Para, Michael F.; Meehan, Patricia; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Fischl, Margaret; Morse, Gene; Shafer, Robert; Demeter, Lisa M.; Wood, Kenneth; Nevin, Tom; Virani-Ketter, Nzeera; Freimuth, William W.

    1999-01-01

    ACTG 260 was an open-label, four-arm trial designed to study the safety and anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) activity of delavirdine monotherapy at three ranges of concentrations in plasma compared to those of control therapy with zidovudine or didanosine. Delavirdine doses were adjusted weekly until subjects were within their target trough concentration range (3 to 10, 11 to 30, or 31 to 50 μM). A total of 113 subjects were analyzed. At week 2, the mean HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RNA level declines among the subjects in the three delavirdine arms were similar (0.87, 1.08, and 1.02 log10 for the low, middle, and high target arms, respectively), but by week 8, the subjects in the pooled delavirdine arms showed only a 0.10 log10 reduction. In the subjects in the nucleoside arm, mean HIV-1 RNA level reductions at weeks 2 and 8 were 0.67 and 0.55 log10, respectively. Because viral suppression by delavirdine was not maintained, the trial was stopped early. Rash, which was usually self-limited, developed in 36% of subjects who received delavirdine. Delavirdine monotherapy has potent anti-HIV activity at 2 weeks, but its activity is time limited due to the rapid emergence of drug resistance. PMID:10348755

  15. Factors Affecting Date of Implantation, Parturition, and Den Entry Estimated from Activity and Body Temperature in Free-Ranging Brown Bears

    PubMed Central

    Friebe, Andrea; Evans, Alina L.; Arnemo, Jon M.; Blanc, Stéphane; Brunberg, Sven; Fleissner, Günther; Swenson, Jon E.; Zedrosser, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of factors influencing the timing of reproduction is important for animal conservation and management. Brown bears (Ursus arctos) are able to vary the birth date of their cubs in response to their fat stores, but little information is available about the timing of implantation and parturition in free-ranging brown bears. Body temperature and activity of pregnant brown bears is higher during the gestation period than during the rest of hibernation and drops at parturition. We compared mean daily body temperature and activity levels of pregnant and nonpregnant females during preimplantation, gestation, and lactation. Additionally we tested whether age, litter size, primiparity, environmental conditions, and the start of hibernation influence the timing of parturition. The mean date of implantation was 1 December (SD = 12), the mean date of parturition was 26 January (SD = 12), and the mean duration of the gestation period was 56 days (SD = 2). The body temperature of pregnant females was higher during the gestation and lactation periods than that of nonpregnant bears. The body temperature of pregnant females decreased during the gestation period. Activity recordings were also used to determine the date of parturition. The parturition dates calculated with activity and body temperature data did not differ significantly and were the same in 50% of the females. Older females started hibernation earlier. The start of hibernation was earlier during years with favorable environmental conditions. Dates of parturition were later during years with good environmental conditions which was unexpected. We suggest that free-ranging pregnant brown bears in areas with high levels of human activities at the beginning of the denning period, as in our study area, might prioritize investing energy in early denning than in early parturition during years with favorable environmental conditions, as a strategy to prevent disturbances caused by human. PMID:24988486

  16. Factors affecting date of implantation, parturition, and den entry estimated from activity and body temperature in free-ranging brown bears.

    PubMed

    Friebe, Andrea; Evans, Alina L; Arnemo, Jon M; Blanc, Stéphane; Brunberg, Sven; Fleissner, Günther; Swenson, Jon E; Zedrosser, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of factors influencing the timing of reproduction is important for animal conservation and management. Brown bears (Ursus arctos) are able to vary the birth date of their cubs in response to their fat stores, but little information is available about the timing of implantation and parturition in free-ranging brown bears. Body temperature and activity of pregnant brown bears is higher during the gestation period than during the rest of hibernation and drops at parturition. We compared mean daily body temperature and activity levels of pregnant and nonpregnant females during preimplantation, gestation, and lactation. Additionally we tested whether age, litter size, primiparity, environmental conditions, and the start of hibernation influence the timing of parturition. The mean date of implantation was 1 December (SD = 12), the mean date of parturition was 26 January (SD = 12), and the mean duration of the gestation period was 56 days (SD = 2). The body temperature of pregnant females was higher during the gestation and lactation periods than that of nonpregnant bears. The body temperature of pregnant females decreased during the gestation period. Activity recordings were also used to determine the date of parturition. The parturition dates calculated with activity and body temperature data did not differ significantly and were the same in 50% of the females. Older females started hibernation earlier. The start of hibernation was earlier during years with favorable environmental conditions. Dates of parturition were later during years with good environmental conditions which was unexpected. We suggest that free-ranging pregnant brown bears in areas with high levels of human activities at the beginning of the denning period, as in our study area, might prioritize investing energy in early denning than in early parturition during years with favorable environmental conditions, as a strategy to prevent disturbances caused by human. PMID:24988486

  17. The influence of various resistance loads on the ratio of activity of the external rotator muscles of the shoulder and the anterior gliding of the humeral head during external rotation exercise.

    PubMed

    Jo, Marg-Eun; Lee, Seung-Min; Jang, Jun-Hyeok; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] To quantify the ratio of activation of the infraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles and the anterior gliding motion of the humeral head during external rotation (ER) motions of the shoulder performed in prone position against different external resistance loads. [Subjects] Twenty healthy women between the ages of 20 and 30 years. [Methods] Activity ratio was quantified as the difference in the root mean square of the smoothed electromyography signal (EMG) of the posterior deltoid to the infraspinatus muscle, and anterior gliding pressure of the humeral head using a pressure biofeedback unit (PBU), for three resistance loads: 0, 1 and 2 kg. [Results] There was a significant correlation among all three variables (load, ratio, and pressure). Anterior gliding pressure correlated with the activity ratio, with activity of the posterior deltoid increasing with the magnitude of the resistance load. [Conclusion] There was a positive association between the magnitude of resistance load, activity of the posterior deltoid and anterior gliding pressure of the humeral head. The PBU could be used to facilitate the recruitment of the infraspinatus muscle at higher loads to improve glenohumeral joint stability during ER exercise against higher resistance. PMID:26644683

  18. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  19. Modulation of Enzymatic Activity and Biological Function of Listeria monocytogenes Broad-Range Phospholipase C by Amino Acid Substitutions and by Replacement with the Bacillus cereus Ortholog

    PubMed Central

    Zückert, Wolfram R.; Marquis, Hélène; Goldfine, Howard

    1998-01-01

    The secreted broad-range phosphatidylcholine (PC)-preferring phospholipase C (PC-PLC) of Listeria monocytogenes plays a role in the bacterium’s ability to escape from phagosomes and spread from cell to cell. Based on comparisons with two orthologs, Clostridium perfringens α-toxin and Bacillus cereus PLC (PLCBc), we generated PC-PLC mutants with altered enzymatic activities and substrate specificities and analyzed them for biological function in tissue culture and mouse models of infection. Two of the conserved active-site zinc-coordinating histidines were confirmed by single amino acid substitutions H69G and H118G, which resulted in proteins inactive in broth culture and unstable intracellularly. Substitutions D4E and H56Y remodeled the PC-PLC active site to more closely resemble the PLCBc active site, while a gene replacement resulted in L. monocytogenes secreting PLCBc. All of these mutants yielded similar amounts of active enzyme as wild-type PC-PLC both in broth culture and intracellularly. D4E increased activity on and specificity for PC, while H56Y and D4E H56Y showed higher activity on both PC and sphingomyelin, with reduced specificity for PC. As expected, PLCBc expressed by L. monocytogenes was highly specific for PC. During early intracellular growth in human epithelial cells, the D4E mutant and the PLCBc-expressing strain performed significantly better than the wild type, while the H56Y and D4E H56Y mutants showed a significant defect. In assays for cell-to-cell spread, the H56Y and D4E mutants had close to wild-type characteristics, while the spreading efficiency of PLCBc was significantly lower. These studies emphasize the species-specific features of PC-PLC important for growth in mammalian cells. PMID:9746585

  20. Uplift and denudation rates of an actively growing mountain range inferred from in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be: the Yumu Shan (NE Tibetan Plateau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, L.; Hetzel, R.; Minxing, T.; Li, X.; Guo, J.

