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Sample records for activity reduced glutathione

  1. The effects of exogenous glutathione on reduced glutathione level, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities of rats with different ages and gender after whole-body Γ-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Erden Inal, Mine; Akgün, Asiye; Kahraman, Ahmet

    2003-07-01

    Age-and gender-related changes on reduced glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in the liver of rat exposed to different dose of whole-body g-ray irradiation were determined. In addition, the effect of administration of exogenous GSH on endogenous GSH levels, GPx and GR activities was investigated. For this aim, male and female rats aged 1 and 5 moths were divided into two groups as g-ray and g-ray+GSH. Both groups were again divided into four groups as irradiated with 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy doses. GSH level and GPx activity did not change with age while GR activity was decreased with age. Gender-dependent changes in GPx and GR activities were observed, but GSH values were not affect by sex. GSH levels, GPx and GR activities were not observed dose-associated changes of g-irradiation. GSH level and GPx activity in the 8Gy group were increased by GSH. GR activities of old male rats were found to be increased by glutathione in the 6 and 8Gy groups. These results indicate that radiation and administration of exogenous GSH affect gender-and age-dependent GSH level, GPx and GR activities in the rats.

  2. The Biochemical Adaptations of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to Fresh Fruits Reduced Fructose Concentrations and Glutathione-S Transferase Activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Kim, A-Young; Jung, Jin Kyo; Donahue, Kelly M; Jung, Chuleui; Choi, Man-Yeon; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-04-01

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America. The females have a serrated ovipositor that enables them to infest almost all ripening small fruits. To understand the physiological and metabolic basis of spotted wing drosophila food preferences for healthy ripening fruits, we investigated the biological and biochemical characteristics of spotted wing drosophila and compared them with those of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that the susceptibility to oxidative stressors was significantly increased in spotted wing drosophila compared with those of D. melanogaster. In addition, we found that spotted wing drosophila had significantly reduced glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity and gene numbers. Furthermore, fructose concentrations found in spotted wing drosophila were significantly lower than those of D. melanogaster. Our data strongly suggest that the altered food preferences of spotted wing drosophila may stem from evolutionary adaptations to fresh foods accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and GST activities.

  3. Comparison of inhibitory effects between acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione in human glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Nýdlová, Erika; Vrbová, Martina; Cesla, Petr; Jankovičová, Barbora; Ventura, Karel; Roušar, Tomáš

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver injury. The main mechanism of acetaminophen toxicity has been attributed to oxidation of acetaminophen. The oxidation product is very reactive and reacts with glutathione generating acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate (APAP-SG). Although this conjugate has been recognized to be generally nontoxic, we have found recently that APAP-SG could produce a toxic effect. Therefore, the aim of our study was to estimate the toxicity of purified APAP-SG by characterizing the inhibitory effect in human glutathione reductase (GR) and comparing that to the inhibitory effect of the natural inhibitor reduced glutathione. We used two types of human GR: recombinant and freshly purified from red blood cells. Our results show that GR was significantly inhibited in the presence of both APAP-SG and reduced glutathione. For example, the enzyme activity of recombinant and purified GR was reduced in the presence of 4 mm APAP-SG (with 0.5 mm glutathione disulfide) by 28% and 22%, respectively. The type of enzyme inhibition was observed to be competitive in the cases of both APAP-SG and glutathione. As glutathione inhibits GR activity in cells under physiological conditions, the rate of enzyme inhibition ought to be weaker in the case of glutathione depletion that is typical of acetaminophen overdose. Notably, however, enzyme activity likely remains inhibited due to the presence of APAP-SG, which might enhance the pro-oxidative status in the cell. We conclude that our finding could reflect some other pathological mechanism that may contribute to the toxicity of acetaminophen.

  4. Changes of reduced glutathion, glutathion reductase, and glutathione peroxidase after radiation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Erden, M; Bor, N M

    1984-04-01

    In this series of experiments the protective action of reduced glutathion due to ionizing radiation has been studied. In the experimental group 18 guinea pigs were exposed to successive radiations of 150 rad 3 or 4 days apart. Total dose given amounted to 750 rad which is the LD50 for guinea pigs. Blood samples were taken 30 min after each exposure. The control series were sham radiated but otherwise treated identically. The cells of the removed blood samples were separated by centrifugation and were subjected to the reduced glutathion stability test. GSSGR, GPer, and LDH enzyme activities were also measured of which the latter served as a marked enzyme. It was found that LDH did not show any alteration after radiation. The reduced glutathion stability test showed a consistent but minor reduction (P greater than 0.05), in the experimental group. GSSGR enzyme activity on the other hand was reduced significantly (from 176.48 +/- 11.32 to 41.34 +/- 1.17 IU/ml of packed erythrocytes, P less than 0.001) in the same group. GPer activity showed a consistent but minor elevation during the early phase of the experimental group. It was later increased significantly beginning after 600 rad total radiation on the fourth session (P less than 0.050).

  5. Brazilian nut consumption improves selenium status and glutathione peroxidase activity and reduces atherogenic risk in obese women.

    PubMed

    Cominetti, Cristiane; de Bortoli, Maritsa C; Garrido, Arthur B; Cozzolino, Silvia M F

    2012-06-01

    Studies have shown that there are inverse relationships between nut consumption and the reduction of cardiovascular risk. This study tested the hypothesis that daily consumption of Brazilian nuts would have a positive effect upon selenium (Se) status, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity, lipid profile, and atherogenic risk in severely obese women. Thirty-seven severely obese women each consumed 1 Brazilian nut a day (290 μg of Se a day) for 8 weeks. Blood Se concentrations, total erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity, lipid profile, and Castelli I and II indexes were evaluated before and after the nuts consumption. All the patients were Se deficient at baseline; this deficiency was remedied by the consumption of the Brazilian nut (P < .0001). The intake of Brazilian nuts promoted a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations (P < .00001), which then resulted in a significant improvement of the Castelli I (P < .0002) and II (P < .0004) indexes. This study shows that obese people who implement daily consumption of Brazilian nuts can improve both Se status and lipid profile, especially high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, thereby reducing cardiovascular risks.

  6. Sunscreen protection against ultraviolet-induced oxidative stress: evaluation of reduced glutathione levels, metalloproteinase secretion, and myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Vilela, F M P; Fonseca, Y M; Vicentini, F T M C; Fonseca, M J V

    2013-11-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the skin protection by sunscreens considering the aspects skin penetration, photostability, and protection against erythema and sunburn. However, little is known about the effect of topically applied sunscreen formulations on the antioxidant defense, metalloproteinases, and inflammatory processes of skin in response to UVR exposure. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the use of a cream gel formulation containing the UV filters benzophenone-3, octyl methoxycinnamate, and octyl salicylate to prevent skin damage from a single dose of UVR (2.87 J/cm2). This protective effect was evaluated in vivo by measuring the following biochemical parameters: reduced glutathione levels, secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloperoxidase activity. The results showed that the sunscreen formulation, despite having sun protection factor (SPF) 15, was not completely effective to protect the skin against GSH depletion, MMP-9 secretion and the inflammatory process induced by UVR. These results demonstrate the importance of analyzing UV-altered biochemical parameters of skin in order to propose new sunscreen formulations that can completely protect skin against UVR-induced damage.

  7. Galangin Activates the ERK/AKT-Driven Nrf2 Signaling Pathway to Increase the Level of Reduced Glutathione in Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Piao, Mei Jing; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Ryu, Yea Seong; Fernando, Pattage Madushan Dilhara Jayatissa; Oh, Min Chang; Park, Jeong Eon; Shilnikova, Kristina; Moon, Yu Jin; Shin, Dae O; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-11-08

    Previously, we demonstrated that galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone) protects human keratinocytes against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced oxidative damage. In this study, we investigated the effect of galangin on induction of antioxidant enzymes involved in synthesis of reduced glutathione (GSH), and investigated the associated upstream signaling cascades. By activating nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), galangin treatment significantly increased expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and glutathione synthetase (GSS). This activation of Nrf2 depended on extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. Inhibition of GSH in galangin-treated cells attenuated the protective effect of galangin against the deleterious effects of UVB. Our results reveal that galangin protects human keratinocytes by activating ERK/AKT-Nrf2, leading to elevated expression of GSH-synthesizing enzymes.

  8. Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Noctor, Graham; Queval, Guillaume; Mhamdi, Amna; Chaouch, Sejir; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione is a simple sulfur compound composed of three amino acids and the major non-protein thiol in many organisms, including plants. The functions of glutathione are manifold but notably include redox-homeostatic buffering. Glutathione status is modulated by oxidants as well as by nutritional and other factors, and can influence protein structure and activity through changes in thiol-disulfide balance. For these reasons, glutathione is a transducer that integrates environmental information into the cellular network. While the mechanistic details of this function remain to be fully elucidated, accumulating evidence points to important roles for glutathione and glutathione-dependent proteins in phytohormone signaling and in defense against biotic stress. Work in Arabidopsis is beginning to identify the processes that govern glutathione status and that link it to signaling pathways. As well as providing an overview of the components that regulate glutathione homeostasis (synthesis, degradation, transport, and redox turnover), the present discussion considers the roles of this metabolite in physiological processes such as light signaling, cell death, and defense against microbial pathogen and herbivores. PMID:22303267

  9. [Effect of chloditan on the changes of activity of glutathione transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione content in the adrenal glands and liver in rats].

    PubMed

    Zorich, P A; Tronko, N D; Mikosha, A S

    1994-01-01

    The chloditan (o.p-DDD, mitotane), which causes the destruction of the human and dog adrenal cortex, on the most essential system of xenobiotic metabolism: glutathione-S-transferase--glutathione has been studied. The effect of o,p-DDD on GSH level and activity of glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase which maintain the level of reduced glutathione was analyzed in the adrenal and liver tissue of rats. This species is resistant to adrenocorticolytic action of o,p-DDD. It was shown that feeding of rats weighting 200-240 g with oil solution of o,p-DDD (75 mg daily) for 3 days causes the decrease in activity of glutathione-S-transferase and content of oxidazed glutathione in the adrenals with simultaneous increase of the content of reduced glutathione. The glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase activity in the liver rises under the effect of o,p-DDD, the decrease of the GSH level being observed. The revealed changes may explain the species sensitivity of animals to o,p-DDD.

  10. Selenium reduces the proapoptotic signaling associated to NF-kappaB pathway and stimulates glutathione peroxidase activity during excitotoxic damage produced by quinolinate in rat corpus striatum.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Abel; Vázquez-Román, Beatriz; La Cruz, Verónica Pérez-De; González-Cortés, Carolina; Trejo-Solís, Ma Cristina; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Jara-Prado, Aurelio; Guevara-Fonseca, Jorge; Ali, Syed F

    2005-12-15

    Quinolinate (QUIN) neurotoxicity has been attributed to degenerative events in nerve tissue produced by sustained activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) and oxidative stress. We have recently described the protective effects that selenium (Se), an antioxidant, produces on different markers of QUIN-induced neurotoxicity (Santamaría et al., 2003, J Neurochem 86:479-488.). However, the mechanisms by which Se exerts its protective actions remain unclear. Since some of these events are thought to be related with inhibition of deadly molecular cascades through the activation of antioxidant selenoproteins, in this study we investigated the effects of Se on QUIN-induced cell damage elicited by the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway, as well as the time-course response of striatal glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Se (sodium selenite, 0.625 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was administered to rats for 5 days, and 120 min after the last administration, animals received a single striatal injection of QUIN (240 nmol/mul). Twenty-four hours later, their striata were tested for the expression of IkappaB-alpha (the NF-kappaB cytosolic binding protein), the immunohistochemical expression of NF-kappaB (evidenced as nuclear expression of P65), caspase-3-like activation, and DNA fragmentation. Additional groups were killed at 2, 6, and 24 h for measurement of GPx activity. Se reduced the QUIN-induced decrease in IkappaB-alpha expression, evidencing a reduction in its cytosolic degradation. Se also prevented the QUIN-induced increase in P65-immunoreactive cells, suggesting a reduction of NF-kappaB nuclear translocation. Caspase-3-like activation and DNA fragmentation produced by QUIN were also inhibited by Se. Striatal GPx activity was stimulated by Se at 2 and 6 h, but not at 24 h postlesion. Altogether, these data suggest that the protective effects exerted by Se on QUIN-induced neurotoxicity are partially mediated by the inhibition of proapoptotic events underlying Ikappa

  11. Uterine glutathione reductase activity: modulation by estrogens and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, M; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Pedrón, N N; Hicks, J J

    1999-10-29

    The aim of this study was to determine whether glutathione reductase activity in uterine tissue is regulated by sex hormones. In spayed rats uterine glutathione reductase was significantly increased by exogenous estrogen (P< 0.01), progesterone (P< 0.01) or estrogen plus progesterone (P<0.01). When enzyme activity is expressed per mg protein, daily administration of estrogen or progesterone induces a progressive increase of this enzyme between 24 to 48 h or 24 to 72 h of treatment, respectively. Whereas the combination of both steroids causes an earlier and higher increase in glutathione reductase activity at 24 h of treatment. Estradiol singly or in combination with progesterone induced the highest protein concentration in the uterus. Whereas uterine DNA concentration is only significantly affected by estradiol. Our results suggest that uterine glutathione reductase is regulated by estradiol and progesterone and may be involved in maintaining levels of reduced glutathione in the uterus. This compound may be required for control of the redox state of thiol groups and in detoxification reactions involving H2O2 and electrophylic substances. The antioxidant action of estrogens is partially due to the stimulation of glutathione reductase.

  12. Role of thiol compounds in mammalian melanin pigmentation: Part I. Reduced and oxidized glutathione.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, J P; Ortonne, J P; Voulot, C; Khatchadourian, C; Prota, G; Thivolet, J

    1981-11-01

    Evidence for the postulated role of glutathione reductase in melanin pigmentation has been obtained by determinations of the glutathione concentrations in Tortoiseshell guinea pig skin of different colors (black, yellow, red, and white). As expected, the lowest levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) were found associated with eumelanin type pigmentation, whereas the highest ones were found in the skin with phaeomelanin producing melanocytes. On the other hand, white skin of guinea pig having no active melanocytes showed GSH levels which were intermediate between those of the black and yellow areas. These results are consistent with the view that the activity of the enzyme glutathione reductase, though not primarily related to pigmentation, plays an important role in the regulation and control of the biosynthetic activity of melanocytes leading to various types of melanin pigments.

  13. Marked differences in drug-induced methemoglobinemia in sheep are not due to RBC glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, reduced glutathione, or methemoglobin reductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Guertler, A.T.; Lagutchik, M.S.; Woodard, C.L.; Leonard, D.A.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine is a commonly used topical anesthetic that is structurally similar to current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis. Benzocaine induces profound methemoglobinemia in some sheep but not others. After topical benzocaine administration certain sheep respond to form MHb (elevated MHb 16-50% after a 56-280 mg dose, a 2-10 second spray with benzocine), while other phenotypically similar sheep fail to significantly form MHb (less than a 2% increase from baseline). Deficiencies in Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD), reduced glutathione (GSH), and MHb reductase increase the susceptibility to methemoglobinemia in man and animals. Sheep are used as a model for G-6-PD deficiency in man, and differences in this enzyme level could cause the variable response seen in these sheep. Similarly, differences in GSH and MHb reductase could be responsible for the observed differences in MHb formation.

  14. Antioxidant Protection of NADPH-Depleted Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Is Dependent on Supply of Reduced Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Saraswat Ohri, Sujata; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2016-01-01

    The pentose phosphate pathway is the main source of NADPH, which by reducing oxidized glutathione, contributes to antioxidant defenses. Although oxidative stress plays a major role in white matter injury, significance of NADPH for oligodendrocyte survival has not been yet investigated. It is reported here that the NADPH antimetabolite 6-amino-NADP (6AN) was cytotoxic to cultured adult rat spinal cord oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) as well as OPC-derived oligodendrocytes. The 6AN-induced necrosis was preceded by increased production of superoxide, NADPH depletion, and lower supply of reduced glutathione. Moreover, survival of NADPH-depleted OPCs was improved by the antioxidant drug trolox. Such cells were also protected by physiological concentrations of the neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone (10−8 M). The protection by dehydroepiandrosterone was associated with restoration of reduced glutathione, but not NADPH, and was sensitive to inhibition of glutathione synthesis. A similar protective mechanism was engaged by the cAMP activator forskolin or the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) ligand G1. Finally, treatment with the glutathione precursor N-acetyl cysteine reduced cytotoxicity of 6AN. Taken together, NADPH is critical for survival of OPCs by supporting their antioxidant defenses. Consequently, injury-associated inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway may be detrimental for the myelination or remyelination potential of the white matter. Conversely, steroid hormones and cAMP activators may promote survival of NADPH-deprived OPCs by increasing a NADPH-independent supply of reduced glutathione. Therefore, maintenance of glutathione homeostasis appears as a critical effector mechanism for OPC protection against NADPH depletion and preservation of the regenerative potential of the injured white matter. PMID:27449129

  15. [The activity of glutathione antioxidant system at melaksen and valdoxan action under experimental hyperthyroidism in rats].

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, M V; Popova, T N; Shul'gin, K K; Popov, S S

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of glutathione antioxidant system activity and diene conjugates content in rats liver and blood serum at the influence of melaksen and valdoxan under experimental hyperthyroidism (EG) has been revealed. It has been established that the activities of glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GP) and glutathione transferase (GT), growing at pathological conditions, change to the side of control value at these substunces introduction. Reduced glutathione content (GSH) at melaxen and valdoxan action increased compared with values under the pathology, that, obviously, could be associated with a reduction of its spending on the detoxication of free radical oxidation (FRO) toxic products. Diene conjugates level in rats liver and blood serum, increasing at experimental hyperthyroidism conditions, under introduction of melatonin level correcting drugs, also approached to the control meaning. Results of the study indicate on positive effect of melaxen and valdoxan on free radical homeostasis, that appears to be accompanied by decrease of load on the glutathione antioxidant system in comparison with the pathology.

  16. Sulforaphane restores cellular glutathione levels and reduces chronic periodontitis neutrophil hyperactivity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dias, Irundika H K; Chapple, Ian L C; Milward, Mike; Grant, Melissa M; Hill, Eric; Brown, James; Griffiths, Helen R

    2013-01-01

    The production of high levels of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils is associated with the local and systemic destructive phenotype found in the chronic inflammatory disease periodontitis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of sulforaphane (SFN) to restore cellular glutathione levels and reduce the hyperactivity of circulating neutrophils associated with chronic periodontitis. Using differentiated HL60 cells as a neutrophil model, here we show that generation of extracellular O2 (. -) by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase complex is increased by intracellular glutathione depletion. This may be attributed to the upregulation of thiol regulated acid sphingomyelinase driven lipid raft formation. Intracellular glutathione was also lower in primary neutrophils from periodontitis patients and, consistent with our previous findings, patients neutrophils were hyper-reactive to stimuli. The activity of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a master regulator of the antioxidant response, is impaired in circulating neutrophils from chronic periodontitis patients. Although patients' neutrophils exhibit a low reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidised glutathione (GSSG) ratio and a higher total Nrf2 level, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear Nrf2 remained unchanged relative to healthy controls and had reduced expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC), and modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNAs, compared to periodontally healthy subjects neutrophils. Pre-treatment with SFN increased expression of GCLC and GCM, improved intracellular GSH/GSSG ratios and reduced agonist-activated extracellular O2 (. -) production in both dHL60 and primary neutrophils from patients with periodontitis and controls. These findings suggest that a deficiency in Nrf2-dependent pathways may underpin susceptibility to hyper-reactivity in circulating primary neutrophils during chronic periodontitis.

  17. Probiotics enhance pancreatic glutathione biosynthesis and reduce oxidative stress in experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lutgendorff, Femke; Trulsson, Lena M; van Minnen, L Paul; Rijkers, Ger T; Timmerman, Harro M; Franzén, Lennart E; Gooszen, Hein G; Akkermans, Louis M A; Söderholm, Johan D; Sandström, Per A

    2008-11-01

    Factors determining severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) are poorly understood. Oxidative stress causes acinar cell injury and contributes to the severity, whereas prophylactic probiotics ameliorate experimental pancreatitis. Our objective was to study how probiotics affect oxidative stress, inflammation, and acinar cell injury during the early phase of AP. Fifty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into groups: 1) control, 2) sham procedure, 3) AP with no treatment, 4) AP with probiotics, and 5) AP with placebo. AP was induced under general anesthesia by intraductal glycodeoxycholate infusion (15 mM) and intravenous cerulein (5 microg.kg(-1).h(-1), for 6 h). Daily probiotics or placebo were administered intragastrically, starting 5 days prior to AP. After cerulein infusion, pancreas samples were collected for analysis including lipid peroxidation, glutathione, glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity, histological grading of pancreatic injury, and NF-kappaB activation. The severity of pancreatic injury correlated to oxidative damage (r = 0.9) and was ameliorated by probiotics (1.5 vs. placebo 5.5; P = 0.014). AP-induced NF-kappaB activation was reduced by probiotics (0.20 vs. placebo 0.53 OD(450nm)/mg nuclear protein; P < 0.001). Probiotics attenuated AP-induced lipid peroxidation (0.25 vs. placebo 0.51 pmol malondialdehyde/mg protein; P < 0.001). Not only was AP-induced glutathione depletion prevented (8.81 vs. placebo 4.1 micromol/mg protein, P < 0.001), probiotic pretreatment even increased glutathione compared with sham rats (8.81 vs. sham 6.18 miccromol/mg protein, P < 0.001). Biosynthesis of glutathione (glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity) was enhanced in probiotic-pretreated animals. Probiotics enhanced the biosynthesis of glutathione, which may have reduced activation of inflammation and acinar cell injury and ameliorated experimental AP, via a reduction in oxidative stress.

  18. Oral glutathione supplementation drastically reduces Helicobacter-induced gastric pathologies

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyne, Ellen; Ducatelle, Richard; Foss, Dennis; Sanchez, Margaret; Joosten, Myrthe; Zhang, Guangzhi; Smet, Annemieke; Pasmans, Frank; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter (H.) suis causes gastric pathologies in both pigs and humans. Very little is known on the metabolism of this bacterium and its impact on the host. In this study, we have revealed the importance of the glutamate-generating metabolism, as shown by a complete depletion of glutamine (Gln) in the medium during H. suis culture. Besides Gln, H. suis can also convert glutathione (GSH) to glutamate, and both reactions are catalyzed by the H. suis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT). Both for H. pylori and H. suis, it has been hypothesized that the degradation of Gln and GSH may lead to a deficiency for the host, possibly initiating or promoting several pathologies. Therefore the in vivo effect of oral supplementation with Gln and GSH was assessed. Oral supplementation with Gln was shown to temper H. suis induced gastritis and epithelial (hyper)proliferation in Mongolian gerbils. Astonishingly, supplementation of the feed with GSH, another GGT substrate, resulted in inflammation and epithelial proliferation levels returning to baseline levels of uninfected controls. This indicates that Gln and GSH supplementation may help reducing tissue damage caused by Helicobacter infection in both humans and pigs, highlighting their potential as a supportive therapy during and after Helicobacter eradication therapy. PMID:26833404

  19. Sulforaphane reduces the alterations induced by quinolinic acid: modulation of glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Santana-Martínez, R A; Galván-Arzáte, S; Hernández-Pando, R; Chánez-Cárdenas, M E; Avila-Chávez, E; López-Acosta, G; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Santamaría, A; Maldonado, P D

    2014-07-11

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity involves a state of acute oxidative stress, which is a crucial event during neuronal degeneration and is part of the physiopathology of neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, we evaluated the ability of sulforaphane (SULF), a natural dietary isothiocyanate, to induce the activation of transcription factor Nrf2 (a master regulator of redox state in the cell) in a model of striatal degeneration in rats infused with quinolinic acid (QUIN). Male Wistar rats received SULF (5mg/kg, i.p.) 24h and 5min before the intrastriatal infusion of QUIN. SULF increased the reduced glutathione (GSH) levels 4h after QUIN infusion, which was associated with its ability to increase the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), an antioxidant enzyme capable to regenerate GSH levels at 24h. Moreover, SULF treatment increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, while no changes were observed in γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase (GCL) activity. SULF treatment also prevented QUIN-induced oxidative stress (measured by oxidized proteins levels), the histological damage and the circling behavior. These results suggest that the protective effect of SULF could be related to its ability to preserve GSH levels and increase GPx and GR activities.

  20. Efflux of reduced glutathione after exposure of human lung epithelial cells to crocidolite asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Golladay, S A; Park, S H; Aust, A E

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated glutathione (GSH) homeostasis in human lung epithelial cells (A549) exposed to crocidolite. Exposure of A549 cells to 3 micrograms/cm2 crocidolite resulted in a decrease in intracellular reduced glutathione by 36% without a corresponding increase in GSH disulfide. After a 24-hr exposure to crocidolite, 75% of the intracellular GSH lost was recovered in the extracellular medium, of which 50% was in reduced form. Since the half-life of reduced GSH in culture medium was less than 1 hr, this suggests that reduced GSH was released continuously from the cells after treatment. The release of GSH did not appear to result from nonspecific membrane damage, as there was no concomitant release of lactate dehydrogenase or 14C-adenine from loaded cells after crocidolite treatment for 24 hr. Crocidolite exposure resulted in the formation of S-nitrosothiols but no increase in the level of GSH-protein mixed disulfides or GSH conjugates. Exposure of A549 cells to crocidolite for 24 hr decreased gamma glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS) activity by 47% without changes in the activities of GSH reductase, GSH peroxidase, GSH S-transferase, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Treatment of cells with crocidolite pretreated with the iron chelator desferrioxamine B resulted in the same level of intracellular GSH depletion and efflux and the same decrease in gamma-GCS activity as treatment with unmodified crocidolite, which suggests that iron-catalyzed reactions were not responsible for the GSH depletion. PMID:9400737

  1. Unbalanced Activation of Glutathione Metabolic Pathways Suggests Potential Involvement in Plant Defense against the Gall Midge Mayetiola destructor in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuming; Zhang, Shize; Whitworth, R. Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J.; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. We found that the abundance of total glutathione increased up to 60% in resistant wheat plants within 72 hours following attack by the gall midge Mayetiola destructor, the Hessian fly. The increase in total glutathione abundance, however, is coupled with an unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways. The activity and transcript abundance of glutathione peroxidases, which convert reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), increased in infested resistant plants. However, the enzymatic activity and transcript abundance of glutathione reductases, which convert GSSG back to GSH, did not change. This unbalanced regulation of the glutathione oxidation/reduction cycle indicates the existence of an alternative pathway to regenerate GSH from GSSG to maintain a stable GSSG/GSH ratio. Our data suggest the possibility that GSSG is transported from cytosol to apoplast to serve as an oxidant for class III peroxidases to generate reactive oxygen species for plant defense against Hessian fly larvae. Our results provide a foundation for elucidating the molecular processes involved in glutathione-mediated plant resistance to Hessian fly and potentially other pests as well. PMID:25627558

  2. Regression of Aflatoxin B1-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinomas by Reduced Glutathione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novi, Anna M.

    1981-05-01

    Reduced glutathione administered to rats bearing aflatoxin B1-induced liver tumors caused regression of tumor growth and resulted in survival of the animals. Since glutathione is a harmless natural product, it merits further investigation as a potential antitumor drug for humans.

  3. tRNA synthase suppression activates de novo cysteine synthesis to compensate for cystine and glutathione deprivation during ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenichi; Stockwell, Brent R

    2016-03-01

    Glutathione is a major endogenous reducing agent in cells, and cysteine is a limiting factor in glutathione synthesis. Cysteine is obtained by uptake or biosynthesis, and mammalian cells often rely on either one or the other pathway. Because of the scarcity of glutathione, blockade of cysteine uptake causes oxidative cell death known as ferroptosis. A new study suggests that tRNA synthetase suppression activates the endogenous biosynthesis of cysteine, compensates such cysteine loss, and thus makes cells resistant to ferroptosis.

  4. Reduced glutathione attenuates liver injury induced by methyl parathion in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Na; Lu, Lina; Wang, Tian; Zhang, Leiming; Xin, Wenyu; Fu, Fenghua

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether exogenous reduced glutathione (GSH) could protect liver injury induced by methyl parathion. Rats were allocated into four groups named as control, MP (methyl parathion poisoning), MP+GSH1 (methyl parathion poisoning treated with GSH 600 mg/kg), and MP+GSH2 (methyl parathion poisoning treated with GSH 1200 mg/kg). Each one of the last three groups was assigned into 6 h, 24 h, and 72 h sub-groups. The activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) in plasma, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in liver were assayed. The malondialdehyde (MDA) in liver was also determined. Histopathological changes in liver were observed. Results showed that AChE activity was significantly inhibited by methyl parathion and attenuated after GSH administered. GSH could relieve hepatocellular edema and fatty degeneration, and attenuate the increased activities of GPT and GOT. GSH treatment increased the SOD and GPx activities, but had no effect on the MDA level. These results indicated that GSH could attenuate liver injury induced by methyl parathion.

  5. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios and oxygen sensing in calf and rabbit carotid body chemoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Alfayate, G; Obeso, A; Agapito, M T; González, C

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work was to test the redox hypotheses of O2 chemoreception in the carotid body (CB). They postulate that hypoxia alters the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), causing modifications to the sulfhydryl groups/disulfide bonds of K+ channel proteins, which leads to the activation of chemoreceptor cells. We found that the GSH/GSSG ratio in normoxic calf CB (30.14 ± 4.67; n = 12) and hypoxic organs (33.03 ± 6.88; n = 10), and the absolute levels of total glutathione (0.71 ± 0.07 nmol (mg tissue)−1, normoxia vs. 0.76 ± 0.07 nmol (mg tissue)−1, hypoxia) were not statistically different. N-Acetylcysteine (2 mm; NAC), a precursor of glutathione and ROS scavenger, increased normoxic glutathione levels to 1.03 ± 0.06 nmol (mg tissue)−1 (P < 0.02) and GSH/GSSG ratios to 59.05 ± 5.05 (P < 0.001). NAC (20 μm–10 mm) did not activate or inhibit chemoreceptor cells as it did not alter the normoxic or the hypoxic release of 3H-catecholamines (3H-CAs) from rabbit and calf CBs whose CA deposits had been labelled by prior incubation with the natural CA precursor 3H-tyrosine. NAC (2 mm) was equally ineffective in altering the release of 3H-CAs induced by stimuli (high external K+ and ionomycin) that bypass the initial steps of the hypoxic cascade of activation of chemoreceptor cells, thereby excluding the possibility that the lack of effect of NAC on normoxic and hypoxic release of 3H-CAs results from a concomitant alteration of Ca2+ channels or of the exocytotic machinery. The present findings do not support the contention that O2 chemoreception in the CB is linked to variations in the GSH/GSSG quotient as the redox models propose. PMID:11711574

  6. Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress, improves glutathione metabolism and modifies antioxidant defense systems in lead-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Dobrakowski, Michał; Kasperczyk, Janusz; Ostałowska, Alina; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Birkner, Ewa

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether beta-carotene administration reduces oxidative stress and influences antioxidant, mainly glutathione-related, defense systems in workers chronically exposed to lead. The population consisted of two randomly divided groups of healthy male volunteers exposed to lead. Workers in the first group (reference group) were not administered any antioxidants, while workers in the second group (CAR group) were treated orally with 10mg of beta-carotene once a day for 12weeks. Biochemical analysis included measuring markers of lead-exposure and oxidative stress in addition to the levels and activities of selected antioxidants. After treatment, levels of malondialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxides and lipofuscin significantly decreased compared with the reference group. However, the level of glutathione significantly increased compared with the baseline. Treatment with beta-carotene also resulted in significantly decreased glutathione peroxidase activity compared with the reference group, while the activities of other glutathione-related enzymes and of superoxide dismutase were not significantly changed. However, the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase, as well as the level of alpha-tocopherol, were significantly higher after treatment compared with the baseline. Despite controversy over the antioxidant properties of beta-carotene in vivo, our findings showed reduced oxidative stress after beta-carotene supplementation in chronic lead poisoning.

  7. Decreased glutathione levels and antioxidant enzyme activities in untreated and treated schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Monia; Mechri, Anwar; Othman, Leila Ben; Fendri, Chiraz; Gaha, Lotfi; Kerkeni, Abdelhamid

    2009-10-01

    There is substantial evidence found in the literature that supports the fact that the presence of oxidative stress may play an important role in the physiopathology of schizophrenia. Previous studies have reported the occurrence of impairments in the glutathione levels and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes in patients suffering from schizophrenia. However, most of these studies were performed on treated patients. The present study evaluated treated schizophrenic patients (n=52) along with neuroleptic-free or untreated schizophrenic patients (n=36) and healthy controls (n=46). The blood glutathione levels: total glutathione (GSHt), reduced glutathione (GSHr), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) as well as the activities of the antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT) were measured. The psychopathology of the patients was assessed through the Clinical Global Impressions-severity (CGI-severity). The tests revealed that in comparison with the healthy controls, the schizophrenic patients showed significantly lower levels of GSHr, SOD, and CAT. Among the schizophrenic patients, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT were recorded to be significantly lower in untreated patients than in the treated ones. In addition, the levels of both GSHt and GSHr were found to be inversely correlated with the obtained CGI-severity score. These results evidently suggest that a decrease in the glutathione levels and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia is not related to neuroleptic treatment and could be considered as a biological indicator of the degree of severity of the symptoms of schizophrenia.

  8. Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress, improves glutathione metabolism and modifies antioxidant defense systems in lead-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Dobrakowski, Michał; Kasperczyk, Janusz; Ostałowska, Alina; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Birkner, Ewa

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether beta-carotene administration reduces oxidative stress and influences antioxidant, mainly glutathione-related, defense systems in workers chronically exposed to lead. The population consisted of two randomly divided groups of healthy male volunteers exposed to lead. Workers in the first group (reference group) were not administered any antioxidants, while workers in the second group (CAR group) were treated orally with 10 mg of beta-carotene once a day for 12 weeks. Biochemical analysis included measuring markers of lead-exposure and oxidative stress in addition to the levels and activities of selected antioxidants. After treatment, levels of malondialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxides and lipofuscin significantly decreased compared with the reference group. However, the level of glutathione significantly increased compared with the baseline. Treatment with beta-carotene also resulted in significantly decreased glutathione peroxidase activity compared with the reference group, while the activities of other glutathione-related enzymes and of superoxide dismutase were not significantly changed. However, the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase, as well as the level of alpha-tocopherol, were significantly higher after treatment compared with the baseline. Despite controversy over the antioxidant properties of beta-carotene in vivo, our findings showed reduced oxidative stress after beta-carotene supplementation in chronic lead poisoning. - Highlights: • Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene elevates glutathione level in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene administration could be beneficial in lead poisoning.

  9. Activity of the glutathione antioxidant system and NADPH-generating enzymes in blood serum of rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus after administration of melatonin-correcting drugs.

    PubMed

    Agarkov, A A; Popova, T N; Verevkin, A N; Matasova, L V

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effects of epifamin and melaxen on serum content of reduced glutathione and activities of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and NADPH-generating enzymes (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase) in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The concentration of reduced glutathione was decreased in rats with this disease (by 1.8 times), but increased after treatment with epifamin and melaxen (by 1.6 and 1.7 times, respectively). Activities of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and NADPH-generating enzymes returned to the control level. Correction of melatonin concentration after treatment with the test drugs was probably followed by inhibition of free radical processes. The observed changes were accompanied by normalization of activity of the glutathione antioxidant system and NADPH-generating enzymes required for normal function of this system.

  10. Reduced glutathione and Trolox (vitamin E) as extender supplements in cryopreservation of red deer epididymal spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Anel-López, Luis; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Manuel; García-Álvarez, Olga; Alvarez, Mercedes; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Anel, Luis; de Paz, Paulino; Garde, J Julián; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe

    2012-11-01

    The use of assisted reproductive techniques in cervids is increasing as the commercial use of these species increase. We have tested the suitability of the antioxidants Trolox and reduced glutathione (GSH) for freezing red deer epididymal spermatozoa, aiming at improving post-thawing quality. Samples from 19 stags were frozen in a TES-Tris-fructose extender (20% egg yolk, 8% glycerol), with 1 or 5 mM of antioxidant. Motility (CASA), lipoperoxidation (malondialdehyde -MDA- production), membrane status, mitochondrial activity, acrosomal status (flow cytometry) and chromatin status (SCSA: %DFI and %HDS; flow cytometry) were assessed after thawing and after 6 h at 39°C. There were few differences between treatments after thawing, with Trolox reducing MDA production in a dose-response manner. After the incubation, sperm quality decreased and %DFI increased moderately, with no change for MDA. GSH improved motility, kinematic parameters and mitochondrial status, with a slight increase in %HDS. GSH 5 mM also increased moderately MDA production and %DFI, possibly due to enhanced metabolic activity and reducing power. Trolox maintained MDA low, but was detrimental to sperm quality. Trolox might not be appropriate for the cryopreservation of red deer epididymal spermatozoa, at least at the millimolar range. GSH results are promising, especially regarding motility improvement after the post-thawing incubation, and should be selected for future fertility trials.

  11. Single-molecule transformation and analysis of glutathione oxidized and reduced in nanopore.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yongfeng; Su, Zhuoqun; Kang, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Yanli; Mu, Xiaoxue

    2017-05-15

    The determination of glutathione reduced (GSH) or oxidized (GSSG) in bulk solution has been reported previously. However, it is critically important to set up a simple and label-free method to recognize GSSG and GSH selectively and dynamically, especially at a single-molecule level. Here we report a novel nanopore method to recognize GSSG based on a newly synthesized per-6-quaternary ammonium-β-cyclodextrin (p-QABCD), which is used as both the molecular adaptor of protein nanopore and the recognizing element of GSSG. Distinct current signature is observed upon GSSG binding in a mutant protein nanopore (M113R RL2)7 equipped with p-QABCD, while there is no signal for GSH. Thus GSSG in the mixture can be selectively detected in the concentration range of 6.00-90.0μM. Furthermore, the conversion between GSH and GSSG both in bulk solution and in nanochannel can be continuously monitored in real time and in situ. The label-free method provides a possibility to investigate enzymatic activity as well as its activators or inhibitors related to the transformation between GSH and GSSG.

  12. Reduced cardiac remodelling and prevention of glutathione deficiency after omega-3 supplementation in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuehua; Favre, Julie; Vercauteren, Magalie; Laillet, Brigitte; Remy-Jouet, Isabelle; Skiba, Mohamed; Lallemand, Françoise; Dehaudt, Cathy; Monteil, Christelle; Thuillez, Christian; Mulder, Paul

    2011-06-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3) supplementation is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality and post-infarction death. However, the impact of omega-3 supplementation in congestive heart failure (CHF) is still unknown. This study assesses the effects of omega-3 supplementation on left ventricular (LV) function and remodelling. We assessed, in rats with CHF induced by left coronary ligation, the effects of a 1-week and a 12-week supplementation with omega-3 (450 mg/kg per day) on LV hemodynamics, function and structure. Chronic omega-3 reduces total peripheral resistance due to an increase in cardiac output without modification of arterial pressure. Only chronic omega-3 reduces LV end-diastolic pressure and LV relaxation constant. Moreover, chronic omega-3 decreases LV systolic and diastolic diameters, LV weight and collagen density. Acute and chronic omega-3 increase LV γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase and oppose glutathione deficiency resulting in a reduction of myocardial oxidized glutathione. In experimental CHF, long-term omega-3 supplementation improves LV hemodynamics and function and prevents LV remodelling and glutathione deficiency. The latter might be one of the mechanisms involved, but whether other mechanism, independent of myocardial redox 'status', such as reduced inflammation, are implicated remains to be confirmed.

  13. Development and validation of a novel RP-HPLC method for the analysis of reduced glutathione.

    PubMed

    Sutariya, Vijaykumar; Wehrung, Daniel; Geldenhuys, Werner J

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was the development, optimization, and validation of a novel reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for the quantification of reduced glutathione in pharmaceutical formulations utilizing simple UV detection. The separation utilized a C18 column at room temperature and UV absorption was measured at 215 nm. The mobile phase was an isocratic flow of a 50/50 (v/v) mixture of water (pH 7.0) and acetonitrile flowing at 1.0 mL/min. Validation of the method assessed the methods ability in seven categories: linearity, range, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision, and selectivity. Analysis of the system suitability showed acceptable levels of suitability in all categories. Likewise, the method displayed an acceptable degree of linearity (r(2) = 0.9994) over a concentration range of 2.5-60 µg/mL. The detection limit and quantification limit were 0.6 and 1.8 µg/mL respectively. The percent recovery of the method was 98.80-100.79%. Following validation the method was employed in the determination of glutathione in pharmaceutical formulations in the form of a conjugate and a nanoparticle. The proposed method offers a simple, accurate, and inexpensive way to quantify reduced glutathione.

  14. Cadmium-Induced Hydrogen Sulfide Synthesis Is Involved in Cadmium Tolerance in Medicago sativa by Reestablishment of Reduced (Homo)glutathione and Reactive Oxygen Species Homeostases

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Weiti; Chen, Huiping; Zhu, Kaikai; Jin, Qijiang; Xie, Yanjie; Cui, Jin; Xia, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Until now, physiological mechanisms and downstream targets responsible for the cadmium (Cd) tolerance mediated by endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have been elusive. To address this gap, a combination of pharmacological, histochemical, biochemical and molecular approaches was applied. The perturbation of reduced (homo)glutathione homeostasis and increased H2S production as well as the activation of two H2S-synthetic enzymes activities, including L-cysteine desulfhydrase (LCD) and D-cysteine desulfhydrase (DCD), in alfalfa seedling roots were early responses to the exposure of Cd. The application of H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), not only mimicked intracellular H2S production triggered by Cd, but also alleviated Cd toxicity in a H2S-dependent fashion. By contrast, the inhibition of H2S production caused by the application of its synthetic inhibitor blocked NaHS-induced Cd tolerance, and destroyed reduced (homo)glutathione and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostases. Above mentioned inhibitory responses were further rescued by exogenously applied glutathione (GSH). Meanwhile, NaHS responses were sensitive to a (homo)glutathione synthetic inhibitor, but reversed by the cotreatment with GSH. The possible involvement of cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in NaHS responses was also suggested. In summary, LCD/DCD-mediated H2S might be an important signaling molecule in the enhancement of Cd toxicity in alfalfa seedlings mainly by governing reduced (homo)glutathione and ROS homeostases. PMID:25275379

  15. Cadmium-induced hydrogen sulfide synthesis is involved in cadmium tolerance in Medicago sativa by reestablishment of reduced (homo)glutathione and reactive oxygen species homeostases.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiti; Chen, Huiping; Zhu, Kaikai; Jin, Qijiang; Xie, Yanjie; Cui, Jin; Xia, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Until now, physiological mechanisms and downstream targets responsible for the cadmium (Cd) tolerance mediated by endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have been elusive. To address this gap, a combination of pharmacological, histochemical, biochemical and molecular approaches was applied. The perturbation of reduced (homo)glutathione homeostasis and increased H2S production as well as the activation of two H2S-synthetic enzymes activities, including L-cysteine desulfhydrase (LCD) and D-cysteine desulfhydrase (DCD), in alfalfa seedling roots were early responses to the exposure of Cd. The application of H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), not only mimicked intracellular H2S production triggered by Cd, but also alleviated Cd toxicity in a H2S-dependent fashion. By contrast, the inhibition of H2S production caused by the application of its synthetic inhibitor blocked NaHS-induced Cd tolerance, and destroyed reduced (homo)glutathione and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostases. Above mentioned inhibitory responses were further rescued by exogenously applied glutathione (GSH). Meanwhile, NaHS responses were sensitive to a (homo)glutathione synthetic inhibitor, but reversed by the cotreatment with GSH. The possible involvement of cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in NaHS responses was also suggested. In summary, LCD/DCD-mediated H2S might be an important signaling molecule in the enhancement of Cd toxicity in alfalfa seedlings mainly by governing reduced (homo)glutathione and ROS homeostases.

  16. Involvement of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in reduced glutathione maintenance and hydrogen peroxide signal under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomin; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Chenghong; Li, Jisheng; Wan, Qi; Bi, Yurong

    2008-06-01

    Cellular redox homeostasis is essential for plant growth, development as well as for the resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, which is governed by the complex network of prooxidant and antioxidant systems. Recently, new evidence has been published that NADPH, produced by glucose-6-phosephate dehydrogenase enzyme (G6PDH), not only acted as the reducing potential for the output of reduced glutathione (GSH), but was involved in the activity of plasma membrane (PM) NADPH oxidase under salt stress, which resulted in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) accumulation. H(2)O(2) acts as a signal in regulating G6PDH activity and expression, and the activities of the enzymes in the glutathione cycle as well, through which the ability of GSH regeneration was increased under salt stress. Thus, G6PDH plays a critical role in maintaining cellular GSH levels under long-term salt stress. In this addendum, a hypothetical model for the roles of G6PDH in modulating the intracellular redox homeostasis under salt stress is presented.

  17. Regulative roles of glutathione reductase and four glutaredoxins in glutathione redox, antioxidant activity, and iron homeostasis of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Bin; Tang, Li; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple glutaredoxins (Grx) and glutathione reductase (Glr) are vital for the thiol-disulfide redox system in budding yeast but generally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we characterized the Beauveria bassiana redox system comprising dithiol Grx1, monothiol Grx2-4, Grx-like Grx5, and Glr orthologue. Each grx or glr deletion was compensated by increased transcripts of some other grx genes in normal cultures. Particularly, grx3 compensated the absence of grx1, grx2, grx5, or glr under oxidative stress while its absence was compensated only by undeletable grx4 under normal conditions but by most of other undeleted grx and glr genes in response to menadione. Consequently, the redox state was disturbed in Δglr more than in Δgrx3 but not in Δgrx1/2/5. Superoxide dismutases were more active in normal Δgrx1-3 cultures but less in Δgrx5 or Δglr response to menadione. Total catalase activity increased differentially in all the mutant cultures stressed with or without H2O2 while total peroxidase activity decreased more in the normal or H2O2-stressed culture of Δglr than of Δgrx3. Among the mutants, Δgrx3 showed slightly increased sensitivity to menadione or H2O2; Δglr exhibited greater sensitivity to thiol-oxidizing diamide than thiol-reducing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as well as increased sensitivity to the two oxidants. Intriguingly, all the mutants grew slower in a Fe(3+)-inclusive medium perhaps due to elevated transcripts of two Fe(3+) transporter genes. More or fewer phenotypes linked with biocontrol potential were altered in four deletion mutants excluding Δgrx5. All the changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Overall, Grx3 played more critical role than other Grx homologues in the Glr-dependent redox system of the fungal entomopathogen.

  18. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) inhibits epithelial sodium channel activity in primary alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A.; Kreiner, Lisa; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Trac, Phi; Johnson, Nicholle M.; Hansen, Jason M.; Brown, Lou Ann

    2015-01-01

    Amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC) regulate fluid balance in the alveoli and are regulated by oxidative stress. Since glutathione (GSH) is the predominant antioxidant in the lungs, we proposed that changes in glutathione redox potential (Eh) would alter cell signaling and have an effect on ENaC open probability (Po). In the present study, we used single channel patch-clamp recordings to examine the effect of oxidative stress, via direct application of glutathione disulfide (GSSG), on ENaC activity. We found a linear decrease in ENaC activity as the GSH/GSSG Eh became less negative (n = 21; P < 0.05). Treatment of 400 μM GSSG to the cell bath significantly decreased ENaC Po from 0.39 ± 0.06 to 0.13 ± 0.05 (n = 8; P < 0.05). Likewise, back-filling recording electrodes with 400 μM GSSG reduced ENaC Po from 0.32 ± 0.08 to 0.17 ± 0.05 (n = 10; P < 0.05), thus implicating GSSG as an important regulatory factor. Biochemical assays indicated that oxidizing potentials promote S-glutathionylation of ENaC and irreversible oxidation of cysteine residues with N-ethylmaleimide blocked the effects of GSSG on ENaC Po. Additionally, real-time imaging studies showed that GSSG impairs alveolar fluid clearance in vivo as opposed to GSH, which did not impair clearance. Taken together, these data show that glutathione Eh is an important determinant of alveolar fluid clearance in vivo. PMID:25713321

  19. Cadmium-Induced Hydrogen Accumulation Is Involved in Cadmium Tolerance in Brassica campestris by Reestablishment of Reduced Glutathione Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin; Shen, Wenbiao; Shen, Zhenguo; Xia, Yan; Cui, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas (H2) was recently proposed as a therapeutic antioxidant and signaling molecule in clinical trials. However, the underlying physiological roles of H2 in plants remain unclear. In the present study, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize the physiological roles of H2 in enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris against cadmium (Cd). The results showed that both 50 μM CdCl2 and 50%-saturated HRW induced an increase of endogenous H2 in Brassica campestris seedlings, and HRW alleviated Cd toxicity related to growth inhibition and oxidative damage. Seedlings supplied with HRW exhibited increased root length and reduced lipid peroxidation, similar to plants receiving GSH post-treatment. Additionally, seedlings post-treated with HRW accumulated higher levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) and showed increased GST and GPX activities in roots. Molecular evidence illustrated that the expression of genes such as GS, GR1 and GR2, which were down-regulated following the addition of Cd, GSH or BSO, could be reversed to varying degrees by the addition of HRW. Based on these results, it could be proposed that H2 might be an important regulator for enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris seedlings against Cd, mainly by governing reduced glutathione homeostasis. PMID:26445361

  20. Decreased glutathione levels and impaired antioxidant enzyme activities in drug-naive first-episode schizophrenic patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine glutathione levels and antioxidant enzyme activities in the drug-naive first-episode patients with schizophrenia in comparison with healthy control subjects. Methods It was a case-controlled study carried on twenty-three patients (20 men and 3 women, mean age = 29.3 ± 7.5 years) recruited in their first-episode of schizophrenia and 40 healthy control subjects (36 men and 9 women, mean age = 29.6 ± 6.2 years). In patients, the blood samples were obtained prior to the initiation of neuroleptic treatments. Glutathione levels: total glutathione (GSHt), reduced glutathione (GSHr) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and antioxidant enzyme activities: superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) were determined by spectrophotometry. Results GSHt and reduced GSHr were significantly lower in patients than in controls, whereas GSSG was significantly higher in patients. GPx activity was significantly higher in patients compared to control subjects. CAT activity was significantly lower in patients, whereas the SOD activity was comparable to that of controls. Conclusion This is a report of decreased plasma levels of GSHt and GSHr, and impaired antioxidant enzyme activities in drug-naive first-episode patients with schizophrenia. The GSH deficit seems to be implicated in psychosis, and may be an important indirect biomarker of oxidative stress in schizophrenia early in the course of illness. Finally, our results provide support for further studies of the possible role of antioxidants as neuroprotective therapeutic strategies for schizophrenia from early stages. PMID:21810251

  1. The effects of exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic field and amphetamine on the reduced glutathione in the brain.

    PubMed

    Jelenković, Ankica; Janać, Branka; Pesić, Vesna; Jovanović, Marina D; Vasiljević, Ivana; Prolić, Zlatko

    2005-06-01

    Continuous exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF, 50 Hz, 0.5 mT) alone and combined with D-amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg) affected the reduced glutathione content in brain regions of rats. Compared to sham-exposed rats, the glutathione content in the forebrain cortex of the ELF-MF-exposed rats decreased (P < 0.001), but this reverted after giving amphetamine upon ELF-MF exposure. In this group, the glutathione content was increased in the brain stem and cerebellum (P < 0.05 compared to the sham-exposed, ELM-MF-exposed, and amphetamine-treated groups). It is suggested that biogenic monoamines are involved in the reduced glutathione changes observed. The changes are not uniform in the brain regions examined.

  2. [Effects of melaxen and valdoxan on the activity of glutathione antioxidant system and NADPH-producing enzymes in rat heart under experimental hyperthyroidism conditions].

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, M V; Popova, T N; Shul'gin, K K; Popov, S S

    2013-01-01

    The effects of melaxen and valdoxan on the activity of glutathione antioxidant system and some NADPH-producing enzymes have been studied under conditions of experimental hyperthyroidism in rat heart. Under the action of these drugs, reduced glutathione (GSH) content increased as compared to values observed under the conditions of pathology. It has been established that the activities of glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GP), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase (increased under pathological conditions) change toward the intact control values upon the introduction of both drugs. The influence of melaxen and valdoxan, capable of producing antioxidant effect, leads apparently to the inhibition of free-radical oxidation processes and, as a consequence, the reduction of mobilization degree of the glutathione antioxidant system.

  3. Influence of pre- and post-slaughter factors on the reduced glutathione content of beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Rakowska, R; Sadowska, A; Waszkiewicz-Robak, B

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this experiment was to assess the effect of certain factors (muscle anatomy, paternal breed, diet, age at slaughter, castration, process of meat aging and grilling) on the content of reduced glutathione (GSH) in beef. The research material included selected beef muscles acquired from steers and bulls obtained by crossing Polish Holstein-Friesian cows with meat breed bulls (Limousin, Charolais, Hereford). An analysis of ante-mortem factors such as the castration, slaughter age, and fattening of the animals showed no significant effect on the content of GSH (α=0,05). On the other hand, the paternal breed of animals was observed to have a significant effect on GSH content. In the study, GSH content significantly increased during meat aging. In contrast, grilling caused a loss approximately 40% of GSH content. Based on the study, it can be concluded that the distribution of GSH in anatomical beef muscles is uneven.

  4. Electrochemiluminescence detection of reduced and oxidized glutathione ratio by quantum dot-layered double hydroxide film.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yingchang; Shi, Jingjing; Zhao, Xiaocen; Yuan, Zhiqin; Lu, Chao; Lu, Jun

    2016-05-23

    The ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio) is a greater first indication of disease risk than the total concentration of GSH. However, the interferences from thiolated biomolecules, especially cysteine (Cys), make the accurate detection of GSH/GSSG ratio a technical problem. In this work, we successfully used a mixture of quantum dots (QDs) and ZnAl-LDH nanosheets to fabricate a high electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ERET) efficiency sensor for GSH from the disturbances of amino acids, especially Cys and GSSG. The mechanisms of high ERET efficiency and selectivity were well investigated with spectroscopy analysis and theoretical calculation. The results showed that the interaction force between ZnAl-LDH nanosheets and molecules proved a long-range-ordered space and selective transmission for molecules. On the basis of these interesting phenomena, we successfully measured the GSH/GSSG ratio in whole blood and serum samples.

  5. Studies on the Glutathione-Dependent Formaldehyde-Activating Enzyme from Paracoccus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, Richard J.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Smart, Tristan J.; Rose, Nathan R.; Henry, Luc; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a toxin and carcinogen that is both an environmental pollutant and an endogenous metabolite. Formaldehyde metabolism, which is probably essential for all aerobic cells, likely proceeds via multiple mechanisms, including via a glutathione-dependent pathway that is widely conserved in bacteria, plants and animals. However, it is unclear whether the first step in the glutathione-dependent pathway (i.e. formation of S-hydroxymethylglutathione (HMG)) is enzyme-catalysed. We report studies on glutathione-dependent formaldehyde-activating enzyme (GFA) from Paracoccus denitrificans, which has been proposed to catalyse HMG formation from glutathione and formaldehyde on the basis of studies using NMR exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). Although we were able to replicate the EXSY results, time course experiments unexpectedly imply that GFA does not catalyse HMG formation under standard conditions. However, GFA was observed to bind glutathione using NMR and mass spectrometry. Overall, the results reveal that GFA binds glutathione but does not directly catalyse HMG formation under standard conditions. Thus, it is possible that GFA acts as a glutathione carrier that acts to co-localise glutathione and formaldehyde in a cellular context. PMID:26675168

  6. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  7. Reduced formation of advanced glycation endproducts via interactions between glutathione peroxidase 3 and dihydroxyacetone kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hana; Chi, Seung Wook; Lee, Phil Young; Kang, Sunghyun; Cho, Sayeon; Lee, Chong-Kil; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Park, Byoung Chul; Park, Sung Goo

    2009-11-06

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) induces the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), which are involved in several diseases. Earlier, we identified dihydroxyacetone kinase 1 (Dak1) as a candidate glutathione peroxidase 3 (Gpx3)-interacting protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding is noteworthy, as no clear evidence on the involvement of oxidative stress systems in DHA-induced AGE formation has been found to date. Here, we demonstrate that Gpx3 interacts with Dak1, alleviates DHA-mediated stress by upregulating Dak activity, and consequently suppresses AGE formation. Based on these results, we propose that defense systems against oxidative stress and DHA-induced AGE formation are related via interactions between Gpx3 and Dak1.

  8. Blood selenium concentrations and enzyme activities related to glutathione metabolism in wild emperor geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Hoffman, David J.; Schmutz, Joel A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, we collected blood samples from 63 emperor geese (Chen canagica) on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, USA. We studied the relationship between selenium concentrations in whole blood and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that plasma activities of these enzymes are useful biomarkers of selenium-induced oxidative stress, but little information is available on their relationship to selenium in the blood of wild birds. Adult female emperor geese incubating their eggs in mid-June had a higher mean concentration of selenium in their blood and a greater activity of glutathione peroxidase in their plasma than adult geese or goslings that were sampled during the adult flight feathermolting period in late July and early August. Glutathione peroxidase activity was positively correlated with the concentration of selenium in the blood of emperor geese, and the rate of increase relative to selenium was greater in goslings than in adults. The activity of glutathione reductase was greatest in the plasma of goslings and was greater in molting adults than incubating females but was not significantly correlated with selenium in the blood of adults or goslings. Incubating female emperor geese had high selenium concentrations in their blood, accompanied by increased glutathione peroxidase activity consistent with early oxidative stress. These findings indicate that further study of the effects of selenium exposure, particularly on reproductive success, is warranted in this species.

  9. Age-related changes of antioxidant enzyme activities, glutathione status and lipid peroxidation in rat erythrocytes after heat stress.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Oğuz; Gümüşlü, Saadet

    2004-08-13

    The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure to heat stress would lead to oxidative stress and whether this effect varied with different exposure periods. We kept 1-, 6- and 12-month-old male Wistar rats at an ambient temperature of either 22 degrees C or 40 degrees C for 3 and 7 days and measured glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD), Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities and levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in erythrocytes and determined GSH/GSSG ratio, total glutathione and the redox index. G-6-PD and CAT activities were found to be significantly increased in 1- and 6-month-old rats after 3 and 7 days of heat stress, but G-6-PD activities decreased in 12-month-old rats. Cu, Zn-SOD activity decreased in 1-month-old rats after heat stress, whereas it increased in 6- and 12-month-old rats. GST activity increased in all groups. GSH and total GSH levels and GSH/GSSG ratios decreased in 1- and 6-month-old rats but they increased in 12-month-old rats after heat stress. GSSG levels increased in 1- and 6-month-old rats but decreased in 12-month-old rats after heat stress. TBARS levels increased in all groups. Seven days of stress is more effective in altering enzyme activities and levels of GSH, GSSG and TBARS. When the effects of both heat stress and aging were examined together, it was interesting to note that they mostly influenced G-6-PD activity.

  10. Reduced glutathione biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster causes neuronal defects linked to copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Stephen W; La Fontaine, Sharon; Warr, Coral G; Burke, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide often considered to be the master antioxidant in cells. GSH plays an integral role in cellular redox regulation and is also known to have a role in mammalian copper homeostasis. In vitro evidence suggests that GSH is involved in copper uptake, sequestration and efflux. This study was undertaken to further investigate the roles that GSH plays in neuronal copper homeostasis in vivo, using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the Glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit gene (Gclc) that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis was utilised to genetically deplete GSH levels. When Gclc was knocked down in all neurons, this caused lethality, which was partially rescued by copper supplementation and was exacerbated by additional knockdown of the copper uptake transporter Ctr1A, or over-expression of the copper efflux transporter ATP7. Furthermore, when Gclc was knocked down in a subset of neuropeptide-producing cells, this resulted in adult progeny with unexpanded wings, a phenotype previously associated with copper dyshomeostasis. In these cells, Gclc suppression caused a decrease in axon branching, a phenotype further enhanced by ATP7 over-expression. Therefore, we conclude that GSH may play an important role in regulating neuronal copper levels and that reduction in GSH may lead to functional copper deficiency in neurons in vivo. We provide genetic evidence that glutathione (GSH) levels influence Cu content or distribution in vivo, in Drosophila neurons. GSH could be required for binding Cu imported by Ctr1A and distributing it to chaperones, such as Mtn, CCS and Atox1. Alternatively, GSH could modify the copper-binding and transport activities of Atox1 and the ATP7 efflux protein via glutathionylation of copper-binding cysteines.

  11. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  12. Inhibitory effect of a naphthazarin derivative, S64, on heat shock factor (Hsf) activation and glutathione status following hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Park, E M; Lee, I J; Kim, S H; Song, G Y; Park, Y M

    2003-10-01

    The presence of hypoxic cells in solid tumors has long been considered a problem in cancer treatment. Resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation and anticancer drugs has in part been attributed to changes in altered gene expression by hypoxia. We previously reported an activation of heat shock factor (Hsf) in murine tumor RIF cells following hypoxia and suggested that a subsequent accumulation of heat shock protein(s) (Hsp) is likely to contribute to the malignant progression of hypoxic tumor cells (Baek et al., 2001). In this study, we showed that hypoxia induced a DNA-binding activity of Hsf and activation of hsp70 gene expression in colon cancer Clone A cells, and that a naphthazarin derivative, S64, significantly inhibited the hypoxia-inducible hsp70 gene expression in Clone A cells. We also showed that S64 significantly reduced the cellular glutathione levels in this cell line. Considering the proposed effects of Hsp and glutathione on radiation and chemotherapy sensitivity, we suggest that the inhibitory effects of S64 on Hsf activation and cellular glutathione levels have potentially important clinical implications. We believe that the previously reported in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor effect of S64 (Song et al., 2000a, 2001) might be attributed, at least in part, to its effect on Hsf activation and/or glutathione depletion. We also believe that the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of S64 on Hsf and glutathione level following hypoxia deserve a more rigorous future study, the results of which could offer novel strategy to manipulate the resistance mechanisms of solid tumors.

  13. Secreted CLIC3 drives cancer progression through its glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase activity

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R.; Ruengeler, Elena; Casazza, Andrea; Neilson, Lisa J.; Pulleine, Ellie; Santi, Alice; Ismail, Shehab; Lilla, Sergio; Dhayade, Sandeep; MacPherson, Iain R.; McNeish, Iain; Ennis, Darren; Ali, Hala; Kugeratski, Fernanda G.; Al Khamici, Heba; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van den Berghe, Peter V.E.; Cloix, Catherine; McDonald, Laura; Millan, David; Hoyle, Aoisha; Kuchnio, Anna; Carmeliet, Peter; Valenzuela, Stella M.; Blyth, Karen; Yin, Huabing; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Norman, Jim C.; Zanivan, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The secretome of cancer and stromal cells generates a microenvironment that contributes to tumour cell invasion and angiogenesis. Here we compare the secretome of human mammary normal and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). We discover that the chloride intracellular channel protein 3 (CLIC3) is an abundant component of the CAF secretome. Secreted CLIC3 promotes invasive behaviour of endothelial cells to drive angiogenesis and increases invasiveness of cancer cells both in vivo and in 3D cell culture models, and this requires active transglutaminase-2 (TGM2). CLIC3 acts as a glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase that reduces TGM2 and regulates TGM2 binding to its cofactors. Finally, CLIC3 is also secreted by cancer cells, is abundant in the stromal and tumour compartments of aggressive ovarian cancers and its levels correlate with poor clinical outcome. This work reveals a previously undescribed invasive mechanism whereby the secretion of a glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase drives angiogenesis and cancer progression by promoting TGM2-dependent invasion. PMID:28198360

  14. Enzyme activity of α-chymotrypsin: Deactivation by gold nano-cluster and reactivation by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Catherine; Mondal, Tridib; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2017-05-15

    Effect of gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) on the circular dichroism (CD) spectra and enzymatic activity of α-chymotrypsin (ChT) (towards hydrolysis of a substrate, N-succinyl-l-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide) are studied. The CD spectra indicate that on binding to Au-NC, ChT is completely unfolded, resulting in nearly zero ellipticity. α-chymotrypsin (ChT) coated gold nano-clusters exhibit almost no enzymatic activity. Addition of glutathione (GSH) or oxidized glutathione (GSSG) restore the enzyme activity of α-chymotrypsin by 30-45%. ChT coated Au-NC exhibits two emission maxima-one at 480nm (corresponding to Au10) and one at 640nm (Au25). On addition of glutathione (GSH) or oxidized glutathione (GSSG) the emission peak at 640nm vanishes and only one peak at 480nm (Au10) remains. MALDI mass spectrometry studies suggest addition of glutathione (GSH) to α-chymotrypsin capped Au-NCs results in the formation of glutathione-capped Au-NCs and α-chymotrypsin is released from Au-NCs. CD spectroscopy indicates that the conformation of the released α-chymotrypsin is different from that of the native α-chymotrypsin.

  15. Age dependent changes in tissue glutathione depleting activity of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Makar, A.B.; Currie, R.B.

    1986-03-01

    Hepatic glutathione (GSH) plays a major role in protecting the liver against the toxic effects of a variety of chemicals. Decreased GSH can increase liver susceptibility to the toxic actions of such agents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether age or the feeding status of animals alter the steady-state hepatic GSH concentrations. The authors also tested the ability of ethanol to lower GSH under these conditions. Male Sprague-Dawley rats between 3 and 34 weeks of age were used. Animals designed fasted were allowed water, but no food for the 24 hours preceding sacrifice. Six hours before sacrifice, ethanol or saline was injected i.p. The rats were always sacrificed between 12:00 noon and 1:00 P.M. to avoid the effects of diurnal variation of tissue GSH. Glutathione concentrations were determined in the liver using Ellman's reagent. Results indicated that the steady-state hepatic GSH in fed rats increased as a function of age, whereas fasted rats showed minimal changes. The ability of ethanol to lower hepatic GSH also increased with age. In 3 week old rats, GSH decreased 22% while in 34 week old rats it decreased 52%. The authors conclude that both the steady-state concentration of GSH and the GSH-lowering ability of ethanol are highly dependent on the age of as well as on the feeding status of rats.

  16. Festuca arundinacea, glutathione S-transferase and herbicide safeners: a preliminary case study to reduce herbicidal pollution.

    PubMed

    Scarponi, Luciano; Del Buono, Daniele

    2009-11-01

    The expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in Festuca arundinacea was investigated in response to the following herbicide safeners: benoxacor, cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazol-ethyl, fenclorim, fluxofenim and oxabetrinil. All the above compounds enhanced the GST activity tested towards the "model" substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Assays of GST activity towards the herbicides terbuthylazine (N(2)-tert-butyl-6-chloro-N(4)-ethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) and butachlor (N-butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethylacetanilide) as substrates also showed the ability of the safeners to enhance the enzyme activity towards both these herbicides, with the exception of cloquintocet-mexyl for the enzyme activity towards butachlor. As a consequence of the above effects at a macro-scale level, decreased herbicide accumulation and persistence were ascertained in response to the addition of the safener benoxacor to both terbuthylazine and butachlor treatments. These results are discussed in terms of capacity of benoxacor to induce herbicide detoxification in Festuca arundinacea with a view to utilizing them in reducing herbicide pollution.

