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Sample records for activity reduced glutathione

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Reduces Oxidative Injury via Glutathione Activity in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shoulong; Yu, Kun; Wu, Qian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Baolu; Liu, Guoshi; Liu, Yixun; Lian, Zhengxing

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important sensor of Gram-negative bacteria and can trigger activation of the innate immune system. Increased activation of TLR4 can lead to the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, the pathway whereby TLR4 affects antioxidant activity was studied. In TLR4-overexpressing sheep, TLR4 expression was found to be related to the integration copy number when monocytes were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Consequently, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) was increased, which could increase the activation of prooxidative stress enzymes. Meanwhile, activation of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), was increased. Real-time PCR showed that expression of activating protein-1 (AP-1) and the antioxidative-related genes was increased. By contrast, the expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT) were reduced. In transgenic sheep, glutathione (GSH) levels were dramatically reduced. Furthermore, transgenic sheep were intradermally injected with LPS in each ear. The amounts of inflammatory infiltrates were correlated with the number of TLR4 copies that were integrated in the genome. Additionally, the translation of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) was increased. Our findings indicated that overexpression of TLR4 in sheep could ameliorate oxidative injury through GSH secretion that was induced by LPS stimulation. Furthermore, TLR4 promoted γ-GCS translation through the AP-1 pathway, which was essential for GSH synthesis. PMID:26640618

  2. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Reduces Oxidative Injury via Glutathione Activity in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shoulong; Yu, Kun; Wu, Qian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Baolu; Liu, Guoshi; Liu, Yixun; Lian, Zhengxing

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important sensor of Gram-negative bacteria and can trigger activation of the innate immune system. Increased activation of TLR4 can lead to the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, the pathway whereby TLR4 affects antioxidant activity was studied. In TLR4-overexpressing sheep, TLR4 expression was found to be related to the integration copy number when monocytes were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Consequently, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) was increased, which could increase the activation of prooxidative stress enzymes. Meanwhile, activation of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), was increased. Real-time PCR showed that expression of activating protein-1 (AP-1) and the antioxidative-related genes was increased. By contrast, the expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT) were reduced. In transgenic sheep, glutathione (GSH) levels were dramatically reduced. Furthermore, transgenic sheep were intradermally injected with LPS in each ear. The amounts of inflammatory infiltrates were correlated with the number of TLR4 copies that were integrated in the genome. Additionally, the translation of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) was increased. Our findings indicated that overexpression of TLR4 in sheep could ameliorate oxidative injury through GSH secretion that was induced by LPS stimulation. Furthermore, TLR4 promoted γ-GCS translation through the AP-1 pathway, which was essential for GSH synthesis. PMID:26640618

  3. Effect of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid on activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione level in selected organs of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Szaroma, Waldemar; Dziubek, K; Kapusta, E

    2014-09-01

    One of the major classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors is the class of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Receptor activation recruits, via calcium signal transduction mechanisms which play important roles in oxidative metabolism, mitochondrial free radical production and occurrence of other mitochondrial factors which potentially contribute to excitotoxicity and neuronal death. In the present study, the effects of stimulation of NMDARs by applying N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) in the brain, liver, kidneys and pancreas on change of the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and in the amount of reduced glutathione (GSH) in blood, brain, liver and kidneys has been investigated. Statistically significant decrease of the activity of SOD, CAT and GSHPx and in the amount of reduced glutathione (GSH) was found in the examined organs after administration of NMDA, an agonist of NMDA receptors, demonstrating that NMDA administration compromises the antioxidant status in the investigated organs of the mouse.

  4. The Biochemical Adaptations of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to Fresh Fruits Reduced Fructose Concentrations and Glutathione-S Transferase Activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Kim, A-Young; Jung, Jin Kyo; Donahue, Kelly M; Jung, Chuleui; Choi, Man-Yeon; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-04-01

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America. The females have a serrated ovipositor that enables them to infest almost all ripening small fruits. To understand the physiological and metabolic basis of spotted wing drosophila food preferences for healthy ripening fruits, we investigated the biological and biochemical characteristics of spotted wing drosophila and compared them with those of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that the susceptibility to oxidative stressors was significantly increased in spotted wing drosophila compared with those of D. melanogaster. In addition, we found that spotted wing drosophila had significantly reduced glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity and gene numbers. Furthermore, fructose concentrations found in spotted wing drosophila were significantly lower than those of D. melanogaster. Our data strongly suggest that the altered food preferences of spotted wing drosophila may stem from evolutionary adaptations to fresh foods accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and GST activities.

  5. The Biochemical Adaptations of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to Fresh Fruits Reduced Fructose Concentrations and Glutathione-S Transferase Activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Kim, A-Young; Jung, Jin Kyo; Donahue, Kelly M; Jung, Chuleui; Choi, Man-Yeon; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-04-01

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America. The females have a serrated ovipositor that enables them to infest almost all ripening small fruits. To understand the physiological and metabolic basis of spotted wing drosophila food preferences for healthy ripening fruits, we investigated the biological and biochemical characteristics of spotted wing drosophila and compared them with those of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that the susceptibility to oxidative stressors was significantly increased in spotted wing drosophila compared with those of D. melanogaster. In addition, we found that spotted wing drosophila had significantly reduced glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity and gene numbers. Furthermore, fructose concentrations found in spotted wing drosophila were significantly lower than those of D. melanogaster. Our data strongly suggest that the altered food preferences of spotted wing drosophila may stem from evolutionary adaptations to fresh foods accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and GST activities. PMID:26921228

  6. Arsenic trioxide and reduced glutathione act synergistically to augment inhibition of thyroid peroxidase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Palazzolo, Dominic L; Ely, Emily A

    2015-05-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is the enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is known to inhibit TPO activity in vitro. This inhibition is believed to occur when As2O3 binds to TPO's free sulfhydryl groups. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is also known to inhibit TPO activity in vitro. This inhibition may occur because GSH acts as a competitive substrate for hydrogen peroxide, or possibly reduce the oxidized form of iodide, requirements for TPO action. On the other hand, one could speculate that GSH reduces arsenic-induced TPO inhibition by interacting directly with arsenic or TPO, consequently limiting arsenic's ability to inhibit TPO activity. Since GSH is known to inhibit thyroid hormone synthesis while at the same time it is also known to be an important antioxidant preventing cellular damage induced by oxidative stress and protecting the thyroid gland from oxidative damage induced by arsenic, we wanted to determine if a combination of As2O3 and reduced GSH would either attenuate or augment the As2O3-induced inhibition on TPO activity. Using an in vitro system, TPO was assayed spectrophotometrically in the presence of As2O3 (0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 ppm), GSH (0.1, 1, 5, and 10 ppm), and As2O3 (0.1 ppm) and GSH (0.01, 0.1, 1, or 10 ppm) combinations. Our results show that 0.1, 1.0, and 10 ppm As2O3 inhibit TPO activity. Similarly, 5 and 10 ppm GSH also inhibit TPO activity. When 0.1 ppm As2O3 (i.e., the lowest dose of arsenic able to partially inhibit TPO activity) is combined with 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, or 10 ppm GSH inhibition of in vitro TPO activity is augmented as indicated by complete inhibition of TPO. The mechanism of this augmentation and whether it translates to living systems remains unclear.

  7. Comparison of inhibitory effects between acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione in human glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Nýdlová, Erika; Vrbová, Martina; Cesla, Petr; Jankovičová, Barbora; Ventura, Karel; Roušar, Tomáš

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver injury. The main mechanism of acetaminophen toxicity has been attributed to oxidation of acetaminophen. The oxidation product is very reactive and reacts with glutathione generating acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate (APAP-SG). Although this conjugate has been recognized to be generally nontoxic, we have found recently that APAP-SG could produce a toxic effect. Therefore, the aim of our study was to estimate the toxicity of purified APAP-SG by characterizing the inhibitory effect in human glutathione reductase (GR) and comparing that to the inhibitory effect of the natural inhibitor reduced glutathione. We used two types of human GR: recombinant and freshly purified from red blood cells. Our results show that GR was significantly inhibited in the presence of both APAP-SG and reduced glutathione. For example, the enzyme activity of recombinant and purified GR was reduced in the presence of 4 mm APAP-SG (with 0.5 mm glutathione disulfide) by 28% and 22%, respectively. The type of enzyme inhibition was observed to be competitive in the cases of both APAP-SG and glutathione. As glutathione inhibits GR activity in cells under physiological conditions, the rate of enzyme inhibition ought to be weaker in the case of glutathione depletion that is typical of acetaminophen overdose. Notably, however, enzyme activity likely remains inhibited due to the presence of APAP-SG, which might enhance the pro-oxidative status in the cell. We conclude that our finding could reflect some other pathological mechanism that may contribute to the toxicity of acetaminophen.

  8. Brazilian nut consumption improves selenium status and glutathione peroxidase activity and reduces atherogenic risk in obese women.

    PubMed

    Cominetti, Cristiane; de Bortoli, Maritsa C; Garrido, Arthur B; Cozzolino, Silvia M F

    2012-06-01

    Studies have shown that there are inverse relationships between nut consumption and the reduction of cardiovascular risk. This study tested the hypothesis that daily consumption of Brazilian nuts would have a positive effect upon selenium (Se) status, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity, lipid profile, and atherogenic risk in severely obese women. Thirty-seven severely obese women each consumed 1 Brazilian nut a day (290 μg of Se a day) for 8 weeks. Blood Se concentrations, total erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity, lipid profile, and Castelli I and II indexes were evaluated before and after the nuts consumption. All the patients were Se deficient at baseline; this deficiency was remedied by the consumption of the Brazilian nut (P < .0001). The intake of Brazilian nuts promoted a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations (P < .00001), which then resulted in a significant improvement of the Castelli I (P < .0002) and II (P < .0004) indexes. This study shows that obese people who implement daily consumption of Brazilian nuts can improve both Se status and lipid profile, especially high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, thereby reducing cardiovascular risks.

  9. Comparison of glutathione reductase activity and the intracellular glutathione reducing effects of 13 derivatives of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shenghui; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko; Azuma, Hideki; Kennedy, David Opare; Konishi, Yotaro; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao

    2010-05-14

    In a previous study, we showed that (1'S)-acetoxychavicol acetate ((S)-ACA) caused a rapid decrease in glutathione (GSH) levels less than 15 min after exposure. (S)-ACA-induced cell death was reversed by the addition of N-acetylcysteine. In the current study, we investigated the inhibitory activities of 13 derivatives of (S)-ACA on tumor cell viability, intracellular GSH level and GR activity. Correlations were found among a decrease in cell viability, intracellular GSH levels and the activity of GR in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells treated with the various ACA analogues. A test of the 13 derivatives revealed that the structural factors regulating activity were as follows: (1) the para or 1'-position of acetoxyl group (or other acyl group) was essential, (2) the presence of a C2'-C3' double or triple bond was essential, and (3) the S configuration of the 1'-acetoxyl group was preferable.

  10. Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Noctor, Graham; Queval, Guillaume; Mhamdi, Amna; Chaouch, Sejir; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione is a simple sulfur compound composed of three amino acids and the major non-protein thiol in many organisms, including plants. The functions of glutathione are manifold but notably include redox-homeostatic buffering. Glutathione status is modulated by oxidants as well as by nutritional and other factors, and can influence protein structure and activity through changes in thiol-disulfide balance. For these reasons, glutathione is a transducer that integrates environmental information into the cellular network. While the mechanistic details of this function remain to be fully elucidated, accumulating evidence points to important roles for glutathione and glutathione-dependent proteins in phytohormone signaling and in defense against biotic stress. Work in Arabidopsis is beginning to identify the processes that govern glutathione status and that link it to signaling pathways. As well as providing an overview of the components that regulate glutathione homeostasis (synthesis, degradation, transport, and redox turnover), the present discussion considers the roles of this metabolite in physiological processes such as light signaling, cell death, and defense against microbial pathogen and herbivores. PMID:22303267

  11. Selenium reduces the proapoptotic signaling associated to NF-kappaB pathway and stimulates glutathione peroxidase activity during excitotoxic damage produced by quinolinate in rat corpus striatum.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Abel; Vázquez-Román, Beatriz; La Cruz, Verónica Pérez-De; González-Cortés, Carolina; Trejo-Solís, Ma Cristina; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Jara-Prado, Aurelio; Guevara-Fonseca, Jorge; Ali, Syed F

    2005-12-15

    Quinolinate (QUIN) neurotoxicity has been attributed to degenerative events in nerve tissue produced by sustained activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) and oxidative stress. We have recently described the protective effects that selenium (Se), an antioxidant, produces on different markers of QUIN-induced neurotoxicity (Santamaría et al., 2003, J Neurochem 86:479-488.). However, the mechanisms by which Se exerts its protective actions remain unclear. Since some of these events are thought to be related with inhibition of deadly molecular cascades through the activation of antioxidant selenoproteins, in this study we investigated the effects of Se on QUIN-induced cell damage elicited by the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway, as well as the time-course response of striatal glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Se (sodium selenite, 0.625 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was administered to rats for 5 days, and 120 min after the last administration, animals received a single striatal injection of QUIN (240 nmol/mul). Twenty-four hours later, their striata were tested for the expression of IkappaB-alpha (the NF-kappaB cytosolic binding protein), the immunohistochemical expression of NF-kappaB (evidenced as nuclear expression of P65), caspase-3-like activation, and DNA fragmentation. Additional groups were killed at 2, 6, and 24 h for measurement of GPx activity. Se reduced the QUIN-induced decrease in IkappaB-alpha expression, evidencing a reduction in its cytosolic degradation. Se also prevented the QUIN-induced increase in P65-immunoreactive cells, suggesting a reduction of NF-kappaB nuclear translocation. Caspase-3-like activation and DNA fragmentation produced by QUIN were also inhibited by Se. Striatal GPx activity was stimulated by Se at 2 and 6 h, but not at 24 h postlesion. Altogether, these data suggest that the protective effects exerted by Se on QUIN-induced neurotoxicity are partially mediated by the inhibition of proapoptotic events underlying Ikappa

  12. Marked differences in drug-induced methemoglobinemia in sheep are not due to RBC glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, reduced glutathione, or methemoglobin reductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Guertler, A.T.; Lagutchik, M.S.; Woodard, C.L.; Leonard, D.A.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine is a commonly used topical anesthetic that is structurally similar to current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis. Benzocaine induces profound methemoglobinemia in some sheep but not others. After topical benzocaine administration certain sheep respond to form MHb (elevated MHb 16-50% after a 56-280 mg dose, a 2-10 second spray with benzocine), while other phenotypically similar sheep fail to significantly form MHb (less than a 2% increase from baseline). Deficiencies in Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD), reduced glutathione (GSH), and MHb reductase increase the susceptibility to methemoglobinemia in man and animals. Sheep are used as a model for G-6-PD deficiency in man, and differences in this enzyme level could cause the variable response seen in these sheep. Similarly, differences in GSH and MHb reductase could be responsible for the observed differences in MHb formation.

  13. Melatonin and nitric oxide modulate glutathione content and glutathione reductase activity in sunflower seedling cotyledons accompanying salt stress.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harmeet; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-09-30

    The present findings demonstrate significant modulation of total glutathione content, reduced glutathione (GSH) content, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) content, GSH/GSSG ratio and glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) activity in dark-grown seedling cotyledons in response to salt-stress (120 mM NaCl) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings. A differential spatial distribution of GR activity (monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging) is also evident. Melatonin and nitric oxide (NO) differentially ameliorate salt stress effect by modulating GR activity and GSH content in seedling cotyledons. Total glutathione content (GSH + GSSG) exhibit a seedling age-dependent increase in the cotyledons, more so in salt-stressed conditions and when subjected to melatonin treatment. Seedlings raised in presence of 15 μM of melatonin exhibit significant increase in GR activity in cotyledon homogenates (10,000 g supernatant) coinciding with significant increase in GSH content. GSSG content and GSH/GSSG ratio also increased due to melatonin treatment. A correlation is thus evident in NaCl-sensitized modulation of GSH content and GR activity by melatonin. GSH content is down regulated by NO provided as 250 μM of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) although total glutathione content remained in similar range. A reversal of response (enhanced total glutathione accumulation) by NO scavenger (cPTIO) highlights the critical role of NO in modulating glutathione homeostasis. SNP lowers the activity of hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT) - a regulatory enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in control seedlings whereas its activity is upregulated in salt-stressed seedling cotyledons. Melatonin content of seedling cotyledons is also modulated by NO. NO and melatonin thus seem to modulate GR activity and GSH content during seedling growth under salt stress. PMID:27432590

  14. Antioxidant Protection of NADPH-Depleted Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Is Dependent on Supply of Reduced Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Saraswat Ohri, Sujata; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2016-01-01

    The pentose phosphate pathway is the main source of NADPH, which by reducing oxidized glutathione, contributes to antioxidant defenses. Although oxidative stress plays a major role in white matter injury, significance of NADPH for oligodendrocyte survival has not been yet investigated. It is reported here that the NADPH antimetabolite 6-amino-NADP (6AN) was cytotoxic to cultured adult rat spinal cord oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) as well as OPC-derived oligodendrocytes. The 6AN-induced necrosis was preceded by increased production of superoxide, NADPH depletion, and lower supply of reduced glutathione. Moreover, survival of NADPH-depleted OPCs was improved by the antioxidant drug trolox. Such cells were also protected by physiological concentrations of the neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone (10−8 M). The protection by dehydroepiandrosterone was associated with restoration of reduced glutathione, but not NADPH, and was sensitive to inhibition of glutathione synthesis. A similar protective mechanism was engaged by the cAMP activator forskolin or the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) ligand G1. Finally, treatment with the glutathione precursor N-acetyl cysteine reduced cytotoxicity of 6AN. Taken together, NADPH is critical for survival of OPCs by supporting their antioxidant defenses. Consequently, injury-associated inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway may be detrimental for the myelination or remyelination potential of the white matter. Conversely, steroid hormones and cAMP activators may promote survival of NADPH-deprived OPCs by increasing a NADPH-independent supply of reduced glutathione. Therefore, maintenance of glutathione homeostasis appears as a critical effector mechanism for OPC protection against NADPH depletion and preservation of the regenerative potential of the injured white matter. PMID:27449129

  15. Pharmacokinetics of tetraplatin administered intraperitoneally with reduced glutathione in mice.

    PubMed

    Kido, Y; Khokhar, A R; Yoshida, M; Thai, G W; Siddik, Z H

    1994-01-01

    Tetraplatin (Ormaplatin) has been developed as a second generation platinum complex because of its good antitumor activity against some cisplatin-resistant tumor cell lines. It is currently in clinical trials. Its reduction to diaminocyclohexane (DACH)-dichloroplatinum(II) [DACH-Pt(II)Cl2] or closely similar species is essential for binding to DNA to produce the desired antitumor effects. We have studied the pharmacokinetics of tetraplatin in mice after intraperitoneal administration with the reducing agent glutathione (GSH). The systemic absorption of tetraplatin (5 mg/kg) with GSH (31 mg/kg) was faster than of tetraplatin alone. Peak plasma platinum (Pt) levels of 0.89 and 1.44 micrograms Pt/ml were observed at 15 min and 2 hr after administration of tetraplatin with and without GSH, respectively, and the Pt then decayed biphasically when administered with GSH and monophasically when administered alone. The plasma Pt level was 4-fold lower (0.17 vs. 0.71 micrograms Pt/ml) by 24 hr when tetraplatin was administered with GSH compared with its administration alone. DACH-Pt(II)Cl2 (4.21 mg/kg, ip) gave similar plasma Pt kinetics to that seen with the combination of tetraplatin and GSH. Pt levels in kidney 24 hr after administration of tetraplatin+GSH or of DACH-Pt(II)Cl2 were lower (1.6-fold) than after tetraplatin alone. Plasma and ascitic fluid from tumor-bearing mice demonstrated equivalent abilities to reduce tetraplatin rapidly. However, tetraplatin treatment of intraperitoneal-inoculated L1210/0 (parent) or L1210/DDP (cisplatin-resistant) tumor cells was unaffected by GSH. As GSH lowered systemic tetraplatin exposure in vivo without compromising antitumor activity against peritoneal tumor models, the combination of thiol and tetraplatin may be clinically useful in the treatment of intraperitoneal disseminated cancers. PMID:8013287

  16. Glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activities in blood of patients in early stages following kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronislaw A; Wlodarczyk, Zbigniew; Andruszkiewicz, Jacek; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on glutathione (GSH) level in red blood cells, as well as on glutathione peroxidases (GSH-Px) activities in red blood cells and in plasma of chronic renal failure (CRF) patients following renal transplantation. We want to focus our main attention on plasma GSH-Px, the selenoenzyme that is synthesized primarily in the kidney. In CRF patients, activity of this enzyme is significantly reduced, and the reduction decreases with the progress of the disease, reaching in the end-stage 20% to 30% of the activity of healthy patients. We have shown that following renal transplantation the activity of plasma GSH-Px is restored very rapidly, and 2 weeks after surgery it reached the value of the control group. Red blood cell GSH level is significantly higher in CRF patients, and following transplantation, no significant changes were observed. Red blood cell GSH-Px activity before transplantation was the same as in healthy patients and did not change significantly after surgery. PMID:16350829

  17. Reactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin with reduced glutathione.

    PubMed

    Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Shimmon, Ronald; Dawson, Michael; Hilmer, Sarah N; Le Couteur, David G

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common cause of chronic and recurrent lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) whose sputa contain copious quantities of P. aeruginosa toxin, pyocyanin. Pyocyanin triggers tissue damage mainly by its redox cycling and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The reactions between reduced glutathione (GSH) and pyocyanin were observed using absorption spectra from spectrophotometry and the reaction products analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Pyocyanin reacted with GSH non-enzymatically at 37 degrees C resulting in the production of red-brown products, spectophotometrically visible as a 480 nm maximum absorption peak after 24 h of incubation. The reaction was concentration-dependent on reduced glutathione but not on pyocyanin. Minimizing the accessibility of oxygen to the reaction decreased its rate. The anti-oxidant enzyme catalase circumvented the reaction. Proton-NMR analysis demonstrated the persistence of the original aromatic ring and the methyl-group of pyocyanin in the red-brown products. Anti-oxidant agents having thiol groups produced similar spectophotometrically visible peaks. The presence of a previously unidentified non-enzymatic GSH-dependent metabolic pathway for pyocyanin has thus been identified. The reaction between pyocyanin and GSH is concentration-, time-, and O(2)-dependent. The formation of H(2)O(2) as an intermediate and the thiol group in GSH seem to be important in this reaction. PMID:18797520

  18. Oral glutathione supplementation drastically reduces Helicobacter-induced gastric pathologies

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyne, Ellen; Ducatelle, Richard; Foss, Dennis; Sanchez, Margaret; Joosten, Myrthe; Zhang, Guangzhi; Smet, Annemieke; Pasmans, Frank; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter (H.) suis causes gastric pathologies in both pigs and humans. Very little is known on the metabolism of this bacterium and its impact on the host. In this study, we have revealed the importance of the glutamate-generating metabolism, as shown by a complete depletion of glutamine (Gln) in the medium during H. suis culture. Besides Gln, H. suis can also convert glutathione (GSH) to glutamate, and both reactions are catalyzed by the H. suis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT). Both for H. pylori and H. suis, it has been hypothesized that the degradation of Gln and GSH may lead to a deficiency for the host, possibly initiating or promoting several pathologies. Therefore the in vivo effect of oral supplementation with Gln and GSH was assessed. Oral supplementation with Gln was shown to temper H. suis induced gastritis and epithelial (hyper)proliferation in Mongolian gerbils. Astonishingly, supplementation of the feed with GSH, another GGT substrate, resulted in inflammation and epithelial proliferation levels returning to baseline levels of uninfected controls. This indicates that Gln and GSH supplementation may help reducing tissue damage caused by Helicobacter infection in both humans and pigs, highlighting their potential as a supportive therapy during and after Helicobacter eradication therapy. PMID:26833404

  19. Sulforaphane reduces the alterations induced by quinolinic acid: modulation of glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Santana-Martínez, R A; Galván-Arzáte, S; Hernández-Pando, R; Chánez-Cárdenas, M E; Avila-Chávez, E; López-Acosta, G; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Santamaría, A; Maldonado, P D

    2014-07-11

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity involves a state of acute oxidative stress, which is a crucial event during neuronal degeneration and is part of the physiopathology of neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, we evaluated the ability of sulforaphane (SULF), a natural dietary isothiocyanate, to induce the activation of transcription factor Nrf2 (a master regulator of redox state in the cell) in a model of striatal degeneration in rats infused with quinolinic acid (QUIN). Male Wistar rats received SULF (5mg/kg, i.p.) 24h and 5min before the intrastriatal infusion of QUIN. SULF increased the reduced glutathione (GSH) levels 4h after QUIN infusion, which was associated with its ability to increase the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), an antioxidant enzyme capable to regenerate GSH levels at 24h. Moreover, SULF treatment increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, while no changes were observed in γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase (GCL) activity. SULF treatment also prevented QUIN-induced oxidative stress (measured by oxidized proteins levels), the histological damage and the circling behavior. These results suggest that the protective effect of SULF could be related to its ability to preserve GSH levels and increase GPx and GR activities.

  20. Unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways suggests potential involvement in plant defense against the gall midge Mayetiola destructor in wheat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuming; Zhang, Shize; Whitworth, R Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. We found that the abundance of total glutathione increased up to 60% in resistant wheat plants within 72 hours following attack by the gall midge Mayetiola destructor, the Hessian fly. The increase in total glutathione abundance, however, is coupled with an unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways. The activity and transcript abundance of glutathione peroxidases, which convert reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), increased in infested resistant plants. However, the enzymatic activity and transcript abundance of glutathione reductases, which convert GSSG back to GSH, did not change. This unbalanced regulation of the glutathione oxidation/reduction cycle indicates the existence of an alternative pathway to regenerate GSH from GSSG to maintain a stable GSSG/GSH ratio. Our data suggest the possibility that GSSG is transported from cytosol to apoplast to serve as an oxidant for class III peroxidases to generate reactive oxygen species for plant defense against Hessian fly larvae. Our results provide a foundation for elucidating the molecular processes involved in glutathione-mediated plant resistance to Hessian fly and potentially other pests as well. PMID:25627558

  1. Effect of tocotrienol on the activities of cytosolic glutathione-dependent enzymes in rats treated with 2-acetylaminofluorene.

    PubMed

    Shamaan, N A; Wan Ngah, W Z; Ibrahim, R; Jarien, Z; Top, A G; Abdul Kadir, K

    1993-04-01

    The effect of tocotrienol on the activities of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in rats given 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) was investigated over a 20 week period. Liver and kidney GST and liver GR activities were significantly increased after AAF administration. Kidney GPx activities were significantly affected; activity assayed with cumene hydroperoxide (cu-OOH) was increased but activity assayed with H2O2 was reduced. Supplementation of the diet with tocotrienol in the AAF-treated rats reduced the increase in enzyme activities. Tocotrienol on its own had no effect on the enzyme activities.