    2009-04-01

    Located in the foreland of the Quilian Shan (NE Tibet), the Yumu Shan is an isolated mountain range bounded by an active NW-SE striking thrust fault. Geomorphic and structural features such as fault scarps and wind gaps suggest that the ~70 km long range is actively growing (Hetzel et al., 2004; Tapponnier et al., 1990), hence the tectonic uplift should exceed the rate of denudation. Here we quantify the rate of these two competing processes using in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be. Catchment-wide denudation rates are derived from 10Be concentrations in stream sediments, whereas rock uplift rates are obtained by combining scarp topographic profiles with dating of geomorphic surfaces deformed by active thrust faults at the Yumu Shan mountain front. Both denudation and rock uplift rates integrate over a similar temporal scale (~10-100 ka) and thus over many earthquake cycles. Our data document that catchment wide-denudation rates vary from ~100 to ~400 mm ka-1 as a function of morphology and lithology, while rock uplift takes place at the rate of ~0.7 mm ka-1. The difference between these values confirms that the Yumu Shan is in a topographic pre-steady state and in accordance with geomorphic and structural features. Tectonic features indicate that over few millions of years the Yumu Shan may rise to a similar height as the main ranges of the Qilian Shan farther south, which have peaks with elevations between ~5 and ~5.5 km. References: Hetzel R., Tao M., Niedermann S., Strecker M.R., Ivy-Ochs S., Kubik P.W., Gao B. (2004). Implications of the fault scaling law for the growth of topography: Mountain ranges in the broken foreland of NE Tibet, Terra Nova, 16, 157-162. Tapponnier P., Meyer B., Avouac J.P., Peltzer G., Gaudemer Y., Guo S., Xiang H., Yin K., Chen Z., Cai S., Dai H. (1990). Active thrusting and folding in the Quilian Shan, and decoupling between upper crust and mantle in northeastern Tibet, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 97, 382-403.

  1. Interconnected Co-Entrapped, N-Doped Carbon Nanotube Film as Active Hydrogen Evolution Cathode over the Whole pH Range.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhicai; Liu, Qian; Xing, Wei; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2015-06-01

    The use of electrocatalysts with low metal content (metal-deficient) or metal free for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) can prevent or decrease metal ion release, which reduces environmental impact; development of such catalysts with high activity and durability over the whole pH range is thus highly desired but still remains a huge challenge. Herein, we describe the direct growth of a film consisting of interconnected Co-entrapped, N-doped carbon nanotubes on carbon cloth using chemical vapor deposition from dicyanodiamine using a Co3 O4 nanowire array as catalyst. This integrated architecture is used as a flexible 3D electrode for the electrolytic hydrogen evolution with outstanding catalytic activity and durability in acidic media. Moreover, this electrode is also highly efficient under neutral and basic conditions. It offers us an attractive carbon-based metal-deficient HER catalyst outperforming most transition-metal and all metal-free/deficient catalysts. PMID:25916622

  2. Visual detection of telomerase activity with a tunable dynamic range by using a gold nanoparticle probe-based hybridization protection strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiasi; Wu, Li; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    We developed a novel telomere complementary (TC) oligonucleotide modified AuNP probe (TC-AuNPs) for colorimetric analysis of telomerase activity. The mechanism of this method is that the telomerase reaction products (TRP), which can hybridize with the TC-AuNPs, are able to protect the AuNPs from the aggregation induced by salt. It is demonstrated that the colorimetric method enabled the analysis of the telomerase activity in 1000 HeLa cells with the naked eye, and down to 100 HeLa cells with the aid of UV-Vis spectroscopy. This strategy is not only convenient and sensitive, but also has a tunable dynamic range. The platform is also applicable for the initial screening of a telomerase inhibitor to discover new anticancer drugs.We developed a novel telomere complementary (TC) oligonucleotide modified AuNP probe (TC-AuNPs) for colorimetric analysis of telomerase activity. The mechanism of this method is that the telomerase reaction products (TRP), which can hybridize with the TC-AuNPs, are able to protect the AuNPs from the aggregation induced by salt. It is demonstrated that the colorimetric method enabled the analysis of the telomerase activity in 1000 HeLa cells with the naked eye, and down to 100 HeLa cells with the aid of UV-Vis spectroscopy. This strategy is not only convenient and sensitive, but also has a tunable dynamic range. The platform is also applicable for the initial screening of a telomerase inhibitor to discover new anticancer drugs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05185d

  3. Measurement, Ratios, and Graphing: Who Added the "Micro" to Gravity? An Educator Guide with Activities in Mathematics, Science, and Technology. NASA CONNECT[TM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    The NASA CONNECT series features 30-minute, instructional videos for students in grades 5-8 and teacher's guides that use aeronautics and space technology as the organizing theme. In this guide and videotape, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) researchers and scientists use measurement, ratios, and graphing to demonstrate the…

  4. Single-mode lasers and parity-time symmetry broken gratings based on active dielectric-loaded long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Choloong; Song, Seok Ho; Oh, Cha Hwan; Berini, Pierre

    2015-07-27

    Single-mode distributed feedback laser structures and parity-time symmetry broken grating structures based on dielectric-loaded long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides are proposed. The structures comprise a thin Ag stripe on an active polymer bottom cladding with an active polymer ridge. The active polymer assumed is PMMA doped with IR140 dye providing optical gain at near infrared wavelengths. Cutoff top ridge dimensions (thickness and width) are calculated using a finite element method and selected to guarantee single-mode operation of the laser. Several parameters such as the threshold number of periods and the lasing wavelength are determined using the transfer matrix method. A related structure based on two pairs of waveguides of two widths, which have the same imaginary part but different real part of effective index, arranged within one grating period, is proposed as an active grating operating at the threshold for parity-time symmetry breaking (i.e., operating at an exceptional point). Such "exceptional point" gratings produce ideal reflectance asymmetry as demonstrated via transfer matrix computations. PMID:26367652

  5. Improving the Catalytic Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus horikoshii Prolidase for Detoxification of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents over a Broad Range of Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Theriot, Casey M.; Semcer, Rebecca L.; Shah, Saumil S.; Grunden, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    Prolidases hydrolyze Xaa-Pro dipeptides and can also cleave the P-F and P-O bonds found in organophosphorus (OP) compounds, including the nerve agents soman and sarin. Ph1prol (PH0974) has previously been isolated and characterized from Pyrococcus horikoshii and was shown to have higher catalytic activity over a broader pH range, higher affinity for metal, and increased thermostability compared to P. furiosus prolidase, Pfprol (PF1343). To obtain a better enzyme for OP nerve agent decontamination and to investigate the structural factors that may influence protein thermostability and thermoactivity, randomly mutated Ph1prol enzymes were prepared. Four Ph1prol mutants (A195T/G306S-, Y301C/K342N-, E127G/E252D-, and E36V-Ph1prol) were isolated which had greater thermostability and improved activity over a broader range of temperatures against Xaa-Pro dipeptides and OP nerve agents compared to wild type Pyrococcus prolidases. PMID:22162664

  6. Improving the catalytic activity of hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus horikoshii prolidase for detoxification of organophosphorus nerve agents over a broad range of temperatures.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Semcer, Rebecca L; Shah, Saumil S; Grunden, Amy M

    2011-01-01

    Prolidases hydrolyze Xaa-Pro dipeptides and can also cleave the P-F and P-O bonds found in organophosphorus (OP) compounds, including the nerve agents soman and sarin. Ph1prol (PH0974) has previously been isolated and characterized from Pyrococcus horikoshii and was shown to have higher catalytic activity over a broader pH range, higher affinity for metal, and increased thermostability compared to P. furiosus prolidase, Pfprol (PF1343). To obtain a better enzyme for OP nerve agent decontamination and to investigate the structural factors that may influence protein thermostability and thermoactivity, randomly mutated Ph1prol enzymes were prepared. Four Ph1prol mutants (A195T/G306S-, Y301C/K342N-, E127G/E252D-, and E36V-Ph1prol) were isolated which had greater thermostability and improved activity over a broader range of temperatures against Xaa-Pro dipeptides and OP nerve agents compared to wild type Pyrococcus prolidases. PMID:22162664

  7. Extension of the energy range of experimental activation cross-sections data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on indium up to 50MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-11-01

    The energy range of our earlier measured activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on indium were extended from 40MeV up to 50MeV. The traditional stacked foil irradiation technique and non-destructive gamma spectrometry were used. No experimental data were found in literature for this higher energy range. Experimental cross-sections for the formation of the radionuclides (113,110)Sn, (116m,115m,114m,113m,111,110g,109)In and (115)Cd are reported in the 37-50MeV energy range, for production of (110)Sn and (110g,109)In these are the first measurements ever. The experimental data were compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS 1.6 nuclear model code as listed in the on-line library TENDL-2014. PMID:26226220

  8. Assessment of long-range correlation in animal behavior time series: The temporal pattern of locomotor activity of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix) and mosquito larva (Culex quinquefasciatus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kembro, Jackelyn M.; Flesia, Ana Georgina; Gleiser, Raquel M.; Perillo, María A.; Marin, Raul H.

    2013-12-01

    Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is a method that has been frequently used to determine the presence of long-range correlations in human and animal behaviors. However, according to previous authors using statistical model systems, in order to correctly use DFA different aspects should be taken into account such as: (1) the establishment by hypothesis testing of the absence of short term correlation, (2) an accurate estimation of a straight line in the log-log plot of the fluctuation function, (3) the elimination of artificial crossovers in the fluctuation function, and (4) the length of the time series. Taking into consideration these factors, herein we evaluated the presence of long-range correlation in the temporal pattern of locomotor activity of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix) and mosquito larva (Culex quinquefasciatus). In our study, modeling the data with the general autoregressive integrated moving average (ARFIMA) model, we rejected the hypothesis of short-range correlations (d=0) in all cases. We also observed that DFA was able to distinguish between the artificial crossover observed in the temporal pattern of locomotion of Japanese quail and the crossovers in the correlation behavior observed in mosquito larvae locomotion. Although the test duration can slightly influence the parameter estimation, no qualitative differences were observed between different test durations.