  17. Reduced Glutathione Mediates Resistance to H2S Toxicity in Oral Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Xi Jia

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is associated with changes in the composition of the oral microflora, where health-associated oral streptococci decrease while Gram-negative anaerobes predominate in disease. A key feature of periodontal disease-associated anaerobes is their ability to produce hydrogen sulfide (H2S) abundantly as a by-product of anaerobic metabolism. So far, H2S has been reported to be either cytoprotective or cytotoxic by modulating bacterial antioxidant defense systems. Although oral anaerobes produce large amounts of H2S, the potential effects of H2S on oral streptococci are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of H2S on the survival and biofilm formation of oral streptococci. The growth and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis were inhibited by H2S. However, H2S did not significantly affect the growth of Streptococcus gordonii or Streptococcus sanguinis. The differential susceptibility of oral streptococci to H2S was attributed to differences in the intracellular concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH). In the absence of GSH, H2S elicited its toxicity through an iron-dependent mechanism. Collectively, our results showed that H2S exerts antimicrobial effects on certain oral streptococci, potentially contributing to the decrease in health-associated plaque microflora. PMID:26801579

  18. Cardiovascular responses to l-glutamate microinjection into the NTS are abrogated by reduced glutathione.

    PubMed

    Granato, Álisson Silva; Gomes, Paula Magalhães; Martins Sá, Renato William; Borges, Gabriel Silva Marques; Alzamora, Andréia Carvalho; de Oliveira, Lisandra Brandino; Toney, Glenn M; Cardoso, Leonardo M

    2017-03-06

    Redox imbalance in regions of the CNS controlling blood pressure is increasingly recognized as a leading factor for hypertension. Nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the dorsomedial medulla is the main region receiving excitatory visceral sensory inputs that modulate autonomic efferent drive to the cardiovascular system. This study sought to determine the capacity of reduced glutathione, a major bioactive antioxidant, to modulate NTS-mediated control of cardiovascular function in unanaesthetized rats. Male Fischer 344 rats were used for microinjection experiments. Cardiovascular responses to l-glutamate were first used to verify accurate placement of injections into the dorsomedial region comprising the NTS. Next, responses to GSH or vehicle were recorded followed by responses to l-glutamate again at the same site. GSH microinjection increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) compared to vehicle and abrogated responses to subsequent injection of l-glutamate. These data indicate that GSH microinjection into the NTS affects blood pressure regulation by dorsomedial neuronal circuits and blunts l-glutamate driven excitation in this region. These findings raise the possibility that increased antioxidant actions of GSH in NTS could contribute to autonomic control dysfunctions of the cardiovascular system.

  19. Reduced Glutathione Mediates Resistance to H2S Toxicity in Oral Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Xi Jia; Tan, Kai Soo

    2016-01-22

    Periodontal disease is associated with changes in the composition of the oral microflora, where health-associated oral streptococci decrease while Gram-negative anaerobes predominate in disease. A key feature of periodontal disease-associated anaerobes is their ability to produce hydrogen sulfide (H2S) abundantly as a by-product of anaerobic metabolism. So far, H2S has been reported to be either cytoprotective or cytotoxic by modulating bacterial antioxidant defense systems. Although oral anaerobes produce large amounts of H2S, the potential effects of H2S on oral streptococci are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of H2S on the survival and biofilm formation of oral streptococci. The growth and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis were inhibited by H2S. However, H2S did not significantly affect the growth of Streptococcus gordonii or Streptococcus sanguinis. The differential susceptibility of oral streptococci to H2S was attributed to differences in the intracellular concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH). In the absence of GSH, H2S elicited its toxicity through an iron-dependent mechanism. Collectively, our results showed that H2S exerts antimicrobial effects on certain oral streptococci, potentially contributing to the decrease in health-associated plaque microflora.

  20. Chelating efficacy of CaNa(2) EDTA on nickel-induced toxicity in Cirrhinus mrigala (Ham.) through its effects on glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Rengaswamy; Narmada, S; Vijayakumar, Remya; Jaleel, Cheruth Abdul

    2009-08-01

    In this age of modern biology, aquatic toxicological research has provided potential tools for ecotoxicologic investigations. Heavy metals primarily affect protein structures and induce a stress in the organisms. The present investigation was carried out to assess the effect of nickel chloride on the selected organs of the freshwater fish Cirrhinus mrigala and how CaNa(2) EDTA counters its effects as an antidote. Toxicity experiments were conducted for different exposure periods and also in certain tissues namely gill, liver, kidney and muscle. The total protein content, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and lipid peroxidation were found to be decreased in the nickel chloride treated tissues and the treatment with CaNa(2) EDTA+nickel chloride returned to near normal levels. Histopathological observations also revealed that after the administration of nickel chloride+CaNa(2) EDTA the chelator induced reduction in nickel toxicity. It has also contributed towards reduction in the pathological damage, thus enabling the organs to attain their near normal histological appearance. The present study shown that CaNa(2) EDTA is an effective chelating agent for the removal of nickel and it has proved efficient in restoring both the biochemical variables and pathological features immediately after a sub lethal exposure of nickel chloride in fish.

  1. Determination of glutathione in single HepG2 cells by capillary electrophoresis with reduced graphene oxide modified microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Wang, Jun; Fu, Hongyan; Liu, Dongju; Chen, Zhenzhen

    2014-12-01

    Determination of intracellular bioactive species will afford beneficial information related to cell metabolism, signal transduction, cell function, and disease treatment. In this study, the electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified carbon fiber microdisk electrode (ER-GOME) was used as a detector of CZE-electrochemical detection and developed to detect glutathione (GSH). The electrocatalytic activity of the modified microelectrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry. Under optimized experimental conditions, the concentration linear range of GSH was from 1 to 60 μM. When the S/N ratio was 3, the concentration detection limit was 1 μM. Compared with the unmodified carbon fiber microdisk electrode, the sensitivity was enhanced more than five times. With the use of this method, the average contents of GSH in single HepG2 cells were found to be 7.13 ± 1.11 fmol (n = 10). Compared with gold/mercury amalgam microelectrode, which was usually used in determining GSH, the electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified carbon fiber microdisk electrode was friendly to environment for free mercury. Furthermore, there were several merits of the novel electrochemical detector coupled with CE, such as comparative repeatability, easy fabrication, and high sensitivity, hold great potential for the single-cell assay.

  2. Substrate specificity of human ABCC4 (MRP4)-mediated cotransport of bile acids and reduced glutathione.

    PubMed

    Rius, Maria; Hummel-Eisenbeiss, Johanna; Hofmann, Alan F; Keppler, Dietrich

    2006-04-01

    The multidrug resistance protein ABCC4 (MRP4), a member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, mediates ATP-dependent unidirectional efflux of organic anions out of cells. Previous studies showed that human ABCC4 is localized to the sinusoidal membrane of hepatocytes and mediates, among other substrates, the cotransport of reduced glutathione (GSH) with bile acids. In the present study, using inside-out membrane vesicles, we demonstrated that human ABCC4 in the presence of physiological concentrations of GSH has a high affinity for the taurine and glycine conjugates of the common natural bile acids as well as the unconjugated bile acid cholate. Chenodeoxycholyltaurine and chenodeoxycholylglycine were the GSH cosubstrates with the highest affinities for ABCC4, with K(m) values of 3.6 and 5.9 microM, respectively. Ursodeoxycholyltaurine and ursodeoxycholylglycine were cotransported together with GSH by ABCC4 with K(m) values of 7.8 and 12.5 microM, respectively, but no transport of ursodeoxycholate and deoxycholate was observed. The simultaneous transport of labeled GSH and cholyltaurine or cholylglycine was demonstrated in double-labeled cotransport experiments with a bile acid-to-GSH ratio of approximately 1:22. K(m) values of the bile acids for ABCC4 were in a range similar to those reported for the canalicular bile salt export pump ABCB11. Under physiological conditions, the sinusoidal ABCC4 may compete with canalicular ABCB11 for bile acids and thereby play a key role in determining the hepatocyte concentration of bile acids. In cholestatic conditions, ABCC4 may become a key pathway for efflux of bile acids from hepatocytes into blood.

  3. Combining reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid has supplementary beneficial effects on boar sperm cryotolerance.

    PubMed

    Giaretta, Elisa; Estrada, Efrén; Bucci, Diego; Spinaci, Marcella; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E; Yeste, Marc

    2015-02-01

    The main aim of this work was to evaluate how supplementing freezing and thawing media with reduced glutathione (GSH) and l-ascorbic acid (AA) affected the quality parameters of frozen-thawed boar spermatozoa. With this purpose, semen samples of 12 ejaculates coming from 12 boars were used. Each ejaculate was split into seven aliquots to which 5 mM of GSH and 100 μM of AA were added separately or together at two different steps of freeze-thawing. Various sperm parameters (levels of free cysteine residues in sperm nucleoproteins, sperm viability, acrosome membrane integrity, intracellular peroxide and superoxide levels [ROS], and total and progressive motility) were evaluated before freezing and at 30 and 240 minutes after thawing. Both GSH and AA significantly improved boar sperm cryotolerance when they were separately added to freezing and thawing media. However, the highest improvement was recorded when both freezing and thawing media were supplemented with 5 mM of GSH plus 100 μM of AA. This improvement was observed in sperm viability and acrosome integrity, sperm motility, and nucleoprotein structure. Although ROS levels were not much increased by freeze-thawing procedures, the addition of GSH and AA to both freezing and thawing extenders significantly decreased intracellular peroxide levels and had no impact on superoxide levels. According to our results, we can conclude that supplementation of freezing and thawing media with both GSH and AA has a combined, beneficial effect on frozen-thawed boar sperm, which is greater than that obtained with the separate addition of either GSH or AA.

  4. Impact of glutathione supplementation of parenteral nutrition on hepatic methionine adenosyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Elremaly, Wesam; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Rouleau, Thérèse; Lavoie, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Background The oxidation of the methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) by the combined impact of peroxides contaminating parenteral nutrition (PN) and oxidized redox potential of glutathione is suspected to explain its inhibition observed in animals. A modification of MAT activity is suspected to be at origin of the PN-associated liver disease as observed in newborns. We hypothesized that the correction of redox potential of glutathione by adding glutathione in PN protects the MAT activity. Aim To investigate whether the addition of glutathione to PN can reverse the inhibition of MAT observed in animal on PN. Methods Three days old guinea pigs received through a jugular vein catheter 2 series of solutions. First with methionine supplement, (1) Sham (no infusion); (2) PN: amino acids, dextrose, lipids and vitamins; (3) PN-GSSG: PN+10 μM GSSG. Second without methionine, (4) D: dextrose; (5) D+180 μM ascorbylperoxide; (6) D+350 μM H2O2. Four days later, liver was sampled for determination of redox potential of glutathione and MAT activity in the presence or absence of 1 mM DTT. Data were compared by ANOVA, p<0.05. Results MAT activity was 45±4% lower in animal infused with PN and 23±7% with peroxides generated in PN. The inhibition by peroxides was associated with oxidized redox potential and was reversible by DTT. Correction of redox potential (PN+GSSG) or DTT was without effect on the inhibition of MAT by PN. The slope of the linear relation between MAT activity and redox potential was two fold lower in animal infused with PN than in others groups. Conclusion The present study suggests that prevention of peroxide generation in PN and/or correction of the redox potential by adding glutathione in PN are not sufficient, at least in newborn guinea pigs, to restore normal MAT activity. PMID:26722840

  5. Reactivity of 9-aminoacridine drug quinacrine with glutathione limits its antiprion activity.

    PubMed

    Šafařík, Martin; Moško, Tibor; Zawada, Zbigniew; Šafaříková, Eva; Dračínský, Martin; Holada, Karel; Šebestík, Jaroslav

    2016-12-09

    Quinacrine-the drug based on 9-aminoacridine-failed in clinical trials for prion diseases, whereas it was active in in vitro studies. We hypothesize that aromatic nucleophilic substitution at C9 could be contributing factor responsible for this failure because of the transfer of acridine moiety from quinacrine to abundant glutathione. Here, we described the semi-large-scale synthesis of the acridinylated glutathione and the consequences of its formation on biological and biophysical activities. The acridinylated glutathione is one order of magnitude weaker prion protein binder than the parent quinacrine. Moreover, according to log DpH 7.4 , the glutathione conjugate is two orders of magnitude more hydrophilic than quinacrine. Its higher hydrophilicity and higher dsDNA binding potency will significantly decrease its bioavailability in membrane-like environment. The glutathione deactivates quinacrine not only directly but also decreases its bioavailability. Furthermore, the conjugate can spontaneously decompose to practically insoluble acridone, which is precipitated out from the living systems.

  6. A Simple Colorimetric Assay for Specific Detection of Glutathione-S Transferase Activity Associated with DDT Resistance in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Rajatileka, Shavanti; Steven, Andrew; Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Paine, Mark; Vontas, John

    2010-01-01

    Background Insecticide-based methods represent the most effective means of blocking the transmission of vector borne diseases. However, insecticide resistance poses a serious threat and there is a need for tools, such as diagnostic tests for resistance detection, that will improve the sustainability of control interventions. The development of such tools for metabolism-based resistance in mosquito vectors lags behind those for target site resistance mutations. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed and validated a simple colorimetric assay for the detection of Epsilon class Glutathione transferases (GST)-based DDT resistance in mosquito species, such as Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue and yellow fever worldwide. The colorimetric assay is based on the specific alkyl transferase activity of Epsilon GSTs for the haloalkene substrate iodoethane, which produces a dark blue colour highly correlated with AaGSTE2-2-overexpression in individual mosquitoes. The colour can be measured visually and spectrophotometrically. Conclusions/Significance The novel assay is substantially more sensitive compared to the gold standard CDNB assay and allows the discrimination of moderate resistance phenotypes. We anticipate that it will have direct application in routine vector monitoring as a resistance indicator and possibly an important impact on disease vector control. PMID:20824165

  7. [Pineal gland glutathione peroxidase activity in rats and its age-associated change].

    PubMed

    Razygraev, A V

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase activity has been studied in the pineal gland (epiphysis) of young and aging female Wistar rats (2-4 and 17-19 month old). For comparison the same activity was studied in the pyramids of medulla oblongata and in the olfactory tubercle. These two brain structures represent white and gray matter respectively. The determination of the activity was performed with H2O2 as a substrate and with 5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) for estimation of the decrease of restored form of glutathione concentration. The glutathione peroxidase activity was higher in the pineal gland than in the brain structures used. Pineal glutathione peroxidase activities (micromole of GSH per minute per milligram of protein, M +/- m) in young and old rats were 1,52 +/- 0,07 and 1,27 +/- 0,06 respectively (p<0,05). The potential reason for the declined enzymatic activity found in the aged rats is the age-associated decrease of the selenium content in the pineal gland. The decline found may be one of the reflections of the pineal gland functional involution.

  8. A Selective Glutathione Probe based on AIE Fluorogen and its Application in Enzymatic Activity Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xiaoding; Hong, Yuning; Chen, Sijie; Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Zhao, Na; Situ, Bo; Lam, Jacky Wing Yip; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we design and synthesize a malonitrile-functionalized TPE derivative (TPE-DCV), which can react with thiol group through thiol-ene click reaction, leading to the fluorescence change of the system. Combined with the unique AIE property, TPE-DCV can selectively detect glutathione (GSH) but not cysteine or homocysteine. As the cleavage of GSSG with the aid of glutathione reductase produces GSH, which turns on the fluorescence of TPE-DCV, the ensemble of TPE-DCV and GSSG can thus serve as a label-free sensor for enzymatic activity assay of glutathione reductase. We also apply TPE-DCV for the detection of intracellular GSH in living cells.

  9. Copper(II)-Graphitic Carbon Nitride Triggered Synergy: Improved ROS Generation and Reduced Glutathione Levels for Enhanced Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ju, Enguo; Dong, Kai; Chen, Zhaowei; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Chaoqun; Huang, Yanyan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-09-12

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) has been used as photosensitizer to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) for photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, its therapeutic efficiency was far from satisfactory. One of the major obstacles was the overexpression of glutathione (GSH) in cancer cells, which could diminish the amount of generated ROS before their arrival at the target site. Herein, we report that the integration of Cu(2+) and g-C3 N4 nanosheets (Cu(2+) -g-C3 N4 ) led to enhanced light-triggered ROS generation as well as the depletion of intracellular GSH levels. Consequently, the ROS generated under light irradiation could be consumed less by reduced GSH, and efficiency was improved. Importantly, redox-active species Cu(+) -g-C3 N4 could catalyze the reduction of molecular oxygen to the superoxide anion or hydrogen peroxide to the hydroxyl radical, both of which facilitated the generation of ROS. This synergy of improved ROS generation and GSH depletion could enhance the efficiency of PDT for cancer therapy.

  10. Correlation between Glutathione Peroxidase Activity and Anthropometrical Parameters in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, F. J.; Rosety-Rodriguez, M.

    2007-01-01

    Since we have recently found that regular exercise increased erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities such as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in adolescents with Down syndrome, these programs may be recommended. This study was designed to assess the role of anthropometrical parameters as easy, economic and non-invasive biomarkers of GPX. Thirty-one…

  11. Effects of commercial selenium products on glutathione peroxidase activity and semen quality in stud boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine how dietary supplementation of inorganic and organic selenium affects selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and sperm of sexually mature stud boars. Twenty-four boars of the Large White, Landrace, Pietrain, and Duroc breeds of opt...

  12. Selenium concentrations and enzyme activities of glutathione metabolism in wild long-tailed ducks and common eiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Hoffman, David J.; Flint, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    The relationships of selenium (Se) concentrations in whole blood with plasma activities of total glutathione peroxidase, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were studied in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) and common eiders (Somateria mollissima) sampled along the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska, USA. Blood Se concentrations were >8 μg/g wet weight in both species. Linear regression revealed that the activities of total and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase were significantly related to Se concentrations only in long-tailed ducks, raising the possibility that these birds were experiencing early oxidative stress.

  13. Selenium concentrations and enzyme activities of glutathione metabolism in wild long-tailed ducks and common eiders.

    PubMed

    Franson, J Christian; Hoffman, David J; Flint, Paul L

    2011-06-01

    The relationships of selenium (Se) concentrations in whole blood with plasma activities of total glutathione peroxidase, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were studied in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) and common eiders (Somateria mollissima) sampled along the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska, USA. Blood Se concentrations were >8 µg/g wet weight in both species. Linear regression revealed that the activities of total and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase were significantly related to Se concentrations only in long-tailed ducks, raising the possibility that these birds were experiencing early oxidative stress.

  14. Prolactin confers resistance against cisplatin in breast cancer cells by activating glutathione-S-transferase.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, Elizabeth W; Schwemberger, Sandy J; LaPensee, Christopher R; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Afton, Scott E; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2009-08-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle for successful treatment of breast cancer patients. Given that prolactin (PRL) acts as an anti-apoptotic/survival factor in the breast, we postulated that it antagonizes cytotoxicity by chemotherapeutic drugs. Treatment of breast cancer cells with PRL caused variable resistance to taxol, vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin. PRL prevented cisplatin-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In the presence of PRL, significantly less cisplatin was bound to DNA, as determined by mass spectroscopy, and little DNA damage was seen by gamma-H2AX staining. PRL dramatically increased the activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), which sequesters cisplatin in the cytoplasm; this increase was abrogated by Jak and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. PRL upregulated the expression of the GSTmu, but not the pi, isozyme. A GST inhibitor abrogated antagonism of cisplatin cytotoxicity by PRL. In conclusion, PRL confers resistance against cisplatin by activating a detoxification enzyme, thereby reducing drug entry into the nucleus. These data provide a rational explanation for the ineffectiveness of cisplatin in breast cancer, which is characterized by high expression of both PRL and its receptor. Suppression of PRL production or blockade of its actions should benefit patients undergoing chemotherapy by allowing for lower drug doses and expanded drug options.

  15. [Induction of glutathione and activation of immune functions by low-dose, whole-body irradiation with gamma-rays].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shuji

    2006-10-01

    We first examined the relation between the induction of glutathione and immune functions in mice after low-dose gamma-ray irradiation. Thereafter, inhibition of tumor growth by radiation was confirmed in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST)-bearing mice. The total glutathione level of the splenocytes transiently increased soon after irradiation and reached a maximum at around 4 h postirradiation. Thereafter, the level reverted to the 0 h value by 24 h postirradiation. A significantly high splenocyte proliferative response was also recognized 4 h postirradiation. Natural killer (NK) activity was also increased significantly in a similar manner. The time at which the response reached the maximum coincided well with that of maximum total glutathione levels of the splenocytes in the gamma-ray-irradiated mice. Reduced glutathione exogenously added to splenocytes obtained from normal mice enhanced the proliferative response and NK activity in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of radiation on tumor growth was then examined in EST-bearing mice. Repeated low-dose irradiation (0.5 Gy, four times, before and within an early time after inoculation) significantly delayed the tumor growth. Finally, the effect of single low-dose (0.5 Gy), whole-body gamma-ray irradiation on immune balance was examined to elucidate the mechanism underlying the antitumor immunity. The percentage of B cells in blood lymphocytes was selectively decreased after radiation, concomitant with an increase in that of the helper T cell population. The IFN-gamma level in splenocyte culture prepared from EST-bearing mice was significantly increased 48 h after radiation, although the level of IL-4 was unchanged. IL-12 secretion from macrophages was also enhanced by radiation. These results suggest that low-dose gamma-rays induce Th1 polarization and enhance the activities of tumoricidal effector cells, leading to an inhibition of tumor growth.

  16. Dietary selenium, glutathione peroxidase activity, and toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, M.Q.; Stohs, S.J.; Murray, W.J.; Birt, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    TCDD has been shown to inhibit selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity. The role of selenium in TCDD toxicity is not known. The authors have therefore examined the effect of TCDD administration on hepatic glutathione peroxidase, aryl hydrocarbon hydroxlase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione S-transferase activities, glutathione content, and lipid peroxidation in rats fed 0, 0.10, and 2.0 ppm dietary selenium. TCDD treatment significantly inhibited selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase in animals on diets containing 0.10 and 2.0 ppm selenium. The selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activities in rats on 0.10 and 2.0 ppm dietary selenium were 8.3- and 4.7-fold greater than in animals fed a diet containing 0 ppm selenium. TCDD administration enhanced hepatic microsomal lipid peroxidation by factors of 4.0, 4.9, and 9.8 in animals fed diets containing 0, 0.10, and 2.0 ppm selenium, respectively. The administration of a lethal dose of TCDD to rats fed diets containing 0, 0.10, and 2.0 ppm selenium, respectively. The administration of a lethal dose of TCDD to rats fed diets containing 0, 0.10, and 2.0 ppm selenium resulted in 0, 46, and 7% survival, respectively, after 66 d. Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase activities were induced by TCDD. The results indicate that optimum dietary selenium provides partial protection from the toxic effects of TCDD.

  17. Synaptic NMDA receptor activity is coupled to the transcriptional control of the glutathione system

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul S.; Bell, Karen F.S.; Hasel, Philip; Kaindl, Angela M.; Fricker, Michael; Thomson, Derek; Cregan, Sean P.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2015-01-01

    How the brain's antioxidant defenses adapt to changing demand is incompletely understood. Here we show that synaptic activity is coupled, via the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), to control of the glutathione antioxidant system. This tunes antioxidant capacity to reflect the elevated needs of an active neuron, guards against future increased demand and maintains redox balance in the brain. This control is mediated via a programme of gene expression changes that boosts the synthesis, recycling and utilization of glutathione, facilitating ROS detoxification and preventing Puma-dependent neuronal apoptosis. Of particular importance to the developing brain is the direct NMDAR-dependent transcriptional control of glutathione biosynthesis, disruption of which can lead to degeneration. Notably, these activity-dependent cell-autonomous mechanisms were found to cooperate with non-cell-autonomous Nrf2-driven support from astrocytes to maintain neuronal GSH levels in the face of oxidative insults. Thus, developmental NMDAR hypofunction and glutathione system deficits, separately implicated in several neurodevelopmental disorders, are mechanistically linked. PMID:25854456

  18. Site Directed Mutagenesis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Glutathione Synthetase Produces an Enzyme with Homoglutathione Synthetase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dworeck, Tamara; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Three different His-tagged, mutant forms of the fission yeast glutathione synthetase (GSH2) were derived by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in E. coli DH5α and affinity purified in a two-step procedure. Analysis of enzyme activity showed that it was possible to shift the substrate specificity of GSH2 from Gly (km 0,19; wild-type) to β-Ala or Ser. One mutation (substitution of Ile471, Cy472 to Met and Val and Ala 485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro) increased the affinity of GSH2 for β-Ala (km 0,07) and lowered the affinity for Gly (km 0,83), which is a characteristic of the enzyme homoglutathione synthetase found in plants. Substitution of Ala485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro only, increased instead the affinity of GSH2 for Ser (km 0,23) as a substrate, while affinity to Gly was preserved (km 0,12). This provides a new biosynthetic pathway for hydroxymethyl glutathione, which is known to be synthesized from glutathione and Ser in a reaction catalysed by carboxypeptidase Y. The reported findings provide further insight into how specific amino acids positioned in the GSH2 active site facilitate the recognition of different amino acid substrates, furthermore they support the evolutionary theory that homoglutathione synthetase evolved from glutathione synthetase by a single gene duplication event. PMID:23091597

  19. Reduced glutathione addition improves both the kinematics and physiological quality of post-thawed red deer sperm.

    PubMed

    Anel-López, L; Garcia-Alvarez, O; Maroto-Morales, A; Iniesta-Cuerda, M; Ramón, M; Soler, A J; Fernández-Santos, M R; Garde, J J

    2015-11-01

    The potential protective effect of reduced glutathione (GSH) and trolox (TRX), an analogue of vitamin E, supplementation during in vitro culture (2h, 39°C) of electroejaculated frozen/thawed red deer sperm was investigated. Cryopreserved sperm were thawed and incubated with no additive (Control) and 1mM or 5mM of each antioxidant to find out whether these supplementations can maintain the sperm quality, considering the use of thawed samples for in vitro techniques such as in vitro fertilisation (IVF), sperm sex sorting or refreezing. The effect of GSH on sperm motility was positive compared to TRX which was negative (P<0.001). After 2h of incubation at 39°C, use of GSH improved motility while TRX supplementation reduced sperm motility compared with Control samples without antioxidant. Use of TRX at both concentrations (1 and 5mM; TRX1 and TRX5) resulted in lesser percentages of apoptotic sperm (12.4±1.1% and 11.7±0.9%) than GSH1, GSH5 (15.2±1% and 14.6±1.1%) and Control samples (16.9±1.2%) (P<0.001). Use of GSH at both concentrations (1 and 5mM) resulted in greater mitochondrial activity as compared with findings for the Control, TRX1 and TRX5 groups. Results of this study indicate that GSH is a suitable supplement for electroejaculated red deer sperm. It would be necessary to conduct fertility trials (in vivo and in vitro), to assess whether GSH supplementation of thawed red deer sperm could improve fertility rates.

  20. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  1. Differential metallothionein, reduced glutathione and metal levels in Perna perna mussels in two environmentally impacted tropical bays in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lavradas, Raquel T; Rocha, Rafael C C; Bordon, Isabella C A C; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Godoy, José M; Hauser-Davis, Rachel A

    2016-07-01

    Mussel farming is an important economic activity in Brazil, and these organisms are consumed by the majority of the population in most coastal zones in the country. However, despite the increasing pollution of aquatic ecosystems in Brazil, little is known about the biochemical activity in mussels in response to metal exposure. In this context, the aim of the present study was to investigate metal and metalloid exposure effects in Perna perna mussels, by determining metal levels, the induction of metallothionein (MT) synthesis, and oxidative stress, in the form of reduced glutathione (GSH) in 3 contaminated areas from the Guanabara Bay in comparison to a reference site, Ilha Grande Bay, both in summer and winter. Metal and metalloid concentrations were also compared to Brazilian and international guidelines, to verify potential health risks to human consumers. Mussels from all sampling sites were shown to be improper for human consumption due to metal contamination, including Ilha Grande Bay, which has previously been considered a reference site. Several statistically significant correlations and seasonal differences were observed between MT, GSH and metals and metalloids in both analyzed tissues. A Discriminant Canonical Analysis indicated that the digestive gland is a better bioindicator for environmental contamination by metals and metalloids in this species and offers further proof that MT variations observed are due to metal exposure and not oxidative stress, since GSH influence for both muscle tissue and the digestive glands was non-significant in this analysis. These results show that P. perna mussels are an adequate sentinel species for metal contamination with significant effects on oxidative stress and metal exposure biomarkers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report metals, metalloids, MT and GSH levels in the muscle tissue of this species.

  2. [Influence of complex therapy on the activity of glutathione-dependent enzymes of saliva in patients with parodontitis].

    PubMed

    Gavriliuk, L A; Shevchenko, N V; Vartichan, A I; Lysyĭ, L T; Kepnataru, K F; Godorozha, P D

    2008-01-01

    The activities of antioxidative enzymes (glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase) and content of reduced glutathione (GSH), thiocyanate (SCN) and protein were determined in saliva of patients with parodontitis treated with traditional and complex therapy, which additionally included the antihomotoxic preparations Traumeel S ointment, Coenzyme compositum or Lymphomyosot. Inflammation process led to the metabolic disturbances and imbalance of the antioxidative defense system in the patients with parodontitis. The results suggest that complex therapy with the antihomotoxic preparations restored imbalance of the antioxidative defense and was more effective than the traditional therapy alone in the patients with parodontitis. Analysis of interrelation between salivary parameters in patients with parodontitis indicated positive correlation before and after the complex therapy (as an exception there was lack of correlation between content of protein and tiocyanate in the saliva of patients before the beginning of the therapeutic course). So these results reflect activityof pathological process and antioxidant defense imbalance in saliva of patients with parodontitis and may be a basis for recommendation of employment of the complex antihomotoxic therapy as the initial stage of pathological process.

  3. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Christina; Dietrich, Michael; Herrmann, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR), a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase. PMID:28116039

  4. Short-term oral exposure to aluminium decreases glutathione intestinal levels and changes enzyme activities involved in its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, Daniel; Meichtry, Verónica; Pregi, Nicolás; Pizarro, Manuel

    2005-09-01

    To study the effects of aluminium (Al) on glutathione (GSH) metabolism in the small intestine, adult male Wistar rats were orally treated with AlCl3.6H2O at doses of 30, 60, 120 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day, during seven days. Controls received deionized water. At doses above 120 mg/kg b.w., Al produced both a significant reduction of GSH content and an increase of oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio (P < 0.05). The index of oxidative stress of the intestine mucosa in terms of lipid peroxidation evaluated by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances was significantly increased (52%) at higher Al dose used. The duodenal expression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in brush border membranes, determined by Western blot technique, was increased 2.7-fold in rats treated with 200mg AlCl3/kg b.w (P < 0.01). Intestine activities of both GSH-synthase (from 60 mg/kg b.w.) and GSSG-reductase (from 120 mg/kg b.w.) were significantly reduced (26% and 31%, respectively) while glutathione-S-transferase showed to be slightly modified in the Al-treated groups. Conversely, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.05) due to the Al treatment. Al reduced in vitro mucosa-to-lumen GSH efflux (P < 0.05). A positive linear correlation between the intestine GSH depletion and reduction of in situ 45Ca intestinal absorption, both produced by Al, was found (r = 0.923, P = 0.038). Taking as a whole, these results show that Al would alter GSH metabolism in small intestine by decreasing its turnover, leading to an unbalance of redox state in the epithelial cells, thus contributing to deteriorate GSH-dependent absorptive functions.

  5. JS-K, a glutathione/glutathione S-transferase-activated nitric oxide donor of the diazeniumdiolate class with potent antineoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Shami, Paul J; Saavedra, Joseph E; Wang, Lai Y; Bonifant, Challice L; Diwan, Bhalchandra A; Singh, Shivendra V; Gu, Yijun; Fox, Stephen D; Buzard, Gregory S; Citro, Michael L; Waterhouse, David J; Davies, Keith M; Ji, Xinhua; Keefer, Larry K

    2003-04-01

    We have previously shown that nitric oxide (NO) inhibits growth and induces differentiation and apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells, with the HL-60 human myeloid leukemia line being particularly sensitive to NO-mediated cytolysis. With the goal of identifying a prodrug that can target NO to the leukemia cells without inducing NO-mediated systemic hypotension, we have screened a series of O(2)-aryl diazeniumdiolates designed to be stable at physiological pH but to release NO upon reaction with glutathione. O(2)-(2,4-Dinitrophenyl) 1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (JS-K) proved to be the most active antiproliferative agent among those tested in HL-60 cells, with an IC(50) of 0.2-0.5 microM. After 5 days of exposure to 0.5 micro M JS-K, HL-60 cells had differentiated and acquired some of the phenotypic features of normal monocytes. One- to 2-day treatment with JS-K at concentrations of 0.5-1 microM resulted in apoptosis induction in a concentration- and caspase-dependent manner. JS-K also inhibited the growth of solid tumor cell lines but to a lesser extent than HL-60 cells. JS-K was administered i.v. to nonobese diabetic-severe combined immune deficient mice at doses of up to 4 micromol/kg without inducing significant hypotension. The growth of s.c. implanted HL-60 cells was reduced by approximately 50% when the mice received i.v. injections three times/week with 4 micromol/kg boluses of JS-K. Histological examination of tumor explants from JS-K-treated animals revealed extensive necrosis. Similar results were seen with s.c. human prostate cancer (PPC-1) xenografts. Our data indicate that JS-K is a promising lead compound for the possible development of a novel class of antineoplastic agents.

  6. Conjugation of glutathione and other thiols with bioreductively activated mitomycin C. Effect of thiols on the reductive activation rate.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Tomasz, M

    1994-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MC), a clinically used natural antitumor agent, was shown to form three monoconjugates (11a-13a) and two bisconjugates (14a, 15a) with GSH upon reductive activation by rat liver microsomes, purified NADPH-cytochrome c reductase, or NADH-cytochrome c reductase or chemical reduction using H2/PtO2. Rat liver cytosol/NADH activated MC only at acidic pH (5.8), resulting in the formation of a single GSH-MC monoconjugate, 13a. The reductase responsible for cytosolic activation of MC to form this conjugate was DT-diaphorase. GSH itself did not reduce MC, and unreduced MC did not form conjugates with GSH. A moderate catalytic effect by glutathione S-transferase was demonstrated on the cytosol-activated reaction. Mercaptoethanol and N-acetylcysteine gave analogous sets of five MC-thiol conjugates under cytochrome c reductase or H2/PtO2 activation conditions. The structures of all 15 MC-thiol conjugates (five each with GSH, mercaptoethanol, and N-acetylcysteine, respectively) were determined, using 1H-NMR, UV, and mass spectroscopies, combined with analytical chemical and radiolabeling methods. The mechanism of formation of the conjugates features SN2 displacement of the carbamate of the reduced MC by GS-. The MC-GSH conjugates were noncytotoxic to the tumor cells tested. The conjugation of GSH with activated MC is likely to represent detoxication in mammalian cells. As another effect, GSH accelerates the rate of reduction of MC by "slow" reducing agents such as cytochrome c reductases and H2/PtO2. A mechanism is proposed to explain this effect, which involves further reduction of the initially formed MC semiquinone free radical by GSH.

  7. Serum Malondialdehyde Concentration and Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in a Longitudinal Study of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, María; Muriach, María; Romero, Francisco J.; Villar, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The main goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of oxidative damage and to quantify its level in gestational diabetes. Methods Thirty-six healthy women and thirty-six women with gestational diabetes were studied in the three trimesters of pregnancy regarding their levels of oxidative stress markers. These women were diagnosed with diabetes in the second trimester of pregnancy. Blood glucose levels after 100g glucose tolerance test were higher than 190, 165 or 145 mg/dl, 1, 2 or 3 hours after glucose intake. Results The group of women with gestational diabetes had higher serum malondialdehyde levels, with significant differences between groups in the first and second trimester. The mean values of serum glutathione peroxidase activity in the diabetic women were significantly lower in the first trimester. In the group of women with gestational diabetes there was a negative linear correlation between serum malondialdehyde concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the second and third trimester. Conclusions In this observational and longitudinal study in pregnant women, the alterations attributable to oxidative stress were present before the biochemical detection of the HbA1c increase. Usual recommendations once GD is detected (adequate metabolic control, as well as any other normally proposed to these patients) lowered the concentration of malondialdehyde at the end of pregnancy to the same levels of the healthy controls. Serum glutathione peroxidase activity in women with gestational diabetes increased during the gestational period. PMID:27228087

  8. Influence of nitric oxide on the intracellular reduced glutathione pool: different cellular capacities and strategies to encounter nitric oxide-mediated stress.

    PubMed

    Berendji, D; Kolb-Bachofen, V; Meyer, K L; Kröncke, K D

    1999-10-01

    Different cell types exhibit huge differences towards the cytotoxic action of NO. In search for an explanation, we used subtoxic concentrations of the NO-donors S-nitrosocysteine (SNOC) for short-term challenge and of (Z)-1-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1- ium-1,2-diolate (DETA/NO) for longer periods of exposure, respectively, and subtoxic concentrations of the oxidant H2O2 to determine the impact on intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) concentrations. We find that GSH concentrations are always decreased, but that different cell types show different responses. Incubation of the relatively NO-sensitive murine lymphocytes with both NO-donors, but not with H2O2, resulted in a nearly complete loss of intracellular GSH. Short-term NO-treatment of P815 mastocytoma cells, also sensitive to NO-mediated cell death, decreased GSH to a similar extent only if either glutathione reductase (GSHR) activity or y-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gammaGCS) activity were inhibited concomitantly by specific inhibitors. Long-term NO-treatment of P815 cells, however, resulted in a significant decrease of GSH that could be further enhanced by inhibiting gammaGCS activity. In contrast, neither short-term nor long-term NO-exposure nor H2O2-treatment affected intracellular GSH levels of L929 fibroblasts, which were previously shown to be extremely resistant towards NO, whereas concomitant gammaGCS inhibition, but not GSHR inhibition, completely decreased GSH concentrations. These results show that different cell types use different pathways trying to maintain glutathione concentrations to cope with nitrosative stress, and the overall capability to maintain a critical amount of GSH correlates with susceptibility to NO-induced cell death.

  9. Activity levels and expression of antioxidant enzymes in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in artificially aged rice seed.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangkun; Xin, Xia; Song, Chao; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jinmei; Wu, Shuhua; Li, Ruifang; Liu, Xu; Lu, Xinxiong

    2014-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species are the main contributors to seed deterioration. In order to study scavenging systems for reactive oxygen species in aged seed, we performed analyses using western blotting, real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, high-performance liquid chromatography, and antioxidant enzyme activity analyses in artificially aged rice seeds (Oryza sativa L. cv. wanhua no.11). Aging seeds by storing them at 50 °C for 1, 9, or 17 months increased the superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide levels and reduced the germination percentage from 99% to 92%, 55%, and 2%, respectively. The activity levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) did not change in aged seeds. In contrast, the activity levels of catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) were significantly decreased in aged seeds, as were the expression of catalase and cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase protein. Transcript accumulation analysis showed that specific expression patterns were complex for each of the antioxidant enzyme types in the rice embryos. Overall, the expression of most genes was down-regulated, along with their protein expression. In addition, the reduction in the amount of ascorbate and glutathione was associated with the reduction in scavenging enzymes activity in aged rice embryos. Our data suggest that the depression of the antioxidant system, especially the reduction in the expression of CAT1, APX1 and MDHAR1, may be responsible for the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in artificially aged seed embryos, leading to a loss of seed vigor.

  10. Stobadine pretreatment enhances glutathione peroxidase activity in the heart of irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Kováciková, Z; Chorvatovicová, D; Ginter, E

    1997-05-01

    The effect of pretreatment with stobadine (a novel drug with cardioprotective properties) on the activity of glutathione peroxidase was studied in the heart of mice after Co60 irradiation. Exposure to 6.5 Gy caused significant decrease in the activity of the enzyme (p < 0.01). Treatment with stobadine (70.07 mg/kg) 1 or 2 h before irradiation resulted in activity enhancement in comparison with the nonpretreated irradiated group (p < 0.01). We conclude that the radical scavenging mechanism may be involved in the protection exerted by stobadine. The results are in agreement with those obtained by the micronucleus test.

  11. Glutathion S-transferase activity and DDT-susceptibility of Malaysian mosquitos.

    PubMed

    Lee, H L; Chong, W L

    1995-03-01

    Comparative DDT-susceptibility status and glutathion s-transferase (GST) activity of Malaysian Anopheles maculatus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti was investigated to ascertain the role of this enzyme in DDT resistance. The standardised WHO dose-mortality bioassay tests were used to determine DDT susceptibility in these mosquitos, whilst GST microassay (Brogdon and Barber, 1990) was conducted to measure the activity of this enzyme in mosquito homogenate. It appeared that DDT susceptibility status of Malaysian mosquitos was not correlated with GST activity.

  12. Transcriptional activation of glutathione pathways and role of glucose homeostasis during copper imbalance.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Natalia; Rivas, Nicole; del Pozo, Talía; Burkhead, Jason; Suazo, Miriam; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for organism health. Dietary changes or pathologies linked to this metal induce changes in intracellular glutathione concentrations. Here, we studied the transcriptional activation of glutathione pathways in Jurkat cell lines, analyzing the effect of change in glucose homeostasis during a physiological and supra-physiological copper exposure. An immortalized line of human T lymphocyte cell line (Jurkat) was exposed to different copper and glucose conditions to mimic concentrations present in human blood. We applied treatments for 6 (acute) and 24 h (sustained) to 2 µM (physiological) or 20 µM (supra-physiological, Wilson disease scenario) of CuSO4 in combination with 25 mg/dL (hypoglycemia), 100 mg/dL (normal) and 200 mg/dL (hyperglycemia, diabetes scenario) of glucose. The results indicate that a physiological concentration of copper exposure does not induce transcriptional changes in the glutathione synthesis pathway after 6 or 24 h. The G6PDH gene (regeneration pathway), however, is induced during a supra-physiological copper condition. This data was correlated with the viability assays, where fluctuation in both glucose conditions (hypo and hyperglycemia scenario) affected Jurkat proliferation when 20 µM of CuSO4 was added to the culture media. Under a copper overload condition, the transcription of a component of glutathione regeneration pathway (G6PDH gene) is activated in cells chronically exposed to a hyperglycemia scenario, indicating that fluctuations in glucose concentration impact the resistance against the metal. Our findings illustrate the importance of glucose homeostasis during copper excess.

  13. Proteomic and activity profiles of ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in germinating barley embryo.

    PubMed

    Bønsager, Birgit C; Shahpiri, Azar; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2010-10-01

    Enzymes involved in redox control are important during seed germination and seedling growth. Ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in barley embryo extracts were monitored both by 2D-gel electrophoresis and activity measurements from 4 to 144 h post imbibition (PI). Strikingly different activity profiles were observed. No ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was present in mature seeds but activity was detected after 24 h PI and increased 14-fold up to 144 h PI. In contrast, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activity was present at 4h PI and first decreased by 9-fold until 72 h PI followed by a 5-fold increase at 144 h PI. Glutathione reductase and monodehydroascorbate reductase activities were also detected at 4 h PI, and showed modest increases of 1.8- and 2.7-fold, respectively, by 144 h PI. The combination of functional analysis with the proteomics approach enabled correlation of the activity profiles and protein abundance. While gel spots containing APX showed intensity changes consistent with the activity profile from 0 to 72 h PI, DHAR spot intensities indicated that post-translational regulation may be responsible for the observed changes in activity. Transcript profiling, 2D-western blotting and mass spectrometric characterization of multiple APX spots demonstrated the presence of APX1 and minor amounts of APX2.

  14. Environmental stress enhances biosynthesis of flavor precursors, S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-glutathione and S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-L-cysteine, in grapevine through glutathione S-transferase activation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hironori; Takase, Hideki; Suzuki, Yumiko; Tanzawa, Fumiko; Takata, Ryoji; Fujita, Keiko; Kohno, Minako; Mochizuki, Mai; Suzuki, Shunji; Konno, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthesis of S-(3-hexan-1-ol)-glutathione (3MH-S-glut) and S-(3-hexan-l-ol)-L-cysteine (3MH-S-cys), which act as flavour precursors in wines, in Vitis vinifera grapes exposed to various environmental stress conditions is reported here. Ultraviolet (UV-C) irradiation, water deficit, and biological stimulation up-regulated 3MH-S-glut and 3MH-S-cys biosynthesis in grape leaves. 3MH-S-glut and 3MH-S-cys contents in grape berries were increased by cold shock, heat shock, UV-C irradiation, and biological stimulation. The results suggest that environmental stress enhances the biosynthesis of both flavour precursors in grapevine. The transcription of VvGST1, VvGST3, VvGST4, and GGT in grapevine exposed to the stress conditions was increased markedly compared with that in control grapevine. Also, UV irradiation increased GST (glutathione S-transferase) and GGT (γ-glutamyl transferase) enzyme activities in grape berries. Recombinant VvGST3 and VvGST4, but not VvGST1, mediated the synthesis of 3MH-S-glut from reduced glutathione and trans-2-hexenal in vitro. The enzymatic mediation of flavour precursor production is a novel function of plant GSTs and may result in the detoxification of damaged grape cells under stress conditions. PMID:21115666

  15. Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David P.; Edwards, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The 55 Arabidopsis glutathione transferases (GSTs) are, with one microsomal exception, a monophyletic group of soluble enzymes that can be divided into phi, tau, theta, zeta, lambda, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and TCHQD classes. The populous phi and tau classes are often highly stress inducible and regularly crop up in proteomic and transcriptomic studies. Despite much study on their xenobiotic-detoxifying activities their natural roles are unclear, although roles in defence-related secondary metabolism are likely. The smaller DHAR and lambda classes are likely glutathione-dependent reductases, the zeta class functions in tyrosine catabolism and the theta class has a putative role in detoxifying oxidised lipids. This review describes the evidence for the functional roles of GSTs and the potential for these enzymes to perform diverse functions that in many cases are not “glutathione transferase” activities. As well as biochemical data, expression data from proteomic and transcriptomic studies are included, along with subcellular localisation experiments and the results of functional genomic studies. PMID:22303257

  16. Simultaneous determination of the impurity and radial tensile strength of reduced glutathione tablets by a high selective NIR-PLS method.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Jiang, Yue; Fan, Qi; Chen, Yang; Wu, Ruanqi

    2014-05-05

    This paper establishes a high-throughput and high selective method to determine the impurity named oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and radial tensile strength (RTS) of reduced glutathione (GSH) tablets based on near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and partial least squares (PLS). In order to build and evaluate the calibration models, the NIR diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and transmittance spectra (TS) for 330 GSH tablets were accurately measured by using the optimized parameter values. For analyzing GSSG or RTS of GSH tablets, the NIR-DRS or NIR-TS were selected, subdivided reasonably into calibration and prediction sets, and processed appropriately with chemometric techniques. After selecting spectral sub-ranges and neglecting spectrum outliers, the PLS calibration models were built and the factor numbers were optimized. Then, the PLS models were evaluated by the root mean square errors of calibration (RMSEC), cross-validation (RMSECV) and prediction (RMSEP), and by the correlation coefficients of calibration (R(c)) and prediction (R(p)). The results indicate that the proposed models have good performances. It is thus clear that the NIR-PLS can simultaneously, selectively, nondestructively and rapidly analyze the GSSG and RTS of GSH tablets, although the contents of GSSG impurity were quite low while those of GSH active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) quite high. This strategy can be an important complement to the common NIR methods used in the on-line analysis of API in pharmaceutical preparations. And this work expands the NIR applications in the high-throughput and extraordinarily selective analysis.

  17. The biological selenium status of livestock in Britain as indicated by sheep erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P H; Berrett, S; Patterson, D S

    1979-03-17

    The reliability of erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity as an indicator of selenium status in livestock is discussed. Based on this measurement, a survey is described of the biological selenium status of sheep on each of 329 farms in Britain. Results showed that 47 per cent of these farms were probably unable to provide grazing livestock with sufficient selenium to maintain blood levels greater than 0.075 microgram per ml. Increased selenium deficiency from the increasing use of home grown feeds as a major constituent of livestock rations may be causally related to the increase of white muscle disease and other selenium responsive diseases in Britain.

  18. Effect of chemical form of selenium on tissue glutathione peroxidase activity in developing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Strength, Ralph; Johnson, Janet; White, Marguerite T.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that the stage of development of rats may affect the availability of various forms of selenium for the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) in the rat was experimentally investigated. One experiment evaluated the availability of selenium as selenite or selenomethionine for GSPHx activity during three developmental states in rats: fetus and 7-day old and 14-day old nursing pups. In all tissues studied, GSHPx activity was highest in the 14-day-old pups whose dams were in the selenomethionine group. Rat pups given intraperitoneal selenite had higher liver and kidney GSHPx activity than pups given the same amount of selenium as intraperitoneal selenomethionine. In a second experiment, all dams were fed the same basal diet and pups were weaned to diets containing one of two levels of selenium and one of three forms of selenium (selenite, selenomethionine, or selenocystine). The results also supported the hypothesis these dietary forms of selenium are differentially available for GSHPx activity.

  19. Glutathion peroxidase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in bovine blood and liver.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mahmoud Rushdi; Niishimori, Kazuhiro; Goryo, Masanobu; Okada, Keiji; Yasuda, Jun

    2004-10-01

    A total of 46 cattle, including 25 as control, 16 with glycogen degeneration and 5 with severe fatty degeneration were studied. Whole blood and liver tissue specimens were used to measure glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) activities. The present study determined the value of these parameters in diagnosing glycogen and fatty degeneration in cattle from the point of the status of antioxidation and lipid peroxidation. The results showed a significant decrease in hepatic GSH-Px activity and a significant increase in hepatic G6PD activity in cases of fatty degeneration. On the other hand, there were no significant changes in erythrocytic and hepatic GSH-Px and G6PD activities in cases of glycogen degeneration. The results indicated lipoperoxidation process in the liver tissues increased in cases of fatty degeneration. Therefore, supplying animals suffering from fatty liver with sufficient quantities of nutrient antioxidants may be valuable when treatment is considered.

  20. Single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet tolerance and glutathione redox system significance assessment in faba bean ( Vicia faba L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, Naser A.; Singh, Neetu; Singh, Manoj K.; Shah, Zahoor A.; Duarte, Armando C.; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2013-07-01

    Adsorbents based on single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet (hereafter termed "graphene oxide") are widely used in contaminated environments cleanup which may easily open the avenues for their entry to different environmental compartments, exposure to organisms and their subsequent transfer to human/animal food chain. Considering a common food crop—faba bean ( Vicia faba L.) germinating seedlings as a model plant system, this study assesses the V. faba-tolerance to different concentrations (0, 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1600 mg L-1) of graphene oxide (0.5-5 μm) and evaluates glutathione (γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine) redox system significance in this context. The results showed significantly increased V. faba sensitivity under three graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 1,600 > 200 > 100 mg graphene oxide L-1), which was accompanied by decreased glutathione redox (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione) ratio, reduced glutathione pool, as well as significant and equally elevated activities of glutathione-regenerating (glutathione reductase) and glutathione-metabolizing (glutathione peroxidase; glutathione sulfo-transferase) enzymes. Contrarily, the two graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 800 > 400 graphene oxide mg L-1) yielded promising results; where, significant improvements in V. faba health status (measured as increased graphene oxide tolerance) were clearly perceptible with increased ratio of the reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione, reduced glutathione pool and glutathione reductase activity but decreased activities of glutathione-metabolizing enzymes. It is inferred that V. faba seedlings-sensitivity and/or tolerance to graphene oxide concentrations depends on both the cellular redox state (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione ratio) and the reduced glutathione pool which in turn are controlled by a finely tuned modulation of the coordination between glutathione-regenerating and glutathione-metabolizing enzymes.

  1. Hepatitis viral load correlates to glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Several recent scientific articles have found a direct correlation between Glutathione levels and viral activity for hepatitis B and C. When viral load increases, Glutathione decreases. Researchers from Germany report that adding NAC (N-acetyl cysteine) to HBV producing cells lines can reduce hepatitis viral load 50 fold. Glutathione is used by the liver to help break down toxins. Patients who have chronic infection for more than 90 days should ask their physicians to check their Glutathione levels. A test kit is available from ImmunoSciences Labs; contact information is included. An amino acid, L-Glutamine, can be used with Alpha Lipoic Acid and NAC to increase Glutathione levels. Chlorophyll also offers benefits to people with hepatitis and other infections. Instructions on how to use a special retention enema containing chlorophyll, water, and apple cider vinegar are provided.

  2. Glutathione depletion activates the yeast vacuolar transient receptor potential channel, Yvc1p, by reversible glutathionylation of specific cysteines

    PubMed Central

    Chandel, Avinash; Das, Krishna K.; Bachhawat, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione depletion and calcium influx into the cytoplasm are two hallmarks of apoptosis. We have been investigating how glutathione depletion leads to apoptosis in yeast. We show here that glutathione depletion in yeast leads to the activation of two cytoplasmically inward-facing channels: the plasma membrane, Cch1p, and the vacuolar calcium channel, Yvc1p. Deletion of these channels partially rescues cells from glutathione depletion–induced cell death. Subsequent investigations on the Yvc1p channel, a homologue of the mammalian TRP channels, revealed that the channel is activated by glutathionylation. Yvc1p has nine cysteine residues, of which eight are located in the cytoplasmic regions and one on the transmembrane domain. We show that three of these cysteines, Cys-17, Cys-79, and Cys-191, are specifically glutathionylated. Mutation of these cysteines to alanine leads to a loss in glutathionylation and a concomitant loss in calcium channel activity. We further investigated the mechanism of glutathionylation and demonstrate a role for the yeast glutathione S-transferase Gtt1p in glutathionylation. Yvc1p is also deglutathionylated, and this was found to be mediated by the yeast thioredoxin, Trx2p. A model for redox activation and deactivation of the yeast Yvc1p channel is presented. PMID:27708136

  3. The poplar Phi class glutathione transferase: expression, activity and structure of GSTF1

    PubMed Central

    Pégeot, Henri; Koh, Cha San; Petre, Benjamin; Mathiot, Sandrine; Duplessis, Sébastien; Hecker, Arnaud; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes with essential roles in cellular detoxification and secondary metabolism in plants as in other organisms. Several plant GSTs, including those of the Phi class (GSTFs), require a conserved catalytic serine residue to perform glutathione (GSH)-conjugation reactions. Genomic analyses revealed that terrestrial plants have around ten GSTFs, eight in the Populus trichocarpa genome, but their physiological functions and substrates are mostly unknown. Transcript expression analyses showed a predominant expression of all genes both in reproductive (female flowers, fruits, floral buds) and vegetative organs (leaves, petioles). Here, we show that the recombinant poplar GSTF1 (PttGSTF1) possesses peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide and GSH-conjugation activity toward model substrates such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, benzyl and phenetyl isothiocyanate, 4-nitrophenyl butyrate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal but interestingly not on previously identified GSTF-class substrates. In accordance with analytical gel filtration data, crystal structure of PttGSTF1 showed a canonical dimeric organization with bound GSH or 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid molecules. The structure of these protein-substrate complexes allowed delineating the residues contributing to both the G and H sites that form the active site cavity. In sum, the presence of GSTF1 transcripts and proteins in most poplar organs especially those rich in secondary metabolites such as flowers and fruits, together with its GSH-conjugation activity and its documented stress-responsive expression suggest that its function is associated with the catalytic transformation of metabolites and/or peroxide removal rather than with ligandin properties as previously reported for other GSTFs. PMID:25566286

  4. Identification and clarification of the role of key active site residues in bacterial glutathione S-transferase zeta/maleylpyruvate isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ti; Li, De-Feng; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Application of site-directed mutagenesis to probe the active site residues of glutathione-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase. {yields} Two conserved residues, Arg8 and Arg176, in zeta class glutathione S-transferases are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization. {yields} Arg109, found exclusively in NagL, participates in k{sub cat} regulation. {yields} The T11A mutant exhibited a significantly decreased K{sub m} value for glutathione with little impact on maleylpyruvate kinetics. {yields} The Thr11 residue appears to have significance in the evolution of glutathione S-transferase classes. -- Abstract: The maleylpyruvate isomerase NagL from Ralstonia sp. strain U2, which has been structurally characterized previously, catalyzes the isomerization of maleylpyruvate to fumarylpyruvate. It belongs to the class zeta glutathione S-transferases (GSTZs), part of the cytosolic GST family (cGSTs). In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was conducted to probe the functions of 13 putative active site residues. Steady-state kinetic information for mutants in the reduced glutathione (GSH) binding site, suggested that (a) Gln64 and Asp102 interact directly with the glutamyl moiety of glutathione, (b) Gln49 and Gln64 are involved in a potential electron-sharing network that influences the ionization of the GSH thiol. The information also suggests that (c) His38, Asn108 and Arg109 interact with the GSH glycine moiety, (d) His104 has a role in the ionization of the GSH sulfur and the stabilization of the maleyl terminal carboxyl group in the reaction intermediate and (e) Arg110 influences the electron distribution in the active site and therefore the ionization of the GSH thiolate. Kinetic data for mutants altered in the substrate-binding site imply that (a) Arg8 and Arg176 are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization, and (b) Arg109 (exclusive to NagL) participates in k{sub cat} regulation. Surprisingly, the T11A mutant had a

  5. Elongation index of erythrocytes, study of activity of chosen erythrocyte enzymes, and the levels of glutathione, malonyldialdehyde in polycythemia vera (PV).

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Z; Dybowicz, A J; Marchewka, A; Teległów, A; Skotnicki, A; Zduńczyk, A; Aleksander, P; Filar-Mierzwa, K

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of the study was to investigate rheological properties of erythrocytes obtained from patients admitted to the clinic, and diagnosed with polycythemia vera. The polycythemia vera diagnosis was based on the WHO criteria for polycythemia vera. Using a laser rheometer SSD Rheometer-Rheodyn, the elongation index of erythrocytes was determined, indicating an increased rigidity of the erythrocytes in this disease compared with the erythrocytes in healthy people. In order to explain (albeit partially) the reason for reduced elasticity, the erythrocytes of patients with polycythemia were studied for the activity of enzymes - glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and acetylcholinesterase membrane enzyme, as well as the levels of glutathione and malonyldialdehyde. The elevated activities of these enzymes, the glutathione level, and elevated ‰ of reticulocytes, indicated an increased pool of juvenile erythrocyte forms; furthermore, the elevated value of malonyldialdehyde may suggest a lipid peroxidative damage in certain pool of the erythrocyte membrane in blood circulation.

  6. Electroconvulsive shock in rats: changes in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Eraković, V; Zupan, G; Varljen, J; Radosević, S; Simonić, A

    2000-03-29

    Seizures trigger a variety of biochemical processes including an influx of extracellular Ca(2+), activation of membrane phospholipases, liberation of free fatty acids, diacylglycerols, eicosanoids, lipid peroxides and free radicals. These lipid metabolites along with abnormal ion homeostasis may be involved in cell injury and cell death. The aim of this study was to determine brain antioxidant enzyme activities in rats with electroconvulsive shock (ECS)-induced seizures. ECS, single or repeated, induced a decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities in various brain regions. The most prominent changes of enzymatic activities were observed in rats that received five ECSs with 24-h recovery period between them. Decreased SOD activity was observed in the frontal cortex of all treated animals except those sacrificed 24 h after single ECS, in the cerebellum of the animals that received repeated ECSs, in the hippocampus of animals that were decapitated 2 h after a single ECS and in the pons-medulla region of rats that received five daily ECSs. Decreased GPX activity was found in all examined brain regions of the rats that received five ECSs, the cortex and hippocampus of rats that were decapitated 2 h after single ECS and the cortex of those that received 10 ECSs with 48 h between them. The results show that neither 24-h nor 48-h recovery period was sufficient for the normalisation of antioxidative enzyme activities after repeated ECS treatment.

  7. The improving effect of reduced glutathione on boar sperm cryotolerance is related with the intrinsic ejaculate freezability.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Marc; Estrada, Efrén; Pinart, Elisabeth; Bonet, Sergi; Miró, Jordi; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E

    2014-04-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) improves boar sperm cryosurvival and fertilising ability when added to freezing extenders. Poor freezability ejaculates (PFE) are known to present lower resistance than good freezability ejaculates (GFE) to cryopreservation procedures. So far, no study has evaluated whether the ability of GSH to counteract the cryopreservation-induced injuries depends on ejaculate freezability (i.e. GFE vs. PFE). For this reason, thirty boar ejaculates were divided into three equal volume fractions and cryopreserved with or without GSH at a final concentration of either 2 or 5mM in freezing media. Before and after freeze-thawing, sperm quality was evaluated through analysis of viability, motility, integrity of outer acrosome membrane, ROS levels, integrity of nucleoprotein structure, and DNA fragmentation. Ejaculates were classified into two groups (GFE or PFE) according to their post-thaw sperm motility and viability assessments in negative control (GSH 0mM), after running cluster analyses. Values of each sperm parameter were then compared between treatments (GSH 0mM, GSH 2mM, GSH 5mM) and freezability groups (GFE, PFE). In the case of GFE, GSH significantly improved boar sperm cryotolerance, without differences between 2 and 5mM. In contrast, PFE freezability was significantly increased when supplemented with 5mM GSH, but not when supplemented with 2mM GSH. In conclusion, PFE need a higher concentration of GSH than GFE to improve their cryotolerance.

  8. Reduced glutathione and procaine hydrochloride protect the nucleoprotein structure of boar spermatozoa during freeze-thawing by stabilising disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Marc; Flores, Eva; Estrada, Efrén; Bonet, Sergi; Rigau, Teresa; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E

    2013-01-01

    One important change the head of boar spermatozoa during freeze-thawing is the destabilisation of its nucleoprotein structure due to a disruption of disulfide bonds. With the aim of better understanding these changes in frozen-thawed spermatozoa, two agents, namely reduced glutathione (GSH) and procaine hydrochloride (ProHCl), were added at different concentrations to the freezing media at different concentrations and combinations over the range 1-2mM. Then, 30 and 240 min after thawing, cysteine-free residue levels of boar sperm nucleoproteins, DNA fragmentation and other sperm functional parameters were evaluated. Both GSH and ProHCl, at final concentrations of 2mM, induced a significant (P<0.05) increase in the number of non-disrupted sperm head disulfide bonds 30 and 240 min after thawing compared with the frozen-thawed control. This effect was accompanied by a significant (P<0.05) decrease in DNA fragmentation 240 min after thawing. Concomitantly, 1 and 2mM GSH, but not ProHCl at any of the concentrations tested, partially counteracted the detrimental effects caused by freeze-thawing on sperm peroxide levels, motility patterns and plasma membrane integrity. In conclusion, the results show that both GSH and ProHCl have a stabilising effect on the nucleoprotein structure of frozen-thawed spermatozoa, although only GSH exerts an appreciable effect on sperm viability.

  9. Critical roles of cellular glutathione homeostasis and jnk activation in andrographolide-mediated apoptotic cell death in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lili; Shen, Kaikai; Jiang, Ping; Morahan, Grant; Wang, Zhengtao

    2011-08-01

    Andrographolide (ANDRO), isolated from the traditional herbal medicine Andrographis paniculata, is reported to have the potential therapeutic effects for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in our previous reports. Here, we investigated the mechanism of ANDRO-mediated apoptotic cell death, focusing on the involvement of cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) homeostasis and c-Jun NH(2) -Terminal kinase (JNK). Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of cellular GSH biosynthesis, significantly augmented ANDRO-induced cytotoxicity in hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells. BSO depleted cellular GSH, and augmented ANDRO-induced apoptosis, inhibition of colony formation and JNK activation in Hep3B cells. All these effects could be reversed by GSH monoethyl ester (GSH.EE), whose deacetylation replenishes cellular GSH. BSO also augmented ANDRO-induced activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-4 (MKK4) and c-Jun, which are all up-stream or down-stream signals of JNK. Further results showed that JNK inhibitor SP600125 and 420116 both reversed ANDRO-induced cytotoxicity, and SP600125 also decreased ANDRO-increased intracellular GSH and GCL activity. Finally, we showed that in nude mice bearing xenografted Hep3B tumors, BSO improved the inhibition of tumor growth by ANDRO. Taken together, our results suggest that there is a crosstalk between JNK activation and cellular GSH homeostasis, and ANDRO targets this to induce cytotoxicity in hepatoma cells.

  10. Structure-activity relationships for chemical and glutathione S-transferase-catalysed glutathione conjugation reactions of a series of 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Aar, E M; Bouwman, T; Commandeur, J N; Vermeulen, N P

    1996-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute an important class of phase II (de)toxifying enzymes, catalysing the conjugation of glutathione (GSH) with electrophilic compounds. In the present study, Km, kcat and kcat/Km values for the rat GST 1-1-, 3-3-, 4-4- and 7-7-catalysed conjugation reactions between GSH and a series of 10 different 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes, and the second-order rate constants (ks) of the corresponding base-catalysed reactions, were correlated with nine classical physicochemical parameters (electronic, steric and lipophilic) of the substituents and with 16 computer-calculated molecular parameters of the substrates and of the corresponding Meisenheimer complexes with MeS- as a model nucleophile for GS- (charge distributions and several energy values), giving structure-activity relationships. On the basis of an identical dependence of the base-catalysed as well as the GST 1-1- and GST 7-7-catalysed reactions on electronic parameters (among others, Hammett substituent constant sigma p and charge on p-nitro substituents), and the finding that the corresponding reactions catalysed by GSTs 3-3 and 4-4 depend to a significantly lesser extent on these parameters, it was concluded that the Mu-class GST isoenzymes have a rate-determining transition state in the conjugation reaction between 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes and GSH which is different from that of the other two GSTs. Several alternative rate-limiting transition states for GST 3-3 and 4-4 are discussed. Furthermore, based on the obtained structure-activity relationships, it was possible to predict the kcat/Km values of the four GST isoenzymes and the ks of the base-catalysed GSH conjugation of 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene. PMID:8973562

  11. [Effects of Tagetes erecta extracts on glutathione S-transferase and protease activities and protein content in Tetranychus viennensis].

    PubMed

    Shi, Guang-lu; Wang, You-nian; Wang, Hong-lei; Zhao, Li-lin; Liu, Su-qi; Cao, Hui; Yu, Tong-quan; Lu, Ping

    2007-02-01

    With in vivo and in vitro Tagetes erecta roots under light and dark as test materials, this paper studied the effects of their extracts on the glutathione S-transferase and protease activities and protein content in Tetranychus viennensis. The results showed that the chloroform extract of T. erecta roots had the highest light-activated activity, followed by water extract, and methanol extract. After treated with chloroform extract, the glutathione S-transferase and protease activities in T. viennensis increased markedly, while its protein content decreased obviously. The variation degree of T. viennensis protease activity and protein content was significantly higher when the chloroform extract came from the T. erecta roots under light, suggesting that there existed active matters in the extract, which could promote the activation of protease, and thus, the decomposition of protein in T. viennensis. The bioactivity of T. erecta metabolites was mainly of light-activated one.