  2. Thioltransferase activity of bovine lens glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Dal Monte, M; Cecconi, I; Buono, F; Vilardo, P G; Del Corso, A; Mura, U

    1998-01-01

    A Mu-class glutathione S-transferase purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens displayed thioltransferase activity, catalysing the transthiolation reaction between GSH and hydroxyethyldisulphide. The thiol-transfer reaction is composed of two steps, the formation of GSSG occurring through the generation of an intermediate mixed disulphide between GSH and the target disulphide. Unlike glutaredoxin, which is only able to catalyse the second step of the transthiolation process, glutathioneS-transferase catalyses both steps of the reaction. Data are presented showing that bovine lens glutathione S-transferase and rat liver glutaredoxin, which was used as a thioltransferase enzyme model, can operate in synergy to catalyse the GSH-dependent reduction of hydroxyethyldisulphide. PMID:9693102

  3. Functional mimicry of the active site of glutathione peroxidase by glutathione imprinted selenium-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Mao, Shi-zhong; Liu, Xiao-man; Huang, Xin; Xu, Jia-yun; Liu, Jun-qiu; Luo, Gui-min; Shen, Jia-cong

    2008-01-01

    For imitating the active site of antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an artificial enzyme selenosubtilisin was employed as a scaffold for reconstructing substrate glutathione (GSH) specific binding sites by a bioimprinting strategy. GSH was first covalently linked to selenosubtilisin to form a covalent complex GSH-selenosubtilisin through a Se-S bond, then the GSH molecule was used as a template to cast a complementary binding site for substrate GSH recognition. The bioimprinting procedure consists of unfolding the conformation of selenosubtilisin and fixing the new conformation of the complex GSH-selenosubtilisin. Thus a new specificity for naturally occurring GPx substrate GSH was obtained. This bioimprinting procedure facilitates the catalytic selenium moiety of the imprinted selenosubtilisin to match the reactive thiol group of GSH in the GSH binding site, which contributes to acceleration of the intramolecular catalysis. These imprinted selenium-containing proteins exhibited remarkable rate enhancement for the reduction of H2O2 by GSH. The average GPx activity was found to be 462 U/micromol, and it was approximately 100 times that for unimprinted selenosubtilisin. Compared with ebselen, a well-known GPx mimic, an activity enhancement of 500-fold was observed. Detailed steady-state kinetic studies demonstrated that the novel selenoenzyme followed a ping-pong mechanism similar to the naturally occurring GPx. PMID:18163571

  4. Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress, improves glutathione metabolism and modifies antioxidant defense systems in lead-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Dobrakowski, Michał; Kasperczyk, Janusz; Ostałowska, Alina; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Birkner, Ewa

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether beta-carotene administration reduces oxidative stress and influences antioxidant, mainly glutathione-related, defense systems in workers chronically exposed to lead. The population consisted of two randomly divided groups of healthy male volunteers exposed to lead. Workers in the first group (reference group) were not administered any antioxidants, while workers in the second group (CAR group) were treated orally with 10 mg of beta-carotene once a day for 12 weeks. Biochemical analysis included measuring markers of lead-exposure and oxidative stress in addition to the levels and activities of selected antioxidants. After treatment, levels of malondialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxides and lipofuscin significantly decreased compared with the reference group. However, the level of glutathione significantly increased compared with the baseline. Treatment with beta-carotene also resulted in significantly decreased glutathione peroxidase activity compared with the reference group, while the activities of other glutathione-related enzymes and of superoxide dismutase were not significantly changed. However, the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase, as well as the level of alpha-tocopherol, were significantly higher after treatment compared with the baseline. Despite controversy over the antioxidant properties of beta-carotene in vivo, our findings showed reduced oxidative stress after beta-carotene supplementation in chronic lead poisoning. - Highlights: • Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene elevates glutathione level in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene administration could be beneficial in lead poisoning.

  5. Comparison of oxidized and reduced glutathione in the bread-making qualities of rice batter.

    PubMed

    Yano, Hiroyuki

    2012-02-01

    The demand for gluten-free bread is growing as the recognition of celiac disease and wheat allergy has increased worldwide. In our previous study, reduced glutathione (GSH) was found to improve the gas-retaining properties of rice batter used for gluten-free bread. In this article, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) was shown to have the same effect. Moreover, sensory tests revealed that GSSG bread had a significantly reduced sulfurous odor. Analyses by a gas chromatography-flame photometric detector demonstrated the presence of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan in the headspace of GSH bread, and also their significant reduction in GSSG bread. The viscoelastic properties and microstructures of GSSG and GSH bread did not noticeably differ. These observations suggest the usefulness of GSSG in making gluten-free rice bread and extend our knowledge of the use of glutathione in food processing. Practical Application: Glutathione, a widely-distributed peptide in cells, improves the bread-making quality of gluten-free rice batter. While both the reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione are effective, GSSG-bread has significantly reduced sulfurous odor compared to GSH-bread.

  6. The content of glutathione and glutathione S-transferases and the glutathione peroxidase activity in rat liver nuclei determined by a non-aqueous technique of cell fractionation.

    PubMed Central

    Soboll, S; Gründel, S; Harris, J; Kolb-Bachofen, V; Ketterer, B; Sies, H

    1995-01-01

    Hepatocellular nuclei require glutathione, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx) for intranuclear protection against damage from electrophiles or products of active oxygen. Data so far available from the literature on nuclei isolated in aqueous systems range from glutathione, GSTs and GPx either being absent altogether to being present in quantities in excess of those in the cytoplasm. This paper describes a small-scale preparation of a nuclear fraction from rat liver by a non-aqueous technique, designed to retain nuclear water-soluble molecules in situ, since low-molecular-mass compounds can diffuse freely into other compartments during aqueous separation. This non-aqueous procedure shows the nucleus to contain glutathione at 8.4 mM and soluble GSTs at 38 micrograms/mg of protein, the enrichment over the homogenate being 1.2-1.4-fold. Se-dependent GPx activity was also present in the nucleus (56 m-units/mg), although with slightly lower activity than in the homogenate (0.7-fold). Images Figure 1 PMID:7487946

  7. Loss of hepatic monooxygenase activities, glutathione, and 'green pigment' formation after the administration of vinyl-cyclooctane to mice.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, P G; Citti, L; Fassina, G; Testai, E; Turchi, G

    1983-05-01

    Vinylcyclooctane, when administered to mice at 500 mg/kg, produced reduction of microsomal cytochrome P-450, heme, aminopyrine-N-demethylase and ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase activities with respect to control values; furthermore the hepatic reduced glutathione level was depleted suggesting that glutathione is involved in the vinylcyclooctane metabolism. The reduction of cytochrome P-450 and monooxygenase activities was accompanied by the formation of abnormal 'green pigments'.

  8. Effect of edetate disodium and reduced glutathione on absorption of acetazolamide from GI tract of rats.

    PubMed

    Schoenwald, R D; Ward, R L

    1976-05-01

    The absorption of acetazolamide suspensions from in situ rat gastric and intestinal loop segments was studied. In 1 hr, 66.2 and 64.3% remained unabsorbed from the rat stomach and intestine, respectively. Although 1% (w/v) reduced glutathione and 1% (w/v) (24 mM) edetate disodium had no effect on gastric absorption, drug absorption from the rat intestine (1 hr) was increased 1.5 and 2 times, respectively. It was hypothesized that the relatively poor intestinal absorption was due primarily to the formation of a pH-dependent (pH 4.5-10), nonabsorbable complex between acetazolamide and carbonic anhydrase present in the gut and that reduced glutathione acted as an inhibitor to promote intestinal absorption. Equilibrium dialysis studies showed that reduced glutathion could reduce the fraction of drug bound to human carbonic anhydrase B by one-half when present in a molar ratio 10 times that of acetazolamide; edetate disodium had no effect on the in vitro binding. It was, therefore, assumed that edetate disodium promoted an increase in intestinal absorption by altering the permeability of intestinal epithelium. Based upon present experimentation, however, the alteration of intestinal epithelium by reduced glutathione cannot be ruled out. PMID:6773

  9. A supramolecular microgel glutathione peroxidase mimic with temperature responsive activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanzhen; Jiao, Shufei; Lang, Chao; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-05-21

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) protects cells from oxidative damage by scavenging surplus reactive oxygen species (ROS). Commonly, an appropriate amount of ROS acts as a signal molecule in the metabolism. A smart artificial GPx exhibits adjustable catalytic activity, which can potentially reduce the amount of ROS to an appropriate degree and maintain its important physiological functions in metabolism. To construct an optimum and excellent smart artificial GPx, a novel supramolecular microgel artificial GPx (SM-Te) was prepared based on the supramolecular host-guest interaction employing the tellurium-containing guest molecule (ADA-Te-ADA) and the cyclodextrin-containing host block copolymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-[polyacrylamides-co-poly(6-o-(triethylene glycol monoacrylate ether)-β-cyclodextrin)], PPAM-CD) as building blocks. Subsequently, based on these building blocks, SM-Te was constructed and the formation of its self-assembled structure was confirmed by dynamic light scattering, NMR, SEM, TEM, etc. Typically, benefitting from the temperature responsive properties of the PNIPAM scaffold, SM-Te also exhibited similar temperature responsive behaviour. Importantly, the GPx catalytic rates of SM-Te displayed a noticeable temperature responsive characteristic. Moreover, SM-Te exhibited the typical saturation kinetics behaviour of a real enzyme catalyst. It was proved that the changes of the hydrophobic microenvironment and the pore size in the supramolecular microgel network of SM-Te played significant roles in altering the temperature responsive catalytic behaviour. The successful construction of SM-Te not only overcomes the insurmountable disadvantages existing in previous covalent bond crosslinked microgel artificial GPx but also bodes well for the development of novel intelligent antioxidant drugs. PMID:24652520

  10. Enteric glial cells protect neurons from oxidative stress in part via reduced glutathione.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Hind; Derkinderen, Pascal; Gomes, Priya; Chevalier, Julien; Aubert, Philippe; Masson, Damien; Galmiche, Jean-Paul; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Neunlist, Michel; Lardeux, Bernard

    2010-04-01

    Enteric glial cells (EGCs) are essential in the control of gastrointestinal functions. Although lesions of EGCs are associated with neuronal degeneration in animal models, their direct neuroprotective role remains unknown. Therefore, the aims of this study were to demonstrate the direct neuroprotective effects of EGCs and to identify putative glial mediators involved. First, viral targeted ablation of EGCs in primary cultures of enteric nervous system increased neuronal death both under basal conditions and in the presence of oxidative stress (dopamine, hydrogen peroxide). Second, direct or indirect coculture experiments of EGC lines with primary cultures of enteric nervous system or neuroblastoma cell lines (SH-SY5Y) prevented neurotoxic effects induced by oxidative stress (increased membrane permeability, release of neuronal specific enolase, caspase-3 immunoreactivity, changes in [Ca(2+)](i) response). Finally, combining pharmacological inhibition and mRNA silencing methods, we demonstrated that neuroprotective effects of EGCs were mediated in part by reduced glutathione but not by oxidized glutathione or by S-nitrosoglutathione. Our study identified the neuroprotective effects of EGCs via their release of reduced glutathione, extending their critical role in physiological contexts and in enteric neuropathies.-Abdo, H., Derkinderen, P., Gomes, P., Chevalier, J., Aubert, P., Masson, D., Galmiche, J.-P., Vanden Berghe, P., Neunlist, M., Lardeux, B. Enteric glial cells protect neurons from oxidative stress in part via reduced glutathione.

  11. The mechanism of biliary secretion of reduced glutathione. Analysis of transport process in isolated rat-liver canalicular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Kinne, R; Tran, T; Arias, I M

    1983-08-15

    Transport of reduced glutathione (GSH) was studied in isolated rat liver canalicular membrane vesicles by a rapid filtration technique. The membrane vesicles exhibit uptake of [2-3H]glycine--labeled GSH into an osmotically reactive intravesicular space. Although the canalicular membrane vesicles possess gamma-glutamyltransferase and aminopeptidase M, enzymes that hydrolyze glutathione into component amino acids, inactivation of the vesicle-associated transferase by affinity labeling with L-(alpha S,5S)-alpha-amino-3-chloro-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazoleacetic acid (AT-125) had no effect on the initial rate of GSH transport. Chemical analysis revealed that intact GSH accounted for most of vesicle-associated radioactivity. The initial rate of transport followed saturation kinetics with respect to GSH concentration; an apparent Km of 0.33 mM and V of 1.47 nmol/mg protein in 20 s were calculated. These results indicate that transport of GSH across the canalicular membranes is a carrier-mediated process. Replacement of NaCl in the transport medium by KCl, LiCl or choline chloride had no effect on the transport activity of the vesicles. The rate of GSH uptake by the vesicles was enhanced by valinomycin-induced K+-diffusion potential (vesicle inside-positive) and was inhibited by probenecid, indicating that GSH transport across the canalicular membranes is electrogenic and involves the transfer of negative charge. The transport of GSH was inhibited by oxidized glutathione or S-benzyl-glutathione. This transport system in canalicular plasma membranes may function in biliary secretion of GSH and its derivatives which are synthesized in hepatocytes by oxidative processes or glutathione S-transferase.

  12. [GLUTATHIONE SYSTEM ACTIVITY IN RAT TISSUES UNDER PHENYLETHYL BIGUANIDE ACTION ON THE BACKGROUND OF EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN ISCHEMIA/REPERFUSION DEVELOPMENT].

    PubMed

    Safonova, O A; Popova, T N; Kryl'skii, D V

    2016-01-01

    It was studied the total antioxidant activity, content of primary lipid peroxidation (LPO) products and reduced glutathione, and the activity of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase in rat tissues under phenylethyl biguanide (phenfor- min) action on the background of experimental brain ischemia/reperfusion development. It is stablished the analyzed parameters, increasing under ischemia/reperfusion conditions in the brain and blood serum of animals, exhibit a decrease upon the introduction of this biguanide derivative. The obtained data can be explained by a decrease in degree of mobilization of the antioxidant system--in particular, of its glutathione chain--in the pathologic state. Hence, there is a need in NADPH supply for the system functioning compared with the pathology. Thus, phenylethyl biguanide demonstrates its antioxidant and protective properties under oxidative stress development that is accompanied by accumulation of the products of free radical oxidation of biomolecules during the ischemic brain injury. PMID:27159954

  13. Glutathione-Mediated Regulation of ATP Sulfurylase Activity, SO42- Uptake, and Oxidative Stress Response in Intact Canola Roots.

    PubMed

    Lappartient, A. G.; Touraine, B.

    1997-05-01

    The dual role of glutathione as a transducer of S status (A.G. Lappartient and B. Touraine [1996] Plant Physiol 111: 147-157) and as an antioxidant was examined by comparing the effects of S deprivation, glutathione feeding, and H2O2 (oxidative stress) on SO42- uptake and ATP sulfurylase activity in roots of intact canola (Brassica napus L.). ATP sulfurylase activity increased and SO42- uptake rate severely decreased in roots exposed to 10 mM H2O2, whereas both increased in S-starved plants. In split-root experiments, an oxidative stress response was induced in roots remote from H2O2 exposure, as revealed by changes in the reduced glutathione (GSH) level and the GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio, but there was only a small decrease in SO42- uptake rate and no effect on ATP sulfurylase activity. Feeding plants with GSH increased GSH, but did not affect the GSH/GSSG ratio, and both ATP sulfurylase activity and SO42- uptake were inhibited. The responses of the H2O2-scavenging enzymes ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase to S starvation, GSH treatment, and H2O2 treatment were not to glutathione-mediated S demand regulatory process. We conclude that the regulation of ATP sulfurylase activity and SO42- uptake by S demand is related to GSH rather than to the GSH/GSSG ratio, and is distinct from the oxidative stress response. PMID:12223697

  14. Glutathione transferase classes alpha, pi, and mu: GSH activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Daniel F A R; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2010-10-14

    Since the early 1960s, glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been described as detoxification enzymes. In fact, GSTs are the most important enzymes involved in the metabolism of electrophilic xenobiotic/endobiotic compounds. These enzymes are able to catalyze the nucleophilic addition of glutathione (GSH) sulfur thiolate to a wide range of electrophilic substrates, building up a less toxic and more soluble compound. Cytosolic classes alpha, pi, and mu are the most extensively studied GSTs. However, many of the catalytic events are still poorly understood. In the present work, we have resorted to density functional theory (DFT) and to potential of mean force (PMF) calculations to determine the GSH activation mechanism of GSTP1-1 and GSTM1-1 isoenzymes. For the GSTP1-1 enzyme, we have demonstrated that a water molecule, after an initial conformational rearrangement of GSH, can assist a proton transfer between the GSH cysteine thiol (GSH-SH) and the GSH glutamate alpha carboxylate (GSH-COO(-)) groups. The energy barrier associated with the proton transfer is 11.36 kcal·mol(-1). The GSTM1-1 enzyme shows a completely different behavior from the previous isoenzyme. In this case, two water molecules, positioned between the GSH-SH and the ξ N atom of His107, working like a bridge, are able to promote the proton transfer between these two active groups with an energy barrier of 7.98 kcal·mol(-1). All our results are consistent with all the enzymes kinetics and mutagenesis experimental studies.

  15. Effect of innate glutathione levels on activity of redox-responsive gene delivery vectors

    PubMed Central

    Manickam, Devika S.; Li, Jing; Putt, David A.; Zhou, Qing-Hui; Wu, Chao; Lash, Lawrence H.; Oupický, David

    2009-01-01

    Redox-responsive polyplexes represent a promising class of non-viral gene delivery vectors. The reducible disulfide bonds in the polyplexes undergo intracellular reduction owing to the presence of high concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH). Available evidence suggests improved transfection activity of redox-sensitive polyplexes upon artificial modulation of intracellular GSH. This study investigates the effect of innate differences in GSH concentration in a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines on activity of reducible polyplexes of the four major classes of nucleic acid therapeutics: plasmid DNA (pDNA), messenger RNA (mRNA), antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AON) and siRNA. In general, reducible polyplexes of linear poly(amido amines) (PAA) show improved activity compared to non-reducible polyplexes of PAA. Results demonstrate that increased GSH levels are associated with improved transfection of mRNA polyplexes but no clear trend is observed for pDNA, AON and siRNA polyplexes. PMID:19720098

  16. Cadmium-Induced Hydrogen Sulfide Synthesis Is Involved in Cadmium Tolerance in Medicago sativa by Reestablishment of Reduced (Homo)glutathione and Reactive Oxygen Species Homeostases

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Weiti; Chen, Huiping; Zhu, Kaikai; Jin, Qijiang; Xie, Yanjie; Cui, Jin; Xia, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Until now, physiological mechanisms and downstream targets responsible for the cadmium (Cd) tolerance mediated by endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have been elusive. To address this gap, a combination of pharmacological, histochemical, biochemical and molecular approaches was applied. The perturbation of reduced (homo)glutathione homeostasis and increased H2S production as well as the activation of two H2S-synthetic enzymes activities, including L-cysteine desulfhydrase (LCD) and D-cysteine desulfhydrase (DCD), in alfalfa seedling roots were early responses to the exposure of Cd. The application of H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), not only mimicked intracellular H2S production triggered by Cd, but also alleviated Cd toxicity in a H2S-dependent fashion. By contrast, the inhibition of H2S production caused by the application of its synthetic inhibitor blocked NaHS-induced Cd tolerance, and destroyed reduced (homo)glutathione and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostases. Above mentioned inhibitory responses were further rescued by exogenously applied glutathione (GSH). Meanwhile, NaHS responses were sensitive to a (homo)glutathione synthetic inhibitor, but reversed by the cotreatment with GSH. The possible involvement of cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in NaHS responses was also suggested. In summary, LCD/DCD-mediated H2S might be an important signaling molecule in the enhancement of Cd toxicity in alfalfa seedlings mainly by governing reduced (homo)glutathione and ROS homeostases. PMID:25275379

  17. Effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Y.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver was studied in vivo. A daily dose of 10mg methylmercuric chloride/kg body weight was administered subcutaneously to 15 male Wistar rats for 10 days, and the glutathione peroxidase activity in the liver was measured to compare with the control activity. A marked decrease was observed in the glutathione peroxidase activity in the experimental animals, which measured as low as 40% in comparison to that in the control animals. It can be speculated that the inhibition of glutathione peroxidase activity plays a significant role in the development of mercury toxicity and that the protective effect of selenium and vitamin E on the mercury intoxication might be partly due to preserving the glutathione peroxidase activity in the antioxidative defense mechanisms.

  18. Storage of Heparinised Canine Whole Blood for the Measurement of Glutathione Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    van Zelst, Mariëlle; Hesta, Myriam; Gray, Kerry; Janssens, Geert P J

    2016-08-01

    Glutathione peroxidase activity is used as a biomarker of selenium status in dogs. Freshly collected blood samples are usually measured, due to the lack of knowledge on the effect of storing the samples. This study investigated if the analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity in whole blood collected from dogs was affected by storage of between 5 and 164 days. Results indicated that glutathione peroxidase activity was more variable in the freshly analysed samples compared to the stored samples. Although the mean differences between fresh and stored samples were not always equal to zero, this is thought to be caused by the variability of reagent preparation rather than by storage, as no consistent increase or decrease in glutathione peroxidase activity was found. Therefore, it can be concluded that heparinised dog blood samples can be successfully stored up to 164 days before analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity. PMID:26701335

  19. Role of reduced glutathione in the amelioration of nicotine-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dey, S K; Roy, S

    2010-04-01

    Nicotine, a major toxic component of cigarette smoke has been identified as a major risk factor for different diseases. This study investigates the role of reduce glutathione (GSH) against nicotine treated liver and kidney toxicity. Results showed that the application of 80 mg GSH per kg body weight per day exert protective effect against nicotine-induced liver and kidney toxicity by modulating the biochemical marker enzyme LDH, lipid peroxidation and augmenting antioxidant defense system. To our knowledge, this is the first finding of this sort. PMID:20221824

  20. Cadmium-Induced Hydrogen Accumulation Is Involved in Cadmium Tolerance in Brassica campestris by Reestablishment of Reduced Glutathione Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin; Shen, Wenbiao; Shen, Zhenguo; Xia, Yan; Cui, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas (H2) was recently proposed as a therapeutic antioxidant and signaling molecule in clinical trials. However, the underlying physiological roles of H2 in plants remain unclear. In the present study, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize the physiological roles of H2 in enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris against cadmium (Cd). The results showed that both 50 μM CdCl2 and 50%-saturated HRW induced an increase of endogenous H2 in Brassica campestris seedlings, and HRW alleviated Cd toxicity related to growth inhibition and oxidative damage. Seedlings supplied with HRW exhibited increased root length and reduced lipid peroxidation, similar to plants receiving GSH post-treatment. Additionally, seedlings post-treated with HRW accumulated higher levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) and showed increased GST and GPX activities in roots. Molecular evidence illustrated that the expression of genes such as GS, GR1 and GR2, which were down-regulated following the addition of Cd, GSH or BSO, could be reversed to varying degrees by the addition of HRW. Based on these results, it could be proposed that H2 might be an important regulator for enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris seedlings against Cd, mainly by governing reduced glutathione homeostasis. PMID:26445361

  1. Cadmium-Induced Hydrogen Accumulation Is Involved in Cadmium Tolerance in Brassica campestris by Reestablishment of Reduced Glutathione Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Su, Nana; Chen, Qin; Shen, Wenbiao; Shen, Zhenguo; Xia, Yan; Cui, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas (H2) was recently proposed as a therapeutic antioxidant and signaling molecule in clinical trials. However, the underlying physiological roles of H2 in plants remain unclear. In the present study, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize the physiological roles of H2 in enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris against cadmium (Cd). The results showed that both 50 μM CdCl2 and 50%-saturated HRW induced an increase of endogenous H2 in Brassica campestris seedlings, and HRW alleviated Cd toxicity related to growth inhibition and oxidative damage. Seedlings supplied with HRW exhibited increased root length and reduced lipid peroxidation, similar to plants receiving GSH post-treatment. Additionally, seedlings post-treated with HRW accumulated higher levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) and showed increased GST and GPX activities in roots. Molecular evidence illustrated that the expression of genes such as GS, GR1 and GR2, which were down-regulated following the addition of Cd, GSH or BSO, could be reversed to varying degrees by the addition of HRW. Based on these results, it could be proposed that H2 might be an important regulator for enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris seedlings against Cd, mainly by governing reduced glutathione homeostasis.

  2. Redox-implications associated with the formation of complexes between copper ions and reduced or oxidized glutathione.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Margarita E; López-Alarcón, Camilo; Bridi, Raquel; Speisky, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Binding of copper by reduced glutathione (GSH) is generally seen as a mechanism to lower, if not abolish, the otherwise high electrophilicity and redox activity of its free ions. In recent years, however, this concept has been contradicted by new evidence revealing that, rather than stabilizing free copper ions, its binding to GSH leads to the formation of a Cu(I)-[GSH]2 complex capable of reducing molecular oxygen into superoxide. It is now understood that, under conditions leading to the removal of such radicals, the Cu(I)-[GSH]2 complex is readily oxidized into Cu(II)-GSSG. Interestingly, in the presence of a GSH excess, the latter complex is able to regenerate the superoxide-generating capacity of the complex it originated from, opening the possibility that a GSH-dependent interplay exists between the reduced and the oxidized glutathione forms of these copper-complexes. Furthermore, recent evidence obtained from experiments conducted in non-cellular systems and intact mitochondria indicates that the Cu(II)-GSSG complex is also able to function in a catalytic manner as an efficient superoxide dismutating- and catalase-like molecule. Here we review and discuss the most relevant chemical and biological evidence on the formation of the Cu(I)-[GSH]2 and Cu(II)-GSSG complexes and on the potential redox implications associated with their intracellular occurrence.

  3. Direct assay of glutathione peroxidase activity using high-performance capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pascual, P; Martinez-Lara, E; Bárcena, J A; López-Barea, J; Toribio, F

    1992-10-01

    A fast, sensitive and direct method has been developed for the determination of glutathione peroxidase activity (both selenium- and non-selenium-dependent) in cell-free preparations. The assay is based on the separation and quantitation of reduced and oxidized glutathione by capillary electrophoresis. The electrophoretic separation buffer was 100 mM sodium tetraborate (pH 8.2) containing 100 mM sodium dodecylsulphate. A micellar electrokinetic mechanism took place under these conditions, and a total mass recovery was observed for both peptides. The reproducibility of migration times was excellent (less than 3% variability). A linear detector response range was observed in the range 5-50 U/ml, and both the reproducibility and accuracy were satisfied. Samples out of this linear range could be analysed by either increasing the reaction time or diluting the enzyme preparation. The results obtained with the new direct capillary electrophoresis assay were compared with those derived from a reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic and spectrophotometric coupled assay. A very good agreement was found between the two direct assay methods in all samples. Capillary electrophoresis is a versatile technique that allows the automation of the glutathione peroxidase assay in a reproducible manner and within a relatively short time with sufficient accuracy and precision. PMID:1430007

  4. Indole-3-carbinol induces a rat liver glutathione transferase subunit (Yc2) with high activity toward aflatoxin B1 exo-epoxide. Association with reduced levels of hepatic aflatoxin-DNA adducts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stresser, D M; Williams, D E; McLellan, L I; Harris, T M; Bailey, G S

    1994-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a metabolite of the grain mold Aspergillus flavus, is a potent hepatocarcinogen and widespread contaminant of human food supplies. AFB1-induced tumors or preneoplastic lesions in experimental animals can be inhibited by cotreatment with several compounds, including indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a component of cruciferous vegetables, and the well-known Ah receptor agonist beta-naphthoflavone (BNF). This study examines the influence of these two agents on the AFB1-glutathione detoxication pathway and AFB1-DNA adduction in rat liver. After 7 days of feeding approximately equally inhibitory doses of I3C (0.2%) or BNF (0.04%) alone or in combination, male Fischer 344 rats were administered [3H]AFB1 (0.5 mg/kg, 480 microCi/kg) intraperitoneally and killed 2 hr later. All three experimental diets inhibited in vivo AFB1-DNA adduction (BNF, 46%; I3C, 68%; combined, 51%). Based on Western blots using antibodies specific for the glutathione S-transferase (GST), subunit Yc2 (subunit 10) appeared to be substantially elevated by the diets containing I3C (I3C diet, 4.0-fold increase in band density; combined diet, 2.8-fold). The BNF diet appeared to elevate Yc2 to a lesser extent (2.2-fold increase in band density).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Curcumin reduces oxidative damage by increasing reduced glutathione and preventing membrane permeability transition in isolated brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jat, D; Parihar, P; Kothari, S C; Parihar, M S

    2013-12-31

    Mitochondria are critical regulators of energy metabolism and programmed cell death pathways. Mitochondria are also the major site for the production of reactive oxygen species which make this organelle more susceptible to oxidative damage and impairments of mitochondrial functions. Antioxidants have been of limited therapeutic success to ameliorate the toxic effects of oxidative stress in mitochondria. One reason may be the inability of mitochondria to selectively take up antioxidants. In the present study we synthesized mitochondrially targeted curcumin with an aim of delivering this polyphenolic compound to isolated mitochondria. Our observations show the strong anti-oxidative effects of curcumin and mitochondrially targeted curcumin against the lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and mitochondrial permeability transition induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide. Both curcumin and mitochondrially targeted curcumin significantly enhanced endogenous reduced glutathione level in the mitochondria thus preserving mitochondrial defense system against oxidative stress. We concluded that curcumin and mitochondrially targeted curcumin protected mitochondria against tert-butylhydroperoxide by lowering the oxidative damage, increasing the availability of endogenous reduced glutathione and preserving the mitochondrial integrity. Importantly, mitochondrially targeted curcumin was found most effective in ameliorating oxidative stress and preserving mitochondrial integrity than curcumin.