  9. Impacts of chemical amendment and plant growth on lead speciation and enzyme activities in a shooting range soil: an x-ray absorption fine structure investigation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yohey; Matsufuru, Hiroki; Takaoka, Masaki; Tanida, Hajime; Sato, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    In situ chemical immobilization is a practical remediation technology for metal-contaminated soils because of its capability to reduce cost and environmental impacts. We assessed the immobilization effects of poultry waste amendment and plant growth (Panicum maximum Jacq.) on Pb speciation and enzyme activities in shooting range soils. Soil contaminated with Pb was obtained from the top 20 cm of a shooting range. To evaluate Pb mobility in the soil profile treated with plants and immobilizing amendment, we used large columns filled with Pb-contaminated soil (0-20 cm, surface soils) and non-contaminated soil (20-75 cm, subsurface soils). The column study demonstrated that the amendment reduced the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure-extractable Pb in the surface soil by 90% of the Control soil. Lead mobility from the surface to subsurface profiles was significantly attenuated by plant growth but was promoted by the amendment without plant application. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis revealed that the amendment reduced the proportion of PbCO(3) and Pb-organic complexes and transformed them into a more geochemically stable species of Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl with 30 to 35% of the total Pb species. Applications of plant and amendment increased activities of dehydrogenase and phosphatase in the surface soil with 2.7- and 1.1-fold greater than those in Control, respectively. The use of amendments in combination with plant growth may have potential as an integrated remediation strategy that enables Pb immobilization and soil biological restoration in shooting range soils. PMID:19465717

  10. The Golden Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2004-01-01

    The Golden Ratio is sometimes called the "Golden Section" or the "Divine Proportion", in which three points: A, B, and C, divide a line in this proportion if AC/AB = AB/BC. "Donald in Mathmagicland" includes a section about the Golden Ratio and the ratios within a five-pointed star or pentagram. This article presents two computing exercises that…

  11. Design of Thermostable Beta-Propeller Phytases with Activity over a Broad Range of pHs and Their Overproduction by Pichia pastoris▿

    PubMed Central

    Viader-Salvadó, José M.; Gallegos-López, Juan A.; Carreón-Treviño, J. Gerardo; Castillo-Galván, Miguel; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Guerrero-Olazarán, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Thermostable phytases, which are active over broad pH ranges, may be useful as feed additives, since they can resist the temperatures used in the feed-pelleting process. We designed new beta-propeller phytases, using a structure-guided consensus approach, from a set of amino acid sequences from Bacillus phytases and engineered Pichia pastoris strains to overproduce the enzymes. The recombinant phytases were N-glycosylated, had the correct amino-terminal sequence, showed activity over a pH range of 2.5 to 9, showed a high residual activity after 10 min of heat treatment at 80°C and pH 5.5 or 7.5, and were more thermostable at pH 7.5 than a recombinant form of phytase C from Bacillus subtilis (GenBank accession no. AAC31775). A structural analysis suggested that the higher thermostability may be due to a larger number of hydrogen bonds and to the presence of P257 in a surface loop. In addition, D336 likely plays an important role in the thermostability of the phytases at pH 7.5. The recombinant phytases showed higher thermostability at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.5. This difference was likely due to a different protein total charge at pH 5.5 from that at pH 7.5. The recombinant beta-propeller phytases described here may have potential as feed additives and in the pretreatment of vegetable flours used as ingredients in animal diets. PMID:20693453

  12. Acute effects of muscle stretching on physical performance, range of motion, and injury incidence in healthy active individuals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Behm, David G; Blazevich, Anthony J; Kay, Anthony D; McHugh, Malachy

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been a shift from static stretching (SS) or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching within a warm-up to a greater emphasis on dynamic stretching (DS). The objective of this review was to compare the effects of SS, DS, and PNF on performance, range of motion (ROM), and injury prevention. The data indicated that SS- (-3.7%), DS- (+1.3%), and PNF- (-4.4%) induced performance changes were small to moderate with testing performed immediately after stretching, possibly because of reduced muscle activation after SS and PNF. A dose-response relationship illustrated greater performance deficits with ≥60 s (-4.6%) than with <60 s (-1.1%) SS per muscle group. Conversely, SS demonstrated a moderate (2.2%) performance benefit at longer muscle lengths. Testing was performed on average 3-5 min after stretching, and most studies did not include poststretching dynamic activities; when these activities were included, no clear performance effect was observed. DS produced small-to-moderate performance improvements when completed within minutes of physical activity. SS and PNF stretching had no clear effect on all-cause or overuse injuries; no data are available for DS. All forms of training induced ROM improvements, typically lasting <30 min. Changes may result from acute reductions in muscle and tendon stiffness or from neural adaptations causing an improved stretch tolerance. Considering the small-to-moderate changes immediately after stretching and the study limitations, stretching within a warm-up that includes additional poststretching dynamic activity is recommended for reducing muscle injuries and increasing joint ROM with inconsequential effects on subsequent athletic performance. PMID:26642915

  13. Drivers and Estimates of Terrain Suitability for Active Layer Detachment Slides and Retrogressive Thaw Slumps in the Brooks Range and Foothills of Northwest Alaska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balser, A.; Jones, J.

    2015-12-01

    Active layer detachment sliding and retrogressive thaw slumping are important modes of upland permafrost degradation and disturbance in permafrost regions, and have been linked with climate warming trends, ecosystem impacts, and permafrost carbon release. In the Brooks Range and foothills of northwest Alaska, these features are widespread, with distribution linked to multiple landscape properties. Inter-related and co-varying terrain properties, including surficial geology, topography, geomorphology, vegetation and hydrology, are generally considered key drivers of permafrost landscape characteristics and responses to climate perturbation. However, these inter-relationships as collective drivers of terrain suitability for active layer detachment and retrogressive thaw slump processes are poorly understood in this region. We empirically tested and refined a hypothetical model of terrain factors driving active layer detachment and retrogressive thaw slump terrain suitability, and used final model results to generate synoptic terrain suitability estimates across the study region. Spatial data for terrain properties were examined against locations of 2,492 observed active layer detachments and 805 observed retrogressive thaw slumps using structural equation modelling and integrated terrain unit analysis. Factors significant to achieving model fit were found to substantially hone and constrain region-wide terrain suitability estimates, suggesting that omission of relevant factors leads to broad overestimation of terrain suitability. Resulting probabilistic maps of terrain suitability, and a threshold-delineated mask of suitable terrain, were used to quantify and describe landscape settings typical of these features. 51% of the study region is estimated suitable terrain for retrogressive thaw slumps, compared with 35% for active layer detachment slides, while 29% of the study region is estimated suitable for both. Results improve current understanding of arctic landscape

  14. Range of variation of genu valgum and association with anthropometric characteristics and physical activity: comparison between children aged 3-9 years.

    PubMed

    Kaspiris, Angelos; Zaphiropoulou, Chrisi; Vasiliadis, Elias

    2013-07-01

    The lower limbs of children aged 3-9 years present varying knock-knee deformities that have a direct impact on the diversification of the load-bearing axis of the valgus limb and on the modification of gait kinematics. The purpose of our study was to establish the reference values of knee alignment in a Greek population and whether this is linked to a change in the physical activity of children depending on the severity of the genu valgum. Using a clinical method, we measured both the tibiofemoral (TF) angle and the intermalleolar (IM) distance of the lower extremities of normal children. Subsequently, forms of the Netherlands Physical Activity Questionnaire (NPAQ) for young children and the Baecke questionnaire on habitual physical activity, modified especially for children, were completed by the parents. We examined both the development of the TF angle and the IM distance in relation to age and the degree of restriction of physical activity in relation to the severity of the genu valgum. We analysed 316 unaffected lower extremities in children aged 3-9 years. The average value of the TF angle starts around 7° at the age of 3 years and gradually decreases to 4° at the age of 7-8 years. The average value of the IM distance ranges over 3.5 cm at the age of 3 years and progressively decreases to 2 cm at the age of 7-8 years. Physical activity appears to be influenced by sex and the severity of the genu valgum. We provide age-specific values for limb alignment and joint orientation of the lower extremity in children aged 3-9 years. A statistical correlation between all indexes (sport, leisure time and total) of the Baecke and the NPAQs and measurements of genu valgum was noted depending on the severity of the valgus deformity. PMID:23563283

  15. Arcjet Nozzle Area Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  16. [Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion ratio].