  12. The role of reduced glutathione during the course of acute haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients: clinical and pharmacodynamic aspects.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, G G

    1990-01-01

    Tissue hypoperfusion leads to cellular oxidative and peroxidative damage due to biochemical disorders in the oxygen and substrate metabolism. The metabolic turnover of glutathione (GSH) represents one the main cytoprotective systems against the peroxide attack and the depletion or defect in resynthesis of this compound is accompanied by pathological consequences. In the present study the clinical effects of glutathione depletion were investigated in conditions of acute tissue hypoxia due to marked haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients (favism syndrome). In these subjects a significant marker of the tissue oxidative damage was represented by the uric acid blood levels, presumably linked to xanthine-hypoxanthine altered metabolism. To antagonize the effects of oxyradical pathology, reduced glutathione was administered to a group of patients and the results confirmed the cytoprotective role played by the GSH supplementation. The GSH action was evident on the tissue metabolism and this supports the opinion that reduced glutathione could represent a new and interesting therapeutic approach in marked and acute hypoxic conditions.

  13. The Glutathione System of Aspergillus nidulans Involves a Fungus-specific Glutathione S-Transferase*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ikuo; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2009-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is involved in cellular defense mechanisms for xenobiotics and reactive oxygen species. This study investigated glutathione-dependent mechanisms in the model organism Aspergillus nidulans. A recombinant dimeric protein of A. nidulans glutathione reductase (GR) contained FAD and reduced oxidized glutathione (GSSG) using NADPH as an electron donor. A deletion strain of the GR gene (glrA) accumulated less intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH), indicating that the fungal GR contributes to GSSG reduction in vivo. Growth of the deletion strain of glrA was temperature-sensitive, and this phenotype was suppressed by adding GSH to the medium. The strain subsequently accumulated more intracellular superoxide, and cell-free respiration activity was partly defective. Growth of the strain decreased in the presence of oxidants, which induced glrA expression 1.5-6-fold. These results indicated that the fungal glutathione system functions as an antioxidant mechanism in A. nidulans. Our findings further revealed an initial proteomic differential display on GR-depleted and wild type strains. Up-regulation of thioredoxin reductase, peroxiredoxins, catalases, and cytochrome c peroxidase in the glrA-deletion strain revealed interplay between the glutathione system and both the thioredoxin system and hydrogen peroxide defense mechanisms. We also identified a hypothetical, up-regulated protein in the GR-depleted strains as glutathione S-transferase, which is unique among Ascomycetes fungi. PMID:19171936

  14. Differential Action between Schisandrin A and Schisandrin B in Eliciting an Anti-Inflammatory Action: The Depletion of Reduced Glutathione and the Induction of an Antioxidant Response

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Pou Kuan; Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Jihang; Chan, Wing Man; Leung, Hoi Yan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2016-01-01

    Schisandrin A (Sch A) and schisandrin B (Sch B) are active components of Schisandrae Fructus. We compared the biochemical mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory action of Sch A and Sch B, using cultured lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and concanavalin (ConA)-stimulated mouse splenocytes. Pre-incubation with Sch A or Sch B produced an anti-inflammatory action in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, as evidenced by the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory c-Jun N-terminal kinases/p38 kinase/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway as well as the suppression of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors, with the extent of inhibition by Sch A being more pronounced. The greater activity of Sch A in anti-inflammatory response was associated with a greater decrease in cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level and a greater increase in glutathione S-transferase activity than corresponding changes produced by Sch B. However, upon incubation, only Sch B resulted in the activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like factor 2 and the induction of a significant increase in the expression of thioredoxin (TRX) in RAW264.7 cells. The Sch B-induced increase in TRX expression was associated with the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Studies in a mouse model of inflammation (carrageenan-induced paw edema) indicated that while long-term treatment with either Sch A or Sch B suppressed the extent of paw edema, only acute treatment with Sch A produced a significant degree of inhibition on the inflammatory response. Although only Sch A decreased the cellular GSH level and suppressed the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell proliferation in ConA-simulated splenocytes in vitro, both Sch A and Sch B treatments, while not altering cellular GSH levels, suppressed ConA-stimulated splenocyte proliferation ex vivo. These results suggest that Sch A and Sch B may act differentially on activating GST

  15. Dichloroacetate- and Trichloroacetate-Induced Modulation of Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, and Glutathione Peroxidase Activities and Glutathione Level in the livers of Mice after Subacute and Subchronic exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Ezdihar A.; Cearfoss, Jacquelyn

    2010-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) were previously found to induce various levels of oxidative stress in the hepatic tissues of mice after subacute and subchronic exposure. The cells are known to have several protective mechansims against production of oxidative stress by different xenobiotics. To assess the roles of the antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH) in DCA- and TCA-induced oxidative stress, groups of B6C3F1 mice were administered either DCA or TCA at doses of 7.7, 77, 154 and 410 mg/kg/day, by gavage for 4 weeks (4-W) and 13 weeks (13-W), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, as well as GSH were determined in the hepatic tissues. DCA at doses ranging between 7.7-410, and 7.7-77 mg/kg/day, given for 4-W and 13-W, respectively, resulted in either suppression or no change in SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities, but doses of 154-410 mg DCA/kg/day administered for 13-W were found to result in significant induction of the three enzyme activities. TCA administration on the other hand, resulted in increases in SOD and CAT activities, and suppression of GSH-Px activity in both periods. Except for the DCA doses of 77-154 mg/kg/day administered for 13-W that resulted in significant reduction in GSH levels, all other DCA, as well as TCA treatments produced no changes in GSH. Since these enzymes are involved in the detoxification of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide anion (SA) and H2O2, it is concluded that SA is the main contributor to DCA-induced oxidative stress while both ROS contribute to that of TCA. The increases in the enzyme activities associated with 154-410 mg DCA/kg/day in the 13-W period suggest their role as protective mechanisms contributing to the survival of cells modified in response to those treatments. PMID:21170174

  16. The effects of selenium on glutathione peroxidase activity and radioprotection in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P.; Tritz, R.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-09-05

    The media of representative mammalian cell lines were supplemented with low levels of selenium in the form of sodium selenite in order to investigate the effects of selenium on mammalian cells. Following incubation in 30 nM sodium selenite, these cells were assayed for changes in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The cells examined included NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, PC12 rat sympathetic precursor cells, SupT-1 human lymphocytes, MCF-7{sup adr} human breast carcinoma cells and AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. Selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in GPx activity for the NIH 3T3, MCF-7{sup adr} and Supt-1 cells but stimulated GPx activity approximately 5-fold in PC12 and AA8 cells. AA8 cells were selected to evaluate whether selenium supplementation was radioprotective against {sup 60}cobalt gamma irradiation. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was measured by evaluating mutation frequency at the hprt locus. In this assay, preincubation of AA8 CHO cells significantly protected these cells from exposure to 8 Gy.

  17. A novel selenium and copper-containing peptide with both superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xian-Feng; Ji, Yue-Tong; Gao, Gui; Zhu, Xue-Jun; Lv, Shao-Wu; Yan, Fei; Han, Si-Ping; Chen, Xing; Gao, Chang-Cheng; Liu, Junqiu; Luo, Gui-Min

    2010-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) play crucial roles in balancing the production and decomposition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in living organisms. These enzymes act cooperatively and synergistically to scavenge ROS. In order to imitate the synergism of these enzymes, we designed and synthesized a novel 32-mer peptide (32P) on the basis of the previous 15-mer peptide with GPX activity and a 17-mer peptide with SOD activity. Upon the selenation and chelation of copper, the 32-mer peptide is converted to a new Se- and Cu-containing 32-mer peptide (Se-Cu-32P) and displays both SOD and GPX activities and its kinetics was studied. Moreover, the novel peptide was demonstrated to be able to better protect vero cells from the injury induced by xanthine oxidase (XOD)/xanthine/Fe2+ damage system than its parents. Thus, this bifunctional enzyme imitated the synergism of SOD and GPX and could be a better candidate of therapeutic medicine.

  18. Evaluation of glutathione S-transferase activity in human buccal epithelial dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y K; Lin, L M

    1997-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and amount of GST alpha, mu and pi isoforms were measured in 40 patients with histopathologically confirmed oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa. The results were compared with those of normal mucosa in an equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Mean total GST activities were significantly elevated from normal buccal mucosa for mild OED, moderate OED, severe OED and squamous cell carcinoma. GST activity of value approximating 100 nmol/min/mg distinguished between normal and dysplasia, and of value about 400 nmol/min/mg delineated between dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma were observed. GST pi was the predominant class in both the diseased and normal buccal mucosa examined. This class pi GST was present at an intracellular concentration, which was significantly higher in diseased buccal mucosa than in normal buccal mucosa. These results indicated that pi class GST was the major form of this enzyme in the cytosolic fraction of oral mucosa. The severity of OED related to squamous cell carcinoma development seemed to increase concomitantly with an increase in the level of this enzyme. Further studies will validate the role of GST pi estimation in predicting the potential malignancy of OED.

  19. SERS Active Nanobiosensor Functionalized by Self-Assembled 3D Nickel Nanonetworks for Glutathione Detection.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Sivaprasad; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2017-02-15

    We introduce a "non-noble metal" based SERS active nanobiosensor using a self-assembled 3D hybrid nickel nanonetwork. A tunable biomolecule detector fabricated by a bottom-up approach was functionalized using a multiphoton ionization energy mechanism to create a self-assembled 3D hybrid nickel nanonetwork. The nanonetwork was tested for SERS detection of crystal violet (CV) and glutathione (GSH) at two excitation wavelengths, 532 and 785 nm. The results reveal indiscernible peaks with a limit of detection (LOD) of 1 picomolar (pM) concentration. An enhancement factor (EF) of 9.3 × 10(8) was achieved for the chemical molecule CV and 1.8 × 10(9) for the biomolecule GSH, which are the highest reported values so far. The two results, one being the CV molecule proved that nickel nanonetwork is indeed SERS active and the second being the GSH biomolecule detection at both 532 and 785 nm, confirm that the nanonetwork is a biosensor which has potential for both in vivo and in vitro sensing. In addition, the selectivity and versatility of this biosensor is examined with biomolecules such as l-Cysteine, l-Methionine, and sensing GSH in cell culture medium which mimics the complex biological environment. The functionalized self-assembled 3D hybrid nickel nanonetwork exhibits electromagnetic and charge transfer based SERS activation mechanisms.

  20. The ocular inflammatory response to endotoxin is not altered when glutathione peroxidase activity is decreased

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, A.M.; McGahan, M.C.; Smith, M.G. )

    1991-03-11

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element and an integral part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx). GPx is an antioxidant which scavenges both hydroperoxide and lipid peroxides. The purpose of the current study was to determine if decreased GPx activity affects the ocular inflammatory response. New Zealand White rabbits were fed either a purified Se deficient or Se adequate diet for 9 weeks. After 9 weeks, plasma Se levels were 0.151 {plus minus} 0.0130 {mu}g/ml in the deficient diet group compared to 0.217 {plus minus} 0.015 {plus minus} 0.87 U compared with 25.43 {plus minus} 1.77 U in the basal diet group. At this point, ocular inflammation was induced by intravitreal injection of endotoxin. Twenty-four hours later, despite a 40% decrease in plasma and a 30% decrease in intraocular fluid GPx activity, there was no significant difference in inflammatory parameters between the groups. However, it is possible that a further decrease in GPx activity could have some effect on the inflammatory response.

  1. Glutathione in cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bermudes, D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of light and O2 on glutathione production were determined. Results of light and dark studies under normal and reduced oxygen tensions were compared to determine the effect of reduction in oxygen tension on glutathione levels. The growth rate of Anacystis nidulans and concurrent production of glutathione is presented. The generation of time of Anacystis nidulans was approximately 12 hours. Results of light and dark incubation of Aphanothece halophytica dominated planktonic microbial community from Pond 4 and Anacystis nidulans under high and low oxygen tension is also presented. It appears that light grown Anacystis nidulans cells have equal amounts of glutathione while dark grown cells produce more glutathione in the presence of increased O2.

  2. Pyridine nucleotide cycling and control of intracellular redox state in relation to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and nuclear localization of glutathione during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Pellny, Till K; Locato, Vittoria; Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Markovic, Jelena; De Gara, Laura; Pallardó, Federico V; Foyer, Christine H

    2009-05-01

    Pyridine nucleotides, ascorbate and glutathione are major redox metabolites in plant cells, with specific roles in cellular redox homeostasis and the regulation of the cell cycle. However, the regulation of these metabolite pools during exponential growth and their precise functions in the cell cycle remain to be characterized. The present analysis of the abundance of ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotides during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture provides evidence for the differential regulation of each of these redox pools. Ascorbate was most abundant early in the growth cycle, but glutathione was low at this point. The cellular ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulphide ratios were high and constant but the pyridine nucleotide pools were largely oxidized over the period of exponential growth and only became more reduced once growth had ceased. The glutathione pool increased in parallel with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities and with increases in the abundance of PARP1 and PARP2 mRNAs at a time of high cell cycle activity as indicated by transcriptome information. Marked changes in the intracellular partitioning of GSH between the cytoplasm and nucleus were observed. Extension of the exponential growth phase by dilution or changing the media led to increases in the glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form (NAD)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form (NADH) pools and to higher NAD/NADH ratios but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, oxidized form (NADP)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH) pool sizes, and NAPD/NADPH ratios were much less affected. The ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotide pools and PARP activity decreased before the exponential growth phase ended. We conclude that there are marked changes in intracellular redox state during the growth cycle but that redox homeostasis is

  3. Selenium-enriched Agaricus bisporus increases expression and activity of glutathione peroxidase-1 and expression of glutathione peroxidase-2 in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Tebo; Howell, Kate; Dunshea, Frank R; Ng, Ken

    2014-03-01

    The effect of dietary supplementation with Se-enriched Agaricus bisporus on cytosolic gluthathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), gastrointestinal specific glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) and selenoprotein P (SeP) mRNA expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon was examined. Rats were fed for 5weeks with control diet (0.15μg Se/g feed) or Se-enriched diet fortified with selenised mushroom (1μg Se/g feed). The mRNA expression levels were found to be significantly (P<0.01) up-regulated by 1.65-fold and 2.3-fold for GPx-1 and GPx-2, respectively, but were not significantly different for TrxR-1 and SeP between the 2 diet treatments. The up-regulation of GPx-1 mRNA expression was consistent with GPX-1 activity level, which was significantly (P<0.05) increased by 1.77-fold in rats fed with the Se-enriched diet compared to the control diet. The results showed that selenised A. bisporus can positively increase GPx-1 and GPx-2 gene expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon.

  4. Increased Glutathione Synthesis Following Nrf2 Activation by Vanadyl Sulfate in Human Chang Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum Daseul; Zhang, Rui; Kang, Kyoung Ah; You, Ho Jin; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-01-01

    Jeju ground water, containing vanadium compounds, was shown to increase glutathione (GSH) levels as determined by a colorimetric assay and confocal microscopy. To investigate whether the effects of Jeju ground water on GSH were specifically mediated by vanadium compounds, human Chang liver cells were incubated for 10 passages in media containing deionized distilled water (DDW), Jeju ground water (S1 and S3), and vanadyl sulfate (VOSO4). Vanadyl sulfate scavenged superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species. Vanadyl sulfate effectively increased cellular GSH level and up-regulated mRNA and protein expression of a catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC), which is involved in GSH synthesis. The induction of GCLC expression by vanadyl sulfate was found to be mediated by transcription factor erythroid transcription factor NF-E2 (Nrf2), which critically regulates GCLC by binding to the antioxidant response elements (AREs). Vanadyl sulfate treatment increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the accumulation of phosphorylated Nrf2. Extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) contributed to ARE-driven GCLC expression via Nrf2 activation. Vanadyl sulfate induced the expression of the active phospho form of ERK. Taken together, these results suggest that the increase in GSH level by Jeju ground water is, at least in part, due to the effects of vanadyl sulfate via the Nrf2-mediated induction of GCLC. PMID:22272109

  5. Glutathione-S-transferase activity of Fucus spp. as a biomarker of environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Cairrão, E; Couderchet, M; Soares, A M V M; Guilhermino, L

    2004-12-20

    Coastal zones are important areas from both ecological and economical points of view. However, in the last decades, in several regions of the globe, they have been increasingly impacted by complex discharges of contaminants and by marine traffic accidents. The Portuguese Atlantic coast is particularly exposed to these contaminants due to the proximity of important navigation routes. Several rocky shore organisms have been tested and used as bioindicators of environmental contamination. However, to the best of our knowledge Fucus spp., which are key species in rocky shore communities, have not been used as bioindicators in monitoring studies based on biomarkers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity of several Fucus species (Fucus ceranoides, Fucus spiralis var. platycarpus, Fucus spiralis var. spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus var. vesiculosus) to discriminate sites with different contamination levels along the Portuguese Northwestern coast, between the Minho river estuary and the Aveiro's Lagoon, as an environmental biomarker. With the exception of F. spiralis var. spiralis, for which a confusing pattern of activity was found requiring further analysis, all the other species and varieties showed higher GST levels in more contaminated sites than in less contaminated ones, indicating that Fucus spp. are suitable for use as bioindicators and their GSTs as biomarkers of environmental contamination in coastal zones and estuaries.

  6. Glutathione induces GABA release through P2X7R activation on Müller glia.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Hércules Rezende; Reis, Ricardo A de Melo

    2017-01-01

    The retinal tissue of warm-blooded vertebrates performs surprisingly complex and accurate transduction of visual information. To achieve precision, a multilayered neuroglia structure is established throughout the embryonic development, and the presence of radial Müller (glial) cells ensure differentiation, growth and survival for the neuronal elements within retinal environment. It is assumed that Müller cells serve as a dynamic reservoir of progenitors, capable of expressing transcription factors, differentiating and proliferating as either neuronal or glial cells depending on extrinsic cues. In the postnatal period, Müller glia may re-enter cell cycle and produce new retinal neurons in response to acute damage. In this context, glutathione (GSH), a virtually ubiquitous tripeptide antioxidant, which is found at milimolar concentrations in central glial cells, plays a vital role as a reducing agent, buffering radical oxygen species (ROS) and preventing cell death in severely injured retinal tissues. Despite its antioxidant role, data also point to GSH as a signaling agent, suggesting that GABA release and P2X7R-mediated calcium inwards occur in Müller cells in a GSH-enriched environment. These phenomena indicate a novel mechanistic response to damage in the vertebrate retinal tissue, particularly in neuron-glia networks.

  7. Core-shell self-assembly triggered via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction for reduced glutathione detection and single cells monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel core-shell DNA self-assembly catalyzed by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions was proposed, which could realize GSH-initiated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification and molecules gathering. Significantly, these self-assembled products via electrostatic interaction could accumulate into prominent and clustered fluorescence-bright spots in single cancer cells for reduced glutathione monitoring, which will effectively drive cell monitoring into a new era. PMID:27412605

  8. Roles of sedentary aging and lifelong physical activity in exchange of glutathione across exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Mortensen, Stefan P; Cabo, Helena; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari-Carmen; Viña, Jose; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules with regulatory functions, and in young and adult organisms, the formation of ROS is increased during skeletal muscle contractions. However, ROS can be deleterious to cells when not sufficiently counterbalanced by the antioxidant system. Aging is associated with accumulation of oxidative damage to lipids, DNA, and proteins. Given the pro-oxidant effect of skeletal muscle contractions, this effect of age could be a result of excessive ROS formation. We evaluated the effect of acute exercise on changes in blood redox state across the leg of young (23 ± 1 years) and older (66 ± 2 years) sedentary humans by measuring the whole blood concentration of the reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) forms of the antioxidant glutathione. To assess the role of physical activity, lifelong physically active older subjects (62 ± 2 years) were included. Exercise increased the venous concentration of GSSG in an intensity-dependent manner in young sedentary subjects, suggesting an exercise-induced increase in ROS formation. In contrast, venous GSSG levels remained unaltered during exercise in the older sedentary and active groups despite a higher skeletal muscle expression of the superoxide-generating enzyme NADPH oxidase. Arterial concentration of GSH and expression of antioxidant enzymes in skeletal muscle of older active subjects were increased. The potential impairment in exercise-induced ROS formation may be an important mechanism underlying skeletal muscle and vascular dysfunction with sedentary aging. Lifelong physical activity upregulates antioxidant systems, which may be one of the mechanisms underlying the lack of exercise-induced increase in GSSG.

  9. Targeting of Gamma-Glutamyl-Cysteine Ligase by miR-433 Reduces Glutathione Biosynthesis and Promotes TGF-β-Dependent Fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Diez, Cristina; Fierro-Fernández, Marta; Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando; Alique, Matilde; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Beraza, Naiara; Martínez-Chantar, Maria L.; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Glutathione (GSH) is the main antioxidant against cell damage. Several pathological states course with reduced nucleophilic tone and perturbation of redox homeostasis due to changes in the 2GSH/GSSG ratio. Here, we investigated the regulation of the rate-limiting GSH biosynthetic heterodimeric enzyme γ-glutamyl-cysteine ligase (GCL) by microRNAs (miRNAs). Results: “In silico” analysis of the 3′- untranslated regions (UTRs) of both catalytic (GCLc) and regulatory (GCLm) subunits of GCL enabled an identification of miR-433 as a strong candidate for the targeting of GCL. Transitory overexpression of miR-433 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) showed a downregulation of both GCLc and GCLm in a nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)-independent manner. Increases in pro-oxidant stimuli such as exposure to hydrogen peroxide or GSH depletion in endothelial and hepatic cells caused an expected increase in GCLc and GCLm protein expression and abrogation of miR-433 levels, thus supporting a cross-regulation of these pathways. Treatment of HUVEC with miR-433 resulted in reduced antioxidant and redox potentials, increased S-glutathionylation, and reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation. In vivo models of renal and hepatic fibrosis were associated with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)-related reduction of GCLc and GCLm levels that were miR-433 dependent. Innovation and Conclusion: We describe for the first time an miRNA, miR-433, capable of directly targeting GCL and promoting functional consequences in endothelial physiology and fibrotic processes by decreasing GSH levels. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1092–1105. PMID:25353619

  10. Activity of carboxylesterase and glutathione S-transferase in different life-stages of carabid beetle (Poecilus cupreus) exposed to toxic metal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grazyna; Kramarz, Paulina; Babczyńska, Agnieszka

    2003-04-01

    Among the cytoplasmatic enzymes responsible for neutralization of organic xenobiotics, carboxylesterases (CarE) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) play important roles. Our study tested to what extent dietary Zn or Cd could modify the activity of CarE and GST at different life-stages of the carabid beetle Poecilus cupreus. Treatment and stage effects generally were statistically significant. For CarE activity in the beetles exposed to cadmium, only treatment was a significant factor. In all cases, the interaction between studied factors was statistically significant, implying that the physiological condition of the animals may enhance or reduce enzyme activity. We also observed differences between animals treated with cadmium and zinc in the pattern of enzyme activity, and a difference in GST activity measured with two different substrates. Our results confirmed that in studying enzyme activity under metal stress one should consider the animal's life-stage and sex.

  11. Decreased glutathione S-transferase expression and activity and altered sex steroids in Lake Apopka brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallagher, E.P.; Gross, T.S.; Sheehy, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    A number of freshwater lakes and reclaimed agricultural sites in Central Florida have been the receiving waters for agrochemical and municipal runoff. One of these sites, Lake Apopka, is also a eutrophic system that has been the focus of several case studies reporting altered reproductive activity linked to bioaccumulation of persistent organochlorine chemicals in aquatic species. The present study was initiated to determine if brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus) from the north marsh of Lake Apopka (Lake Apopka Marsh) exhibit an altered capacity to detoxify environmental chemicals through hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated conjugation as compared with bullheads from a nearby reference site (Lake Woodruff). We also compared plasma sex hormone concentrations (testosterone, 17-?? estradiol, and 11 keto-testosterone) in bullheads from the two sites. Female bullheads from Lake Apopka had 40% lower initial rate GST conjugative activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 50% lower activity towards p-nitrobutyl chloride (NBC), 33% lower activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA), and 43% lower activity toward ??5-androstene-3,17-dione (??5-ADI), as compared with female bullheads from Lake Woodruff. Enzyme kinetic analyses demonstrated that female bullheads from Lake Apopka had lower GST-catalyzed CDNB clearance than did female Lake Woodruff bullheads. Western blotting studies of bullhead liver cytosolic proteins demonstrated that the reduced GST catalytic activities in female Lake Apopka bullheads were accompanied by lower expression of hepatic GST protein. No site differences were observed with respect to GST activities or GST protein expression in male bullheads. Female Lake Apopka bullheads also had elevated concentrations of plasma androgens (testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone) as compared with females from Lake Woodruff. In contrast, male Lake Apopka bullheads had elevated levels of plasma estrogen but similar levels of androgens as compared with

  12. Glutathione S-transferase activity in follicular fluid from women undergoing ovarian stimulation: role in maturation.

    PubMed

    Meijide, Susana; Hernández, M Luisa; Navarro, Rosaura; Larreategui, Zaloa; Ferrando, Marcos; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio; Ruiz-Larrea, M Begoña

    2014-10-01

    Female infertility involves an emotional impact for the woman, often leading to a state of anxiety and low self-esteem. The assisted reproduction techniques (ART) are used to overcome the problem of infertility. In a first step of the in vitro fertilization therapy women are subjected to an ovarian stimulation protocol to obtain mature oocytes, which will result in competent oocytes necessary for fertilization to occur. Ovarian stimulation, however, subjects the women to a high physical and psychological stress, thus being essential to improve ART and to find biomarkers of dysfunction and fertility. GSH is an important antioxidant, and is also used in detoxification reactions, catalysed by glutathione S-transferases (GST). In the present work, we have investigated the involvement of GST in follicular maturation. Patients with fertility problems and oocyte donors were recruited for the study. From each woman follicles at two stages of maturation were extracted at the preovulatory stage. Follicular fluid was separated from the oocyte by centrifugation and used as the enzyme source. GST activity was determined based on its conjugation with 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene and the assay was adapted to a 96-well microplate reader. The absorbance was represented against the incubation time and the curves were adjusted to linearity (R(2)>0.990). Results showed that in both donors and patients GST activity was significantly lower in mature oocytes compared to small ones. These results suggest that GST may play a role in the follicle maturation by detoxifying xenobiotics, thus contributing to the normal development of the oocyte. Supported by FIS/FEDER (PI11/02559), Gobierno Vasco (Dep. Educación, Universiades e Investigación, IT687-13), and UPV/EHU (CLUMBER UFI11/20 and PES13/58). The work was approved by the Ethics Committee of the UPV/EHU (CEISH/96/2011/RUIZLARREA), and performed according to the UPV/EHU and IVI-Bilbao agreement (Ref. 2012/01).

  13. Nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi prevents apoptosis by reducing the oxidative stress-induced formation of exocyclic DNA products.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kensaku; Goto, Shinji; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Ihara, Yoshito; Tsuji, Kentaro; Kawai, Yoshichika; Uchida, Koji; Osawa, Toshihiko; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Kondo, Takahito

    2004-12-01

    We previously found that nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi) accumulates in cancer cells resistant to anticancer drugs, suggesting that it has a role in the acquisition of resistance to anticancer drugs. In the present study, the effect of oxidative stress on the nuclear translocation of GSTpi and its role in the protection of DNA from damage were investigated. In human colonic cancer HCT8 cells, the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced increase in nuclear condensation, the population of sub-G(1) peak, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells were observed in cells pretreated with edible mushroom lectin, an inhibitor of the nuclear transport of GSTpi. The DNA damage and the formation of lipid peroxide were dependent on the dose of H(2)O(2) and the incubation time. Immunological analysis showed that H(2)O(2) induced the nuclear accumulation of GSTpi but not of glutathione peroxidase. Formation of the 7-(2-oxo-hepyl)-substituted 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct by the reaction of 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) with 2'-deoxyguanosine was inhibited by GSTpi in the presence of glutathione. The conjugation product of 4-oxo-2-nonenal, a lipid aldehyde of 13-HPODE, with GSH in the presence of GSTpi, was identified by LS/MS. These results suggested that nuclear GSTpi prevents H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by scavenging the formation of lipid-peroxide-modified DNA.

  14. Selenium status, lipid peroxides concentration, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the blood of power station and rubber factory workers.

    PubMed

    Zachara, B A; Wasowicz, W; Sklodowska, M; Gromadzinska, J

    1987-01-01

    Concentration of selenium in whole blood and plasma, lipid peroxides in plasma, and glutathione peroxidase activities in red blood cell hemolysates and plasma were determined in 49 coal power plant workers and in 50 rubber factory workers. The results were compared with those obtained for 58 nonindustrial controls. Whole blood selenium was significantly lower and plasma lipid peroxides were significantly higher in power plant workers when compared to the nonindustrial group. In the rubber factory workers, whole blood selenium and red blood cells and plasma glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly lower than in the control group. Urinary output of selenium was also significantly decreased in rubber factory workers. Slightly elevated lipid peroxides were also observed in that group. It seems reasonable to conclude that the lower blood selenium and decreased urinary output of this element may result from increased loss of selenium with perspiration. No correlation has been observed between selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity and between enzyme activity and lipid peroxides concentration in the industrial group.

  15. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed.

  16. Inhibition of Tapeworm Thioredoxin and Glutathione Pathways by an Oxadiazole N-Oxide Leads to Reduced Mesocestoides vogae Infection Burden in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pasquet, Vivian; Bisio, Hugo; López, Gloria V; Romanelli-Cedrez, Laura; Bonilla, Mariana; Saldaña, Jenny; Salinas, Gustavo

    2015-06-26

    Parasitic flatworms cause serious infectious diseases that affect humans and livestock in vast regions of the world, yet there are few effective drugs to treat them. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) is an essential enzyme for redox homeostasis in flatworm parasites and a promising pharmacological target. We purified to homogeneity and characterized the TGR from the tapeworm Mesocestoides vogae (syn. M. corti). This purification revealed absence of conventional TR and GR. The glutathione reductase activity of the purified TGR exhibits a hysteretic behavior typical of flatworm TGRs. Consistently, M. vogae genome analysis revealed the presence of a selenocysteine-containing TGR and absence of conventional TR and GR. M. vogae thioredoxin and glutathione reductase activities were inhibited by 3,4-bis(phenylsulfonyl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole N2-oxide (VL16E), an oxadiazole N-oxide previously identified as an inhibitor of fluke and tapeworm TGRs. Finally, we show that mice experimentally infected with M. vogae tetrathyridia and treated with either praziquantel, the reference drug for flatworm infections, or VL16E exhibited a 28% reduction of intraperitoneal larvae numbers compared to vehicle treated mice. Our results show that oxadiazole N-oxide is a promising chemotype in vivo and highlights the convenience of M. vogae as a model for rapid assessment of tapeworm infections in vivo.

  17. Arsenite-induced stress granule formation is inhibited by elevated levels of reduced glutathione in West Nile virus-infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Mausumi; Courtney, Sean C.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress activates the cellular kinase HRI, which then phosphorylates eIF2α, resulting in stalled translation initiation and the formation of stress granules (SGs). SG assembly redirects cellular translation to stress response mRNAs and inhibits cap-dependent viral RNA translation. Flavivirus infections were previously reported to induce oxidative stress in infected cells but flavivirus-infected cells paradoxically develop resistance to arsenite (Ars)-induced SG formation with time after infection. This resistance was previously postulated to be due to sequestration of the SG protein Caprin1 by Japanese encephalitis virus capsid protein. However, Caprin1 did not co-localize with West Nile virus (WNV) capsid protein in infected cells. Other stressors induced SGs with equal efficiency in mock- and WNV-infected cells indicating the intrinsic ability of cells to assemble SGs was not disabled. Induction of both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antioxidant response was detected at early times after WNV-infection. The transcription factors, Nrf2 and ATF4, which activate antioxidant genes, were upregulated and translocated to the nucleus. Knockdown of Nrf2, ATF4 or apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial protein involved in regenerating intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, with siRNA or treatment of cells with buthionine sulphoximine, which induces oxidative stress by inhibiting GSH synthesis, decreased intracellular GSH levels and increased the number of SG-positive, infected cells. Mitochondria were protected from Ars-induced damage by WNV infection until late times in the infection cycle. The results indicate that the increase in virus-induced ROS levels is counterbalanced by a virus-induced antioxidant response that is sufficient to also overcome the increase in ROS induced by Ars treatment and prevent Ars-induced SG assembly and mitochondrial damage. The virus-induced alterations in the cellular redox status appear to provide benefits

  18. A steady-state-kinetic model for formaldehyde dehydrogenase from human liver. A mechanism involving NAD+ and the hemimercaptal adduct of glutathione and formaldehyde as substrates and free glutathione as an allosteric activator of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Uotila, L; Mannervik, B

    1979-01-01

    The steady-state kinetics of formaldehyde dehydrogenase from human liver have been explored. Non-linearities were obtained in v-versus-v[S] plots. It was necessary and sufficient to consider two reactants of the equilibrium mixture of formaldehyde, glutathione and their hemimercaptal adduct for a complete description of the kinetics. A random sequential reaction scheme is proposed in which adduct and beta-NAD+ are the substrates. In addition, glutathione can bind to an allosteric regulatory site and only the glutathione-containing enzyme is considered productive. Various alternative reaction models were examined but no simple alterative was superior to the model chosen. The discrimination was largely based on results of non-linear regression analysis. Several S-substituted glutathione derivatives were tested as activators or inhibitors of the enzyme, but all were without effect. Thio-NAD+, nicotinamide--hypoxanthine dinucleotide and 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide could substitute for beta-NAD+ as the nucleotide substrate. alpha-NAD+ and ADP-ribose were competitive inhibitors with respect to beta-NAD+ and non-competitive with glutathione and the adduct. When used simultaneously, the inhibitors were linear competitive versus each other, indicating a single nucleotide-binding site or, if more than one, non-co-operative binding sites. PMID:220952

  19. The role of glutathione reductase and related enzymes on cellular redox homoeostasis network.

    PubMed

    Couto, Narciso; Wood, Jennifer; Barber, Jill

    2016-06-01

    In this review article we examine the role of glutathione reductase in the regulation, modulation and maintenance of cellular redox homoeostasis. Glutathione reductase is responsible for maintaining the supply of reduced glutathione; one of the most abundant reducing thiols in the majority of cells. In its reduced form, glutathione plays key roles in the cellular control of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species act as intracellular and extracellular signalling molecules and complex cross talk between levels of reactive oxygen species, levels of oxidised and reduced glutathione and other thiols, and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase determine the most suitable conditions for redox control within a cell or for activation of programmed cell death. Additionally, we discuss the translation and expression of glutathione reductase in a number of organisms including yeast and humans. In yeast and human cells, a single gene expresses more than one form of glutathione reductase, destined for residence in the cytoplasm or for translocation to different organelles; in plants, however, two genes encoding this protein have been described. In general, insects and kinetoplastids (a group of protozoa, including Plasmodia and Trypanosoma) do not express glutathione reductase or glutathione biosynthetic enzymes. Instead, they express either the thioredoxin system or the trypanothione system. The thioredoxin system is also present in organisms that have the glutathione system and there may be overlapping functions with cross-talk between the two systems. Finally we evaluate therapeutic targets to overcome oxidative stress associated cellular disorders.

  20. Effect on post-cryopreserved semen characteristics of Holstein bulls of adding combinations of vitamin C and either catalase or reduced glutathione to Tris extender.

    PubMed

    Eidan, Sajeda M

    2016-04-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of adding combinations of vitamin C to Tris extender with either catalase or reduced glutathione on post-cryopreserved semen characteristics of Holstein bulls for different preservation periods (cooling at 5°C, 48 h, 1, 2 and 3 months post cryopreservation, PC). Seven Holstein bulls of 2.5-3 years of age were used in this experiment. Semen was collected via artificial vagina in one ejaculate per bull per week for the 7 week experimental period. Pooled semen was equally divided into three treatments using Tris extender. Combinations of vitamin C (2.5mM) were added with either catalase (100 IU/ml, T2) or reduced glutathione (2mM, T3) to Tris extender and comparisons in response were made with the control group (Tris extender, T1). Individual sperm motility (IM), viability (V), plasma membrane integrity (PMI), and acrosome integrity (AI) were assessed during all periods of the study along with Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations and freezing ability. The IM was greater (P ≤ 0.01) in the T2 as compared with the T1 group at all periods of the study. Furthermore, the IM were greater (P ≤ 0.01) in the T3 as compared with the T1 group at the 48 h time period and at 3 months PC. The V, PMI and AI were greater (P ≤ 0.01) in T2 and T3 as compared with the T1 group at all the experimental periods. The MDA was greater (P ≤ 0.01) in the T2 as compared with the T1 group at 3 months PC. In conclusion, there was improved semen quality if semen of Holstein bulls was collected and stored in combinations of vitamin C with either catalase (T2) or reduced glutathione (T3) being added to Tris extender.

  1. Vasorelaxing activity of stable powder preparations of dinitrosyl iron complexes with cysteine or glutathione ligands.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Anatoly F; Mokh, Vladimir P; Serezhenkov, Vladimir A; Chazov, Evgeny I

    2007-05-01

    Vasorelaxant activity of new stable powder preparations of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with thiol-containing ligands was investigated on rat abdominal aorta rings. The preparations preserve their physicochemical characteristics (EPR and optical absorption) if stored for a long time in dry air (at least half-year). Three preparations of DNIC were tested: diamagnetic dimeric DNIC with glutathione (DNIC-GS 1:2) or cysteine (DNIC-cys 1:2) and paramagnetic monomeric DNIC with cysteine (DNIC-cys 1:20). Being dissolved in physiological solution the preparations induced relaxation of vessel similarly to that by earlier described non-stable DNICs which should be stored in liquid nitrogen. The amplitudes and kinetic characteristics of the relaxation were dependent on the incorporated thiolate ligands. Rapid transient relaxation followed by significant tone recovery to stationary level (plateau) was observed for DNIC-cys 1:2. DNIC-cys 1:20 also induced initial rapid relaxation followed by incomplete tone recovery. DNIC-GS 1:2 induced slow developing and long lasting relaxation. NO scavenger, hydroxocobalamin (2x10(-5)M) eliminated the rapid transitory relaxation induced by DNIC-cys 1:20 and did not influence significantly on the plateau level. SOD increased duration of the DNIC-cys 1:2 and DNIC-cys 1:20 induced relaxation. The addition of 5x10(-5)M DNIC-cys 1:2 or DNIC-cys 1:20 induced long lasting vasorelaxation within 20min and more. However the EPR measurements demonstrated full rapid disappearance (within 1-2min) of both type of DNIC-cys in Krebs medium bubbled with carbogen gas. This was not the case for DNIC-GS 1:2. We suggested that the long lasting vasorelaxation observed during the addition of DNICs-cys was induced by S-nitrosocysteine derived from DNICs-cys and stabilized by EDTA in Krebs medium. The suggestion is in line with the fact that strong ferrous chelator bathophenantroline disulfonate (BPDS) which is capable of rapid degradation of DNICs did not

  2. The importance and regulation of hepatic glutathione.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplowitz, N.

    1981-01-01

    Glutathione plays a key role in the liver in detoxification reactions and in regulating the thiol-disulfide status of the cell. Glutathione synthesis is regulated mainly by the availability of precursor cysteine and the concentration of glutathione itself which feeds back to regulate its own synthesis. Degradation of hepatic glutathione is principally regulated by the efflux of reduced and oxidized glutathione into both sinusoidal plasma and bile. In addition, glutathione may be consumed in conjugation reactions. Under conditions of oxidative stress, the liver exports oxidized glutathione into bile in a concentrative fashion, whereas under basal conditions, mainly reduced glutathione is exported into bile and blood. The mechanism of export of reduced glutathione into bile and sinusoidal blood is poorly understood. PMID:7342494

  3. Altering the redox state of skeletal muscle by glutathione depletion increases the exercise‐activation of PGC‐1α

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Natalie A.; Matsumoto, Aya; Peake, Jonathan M.; Marsh, Susan A.; Peternelj, Tina‐Tinkara; Briskey, David; Fassett, Robert G.; Coombes, Jeff S.; Wadley, Glenn D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the relationship between markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, cell signaling, and antioxidant enzymes by depleting skeletal muscle glutathione with diethyl maleate (DEM) which resulted in a demonstrable increase in oxidative stress during exercise. Animals were divided into six groups: (1) sedentary control rats; (2) sedentary rats + DEM; (3) exercise control rats euthanized immediately after exercise; (4) exercise rats + DEM; (5) exercise control rats euthanized 4 h after exercise; and (6) exercise rats + DEM euthanized 4 h after exercise. Exercising animals ran on the treadmill at a 10% gradient at 20 m/min for the first 30 min. The speed was then increased every 10 min by 1.6 m/min until exhaustion. There was a reduction in total glutathione in the skeletal muscle of DEM treated animals compared to the control animals (P < 0.05). Within the control group, total glutathione was higher in the sedentary group compared to after exercise (P < 0.05). DEM treatment also significantly increased oxidative stress, as measured by increased plasma F2–isoprostanes (P < 0.05). Exercising animals given DEM showed a significantly greater increase in peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator‐1α (PGC–1α) mRNA compared to the control animals that were exercised (P < 0.05). This study provides novel evidence that by lowering the endogenous antioxidant glutathione in skeletal muscle and inducing oxidative stress through exercise, PGC‐1α gene expression was augmented. These findings further highlight the important role of exercise induced oxidative stress in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25538148

  4. Evaluation of glutathione S-transferase activity as a biomarker of PAH pollution in mudskipper, Boleophthalmus dussumieri, Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Sinaei, Mahmood; Rahmanpour, Shirin

    2013-03-01

    As an attempt to study on the biomarkers types to assess the specification of the pollutants and health status of marine ecosystems, sediments and biota (i.e., Boleophthalmus dussumieri) were collected from the Persian Gulf. The liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in mudskipper was higher as compared with that in blood which could be illustrated by high metabolic rate in this organ, its key role in the metabolism of PAHs detoxification and specificity of enzymes composition. The results suggest that the liver GST activity in B. dussumieri was PAH inducible and could be extended as a biomarker of PAH pollution.

  5. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase are equally active in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaetani, G.F.; Galiano, S.; Canepa, L.; Ferraris, A.M.; Kirkman, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and NADPH predispose affected erythrocytes to destruction from peroxides. Conversely, genetic deficiencies of catalase do not predispose affected erythrocytes to peroxide-induced destruction. These observations have served to strengthen the assumption that the NADPH/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase pathway is the principal means for disposal of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. Recently, however, mammalian catalase was found to have tightly bound NADPH and to require NADPH for the prevention and reversal of inactivation by its toxic substrate (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). Since both catalase and the glutathione pathway are dependent on NADPH for function, this finding raises the possibility that both mechanisms destroy H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. A comparison of normal and acatalasemic erythrocytes in the present study indicated that catalase accounts for more than half of the destruction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is generated at a rate comparable to that which leads to hemolysis in G6PD- deficient erythrocytes.

  6. A novel persulfide detection method reveals protein persulfide- and polysulfide-reducing functions of thioredoxin and glutathione systems

    PubMed Central

    Dóka, Éva; Pader, Irina; Bíró, Adrienn; Johansson, Katarina; Cheng, Qing; Ballagó, Krisztina; Prigge, Justin R.; Pastor-Flores, Daniel; Dick, Tobias P.; Schmidt, Edward E.; Arnér, Elias S. J.; Nagy, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide signaling involves persulfide formation at specific protein Cys residues. However, overcoming current methodological challenges in persulfide detection and elucidation of Cys regeneration mechanisms from persulfides are prerequisites for constructing a bona fide signaling model. We here establish a novel, highly specific protein persulfide detection protocol, ProPerDP, with which we quantify 1.52 ± 0.6 and 11.6 ± 6.9 μg/mg protein steady-state protein persulfide concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and mouse liver, respectively. Upon treatment with polysulfides, HEK293 and A549 cells exhibited increased protein persulfidation. Deletion of the sulfide-producing cystathionine-γ-lyase or cystathionine-β-synthase enzymes in yeast diminished protein persulfide levels, thereby corroborating their involvement in protein persulfidation processes. We here establish that thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione (GSH) systems can independently catalyze reductions of inorganic polysulfides and protein persulfides. Increased endogenous persulfide levels and protein persulfidation following polysulfide treatment in thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) or thioredoxin-related protein of 14 kDa (TRP14) knockdown HEK293 cells indicated that these enzymes constitute a potent regeneration system of Cys residues from persulfides in a cellular context. Furthermore, TrxR1-deficient cells were less viable upon treatment with toxic amounts of polysulfides compared to control cells. Emphasizing the dominant role of cytosolic disulfide reduction systems in maintaining sulfane sulfur homeostasis in vivo, protein persulfide levels were markedly elevated in mouse livers where hepatocytes lack both TrxR1 and glutathione reductase (TR/GR-null). The different persulfide patterns observed in wild-type, GR-null, and TR/GR-null livers suggest distinct roles for the Trx and GSH systems in regulating subsets of protein persulfides and thereby fine-tuning sulfide

  7. Glutathione administration reduces mitochondrial damage and shifts cell death from necrosis to apoptosis in ageing diabetic mice hearts during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, S; Botta, A; Gottfred, S; Nusrat, A; Laher, I; Ghosh, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The effect of antioxidants on ageing type 2 diabetic (T2D) hearts during exercise is unclear. We hypothesized that GSH therapy during exercise reduces mitochondrial oxidative stress (mOXS) and cell death in ageing db/db mice hearts. Experimental Approach The effect of GSH on cardiac mOXS and cell death was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro. Key Results During exercise, GSH treatment protected db/db hearts from exaggerated mOXS without reducing total cell death. Despite similar cell death, investigations on apoptosis-specific single-stranded DNA breaks and necrosis-specific damage provided the first in vivo evidence of a shift from necrosis to apoptosis, with reduced fibrosis following GSH administration in exercised db/db hearts. Further support for a GSH-regulated ‘switch’ in death phenotypes came from NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and H9c2 cardiomyocytes treated with H2O2, a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Similar to in vivo findings, augmenting GSH by overexpressing glutamyl cysteine ligase (GCLc) protected fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes from necrosis induced by H2O2, but elevated caspase-3 and apoptosis instead. Similar to in vivo findings, where GSH therapy in normoglycaemic mice suppressed endogenous antioxidants and augmented caspase-3 activity, GCLc overexpression during staurosporine-induced death, which was not characterized by ROS, increased GSH efflux and aggravated death in fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes, confirming that oxidative stress is required for GSH-mediated cytoprotection. Conclusions and Implications While GSH treatment is useful for reducing mOXS and attenuating necrosis and fibrosis in ageing T2D hearts during exercise, such antioxidant treatment could be counterproductive in the healthy heart during exercise. PMID:25039894

  8. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal induces apoptosis by activating ERK1/2 signaling and depleting intracellular glutathione in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yun; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao; Wu, Zhenlong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces oxidative damage to cellular constituents, ultimately leading to induction of apoptotic cell death and the pathogenesis of various diseases. The molecular mechanisms for the action of ROS in intestinal diseases remain poorly defined. Here, we reported that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) treatment led to capses-3-dependent apoptosis accompanied by increased intracellular ROS level and reduced glutathione concentration in intestinal epithelial cells. These effects of 4-HNE were markedly abolished by the antioxidant L-cysteine derivative N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Further studies demonstrated that the protective effect of NAC was associated with restoration of intracellular redox state by Nrf2-related regulation of expression of genes involved in intracellular glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis and inactivation of 4-HNE-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2). The 4-HNE-induced ERK1/2 activation was mediated by repressing mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), a negative regulator of ERK1/2, through a proteasome-dependent degradation mechanism. Importantly, either overexpression of MKP-1 or NAC treatment blocked 4-HNE-induced MKP-1 degradation, thereby protecting cell from apoptosis. These novel findings provide new insights into a functional role of MKP-1 in oxidative stress-induced cell death by regulating ERK1/2 MAP kinase in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:27620528

  9. Increased Zn/Glutathione Levels and Higher Superoxide Dismutase-1 Activity as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Women with Long-Term Dental Amalgam Fillings: Correlation between Mercury/Aluminium Levels (in Hair) and Antioxidant Systems in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cabaña-Muñoz, María Eugenia; Parmigiani-Izquierdo, José María; Bravo-González, Luis Alberto; Kyung, Hee-Moon; Merino, José Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Background The induction of oxidative stress by Hg can affect antioxidant enzymes. However, epidemiological studies have failed to establish clear association between dental fillings presence and health problems. Objectives To determine whether heavy metals (in hair), antioxidant enzymes (SOD-1) and glutathione levels could be affected by the chronic presence of heavy metals in women who had dental amalgam fillings. Materials and Methods 55 hair samples (42 females with amalgam fillings and 13 female control subjects) were obtained. All subjects (mean age 44 years) who had dental amalgam filling for more than 10 years (average 15 years). Certain metals were quantified by ICP-MS (Mass Spectrophotometry) in hair (μg/g: Al, Hg, Ba, Ag, Sb, As, Be, Bi, Cd, Pb, Pt, Tl, Th, U, Ni, Sn, Ti) and SOD-1 and Glutathione (reduced form) levels in plasma. Data were compared with controls without amalgams, and analyzed to identify any significant relation between metals and the total number of amalgam fillings, comparing those with four or less (n = 27) with those with more than four (n = 15). As no significant differences were detected, the two groups were pooled (Amlgam; n = 42). Findings Hg, Ag, Al and Ba were higher in the amalgam group but without significant differences for most of the heavy metals analyzed. Increased SOD-1 activity and glutathione levels (reduced form) were observed in the amalgam group. Aluminum (Al) correlated with glutathione levels while Hg levels correlated with SOD-1. The observed Al/glutathione and Hg/SOD-1 correlation could be adaptive responses against the chronic presence of mercury. Conclusions Hg, Ag, Al and Ba levels increased in women who had dental amalgam fillings for long periods. Al correlated with glutathione, and Hg with SOD-1. SOD-1 may be a possible biomarker for assessing chronic Hg toxicity. PMID:26076368

  10. Salinity effects on activity and expression of glutathione S-transferases in white sturgeon and Chinook salmon.

    PubMed

    Donham, Rachel T; Morin, Dexter; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the activity and expression of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) detoxification isoenzymes in juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during acclimation from freshwater (2 per thousand) to estuarine (15 per thousand) salinity conditions. In white sturgeon, GST activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) increased significantly (P = 0.005; n = 5) with elevated salinity, but not for the Chinook salmon (P = 0.174; n = 10). GST activity of both sturgeon and salmon toward ethacrynic acid (ETHA) did not significantly change with elevated salinity (P = 0.516 with n = 3, and P = 0.125 with n = 3, respectively). Expression of the GST classes, and hepatic glutathione (GSH) concentration, as determined by HPLC, also did not significantly change with increased salinity. In conclusion, overall GST activity in white sturgeon, but not Chinook salmon, is stimulated by elevated water salinity, thus electrophilic chemicals such as pesticides may be more effectively detoxified by sturgeon as they undergo seaward migration.

  11. Reduced Silver Nanoparticle Phytotoxicity in Crambe abyssinica with Enhanced Glutathione Production by Overexpressing Bacterial γ-Glutamylcysteine Synthase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuanxin; Chhikara, Sudesh; Minocha, Rakesh; Long, Stephanie; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Xing, Baoshan; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2015-08-18

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are widely used in consumer products, and their release has raised serious concerns about the risk of their exposure to the environment and to human health. However, biochemical mechanisms by which plants counteract NP toxicity are largely unknown. We have previously engineered Crambe abyssinica plants expressing the bacterial γ-glutamylecysteine synthase (γ-ECS) for enhancing glutathione (GSH) levels. In this study, we investigated if enhanced levels of GSH and its derivatives can protect plants from Ag NPs and AgNO3 (Ag(+) ions). Our results showed that transgenic lines, when exposed to Ag NPs and Ag(+) ions, were significantly more tolerant, attaining a 28%-46% higher biomass and 34-49% more chlorophyll content, as well as maintaining 35-46% higher transpiration rates as compared to those of wild type (WT) plants. Transgenic γ-ECS lines showed 2-6-fold Ag accumulation in shoot tissue and slightly lower or no difference in root tissue relative to levels in WT plants. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in γ-ECS lines were also 27.3-32.5% lower than those in WT Crambe. These results indicate that GSH and related peptides protect plants from Ag nanotoxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first direct report of Ag NP detoxification by GSH in transgenic plants, and these results will be highly useful in developing strategies to counteract the phytotoxicty of metal-based nanoparticles in crop plants.

  12. Effect of age and environmental factors on semen quality, glutathione peroxidase activity and oxidative parameters in Simmental bulls.

    PubMed

    Balić, I Majić; Milinković-Tur, S; Samardžija, M; Vince, S

    2012-07-15

    Taking into account that semen quality depends on animal age and climate conditions and that oxidative stress has been reported to be a common cause of infertility, the objective of this study was to monitor indicators of oxidative stress and antioxidant protection during four seasonal periods in service bulls of various age to get better insight into the significance of these factors upon evaluating service bull semen. The research was conducted over a year on 19 Simmental service bulls. Animals were divided into two groups according to age; Group I consisted of younger bulls aged two to four yrs (n=9), and Group II was comprised of older bulls aged five to ten yrs (n=10). Semen samples were obtained once in the middle of every seasonal period and blood samples for biochemical analysis were collected by jugular venipuncture immediately after ejaculate collection. The activity of total glutathione peroxidase (T-GSH-Px), selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) and selenium-independent glutathione peroxidase (non-Se-GSH-Px), together with the intensity of lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; TBARS) and oxidative protein damage (protein carbonyl content (PCC)) were measured in seminal plasma. In samples of spermatozoa and blood serum, the activity of Se-GSH-Px and TBARS and PCC concentrations were determined. Older service bulls had significantly higher ejaculate volume in summer in comparison with younger bulls, whereas the number of spermatozoa and progressive motility percentage did not significantly vary with age. Younger animals had lower progressive motility percentage during summer than in spring, with more intensive oxidative processes observed in seminal plasma (TBARS) and spermatozoa (TBARS and PCC). Based on the results presented here, it can be concluded that younger bulls are more sensitive to elevated ambient temperatures during the summer, when intensified prooxidative processes in semen plasma and spermatozoa

  13. Metabolic activation of the antibacterial agent triclocarban by cytochrome P450 1A1 yielding glutathione adducts.

    PubMed

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Muvvala, Jaya B; Morin, Dexter; Buckpitt, Alan R; Hammock, Bruce D; Rice, Robert H

    2014-07-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC) is an antibacterial agent used in personal care products such as bar soaps. Small amounts of chemical are absorbed through the epidermis. Recent studies show that residues of reactive TCC metabolites are bound covalently to proteins in incubations with keratinocytes, raising concerns about the potential toxicity of this antimicrobial agent. To obtain additional information on metabolic activation of TCC, this study characterized the reactive metabolites trapped as glutathione conjugates. Incubations were carried out with (14)C-labeled TCC, recombinant CYP1A1 or CYP1B1, coexpressed with cytochrome P450 reductase, glutathione-S-transferases (GSH), and an NADPH-generating system. Incubations containing CYP1A1, but not 1B1, led to formation of a single TCC-GSH adduct with a conversion rate of 1% of parent compound in 2 hours. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and diagnostic fragmentation, the adduct was tentatively identified as 3,4-dichloro-3'-glutathionyl-4'-hydroxycarbanilide. These findings support the hypothesis that TCC is activated by oxidative dehalogenation and oxidation to a quinone imine. Incubations of TCDD-induced keratinocytes with (14)C-TCC yielded a minor radioactive peak coeluting with TCC-GSH. Thus, we conclude that covalent protein modification by TCC in TCDD-induced human keratinocyte incubations is mainly caused by activation of TCC by CYP1A1 via a dehalogenated TCC derivative as reactive species.

  14. Cantharidin Impedes Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase in the Midgut of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rashid Ahmed; Liu, Ji Yuan; Rashid, Maryam; Wang, Dun; Zhang, Ya Lin

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have implicated glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) as one of the major reasons for insecticide resistance. Therefore, effectiveness of new candidate compounds depends on their ability to inhibit GSTs to prevent metabolic detoxification by insects. Cantharidin, a terpenoid compound of insect origin, has been developed as a bio-pesticide in China, and proves highly toxic to a wide range of insects, especially lepidopteran. In the present study, we test cantharidin as a model compound for its toxicity, effects on the mRNA transcription of a model Helicoverpa armigera glutathione S-transferase gene (HaGST) and also for its putative inhibitory effect on the catalytic activity of GSTs, both in vivo and in vitro in Helicoverpa armigera, employing molecular and biochemical methods. Bioassay results showed that cantharidin was highly toxic to H. armigera. Real-time qPCR showed down-regulation of the HaGST at the mRNA transcript ranging from 2.5 to 12.5 folds while biochemical assays showed in vivo inhibition of GSTs in midgut and in vitro inhibition of rHaGST. Binding of cantharidin to HaGST was rationalized by homology and molecular docking simulations using a model GST (1PN9) as a template structure. Molecular docking simulations also confirmed accurate docking of the cantharidin molecule to the active site of HaGST impeding its catalytic activity. PMID:23528854

  15. Red-cell GSH regeneration and glutathione reductase activity in G6PD variants in the Ferrara area.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B B; Carandina, G; Lucci, M; Perry, G M; Vullo, C

    1987-12-01

    Red-cell studies were carried out on three groups of G6PD-deficient subjects with different G6PD variants from the Ferrara area of Northern Italy. Red-cell GSH and activities of G6PD, glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. A method was developed to measure red-cell GSH regeneration after oxidation of endogenous GSH in whole blood by diamide and only this clearly distinguished the variants from each other and from normal. Regeneration by 1 h was lowest in the Mediterranean variant, 0-10.2% in contrast to 93-98% in normal. A predisposition to a haemolytic crisis after ingestion of fava beans was not clearcut, but subjects appeared to be at risk if GSH regeneration at 1 h was less than 30% of the endogenous level, and red-cell FAD+ was very high indicated by high in vitro GR activity and inhibition by added FAD+. It is suggested that the most informative tests in G6PD deficiency are measurements of GSH regeneration in intact red cells plus GR activity and/or red-cell flavin compounds.

  16. Glutathione and lymphocyte activation: a function of ageing and auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Fidelus, R K; Tsan, M F

    1987-08-01

    A decline in tissue and serum of glutathione (GSH) content and GSH-metabolizing enzymes with age has been implicated in the increasing susceptibility to carcinogens, disease and drugs which occurs with advanced age. Immunological senescence has been directly associated with increased incidence of cancer and infection with age. The auto-immune diseases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) demonstrate depressed T-cell function together with B-cell hyperactivity. In addition, RA and SLE are chronic inflammatory conditions which have been associated with low serum and erythrocyte GSH concentrations when compared to normal. We hypothesized that augmentation of intracellular GSH concentrations in lymphocytes may enhance immune function in depressed immune states. Our data, using murine animal models for ageing (C57BL/6J) and the RA/SLE-like auto-immune diseases of the MRL/lpr mouse, indicate that intracellular glutathione of splenic lymphocytes does not decline with age or with a chronic inflammatory auto-immune disease. In contrast, immune responsiveness in splenic lymphocytes does decline. We can, however, augment both intracellular GSH concentrations and the immune response of splenic lymphocytes from animals of all ages as well as in those animals with the SLE-like auto-immune disease.

  17. Glutathione conjugation and contaminant transformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, Jennifer A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    The recent identification of a novel sulfonated metabolite of alachlor in groundwater and metolachlor in soil is likely the result of glutathione conjugation. Glutathione conjugation is an important biochemical reaction that leads, in the case of alachlor, to the formation of a rather difficult to detect, water-soluble, and therefore highly mobile, sulfonated metabolite. Research from weed science, toxicology, and biochemistry is discussed to support the hypothesis that glutathione conjugation is a potentially important detoxification pathway carried out by aquatic and terrestrial plants and soil microorganisms. A brief review of the biochemical basis for glutathione conjugation is presented. We recommend that multidisciplinary research focus on the occurrence and expression of glutathione and its attendant enzymes in plants and microorganisms, relationships between electrophilic substrate structure and enzyme activity, and the potential exploitation of plants and microorganisms that are competent in glutathione conjugation for phytoremediation and bioremediation.

  18. Unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways suggests potential involvement in plant defense against the gall midge mayetiola destructor in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutathione, a thiol tripeptide of '-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. In this study, we found that the abundance of total glutathion...

  19. GSTP1 Polymorphisms and their Association with Glutathione Transferase and Peroxidase Activities in Patients with Motor Neuron Disease.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Beata; Kaźmierczak, Beata; Kuźma-Kozakiewicz, Magdalena; Jamrozik, Zygmunt; Barańczyk-Kuźma, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP1) is a crucial enzyme in detoxification of electrophilic compounds and organic peroxides. Together with Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSHPx) it protects cells against oxidative stress which may be a primary factor implicated in motor neuron disease (MND) pathogenesis. We investigated GSTP1 polymorphisms and their relationship with GST and Se-GSTPx activities in a cohort of Polish patients with MND. Results were correlated with clinical phenotypes. The frequency of genetic variants for GSTP1 exon 5 (I105V) and exon 6 (A114V) was studied in 104 patients and 100 healthy controls using real-time polymerase chain reaction. GST transferase activity was determined in serum with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, its peroxidase activity with cumene hydroperoxide, and Se-GSHPx activity with hydrogen peroxide. There were no differences in the prevalence of GSTP1 polymorphism I105V and A114V between MND and controls, however the occurrence of CT variant in codon 114 was associated with a higher risk for MND. GSTP1 polymorphisms were less frequent in classic ALS than in progressive bulbar palsy. In classic ALS C* (heterozygous I /V and A /V) all studied activities were significantly lower than in classic ALS A* (homozygous I /I and A/A). GST peroxidase activity and Se-GSHPx activity were lower in classic ALS C* than in control C*, but in classic ALS A* Se-GSHPx activity was significantly higher than in control A*. It can be concluded that the presence of GSTP1 A114V but not I105V variant increases the risk of MND, and combined GSTP1 polymorphisms in codon 105 and 114 may result in lower protection of MND patients against the toxicity of electrophilic compounds, organic and inorganic hydroperoxides.

  20. Changes in glutathione redox cycle during diapause determination and termination in the bivoltine silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin-Chuan; Hou, Yi-Sheng; Sima, Yang-Hu

    2014-02-01

    To explore whether glutathione regulates diapause determination and termination in the bivoltine silkworm Bombyx mori, we monitored the changes in glutathione redox cycle in the ovary of both diapause- and nondiapause-egg producers, as well as those in diapause eggs incubated at different temperatures. The activity of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) was detected in ovaries but not in eggs, while neither ovaries nor eggs showed activity of glutathione peroxidase. A lower reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio was observed in the ovary of diapause-egg producers, due to weaker reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to the reduced glutathione (GSH) catalyzed by glutathione reductase (GR) and TrxR. This indicates an oxidative shift in the glutathione redox cycle during diapause determination. Compared with the 25°C-treated diapause eggs, the 5°C-treated diapause eggs showed lower GSH/GSSG ratio, a result of stronger oxidation of GSH catalyzed by thioredoxin peroxidase and weaker reduction of GSSG catalyzed by GR. Our study demonstrated the important regulatory role of glutathione in diapause determination and termination of the bivoltine silkworm.

  1. Mathematical modeling of the effects of glutathione on arsenic methylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a major environmental toxin that is detoxified in the liver by biochemical mechanisms that are still under study. In the traditional metabolic pathway, arsenic undergoes two methylation reactions, each followed by a reduction, after which it is exported and released in the urine. Recent experiments show that glutathione plays an important role in arsenic detoxification and an alternative biochemical pathway has been proposed in which arsenic is first conjugated by glutathione after which the conjugates are methylated. In addition, in rats arsenic-glutathione conjugates can be exported into the plasma and removed by the liver in the bile. Methods We have developed a mathematical model for arsenic biochemistry that includes three mechanisms by which glutathione affects arsenic methylation: glutathione increases the speed of the reduction steps; glutathione affects the activity of arsenic methyltranferase; glutathione sequesters inorganic arsenic and its methylated downstream products. The model is based as much as possible on the known biochemistry of arsenic methylation derived from cellular and experimental studies. Results We show that the model predicts and helps explain recent experimental data on the effects of glutathione on arsenic methylation. We explain why the experimental data imply that monomethyl arsonic acid inhibits the second methylation step. The model predicts time course data from recent experimental studies. We explain why increasing glutathione when it is low increases arsenic methylation and that at very high concentrations increasing glutathione decreases methylation. We explain why the possible temporal variation of the glutathione concentration affects the interpretation of experimental studies that last hours. Conclusions The mathematical model aids in the interpretation of data from recent experimental studies and shows that the Challenger pathway of arsenic methylation, supplemented by the glutathione effects

  2. In vitro evaluation of glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-like activity and antioxidant properties of an organoselenium compound.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohammad; Muhammad, Niaz; Naeem, Muhammad; Deobald, Anna Maria; Kamdem, Jean Paul; Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira

    2015-08-01

    The amine based diselenide, (Z)-N-(4-methylbenzylidene)-1-(2-((2-(1-((E)-4-methyl benzylideneamino)ethyl)phenyl)diselanyl)phenyl)ethanamine ethyl)phenyl) diselanyl) phenyl) ethylimino) methyl)phenol (Compound A) an organoselenium compound that can mimic endogenous antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 were tested against lipid peroxidation induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and Fe(II) in rat brain, interaction with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl stable free radical (DPPH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) like antioxidant activities with H2O2 or tBuOOH as substrates and with PhSH as thiol co-substrates as well as their ability to oxidize thiols were evaluated. From this study, we concluded that Compound A catalyze the reduction of H2O2 with thiol was ∼2-fold more active than (PhSe)2) in both tBuOOH and H2O2 systems when PhSH was used as a substrate. (PhSe)2 exhibited an increased ability to oxidize thiols while Compound A was not a good substrate for the oxidation of thiol used namely DTT and Cystine and showed DPPH radical-scavenging activity, while (PhSe)2 did not present radical scavenging activity. Compound A (amine based diselenide) presented better antioxidant profiles than (PhSe)2 against lipid peroxidation. The results clear showed that nitrogen atom in the Compound A can have a profound effect on their pharmacological properties.

  3. Influence of chemical treatments on glutathione S-transferases of maize with activity towards metolachlor and cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, C K; Hatzios, K K; Meredith, S

    1998-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity extracted from shoots of 3-day-old etiolated seedlings of maize (Zea mays L., Northrup-King 9283 hybrid) and the induction of soluble and membrane-bound GST activity by the safener benoxacor, the herbicide metolachlor and their combination (CGA-180937) were investigated. GST activity extracted from maize shoots was detected in both cytosolic and microsomal fractions and utilized 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), metolachlor, and trans-cinnamic acid (CA) as substrates. Soluble GST activity extracted from maize shoots was greater than microsomal with CDNB or metolachlor as substrate. Membrane-bound GST activity was greater than soluble with cinnamic acid as substrate. Washing the microsomal preparations from maize shoots with Triton X-100 increased GST(CA) activity. Pretreatment with the safener benoxacor or a formulated combination of the herbicide metolachlor with benoxacor induced soluble GST(CDNB), GST(metolachlor) and GST(CA) activities in maize shoots. Benoxacor and CGA-180937 induced also membrane-bound GST(CDNB) and GST(CA) activities in maize shoots, but did not affect membrane-bound GST(metolachlor) activity. These results confirm that maize contains multiple GST isozymes that differ in their substrate specificity and inducibility by safeners or other chemicals.