  6. Regulative roles of glutathione reductase and four glutaredoxins in glutathione redox, antioxidant activity, and iron homeostasis of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Bin; Tang, Li; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple glutaredoxins (Grx) and glutathione reductase (Glr) are vital for the thiol-disulfide redox system in budding yeast but generally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we characterized the Beauveria bassiana redox system comprising dithiol Grx1, monothiol Grx2-4, Grx-like Grx5, and Glr orthologue. Each grx or glr deletion was compensated by increased transcripts of some other grx genes in normal cultures. Particularly, grx3 compensated the absence of grx1, grx2, grx5, or glr under oxidative stress while its absence was compensated only by undeletable grx4 under normal conditions but by most of other undeleted grx and glr genes in response to menadione. Consequently, the redox state was disturbed in Δglr more than in Δgrx3 but not in Δgrx1/2/5. Superoxide dismutases were more active in normal Δgrx1-3 cultures but less in Δgrx5 or Δglr response to menadione. Total catalase activity increased differentially in all the mutant cultures stressed with or without H2O2 while total peroxidase activity decreased more in the normal or H2O2-stressed culture of Δglr than of Δgrx3. Among the mutants, Δgrx3 showed slightly increased sensitivity to menadione or H2O2; Δglr exhibited greater sensitivity to thiol-oxidizing diamide than thiol-reducing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as well as increased sensitivity to the two oxidants. Intriguingly, all the mutants grew slower in a Fe(3+)-inclusive medium perhaps due to elevated transcripts of two Fe(3+) transporter genes. More or fewer phenotypes linked with biocontrol potential were altered in four deletion mutants excluding Δgrx5. All the changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Overall, Grx3 played more critical role than other Grx homologues in the Glr-dependent redox system of the fungal entomopathogen. PMID:26969041

  7. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  8. Oxidized glutathione mediates cation channel activation in calf vascular endothelial cells during oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Koliwad, S K; Elliott, S J; Kunze, D L

    1996-08-15

    1. The oxidant, tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBuOOH) depolarizes calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells by activating a non-selective cation channel. To identify the molecular mediator of channel activation during oxidant stress, the patch-clamp technique was used to compare tBuOOH-induced changes in membrane potential and channel activity with those induced by oxidized glutathione (GSSG), a cytosolic product of oxidant metabolism. 2. When recording pipettes contained GSSG (2 mM), whole-cell zero-current potential measured immediately following pipette break-in was not different from control values (-57 mV). However, within 20 min of break-in, zero-current potential was depolarized to -7 mV. The time course of depolarization was dependent on the concentration of GSSG and was accelerated by inhibition of GSSG metabolism. 3. In excised membrane patches, channels were activated by internal GSSG, but not by internal tBuOOH, reduced glutathione (GSH), or external GSSG. Channels were equal in size (28 pS) and in ionic selectivity to those activated by incubation of intact cells with tBuOOH. As little as 20 microM GSSG was sufficient to maximally activate channels. However, the time course of channel activation was concentration dependent between 20 microM and 2 mM GSSG. 4. Channel activation by GSSG was reversed by GSH and by increasing the [GSH]:[GSSG] ratio. Likewise, channel activation by pre-incubation of intact cells with tBuOOH was reversed by GSH applied after patch excision. 5. These results strongly suggest that GSSG is an endogenous intracellular mediator of channel activation and depolarization during oxidant stress. PMID:8866350

  9. The effect of tilmicosin on cardiac superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities.

    PubMed

    Yazar, E; Altunok, V; Elmas, M; Traş, B; Baş, A L; Ozdemir, V

    2002-05-01

    In this study, the effect of tilmicosin on cardiac superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities was investigated. Forty male BALB/c mice were used as material. Ten mice served as a control group, and 30 mice were injected with tilmicosin (25 mg/kg body weight, subcutaneously, with a single injection). After drug administration, they were monitored for 3 days. Tilmicosin caused decreases in cardiac superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities.

  10. Functional and mutational analyses of an omega-class glutathione S-transferase (GSTO2) that is required for reducing oxidative damage in Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-Y; Guo, X-L; Liu, Y-L; Liu, F; Wang, H-F; Guo, X-Q; Xu, B-H

    2016-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases perform a variety of vital functions, particularly in reducing oxidative damage. Here, we investigated the expression patterns of Apis cerana cerana omega-class glutathione S-transferase 2 (AccGSTO2) under various stresses and explored its connection with antioxidant defences. We found that AccGSTO2 knockdown by RNA interference triggered increased mortality in Ap. cerana cerana, and immunohistochemistry revealed significantly decreased AccGSTO2 expression, particularly in the midgut and fat body. Further analyses indicated that AccGSTO2 knockdown resulted in decreases in catalase and glutathione reductase activities, ascorbate content and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione, and increases in H2 O2 , malondialdehyde and carbonyl contents. We also analysed the transcripts of other antioxidant genes and found that many genes were down-regulated in the AccGSTO2 knockdown samples, revealing that AccGSTO2 may be indispensable for attaining a normal lifespan by enhancing cellular oxidative resistance. In addition, the roles of cysteine residues in AccGSTO2 were explored using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutants of Cys(28) and Cys(124) significantly affected the enzyme and antioxidant activities of AccGSTO2, which may be attributed to the changes in the spatial structures of mutants as determined by homology modelling. In summary, these observations provide novel insight into the structural and functional characteristics of GSTOs. PMID:27170478

  11. Blood selenium concentrations and enzyme activities related to glutathione metabolism in wild emperor geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Schmutz, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, we collected blood samples from 63 emperor geese (Chen canagica) on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, USA. We studied the relationship between selenium concentrations in whole blood and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that plasma activities of these enzymes are useful biomarkers of selenium-induced oxidative stress, but little information is available on their relationship to selenium in the blood of wild birds. Adult female emperor geese incubating their eggs in mid-June had a higher mean concentration of selenium in their blood and a greater activity of glutathione peroxidase in their plasma than adult geese or goslings that were sampled during the adult flight feathera??molting period in late July and early August. Glutathione peroxidase activity was positively correlated with the concentration of selenium in the blood of emperor geese, and the rate of increase relative to selenium was greater in goslings than in adults. The activity of glutathione reductase was greatest in the plasma of goslings and was greater in molting adults than incubating females but was not significantly correlated with selenium in the blood of adults or goslings. Incubating female emperor geese had high selenium concentrations in their blood, accompanied by increased glutathione peroxidase activity consistent with early oxidative stress. These findings indicate that further study of the effects of selenium exposure, particularly on reproductive success, is warranted in this species.

  12. Blood selenium concentrations and enzyme activities related to glutathione metabolism in wild emperor geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Schmutz, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, we collected blood samples from 63 emperor geese (Chen canagica) on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, USA. We studied the relationship between selenium concentrations in whole blood and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that plasma activities of these enzymes are useful biomarkers of selenium-induced oxidative stress, but little information is available on their relationship to selenium in the blood of wild birds. Adult female emperor geese incubating their eggs in mid-June had a higher mean concentration of selenium in their blood and a greater activity of glutathione peroxidase in their plasma than adult geese or goslings that were sampled during the adult flight feathermolting period in late July and early August. Glutathione peroxidase activity was positively correlated with the concentration of selenium in the blood of emperor geese, and the rate of increase relative to selenium was greater in goslings than in adults. The activity of glutathione reductase was greatest in the plasma of goslings and was greater in molting adults than incubating females but was not significantly correlated with selenium in the blood of adults or goslings. Incubating female emperor geese had high selenium concentrations in their blood, accompanied by increased glutathione peroxidase activity consistent with early oxidative stress. These findings indicate that further study of the effects of selenium exposure, particularly on reproductive success, is warranted in this species.

  13. Glutathione-dependent extracellular ferric reductase activities in dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zarnowski, Robert; Woods, Jon P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase (GSH-FeR) activities in different dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species were characterized. Supernatants from Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in their yeast form were able to reduce iron enzymically with glutathione as a cofactor. Some variations in the level of reduction were noted amongst the strains. This activity was stable in acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline environments and was inhibited when trivalent aluminium and gallium ions were present. Using zymography, single bands of GSH-FeRs with apparent molecular masses varying from 430 to 460 kDa were identified in all strains. The same molecular mass range was determined by size exclusion chromatography. These data demonstrate that dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi produce and secrete a family of similar GSH-FeRs that may be involved in the acquisition and utilization of iron. Siderophore production by these and other fungi has sometimes been considered to provide a full explanation of iron acquisition in these organisms. Our work reveals an additional common mechanism that may be biologically and pathogenically important. Furthermore, while some characteristics of these enzymes such as extracellular location, cofactor utilization and large size are not individually unique, when considered together and shared across a range of fungi, they represent an important novel physiological feature. PMID:16000713

  14. Glutathione and glutaredoxin act as a backup of human thioredoxin reductase 1 to reduce thioredoxin 1 preventing cell death by aurothioglucose.

    PubMed

    Du, Yatao; Zhang, Huihui; Lu, Jun; Holmgren, Arne

    2012-11-01

    Thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) in cytosol is the only known reductant of oxidized thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) in vivo so far. We and others found that aurothioglucose (ATG), a well known active-site inhibitor of TrxR1, inhibited TrxR1 activity in HeLa cell cytosol but had no effect on the viability of the cells. Using a redox Western blot analysis, no change was observed in redox state of Trx1, which was mainly fully reduced with five sulfhydryl groups. In contrast, auranofin killed cells and oxidized Trx1, also targeting mitochondrial TrxR2 and Trx2. Combining ATG with ebselen gave a strong synergistic effect, leading to Trx1 oxidation, reactive oxygen species accumulation, and cell death. We hypothesized that there should exist a backup system to reduce Trx1 when only TrxR1 activity was lost. Our results showed that physiological concentrations of glutathione, NADPH, and glutathione reductase reduced Trx1 in vitro and that the reaction was strongly stimulated by glutaredoxin1. Simultaneous depletion of TrxR activity by ATG and glutathione by buthionine sulfoximine led to overoxidation of Trx1 and loss of HeLa cell viability. In conclusion, the glutaredoxin system and glutathione have a backup role to keep Trx1 reduced in cells with loss of TrxR1 activity. Monitoring the redox state of Trx1 shows that cell death occurs when Trx1 is oxidized, followed by general protein oxidation catalyzed by the disulfide form of thioredoxin.

  15. Intrinsic electrophilicity of the 4-methylsulfonyl-2-pyridone scaffold in glucokinase activators: role of glutathione-S-transferases and in vivo quantitation of a glutathione conjugate in rats.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, John; Sharma, Raman; Atkinson, Karen; Filipski, Kevin J; Wright, Stephen W; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Tan, Beijing; Kosa, Rachel E; Stevens, Benjamin; Tu, Meihua; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies on the in vitro metabolism of 4-alkylsulfonyl-2-pyridone-based glucokinase activators revealed a facile, non-enzymatic displacement of the 4-alkylsulfonyl group by glutathione. In the present studies, a role for glutathione-S-transferases (GST) as catalysts in the desulfonylation reaction was demonstrated using a combination of human liver microsomes, human liver cytosol and human GSTs. The identification of a glutathione conjugate in circulation following intravenous administration of a candidate 4-methylsulfonyl-2-pyridone to rats confirmed the relevance of the in vitro findings.

  16. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site.

    PubMed

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-10-20

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme.

  17. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  18. Reduced glutathione biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster causes neuronal defects linked to copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Stephen W; La Fontaine, Sharon; Warr, Coral G; Burke, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide often considered to be the master antioxidant in cells. GSH plays an integral role in cellular redox regulation and is also known to have a role in mammalian copper homeostasis. In vitro evidence suggests that GSH is involved in copper uptake, sequestration and efflux. This study was undertaken to further investigate the roles that GSH plays in neuronal copper homeostasis in vivo, using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the Glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit gene (Gclc) that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis was utilised to genetically deplete GSH levels. When Gclc was knocked down in all neurons, this caused lethality, which was partially rescued by copper supplementation and was exacerbated by additional knockdown of the copper uptake transporter Ctr1A, or over-expression of the copper efflux transporter ATP7. Furthermore, when Gclc was knocked down in a subset of neuropeptide-producing cells, this resulted in adult progeny with unexpanded wings, a phenotype previously associated with copper dyshomeostasis. In these cells, Gclc suppression caused a decrease in axon branching, a phenotype further enhanced by ATP7 over-expression. Therefore, we conclude that GSH may play an important role in regulating neuronal copper levels and that reduction in GSH may lead to functional copper deficiency in neurons in vivo. We provide genetic evidence that glutathione (GSH) levels influence Cu content or distribution in vivo, in Drosophila neurons. GSH could be required for binding Cu imported by Ctr1A and distributing it to chaperones, such as Mtn, CCS and Atox1. Alternatively, GSH could modify the copper-binding and transport activities of Atox1 and the ATP7 efflux protein via glutathionylation of copper-binding cysteines.

  19. Effect of reduced glutathione (GSH) in canine sperm cryopreservation: In vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lucio, C F; Silva, L C G; Regazzi, F M; Angrimani, D S R; Nichi, M; Assumpção, M E O; Vannucchi, C I

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro and in vivo efficiency of different concentrations (0, 10 and 20 mM) of reduced glutathione supplemented to the extender for canine semen cryopreservation. Six normospermic dogs were used and each ejaculate was divided in 3 experimental groups, according to GSH concentration (GSH-0, GSH-10 and GSH-20 Groups). After thawing, samples were evaluated by sperm motility by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA), flow cytometric evaluation of plasma and acrosome membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential and activity, chromatin susceptibility to acid-induced denaturation, and measurement of spontaneous and induced production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). In vivo tests were carried out with GSH-0 and GSH-10 groups, for which six bitches were inseminated with semen cryopreserved in extender without GSH or containing 10 mM GSH. Intrauterine insemination was performed by cervical catheterization on the 5th and 6th days after the LH surge, detected by serum progesterone and LH assays. In the CASA evaluation, GSH-20 group had the lowest total and progressive motility and lower percentage of sperm with rapid and slow speed. Groups treated with glutathione showed lower percentage of acrosome damage, but higher percentage of plasma membrane injury. GSH-20 group had higher percentage of sperm with low mitochondrial activity and higher concentration of induced TBARS. Both groups (GSH-0 and GSH-10) had positive pregnancies. In conclusion, 20 mM GSH supplementation to canine cryopreservation extender promoted sperm damage, especially to mitochondrial activity. However, addition of 10 mM GSH resulted in acrosome protection, preserving fertility rate. PMID:26883376

  20. Structural insight into the active site of a Bombyx mori unclassified glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here, we identify amino acid residues of an unclassified GST from Bombyx mori, bmGSTu-interacting glutathione (GSH). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTu mutants indicated that amino acid residues Asp103, Ser162, and Ser166 contribute to catalytic activity.

  1. Thiram-induced cytotoxicity is accompanied by a rapid and drastic oxidation of reduced glutathione with consecutive lipid peroxidation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Cereser, C; Boget, S; Parvaz, P; Revol, A

    2001-06-21

    The toxic effect of thiram, a widely used dithiocarbamate fungicide, was investigated in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Cell survival assays demonstrated that thiram induced a dose-dependent decrease in the viable cell recovery. Thiram exposure resulted in a rapid depletion of intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) content with a concomitant increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentration. Alteration of glutathione levels was accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease in the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), a key enzyme for the regeneration of GSH from GSSG. Thiram-exposed cells exhibited increased lipid peroxidation reflected by enhanced thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) production, suggesting that GSH depletion and the lower GR activity gave rise to increased oxidative processes. To investigate the role of decreased GSH content in the toxicity of thiram, GSH levels were modulated prior to exposure. Pretreatment of fibroblasts with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a GSH biosynthesis precursor, prevented both lipid peroxidation and cell death induced by thiram exposure. In contrast, thiram cytotoxicity was exacerbated by the previous depletion of cellular GSH by L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO). Taken together, these results strongly suggest that thiram induces GSH depletion, leading to oxidative stress and finally cell death.

  2. Peroxiredoxin 6: A Bifunctional Enzyme with Glutathione Peroxidase and Phospholipase A2 Activities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) is the prototype and the only mammalian 1-Cys member of the Prdx family. Major differences from 2-Cys Prdxs include the use of glutathione (GSH) instead of thioredoxin as the physiological reductant, heterodimerization with πGSH S-transferase as part of the catalytic cycle, and the ability either to reduce the oxidized sn-2 fatty acyl group of phospholipids (peroxidase activity) or to hydrolyze the sn-2 ester (alkyl) bond of phospholipids (phospholipase A2 [PLA2] activity). The bifunctional protein has separate active sites for peroxidase (C47, R132, H39) and PLA2 (S32, D140, H26) activities. These activities are dependent on binding of the protein to phospholipids at acidic pH and to oxidized phospholipids at cytosolic pH. Prdx6 can be phosphorylated by MAP kinases at T177, which markedly increases its PLA2 activity and broadens its pH-activity spectrum. Prdx6 is primarily cytosolic but also is targeted to acidic organelles (lysosomes, lamellar bodies) by a specific targeting sequence (amino acids 31–40). Oxidant stress and keratinocyte growth factor are potent regulators of Prdx6 gene expression. Prdx6 has important roles in both antioxidant defense based on its ability to reduce peroxidized membrane phospholipids and in phospholipid homeostasis based on its ability to generate lysophospholipid substrate for the remodeling pathway of phospholipid synthesis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 831–844. PMID:20919932

  3. The circadian clock regulates rhythmic activation of the NRF2/glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense pathway to modulate pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pekovic-Vaughan, Vanja; Gibbs, Julie; Yoshitane, Hikari; Yang, Nan; Pathiranage, Dharshika; Guo, Baoqiang; Sagami, Aya; Taguchi, Keiko; Bechtold, David; Loudon, Andrew; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Chan, Jefferson; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T.J.; Fukada, Yoshitaka; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The disruption of the NRF2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2)/glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense pathway is a critical step in the pathogenesis of several chronic pulmonary diseases and cancer. While the mechanism of NRF2 activation upon oxidative stress has been widely investigated, little is known about the endogenous signals that regulate the NRF2 pathway in lung physiology and pathology. Here we show that an E-box-mediated circadian rhythm of NRF2 protein is essential in regulating the rhythmic expression of antioxidant genes involved in glutathione redox homeostasis in the mouse lung. Using an in vivo bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis model, we reveal a clock “gated” pulmonary response to oxidative injury, with a more severe fibrotic effect when bleomycin was applied at a circadian nadir in NRF2 levels. Timed administration of sulforaphane, an NRF2 activator, significantly blocked this phenotype. Moreover, in the lungs of the arrhythmic ClockΔ19 mice, the levels of NRF2 and the reduced glutathione are constitutively low, associated with increased protein oxidative damage and a spontaneous fibrotic-like pulmonary phenotype. Our findings reveal a pivotal role for the circadian control of the NRF2/glutathione pathway in combating oxidative/fibrotic lung damage, which might prompt new chronotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of human lung diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24637114

  4. Effects of growth hormone, melatonin, oestrogens and phytoestrogens on the oxidized glutathione (GSSG)/reduced glutathione (GSH) ratio and lipid peroxidation in aged ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Isabel; Fdez-Tresguerres, Jesús; Ariznavarreta, Carmen; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2010-12-01

    Ovariectomy constitutes a commonly used model in rats and mice for human menopause. After ovariectomy, an imbalance between oxidant production and antioxidant levels appears in favour of the former, with increased oxidative stress and consequently an acceleration of ageing. In the present work, the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), a relevant antioxidant, and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), an oxidant compound, as well as lipid peroxidation (through malondialdehyde (MDA) levels), were studied in liver, heart, kidney and spleen homogenates of old (24 months of age) unovariectomized and ovariectomized female Wistar rats. The results showed a significant increase of the GSSG/GSH ratio, a marker of oxidative stress, and higher MDA production in all the studied organs of ovariectomized rats as compared with unovariectomized animals. These data confirm the idea that ovariectomy accelerates the ageing process. Administration of growth hormone (GH), melatonin (MEL) and oestrogens (OE), as well as soybean phytoestrogens (PE) for 10 weeks, between 22 and 24 months of age, was able to decrease oxidative stress in the investigated organs of ovariectomized old rats, therefore slowing down the ageing process in those animals.

  5. Reduced Glutathione Mediates Resistance to H2S Toxicity in Oral Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Xi Jia

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is associated with changes in the composition of the oral microflora, where health-associated oral streptococci decrease while Gram-negative anaerobes predominate in disease. A key feature of periodontal disease-associated anaerobes is their ability to produce hydrogen sulfide (H2S) abundantly as a by-product of anaerobic metabolism. So far, H2S has been reported to be either cytoprotective or cytotoxic by modulating bacterial antioxidant defense systems. Although oral anaerobes produce large amounts of H2S, the potential effects of H2S on oral streptococci are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of H2S on the survival and biofilm formation of oral streptococci. The growth and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis were inhibited by H2S. However, H2S did not significantly affect the growth of Streptococcus gordonii or Streptococcus sanguinis. The differential susceptibility of oral streptococci to H2S was attributed to differences in the intracellular concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH). In the absence of GSH, H2S elicited its toxicity through an iron-dependent mechanism. Collectively, our results showed that H2S exerts antimicrobial effects on certain oral streptococci, potentially contributing to the decrease in health-associated plaque microflora. PMID:26801579

  6. Antioxidant-rich coffee reduces DNA damage, elevates glutathione status and contributes to weight control: results from an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Bakuradze, Tamara; Boehm, Nadine; Janzowski, Christine; Lang, Roman; Hofmann, Thomas; Stockis, Jean-Pierre; Albert, Franz W; Stiebitz, Herbert; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Baum, Matthias; Eisenbrand, Gerhard

    2011-05-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence increasingly suggests coffee consumption to be correlated to prevention or delay of degenerative diseases connected with oxidative cellular stress. In an intervention study comprising 33 healthy volunteers, we examined DNA-protective and antioxidative effects exerted in vivo by daily ingestion of 750 mL of freshly brewed coffee rich in both green coffee bean constituents as well as roast products. The study design encompassed an initial 4 wk of wash-out, followed by 4 wk of coffee intake and 4 wk of second wash-out. At the start and after each study phase blood samples were taken to monitor biomarkers of oxidative stress response. In addition, body weight/composition and intake of energy/nutrients were recorded. In the coffee ingestion period, the primary endpoint, oxidative DNA damage as measured by the Comet assay (± FPG), was markedly reduced (p<0.001). Glutathione level (p<0.05) and GSR-activity (p<0.01) were elevated. Body weight (p<0.01)/body fat (p<0.05) and energy (p<0.001)/nutrient (p<0.001-0.05) intake were reduced. Our results allow to conclude that daily consumption of 3-4 cups of brew from a special Arabica coffee exerts health beneficial effects, as evidenced by reduced oxidative damage, body fat mass and energy/nutrient uptake.

  7. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of malondialdehyde and glutathione reductase activity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, V; Raffaele, R; Cosentino, E; Rizza, V

    1994-01-01

    The chemical composition of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is considered to reflect brain metabolism. In this study we measured malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and the activity of enzymes involved in antioxidative processes, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase, in human cerebrospinal fluid of multiple-sclerosis (MS) patients and normal healthy volunteers. Our results indicated that the cerebrospinal fluid in MS showed significantly higher endogenous levels of MDA than the control, as well as a much greater resistance to in-vitro stimulation test. In addition, we found the activity of GSH reductase significantly increased, about twice the control values, whereas the activity of glutathione peroxidase was markedly decreased as compared to control values. Our findings suggest that in MS the activity of antioxidant enzymes is modified, and indicates the conceivable possibility of a pathogenic role of oxidative stress in the determinism of the disease. PMID:7607784

  8. ENHANCING FUNGICIDAL ACTIVITY OF FLUDIOXONIL BY DISRUPTING CELLULAR GLUTATHIONE HOMEOSTASIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicidal activity of fludioxonil, a phenylpyrrole fungicide, is elevated by co-application with the aspirin/salicylic acid metabolite, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHBA). Fludioxonil fungicidal activity is potentiated through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway regulating osmotic...

  9. Effects of commercial selenium products on glutathione peroxidase activity and semen quality in stud boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine how dietary supplementation of inorganic and organic selenium affects selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and sperm of sexually mature stud boars. Twenty-four boars of the Large White, Landrace, Pietrain, and Duroc breeds of opt...

  10. Correlation between Glutathione Peroxidase Activity and Anthropometrical Parameters in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, F. J.; Rosety-Rodriguez, M.

    2007-01-01

    Since we have recently found that regular exercise increased erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities such as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in adolescents with Down syndrome, these programs may be recommended. This study was designed to assess the role of anthropometrical parameters as easy, economic and non-invasive biomarkers of GPX. Thirty-one…

  11. Selenium concentrations and enzyme activities of glutathione metabolism in wild long-tailed ducks and common eiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Hoffman, David J.; Flint, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    The relationships of selenium (Se) concentrations in whole blood with plasma activities of total glutathione peroxidase, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were studied in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) and common eiders (Somateria mollissima) sampled along the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska, USA. Blood Se concentrations were >8 μg/g wet weight in both species. Linear regression revealed that the activities of total and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase were significantly related to Se concentrations only in long-tailed ducks, raising the possibility that these birds were experiencing early oxidative stress.

  12. Copper(II)-Graphitic Carbon Nitride Triggered Synergy: Improved ROS Generation and Reduced Glutathione Levels for Enhanced Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ju, Enguo; Dong, Kai; Chen, Zhaowei; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Chaoqun; Huang, Yanyan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-09-12

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) has been used as photosensitizer to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) for photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, its therapeutic efficiency was far from satisfactory. One of the major obstacles was the overexpression of glutathione (GSH) in cancer cells, which could diminish the amount of generated ROS before their arrival at the target site. Herein, we report that the integration of Cu(2+) and g-C3 N4 nanosheets (Cu(2+) -g-C3 N4 ) led to enhanced light-triggered ROS generation as well as the depletion of intracellular GSH levels. Consequently, the ROS generated under light irradiation could be consumed less by reduced GSH, and efficiency was improved. Importantly, redox-active species Cu(+) -g-C3 N4 could catalyze the reduction of molecular oxygen to the superoxide anion or hydrogen peroxide to the hydroxyl radical, both of which facilitated the generation of ROS. This synergy of improved ROS generation and GSH depletion could enhance the efficiency of PDT for cancer therapy.

  13. Brain acetylcholinesterase, malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione as biomarkers of continuous exposure of tench, Tinca tinca, to carbofuran or deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Moreno, D; Soler, F; Míguez, M P; Pérez-López, M

    2010-10-01

    In this study, the chronic effect of the insecticides carbofuran and deltamethrin on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were examined in the brain of tench. Both pesticides were evaluated in two separate experiments, and animals were exposed in a continuous flow-system to three different concentrations of carbofuran (0, 10 and 100 microg/L) and deltamethrin (0, 0.0039 and 0.039 microg/L) for 60 days. After that period, animals were kept into pesticide-free water for other 30 days. In all cases, animals were sampled every 10 days all along the experience. AChE activity was significantly inhibited in fish exposed to 100 microg/L of carbofuran, during the first 30 days of exposition, returning to basal levels after this initial period. With respect to deltamethrin exposure, AChE activity was not significantly affected. When considering MDA levels, significant changes could only be detected during the recovery period for both pesticides, with a maximum of induction at 70 and 80 days, respectively associated to the highest dose of carbofuran and deltamethrin. Similarly, GSH levels varied all along the experience, with a maximum of significant increase at day 80 of exposition to the highest dose of both pesticides. This study shows that changes in AChE brain activity in tench can be used as a biomarker of early pesticide exposition in environmental monitoring programs, whereas MDA and GSH levels could be more associated to long-term expositions. The above results confirm and broaden former observations, suggesting that more investigations are needed before these biochemical parameters can be used as biomarkers.