    PubMed

    Guenard, H

    1987-01-01

    The ratios of ventilatory (V) and perfusion (Q) flow rates in the lung are to a large extent responsible for the efficiency of gas exchange. In a simplified monocompartmental model of the lung, the arterial partial pressure of a given gas (Pa) is a function of several factors: the solubility of this gas in blood, its venous and inspired partial pressures and the V/Q ratio. In a multicompartemental model, the mean arterial partial pressure of the gas is a function of the individual values of Pa in each compartment as well as the distribution of V/Q ratios in the lung and the relationship between the concentration and the partial pressure of the gas. The heterogeneity of the distribution of V/Q results from those of both V and Q. Two factors are mainly responsible for this heterogeneity: the gravity and the morphometric characteristics of bronchi and vessels. V/Q ratios are partially controlled at least in low V/Q compartments since hypoxia in these compartments leads to pulmonary arteriolar vasoconstriction. However lungs V/Q ratios range from 0.1 to 10 with a mode around 1. Age, muscular exercise, posture, accelerations, anesthesia, O2 breathing, pulmonary pathology are factors which may alter the distribution of V/Q ratios. PMID:3332289

  17. Arcjet nozzle area ratio effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  18. ISEE 3 observations during the CDAW 8 intervals - Case studies of the distant geomagnetic tail covering a wide range of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Slavin, J. A.; Owen, C. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Galvin, A. B.; Sanderson, T. R.; Scholer, M.

    1989-01-01

    Observations made by the ISEE 3 spacecraft in the distant geomagnetic tail during the eight CDAW 8 intervals are discussed, along with their relation to concurrent geomagnetic activity. This extensive multiinstrument case study of distant tail data covers a wide range of geomagnetic conditions from extended intervals of magnetic quiet with isolated substorms to prolonged periods of intense disturbance. Plasmoids are observed in the distant tail following disturbance enhancements, the time of their appearance being generally consistent with disconnection from the near-earth region at the time of the enhancement. Their structure is entirely consistent with the neutral line model. However, not all enhancements in geomagnetic activity result in the observation of plasmoids. In particular, the CDAW 8 data suggest that, during extended intervals of strong activity, a continuous neutral line may reside in the near-earth tail and some disturbance enhancements may then relate to an increase in the reconnection rate at a preexisting neutral line, rather than to new neutral line and plasmoid formation.

  19. An acute bout of self-myofascial release increases range of motion without a subsequent decrease in muscle activation or force.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Graham Z; Penney, Michael D H; Mullaley, Michelle E; Cuconato, Amanda L; Drake, Corey D J; Behm, David G; Button, Duane C

    2013-03-01

    Foam rolling is thought to improve muscular function, performance, overuse, and joint range of motion (ROM); however, there is no empirical evidence demonstrating this. Thus, the objective of the study was to determine the effect of self-myofascial release (SMR) via foam roller application on knee extensor force and activation and knee joint ROM. Eleven healthy male (height 178.9 ± 3.5 cm, mass 86.3 ± 7.4 kg, age 22.3 ± 3.8 years) subjects who were physically active participated. Subjects' quadriceps maximum voluntary contraction force, evoked force and activation, and knee joint ROM were measured before, 2 minutes, and 10 minutes after 2 conditions: (a) 2, 1-minute trials of SMR of the quadriceps via a foam roller and (b) no SMR (Control). A 2-way analysis of variance (condition × time) with repeated measures was performed on all dependent variables recorded in the precondition and postcondition tests. There were no significant differences between conditions for any of the neuromuscular dependent variables. However, after foam rolling, subjects' ROM significantly (p < 0.001) increased by 10° and 8° at 2 and 10 minutes, respectively. There was a significant (p < 0.01) negative correlation between subjects' force and ROM before foam rolling, which no longer existed after foam rolling. In conclusion, an acute bout of SMR of the quadriceps was an effective treatment to acutely enhance knee joint ROM without a concomitant deficit in muscle performance. PMID:22580977

  20. The replication initiation protein of the broad-host-range plasmid RK2 is activated by the ClpX chaperone.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, I; Helinski, D R

    1997-12-23

    Initiation and control of replication of the broad-host-range plasmid RK2 requires two plasmid-encoded elements, the replication origin (oriV) and the initiation protein TrfA. Purified TrfA is largely in the form of a dimer; however, only the monomeric form of the protein can bind specifically to the direct repeats (iterons) at the RK2 origin. The largely dimeric form of wild-type TrfA is inactive in the initiation of replication of RK2 in an in vitro replication system reconstituted from purified components. However, preincubation of the TrfA protein with the ClpX molecular chaperone isolated from Escherichia coli activates the initiator protein for replication in the purified system. We further observed that ClpX, in an ATP-dependent reaction, greatly increases the proportion of TrfA monomers and, therefore, the ability of this protein to bind to iterons localized within RK2 origin. Finally, a copy-up mutant of the TrfA protein which is largely in the monomer form is active in the reconstituted in vitro replication system, and its activity is not affected by ClpX. PMID:9405620

  1. Optimization of NaOH Molarity, LUSI Mud/Alkaline Activator, and Na2SiO3/NaOH Ratio to Produce Lightweight Aggregate-Based Geopolymer

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Razak, Rafiza; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Hardjito, Djwantoro; Yahya, Zarina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical function and characterization of an artificial lightweight geopolymer aggregate (ALGA) using LUSI (Sidoarjo mud) and alkaline activator as source materials. LUSI stands for LU-Lumpur and SI-Sidoarjo, meaning mud from Sidoarjo which erupted near the Banjarpanji-1 exploration well in Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia on 27 May 2006. The effect of NaOH molarity, LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA) ratio, and Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio to the ALGA are investigated at a sintering temperature of 950 °C. The results show that the optimum NaOH molarity found in this study is 12 M due to the highest strength (lowest AIV value) of 15.79% with lower water absorption and specific gravity. The optimum LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA) ratio of 1.7 and the Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 0.4 gives the highest strength with AIV value of 15.42% with specific gravity of 1.10 g/cm3 and water absorption of 4.7%. The major synthesized crystalline phases were identified as sodalite, quartz and albite. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image showed more complete geopolymer matrix which contributes to highest strength of ALGA produced. PMID:26006238

  2. Optimization of NaOH Molarity, LUSI Mud/Alkaline Activator, and Na2SiO3/NaOH Ratio to Produce Lightweight Aggregate-Based Geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Razak, Rafiza Abdul; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Hardjito, Djwantoro; Yahya, Zarina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical function and characterization of an artificial lightweight geopolymer aggregate (ALGA) using LUSI (Sidoarjo mud) and alkaline activator as source materials. LUSI stands for LU-Lumpur and SI-Sidoarjo, meaning mud from Sidoarjo which erupted near the Banjarpanji-1 exploration well in Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia on 27 May 2006. The effect of NaOH molarity, LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA) ratio, and Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio to the ALGA are investigated at a sintering temperature of 950 °C. The results show that the optimum NaOH molarity found in this study is 12 M due to the highest strength (lowest AIV value) of 15.79% with lower water absorption and specific gravity. The optimum LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA) ratio of 1.7 and the Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 0.4 gives the highest strength with AIV value of 15.42% with specific gravity of 1.10 g/cm3 and water absorption of 4.7%. The major synthesized crystalline phases were identified as sodalite, quartz and albite. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image showed more complete geopolymer matrix which contributes to highest strength of ALGA produced. PMID:26006238

  3. Ovarian cycle activity varies with respect to age and social status in free-ranging elephants in Addo Elephant National Park, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Elizabeth W.; Meyer, Jordana M.; Putman, Sarah B.; Schulte, Bruce A.; Brown, Janine L.

    2013-01-01

    Free-ranging African elephants live in a fission–fusion society, at the centre of which is the matriarch. Matriarchs are generally older females that guide their families to resources and co-ordinate group defense. While much is known about elephant society, knowledge is generally lacking about how age affects the physiology of wild elephants. Investigation of the ovarian activity of free-ranging elephants could provide insight into the reproductive ageing process, with implications for population management. Faecal samples were collected from 46 individuals ranging in age from 14 to 60 years for a 2-year period, and progestagen metabolite analyses were used to examine relationships between social status, age, season, and ovarian activity in female elephants in Addo Elephant National Park, South Africa. Social status was the strongest predictor of faecal progestagen metabolite concentrations in non-pregnant elephants, with grand matriarchs (n = 6) having the lowest values compared with matriarchs (n = 21) and non-matriarch females (n = 19). Likewise, social status and age were the strongest predictors of faecal progestagen metabolite concentrations in pregnant elephants (n = 27). The number of years since a non-pregnant female gave birth to her last calf (post-partum duration) was longer for older females with a higher social status, as well as during the dry season. Our results indicate that social standing and age of elephants are related to reproductive function, and that older females exhibit reductions in ovarian capacity. These results expand our understanding of reproduction and fertility throughout an elephant's lifespan, and the factors that impact gonadal function in free-ranging females. Given that possible over-abundance of elephants in areas such as Addo Elephant National Park is fuelling the debate over how best to manage these populations, knowledge about the reproductive potential of high-ranking females can provide managers with

  4. A Ratio Explanation for Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riss, Pam Helfers

    1993-01-01

    Describes hands-on physical anthropology activities for teaching students about evolution. Using evidence found in hominid skulls, students conduct investigations that involve calculating ratios. Eight full-page photographs of skulls from the program Stones and Bones are included. (PR)

  5. Mirror activity in the human brain while observing hand movements: a comparison between EEG desynchronization in the mu-range and previous fMRI results.