  4. Selenite-induced variation in glutathione peroxidase activity of three mammalian cell lines: no effect on radiation-induced cell killing or DNA strand breakage

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, B.E.C.; Carlsson, J.; Marklund, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    The selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activities of three mammalian cell lines, HT29, P31, and N-18, cultured in medium with low serum content, increased about 2-, 5-, and 40-fold, respectively, after supplementation with 100 nM selenite. Catalase, CuZn superoxide dismutase, and Mn superoxide dismutase activities were not generally influenced by selenite supplementation, and there was only a minor nonselenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity in the investigated cell lines. Gamma-irradiated control and selenite-supplemented cells showed no changes in the surviving fractions, as estimated by clonogenic survival or (/sup 3/H)-thymidine uptake, nor were there any significant differences between the two groups in the induction of DNA strand breaks after gamma irradiation under repairing (37 degrees C) or nonrepairing (0 degrees C) conditions. The results suggest that selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase does not contribute significantly to the radiation resistance of cultured mammalian cells.

  5. Induction of wheat and maize glutathione S-transferase by some herbicide safeners and their effect on enzyme activity against butachlor and terbuthylazine.

    PubMed

    Scarponi, Luciano; Quagliarini, Elisa; Del Buono, Daniele

    2006-10-01

    The expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in wheat and maize shoots was investigated in response to treatments with the herbicide safeners benoxacor, cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazole-ethyl, fenclorim, fluxofenim and oxabetrinil. These safeners significantly enhanced the GST activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as a 'standard' substrate, with the exception of oxabetrinil in maize. The enhancements of GST (CDNB) activity were found to be concomitant with increases in V(max) (the reaction rate when the enzyme is fully saturated by the substrate) in wheat following cloquintocet-mexyl and fenchlorazole-ethyl treatments, and in maize following fenchlorazole-ethyl treatment. Otherwise, decreases in V(max) were observed in wheat and maize following fenclorim and fluxofenim treatments. With the exception of oxabetrinil, all the safeners significantly reduced the apparent K(M) (the substrate concentration required for 50% of maximum GST activity) of both wheat and maize GST. The V(max) and K(M) variations following safener treatments are discussed in terms of an increased expression of GST enzymes and an increased affinity for the CDNB substrate. The activity of wheat and maize GST was also assayed towards butachlor and terbuthylazine respectively; the results indicate the ability of cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazole-ethyl and fluxofenim to enhance the enzyme activity in wheat and of benoxacor and fenchlorazole-ethyl to do so in maize.

  6. Plasma glutathione peroxidase activity in kidney recipients with and without adverse outcome.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Hajirahimkhan, Athie; Taghizadeh Afshari, Ali; Nourooz-Zadeh, Jaffar

    2012-01-01

    Kidney function is routinely monitored utilizing classic biochemical parameters including serum or plasma creatinine (Cr), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentrations. This study demonstrates that the simultaneous assessment of plasma glutathione peroxidase (pGPx) and Cr levels provides a better strategy for the immediate follow-up of kidney function in organ recipients. Kidney recipients (Krs; n = 22) were recruited. Blood sampling schedule commenced at day 1 (pre-transplantation) and post-transplantation days (i.e., everyday from 1 until day 14, and thereafter on days 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, and 56). pGPx was measured spectrophotometrically. Candidates for transplantation exhibited lower pGPx than control subjects (42 ± 24 vs. 143 ± 31 U/L; p < 0.005). In Krs with a stable post-transplant outcome, pGPx increased to a maximum at day 28 (214 ± 61 U/L). In a Kr diagnosed with acute tubulonecrosis, pGPx provided a better predictive value (threefold increase) than Cr. In a Kr diagnosed with acute rejection, the increment in Cr values was found to be more pronounced than in pGPx values. The pGPx test is simple, inexpensive and automatable, and should be a valuable diagnostic tool of kidney function in organ recipients with and without troublesome outcome for the follow-up during hospitalization period.

  7. Synthesis, nitric oxide release, and anti-leukemic activity of glutathione-activated nitric oxide prodrugs: Structural analogues of PABA/NO, an anti-cancer lead compound.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Harinath; Wilde, Thomas C; Citro, Michael L; Goodblatt, Michael M; Keefer, Larry K; Saavedra, Joseph E

    2008-03-01

    Diazeniumdiolate anions and their prodrug forms are reliable sources of nitric oxide (NO) that have generated interest as promising therapeutic agents. A number of structural analogues of O(2)-(2,4-dinitro-5-(4-(N-methylamino)benzoyloxy)phenyl) 1-(N,N-dimethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PABA/NO), an anti-cancer lead compound that is designed to release NO upon activation by glutathione, were prepared. The nitric oxide release patterns of these O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) diazeniumdiolates in the presence of glutathione were tested and it was found that in the absence of competing pathways, these compounds release nearly quantitative amounts of NO. The ability of PABA/NO and its structural analogues to inhibit human leukemia cell proliferation was determined and it was found that compounds releasing elevated amounts of NO displayed superior cytotoxic effects.

  8. PARTICIPATION OF Y89 AND Y97 IN THE CONJUGATING ACTIVITY OF Drosophila melanogaster GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE D3 (DmGSTD3).

    PubMed

    Vignesvaran, Kithalakshmi; Alias, Zazali

    2016-07-01

    Drosophila melanogaster glutathione S-transferase D3 (DmGSTD3) has a shorter amino acid sequence as compared to other GSTs known in the fruit flies. This is due to the 15 amino acid N-terminal truncation in which normally active amino acid residue is located. The work has made use of homology modeling to visualize the arrangement of amino acid side chains in the glutathione (GSH) substrate cavity. The identified amino acids were then replaced with amino acids without functional groups in the side chains and the mutants were analyzed kinetically. Homology modeling revealed that the side chains of Y89 and Y97 were shown facing toward the substrate cavity proposing their possible role in catalyzing the conjugation. Y97A and Y89A GSH gave large changes in Km (twofold increase), Vmax (fivefold reduction), and Kcat /Km values for GSH suggesting their significant role in the conjugation reaction. The replacement at either positions has not affected the affinity of the enzyme toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as no significant change in values of Kmax was observed. The replacement, however, had significantly reduced the catalytic efficiency of both mutants with (Kcat /Km )(GSH) and (Kcat /Km )(CDNB) of eight- and twofold reduction. The recombinant DmGSTD3 has shown no activity toward 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene, 2,4-hexadienal, 2,4-heptadienal, p-nitrobenzyl chloride, ethacrynic acid, and sulfobromophthalein. Therefore, it was evident that DmGSTD3 has made use of distal amino acids Y97 and Y89 for GSH conjugation.

  9. Selenium-Enriched Foods Are More Effective at Increasing Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) Activity Compared with Selenomethionine: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, Emma N.; Hesketh, John E.; Sinclair, Bruce R.; Koolaard, John P.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium may play a beneficial role in multi-factorial illnesses with genetic and environmental linkages via epigenetic regulation in part via glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. A meta-analysis was undertaken to quantify the effects of dietary selenium supplementation on the activity of overall GPx activity in different tissues and animal species and to compare the effectiveness of different forms of dietary selenium. GPx activity response was affected by both the dose and form of selenium (p < 0.001). There were differences between tissues on the effects of selenium supplementation on GPx activity (p < 0.001); however, there was no evidence in the data of differences between animal species (p = 0.95). The interactions between dose and tissue, animal species and form were significant (p < 0.001). Tissues particularly sensitive to changes in selenium supply include red blood cells, kidney and muscle. The meta-analysis identified that for animal species selenium-enriched foods were more effective than selenomethionine at increasing GPx activity. PMID:25268836

  10. Glutathione transferases and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Fiorile, Maria Carmela; Primavera, Alessandra; Lo Bello, Mario

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial agreement that the unbalance between oxidant and antioxidant species may affect the onset and/or the course of a number of common diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Many studies suggest a crucial role for oxidative stress in the first phase of aging, or in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neurological ones. Particularly, the role exerted by glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes (Glutathione Transferases) in the nervous system appears more relevant, this latter tissue being much more vulnerable to toxins and oxidative stress than other tissues such as liver, kidney or muscle. The present review addresses the question by focusing on the results obtained by specimens from patients or by in vitro studies using cells or animal models related to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In general, there is an association between glutathione depletion and Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a significant decrease of glutathione transferase activity in selected areas of brain and in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was found. For some glutathione transferase genes there is also a correlation between polymorphisms and onset/outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, there is a general agreement about the protective effect exerted by glutathione and glutathione transferases but no clear answer about the mechanisms underlying this crucial role in the insurgence of neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Glutathione S-transferase pi modulates NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory responses in lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jane T.; Qian, Xi; van der Velden, Jos L.J.; Chia, Shi Biao; McMillan, David H.; Flemer, Stevenson; Hoffman, Sidra M.; Lahue, Karolyn G.; Schneider, Robert W.; Nolin, James D.; Anathy, Vikas; van der Vliet, Albert; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a transcription factor family critical in the activation of pro- inflammatory responses. The NF-κB pathway is regulated by oxidant-induced post-translational modifications. Protein S-glutathionylation, or the conjugation of the antioxidant molecule, glutathione to reactive cysteines inhibits the activity of inhibitory kappa B kinase beta (IKKβ), among other NF-κB proteins. Glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP) is an enzyme that has been shown to catalyze protein S-glutathionylation (PSSG) under conditions of oxidative stress. The objective of the present study was to determine whether GSTP regulates NF-κB signaling, S-glutathionylation of IKK, and subsequent pro-inflammatory signaling. We demonstrated that, in unstimulated cells, GSTP associated with the inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBα. However, exposure to LPS resulted in a rapid loss of association between IκBα and GSTP, and instead led to a protracted association between IKKβ and GSTP. LPS exposure also led to increases in the S-glutathionylation of IKKβ. SiRNA-mediated knockdown of GSTP decreased IKKβ-SSG, and enhanced NF-κB nuclear translocation, transcriptional activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TLK117, an isotype-selective inhibitor of GSTP, also enhanced LPS-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, suggesting that the catalytic activity of GSTP is important in repressing NF-κB activation. Expression of both wild-type and catalytically-inactive Y7F mutant GSTP significantly attenuated LPS- or IKKβ-induced production of GM-CSF. These studies indicate a complex role for GSTP in modulating NF-κB, which may involve S-glutathionylation of IKK proteins, and interaction with NF-κB family members. Our findings suggest that targeting GSTP is a potential avenue for regulating the activity of this prominent pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory transcription factor. PMID:27058114

  12. Glutathione-conjugating and membrane-remodeling activity of GDAP1 relies on amphipathic C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Nina; Bieniossek, Christoph; Wagner, Konstanze Marion; Elsässer, Hans-Peter; Suter, Ueli; Berger, Imre; Niemann, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the ganglioside-induced differentiation associated protein 1 (GDAP1) cause severe peripheral motor and sensory neuropathies called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. GDAP1 expression induces fission of mitochondria and peroxisomes by a currently elusive mechanism, while disease causing mutations in GDAP1 impede the protein’s role in mitochondrial dynamics. In silico analysis reveals sequence similarities of GDAP1 to glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). However, a proof of GST activity and its possible impact on membrane dynamics are lacking to date. Using recombinant protein, we demonstrate for the first time theta-class-like GST activity for GDAP1, and it’s activity being regulated by the C-terminal hydrophobic domain 1 (HD1) of GDAP1 in an autoinhibitory manner. Moreover, we show that the HD1 amphipathic pattern is required to induce membrane dynamics by GDAP1. As both, fission and GST activities of GDAP1, are critically dependent on HD1, we propose that GDAP1 undergoes a molecular switch, turning from a pro-fission active to an auto-inhibited inactive conformation. PMID:27841286

  13. Plasmodium spp. membrane glutathione S-transferases: detoxification units and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Lisewski, Andreas M.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane glutathione S-transferases from the class of membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG) form a superfamily of detoxification enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of reduced glutathione (GSH) to a broad spectrum of xenobiotics and hydrophobic electrophiles. Evolutionarily unrelated to the cytosolic glutathione S-transferases, they are found across bacterial and eukaryotic domains, for example in mammals, plants, fungi and bacteria in which significant levels of glutathione are maintained. Species of genus Plasmodium, the unicellular protozoa that are commonly known as malaria parasites, do actively support glutathione homeostasis and maintain its metabolism throughout their complex parasitic life cycle. In humans and in other mammals, the asexual intraerythrocytic stage of malaria, when the parasite feeds on hemoglobin, grows and eventually asexually replicates inside infected red blood cells (RBCs), is directly associated with host disease symptoms and during this critical stage GSH protects the host RBC and the parasite against oxidative stress from parasite-induced hemoglobin catabolism. In line with these observations, several GSH-dependent Plasmodium enzymes have been characterized including glutathione reductases, thioredoxins, glyoxalases, glutaredoxins and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs); furthermore, GSH itself have been found to associate spontaneously and to degrade free heme and its hydroxide, hematin, which are the main cytotoxic byproducts of hemoglobin catabolism. However, despite the apparent importance of glutathione metabolism for the parasite, no membrane associated glutathione S-transferases of genus Plasmodium have been previously described. We recently reported the first examples of MAPEG members among Plasmodium spp. PMID:28357217

  14. [Effects of repeated skin applications of heavy pyrolysis resin on cytochrome P-450 level and glutathione transferase activity in liver microsomes and cytosol in rats in relation to the level of toxic effects of pyrolysis resin on internal organs].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, M N; Loginov, A S; Petrova, L P; Ausheva, L Kh; Bendikov, E A

    1990-10-01

    Rats received 20 skin applications of heavy pyrolysis resin, containing about 30% of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The every exposure duration was 4 hours a day. Applications have been carried out daily 5 days a week in the course of 4 weeks. Induction of cytochrome P-450 (P-450) by 79%, significant induction of microsomal (GTm) and cytosol (GTc) glutathione-S-transferase activity (by 46 and 85%, respectively) and small increase of reduced glutathione level (by 9%) also were registered as a result of these exposures. Lipid peroxidation level determined by TBK-reactive products quantity didn't alter significantly. Close correlation between ratio values of P-450/GTm levels and P-450/GTc levels and toxic effect indices of heavy pyrolysis resin on rat immune and endocrine systems.

  15. Enzymatic Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase and Dental Fluorosis Among Children Receiving Two Different Levels of Naturally Fluoridated Water.

    PubMed

    Bonola-Gallardo, Irvin; Irigoyen-Camacho, María Esther; Vera-Robles, Liliana; Campero, Antonio; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to measure the activity of the enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) in saliva and to compare the activity of this enzyme in children with and without dental fluorosis in communities with different concentrations of naturally fluoridated water. A total of 141 schoolchildren participated in this cross-sectional study. Children were selected from two communities: one with a low (0.4 ppm) and the other with a high (1.8 ppm) water fluoride concentration. Dental fluorosis was evaluated by applying the Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index (TFI) criteria. Stimulated saliva was obtained, and fluoride concentration and GST activity were measured. The GST activity was compared among children with different levels of dental fluorosis using multinomial logistic regression models and odds ratios (OR). The mean age of the children was 10.6 (±1.03) years. Approximately half of the children showed dental fluorosis (52.5 %). The average GST activity was 0.5678 (±0.1959) nmol/min/μg. A higher concentration of fluoride in the saliva was detected in children with a higher GST activity (p = 0.039). A multinomial logistic regression model used to evaluate the GST activity and the dental fluorosis score identified a strong association between TFI = 2-3 (OR = 15.44, p = 0.007) and TFI ≥ 4 (OR = 55.40, p = 0.026) and the GST activity level, compared with children showing TFI = 0-1, adjusted for age and sex. Schoolchildren with higher levels of dental fluorosis and a higher fluoride concentration in the saliva showed greater GST activity. The increased GST activity most likely was the result of the body's need to inactivate free radicals produced by exposure to fluoride.

  16. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  17. Glyoxalase III from Escherichia coli: a single novel enzyme for the conversion of methylglyoxal into D-lactate without reduced glutathione.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, K; Banerjee, A B; Ray, S; Ray, M

    1995-01-01

    A single novel enzyme, glyoxalase III, which catalyses the conversion of methylglyoxal into D-lactate without involvement of GSH, has been detected in and purified from Escherichia coli. Of several carbonyl compounds tested, only the alpha-ketoaldehydes methylglyoxal and phenylglyoxal were found to be substrates for this enzyme. Glyoxalase III is active over a wide range of pH with no sharp pH optimum. In its native form it has an M(r) of 82000 +/- 2000, and it is composed of two subunits of equal M(r). Glutathione analogues, which are inhibitors of glyoxalase I, do not inhibit glyoxalase III. Glyoxalase III is found to be sensitive to thiol-blocking reagents. The p-hydroxymercuribenzoate-inactivated enzyme could be almost completely re-activated by dithiothreitol and other thiol-group-containing compounds, indicating the possible involvement of thiol group(s) at or near the active site of the enzyme. Images Figure 1 PMID:7848303

  18. Structural basis for glutathione-mediated activation of the virulence regulatory protein PrfA in Listeria

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael; Grundström, Christin; Begum, Afshan; Lindberg, Mikael J.; Sauer, Uwe H.; Almqvist, Fredrik; Johansson, Jörgen; Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Infection by the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is mainly controlled by the positive regulatory factor A (PrfA), a member of the Crp/Fnr family of transcriptional activators. Published data suggest that PrfA requires the binding of a cofactor for full activity, and it was recently proposed that glutathione (GSH) could fulfill this function. Here we report the crystal structures of PrfA in complex with GSH and in complex with GSH and its cognate DNA, the hly operator PrfA box motif. These structures reveal the structural basis for a GSH-mediated allosteric mode of activation of PrfA in the cytosol of the host cell. The crystal structure of PrfAWT in complex only with DNA confirms that PrfAWT can adopt a DNA binding-compatible structure without binding the GSH activator molecule. By binding to PrfA in the cytosol of the host cell, GSH induces the correct fold of the HTH motifs, thus priming the PrfA protein for DNA interaction. PMID:27930316

  19. Effects of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb, Zn) on fish glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, A; Dogan, Z; Kanak, E G; Atli, G; Canli, M

    2015-03-01

    The glutathione metabolism contains crucial antioxidant molecules to defend the organisms against oxidants. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the response of the glutathione metabolism in the liver of freshwater fish Oreochromis niloticus exposed to metals (Cu, Cd, Cr, Pb, Zn) in different periods. Fish were exposed to metals (as 1 μg/mL) individually for 1, 7, and 14 days and subsequently antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, GPX; glutathione reductase, GR and glutathione S-transferase, GST) and glutathione levels (total glutathione, tGSH; reduced glutathione, rGSH; oxidized glutathione, GSSG and GSH/GSSG ratios) in the liver were measured. There was no fish mortality during the experiments, except Cu exposure. The antioxidant enzymes responded differently to metal exposures depending on metal types and exposure durations. GPX activity increased only after Cd exposure, while GST activity increased following 7 days of all metal exposures. However, GR activity did not alter in most cases. Total GSH and GSH/GSSG levels generally decreased, especially after 7 days. Data showed that metal exposures significantly altered the response of antioxidant system parameters, particularly at day 7 and some recovery occurred after 14 days. This study suggests that the response of antioxidant system could help to predict metal toxicity in the aquatic environments and be useful as an "early warning tool" in natural monitoring studies.

  20. Changes of the thioredoxin system, glutathione peroxidase activity and total antioxidant capacity in rat brain cortex during acute liver failure: modulation by L-histidine.

    PubMed

    Ruszkiewicz, Joanna; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione and thioredoxin are complementary antioxidants in the protection of mammalian tissues against oxidative-nitrosative stress (ONS), and ONS is a principal cause of symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) associated with acute liver failure (ALF). We compared the activities of the thioredoxin system components: thioredoxin (Trx), thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and the expression of the thioredoxin-interacting protein, and of the key glutathione metabolizing enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the cerebral cortex of rats with ALF induced by thioacetamide (TAA). ALF increased the Trx and TrxR activity without affecting Trip protein expression, but decreased GPx activity in the brains of TAA-treated rats. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of the brain was increased by ALF suggesting that upregulation of the thioredoxin may act towards compensating impaired protection by the glutathione system. Intraperitoneal administration of L-histidine (His), an amino acid that was earlier reported to prevent acute liver failure-induced mitochondrial impairment and brain edema, abrogated most of the acute liver failure-induced changes of both antioxidant systems, and significantly increased TAC of both the control and ALF-affected brain. These observations provide further support for the concept of that His has a potential to serve as a therapeutic antioxidant in HE. Most of the enzyme activity changes evoked by His or ALF were not well correlated with alterations in their expression at the mRNA level, suggesting complex translational or posttranslational mechanisms of their modulation, which deserve further investigations.

  1. Regulation of Endothelial Glutathione by ICAM-1 governs VEGF-A mediated eNOS Activity and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Langston, Will; Chidlow, John H.; Booth, Blake A.; Barlow, Shayne C.; Lefer, David J.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that inflammatory cell adhesion molecules may modulate endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis through unknown mechanisms. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, herein we reveal a novel redox sensitive mechanism by which ICAM-1 modulates endothelial GSH that controls VEGF-A induced eNOS activity, endothelial chemotaxis, and angiogenesis. In vivo disk angiogenesis assays showed attenuated VEGF-A mediated angiogenesis in ICAM-1−/− mice. Moreover, VEGF-A dependent chemotaxis, eNOS phosphorylation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were impaired in ICAM-1−/− MAEC compared to WT MAEC. Decreasing intracellular GSH in ICAM-1−/− MAEC to levels observed in WT MAEC with 150 μM buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) restored VEGF-A responses. Conversely, GSH supplementation of WT MAEC with 5 mM glutathione ethyl ester (GEE) mimicked defects observed in ICAM-1−/− cells. Deficient angiogenic responses in ICAM-1−/− cells were associated with increased expression of the lipid phosphatase, PTEN, consistent with antagonism of signaling pathways leading to eNOS activation. PTEN expression was also sensitive to GSH status, decreasing or increasing in proportion to intracellular GSH concentrations. These data suggest a novel role for ICAM-1 in modulating VEGF-A induced angiogenesis and eNOS activity through regulation of PTEN expression via modulation of intracellular GSH status. PMID:17291995

  2. Glutathione S-transferases in human renal cortex and neoplastic tissue: enzymatic activity, isoenzyme profile and immunohistochemical localization.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, V; Benzie, A A; Veitch, J M; Murray, G I; Rowe, J D; Hawksworth, G M

    1998-05-01

    1. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in the cytosol of renal cortex and tumours from eight men and eight women was measured using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as a substrate. GST activities ranged from 685 to 2192 nmol/min/mg protein in cortex (median 1213) and from non-detectable (minimum 45) to 2424 nmol/min/mg protein in tumours (median 469). The activities in the tumours were lower than those in the normal cortices (p < 0.05). 2. In men, the activity in the cortical cytosol was in all cases higher than that measured in the corresponding tumours (p < 0.05). In women, the difference in activity between cortices and tumours was not significantly different (p > 0.05). 3. The age of the patients ranged from 42 to 81 years (median 62) and was not found to play a role in the levels of GST activity observed in cortex or in renal tumours from either sex. 4. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that GST-alpha was the predominant form expressed both in normal cortex and tumour and probably accounted for most of the GST activity present in these samples. GST-mu and GST-phi were expressed in both tumours and normal cortex and, while in some cases the level of expression in the cortices was higher than that found in the tumours, the reverse was also observed. Within the GST-mu class, GST M1/M2 was only detected in one sample (tumour), which showed the highest overall expression of GST-mu. GSTM3 was the predominant isoenzyme of the mu class in normal and tumour tissue, whereas GTM4 and GSTM5 were not detected. 5. These differences could have functional significance where xenobiotics or cytotoxic drugs are specific substrates for the different classes of GSTs.

  3. Validation of a Reversed-Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method for the Simultaneous Analysis of Cysteine and Reduced Glutathione in Mouse Organs

    PubMed Central

    Brundu, Serena; Nencioni, Lucia; Celestino, Ignacio; Coluccio, Paolo; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Fraternale, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    A depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) has been observed in pathological conditions and in aging. Measuring GSH in tissues using mouse models is an excellent way to assess GSH depletion and the potential therapeutic efficacy of drugs used to maintain and/or restore cellular redox potential. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the simultaneous determination of GSH and cysteine (Cys) in mouse organs was validated according to USA and European standards. The method was based on separation coupled with ultraviolet detection and precolumn derivatization with 5,5′-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB). The required validation parameters, that are, selectivity, linearity, lower limit of quantification, precision, accuracy, recovery, and stability, were studied for spleen, lymph nodes, pancreas, and brain. The results showed that the lower limits of quantification were 0.313 μM and 1.25 μM for Cys and GSH, respectively. Intraday and interday precisions were less than 11% and 14%, respectively, for both compounds. The mean extraction recoveries of Cys and GSH from all organs were more than 93% and 86%, respectively. Moreover, the stability of both analytes during sample preparation and storage was demonstrated. The method was accurate, reliable, consistent, and reproducible and it was useful to determine Cys and GSH in the organs of different mouse strains. PMID:26885246

  4. The influence of reduced glutathione in fertilization medium on the fertility of in vitro-matured C57BL/6 mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Y; Nishimura, M; Matsumoto, K; Miyashita, M; Takeo, T; Nakagata, N; Hosoi, Y; Anzai, M

    2013-09-15

    It is well known that IVM oocytes show a decreased potential for fertility and development compared with in vivo-matured oocytes. In this study, we added reduced glutathione (GSH) to the fertilization medium during IVF to investigate its effect on the fertility and early embryo development of IVM oocytes. The fertilization rate for IVM oocytes and fresh sperm increased with the addition of GSH (0, 1.0, and 2.0 mM: 51%, 76%, and 70%). Moreover, the addition of GSH to the fertilization medium also improved the developmental potential compared with the control sample (0 mM). In addition, we performed IVF using IVM oocytes and frozen/thawed sperm that had been cryopreserved in a mouse bank. Results indicated a marked increase in the fertilization rate when 1.0 mM GSH was added to the fertilization medium compared with when no GSM was used (0.0 mM GSH: 2% (3/195); 1.0 mM GSH: 33% (156/468)). Furthermore, the fertilization rate improved dramatically via zona drilling using laser equipment (52%: 267/516), whereas normal offspring were obtainsed after transferring embryos created via IVF using IVM oocytes and frozen/thawed sperm. This is the first report in which offspring have been obtained via IVF using IVM oocytes and frozen/thawed sperm.

  5. Redox regulation of antioxidant enzymes: post-translational modulation of catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity by resveratrol in diabetic rat liver.

    PubMed

    Sadi, Gökhan; Bozan, Davut; Yildiz, Huseyin Bekir

    2014-08-01

    Resveratrol is a strong antioxidant that exhibits blood glucose-lowering effects, which might contribute to its usefulness in preventing complications associated with diabetes. The present study aimed to investigate resveratrol effects on catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) gene and protein expression, their phosphorylation states and activities in rat liver of STZ-induced diabetes. Diabetes increased the levels of total protein phosphorylation and p-CAT, while mRNA expression, protein levels, and activity were reduced. Although diabetes induced transcriptional repression over GPx, it did not affect the protein levels and activity. When resveratrol was administered to diabetic rats, an increase in activity was associated with an increase in p-GPx levels. Decrease in Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) gene expression in diabetes were associated with a decrease in CAT and GPx mRNA expression. A possible compensatory mechanism for reduced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes is proved to be nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2 and NFκB in diabetes which is confirmed by the increase in nuclear and decrease in cytoplasmic protein levels of Nrf2 and NFκB. Taken together, these findings revealed that an increase in the oxidized state in diabetes intricately modified the cellular phosphorylation status and regulation of antioxidant enzymes. Gene regulation of antioxidant enzymes was accompanied by nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and NFκB. Resveratrol administration also activated a coordinated cytoprotective response against diabetes-induced changes in liver tissues.

  6. The effect of acute high light and low temperature stresses on the ascorbate-glutathione cycle and superoxide dismutase activity in two Dunaliella salina strains.

    PubMed

    Haghjou, Maryam M; Shariati, Mansour; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    Dunaliella species accumulate carotenoids and their role in protection against photooxidative stress has been investigated extensively. By contrast, the role of other antioxidants in this alga, has received less attention. Therefore, the components of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, along with superoxide dismutase (E.C. 1.15.1.1) and peroxidase (E.C. 1.11.1.11) activity were compared in two strains of Dunaliella salina. Strain IR-1 had two-fold higher chlorophyll and beta-carotene concentration than Gh-U. IR-1 had around four-fold higher superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and pyrogallol peroxidase activities than Gh-U on a protein basis. Ascorbate and glutathione concentrations and redox state did not differ between strains and there was little difference in the activity of ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes (monodehydroascorbate reductase [E.C. 1.6.5.4], dehydroascorbate reductase [E.C. 1.8.5.1] and glutathione reductase [E.C. 1.8.1.7]). The response of these antioxidants to high light and low temperature was assessed by transferring cells from normal growth conditions (28 degrees C, photon flux density of 100 micromol m(-2) s(-1))to 28 degrees C/1200 micromol m(-2) s(-1); 13 degrees C/100 micromol m(-2) s(-1); 13 degrees C/1200 micromol m(-2) s(-1) and 28 degrees C/100 micromol m(-2) s(-1) for 24 h. Low temperature and combined high light-low temperature decreased chlorophyll and beta-carotene in both strains indicating that these treatments cause photooxidative stress. High light, low temperature and combined high light-low temperature treatments increased the total ascorbate pool by 10-50% and the total glutathione pool by 20-100% with no consistent effect on their redox state. Activities of ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes were not greatly affected but all the treatments increased superoxide dismutase activity. It is concluded that D. salina can partially adjust to photooxidative conditions by increasing superoxide dismutase activity, ascorbate

  7. Glutathione S-Transferase Omega 1 Activity Is Sufficient to Suppress Neurodegeneration in a Drosophila Model of Parkinson Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiyoung; Kim, Song-Hee; Kim, Jaekwang; Kim, Heuijong; Yim, Jeongbin

    2012-01-01

    A loss-of-function mutation in the gene parkin causes a common neurodegenerative disease that may be caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Glutathione S-transferase Omega (GSTO) is involved in cell defense mechanisms, but little is known about the role of GSTO in the progression of Parkinson disease. Here, we report that restoration of Drosophila GSTO1 (DmGSTO1), which is down-regulated in parkin mutants, alleviates some of the parkin pathogenic phenotypes and that the loss of DmGSTO1 function enhances parkin mutant phenotypes. We further identified the ATP synthase β subunit as a novel in vivo target of DmGSTO1. We found that glutathionylation of the ATP synthase β subunit is rescued by DmGSTO1 and that the expression of DmGSTO1 partially restores the activity and assembly of the mitochondrial F1F0-ATP synthase in parkin mutants. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for the protective role of DmGSTO1 in parkin mutants, through the regulation of ATP synthase activity, and provide insight into potential therapies for Parkinson disease neurodegeneration. PMID:22219196

  8. Glutathione peroxidase 3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suppresses non-enzymatic proteolysis of glutamine synthetase in an activity-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Phil Young; Kho, Chang Won; Lee, Do Hee; Kang, Sunghyun; Kang, Seongman; Lee, Sang Chul; Park, Byoung Chul; Cho, Sayeon; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Park, Sung Goo

    2007-10-19

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (Gpx3) is ubiquitously expressed and is important antioxidant enzyme in yeast. It modulates the activities of redox-sensitive thiol proteins, particularly those involved in signal transduction pathway and protein translocation. Through immunoprecipitation/two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (IP-2DE), MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and a pull down assay, we found glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) as a candidate interacting protein with Gpx3. GS is a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism and ammonium assimilation. It has been known that GS is non-enzymatically cleaved by ROS generated by MFO (thiol/ Fe(3+)/O(2) mixed-function oxidase) system. In this study, it is demonstrated that GS interacts with Gpx3 through its catalytic domain both in vivo and in vitro regardless of redox state. In addition, Gpx3 helps to protect GS from inactivation and degradation via oxidative stress in an activity-independent manner. Based on the results, it is suggested that Gpx3 protects GS from non-enzymatic proteolysis, thereby contributing to cell homeostasis when cell is exposed to oxidative stress.

  9. Oxidative status, in vitro iron-induced lipid oxidation and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in rhea meat.

    PubMed

    Terevinto, A; Ramos, A; Castroman, G; Cabrera, M C; Saadoun, A

    2010-04-01

    Rhea (Rhea americana) muscles Obturatorius medialis (OM) Iliotibialis lateralis (IL) and Iliofibularis (I), obtained from farmed animals, were evaluated regarding their oxidative/antioxidant status. The mean level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) expressed as malonaldehyde (MDA) content was of 0.84 mg MDA/kg wet tissue for the three muscles. TBARS level was significantly higher in IL than OM and I, with the two latter showing similar levels. The mean level of carbonyl proteins expressed as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) was 1.59 nmol DNPH mg(-1). Carbonyl protein levels were significantly different (P<0.05) between the three muscles (IL>OM>I). Iron-induced TBARS generation was not significantly different between the three muscles at any time, nor for each muscle during the 5 h of the experiment. Superoxide dismutase activity in IL muscle was significantly higher (P<0.05) than in I muscle. However, the difference between IL and OM muscles was not significant. The differences between the three muscles became not significant when the results were expressed by mg of protein contained in the extract, instead by g of wet tissue. No differences were found for catalase (micromol of discomposed H(2)O(2) min(-1) g(-1) wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) and glutathione peroxidase (micromol ol of oxidized NADPH min(-1) g(-1) of wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) activities between the three muscles.

  10. Low red blood cell glutathione reductase and pyridoxine phosphate oxidase activities not related to dietary riboflavin: selection by malaria?

    PubMed

    Anderson, B B; Giuberti, M; Perry, G M; Salsini, G; Casadio, I; Vullo, C

    1993-05-01

    This study was designed to confirm that low dietary riboflavin does not contribute to the flavin-deficient red blood cells commonly found in subjects in Ferrara Province, northern Italy. In this area it is primarily an inherited characteristic believed to have been selected for by malaria, which was endemic from the 12th century. In parallel with assessment of daily riboflavin intake (DRI), flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glutathione reductase (EGR) and flavin mononucleotide-dependent pyridoxine phosphate oxidase (PPO) were measured in beta-thalassemic heterozygotes, their normal relatives, and normal spouses (representative of the normal population). In all of these groups there is a high incidence of deficiency of these flavin enzymes. We found that the majority had an adequate riboflavin intake and there was no significant correlation of EGR and PPO activities with DRI. Thus, interpretation of low EGR activity is discussed with reference to studies of EGR done to detect nutritional riboflavin deficiency in countries where there is malnutrition and endemic malaria.

  11. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of ethacrynic acid analogues on glutathione-s-transferase P1-1 activity inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guisen; Yu, Tao; Wang, Rui; Wang, Xiaobing; Jing, Yongkui

    2005-06-02

    Ethacrynic acid (EA) is a glutathione-s-transferase pi (GSTP1-1) inhibitor. Fifteen of EA analogues were designed and synthesized and their inhibition on GSTP1-1 activity was tested in lysate of human leukemia HL-60 cells. These compounds were synthesized using substituted phenol as precursors through reacting with 2-chlorocarboxylic acid and acylation. Structure-activity analysis indicates that replacements of chlorides of EA by methyl, bromide, and fluoride at 3' position remain the GSTP1-1 inhibitory effect. The compounds without any substitute at 3' position lose the activity on GSTP1-1 inhibition. These data suggest that the substitution of 3' position of EA is necessary for inhibiting GSTP1-1 activity.

  12. Tyrosine 8 contributes to catalysis but is not required for activity of rat liver glutathione S-transferase, 1-1.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Barycki, J. J.; Colman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Reaction of rat liver glutathione S-transferase, isozyme 1-1, with 4-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoic acid (4-FSB), a xenobiotic substrate analogue, results in a time-dependent inactivation of the enzyme to a final value of 35% of its original activity when assayed at pH 6.5 with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate. The rate of inactivation exhibits a nonlinear dependence on the concentration of 4-FSB from 0.25 mM to 9 mM, characterized by a KI of 0.78 mM and kmax of 0.011 min-1. S-Hexylglutathione or the xenobiotic substrate analogue, 2,4-dinitrophenol, protects against inactivation of the enzyme by 4-FSB, whereas S-methylglutathione has little effect on the reaction. These experiments indicate that reaction occurs within the active site of the enzyme, probably in the binding site of the xenobiotic substrate, close to the glutathione binding site. Incorporation of [3,5-3H]-4-FSB into the enzyme in the absence and presence of S-hexylglutathione suggests that modification of one residue is responsible for the partial loss of enzyme activity. Tyr 8 and Cys 17 are shown to be the reaction targets of 4-FSB, but only Tyr 8 is protected against 4-FSB by S-hexylglutathione. DTT regenerates cysteine from the reaction product of cysteine and 4-FSB, but does not reactivate the enzyme. These results show that modification of Tyr 8 by 4-FSB causes the partial inactivation of the enzyme. The Michaelis constants for various substrates are not changed by the modification of the enzyme. The pH dependence of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction of glutathione with CDNB for the modified enzyme, as compared with the native enzyme, reveals an increase of about 0.9 in the apparent pKa, which has been interpreted as representing the ionization of enzyme-bound glutathione; however, this pKa of about 7.4 for modified enzyme remains far below the pK of 9.1 for the -SH of free glutathione. Previously, it was considered that Tyr 8 was essential for GST catalysis. In contrast, we conclude that

  13. [Effect of nano-selenium on the activities of glutathione peroxidase and type-I deiodinase in the liver of weanling pigs].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Xia, Meisheng; Hu, Caihong

    2007-02-01

    To study the effects of nano elemental selenium (Nano-Se) or sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) on the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and Type-I deiodinase in the liver. A total of 234 weanling pigs (Duroc x Landrace x Yorkshire) at an average initial body weight of 8.3 kg were allocated to 13 treatments. The thirteen dietary treatments were basal diet only (containing 0.04 mg/kg Se), basal diet + 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 1.0 mg/kg Se as Na2SeO3 or Nano-Se, respectively. The results were as follows: Supplementation with 1.0 mg/ kg Se as Na2SeO3 reduced (P < 0.05) growth performance and GSH-Px activities as compared with the addition of a concentration range of 0.20-0.40 mg/kg Se. When Nano-Se was added to the diet, the growth and GSH-Px activities remained steady at the peak value as at a concentration of 1.0 mg/kg Se; There were no difference in the activities of GSH-Px between the treatments of Nano-Se and Na2SeO3 when added concentration of Se was 0.10-0.40 mg/kg. The pigs had higher (P < 0.05) activities of GSH-Px at a concentration range of 0.50 and 1.0 mg/kg as Nano-Se than Na2SeO3; Supplentation with Se increased the activity of Type- I deiodinase in liver, however, the increased extent was affected by neither Se sources nor added concentration of Se. The results implicated that for the best concentration range of Weinberg curve, Nano-Se is wider than Na2SeO3.

  14. Selenium requirements are higher for glutathione peroxidase-1 mRNA than gpx1 activity in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Schriever, Sonja C; Barnes, Kimberly M; Evenson, Jacqueline K; Raines, Anna M; Sunde, Roger A

    2009-05-01

    Selenium (Se) plays a critical role in testis, sperm, and reproduction, and testis Se levels are remarkably maintained in Se deficiency. In most other tissues, Se levels decrease dramatically as do levels of most selenoproteins and levels of a subset of Se-regulated selenoprotein mRNAs. Because of the recent identification of key molecules in the targeted trafficking of Se to the testis, we examined the hierarchy of Se regulation in testis by determining the dietary Se regulation of the full testis selenoproteome in rats fed graded levels of Se (0 to 0.8 microg Se/g) as Na2SeO3 for 28 d. Se status did not significantly affect testis weight or glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) activity (P>0.05). qRT-PCR analysis of selenoprotein mRNA expression revealed that 21 of the 24 selenoprotein mRNAs and ApoER2 mRNA (the selenoprotein P [Sepp1] receptor) were also not regulated significantly by dietary Se status. In contrast, Gpx1 activity decreased to 28% of Se-adequate levels, and mRNA levels for Gpx1, Sepp1, and Sepw1 (selenoprotein W) decreased significantly in Se-deficient rats to 45, 46, and 55%, respectively, of Se-adequate plateau levels. Overlap of hyperbolic Gpx4 activity and Sepw1 mRNA response curves with testis Se concentration, all with minimum dietary Se requirements<0.016 microg Se/g, showed the priority for synthesis of Gpx4. Higher minimum dietary Se requirements of 0.04 microg Se/g for Gpx1 activity and Sepp1 mRNA, and the even higher minimum dietary Se requirement of 0.08 microg Se/g for Gpx1 mRNA, suggest that the hierarchy of these biomarkers reflects distinct, lower priority pools, cell types, and roles for Se within the testis.

  15. Reducing Skin Picking via Competing Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Thompson, Ada; Reske, Cara L.; Gable, Lauren M.; Barton-Arwood, Sally

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the outcomes of a competing activities intervention to decrease skin picking exhibited by a 9-year-old student with comorbid diagnoses. Results of an ABCBAB design revealed that the use of student-selected manipulatives resulted in reduced skin picking. (Contains 1 figure.)

  16. Erythrocyte glutathione transferase: a non-antibody biomarker for systemic sclerosis, which correlates with severity and activity of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Fabrini, R; Rosato, E; Gigante, A; Bocedi, A; Cianci, R; Barbano, B; Del Grosso, E; Ricci, F; Zingaretti, V; Salsano, F; Ricci, G

    2013-01-01

    Erythrocyte glutathione transferase (e-GST) is a detoxifying enzyme hyper-expressed in nephropathic patients and used recently as a biomarker for blood toxicity. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Renal involvement is frequent in SSc patients. Here we show that e-GST is hyper-expressed in SSc patients (n=102) and correlates (R2=0.49, P<0.0001) with the Medsger DSS and DAI Valentini indices that quantify the severity and activity of this disease. Interestingly, e-GST does not correlate with the impairment of kidney or other specific organs taken separately. e-GST hyper-expression seems to be linked to the presence of a factor (i.e., toxin) that triggers the autoimmune disease, and not to the damage of specific organs or to oxidative stress. e-GST may be proposed as an innovative non-antibody biomarker for SSc useful to check the progress of this disease and the efficiency of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:23887627

  17. Effect of Dietary Selenomethionine Supplementation on Growth Performance, Tissue Se Concentration, and Blood Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in Kid Boer Goats.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-xuan; Hou, Jin-xing; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Jian-gang; Liu, Xiao-rui; Zhou, Zhan-qin; Cao, Bin-yun

    2015-10-01

    We used 240 kid Boer goats that were divided into six groups. The control group was fed a basal diet containing 0.05 mg of selenium (Se)/kg dry matter (DM). Trial groups received the basal diet supplemented with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, or 0.5 mg Se/kg DM (using a commercial selenomethionine product). Trial groups showed an improvement in growth performance (P < 0.05) despite no change in average daily feed intakes (ADFIs) (P > 0.05) compared to the control group A, quadratic model showed a correlation between glutathione peroxidase activity level in whole blood and dietary Se concentration (R(2) = 0.883, P < 0.04). The best linear model showed that increasing concentrations of Se in the blood (R(2) = 0.968, P < 0.001) and muscle (R(2) = 0.942, P < 0.001) corresponded to increasing Se concentrations in feed. Accumulation of Se in different tissues and organs corresponded to increasing Se concentrations in the diet as well as to the total time goats spent feeding on supplemented diet. Kidney and muscle tissues showed the highest and lowest accumulation of Se, respectively. Thus, Se in goat meat can be increased by adding between 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg of selenomethionine to the diet of goats.

  18. Activating Attachments Reduces Memories of Traumatic Images

    PubMed Central

    Foord, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Emotional memories, and especially intrusive memories, are a common feature of many psychological disorders, and are overconsolidated by stress. Attachment theory posits that activation of mental representations of attachment figures can reduce stress and boost coping. This study tested the proposition that attachment activation would reduce consolidation of emotional and intrusive memories. Sixty-seven undergraduate students viewed subliminal presentations of traumatic and neutral images, which were preceded by subliminal presentations of either attachment-related images or non-attachment-related images; free recall and intrusive memories were assessed two days later. Participants with low avoidant attachment tendencies who received the attachment primes recalled fewer memories and reported fewer intrusions than those who received the non-attachment primes. Unexpectedly, those with high anxious attachment tendencies reported fewer memories. These findings generally accord with attachment theory, and suggest that consolidation of emotional memories can be moderated by activation of attachment representations. PMID:27631498

  19. Rhythms of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in brain of chick and their inhibition by light.

    PubMed

    Pablos, M I; Reiter, R J; Ortiz, G G; Guerrero, J M; Agapito, M T; Chuang, J I; Sewerynek, E

    1998-01-01

    Melatonin was recently shown to be a component of the antioxidative defense system of organisms due to its free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities. Pharmacologically, melatonin stimulates the activity of the peroxide detoxifying enzyme glutathione peroxidase in rat brain and in several tissues of chicks. In this report, we studied the endogenous rhythm of two antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, in five regions (hippocampus, hypothalamus, striatum, cortex and cerebellum) of chick brain and correlated them with physiological blood melatonin concentrations. Glutathione peroxidase exhibited a marked 24 h rhythm with peak activity in each brain region which had acrophases about 8 h after lights off and about 4 h after the serum melatonin peak was detected. Glutathione reductase activity exhibited similar robust rhythms with the peaks occurring roughly 2 h after those of glutathione peroxidase. We suggest that neural glutathione peroxidase increases due to the rise of nocturnal melatonin levels while glutathione reductase activity rises slightly later possibly due to an increase of its substrate, oxidized glutathione. The exposure of chicks to constant light for 6 days eliminated the melatonin rhythm as well as the peaks in both glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. These findings suggest that the melatonin rhythm may be related to the nighttime increases in the enzyme activities, although other explanations cannot be excluded.

  20. Relationships between silicon content and glutathione peroxidase activity in tissues of rats receiving lithium in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kiełczykowska, Małgorzata; Musik, Irena; Pasternak, Kazimierz

    2008-02-01

    Lithium salts are widely used in psychiatry, but their presence in organism can result in both beneficial and adverse effects. Silicon, the third most abundant trace element in humans as well as antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx) play important roles in organism. The disturbance of their level can cause severe disorders. The aim of our work was to evaluate the influence of Li2CO3 administration in drinking water for a period of 4 weeks on Si content and GPx activity in the tissues of liver, kidney, brain and femoral muscle in rats. The concentrations of provided solutions were 0.7, 1.4, 2.6, 3.6, 7.1 and 10.7 mmol Li+ x dm-3. GPx activity was decreased versus control as a consequence of Li treatment, particularly in kidney and brain. This effect could be suggested to contribute to renal abnormalities which could occur during Li therapy. Si tissue level was significantly enhanced versus control in liver and femoral muscle in groups receiving high Li doses. In brain no well-marked changes were observed, whereas in kidney we observed the depletion in low-Li-groups, restoration of Si level in higher-Li-groups and unexpected decrease in the highest-Li-group. Positive correlations between Si content and GPx activity in the tissues of kidney (r = 0.677) and brain (r = 0.790) as well as negative correlation (r = -0.819) in femoral muscle were found. We consider that our results give some reason for suggesting that monitoring of silicon level in patients undergoing Li therapy could be recommended. However, more investigations should be performed, particularly regarding the relationships between Si and GPx in blood and urine Si excretion during lithium administration.

  1. Effect of elemental nano-selenium on semen quality, glutathione peroxidase activity, and testis ultrastructure in male Boer goats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Li-guang; Yang, Ru-jie; Yue, Wen-bin; Xun, Wen-juan; Zhang, Chun-xiang; Ren, You-she; Shi, Lei; Lei, Fu-lin

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this experiment is to study the effects of novel elemental nano-selenium in the diet on testicular ultrastructure, semen quality and GSH-Px activity in male goats. Forty-two 2-month-old bucks were offered a total mixed ration which had been supplemented with nano-Se (0.3mg/kg Se) or unsupplemented (the control group only received 0.06mg/kg Se-background), for a period of 12 weeks (from weaning to sexual maturity). Results showed that the testicular Se level, semen glutathione peroxidase and ATPase activity increased significantly in the nano-Se supplementation group compared with control (P<0.05). The semen quality (volume, density, motility and pH) was not affected by added Se in diets, however, the sperm abnormality rate of control bucks was significantly higher than Se supplemented bucks (P<0.05). The testes of 5 goats in each group were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and showed that in Se-deficient bucks the membrane was damaged, and showed the occurrence of abnormalities in the mitochondria of the midpiece of spermatozoa. In conclusion, selenium deficiency resulted in abnormal spermatozoal mitochondria, and supplementation with nano-Se enhanced the testis Se content, testicular and semen GSH-Px activity, protected the membrane system integrity and the tight arrayment of the midpiece of the mitochondria. Further studies are required to research the novel elemental nano-Se with characterization of bioavailability and toxicity in small ruminants.

  2. Serum glutathione S-transferase B1 activity as an index of liver function in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rattenbury, J M; Taylor, C J; Heath, P K; Howie, A F; Beckett, G J

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate serum glutathione S-transferase B1 (GST B1), a highly sensitive test of hepatocellular function, as a means of identifying liver disease in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS--The presence of liver disease was sought over a three year period in 60 children with CF, using a combination of clinical assessment, ultrasound examination, conventional biochemical tests of liver function (LFTs), and measurement of GST B1. RESULTS--Reference ranges for serum GST B1 were established in a paediatric control population. The 95% value (4.55 micrograms/l) was similar to the upper limit of normal previously derived in adults. Mean (SE) serum GST B1 activities were higher in the CF population (9.0 (1.14) micrograms/l) than in age matched controls (2.4 (0.15) micrograms/l). Ten patients with CF showed clinical signs of liver dysfunction. All but one had a serum GST B1 > 4.55 micrograms/l. Twelve other patients had elevated LFTs without clinically evident liver dysfunction, six had abnormal ultrasound scans and two showed both of these anomalies. Thirty patients with CF had neither biochemical, ultrasonographic nor clinical signs of liver disease. On review three years later, clinically important liver disease was reaffirmed in eight of the 10 index cases and had become apparent in a further eight, all of whom had elevated GST B1 activities. Five (36%) of the patients with elevated LFTs and two (33%) with isolated ultrasound changes continued to show these abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS--The limitations of conventional LFTs and ultrasound scans were evident from this study. The results suggest that elevated GST B1 activities may be a better predictor of hepatic dysfunction in CF than conventional LFTs. PMID:7560208

  3. Effects of glutathione depletion by 2-cyclohexen-1-one on excitatory amino acids-induced enhancement of activator protein-1 DNA binding in murine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ogita, K; Kitayama, T; Okuda, H; Yoneda, Y

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the role of glutathione in mechanisms associated with excitatory amino acid signaling to the nuclear transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP1) in the brain using mice depleted of endogenous glutathione by prior treatment with 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX). In the hippocampus of animals treated with CHX 2 h before, a significant increase was seen in enhancement of AP1 DNA binding when determined 2 h after the injection of kainic acid (KA) at low doses. The sensitization to KA was not seen in animals injected with CHX 24 h before, in coincidence with the recovery of glutathione contents to the normal levels. By contrast, CHX did not significantly affect the potentiation by NMDA of AP1 binding under any experimental conditions. Prior treatment with CHX resulted in facilitation of behavioral changes induced by KA without affecting those induced by NMDA. These results suggest that endogenous glutathione may be at least in part involved in molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional control by KA, but not by NMDA, signals of cellular functions.

  4. In vivo radioprotective effects of Nigella sativa L oil and reduced glutathione against irradiation-induced oxidative injury and number of peripheral blood lymphocytes in rats.

    PubMed

    Cemek, Mustafa; Enginar, Hüseyin; Karaca, Turan; Unak, Perihan

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most common therapies for treating human cancers. Several studies have indicated that irradiation induces reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play an important role in radiation damage of the cell. It has been shown that Nigella sativa L. (NS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) have both an antiperoxidative effect on different tissues and a scavenger effect on ROS. The purpose of this study was to determine the antioxidant and radio-protective roles of NS and GSH against irradiation-induced oxidative injury in an experimental model. The NS group was administrated NS (1 mL/kg body weight), the GSH group was injected GSH (150 mg/kg body weight) and the control group was given physiologic saline solution (1 mL/kg body weight) for 30 consecutive days before exposure to a single dose of 6 Gy of radiation. Animals were sacrificed after irradiation. Malondialdehyde, nitrate, nitrite (oxidative stress markers) and ascorbic acid, retinol, beta-carotene, GSH and ceruloplasmin (nonenzymatic antioxidant markers) levels and peripheral blood lymphocytes were measured in all groups. There were statistically significant differences between the groups for all parameters (P < 0.05). Whole-body irradiation caused a significant increase in blood malondialdehyde, nitrate and nitrite levels. The blood oxidative stress marker levels in irradiated rats that were pretreated with NS and GSH were significantly decreased; however, non-enzymatic antioxidant levels were significantly increased. Also, our results suggest that NS and GSH administration prior to irradiation prevent the number of alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase peripheral blood T lymphocytes from declining. These results clearly show that NS and GSH treatment significantly antagonize the effects of radiation. Therefore, NS and GSH may be a beneficial agent in protection against ionizing radiation-related tissue injury.

  5. Curcumin induces glutathione biosynthesis and inhibits NF-kappaB activation and interleukin-8 release in alveolar epithelial cells: mechanism of free radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saibal K; McClure, Danny; Jimenez, Luis A; Megson, Ian L; Rahman, Irfan

    2005-01-01

    Oxidants and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) activate transcription factors such as nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), which is involved in the transcription of proinflammatory mediators, including interleukin-8 (IL-8). Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a naturally occurring flavonoid present in the spice turmeric, which has a long traditional use as a chemotherapeutic agent for many diseases. We hypothesize that curcumin may possess both antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties by increasing the glutathione levels and inhibiting oxidant- and cytokine-induced NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 release from cultured alveolar epithelial cells (A549). Treatment of A549 cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 100 microM) and TNF-alpha (10 ng/ml) significantly increased NF-kappaB and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, as well as IL-8 release. Curcumin inhibited both H2O2- and TNF-alpha-mediated activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1, and IL-8 release. Furthermore, an increased level of GSH and glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit mRNA expression was observed in curcumin-treated cells as compared with untreated cells. Curcumin interacted directly with superoxide anion (O2*-) and hydroxyl radical (*OH) as shown by electron paramagnetic resonance, quenching the interaction of the radicals with the spin trap, Tempone-H. This suggests that curcumin has multiple properties: as an oxygen radical scavenger, antioxidant through modulation of glutathione levels, and antiinflammatory agent through inhibition of IL-8 release in lung cells.

  6. Glutathione, glutathione-related enzymes, and oxidative stress in individuals with subacute occupational exposure to lead.

    PubMed

    Dobrakowski, Michał; Pawlas, Natalia; Hudziec, Edyta; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Agnieszka; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of subacute exposure to lead on the glutathione-related antioxidant defense and oxidative stress parameters in 36 males occupationally exposed to lead for 40±3.2days. Blood lead level in the examined population increased significantly by 359% due to lead exposure. Simultaneously, erythrocyte glutathione level decreased by 16%, whereas the activity of glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and leukocytes decreased by 28% and 10%, respectively. Similarly, the activity of glutathione-S-transferase in erythrocytes decreased by 45%. However, the activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes and leukocytes increased by 26% and 6%, respectively, whereas the total oxidant status value in leukocytes increased by 37%. Subacute exposure to lead results in glutathione pool depletion and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products; however, it does not cause DNA damage. Besides, subacute exposure to lead modifies the activity of glutathione-related enzymes.

  7. o-hydroxylmethylphenylchalcogens: synthesis, intramolecular nonbonded chalcogen...OH interactions, and glutathione peroxidase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Santosh K; Patel, Upali; Roy, Dipankar; Sunoj, Raghavan B; Singh, Harkesh B; Wolmershäuser, Gotthelf; Butcher, Ray J

    2005-11-11

    [Structure: see text]. The synthesis and characterization of a series of organochalcogen (Se, Te) compounds derived from benzyl alcohol 13 are described. The synthesis of the key precursor dichalcogenides 15, 22, and 29 was achieved by the ortho-lithiation route. Selenide 18 was obtained by the reaction of the dilithiated derivative 14 with Se(dtc)2. Oxidation of 15 and 22 with H2O2 afforded the corresponding cyclic ester derivatives 17 and 24, respectively. Oxidation of selenide 18 with H2O2 affords the spirocyclic compound 19. The presence of intramolecular interactions in dichalcogenides 15 and 22 has been proven by single-crystal X-ray studies. The cyclic compounds 17 and 19 have also been characterized by single-crystal X-ray studies. GP(X)-like antioxidant activity of selenium compounds has been evaluated by the coupled bioassay method. Density functional theory calculations at the mPW1PW91 level on ditelluride 22 have identified a fairly strong nonbonding interaction between the hydroxy oxygen and tellurium atom. The second-order perturbation energy obtained through NBO analysis conveys the involvement of n(O) --> sigma(Te-Te) orbital overlap in nonbonding interaction. Post wave function analysis with the Atoms in Molecules (AIM) method identified distinct bond critical point in 15 and 22 and also indicated that the nonbonding interaction is predominantly covalent. Comparison between diselenide 15 and ditelluride 22 using the extent of orbital interaction as well as the value of electron density at the bond critical points unequivocally established that a ditelluride could be a better acceptor in nonbonding interaction, when the hydroxy group acts as the donor.

  8. Forms of selenium affect its transport, uptake and glutathione peroxidase activity in the Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanbo; Fu, Linglin

    2012-10-01

    The experiment was designed to investigate the effect of selenium (Se) chemical forms (sodium selenite, selenium nanoparticle [nano-Se] and selenomethionine) on the transport, uptake and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in the Caco-2 cell model. The transport and uptake of different forms of Se (0.1 μmol l(-1)) across the Caco-2 cell monolayer were carried out in two directions (apical [AP] to basolateral [BL] and BL to AP) for 2 h, respectively, and the apparent permeability coefficient (P(app)), transport efficiency and uptake efficiency were all calculated. In the present study, the transport and uptake of three forms of Se were time-dependent both in AP to BL and BL to AP directions. By the end of 2 h, the transport efficiencies of selenomethionine and nano-Se were higher than that of sodium selenite (P<0.05). The highest uptake efficiency (P<0.05) was observed in cells treated with nano-Se and significant difference (P<0.05) was also observed between the cells incubated with sodium selenite and selenomethionine. As for the P(app), sodium selenite (P<0.05) had the lowest values compared with that of selenomethionine and nano-Se, in both AP-BL and BL-AP. However, no significant differences were observed in GSH-Px activities. These results indicated that the efficiency of Se in the Caco-2 cells varied with its chemical forms, which might be associated with the differences in Se transport and uptake.

  9. Probucol increases striatal glutathione peroxidase activity and protects against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced pro-oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Colle, Dirleise; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Hartwig, Juliana Montagna; dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; Zimmermann, Luciana Teixeira; Hort, Mariana Appel; Farina, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by symptoms attributable to the death of striatal and cortical neurons. The molecular mechanisms mediating neuronal death in HD involve oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an irreversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, in rodents has been proposed as a useful experimental model of HD. This study evaluated the effects of probucol, a lipid-lowering agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, on the biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress, as well as on the behavioral parameters related to motor function in an in vivo HD model based on 3-NP intoxication in rats. Animals were treated with 3.5 mg/kg of probucol in drinking water daily for 2 months and, subsequently, received 3-NP (25 mg/kg i.p.) once a day for 6 days. At the end of the treatments, 3-NP-treated animals showed a significant decrease in body weight, which corresponded with impairment on motor ability, inhibition of mitochondrial complex II activity and oxidative stress in the striatum. Probucol, which did not rescue complex II inhibition, protected against behavioral and striatal biochemical changes induced by 3-NP, attenuating 3-NP-induced motor impairments and striatal oxidative stress. Importantly, probucol was able to increase activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an enzyme important in mediating the detoxification of peroxides in the central nervous system. The major finding of this study was that probucol protected against 3-NP-induced behavioral and striatal biochemical changes without affecting 3-NP-induced mitochondrial complex II inhibition, indicating that long-term probucol treatment resulted in an increased resistance against neurotoxic events (i.e., increased oxidative damage) secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction. These data appeared to be of great relevance when

  10. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) family in barley: identification of members, enzyme activity, and gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammad Kazem; Shobbar, Zahra-Sadat; Shahbazi, Maryam; Abedini, Raha; Zare, Sajjad

    2013-09-15

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is one of the most important cereals in many developing countries where drought stress considerably diminishes agricultural production. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs EC 2.5.1.18) are multifunctional enzymes which play a crucial role in cellular detoxification and oxidative stress tolerance. In this study, 84 GST genes were identified in barley by a comprehensive in silico approach. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis grouped these HvGST proteins in eight classes. The largest numbers of the HvGST genes (50) were included in the Tau class followed by 21 genes in Phi, five in Zeta, two in DHAR, two in EF1G, two in Lambda, and one each in TCHQD and Theta classes. Phylogenetic analysis of the putative GSTs from Arabidopsis, rice, and barley indicated that major functional diversification within the GST family predated the monocot/dicot divergence. However, intra-specious duplication seems to be common. Expression patterns of five GST genes from Phi and Tau classes were investigated in three barley genotypes (Yusof [drought-tolerant], Moroc9-75 [drought-sensitive], and HS1 [wild ecotype]) under control and drought-stressed conditions, during the vegetative stage. All investigated genes were up-regulated significantly under drought stress and/or showed a higher level of transcripts in the tolerant cultivar. Additionally, GST enzyme activity was superior in Yusof and induced in the extreme-drought-treated leaves, while it was not changed in Moroc9-75 under drought conditions. Moreover, the lowest and highest levels of lipid peroxidation were observed in the Yusof and Moroc9-75 cultivars, respectively. Based on the achieved results, detoxification and antioxidant activity of GSTs might be considered an important factor in the drought tolerance of barley genotypes for further investigations.

  11. Study examines sulfate-reducing bacteria activity

    SciTech Connect

    McElhiney, J.E.; Hardy, J.A.; Rizk, T.Y.; Stott, J.F.D.; Eden, R.D.

    1996-12-09

    Low-sulfate seawater injection can reduce the potential of an oil reservoir turning sour because of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) convert sulfate ions in seawater used in waterflooding into sulfide with the concomitant oxidation of a carbon source. A recent study at Capcis investigated the efficiency of SRB under various conditions of sulfate limitation. This study was conducted in a flowing bioreactor at 2,000 psia with different temperature zones (mesophilic 35 C and thermophilic 60--80 C). The study mixed microfloral populations derived from real North Sea-produced fluids, and included an active population of marine methanogenic bacteria present to provide competition for the available carbon sources. In general, results showed that SRB continue to convert sulfate to sulfide in stoichiometric quantities without regard to absolute concentrations. The paper discusses the results and recommends nanofiltration of seawater for ``sweet`` reservoirs.

  12. Modulation of human multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 1 (ABCC1) and MRP2 (ABCC2) transport activities by endogenous and exogenous glutathione-conjugated catechol metabolites.

    PubMed

    Slot, Andrew J; Wise, Dana D; Deeley, Roger G; Monks, Terrence J; Cole, Susan P C

    2008-03-01

    Members of the multidrug resistance protein (MRP/ABCC) subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins transport a wide array of anionic compounds, including sulfate, glucuronide, and glutathione (GSH) conjugates. The present study tested the ATP-dependent vesicular transport of leukotriene C(4) and 17beta-estradiol 17-(beta-d-glucuronide) (E(2)17betaG) mediated by the MRP1 and MRP2 transporters in the presence of six potential modulators from three different classes of GSH-conjugated catechol metabolites: the ecstasy metabolite 5-(glutathion-S-yl)-N-methyl-alpha-methyldopamine (5-GS-N-Me-alpha-MeDA), the caffeic acid metabolite 2-(glutathion-S-yl)-caffeic acid (2-GS-CA), and four GSH conjugates of 2-hydroxy (OH) and 4-OH estrogens (GS estrogens). MRP1-mediated E(2)17betaG transport was inhibited in a competitive manner with a relative order of potency of GS estrogens (IC(50) <1 microM) > 2-GS-CA (IC(50) 3 microM) > 5-GS-N-Me-alpha-MeDA (IC(50) 31 microM). MRP2-mediated transport was inhibited with a similar order of potency, except the 2-hydroxy-4-(glutathion-S-yl)-estradiol and 4-hydroxy-2-(glutathion-S-yl)-estradiol conjugates were approximately 50- and 300-fold less potent, respectively. Transport activity was unaffected by N-acetylcysteine conjugates of N-Me-alpha-MeDA and CA. The position of GSH conjugation appears important as all four GS estrogen conjugates tested were potent inhibitors of MRP1 transport, but only the 2-hydroxy-1-(glutathion-S-yl)-estradiol and 2-hydroxy-1-(glutathion-S-yl)-estrone conjugates were potent inhibitors of MRP2-mediated transport. In conclusion, we have identified three new classes of MRP1 and MRP2 modulators and demonstrated that one of these, the estrogen conjugates, shows unanticipated differences in their interactions with the two transporters.

  13. Improvement of oxidized glutathione fermentation by thiol redox metabolism engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Aoki, Naoko; Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Nishida, Keiji; Araki, Michihiro; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tripeptide widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. In industrial fermentation, glutathione is currently produced primarily using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Intracellular glutathione exists in two forms; the majority is present as reduced glutathione (GSH) and a small amount is present as oxidized glutathione (GSSG). However, GSSG is more stable than GSH and is a more attractive form for the storage of glutathione extracted from yeast cells after fermentation. In this study, intracellular GSSG content was improved by engineering thiol oxidization metabolism in yeast. An engineered strain producing high amounts of glutathione from over-expression of glutathione synthases and lacking glutathione reductase was used as a platform strain. Additional over-expression of thiol oxidase (1.8.3.2) genes ERV1 or ERO1 increased the GSSG content by 2.9-fold and 2.0-fold, respectively, compared with the platform strain, without decreasing cell growth. However, over-expression of thiol oxidase gene ERV2 showed almost no effect on the GSSG content. Interestingly, ERO1 over-expression did not decrease the GSH content, raising the total glutathione content of the cell, but ERV1 over-expression decreased the GSH content, balancing the increase in the GSSG content. Furthermore, the increase in the GSSG content due to ERO1 over-expression was enhanced by additional over-expression of the gene encoding Pdi1, whose reduced form activates Ero1 in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that engineering the thiol redox metabolism of S. cerevisiae improves GSSG and is critical to increasing the total productivity and stability of glutathione.