  14. Unglycosylated recombinant human glutathione peroxidase 3 mutant from Escherichia coli is active as a monomer.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Yu, Yang; Xing, Ruiqing; Guo, Xiao; Liu, Dali; Wei, Jingyan; Song, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) is a glycosylated member of GPx family and can catalyze the reaction of different types of peroxides with GSH to form their corresponding alcohols in vitro. The active center of GPx3 is selenocysteine (Sec), which is incorporated into proteins by a specific mechanism. In this study, we prepared a recombinant human GPx3 (rhGPx3) mutant with all Cys changed to Ser from a Cys auxotrophic strain of E. coli, BL21(DE3)cys. Although lacking post-translational modification, rhGPx3 mutant still retained the ability to reduce H2O2 and PLPC-OOH. Study on the quaternary structure suggested that rhGPx3 mutant existed as a monomer in solution, which is different from native tetrameric GPx3. Loss of the catalytic activity was considered to be attributed to both the absence of glycosylation and the failure of the tetramer. Further analysis was performed to compare the structures of rhGPx3 and GPx4 mutant, which were quite similar except for oligomerization loop. The differences of amino acid composition and electrostatic potentials on the oligomerization loop may affect the binding of large substrates to rhGPx3 mutant. This research provides an important foundation for biosynthesis of functionally selenium-containing GPx3 mutant in E.coli. PMID:25331785

  15. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  16. A comparison of erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase activity from human foetuses and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Strange, R C; Johnston, J D; Coghill, D R; Hume, R

    1980-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity was measured in partially purified haemolysates of erythrocytes from human foetuses and adults. Enzyme activity was present in erythrocytes obtained between 12 and 40 weeks of gestation. The catalytic properties of the enzyme from foetal cells were similar to those of the enzyme from adult erythrocytes, indicating that probably only one form of the erythrocytes enzyme exists throughout foetal and adult life. PMID:7396875

  17. Short-term oral exposure to aluminium decreases glutathione intestinal levels and changes enzyme activities involved in its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, Daniel; Meichtry, Verónica; Pregi, Nicolás; Pizarro, Manuel

    2005-09-01

    To study the effects of aluminium (Al) on glutathione (GSH) metabolism in the small intestine, adult male Wistar rats were orally treated with AlCl3.6H2O at doses of 30, 60, 120 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day, during seven days. Controls received deionized water. At doses above 120 mg/kg b.w., Al produced both a significant reduction of GSH content and an increase of oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio (P < 0.05). The index of oxidative stress of the intestine mucosa in terms of lipid peroxidation evaluated by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances was significantly increased (52%) at higher Al dose used. The duodenal expression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in brush border membranes, determined by Western blot technique, was increased 2.7-fold in rats treated with 200mg AlCl3/kg b.w (P < 0.01). Intestine activities of both GSH-synthase (from 60 mg/kg b.w.) and GSSG-reductase (from 120 mg/kg b.w.) were significantly reduced (26% and 31%, respectively) while glutathione-S-transferase showed to be slightly modified in the Al-treated groups. Conversely, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.05) due to the Al treatment. Al reduced in vitro mucosa-to-lumen GSH efflux (P < 0.05). A positive linear correlation between the intestine GSH depletion and reduction of in situ 45Ca intestinal absorption, both produced by Al, was found (r = 0.923, P = 0.038). Taking as a whole, these results show that Al would alter GSH metabolism in small intestine by decreasing its turnover, leading to an unbalance of redox state in the epithelial cells, thus contributing to deteriorate GSH-dependent absorptive functions. PMID:16084594

  18. Short-term oral exposure to aluminium decreases glutathione intestinal levels and changes enzyme activities involved in its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, Daniel; Meichtry, Verónica; Pregi, Nicolás; Pizarro, Manuel

    2005-09-01

    To study the effects of aluminium (Al) on glutathione (GSH) metabolism in the small intestine, adult male Wistar rats were orally treated with AlCl3.6H2O at doses of 30, 60, 120 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day, during seven days. Controls received deionized water. At doses above 120 mg/kg b.w., Al produced both a significant reduction of GSH content and an increase of oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio (P < 0.05). The index of oxidative stress of the intestine mucosa in terms of lipid peroxidation evaluated by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances was significantly increased (52%) at higher Al dose used. The duodenal expression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in brush border membranes, determined by Western blot technique, was increased 2.7-fold in rats treated with 200mg AlCl3/kg b.w (P < 0.01). Intestine activities of both GSH-synthase (from 60 mg/kg b.w.) and GSSG-reductase (from 120 mg/kg b.w.) were significantly reduced (26% and 31%, respectively) while glutathione-S-transferase showed to be slightly modified in the Al-treated groups. Conversely, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.05) due to the Al treatment. Al reduced in vitro mucosa-to-lumen GSH efflux (P < 0.05). A positive linear correlation between the intestine GSH depletion and reduction of in situ 45Ca intestinal absorption, both produced by Al, was found (r = 0.923, P = 0.038). Taking as a whole, these results show that Al would alter GSH metabolism in small intestine by decreasing its turnover, leading to an unbalance of redox state in the epithelial cells, thus contributing to deteriorate GSH-dependent absorptive functions.

  19. Fluorometric microplate assay to measure glutathione S-transferase activity in insects and mites using monochlorobimane.

    PubMed

    Nauen, Ralf; Stumpf, Natascha

    2002-04-15

    Elevated levels of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a major role as a mechanism of resistance to insecticides and acaricides in resistant pest insects and mites, respectively. Such compounds are either detoxicated directly via phase I metabolism or detoxicated by phase II metabolism of metabolites as formed by microsomal monooxygenases. Here we used monochlorobimane (MCB) as an artificial substrate and glutathione to determine total GST activity in equivalents of single pest insects and spider mites in a sensitive 96-well plate-based assay system by measuring the enzymatic conversion of MCB to its fluorescent bimane-glutathione adduct. The differentiation by their GST activity between several strains of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), with different degrees of resistance to numerous acaricides was more sensitive with MCB compared to the commonly used substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Compared to an acaricide-susceptible reference strain, one field population of T. urticae showed a more than 10-fold higher GST activity measured with MCB, in contrast to a less than 2-fold higher activity when CDNB was used. Furthermore, we showed that GST activity can be sensitively assessed with MCB in homogenates of pest insects such as Heliothis virescens, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae), and Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae). PMID:11950219

  20. Atypical thioredoxins in poplar: the glutathione-dependent thioredoxin-like 2.1 supports the activity of target enzymes possessing a single redox active cysteine.

    PubMed

    Chibani, Kamel; Tarrago, Lionel; Gualberto, José Manuel; Wingsle, Gunnar; Rey, Pascal; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2012-06-01

    Plant thioredoxins (Trxs) constitute a complex family of thiol oxidoreductases generally sharing a WCGPC active site sequence. Some recently identified plant Trxs (Clot, Trx-like1 and -2, Trx-lilium1, -2, and -3) display atypical active site sequences with altered residues between the two conserved cysteines. The transcript expression patterns, subcellular localizations, and biochemical properties of some representative poplar (Populus spp.) isoforms were investigated. Measurements of transcript levels for the 10 members in poplar organs indicate that most genes are constitutively expressed. Using transient expression of green fluorescent protein fusions, Clot and Trx-like1 were found to be mainly cytosolic, whereas Trx-like2.1 was located in plastids. All soluble recombinant proteins, except Clot, exhibited insulin reductase activity, although with variable efficiencies. Whereas Trx-like2.1 and Trx-lilium2.2 were efficiently regenerated both by NADPH-Trx reductase and glutathione, none of the proteins were reduced by the ferredoxin-Trx reductase. Only Trx-like2.1 supports the activity of plastidial thiol peroxidases and methionine sulfoxide reductases employing a single cysteine residue for catalysis and using a glutathione recycling system. The second active site cysteine of Trx-like2.1 is dispensable for this reaction, indicating that the protein possesses a glutaredoxin-like activity. Interestingly, the Trx-like2.1 active site replacement, from WCRKC to WCGPC, suppresses its capacity to use glutathione as a reductant but is sufficient to allow the regeneration of target proteins employing two cysteines for catalysis, indicating that the nature of the residues composing the active site sequence is crucial for substrate selectivity/recognition. This study provides another example of the cross talk existing between the glutathione/glutaredoxin and Trx-dependent pathways.

  1. Lack of glutathione peroxidase-1 facilitates a pro-inflammatory and activated vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arpeeta; Yuen, Derek; Huet, Olivier; Pickering, Raelene; Stefanovic, Nada; Bernatchez, Pascal; de Haan, Judy B

    2016-04-01

    A critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is vascular inflammation leading to endothelial dysfunction (ED). Reactive oxygen species and inflammation are inextricably linked and declining antioxidant defense is implicated in ED. We have previously shown that Glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1) is a crucial antioxidant enzyme in the protection against diabetes-associated atherosclerosis. In this study we aimed to investigate mechanisms by which lack of GPx1 affects pro-inflammatory mediators in primary aortic endothelial cells (PAECs) isolated from GPx1 knockout (GPx1 KO) mice. Herein, we demonstrate that lack of GPx1 prolonged TNF-α induced phosphorylation of P38, ERK and JNK, all of which was reversed upon treatment with the GPx1 mimetic, ebselen. In addition, Akt phosphorylation was reduced in GPx1 KO PAECs, which correlated with decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability as compared to WT PAECs. Furthermore, IκB degradation was prolonged in GPx1 KO PAECS suggesting an augmentation of NF-κB activity. In addition, the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) was significantly increased in GPx1 KO PAECs and aortas. Static and dynamic flow adhesion assays showed significantly increased adhesion of fluorescently labeled leukocytes to GPx1 KO PAECS and aortas respectively, which were significantly reduced by ebselen treatment. Our results suggest that GPx1 plays a critical role in regulating pro-inflammatory pathways, including MAPK and NF-κB, and down-stream mediators such as VCAM-1, in vascular endothelial cells. Lack of GPx1, via effects on p-AKT also affects signaling to eNOS-derived NO. We speculate based on these results that declining antioxidant defenses as seen in cardiovascular diseases, by failing to regulate these pro-inflammatory pathways, facilitates an inflammatory and activated endothelium leading to ED and atherogenesis. PMID:26569096

  2. Serum Malondialdehyde Concentration and Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in a Longitudinal Study of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, María; Muriach, María; Romero, Francisco J.; Villar, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The main goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of oxidative damage and to quantify its level in gestational diabetes. Methods Thirty-six healthy women and thirty-six women with gestational diabetes were studied in the three trimesters of pregnancy regarding their levels of oxidative stress markers. These women were diagnosed with diabetes in the second trimester of pregnancy. Blood glucose levels after 100g glucose tolerance test were higher than 190, 165 or 145 mg/dl, 1, 2 or 3 hours after glucose intake. Results The group of women with gestational diabetes had higher serum malondialdehyde levels, with significant differences between groups in the first and second trimester. The mean values of serum glutathione peroxidase activity in the diabetic women were significantly lower in the first trimester. In the group of women with gestational diabetes there was a negative linear correlation between serum malondialdehyde concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the second and third trimester. Conclusions In this observational and longitudinal study in pregnant women, the alterations attributable to oxidative stress were present before the biochemical detection of the HbA1c increase. Usual recommendations once GD is detected (adequate metabolic control, as well as any other normally proposed to these patients) lowered the concentration of malondialdehyde at the end of pregnancy to the same levels of the healthy controls. Serum glutathione peroxidase activity in women with gestational diabetes increased during the gestational period. PMID:27228087

  3. Glutathione concentration and gamma-glutamyltransferase activity in water buffalo colostrum.

    PubMed

    Pero, M E; Pelagalli, A; Lombardi, P; Avallone, L

    2010-10-01

    Evidence is presented that the buffalo mammary gland contains enzymes that catalyse the synthesis and utilization of glutathione. A significant, inverse correlation (r = 0.79) was detected between colostrum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and glutathione (GSH), suggesting that the enzyme uses GSH as a substrate for its activity. A similar trend was shown in mammary gland homogenates (r = 0.75). Our results show that GSH is secreted into buffalo colostrum and suggest that the enzyme GGT degrades it. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the involvement of GGT-mediated GSH metabolism in the synthesis of colostrums, which elucidates the role of the enzyme that has always been reported very high in colostrum.

  4. Selenium supplementation on plasma glutathione peroxidase activity in patients with end-stage chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronisław A; Koterska, Dominika; Manitius, Jacek; Sadowski, Leszek; Dziedziczko, Andrzej; Salak, Anna; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) usually have a lower than healthy level of selenium (Se) in whole blood and plasma. Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) is synthesized mostly in the kidney. In CRF patients, activity of this enzyme is significantly reduced and its reduction increases with the progress of the disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of Se supplementation to CRF patients at various stages of the disease on Se concentration in blood components and on plasma GSHPx activity. The study group comprised 53 CRF patients at various stages of the disease supplemented with Se (200 microg/d for 3 mo as Se-enriched yeast, containing about 70% L-selenomethionine [SeMet]). The control group consisted of 20 healthy subjects. The Se concentration in blood components was measured spectrofluorometrically with 2,3-diaminonaphthalene as a complexing reagent. GSH-Px activity in red cell hemolysates and plasma was assayed by the coupled method with tert-butyl hydroperoxide as a substrate. The Se concentration in whole blood and plasma of CRF patients is significantly lower as compared with healthy subjects, but similar at all stages of the disease. In the patients' plasma, total protein and albumin levels are also significantly lower than in healthy subjects. Plasma GSH-Px activity in patients is extremely low, and contrary to Se concentration, it decreases linearly with the increasing stage of the illness. Se-supplied patients show an increased Se concentration in all blood components and at all disease stages, whereas plasma GSH-Px activity is enhanced only at the incipient stage of the disease. Se supply has no effect on plasma GSHPx activity in uremic patients at the end stage of the disease. Total plasma protein and albumin levels did not change after Se supplementation. Our data seem to show that in patients with CRF lower total protein and albumin levels in plasma may be the chief cause of the low blood and plasma Se concentrations. GSH

  5. Glutathion S-transferase activity and DDT-susceptibility of Malaysian mosquitos.

    PubMed

    Lee, H L; Chong, W L

    1995-03-01

    Comparative DDT-susceptibility status and glutathion s-transferase (GST) activity of Malaysian Anopheles maculatus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti was investigated to ascertain the role of this enzyme in DDT resistance. The standardised WHO dose-mortality bioassay tests were used to determine DDT susceptibility in these mosquitos, whilst GST microassay (Brogdon and Barber, 1990) was conducted to measure the activity of this enzyme in mosquito homogenate. It appeared that DDT susceptibility status of Malaysian mosquitos was not correlated with GST activity.

  6. Transcriptional activation of glutathione pathways and role of glucose homeostasis during copper imbalance.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Natalia; Rivas, Nicole; del Pozo, Talía; Burkhead, Jason; Suazo, Miriam; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for organism health. Dietary changes or pathologies linked to this metal induce changes in intracellular glutathione concentrations. Here, we studied the transcriptional activation of glutathione pathways in Jurkat cell lines, analyzing the effect of change in glucose homeostasis during a physiological and supra-physiological copper exposure. An immortalized line of human T lymphocyte cell line (Jurkat) was exposed to different copper and glucose conditions to mimic concentrations present in human blood. We applied treatments for 6 (acute) and 24 h (sustained) to 2 µM (physiological) or 20 µM (supra-physiological, Wilson disease scenario) of CuSO4 in combination with 25 mg/dL (hypoglycemia), 100 mg/dL (normal) and 200 mg/dL (hyperglycemia, diabetes scenario) of glucose. The results indicate that a physiological concentration of copper exposure does not induce transcriptional changes in the glutathione synthesis pathway after 6 or 24 h. The G6PDH gene (regeneration pathway), however, is induced during a supra-physiological copper condition. This data was correlated with the viability assays, where fluctuation in both glucose conditions (hypo and hyperglycemia scenario) affected Jurkat proliferation when 20 µM of CuSO4 was added to the culture media. Under a copper overload condition, the transcription of a component of glutathione regeneration pathway (G6PDH gene) is activated in cells chronically exposed to a hyperglycemia scenario, indicating that fluctuations in glucose concentration impact the resistance against the metal. Our findings illustrate the importance of glucose homeostasis during copper excess.

  7. Protective effect of reduced glutathione C60 derivative against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Zhou, Chi; He, Jun; Hu, Zheng; Guan, Wen-Chao; Liu, Sheng-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and free radicals cause oxidative stress, which induces cellular injuries, metabolic dysfunction, and even cell death in various clinical abnormalities. Fullerene (C60) is critical for scavenging oxygen free radicals originated from cell metabolism, and reduced glutathione (GSH) is another important endogenous antioxidant. In this study, a novel water-soluble reduced glutathione fullerene derivative (C60-GSH) was successfully synthesized, and its beneficial roles in protecting against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cultured HEK 293T cells were investigated. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance were used to confirm the chemical structure of C60-GSH. Our results demonstrated that C60-GSH prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cell damage. Additionally, C60-GSH pretreatment significantly attenuated H2O2-induced superoxide dismutase (SOD) consumption and malondialdehyde (MDA) elevation. Furthermore, C60-GSH inhibited intracellular calcium mobilization, and subsequent cell apoptosis via bcl-2/bax-caspase-3 signaling pathway induced by H2O2 stimulation in HEK 293T cells. Importantly, these protective effects of C60-GSH were superior to those of GSH. In conclusion, these results suggested that C60-GSH has potential to protect against H2O2-induced cell apoptosis by scavenging free radicals and maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis without evident toxicity.

  8. Protective effect of reduced glutathione C60 derivative against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Zhou, Chi; He, Jun; Hu, Zheng; Guan, Wen-Chao; Liu, Sheng-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and free radicals cause oxidative stress, which induces cellular injuries, metabolic dysfunction, and even cell death in various clinical abnormalities. Fullerene (C60) is critical for scavenging oxygen free radicals originated from cell metabolism, and reduced glutathione (GSH) is another important endogenous antioxidant. In this study, a novel water-soluble reduced glutathione fullerene derivative (C60-GSH) was successfully synthesized, and its beneficial roles in protecting against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cultured HEK 293T cells were investigated. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance were used to confirm the chemical structure of C60-GSH. Our results demonstrated that C60-GSH prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cell damage. Additionally, C60-GSH pretreatment significantly attenuated H2O2-induced superoxide dismutase (SOD) consumption and malondialdehyde (MDA) elevation. Furthermore, C60-GSH inhibited intracellular calcium mobilization, and subsequent cell apoptosis via bcl-2/bax-caspase-3 signaling pathway induced by H2O2 stimulation in HEK 293T cells. Importantly, these protective effects of C60-GSH were superior to those of GSH. In conclusion, these results suggested that C60-GSH has potential to protect against H2O2-induced cell apoptosis by scavenging free radicals and maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis without evident toxicity. PMID:27376803

  9. Exogenous sodium nitroprusside and glutathione alleviate copper toxicity by reducing copper uptake and oxidative damage in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Mostofa, Mohammad Golam; Seraj, Zeba Islam; Fujita, Masayuki

    2014-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and glutathione (GSH) regulate a variety of physiological processes and stress responses; however, their involvement in mitigating Cu toxicity in plants has not been extensively studied. This study investigated the interactive effect of exogenous sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and GSH on Cu homeostasis and Cu-induced oxidative damage in rice seedlings. Hydroponically grown 12-day-old seedlings were subjected to 100 μM CuSO4 alone and in combination with 200 μM SNP (an NO donor) and 200 μM GSH. Cu exposure for 48 h resulted in toxicity symptoms such as stunted growth, chlorosis, and rolling in leaves. Cu toxicity was also manifested by a sharp increase in lipoxygenase (LOX) activity, lipid peroxidation (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), proline (Pro) content, and rapid reductions in biomass, chlorophyll (Chl), and relative water content (RWC). Cu-caused oxidative stress was evident by overaccumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide (O2 (•-)) and H2O2). Ascorbate (AsA) content decreased while GSH and phytochelatin (PC) content increased significantly in Cu-stressed seedlings. Exogenous SNP, GSH, or SNP + GSH decreased toxicity symptoms and diminished a Cu-induced increase in LOX activity, O2 (•-), H2O2, MDA, and Pro content. They also counteracted a Cu-induced increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), and glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II activities, which paralleled changes in ROS and MDA levels. These seedlings also showed a significant increase in catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities, and AsA and PC content compared with the seedlings stressed with Cu alone. Cu analysis revealed that SNP and GSH restricted the accumulation of Cu in the roots and leaves of Cu-stressed seedlings. Our results suggest that Cu exposure provoked an oxidative burden while

  10. Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion syndrome after partial liver resection (LR): hepatic venous oxygen saturation, enzyme pattern, reduced and oxidized glutathione, procalcitonin and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Michael; Krüger, Antie; Schirrmeister, Wulf

    2003-06-01

    The hepatic ischemia-reperfusion syndrome was investigated in 28 patients undergoing elective partial liver resection with intraoperative occlusion of hepatic inflow (Pringle maneuver) using the technique of liver vein catheterization. Hepatic venous oxygen saturation (ShvO2) was monitored continuously up to 24 hours after surgery. Aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, pseudocholinesterase, alpha-glutathione S-transferase, reduced and oxidized glutathione, procalcitonine, and interleukin-6 were serially measured both before and after Pringle maneuver during the resection and postoperatively in arterial and/or hepatic venous blood. ShvO2 measurement demonstrated that peri- and postoperative management was suitable to maintain an optimal hepatic oxygen supply. As expected, we were able to demonstrate a typical enzyme pattern of postischemic liver injury. There was a distinct decrease of reduced glutathione levels both in arterial and hepatic venous plasma after LR accompanied by a strong increase in oxidized glutathione concentration during the phase of reperfusion. We observed increases in procalcitonin and interleukin-6 levels both in arterial and hepatic venous blood after declamping. Our data support the view that liver resection in man under conditions of inflow occlusion resulted in ischemic lesion of the liver (loss of glutathione synthesizing capacity with disturbance of protection against oxidative stress) and an additional impairment during reperfusion (liberation of reactive oxygen species, local and systemic inflammation reaction with cytokine production). Additionally, we found some evidence for the assumption that the liver has an export function for reduced glutathione into plasma in man. PMID:12877355

  11. Corneal aldehyde dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase activity after excimer laser keratectomy in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bilgihan, K.; Bilgihan, A.; Turkozkan, N.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The free radical balance of the eye may be changed by excimer laser keratectomy. Previous studies have demonstrated that excimer laser keratectomy increases the corneal temperature, decreases the superoxide dismutase activity of the aqueous, and induces lipid peroxidation in the superficial corneal stroma. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) are known to play an important role in corneal metabolism, particularly in detoxification of aldehydes, which are generated from free radical reactions.
METHODS—In three groups of guinea pigs mechanical corneal de-epithelialisation was performed in group I, superficial corneal photoablation in group II, and deep corneal photoablation in group III, and the corneal ALDH and GST activities measured after 48 hours.
RESULTS—The mean ALDH and GST activities of group I and II showed no differences compared with the controls (p>0.05). The corneal ALDH activities were found to be significantly decreased (p<0.05) and GST activities increased (p<0.05) in group III.
CONCLUSION—These results suggest that excimer laser treatment of high myopia may change the ALDH and GST activities, metabolism, and free radical balance of the cornea.

 Keywords: excimer laser keratectomy; aldehyde dehydrogenase; glutathione S-transferase PMID:9602629

  12. Activities of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and erythrocyte glutathione dependent enzymes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Ngah, W Z; Shamaan, N A; Said, M H; Azhar, M T

    1993-01-01

    Plasma gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (gamma-GT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities were determined in normal and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. No difference in enzyme activities was observed in the three major races of the Malaysian population, i.e. Malay, Chinese and Indian patients. However, plasma gamma-GT, erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase (GST) and GPx activities were significantly increased in all NPC patients, while GR activity remained unchanged. Patients with elevated plasma gamma-GT activities also had increased GST and GPx activities. Plasma gamma-GT and GPx activities were then found to be affected by treatment. Patients with plasma gamma-GT activity greater than 70 IU/l had very poor prognoses but patients with decreased gamma-GT activities were found to be in remission.

  13. L-Cysteine and glutathione restore the reduction of rat hippocampal Na+, K+-ATPase activity induced by aspartame metabolites.

    PubMed

    Simintzi, Irene; Schulpis, Kleopatra H; Angelogianni, Panagoula; Liapi, Charis; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2007-07-31

    Studies have implicated aspartame (ASP) ingestion in neurological problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate hippocampal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities after incubation with ASP or each of ASP metabolites, phenylalanine (Phe), methanol (MeOH) and aspartic acid (asp) separately. Suckling rat hippocampal homogenates or pure Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were incubated with ASP metabolites. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities were measured spectrophotometrically. Incubation of hippocampal or pure Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with ASP concentrations (expected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)) after ASP consumption of 34, 150 or 200mg/kg resulted in hippocampal enzyme activity reduction of 26%, 50% or 59%, respectively, whereas pure enzyme was remarkably stimulated. Moreover, incubation with hippocampal homogenate of each one of the corresponding in the CSF ASP metabolites related to the intake of common, high/abuse doses of the sweetener, inhibited Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, while pure enzyme was activated. Hippocampal Mg(2+)-ATPase remained unaltered. Addition of l-cysteine (cys) or reduced glutathione (GSH) in ASP mixtures, related with high/toxic doses of the sweetener, completely or partially restored the inactivated membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, whereas the activated pure enzyme activity returned to normal. CSF concentrations of ASP metabolites related to common, abuse/toxic doses of the additive significantly reduced rat hippocampal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, whereas pure enzyme was activated. Cys or GSH completely or partially restored both enzyme activities.

  14. Overexpression of rice glutaredoxins (OsGrxs) significantly reduces arsenite accumulation by maintaining glutathione pool and modulating aquaporins in yeast.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pankaj Kumar; Verma, Shikha; Meher, Alok Kumar; Pande, Veena; Mallick, Shekhar; Bansiwal, Amit Kumar; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic (As) is an acute poison and class I carcinogen, can cause a serious health risk. Staple crops like rice are the primary source of As contamination in human food. Rice grown on As contaminated areas accumulates higher As in their edible parts. Based on our previous transcriptome data, two rice glutaredoxins (OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1) were identified that showed up-regulated expression during As stress. Here, we report OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1 from rice involved in the regulation of intracellular arsenite (AsIII). To elucidate the mechanism of OsGrx mediated As tolerance, both OsGrxs were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli (Δars) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strains (Δycf1, Δacr3). The expression of OsGrxs increased As tolerance in E. coli (Δars) mutant strain (up to 4 mM AsV and up to 0.6 mM AsIII). During AsIII exposure, S. cerevisiae (Δacr3) harboring OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1 have lower intracellular AsIII accumulation (up to 30.43% and 24.90%, respectively), compared to vector control. Arsenic accumulation in As-sensitive S. cerevisiae mutant (Δycf1) also reduced significantly on exposure to inorganic As. The expression of OsGrxs in yeast maintained intracellular GSH pool and increased extracellular GSH concentration. Purified OsGrxs displays in vitro GSH-disulfide oxidoreductase, glutathione reductase and arsenate reductase activities. Also, both OsGrxs are involved in AsIII extrusion by altering the Fps1 transcripts in yeast and protect the cell by maintaining cellular GSH pool. Thus, our results strongly suggest that OsGrxs play a crucial role in the maintenance of the intracellular GSH pool and redox status of the cell during both AsV and AsIII stress and might be involved in regulating intracellular AsIII levels by modulation of aquaporin expression and functions. PMID:27174139

  15. Overexpression of rice glutaredoxins (OsGrxs) significantly reduces arsenite accumulation by maintaining glutathione pool and modulating aquaporins in yeast.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pankaj Kumar; Verma, Shikha; Meher, Alok Kumar; Pande, Veena; Mallick, Shekhar; Bansiwal, Amit Kumar; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic (As) is an acute poison and class I carcinogen, can cause a serious health risk. Staple crops like rice are the primary source of As contamination in human food. Rice grown on As contaminated areas accumulates higher As in their edible parts. Based on our previous transcriptome data, two rice glutaredoxins (OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1) were identified that showed up-regulated expression during As stress. Here, we report OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1 from rice involved in the regulation of intracellular arsenite (AsIII). To elucidate the mechanism of OsGrx mediated As tolerance, both OsGrxs were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli (Δars) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strains (Δycf1, Δacr3). The expression of OsGrxs increased As tolerance in E. coli (Δars) mutant strain (up to 4 mM AsV and up to 0.6 mM AsIII). During AsIII exposure, S. cerevisiae (Δacr3) harboring OsGrx_C7 and OsGrx_C2.1 have lower intracellular AsIII accumulation (up to 30.43% and 24.90%, respectively), compared to vector control. Arsenic accumulation in As-sensitive S. cerevisiae mutant (Δycf1) also reduced significantly on exposure to inorganic As. The expression of OsGrxs in yeast maintained intracellular GSH pool and increased extracellular GSH concentration. Purified OsGrxs displays in vitro GSH-disulfide oxidoreductase, glutathione reductase and arsenate reductase activities. Also, both OsGrxs are involved in AsIII extrusion by altering the Fps1 transcripts in yeast and protect the cell by maintaining cellular GSH pool. Thus, our results strongly suggest that OsGrxs play a crucial role in the maintenance of the intracellular GSH pool and redox status of the cell during both AsV and AsIII stress and might be involved in regulating intracellular AsIII levels by modulation of aquaporin expression and functions.