    PubMed

    Perry, Anat; Bentin, Shlomo

    2009-07-28

    Mu (mu) rhythms are EEG oscillations between 8-13 Hz distinguished from alpha by having more anterior distribution and being desynchronized by motor rather than visual activity. Evidence accumulating during the last decade suggests that the desynchronization of mu rhythms (mu suppression) might be also a manifestation of a human Mirror Neuron System (MNS). To further explore this hypothesis we used a paradigm that, in a previous fMRI study, successfully activated this putative MNS in humans. Our direct goal was to provide further support for a link between modulation of mu rhythms and the MNS, by finding parallels between the reported patterns of fMRI activations and patterns of mu suppression. The EEG power in the mu range has been recorded while participants passively observed either a left or a right hand, reaching to and grasping objects, and compared it with that recorded while participants observed the movement of a ball, and while observing static grasping scenes or still objects. Mirroring fMRI results (Shmuelof, L., Zohary, E., 2005. Dissociation between ventral and dorsal fMRI activation during object and action recognition. Neuron 47, 457-470), mu suppression was larger in the hemisphere contra-lateral to the moving hand and larger when the hands grasped different objects in different ways than when the movement was repetitive. No suppression was found while participants observed still objects but mu suppression was also found while seeing static grasping postures. These data are discussed in light of similar parallels between modulations of alpha waves and fMRI while recording EEG in the magnet. The present data support a link between mu suppression and a human MNS. PMID:19500557

  6. Inhibition of microglial activity alters spinal wide dynamic range neuron discharge and reduces microglial Toll-like receptor 4 expression in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Nazemi, Samad; Manaheji, Homa; Noorbakhsh, Syyed Mohammad; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Mohammad-Zadeh, Mohammad; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    It is believed that neuropathic pain results from aberrant neuronal discharges although some evidence suggests that the activation of glia cells contributes to pain after an injury to the nervous system. This study aimed to evaluate the role of microglial activation on the hyper-responsiveness of wide dynamic range neurons (WDR) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expressions in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (230 ± 30 g) underwent surgery for induction of CCI neuropathy. Six days after surgery, administration of minocycline (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) was initiated and continued until day 14. After administration of the last dose of minocycline or saline, a behavioral test was conducted, then animals were sacrificed and lumbar segments of the spinal cord were collected for Western blot analysis of TLR4 expression. The electrophysiological properties of WDR neurons were investigated by single unit recordings in separate groups. The findings showed that after CCI, in parallel with thermal hyperalgesia, the expression of TLR4 in the spinal cord and the evoked response of the WDR neurons to electrical, mechanical, and thermal stimulation significantly increased. Post-injury administration of minocycline effectively decreased thermal hyperalgesia, TLR4 expression, and hyper-responsiveness of WDR neurons in CCI rats. The results of this study indicate that post-injury, repeated administration of minocycline attenuated neuropathic pain by suppressing microglia activation and reducing WDR neuron hyper-responsiveness. This study confirms that post-injury modulation of microglial activity is a new strategy for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:25933029

  7. Broad range of inhibiting action of novel camphor-based compound with anti-hemagglutinin activity against influenza viruses in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zarubaev, V V; Garshinina, A V; Tretiak, T S; Fedorova, V A; Shtro, A A; Sokolova, A S; Yarovaya, O I; Salakhutdinov, N F

    2015-08-01

    Influenza virus continues to remain one of the leading human respiratory pathogens causing significant morbidity and mortality around the globe. Due to short-term life cycle and high rate of mutations influenza virus is able to rapidly develop resistance to clinically available antivirals. This makes necessary the search and development of new drugs with different targets and mechanisms of activity. Here we report anti-influenza activity of camphor derivative 1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-ylidene-aminoethanol (camphecene). In in vitro experiments it inhibited influenza viruses A(H1, H1pdm09, H3 and H5 subtypes) and B with EC50's lying in micromolar range. Due to low cytotoxicity it resulted in high selectivity indices (74-661 depending on the virus). This effect did not depend on susceptibility or resistance of the viruses to adamantane derivatives amantadine and rimantadine. The compound appeared the most effective when added at the early stages of viral life cycle (0-2h p.i.). In direct hemagglutinin inhibition tests camphecene was shown to decrease the activity of HA's of influenza viruses A and B. The activity of camphecene was further confirmed in experiments with influenza virus-infected mice, in which, being used orally by therapeutic schedule (once a day, days 1-5 p.i.) it decreased specific mortality of animals infected with both influenza A and B viruses (highest indices of protection 66.7% and 88.9%, respectively). Taken together, these results are encouraging for further development of camphecene-based drug(s) and for exploration of camphor derivatives as highly prospective group of potential antivirals. PMID:26072310

  8. Support of Joint Function, Range of Motion, and Physical Activity Levels by Consumption of a Water-Soluble Egg Membrane Hydrolyzate

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Gitte S.; Lenninger, Miki R.; Beaman, Joni L.; Taylor, Robert; Benson, Kathleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the effects of consumption of hydrolyzed water-soluble egg membrane (WSEM) on joint function in an otherwise healthy population experiencing chronic pain. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study included two 4-week periods of placebo and WSEM consumption, separated by a 4-week washout period. Twenty-five study participants were randomized to either the “placebo-first” or “WSEM first” sequence in the crossover trial, and 22 participants completed the study requirements. Range of motion (ROM) was assessed using digital inclinometry for joints associated with vertical weight bearing from neck to knees and for shoulders. Pain at rest and when physically active was scored for the same anatomical areas using visual analog scales (VAS). Physical functioning was tracked using questionnaires with VAS. Consumption of WSEM was associated with improved ROM for neck, spine, hips, and knees, with ROM for the neck and right knee being significantly improved during WSEM consumption compared to placebo (P < .05). ROM improvement for the dominant shoulder was highly significant during WSEM consumption (P < .01). Physical activity levels were significantly higher after WSEM than after placebo consumption (P < .05). Many aspects of physical functioning as part of daily living improved. Subgroup analysis showed rapid improvement of lower back pain after 5 days of WSEM consumption compared to placebo consumption (P < .05) in subjects who participated in the study during the winter season. Daily consumption of 450 mg WSEM was associated with improved joint function, comfort during daily activities, and increased physical activity. PMID:26355952

  9. Feroxyhyte nanoflakes coupled to up-converting carbon nanodots: a highly active, magnetically recoverable, Fenton-like photocatalyst in the visible-NIR range.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Liebana, M C; Hueso, J L; Larrea, A; Sebastian, V; Santamaria, J

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced photocatalytic response of a novel Fenton-like heterogeneous catalyst obtained through the assembly of superparamagnetic feroxyhyte nanoflakes synthesized by continuous gas-slug microfluidics and carbon nanodots obtained by pyrolysis from a natural organic source. The novel nanohybrids enable the utilization of the visible and near-infrared ranges due to the active role of the carbon nanodots as up-converting photo-sensitizers. This novel photocatalyst is magnetically recoverable and maintains an excellent response after multiple reutilization cycles. In addition, its synthesis is based on inexpensive and abundant raw materials and its photocatalytic response is evaluated in the presence of energy efficient, affordable light-emitting diodes (LEDs), thereby providing a promising and feasible alternative to the homogeneous Fenton process. PMID:26421733

  10. A small-scale hyperacute compound eye featuring active eye tremor: application to visual stabilization, target tracking, and short-range odometry.

    PubMed

    Colonnier, Fabien; Manecy, Augustin; Juston, Raphaël; Mallot, Hanspeter; Leitel, Robert; Floreano, Dario; Viollet, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a miniature artificial compound eye (15 mm in diameter) called the curved artificial compound eye (CurvACE) was endowed for the first time with hyperacuity, using similar micro-movements to those occurring in the fly's compound eye. A periodic micro-scanning movement of only a few degrees enables the vibrating compound eye to locate contrasting objects with a 40-fold greater resolution than that imposed by the interommatidial angle. In this study, we developed a new algorithm merging the output of 35 local processing units consisting of adjacent pairs of artificial ommatidia. The local measurements performed by each pair are processed in parallel with very few computational resources, which makes it possible to reach a high refresh rate of 500 Hz. An aerial robotic platform with two degrees of freedom equipped with the active CurvACE placed over naturally textured panels was able to assess its linear position accurately with respect to the environment thanks to its efficient gaze stabilization system. The algorithm was found to perform robustly at different light conditions as well as distance variations relative to the ground and featured small closed-loop positioning errors of the robot in the range of 45 mm. In addition, three tasks of interest were performed without having to change the algorithm: short-range odometry, visual stabilization, and tracking contrasting objects (hands) moving over a textured background. PMID:25712307

  11. Home range and travels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  12. Laser Ranging Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazolla, Sabino; Hemmati, Hamid; Tratt, David

    2003-01-01

    Laser Ranging Simulation Program (LRSP) is a computer program that predicts selected aspects of the performances of a laser altimeter or other laser ranging or remote-sensing systems and is especially applicable to a laser-based system used to map terrain from a distance of several kilometers. Designed to run in a more recent version (5 or higher) of the MATLAB programming language, LRSP exploits the numerical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB. LRSP generates a graphical user interface that includes a pop-up menu that prompts the user for the input of data that determine the performance of a laser ranging system. Examples of input data include duration and energy of the laser pulse, the laser wavelength, the width of the laser beam, and several parameters that characterize the transmitting and receiving optics, the receiving electronic circuitry, and the optical properties of the atmosphere and the terrain. When the input data have been entered, LRSP computes the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of range, signal and noise currents, and ranging and pointing errors.