  14. Effect of fish oil on glutathione redox system in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sorto-Gomez, Tania E; Ortiz, Genaro G; Pacheco-Moises, Fermín P; Torres-Sanchez, Erandis D; Ramirez-Ramirez, Viridiana; Macias-Islas, Miguel A; de la Rosa, Alfredo Celis; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory and autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are implicated in the induction and progression of MS. Evidence suggests that Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of fish oil on the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), content of reduced and oxidized glutathione, and GSH/GSSG ratio in MS. 50 patients with relapsing-remitting MS were enrolled. The experimental group received orally 4 g/day of fish oil for 12 months. Fish oil supplementation resulted in a significant increase in n-3 fatty acids and a decrease n-6 fatty acids. No differences in glutathione reductase activity, content of reduced and oxidized glutathione, and GSH/GSSG ratio were found. Conclusion: Glutathione reductase activity was not significantly different between the groups; however, fish oil supplementation resulted in smaller increase in GR compared with control group, suggesting a possible effect on antioxidant defence mechanisms. PMID:27335704

  15. Glutathione peroxidase 1 deficiency attenuates concanavalin A-induced hepatic injury by modulation of T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, D H; Son, D J; Park, M H; Yoon, D Y; Han, S B; Hong, J T

    2016-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis model is well-established experimental T cell-mediated liver disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with T-cell activation and proliferation, but continued ROS exposure induces T-cell hyporesponsiveness. Because glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1) is an antioxidant enzyme and is involved in T-cell development, we investigated the role of Gpx1 during Con A-induced liver injury in Gpx1 knockout (KO) mice. Male wild-type (WT) mice and Gpx1 KO mice were intravenously injected with Con A (10 mg/kg), and then killed after 8 h after Con A injection. Serum levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase were measured to assess hepatic injury. To identify that Gpx1 affects T cell-mediated inflammation, we pretreated Gpx1 inhibitor to Human Jurkat T cells then treated Con A. Con A-induced massive liver damage in WT mice but its damage was attenuated in Gpx1 KO mice. Con A-induced Th1 cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-2 were also decreased in the liver and spleen of Gpx1 KO mice compared with WT mice. In Jurkat T cells, Con A-induced mRNA levels of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α were downregulated by pretreatment of Gpx inhibitor, mercaptosuccinic acid. We also observed that Gpx1 KO mice showed increasing oxidative stress in the liver and spleen compared with WT mice. These results suggest that Gpx1 deficiency attenuates Con A-induced liver injury by induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness through chronic ROS exposure. PMID:27124582

  16. Effect of polyphenols extracted from tamarind ( Tamarindus indica L.) seed coat on pathophysiological changes and red blood cell glutathione peroxidase activity in heat-stressed broilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aengwanich, Worapol; Suttajit, Maitree

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of polyphenols extracted from the tamarind seed coat (PETSC) on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, red blood cell parameters and bilirubin in heat-stressed broilers. One hundred forty-seven broilers, 18-days old were divided into two groups. In group 1, broilers were maintained at an environmental temperature of 26 ± 2 °C throughout the experimental period. In group 2, the broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C (cyclic temperature: 26 ± 2 °C; -38 ± 2 °C; and -26 ± 2 °C, and broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C for 6 h/ day) and received PETSC at a concentration of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 mg/kg in their diet ad libitum. Parameters were investigated on days 1, 7, 14 and 21 of the experimental period. Results showed that GPx activity of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC in their diet was lower ( P < 0.05) than that in broilers fed the other concentrations. The mean total red blood cell count and hemoglobin concentration of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg PETSC was higher ( P < 0.05) than those in broilers in group 1 and those fed the other concentrations. The mean bilirubin level in the excreta of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC was lower ( P < 0.05) than that in broilers that received 0, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg of PETSC. This showed that PETSC could reduce GPx activity and bilirubin in feces, and increase red blood cell parameters in heat-stressed broilers.

  17. Effect of polyphenols extracted from tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seed coat on pathophysiological changes and red blood cell glutathione peroxidase activity in heat-stressed broilers.

    PubMed

    Aengwanich, Worapol; Suttajit, Maitree

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of polyphenols extracted from the tamarind seed coat (PETSC) on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, red blood cell parameters and bilirubin in heat-stressed broilers. One hundred forty-seven broilers, 18-days old were divided into two groups. In group 1, broilers were maintained at an environmental temperature of 26 ± 2 °C throughout the experimental period. In group 2, the broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C (cyclic temperature: 26 ± 2 °C; -38 ± 2 °C; and -26 ± 2 °C, and broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C for 6 h/ day) and received PETSC at a concentration of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 mg/kg in their diet ad libitum. Parameters were investigated on days 1, 7, 14 and 21 of the experimental period. Results showed that GPx activity of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC in their diet was lower (P < 0.05) than that in broilers fed the other concentrations. The mean total red blood cell count and hemoglobin concentration of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg PETSC was higher (P < 0.05) than those in broilers in group 1 and those fed the other concentrations. The mean bilirubin level in the excreta of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC was lower (P < 0.05) than that in broilers that received 0, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg of PETSC. This showed that PETSC could reduce GPx activity and bilirubin in feces, and increase red blood cell parameters in heat-stressed broilers.

  18. A conserved mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette transporter exports glutathione polysulfide for cytosolic metal cofactor assembly.

    PubMed

    Schaedler, Theresia A; Thornton, Jeremy D; Kruse, Inga; Schwarzländer, Markus; Meyer, Andreas J; van Veen, Hendrik W; Balk, Janneke

    2014-08-22

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter located in the inner mitochondrial membrane is involved in iron-sulfur cluster and molybdenum cofactor assembly in the cytosol, but the transported substrate is unknown. ATM3 (ABCB25) from Arabidopsis thaliana and its functional orthologue Atm1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were expressed in Lactococcus lactis and studied in inside-out membrane vesicles and in purified form. Both proteins selectively transported glutathione disulfide (GSSG) but not reduced glutathione in agreement with a 3-fold stimulation of ATPase activity by GSSG. By contrast, Fe(2+) alone or in combination with glutathione did not stimulate ATPase activity. Arabidopsis atm3 mutants were hypersensitive to an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis and accumulated GSSG in the mitochondria. The growth phenotype of atm3-1 was strongly enhanced by depletion of the mitochondrion-localized, GSH-dependent persulfide oxygenase ETHE1, suggesting that the physiological substrate of ATM3 contains persulfide in addition to glutathione. Consistent with this idea, a transportomics approach using mass spectrometry showed that glutathione trisulfide (GS-S-SG) was transported by Atm1. We propose that mitochondria export glutathione polysulfide, containing glutathione and persulfide, for iron-sulfur cluster assembly in the cytosol.

  19. Characterization of thyroidal glutathione reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione levels were determined in bovine and rat thyroid tissue by enzymatic conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene using glutathione S-transferase. Bovine thyroid tissue contained 1.31 {+-} 0.04 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) and 0.14 {+-} 0.02 mM oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In the rat, the concentration of GSH was 2.50 {+-} 0.05 mM while GSSG was 0.21 {+-} 0.03 mM. Glutathione reductase (GR) was purified from bovine thyroid to electrophoretic homogeneity by ion exchange, affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. A molecular weight range of 102-109 kDa and subunit size of 55 kDa were determined for GR. Thyroidal GR was shown to be a favoprotein with one FAD per subunit. The Michaelis constants of bovine thyroidal GR were determined to be 21.8 {mu}M for NADPH and 58.8 {mu}M for GSSG. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) on in vivo levels of GR and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in rat thyroid homogenates. Both enzymes were stimulated by TSH treatment and markedly reduced following T{sub 4} treatment. Lysosomal hydrolysis of ({sup 125}I)-labeled and unlabeled thyroglobulin was examined using size exclusion HPLC.

  20. Linked thioredoxin-glutathione systems in platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Gustavo; Selkirk, Murray E; Chalar, Cora; Maizels, Rick M; Fernández, Cecilia

    2004-07-01

    The thioredoxin and glutathione systems play a central role in thiol-disulfide redox homeostasis in many organisms by providing electrons to essential enzymes, and defence against oxidative stress. These systems have recently been characterized in platyhelminth parasites, and the emerging biochemical scenario is the existence of linked processes with the enzyme thioredoxin glutathione reductase supplying reducing equivalents to both pathways. In contrast to their hosts, conventional thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase enzymes appear to be absent. Analysis of published data and expressed-sequence tag databases indicates the presence of linked thioredoxin-glutathione systems in the cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments of these parasites.

  1. Characterization of glutathione S-transferase of Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Vibanco-Pérez, N; Jiménez, L; Merchant, M T; Landa, A

    1999-06-01

    A Taenia solium glutathione-S-transferase fraction (SGSTF) was isolated from a metacestode crude extract by affinity chromatography on reduced glutathione (GSH)-sepharose. The purified fraction displayed a specific glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity of 2.8 micromol/min/mg and glutathione peroxidase selenium-independent activity of 0.22 micromol/min/mg. Enzymatic characterization of the fraction suggested that the activity was closer to the mammalian mu-class GSTs. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and enzyme activity analysis showed that the fraction was composed of a major band of Mr = 26 kd and that the active enzyme was dimeric. Immunohistochemical studies using specific antibodies against the major 26-kd band of the SGSTF indicated that GST protein was present in the tegument, parenchyma, protonephridial, and tegumentary cytons of the T. solium metacestode. Antibodies generated against the SGSTF tested in western blot showed cross-reactivity against GSTs purified from Taenia saginata, T. taeniaeformis, and T. crassiceps, but did not react with GSTs from Schistosoma mansoni, or mice, rabbit, and pig liver tissue. Furthermore, immunization of mice with SGSTF reduced the metacestode burden up to 74.2%. Our findings argue in favor of GST having an important role in the survival of T. solium in its hosts.

  2. Radiation resistance and the CuZn superoxide dismutase, Mn superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities of seven human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Marklund, S L; Westman, N G; Roos, G; Carlsson, J

    1984-10-01

    CuZn superoxide dismutase, Mn superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase form the primary enzymic defense against toxic oxygen reduction metabolites in cells. To test the importance of these protective enzymes in the cellular radiation response, the enzymic activities of seven different human cell lines were determined in parallel with their clonogenic survival characteristics. A positive correlation between the content of glutathione peroxidase in cell lines and their extrapolation numbers (n) and quasithreshold doses (Dq) was detected. Between the cellular contents of the other enzymes and D0, n, and Dq no positive correlations could be established. An interesting finding was a very high Mn superoxide dismutase content in a malignant mesothelioma cell line P7, which had an extremely high D0, 5.0 Gy.

  3. Activity of glutathione S-transferase in the hepatopancreas is not influenced by the molting cycle in the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator.

    PubMed

    Hotard, Sarah; Zou, Enmin

    2008-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) in the hepatopancreas of crustaceans has been suggested as a biomarker for organic pollution. However, much of crustacean physiology is known to exhibit a cyclic characteristic because of the periodic shedding of the confining exoskeleton. The goal of this study was to determine whether hepatopancreatic GST activity varies during the molting cycle using the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator, as the model. Neither the molting cycle nor 20-hydroxyecdysone injection had a significant effect on hepatopancreatic GST activity, suggesting GST activity is not under control of the molting hormone in Uca pugilator.

  4. Assessment of Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Mineral Nutrients in Response to NaCl Stress and its Amelioration Through Glutathione in Chickpea.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Vinay; Kumar, Dinesh; Agrawal, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Salinity stress has been reckoned as one of the major threat towards crop productivity as it causes significant decline in the yield. The impact of NaCl stress (0, 1, 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg L(-1)) as well as glutathione (10 mg L(-1)) either alone or in combination has been evaluated on the induction of multiple shoots, antioxidant enzymes' activity, lipid peroxidation, relative permeability, concentration of nutrients, photosynthetic pigments, protein and proline content of nodal segments of chickpea after 14 days of culture. The antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR) were found to be increased under salt stress as well as glutathione-supplemented medium. A significant decrease in the concentrations of chlorophylls a, b, total chlorophyll and carotenoid was observed under salt stress. Concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, carbon, magnesium and sulphur showed an initial increase up to 10 mg L(-1) NaCl, but a decline was seen at higher NaCl levels. Proline content and malondialdehyde concentration were found to be increased under salt stress. Three isoforms of SOD, one of CAT and four of GPX were expressed during native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis. However, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the stressed nodal explants revealed the over-expression of several polypeptide bands related to NaCl stress. These findings for the first time suggest that glutathione (GSH) helps in ameliorating NaCl stress in nodal explants of chickpea by manipulating various biochemical and physiological responses of plants.

  5. Glutathione metabolism and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Smeyne, Michelle; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2013-09-01

    It has been established that oxidative stress, defined as the condition in which the sum of free radicals in a cell exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell, contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Glutathione is a ubiquitous thiol tripeptide that acts alone or in concert with enzymes within cells to reduce superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals, and peroxynitrites. In this review, we examine the synthesis, metabolism, and functional interactions of glutathione and discuss how these relate to the protection of dopaminergic neurons from oxidative damage and its therapeutic potential in Parkinson disease.

  6. Roles for glutathione transferases in antioxidant recycling

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David P; Steel, Patrick G

    2011-01-01

    Uniquely among the plant glutathione transferases, two classes possess a catalytic cysteine capable of performing glutathione-dependent reductions. These are the dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) and the lambda-class glutathione transferases (GSTLs). Using immobilized GSTLs probed with crude plant extracts we have identified flavonols as high affinity ligands and subsequently demonstrated a novel glutathione-dependent role for these enzymes in recycling oxidized quercetin. By comparing the activities of DHARs and GSTLs we now propose a unified catalytic mechanism that suggests oxidized anthocyanidins and tocopherols may be alternative polyphenolic substrates of GSTLs. PMID:21778824

  7. Chronic Glutathione Depletion Confers Protection against Alcohol-induced Steatosis: Implication for Redox Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Singh, Surendra; Matsumoto, Akiko; Manna, Soumen K.; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Golla, Srujana; Murphy, Robert C.; Dong, Hongbin; Song, Byoung-Joon; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is not well established. However, oxidative stress and associated decreases in levels of glutathione (GSH) are known to play a central role in ALD. The present study examines the effect of GSH deficiency on alcohol-induced liver steatosis in Gclm knockout (KO) mice that constitutively have ≈15% normal hepatic levels of GSH. Following chronic (6 week) feeding with an ethanol-containing liquid diet, the Gclm KO mice were unexpectedly found to be protected against steatosis despite showing increased oxidative stress (as reflected in elevated levels of CYP2E1 and protein carbonyls). Gclm KO mice also exhibit constitutive activation of liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway and nuclear factor-erythroid 2–related factor 2 target genes, and show enhanced ethanol clearance, altered hepatic lipid profiles in favor of increased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and concordant changes in expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. In summary, our data implicate a novel mechanism protecting against liver steatosis via an oxidative stress adaptive response that activates the AMPK pathway. We propose redox activation of the AMPK may represent a new therapeutic strategy for preventing ALD. PMID:27403993

  8. Interaction of Omega, Sigma, and Theta Glutathione Transferases with p38b Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase from the Fruit Fly, Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wongtrakul, J.; Janphen, K.; Saisawang, C.; Ketterman, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a diverse family of phase II detoxification enzymes found in almost all organisms. Besides playing a major role in the detoxification of xenobiotic and toxic compounds, GSTs are also involved in the regulation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction by interaction with proteins in the pathway. An in vitro study was performed for Theta, Omega, Sigma GSTs and their interaction with MAP kinase p38b protein from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae). The study included the effects of all five Omega class GSTs (DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, DmGSTO2b, DmGSTO3, DmGSTO4), all five Theta class GSTs (DmGSTT1, DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3a, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTT4), and one Sigma class glutathione transferase on the activity of Drosophila p38b, including the reciprocal effect of this kinase protein on glutathione transferase activity. It was found that DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTO1, and DmGSTO3 activated p38b significantly. Substrate specificities of GSTs were also altered after co-incubation with p38b. Although p38b activated DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, and DmGSTT2, it inhibited DmGSTT3b and DmGSTO3 activity toward xenobiotic and physiological substrates tested. These results suggest a novel link between Omega and Theta GSTs with the p38b MAP kinase pathway. PMID:25373207

  9. Adaptation of glutathion-peroxidase activity to oxidative stress occurs in children but not in adult patients with end-stage renal failure undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sommerburg, O; Grune, T; Ehrich, J H H; Siems, W G

    2002-07-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LPO) products formed after reaction of free radicals with membrane lipids are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases. Also in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) LPO was shown to be accelerated and concentrations of non-enzymatic antioxidants were measured lower than in control subjects. However, up to now only limited knowledge about the role of antioxidant enzymes was available. Whether or not activity of those antioxidants might be induced due to oxidative stress in ESRD patients is not known. To answer the question the activity of 3 enzymatic antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathion peroxidase (GPx), was measured in red blood cells of the ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis (2 groups: children and adults) and matching controls. LPO in these subjects was determined by measurement of the LPO product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) in blood plasma. Plasma HNE was significantly increased by factor 3 in both patient groups children and adults compared to the control groups. The activity of the enzymatic antioxidants was measured differently. While SOD was significantly lower in patients (children and adults) than in the matching controls this was not the case for catalase and GPx. While GPx activity in adult patients was comparable to that in the control groups (childrens and adults), the GPx in children with ESRD was almost twice as high than in the other groups. Since children were shown to have higher levels of glutathion, activated GPx might be a sign of adaptation of these children to the increased rate of oxidation.

  10. Glutathione synthesis is essential for pollen germination in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The antioxidant glutathione fulfills many important roles during plant development, growth and defense in the sporophyte, however the role of this important molecule in the gametophyte generation is largely unclear. Bioinformatic data indicate that critical control enzymes are negligibly transcribed in pollen and sperm cells. Therefore, we decided to investigate the role of glutathione synthesis for pollen germination in vitro in Arabidopsis thaliana accession Col-0 and in the glutathione deficient mutant pad2-1 and link it with glutathione status on the subcellular level. Results The depletion of glutathione by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, reduced pollen germination rates to 2-5% compared to 71% germination in wildtype controls. The application of reduced glutathione (GSH), together with BSO, restored pollen germination and glutathione contents to control values, demonstrating that inhibition of glutathione synthesis is responsible for the decrease of pollen germination in vitro. The addition of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to media containing BSO restored pollen germination to control values, which demonstrated that glutathione depletion in pollen grains triggered disturbances in auxin metabolism which led to inhibition of pollen germination. Conclusions This study demonstrates that glutathione synthesis is essential for pollen germination in vitro and that glutathione depletion and auxin metabolism are linked in pollen germination and early elongation of the pollen tube, as IAA addition rescues glutathione deficient pollen. PMID:21439079

  11. Aphicidal Activity of Illicium verum Fruit Extracts and Their Effects on the Acetylcholinesterase and Glutathione S-transferases Activities in Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ben-Guo; Wang, Sa; Dou, Ting-Ting; Liu, Su; Li, Mao-Ye; Hua, Ri-Mao; Li, Shi-Guang; Lin, Hua-Feng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the aphicidal activity and underlying mechanism of Illicium verum Hook. f. that is used as both food and medicine. The contact toxicity of the extracts from I. verum fruit with methyl alcohol (MA), ethyl acetate (EA), and petroleum ether (PE) against Myzus persicae (Sulzer), and the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) of M. persicae after contact treatment were tested. The results showed that MA, EA, and PE extracts of 1.000 mg/l caused, respectively, M. persicae mortalities of 68.93%, 89.95% and 74.46%, and the LC50 of MA, EA, and PE extracts were 0.31, 0.14 and 0.27 mg/l at 72 h after treatment, respectively; the activities of AChE and GSTs in M. persicae were obviously inhibited by the three extracts, as compared with the control, with strong dose and time-dependent effects, the inhibition rates on the whole reached more than 50.00% at the concentration of 1.000 mg/l at 72 h after treatment. The inhibition of the extracts on AChE and GSTs activities (EA extract > PE extract > MA extract) were correlated with theirs contact toxic effects, so it is inferred that the decline of the metabolic enzymes activities may be one of important reasons of M. persicae death. The study results suggested that I. verum extracts have potential as a eco-friendly biopesticide in integrated pest management against M. persicae. PMID:26826651

  12. Interaction between reduced glutathione and PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers in aqueous solutions: studied by 1H NMR and spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lianwei; Guo, Chen; Yang, Liangrong; Xiang, Junfeng; Tang, Yalin; Liu, Huizhou

    2011-03-17

    In order to investigate the effect of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers on the glutathione (GSH)/glutathione-S-transferase (GST) detoxification system, interaction between the copolymers and GSH is studied by NMR measurements. Selective rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect (ROE) experiment confirms that glutamyl (Glu) α-H of GSH has spatial contact with EO methylene protons. Spin-lattice relaxation times of GSH Glu α-H show a decrease when PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers are added, and the decrease is greater with copolymers possessing more EO units. Other protons of GSH show little change in the presence of the copolymers. The addition of GSH promotes the dehydration of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers. This results from the breaking of hydrogen bonds between water and the polymers and the forming of hydrogen bonds between Glu α-carboxylate protons and oxygen atoms of EO units. The dissociation constant between GSH and P85 copolymer is determined by spin-lattice relaxation measurements, which shows the binding is of low affinity and the two molecules are in fast dissociation kinetics. This study suggests that GSH transporting or utilizing systems may be affected by treatment of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers.

  13. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vivek Kumar; Bains, Rhythm

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO), is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials. PMID:26604952

  14. Maximal enzyme activities, and myoglobin and glutathione concentrations in heart, liver and skeletal muscle of the Northern Short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda; Insectivora: Soricidae).

    PubMed

    Stewart, J M; Woods, A K; Blakely, J A

    2005-07-01

    We measured the enzymes of glycolysis, Krebs Cycle, beta-oxidation and electron transport in the heart, liver and skeletal muscle of the Northern Short-tailed Shrew, Blarina brevicauda. Additionally, we measured the amount of myoglobin in skeletal and heart muscle as well as the concentration of glutathione in heart. The picture that emerges is of an aerobically well-endowed animal with constrained anaerobic capacity as indicated by small activities of glycolytic enzymes and creatine kinase. Lipid metabolism and amino acid transamination, as well as gluconeogenesis, are predominant in processing carbon resources and probably reflect the large contribution lipid and protein make to the diet of this carnivore. The citrate synthase activity is the largest of any reported value for vertebrate heart (250 U/g). The additional, very active cytochrome c oxidase activity (220 U/g) and large myoglobin concentrations (8 mg/g) in heart are clearly the underpinnings of the rapid metabolic rates reported for small insectivores. The potential for generation of reactive oxygen species must be great since the total glutathione concentration (165 mumol/g) is 300-fold greater in shrew hearts than in hearts of rats.

  15. Effect of dietary selenium concentration and duration of selenium feeding on hepatic glutathione concentrations in rats

    SciTech Connect

    LeBoeuf, R.A.; Zentner, K.L.; Hoekstra, W.G.

    1985-11-01

    Studies were conducted in rats to determine the effect of dietary selenium (Se) concentration on hepatic glutathione concentrations and enzyme activities associated with the maintenance of the cellular glutathione status. Male rats were fed 0.1, 3.0, or 6.0 ppm Se as Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/ for 2, 4, or 6 weeks at which time they were killed and analyses were performed. Both 3.0 and 6.0 ppm Se caused a significant dose-dependent increase in hepatic-reduced glutathione (GSH) by 4 weeks of feeding compared to 0.1 ppm Se. The increase in GSH was preceded by significant, dose-dependent increases in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) as well as the GSSG to GSH ratio. Increases in GSSG and the GSSG to GSH ratio as well as in glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities were observed by 2 weeks of high Se feeding. The current findings substantiate previous results demonstrating effects of high Se on hepatic glutathione concentrations and further suggest that increased cellular GSSG concentrations or the GSSG to GSH ratio caused by 3.0 and 6.0 ppm dietary Se signals for adaptive changes in hepatic glutathione metabolism.

  16. The biochemical adaptations of spotted wing drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to fresh fruits reduced fructose concentrations and glutathione-S transferase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America, because the females have a serrated ovipositor enabling them to infest ripening almost all small fruits before harvest. Also flies are strongly attracted to fresh fruits rath...

  17. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate enhances key enzymatic activities of hepatic thioredoxin and glutathione systems in selenium-optimal mice but activates hepatic Nrf2 responses in selenium-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruixia; Wang, Dongxu; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Ke; Chen, Pingping; Yang, Chung S; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-12-01

    Selenium participates in the antioxidant defense mainly through a class of selenoproteins, including thioredoxin reductase. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant and biologically active catechin in green tea. Depending upon the dose and biological systems, EGCG may function either as an antioxidant or as an inducer of antioxidant defense via its pro-oxidant action or other unidentified mechanisms. By manipulating the selenium status, the present study investigated the interactions of EGCG with antioxidant defense systems including the thioredoxin system comprising of thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, the glutathione system comprising of glutathione and glutathione reductase coupled with glutaredoxin, and the Nrf2 system. In selenium-optimal mice, EGCG increased hepatic activities of thioredoxin reductase, glutathione reductase and glutaredoxin. These effects of EGCG appeared to be not due to overt pro-oxidant action because melatonin, a powerful antioxidant, did not influence the increase. However, in selenium-deficient mice, with low basal levels of thioredoxin reductase 1, the same dose of EGCG did not elevate the above-mentioned enzymes; intriguingly EGCG in turn activated hepatic Nrf2 response, leading to increased heme oxygenase 1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 protein levels and thioredoxin activity. Overall, the present work reveals that EGCG is a robust inducer of the Nrf2 system only in selenium-deficient conditions. Under normal physiological conditions, in selenium-optimal mice, thioredoxin and glutathione systems serve as the first line defense systems against the stress induced by high doses of EGCG, sparing the activation of the Nrf2 system.

  18. Caribbean yellow band disease compromises the activity of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in the reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata exposed to anthracene.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia; Cróquer, Aldo

    2016-05-03

    Healthy and diseased corals are threatened by different anthropogenic sources, such as pollution, a problem expected to become more severe in the near future. Despite the fact that coastal pollution and coral diseases might represent a serious threat to coral reef health, there is a paucity of controlled experiments showing whether the response of diseased and healthy corals to xenobiotics differs. In this study, we exposed healthy and Caribbean yellow band disease (CYBD)-affected Orbicella faveolata colonies to 3 sublethal concentrations of anthracene to test if enzymatic responses to this hydrocarbon were compromised in CYBD-affected tissues. For this, a 2-factorial fully orthogonal design was used in a controlled laboratory bioassay, using tissue condition (2 levels: apparently healthy and diseased) and pollutant concentration (4 levels: experimental control, 10, 30 and 100 ppb concentration) as fixed factors. A permutation-based ANOVA (PERMANOVA) was used to test the effects of condition and concentration on the specific activity of 3 enzymatic biomarkers: catalase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase. We found a significant interaction between the concentration of anthracene and the colony condition for catalase (Pseudo-F = 3.84, df = 3, p < 0.05) and glutathione S-transferase (Pseudo-F = 3.29, df = 3, p < 0.05). Moreover, our results indicated that the enzymatic response to anthracene in CYBD-affected tissues was compromised, as the activity of these enzymes decreased 3- to 4-fold compared to healthy tissues. These results suggest that under a potential scenario of increasing hydrocarbon coastal pollution, colonies of O. faveolata affected with CYBD might become more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of chemical pollution.

  19. Cardiovascular function following reduced aerobic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, P. B.; Welch-O'Connor, R. M.; Shi, X.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a sustained reduction of physical activity (deconditioning) would alter the cardiovascular regulatory function. METHODS: Nineteen young, healthy volunteers participated in physical deconditioning for a period of 8 wk. Before (pre) and following (post) physical deconditioning, the responses of heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured by Finapres), central venous pressure (CVP), stroke volume (SV, Doppler), and forearm blood flow (FBF, plethysmography) were determined during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The carotid baroreflex (CBR) function was assessed using a train of pulsatile neck pressure (NP) and suction, and the aortic baroreflex control of HR was assessed during steady-state phenylephrine (PE) infusion superimposed by LBNP and NP to counteract the PE increased CVP and carotid sinus pressure, respectively. RESULTS: Active physical deconditioning significantly decreased maximal oxygen uptake (-7%) and LBNP tolerance (-13%) without a change in baseline hemodynamics. Plasma volume (-3% at P = 0.135), determined by Evans Blue dilution, and blood volume (-4% at P = 0.107) were not significantly altered. During LBNP -20 to -50 torr, there was a significantly greater drop of SV per unit decrease in CVP in the post- (14.7 +/- 1.6%/mm Hg) than predeconditioning (11.2 +/- 0.7%/mm Hg) test accompanied by a greater tachycardia. Deconditioning increased the aortic baroreflex sensitivity (pre vs post: -0.61 +/- 0.12 vs -0.84 +/- 0.14 bpm.mm-1 Hg, P = 0.009) and the slope of forearm vascular resistance (calculated from [MAP-CVP]/FBF) to CVP (-2.75 +/- 0.26 vs -4.94 +/- 0.97 PRU/mm Hg, P = 0.086). However, neither the CBR-HR (-0.28 +/- 0.03 VS -0.39 +/- 0.10 bpm.mm-1 Hg) nor the CBR-MAP (-0.37 +/- 0.16 vs -0.25 +/- 0.07 mm Hg/mm Hg) gains were statistically different between pre- and postdeconditioning. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the functional modification of the cardiac pressure

  20. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, P<0.02). After 4 weeks of balneotherapy, the mean level of GSH showed no changes; however, in well-controlled patients (FPG <150 mg/dl), the level increased ( P<0.01) and in poorly controlled patients (FPG >150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities and the levels of FPG ( r=-0.430, P<0.05). After balneotherapy, the activity increased in 5 patients, decreased in 3 patients and showed no changes (alteration within ±3%) in all the other patients. From these findings in diabetic patients we concluded: (1) platelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  1. Iron deficiency enhances the levels of ascorbate, glutathione, and related enzymes in sugar beet roots.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Tatiana B; Abadía, Javier

    2003-06-01

    The effects of Fe deficiency stress on the levels of ascorbate and glutathione, and on the activities of the enzymes ferric chelate reductase, glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2), ascorbate free-radical reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) and ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11), have been investigated in sugar beet ( Beta vulgaris L.) roots. Plasma membrane vesicles and cytosolic fractions were isolated from the roots of the plants grown in nutrient solutions in the absence or presence of Fe for two weeks. Plants responded to Fe deficiency not only with a 20-fold increase in root ferric chelate reductase activity, but also with moderately increased levels of the general reductants ascorbate (2-fold) and glutathione (1.6-fold). The enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in roots were also affected by Fe deficiency. Glutathione reductase activity was enhanced 1.4-fold with Fe deficiency, associated to an increased ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione, from 3.1 to 5.2. The plasma membrane fraction from iron-deficient roots showed 1.7-fold higher ascorbate free-radical reductase activity, whereas in the cytosolic fraction the enzyme activity was not affected by Fe deficiency. The activity of the cytosolic hemoprotein ascorbate peroxidase decreased approximately by 50% with Fe deprivation. These results show that sugar beet responds to Fe deficiency with metabolic changes affecting components of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in root cells. This suggests that the ascorbate-glutathione cycle would play certain roles in the general Fe deficiency stress responses in strategy I plants.

  2. Germinating Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Seedlings Attenuated Selenite-Induced Toxicity by Activating the Antioxidant Enzymes and Mediating the Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang; Zhang, Hong; Lai, Furao; Wu, Hui

    2016-02-17

    Selenite can enhance the selenium nutrition level of crops, but excessive selenite may be toxic to plant growth. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the role of selenite in production and detoxification of oxidative toxicity, peanut seedlings were developed with sodium selenite (0, 3, and 6 mg/L). The effects of selenite on antioxidant capacity, transcript levels of antioxidant enzyme genes, and enzyme activities in hypocotyl were investigated. The CuZn-SOD, GSH-Px, GST, and APX gene expression levels and their enzyme activities in selenite treatments were 1.0-3.6-fold of the control. Selenite also significantly increased the glutathione and ascorbate concentrations by mediating the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, and the selenite-induced hydrogen peroxide may act as a second messenger in the signaling pathways. This work has revealed a complex antioxidative response to selenite in peanut seedling. Understanding these mechanisms may help future research in increasing selenite tolerance and selenium accumulation in peanut and other crops.

  3. Functional Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Points to Novel Roles for Glutathione in Coupling H2O2 to Activation of Salicylic Acid Accumulation and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yi; Chaouch, Sejir; Mhamdi, Amna; Queval, Guillaume; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Through its interaction with H2O2, glutathione is a candidate for transmission of signals in plant responses to pathogens, but identification of signaling roles is complicated by its antioxidant function. Using a genetic approach based on a conditional catalase-deficient Arabidopsis mutant, cat2, this study aimed at establishing whether GSH plays an important functional role in the transmission of signals downstream of H2O2. Results: Introducing the cad2 or allelic mutations in the glutathione synthesis pathway into cat2 blocked H2O2-triggered GSH oxidation and accumulation. While no effects on NADP(H) or ascorbate were observed, and H2O2-induced decreases in growth were maintained, blocking GSH modulation antagonized salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and SA-dependent responses. Other novel double and triple mutants were produced and compared with cat2 cad2 at the levels of phenotype, expression of marker genes, nontargeted metabolite profiling, accumulation of SA, and bacterial resistance. Most of the effects of the cad2 mutation on H2O2-triggered responses were distinct from those produced by mutations for GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE1 (GR1) or NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1), and were linked to compromised induction of ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE1 (ICS1) and ICS1-dependent SA accumulation. Innovation: A novel genetic approach was used in which GSH content or antioxidative capacity was independently modified in an H2O2 signaling background. Analysis of new double and triple mutants allowed us to infer previously undescribed regulatory roles for GSH. Conclusion: In parallel to its antioxidant role, GSH acts independently of NPR1 to allow increased intracellular H2O2 to activate SA signaling, a key defense response in plants. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2106–2121. PMID:23148658

  4. Glutathione level after long-term occupational elemental mercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kobal, Alfred Bogomir Prezelj, Marija; Horvat, Milena; Krsnik, Mladen; Gibicar, Darija; Osredkar, Josko

    2008-05-15

    Many in vitro and in vivo studies have elucidated the interaction of inorganic mercury (Hg) and glutathione. However, human studies are limited. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of remote long-term intermittent occupational elemental Hg vapour (Hg{sup o}) exposure on erythrocyte glutathione levels and some antioxidative enzyme activities in ex-mercury miners in the period after exposure. The study included 49 ex-mercury miners divided into subgroups of 28 still active, Hg{sup o}-not-exposed miners and 21 elderly retired miners, and 41 controls, age-matched to the miners subgroup. The control workers were taken from 'mercury-free works'. Reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized disulphide glutathione (GSSG) concentrations in haemolysed erythrocytes were determined by capillary electrophoresis, while total glutathione (total GSH) and the GSH/GSSG ratio were calculated from the determined values. Catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in erythrocytes were measured using commercially available reagent kits, while urine Hg (U-Hg) concentrations were determined by cold vapour atomic absorption (CVAAS). No correlation of present U-Hg levels, GSH, GSSG, and antioxidative enzymes with remote occupational biological exposure indices were found. The mean CAT activity in miners and retired miners was significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the controls. No differences in mean GPx activity among the three groups were found, whereas the mean GR activity was significantly higher (p<0.05) in miners than in retired miners. The mean concentrations of GSH (mmol/g Hb) in miners (13.03{+-}3.71) were significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the control group (11.68{+-}2.66). No differences in mean total GSH, GSSG levels, and GSH/GSSG ratio between miners and controls were found. A positive correlation between GSSG and present U-Hg excretion (r=0.41, p=0.001) in the whole group of ex-mercury miners was observed. The

  5. Enhanced activity of galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase and ascorbate-glutathione cycle in mitochondria from complex III deficient Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zsigmond, Laura; Tomasskovics, Bálint; Deák, Veronika; Rigó, Gábor; Szabados, László; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Szarka, András

    2011-08-01

    The mitochondrial antioxidant homeostasis was investigated in Arabidopsis ppr40-1 mutant, which presents a block of electron flow at complex III. The activity of the ascorbate biosynthetic enzyme, L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.2.3) (GLDH) was elevated in mitochondria isolated from mutant plants. In addition increased activities of the enzymes of Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle and elevated glutathione (GSH) level were observed in the mutant mitochondria. Lower ascorbate and ascorbate plus dehydroascorbate contents were detected at both cellular and mitochondrial level. Moreover, the more oxidized mitochondrial redox status of ascorbate in the ppr40-1 mutant indicated that neither the enhanced activity of GLDH nor Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle could compensate for the enhanced ascorbate consumption in the absence of a functional respiratory chain.

  6. Induction of Apoptosis by [8]-shogaol via Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, Glutathione Depletion and Caspase Activation in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Po-Chuen; Chen, Yi-Own; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Chen, Fu-An; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Chang, Ing-Shing; Wu, Hou; Sang, Shengmin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    Ginger, the rhizome of Zingiber officinale, is a traditional medicine with carminative effect, anti-nausea, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. This study examined the growth inhibitory effects of [8]-shogaol, one of pungent phenolic compounds in ginger, on human leukemia HL-60 cells. It demonstrated that [8]-shogaol was able to induce apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with [8]-shogaol caused a rapid loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytosol, and subsequent induction of procaspase-9 and procaspase-3 processing. Taken together, these results suggest for the first time that ROS production and depletion of the glutathione that committed to [8]-shogaol-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. PMID:20163181

  7. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-10-07

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  8. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  9. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

    1985-04-11

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

  10. In vitro Effects of Four Native Brazilian Medicinal Plants in CYP3A4 mRNA Gene Expression, Glutathione Levels, and P-Glycoprotein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzari, Andre L. D. A.; Milton, Flora; Frangos, Samantha; Carvalho, Ana C. B.; Silveira, Dâmaris; de Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco; Prieto, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Erythrina mulungu Benth. (Fabaceae), Cordia verbenacea A. DC. (Boraginaceae), Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae) and Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) are medicinal plant species native to Brazil shortlisted by the Brazilian National Health System for future clinical use. However, nothing is known about their effects in metabolic and transporter proteins, which could potentially lead to herb-drug interactions (HDI). In this work, we assess non-toxic concentrations (100 μg/mL) of the plant infusions for their in vitro ability to modulate CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression and intracellular glutathione levels in HepG2 cells, as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity in vincristine-resistant Caco-2 cells (Caco-2 VCR). Their mechanisms of action were further studied by measuring the activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) in transiently co-transfected HeLa cells and the inhibition of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in HepG2 cells. Our results show that P-gp activity was not affected in any case and that only Solanum paniculatum was able to significantly change CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression (twofold decrease, p < 0.05), this being correlated with an antagonist effect upon hPXR (EC50 = 0.38 mg/mL). Total intracellular glutathione levels were significantly depleted by exposure to Solanum paniculatum (-44%, p < 0.001), Lippia sidoides (-12%, p < 0.05) and Cordia verbenacea (-47%, p < 0.001). The latter plant extract was able to decrease GGT activity (-48%, p < 0.01). In conclusion, this preclinical study shows that the administration of some of these herbal medicines may be able to cause disturbances to metabolic mechanisms in vitro. Although Erythrina mulungu appears safe in our tests, active pharmacovigilance is recommended for the other three species, especially in the case of Solanum paniculatum. PMID:27594838

  11. Glutathione redox regulates airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yoko; Hisada, Takeshi; Utsugi, Mitsuyoshi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Shimizu, Yasuo; Ono, Akihiro; Murata, Yukie; Hamuro, Junji; Mori, Masatomo; Dobashi, Kunio

    2007-09-01

    Glutathione is the major intracellular redox buffer. We have shown that glutathione redox status, which is the balance between intracellular reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, in antigen-presenting cells (APC) regulates the helper T cell type 1 (Th1)/Th2 balance due to the production of IL-12. Bronchial asthma is a typical Th2 disease. Th2 cells and Th2 cytokines are characteristic of asthma and trigger off an inflammation. Accordingly, we studied the effects of the intracellular glutathione redox status on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and allergen-induced airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. We used gamma-Glutamylcysteinylethyl ester (gamma-GCE), which is a membrane-permeating GSH precursor, to elevate the intracellular GSH level and GSH/GSSG ratio of mice. In vitro, gamma-GCE pretreatment of human monocytic THP-1 cells elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio and enhanced IL-12(p70) production induced by LPS. In the mouse asthma model, intraperitoneal injection of gamma-GCE elevated the GSH/GSSG ratio of lung tissue and reduced AHR. gamma-GCE reduced levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and the chemokines eotaxin and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas it enhanced the production of IL-12 and IFN-gamma. Histologically, gamma-GCE suppressed eosinophils infiltration. Interestingly, we also found that gamma-GCE directly inhibited chemokine-induced eosinophil chemotaxis without affecting eotaxin receptor chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) expressions. Taken together, these findings suggest that changing glutathione redox balance, increase in GSH level, and the GSH/GSSG ratio by gamma-GCE, ameliorate bronchial asthma by altering the Th1/Th2 imbalance through IL-12 production from APC and suppressing chemokine production and eosinophil migration itself.

  12. Genetic depletion of glutathione peroxidase-1 potentiates nephrotoxicity induced by multiple doses of cocaine via activation of angiotensin II AT1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Mai, Huynh Nhu; Chung, Yoon Hee; Shin, Eun-Joo; Kim, Dae-Joong; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Nguyen, Thuy-Ty Lan; Nam, Yunsung; Lee, Yu Jeung; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jang, Choon-Gon; Ho, Ye-Shih; Lei, Xin Gen; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possible roles of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and oxidative stress responsive nuclear factor κB (NFκB) in renal damage caused by multiple doses of cocaine in glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1 gene-depleted mice. Treatment with cocaine resulted in significant increases in malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and pro-apoptotic Bax expression and decreases in the ratio of glutathione (GSH) and its oxidized form (GSSG), GSH-dependent enzymes, and anti-apoptotic factors in the kidney. These alterations were more pronounced in GPx-1 knockout (-/-) mice than in wild type (WT) mice. Notably, the AT1R antagonist losartan protected against the renal toxicity induced by cocaine, whereas the NFκB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate was not protective. The toxicity was more pronounced in GPx-1 (-/-) mice than in WT mice. The protective effect afforded by losartan against cocaine toxicity appeared to be more sensitive in GPx-1 (-/-) mice than that in WT mice. These losartan-mediated protective effects were inhibited by the phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, indicating that losartan provides significant protection from cocaine-induced renal toxicity through PI3K/Akt signaling. Our results suggest that genetic inhibition of GPx-1 potentiates cocaine-induced renal damage via activation of AT1R by inhibition of PI3K-Akt signaling, and that AT1R can be a therapeutic target against renal toxicity induced by cocaine.

  13. Stimuli Reduce the Dimensionality of Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The activity of ensembles of simultaneously recorded neurons can be represented as a set of points in the space of firing rates. Even though the dimension of this space is equal to the ensemble size, neural activity can be effectively localized on smaller subspaces. The dimensionality of the neural space is an important determinant of the computational tasks supported by the neural activity. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the sensory cortex of alert rats during periods of ongoing (inter-trial) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that dimensionality grows linearly with ensemble size, and grows significantly faster during ongoing activity compared to evoked activity. We explain these results using a spiking network model based on a clustered architecture. The model captures the difference in growth rate between ongoing and evoked activity and predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size that could be tested in high-density multi-electrode recordings. Moreover, we present a simple theory that predicts the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality. This upper bound is inversely proportional to the amount of pair-wise correlations and, compared to a homogeneous network without clusters, it is larger by a factor equal to the number of clusters. The empirical estimation of such bounds depends on the number and duration of trials and is well predicted by the theory. Together, these results provide a framework to analyze neural dimensionality in alert animals, its behavior under stimulus presentation, and its theoretical dependence on ensemble size, number of clusters, and correlations in spiking network models. PMID:26924968

  14. Stimuli Reduce the Dimensionality of Cortical Activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The activity of ensembles of simultaneously recorded neurons can be represented as a set of points in the space of firing rates. Even though the dimension of this space is equal to the ensemble size, neural activity can be effectively localized on smaller subspaces. The dimensionality of the neural space is an important determinant of the computational tasks supported by the neural activity. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the sensory cortex of alert rats during periods of ongoing (inter-trial) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that dimensionality grows linearly with ensemble size, and grows significantly faster during ongoing activity compared to evoked activity. We explain these results using a spiking network model based on a clustered architecture. The model captures the difference in growth rate between ongoing and evoked activity and predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size that could be tested in high-density multi-electrode recordings. Moreover, we present a simple theory that predicts the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality. This upper bound is inversely proportional to the amount of pair-wise correlations and, compared to a homogeneous network without clusters, it is larger by a factor equal to the number of clusters. The empirical estimation of such bounds depends on the number and duration of trials and is well predicted by the theory. Together, these results provide a framework to analyze neural dimensionality in alert animals, its behavior under stimulus presentation, and its theoretical dependence on ensemble size, number of clusters, and correlations in spiking network models.

  15. The effect of quercetin and galangin on glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Paulíková, Helena; Berczeliová, Elena

    2005-12-01

    Quercetin and galangin can change the activity of glutathione reductase. Quercetin (a catechol structure in the B-ring) and galangin (any hydroxyl group in the B-ring) have different biological activities but, both possess high antioxidant abilities. Quercetin during the antioxidative action, is converted into an oxidized products (o-semiquinone and o-quinone), and subsequently glutathionyl adducts may be formed or SH-enzyme can be inhibited. We have tried to see whether inhibition of glutathione reductase (GR) can be influenced by preincubation of enzyme with NADPH (a creation of reduced form of enzyme, GRH(2)) and whether diaphorase activity of the enzyme is decreased by these flavonoids. The results confirmed that quercetin inhibits GRH(2) and inhibition is reduced by addition of EDTA or N-acetylcysteine. Both of flavonoids have no effect on diaphorase activity of glutathione reductase and this enzyme could increase the production of free radicals by catalysis of reduction of o-quinone during action of quercetin in vivo.

  16. The effect of aluminium-stress and exogenous spermidine on chlorophyll degradation, glutathione reductase activity and the photosystem II D1 protein gene (psbA) transcript level in lichen Xanthoria parietina.

    PubMed

    Sen, Gulseren; Eryilmaz, Isil Ezgi; Ozakca, Dilek

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of short-term aluminium toxicity and the application of spermidine on the lichen Xanthoria parietina were investigated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. Our results suggest that aluminium stress leads to physiological processes in a dose-dependent manner through differences in lipid peroxidation rate, chlorophyll content and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity in aluminium and spermidine treated samples. The expression of the photosystem II D1 protein (psbA) gene was quantified using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Increased glutathione reductase activity and psbA mRNA transcript levels were observed in the X. parietina thalli that were treated with spermidine before aluminium-stress. The results showed that the application of spermidine could mitigate aluminium-induced lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll degradation on lichen X. parietina thalli through an increase in psbA transcript levels and activity of glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes.

  17. Glutathione S-transferase class {pi} polymorphism in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Aivaliotis, M.J.; Cantu, T.; Gilligan, R.

    1995-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) comprises a family of isozymes with broad substrate specificities. One or more GST isozymes are present in most animal tissues and function in several detoxification pathways through the conjugation of reduced glutathione with various electrophiles, thereby reducing their potential toxicity. Four soluble GST isozymes encoded by genes on different chromosomes have been identified in humans. The acidic class pi GST, GSTP (previously designated GST-3), is widely distributed in adult tissues and appears to be the only GST isozyme present in leukocytes and placenta. Previously reported electrophoretic analyses of erythrocyte and leukocyte extracts revealed single bands of activity, which differed slightly in mobility between the two cell types, or under other conditions, a two-banded pattern. To our knowledge, no genetically determined polymorphisms have previously been reported in GSTP from any species. We now report a polymorphism of GSTP in baboon leukocytes, and present family data that verifies autosomal codominant inheritance. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Johnny X.; Blaskovich, Mark A. T.; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G.; Butler, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26169405

  19. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G; Butler, Mark S; Montgomery, A Bruce; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance.

  20. Effects of mace (Myristica fragrans, Houtt.) on cytosolic glutathione S-transferase activity and acid soluble sulfhydryl level in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Kumari, M V; Rao, A R

    1989-07-15

    The aril of plant Myristica fragrans Houtt. commonly known as mace, which is consumed as a spice as well as used as a folk-medicine, was screened for its effects on the levels of cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) and acid-soluble sulfhydryl (SH) groups in the liver of young adult male and female Swiss albino mice. Animals were assorted into 4 groups comprised of either sex and received either normal diet (negative control), 1% 2,3-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole (BHA) diet (positive control), 1% mace diet or 2% mace diet for 10 days. There was a significant increase in the GST activity in the liver of mice exposed to BHA or mace. In addition, there was a significant increase in the SH content in the liver of mice fed on 1% BHA and 2% mace diets.

  1. Alteration in glutathione content and associated enzyme activities in the synaptic terminals but not in the non-synaptic mitochondria from the frontal cortex of Parkinson's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Harish, G; Mahadevan, Anita; Srinivas Bharath, M M; Shankar, S K

    2013-01-01

    Altered redox dynamics contribute to physiological aging and Parkinson's disease (PD). This is reflected in the substantia nigra (SN) of PD patients as lowered antioxidant levels and elevated oxidative damage. Contrary to this observation, we previously reported that non-SN regions such as caudate nucleus and frontal cortex (FC) exhibited elevated antioxidants and lowered mitochondrial and oxidative damage indicating constitutive protective mechanisms in PD brains. To investigate whether the sub-cellular distribution of antioxidants could contribute to these protective effects, we examined the distribution of antioxidant/oxidant markers in the neuropil fractions [synaptosomes, non-synaptic mitochondria and cytosol] of FC from PD (n = 9) and controls (n = 8). In the control FC, all the antioxidant activities [Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), GSH peroxidase (GPx), GSH-S-transferase (GST)] except glutathione reductase (GR) were the highest in cytosol, but several fold lower in mitochondria and much lower in synaptosomes. However, FC synaptosomes from PD brains had significantly higher levels of GSH (p = 0.01) and related enzymes [GPx (p = 0.02), GR (p = 0.06), GST (p = 0.0001)] compared to controls. Conversely, mitochondria from the FC of PD cases displayed elevated SOD activity (p = 0.02) while the GSH and related enzymes were relatively unaltered. These changes in the neuropil fractions were associated with unchanged or lowered oxidative damage. Further, the mitochondrial content in the synaptosomes of both PD and control brains was ≥five-fold lower compared to the non-synaptic mitochondrial fraction. Altered distribution of oxidant/antioxidant markers in the neuropil fractions of the human brain during aging and PD has implications for (1) degenerative and protective mechanisms (2) distinct antioxidant mechanisms in synaptic terminals compared to other compartments.

  2. Interaction between mercury (Hg), arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) affects the activity of glutathione S-transferase in breast milk; possible relationship with fish and sellfish intake.

    PubMed

    Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; Celis de la Rosa, Alfredo de Jesús; Acosta-Vargas, Baudilio; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía Celina; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-08-01

    Breast milk is regarded as an ideal source of nutrients for the growth and development of neonates, but it can also be a potential source of pollutants. Mothers can be exposed to different contaminants as a result of their lifestyle and environmental pollution. Mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) could adversely affect the development of fetal and neonatal nervous system. Some fish and shellfish are rich in selenium (Se), an essential trace element that forms part of several enzymes related to the detoxification process, including glutathione S-transferase (GST). The goal of this study was to determine the interaction between Hg, As and Se and analyze its effect on the activity of GST in breast milk. Milk samples were collected from women between day 7 and 10 postpartum. The GST activity was determined spectrophotometrically; total Hg, As and Se concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. To explain the possible association of Hg, As and Se concentrations with GST activity in breast milk, generalized linear models were constructed. The model explained 44% of the GST activity measured in breast milk. The GLM suggests that GST activity was positively correlated with Hg, As and Se concentrations. The activity of the enzyme was also explained by the frequency of consumption of marine fish and shellfish in the diet of the breastfeeding women.

  3. Activation of the p38 signaling pathway by heat shock involves the dissociation of glutathione S-transferase Mu from Ask1.

    PubMed

    Dorion, Sonia; Lambert, Herman; Landry, Jacques

    2002-08-23

    Despite the importance of the stress-activated protein kinase pathways in cell death and survival, it is unclear how stressful stimuli lead to their activation. In the case of heat shock, the existence of a specific mechanism of activation has been evidenced, but the molecular nature of this pathway is undefined. Here, we found that Ask1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1), an upstream activator of the stress-activated protein kinase p38 during exposure to oxidative stress and other stressful stimuli, was also activated by heat shock. Ask1 activity was required for p38 activation since overexpression of a kinase dead mutant of Ask1, Ask1(K709M), inhibited heat shock-induced p38 activation. The activation of Ask1 by oxidative stress involves the oxidation of thioredoxin, an endogenous inhibitor of Ask1. A different activation mechanism takes place during heat shock. In contrast to p38 induction by H(2)O(2), induction by heat shock was not antagonized by pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine or by overexpressing thioredoxin and was not accompanied by the dissociation of thioredoxin from Ask1. Instead, heat shock caused the dissociation of glutathione S-transferase Mu1-1 (GSTM1-1) from Ask1 and overexpression of GSTM1-1-inhibited induction of p38 by heat shock. We concluded that because of an alternative regulation by the two distinct repressors thioredoxin and GSTM1-1, Ask1 constitutes the converging point of the heat shock and oxidative stress-sensing pathways that lead to p38 activation.

  4. Glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes in rats exposed to dimethoate and/or pyrantel.

    PubMed

    Spodniewska, A

    2014-01-01

    The study was undertaken to examine the effect of single and combined administration of dimethoate (an OP insecticide) and pyrantel embonate (an anthelmintic agent) on the concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) in rats. Dimethoate (Group I) was administered to rats at a dose of 1/10 LD50 for 5 consecutive days and pyrantel embonate (Group II) at a dose of 1/5 LD50 for 3 consecutive days. The animals of group III were given both of the mentioned above compounds in the same manner as group I and II, but pyrantel embonate was applied on day 3, 4, and 5 from the beginning of dimethoate intoxication. Material from 6 rats randomly selected from each group was obtained after 3, 6 and 12 hours and 2, 7 and 14 days following the last applied dose of the compounds under study. It was found that application of pyrantel embonate caused only slight changes in the analysed parameters i.e. GSH, GPx and GR. Dimethoate administration caused disturbances in the antioxidative system manifested as a decrease in GSH concentration in the liver (max.--37.7% after 6 hours) and an increase of GPx and GR activities in erythrocytes (max.--21.7% and 29.6% after 3 hours, respectively), compared to the control group. The profile of changes after combined intoxication was similar, but their intensity was higher compared to the group of animals exposed to dimethoate only. Based on current studies, it was concluded that both dimethoate and pyrantel embonate at the applied doses showed a pro-oxidative activity.

  5. Role of the Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle of Mitochondria and Peroxisomes in the Senescence of Pea Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Ana; Hernández, José A.; Pastori, Gabriela; del Río, Luis A.; Sevilla, Francisca

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between H2O2 metabolism and the senescence process using soluble fractions, mitochondria, and peroxisomes from senescent pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves. After 11 d of senescence the activities of Mn-superoxide dismutase, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), and glutathione reductase (GR) present in the matrix, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) activities localized in the mitochondrial membrane, were all substantially decreased in mitochondria. The mitochondrial ascorbate and dehydroascorbate pools were reduced, whereas the oxidized glutathione levels were maintained. In senescent leaves the H2O2 content in isolated mitochondria and the NADH- and succinate-dependent production of superoxide (O2·−) radicals by submitochondrial particles increased significantly. However, in peroxisomes from senescent leaves both membrane-bound APX and MDHAR activities were reduced. In the matrix the DHAR activity was enhanced and the GR activity remained unchanged. As a result of senescence, the reduced and the oxidized glutathione pools were considerably increased in peroxisomes. A large increase in the glutathione pool and DHAR activity were also found in soluble fractions of senescent pea leaves, together with a decrease in GR, APX, and MDHAR activities. The differential response to senescence of the mitochondrial and peroxisomal ascorbate-glutathione cycle suggests that mitochondria could be affected by oxidative damage earlier than peroxisomes, which may participate in the cellular oxidative mechanism of leaf senescence longer than mitochondria. PMID:9847106

  6. Selenium Fortification of an Italian Rice Cultivar via Foliar Fertilization with Sodium Selenate and Its Effects on Human Serum Selenium Levels and on Erythrocyte Glutathione Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Giacosa, Attilio; Faliva, Milena Anna; Perna, Simone; Minoia, Claudio; Ronchi, Anna; Rondanelli, Mariangela

    2014-01-01

    Selenium food fortification could be a cost-effective strategy to counteract the inadequacy of selenium intake among the Italian population. In this study, the effect of foliar fertilization with sodium selenate of an Italian rice cultivar and the increase of serum selenium and of erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity after intake of fortified rice, have been evaluated. The effect of foliar fertilization with sodium selenate (50 g Se/ha) vs. water was studied. Moreover, in a randomized, double-blind study, 10 healthy women supplemented their usual diet with a daily dose of 80 g of Se-enriched-rice and 10 matched-women with 80 g of regular rice. Before, after 5 and 20 days of supplementation, serum Se and GPx-activity were evaluated. The mean selenium content in Se-enriched-rice was 1.64 ± 0.28 μg/g, while in regular rice it was 0.36 ± 0.15 μg/g (p < 0.001). A significant increase of serum Se and GPx-activity was observed only in the intervention group and only after 20 days. The results show that selenium fortification of rice can be achieved with foliar fertilization with sodium selenate and that the 20 days intake of this Se-enriched-rice increases the serum selenium levels and GPx-activity. PMID:24667132

  7. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase activities and risk of coronary heart disease in generally healthy women: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuman; Jensen, Majken K; Rimm, Eric B; Willett, Walter; Wu, Tianying

    2014-11-01

    Erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes are major circulating antioxidant enzymes in the oxidative stress defense system. Few prospective studies have assessed the association between these enzymes and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in generally healthy adults. We conducted a prospective nested case-control study of CHD among 32,826 women at baseline with 15 years of follow-up from 1989 to 2004 in the Nurses' Health Study. We investigated the association of baseline erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activities with the risk of CHD. A total of 365 cases and 728 controls were included in the analysis. Overall, the relative risks of CHD associated with 1-standard deviation higher SOD, GPx, and CAT activities were 1.07 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 1.22), 1.04 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.18), and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.17), respectively. Multivariable adjustments did not change the associations appreciably. Fasting status did not modify the associations, with the exception that SOD activity was positively associated with the risk of CHD among participants who provided blood samples within 12 hours of fasting. Overall, activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were not associated with CHD among women who were generally healthy at the time of blood collection.

  8. Selenium fortification of an Italian rice cultivar via foliar fertilization with sodium selenate and its effects on human serum selenium levels and on erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Giacosa, Attilio; Faliva, Milena Anna; Perna, Simone; Minoia, Claudio; Ronchi, Anna; Rondanelli, Mariangela

    2014-03-24

    Selenium food fortification could be a cost-effective strategy to counteract the inadequacy of selenium intake among the Italian population. In this study, the effect of foliar fertilization with sodium selenate of an Italian rice cultivar and the increase of serum selenium and of erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity after intake of fortified rice, have been evaluated. The effect of foliar fertilization with sodium selenate (50 g Se/ha) vs. water was studied. Moreover, in a randomized, double-blind study, 10 healthy women supplemented their usual diet with a daily dose of 80 g of Se-enriched-rice and 10 matched-women with 80 g of regular rice. Before, after 5 and 20 days of supplementation, serum Se and GPx-activity were evaluated. The mean selenium content in Se-enriched-rice was 1.64 ± 0.28 μg/g, while in regular rice it was 0.36 ± 0.15 μg/g (p < 0.001). A significant increase of serum Se and GPx-activity was observed only in the intervention group and only after 20 days. The results show that selenium fortification of rice can be achieved with foliar fertilization with sodium selenate and that the 20 days intake of this Se-enriched-rice increases the serum selenium levels and GPx-activity.

  9. Fisetin attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced cell damage by scavenging reactive oxygen species and activating protective functions of cellular glutathione system.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Cha, Ji Won; Zheng, Jian; Yao, Cheng Wen; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can induce cell damage by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in DNA damage and cell death. The aim of this study is to elucidate the protective effects of fisetin (3,7,3',4',-tetrahydroxy flavone) against H2O2-induced cell damage. Fisetin reduced the level of superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical in cell free system, and intracellular ROS generated by H2O2. Moreover, fisetin protected against H2O2-induced membrane lipid peroxidation, cellular DNA damage, and protein carbonylation, which are the primary cellular outcomes of H2O2 treatment. Furthermore, fisetin increased the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, which is decreased by H2O2. Conversely, a GSH inhibitor abolished the cytoprotective effect of fisetin against H2O2-induced cells damage. Taken together, our results suggest that fisetin protects against H2O2-induced cell damage by inhibiting ROS generation, thereby maintaining the protective role of the cellular GSH system.

  10. Oxaloacetate activates brain mitochondrial biogenesis, enhances the insulin pathway, reduces inflammation and stimulates neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Harris, Janna L; Carl, Steven M; E, Lezi; Lu, Jianghua; Eva Selfridge, J; Roy, Nairita; Hutfles, Lewis; Koppel, Scott; Morris, Jill; Burns, Jeffrey M; Michaelis, Mary L; Michaelis, Elias K; Brooks, William M; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-12-15

    Brain bioenergetic function declines in some neurodegenerative diseases, this may influence other pathologies and administering bioenergetic intermediates could have therapeutic value. To test how one intermediate, oxaloacetate (OAA) affects brain bioenergetics, insulin signaling, inflammation and neurogenesis, we administered intraperitoneal OAA, 1-2 g/kg once per day for 1-2 weeks, to C57Bl/6 mice. OAA altered levels, distributions or post-translational modifications of mRNA and proteins (proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α, PGC1 related co-activator, nuclear respiratory factor 1, transcription factor A of the mitochondria, cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 isoform 1, cAMP-response element binding, p38 MAPK and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) in ways that should promote mitochondrial biogenesis. OAA increased Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin and P70S6K phosphorylation. OAA lowered nuclear factor κB nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratios and CCL11 mRNA. Hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA, doublecortin mRNA, doublecortin protein, doublecortin-positive neuron counts and neurite length increased in OAA-treated mice. (1)H-MRS showed OAA increased brain lactate, GABA and glutathione thereby demonstrating metabolic changes are detectable in vivo. In mice, OAA promotes brain mitochondrial biogenesis, activates the insulin signaling pathway, reduces neuroinflammation and activates hippocampal neurogenesis.

  11. Effects of cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharides from microcystis on glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo.

    PubMed

    Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; Gantar, Miroslav; Mayer, Gregory D; Gibbs, Patrick D L; Berry, John P

    2012-06-01

    Cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae") are recognized producers of a diverse array of toxic secondary metabolites. Of these, the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), produced by all cyanobacteria, remain to be well investigated. In the current study, we specifically employed the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo to investigate the effects of LPS from geographically diverse strains of the widespread cyanobacterial genus, Microcystis, on several detoxifying enzymes/pathways, including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)/glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), and compared observed effects to those of heterotrophic bacterial (i.e., E. coli) LPS. In agreement with previous studies, cyanobacterial LPS significantly reduced GST in embryos exposed to LPS in all treatments. In contrast, GPx moderately increased in embryos exposed to LPS, with no effect on reciprocal GR activity. Interestingly, total glutathione levels were elevated in embryos exposed to Microcystis LPS, but the relative levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH/GSSG) were, likewise, elevated suggesting that oxidative stress is not involved in the observed effects as typical of heterotrophic bacterial LPS in mammalian systems. In further support of this, no effect was observed with respect to CAT or SOD activity. These findings demonstrate that Microcystis LPS affects glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish embryo, and more generally, that this model is well suited for investigating the apparent toxicophore of cyanobacterial LPS, including possible differences in structure-activity relationships between heterotrophic and cyanobacterial LPS, and teleost fish versus mammalian systems.

  12. Differential effects of sodium selenite and nano-Se on growth performance, tissue se distribution, and glutathione peroxidase activity of avian broiler.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanbo

    2009-05-01

    The present research evaluated differential effects of sodium selenite and nano-Se on growth performance, tissue Se distribution, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity of avian broiler. Broilers were randomly segregated into 12 groups so that three replicates were available for each of the three treatments (T-1, T-2, and T-3) and control groups. The control groups were fed basal diets without Se addition. T-1, T-2, and T-3 were fed with diets containing 0.2 mg kg(-1) sodium selenite, 0.2 mg kg(-1) nano-Se, and 0.5 mg kg(-1) nano-Se, respectively. Compared with the control, Se supplementation remarkably improved daily weight gain and survival rate and decreased feed conversion ratio (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference was observed between T-1, T-2, and T-3. The tissue Se content was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in Se-supplemented groups than the control, and T-3 showed the highest. Furthermore, higher Se content was observed in liver, and there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) compared with that in muscle. As for serum and hepatic GSH-Px activities, Se supplementation remarkably improved GSH-Px activity (P < 0.05), and there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between treatments (T-1, T-2, and T-3).

  13. Inhibition of glutathione production by L-S,R-buthionine sulfoximine activates hepatic ascorbate synthesis - A unique anti-oxidative stress mechanism in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Liu, Ying; Duan, Yajun; Chen, Yuanli; Han, Jihong; Sun, Lei; Yang, Xiaoxiao

    2017-02-26

    Glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate, the cytoplasmic antioxidants, can regenerate and replace each other in scavenging reactive oxygen species reaction. Mice, but not guinea pigs, produce ascorbate endogenously. l-Buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (L-S,R-BSO) substantially inhibited GSH production at a greater degree and caused a higher toxicity to guinea pigs than mice, implying that mice may have an additional protective mechanism against oxidative stress injury. Indeed, administration of L-S,R-BSO to mice inhibited tissue GSH production while increasing ascorbate levels. L-S,R-BSO also increased tissue ascorbate levels in mice fed a ascorbate and dehydroascorbate-free diet suggesting activation of ascorbate synthesis, which was further confirmed by increased urinary ascorbate excretion. Other reagents inhibiting GSH production also increased tissue ascorbate levels. The results of Northern blot and promoter assay showed that L-S,R-BSO increased mRNA expression and promoter activity of mouse liver L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase, the critical enzyme for ascorbate synthesis. Taken together, our study demonstrates that inhibition of GSH production activates ascorbate synthesis to protect mice against oxidative stress injury, the mechanism which is not present in guinea pigs or humans.

  14. Effect of vitamin E and selenium supplementation of cockerel diets on glutathione peroxidase activity and lipid peroxidation susceptibility in sperm, testes, and liver.

    PubMed

    Surai, P; Kostjuk, I; Wishart, G; Macpherson, A; Speake, B; Noble, R; Ionov, I; Kutz, E

    1998-01-01

    The phospholipids of avian spermatozoa are characterized by high proportions of arachidonic (20:4n-6) and docosatetraenoic (22:4n-6) fatty acids and are therefore sensitive to lipid peroxidation. Alpha-tocopherol and glutathione peroxidase [GSH-Px] are believed to be the primary components of the antioxidant system of the spermatozoa. The present study evaluates the effect of vitamin E and vitamin E plus Se supplementation of the cockerel diet on GSH-Px activity, vitamin E accumulation, and lipid peroxidation in the spermatozoa, testes, and liver. At the beginning of the experiment 75 Rhode Island Red cockerels were divided into five groups, kept in individual cages, and fed a wheat-barley-based ration balanced in all nutrients. Supplements fed to the different groups were as follows: vitamin E, 0, 20, 200, 20, and 200 mg/kg to groups 1-5, respectively, with groups 4 and 5 also receiving 0. 3 mg Se/kg. The vitamin E supplementation produced increased levels of alpha-tocopherol in semen, testes, and liver. The inclusion of the Se into the cock diet had a significant (P < 0.01) stimulating effect on GSH-Px activity in seminal plasma, spermatozoa, testes, and liver. The increased vitamin E concentration in the spermatozoa was associated with a reduction in their susceptibility to lipid peroxidation. Similarly, the increased GSH-Px activity provided enhanced protection against lipid peroxidation.