  16. Structural insights into the dehydroascorbate reductase activity of human omega-class glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huina; Brock, Joseph; Liu, Dan; Board, Philip G; Oakley, Aaron J

    2012-07-13

    The reduction of dehydroascorbate (DHA) to ascorbic acid (AA) is a vital cellular function. The omega-class glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyze several reductive reactions in cellular biochemistry, including DHA reduction. In humans, two isozymes (GSTO1-1 and GSTO2-2) with significant DHA reductase (DHAR) activity are found, sharing 64% sequence identity. While the activity of GSTO2-2 is higher, it is significantly more unstable in vitro. We report the first crystal structures of human GSTO2-2, stabilized through site-directed mutagenesis and determined at 1.9 Å resolution in the presence and absence of glutathione (GSH). The structure of a human GSTO1-1 has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution in complex with the reaction product AA, which unexpectedly binds in the G-site, where the glutamyl moiety of GSH binds. The structure suggests a similar mode of ascorbate binding in GSTO2-2. This is the first time that a non-GSH-based reaction product has been observed in the G-site of any GST. AA stacks against a conserved aromatic residue, F34 (equivalent to Y34 in GSTO2-2). Mutation of Y34 to alanine in GSTO2-2 eliminates DHAR activity. From these structures and other biochemical data, we propose a mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis of DHAR activity.

  17. Effect of chemical form of selenium on tissue glutathione peroxidase activity in developing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Strength, Ralph; Johnson, Janet; White, Marguerite T.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that the stage of development of rats may affect the availability of various forms of selenium for the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) in the rat was experimentally investigated. One experiment evaluated the availability of selenium as selenite or selenomethionine for GSPHx activity during three developmental states in rats: fetus and 7-day old and 14-day old nursing pups. In all tissues studied, GSHPx activity was highest in the 14-day-old pups whose dams were in the selenomethionine group. Rat pups given intraperitoneal selenite had higher liver and kidney GSHPx activity than pups given the same amount of selenium as intraperitoneal selenomethionine. In a second experiment, all dams were fed the same basal diet and pups were weaned to diets containing one of two levels of selenium and one of three forms of selenium (selenite, selenomethionine, or selenocystine). The results also supported the hypothesis these dietary forms of selenium are differentially available for GSHPx activity.

  18. Salicylic acid modulates oxidative stress and glutathione peroxidase activity in the rat colon.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E; Arthur, John R; Farquharson, Andrew J; Russell, Wendy R; Morrice, Philip C; Duthie, Garry G

    2005-09-15

    Oxidative stress is a characteristic of cancerous colon tissue and inflammatory bowel diseases that increase colon cancer risk. Epidemiological evidence supports a protective effect of plant-derived compounds. Aspirin is also protective against colon cancer. The mechanism of action is unclear although salicylic acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, has been shown to decrease the synthesis of pro-inflammatory and potentially neo-plastic prostaglandins. Salicylic acid is found in significant quantities in a plant-based diet. However, in plants salicylic acid is also reported to modulate the expression of numerous enzymes with antioxidant activity. The aim of this study was to assess whether salicylic acid can modulate pro-cancerous biological pathways in the colon. Oxidative stress, prostaglandins and cytosolic glutathione peroxidase (cyGPX) were analysed in proximal, transverse and distal colon from a rat model of diet-induced oxidative stress. Elevated plasma pyruvate kinase activity (1293+/-206 U/ml) and increased indices of lipid peroxidation in colon (proximal 6.4+/-0.84 nM MDA/mg protein; transverse 6.9+/-0.97 nM MDA/mg protein; distal 5.2+/-0.62 nM MDA/mg protein) from rats fed a Vitamin E deficient diet were significantly decreased on supplementation with salicylic acid (plasma pyruvate 546+/-43 U/ml; salicylic acid proximal 3.6+/-0.39 nM MDA/mg protein; transverse 4.5+/-0.61 nM MDA/mg protein; distal 4.4+/-0.27 nM MDA/mg protein). Reductions in oxidative stress and prostaglandin production on supplementation with salicylic acid were associated with an elevation in glutathione peroxidase activity (Vitamin E deficient proximal 0.056+/-0.013 U/mg protein; transverse 0.073+/-0.008 U/mg protein; distal 0.088+/-0.010 U/mg protein; Vitamin E deficient with salicylic acid proximal 0.17+/-0.01 U/mg protein; transverse 0.23+/-0.016 U/mg protein; distal 0.16+/-0.020 U/mg protein). Gpx1 and Gpx2 gene transcripts were not elevated in association with increased activity

  19. JS-K, a glutathione/glutathione S-transferase-activated nitric oxide releasing prodrug inhibits androgen receptor and WNT-signaling in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) and its oxidative reaction products have been repeatedly shown to block steroid receptor function via nitrosation of zinc finger structures in the DNA-binding domain (DBD). In consequence NO-donors could be of special interest for the treatment of deregulated androgen receptor(AR)-signaling in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods Prostate cancer (PCa) cells were treated with JS-K, a diazeniumdiolate derivate capable of generating large amounts of intracellular NO following activation by glutathione S-transferase. Generation of NO was determined indirectly by the detection of nitrate in tissue culture medium or by immunodetection of nitrotyrosine in the cytoplasm. Effects of JS-K on intracellular AR-levels were determined by western blotting. AR-dimerization was analyzed by mammalian two hybrid assay, nuclear translocation of the AR was visualized in PCa cells transfected with a green fluorescent AR-Eos fusion protein using fluorescence microscopy. Modulation of AR- and WNT-signalling by JS-K was investigated using reporter gene assays. Tumor cell proliferation following JS-K treatment was measured by MTT-Assay. Results The NO-releasing compound JS-K was shown to inhibit AR-mediated reporter gene activity in 22Rv1 CRPC cells. Inhibition of AR signaling was neither due to an inhibition of nuclear import nor to a reduction in AR-dimerization. In contrast to previously tested NO-donors, JS-K was able to reduce the intracellular concentration of functional AR. This could be attributed to the generation of extremely high intracellular levels of the free radical NO as demonstrated indirectly by high levels of nitrotyrosine in JS-K treated cells. Moreover, JS-K diminished WNT-signaling in AR-positive 22Rv1 cells. In line with these observations, castration resistant 22Rv1 cells were found to be more susceptible to the growth inhibitory effects of JS-K than the androgen dependent LNCaP which do not exhibit an active WNT

  20. NEW STRATEGIES FOR THE ISOLATION AND ACTIVITY DETERMINATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING TYPE-4 GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Kernstock, Robert M.; Girotti, Albert W.

    2008-01-01

    Type 4 glutathione peroxidase (GPx4) is a widely expressed mammalian selenoenzyme known to play a vital role in cytoprotection against lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH)-mediated oxidative stress and regulation of oxidative signaling cascades. Since prokaryotes are not equipped to express mammalian selenoproteins, preparation of recombinant GPx4 via commonly used bacterial transformation is not feasible. A published procedure for isolating the enzyme from rat testis employs affinity chromatography on bromosulfophthalein-glutathione-linked agarose as the penultimate step in purification. Since this resin is no longer commercially available and preparing it in satisfactory operational form is tedious, we have developed an alternative purification approach based on sequential anion exchange, size exclusion, and cation exchange chromatography. Final preparations were found to be essentially homogeneous in GPx4 (Mr ∼20 kDa), as demonstrated by SDS-PAGE with protein staining and immunoblotting. Specific enzymatic activity was determined using a novel thin layer chromatographic approach in which the kinetics of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide loss or cholesterol-7α-hydroperoxide loss were monitored. A >400-fold purification of active enzyme has been attained. The relatively straightforward isolation procedure described should prove valuable for further functional studies on GPx4, e.g. how its ability to catalyze LOOH reduction compares with that of other LOOH detoxifying enzymes. PMID:18723092

  1. Dietary fish oil replacement with palm or poultry oil increases fillet oxidative stability and decreases liver glutathione peroxidase activity in barramundi (Lates calcarifer).

    PubMed

    Wan Ahmad, Wan A R; Stone, David A J; Schuller, Kathryn A

    2013-12-01

    Complete dietary fish oil replacement with palm or poultry oil in barramundi (Lates calcarifer) had no detrimental effects on growth or hepatosomatic index of juvenile fish up to an average size of ~50 g. However, it significantly decreased the omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid content of the fish muscle (fillet) lipids. This was particularly true for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) which are recognised for their health beneficial effects in the human diet. As a result of their decreased EPA and DHA content, the peroxidation index of the muscle lipids was also decreased. This was associated with increased simulated retail storage shelf life as indicated by decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in muscle samples from fish fed the palm or poultry oil-based diets. Concomitantly, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, but not glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity or reduced glutathione concentration, was significantly reduced in the liver of barramundi fed the palm or poultry oil-based diets as compared with the fish fed the fish oil-based diet. Furthermore, GPx and GST activity were very low in muscle, much lower than in gastrointestinal tract, liver or swim bladder. Therefore, we propose that liver GPx activity may be a good predictor of fillet shelf life in barramundi and other fish species.

  2. Role of P-450 activity and glutathione levels in 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane tissue distribution, renal necrosis and in vivo DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Låg, M; Omichinski, J G; Søderlund, E J; Brunborg, G; Holme, J A; Dahl, J E; Nelson, S D; Dybing, E

    1989-06-16

    Treatments known to alter P-450 activity and glutathione levels were used to elucidate the involvement of P-450 and glutathione S-transferase metabolism in 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) organ toxicity in the rat. Phenobarbital pretreatment abolished DBCP-induced renal necrosis, whereas it had only a small effect on initial renal DNA damage. The DBCP levels in plasma and tissues were markedly reduced by phenobarbital pretreatment. Perdeuterated DBCP had much higher plasma and tissue levels than protio-DBCP in phenobarbital-pretreated animals, but perdeuteration was without effect in uninduced animals. This indicates that P-450 metabolism of DBCP is of major importance only in phenobarbital-pretreated animals. In order to study the effects of decreased glutathione levels on renal distribution and toxicity, rats were pretreated with either diethyl maleate or buthionine sulfoximine. The DBCP levels in plasma and tissues showed transitory elevations after diethyl maleate and buthionine sulfoximine pretreatment compared to the control situation. Despite the fact that diethyl maleate and buthionine sulfoximine pretreatments are known to block DBCP-induced DNA damage in vitro, these pretreatments did not significantly alter DBCP-induced renal necrosis nor DNA damage. Thus, a role for glutathione conjugation in DBCP-induced in vivo renal toxicity could not be established in the present study. PMID:2734806

  3. A novel application of pulsed electric field (PEF) processing for improving glutathione (GSH) antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Wang, Ke; Wang, Ying; Lin, Songyi; Zhao, Ping; Jones, Gregory

    2014-10-15

    Glutathione (GSH) was treated by pulsed electric field (PEF) processing to investigate its effect on antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity of GSH was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazy (DPPH) radical inhibition. A Box-Behnken design (BBD) with three independent variables, which were concentration, electric field intensity and pulse frequency was used to establish the regression equation of second-order response surface. Optimal conditions were as follows: GSH concentration 8.86mg/mL, electric field intensity 9.74kV/cm and pulse frequency 2549.08Hz. The DPPH radical inhibition increased from 81.83% to 97.40%. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR) were used to analyse the change of structure and functional groups of GSH.

  4. The poplar Phi class glutathione transferase: expression, activity and structure of GSTF1

    PubMed Central

    Pégeot, Henri; Koh, Cha San; Petre, Benjamin; Mathiot, Sandrine; Duplessis, Sébastien; Hecker, Arnaud; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes with essential roles in cellular detoxification and secondary metabolism in plants as in other organisms. Several plant GSTs, including those of the Phi class (GSTFs), require a conserved catalytic serine residue to perform glutathione (GSH)-conjugation reactions. Genomic analyses revealed that terrestrial plants have around ten GSTFs, eight in the Populus trichocarpa genome, but their physiological functions and substrates are mostly unknown. Transcript expression analyses showed a predominant expression of all genes both in reproductive (female flowers, fruits, floral buds) and vegetative organs (leaves, petioles). Here, we show that the recombinant poplar GSTF1 (PttGSTF1) possesses peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide and GSH-conjugation activity toward model substrates such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, benzyl and phenetyl isothiocyanate, 4-nitrophenyl butyrate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal but interestingly not on previously identified GSTF-class substrates. In accordance with analytical gel filtration data, crystal structure of PttGSTF1 showed a canonical dimeric organization with bound GSH or 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid molecules. The structure of these protein-substrate complexes allowed delineating the residues contributing to both the G and H sites that form the active site cavity. In sum, the presence of GSTF1 transcripts and proteins in most poplar organs especially those rich in secondary metabolites such as flowers and fruits, together with its GSH-conjugation activity and its documented stress-responsive expression suggest that its function is associated with the catalytic transformation of metabolites and/or peroxide removal rather than with ligandin properties as previously reported for other GSTFs. PMID:25566286

  5. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of latent alkylating agents activated by glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Satyam, A; Hocker, M D; Kane-Maguire, K A; Morgan, A S; Villar, H O; Lyttle, M H

    1996-04-12

    In search of compounds with improved specificity for targeting the important cancer-associated P1-1 glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozyme, new analogs 4 and 5 of the previously reported glutathione S-transferase (GST)-activated latent alkylating agent gamma-glutamyl-alpha-amino-beta-[[[2-[[bis[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]ph osp horyl]oxy]ethyl]sulfonyl]propionyl]-(R)-(-)-phenylglycine (3) have been designed, synthesized, and evaluated. One of the diastereomers of 4 exhibited good selectivity for GST P1-1. The tetrabromo analog 5 of the tetrachloro compound 3 maintained its specificity and was found to be more readily activated by GSTs than 3. The GST activation concept was further broadened through design, synthesis, and evaluation of a novel latent urethane mustard 8 and its diethyl ester 9. Interestingly, 8 showed very good specificity for P1-1 GST. Cell culture studies were carried out on 4, 5, 8, and 9 using cell lines engineered to have varying levels of GST P1-1 isozyme. New analogs 4 and 5 exhibited increased toxicity to cell lines with overexpressed GST P1-1 isozyme. The urethane mustard 8 and its diethyl ester 9 were found to be not as toxic. However, they too exhibited more toxicity to a cell line engineered to have elevated P1-1 levels, which was in agreement with the observed in vitro specificity of 8 for P1-1 GST isozyme. Mechanistic studies on alkaline as well as enzyme-catalyzed decomposition of latent mustard 3 provided experimental proof for the hypothesis that 3 breaks down into an active phosphoramidate mustard and a reactive vinyl sulfone. The alkylating nature of the decomposition products was further demonstrated by trapping those transient species as relatively stable diethyldithiocarbamic acid adducts. These results substantially extend previous efforts to develop drugs targeting GST and provide a paradigm for development of other latent drugs. PMID:8648613

  6. MnO2-induced synthesis of fluorescent polydopamine nanoparticles for reduced glutathione sensing in human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang-Juan; Wu, Shuang; Chen, Ting-Ting; Yu, Ru-Qin; Chu, Xia

    2016-08-25

    Polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, as a kind of popular polymer material, have attracted a great deal of attention from various areas including materials science, biomedicine, energy, environmental science and so on owing to their striking physicochemical properties. Herein, we reported for the first time the synthesis of intrinsic fluorescent PDA nanoparticles using MnO2 as an oxidant. In the presence of MnO2, dopamine was quickly oxidized into its quinone derivative, and autopolymerized into fluorescent PDA nanoparticles. Using fluorescent PDA nanoparticles as a fluorescence signal indicator, we further established a cost-effective sensor for rapid, sensitive and selective sensing of reduced glutathione (GSH) based on the redox reaction between MnO2 and GSH, and the key role of MnO2 in the formation of fluorescent PDA nanoparticles. GSH has the capability of reducing MnO2 into Mn(2+), which inhibited the formation of the fluorescent PDA nanoparticles. Thus, the concentration of GSH was directly related to the decreased fluorescence signal intensity of the PDA nanoparticles. The sensor showed good sensing performance for GSH detection with high sensitivity and desirable selectivity over other potential interfering species. Additionally, the sensor exhibited excellent practical applications for GSH detection in human whole blood samples, which presents potential applications in biological detection and clinical diagnosis. PMID:27511888

  7. Comparison of age-related differences in expression of phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase mRNA and activity in various tissues of pigs.

    PubMed

    Lei, X G; Ross, D A; Roneker, K R

    1997-05-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPX) is the second identified Se-dependent intracellular glutathione peroxidase (PHGPX) that reduces phospholipid hydroperoxides. The objective of this study was to determine the developmental regulation of PHGPX expression in tissues of neonatal, weanling and finishing pigs (Sus scrofa) compared with the expression of the classic Se-dependent cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and the Se-independent enzyme, glutathione S-transferase (GST). Eight different tissues were collected from Se-adequate male pigs aged 1, 28 and 180 days, and supernatant of the tissue homogenate was assayed for PHGPX, GPX and GST activities by using phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide, hydrogen peroxide and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrate, respectively. Total RNA was isolated from four tissues and assayed for PHGPX mRNA expression. Both mRNA and activity expression of PHGPX in most assayed tissues was increased as pigs became older (P < 0.05), but increases in PHGPX mRNA levels between ages did not fully account for all changes in activity. Expression of GPX activity was increased more than that of PHGPX between day 1 and day 28 (P < 0.0001). Expression of GST activity in various tissues was also affected by age (P < 0.01) but lacked a consistent relationship with the changes in GPX and PHGPX activity. Tissue-specific patterns of developmental expression of these enzymes may be related to the susceptibility of organs to pro-oxidant injuries. In conclusion, expression of PHGPX mRNA and activity in various tissues of pigs is developmentally increased over ages, and the pattern is somewhat different from that of GPX.

  8. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Misako; Mori, Nobuko; Iramina, Chizuru

    2016-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI) diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine) to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malic enzyme (ME), in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule. PMID:27597985

  9. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Misako; Mori, Nobuko; Iramina, Chizuru

    2016-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI) diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine) to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malic enzyme (ME), in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule.

  10. Vitamin E, glutathione S-transferase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activities in cultured hepatocytes of rats treated with carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Ong, F B; Wan Ngah, W Z; Top, A G; Khalid, B A; Shamaan, N A

    1994-03-01

    1. The effects of alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocotrienol on glutathione S-transferase (GST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) activities in cultured hepatocytes prepared from rats treated with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) were investigated. 2. Both the alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocotrienol treated hepatocytes showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) GST activities than untreated hepatocytes prepared from the carcinogen treated rats in the first 3 days of culture. Treatment with alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocotrienol generally resulted in a tendency to increase the GST activities above that in the untreated hepatocytes. 3. Treatment with high doses (125-250 microM) of alpha-tocopherol and low doses (12.5-25 microM) of gamma-tocotrienol generally resulted in a significant reduction in gamma-GT activities at 1-3 days. gamma-GT activities are reduced as the dose of alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocotrienol are increased.

  11. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Misako; Mori, Nobuko; Iramina, Chizuru; Yasutake, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI) diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine) to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malic enzyme (ME), in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule. PMID:27597985

  12. Decrease of reduced glutathione in isolated rat hepatocytes caused by acrolein, acrylonitrile, and the thermal degradation products of styrene copolymers.

    PubMed

    Zitting, A; Heinonen, T

    1980-01-01

    Decrease of reduced glutathione (GSH) was induced in isolated rat hepatocytes by incubation with acrolein or acrylonitrile for 120 min or exposure to the products of oxidative thermal degradation of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer (ABS), styrene-acrylonitrile copolymer (SAN), and high impact polystyrene (SB). The decrease of GSH by acrolein was rapid but the cells soon recovered at acrolein concentrations of 0.025--0.25 mM. 0.5 mM acrolein depleted the cells of GSH and they were uncapable of further GSH synthesis. At concentrations of 0.25--0.5 mM concomitant lipid peroxidation impaired the integrity of the cell membranes. Also acrylonitrile induced a dose dependent GSH decrease at concentrations of 0.05--1 mM. Neither membrane damage nor lipid peroxidation was detected during 120-min incubations at these acrylonitrile concentrations. The thermal degradation products of ABS, SAN and SB caused a decrease of GSH in hepatocytes. The extent of the decrease depended on the degradation temperature and the type of the plastic. The membrane integrity was impaired in the cases where GSH was depleted almost completely; ABS degraded at 350 degrees C and SB at 250 degrees C. The measurements of lipid peroxidation by the thiobarbituric acid and the diene conjugation methods were impossible because the degradation products contained compounds which interfered with these tests.

  13. Structure-activity relationships for chemical and glutathione S-transferase-catalysed glutathione conjugation reactions of a series of 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Aar, E M; Bouwman, T; Commandeur, J N; Vermeulen, N P

    1996-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute an important class of phase II (de)toxifying enzymes, catalysing the conjugation of glutathione (GSH) with electrophilic compounds. In the present study, Km, kcat and kcat/Km values for the rat GST 1-1-, 3-3-, 4-4- and 7-7-catalysed conjugation reactions between GSH and a series of 10 different 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes, and the second-order rate constants (ks) of the corresponding base-catalysed reactions, were correlated with nine classical physicochemical parameters (electronic, steric and lipophilic) of the substituents and with 16 computer-calculated molecular parameters of the substrates and of the corresponding Meisenheimer complexes with MeS- as a model nucleophile for GS- (charge distributions and several energy values), giving structure-activity relationships. On the basis of an identical dependence of the base-catalysed as well as the GST 1-1- and GST 7-7-catalysed reactions on electronic parameters (among others, Hammett substituent constant sigma p and charge on p-nitro substituents), and the finding that the corresponding reactions catalysed by GSTs 3-3 and 4-4 depend to a significantly lesser extent on these parameters, it was concluded that the Mu-class GST isoenzymes have a rate-determining transition state in the conjugation reaction between 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes and GSH which is different from that of the other two GSTs. Several alternative rate-limiting transition states for GST 3-3 and 4-4 are discussed. Furthermore, based on the obtained structure-activity relationships, it was possible to predict the kcat/Km values of the four GST isoenzymes and the ks of the base-catalysed GSH conjugation of 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene. PMID:8973562

  14. The reactivity of selected acrylate esters toward glutathione and deoxyribonucleosides in vitro: structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, T J; Hayes, E P; Schwartz, C S; Witz, G

    1994-05-01

    Acrylate esters are alpha,beta-unsaturated esters used as plastic monomers whose toxicity may involve reaction with tissue nucleophiles via Michael addition. Structure-activity relationships for reactivity of selected esters with glutathione (GSH) and deoxyribonucleosides were investigated in the present studies. The esters investigated were methyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, ethyl acrylate, ethyl methacrylate, butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, tetraethyleneglycol diacrylate, tetraethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. To compare their reactivities toward GSH, esters were incubated for up to 1 hr at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4 with either GSH or red blood cells in phosphate-buffered saline followed by measurement of free thiol. In both systems acrylate electrophilic reactivity decreased with alpha-methyl substitution; however, the decrease in electrophilic reactivity was more evident in the cell-free system than in the red blood cell model. Increased alcohol chain length moderately affected the apparent second-order rate constant for the spontaneous reaction of acrylate esters with GSH, but did not affect potency relative to cellular GSH depletion. The apparent second-order rate constants of bifunctional esters are more than twice the rate constants of the much smaller monofunctional esters. Ethyl acrylate, a reactive acrylate ester based upon glutathione alkylation, has been designated a class 2B (suspect human) carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. To detect possible DNA alkylation by acrylate esters in vitro, ethyl acrylate was incubated with deoxyribonucleosides for up to 24 hr at pH 6.7 or 7.4 and 37 degrees C or up to 8 hr and 50 degrees C. HPLC analysis revealed no detectable adduct formation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. A redox-dependent dimerization switch regulates activity and tolerance for reactive oxygen species of barley seed glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Navrot, Nicolas; Skjoldager, Nicklas; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Svensson, Birte; Hägglund, Per

    2015-05-01

    Monomeric and dimeric forms of recombinant barley (Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare) glutathione peroxidase 2 (HvGpx2) are demonstrated to display distinctly different functional properties in vitro. Monomeric HvGpx2 thus has five fold higher catalytic efficiency than the dimer towards tert-butyl hydroperoxide, but is more sensitive to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide. Treatment of the monomer with hydrogen peroxide results in dimer formation. This observed new behavior of a plant glutathione peroxidase suggests a mechanism involving a switch from a highly catalytically competent monomer to a less active, but more oxidation-resistant dimer. PMID:25796076

  16. Inactivation of glutathione peroxidase activity contributes to UV-induced squamous cell carcinoma formation.

    PubMed

    Walshe, Jennifer; Serewko-Auret, Magdalena M; Teakle, Ngari; Cameron, Sarina; Minto, Kelly; Smith, Louise; Burcham, Philip C; Russell, Terry; Strutton, Geoffrey; Griffin, Anthony; Chu, Fong-Fong; Esworthy, Stephen; Reeve, Vivienne; Saunders, Nicholas A

    2007-05-15

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (CSCC) are a common malignancy of keratinocytes that arise in sites of the skin exposed to excessive UV radiation. In the present study, we show that human SCC cell lines, preneoplastic solar keratoses (SK), and CSCC are associated with perturbations in glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and peroxide levels. Specifically, we found that two of three SKs and four of five CSCCs, in vivo, were associated with decreased GPX activity and all SKs and CSCCs were associated with an elevated peroxide burden. Given the association of decreased GPX activity with CSCC, we examined the basis for the GPX deficiency in the CSCCs. Our data indicated that GPX was inactivated by a post-translational mechanism and that GPX could be inactivated by increases in intracellular peroxide levels. We next tested whether the decreased peroxidase activity coupled with an elevated peroxidative burden might contribute to CSCC formation in vivo. This was tested in Gpx1(-/-) and Gpx2(-/-) mice exposed to solar-simulated UV radiation. These studies showed that Gpx2 deficiency predisposed mice to UV-induced CSCC formation. These results suggest that inactivation of GPX2 in human skin may be an early event in UV-induced SCC formation.

  17. Differential Action between Schisandrin A and Schisandrin B in Eliciting an Anti-Inflammatory Action: The Depletion of Reduced Glutathione and the Induction of an Antioxidant Response

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Pou Kuan; Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Jihang; Chan, Wing Man; Leung, Hoi Yan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2016-01-01

    Schisandrin A (Sch A) and schisandrin B (Sch B) are active components of Schisandrae Fructus. We compared the biochemical mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory action of Sch A and Sch B, using cultured lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and concanavalin (ConA)-stimulated mouse splenocytes. Pre-incubation with Sch A or Sch B produced an anti-inflammatory action in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, as evidenced by the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory c-Jun N-terminal kinases/p38 kinase/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway as well as the suppression of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors, with the extent of inhibition by Sch A being more pronounced. The greater activity of Sch A in anti-inflammatory response was associated with a greater decrease in cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level and a greater increase in glutathione S-transferase activity than corresponding changes produced by Sch B. However, upon incubation, only Sch B resulted in the activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like factor 2 and the induction of a significant increase in the expression of thioredoxin (TRX) in RAW264.7 cells. The Sch B-induced increase in TRX expression was associated with the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Studies in a mouse model of inflammation (carrageenan-induced paw edema) indicated that while long-term treatment with either Sch A or Sch B suppressed the extent of paw edema, only acute treatment with Sch A produced a significant degree of inhibition on the inflammatory response. Although only Sch A decreased the cellular GSH level and suppressed the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell proliferation in ConA-simulated splenocytes in vitro, both Sch A and Sch B treatments, while not altering cellular GSH levels, suppressed ConA-stimulated splenocyte proliferation ex vivo. These results suggest that Sch A and Sch B may act differentially on activating GST

  18. Differential Action between Schisandrin A and Schisandrin B in Eliciting an Anti-Inflammatory Action: The Depletion of Reduced Glutathione and the Induction of an Antioxidant Response.