  13. Highly Active and Robust Metalloporphyrin Catalysts for the Synthesis of Cyclic Carbonates from a Broad Range of Epoxides and Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Chihiro; Shimonishi, Junta; Miyazaki, Ray; Hasegawa, Jun-Ya; Ema, Tadashi

    2016-05-01

    Bifunctional metalloporphyrins with quaternary ammonium bromides (nucleophiles) at the meta, para, or ortho positions of meso-phenyl groups were synthesized as catalysts for the formation of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide under solvent-free conditions. The meta-substituted catalysts exhibited high catalytic performance, whereas the para- and ortho-substituted catalysts showed moderate and low activity, respectively. DFT calculations revealed the origin of the advantage of the meta-substituted catalyst, which could use the flexible quaternary ammonium cation at the meta position to stabilize various anionic species generated during catalysis. A zinc(II) porphyrin with eight nucleophiles at the meta positions showed very high catalytic activity (turnover number (TON)=240 000 at 120 °C, turnover frequency (TOF)=31 500 h(-1) at 170 °C) at an initial CO2 pressure of 1.7 MPa; catalyzed the reaction even at atmospheric CO2 pressure (balloon) at ambient temperature (20 °C); and was applicable to a broad range of substrates, including terminal and internal epoxides. PMID:26990557

  14. Neocortical inhibitory activities and long-range afferents contribute to the synchronous onset of silent states of the neocortical slow oscillation.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Maxime; Chauvette, Sylvain; Timofeev, Igor

    2015-02-01

    During slow-wave sleep, neurons of the thalamocortical network are engaged in a slow oscillation (<1 Hz), which consists of an alternation between the active and the silent states. Several studies have provided insights on the transition from the silent, which are essentially periods of disfacilitation, to the active states. However, the conditions leading to the synchronous onset of the silent state remain elusive. We hypothesized that a synchronous input to local inhibitory neurons could contribute to the transition to the silent state in the cat suprasylvian gyrus during natural sleep and under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. After partial and complete deafferentation of the cortex, we found that the silent state onset was more variable among remote sites. We found that the transition to the silent state was preceded by a reduction in excitatory postsynaptic potentials and firing probability in cortical neurons. We tested the impact of chloride-mediated inhibition in the silent-state onset. We uncovered a long-duration (100-300 ms) inhibitory barrage occurring about 250 ms before the silent state onset in 3-6% of neurons during anesthesia and in 12-15% of cases during natural sleep. These inhibitory activities caused a decrease in cortical firing that reduced the excitatory drive in the neocortical network. That chain reaction of disfacilitation ends up on the silent state. Electrical stimuli could trigger a network silent state with a maximal efficacy in deep cortical layers. We conclude that long-range afferents to the neocortex and chloride-mediated inhibition play a role in the initiation of the silent state. PMID:25392176

  15. Quantifying asymmetry: ratios and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Franks, Erin M; Cabo, Luis L

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, the study of metric skeletal asymmetry has relied largely on univariate analyses, utilizing ratio transformations when the goal is comparing asymmetries in skeletal elements or populations of dissimilar dimensions. Under this approach, raw asymmetries are divided by a size marker, such as a bilateral average, in an attempt to produce size-free asymmetry indices. Henceforth, this will be referred to as "controlling for size" (see Smith: Curr Anthropol 46 (2005) 249-273). Ratios obtained in this manner often require further transformations to interpret the meaning and sources of asymmetry. This model frequently ignores the fundamental assumption of ratios: the relationship between the variables entered in the ratio must be isometric. Violations of this assumption can obscure existing asymmetries and render spurious results. In this study, we examined the performance of the classic indices in detecting and portraying the asymmetry patterns in four human appendicular bones and explored potential methodological alternatives. Examination of the ratio model revealed that it does not fulfill its intended goals in the bones examined, as the numerator and denominator are independent in all cases. The ratios also introduced strong biases in the comparisons between different elements and variables, generating spurious asymmetry patterns. Multivariate analyses strongly suggest that any transformation to control for overall size or variable range must be conducted before, rather than after, calculating the asymmetries. A combination of exploratory multivariate techniques, such as Principal Components Analysis, and confirmatory linear methods, such as regression and analysis of covariance, appear as a promising and powerful alternative to the use of ratios. PMID:24842694

  16. Lactose electroisomerization into lactulose: effect of the electrode material, active membrane surface area-to-electrode surface area ratio, and interelectrode-membrane distance.

    PubMed

    Aït-Aissa, Amara; Aïder, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study and develop an innovative, clean, and environmentally friendly process for lactulose synthesis by electroactivation of lactose. In this work, the electrode material (type 304 stainless steel, titanium, and copper), dimensionless interelectrode-membrane distance at the cathodic compartment (0.36, 0.68, and 1), and the membrane:electrode surface area ratio (0.23, 0.06, and 0.015) were considered to be the factors that could affect the kinetic conversion of lactose into lactulose. The reactions were conducted under an initial lactose concentration of 0.15mol/L at 10°C, Froude number (mixing speed) of 2.05×10(-2), and electric current intensity of 300mA for 30min. The highest lactulose formation yield of 32.50% (0.05mol/L) was obtained by using a copper electrode, interelectrode-membrane distance of 0.36, and membrane:electrode surface area ratio of 0.23. The 2-parameter Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherm models were used for the prediction of the lactose isomerization kinetics as well as the 3-parameter Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model. It was shown that the lactose isomerization kinetics into lactulose followed the Temkin and Langmuir-Freundlich models with coefficients of determination of 0.99 and 0.90 and a relative error of 1.42 to 1.56% and 4.27 to 4.37%, respectively. PMID:24931526

  17. Measurements of the cross section for the (182)W(n,p)(182(m+g))Ta and (184)(n,p)(184)Ta reactions in the 14MeV energy range using the activation technique.

    PubMed

    Song, Yueli; Zhou, Fengqun; Tian, Mingli; Li, Yong; Yuan, Shuqing; Lan, Changlin

    2015-04-01

    The cross section for the (182)W(n,p)(182(m+g))Ta and (184)W(n,p)(184)Ta reactions has been measured in the neutron energy range of 13.5-14.7MeV using the activation technique and a coaxial HPGe γ-ray detector. In our experiment, the fast neutrons were produced by the T(d,n)(4)He reaction at the ZF-300-II Intense Neutron Generator at Lanzhou University. Natural wolfram foils of 99.9% purity were used as target materials. The neutron flux was determined using the monitor reaction (93)Nb(n,2n)(92m)Nb and the neutron energies were determined using the method of cross-section ratio measurements employing the (90)Zr(n,2n)(89)Zr to (93)Nb(n,2n)(92m)Nb reactions. The results of this work are compared with experimental data found in the literature and the estimates obtained from a published empirical formula based on the statistical model with Q-value dependence and odd-even effects taken into consideration. PMID:25617709

  18. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-01

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide. PMID:17778807

  20. Sialyltransferase and Neuraminidase Levels/Ratios and Sialic Acid Levels in Peripheral Blood B Cells Correlate with Measures of Disease Activity in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Lieh-bang; Huang, Che-ching

    2016-01-01

    Objective We attempted to determine whether the level of enzymes sialyltransferase (ST) and neuraminidase (Neu) and sialic acid (SIA) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlates with the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) correlates with the Disease Activity Score28 (DAS28). Methods We examined cell-surface levels of ST6Gal-1, Neu1, ST3Gal-1, Neu3, α-2,6-SIA, and α-2,3-SIA by using fluorescent anti-enzyme antibodies, fluorescent-conjugated Sambucus nigra lectin, and fluorescent-conjugated Maackia amurensis lectin on blood cells in SLE and RA patients and assessed correlations of these levels with SLEDAI and with DAS28. Areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for different variables against SLEDAI. Results The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio positively correlated with SLEDAI scores (ρ = 0.409 and P = 0.002, statistically significant after Bonferroni’ correction for multiple analyses.). It was supported by the inverse correlation of B-cell Neu3 levels with SLEDAI scores (ρ = −0.264, P = 0.048). The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio against SLEDAI yielded an AUC of 0.689, which was comparable to that of anti-dsDNA levels at 0.635. In contrast, both ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels of RA B cells (r = 0.376, P = 0.013; r = 0.425, P = 0.005, respectively) correlated positively with high disease-activity DAS28 scores. Conclusion B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratios in SLE and B-cell ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels in RA with high disease-activity DAS28 scores correlated with disease activity measures and may be useful in monitoring disease activities. PMID:26981635

  1. Activity cycles and foraging behaviors of free-ranging sidewinder rattlesnakes (Crotalus cerastes): the ontogeny of hunting in a precocial vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rulon W; Dorr, Scott W; Whitford, Malachi D; Freymiller, Grace A; Putman, Breanna J