  15. 1,4-Naphthoquinones and Others NADPH-Dependent Glutathione Reductase-Catalyzed Redox Cyclers as Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Belorgey, Didier; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The homodimeric flavoenzyme glutathione reductase catalyzes NADPH-dependent glutathione disulfide reduction. This reaction is important for keeping the redox homeostasis in human cells and in the human pathogen Plasmodium falciparum. Different types of NADPH-dependent disulfide reductase inhibitors were designed in various chemical series to evaluate the impact of each inhibition mode on the propagation of the parasites. Against malaria parasites in cultures the most potent and specific effects were observed for redox-active agents acting as subversive substrates for both glutathione reductases of the Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. In their oxidized form, these redox-active compounds are reduced by NADPH-dependent flavoenzyme-catalyzed reactions in the cytosol of infected erythrocytes. In their reduced forms, these compounds can reduce molecular oxygen to reactive oxygen species, or reduce oxidants like methemoglobin, the major nutrient of the parasite, to indigestible hemoglobin. Furthermore, studies on a fluorinated suicide-substrate of the human glutathione reductase indicate that the glutathione reductase-catalyzed bioactivation of 3-benzylnaphthoquinones to the corresponding reduced 3-benzoyl metabolites is essential for the observed antimalarial activity. In conclusion, the antimalarial lead naphthoquinones are suggested to perturb the major redox equilibria of the targeted cells. These effects result in development arrest of the parasite and contribute to the removal of the parasitized erythrocytes by macrophages. PMID:23116403

  16. Reduced-activation steels: Future development for improved creep strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.

    2008-08-01

    Reduced-activation steels for fusion applications were developed in the 1980s to replace the elevated-temperature commercial steels first considered. The new steels were patterned after the commercial steels, with the objective that the new steels have yield stress and ultimate tensile strength and impact toughness in a Charpy test comparable to or better than the steels they replaced. That objective was achieved in reduced-activation steels developed in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Although tensile and impact toughness of the reduced-activation steels exceed those of the commercial steels they were patterned after, their creep-rupture properties are inferior to some commercial steels they replaced. They are even more inferior to commercial steels developed since the 1980s. In this paper, compositional differences between reduced-activation steels and new commercial steels are examined, and compositions are proposed for development of new-and-improved reduced-activation steels.

  17. The glutaredoxin/glutathione system modulates NF-kappaB activity by glutathionylation of p65 in cinnamaldehyde-treated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Being-Chyuan; Hsieh, Chia-Wen; Lin, Yuan-Chun; Wung, Being-Sun

    2010-07-01

    Reversible protein glutathionylation is an important posttranslational modification that provides protection against oxidation. In endothelial cells (ECs), cinnamaldehyde is an electrophilic compound that can increase the intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels or reactive oxygen species (ROS) production depending on the treatment duration. ECs treated with GSH and H(2)O(2) show increased sulfhydryl modifications of the p65 subunit of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kappaB), which are responsible for NF-kappaB inactivation, and also a block in TNF-alpha-induced p65 nuclear translocation and inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. In our current study, we find that cinnamaldehyde induces p65 glutathionylation and inhibits TNF-alpha-induced p65 nuclear translocation and ICAM-1 expression within 12 h of treatment. Our analyses also reveal that p65 glutathionylation is suppressed by a GSH synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), and we further observed that the inhibitory effects of p65 nuclear translocation and ICAM-1 expression are also suppressed by BSO. NF-E2-related factor-2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules not only inhibit glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM) induction and increases in GSH but also abolish cinnamaldehyde-induced p65 glutathionylation and its inhibitory effects. The gene expression and activity of glutaredoxin-1 (Grx-1), which catalyzes the formation of protein-glutathione mixed disulfides (protein-SSG), were also found to be increased after cinnamaldehyde treatment. A knock down of endogenous Grx-1 by siRNA or pretreatment with an inhibitor of Grx-1 activity, CdCl(2), abolishes p65-SSG formation. In addition, Grx-1 siRNA blocks the inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation and ICAM-1 expression, suggesting that this enzyme is involved in the cinnamaldehyde-mediated NF-kappaB inhibition. Our current results thus

  18. Serum Glutathione in Patients with Schizophrenia in Dynamics of Antipsychotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, S A; Smirnova, L P; Shchigoreva, Yu G; Semke, A V; Bokhan, N A

    2015-12-01

    Serum concentrations of oxidized and reduced glutathione were measured in 73 patients with schizophrenia at admission and in dynamics of therapy with traditional and atypical antipsychotic drugs. The level of reduced glutathione in patients with schizophrenia with manifest clinical symptoms was lower than in normal subjects. Atypical neuroleptics produced virtually no effects on the glutathione system, while therapy with typical antipsychotics led to further decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione, thus aggravating the imbalance of metabolic processes typical of schizophrenia.

  19. Reduction of mitochondrial protein mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters by human glutathione reductase

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Aaron P.; Cheng, Zishuo; Ding, Huangen

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondrial outer membrane protein mitoNEET is a newly discovered target of type II diabetes drug pioglitazone. Structurally, mitoNEET is a homodimer with each monomer containing an N-terminal transmembrane alpha helix tethered to mitochondrial outer membrane and a C-terminal cytosolic domain hosting a redox active [2Fe-2S] cluster. Genetic studies have shown that mitoNEET has a central role in regulating energy metabolism in mitochondria. However, specific function of mitoNEET remains largely elusive. Here we find that the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters can be efficiently reduced by Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase in an NADPH-dependent reaction. Purified human glutathione reductase has the same activity as E. coli thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. However, rat thioredoxin reductase, a human thioredoxin reductase homolog that contains selenocysteine in the catalytic center, has very little or no activity to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. N-ethylmaleimide, a potent thiol modifier, completely inhibits human glutathione reductase to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters, indicating that the redox active disulfide in the catalytic center of human glutathione reductase may be directly involved in reducing the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. Additional studies reveal that the reduced mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters in mouse heart cell extracts can be reversibly oxidized by hydrogen peroxide without disruption of the clusters, suggesting that the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters may undergo redox transition to regulate energy metabolism in mitochondria in response to oxidative signals. PMID:25645953

  20. Changes in Glutathione S-Transferase Activity and Parental Care Patterns in a Catfish (Pisces, Ariidae) as a Biomarker of Anthropogenic Impact in a Brazilian Harbor.

    PubMed

    Fortes Carvalho Neta, Raimunda Nonata; Barbosa, Gleyciane Lobato; Torres, Hetty Salvino; Pinheiro Sousa, Débora Batista; Castro, Jonatas da Silva; Santos, Débora Martins Silva; Tchaicka, Lígia; Almeida, Zafira da Silva de; Teixeira, Erivania Gomes; Torres, Audalio Rebelo

    2017-01-01

    Catfish have been used as a model system for studying biochemical mechanisms of biotransformation. The main goal of this study was to identify alterations in hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and changes in the parental care pattern of a mouth-brooding catfish, Sciades herzbergii, as a biomarker of anthropogenic impact in a port area on the northeastern coast of Brazil. The fish were sampled from a natural reserve (A1 = reference site) and from an industrialized port area (A2 = impacted site). Two analyses were carried out: hepatic GST activity and mouth-brooding behavior of males. Catfish collected from the A1 site displayed all stages of gonadal maturation, and some of the adult males were mouth brooding 12-30 embryos. Not all gonadal maturation stages of the catfish were represented at the A2 site, and no mouth-brooding males were observed. GST activity in the liver of S. herzbergii was significantly higher in fish from the impacted site compared with fish from the reference site. Values for the enzymatic activity increased progressively in fish sampled from the reserve area as they became more reproductively mature (immature ≤ maturing ≤ mature ≤ spent). However, the greatest values for GST activity (2.84 ± 0.31 μmol min(-1) mg protein(-1)) among fish sampled from the impacted area were found in (immature) juveniles. These data suggest that changes in hepatic GST activity and mouth-brooding behavior of S. herzbergii can be used as biomarkers of anthropogenic impact.

  1. Selenium/Tellurium-Containing Hyperbranched Polymers: Effect of Molecular Weight and Degree of Branching on Glutathione Peroxidase-Like Activity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joice; Dong, Zeyuan; Dehaen, Wim; Smet, Mario

    2012-12-21

    A series of novel hyperbranched polyselenides and polytellurides with multiple catalytic sites at the branching units has been synthesized via the polycondensation of A2 + B3 monomers. The GPx-like activities of these polymer mimics were assessed and it was found that the polytellurides showed higher GPx-like activities than the corresponding polyselenides. Interestingly, the polymers with higher molecular weights and degree of branching (DB) showed higher GPx-like activities than the analogous lower molecular weight polymer. The enhancement in the catalytical activity of the hyperbranched polymers with increasing molecular weight affirmed the importance of the incorporation of multiple catalytic groups in the macromolecule which increases the local concentration of catalytic sites.

  2. Effects of selenium and tellurium on the activity of selenoenzymes glutathione peroxidase and type I iodothyronine deiodinase, trace element thyroid level, and thyroid hormone status in rats.

    PubMed

    Eybl, Vladislav; Kotyzová, Dana; Sýkora, Jindrich; Topolcan, Ondrej; Pikner, Richard; Mihaljevic, Martin; Brtko, Július; Glattre, Eystein

    2007-01-01

    Tellurium (Te) and selenium (Se) belong chemically to the VIa group of elements. Se represents an essential element closely related to thyroid function. Te has growing application in industrial processes. Little is known about the Te biological activity, particularly with respect to potential chemical interactions with Se-containing components in the organism. In this study, female Wistar rats (body weight: 115-120 g) received sodium selenite pentahydrate (10 mg/L) or sodium tellurite (9.4 mg/L) in drinking water for 6 wk. Additional groups of rats received their combination with zinc sulfate heptahydrate (515 mg/L). The stimulation of 5'-DI-I activity due to selenite (to 158%, p<0.01) or tellurite treatment (to 197%, p<0.01) was seen; however, no effect on glutathione peroxidase was demonstrated in this experiment. An elevation of T4, T3, and rT3 serum levels was measured in the Se+Te-treated group; T4 and rT3 levels were elevated in the Te+Zn-treated group. Te accumulates in the thyroid gland and influences the zinc thyroid level. Te treatment alone and in combination with Se or Zn decreased the iodine thyroid concentration to 65-70% of the control value. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature and effects of these events.

  3. Upregulation of glutathione peroxidase-1 expression and activity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor promotes high-level protection of PC12 cells against 6-hydroxydopamine and hydrogen peroxide toxicities.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Ehsan; Gardaneh, Mossa; Shojaei, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    We examined the impact of strong co-presence and function of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX-1) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on protecting the rat dopaminergic pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) toxicities. Primarily, GPX-1 over-expression by PC12 cells infected with pLV-GPX1 lentivirus vectors significantly increased cell survival against 6-OHDA toxicity (p<0.01). Addition of conditioned medium collected from growing wild-type astrocytes (Control astro-CM) increased survival rate of pLV-GPX1 infectants by 10% compared to their un-treated counterparts (p<0.05) and 20% compared to their treated empty vector control (p<0.01). Treatment of pLV-GPX1 cells with astro-CM of GDNF-over-secreting astrocytes (Test astro-CM) significantly induced GPX-1 expression, peroxidase enzymatic activity, and intra-cellular glutathione (GSH) levels. These changes paralleled with protection of 90% of GDNF⁺/GPX1⁺ PC12 cells against toxicity, a rate that was 37% up from their un-infected un-treated (GDNF⁻/GPX1⁻) controls (p<0.001), and 12% up from pLV-GPX1 cells that received only Control astro-CM (GPX⁺/GDNF⁻) (p<0.01). GPX-1 over-expression per se suppressed intra-cellular H₂O₂ elevation upon 6-OHDA exposure, and addition of GDNF medium significantly accelerated this suppression (p<0.01). Substitution of 6-OHDA with H₂O₂ induced similar intra-cellular changes and comparable protection levels. In all cell groups, increased cell survival against either compound was further confirmed by increased live cell counts measured by double staining. Following depletion of intra-cellular GSH, only 46% of pLV-GPX1 cells survived 6-OHDA toxicity, whereas over 70% of them were saved upon GDNF treatment (p<0.001). Moreover, capase-3 activation was reduced in pLV-GPX1 cells and maximized by addition of GDNF. Comparison analyses established correlations between GPX-1-GDNF co-presence and both

  4. Effect of selenium supplementation on the level of glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in the nursing rat

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, S.P.; Hittner, H.M.; Strength, D.R.; Kretzer, F.; Lane, H.W.

    1986-03-01

    Prevention of retinopathy of prematurity using vitamin E as an antioxidant has been demonstrated. The purpose of this experiment was to study the antioxidant system, GSH-Px, (a selenoenzyme), in the retina. The effect of i.p. administration and dietary Se as selenite or selenomethionine (selmet) on tissue GSH-Px activity was determined in nursing pups. Dams were randomized into 3 dietary treatments (Basal, 0.15 ppm selenite, and 0.15 ppm selmet) and mated. Pups were sacrificed at 0, 7, and 14 days after delivery and GSH-Px was measured in pup eyes, hearts, livers, and kidneys, and dam livers. The pups of the dams consuming the Basal diet were divided into 4 i.p. groups: none, saline, selenite, and selmet (3 ..mu..g Se/kg body wt). The i.p. Se had no effect on GSH-Px activity in eye or heart, but significantly increased GSH-Px activity in liver and kidney with no difference between selenite and selmet. The pups of the dams consuming selenite and selmet diets showed significantly higher GSH-Px activity in all tissues studied than those consuming the Basal diet. For all tissues GSH-Px activity was higher for pups and dams fed selmet than those fed selenite. This research demonstrates that there was a difference in selenium availability between diet and i.p. administration.

  5. Effects of concentrated drinking water injection on glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes in liver of Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed

    Elia, Antonia Concetta; Fanetti, Alessia; Dörr, Ambrosius Josef Martin; Taticchi, Maria I

    2008-06-01

    Two drinking water production plants located in North Italy, collecting water from the River Po (Plants 1 and 2) were chosen for this study. Water samples were collected before and after the disinfection process and at two points along the piping system. Water samples were concentrated by the solid-phase extraction system and injected intraperitoneally into specimens of Cyprinus carpio. The concentration of water samples was 3 l/equiv. In order to assess the effects of the water samples on carp liver, total glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glyoxalase I, were measured following this treatment for 6 days at two experimental times (3 and 6 days). Both water plant-treated carp showed a general increase of the enzymatic activities of glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase which might be employed as potential biomarkers of oxidative stress induced by disinfected river water. Plant 1-treated carp showed higher glyoxalase I and glutathione levels and lower glutathione peroxidase activity. A depleted level of total glutathione and of glyoxalase I for specimens of water plant 2 (for both experimental times), without correlation with the distances in the pipeline, suggests that river plant water can also lead to potentially adverse effects on selected biochemical parameters in C. carpio.

  6. Reassessing cellular glutathione homoeostasis: novel insights revealed by genetically encoded redox probes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Bruce

    2014-08-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant small molecule thiol in nearly all eukaryotes. Whole-cell levels of oxidized (GSSG) and reduced (GSH) glutathione are variable and responsive to genetic and chemical manipulations, which has led to their relative levels being widely used as a marker of the 'cellular redox state' and to indicate the level of 'oxidative stress' experienced by cells, tissues and organisms. However, the applicability of glutathione as a marker for a generalized 'cellular redox state' is questionable, especially in the light of recent observations in yeast cells. In yeast, whole-cell GSSG changes are almost completely dependent upon the activity of an ABC-C (ATP-binding cassette-C) transporter, Ycf1 (yeast cadmium factor 1), which mediates sequestration of GSSG to the vacuole. In the absence of Ycf1 whole-cell GSSG content is strongly decreased and extremely robust to perturbation. These observations are consistent with highly specific redox-sensitive GFP probe-based measurements of the cytosolic glutathione pool and indicate that cytosolic GSSG reductive systems are easily able to reduce nearly all GSSG formed, even following treatment with large concentrations of oxidant. In the present paper, I discuss the consequences of these new findings for our understanding of glutathione homoeostasis in the eukaryotic cell.

  7. Influence of dietary nano elemental selenium on growth performance, tissue selenium distribution, meat quality, and glutathione peroxidase activity in Guangxi Yellow chicken.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Wang, Y

    2011-03-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate the effect of feed supplementation with nano elemental Se (Nano-Se) on growth performance, tissue Se distribution, meat quality, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in Guangxi Yellow chicken. Four treatments (control, T-1, T-2, and T-3 treatment groups) with 3 replicates of 30 chickens each were carried out. Diets for the control, T-1, T-2, and T-3 groups consisted of the basal diet supplemented with, respectively, 0.00, 0.10, 0.30, and 0.50 mg/kg of Nano-Se. Improved final BW, daily BW gain (DWG), feed conversion ratios, and survival rate (P < 0.05) were observed in the groups supplemented with Nano-Se as compared with the control groups after 90 d of feeding. The groups that received Nano-Se showed higher (P < 0.05) hepatic and muscle Se contents, drip loss percentage, inosine 5'-monophosphate content, and GSH-Px activities in the serum and liver than that did the control groups. For the T-2 and T-3 groups, a significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed in final BW, DWG, muscle Se content, breast drip loss, and GSH-Px activities in the serum and liver compared with the T-1 group. However, no significant differences were observed in final BW, DWG, and GSH-Px activities in the serum and liver between the T-2 and T-3 groups. It could be concluded from this study that supplementing diets with 0.30 mg/kg of Nano-Se for was effective in increasing the growth performance and feed conversion ratios of chickens, the Se content of tissues, and the quality of the meat.

  8. Cholinesterase and glutathione S-transferase activities of three mollusc species from the NW Portuguese coast in relation to the 'Prestige' oil spill.

    PubMed

    Tim-Tim, Ana L S; Morgado, Fernando; Moreira, Susana; Rangel, Rui; Nogueira, António J A; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2009-12-01

    In November 2002, the tanker 'Prestige' released about 19,000 tonnes of a heavy fuel oil (no. 6) before sinking with about 58,000 tonnes of its cargo, 135 miles from Cabo Finisterra (Spain). A considerable part of the released fuel oil reached the Galician coast, causing a heavy black tide and an ecological disaster. Although the black tide did not reach the NW coast of Portugal, it is possible that some of the fuel oil or its components also arrived to this area directly through the sea water and/or indirectly through the food chain. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate possible changes in two widely used biomarkers, the activity of the enzymes cholinesterases (ChE) and glutathione S-transferases (GST), of three molluscs (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Nucella lapillus and Monodonta lineata) from wild populations of the NW Portuguese coast in relation to the 'Prestige' oil spill. Molluscs were collected seasonally before (autumn 2002) and after (winter 2002/2003), spring and summer 2003) the oil spill at several sites along the Portuguese NW coast. Enzymatic activities determined before the accident were compared with those determined at different times after the oil spill taking into consideration abiotic factors. Information from different parameters was integrated by Redundancy Analysis and Principal Response Curves (PRC). Results show that GST and ChE activities were influenced by abiotic factors. Despite this influence, the results of PRC analysis also suggest that some of the fuel oil reached the NW Portuguese coast changing the patterns of ChE and GST activities of local populations of rocky shore species. Furthermore, the present study highlights the need of long-term monitoring with wild populations to assess both historical and punctual effects of pollution in the marine environment.

  9. Structural and biochemical studies on Vibrio cholerae Hsp31 reveals a novel dimeric form and Glutathione-independent Glyoxalase activity

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae experiences a highly hostile environment at human intestine which triggers the induction of various heat shock genes. The hchA gene product of V. cholerae O395, referred to a hypothetical intracellular protease/amidase VcHsp31, is one such stress-inducible homodimeric protein. Our current study demonstrates that VcHsp31 is endowed with molecular chaperone, amidopeptidase and robust methylglyoxalase activities. Through site directed mutagenesis coupled with biochemical assays on VcHsp31, we have confirmed the role of residues in the vicinity of the active site towards amidopeptidase and methylglyoxalase activities. VcHsp31 suppresses the aggregation of insulin in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Through crystal structures of VcHsp31 and its mutants, grown at various temperatures, we demonstrate that VcHsp31 acquires two (Type-I and Type-II) dimeric forms. Type-I dimer is similar to EcHsp31 where two VcHsp31 monomers associate in eclipsed manner through several intersubunit hydrogen bonds involving their P-domains. Type-II dimer is a novel dimeric organization, where some of the intersubunit hydrogen bonds are abrogated and each monomer swings out in the opposite directions centering at their P-domains, like twisting of wet cloth. Normal mode analysis (NMA) of Type-I dimer shows similar movement of the individual monomers. Upon swinging, a dimeric surface of ~400Å2, mostly hydrophobic in nature, is uncovered which might bind partially unfolded protein substrates. We propose that, in solution, VcHsp31 remains as an equilibrium mixture of both the dimers. With increase in temperature, transformation to Type-II form having more exposed hydrophobic surface, occurs progressively accounting for the temperature dependent increase of chaperone activity of VcHsp31. PMID:28235098

  10. The glutathione-related detoxication responses to juvenile and ecdysone hormones in Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, Leman; Kayalı, Hülya Ayar; Karacali, Sabire

    2013-08-01

    The effect of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH) on the glutathione pathway of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) was determined by investigating glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione S-transferases (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities as well as reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) content with respect to developmental stage. The continuous decreases of GSH-Px and GST activities dependent on the growth period of G. mellonella occurred in JH and 20E groups over and under their controls, respectively. While the GR activities of G. mellonella showed increases in young pupa (YP) for both control and in old larvae (OL) for the 20E groups after the minimum at these periods, they also increased after old pupa (OP) for the JH group with a maximum in OL period. Although GR activity levels in the JH group were significantly higher compared with controls and 20E groups up to OP period, the activity levels for the control and 20E groups were higher than those of the JH group at adult (AD) and old pupa (OP) periods, respectively. In spite of increases in the GR activity of 20E and control groups of G. mellonella, decreased GSH and increased GSSG levels were observed at aging period. GSH levels in the JH group reached a maximum at prepupa (PP) and then decreased with non-significant changes from OL to AD period. According to the results, GSH and GSSG levels, as well as GSH/GSSG ratios, were below and over control levels in 20E and JH groups, respectively, during all of the investigated developmental stages. On the contrary, the LPO levels were higher than the control for 20E and lower for the JH groups during the developmental period. These results show that while ecdysone hormone has a negative effect on the glutathione-related detoxication capacity of G. mellonella, the juvenile hormone has a positive effect on this process.

  11. Recreational Activities to Reduce Behavioural Symptoms in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kolanowski, Ann; Fick, Donna M.; Buettner, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Few clinicians have an educational grounding in the use of nonpharmacological therapies for people with dementia. In this article, we explore the utility of recreational activities as one nonpharmacological intervention that has demonstrated effectiveness for reducing the behavioural symptoms of dementia. The implementation of effective recreational activities involves three components: understanding the evidence for this approach; acknowledging the need to reduce medications that have the potential to interfere with activity effectiveness; and individualizing activities so that the maximum benefit from the intervention is obtained. PMID:20046903

  12. Systematic review of active workplace interventions to reduce sickness absence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The workplace is used as a setting for interventions to prevent and reduce sickness absence, regardless of the specific medical conditions and diagnoses. Aims To give an overview of the general effectiveness of active workplace interventions aimed at preventing and reducing sickness absence. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Psych-info, and ISI web of knowledge on 27 December 2011. Inclusion criteria were (i) participants over 18 years old with an active role in the intervention, (ii) intervention done partly or fully at the workplace or at the initiative of the workplace and (iii) sickness absence reported. Two reviewers independently screened articles, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. A narrative synthesis was used. Results We identified 2036 articles of which, 93 were assessed in full text. Seventeen articles were included (2 with low and 15 with medium risk of bias), with a total of 24 comparisons. Five interventions from four articles significantly reduced sickness absence. We found moderate evidence that graded activity reduced sickness absence and limited evidence that the Sheerbrooke model (a comprehensive multidisciplinary intervention) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) reduced sickness absence. There was moderate evidence that workplace education and physical exercise did not reduce sickness absence. For other interventions, the evidence was insufficient to draw conclusions. Conclusions The review found limited evidence that active workplace interventions were not generally effective in reducing sickness absence, but there was moderate evidence of effect for graded activity and limited evidence for the effectiveness of the Sheerbrooke model and CBT. PMID:23223750

  13. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced alterations of glutathione status in immortalized rat dopaminergic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Drechsel, Derek A.; Liang, L.-P.; Patel, Manisha . E-mail: manisha.patel@uchsc.edu

    2007-05-01

    Decreased glutathione levels associated with increased oxidative stress are a hallmark of numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. GSH is an important molecule that serves as an anti-oxidant and is also a major determinant of cellular redox environment. Previous studies have demonstrated that neurotoxins can cause changes in reduced and oxidized GSH levels; however, information regarding steady state levels remains unexplored. The goal of this study was to characterize changes in cellular GSH levels and its regulatory enzymes in a dopaminergic cell line (N27) following treatment with the Parkinsonian toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP{sup +}). Cellular GSH levels were initially significantly decreased 12 h after treatment, but subsequently recovered to values greater than controls by 24 h. However, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels were increased 24 h following treatment, concomitant with a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio prior to cell death. In accordance with these changes, ROS levels were also increased, confirming the presence of oxidative stress. Decreased enzymatic activities of glutathione reductase and glutamate-cysteine ligase by 20-25% were observed at early time points and partly account for changes in GSH levels after MPP{sup +} exposure. Additionally, glutathione peroxidase activity was increased 24 h following treatment. MPP{sup +} treatment was not associated with increased efflux of glutathione to the medium. These data further elucidate the mechanisms underlying GSH depletion in response to the Parkinsonian toxin, MPP{sup +}.

  14. Glutathione Metabolism and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smeyne, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    It has been established that oxidative stress, defined as the condition when the sum of free radicals in a cell exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell, contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Glutathione is a ubiquitous thiol tripeptide that acts alone, or in concert with enzymes within cells to reduce superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals and peroxynitrites. In this review, we examine the synthesis, metabolism and functional interactions of glutathione, and discuss how this relates to protection of dopaminergic neurons from oxidative damage and its therapeutic potential in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23665395

  15. Glutathione Levels in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gamcsik, Michael P.; Kasibhatla, Mohit S.; Teeter, Stephanie D.; Colvin, O. Michael

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes clinical studies in which glutathione was measured in tumor tissue from patients with brain, breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, head and neck and lung cancer. Glutathione tends to be elevated in breast, ovarian, head and neck and lung cancer and lower in brain and liver tumors compared to disease-free tissue. Cervical, colorectal, gastric and esophageal cancers show both higher and lower levels of tumor glutathione. Some studies show an inverse relationship between patient survival and tumor glutathione. Based on this survey, we recommend approaches that may improve the clinical value of glutathione as a biomarker. PMID:22900535

  16. -SH groups and glutathione in cancer patient's blood.

    PubMed

    della Rovere, F; Granata, A; Saija, A; Broccio, M; Tomaino, A; Zirilli, A; De Caridi, G; Broccio, G

    2000-01-01

    As reported in previous investigations, erythrocytes are the elements of peripheral blood most affected by free radical activity in the pathogenesis of cancer. In these studies, the level of sulphydrilic groups and reduced glutathione were assayed in the erythrocytes and plasma, while their successful scavenger activity against cell membrane oxidation and peroxidation has already been established. In subjects with cancer, the levels of -SH groups (p < 0.002) and reduced glutathione in both plasma and erythrocytes (p < 0.0001) were shown be a statistically significantly decreased compared to healthy controls. These differences were related to the defence of the hematic tissue against free radical activity. A similar pattern has also been reported when studying vitamin A and E content in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. The role of oxido-reduction phenomena in this disease is discussed, as well as the importance of reducing the oxido-peroxidation involvement of tissues and cell elements. The study of the GSH/GSSG ratio in order to determine the stage of the disease would be useful and might represent a systemic marker for cancerous lesions.

  17. Reduced DNA topoisomerase II activity in ataxia-telangiectasia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S P; Mohamed, R; Salmond, C; Lavin, M F

    1988-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports a defect at the level of chromatin structure or recognition of that structure in cells from patients with the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. Accordingly, we have investigated the activities of enzymes that alter the topology of DNA in Epstein Barr Virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cells from patients with this syndrome. Reduced activity of DNA topoisomerase II, determined by unknotting of P4 phage DNA, was observed in partially purified extracts from 5 ataxia-telangiectasia cell lines. The levels of enzyme activity was reduced substantially in 4 of these cell lines and to a lesser extent in the other cell line compared to controls. DNA topoisomerase I, assayed by relaxation of supercoiled DNA, was found to be present at comparable levels in both cell types. Reduced activity of topoisomerase II in ataxia-telangiectasia is compatible with the molecular, cellular and clinical changes described in this syndrome. Images PMID:2836804

  18. Preclinical pharmacokinetic analysis of NOV-002, a glutathione disulfide mimetic.

    PubMed

    Uys, J D; Manevich, Y; Devane, L C; He, L; Garret, T E; Pazoles, C J; Tew, K D; Townsend, D M

    2010-09-01

    NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is the subject of clinical investigation in oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Non-linear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of approximately 13 min with an AUC of 1.18 μgh/mL, a C(max) of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis.

  19. Evidence for the Presence of the Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle in Mitochondria and Peroxisomes of Pea Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, A.; Hernandez, J. A.; Del Rio, L. A.; Sevilla, F.

    1997-01-01

    The presence of the enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle was investigated in mitochondria and peroxisomes purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves. All four enzymes, ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11), monodehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.6.5.4), dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2), were present in mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione. The activity of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes was higher in mitochondria than in peroxisomes, except for APX, which was more active in peroxisomes than in mitochondria. Intact mitochondria and peroxisomes had no latent APX activity, and this remained in the membrane fraction after solubilization assays with 0.2 M KCl. Monodehydroascorbate reductase was highly latent in intact mitochondria and peroxisomes and was membrane-bound, suggesting that the electron acceptor and donor sites of this redox protein are not on the external side of the mitochondrial and peroxisomal membranes. Dehydroascorbate reductase was found mainly in the soluble peroxisomal and mitochondrial fractions. Glutathione reductase had a high latency in mitochondria and peroxisomes and was present in the soluble fractions of both organelles. In intact peroxisomes and mitochondria, the presence of reduced ascorbate and glutathione and the oxidized forms of ascorbate and glutathione were demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The ascorbate-glutathione cycle of mitochondria and peroxisomes could represent an important antioxidant protection system against H2O2 generated in both plant organelles. PMID:12223704

  20. Biliary excretion of acetaminophen-glutathione as an index of toxic activation of acetaminophen: effect of chemicals that alter acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Madhu, C.; Gregus, Z.; Klaassen, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    Acetaminophen (AA) is converted, presumably by cytochrome P-450, to an electrophile which is conjugated with glutathione (GS). AA-GS is excreted into bile, therefore the biliary excretion rate of AA-GS may reflect the rate of activation of AA in vivo. In order to test this hypothesis, the effect of agents capable of altering the activation of AA including cytochrome P-450 inducers and inhibitors, cobaltous chloride which decreases the amount of P-450, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors (indomethacin and naproxen), antioxidants (butylated hydroxyanisole, alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid and ascorbic acid palmitate) and other chemicals known to decrease AA hepatotoxicity (dimethylsulfoxide and cysteamine), on the biliary excretion of AA-GS was studied in hamsters, the species most sensitive to AA-induced hepatotoxicity. The biliary excretion of AA-GS increased linearly up to 1 mmol/kg of AA i.v., but at higher dosages exhibited saturation kinetics. Dosages above 0.5 mmol/kg lowered hepatic GS concentration. Of the cytochrome P-450 inducers, 3-methylcholanthrene and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, increased the biliary excretion of AA-GS (2.9- and 3.2-fold, respectively) whereas ethanol and isoniazid did not affect it, and pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile tended to decrease it (43%). Phenobarbital tended to increase the biliary excretion of AA-GS, but not in a statistically significant manner. Several cytochrome P-450 inhibitors (metyrapone, 8-methoxypsoralen, 2-(4,6-dichloro-biphenyloxy) ethylamine, alpha-naphthoflavone and cimetidine) decreased the biliary excretion of AA-GS, although SKF 525-A and piperonyl butoxide did not. Cobaltous chloride decreased dramatically the biliary excretion of AA-GS.

  1. Expression of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase pi in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutathione (GSH) is one of the most important agents of the antioxidant defense system of the cell because, in conjunction with the enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione S transferase pi (GSTpi), it plays a central role in the detoxification and biotransformation of chemotherapeutic drugs. This study evaluated the expression of GSH and the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes by immunohistochemistry in 30 canine mammary tumors, relating the clinicopathological parameters, clinical outcome and survival of the bitches. In an in vitro study, the expression of the genes glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC) and glutathione synthetase (GSS) that synthesize GSH and GSH-Px gene were verified by qPCR and subjected to treatment with doxorubicin, to check the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Results The immunohistochemical expression of GSH, GSH-Px and GSTpi was compared with the clinical and pathological characteristics and the clinical outcome in the bitches, including metastasis and death. The results showed that high immunoexpression of GSH was correlated to the absence of tumor ulceration and was present in dogs without metastasis (P < 0.05). There was significant correlation of survival with the increase of GSH (P < 0.05). The expression of the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes showed no statistically significant correlation with the analyzed variables (p > 0.05). The analysis of the relative expression of genes responsible for the synthesis of GSH (GCLC and GSS) and GSH-Px by quantitative PCR was done with cultured cells of 10 tumor fragments from dogs with mammary tumors. The culture cells showed a decrease in GCLC and GSS expression when compared with no treated cells (P < 0.05). High GSH immunoexpression was associated with better clinical outcomes. Conclusion Therefore, high expression of the GSH seems to play an important role in the clinical outcome of patients with mammary tumors and suggest its use as prognostic marker. The in

  2. Effects of mercury on glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes in hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas).

    PubMed

    Linšak, Željko; Linšak, Dijana Tomić; Špirić, Zdravko; Srebočan, Emil; Glad, Marin; Milin, Čedomila

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and evaluate risks of long-term exposure to mercury in hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas), with a chemical-analytical approach evaluating median mass fraction of toxic mercury in the hares organs (liver, kidney, muscle and brain). To obtain better insight into possible effects of mercury, the study included screening of the oxidative status after long term exposure to low concentrations of mercury. Hares organs were analyzed for total mercury concentration by AAS. Glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes status was also investigated. The median mercury concentrations (wet weight) in the liver, kidney, muscle and brain of the hares ranged from 0.058-0.189, 0.138-0.406, 0.013-0.046 and 0.022-0.102 μg/g respectively. Concentration of the glutathione (GSH), glutathione-peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione-reductase (GR) activity increased with the mercury concentration. However, glutathione S-transferase (GST) and superoxide-dismutase (SOD) activity decreased with the mercury concentration. The results of this study show the impact of environmentally absorbed mercury on the antioxidant status of the examined hares. Further research on long-term exposure to low concentrations of mercury is needed.

  3. Schisandrin B protects against carbon tetrachloride toxicity by enhancing the mitochondrial glutathione redox status in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Ip, S P; Poon, M K; Che, C T; Ng, K H; Kong, Y C; Ko, K M

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated the effect of Schisandrin B (Sch B),an active ingredient of the fruit of Schisandra chinensis, on enhancing the hepatic glutathione antioxidant system in mice, as evidenced by the hepatoprotection against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) toxicity. In the present study, the mechanism involved in the hepatoprotection afforded by Sch B treatment was investigated. Treating female Balb/c mice with 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, an inhibitor of glutathione reductase (GRD), at a dose of 2 mmol/kg (i.p.) did not abrogate the hepatoprotective action of Sch B in CCl4-treated mice. The result indicates that the increased activity of hepatic GRD is not ascribable to the hepatoprotective action of Sch B. In control mice, the same Sch B treatment regimen caused an enhancement in hepatic mitochondrial glutathione redox status, as indicated by the significant increase and decrease in reduced and oxidized glutathione levels, respectively. While the CCl4 intoxication greatly impaired mitochondrial glutathione redox status, the beneficial effect of Sch B treatment became more evident after CCl4 challenge. Our results strongly suggest that the mechanism of hepatoprotection afforded by Sch B treatment may involve the enhancement of mitochondrial glutathione redox status.

  4. Glutathione: a key player in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; De Carolis, Caterina; Perricone, Roberto

    2009-07-01

    Increasing attention in the physiopathology of inflammatory/immunomediated diseases has been focused on the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxygen-based molecules possessing high chemical reactivity and produced by activated neutrophils during the inflammatory response. During chronic inflammation, when sustained production of ROS occurs, antioxidant defences can weaken, resulting in a situation termed oxidative stress. Moreover, antioxidant defence systems have been demonstrated to be constitutively lacking in patients affected with chronic degenerative diseases, especially inflammatory/immunomediated. Glutathione, a tripeptide, is the principal component of the antioxidant defence system in the living cells. Glutathione has been demonstrated to have diverse effects on the immune system, either stimulating or inhibiting the immunological response in order to control inflammation. The study of interactions between glutathione and the immune system has attracted many investigators. Altered glutathione concentrations may play an important role in many autoimmune pathological conditions prevalently elicited, detrimed and maintained by inflammatory/immune response mediated by oxidative stress reactions. The role of glutathione in autoimmunity will be reviewed herein.

  5. Size effect of elemental selenium nanoparticles (Nano-Se) at supranutritional levels on selenium accumulation and glutathione S-transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dungeng; Zhang, Jinsong; Liu, Qingliang; Taylor, Ethan Will

    2007-10-01

    It has been shown that 36 nm Nano-Se has lower toxicity than selenite or selenomethionine, but these forms of selenium (Se) all possess similar ability to increase selenoenzyme levels. The size of nanoparticles plays an important role in their biological activity: as expected, 5-200 nm Nano-Se can directly scavenge free radicals in vitro in a size-dependent fashion. However, in Se-deficient cells and Se-deficient mice, the size effect of Nano-Se on increasing selenoenzymes and liver Se disappears unexpectedly. We hypothesize that under conditions of Se deficiency, the avidity of Se uptake mechanisms may be increased to maintain the biosynthesis of selenoenzymes, which are fundamental for redox homeostasis. This increased avidity may override the potential advantage of small size Nano-Se seen under Se-replete conditions, thereby eliminating the size effect. Once selenoenzymes have been saturated, Se uptake mechanisms may downregulate; accordingly, the size effect of Nano-Se can then reappear. To test this hypothesis, Se-deficient mice were administered either 36 or 90 nm Nano-Se at supranutritional doses, in both a short-term model and a single-dose model. Under these conditions, Nano-Se showed a size effect on Se accumulation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. A size effect of Nano-Se was found in 15 out of 18 total comparisons between sizes at the same dose and time in the two models. Furthermore, the magnitude of the size effect was more prominent on Se accumulation than on GST activity. GST is strictly regulated by transcriptional and translational mechanisms, so its increase in activity normally does not exceed 3-fold. In contrast, the homeostasis of Se accumulation is not as tightly controlled. In the present experiments, GST activity had reached or was approaching saturation, but liver Se was far below saturation. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that the saturation profile of the tested biomarker has an impact on the size effect of Nano

  6. Mg deficiency results in modulation of serum lipids, glutathione, and NO synthase isozyme activation in cardiovascular tissues: relevance to de novo synthesis of ceramide, serum Mg and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nilank C; Liu, Jian-Ping; Iqbal, Jahangir; Hussain, Mahmood; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Yan; Zheng, Tao; Li, Wenyan; Sica, Anthony C; Perez-Albela, Jose Luis; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2011-01-01

    The present work tested the hypothesis that short-term (S-T) dietary deficiency of magnesium (Mg) (21 days) in rats would: 1) result in reduction in serum(s) sphingomyelin (SM) and changes in several blood lipids, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) concomitant with elevations in s cholesterol (chol), s LDL+VLDL and trigycerides (TG), as well as reduction in the PC/cholesterol ratio; 2) lead to oxidative stress, characterized by reductions in glutathione (glut) content in the various chambers of the heart and activation of e-NOS and n-NOS in the atria, ventricles and aortic smooth muscle (ASM); 3) produce early cardiac damage characterized by leakage of creatine kinase (CK) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH); and 4) demonstrate that these pathophysiological changes are a result of profound reductions in s ionized Mg (Mg(2+)) and activation of the SM-ceramide pathway. In addition, we hypothesized that: 1) exposure of primary cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to low extracellular Mg(2+) would lead to de novo synthesis of ceramide and activation of NO synthase with reduction in glut, both of which would be attenuated by inhibition of sphingomyelinase (SMase) and serine palmitoyl CoA transferase (SPT); and 2) low levels of Mg(2+)added to the drinking water would either prevent or ameliorate these manifestations. Our data indicate that S-T Mg deficiency resulted in reductions in s Mg(2+), SM, PC, HDL-C and the PC/chol ratio concomitant with decreases in tissue levels of glut, leakage of cardiac CK and LDH, as well as activation of e-NOS and n-NOS in all chambers of the heart and ASM. The greater the reduction in s Mg(2+), the greater the effects on all parameters analyzed; very significant correlations to levels of s SM and Mg(2+) were found with all of the serum and tissue biochemical -molecular analytes measured. Our experiments also showed that VSMCs exposed to low Mg(2+)resulted in activation of NO synthase, loss of glut and de novo

  7. Subcellular immunocytochemical analysis detects the highest concentrations of glutathione in mitochondria and not in plastids.

    PubMed

    Zechmann, B; Mauch, F; Sticher, L; Müller, M

    2008-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is a major antioxidant and redox buffer with multiple roles in plant metabolism. Glutathione biosynthesis is restricted to the cytosol and the plastids and the product is distributed to the various organelles by unknown mechanisms. In the present study immunogold cytochemistry based on anti-glutathione antisera and transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the relative concentration of glutathione in different organelles of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and root cells. Glutathione-specific labelling was detected in all cellular compartments except the apoplast and the vacuole. The highest glutathione content was surprisingly not found in plastids, which have been described before as a major site of glutathione accumulation, but in mitochondria which lack the capacity for glutathione biosynthesis. Mitochondria of both leaf and root cells contained 7-fold and 4-fold, respectively, higher glutathione levels than plastids while the density of glutathione labelling in the cytosol, nuclei, and peroxisomes was intermediate. The accuracy of the glutathione labelling is supported by two observations. First, pre-adsorption of the anti-glutathione antisera with glutathione reduced the density of the gold particles in all organelles to background levels. Second, the overall glutathione-labelling density was reduced by about 90% in leaves of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis mutant pad2-1 and increased in transgenic plants with enhanced glutathione accumulation. Hence, there was a strong correlation between immunocytochemical and biochemical data of glutathione accumulation. Interestingly, the glutathione labelling of mitochondria in pad2-1 remained very similar to wild-type plants thus suggesting that the high mitochondrial glutathione content is maintained in a situation of permanent glutathione-deficiency at the expense of other glutathione pools. High and constant levels of glutathione in mitochondria appear to be particularly

  8. Subcellular immunocytochemical analysis detects the highest concentrations of glutathione in mitochondria and not in plastids

    PubMed Central

    Zechmann, B.; Mauch, F.; Sticher, L.; Müller, M.

    2008-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is a major antioxidant and redox buffer with multiple roles in plant metabolism. Glutathione biosynthesis is restricted to the cytosol and the plastids and the product is distributed to the various organelles by unknown mechanisms. In the present study immunogold cytochemistry based on anti-glutathione antisera and transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the relative concentration of glutathione in different organelles of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and root cells. Glutathione-specific labelling was detected in all cellular compartments except the apoplast and the vacuole. The highest glutathione content was surprisingly not found in plastids, which have been described before as a major site of glutathione accumulation, but in mitochondria which lack the capacity for glutathione biosynthesis. Mitochondria of both leaf and root cells contained 7-fold and 4-fold, respectively, higher glutathione levels than plastids while the density of glutathione labelling in the cytosol, nuclei, and peroxisomes was intermediate. The accuracy of the glutathione labelling is supported by two observations. First, pre-adsorption of the anti-glutathione antisera with glutathione reduced the density of the gold particles in all organelles to background levels. Second, the overall glutathione-labelling density was reduced by about 90% in leaves of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis mutant pad2-1 and increased in transgenic plants with enhanced glutathione accumulation. Hence, there was a strong correlation between immunocytochemical and biochemical data of glutathione accumulation. Interestingly, the glutathione labelling of mitochondria in pad2-1 remained very similar to wild-type plants thus suggesting that the high mitochondrial glutathione content is maintained in a situation of permanent glutathione-deficiency at the expense of other glutathione pools. High and constant levels of glutathione in mitochondria appear to be particularly

  9. Glutathione reductase gsr-1 is an essential gene required for Caenorhabditis elegans early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Mora-Lorca, José Antonio; Sáenz-Narciso, Beatriz; Gaffney, Christopher J; Naranjo-Galindo, Francisco José; Pedrajas, José Rafael; Guerrero-Gómez, David; Dobrzynska, Agnieszka; Askjaer, Peter; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Cabello, Juan; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant thiol in the vast majority of organisms and is maintained in its reduced form by the flavoenzyme glutathione reductase. In this work, we describe the genetic and functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans gsr-1 gene that encodes the only glutathione reductase protein in this model organism. By using green fluorescent protein reporters we demonstrate that gsr-1 produces two GSR-1 isoforms, one located in the cytoplasm and one in the mitochondria. gsr-1 loss of function mutants display a fully penetrant embryonic lethal phenotype characterized by a progressive and robust cell division delay accompanied by an aberrant distribution of interphasic chromatin in the periphery of the cell nucleus. Maternally expressed GSR-1 is sufficient to support embryonic development but these animals are short-lived, sensitized to chemical stress, have increased mitochondrial fragmentation and lower mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, the embryonic lethality of gsr-1 worms is prevented by restoring GSR-1 activity in the cytoplasm but not in mitochondria. Given the fact that the thioredoxin redox systems are dispensable in C. elegans, our data support a prominent role of the glutathione reductase/glutathione pathway in maintaining redox homeostasis in the nematode.

  10. Sodium chloride enhances cadmium tolerance through reducing cadmium accumulation and increasing anti-oxidative enzyme activity in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing-Lin; Shang, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Jabeen, Zahra; Zhang, Guo-Ping

    2013-06-01

    The effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on cadmium (Cd) uptake, translocation, and oxidative stress was investigated using 2 tobacco cultivars differing in Cd tolerance. The growth inhibition of the tobacco plants exposed to Cd toxicity was in part alleviated by moderate addition of NaCl in the culture solution. Cadmium concentration of shoots and roots in the 2 cultivars increased with increasing Cd levels in the solution and decreased with the addition of NaCl. The addition of NaCl could alleviate the oxidative stress caused by Cd toxicity, as reflected by reduced production of malondialdehyde and recovered or enhanced activities of antioxidative enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The results also showed that the enhancement of antioxidative enzyme activity by NaCl for the tobacco plants exposed to Cd stress is related to induced Ca signaling.

  11. [The dynamics of indicators of selenium, glutathione and anti-oxidant defense of blood in patients with anemic cardiomyopathy against the background of treatment with preparations of iron and selenium].

    PubMed

    Goncharova, E V; Govorin, A V; Scherbakova, O A; Chistiakova, M V

    2015-02-01

    The study was carried out on samplings of 46 patients with asiderotic anemia of severe degree and complicated by cardiomyopathy and 16 healthy persons. The content of selenium was analyzed using I.I. Nazarenko technique of detection of mass concentration GOST 19413-89. The content of glutathione in blood was detected using the technique based on capacity of acid-soluble thiol aggregations at interaction with 5,5-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzene) acid to form a colored compound--thio-2-nitrobenzene acid. The principle of technique of measurement of activity of glutathione peroxidase of blood ervthrocvtes is in capacity of peroxide hydrogen to form a resistant colored complex with molybdenum salts. The technique of detection of activity of glutathione peroxidase is based on its capacity to catalyze reaction of interaction of reduced glutathione with tretbutyl hydro peroxide and on capacity of glutathione reductase to catalyze NADFN-dependent reduction of oxidated glutathione. The principle of technique of detection of activity of superoxiddismutase is based on capacity of enzyme to suppress reaction of reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium with superoxide anion-radical generated in vitro in the system xanthine-xanthineoxidase. The study established decreasing of content of selenium in blood of patients with anemic cardiomyopathy up to 1.8 times as compared with control group. The content of total glutathione in blood of patients was decreased up to 17.7% at the expense of decreasing of level of reduced glutathione up to 18.5%. The study established decreasing of activity of catalase in erythrocytes up to 1.3 times, glutathione peroxidase up to 2.5 times, glutathione reductase up to 2.1 times and superoxiddismutase up to 1.5 times as compared with control group. After the preparations of iron and selenium ware applied to patients with anemic cardiomyopathy the increase of level of selenium in blood up to 80.4% was established. The level of total glutathione increased up to 54

  12. Reduced Chitinase Activities in Ant Plants of the Genus Macaranga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Martin; Fiala, Brigitte; Linsenmair, K. Eduard; Boller, Thomas

    Many plant species have evolved mutualistic associations with ants, protecting their host against detrimental influences such as herbivorous insects. Letourneau (1998) reported in the case of Piper that ants defend their plants principally against stem-boring insects and also reduce fungal infections on inflorescences. Macaranga plants that were experimentally deprived of their symbiotic Crematogaster ants suffered heavily from shoot borers and pathogenic fungi (Heil 1998). Here we report that ants seem to reduce fungal infections actively in the obligate myrmecophyte Macarangatriloba (Euphorbiaceae), while ant-free plants can be easily infected. We also found extremely low chitinase activity in Macaranga plants. The plants' own biochemical defense seems to be reduced, and low chitinase activity perhaps may represent a predisposition for the evolution of myrmecophytism. These plants are therefore highly dependent on their ants, which obviously function not only as an antiherbivore defense but also as an effective agent against fungal pathogens.

  13. Systemic chromosome instability in Shugoshin-1 mice resulted in compromised glutathione pathway, activation of Wnt signaling and defects in immune system in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, H Y; Kumar, G; Zhang, Y; Rubin, E; Lightfoot, S; Dai, W; Rao, C V

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic error-mediated chromosome instability (CIN) can lead to aneuploidy, chromothripsis, DNA damage and/or whole chromosome gain/loss. CIN may prompt rapid accumulation of mutations and genomic alterations. Thus, CIN can promote carcinogenesis. This CIN process results from a mutation in certain genes or environmental challenge such as smoking, and is highly prevalent in various cancers, including lung cancer. A better understanding of the effects of CIN on carcinogenesis will lead to novel methods for cancer prevention and treatment. Previously Shugoshin-1 (Sgo1−/+) mice, a transgenic mouse model of CIN, showed mild proneness to spontaneous lung and liver cancers. In this study, adoptive (T/B-cell based) immunity-deficient RAG1−/− Sgo1−/+ double mutant mice developed lung adenocarcinomas more aggressively than did Sgo1−/+ or RAG1−/− mice, suggesting immune system involvement in CIN-mediated lung carcinogenesis. To identify molecular causes of the lung adenocarcinoma, we used systems biology approach, comparative RNAseq, to RAG1−/− and RAG1−/− Sgo1−/+. The comparative RNAseq data and follow-up analyses in the lungs of naive Sgo1−/+ mice demonstrate that, (i) glutathione is depleted, making the tissue vulnerable to oxidative stress, (ii) spontaneous DNA damage is increased, (iii) oncogenic Wnt signaling is activated, (iv) both major branches of the immune system are weakened through misregulations in signal mediators such as CD80 and calreticulin and (v) the actin cytoskeleton is misregulated. Overall, the results show multi-faceted roles of CIN in lung carcinoma development in Sgo1−/+ mice. Our model presents various effects of CIN and will help to identify potential targets to prevent CIN-driven carcinogenesis in the lung. PMID:27526110

  14. Motor dysfunction and alterations in glutathione concentration, cholinesterase activity, and BDNF expression in substantia nigra pars compacta in rats with pedunculopontine lesion.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Lezcano, Lisette; Jimenez-Martin, Javier; Díaz-Hung, Mei-Li; Alberti-Amador, Esteban; Wong-Guerra, Maylin; González-Fraguela, Ma Elena; Estupiñán-Díaz, Bárbara; Serrano-Sánchez, Teresa; Francis-Turner, Liliana; Delgado-Ocaña, Susana; Núñez-Figueredo, Yanier; Vega-Hurtado, Yamilé; Fernández-Jiménez, Isabel

    2017-04-21

    Pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been considered a critically important region in the regulation of some of the physiological functions that fail during the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this paper, the effects of unilateral neurotoxic lesion of the PPN [through the injection of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) solution (concentration: 0.1M; volume: 0.5µL)] in motor execution and gait disorders and the changes in cellular and molecular indicators in rat nigral tissue were evaluated. The motor execution was assessed using the beam test (BT) and the gait disorders by footprint test. Glutathione (GSH) concentrations, acetyl cholinesterase enzymatic activity (AChE EA), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in nigral tissue were analyzed. NMDA-lesioned rats showed fine motor dysfunction with a significant increase in the slow (p≤0.01) and fast movement (p≤0.01) time and in path deviation (p≤0.01) on the smaller diameter beams. Moreover, NMDA-lesioned rats exhibited an imprecise path with moments of advances and setbacks, alternating with left and right deviations, suspensions, and inverted positions. Footprint test revealed slight gait disorders, which were manifested by a reduction in the left and right stride lengths, the intra-step distance, and the support area (p≤0.01). Biochemical studies showed that 48h after the PPN neurotoxic injury, the GSH concentrations and BDNF expression were significantly increased (p≤0.01). These variables returned to normal values 7days after the PPN lesion; the AChE EA showed a significant increase at this time. These functional changes in nigral tissue could be a plastic responses associated with early PD.

  15. Development of roGFP2-derived redox probes for measurement of the glutathione redox potential in the cytosol of severely glutathione-deficient rml1 seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Aller, Isabel; Rouhier, Nicolas; Meyer, Andreas J.

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione is important for detoxification, as a cofactor in biochemical reactions and as a thiol-redox buffer. The cytosolic glutathione buffer is normally highly reduced with glutathione redox potentials (EGSH) of more negative than −310 mV. Maintenance of such negative redox potential is achieved through continuous reduction of glutathione disulfide by glutathione reductase (GR). Deviations from steady state glutathione redox homeostasis have been discussed as a possible mean to alter the activity of redox-sensitive proteins through switching of critical thiol residues. To better understand such signaling mechanisms it is essential to be able to measure EGSH over a wide range from highly negative redox potentials down to potentials found in mutants that show already severe phenotypes. With the advent of redox-sensitive GFPs (roGFPs), understanding the in vivo dynamics of the thiol-based redox buffer system became within reach. The original roGFP versions, roGFP1 and roGFP2, however, have midpoint potentials between −280 and −290 mV rendering them fully oxidized in the ER and almost fully reduced in the cytosol, plastids, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. To extend the range of suitable probes we have engineered a roGFP2 derivative, roGFP2-iL, with a midpoint potential of about −238 mV. This value is within the range of redox potentials reported for homologous roGFP1-iX probes, albeit with different excitation properties. To allow rapid and specific equilibration with the glutathione pool, fusion constructs with human glutaredoxin 1 (GRX1) were generated and characterized in vitro. GRX1-roGFP2-iL proved to be suitable for in vivo redox potential measurements and extends the range of EGSH values that can be measured in vivo with roGFP2-based probes from about −320 mV for GRX1-roGFP2 down to about −210 mV for GRX1-roGFP2-iL. Using both probes in the cytosol of severely glutathione-deficient rml1 seedlings revealed an EGSH of about −260 mV in this mutant

  16. Cytosolic Triosephosphate Isomerase from Arabidopsis thaliana Is Reversibly Modified by Glutathione on Cysteines 127 and 218

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Sébastien; Bykova, Natalia V.; Pelletier, Guillaume; Dorion, Sonia; Rivoal, Jean

    2016-01-01

    In plant cells, an increase in cellular oxidants can have multiple effects, including the promotion of mixed disulfide bonds between glutathione and some proteins (S-glutathionylation). The present study focuses on the cytosolic isoform of the glycolytic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (cTPI) from Arabidopsis thaliana and its reversible modification by glutathione. We used purified recombinant cTPI to demonstrate the enzyme sensitivity to inhibition by N-ethylmaleimide, hydrogen peroxide and diamide. Treatment of cTPI with diamide in the presence of reduced glutathione (GSH) led to a virtually complete inhibition of its enzymatic activity by S-glutathionylation. Recombinant cTPI was also sensitive to the oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG) in the micromolar range. Activity of cTPI was restored after reversion of S-glutathionylation by two purified recombinant A. thaliana cytosolic glutaredoxins (GRXs). GRXs-mediated deglutathionylation of cTPI was dependent on a GSH-regenerating system. Analysis of cTPI by mass spectrometry after S-glutathionylation by GSSG revealed that two Cys residues (Cys127 and Cys218) were modified by glutathione. The role of these two residues was assessed using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of Cys127 and Cys218 to Ser separately or together caused different levels of decrease in enzyme activity, loss of stability, as well as alteration of intrinsic fluorescence, underlining the importance of these Cys residues in protein conformation. Comparison of wild-type and mutant proteins modified with biotinyl glutathione ethyl ester (BioGEE) showed partial binding with single mutants and total loss of binding with the double mutant, demonstrating that both Cys residues were significantly S-glutathionylated. cTPI modification with BioGEE was reversed using DTT. Our study provides the first identification of the amino acid residues involved in cTPI S-glutathionylation and supports the hypothesis that this reversible modification could be part

  17. Arabidopsis dehydroascorbate reductase 1 and 2 modulate redox states of ascorbate-glutathione cycle in the cytosol in response to photooxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Noshi, Masahiro; Yamada, Hiroki; Hatanaka, Risa; Tanabe, Noriaki; Tamoi, Masahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    Ascorbate and glutathione are indispensable cellular redox buffers and allow plants to acclimate stressful conditions. Arabidopsis contains three functional dehydroascorbate reductases (DHAR1-3), which catalyzes the conversion of dehydroascorbate into its reduced form using glutathione as a reductant. We herein attempted to elucidate the physiological role in DHAR1 and DHAR2 in stress responses. The total DHAR activities in DHAR knockout Arabidopsis plants, dhar1 and dhar2, were 22 and 92%, respectively, that in wild-type leaves. Under high light (HL), the levels of total ascorbate and dehydroascorbate were only reduced and increased, respectively, in dhar1. The oxidation of glutathione under HL was significantly inhibited in both dhar1 and dhar2, while glutathione contents were only enhanced in dhar1. The dhar1 showed stronger visible symptoms than the dhar2 under photooxidative stress conditions. Our results demonstrated a pivotal role of DHAR1 in the modulation of cellular redox states under photooxidative stress.

  18. Spirulina prevents memory dysfunction, reduces oxidative stress damage and augments antioxidant activity in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Juen-Haur; Lee, I-Te; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Wang, Ming-Fu; Hou, Rolis Chien-Wei; Wu, Su-Mei; Chan, Yin-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Spirulina has proven to be effective in treating certain cancers, hyperlipidemia, immunodeficiency, and inflammatory processes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of Spirulina on memory dysfunction, oxidative stress damage and antioxidant enzyme activity. Three-month-old male senescence-accelerated prone-8 (SAMP8) mice were randomly assigned to either a control group or to one of two experimental groups (one receiving daily dietary supplementation with 50 mg/kg BW and one with 200 mg/kg BW of Spirulina platensis water extract). Senescence-accelerated-resistant (SAMR1) mice were used as the external control. Results showed that the Spirulina-treated groups had better passive and avoidance scores than the control group. The amyloid β-protein (Aβ) deposition was significantly reduced at the hippocampus and whole brain in both Spirulina groups. The levels of lipid peroxidation were significantly reduced at the hippocampus, striatum, and cortex in both Spirulina groups, while catalase activity was significantly higher only in the 200 mg/kg BW Spirulina group than in the control group. Glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly higher only in the cortex of the 200 mg/kg group than in that of the SAMP8 control group. However, superoxide dismutase activity in all parts of the brain did not significantly differ among all groups. In conclusion, Spirulina platensis may prevent the loss of memory possibly by lessening Aβ protein accumulation, reducing oxidative damage and mainly augmenting the catalase activity.

  19. Plant glutathione transferases

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David P; Lapthorn, Adrian; Edwards, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are encoded by a large and diverse gene family in plants, which can be divided on the basis of sequence identity into the phi, tau, theta, zeta and lambda classes. The theta and zeta GSTs have counterparts in animals but the other classes are plant-specific and form the focus of this article. The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana contains 48 GST genes, with the tau and phi classes being the most numerous. The GST proteins have evolved by gene duplication to perform a range of functional roles using the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) as a cosubstrate or coenzyme. GSTs are predominantly expressed in the cytosol, where their GSH-dependent catalytic functions include the conjugation and resulting detoxification of herbicides, the reduction of organic hydroperoxides formed during oxidative stress and the isomerization of maleylacetoacetate to fumarylacetoacetate, a key step in the catabolism of tyrosine. GSTs also have non-catalytic roles, binding flavonoid natural products in the cytosol prior to their deposition in the vacuole. Recent studies have also implicated GSTs as components of ultraviolet-inducible cell signaling pathways and as potential regulators of apoptosis. Although sequence diversification has produced GSTs with multiple functions, the structure of these proteins has been highly conserved. The GSTs thus represent an excellent example of how protein families can diversify to fulfill multiple functions while conserving form and structure. PMID:11897031

  20. Activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria under simulated reservoir conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosnes, J.T.; Graue, A.; Lien, T. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) that have been isolated from hot oilfield waters from subsea oil reservoirs in the North Sea. Experiments with these bacteria in a reservoir simulator indicate that SRB may maintain their activity in the conditions found in most North Sea reservoirs and, if precautions are not taken, may contribute to souring of the oil and gas.

  1. Antioxidative response of ascorbate-glutathione pathway enzymes and metabolites to desiccation of recalcitrant Acer saccharinum seeds.

    PubMed

    Pukacka, Stanisława; Ratajczak, Ewelina

    2006-12-01

    Ascorbate-glutathione systems were studied during desiccation of recalcitrant seeds of the silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.). The desiccated seeds gradually lost their germination capacity and this was strongly correlated with an increase in electrolyte leakage from seeds. Simultaneously the increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (superoxide radical - O(2)(-*) and hydrogen peroxide - H(2)O(2)) production was observed. The results indicate that remarkable changes in the concentrations and redox status of ascorbate and glutathione occur in embryo axes and cotyledons. After shedding, concentrations of ascorbic acid (ASA) and the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) are higher in embryo axes than in cotyledons and their redox status is high in both embryo parts. Cotyledons in freshly shed seeds are devoid of GSH. At the first stages of desiccation, up to a level of 43% of moisture content, ASA content in embryo axes and GSH content in cotyledons increased. Below this level of moisture content, the antioxidant contents as well as their redox status rapidly decreased. The enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione pathway: ascorbate peroxidase (APX) (EC 1.11.1.11), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MR) (EC 1.6.5.4), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) (EC 1.8.5.1) and glutathione reductase (GR) (EC 1.6.4.2) increased their activity during desiccation, but mainly in embryonic axes. The changes are probably required for counteracting the production of ROS during desiccation. The relationship between ascorbate and glutathione metabolism and their relevance during desiccation of recalcitrant Acer saccharinum seeds is discussed.

  2. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation.

  3. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials.

  4. Variation in cellular glutathione peroxidase activity in lens epithelial cells, transgenics and knockouts does not significantly change the response to H2O2 stress.

    PubMed

    Spector, A; Yang, Y; Ho, Y S; Magnenat, J L; Wang, R R; Ma, W; Li, W C

    1996-05-01

    This investigation examines the contribution of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx-1) in degrading H2O2 in lens preparations. Rabbit (N/N1003A) and normal and GSHPx-1 transfected mouse (alpha TN4-1) lens epithelial cell lines and normal and GSHPx-1 transgenic and knockout mouse lenses were utilized. GSHPx-1 activity in the cell lines was increased from two-fold to about four-fold, in the lenses from transgenics more than four-fold and the lenses from knockouts had less than 3% of normal GSHPx-1 activity. The transgenic and knockout mice as well as their lenses appeared normal for up to 3 to 4 months, the longest period of observation. The preparations were subjected to oxidative stress by placing them either in a medium containing 120 or 300 microM H2O2 or utilizing photochemical stress where the H2O2 levels normally rise to about 100 microM over a few hours in the presence of a normal lens. With all preparations, it was found that either markedly increasing or eliminating GSHPx-1 activity had only a small effect on the system's ability to metabolize H2O2, 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU), an inhibitor of GSSG reductase (GSSG Red) and 3-aminotriazole (3-AT), an inhibitor of catalase, also had little effect. However, the addition of both inhibitors caused a marked decrease in H2O2 degradation. Examination of the distribution of GSHPx-1 in the lens indicated that the activity per milligram of protein was evenly distributed between the epithelium and the remainder of the lens in the normal lens and was about 1.7-fold greater in the epithelium of transgenic lenses than in the remainder of the lens. Surprisingly, the distribution of GSSG Red was quite different with eight- to ten-fold more activity in the epithelium. Catalase was also found to be concentrated in the epithelium. With H2O2 exposure, a rapid loss of non-protein thiol (NP-thiol) was found in cell cultures and in the epithelia of cultured lenses. However, the remainder of the lens showed little change

  5. Overexpression of phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase in human dermal fibroblasts abrogates UVA irradiation-induced expression of interstitial collagenase/matrix metalloproteinase-1 by suppression of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide-mediated NFkappaB activation and interleukin-6 release.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jutta; Schüller, Jutta; Hinrichs, Christina; Syrovets, Tatjana; Azoitei, Ninel; Podda, Maurizio; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Brenneisen, Peter; Schneider, Lars-A; Sabiwalsky, Andrea; Peters, Thorsten; Sulyok, Silke; Dissemond, Joachim; Schauen, Matthias; Krieg, Thomas; Wirth, Thomas; Simmet, Thomas; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2004-10-29

    Phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) exhibits high specific activity in reducing phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides (PCOOHs) and thus may play a central role in protecting the skin against UV irradiation-triggered detrimental long term effects like cancer formation and premature skin aging. Here we addressed the role of PHGPx in the protection against UV irradiation-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). For this purpose, we created human dermal fibroblast cell lines overexpressing human PHGPx. Overexpression led to a significant increase in PHGPx activity. In contrast to a maximal 4.5-fold induction of specific MMP-1 mRNA levels in vector-transfected cells at 24 h after UVA irradiation, no MMP-1 induction occurred at any studied time point after UVA treatment of PHGPx-overexpressing fibroblasts. As interleukin-6 (IL-6) was earlier shown to mediate the UVA induction of MMP-1, we studied whether PHGPx overexpression might interfere with the NFkappaB-mediated IL-6 induction and downstream signaling. Using transient transfections of IL-6 promoter constructs containing NFkappaB binding sites, we observed a high induction of the reporter gene luciferase in vector-transfected control cells and a significantly lower induction in PHGPx-overexpressing fibroblasts following UVA irradiation. Consistently both UVA irradiation and treatment of fibroblasts with PCOOHs led to phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit, whereas cells overexpressing PHGPx exhibited impaired NFkappaB activation, p65 phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation. In line with this, the PHGPx-overexpressing fibroblasts showed a reduced constitutive and UVA irradiation-induced IL-6 release. After incubating PHGPx-overexpressing cells with PCOOHs a reduced induction of IL-6 was observed. This together with the suppression of UVA irradiation-induced IL-6 release in the presence of Trolox, a chain breaker of PCOOH-initiated lipid peroxidation

  6. A reduced energy supply strategy in active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichchou, M. N.; Loukil, T.; Bareille, O.; Chamberland, G.; Qiu, J.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, a control strategy is presented and numerically tested. This strategy aims to achieve the potential performance of fully active systems with a reduced energy supply. These energy needs are expected to be comparable to the power demands of semi-active systems, while system performance is intended to be comparable to that of a fully active configuration. The underlying strategy is called 'global semi-active control'. This control approach results from an energy investigation based on management of the optimal control process. Energy management encompasses storage and convenient restitution. The proposed strategy monitors a given active law without any external energy supply by considering purely dissipative and energy-demanding phases. Such a control law is offered here along with an analysis of its properties. A suboptimal form, well adapted for practical implementation steps, is also given. Moreover, a number of numerical experiments are proposed in order to validate test findings.