    PubMed

    Leong, Pou Kuan; Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Jihang; Chan, Wing Man; Leung, Hoi Yan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2016-01-01

    Schisandrin A (Sch A) and schisandrin B (Sch B) are active components of Schisandrae Fructus. We compared the biochemical mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory action of Sch A and Sch B, using cultured lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and concanavalin (ConA)-stimulated mouse splenocytes. Pre-incubation with Sch A or Sch B produced an anti-inflammatory action in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, as evidenced by the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory c-Jun N-terminal kinases/p38 kinase/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway as well as the suppression of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors, with the extent of inhibition by Sch A being more pronounced. The greater activity of Sch A in anti-inflammatory response was associated with a greater decrease in cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level and a greater increase in glutathione S-transferase activity than corresponding changes produced by Sch B. However, upon incubation, only Sch B resulted in the activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like factor 2 and the induction of a significant increase in the expression of thioredoxin (TRX) in RAW264.7 cells. The Sch B-induced increase in TRX expression was associated with the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Studies in a mouse model of inflammation (carrageenan-induced paw edema) indicated that while long-term treatment with either Sch A or Sch B suppressed the extent of paw edema, only acute treatment with Sch A produced a significant degree of inhibition on the inflammatory response. Although only Sch A decreased the cellular GSH level and suppressed the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell proliferation in ConA-simulated splenocytes in vitro, both Sch A and Sch B treatments, while not altering cellular GSH levels, suppressed ConA-stimulated splenocyte proliferation ex vivo. These results suggest that Sch A and Sch B may act differentially on activating GST

  19. Glutathione in cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bermudes, D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of light and O2 on glutathione production were determined. Results of light and dark studies under normal and reduced oxygen tensions were compared to determine the effect of reduction in oxygen tension on glutathione levels. The growth rate of Anacystis nidulans and concurrent production of glutathione is presented. The generation of time of Anacystis nidulans was approximately 12 hours. Results of light and dark incubation of Aphanothece halophytica dominated planktonic microbial community from Pond 4 and Anacystis nidulans under high and low oxygen tension is also presented. It appears that light grown Anacystis nidulans cells have equal amounts of glutathione while dark grown cells produce more glutathione in the presence of increased O2.

  20. N-acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol augment selenium-glutathione peroxidase activity in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Alicigüzel, Y; Aslan, M

    2004-09-01

    In glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient erythrocytes, failure to maintain normal levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) due to decreased NADPH regeneration in the hexose monophosphate pathway results in acute hemolytic anemia following exposure to oxidative insults, such as ingestion of Vicia fava beans or use of certain drugs. GSH is a source of protection against oxidative attack, used by the selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px)/reductase (GR) system to detoxify hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides, provided that sufficient GSH is made available. In this study, Se-GSH-Px activity was analyzed in G6PD-deficient patients in the presence of reducing agents such as N-Acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol. Se-GSH-Px activity was decreased in G6PD-deficient red blood cells (RBCs). N-Acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol increased Se-GSH-Px activity in G6PD-deficient human erythrocytes, indicating that other reducing agents can be utilized to complement Se-GSH-Px activity in G6PD deficiency. Based on the increased susceptibility of G6PD-deficient patients to oxidative stress, the reported increase in Se-GSH-Px activity can facilitate the detoxification of reactive oxygen species. PMID:15598086

  1. Glutathione S-transferases interact with AMP-activated protein kinase: evidence for S-glutathionylation and activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Anna; Zorman, Sarah; Berthier, Alexandre; Polge, Cécile; Ramirez, Sacnicte; Michelland, Sylvie; Sève, Michel; Vertommen, Didier; Rider, Mark; Lentze, Nicolas; Auerbach, Daniel; Schlattner, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular and whole body energy sensor with manifold functions in regulating energy homeostasis, cell morphology and proliferation in health and disease. Here we apply multiple, complementary in vitro and in vivo interaction assays to identify several isoforms of glutathione S-transferase (GST) as direct AMPK binding partners: Pi-family member rat GSTP1 and Mu-family members rat GSTM1, as well as Schistosoma japonicum GST. GST/AMPK interaction is direct and involves the N-terminal domain of the AMPK β-subunit. Complex formation of the mammalian GSTP1 and -M1 with AMPK leads to their enzymatic activation and in turn facilitates glutathionylation and activation of AMPK in vitro. GST-facilitated S-glutathionylation of AMPK may be involved in rapid, full activation of the kinase under mildly oxidative physiological conditions.

  2. The effects of selenium on glutathione peroxidase activity and radioprotection in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P.; Tritz, R.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-09-05

    The media of representative mammalian cell lines were supplemented with low levels of selenium in the form of sodium selenite in order to investigate the effects of selenium on mammalian cells. Following incubation in 30 nM sodium selenite, these cells were assayed for changes in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The cells examined included NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, PC12 rat sympathetic precursor cells, SupT-1 human lymphocytes, MCF-7{sup adr} human breast carcinoma cells and AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. Selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in GPx activity for the NIH 3T3, MCF-7{sup adr} and Supt-1 cells but stimulated GPx activity approximately 5-fold in PC12 and AA8 cells. AA8 cells were selected to evaluate whether selenium supplementation was radioprotective against {sup 60}cobalt gamma irradiation. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was measured by evaluating mutation frequency at the hprt locus. In this assay, preincubation of AA8 CHO cells significantly protected these cells from exposure to 8 Gy.

  3. The ocular inflammatory response to endotoxin is not altered when glutathione peroxidase activity is decreased

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, A.M.; McGahan, M.C.; Smith, M.G. )

    1991-03-11

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element and an integral part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx). GPx is an antioxidant which scavenges both hydroperoxide and lipid peroxides. The purpose of the current study was to determine if decreased GPx activity affects the ocular inflammatory response. New Zealand White rabbits were fed either a purified Se deficient or Se adequate diet for 9 weeks. After 9 weeks, plasma Se levels were 0.151 {plus minus} 0.0130 {mu}g/ml in the deficient diet group compared to 0.217 {plus minus} 0.015 {plus minus} 0.87 U compared with 25.43 {plus minus} 1.77 U in the basal diet group. At this point, ocular inflammation was induced by intravitreal injection of endotoxin. Twenty-four hours later, despite a 40% decrease in plasma and a 30% decrease in intraocular fluid GPx activity, there was no significant difference in inflammatory parameters between the groups. However, it is possible that a further decrease in GPx activity could have some effect on the inflammatory response.

  4. Selenium levels and Glutathione peroxidase activity in the plasma of patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    González de Vega, Raquel; Fernández-Sánchez, María Luisa; Fernández, Juan Carlos; Álvarez Menéndez, Francisco Vicente; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Selenium, an essential trace element, is involved in the complex system of defense against oxidative stress through selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx) and other selenoproteins. Because of its antioxidant properties, selenium or its selenospecies at appropriate levels could hinder oxidative stress and so development of diabetes. In this vein, quantitative speciation of selenium in human plasma samples from healthy and diabetic patients (controlled and non-controlled) was carried out by affinity chromatography (AF) coupled on-line to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and isotope dilution analysis (IDA). Similarly, it is well known that patients with diabetes who exhibit poor control of blood glucose show a decreased total antioxidant activity. Thus, we evaluated the enzymatic activity of GPx in diabetic and healthy individuals, using the Paglia and Valentine enzymatic method, observing a significant difference (p<0.05) between the three groups of assayed patients (healthy (n=24): 0.61±0.11U/ml, controlled diabetic (n=38): 0.40±0.12U/ml and non-controlled diabetic patients (n=40): 0.32±0.09U/ml). Our results show that hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. What is more, glycation of GPx experiments demonstrated that it is the degree of glycation of the selenoenzyme (another species of the Se protein) what actually modulates its eventual activity against ROS in type II diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27473831

  5. Glutathione redox system, GSH-Px activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in tadpoles of R.r.ridibunda and B.viridis.

    PubMed

    Cavas, Levent; Tarhan, Leman

    2003-03-01

    Total glutathione (t-GSH), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulphide (GSSG) levels, t-GSH/GSSG ratio, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels were investigated during the development period of a predominantly aquatic amphibian R.r.ridibunda and a predominantly terrestrial amphibian B. viridis. While t-GSH and GSH showed a similar trend, GSSG concentration increased significantly (p<0.05) during the larval stages in R.r.ridibunda larvae. In contrast to R.r.ridibunda larvae, there was no significant (p>0.05) change between 1 and 5 weeks in the t-GSH and GSH concentrations of B. viridis. t-GSH and GSH concentrations of B. viridis larvae became sharply elevated after the fifth week, GSSG levels increased 3.25-fold during the metamorphosis. The t-GSH/GSSG ratio fluctuated and the lowest t-GSH/GSSG ratios were observed at the third week for both species. GSH-Px activities for both species increased significantly (p<0.05) during the growing period. The highest GSH-Px activities in R.r.ridibunda and B.viridis were observed at the eighth week and they were 3.45 +/- 0.17 and 4.1 +/- 0.21 IU mg(-1), respectively. The membrane LPO levels in the R.r.ridibunda and B. viridis tadpoles significantly (p<0.001) decreased from 206 +/- 10.3 to 146 +/- 7.3 and from 198 +/- 9.9 to 23 +/- 1.15 nmol MDA g(-1) w.w., respectively.

  6. Selenium concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activities in blood of patients before and after allogenic kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronisław A; Włodarczyk, Zbigniew; Masztalerz, Marek; Adamowicz, Andrzej; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    In animals and humans, the highest level of selenium (Se) occurs in the kidney. This organ is also the major site of the synthesis of the selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Decreased Se levels and GSH-Px activities in blood are common symptoms in the advanced stage of chronic renal failure (CRF). Blood samples for Se levels and GSH-Px activities measurements from patients were collected just before transplantation and 3, 7, 14, 30, and 90 d posttransplant. The Se levels in whole blood and plasma of patients before transplantation (79.5 and 64.5 ng/mL, respectively) were lower by 23% and 21%, respectively, as compared with controls (p < 0.0001), and 7 d after operation, it further decreased in both components (p < 0.01). Fourteen days after surgery, the levels reached the initial values and increased slowly in the later period. Red blood cell GSHPx activity in patients in the entire period of the study did not differ from the control group. Plasma GSH-Px of patients before the surgery was extremely low (76 U/L) as compared with controls (243 U/L; p < 0.0001) but increased rapidly to 115 U/L after 3 d, to 164 U/L after 14 d, and to 208 U/L after 3 mo posttransplant. In CRF patients, after kidney transplantation, plasma GSH-Px activity increased rapidly, approaching, after 3 mo, the values that were close to the normal levels. A negative correlation between creatinine level and plasma GSH-Px activity is observed in patients after kidney transplantation. Monitoring of plasma GSH-Px activity may be a useful additional marker of the transplanted kidney function. PMID:14742896

  7. Selenium-enriched Agaricus bisporus increases expression and activity of glutathione peroxidase-1 and expression of glutathione peroxidase-2 in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Tebo; Howell, Kate; Dunshea, Frank R; Ng, Ken

    2014-03-01

    The effect of dietary supplementation with Se-enriched Agaricus bisporus on cytosolic gluthathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), gastrointestinal specific glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) and selenoprotein P (SeP) mRNA expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon was examined. Rats were fed for 5weeks with control diet (0.15μg Se/g feed) or Se-enriched diet fortified with selenised mushroom (1μg Se/g feed). The mRNA expression levels were found to be significantly (P<0.01) up-regulated by 1.65-fold and 2.3-fold for GPx-1 and GPx-2, respectively, but were not significantly different for TrxR-1 and SeP between the 2 diet treatments. The up-regulation of GPx-1 mRNA expression was consistent with GPX-1 activity level, which was significantly (P<0.05) increased by 1.77-fold in rats fed with the Se-enriched diet compared to the control diet. The results showed that selenised A. bisporus can positively increase GPx-1 and GPx-2 gene expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon.

  8. Core-shell self-assembly triggered via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction for reduced glutathione detection and single cells monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel core-shell DNA self-assembly catalyzed by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions was proposed, which could realize GSH-initiated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification and molecules gathering. Significantly, these self-assembled products via electrostatic interaction could accumulate into prominent and clustered fluorescence-bright spots in single cancer cells for reduced glutathione monitoring, which will effectively drive cell monitoring into a new era. PMID:27412605

  9. Activation of family C G-protein-coupled receptors by the tripeptide glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minghua; Yao, Yi; Kuang, Donghui; Hampson, David R

    2006-03-31

    The Family C G-protein-coupled receptors include the metabotropic glutamate receptors, the gamma-aminobutyric acid, type B (GABAB) receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), which participates in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in the body, and a diverse group of sensory receptors that encompass the amino acid-activated fish 5.24 chemosensory receptor, the mammalian T1R taste receptors, and the V2R pheromone receptors. A common feature of Family C receptors is the presence of an amino acid binding site. In this study, a preliminary in silico analysis of the size and shape of the amino acid binding pocket in selected Family C receptors suggested that some members of this family could accommodate larger ligands such as peptides. Subsequent screening and docking experiments identified GSH as a potential ligand or co-ligand at the fish 5.24 receptor and the rat CaSR. These in silico predictions were confirmed using an [3H]GSH radioligand binding assay and a fluorescence-based functional assay performed on wild-type and chimeric receptors. Glutathione was shown to act as an orthosteric agonist at the 5.24 receptor and as a potent enhancer of calcium-induced activation of the CaSR. Within the mammalian receptors, this effect was specific to the CaSR because GSH neither directly activated nor potentiated other Family C receptors including GPRC6A (the putative mammalian homolog of the fish 5.24 receptor), the metabotropic glutamate receptors, or the GABAB receptor. Our findings reveal a potential new role for GSH and suggest that this peptide may act as an endogenous modulator of the CaSR in the parathyroid gland where this receptor is known to control the release of parathyroid hormone, and in other tissues such as the brain and gastrointestinal tract where the role of the calcium receptor appears to subserve other, as yet unknown, physiological functions. PMID:16455645

  10. Roles of sedentary aging and lifelong physical activity in exchange of glutathione across exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Mortensen, Stefan P; Cabo, Helena; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari-Carmen; Viña, Jose; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules with regulatory functions, and in young and adult organisms, the formation of ROS is increased during skeletal muscle contractions. However, ROS can be deleterious to cells when not sufficiently counterbalanced by the antioxidant system. Aging is associated with accumulation of oxidative damage to lipids, DNA, and proteins. Given the pro-oxidant effect of skeletal muscle contractions, this effect of age could be a result of excessive ROS formation. We evaluated the effect of acute exercise on changes in blood redox state across the leg of young (23 ± 1 years) and older (66 ± 2 years) sedentary humans by measuring the whole blood concentration of the reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) forms of the antioxidant glutathione. To assess the role of physical activity, lifelong physically active older subjects (62 ± 2 years) were included. Exercise increased the venous concentration of GSSG in an intensity-dependent manner in young sedentary subjects, suggesting an exercise-induced increase in ROS formation. In contrast, venous GSSG levels remained unaltered during exercise in the older sedentary and active groups despite a higher skeletal muscle expression of the superoxide-generating enzyme NADPH oxidase. Arterial concentration of GSH and expression of antioxidant enzymes in skeletal muscle of older active subjects were increased. The potential impairment in exercise-induced ROS formation may be an important mechanism underlying skeletal muscle and vascular dysfunction with sedentary aging. Lifelong physical activity upregulates antioxidant systems, which may be one of the mechanisms underlying the lack of exercise-induced increase in GSSG.

  11. Glutathione peroxidase activity, selenium, and lipid peroxide concentrations in blood from a healthy Polish population : I. Maternal and cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zachara, B A; Wąsowicz, W; Gromadzińska, J; Skłodowska, M; Krasomski, G

    1986-09-01

    Selenium (Se) concentrations in whole blood and plasma of 19 nonpregnant women. 14 mothers at delivery, 14 neonates, and 13 infants, aged 2-12 mo, were evaluated. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in erythrocytes and plasma and the level of lipid peroxides in plasma were also analyzed. Selenium concentrations in whole blood and plasma in mothers at delivery were significantly lower compared to nonpregnant women. Selenium concentrations in cord blood components were lower compared to mothers, but the differences were not significant. The concentration of the element decreased in the first few months of life. Glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes differed only slightly in the examined groups. In plasma, however, the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pregnant compared to nonpregnant women and in neonates compared to their mothers. Lipid peroxide concentrations in plasma differed only slightly in the examined groups. The results obtained are discussed in terms of the observations of other investigators. PMID:24254392

  12. Activity of carboxylesterase and glutathione S-transferase in different life-stages of carabid beetle (Poecilus cupreus) exposed to toxic metal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grazyna; Kramarz, Paulina; Babczyńska, Agnieszka

    2003-04-01

    Among the cytoplasmatic enzymes responsible for neutralization of organic xenobiotics, carboxylesterases (CarE) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) play important roles. Our study tested to what extent dietary Zn or Cd could modify the activity of CarE and GST at different life-stages of the carabid beetle Poecilus cupreus. Treatment and stage effects generally were statistically significant. For CarE activity in the beetles exposed to cadmium, only treatment was a significant factor. In all cases, the interaction between studied factors was statistically significant, implying that the physiological condition of the animals may enhance or reduce enzyme activity. We also observed differences between animals treated with cadmium and zinc in the pattern of enzyme activity, and a difference in GST activity measured with two different substrates. Our results confirmed that in studying enzyme activity under metal stress one should consider the animal's life-stage and sex. PMID:12727300

  13. Decreased glutathione S-transferase expression and activity and altered sex steroids in Lake Apopka brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallagher, E.P.; Gross, T.S.; Sheehy, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    A number of freshwater lakes and reclaimed agricultural sites in Central Florida have been the receiving waters for agrochemical and municipal runoff. One of these sites, Lake Apopka, is also a eutrophic system that has been the focus of several case studies reporting altered reproductive activity linked to bioaccumulation of persistent organochlorine chemicals in aquatic species. The present study was initiated to determine if brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus) from the north marsh of Lake Apopka (Lake Apopka Marsh) exhibit an altered capacity to detoxify environmental chemicals through hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated conjugation as compared with bullheads from a nearby reference site (Lake Woodruff). We also compared plasma sex hormone concentrations (testosterone, 17-?? estradiol, and 11 keto-testosterone) in bullheads from the two sites. Female bullheads from Lake Apopka had 40% lower initial rate GST conjugative activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 50% lower activity towards p-nitrobutyl chloride (NBC), 33% lower activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA), and 43% lower activity toward ??5-androstene-3,17-dione (??5-ADI), as compared with female bullheads from Lake Woodruff. Enzyme kinetic analyses demonstrated that female bullheads from Lake Apopka had lower GST-catalyzed CDNB clearance than did female Lake Woodruff bullheads. Western blotting studies of bullhead liver cytosolic proteins demonstrated that the reduced GST catalytic activities in female Lake Apopka bullheads were accompanied by lower expression of hepatic GST protein. No site differences were observed with respect to GST activities or GST protein expression in male bullheads. Female Lake Apopka bullheads also had elevated concentrations of plasma androgens (testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone) as compared with females from Lake Woodruff. In contrast, male Lake Apopka bullheads had elevated levels of plasma estrogen but similar levels of androgens as compared with

  14. Age-Related Changes in Antioxidant and Glutathione S-Transferase Enzyme Activities in the Asian Clam.

    PubMed

    Vranković, J

    2016-03-01

    Aging is accompanied by increased production of free oxygen radicals and impairment of normal cellular functions. The aim of this work was to provide preliminary data on age-related differences in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and phase II biotransformation enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) in a wild population of the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), and GST were assessed in visceral mass of four age classes (0+-, 1+-, 2+-, and 3+-year-old) of C. fluminea clams. Age-related changes were seen in antioxidant enzyme status: levels of total SOD (totSOD) (P < 0.05), MnSOD, and CuZnSOD (P < 0.05) activities increased progressively during aging from younger to older clams. Changes in CAT and GR activities with advancing age were found, the levels being the highest in age class II, then being lower in age classes III and IV (P < 0.05). Activities of GPX and GST were lower in the senescent individuals (2+- and 3+-year-old clams) compared with young individuals (0+- and 1+-year-old clams). Overall, the decline of glutathione-dependent enzyme activities, coupled with higher and lower activities of totSOD and CAT, respectively, as the individual grows older, may render the older animals more susceptible to oxidative stress. Data reported here are not intended to be exhaustive since they concern only age/size structure of the population at one locality, so more detailed studies on both the developmental stages and levels of antioxidant enzymes of this new alien species in Serbian rivers are required. PMID:27262191

  15. Enhanced Glutathione Peroxidase Activity of Water-Soluble and Polyethylene Glycol-Supported Selenides, Related Spirodioxyselenuranes, and Pincer Selenuranes.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Nicole M R; Press, David J; Mayder, Don M; Garnica, Pablo; Doyle, Lisa M; Back, Thomas G

    2016-09-01

    Diaryl selenides containing o-hydroxymethylene substituents function as peroxide-destroying mimetics of the antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx), via oxidation to the corresponding spirodioxyselenuranes with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent reduction back to the original selenides with glutathione. Parent selenides with 3-hydroxypropyl or 2,3-dihydroxypropyl groups produced the novel compounds 10 and 11, respectively, with greatly improved aqueous solubility and catalytic activity. The phenolic derivative 28 displayed similarly ameliorated properties and also modest radical-inhibiting antioxidant activity, as evidenced by an assay based on phenolic hydrogen atom transfer to the stable free radical DPPH. In contrast, several selenides that afford pincer selenuranes (e.g., 20 and 21) instead of spiroselenuranes upon oxidation showed inferior catalytic activity. Several selenide analogues were attached to polyethylene glycol (PEG) oligomers, as PEG substituents can improve water solubility and bioavailability, while retarding clearance. Again, the PEG derivatives afforded remarkable activity when oxidation generated spirodioxyselenuranes and diminished activity when pincer compounds were produced. Several such compounds proved to be ca. 10- to 100-fold catalytically superior to the diaryl selenides and their spirodioxyselenurane counterparts investigated previously. Finally, an NMR-based assay employing glutathione in D2O was designed to accommodate the faster reacting water-soluble mimetics and to more closely duplicate in vivo conditions. PMID:27525346

  16. Effects of glutathione modulation on oxidative stress and enzymatic antioxidant defence in yeast Pachysolen tannophilus.

    PubMed

    Saharan, Rajesh K; Sharma, Sukesh C

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of intracellular glutathione with various oxidative stress markers and the stress protectant marker trehalose. In the first group of yeast cells, diethyl maleate was used for depletion of glutathione. A second group of yeast cells were incubated with amino acids constituting glutathione (GIu, Cys, Gly) to increase glutathione level. Increased level of oxidative stress marker like ROS, protein carbonyl formation and lipid peroxidation and decreased viability in glutathione-depleted cells were observed in the present study. The increased activity of antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT in the glutathione depleted group suggests the interaction of different antioxidant defence system in Pachysolen tannophilus. Furthermore, the increased levels of trehalose in glutathione-depleted group shows that trehalose acts as a stress reducer in glutathione depleted Pachysolen tannophilus.

  17. Glutathione peroxidase activity and chemical forms of selenium in tissues of rats given selenite or selenomethionine

    SciTech Connect

    Beilstein, M.A.; Whanger, P.D.

    1988-05-01

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and deposition of selenium (Se) were examined in tissues of rats given dietary Se for 7 wk as either selenite or selenomethionine (SeMet) with 75Se radiotracer of the same chemical form. On the basis of Se:75Se ratio, all tissues of the rats fed selenite were equilibrated with the dietary source, but tissues of the SeMet fed animals maintained a ratio of Se:75Se greater than the dietary ratio. Deposition of dietary Se and 75Se was higher in most tissues of rats fed SeMet. Muscle 75Se was the largest single tissue pool of 75Se in both groups accounting for one-third of recovered 75Se in the rats fed selenite, and one-half of recovered 75Se in the rats fed SeMet. Tissue GPx activities were not different between the two dietary groups. The proportion of Se as GPx in tissues was highest in erythrocytes of the rats fed selenite (.81) and lowest in testes and epididymides of the rats fed SeMet (.009). The proportion of Se present in cytosolic GPx was consistently higher in tissues of rats fed selenite. Erythrocytes of the rats fed SeMet had more 75Se associated with hemoglobin, and muscle cytosols of the rats fed selenite had more 75Se associated with the G-protein. The proportion of 75Se as SeMet determined by ion exchange chromatography of tissue hydrolysates was higher in tissues of rats fed SeMet (highest in muscle and hemoglobin, 70%, and lowest in testes, 16%). In contrast, selenocysteine was the predominant form of Se present in tissues of rats given selenite. These results indicate that the form of Se administered will influence the form in the tissues, the percentage of Se with GPx and the body burden of Se.

  18. Glutathione S-transferase activity in follicular fluid from women undergoing ovarian stimulation: role in maturation.

    PubMed

    Meijide, Susana; Hernández, M Luisa; Navarro, Rosaura; Larreategui, Zaloa; Ferrando, Marcos; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio; Ruiz-Larrea, M Begoña

    2014-10-01

    Female infertility involves an emotional impact for the woman, often leading to a state of anxiety and low self-esteem. The assisted reproduction techniques (ART) are used to overcome the problem of infertility. In a first step of the in vitro fertilization therapy women are subjected to an ovarian stimulation protocol to obtain mature oocytes, which will result in competent oocytes necessary for fertilization to occur. Ovarian stimulation, however, subjects the women to a high physical and psychological stress, thus being essential to improve ART and to find biomarkers of dysfunction and fertility. GSH is an important antioxidant, and is also used in detoxification reactions, catalysed by glutathione S-transferases (GST). In the present work, we have investigated the involvement of GST in follicular maturation. Patients with fertility problems and oocyte donors were recruited for the study. From each woman follicles at two stages of maturation were extracted at the preovulatory stage. Follicular fluid was separated from the oocyte by centrifugation and used as the enzyme source. GST activity was determined based on its conjugation with 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene and the assay was adapted to a 96-well microplate reader. The absorbance was represented against the incubation time and the curves were adjusted to linearity (R(2)>0.990). Results showed that in both donors and patients GST activity was significantly lower in mature oocytes compared to small ones. These results suggest that GST may play a role in the follicle maturation by detoxifying xenobiotics, thus contributing to the normal development of the oocyte. Supported by FIS/FEDER (PI11/02559), Gobierno Vasco (Dep. Educación, Universiades e Investigación, IT687-13), and UPV/EHU (CLUMBER UFI11/20 and PES13/58). The work was approved by the Ethics Committee of the UPV/EHU (CEISH/96/2011/RUIZLARREA), and performed according to the UPV/EHU and IVI-Bilbao agreement (Ref. 2012/01).

  19. Glutathione S-transferase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activities in cultured rat hepatocytes treated with tocotrienol and tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Ong, F B; Wan Ngah, W Z; Shamaan, N A; Md Top, A G; Marzuki, A; Khalid, A K

    1993-09-01

    1. The effect of tocotrienol and tocopherol on glutathione S-transferase (GST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. 2. Tocotrienol and tocopherol significantly decreased GGT activities at 5 days in culture but tocotrienol also significantly decreased GGT activities at 1-2 days. 3. Tocotrienol and tocopherol treatment significantly decreased GST activities at 3 days compared to the control but tocotrienol also decreased GST activities at 1-3 days. 4. Tocotrienol showed a more pronounced effect at a dosage of greater than 50 microM tocotrienol at 1-3 days in culture compared to the control.

  20. Effect of treatment on erythrocyte phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase and glutathione reductase activity in patients with primary gout.