    2016-06-01

    Predators often employ a complex series of behaviors to overcome antipredator defenses and effectively capture prey. Although hunting behaviors can improve with age and experience, many precocial species are necessarily effective predators from birth. Additionally, many predators experience innate ontogenetic shifts in predatory strategies as they grow, allowing them to adapt to prey more appropriate for their increased size and energetic needs. Understanding how the relative roles of innate age-specific adaptation and learning have evolved requires information on how predation behavior develops in situ, in free-ranging predators. However, most of the research on the ontogeny of predation behavior is based on laboratory studies of captive animals, largely due to the difficulty of following newborn individuals in nature. Here, we take advantage of the unique tracks left by juveniles of a precocial viperid, the sidewinder rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes), which we used to follow free-ranging snakes in the field. We recorded details of their ambush hunting behavior, and compared the behaviors of these juveniles to adult snakes that we monitored in the field via radio telemetry. Although juvenile and adult behaviors were similar in most respects, we did find that adults chose more effective ambush sites, which may be due to their increased experience. We also found that juveniles (but typically not adults) perform periodic tail undulations while in ambush, and that juveniles displayed slightly different activity cycles. Both of these latter differences are likely the result of age-specific adaptations for juveniles' greater reliance on lizards versus small mammals as prey. We also compared the general predatory behavior of sidewinders to that of other species in the genus Crotalus. These findings will provide important baseline field information for more detailed empirical research on the ontogeny of predation behavior in precocial vertebrates. PMID:26997261

  2. Dingoes at the Doorstep: Home Range Sizes and Activity Patterns of Dingoes and Other Wild Dogs around Urban Areas of North-Eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Alice T.; Leung, Luke K. -P.; Goullet, Mark S.; Gentle, Matthew N.; Allen, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    Simple summary Conflicts with dingoes and other wild dogs are becoming increasingly common in and around urban areas of Australia. A lack of basic information about wild dog movement ecology hampers efficient planning and allocation of resources to mitigate human–wild dog conflicts. We captured, collared and released 37 wild dogs in urban areas of north-eastern Australia to investigate their movement ecology. In general, wild dogs occupied small fragments of bushland within an urban matrix, were active at all times of the day, and lived within a few hundred meters of houses and humans at all times. We conclude that wild dog management strategies in urban areas should focus on the mitigation of impacts at the individual or group level, and not population-level reductions in numbers. Abstract Top-predators around the world are becoming increasingly intertwined with humans, sometimes causing conflict and increasing safety risks in urban areas. In Australia, dingoes and dingo × domestic dog hybrids are common in many urban areas, and pose a variety of human health and safety risks. However, data on urban dingo ecology is scant. We GPS-collared 37 dingoes in north-eastern Australia and continuously monitored them each 30 min for 11–394 days. Most dingoes were nocturnal, with an overall mean home range size of 17.47 km2. Overall mean daily distance travelled was 6.86 km/day. At all times dingoes were within 1000 m of houses and buildings. Home ranges appeared to be constrained to patches of suitable vegetation fragments within and around human habitation. These data can be used to reallocate dingo management effort towards mitigating actual conflicts between humans and dingoes in urban areas. PMID:27537916

  3. Formation of chloroplast protrusions and catalase activity in alpine Ranunculus glacialis under elevated temperature and different CO2/O2 ratios.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Othmar; Moser, Tim; Karadar, Matthias; Roach, Thomas; Kranner, Ilse; Holzinger, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Chloroplast protrusions (CPs) have frequently been observed in plants, but their significance to plant metabolism remains largely unknown. We investigated in the alpine plant Ranunculus glacialis L. treated under various CO2 concentrations if CP formation is related to photorespiration, specifically focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) metabolism. Immediately after exposure to different CO2 concentrations, the formation of CPs in leaf mesophyll cells was assessed and correlated to catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities. Under natural irradiation, the relative proportion of chloroplasts with protrusions (rCP) was highest (58.7 %) after exposure to low CO2 (38 ppm) and was lowest (3.0 %) at high CO2 (10,000 ppm). The same relationship was found for CAT activity, which decreased from 34.7 nkat mg(-1) DW under low CO2 to 18.4 nkat mg(-1) DW under high CO2, while APX activity did not change significantly. When exposed to natural CO2 concentration (380 ppm) in darkness, CP formation was significantly lower (18.2 %) compared to natural solar irradiation (41.3 %). In summary, CP formation and CAT activity are significantly increased under conditions that favour photorespiration, while in darkness or at high CO2 concentration under light, CP formation is significantly lower, providing evidence for an association between CPs and photorespiration. PMID:25701381

  4. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crea, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    In the area of crop specie identification, it has been found that temporal data analysis, preliminary stratification, and unequal probability analysis were several of the factors that contributed to high identification accuracies. Single data set accuracies on fields of greater than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) are in the 70- to 90-percent range; however, with the use of temporal data, accuracies of 95 percent have been reported. Identification accuracy drops off significantly on areas of less than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) as does measurement accuracy. Forest stratification into coniferous and deciduous areas has been accomplished to a 90- to 95-percent accuracy level. Using multistage sampling techniques, the timber volume of a national forest district has been estimated to a confidence level and standard deviation acceptable to the Forest Service at a very favorable cost-benefit time ratio. Range specie/plant community vegetation mapping has been accomplished at various levels of success (69- to 90-percent accuracy). However, several investigators have obtained encouraging initial results in range biomass (forage production) estimation and range readiness predictions. Soil association map correction and soil association mapping in new area appear to have been proven feasible on large areas; however, testing in a complex soil area should be undertaken.

  5. Burnup estimation of fuel sourcing radioactive material based on monitored Cs and Pu isotopic activity ratios in Fukushima N. P. S. accident

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, T.; Suzuki, M.; Ando, Y.

    2012-07-01

    After the severe core damage of Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Station, radioactive material leaked from the reactor buildings. As part of monitoring of radioactivity in the site, measurements of radioactivity in soils at three fixed points have been performed for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs with gamma-ray spectrometry and for Pu, Pu, and {sup 240}Pu with {alpha}-ray spectrometry. Correlations of radioactivity ratios of {sup 134}Cs to {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 238}Pu to the sum of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu with fuel burnup were studied by using theoretical burnup calculations and measurements on isotopic inventories, and compared with the Cs and Pu radioactivity rations in the soils. The comparison indicated that the burnup of the fuel sourcing the radioactivity was from 18 to 38 GWd/t, which corresponded to that of the fuel in the highest power and, therefore, the highest decay heat in operating high-burnup fueled BWR cores. (authors)

  6. A self-organizing map-based ensemble forecast system for extended range prediction of active/break cycles of Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, N.; Sahai, A. K.; Chattopadhyay, R.; Joseph, S.; Abhilash, S.; Goswami, B. N.

    2013-08-01

    The paper describes a probabilistic prediction scheme of the intraseasonal oscillation of Indian summer monsoon (ISM) in the extended range (ER, ~3-4weeks) using a self-organizing map (SOM)-based technique. SOM is used to derive a set of patterns through empirical model reduction. An ensemble method of forecast is then developed for these reduced modes based on the principle of analogue prediction. A total of 900 ensembles is created based on the variations of one of the parameters, like length of the observation sample, number of patterns, number of lags, and number of input variables, keeping the others constant. Deterministic correlation skill at fourth pentad lead (15-20 days) from the current model is 0.47 (for development period, 1951-1999) and 0.43 (for hindcast period, 2000-2011) over the monsoon zone of India. This method effectively takes care of the stochastic uncertainties associated with a deterministic prediction scheme and provides better guidance to the user community. A large part of the uncertainty in the model's prediction skill is related to the interannual variability of the prediction skill of the active-break spells. The model has problems in forecasting the unusually long active/break spells during the monsoon season, especially during September. Forecasts from certain initial conditions are less predictable than those from others. We describe some probable mechanisms from the literature for such problems in the model. This study will provide a benchmark to evaluate dynamical models' skills in predicting the ISM in ER time scale in future.

  7. Purification, biochemical characterization and antifungal activity of a novel Aspergillus tubingensis glucose oxidase steady on broad range of pH and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kriaa, Mouna; Hammami, Inès; Sahnoun, Mouna; Azebou, Manel Cheffi; Triki, Mohamed Ali; Kammoun, Radhouane

    2015-11-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antifungal efficiency of Aspergillus tubingensis CTM 507 glucose oxidase (GOD) against plant pathogenic fungi. GOD displayed a wide inhibitory spectrum toward different fungi at a concentration of 20 AU. The GOD had a strong inhibitor effect on mycelia growth and spore germination of Pythium ultimum. Interestingly, the GOD exhibited a potent in vivo antifungal effect against P. ultimum responsible for potato plants disease. The antifungal GOD was purified 13-fold with 27 % yield and a specific activity of 3435 U/mg. The relative molecular mass of the GOD was 180 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The GOD activity was optimum at pH 4.5 and 60 °C. It was found to be stable over a large pH range (3-9). It also displayed a marked thermostability with a 50-min half-life at 65 °C. The 10 residues of the N-terminal sequence of the purified GOD (S-K-G-S-A-V-T-T-P-D) showed no homology to the other reported GOD, identifying a novel GOD. FTIR spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of C-O and C=O groups corresponding to a D-glucono-lactone. The findings indicated that GOD is the first A. tubingensis-produced fungicide ever reported to exhibit such promising biological properties. It could become a natural alternative to synthetic fungicides to control certain important plant microbial diseases. PMID:26280215

  8. Deformation textures in Fe{sub 3}Al alloys: An assessment of dominant slip system activity in the 900--1325 K temperature range of hot working

    SciTech Connect

    Kad, B.K.; Schoenfeld, S.E.; Asaro, R.J.; McKamey, C.G.; Sikka, V.K.