  7. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level.

  8. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  9. Glutathione and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Yee Aw, Tak

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death represents a physiologically conserved mechanism of cell death that is pivotal in normal development and tissue homeostasis in all organisms. As a key modulator of cell functions, the most abundant non-protein thiol, glutathione (GSH), has important roles in cellular defense against oxidant aggression, redox regulation of proteins thiols and maintaining redox homeostasis that is critical for proper function of cellular processes, including apoptosis. Thus, a shift in the cellular GSH-to-GSSG redox balance in favour of the oxidized species, GSSG, constitutes an important signal that could decide the fate of a cell. The current review will focus on three main areas: (1) general description of cellular apoptotic pathways, (2) cellular compartmentation of GSH and the contribution of mitochondrial GSH and redox proteins to apoptotic signalling and (3) role of redox mechanisms in the initiation and execution phases of apoptosis. PMID:18671159

  10. Effect of glutathione during bottle storage of sparkling wine.

    PubMed

    Webber, Vanessa; Dutra, Sandra Valduga; Spinelli, Fernanda Rodrigues; Carnieli, Gilberto João; Cardozo, Alejandro; Vanderlinde, Regina

    2017-02-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) is an efficient antioxidant on limiting browning, losing varietal aromas and off-flavor formation. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the effect of GSH addition (10, 20 and 30mgL(-1)) after the disgorging of the sparkling wine during storage. The sparkling wines were analyzed at 1, 6, 12 and 18months of storage according to the color index, concentration of the free SO2, phenolic compounds, catechin, epicatechin, caffeic acid, coumaric acid, acetaldehyde, total and reduced glutathione. The results show that GSH concentration decreased to the level of the control sparkling wine during the first 6months, and the total glutathione gradually declined up to 12months. The GSH reduces browning and acetaldehyde formation for up to 12months. However, the presence of glutathione had low or no influence on the concentration of free SO2, total phenolics, catechin, epicatechin, caffeic and coumaric acids.

  11. Inhibition of glutathione S-transferase activity in human melanoma cells by alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives. Effects of acrolein, cinnamaldehyde, citral, crotonaldehyde, curcumin, ethacrynic acid, and trans-2-hexenal.

    PubMed

    Iersel, M L; Ploemen, J P; Struik, I; van Amersfoort, C; Keyzer, A E; Schefferlie, J G; van Bladeren, P J

    1996-10-21

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in intact human IGR-39 melanoma cells was determined by the quantification by HPLC-analysis of the excreted glutathione (GSH) conjugate (S-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)glutathione; DNPSG). The major GST subunit expressed in these melanoma cells is the pi-class GST subunit P1. Using this system, the effect of exposure for 1 h to a series of alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds at non-toxic concentrations was studied. Curcumin was the most potent inhibitor (96% inhibition at 25 microM), while 67 and 61% inhibition at 25 microM was observed for ethacrynic acid and trans-2-hexenal, respectively. Moderate inhibition was observed for cinnamaldehyde and crotonaldehyde, while no inhibition was found for citral. The reactive acrolein did not inhibit the DNPSG-excretion at 2.5 microM, the highest non-toxic concentration. Up to about 50% GSH-depletion was found after treatment with crotonaldehyde, curcumin and ethacrynic acid, however the consequences for GST conjugation are presumably small. Reversible inhibition of GST was the major mechanism of inhibition of DNPSG-excretion in melanoma cells, except in the cases of curcumin and ethacrynic acid, which compounds also inactivated GSTP1-1 by covalent modification. This was clear from the fact that depending on the dose between 30 and 80% inhibition was still observed after lysis of the cells, under which conditions reversible inhibition was is absent. Intracellular levels of DNPSG remained relatively high in the case of ethacrynic acid. It is possible that ethacrynic acid also inhibits the transport of DNPSG by inhibition of the multidrug resistance-associated protein gene encoding glutathione conjugate export pump (MRP/GS-X pump) in some way.

  12. A comparative study of glutathione and ascorbate metabolism during germination of Pinus pinea L. seeds.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, F; Paciolla, C; de Pinto, M C; De Gara, L

    2001-08-01

    The ascorbate and glutathione systems have been studied during the first stages of germination in orthodox seeds of the gymnosperm Pinus pinea L. (pine). The results indicate that remarkable changes in the content and redox balance of these metabolites occur in both the embryo and endosperm; even if with different patterns for the two redox pairs. Dry seeds are devoid of the ascorbate reduced form (ASC) and contain only dehydroascorbic acid (DHA). By contrast, glutathione is present both in the reduced (GSH) and in the oxidized (GSSG) forms. During imbibition the increase in ASC seems to be mainly caused by the reactivation of its biosynthesis. On the other hand, the GSH rise occurring during the first 24 h seems to be largely due to GSSG reduction, even if GSH biosynthesis is still active in the seeds. The enzymes of the ascorbate--glutathione cycle also change during germination, but in different ways. ASC peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11) and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activities progressively rise both in the embryo and in endosperm. These changes are probably required for counteracting production of reactive oxygen species caused by recovery of oxidative metabolism. The two enzymes involved in the ascorbate recycling, ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) and DHA reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), show different behaviour: the DHA reductase activity decreases, while that of AFR reductase remains unchanged. The relationship between ascorbate and glutathione metabolism and their relevance in the germination of orthodox seeds are also discussed.

  13. Understanding the degradation of ascorbic acid and glutathione in relation to the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. italica cv. Bellstar) during storage and mechanical processing.

    PubMed

    Raseetha, Siva; Leong, Sze Ying; Burritt, David John; Oey, Indrawati

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to understand the degradation of ascorbic acid and glutathione content in broccoli florets (Brassica oleracea L. italica cv. Bellstar) during prolonged storage and subsequent mechanical processing. The initial content of total ascorbic acid and glutathione in broccoli florets averaged at 5.18 ± 0.23 and 0.70 ± 0.03 μmol/g fresh weight, respectively. Results showed that the content of ascorbic acid and glutathione in broccoli degraded during storage at 23°C, for at least 4.5-fold after 6 days of storage. On each day of storage, broccoli florets were mechanically processed, but the content of total ascorbic acid and glutathione was not significantly affected. When the mechanically processed broccoli florets were further incubated for up to 6h, the amount of ascorbic acid was greatly reduced as compared to glutathione. To obtain an in-depth understanding on the degradation of ascorbic acid and glutathione, the activity of enzymes involved in plant antioxidative system via ascorbate-glutathione cycle, as a response towards oxidative stress that took place during storage was determined in this study. The content of total ascorbic acid and glutathione in broccoli florets before and after mechanical processing were found to decrease concurrently with the activity of ascorbic acid peroxidase and glutathione reductase over the experimental storage duration. Meanwhile, the effect of oxidative stress on the content of ascorbic acid and glutathione was apparent during the 6h of incubation after mechanical processing. This phenomenon was demonstrated by the level of oxidative stress biomarkers examined, in which the formation of lipid peroxides, protein carbonyls and DNA oxidised products was positively associated with the degradation of total ascorbic acid and glutathione.

  14. Mutagenic activation reduces carcinogenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene for mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, L P; Bogdanova, L A; Kaledin, V I

    2013-03-01

    Pentachlorophenol (aromatic amine and azo stain metabolic stimulation inhibitor) reduced the hepatocarcinogenic activity of 4-aminoazobenzene and reduced that of ortho-aminoazotoluene in suckling mice. Both 4-aminoazobenzene and ortho-aminoazotoluene exhibited mutagenic activity in Ames' test in vitro on S. typhimurium TA 98 strain with activation with liver enzymes; this mutagenic activity was similarly suppressed by adding pentachlorophenol into activation medium. Induction of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes, stimulating the mutagenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene, suppressed its carcinogenic effect on mouse liver. Hence, ortho-aminotoluene (the initial compound), but not its mutagenic metabolites, was the direct active hepatocarcinogen for mice.

  15. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A.

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  16. Novel oxadiazole analogues derived from ethacrynic acid: design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationships in inhibiting the activity of glutathione S-transferase P1-1 and cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmei; Liu, Guyue; Li, Hongcai; Zhang, Yun; Song, Dandan; Li, Chunmin; Wang, Rui; Liu, Bo; Liang, Wen; Jing, Yongkui; Zhao, Guisen

    2010-02-11

    Ethacrynic acid (EA) is a glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GST P1-1) inhibitor with weak antiproliferative ability in tumor cells. By use of the principle of bioisosterism, a series of novel EA oxadiazole analogues were designed and synthesized. The structure-activity relationships of inhibiting GST P1-1 activity and cell proliferation of those EA analogues were investigated in human leukemia HL-60 cells. Our data revealed that those EA oxadiazole analogues had improved antiproliferative activity and most of them had similar or better inhibitory effects on GST P1-1 activity than EA. Compound 6u was one of the potent antiproliferative agents without inhibition of GST P1-1 activity. Compounds 6r and 6s were two potent cell growth inhibitors in several solid tumor cell lines with the concentrations inhibiting half of cell growth of less than 5 microM. Our data suggest that these EA oxadiazole analogues are promising antitumor agents that may act through GST P1-1 inhibition-dependent and/or -independent pathways.

  17. Five decades with glutathione and the GSTome.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt

    2012-02-24

    Uncle Folke inspired me to become a biochemist by demonstrating electrophoresis experiments on butterfly hemolymph in his kitchen. Glutathione became the subject for my undergraduate project in 1964 and has remained a focal point in my research owing to its multifarious roles in the cell. Since the 1960s, the multiple forms of glutathione transferase (GST), the GSTome, were isolated and characterized, some of which were discovered in our laboratory. Products of oxidative processes were found to be natural GST substrates. Examples of toxic compounds against which particular GSTs provide protection include 4-hydroxynonenal and ortho-quinones, with possible links to the etiology of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and other degenerative conditions. The role of thioltransferase and glutathione reductase in the cellular reduction of disulfides and other oxidized forms of thiols was clarified. Glyoxalase I catalyzes still another glutathione-dependent detoxication reaction. The unusual steady-state kinetics of this zinc-containing enzyme initiated model discrimination by regression analysis. Functional properties of the enzymes have been altered by stochastic mutations based on DNA shuffling and rationally tailored by structure-based redesign. We found it useful to represent promiscuous enzymes by vectors or points in multidimensional substrate-activity space and visualize them by multivariate analysis. Adopting the concept "molecular quasi-species," we describe clusters of functionally related enzyme variants that may emerge in natural as well as directed evolution.

  18. Five Decades with Glutathione and the GSTome

    PubMed Central

    Mannervik, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Uncle Folke inspired me to become a biochemist by demonstrating electrophoresis experiments on butterfly hemolymph in his kitchen. Glutathione became the subject for my undergraduate project in 1964 and has remained a focal point in my research owing to its multifarious roles in the cell. Since the 1960s, the multiple forms of glutathione transferase (GST), the GSTome, were isolated and characterized, some of which were discovered in our laboratory. Products of oxidative processes were found to be natural GST substrates. Examples of toxic compounds against which particular GSTs provide protection include 4-hydroxynonenal and ortho-quinones, with possible links to the etiology of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and other degenerative conditions. The role of thioltransferase and glutathione reductase in the cellular reduction of disulfides and other oxidized forms of thiols was clarified. Glyoxalase I catalyzes still another glutathione-dependent detoxication reaction. The unusual steady-state kinetics of this zinc-containing enzyme initiated model discrimination by regression analysis. Functional properties of the enzymes have been altered by stochastic mutations based on DNA shuffling and rationally tailored by structure-based redesign. We found it useful to represent promiscuous enzymes by vectors or points in multidimensional substrate-activity space and visualize them by multivariate analysis. Adopting the concept “molecular quasi-species,” we describe clusters of functionally related enzyme variants that may emerge in natural as well as directed evolution. PMID:22247548

  19. In vitro effects of hyperoxia on alveolar type II pneumocytes: inhibition of glutathione synthesis increases hyperoxic cell injury.

    PubMed

    Aerts, C; Wallaert, B; Voisin, C

    1992-01-01

    An in vitro model of alveolar epithelial oxidant injury was developed based on exposure to hyperoxia of cultured guinea pig type II pneumocytes using a biphasic cell culture system in aerobiosis. The present study investigates the roles of intracellular antioxidant enzymes and of glutathione in providing protection against hyperoxia. A 2-day type II cell culture in normoxia was associated with a significant decrease in protein, catalase, and Cu-Zn SOD cell content, whereas ATP cell content, Mn-SOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities did not change and glutathione cell content significantly increased. Exposure of type II cells to hyperoxia did not induce significant changes in cell content in protein, SOD, catalase, GPx, or glutathione cell content when compared to control cells (exposed to normoxia). With ATP cell content expressed as a cell injury index (CII), type II cell injury was found to increase with increasing O2 concentrations. Indeed, a 2-day 50% O2 and 95% O2 exposure resulted in a CII of -7.5 +/- 6.2% and 17.9 +/- 5.9%, respectively, LDH release by type II cells was not significantly increased after hypoxic exposure. Cell injury effects of hyperoxia did not correlate with the endogenous antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, Mn-SOD, catalase). In marked contrast, there was a significant correlation between the CII and total glutathione content of type II cells (p < .01). This correlation was largely due to the close relationship between CII and reduced glutathione. Hyperoxic induced cell injury (as demonstrated by CII > 0) was clearly associated with significantly lower intracellular glutathione level when compared to experiments without hyperoxia induced cell injury (CII < 0). In addition, in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), the ability of type II cells to synthetize new glutathione was severely impaired, whereas ATP cell content and cell antioxidant enzyme activities did not change. As a consequence, the reduction of intracellular

  20. [Experimental Evaluation of Radioprotective Efficacy of Synthetic Genistein on Criteria of Glutathione System and Lipid Peroxidation in Erythrocytes of Peripheral Blood in Irradiated Rats].

    PubMed

    Grebenyuk, A N; Tarumov, R A; Basharin, V A; Kovtun, V U

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate experimentally the radioprotective effectiveness of synthetic genistein in terms of the glutathione system and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes of irradiated rats. The animals were exposed to single acute X-ray irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy. Genistein was administered intraperitoneally at 200 mg/kg 1 hour before radiation exposure. The irradiation caused the initiation of lipid peroxidation in the background depletion of reduced glutathione. Decrease by 25% in the number of malondialdehyde in the rats treated with genistein was registered 5 min after irradiation compared with the control. It is established thatl day after irradiation the level of reduced glutathione in the rats treated with genistein was 26% higher. However, intraperitoneal administration of genistein did not cause statistically significant changes in the activity of glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase during the whole period of observation. The results suggest that the radioprotective effect of synthetic genistein is implemented, along with other mechanisms, by stimulating the glutathione system and reducing the severity of lipid peroxidation.

  1. Loneliness Predicts Reduced Physical Activity: Cross-Sectional & Longitudinal Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hawkley, Louise C.; Thisted, Ronald A.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine cross-sectional and prospective associations between loneliness and physical activity, and to evaluate the roles of social control and emotion regulation as mediators of these associations. Design A population-based sample of 229 White, Black, and Hispanic men and women, age 50 to 68 years at study onset, were tested annually for each of 3 years. Main Outcome Measures Physical activity probability, and changes in physical activity probability over a 3-year period. Results Replicating and extending prior cross-sectional research, loneliness was associated with a significantly reduced odds of physical activity (OR = 0.65 per SD of loneliness) net of sociodemographic variables (age, gender, ethnicity, education, income), psychosocial variables (depressive symptoms, perceived stress, hostility, social support), and self-rated health. This association was mediated by hedonic emotion regulation, but not by social control as indexed by measures of social network size, marital status, contact with close ties, group membership, or religious group affiliation. Longitudinal analyses revealed that loneliness predicted diminished odds of physical activity in the next two years (OR = 0.61), and greater likelihood of transitioning from physical activity to inactivity (OR = 1.58). Conclusion Loneliness among middle and older age adults is an independent risk factor for physical inactivity and increases the likelihood that physical activity will be discontinued over time. PMID:19450042

  2. Sequential activation of multiple grounding pads reduces skin heating.

    PubMed

    Schutt, D J; Haemmerich, D

    2006-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) tumor ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for tumors not amenable to surgery. The need for larger ablation zones has required increase in RF generator power, with current generation devices delivering 200-250 W. Skin burns due to ground pad heating have become a common complication and are now a limiting factor for further increase in ablation zone and generator power. We performed ex vivo experiments with three ground pads (5 x 5 cm) placed on a tissue phantom. We applied 100 W of power for 12 min between the pads, and an RF electrode while we measured leading edge temperature below each pad, and temperature profile on the pads using temperature-sensitive LCD-paper. We compared conventional operation (i.e. simultaneous connection of all three pads) to sequential activation of the pads where each pad is only active for approximately 0.5 s. The timing during sequential activation was adjusted to keep leading edge temperature equal between the pads. Temperature rise below the leading edge for proximal, middle and distal ground pad was 10.7 +/- 1.04, 1.0 +/- 0.15 and 0.3 +/- 0.07 degrees C for conventional operation, and 4.8 +/- 0.16, 4.4 +/- 0.20 and 4.5 +/- 0.35 degrees C for sequentially activated operation. The maximum leading edge temperature rise was more than twice as high for conventional compared to switched operation (p<0.001). Sequential activation of multiple ground pads resulted in reduced maximum leading edge temperature, and allows control of each pad such that leading edge temperature of all pads is the same. This may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns by allowing each pad to reach same temperatures independent of location, and may allow higher power RF generators due to reduced skin heating.

  3. A role for glutathione transferases functioning as glutathione peroxidases in resistance to multiple herbicides in black-grass.

    PubMed

    Cummins, I; Cole, D J; Edwards, R

    1999-05-01

    Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides) is a major weed of wheat in Europe, with several populations having acquired resistance to multiple herbicides of differing modes of action. As compared with herbicide-susceptible black-grass, populations showing herbicide cross-resistance contained greatly elevated levels of a specific type I glutathione transferase (GST), termed AmGST2, but similar levels of a type III GST termed AmGST1. Following cloning and expression of the respective cDNAs, AmGST2 differed from AmGST1 in showing limited activity in detoxifying herbicides but high activities as a glutathione peroxidase (GPOX) capable of reducing organic hydroperoxides. In contrast to AmGST2, other GPOXs were not enhanced in the herbicide-resistant populations. Treatment with a range of herbicides used to control grass weeds in wheat resulted in increased levels of hydroperoxides in herbicide-susceptible populations but not in herbicide-resistant plants, consistent with AmGST2 functioning to prevent oxidative injury caused as a primary or secondary effect of herbicide action. Increased AmGST2 expression in black-grass was associated with partial tolerance to the peroxidizing herbicide paraquat. The selective enhancement of AmGST2 expression resulted from a constitutively high expression of the respective gene, which was activated in herbicide-susceptible black-grass in response to herbicide safeners, dehydration and chemical treatments imposing oxidative stress. Our results provide strong evidence that GSTs can contribute to resistance to multiple herbicides by playing a role in oxidative stress tolerance in addition to detoxifying herbicides by catalysing their conjugation with glutathione.

  4. Glutathione and Homoglutathione Synthesis in Legume Root Nodules1

    PubMed Central

    Matamoros, Manuel A.; Moran, Jose F.; Iturbe-Ormaetxe, Iñaki; Rubio, Maria C.; Becana, Manuel

    1999-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection was used to study thiol metabolism in legume nodules. Glutathione (GSH) was the major non-protein thiol in all indeterminate nodules examined, as well as in the determinate nodules of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), whereas homoglutathione (hGSH) predominated in soybean (Glycine max), bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and mungbean (Vigna radiata) nodules. All nodules had greater thiol concentrations than the leaves and roots of the same plants because of active thiol synthesis in nodule tissue. The correlation between thiol tripeptides and the activities of glutathione synthetase (GSHS) and homoglutathione synthetase (hGSHS) in the nodules of eight legumes, and the contrasting thiol contents and activities in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) leaves (98% hGSH, 100% hGSHS) and nodules (72% GSH, 80% GSHS) indicated that the distribution of GSH and hGSH is determined by specific synthetases. Thiol contents and synthesis decreased with both natural and induced nodule senescence, and were also reduced in the senescent zone of indeterminate nodules. Thiols and GSHS were especially abundant in the meristematic and infected zones of pea (Pisum sativum) nodules. Thiols and γ-glutamylcysteinyl synthetase were also more abundant in the infected zone of bean nodules, but hGSHS was predominant in the cortex. Isolation of full-length cDNA sequences coding for γ-glutamylcysteinyl synthetase from legume nodules revealed that they are highly homologous to those from other higher plants. PMID:10557236

  5. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... activity of the enzyme glutathione reductase in serum, plasma, or erythrocytes by such techniques as fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease,...

  6. Glutathione reductase targeted to type II cells does not protect mice from hyperoxic lung injury.

    PubMed

    Heyob, Kathryn M; Rogers, Lynette K; Welty, Stephen E

    2008-12-01

    Exposure of the lung epithelium to reactive oxygen species without adequate antioxidant defenses leads to airway inflammation, and may contribute to lung injury. Glutathione peroxidase catalyzes the reduction of peroxides by oxidation of glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulfide (GSSG), which can in turn be reduced by glutathione reductase (GR). Increased levels of GSSG have been shown to correlate negatively with outcome after oxidant exposure, and increased GR activity has been protective against hyperoxia in lung epithelial cells in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that increased GR expression targeted to type II alveolar epithelial cells would improve outcome in hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Human GR with a mitochondrial targeting sequence was targeted to mouse type II cells using the SPC promoter. Two transgenic lines were identified, with Line 2 having higher lung GR activities than Line 1. Both transgenic lines had lower lung GSSG levels and higher GSH/GSSG ratios than wild-type. Six-week-old wild-type and transgenic mice were exposed to greater than 95% O2 or room air (RA) for 84 hours. After exposure, Line 2 mice had higher right lung/body weight ratios and lavage protein concentrations than wild-type mice, and both lines 1 and 2 had lower GSSG levels than wild-type mice. These findings suggest that GSSG accumulation in the lung may not play a significant role in the development of hyperoxic lung injury, or that compensatory responses to unregulated GR expression render animals more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury.

  7. Tumor hypoxia causes DNA hypermethylation by reducing TET activity

    PubMed Central

    Kuchnio, Anna; Ploumakis, Athanasios; Ghesquière, Bart; Van Dyck, Laurien; Boeckx, Bram; Schoonjans, Luc; Hermans, Els; Amant, Frederic; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Peng Koh, Kian; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Coleman, Mathew; Carell, Thomas; Carmeliet, Peter; Lambrechts, Diether

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hypermethylation of tumor suppressor gene (TSG) promoters confers growth advantages to cancer cells, but how these changes arise is poorly understood. Here, we report that tumor hypoxia reduces the activity of oxygen-dependent TET enzymes, which catalyze DNA de-methylation through 5-methylcytosine oxidation. This occurs independently of hypoxia-associated alterations in TET expression, proliferation, metabolism, HIF activity or reactive oxygen, but directly depends on oxygen shortage. Hypoxia-induced loss of TET activity increases hypermethylation at gene promoters in vitro. Also in patients, TSG promoters are markedly more methylated in hypoxic tumors, independently of proliferation, stromal cell infiltration and tumor characteristics. Our data suggest cellular selection of hypermethylation events, with almost half of them being ascribable to hypoxia across tumor types. Accordingly, increased hypoxia after vessel pruning in murine breast tumors increases hypermethylation, while restored tumor oxygenation by vessel normalization abrogates this effect. Tumor hypoxia thus acts as a novel regulator underlying DNA methylation. PMID:27533040

  8. Interaction of glutathione reductase with heavy metal: the binding of Hg(II) or Cd(II) to the reduced enzyme affects both the redox dithiol pair and the flavin.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Thierry; Desbois, Alain

    2006-12-26

    To determine the inhibition mechanism of yeast glutathione reductase (GR) by heavy metal, we have compared the electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the enzyme in its oxidized (Eox) and two-electron reduced (EH2) forms, in the absence and the presence of Hg(II) or Cd(II). The spectral data clearly show a redox dependence of the metal binding. The metal ions do not affect the absorption and RR spectra of Eox. On the contrary, the EH2 spectra, generated by addition of NADPH, are strongly modified by the presence of heavy metal. The absorption changes of EH2 are metal-dependent. On the one hand, the main flavin band observed at 450 nm for EH2 is red-shifted at 455 nm for the EH2-Hg(II) complex and at 451 nm for the EH2-Cd(II) complex. On the other hand, the characteristic charge-transfer (CT) band at 540 nm is quenched upon metal binding to EH2. In NADPH excess, a new CT band is observed at 610 nm for the EH2-Hg(II)-NADPH complex and at 590 nm for EH2-Cd(II)-NADPH. The RR spectra of the EH2-metal complexes are not sensitive to the NADPH concentration. With reference to the RR spectra of EH2 in which the frequencies of bands II and III were observed at 1582 and 1547 cm-1, respectively, those of the EH2-metal complexes are detected at 1577 and 1542 cm-1, indicating an increased flavin bending upon metal coordination to EH2. From the frequency shifts of band III, a concomitant weakening of the H-bonding state of the N5 atom is also deduced. Taking into account the different chemical properties of Hg(II) and Cd(II), the coordination number of the bound metal ion was deduced to be different in GR. A mechanism of the GR inhibition is proposed. It proceeds primarily by a specific binding of the metal to the redox thiol/thiolate pair and the catalytic histidine of EH2. The bound metal ion then acts on the bending of the isoalloxazine ring of FAD as well as on the hydrophobicity of its microenvironment.

  9. Reduced activation in isometric muscle action after lengthening contractions is not accompanied by reduced performance fatigability

    PubMed Central

    Seiberl, W.; Hahn, D.; Paternoster, F. K.

    2016-01-01

    After active lengthening contractions, a given amount of force can be maintained with less muscle activation compared to pure isometric contractions at the same muscle length and intensity. This increase in neuromuscular efficiency is associated with mechanisms of stretch-induced residual force enhancement. We hypothesized that stretch-related increase in neuromuscular efficiency reduces fatigability of a muscle during submaximal contractions. 13 subjects performed 60 s isometric knee extensions at 60% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with and without prior stretch (60°/s, 20°). Each 60 s trial was preceded and followed by neuromuscular tests consisting of MVCs, voluntary activation (VA) and resting twitches (RT), and there was 4 h rest between sets. We found a significant (p = 0.036) 10% reduction of quadriceps net-EMG after lengthening compared to pure isometric trials. However, increase in neuromuscular efficiency did not influence the development of fatigue. Albeit we found severe reduction of MVC (30%), RT (30%) and VA (5%) after fatiguing trials, there were no differences between conditions with and without lengthening. As the number of subjects showing no activation reduction increased with increasing contraction time, intensity may have been too strenuous in both types of contractions, such that a distinction between different states of fatigue was not possible anymore. PMID:27966620

  10. Analysis of glutathione, glutathione disulfide, cysteine, homocysteine, and other biological thiols by high-performance liquid chromatography following derivatization by n-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide.

    PubMed

    Winters, R A; Zukowski, J; Ercal, N; Matthews, R H; Spitz, D R

    1995-05-01

    The compound N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide (NPM) reacts with free sulfhydryl groups to form fluorescent derivatives. A new method for measurement of glutathione and other biological thiols utilizing reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography to separate and quantify these derivatives is described. Separation and quantification of glutathione, cysteine, homocysteine, cysteinylglycine, and gamma-glutamylcysteine derivatives are achieved. The method allows for the measurement of glutathione disulfide by masking free glutathione with 2-vinylpyridine, reducing glutathione disulfide with glutathione reductase, and measuring the resulting glutathione. Coefficient of variations for the various thiols measured by the NPM method range from 1.5 to 8.8%. The lower detection limit is around 50 fmol of glutathione. NPM derivatives are shown to be stable for 2 months at 4 degrees C. Between 94.2 and 97.2% of glutathione and/or glutathione disulfide added to a sample is recovered using the NPM method. The NPM method is compared to the monobromobimane high-performance liquid chromatography method and the Tietze assay by measuring glutathione in homogenates from five different cell lines. The newly developed method offers some advantages over the currently accepted techniques, including specificity, speed, sensitivity, and ease of use.

  11. Large Roads Reduce Bat Activity across Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  12. Large roads reduce bat activity across multiple species.

    PubMed

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations.

  13. Sensitivity of cerebellar glutathione system to neonatal ionizing radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Di Toro, C G; Di Toro, P A; Zieher, L M; Guelman, L R

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are relevant components of living organisms that, besides their role in the regulation of different important physiological functions, when present in excess are capable to affect cell oxidative status, leading to damage of cellular molecules and disturbance of normal cell function. ROS accumulation has been associated with a variety of conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases and ionizing radiation exposure. Cell ability to counteract ROS overproduction depends on the capacity of the endogenous antioxidant defenses--which includes the glutathione (GSH) system--to cope with. Since developing central nervous system (CNS) is especially sensitive to ROS-induced damage, the aim of the present work was to evaluate ROS, reduced GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels in the cerebellum at different developmental ages after irradiation, in order to test if any changes were induced on these key oxidative stress-related cellular markers that might explain the high cerebellar vulnerability to radiation-induced injury. Since intracellular levels of GSH are maintained by glutathione reductase (GSHr), this enzymatic activity was also evaluated. Newborn Wistar rats were irradiated in their cephalic ends and the different parameters were measured, from 1h to 90 days post-irradiation. Results showed that an early transient increase in ROS levels followed by a decrease in cerebellar weight at 3-5 days post-irradiation were induced. An increase in cerebellar GSH levels was induced at 30 days after irradiation, together with a decrease in GSHr activity. These results support the hypothesis that ROS may represent a marker of damage prior to radiation-induced cell death. In contrast, it would be suggested that GSH system might play a role in the compensatory mechanisms triggered to counteract radiation-induced cerebellar damage.

  14. Withanolide A Prevents Neurodegeneration by Modulating Hippocampal Glutathione Biosynthesis during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Baitharu, Iswar; Jain, Vishal; Deep, Satya Narayan; Shroff, Sabita; Sahu, Jayanta Kumar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera root extract has been used traditionally in ayurvedic system of medicine as a memory enhancer. Present study explores the ameliorative effect of withanolide A, a major component of withania root extract and its molecular mechanism against hypoxia induced memory impairment. Withanolide A was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats before a period of 21 days pre-exposure and during 07 days of exposure to a simulated altitude of 25,000 ft. Glutathione level and glutathione dependent free radicals scavenging enzyme system, ATP, NADPH level, γ-glutamylcysteinyl ligase (GCLC) activity and oxidative stress markers were assessed in the hippocampus. Expression of apoptotic marker caspase 3 in hippocampus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional alteration and expression of GCLC and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)–related factor 2 (Nrf2) were investigated by real time PCR and immunoblotting respectively. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) level and impaired reduced gluatathione dependent free radical scavenging system in hippocampus resulting in elevated oxidative stress. Supplementation of withanolide A during hypoxic exposure increased GSH level, augmented GSH dependent free radicals scavenging system and decreased the number of caspase and hoescht positive cells in hippocampus. While withanolide A reversed hypoxia mediated neurodegeneration, administration of buthionine sulfoximine along with withanolide A blunted its neuroprotective effects. Exogenous administration of corticosterone suppressed Nrf2 and GCLC expression whereas inhibition of corticosterone synthesis upregulated Nrf2 as well as GCLC. Thus present study infers that withanolide A reduces neurodegeneration by restoring hypoxia induced glutathione depletion in hippocampus. Further, Withanolide A increases glutathione biosynthesis in neuronal cells by upregulating GCLC level through Nrf2 pathway in a corticosterone dependenet manner

  15. [Glutathione system in erythrocytes and blood plasma in strokes and dyscirculatory encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Kolesnichenko, L S; Kulinski, V I; Shprakh, V V; Bardymov, V V; Verlan, N V; Gubina, L P; Pensionerova, G A; Sergeeva, M P; Stanevich, L M; Filippova, G T

    2007-01-01

    In dyscirculatory encephalopathy and moderate ischemic stroke there are single changes of components of glutathione metabolism. In moderate and severe ischemic stroke frequent and considerable changes have been revealed. Changes in hemorrhagic stroke are also expressed. An increase of activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione transferase is the most typical, rarely the increase of glutathione reductase and GSH is observed. The increase of enzymes activity was absent at the delayed oneset of treatment (more than 3 days) and in severe cases patients who died later. Glutathione system is important in the tolerance to cerebral ischemia.

  16. N-->S phosphoryl migration in phosphoryl glutathion.

    PubMed

    Yang, H J; Liu, J; Zhao, Y F

    1993-07-01

    It was found that in the case of N-(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (reduced form), 2, N-->S phosphoryl migration took place, but not for N,N-bis(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (oxidized form) or N-diisopropylphosphoryl cysteine. These results were deduced by 31P-NMR tracing experiments. It was shown that phosphoryl migration was catalyzed by an intramolecular carboxyl group, and a mechanism involving a mixed carboxyl-phosphoric anhydride was proposed. A competitive reaction between the amino and thiol group toward diisopropyl phosphite indicated that the phospho-thiol derived from N-(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (reduced form), 2, did not result from direct phosphorylation of the thiol group. N,S-Bis(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion provides an authentic sample to confirm the migrated phosphoryl thiol product.

  17. Glutathione S-transferase can be used as a C-terminal, enzymatically active dimerization module for a recombinant protease inhibitor, and functionally secreted into the periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Tudyka, T.; Skerra, A.

    1997-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) from Schistosoma japonicum, which is widely used for the production of fusion proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli, was employed as a functional fusion module that effects dimer formation of a recombinant protein and confers enzymatic reporter activity at the same time. For this purpose GST was linked via a flexible spacer to the C-terminus of the thiol-protease inhibitor cystatin, whose binding properties for papain were to be studied. The fusion protein was secreted into the bacterial periplasm by means of the OmpA signal peptide to ensure formation of the two disulfide bonds in cystatin. The formation of wrong crosslinks in the oxidizing milieu was prevented by replacing three of the four exposed cysteine residues in GST. Using the tetracycline promoter for tightly controlled gene expression the soluble fusion protein could be isolated from the periplasmic protein fraction. Purification to homogeneity was achieved in one step by means of an affinity column with glutathione agarose. Alternatively, the protein was isolated via streptavidin affinity chromatography after the Strep-tag had been appended to its C terminus. The GST moiety of the fusion protein was enzymatically active and the kinetic parameters were determined using glutathione and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrates. Furthermore, strong binding activity for papain was detected in an ELISA. The signal with the cystatin-GST fusion protein was much higher than with cystatin itself, demonstrating an avidity effect due to the dimer formation of GST. The quaternary structure was further confirmed by chemical crosslinking, which resulted in a specific reaction product with twice the molecular size. Thus, engineered GST is suitable as a moderately sized, secretion-competent fusion partner that can confer bivalency to a protein of interest and promote detection of binding interactions even in cases of low affinity. PMID:9336840

  18. Increasing the glutathione content in a chilling-sensitive maize genotype using safeners increased protection against chilling-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Kocsy, G; von Ballmoos, P; Rüegsegger, A; Szalai, G; Galiba, G; Brunold, C

    2001-11-01

    With the aim of analyzing their protective function against chilling-induced injury, the pools of glutathione and its precursors, cysteine (Cys) and gamma-glutamyl-Cys, were increased in the chilling-sensitive maize (Zea mays) inbred line Penjalinan using a combination of two herbicide safeners. Compared with the controls, the greatest increase in the pool size of the three thiols was detected in the shoots and roots when both safeners were applied at a concentration of 5 microM. This combination increased the relative protection from chilling from 50% to 75%. It is interesting that this increase in the total glutathione (TG) level was accompanied by a rise in glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) activity. When the most effective safener combination was applied simultaneously with increasing concentrations of buthionine sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, the total gamma-glutamyl-Cys and TG contents and GR activity were decreased to very low levels and relative protection was lowered from 75% to 44%. During chilling, the ratio of reduced to oxidized thiols first decreased independently of the treatments, but increased again to the initial value in safener-treated seedlings after 7 d at 5 degrees C. Taking all results together resulted in a linear relationship between TG and GR and a biphasic relationship between relative protection and GR or TG, thus demonstrating the relevance of the glutathione levels in protecting maize against chilling-induced injury.

  19. Brown fat activation reduces hypercholesterolaemia and protects from atherosclerosis development

    PubMed Central

    Berbée, Jimmy F. P.; Boon, Mariëtte R; Khedoe, P. Padmini S. J.; Bartelt, Alexander; Schlein, Christian; Worthmann, Anna; Kooijman, Sander; Hoeke, Geerte; Mol, Isabel M.; John, Clara; Jung, Caroline; Vazirpanah, Nadia; Brouwers, Linda P.J.; Gordts, Philip L.S.M.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Havekes, Louis M.; Scheja, Ludger; Heeren, Joerg; Rensen, Patrick C.N.

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) combusts high amounts of fatty acids, thereby lowering plasma triglyceride levels and reducing obesity. However, the precise role of BAT in plasma cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis development remains unclear. Here we show that BAT activation by β3-adrenergic receptor stimulation protects from atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic APOE*3-Leiden.CETP mice, a well-established model for human-like lipoprotein metabolism that unlike hyperlipidemic Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− mice expresses functional apoE and LDLR. BAT activation increases energy expenditure and decreases plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that BAT activation enhances the selective uptake of fatty acids from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins into BAT, subsequently accelerating the hepatic clearance of the cholesterol-enriched remnants. These effects depend on a functional hepatic apoE-LDLR clearance pathway as BAT activation in Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− mice does not attenuate hypercholesterolaemia and atherosclerosis. We conclude that activation of BAT is a powerful therapeutic avenue to ameliorate hyperlipidaemia and protect from atherosclerosis. PMID:25754609

  20. Reduced brain activation in violent adolescents during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yi; Mei, Yi; Du, XiaoXia; Xie, Bin; Shao, Yang

    2016-02-18

    Deficits in inhibitory control have been linked to aggression and violent behaviour. This study aimed to observe whether violent adolescents show different brain activation patterns during response inhibition and to ascertain the roles these brain regions play. A self-report method and modified overt aggression scale (MOAS) were used to evaluate violent behaviour. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 22 violent adolescents and 17 matched healthy subjects aged 12 to 18 years. While scanning, a go/no-go task was performed. Between-group comparisons revealed that activation in the bilateral middle and superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, and right orbitofrontal area (BA11) regions were significantly reduced in the violent group compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the violent group had more widespread activation in the prefrontal cortex than that observed in the control group. Activation of the prefrontal cortex in the violent group was widespread but lacking in focus, failing to produce intensive activation in some functionally related regions during response inhibition.

  1. Reduced Arylsulfatase B Activity in Leukocytes from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Girish; Burke, Jenifer; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Sharma, Neha; Katyal, Shivani; Park, R. Lucy; Tobacman, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Summary The enzyme Arylsulfatase B (ARSB; N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase) removes 4-sulfate groups from chondroitin-4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and is required for the degradation of these sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Since these GAGs accumulate in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF), we investigated the activity of ARSB in leukocytes of patients with CF, to consider if reduced activity of ARSB might contribute to the pathophysiology of CF. Previous cell-based experiments had demonstrated that when the deficiency of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) was corrected in bronchial epithelial cells, the ARSB activity increased significantly. De-identified, citrated blood samples were collected from 16 children with cystic fibrosis and 31 control subjects, seen in the Pediatric Clinic at Rush University Medical Center. Polymorphonuclear (PMN) and mononuclear cell (MC) populations were separated by density gradient, and blinded determinations of ARSB activity were performed using the exogenous substrate 4-methylumbilliferyl sulfate. Interleukin-6 was measured in the plasma samples by ELISA. ARSB activity was significantly less in the PMN and MC from the CF patients than controls (p<0.0001, unpaired t-test, two-tailed). Interleukin-6 levels in plasma were significantly greater in the CF population (p<0.001). Mean age, age range, and male:female ratio of CF patients and controls were similar, and no association of ARSB activity with age, gender, or CFTR genotype was evident. Since recombinant human ARSB is used successfully for replacement therapy in Mucopolysaccharidosis VI, it may be useful to restore ARSB activity to normal levels and increase degradation of sulfated GAGs in CF patients. PMID:22550062

  2. Reduced superoxide dismutase activity in xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Nishigori, C.; Miyachi, Y.; Imamura, S.; Takebe, H. )

    1989-10-01

    This study was performed in order to assess the possible protective effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on ultraviolet (UV) damage in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts. SOD activity in fibroblasts originating from seven xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients was significantly lower than that in normal cells (p less than 0.005). Average SOD activity in XP cells belonging to complementation group A was 3.68 +/- 0.54 (n = 7) and that in normal human cells was 5.79 +/- 1.59 (n = 6). Addition of SOD before and during UV irradiation (UVB and UVC) to the cells caused no change in the amount of unscheduled DNA synthesis and UV survival. A possible involvement of reduced SOD in XP and a possible protective effect by SOD on UV damage is discussed.

  3. Effects of mercury and selenium on glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    Earlier studies reported on the toxicity and related oxidative stress of different forms of Se, including seleno-D,L-methionine, in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). This study compares the effects of Se (seleno-D,L-methionine) and Hg (methylmercury chloride) separately and in combination. Mallard drakes received one of the following diets: untreated feed (controls), or feed containing 10 ppm Se, 10 ppm Hg, or 10 ppm Se in combination with 10 ppm Hg. After 10 weeks, blood, liver, and brain samples were collected for biochemical assays. The following clinical and biochemical alterations occurred in response to mercury exposure: hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations decreased; activities of the enzymes glutathione (GSH) peroxidase (plasma and liver), glutathione-S-transferase (liver), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) (liver and brain) decreased; hepatic oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentration increased relative to reduced glutathione (GSH); and lipid peroxidation in the brain was evident as detected by increased thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS). Effects of Se alone included increased hepatic GSSG reductase activity and brain TBARS concentration. Se in combination with Hg partially or totally alleviated effects of Hg on GSH peroxidase, G-6-PDH, and GSSG. These findings are compared in relation to field observations for diving ducks and other aquatic birds. It is concluded that since both Hg and excess Se can affect thiol status, measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. The ability of Se to restore the activities of G-6-PDH, GSH peroxidase, and glutathione status involved in antioxidative defense mechanisms may be crucial to biological protection from the toxic effects of methyl mercury.

  4. Active fans and grizzly bears: Reducing risks for wilderness campers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakals, M. E.; Wilford, D. J.; Wellwood, D. W.; MacDougall, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    Active geomorphic fans experience debris flows, debris floods and/or floods (hydrogeomorphic processes) that can be hazards to humans. Grizzly bears ( Ursus arctos) can also be a hazard to humans. This paper presents the results of a cross-disciplinary study that analyzed both hydrogeomorphic and grizzly bear hazards to wilderness campers on geomorphic fans along a popular hiking trail in Kluane National Park and Reserve in southwestern Yukon Territory, Canada. Based on the results, a method is proposed to reduce the risks to campers associated with camping on fans. The method includes both landscape and site scales and is based on easily understood and readily available information regarding weather, vegetation, stream bank conditions, and bear ecology and behaviour. Educating wilderness campers and providing a method of decision-making to reduce risk supports Parks Canada's public safety program; a program based on the principle of user self-sufficiency. Reducing grizzly bear-human conflicts complements the efforts of Parks Canada to ensure a healthy grizzly bear population.

  5. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  6. Effects of neem flowers, Thai and Chinese bitter gourd fruits and sweet basil leaves on hepatic monooxygenases and glutathione S-transferase activities, and in vitro metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens in rats.

    PubMed

    Kusamran, W R; Ratanavila, A; Tepsuwan, A

    1998-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of feeding of four vegetables commonly consumed in Thailand, namely, flowers of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica var. siamensis), fruits of Thai and the Chinese bitter gourd (Momordica charantia Linn.) and leaves of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum Linn) on the levels of phase I enzymes, which include cytochrome P450 (P450), aniline hydroxylase (ANH) and aminopyrine-N-demethylase (AMD) as well as the capacity to activate the mutagenicities of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and to induce the phase II enzymes [i.e. glutathione S-transferase (GST)] in rat liver. It was found that feeding of the diets containing 12.5% neem flowers and Thai bitter gourd fruits for 2 weeks strongly enhanced GST activity, 2.7- and 1.6- fold of the pair-fed control values, respectively, while resulting in a marked reduction of the levels of most phase I reactions. Fruits of the Chinese bitter gourd, which is in the same species as Thai bitter gourd, had no effect on GST activity but decreased AMD activity and the in vitro metabolic activation of AFB1 and BaP. On the other hand, however, dietary sweet basil leaves caused a significant increase in the levels of both GST and all phase I enzymes. Results in the present study clearly demonstrate that neem flowers and Thai bitter gourd fruits contain monofunctional phase II enzyme inducers and compounds capable of repressing some monooxygenases, especially those involved in the metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens, while sweet basil leaves contain compounds, probably bifunctional inducers, capable of inducing both phase I and phase II enzymes and Chinese bitter gourd fruits contain only compounds capable of repressing some monooxygenases. These results therefore suggest that neem flowers and Thai bitter gourd fruits may possess chemopreventive potential, while those of Chinese bitter gourd fruits and sweet basil leaves are uncertain.

  7. Construction of a novel guest biomimetic glutathione peroxidase with solvent-dependent catalytic behavior by incorporating the active center into adamantyl molecule.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanzhen; Lang, Chao; Hua, Xiaoxi; Shia, Zhongfeng; Wang, Yun; Jiao, Shufei; Cai, Chengxiang; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-01-01

    A novel guest biomimetic glutathione peroxidase (3,3'-tellurobis(propane-3,1-diyl) diadamantanecarboxylate, denoted as ADA-Te-ADA) was synthesized. ADA-Te-ADA functioned to overcome the disadvantages in the construction of building block for giant supramolecular biomimetic enzyme. To reveal the catalytic property of hydrophobic ADA-Te-ADA, the catalytic mechanism was investigated using PBS (phosphate buffer (pH 7.0. 50 mM))/methanol solvent mixture as assay solution. Itindicated that ADA-Te-ADA exhibited typical enzyme catalytic behavior by saturation kinetics measurement. Importantly, ADA-Te-ADA exhibited the typical solvent-dependent catalytic behavior. And the highest catalytic rate 4.29 µM x min-1 was obtained when the volume ratio of PBs: methanol was 5 : 5. Especially, the catalytic rates obtained based on various substrates proved that ADA-Te-ADA slightly displayed special substrate selectivity, which was the ideal catalytic characterization of building block for giant supramolecular biomimetic enzyme. The successfully synthesis of ADA-Te-ADA might highlight for the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of hydrophobic guest biomimetic glutathione peroxidase. And it also might provide the basement for the construction of giant supramolecular biomimetic enzyme.

  8. A mu-class glutathione S-transferase from the marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: molecular cloning and active-site structural modeling.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Vergara, Carmen A; Harris-Valle, Citlalli; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    A cDNA clone coding for a mu-class glutathione S-transferase (GST) was isolated from a hepatopancreas cDNA library from the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. The deduced amino acid sequence (215 amino acids) has >50% identity to rodents and other mammals mu-class GSTs. Using RT-PCR, the shrimp GST transcript was detected in hepatopancreas, hemocytes, gills, and muscle, but not in pleopods. The shrimp GST sequence was computer modeled and found to fit the classical two-domain GST structure. Domain I, containing the glutathione (GSH) binding site, is more conserved compared to the flexible C-terminal domain II. Residue Q208 appears to be a key to substrate specificity by comparison with mammalian GST mutants. This position is commonly occupied by serine or threonine in mammalian mu-class GSTs, and shrimp Q208 may affect the affinity to substrates like aminochrome or 1,3-dimethyl-2-cyano-1-nitrosoguanidine. This is the first report of molecular cloning and structural modeling of a crustacean GST and provides new insights into the nature of the detoxification response on marine invertebrates.

  9. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2015-09-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest, despite other studies having reported differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, in this study we compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate the findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation, beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies had used small groups, whereas in the present study we tested these hypotheses in a larger group. The results indicated that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network, relative to an active task, for meditators as compared to controls. Regions of the default mode network showing a Group × Task interaction included the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that the suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and they suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task.

  10. Arabidopsis Glutathione Transferases U24 and U25 Exhibit a Range of Detoxification Activities with the Environmental Pollutant and Explosive, 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Vanda; Tzafestas, Kyriakos; Sparrow, Helen; Johnston, Emily J.; Brentnall, Andrew S.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Rylott, Elizabeth L.; Bruce, Neil C.

    2014-01-01

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a major worldwide military pollutant. The presence of this toxic and highly persistent pollutant, particularly at military sites and former manufacturing facilities, presents various health and environmental concerns. Due to the chemically resistant structure of TNT, it has proven to be highly recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Here, we demonstrate the importance of two glutathione transferases (GSTs), GST-U24 and GST-U25, from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that are specifically up-regulated in response to TNT exposure. To assess the role of GST-U24 and GST-U25, we purified and characterized recombinant forms of both enzymes and demonstrated the formation of three TNT glutathionyl products. Importantly, GST-U25 catalyzed the denitration of TNT to form 2-glutathionyl-4,6-dinitrotoluene, a product that is likely to be more amenable to subsequent biodegradation in the environment. Despite the presence of this biochemical detoxification pathway in plants, physiological concentrations of GST-U24 and GST-U25 result in only a limited innate ability to cope with the levels of TNT found at contaminated sites. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GST-U24 and GST-U25 exhibit significantly enhanced ability to withstand and detoxify TNT, properties that could be applied for in planta detoxification of TNT in the field. The overexpressing lines removed significantly more TNT from soil and exhibited a corresponding reduction in glutathione levels when compared with wild-type plants. However, in the absence of TNT, overexpression of these GSTs reduces root and shoot biomass, and although glutathione levels are not affected, this effect has implications for xenobiotic detoxification. PMID:24733884

  11. Preclinical Pharmacokinetic Analysis of NOV-002, a Glutathione Disulfide Mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Uys, Joachim D.; Manevich, Yefim; DeVane, Lindsay C.; He, Lin; Garret, Tracy E.; Pazoles, Christopher J.; Tew, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Danyelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is in Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer and other oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Nonlinear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of ~13 mins with an AUC of 1.18 μg.h/ml, a Cmax of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis. PMID:20359856

  12. Inhibition of glutathione conjugation in the rat in vivo by analogues of glutathione conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk-Mahadevan, S; Mulder, G J

    1998-04-24

    Glutathione (GSH) conjugation plays an important role in (de-)toxification of its substrates in vivo. We have developed inhibitors of GSH conjugation that are active in the rat in vivo which are derived from the structure of GSH conjugates: they contain a backbone of gamma-L-Glu-D-2-aminoadipic acid that is virtually isosteric with the gamma-L-Glu-L-Cys-Gly structure of GSH. In addition, a hydrophobic alkyl group is attached such that it may interact with the H-site of the enzyme. Finally, the carboxyl groups were esterified with alcohols of varying chain length. The results show that all these compounds preferentially inhibit alpha-GST's 1-1 and 2-2, have less effect on mu isoenzymes 3-3 and 4-4, and finally, have little effect on rat theta (G.J. Mulder, S. Ouwerkerk-Mahadevan, Modulation of glutathione conjugation in vivo: How to decrease glutathione conjugation in vivo or in intact cellular systems in vitro, Chem. Biol. Interact. 105 (1997) 17-34) and pi (S. Ouwerkerk-Mahadevan, J.H. van Boom, M.C. Dreef-Tromp, J.H.T.M. Ploemen, D.J. Meyer, G.J. Mulder, Glutathione analogues as novel inhibitors of rat and human glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes, as well as of glutathione conjugation in isolated rat hepatocytes and the rat in vivo, Bioche. J., 308 (1995) 283-290). Several of the compounds inhibit the GSH conjugation of bromsulfophthalein and (S)-2-bromisovalerylurea in hepatocytes, in the situ recirculating rat liver perfusion and in the rat in vivo (after i.v. administration). The most effective compound contains a 2-heptylamine group linked as an amide to the 1-carboxyl group of the aminoadipic acid moiety at the H-site, and an ethyl ester at the 5-carboxylic acid group of aminoadipic acid.

  13. Prion protein regulates glutathione metabolism and neural glutamate and cysteine uptake via excitatory amino acid transporter 3.

    PubMed

    Guitart, Kathrin; Loers, Gabriele; Schachner, Melitta; Kleene, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    Prion protein (PrP) plays crucial roles in regulating antioxidant systems to improve cell defenses against cellular stress. Here, we show that the interactions of PrP with the excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT), and multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) in astrocytes and the interaction between PrP and EAAT3 in neurons regulate the astroglial and neuronal metabolism of the antioxidant glutathione. Ablation of PrP in astrocytes and cerebellar neurons leads to dysregulation of EAAT3-mediated uptake of glutamate and cysteine, which are precursors for the synthesis of glutathione. In PrP-deficient astrocytes, levels of intracellular glutathione are increased, and under oxidative stress, levels of extracellular glutathione are increased, due to (i) increased glutathione release via MRP1 and (ii) reduced activity of the glutathione-degrading enzyme γ-GT. In PrP-deficient cerebellar neurons, cell death is enhanced under oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity, when compared to wild-type cerebellar neurons. These results indicate a functional interplay of PrP with EAAT3, MRP1 and γ-GT in astrocytes and of PrP and EAAT3 in neurons, suggesting that these interactions play an important role in the metabolic cross-talk between astrocytes and neurons and in protection of neurons by astrocytes from oxidative and glutamate-induced cytotoxicity. Interactions of prion protein (PrP) with excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) regulate the astroglial and neuronal metabolism of glutathione (GSH) which protects cells against the cytotoxic oxidative stress. PrP controls the release of GSH from astrocytes via MRP1 and regulates the hydrolysis of extracellular GSH by GGT as well as the neuronal and astroglial glutamate and cysteine uptake via EAAT3.

  14. Influence of changes in glutathione concentration on body temperature and tolerance to cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kolesnichenko, L S; Kulinsky, V I; Sotnikova, G V; Kovtun, V Yu

    2003-05-01

    Two compounds that deplete glutathione (buthionine sulfoximine and diethyl maleate) with different mechanisms of action decrease body temperature and increase tolerance to complete global cerebral ischemia, both correlating closely with the glutathione concentration decrease. Glutathione apparently participates in the regulations of these functional parameters. GSH diethyl ester does not influence the latter, though it increases moderately the GSH concentration. Injection of GSH ester into the cerebral ventricles or subcutaneously selectively increases the GSH level in the brain and liver. An influence of the brain on the glutathione system in the liver was revealed. Diethyl maleate and GSH ester increase the activity of glutathione metabolizing enzymes under certain conditions.

  15. Novel physiological roles for glutathione in sequestering acetaldehyde to confer acetaldehyde tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Matsufuji, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Kohei; Yamauchi, Kosei; Mitsunaga, Tohru; Hayakawa, Takashi; Nakagawa, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we identified novel physiological functions of glutathione in acetaldehyde tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains deleted in the genes encoding the enzymes involved in glutathione synthesis and reduction, GSH1, GSH2 and GLR1, exhibited severe growth defects compared to wild-type under acetaldehyde stress, although strains deleted in the genes encoding glutathione peroxidases or glutathione transferases did not show any growth defects. On the other hand, intracellular levels of reduced glutathione decreased in the presence of acetaldehyde in response to acetaldehyde concentration. Moreover, we show that glutathione can trap a maximum of four acetaldehyde molecules within its molecule in a non-enzymatic manner. Taken together, these findings suggest that glutathione has an important role in acetaldehyde tolerance, as a direct scavenger of acetaldehyde in the cell.

  16. Amodiaquine failure associated with erythrocytic glutathione in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Zuluaga, Lina; Pabón, Adriana; López, Carlos; Ochoa, Aleida; Blair, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Objective To establish the relationship between production of glutathione and the therapeutic response to amodiaquine (AQ) monotherapy in Plasmodium falciparum non-complicated malaria patients. Methodology Therapeutic response to AQ was evaluated in 32 patients with falciparum malaria in two townships of Antioquia, Colombia, and followed-up for 28 days. For every patient, total glutathione and enzymatic activity (glutathione reductase, GR, and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, γ-GCS) were determined in parasitized erythrocytes, non-infected erythrocytes and free parasites, on the starting day (day zero, before ingestion of AQ) and on the day of failure (in case of occurrence). Results There was found an AQ failure of 31.25%. Independent of the therapeutic response, on the starting day and on the day of failure, lower total glutathione concentration and higher GR activities in parasitized erythrocytes were found, compared with non-infected erythrocytes (p < 0.003). In addition, only on the day of failure, γ-GCS activity of parasitized erythrocytes was higher, compared with that of healthy erythrocytes (p = 0.01). Parasitized and non-parasitized erythrocytes in therapeutic failure patients (TF) had higher total glutathione on the starting day compared with those of adequate clinical response (ACR) (p < 0.02). Parasitized erythrocytes of TF patients showed lower total glutathione on the failure day, compared with starting day (p = 0.017). No differences was seen in the GR and γ-GCS activities by compartment, neither between the two therapeutic response groups nor between the two treatment days. Conclusion This study is a first approach to explaining P. falciparum therapeutic failure in humans through differences in glutathione metabolism in TF and ACR patients. These results suggest a role for glutathione in the therapeutic failure to antimalarials. PMID:17451604

  17. Exercise training with ageing protects against ethanol induced myocardial glutathione homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kakarla, Pushpalatha; Kesireddy, Sathyavelureddy; Christiaan, Leeuwenburgh

    2008-05-01

    Glutathione plays a central role in the maintenance of cellular antioxidant defense. The alterations in the glutathione and associated recyclic enzymes caused by both exercise training and ethanol are well documented; however, their interactive effects with age are not well understood. Therefore, the influence of ageing and the interactive effects of exercise training and ethanol on the myocardial glutathione system in 3 months and 18 months old rats were examined. The results showed a significant (p<0.01) reduction in GSH content, Se and non-Se GSH-Px, GR and GST activities in the myocardium of rat with age. A significant increase (p<0.05) in the activities of these enzymes was observed in both age groups of rats in response to exercise training. This exercise-induced elevation of Se and non-Se GSH-Px and GR activities was more pronounced in the 18 months old rats when compared to 3 months old rats. Ethanol consumption significantly (p<0.05) reduced the GSH content, Se and non-Se GSH-Px and GR activities in both age groups of rats. In contrast, ethanol consumption significantly (p<0.05) increased the activity of GST. The combined action of exercise plus ethanol significantly (p<0.05) elevated the GSH content, Se and non-Se GSH-Px, GR and GST activities when compared to the ethanol treated rats in both age groups, indicating the suppression of ethanol-induced oxidative stress by exercise training. In conclusion, there was a compensatory myocardial response lessening ethanol-induced oxidative stress by exercise training, which seemed to result from the higher activity of glutathione recycling and utilizing enzymes, which may be critical for preventing chronic oxidative damage to the myocardium during ageing and even due to ethanol consumption.

  18. Studies of the relationship between the catalytic activity and binding of non-substrate ligands by the glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, T D; Vessey, D A; Holcomb, C; Saley, N

    1984-01-01

    The dimeric enzyme glutathione S-transferase B is composed of two dissimilar subunits, referred to as Ya and Yc. Transferase B (YaYc) and two other transferases that are homodimers of the individual Ya and Yc subunits were purified from rat liver. Inhibition of these three enzymes by Indocyanine Green, biliverdin and several bile acids was investigated at different values of pH (range 6.0-8.0). Indocyanine Green, biliverdin and chenodeoxycholate were found to be effective inhibitors of transferases YaYc and YcYc at low (pH 6.0) but not high (pH 8.0) values of pH. Between these extremes of pH intermediate degrees of inhibition were observed. Cholate and taurochenodeoxycholate, however, were ineffective inhibitors of transferase YcYc at all values of pH. The observed differences in bile acids appeared to be due, in part, to differences in their state of ionization. In contrast with the above results, transferase YaYa was inhibited by at least 80% by the non-substrate ligands at all values of pH. These effects of pH on the three transferases could not be accounted for by pH-induced changes in the enzyme's affinity for the inhibitor. Thus those glutathione S-transferases that contain the Yc subunit are able to act simultaneously as both enzymes and binding proteins. In addition to enzyme structure, the state of ionization of the non-substrate ligands may also influence whether the transferases can perform both functions simultaneously. PMID:6696720

  19. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient γ-ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Timothy O; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-06-01

    Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M(2) seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione depletion

  20. Nitrate reducing activity pervades surface waters during upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Halarnekar, Reena; Malik, Ashish; Vijayan, Vijitha; Varik, Sandesh; Kumari, Ritu; V. K., Jineesh; Gauns, Manguesh U.; Nair, Shanta; LokaBharathi, P. A.

    2014-09-01

    Nitrate reducing activity (NRA) is known to be mediated by microaerophilic to anaerobic bacteria and generally occurs in the sub-surface waters. However, we hypothesize that NRA could become prominent in the surface waters during upwelling. Hence, we examined nitrification and nitrate reduction along with hydrographic and environmental parameters off Trivandrum and Kochi, south-west-India in June 2010. Shoaling isolines of temperature, density, and nutrients revealed the onset of upwelling off Trivandrum. Shoaling of these signatures was absent in the northern transect off Kochi. The degree of nutrient consumption (DNC) was low emphasizing the presence of newly upwelled water off Trivandrum. A significant increase in NRA (df = 1, p < 0.05) was observed off Trivandrum than at Kochi. Moreover, as hypothesized, NRA at Trivandrum was pronounced at the surface with a maximum rate of 0.85 (± 0.02) μmol L1 h- 1 nearshore which was ~ 29 × higher than that at Kochi. Further, an inverse relationship between NRA and NO3- concentration (n = 34, r = - 0.415, p < 0.01) suggested transformation of the upwelled nutrient. Nitrification/NRA was ~ 10 × lower at 0.28 off Trivandrum indicating a discernible shift towards reduction. Such contribution from bacterial activity could be a response towards restoration of homeostasis.

  1. Reduced autonomic activity during stepwise exposure to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Sevre, K; Bendz, B; Hankø, E; Nakstad, A R; Hauge, A; Kåsin, J I; Lefrandt, J D; Smit, A J; Eide, I; Rostrup, M

    2001-12-01

    Several studies have shown increased sympathetic activity during acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. In a recent field study we found reduced plasma catecholamines during the first days after a stepwise ascent to high altitude. In the present study 14 subjects were exposed to a simulated ascent in a hypobaric chamber to test the hypothesis of a temporary reduction in autonomic activity. The altitude was increased stepwise to 4500 m over 3 days. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed continuously in seven subjects. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) was determined in eight subjects with the 'Transfer Function' method at baseline, at 4500 m and after returning to baseline. Resting plasma catecholamines and cardiovascular- and plasma catecholamine- responses to cold pressor- (CPT) and mental stress-test (MST) were assessed daily in all and 12 subjects, respectively. Data are mean +/- SEM. Compared with baseline at 4500 m there were lower total power (TP) (35 457 +/- 26 302 vs. 15 001 +/- 11 176 ms2), low frequency (LF) power (3112 +/- 809 vs. 1741 +/- 604 ms2), high frequency (HF) power (1466 +/- 520 vs. 459 +/- 189 ms2) and HF normalized units (46 +/- 0.007 vs. 44 +/- 0.006%), P < or = 0.001. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity decreased (15.6 +/- 2.1 vs. 9.5 +/- 2.6 ms mmHg(-1), P = 0.015). Resting noradrenaline (NA) decreased (522 +/- 98 vs. 357 +/- 60 pmol L(-1), P = 0.027). The increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and NA during mental stress was less pronounced (21 +/- 4 vs. 10 +/- 2% and 25 +/- 9 vs. -2 +/- 8%, respectively, P < 0.05). The increase in SBP during cold pressor test decreased (16 +/- 3 vs. 1 +/- 6%, P = 0.03). Diastolic blood pressure, HR and adrenaline displayed similar tendencies. We conclude that a transient reduction in parasympathetic and sympathetic activity was demonstrated during stepwise exposure to high altitude.

  2. [STUDY OF GLUTATHIONE AND ENZYMES OF ITS METABOLISM UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ENRICHED DAIRY PRODUCTS FOR PROPHYLACTIC USE IN CONDITIONS OF OXIDATIVE STRESS CAUSED BY EXCESSIVE EXERCISE].

    PubMed

    Boyarskaya, L A; Turchaninov, D V; Efremenko, E S; Bogdashin, I V; Vilms, E A; Yunatskaya, T A

    2015-01-01

    There was performed the study of the activity of the antioxidant system of glutathione under regular taking of enriched with micronutrients dairy products "Bifidin " and "Prolacta" in conditions ofsimulation of xcessive exercise loads. Target of research: white outbred male rats weighing 180-200 g (n = 68). Research methods and equipment: information retrieval, biochemical, and statistical. In the subacute experiment there was established that in conditions of excessive exercise loads (CEEL) the body of the rat meets with significant oxidative stress, causing the suppression of the activity of glutathione system: the number of reduced glutathione and the activity of selenium-dependent glutathione-peroxidase decline. Regular taking of dairy products "Bifidin" and "Prolacta" in conditions of CEEL (active training process) allows effectively to neutralize lipid peroxidation processes and normalize indices of the system of glutathione. There is established an increase in the activity ofglutathione-S-transferase in the homogenates of liver tissue in the simulation CEEL in combination with the use ofproduct "Bifidin".

  3. Catalytic cycle of human glutathione reductase near 1 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Berkholz, Donald S.; Faber, H. Richard; Savvides, Savvas N.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Summary Efficient enzyme catalysis depends on exquisite details of structure beyond those resolvable in typical medium- and high-resolution crystallographic analyses. Here we report synchrotron-based cryocrystallographic studies of natural substrate complexes of the flavoenzyme human glutathione reductase (GR) at nominal resolutions between 1.1 and 0.95 Å that reveal new aspects of its mechanism. Compression in the active site causes overlapping van der Waals radii and distortion in the nicotinamide ring of the NADPH substrate, which enhances catalysis via stereoelectronic effects. The bound NADPH and redox-active disulfide are positioned optimally on opposite sides of the flavin for a 1,2-addition across a flavin double bond. The new structures extend earlier observations to reveal that the redox-active disulfide loop in GR is an extreme case of sequential peptide bonds systematically deviating from planarity, a net deviation of 53° across 5 residues. But this apparent strain is not a factor in catalysis as it is present in both oxidized and reduced structures. Intriguingly, the flavin bond lengths in oxidized GR are intermediate between those expected for oxidized and reduced flavin, but we present evidence that this may not be due to the protein environment but instead to partial synchrotron reduction of the flavin by the synchrotron beam. Finally, of more general relevance, we present evidence that the structures of synchrotron-reduced disulfide bonds cannot generally be used as reliable models for naturally reduced disulfide bonds. PMID:18638483

  4. Promoting physical activity and reducing climate change: opportunities to replace short car trips with active transportation.