    PubMed Central

    Braven, J; Hardwell, T R; Hickling, P; Whittaker, M

    1986-01-01

    The activities of erythrocyte phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase and glutathione reductase (GTR) were studied in 26 patients with primary gout who were receiving no treatment or treatment with either allopurinol or azapropazone, and compared with the activity in a group of healthy controls. The activity of PRPP synthetase was significantly higher in the gout group and was not influenced by either drug. No significant difference in the activity of GTR was observed. The failure of either drug to suppress the increased activity of PRPP synthetase associated with gout is discussed. PMID:3024593

  1. Nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi prevents apoptosis by reducing the oxidative stress-induced formation of exocyclic DNA products.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kensaku; Goto, Shinji; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Ihara, Yoshito; Tsuji, Kentaro; Kawai, Yoshichika; Uchida, Koji; Osawa, Toshihiko; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Kondo, Takahito

    2004-12-01

    We previously found that nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi) accumulates in cancer cells resistant to anticancer drugs, suggesting that it has a role in the acquisition of resistance to anticancer drugs. In the present study, the effect of oxidative stress on the nuclear translocation of GSTpi and its role in the protection of DNA from damage were investigated. In human colonic cancer HCT8 cells, the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced increase in nuclear condensation, the population of sub-G(1) peak, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells were observed in cells pretreated with edible mushroom lectin, an inhibitor of the nuclear transport of GSTpi. The DNA damage and the formation of lipid peroxide were dependent on the dose of H(2)O(2) and the incubation time. Immunological analysis showed that H(2)O(2) induced the nuclear accumulation of GSTpi but not of glutathione peroxidase. Formation of the 7-(2-oxo-hepyl)-substituted 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct by the reaction of 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) with 2'-deoxyguanosine was inhibited by GSTpi in the presence of glutathione. The conjugation product of 4-oxo-2-nonenal, a lipid aldehyde of 13-HPODE, with GSH in the presence of GSTpi, was identified by LS/MS. These results suggested that nuclear GSTpi prevents H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by scavenging the formation of lipid-peroxide-modified DNA. PMID:15528046

  2. Nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi prevents apoptosis by reducing the oxidative stress-induced formation of exocyclic DNA products.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kensaku; Goto, Shinji; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Ihara, Yoshito; Tsuji, Kentaro; Kawai, Yoshichika; Uchida, Koji; Osawa, Toshihiko; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Kondo, Takahito

    2004-12-01

    We previously found that nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi) accumulates in cancer cells resistant to anticancer drugs, suggesting that it has a role in the acquisition of resistance to anticancer drugs. In the present study, the effect of oxidative stress on the nuclear translocation of GSTpi and its role in the protection of DNA from damage were investigated. In human colonic cancer HCT8 cells, the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced increase in nuclear condensation, the population of sub-G(1) peak, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells were observed in cells pretreated with edible mushroom lectin, an inhibitor of the nuclear transport of GSTpi. The DNA damage and the formation of lipid peroxide were dependent on the dose of H(2)O(2) and the incubation time. Immunological analysis showed that H(2)O(2) induced the nuclear accumulation of GSTpi but not of glutathione peroxidase. Formation of the 7-(2-oxo-hepyl)-substituted 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct by the reaction of 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) with 2'-deoxyguanosine was inhibited by GSTpi in the presence of glutathione. The conjugation product of 4-oxo-2-nonenal, a lipid aldehyde of 13-HPODE, with GSH in the presence of GSTpi, was identified by LS/MS. These results suggested that nuclear GSTpi prevents H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by scavenging the formation of lipid-peroxide-modified DNA.

  3. Selenium status, lipid peroxides concentration, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the blood of power station and rubber factory workers.

    PubMed

    Zachara, B A; Wasowicz, W; Sklodowska, M; Gromadzinska, J

    1987-01-01

    Concentration of selenium in whole blood and plasma, lipid peroxides in plasma, and glutathione peroxidase activities in red blood cell hemolysates and plasma were determined in 49 coal power plant workers and in 50 rubber factory workers. The results were compared with those obtained for 58 nonindustrial controls. Whole blood selenium was significantly lower and plasma lipid peroxides were significantly higher in power plant workers when compared to the nonindustrial group. In the rubber factory workers, whole blood selenium and red blood cells and plasma glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly lower than in the control group. Urinary output of selenium was also significantly decreased in rubber factory workers. Slightly elevated lipid peroxides were also observed in that group. It seems reasonable to conclude that the lower blood selenium and decreased urinary output of this element may result from increased loss of selenium with perspiration. No correlation has been observed between selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity and between enzyme activity and lipid peroxides concentration in the industrial group.

  4. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed. PMID:25628332

  5. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed.

  6. Feeding stage, species, body part and sex-specific activity of glutathione S-transferase in mosquito.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, A; Kar, S K

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, the feeding stage, body parts, development and sex specific activity of Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were observed in different mosquito species (Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi, An. culicifacies, An. annularis, An. subpictus, An. vagus). GST activity was assayed spectrophotometrically at 23°C, using a UV Max microplate Reader, to measure the rate of conjugation of GSH to CDNB. A significant species-specific difference in the activity of GST was noticed, highest being in unfed Ae. aegypti (41.2 nmol/min/mg) followed by unfed Cx. quinquefasciatus (7.9 nmol/min/mg) and the least in unfed An. stephensi (5.8 nmol/min/mg). In all the species the GST activity was found to be significantly higher in fully fed and gravid stages compared with the unfed, while the enzyme activity was reduced after egg laying either to the level of unfed animals or well below its level in all the experimental species. The GST activity was found to be higher in the abdominal region of all the experimental species in comparison with the other body parts (head and thorax). The GST activity of An. stephensi increased gradually through the larval stages and reached the maximum level in the pupae and remained at that level in the newly emerged adults. However, its activity declined markedly (10 fold) with ageing from 5 to 40 days. A significant sex-related difference in the specific activity of GST was found in An. stephensi where approximately 3.5 fold lower activity was observed in males compared with its females, whereas no significant variation was noticed in Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus. The study corroborates the fact that GSTs are differentially regulated by multiple mechanisms in response to xenobiotics modulation in situation-specific manner such as species, sex, feeding and developmental stage. The knowledge of situation-specific modulation of GST will provide a better understanding of GST based insecticide resistance

  7. Effect of prostaglandin F2 alpha on free radical generation, glutathione content and microsomal oxidase activities in rat liver microsomes induced either by ethanol or acetone.

    PubMed

    Sadovnichy, V; Müller, D; Buko, V

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effect of prostaglandin F2 alpha on parameters related to microsomal metabolism (free radical production and lipid peroxidation, glutathione content and activity of microsomal oxidases) after an induction by ethanol or acetone combined with starvation. Long-term ethanol administration led to a significant increase in lipid peroxide formation and NADPH-dependent chemiluminescence amplified by luminol and lucigenin. At the same time hydrogen peroxide production and NADPH-stimulated lipid peroxidation were enhanced although the effect did not reach the level of statistical significance. The concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH) in the liver was decreased 2-fold, whereas oxidized glutathione (GSSG) content remained unaltered. Ethanol intoxication resulted in an increase in 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase (ECOD), 7-benzyloxycoumarin-O-deethylase (BCOD) and 7-ethoxy-resorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activities, whereas 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (PROD) and ethylmorphin-N-demethylase (EMND) activities were unaltered. The combination of acetone treatment with starvation resulted in a significant increase in lipid and hydrogen peroxide formation, NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation and chemiluminescence. GSH and GSSG concentration in the liver dramatically decreased 5- and 3-fold, respectively. The acetone treatment led to significant increase in EROD, ECOD, BCOD, PROD and EMND activities. The treatment of ethanol-intoxicated rats with prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) exerted more pronounced prooxidant effect on liver than action of alcohol itself. At the same time, PGF2 alpha improved most of parameters changed by acetone treatment combined with starvation, decreasing lipid peroxide and radical formation and enhancing GSH and GSSG contents.

  8. The role of glutathione reductase and related enzymes on cellular redox homoeostasis network.

    PubMed

    Couto, Narciso; Wood, Jennifer; Barber, Jill

    2016-06-01

    In this review article we examine the role of glutathione reductase in the regulation, modulation and maintenance of cellular redox homoeostasis. Glutathione reductase is responsible for maintaining the supply of reduced glutathione; one of the most abundant reducing thiols in the majority of cells. In its reduced form, glutathione plays key roles in the cellular control of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species act as intracellular and extracellular signalling molecules and complex cross talk between levels of reactive oxygen species, levels of oxidised and reduced glutathione and other thiols, and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase determine the most suitable conditions for redox control within a cell or for activation of programmed cell death. Additionally, we discuss the translation and expression of glutathione reductase in a number of organisms including yeast and humans. In yeast and human cells, a single gene expresses more than one form of glutathione reductase, destined for residence in the cytoplasm or for translocation to different organelles; in plants, however, two genes encoding this protein have been described. In general, insects and kinetoplastids (a group of protozoa, including Plasmodia and Trypanosoma) do not express glutathione reductase or glutathione biosynthetic enzymes. Instead, they express either the thioredoxin system or the trypanothione system. The thioredoxin system is also present in organisms that have the glutathione system and there may be overlapping functions with cross-talk between the two systems. Finally we evaluate therapeutic targets to overcome oxidative stress associated cellular disorders.

  9. Vitamin B-6 restriction tends to reduce the red blood cell glutathione synthesis rate without affecting red blood cell or plasma glutathione concentrations in healthy men and women123

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Yvonne; O'Rourke, Bruce; Gilbert, Lesa R; Keeling, Christine; Matthews, Dwight E; Stacpoole, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Background: Glutathione plays various protective roles in the human body. Vitamin B-6 as pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP) is required as the coenzyme in the formation of glutathione precursors. Despite this obligatory role of PLP, previous studies from this laboratory showed that vitamin B-6 deficiency caused elevated glutathione concentrations in rat liver and human plasma. Objective: Our aim was to determine the effect of marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency (plasma PLP 20–30 nmol/L) on the rate of red blood cell (RBC) glutathione synthesis. Design: We measured plasma and RBC glutathione concentrations and the fractional and absolute synthesis rates of RBC glutathione using the stable-isotope-labeled glutathione precursor [1,2-13C2]glycine in 13 healthy volunteers aged 21–39 y. Results: Dietary vitamin B-6 restriction did not significantly affect the glutathione concentration in plasma (6.9 ± 1.9 compared with 6.7 ± 1.1 μmol/L) or RBCs (2068 ± 50 compared with 2117 ± 48 μmol/L). For RBC glutathione, the mean fractional synthesis rates were 54 ± 5%/d and 43 ± 4%/d (P = 0.10), and the absolute synthesis rates were 1116 ± 100 and 916 ± 92 μmol · L−1 · d−1 (P = 0.14) before and after vitamin B-6 restriction, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency tended to decrease mean RBC glutathione synthesis with no effect on RBC glutathione concentration, but the responses varied widely among individuals. Because the cysteine concentration in plasma and RBC did not change during vitamin B-6 restriction, we conclude that the effects of marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency on glutathione synthesis are not caused by altered precursor concentrations. PMID:19515736

  10. Loss of NAD(P)-reducing power and glutathione disulfide excretion at the start of induction of aerial growth in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Toledo, I; Noronha-Dutra, A A; Hansberg, W

    1991-05-01

    When exponentially growing hyphae of Neurospora crassa in aerated liquid cultures are filtered and the resulting mycelial mat is exposed to air, aerial hyphae develop and synchronous conidiation is obtained. The hyphae in direct contact with air adhere to each other within minutes and form aerial hyphae during the following 12 h; the hyphae which are not in direct contact with air do not adhere to each other and do not form aerial hyphae. Previous data indicated that oxidative stress was generated in the adhering hyphae; proteins and specific enzymes were found to be oxidatively modified and degraded. In this work, we report a dramatic fall in the reduced-to-oxidized ratio of NAD and NADP coenzymes during the first 6 min of exposure to air. This drop did not occur in a mycelial mat exposed to a N2-enriched atmosphere. Adding a carbon source to the mycelial mat did not abolish the loss of NAD(P)-reducing power. After the initial fall, the reducing levels of the coenzymes returned to the starting value in about 30 min. A peak of extracellular glutathione disulfide occurred simultaneously with the loss of NAD(P)-reducing power. The reducing power loss and the excretion of glutathione disulfide are thought to be consequences of a hyperoxidant state; the adhesion of hyphae is thought to be a response to the hyperoxidant state.

  11. Role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in regulation of redox-dependent processes.

    PubMed

    Kalinina, E V; Chernov, N N; Novichkova, M D

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade fundamentally new features have been revealed for the participation of glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes (glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin) in cell proliferation, apoptosis, protein folding, and cell signaling. Reduced glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining cellular redox status by participating in thiol-disulfide exchange, which regulates a number of cell functions including gene expression and the activity of individual enzymes and enzyme systems. Maintaining optimum GSH/GSSG ratio is essential to cell viability. Decrease in the ratio can serve as an indicator of damage to the cell redox status and of changes in redox-dependent gene regulation. Disturbance of intracellular GSH balance is observed in a number of pathologies including cancer. Consequences of inappropriate GSH/GSSG ratio include significant changes in the mechanism of cellular redox-dependent signaling controlled both nonenzymatically and enzymatically with the participation of isoforms of glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin. This review summarizes recent data on the role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in the regulation of cellular redox-dependent processes.

  12. Glutathione S-transferase activity in follicular fluid from women undergoing ovarian stimulation: role in maturation.

    PubMed

    Meijide, Susana; Hernández, M Luisa; Navarro, Rosaura; Larreategui, Zaloa; Ferrando, Marcos; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio; Ruiz-Larrea, M Begoña

    2014-10-01

    Female infertility involves an emotional impact for the woman, often leading to a state of anxiety and low self-esteem. The assisted reproduction techniques (ART) are used to overcome the problem of infertility. In a first step of the in vitro fertilization therapy women are subjected to an ovarian stimulation protocol to obtain mature oocytes, which will result in competent oocytes necessary for fertilization to occur. Ovarian stimulation, however, subjects the women to a high physical and psychological stress, thus being essential to improve ART and to find biomarkers of dysfunction and fertility. GSH is an important antioxidant, and is also used in detoxification reactions, catalysed by glutathione S-transferases (GST). In the present work, we have investigated the involvement of GST in follicular maturation. Patients with fertility problems and oocyte donors were recruited for the study. From each woman follicles at two stages of maturation were extracted at the preovulatory stage. Follicular fluid was separated from the oocyte by centrifugation and used as the enzyme source. GST activity was determined based on its conjugation with 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene and the assay was adapted to a 96-well microplate reader. The absorbance was represented against the incubation time and the curves were adjusted to linearity (R(2)>0.990). Results showed that in both donors and patients GST activity was significantly lower in mature oocytes compared to small ones. These results suggest that GST may play a role in the follicle maturation by detoxifying xenobiotics, thus contributing to the normal development of the oocyte. Supported by FIS/FEDER (PI11/02559), Gobierno Vasco (Dep. Educación, Universiades e Investigación, IT687-13), and UPV/EHU (CLUMBER UFI11/20 and PES13/58). The work was approved by the Ethics Committee of the UPV/EHU (CEISH/96/2011/RUIZLARREA), and performed according to the UPV/EHU and IVI-Bilbao agreement (Ref. 2012/01). PMID:26461371

  13. Altering the redox state of skeletal muscle by glutathione depletion increases the exercise‐activation of PGC‐1α

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Natalie A.; Matsumoto, Aya; Peake, Jonathan M.; Marsh, Susan A.; Peternelj, Tina‐Tinkara; Briskey, David; Fassett, Robert G.; Coombes, Jeff S.; Wadley, Glenn D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the relationship between markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, cell signaling, and antioxidant enzymes by depleting skeletal muscle glutathione with diethyl maleate (DEM) which resulted in a demonstrable increase in oxidative stress during exercise. Animals were divided into six groups: (1) sedentary control rats; (2) sedentary rats + DEM; (3) exercise control rats euthanized immediately after exercise; (4) exercise rats + DEM; (5) exercise control rats euthanized 4 h after exercise; and (6) exercise rats + DEM euthanized 4 h after exercise. Exercising animals ran on the treadmill at a 10% gradient at 20 m/min for the first 30 min. The speed was then increased every 10 min by 1.6 m/min until exhaustion. There was a reduction in total glutathione in the skeletal muscle of DEM treated animals compared to the control animals (P < 0.05). Within the control group, total glutathione was higher in the sedentary group compared to after exercise (P < 0.05). DEM treatment also significantly increased oxidative stress, as measured by increased plasma F2–isoprostanes (P < 0.05). Exercising animals given DEM showed a significantly greater increase in peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator‐1α (PGC–1α) mRNA compared to the control animals that were exercised (P < 0.05). This study provides novel evidence that by lowering the endogenous antioxidant glutathione in skeletal muscle and inducing oxidative stress through exercise, PGC‐1α gene expression was augmented. These findings further highlight the important role of exercise induced oxidative stress in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25538148

  14. GLUTATHIONE SYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shelly C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glutathione (GSH) is present in all mammalian tissues as the most abundant non-protein thiol that defends against oxidative stress. GSH is also a key determinant of redox signaling, vital in detoxification of xenobiotics, regulates cell proliferation, apoptosis, immune function, and fibrogenesis. Biosynthesis of GSH occurs in the cytosol in a tightly regulated manner. Key determinants of GSH synthesis are the availability of the sulfur amino acid precursor, cysteine, and the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme, glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which is composed of a catalytic (GCLC) and a modifier (GCLM) subunit. The second enzyme of GSH synthesis is GSH synthetase (GS). SCOPE OF REVIEW This review summarizes key functions of GSH and focuses on factors that regulate the biosynthesis of GSH, including pathological conditions where GSH synthesis is dysregulated. MAJOR CONCLUSIONS GCL subunits and GS are regulated at multiple levels and often in a coordinated manner. Key transcription factors that regulate the expression of these genes include NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) via the antioxidant response element (ARE), AP-1, and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). There is increasing evidence that dysregulation of GSH synthesis contributes to the pathogenesis of many pathological conditions. These include diabetes mellitus, pulmonary and liver fibrosis, alcoholic liver disease, cholestatic liver injury, endotoxemia and drug-resistant tumor cells. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE GSH is a key antioxidant that also modulates diverse cellular processes. A better understanding of how its synthesis is regulated and dysregulated in disease states may lead to improvement in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:22995213

  15. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase are equally active in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaetani, G.F.; Galiano, S.; Canepa, L.; Ferraris, A.M.; Kirkman, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and NADPH predispose affected erythrocytes to destruction from peroxides. Conversely, genetic deficiencies of catalase do not predispose affected erythrocytes to peroxide-induced destruction. These observations have served to strengthen the assumption that the NADPH/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase pathway is the principal means for disposal of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. Recently, however, mammalian catalase was found to have tightly bound NADPH and to require NADPH for the prevention and reversal of inactivation by its toxic substrate (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). Since both catalase and the glutathione pathway are dependent on NADPH for function, this finding raises the possibility that both mechanisms destroy H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. A comparison of normal and acatalasemic erythrocytes in the present study indicated that catalase accounts for more than half of the destruction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is generated at a rate comparable to that which leads to hemolysis in G6PD- deficient erythrocytes.

  16. Increased Zn/Glutathione Levels and Higher Superoxide Dismutase-1 Activity as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Women with Long-Term Dental Amalgam Fillings: Correlation between Mercury/Aluminium Levels (in Hair) and Antioxidant Systems in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cabaña-Muñoz, María Eugenia; Parmigiani-Izquierdo, José María; Bravo-González, Luis Alberto; Kyung, Hee-Moon; Merino, José Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Background The induction of oxidative stress by Hg can affect antioxidant enzymes. However, epidemiological studies have failed to establish clear association between dental fillings presence and health problems. Objectives To determine whether heavy metals (in hair), antioxidant enzymes (SOD-1) and glutathione levels could be affected by the chronic presence of heavy metals in women who had dental amalgam fillings. Materials and Methods 55 hair samples (42 females with amalgam fillings and 13 female control subjects) were obtained. All subjects (mean age 44 years) who had dental amalgam filling for more than 10 years (average 15 years). Certain metals were quantified by ICP-MS (Mass Spectrophotometry) in hair (μg/g: Al, Hg, Ba, Ag, Sb, As, Be, Bi, Cd, Pb, Pt, Tl, Th, U, Ni, Sn, Ti) and SOD-1 and Glutathione (reduced form) levels in plasma. Data were compared with controls without amalgams, and analyzed to identify any significant relation between metals and the total number of amalgam fillings, comparing those with four or less (n = 27) with those with more than four (n = 15). As no significant differences were detected, the two groups were pooled (Amlgam; n = 42). Findings Hg, Ag, Al and Ba were higher in the amalgam group but without significant differences for most of the heavy metals analyzed. Increased SOD-1 activity and glutathione levels (reduced form) were observed in the amalgam group. Aluminum (Al) correlated with glutathione levels while Hg levels correlated with SOD-1. The observed Al/glutathione and Hg/SOD-1 correlation could be adaptive responses against the chronic presence of mercury. Conclusions Hg, Ag, Al and Ba levels increased in women who had dental amalgam fillings for long periods. Al correlated with glutathione, and Hg with SOD-1. SOD-1 may be a possible biomarker for assessing chronic Hg toxicity. PMID:26076368

  17. Activities of Antioxidant Scavenger Enzymes (Superoxide Dismutase and Glutathione Peroxidase) in Erythrocytes in Adult Women With and Without Type II Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Raymond; Berner, Yitshal N.

    2004-01-01

    It is widely believed that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type II diabetes. The present study was undertaken to examine the functioning of two antioxidant scavenger enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), in erythrocytes in a population of healthy aging adult women compared with a similar population with type II diabetes. Blood samples were examined from 42 female adult healthy subjects at different ages and from 59 female patients with type II diabetes. A significant increase in SOD activities was correlated with aging in erythrocytes of the healthy control subjects (r = .550, P = .001); however, this correlation was not found in subjects with type II diabetes (r = .250, P < .07). A trend showing a reduction in glutathione peroxidase activities was demonstrated with aging (r = −.331, P = .228); however, this trend was not found in diabetic subjects (r = .031, P < .820). The results indicate a possible imbalance in the antioxidant system in erythrocytes of aging adult women, which is even more pronounced in cases of type II diabetes. This study may indicate possible therapeutic treatment or preventive measures to limit oxidative damage and reduce complications of diabetes. PMID:15203888

  18. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal induces apoptosis by activating ERK1/2 signaling and depleting intracellular glutathione in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yun; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao; Wu, Zhenlong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces oxidative damage to cellular constituents, ultimately leading to induction of apoptotic cell death and the pathogenesis of various diseases. The molecular mechanisms for the action of ROS in intestinal diseases remain poorly defined. Here, we reported that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) treatment led to capses-3-dependent apoptosis accompanied by increased intracellular ROS level and reduced glutathione concentration in intestinal epithelial cells. These effects of 4-HNE were markedly abolished by the antioxidant L-cysteine derivative N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Further studies demonstrated that the protective effect of NAC was associated with restoration of intracellular redox state by Nrf2-related regulation of expression of genes involved in intracellular glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis and inactivation of 4-HNE-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2). The 4-HNE-induced ERK1/2 activation was mediated by repressing mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), a negative regulator of ERK1/2, through a proteasome-dependent degradation mechanism. Importantly, either overexpression of MKP-1 or NAC treatment blocked 4-HNE-induced MKP-1 degradation, thereby protecting cell from apoptosis. These novel findings provide new insights into a functional role of MKP-1 in oxidative stress-induced cell death by regulating ERK1/2 MAP kinase in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:27620528

  19. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal induces apoptosis by activating ERK1/2 signaling and depleting intracellular glutathione in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yun; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao; Wu, Zhenlong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces oxidative damage to cellular constituents, ultimately leading to induction of apoptotic cell death and the pathogenesis of various diseases. The molecular mechanisms for the action of ROS in intestinal diseases remain poorly defined. Here, we reported that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) treatment led to capses-3-dependent apoptosis accompanied by increased intracellular ROS level and reduced glutathione concentration in intestinal epithelial cells. These effects of 4-HNE were markedly abolished by the antioxidant L-cysteine derivative N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Further studies demonstrated that the protective effect of NAC was associated with restoration of intracellular redox state by Nrf2-related regulation of expression of genes involved in intracellular glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis and inactivation of 4-HNE-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2). The 4-HNE-induced ERK1/2 activation was mediated by repressing mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), a negative regulator of ERK1/2, through a proteasome-dependent degradation mechanism. Importantly, either overexpression of MKP-1 or NAC treatment blocked 4-HNE-induced MKP-1 degradation, thereby protecting cell from apoptosis. These novel findings provide new insights into a functional role of MKP-1 in oxidative stress-induced cell death by regulating ERK1/2 MAP kinase in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:27620528

  20. A novel persulfide detection method reveals protein persulfide- and polysulfide-reducing functions of thioredoxin and glutathione systems

    PubMed Central

    Dóka, Éva; Pader, Irina; Bíró, Adrienn; Johansson, Katarina; Cheng, Qing; Ballagó, Krisztina; Prigge, Justin R.; Pastor-Flores, Daniel; Dick, Tobias P.; Schmidt, Edward E.; Arnér, Elias S. J.; Nagy, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide signaling involves persulfide formation at specific protein Cys residues. However, overcoming current methodological challenges in persulfide detection and elucidation of Cys regeneration mechanisms from persulfides are prerequisites for constructing a bona fide signaling model. We here establish a novel, highly specific protein persulfide detection protocol, ProPerDP, with which we quantify 1.52 ± 0.6 and 11.6 ± 6.9 μg/mg protein steady-state protein persulfide concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and mouse liver, respectively. Upon treatment with polysulfides, HEK293 and A549 cells exhibited increased protein persulfidation. Deletion of the sulfide-producing cystathionine-γ-lyase or cystathionine-β-synthase enzymes in yeast diminished protein persulfide levels, thereby corroborating their involvement in protein persulfidation processes. We here establish that thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione (GSH) systems can independently catalyze reductions of inorganic polysulfides and protein persulfides. Increased endogenous persulfide levels and protein persulfidation following polysulfide treatment in thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) or thioredoxin-related protein of 14 kDa (TRP14) knockdown HEK293 cells indicated that these enzymes constitute a potent regeneration system of Cys residues from persulfides in a cellular context. Furthermore, TrxR1-deficient cells were less viable upon treatment with toxic amounts of polysulfides compared to control cells. Emphasizing the dominant role of cytosolic disulfide reduction systems in maintaining sulfane sulfur homeostasis in vivo, protein persulfide levels were markedly elevated in mouse livers where hepatocytes lack both TrxR1 and glutathione reductase (TR/GR-null). The different persulfide patterns observed in wild-type, GR-null, and TR/GR-null livers suggest distinct roles for the Trx and GSH systems in regulating subsets of protein persulfides and thereby fine-tuning sulfide

  1. A novel persulfide detection method reveals protein persulfide- and polysulfide-reducing functions of thioredoxin and glutathione systems.