    1997-04-01

    A combination of numerical and experimental methodologies have been employed to study deformation textures in Fe{sub 3}Al alloys produced entirely by crystallographic shears on the <111>{l_brace}110{r_brace} + <111>{l_brace}112{r_brace}, <100>{l_brace}011{r_brace} and <100>{l_brace}001{r_brace} slip systems, respectively. Numerical simulations indicate that both <111>{l_brace}110{r_brace} + <111>{l_brace}112{r_brace} and <100>{l_brace}011{r_brace} slip systems produce a reasonably strong texture, while <100>{l_brace}001{r_brace} induces no texture over the initial random configuration. Experimental texture measurements on samples deformed at deformation rates of 10{sup {minus}3}--10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} by forging, rolling and extrusion in the 925--1325 K temperature range, of the B2 structure regime, agree well with the predicted textures for the <111>{l_brace}110{r_brace} + <111>{l_brace}112{r_brace} slip system activation. These results appear to be in disagreement with prior transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations that support the activation of <100>{l_brace}011{r_brace} and <100>{l_brace}001{r_brace} slip systems. Possible sources of discrepancies are elucidated. Finally, the loss of ductility in fully recrystallized microstructures is explained by textural reorganizations that are likely to impose larger normal stresses on the dominant {l_brace}100{r_brace} fracture planes.

  9. Inflammatory activation is associated with a reduced glucocorticoid receptor alpha/beta expression ratio in monocytes of inpatients with melancholic major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, L A; Bergink, V; Sumaski, L; Wijkhuijs, J; Hoogendijk, W J; Birkenhager, T K; Drexhage, H A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we used new technology to investigate whether a coherent pattern of enhanced expression of inflammatory and other immune activation genes in circulating monocytes is found in patients with major depression. Since a high inflammatory state of monocytes might be related to glucocorticoid resistance, we also included the genes for the two isoforms of the glucocorticoid receptor. For this study, we aimed at finding a similar coherent pattern of inflammatory and immune activation genes in monocytes of patients with MDD and recruited 47 medication-free melancholic MDD inpatients and 42 healthy controls. A quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) monocyte gene expression analysis was performed using a panel of inflammatory-related genes previously identified as abnormally regulated in mood disorder patients. Selected serum cytokines/chemokines were assessed using a cytometric bead array. Depressive symptoms were analysed using Hamilton depression scores (HAMD). Thirty-four of the 47 monocyte inflammatory-related genes were significantly upregulated and 2 were significantly downregulated as compared to controls, the latter including the gene for the active GRα in particular in those with a high HAMD score. The reduced GRα expression correlated strongly to the upregulation of the inflammatory genes in monocytes. Serum levels of IL6, IL8, CCL2 and VEGF were significantly increased in patients compared to controls. Our data show the deregulation of two interrelated homoeostatic systems, that is, the immune system and the glucocorticoid system, co-occurring in major depression. PMID:24424390

  10. A single diamagnetic catalyCEST MRI contrast agent that detects cathepsin B enzyme activity by using a ratio of two CEST signals

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Dina V.; Montano, Luis A.; Randtke, Edward A.; Lee, Yeon Sun; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    CatalyCEST MRI can detect enzyme activity by monitoring the change in chemical exchange with water after a contrast agent is cleaved by an enzyme. Often these molecules use paramagnetic metals and are delivered with an additional non-responsive reference molecule. To improve this approach for molecular imaging, a single diamagnetic agent with enzyme-responsive and enzyme-unresponsive CEST signals was synthesized and characterized. The CEST signal from the aryl amide disappeared after cleavage of a dipeptidyl ligand with cathepsin B, while a salicylic acid moiety was largely unresponsive to enzyme activity. The ratiometric comparison of the two CEST signals from the same agent allowed for concentration independent measurements of enzyme activity. The chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was unchanged after enzyme catalysis, which further validated that this moiety was enzyme-unresponsive. The temperature dependence of the chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was non-Arrhenius, suggesting a two-step chemical exchange mechanism for salicylic acid. The good detection sensitivity at low saturation power facilitates clinical translation, along with the potentially low toxicity of a non-metallic MRI contrast agent. The modular design of the agent constitutes a platform technology that expands the variety of agents that may be employed by catalyCEST MRI for molecular imaging. PMID:26633584

  11. Inhibition of miR-21 restores RANKL/OPG ratio in multiple myeloma-derived bone marrow stromal cells and impairs the resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Pitari, Maria Rita; Rossi, Marco; Amodio, Nicola; Botta, Cirino; Morelli, Eugenio; Federico, Cinzia; Gullà, Annamaria; Caracciolo, Daniele; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Arbitrio, Mariamena; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2015-09-29

    miR-21 is an oncogenic microRNA (miRNA) with an emerging role as therapeutic target in human malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM). Here we investigated whether miR-21 is involved in MM-related bone disease (BD). We found that miR-21 expression is dramatically enhanced, while osteoprotegerin (OPG) is strongly reduced, in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) adherent to MM cells. On this basis, we validated the 3'UTR of OPG mRNA as miR-21 target. Constitutive miR-21 inhibition in lentiviral-transduced BMSCs adherent to MM cells restored OPG expression and secretion. Interestingly, miR-21 inhibition reduced RANKL production by BMSCs. Overexpression of protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), which is a direct and validated target of miR-21, antagonized STAT3-mediated RANKL gene activation. Finally, we demonstrate that constitutive expression of miR-21 inhibitors in BMSCs restores RANKL/OPG balance and dramatically impairs the resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. Taken together, our data provide proof-of-concept that miR-21 overexpression within MM-microenviroment plays a crucial role in bone resorption/apposition balance, supporting the design of innovative miR-21 inhibition-based strategies for MM-related BD. PMID:26160841

  12. Inhibition of miR-21 restores RANKL/OPG ratio in multiple myeloma-derived bone marrow stromal cells and impairs the resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Pitari, Maria Rita; Rossi, Marco; Amodio, Nicola; Botta, Cirino; Morelli, Eugenio; Federico, Cinzia; Gullà, Annamaria; Caracciolo, Daniele; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Arbitrio, Mariamena; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2015-01-01

    miR-21 is an oncogenic microRNA (miRNA) with an emerging role as therapeutic target in human malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM). Here we investigated whether miR-21 is involved in MM-related bone disease (BD). We found that miR-21 expression is dramatically enhanced, while osteoprotegerin (OPG) is strongly reduced, in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) adherent to MM cells. On this basis, we validated the 3′UTR of OPG mRNA as miR-21 target. Constitutive miR-21 inhibition in lentiviral-transduced BMSCs adherent to MM cells restored OPG expression and secretion. Interestingly, miR-21 inhibition reduced RANKL production by BMSCs. Overexpression of protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), which is a direct and validated target of miR-21, antagonized STAT3-mediated RANKL gene activation. Finally, we demonstrate that constitutive expression of miR-21 inhibitors in BMSCs restores RANKL/OPG balance and dramatically impairs the resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. Taken together, our data provide proof-of-concept that miR-21 overexpression within MM-microenviroment plays a crucial role in bone resorption/apposition balance, supporting the design of innovative miR-21 inhibition-based strategies for MM-related BD. PMID:26160841

  13. DNA G-quadruplex formation in response to remote downstream transcription activity: long-range sensing and signal transducing in DNA double helix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Hong-He; Zheng, Ke-Wei; Hao, Yu-Hua; Tan, Zheng

    2013-08-01

    G-quadruplexes, four-stranded structures formed by Guanine-rich nucleic acids, are implicated in many physiological and pathological processes. G-quadruplex-forming sequences are abundant in genomic DNA, and G-quadruplexes have recently been shown to exist in the genome of mammalian cells. However, how G-quadruplexes are formed in the genomes remains largely unclear. Here, we show that G-quadruplex formation can be remotely induced by downstream transcription events that are thousands of base pairs away. The induced G-quadruplexes alter protein recognition and cause transcription termination at the local region. These results suggest that a G-quadruplex-forming sequence can serve as a sensor or receiver to sense remote DNA tracking activity in response to the propagation of mechanical torsion in a DNA double helix. We propose that the G-quadruplex formation may provide a mean for long-range sensing and communication between distal genomic locations to coordinate regulatory transactions in genomic DNA. PMID:23716646

  14. Reliable Prediction with Tuned Range-Separated Functionals of the Singlet-Triplet Gap in Organi