    PubMed

    Maibach, Edward; Steg, Linda; Anable, Jillian

    2009-10-01

    Automobile use is a significant contributor to climate change, local air pollution, pedestrian injuries and deaths, declines in physical activity and obesity. A significant proportion of car use is for short trips that can relatively easily be taken with active transportation options--walking or cycling--or with public transportation. In this commentary, we review a number of immediate, practical opportunities to implement policies and programs that reduce short car trips and increase active transportation.

  5. Expression Patterns of Genes Involved in Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle in Aphid-Infested Maize (Zea mays L.) Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert

    2016-02-23

    Reduced forms of ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) are among the most important non-enzymatic foliar antioxidants in maize (Zea mays L.). The survey was aimed to evaluate impact of bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) or grain aphid (Sitobion avenae F.) herbivory on expression of genes related to ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in seedlings of six maize varieties (Ambrozja, Nana, Tasty Sweet, Touran, Waza, Złota Karłowa), differing in resistance to the cereal aphids. Relative expression of sixteen maize genes encoding isoenzymes of ascorbate peroxidase (APX1, APX2, APX3, APX4, APX5, APX6, APX7), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR1, MDHAR2, MDHAR3, MDHAR4), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1, DHAR2, DHAR3) and glutathione reductase (GR1, GR2) was quantified. Furthermore, effect of hemipterans' attack on activity of APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR enzymes, and the content of reduced and oxidized ascorbate and glutathione in maize plants were assessed. Seedling leaves of more resistant Z. mays varieties responded higher elevations in abundance of target transcripts. In addition, earlier and stronger aphid-triggered changes in activity of APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR enzymes, and greater modulations in amount of the analyzed antioxidative metabolites were detected in foliar tissues of highly resistant Ambrozja genotype in relation to susceptible Tasty Sweet plants.

  6. Expression Patterns of Genes Involved in Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle in Aphid-Infested Maize (Zea mays L.) Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Reduced forms of ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) are among the most important non-enzymatic foliar antioxidants in maize (Zea mays L.). The survey was aimed to evaluate impact of bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) or grain aphid (Sitobion avenae F.) herbivory on expression of genes related to ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in seedlings of six maize varieties (Ambrozja, Nana, Tasty Sweet, Touran, Waza, Złota Karłowa), differing in resistance to the cereal aphids. Relative expression of sixteen maize genes encoding isoenzymes of ascorbate peroxidase (APX1, APX2, APX3, APX4, APX5, APX6, APX7), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR1, MDHAR2, MDHAR3, MDHAR4), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1, DHAR2, DHAR3) and glutathione reductase (GR1, GR2) was quantified. Furthermore, effect of hemipterans’ attack on activity of APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR enzymes, and the content of reduced and oxidized ascorbate and glutathione in maize plants were assessed. Seedling leaves of more resistant Z. mays varieties responded higher elevations in abundance of target transcripts. In addition, earlier and stronger aphid-triggered changes in activity of APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR enzymes, and greater modulations in amount of the analyzed antioxidative metabolites were detected in foliar tissues of highly resistant Ambrozja genotype in relation to susceptible Tasty Sweet plants. PMID:26907270

  7. N-acetyl cysteine restores brain glutathione loss in combined 2-cyclohexene-1-one and d-amphetamine-treated rats: relevance to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Dean, Olivia M; van den Buuse, Maarten; Berk, Michael; Copolov, David L; Mavros, Christine; Bush, Ashley I

    2011-07-25

    Oxidative stress and reduced brain levels of glutathione have been implicated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) is a precursor of glutathione and has additional effects on glutamate neurotransmission, neurogenesis and inflammation. While NAC treatment has shown benefits in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, the mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Similarly, the interaction between oxidative stress and altered dopaminergic activities in psychiatric illness is not yet characterized. This study investigated the capacity of NAC in restoring brain glutathione depletion in rats that received 2-cyclohexene-1-one (CHX, 75 mg/kg), d-amphetamine (2.5mg/kg) or both. CHX, but not amphetamine, induced significant depletion of glutathione levels in the striatum and frontal cortex. Glutathione depletion was reversed by NAC (1000 mg/kg) in saline-treated and amphetamine-treated (frontal cortex only) rats. While NAC was shown to be beneficial in this model, the lack of additional glutathione depletion by amphetamine in combination with CHX does not support a summative interaction between oxidative stress and altered dopamine transmission.

  8. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  9. Tritium retention in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Y.; Abe, S.; Matsuyama, M.; Alimov, V.K.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Bobyr, N.P.; Cherkez, D.I.; Khripunov, B.I.; Golubeva, A.V.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Klimov, N.S.; Chernov, V.M.; Oyaidzu, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are structural material candidates for breeding blankets of future fusion reactors. Therefore, tritium (T) retention in RAFM steels is an important problem in assessing the T inventory of blankets. In this study, specimens of RAFM steels were subjected to irradiation of 20 MeV W ions to 0.54 displacements per atom (dpa), exposure to high flux D plasmas at 400 and 600 K and that to pulsed heat loads. The specimens thus prepared were exposed to DT gas at 473 K. Despite severe modification in the surface morphology, heat loads had negligible effects on T retention. Significant increase in T retention at the surface and/or subsurface was observed after D plasma exposure. However, T trapped at the surface/subsurface layer was easily removed by maintaining the specimens in the air at about 300 K. Displacement damage led to increase in T retention in the bulk due to the trapping effects of defects, and T trapped was stable at 300 K. It was therefore concluded that displacement damages had the largest influence on T retention under the present conditions.

  10. Materials design data for reduced activation martensitic steel type EUROFER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Alamo, A.; Bedel, L.; Forest, L.; Gentzbittel, J.-M.; Rensman, J.-W.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Schirra, M.; Schmitt, R.; Schneider, H. C.; Petersen, C.; Lancha, A.-M.; Fernandez, P.; Filacchioni, G.; Maday, M. F.; Mergia, K.; Boukos, N.; Baluc; Spätig, P.; Alves, E.; Lucon, E.

    2004-08-01

    Materials design limits derived so far from the data generated in Europe for the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel type Eurofer are presented. These data address the short-term needs of the ITER Test Blanket Modules and a DEMOnstration fusion reactor. Products tested include plates, bars, tubes, TIG and EB welds, as well as powder consolidated blocks and solid-solid HIP joints. Effects of thermal ageing and low dose neutron irradiation are also included. Results are sorted and screened according to design code requirements before being introduced in reference databases. From the physical properties databases, variations of magnetic properties, modulus of elasticity, density, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, mean and instantaneous linear coefficients of thermal expansion versus temperature are derived. From the tensile and creep properties databases design allowable stresses are derived. From the instrumented Charpy impact and fracture toughness databases, ductile to brittle transition temperature, toughness and behavior of materials in different fracture modes are evaluated. From the fatigue database, total strain range versus number of cycles to failure curves are plotted and used to derive fatigue design curves. Cyclic curves are also derived and compared with monotonic hardening curves. Finally, irradiated and aged materials data are compared to ensure that the safety margins incorporated in unirradiated design limits are not exceeded.

  11. Catabolism of Glutathione Conjugates in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Evans, Kathryn M.; Cunningham, Oliver D.; Hodgson, David R. W.; Steel, Patrick G.; Edwards, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The safener fenclorim (4,6-dichloro-2-phenylpyrimidine) increases tolerance to chloroacetanilide herbicides in rice by enhancing the expression of detoxifying glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Fenclorim also enhances GSTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, and while investigating the functional significance of this induction in suspension cultures, we determined that these enzymes glutathionylated the safener. The resulting S-(fenclorim)-glutathione conjugate was sequentially processed to S-(fenclorim)-γ-glutamyl-cysteine and S-(fenclorim)-cysteine (FC), the latter accumulating in both the cells and the medium. FC was then either catabolized to 4-chloro-6-(methylthio)-phenylpyrimidine (CMTP) or N-acylated with malonic acid. These cysteine derivatives had distinct fates, with the enzymes responsible for their formation being induced by fenclorim and FC. Fenclorim-N-malonylcysteine was formed from FC by the action of a malonyl-CoA-dependent N-malonyltransferase. A small proportion of the fenclorim-N-malonylcysteine then underwent decarboxylation to yield a putative S-fenclorim-N-acetylcysteine intermediate, which underwent a second round of GST-mediated S-glutathionylation and subsequent proteolytic processing. The formation of CMTP was catalyzed by the concerted action of a cysteine conjugate β-lyase and an S-methyltransferase, with the two activities being coordinately regulated. Although the fenclorim conjugates tested showed little GST-inducing activity in Arabidopsis, the formation of CMTP resulted in metabolic reactivation, with the product showing good enhancing activity. In addition, CMTP induced GSTs and herbicide-safening activity in rice. The bioactivated CMTP was in turn glutathione-conjugated and processed to a malonyl cysteine derivative. These results reveal the surprisingly complex set of competing catabolic reactions acting on xenobiotics entering the S-glutathionylation pathway in plants, which can result in both detoxification and bioactivation. PMID

  12. Enantioselective induction of a glutathione-S-transferase, a glutathione transporter and an ABC transporter in maize by Metolachlor and its (S)-isomer.

    PubMed

    Pang, Sen; Ran, Zhaojin; Liu, Zhiqian; Song, Xiaoyu; Duan, Liusheng; Li, Xuefeng; Wang, Chengju

    2012-01-01

    The metabolism of chiral herbicides in plants remains poorly understood. Glutathione conjugation reactions are one of the principal mechanisms that plants utilize to detoxify xenobiotics. The induction by rac- and S-metolachlor of the expression of three genes, ZmGST27, ZmGT1 and ZmMRP1, encoding respectively a glutathione-S-transferase, a glutathione transporter and an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter was studied in maize. The results demonstrate that the inducing effect of rac- and S-metolachlor on the expression of ZmGST27 and ZmGT1 is comparable. However, the inducing effect of rac-metolachlor on ZmMRP1 expression is more pronounced than that of S-metolachlor. Furthermore, vanadate, an ABC transporter inhibitor, could greatly reduce the difference in herbicidal activity between rac- and S-metolachlor. These results suggest that the ABC transporters may preferentially transport conjugates of rac-metolachlor, leading to a faster metabolism of the latter. Through comparing the expression of ZmGST27, ZmMRP1 and ZmGT1 after treatment by rac- and S-metolachlor, we provide novel insights into the metabolic processes of chiral herbicides in plants.

  13. Enantioselective Induction of a Glutathione-S-Transferase, a Glutathione Transporter and an ABC Transporter in Maize by Metolachlor and Its (S)-Isomer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqian; Song, Xiaoyu; Duan, Liusheng; Li, Xuefeng; Wang, Chengju

    2012-01-01

    The metabolism of chiral herbicides in plants remains poorly understood. Glutathione conjugation reactions are one of the principal mechanisms that plants utilize to detoxify xenobiotics. The induction by rac- and S-metolachlor of the expression of three genes, ZmGST27, ZmGT1 and ZmMRP1, encoding respectively a glutathione-S-transferase, a glutathione transporter and an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter was studied in maize. The results demonstrate that the inducing effect of rac- and S-metolachlor on the expression of ZmGST27 and ZmGT1 is comparable. However, the inducing effect of rac-metolachlor on ZmMRP1 expression is more pronounced than that of S-metolachlor. Furthermore, vanadate, an ABC transporter inhibitor, could greatly reduce the difference in herbicidal activity between rac- and S-metolachlor. These results suggest that the ABC transporters may preferentially transport conjugates of rac-metolachlor, leading to a faster metabolism of the latter. Through comparing the expression of ZmGST27, ZmMRP1 and ZmGT1 after treatment by rac- and S-metolachlor, we provide novel insights into the metabolic processes of chiral herbicides in plants. PMID:23144728

  14. The biological importance of glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin backup systems in bivalves during peroxide exposure.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Rafael; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Uliano-Silva, Marcela; Delapedra, Gabriel; Arl, Miriam; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2014-10-01

    Organic peroxide elimination in eukaryotes essentially depends on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx) enzymes, which are supported by their respective electron donors, glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx). This system depends on the ancillary enzymes glutathione reductase (GR) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) to maintain GSH and Trx in their reduced state. This study discusses the biological importance of GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx during cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) exposure in brown mussel Perna perna. ZnCl2 or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenze (CDNB) was used to decrease GR and TrxR activities in gills, as already reported with mammals and bivalves. ZnCl2 exposure lowered GR activity (28%), impaired the in vivo CHP decomposition and decreased the survival rates under CHP exposure. CDNB decreased GR (54%) and TrxR (73%) activities and induced glutathione depletion (99%), promoting diminished peroxide elimination and survival rates at a greater extent than ZnCl2. CDNB also increased the susceptibility of hemocytes to CHP toxicity. Despite being toxic and causing mortality at longer exposures, short (2 h) exposure to CHP promoted an up regulation of GSH (50 and 100 μM CHP) and protein-thiol (100 μM CHP) levels, which was blocked by ZnCl2 or CDNB pre-exposure. Results highlight the biological importance of GSH, GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx activities, contributing to organic peroxides elimination and mussel survival under oxidative challenges. To our knowledge, this is the first work that demonstrates, albeit indirectly, the biological importance of GPx/GR/GSH and Prx/TrxR/Trx systems on in vivo organic peroxide elimination in bivalves.

  15. Glutathione synthesis is compromised in erythrocytes from individuals with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Devin; Ly, Judy; Chi, Po-Ting; Daliva, John; Nguyen, Truongson; Soofer, Charleen; Chen, Yung C.; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated that the levels of enzymes responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) such as glutathione synthase (GSS), glutamate-cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit (GCLC), and glutathione reductase (GSR) were significantly reduced in the red blood cells (RBCs) isolated from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and this reduction correlated with decreased levels of intracellular GSH. GSH content in RBCs can be used as a marker for increased overall oxidative stress and immune dysfunctions caused by HIV infection. Our data supports our hypothesis that compromised levels of GSH in HIV infected individuals’ is due to decreased levels of GSH-synthetic enzymes. The role of GSH in combating oxidative stress and improving the functions of immune cells in HIV patients’ indicates the benefit of an antioxidant supplement which can reduce the cellular damage and promote the functions of immune cells. PMID:24782776

  16. Glutathione synthesis is compromised in erythrocytes from individuals with HIV.

    PubMed

    Morris, Devin; Ly, Judy; Chi, Po-Ting; Daliva, John; Nguyen, Truongson; Soofer, Charleen; Chen, Yung C; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated that the levels of enzymes responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) such as glutathione synthase (GSS), glutamate-cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit (GCLC), and glutathione reductase (GSR) were significantly reduced in the red blood cells (RBCs) isolated from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and this reduction correlated with decreased levels of intracellular GSH. GSH content in RBCs can be used as a marker for increased overall oxidative stress and immune dysfunctions caused by HIV infection. Our data supports our hypothesis that compromised levels of GSH in HIV infected individuals' is due to decreased levels of GSH-synthetic enzymes. The role of GSH in combating oxidative stress and improving the functions of immune cells in HIV patients' indicates the benefit of an antioxidant supplement which can reduce the cellular damage and promote the functions of immune cells.

  17. Physical activity but not sedentary activity is reduced in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ng, Wan-Fai; Miller, Ariana; Bowman, Simon J; Price, Elizabeth J; Kitas, George D; Pease, Colin; Emery, Paul; Lanyon, Peter; Hunter, John; Gupta, Monica; Giles, Ian; Isenberg, David; McLaren, John; Regan, Marian; Cooper, Annie; Young-Min, Steven A; McHugh, Neil; Vadivelu, Saravanan; Moots, Robert J; Coady, David; MacKay, Kirsten; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Sutcliffe, Nurhan; Bombardieri, Michele; Pitzalis, Costantino; Griffiths, Bridget; Mitchell, Sheryl; Miyamoto, Samira Tatiyama; Trenell, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the levels of physical activity in individuals with primary Sjögren's syndrome (PSS) and its relationship to the clinical features of PSS. To this cross-sectional study, self-reported levels of physical activity from 273 PSS patients were measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-short form (IPAQ-SF) and were compared with healthy controls matched for age, sex and body mass index. Fatigue and other clinical aspects of PSS including disease status, dryness, daytime sleepiness, dysautonomia, anxiety and depression were assessed using validated tools. Individuals with PSS had significantly reduced levels of physical activity [median (interquartile range, IQR) 1572 (594-3158) versus 3708 (1732-8255) metabolic equivalent of task (MET) × min/week, p < 0.001], but similar levels of sedentary activity [median (IQR) min 300 (135-375) versus 343 (223-433) (MET) × min/week, p = 0.532] compared to healthy individuals. Differences in physical activity between PSS and controls increased at moderate [median (IQR) 0 (0-480) versus 1560 (570-3900) MET × min/week, p < 0.001] and vigorous intensities [median (IQR) 0 (0-480) versus 480 (0-1920) MET × min/week, p < 0.001]. Correlation analysis revealed a significant association between physical activity and fatigue, orthostatic intolerance, depressive symptoms and quality of life. Sedentary activity did not correlate with fatigue. Stepwise linear regression analysis identified symptoms of depression and daytime sleepiness as independent predictors of levels of physical activity. Physical activity is reduced in people with PSS and is associated with symptoms of depression and daytime sleepiness. Sedentary activity is not increased in PSS. Clinical care teams should explore the clinical utility of targeting low levels of physical activity in PSS.

  18. Constitutive adipocyte mTORC1 activation enhances mitochondrial activity and reduces visceral adiposity in mice.

    PubMed

    Magdalon, Juliana; Chimin, Patricia; Belchior, Thiago; Neves, Rodrigo X; Vieira-Lara, Marcel A; Andrade, Maynara L; Farias, Talita S; Bolsoni-Lopes, Andressa; Paschoal, Vivian A; Yamashita, Alex S; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Festuccia, William T

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) loss of function reduces adiposity whereas partial mTORC1 inhibition enhances fat deposition. Herein we evaluated how constitutive mTORC1 activation in adipocytes modulates adiposity in vivo. Mice with constitutive mTORC1 activation in adipocytes induced by tuberous sclerosis complex (Tsc)1 deletion and littermate controls were evaluated for body mass, energy expenditure, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial function, mRNA and protein contents. Adipocyte-specific Tsc1 deletion reduced visceral, but not subcutaneous, fat mass, as well as adipocyte number and diameter, phenotypes that were associated with increased lipolysis, UCP-1 content (browning) and mRNA levels of pro-browning transcriptional factors C/EBPβ and ERRα. Adipocyte Tsc1 deletion enhanced mitochondrial oxidative activity, fatty acid oxidation and the expression of PGC-1α and PPARα in both visceral and subcutaneous fat. In brown adipocytes, however, Tsc1 deletion did not affect UCP-1 content and basal respiration. Adipocyte Tsc1 deletion also reduced visceral adiposity and enhanced glucose tolerance, liver and muscle insulin signaling and adiponectin secretion in mice fed with purified low- or high-fat diet. In conclusion, adipocyte-specific Tsc1 deletion enhances mitochondrial activity, induces browning and reduces visceral adiposity in mice.

  19. Intestinal barrier function in response to abundant or depleted mucosal glutathione in Salmonella-infected rats

    PubMed Central

    van Ampting, Marleen TJ; Schonewille, Arjan J; Vink, Carolien; Brummer, Robert Jan M; Meer, Roelof van der; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Glutathione, the main antioxidant of intestinal epithelial cells, is suggested to play an important role in gut barrier function and prevention of inflammation-related oxidative damage as induced by acute bacterial infection. Most studies on intestinal glutathione focus on oxidative stress reduction without considering functional disease outcome. Our aim was to determine whether depletion or maintenance of intestinal glutathione changes susceptibility of rats to Salmonella infection and associated inflammation. Rats were fed a control diet or the same diet supplemented with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO; glutathione depletion) or cystine (glutathione maintenance). Inert chromium ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (CrEDTA) was added to the diets to quantify intestinal permeability. At day 4 after oral gavage with Salmonella enteritidis (or saline for non-infected controls), Salmonella translocation was determined by culturing extra-intestinal organs. Liver and ileal mucosa were collected for analyses of glutathione, inflammation markers and oxidative damage. Faeces was collected to quantify diarrhoea. Results Glutathione depletion aggravated ileal inflammation after infection as indicated by increased levels of mucosal myeloperoxidase and interleukin-1β. Remarkably, intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation were not increased. Cystine supplementation maintained glutathione in the intestinal mucosa but inflammation and oxidative damage were not diminished. Nevertheless, cystine reduced intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation. Conclusion Despite increased infection-induced mucosal inflammation upon glutathione depletion, this tripeptide does not play a role in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and diarrhoea. On the other hand, cystine enhances gut barrier function by a mechanism unlikely to be related to glutathione. PMID:19374741

  20. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  1. Glutathione in the human brain: Review of its roles and measurement by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rae, Caroline D; Williams, Stephen R

    2016-12-26

    We review the transport, synthesis and catabolism of glutathione in the brain as well as its compartmentation and biochemistry in different brain cells. The major reactions involving glutathione are reviewed and the factors limiting its availability in brain cells are discussed. We also describe and critique current methods for measuring glutathione in the human brain using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and review the literature on glutathione measurements in healthy brains and in neurological, psychiatric, neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental conditions In summary: Healthy human brain glutathione concentration is ∼1-2 mM, but it varies by brain region, with evidence of gender differences and age effects; in neurological disease glutathione appears reduced in multiple sclerosis, motor neurone disease and epilepsy, while being increased in meningiomas; in psychiatric disease the picture is complex and confounded by methodological differences, regional effects, length of disease and drug-treatment. Both increases and decreases in glutathione have been reported in depression and schizophrenia. In Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment there is evidence for a decrease in glutathione compared to age-matched healthy controls. Improved methods to measure glutathione in vivo will provide better precision in glutathione determination and help resolve the complex biochemistry of this molecule in health and disease.

  2. Characterization of the conformational alterations, reduced anticoagulant activity, and enhanced antiangiogenic activity of prelatent antithrombin.

    PubMed

    Richard, Benjamin; Swanson, Richard; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Ramirez, Ben; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G W; Olson, Steven T

    2008-05-23

    A conformationally altered prelatent form of antithrombin that possesses both anticoagulant and antiangiogenic activities is produced during the conversion of native to latent antithrombin (Larsson, H., Akerud, P., Nordling, K., Raub-Segall, E., Claesson-Welsh, L., and Björk, I. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 11996-12002). Here, we show that the previously characterized prelatent antithrombin is a mixture of native antithrombin and a modified, true prelatent antithrombin that are resolvable by heparin-agarose chromatography. Kinetic analyses revealed that prelatent antithrombin is an intermediate in the conversion of native to latent antithrombin whose formation is favored by stabilizing anions of the Hofmeister series. Purified prelatent antithrombin had reduced anticoagulant function compared with native antithrombin, due to a reduced heparin affinity and consequent impaired ability of heparin to either bridge prelatent antithrombin and coagulation proteases in a ternary complex or to induce full conformational activation of the serpin. Significantly, prelatent antithrombin possessed an antiangiogenic activity more potent than that of latent antithrombin, based on the relative abilities of the two forms to inhibit endothelial cell growth. The prelatent form was conformationally altered from native antithrombin as judged from an attenuation of tryptophan fluorescence changes following heparin activation and a reduced thermal stability. The alterations are consistent with the limited structural changes involving strand 1C observed in a prelatent form of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (Dupont, D. M., Blouse, G. E., Hansen, M., Mathiasen, L., Kjelgaard, S., Jensen, J. K., Christensen, A., Gils, A., Declerck, P. J., Andreasen, P. A., and Wind, T. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 36071-36081), since the (1)H NMR spectrum, electrophoretic mobility, and proteolytic susceptibility of prelatent antithrombin most resemble those of native rather than those of latent antithrombin

  3. Glutathione is required for efficient production of infectious picornavirus virions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Allen D. . E-mail: smitha@ba.ars.usda.gov; Dawson, Harry . E-mail: dawsonh@ba.ars.usda.gov

    2006-09-30

    Glutathione is an intracellular reducing agent that helps maintain the redox potential of the cell and is important for immune function. The drug L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) selectively inhibits glutathione synthesis. Glutathione has been reported to block replication of HIV, HSV-1, and influenza virus, whereas cells treated with BSO exhibit increased replication of Sendai virus. Pre-treatment of HeLa cell monolayers with BSO inhibited replication of CVB3, CVB4, and HRV14 with viral titers reduced by approximately 6, 5, and 3 log{sub 1}, respectively. The addition of glutathione ethyl ester, but not dithiothreitol or 2-mercaptoethanol, to the culture medium reversed the inhibitory effect of BSO. Viral RNA and protein synthesis were not inhibited by BSO treatment. Fractionation of lysates from CVB3-infected BSO-treated cells on cesium chloride and sucrose gradients revealed that empty capsids but not mature virions were being produced. The levels of the 5S and 14S assembly intermediates, however, were not affected by BSO treatment. These results demonstrate that glutathione is important for production of mature infectious picornavirus virions.

  4. The Sinorhizobium meliloti LysR family transcriptional factor LsrB is involved in regulation of glutathione biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dawei; Tang, Guirong; Wang, Dong; Luo, Li

    2013-10-01

    Glutathione, a key antioxidant in Sinorhizobium meliloti, is required for the development of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) nitrogen-fixing nodules. This tripeptide can be synthesized by both γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (GshA) and glutathione synthetase (GshB) in Escherichia coli and S. meliloti. Genetic evidence has indicated that the null mutant of S. meliloti gshA or gshB1 does not establish efficient symbiosis on alfalfa. However, the transcriptional regulation of gshA and gshB has not been well understood. Here, S. meliloti LsrB, a member of LysR family transcriptional factors, was found to positively regulate glutathione biosynthesis by activating the transcription of gshA and gshB1 under both free-living and symbiotic conditions. The decrease in glutathione production in the lsrB in-frame deletion mutant (lsrB1-2) was determined by using quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The expression of gshA and gshB1 was correspondingly reduced in the mutant under free-living and symbiotic conditions by analyses of real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and promoter-GUS fusions. Interestingly, LsrB positively regulated the transcription of oxyR, which encodes another member of LysR family regulators and responds to oxidative stresses in S. meliloti. The oxyR null mutant produced less glutathione, in which the transcription of gshA was consistently down-regulated. These findings demonstrate that glutathione biosynthesis is positively regulated by both LsrB and OxyR in S. meliloti.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions glutathione synthetase deficiency glutathione synthetase ...

  6. Uptake and glutathione conjugation of ethacrynic acid and efflux of the glutathione adduct by periportal and perivenous rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tirona, R G; Tan, E; Meier, G; Pang, K S

    1999-12-01

    We assessed the impact of zonal factors on the hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) conjugation of ethacrynic acid (EA). Uptake of EA by enriched periportal (PP) and perivenous (PV) rat hepatocytes was characterized by both saturable (V(max)(uptake) = 3.4 +/- 1.7 and 3. 2 +/- 0.8 nmol/min/mg protein and K(m)(uptake) = 51 +/- 13 and 44 +/- 15 microM) and nonsaturable (12 +/- 5 and 12 +/- 3 microl/min/mg protein) components. Values for the overall GSH conjugation rates of EA (200 microM) were similar among the zonal hepatocytes and resembled those for the influx transport rates. In the absence of the hepatocyte membrane, GSH conjugation in PV and PP hepatocyte cytosol was similar, but a higher perivenous GSH conjugation activity toward EA (PV/PP of 2.4) that mirrored the higher PV/PP ratios of immunodetectable GSTs Ya (1.7) and Yb2 (2.5) was found in cell lysates obtained by the dual-digitonin-pulse perfusion technique. The GSH conjugation rates in the subcellular fragments were, however, much greater than those observed for intact hepatocytes. Efflux rates of the glutathione conjugate EA-SG from zonal hepatocytes were similar, as were levels of the immunodetectable multidrug-resistance protein 2/canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (Mrp2/cMoat) in the 100,000g pellets. The composite results suggest that the GSTs responsible for EA metabolism are more abundant in the PV region, albeit that the gradient of enzymatic activities is shallow. Despite the existence of zonal metabolic activity, the overall GSH conjugation rate of EA is homogeneous among cells because the reaction is rate limited by uptake, which occurs evenly. Results on EA-SG efflux suggest the acinar homogeneity in Mrp2/cMoat function for canalicular transport.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of glutathione reductase (GR) genes from rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Dipesh Kumar; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Yadav, Sandep; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-02-01

    Plant cells and tissues remain always on risk under abiotic and biotic stresses due to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Plants protect themselves against ROS induced oxidative damage by the upregulation of antioxidant machinery. Out of many components of antioxidant machinery, glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) and glutathione (GSH, γ-Glu-Cys-Gly) play important role in the protection of cell against oxidative damage. In stress condition, the GR helps in maintaining the reduced glutathione pool for strengthening the antioxidative processes in plants. Present study investigates genome wide analysis of GR from rice and Arabidopsis. We were able to identify 3 rice GR genes (LOC_Os02 g56850, LOC_Os03 g06740, LOC_Os10 g28000) and 2 Arabidopsis GR genes (AT3G54660, AT3G24170) from their respective genomes on the basis of their annotation as well as the presence of pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site. The evolutionary relationship of the GR genes from rice and Arabidopsis genomes was analyzed using the multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. This revealed evolutionary conserved pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site among the GR protein in rice and Arabidopsis. This study should make an important contribution to our better understanding of the GR under normal and stress condition in plants.

  8. [The flavonoids effect against vinblastine, cyclophosphamide and paracetamol toxicity by inhibition of lipid-peroxydation and increasing liver glutathione concentration].

    PubMed

    Lahouel, M; Boulkour, S; Segueni, N; Fillastre, J P

    2004-07-01

    The paracetamol and cyclophosphamid are metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P450. The formed reactive intermediates are responsible of a hepatocyte depletion of the glutathion and a lipoperoxydation. the vinblastine is also a chemotherapeutic agent hepatotoxic and hematotoxic. Otherwise, flavonoïds are polyphenols substances of plant origin having some biological and anti-oxydative properties. However no information is available on their effects on glutathion and glutathion-s-transferases. In our research, we valued the effect of oral administration of flavonoids (diosmine and quercetine) under shape of propolis extract to 60 mg/kg daily during 14 days, on hematological and hepatic toxicity of a single dose of cyclophosphamide 80 mg/kg by intravenous way, vinblastine 2 mg/kg by intravenous way and the hepatic toxicity of the paracetamol managed by oral way to 200 mg/kg corresponding to 2/3 the DL50 at the rat female albinos wistar. We did a blood numeration, an assessment of serum activities of transaminases and alkali phosphatases as well as quantification of the glutathion and the malondialdehyde (MDA) in liver homogenats of rats treated. Analyses are done at regular intervals; 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after the administration of drugs. In the group of rats treated by the cyclophosphamid paracetamol alone we observed since the 1st day, an increase of lipid peroxide (MDA) of 120% and a downfall of hepatic glutathion including the group receiving the vinblastine (until 210% of reduction). In the same way a severe leucopenia and a thrombopenia (70% of reduction) are observed between the 3rd and the 14th day at rats treated by the chemotherapeutic agents alone (cyclophosphamide and vinblastine). The combination of flavonoids with drugs have clearly reduced the effect of drugs toxicity. Indeed, the aplasic observed with the vinblastine, as well as the leucopenia and thrombopenia of the cyclophosphamide are corrected entirely. In the same way, we noted a restoration

  9. Blood glutathione status following distance running.

    PubMed

    Dufaux, B; Heine, O; Kothe, A; Prinz, U; Rost, R

    1997-02-01

    In 12 moderately trained subjects reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) as well as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were measured in the blood before and during the first two hours and first two days after a 2.5-h run. The participants covered between 19 and 26 km (20.8 +/- 2.5 km, mean +/- SD). The running speed was between 53 and 82% of the speed at which blood lactate concentration reached 4 mmol/L lactate (67.9 +/- 8.2%, mean +/- SD) assessed during a previously performed treadmill test. Blood samples were collected 1 h before, immediately before, immediately after, 1 and 2 h after, as well as 1 and 2 days after the run. Immediately after exercise GSH was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) and GSSG significantly increased (p < 0.01). In all subjects the ratio of GSH to GSSG showed a marked decline to 18 +/- 4% (mean +/- SD) of the pre-exercise values (p < 0.01). One hour later the mean GSH and GSSG values returned to baseline. However, there were considerable inter-individual differences. In some subjects the GSH/ GSSG ratio overshot the pre-exercise levels, in others the ratio remained low even two hours after exercise. Compared with the pre-exercise values TBARS concentrations did not change significantly at any time point after exercise. The findings suggest that after prolonged exercise in moderately trained subjects a critical shift in the blood glutathione redox status may be reached. The changes observed were generally short-lived, the duration of which may have depended on the relative importance of reactive oxygen species generation by the capillary endothelial cells and neutrophil and eosinophil granulocytes after the end of exercise.

  10. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and its dynamic changes under oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zechmann, Bernd; Liou, Liang-Chun; Koffler, Barbara E; Horvat, Lucija; Tomašić, Ana; Fulgosi, Hrvoje; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2011-12-01

    Glutathione is an important antioxidant in most prokaryotes and eukaryotes. It detoxifies reactive oxygen species and is also involved in the modulation of gene expression, in redox signaling, and in the regulation of enzymatic activities. In this study, the subcellular distribution of glutathione was studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by quantitative immunoelectron microscopy. Highest glutathione contents were detected in mitochondria and subsequently in the cytosol, nuclei, cell walls, and vacuoles. The induction of oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide (H(2) O(2) ) led to changes in glutathione-specific labeling. Three cell types were identified. Cell types I and II contained more glutathione than control cells. Cell type II differed from cell type I in showing a decrease in glutathione-specific labeling solely in mitochondria. Cell type III contained much less glutathione contents than the control and showed the strongest decrease in mitochondria, suggesting that high and stable levels of glutathione in mitochondria are important for the protection and survival of the cells during oxidative stress. Additionally, large amounts of glutathione were relocated and stored in vacuoles in cell type III, suggesting the importance of the sequestration of glutathione in vacuoles under oxidative stress.

  11. Altered HBK3 expression affects glutathione and ascorbate metabolism during the early phases of Norway spruce (Picea abies) somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Mark F; Stasolla, Claudio

    2009-10-01

    Plant homeobox genes play an important role in plant development, including embryogenesis. Recently, the function of a class I homeobox of knox 3 gene, HBK3, has been characterized in the conifer Picea abies (L.) Karst (Norway spruce) [8]. During somatic embryogenesis, expression of HBK3 is required for the proper differentiation of proembryogenic masses into somatic embryos. This transition, fundamental for the overall embryogenic process, is accelerated in sense lines over-expressing HBK3 (HBK3-S) but precluded in antisense lines (HBK3-AS) where the expression of this gene is experimentally reduced. Altered HBK3 expression resulted in major changes of ascorbate and glutathione metabolism. During the initial phases of embryogeny the level of reduced GSH was higher in the HBK3-S lines compared to their control counterpart. An opposite profile was observed for the HBK3-AS lines where the glutathione redox state, i.e. GSH/GSH + GSSG, switched towards its oxidized form, i.e. GSSG. Very similar metabolic fluctuations were also measured for ascorbate, especially during the transition of proembryogenic masses into somatic embryos (7 days into hormone-free medium). At this stage the level of reduced ascorbate (ASC) in the HBK3-AS lines was about 75% lower compare to the untransformed line causing a switch of the ascorbate redox state, i.e. ASC/ASC + DHA + AFR, towards its oxidized forms, i.e. DHA + AFR. Changes in activities of several ascorbate and glutathione redox enzymes, including dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), ascorbate free radical reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) and glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) were responsible for these metabolic differences. Data presented here suggest that HBK3 expression might regulate somatic embryo yield through alterations in glutathione and ascorbate metabolism, which have been previously implicated in controlling embryo development and maturation both in vivo and in vitro.

  12. Do glutathione levels decline in aging human brain?

    PubMed

    Tong, Junchao; Fitzmaurice, Paul S; Moszczynska, Anna; Mattina, Katie; Ang, Lee-Cyn; Boileau, Isabelle; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Sailasuta, Napapon; Kish, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    For the past 60 years a major theory of "aging" is that age-related damage is largely caused by excessive uncompensated oxidative stress. The ubiquitous tripeptide glutathione is a major antioxidant defense mechanism against reactive free radicals and has also served as a marker of changes in oxidative stress. Some (albeit conflicting) animal data suggest a loss of glutathione in brain senescence, which might compromise the ability of the aging brain to meet the demands of oxidative stress. Our objective was to establish whether advancing age is associated with glutathione deficiency in human brain. We measured reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in multiple regions of autopsied brain of normal subjects (n=74) aged one day to 99 years. Brain GSH levels during the infancy/teenage years were generally similar to those in the oldest examined adult group (76-99 years). During adulthood (23-99 years) GSH levels remained either stable (occipital cortex) or increased (caudate nucleus, frontal and cerebellar cortices). To the extent that GSH levels represent glutathione antioxidant capacity, our postmortem data suggest that human brain aging is not associated with declining glutathione status. We suggest that aged healthy human brains can maintain antioxidant capacity related to glutathione and that an age-related increase in GSH levels in some brain regions might possibly be a compensatory response to increased oxidative stress. Since our findings, although suggestive, suffer from the generic limitations of all postmortem brain studies, we also suggest the need for "replication" investigations employing the new (1)H MRS imaging procedures in living human brain.

  13. Increasing the Glutathione Content in a Chilling-Sensitive Maize Genotype Using Safeners Increased Protection against Chilling-Induced Injury1

    PubMed Central

    Kocsy, Gábor; von Ballmoos, Peter; Rüegsegger, Adrian; Szalai, Gabriella; Galiba, Gábor; Brunold, Christian

    2001-01-01

    With the aim of analyzing their protective function against chilling-induced injury, the pools of glutathione and its precursors, cysteine (Cys) and γ-glutamyl-Cys, were increased in the chilling-sensitive maize (Zea mays) inbred line Penjalinan using a combination of two herbicide safeners. Compared with the controls, the greatest increase in the pool size of the three thiols was detected in the shoots and roots when both safeners were applied at a concentration of 5 μm. This combination increased the relative protection from chilling from 50% to 75%. It is interesting that this increase in the total glutathione (TG) level was accompanied by a rise in glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) activity. When the most effective safener combination was applied simultaneously with increasing concentrations of buthionine sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, the total γ-glutamyl-Cys and TG contents and GR activity were decreased to very low levels and relative protection was lowered from 75% to 44%. During chilling, the ratio of reduced to oxidized thiols first decreased independently of the treatments, but increased again to the initial value in safener-treated seedlings after 7 d at 5°C. Taking all results together resulted in a linear relationship between TG and GR and a biphasic relationship between relative protection and GR or TG, thus demonstrating the relevance of the glutathione levels in protecting maize against chilling-induced injury. PMID:11706194

  14. Novel weight-reducing activity of Galega officinalis in mice.

    PubMed

    Palit, P; Furman, B L; Gray, A I

    1999-11-01

    Galega officinalis (galega, Goat's Rue, French Lilac) is well known for its hypoglycaemic action and has been used as part of a plant mixture in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. During pharmacological investigations of an ethanolic extract of a powdered mixture of equal proportions of G. officinalis, Cressa cretica, Mangifera indica and Syzygium jambolanum, a weight reducing effect of galega was discovered. In this study we have investigated the novel weight reducing effect of galega in mice. Galega herb (10% w/w in the diet) caused a significant reduction in body weight in both normal and genetically obese (ob/ob) animals treated for 28 days when compared with respective controls (P < 0.01). In normal mice, the weight loss was reversible and initially associated with a transient reduction in food intake but was then maintained even in the presence of increased eating above the control level. Pair-fed normal mice receiving galega for seven days also showed significant weight loss (P < 0.01, compared with the control) in the presence of increasing food intake. In sharp contrast, weight loss in galega-treated ob/ob mice was accompanied by a persistent reduction in food intake over the 28-day treatment period. Post-mortem examinations of all galega-treated mice revealed a striking absence of body fat. Serum glucose was significantly reduced in both strains of mice receiving galega for 28 days (P < 0.01), whereas serum insulin was significantly reduced only in obese mice (P < 0.01). In summary, together with its established hypoglycaemic effects, galega has a novel weight reducing action that, in normal mice, is largely independent of a reduction in food intake. The mechanism of the weight reducing action of galega is unclear but involves loss of body fat.

  15. Active Coping Reduces Reports of Pain from Childbirth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined pain and negative moods during labor in relation to instructions to monitor labor contractions and LaMaze class attendance. In Study 1, pain and negative moods showed sharp decline at Stage 2 (active labor) for women who monitored and LaMaze participants; in Study 2, LaMaze participants reported decline in pain during active labor and…

  16. Piano Playing Reduces Stress More than Other Creative Art Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyoshima, Kumiko; Fukui, Hajime; Kuda, Kiyoto

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the physiological effects of creative art activities. In this study, the effects of creative art activities on human stress were investigated, and their effects were compared in 57 healthy college students (27 males and 30 females). Subjects were divided into four groups, each of which participated in 30-minute…

  17. Glutathione peroxidase in early and advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Johannsen, P; Velander, G; Mai, J; Thorling, E B; Dupont, E

    1991-01-01

    A defective antioxidant scavenging system plays a major role in one of the theories of the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a general difference in antioxidant activity between early and advanced cases of Parkinson's disease. Twenty five recently diagnosed patients, without any clinical fluctuations (group A), and 25 patients in a late phase of the disease with severe fluctuations in response to levodopa therapy (group B) were included in the study. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase was determined as a measure of antioxidant activity and significantly lower values were found in group B than in group A. Regression analyses in groups A and B showed significant correlation between glutathione peroxidase and duration of disease, but not between glutathione peroxidase and age of patients. Images PMID:1940936

  18. Active Supervision: An Intervention to Reduce High School Tardiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Gros, Kristin N.; Lyons, Elizabeth A.; Griffin, Jennifer R.

    2008-01-01

    One proactive approach to aid in reducing disciplinary problems in schools is implementing Positive Behavior Support (PBS) strategies. To successfully implement PBS school-wide, Sugai and Horner (2002a) emphasize a multisystems perspective, which focuses on school-wide discipline, classroom management, non-classroom settings, and individual…

  19. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity.

  20. Polyethylene glycol modification of adenovirus reduces platelet activation, endothelial cell activation, and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hofherr, Sean E; Mok, Hoyin; Gushiken, Francisca C; Lopez, Jose A; Barry, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia is one of the complications for in vivo administration of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors after intravenous injection. In this paper, we investigated the mechanism of Ad5-induced thrombocytopenia and how these effects are attenuated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification of Ad5 (Ad-PEG). After intravenous injection, accelerated platelet loss was observed in Ad-injected mice but not in their Ad-PEG-injected counterparts. This platelet loss induced by Ad5 corresponded with increases in coagulation D-dimer levels, splenomegaly, and, later, production of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. In contrast, these responses were blunted or ablated after injection of Ad-PEG. Ad5 activated both platelets and endothelial cells directly in vitro as evidenced by induction of P-selectin and the formation of von Willebrand factor-platelet strings and in vivo as evidenced by the induction of E-selectin messenger RNA. PEGylation blunted these observed activations. These data suggest that Ad5 may induce thrombocytopenia by direct activation of endothelial cells in addition to its direct effects on platelets. This link provides an important clue for the understanding of the mechanisms of thrombocytopenia associated with Ad5. Given that PEGylation blunted interactions of Ad with platelets and endothelial cells, reduced D-dimer formation, reduced thrombocytopenia, and reduced splenomegaly, these data suggest that this simple vector modification may have utility to improve the safety of Ad vectors for human gene therapy.

  1. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Reduces Neurological Damage after Cerebral Embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivin, Justin A.; Fisher, Marc; Degirolami, Umberto; Hemenway, Carl C.; Stashak, Joan A.

    1985-12-01

    Intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator immediately after the injection of numerous small blood clots into the carotid circulation in rabbit embolic stroke model animals caused a significant reduction in neurological damage. In vitro studies indicate that tissue plasminogen activator produced substantial lysis of clots at concentrations comparable to those expected in vivo, suggesting that this may be the mechanism of action of this drug. Drug-induced hemorrhages were not demonstrable. Tissue plasminogen activator may be of value for the immediate treatment of embolic stroke.

  2. Reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetyl cysteine reduces methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia without affecting motor activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Bortell, Nikki; Galmozzi, Andrea; Conti, Bruno; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia G.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a potentially lethal side effect of Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse, which involves the participation of peripheral thermogenic sites such as the Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT). In a previous study we found that the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) can prevent the high increase in temperature in a mouse model of Meth-hyperthermia. Here, we have further explored the ability of NAC to modulate Meth-induced hyperthermia in correlation with changes in BAT. We found that NAC treatment in controls causes hypothermia, and, when administered prior or upon the onset of Meth-induced hyperthermia, can ameliorate the temperature increase and preserve mitochondrial numbers and integrity, without affecting locomotor activity. This was different from Dantrolene, which decreased motor activity without affecting temperature. The effects of NAC were seen in spite of its inability to recover the decrease of mitochondrial superoxide induced in BAT by Meth. In addition, NAC did not prevent the Meth-induced decrease of BAT glutathione. Treatment with S-adenosyl-L-methionine, which improves glutathione activity, had an effect in ameliorating Meth-induced hyperthermia, but also modulated motor activity. This suggests a role for the remaining glutathione for controlling temperature. However, the mechanism by which NAC operates is independent of glutathione levels in BAT and specific to temperature. Our results show that, in spite of the absence of a clear mechanism of action, NAC is a pharmacological tool to examine the dissociation between Meth-induced hyperthermia and motor activity, and a drug of potential utility in treating the hyperthermia associated with Meth-abuse. PMID:26346736

  3. Sensory stimuli reduce the dimensionality of cortical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    Neural ensembles in alert animals generate complex patterns of activity. Although cortical activity unfolds in a space whose dimension is equal to the number of neurons, it is often restricted to a lower dimensional subspace. Dimensionality is the minimal number of dimensions that accurately capture neural dynamics, and may be related to the computational tasks supported by the neural circuit. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the insular cortex of alert rats during periods of `ongoing' (spontaneous) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that the dimensionality grows with ensemble size, and does so significantly faster during ongoing compared to evoked activity. We explain both results using a recurrent spiking network with clustered architecture, and obtain analytical results on the dependence of dimensionality on ensemble size, number of clusters, and pair-wise noise correlations. The theory predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size and the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality, which grows with the number of clusters and decreases with the amount of noise correlations. To our knowledge, this is the first mechanistic model of neural dimensionality in cortex during both spontaneous and evoked activity.

  4. [Effect of tobacco smoking on glutathione concentration in the blood].

    PubMed

    Bizoń, Anna; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of present study was to determine the influence of tobacco smoking and age on reduced glutathione concentration in the blood. The study was performed in the blood of 65 subjects. The data on smoking which had been obtained from a direct personal interview were verified by determination of serum cotinine concentrations. Biological material was divided into groups of non-smokers and smokers. Malonylodialdehyde concentration in the plasma was measured by reaction with thiobarbituric acid. Concentration of cadmium was measured using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction. Reduced glutathione in the blood was measured using a previously developed method [11]. A significant increase of malonylodialdehyde concentration was observed in the blood of smokers > or = 20 cigarettes per day compared to nonsmoking person. Malonylodialdehyde level in the plasma of smokers <20 cigarettes per day did not differ with non-smokers. The highest cadmium concentration was observed in the whole blood of smokers > or = 20 cigarettes per day and it was about 4-fold higher compared to non-smoking people. Also smokers <20 cigarettes per day have higher cadmium concentration in the blood in comparison to non-smokers. Analyzing the impact of smoking intensity on reduced glutathione concentration it was a statistically significant increase in the blood of smokers > or = 20 cigarettes per day compared to nonsmoking person. Non-smoking and smokers <20 cigarettes per day had comparable levels of this antioxidant in the blood. A significant elevation in reduced glutathione concentration was observed in the blood of smokers < 30 years of age in comparison to nonsmoking persons < 30 and > 30 years of age. Our study confirmed that the reduced glutathione concentration in the body affects tobacco smoking and aging.

  5. Effects of Dietary Pb and Cd and Their Combination on Glutathion-S-Transferase and Catalase Enzyme Activities in Digestive Gland and Foot of the Green Garden Snail, Cantareus apertus (Born, 1778).

    PubMed

    Mleiki, Anwar; Marigómez, Ionan; El Menif, Najoua Trigui

    2015-06-01

    The present study was focused on the assessment of glutathion-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) activities in the digestive gland and foot of the land snail, Cantareus apertus (Born, 1778), exposed to different nominal dietary concentrations of Pb (25 and 2500 mg Pb/Kg), Cd (5 and 100 mg Cd/Kg) and their combination (25 mg Pb + 5 mg Cd/Kg and 2500 mg Pb + 100 mg Cd/Kg) for 7 and 60 days. GST activity was significantly increased after 7 and 60 days exposure to the highest concentration of Pb, Cd and their combination. The levels of CAT activity were different in the two studied organs but in both cases it resulted increased after 7 and 60 days of exposure, which varied significantly between metals and dietary concentrations. Therefore, it can be concluded that GST and CAT enzymes in digestive gland and foot of C. apertus are responsive to Cd, Pb and their combination, whereby they are suitable to be included in a battery of biomarkers for ecosystem health assessment in metal polluted soils using this species as sentinel.

  6. Metformin reduces airway inflammation and remodeling via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Sun; Bang, Bo-Ram; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Moon, Keun-Ai; Kim, Tae-Bum; Lee, Ki-Young; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2012-12-15

    Recent reports have suggested that metformin has anti-inflammatory and anti-tissue remodeling properties. We investigated the potential effect of metformin on airway inflammation and remodeling in asthma. The effect of metformin treatment on airway inflammation and pivotal characteristics of airway remodeling were examined in a murine model of chronic asthma generated by repetitive challenges with ovalbumin and fungal-associated allergenic protease. To investigate the underlying mechanism of metformin, oxidative stress levels and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation were assessed. To further elucidate the role of AMPK, we examined the effect of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR) as a specific activator of AMPK and employed AMPKα1-deficient mice as an asthma model. The role of metformin and AMPK in tissue fibrosis was evaluated using a bleomycin-induced acute lung injury model and in vitro experiments with cultured fibroblasts. Metformin suppressed eosinophilic inflammation and significantly reduced peribronchial fibrosis, smooth muscle layer thickness, and mucin secretion. Enhanced AMPK activation and decreased oxidative stress in lungs was found in metformin-treated asthmatic mice. Similar results were observed in the AICAR-treated group. In addition, the enhanced airway inflammation and fibrosis in heterozygous AMPKα1-deficient mice were induced by both allergen and bleomycin challenges. Fibronectin and collagen expression was diminished by metformin through AMPKα1 activation in cultured fibroblasts. Therefore metformin reduced both airway inflammation and remodeling at least partially through the induction of AMPK activation and decreased oxidative stress. These data provide insight into the beneficial role of metformin as a novel therapeutic drug for chronic asthma.

  7. Reduced Frontal Activation with Increasing 2nd Language Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Maria; Federspiel, Andrea; Koenig, Thomas; Wirth, Miranka; Lehmann, Christoph; Wiest, Roland; Strik, Werner; Brandeis, Daniel; Dierks, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The factors influencing the degree of separation or overlap in the neuronal networks responsible for the processing of first and second language are still subject to investigation. This longitudinal study investigates how increasing second language proficiency influences activation differences during lexico-semantic processing of first and second…

  8. Association of mercury and selenium with altered glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in diving ducks from the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Marn, C.M.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    Adult male greater scaup (Aythya marila) (GS), surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)(SS), and ruddy ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) (RD) were collected from Suisun Bay and coastal Tomales Bay in the greater San Francisco Bay area to assess exposure to inorganic contaminants. Hepatic selenium (Se) concentrations were highest in GS (geometric mean = 67 ppm, dw) and SS (119 ppm) in Suisun Bay, whereas hepatic mercury (Hg) was highest (19 ppm) in GS and SS from Tomales Bay. Hepatic Se and Hg were lower in RD and did not differ between locations. Hepatic supernatants were assayed for enzymes related to glutathione metabolism and antioxidant activity including: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-peroxidase), glutathione reductase (GSSG-reductase), and glutathione-S-transferase (GSH-transferase). GSH-peroxidase activity was higher in SS and RD, and G-6-PDH higher in GS and SS from Suisun Bay than Tomales Bay. GSSG-reductase was higher in SS from Suisun Bay. The ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) was greater in all species from Tomales Bay. The following significant relationships were found in one or more species with increasing hepatic Hg concentration: lower body, liver and heart weights; decreased hepatic GSH concentration, G-6-PDH and GSH-peroxidase activities; increased ratio of GSSG to GSH, and increased GSSG-reductase activity. With increasing hepatic Se concentration, GSH-peroxidase increased but GSH decreased. It is concluded that measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. Concentrations of mercury and selenium and variable affected have been associated with adverse effects on reproduction and neurological function in experimental studies with mallards.

  9. Glutathione and thioredoxin systems contribute to recombinant monoclonal antibody interchain disulfide bond reduction during bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Handlogten, Michael W; Zhu, Min; Ahuja, Sanjeev

    2017-03-06

    Antibody interchain disulfide bond reduction during biopharmaceutical manufacturing has received increased attention since it was first reported in 2010. Antibody reduction leads to loss of product and reduced product stability. It is therefore critical to understand the underlying mechanisms of reduction. To date, the thioredoxin system has been reported as the sole contributor to antibody reduction during bioprocessing. In this work, we show that the glutathione system, in addition to the thioredoxin system, is involved in reducing antibody molecules and the contributions of the two systems can vary depending upon the cell culture process. The roles of the glutathione and thioredoxin systems were evaluated for three molecules with different IgG subclass where reduction was observed during manufacturing: mAb A, mAb B, and mAb C representing an IgG1 , IgG2 , and IgG4, respectively. The expression of enzymes for both the thioredoxin and glutathione systems were confirmed in all three cell lines. Inhibitors were evaluated using purified mammalian reductases to evaluate their specificity. The optimized experimental conditions enabled both the determination of reductase activity contributed from as well as the amount of antibody reduced by each enzymatic system. Our results demonstrate that the underlying enzymatic mechanisms are different depending upon the cell culture process; one of the two systems may be the dominant mechanism, or both enzymatic systems may be involved. Specifically, the glutathione system was found to be the major contributor to mAb A reduction while the thioredoxin system was the major contributor to mAb C reduction. Intriguingly, mAb B experienced significant reduction from both enzymatic systems. In summary, we have demonstrated that in addition to the thioredoxin pathway, the glutathione system is a second major pathway contributing to antibody reduction and this knowledge can be leveraged to develop more specific antibody reduction

  10. Effect of Zirconium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Glutathione Peroxidase Enzyme in PC12 and N2a Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Asadpour, Elham; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Boroushaki, Mohammad Taher

    2014-01-01

    Today, special attention is paid to the use of zirconium dioxide nanoparticle (nano-ZrO2), a neutral bioceramic metal, particularly for drug and gene delivery in medicine. However, there are some reports implying that use of nano-ZrO2 is associated with cytotoxic effects like inhibiting the cell proliferation, DNA damage and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined whether nano-ZrO2 alters cell viability and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in two neuronal cell lines. The PC12 and N2a cells were cultured in the absence or presence of varying concentrations (31.25-2000 µg/mL) of nano-ZrO2 for 12, 24 or 48 h. The cell viability was evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay and GPx activity was determined by quantifying the rate of oxidation of the reduced glutathione to the oxidized glutathione. Nano-ZrO2 caused a significant reduction in cell viability and GPx activity after 12, 24 and 48 h, as compared with control group. These effects were concentration dependent and started from 250 µg/mL. The present study demonstrated that nano-ZrO2, at concentrations of > 250 µg/mL, has antiproliferative effects via reducing the cell defense mechanism against oxidative stress. PMID:25587301

  11. Can co-activation reduce kinematic variability? A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Selen, Luc P J; Beek, Peter J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2005-11-01

    Impedance modulation has been suggested as a means to suppress the effects of internal 'noise' on movement kinematics. We investigated this hypothesis in a neuro-musculo-skeletal model. A prerequisite is that the muscle model produces realistic force variability. We found that standard Hill-type models do not predict realistic force variability in response to variability in stimulation. In contrast, a combined motor-unit pool model and a pool of parallel Hill-type motor units did produce realistic force variability as a function of target force, largely independent of how the force was transduced to the tendon. To test the main hypothesis, two versions of the latter model were simulated as an antagonistic muscle pair, controlling the position of a frictionless hinge joint, with a distal segment having realistic inertia relative to the muscle strength. Increasing the impedance through co-activation resulted in less kinematic variability, except for the lowest levels of co-activation. Model behavior in this region was affected by the noise amplitude and the inertial properties of the model. Our simulations support the idea that muscular co-activation is in principle an effective strategy to meet accuracy demands.

  12. T Lymphocyte Activation Threshold is Increased in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Charley L.; Gonzalez, M.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    There have been substantial advances in molecular and cellular biology that have provided new insight into the biochemical and genetic basis of lymphocyte recognition, activation and expression of distinct functional phenotypes. It has now become evident that for both T and B cells, stimuli delivered through their receptors can result in either clonal expansion or apoptosis. In the case of T cells, clonal expansion of helper cells is accompanied by differentiation into two major functional subsets which regulate the immune response. The pathways between the membrane and the nucleus and their molecular components are an area of very active investigation. This meeting will draw together scientists working on diverse aspects of this problem, including receptor ligand interactions, intracellular pathways that transmit receptor mediated signals and the effect of such signal transduction pathways on gene regulation. The aim of this meeting is to integrate the information from these various experimental approaches into a new synthesis and molecular explanation of T cell activation, differentiation and death.

  13. Textured bearing surface in artificial joints to reduce macrophage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Nishi, Naoki; Chikaura, Hiroto; Nakashima, Yuta; Miura, Hiromasa; Higaki, Hidehiko; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro

    2015-12-01

    Micro slurry-jet erosion has been proposed as a precision machining technique for the bearing surfaces of artificial joints in order to reduce the total amount of polyethylene wear and to enlarge the size of the wear debris. The micro slurry-jet erosion method is a wet blasting technique which uses alumina particles as the abrasive medium along with compressed air and water to create an ideal surface. Pin-on-disc wear tests with multidirectional sliding motion on the textured surface of a \\text{Co}-\\text{Cr}-\\text{Mo} alloy counterface for polyethylene resulted in both a reduction of wear as well as enlargement of the polyethylene debris size. In this study, primary human peripheral blood mononuclear phagocytes were incubated with the debris, and it was elucidated that the wear debris generated on the textured surface regulated secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, indicating a reduction in the induced tissue reaction and joint loosening.

  14. Myostatin Attenuation In Vivo Reduces Adiposity, but Activates Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Naisi; Yang, Qiyuan; Walker, Ryan G.; Thompson, Thomas B.; Du, Min

    2016-01-01

    A potentially novel approach for treating obesity includes attenuating myostatin as this increases muscle mass and decreases fat mass. Notwithstanding, conflicting studies report that myostatin stimulates or inhibits adipogenesis and it is unknown whether reduced adiposity with myostatin attenuation results from changes in fat deposition or adipogenesis. We therefore quantified changes in the stem, transit amplifying and progenitor cell pool in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) using label-retaining wild-type and mstn−/− (Jekyll) mice. Muscle mass was larger in Jekyll mice, WAT and BAT mass was smaller and label induction was equal in all tissues from both wild-type and Jekyll mice. The number of label-retaining cells, however, dissipated quicker in WAT and BAT of Jekyll mice and was only 25% and 17%, respectively, of wild-type cell counts 1 month after induction. Adipose cell density was significantly higher in Jekyll mice and increased over time concomitant with label-retaining cell disappearance, which is consistent with enhanced expansion and differentiation of the stem, transit amplifying and progenitor pool. Stromal vascular cells from Jekyll WAT and BAT differentiated into mature adipocytes at a faster rate than wild-type cells and although Jekyll WAT cells also proliferated quicker in vitro, those from BAT did not. Differentiation marker expression in vitro, however, suggests that mstn−/− BAT preadipocytes are far more sensitive to the suppressive effects of myostatin. These results suggest that myostatin attenuation stimulates adipogenesis in vivo and that the reduced adiposity in mstn−/− animals results from nutrient partitioning away from fat and in support of muscle. PMID:26580671

  15. Chondroitin-4-sulphate reduced oxidative injury in caerulein-induced pancreatitis in mice: the involvement of NF-kappaB translocation and apoptosis activation.

    PubMed

    Campo, Giuseppe M; Avenoso, Angela; Campo, Salvatore; Nastasi, Giancarlo; Traina, Paola; D'Ascola, Angela; Calatroni, Alberto

    2008-06-01

    Activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and caspases may greatly amplify inflammation and cell damage in addition to that directly exerted by free radicals. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in acute pancreatitis, we studied whether the administration of chondroitin-4-sulphate (C4S), in addition to its antioxidant activity, was able to modulate NF-kappaB and caspase activation in an experimental model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Hyperstimulating doses of caerulein (50 microg/ kg), five injections per mouse given at hourly intervals produced the following: high serum lipase and amylase activity; lipid peroxidation, evaluated by 8-isoprostane concentrations; loss of antioxidant defenses such as glutathione reductase (GR) activity; NF-kappaB activation and loss of cytoplasmic IkappaBalpha protein; increases in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), caspase-3, and caspase-7 gene expression and their related protein; accumulation and activation of neutrophils in the damaged tissue, evaluated by elastase (ELA) determination; and pancreatic injury, evaluated by histologic analysis. Pretreatment of mice with different doses of C4S, given 1 hr before caerulein injections and 1 and 2 hrs after the last caerulein injection, reduced lipid peroxidation, inhibited NF-kappaB translocation and cytoplasmic IkappaBalpha protein loss, decreased TNF-alpha, IL-6, and caspase gene expression and their related protein levels, limited endogenous antioxidant depletion, and reduced tissue neutrophils accumulation and tissue damage. Since molecules with antioxidant activity can block NF-kappaB and apoptosis activation, we suggest that C4S administration is able to block NF-kappaB and caspase activation by reducing the oxidative burst.

  16. Subnormothermic Perfusion in the Isolated Rat Liver Preserves the Antioxidant Glutathione and Enhances the Function of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Norma; Sanchez-Nuño, Sergio; Dewey, Shannamar; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of oxidative stress is suggested to be one of the main mechanisms to explain the benefits of subnormothermic perfusion against ischemic liver damage. In this study we investigated the early cellular mechanisms induced in isolated rat livers after 15 min perfusion at temperatures ranging from normothermia (37°C) to subnormothermia (26°C and 22°C). Subnormothermic perfusion was found to maintain hepatic viability. Perfusion at 22°C raised reduced glutathione levels and the activity of glutathione reductase; however, lipid and protein oxidation still occurred as determined by malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts, and advanced oxidation protein products. In livers perfused at 22°C the lysosomal and ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) were both activated. The 26S chymotrypsin-like (β5) proteasome activity was significantly increased in the 26°C (46%) and 22°C (42%) groups. The increased proteasome activity may be due to increased Rpt6 Ser120 phosphorylation, which is known to enhance 26S proteasome activity. Together, our results indicate that the early events produced by subnormothermic perfusion in the liver can induce oxidative stress concomitantly with antioxidant glutathione preservation and enhanced function of the lysosomal and UPS systems. Thus, a brief hypothermia could trigger antioxidant mechanisms and may be functioning as a preconditioning stimulus. PMID:27800122

  17. Green tea supplementation increases glutathione and plasma antioxidant capacity in adults with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arpita; Betts, Nancy M; Mulugeta, Afework; Tong, Capella; Newman, Emily; Lyons, Timothy J

    2013-03-01

    Green tea, a popular polyphenol-containing beverage, has been shown to alleviate clinical features of the metabolic syndrome. However, its effects in endogenous antioxidant biomarkers are not clearly understood. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that green tea supplementation will upregulate antioxidant parameters (enzymatic and nonenzymatic) in adults with the metabolic syndrome. Thirty-five obese participants with the metabolic syndrome were randomly assigned to receive one of the following for 8 weeks: green tea (4 cups per day), control (4 cups water per day), or green tea extract (2 capsules and 4 cups water per day). Blood samples and dietary information were collected at baseline (0 week) and 8 weeks of the study. Circulating carotenoids (α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene) and tocopherols (α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol) and trace elements were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, respectively. Serum antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione, catalase) and plasma antioxidant capacity were measured spectrophotometrically. Green tea beverage and green tea extract significantly increased plasma antioxidant capacity (1.5 to 2.3 μmol/L and 1.2 to 2.5 μmol/L, respectively; P < .05) and whole blood glutathione (1783 to 2395 μg/g hemoglobin and 1905 to 2751 μg/g hemoglobin, respectively; P < .05) vs controls at 8 weeks. No effects were noted in serum levels of carotenoids and tocopherols and glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities. Green tea extract significantly reduced plasma iron vs baseline (128 to 92 μg/dL, P < .02), whereas copper, zinc, and selenium were not affected. These results support the hypothesis that green tea may provide antioxidant protection in the metabolic syndrome.

  18. Increase in Blood Glutathione and Erythrocyte Proteins Related to Glutathione Generation, Reduction and Utilization in African-American Old Women with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Guang; Yang, Fang; Zhou, LiChun; Tang, Tian; Okoro, Emmanuel U.; Yang, Hong; Guo, ZhongMao

    2015-01-01

    Data from this report demonstrate that the plasma and erythrocyte levels of total glutathione (TGSH) are significantly lower in nondiabetic old women than in their young counterparts, and significantly higher in diabetic patients than in age-matched nondiabetic controls. The ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG) declines with age and diabetes, and shows an order as follows: nondiabetic young > nondiabetic old > diabetic old women. In addition, advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) accumulates in RBCs obtained from diabetic patients but not in those from young and old nondiabetic controls. The erythrocyte levels of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1), glutathione S-transferase-ρ1 (GST-ρ1) and glyoxalase I (Glo1) are comparable in nondiabetic young and old women, but significantly higher in diabetic patients than in age-matched nondiabetic controls. Oxidative stress has been suggested to upregulate the expression of these proteins. It is possible that increase in oxidative stress in diabetes, reflected by reduced GSH/GSSG ratio and accumulation of AGEs, upregulates the expression of proteins involved in glutathione synthesis, reduction and utilization in erythrocyte precursor cells, and that overexpression of GCLC is, at least partially, responsible for the increased TGSH in diabetes. PMID:26770888

  19. Barriers associated with reduced physical activity in COPD patients*

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Priscila Batista; Stelmach, Rafael; Carvalho, Celso Ricardo Fernandes; Fernandes, Frederico Leon Arrabal; Carvalho-Pinto, Regina Maria; Cukier, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of COPD patients to perform activities of daily living (ADL); to identify barriers t