    PubMed

    Dóka, Éva; Pader, Irina; Bíró, Adrienn; Johansson, Katarina; Cheng, Qing; Ballagó, Krisztina; Prigge, Justin R; Pastor-Flores, Daniel; Dick, Tobias P; Schmidt, Edward E; Arnér, Elias S J; Nagy, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide signaling involves persulfide formation at specific protein Cys residues. However, overcoming current methodological challenges in persulfide detection and elucidation of Cys regeneration mechanisms from persulfides are prerequisites for constructing a bona fide signaling model. We here establish a novel, highly specific protein persulfide detection protocol, ProPerDP, with which we quantify 1.52 ± 0.6 and 11.6 ± 6.9 μg/mg protein steady-state protein persulfide concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and mouse liver, respectively. Upon treatment with polysulfides, HEK293 and A549 cells exhibited increased protein persulfidation. Deletion of the sulfide-producing cystathionine-γ-lyase or cystathionine-β-synthase enzymes in yeast diminished protein persulfide levels, thereby corroborating their involvement in protein persulfidation processes. We here establish that thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione (GSH) systems can independently catalyze reductions of inorganic polysulfides and protein persulfides. Increased endogenous persulfide levels and protein persulfidation following polysulfide treatment in thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) or thioredoxin-related protein of 14 kDa (TRP14) knockdown HEK293 cells indicated that these enzymes constitute a potent regeneration system of Cys residues from persulfides in a cellular context. Furthermore, TrxR1-deficient cells were less viable upon treatment with toxic amounts of polysulfides compared to control cells. Emphasizing the dominant role of cytosolic disulfide reduction systems in maintaining sulfane sulfur homeostasis in vivo, protein persulfide levels were markedly elevated in mouse livers where hepatocytes lack both TrxR1 and glutathione reductase (TR/GR-null). The different persulfide patterns observed in wild-type, GR-null, and TR/GR-null livers suggest distinct roles for the Trx and GSH systems in regulating subsets of protein persulfides and thereby fine-tuning sulfide

  2. Glutathione peroxidase and catalase modulate the genotoxicity of arsenite.

    PubMed

    Wang, T S; Shu, Y F; Liu, Y C; Jan, K Y; Huang, H

    1997-09-01

    The X-ray hypersensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, xrs-5, are also more sensitive to sodium arsenite in terms of cell growth and micronucleus induction than CHO-K1 cells. Since reactive oxygen species are suggested to be involved in arsenic toxicity, we have measured antioxidant mechanisms in xrs-5 as well as CHO-K1 cells. There were no apparent differences in the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase, and the levels of glutathione between xrs-5 and CHO-K1 cells. However, the activities of glutathione peroxidase and catalase were 5.4- and 5.8-fold lower, respectively, in xrs-5 cells. The addition of catalase or glutathione peroxidase to cultures reduced the arsenite-induced micronuclei in xrs-5 cells. Whereas, simultaneous treatment with mercaptosuccinate, an inhibitor of glutathione peroxidase, and 3-aminotriazole, an inhibitor of catalase, synergistically increased the arsenite-induced micronuclei. These results suggest that both catalase and glutathione peroxidase are involved in defense against arsenite genotoxicity. The xrs-6 cells, another line of x-ray hypersensitive CHO cells, which had 1.6-fold higher catalase activity and 2.5-fold higher glutathione peroxidase activity than xrs-5 cells, were also more sensitive than CHO-K1 cells but were less sensitive than xrs-5 cells to cell growth inhibition of arsenite. Moreover, a 1.6-fold increase of glutathione peroxidase activity by selenite adaptation effectively removed the arsenite-induced micronuclei in CHO-K1 cells. These results suggest that glutathione peroxidase is more important than catalase in defending against arsenite toxicity. Our results also suggest that increasing the intracellular antioxidant level may have preventive or therapeutic effects in arsenic poisoning.

  3. Flaxseed Protects Against Diabetes-Induced Glucotoxicity by Modulating Pentose Phosphate Pathway and Glutathione-Dependent Enzyme Activities in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gök, Müslüm; Ulusu, Nuray N; Tarhan, Nilay; Tufan, Can; Ozansoy, Gülgün; Arı, Nuray; Karasu, Çimen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) intake on general metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and glutathione-dependent enzymes in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection (40 mg/kg, i.p.) and the enzyme activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Diabetic and control rats were divided in two subgroups, one untreated, and one treated with flaxseed (0.714 g/kg body weight/day; orally) for 12 weeks. Flaxseed ameliorated decreased body weight (p < .05) and increased blood glucose (p < .001), triglyceride (p < .001), ALT (p < .001) and AST (p < .001) in diabetic rats. Diabetes resulted in increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) (p < .05) and decreased glutathione-S-transferase (GST) (p < .01), but unchanged 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) and glutathione reductase (GR) in the brain of rats. These alterations were partially improved by flaxseed in comparison to diabetic untreated group (p < .05). G6PD, 6PGD, GR were elevated (p < .001), while GST unchanged in the lung of diabetic untreated group compared to control. Flaxseed partially prevented the increase in 6PGD (p < .05) and GR (p < .01), but unaffected G6PD in the lung of diabetic rats. G6PD (p < .001), 6PGD (p < .05), GR (p < .001) were augmented, while GST showed a significant (p < .001) depletion in the pancreas of diabetic untreated rats compared to control. Diabetic alterations observed in pancreatic enzyme activities were significantly prevented by flaxseed. Furthermore, a remarkable decrease in 6PGD (p < .001) and an increase in G6PD (threefold of control) were found in the lens of diabetic untreated group that were completely prevented by flaxseed (p < .001). Flaxseed has beneficial effects against diabetes-induced glucotoxicity by modulating G6PD, 6PGD, GR and GST activities in tissues.

  4. Flaxseed Protects Against Diabetes-Induced Glucotoxicity by Modulating Pentose Phosphate Pathway and Glutathione-Dependent Enzyme Activities in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gök, Müslüm; Ulusu, Nuray N; Tarhan, Nilay; Tufan, Can; Ozansoy, Gülgün; Arı, Nuray; Karasu, Çimen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) intake on general metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and glutathione-dependent enzymes in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection (40 mg/kg, i.p.) and the enzyme activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Diabetic and control rats were divided in two subgroups, one untreated, and one treated with flaxseed (0.714 g/kg body weight/day; orally) for 12 weeks. Flaxseed ameliorated decreased body weight (p < .05) and increased blood glucose (p < .001), triglyceride (p < .001), ALT (p < .001) and AST (p < .001) in diabetic rats. Diabetes resulted in increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) (p < .05) and decreased glutathione-S-transferase (GST) (p < .01), but unchanged 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) and glutathione reductase (GR) in the brain of rats. These alterations were partially improved by flaxseed in comparison to diabetic untreated group (p < .05). G6PD, 6PGD, GR were elevated (p < .001), while GST unchanged in the lung of diabetic untreated group compared to control. Flaxseed partially prevented the increase in 6PGD (p < .05) and GR (p < .01), but unaffected G6PD in the lung of diabetic rats. G6PD (p < .001), 6PGD (p < .05), GR (p < .001) were augmented, while GST showed a significant (p < .001) depletion in the pancreas of diabetic untreated rats compared to control. Diabetic alterations observed in pancreatic enzyme activities were significantly prevented by flaxseed. Furthermore, a remarkable decrease in 6PGD (p < .001) and an increase in G6PD (threefold of control) were found in the lens of diabetic untreated group that were completely prevented by flaxseed (p < .001). Flaxseed has beneficial effects against diabetes-induced glucotoxicity by modulating G6PD, 6PGD, GR and GST activities in tissues. PMID:26317558

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase p38b interaction with delta class glutathione transferases from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakul, Jeerang; Sukittikul, Suchada; Saisawang, Chonticha; Ketterman, Albert J

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a family of multifunctional enzymes involved in xenobiotic biotransformation, drug metabolism, and protection against oxidative damage. The p38b mitogen-activated protein kinase is involved in cellular stress response. This study screened interactions between Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Delta class glutathione transferases (DmGSTs) and the D. melanogaster p38b MAPK. Therefore, 12 DmGSTs and p38b kinase were obtained as recombinant proteins. The study showed that DmGSTD8 and DmGSTD11b significantly increased p38b activity toward ATF2 and jun, which are transcription factor substrates. DmGSTD3 and DmGSTD5 moderately increased p38b activity for jun. In addition, GST activity in the presence of p38b was also measured. It was found that p38b affected substrate specificity toward CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and DCNB (1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene) of several GST isoforms, i.e., DmGSTD2, DmGSTD5, DmGSTD8, and DmGSTD11b. The interaction of a GST and p38b can affect the substrate specificity of either enzyme, which suggests induced conformational changes affecting catalysis. Similar interactions do not occur for all the Delta enzymes and p38b, which suggests that these interactions could be specific. PMID:23438069

  6. Simultaneous quantitation of oxidized and reduced glutathione via LC-MS/MS: An insight into the redox state of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Dustin; Howard, Diana; Zhu, Haining; Paumi, Christian M; Vore, Mary; Bondada, Subbarao; Liang, Ying; Wang, Chi; St Clair, Daret K

    2016-08-01

    Cellular redox balance plays a significant role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem-progenitor cell (HSC/MPP) self-renewal and differentiation. Unregulated changes in cellular redox homeostasis are associated with the onset of most hematological disorders. However, accurate measurement of the redox state in stem cells is difficult because of the scarcity of HSC/MPPs. Glutathione (GSH) constitutes the most abundant pool of cellular antioxidants. Thus, GSH metabolism may play a critical role in hematological disease onset and progression. A major limitation to studying GSH metabolism in HSC/MPPs has been the inability to measure quantitatively GSH concentrations in small numbers of HSC/MPPs. Current methods used to measure GSH levels not only rely on large numbers of cells, but also rely on the chemical/structural modification or enzymatic recycling of GSH and therefore are likely to measure only total glutathione content accurately. Here, we describe the validation of a sensitive method used for the direct and simultaneous quantitation of both oxidized and reduced GSH via liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in HSC/MPPs isolated from bone marrow. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was determined to be 5.0ng/mL for GSH and 1.0ng/mL for GSSG with lower limits of detection at 0.5ng/mL for both glutathione species. Standard addition analysis utilizing mouse bone marrow shows that this method is both sensitive and accurate with reproducible analyte recovery. This method combines a simple extraction with a platform for the high-throughput analysis, allows for efficient determination of GSH/GSSG concentrations within the HSC/MPP populations in mouse, chemotherapeutic treatment conditions within cell culture, and human normal/leukemia patient samples. The data implicate the importance of the modulation of GSH/GSSG redox couple in stem cells related diseases. PMID:27212018

  7. Reduced Silver Nanoparticle Phytotoxicity in Crambe abyssinica with Enhanced Glutathione Production by Overexpressing Bacterial γ-Glutamylcysteine Synthase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuanxin; Chhikara, Sudesh; Minocha, Rakesh; Long, Stephanie; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Xing, Baoshan; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2015-08-18

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are widely used in consumer products, and their release has raised serious concerns about the risk of their exposure to the environment and to human health. However, biochemical mechanisms by which plants counteract NP toxicity are largely unknown. We have previously engineered Crambe abyssinica plants expressing the bacterial γ-glutamylecysteine synthase (γ-ECS) for enhancing glutathione (GSH) levels. In this study, we investigated if enhanced levels of GSH and its derivatives can protect plants from Ag NPs and AgNO3 (Ag(+) ions). Our results showed that transgenic lines, when exposed to Ag NPs and Ag(+) ions, were significantly more tolerant, attaining a 28%-46% higher biomass and 34-49% more chlorophyll content, as well as maintaining 35-46% higher transpiration rates as compared to those of wild type (WT) plants. Transgenic γ-ECS lines showed 2-6-fold Ag accumulation in shoot tissue and slightly lower or no difference in root tissue relative to levels in WT plants. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in γ-ECS lines were also 27.3-32.5% lower than those in WT Crambe. These results indicate that GSH and related peptides protect plants from Ag nanotoxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first direct report of Ag NP detoxification by GSH in transgenic plants, and these results will be highly useful in developing strategies to counteract the phytotoxicty of metal-based nanoparticles in crop plants. PMID:26186015

  8. Reduced Silver Nanoparticle Phytotoxicity in Crambe abyssinica with Enhanced Glutathione Production by Overexpressing Bacterial γ-Glutamylcysteine Synthase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuanxin; Chhikara, Sudesh; Minocha, Rakesh; Long, Stephanie; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Xing, Baoshan; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2015-08-18

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are widely used in consumer products, and their release has raised serious concerns about the risk of their exposure to the environment and to human health. However, biochemical mechanisms by which plants counteract NP toxicity are largely unknown. We have previously engineered Crambe abyssinica plants expressing the bacterial γ-glutamylecysteine synthase (γ-ECS) for enhancing glutathione (GSH) levels. In this study, we investigated if enhanced levels of GSH and its derivatives can protect plants from Ag NPs and AgNO3 (Ag(+) ions). Our results showed that transgenic lines, when exposed to Ag NPs and Ag(+) ions, were significantly more tolerant, attaining a 28%-46% higher biomass and 34-49% more chlorophyll content, as well as maintaining 35-46% higher transpiration rates as compared to those of wild type (WT) plants. Transgenic γ-ECS lines showed 2-6-fold Ag accumulation in shoot tissue and slightly lower or no difference in root tissue relative to levels in WT plants. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in γ-ECS lines were also 27.3-32.5% lower than those in WT Crambe. These results indicate that GSH and related peptides protect plants from Ag nanotoxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first direct report of Ag NP detoxification by GSH in transgenic plants, and these results will be highly useful in developing strategies to counteract the phytotoxicty of metal-based nanoparticles in crop plants.

  9. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Jackson, Matthew I; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Combs, Gerald F

    2011-11-01

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability at nutritional doses. In this study, we found that two sources of L-selenomethionine (SeMet) and Se-enriched yeast each increased intracellular Se content more effectively than selenite or methylselenocysteine (SeMSC) in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. Interestingly, SeMSC, SeMet, and digested Se-enriched yeast were transported at comparable efficacy from the apical to basolateral sides, each being about 3-fold that of selenite. In addition, these forms of Se, whether before or after traversing from apical side to basolateral side, did not change the potential to support glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Although selenoprotein P has been postulated to be a key Se transport protein, its intracellular expression did not differ when selenite, SeMSC, SeMet, or digested Se-enriched yeast was added to serum-contained media. Taken together, our data show, for the first time, that the chemical form of Se at nutritional doses can affect the absorptive (apical to basolateral side) efficacy and retention of Se by intestinal cells; but that, these effects are not directly correlated to the potential to support GPx activity.

  10. Metabolic activation of the antibacterial agent triclocarban by cytochrome P450 1A1 yielding glutathione adducts.

    PubMed

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Muvvala, Jaya B; Morin, Dexter; Buckpitt, Alan R; Hammock, Bruce D; Rice, Robert H

    2014-07-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC) is an antibacterial agent used in personal care products such as bar soaps. Small amounts of chemical are absorbed through the epidermis. Recent studies show that residues of reactive TCC metabolites are bound covalently to proteins in incubations with keratinocytes, raising concerns about the potential toxicity of this antimicrobial agent. To obtain additional information on metabolic activation of TCC, this study characterized the reactive metabolites trapped as glutathione conjugates. Incubations were carried out with (14)C-labeled TCC, recombinant CYP1A1 or CYP1B1, coexpressed with cytochrome P450 reductase, glutathione-S-transferases (GSH), and an NADPH-generating system. Incubations containing CYP1A1, but not 1B1, led to formation of a single TCC-GSH adduct with a conversion rate of 1% of parent compound in 2 hours. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and diagnostic fragmentation, the adduct was tentatively identified as 3,4-dichloro-3'-glutathionyl-4'-hydroxycarbanilide. These findings support the hypothesis that TCC is activated by oxidative dehalogenation and oxidation to a quinone imine. Incubations of TCDD-induced keratinocytes with (14)C-TCC yielded a minor radioactive peak coeluting with TCC-GSH. Thus, we conclude that covalent protein modification by TCC in TCDD-induced human keratinocyte incubations is mainly caused by activation of TCC by CYP1A1 via a dehalogenated TCC derivative as reactive species.

  11. Metabolic activation of the antibacterial agent triclocarban by cytochrome P450 1A1 yielding glutathione adducts.

    PubMed

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Muvvala, Jaya B; Morin, Dexter; Buckpitt, Alan R; Hammock, Bruce D; Rice, Robert H

    2014-07-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC) is an antibacterial agent used in personal care products such as bar soaps. Small amounts of chemical are absorbed through the epidermis. Recent studies show that residues of reactive TCC metabolites are bound covalently to proteins in incubations with keratinocytes, raising concerns about the potential toxicity of this antimicrobial agent. To obtain additional information on metabolic activation of TCC, this study characterized the reactive metabolites trapped as glutathione conjugates. Incubations were carried out with (14)C-labeled TCC, recombinant CYP1A1 or CYP1B1, coexpressed with cytochrome P450 reductase, glutathione-S-transferases (GSH), and an NADPH-generating system. Incubations containing CYP1A1, but not 1B1, led to formation of a single TCC-GSH adduct with a conversion rate of 1% of parent compound in 2 hours. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and diagnostic fragmentation, the adduct was tentatively identified as 3,4-dichloro-3'-glutathionyl-4'-hydroxycarbanilide. These findings support the hypothesis that TCC is activated by oxidative dehalogenation and oxidation to a quinone imine. Incubations of TCDD-induced keratinocytes with (14)C-TCC yielded a minor radioactive peak coeluting with TCC-GSH. Thus, we conclude that covalent protein modification by TCC in TCDD-induced human keratinocyte incubations is mainly caused by activation of TCC by CYP1A1 via a dehalogenated TCC derivative as reactive species. PMID:24733789

  12. Cantharidin Impedes Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase in the Midgut of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rashid Ahmed; Liu, Ji Yuan; Rashid, Maryam; Wang, Dun; Zhang, Ya Lin

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have implicated glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) as one of the major reasons for insecticide resistance. Therefore, effectiveness of new candidate compounds depends on their ability to inhibit GSTs to prevent metabolic detoxification by insects. Cantharidin, a terpenoid compound of insect origin, has been developed as a bio-pesticide in China, and proves highly toxic to a wide range of insects, especially lepidopteran. In the present study, we test cantharidin as a model compound for its toxicity, effects on the mRNA transcription of a model Helicoverpa armigera glutathione S-transferase gene (HaGST) and also for its putative inhibitory effect on the catalytic activity of GSTs, both in vivo and in vitro in Helicoverpa armigera, employing molecular and biochemical methods. Bioassay results showed that cantharidin was highly toxic to H. armigera. Real-time qPCR showed down-regulation of the HaGST at the mRNA transcript ranging from 2.5 to 12.5 folds while biochemical assays showed in vivo inhibition of GSTs in midgut and in vitro inhibition of rHaGST. Binding of cantharidin to HaGST was rationalized by homology and molecular docking simulations using a model GST (1PN9) as a template structure. Molecular docking simulations also confirmed accurate docking of the cantharidin molecule to the active site of HaGST impeding its catalytic activity. PMID:23528854

  13. Unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways suggests potential involvement in plant defense against the gall midge mayetiola destructor in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutathione, a thiol tripeptide of '-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. In this study, we found that the abundance of total glutathion...

  14. Glutathione-dependent peroxidative metabolism in the alveolar macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Molly T.; Thomas, Catherine; Vassallo, Charles L.; Basford, R. E.; Gee, J. Bernard L.

    1971-01-01

    Phagocytosis by rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM) is accompanied by increases in O2 consumption, glucose oxidation, and H2O2 formation. Two aspects of the interrelations between these metabolic features of phagocytosis have been studied. First, the following evidence indicates that glutathione, glutathione reductase, and peroxidase serve as a cytoplasmic shuttle between H2O2 and NADPH-dependent glucose oxidation: (a) AM contain 5.9 mμmoles of reduced glutathione per 106 cells and exhibit glutathione peroxidase and NADPH-specific glutathione reductase activity; (b) oxidized glutathione potentiates NADP stimulation of glucose oxidation; (c) an artificial H2O2-generating system stimulates glucose oxidation; (d) the cell penetrating thiol inhibitor, N-ethylmaleimide diminishes glucose oxidation. This effect largely depends on inhibition of the glutathione system rather than on inhibition of either H2O2 formation or enzymes directly subserving glucose oxidation. Second, three potential H2O2-generating oxidases have been sought. No cyanide-insensitive NADH or NADPH oxidase activity could be detected. D-amino acid oxidase activity was 0.48 ±0.07 U/106 cells with D-alanine as substrate. PMID:4395562

  15. Effects of methodological variation on assessment of riboflavin status using the erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient assay.

    PubMed

    Hill, Marilyn H E; Bradley, Angela; Mushtaq, Sohail; Williams, Elizabeth A; Powers, Hilary J

    2009-07-01

    Riboflavin status is usually measured as the in vitro stimulation with flavin adenine dinucleotide of the erythrocyte enzyme glutathione reductase, and expressed as an erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient (EGRAC). This method is used for the National Diet and Nutrition Surveys (NDNS) of the UK. In the period between the 1990 and 2003 surveys of UK adults, the estimated prevalence of riboflavin deficiency, expressed as an EGRAC value > or = 1.30, increased from 2 to 46 % in males and from 1 to 34 % in females. We hypothesised that subtle but important differences in the detail of the methodology between the two NDNS accounted for this difference. We carried out an evaluation of the performance of the methods used in the two NDNS and compared against an 'in-house' method, using blood samples collected from a riboflavin intervention study. Results indicated that the method used for the 1990 NDNS gave a significantly lower mean EGRAC value than both the 2003 NDNS method and the 'in-house' method (P < 0.0001). The key differences between the methods relate to the concentration of FAD used in the assay and the duration of the period of incubation of FAD with enzyme. The details of the EGRAC method should be standardised for use in different laboratories and over time. Additionally, it is proposed that consideration be given to re-evaluating the basis of the EGRAC threshold for riboflavin deficiency.

  16. Glutathione depletion exacerbates impairment by oxidative stress of phosphoinositide hydrolysis, AP-1, and NF-kappaB activation by cholinergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Song, L; Jope, R S

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative stress appears to contribute to neuronal dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease and other CNS neurodegenerative disorders. This investigation examined if oxidative stress might contribute to impairments in cholinergic receptor-linked signaling systems and if intracellular glutathione levels modulated responses to oxidative stress. To do this the activation of the AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription factors and of the phosphoinositide second-messenger system was measured in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after exposure to the oxidants H2O2 or diamide, with or without prior depletion of cellular glutathione. H2O2 concentration-dependently inhibited carbachol-stimulated AP-1 activation and this inhibition was potentiated in glutathione-depleted cells. Carbachol-stimulated NF-kappaB activation was unaffected by H2O2 unless glutathione was depleted, in which case there was a H2O2 concentration-dependent inhibition. Glutathione depletion also potentiated the inhibition by H2O2 of carbachol- or G-protein (NaF)-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis, whereas phospholipase C activated by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was not inhibited. The thiol-oxidizing agent diamide also inhibited phosphoinositide hydrolysis stimulated by carbachol or NaF, and glutathione depletion potentiated the diamide concentration-dependent inhibition. Unlike H2O2, diamide also inhibited ionomycin-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis. Activation of both AP-1 and NF-kappaB stimulated by carbachol was inhibited by diamide, and glutathione depletion potentiated the inhibitory effects of diamide. Thus, diamide inhibited a wider range of signaling processes than did H2O2, but glutathione depletion increased the susceptibility of phosphoinositide hydrolysis and of transcription factor activation to inhibition by both H2O2 and diamide. These results demonstrate that the vulnerability of signaling systems to oxidative stress is influenced by intracellular glutathione levels

  17. Developmental changes in glutathione S-transferase isoforms expression and activity in intrasplenic fetal liver tissue transplants in rats.

    PubMed

    Lupp, Amelie; Anschütz, Tino; Lindström-Seppä, Pirjo; Müller, Dieter

    2003-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterise developmental changes in glutathione S-transferase (GST) isoforms expression and in glutathione conjugation capacity in intrasplenic liver tissue transplants. For this purpose, syngenic fetal liver tissue suspensions were transplanted into the spleens of adult male Fischer 344 rats. Three days, 1, 2, 4 weeks, 2, 4, 6 months and 1 year later, transplant-recipients and control animals were sacrificed and class alpha, mu and pi GST isoforms expression and GST activities using the substrates o-dinitrobenzene and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene were assessed in livers and spleens. In the hepatocytes of the adult livers no class pi, but a distinct class alpha and mu GST expression was seen. The bile duct epithelia were class pi GST positive. Fetal livers displayed almost no class alpha and mu, but a slight class pi GST expression. The same pattern was seen in 3-day-old intrasplenic liver tissue transplants. Up to 2 weeks after surgery the class alpha and mu GST expression increased in the hepatocytes of the transplants, whereas the immunostaining for class pi GST disappeared. No remarkable changes were seen thereafter. Normal conjugation capacities were observed with the livers of both groups of rats. Control spleens displayed only low GST activities. From 2 months after transplantation on activities were significantly higher in transplant-containing spleens than in respective control organs with a further increase up to one year after grafting. These results show that intrasplenically transplanted fetal liver cells proliferate and differentiate into mature cells displaying a GST expression pattern with respective enzyme activities similar to adult liver.

  18. Selenite-induced variation in glutathione peroxidase activity of three mammalian cell lines: no effect on radiation-induced cell killing or DNA strand breakage

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, B.E.C.; Carlsson, J.; Marklund, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    The selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activities of three mammalian cell lines, HT29, P31, and N-18, cultured in medium with low serum content, increased about 2-, 5-, and 40-fold, respectively, after supplementation with 100 nM selenite. Catalase, CuZn superoxide dismutase, and Mn superoxide dismutase activities were not generally influenced by selenite supplementation, and there was only a minor nonselenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity in the investigated cell lines. Gamma-irradiated control and selenite-supplemented cells showed no changes in the surviving fractions, as estimated by clonogenic survival or (/sup 3/H)-thymidine uptake, nor were there any significant differences between the two groups in the induction of DNA strand breaks after gamma irradiation under repairing (37 degrees C) or nonrepairing (0 degrees C) conditions. The results suggest that selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase does not contribute significantly to the radiation resistance of cultured mammalian cells.

  19. Cholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferase activities in freshwater invertebrates as biomarkers to assess pesticide contamination.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Inês; Agra, Ana Raquel; Monaghan, Kieran; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Nogueira, António J A

    2010-01-01

    Studies investigating the use of biomarkers in pesticide risk assessment have greatly increased in recent years; however, issues concerning the ecological meaning of enzymatic responses have proved controversial. Ideally a good biomarker response should be modulated by the environmental contaminants alone and demonstrate a predictable behavior towards certain types of toxins. As these premises are rarely observed, the present study aims to outline research that has contributed to an understanding of the behavior of two widely used biomarkers, cholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferase, describing environmental and biotic factors that affect their response in freshwater invertebrates. Studies were performed in the main classes of aquatic invertebrates with these biomarkers and conclusions were reached concerning their behavior towards the main classes of pesticides. Links between biomarker responses and conventional endpoints were evaluated so that ecological relevance could be attributed to enzymatic responses. Toxicity of mixtures was investigated, and cases of synergism and antagonism were pointed out as factors changing the expected toxicity of aquatic systems and leading to misinterpretations of biomarker responses. Finally, the use of biomarkers as a tool for biomonitoring and in situ assays was investigated, with discussion of advantages and disadvantages of their use.

  20. Induction of wheat and maize glutathione S-transferase by some herbicide safeners and their effect on enzyme activity against butachlor and terbuthylazine.

    PubMed

    Scarponi, Luciano; Quagliarini, Elisa; Del Buono, Daniele

    2006-10-01

    The expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in wheat and maize shoots was investigated in response to treatments with the herbicide safeners benoxacor, cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazole-ethyl, fenclorim, fluxofenim and oxabetrinil. These safeners significantly enhanced the GST activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as a 'standard' substrate, with the exception of oxabetrinil in maize. The enhancements of GST (CDNB) activity were found to be concomitant with increases in V(max) (the reaction rate when the enzyme is fully saturated by the substrate) in wheat following cloquintocet-mexyl and fenchlorazole-ethyl treatments, and in maize following fenchlorazole-ethyl treatment. Otherwise, decreases in V(max) were observed in wheat and maize following fenclorim and fluxofenim treatments. With the exception of oxabetrinil, all the safeners significantly reduced the apparent K(M) (the substrate concentration required for 50% of maximum GST activity) of both wheat and maize GST. The V(max) and K(M) variations following safener treatments are discussed in terms of an increased expression of GST enzymes and an increased affinity for the CDNB substrate. The activity of wheat and maize GST was also assayed towards butachlor and terbuthylazine respectively; the results indicate the ability of cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazole-ethyl and fluxofenim to enhance the enzyme activity in wheat and of benoxacor and fenchlorazole-ethyl to do so in maize.

  1. Synthesis, Nitric Oxide Release, and Anti-Leukemic Activity of Glutathione-Activated Nitric Oxide Prodrugs: Structural Analogues of PABA/NO, an Anti-Cancer Lead Compound

    PubMed Central

    Chakrapani, Harinath; Wilde, Thomas C.; Citro, Michael L.; Goodblatt, Michael M.; Keefer, Larry K.; Saavedra, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    Diazeniumdiolate anions and their prodrug forms are reliable sources of nitric oxide (NO) that have generated interest as promising therapeutic agents. A number of structural analogues of O2-(2,4-dinitro-5-(4-(N-methylamino)benzoyloxy)phenyl) 1-(N,N-dimethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PABA/NO), an anti-cancer lead compound that is designed to release NO upon activation by glutathione, were prepared. The nitric oxide release patterns of these O2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) diazeniumdiolates in the presence of glutathione were tested and it was found that in the absence of competing pathways, these compounds release nearly quantitative amounts of NO. The ability of PABA/NO and its structural analogues to inhibit human leukemia cell proliferation was determined and it was found that compounds releasing elevated amounts of NO displayed superior cytotoxic effects. PMID:18060792

  2. Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Glutathione Peroxidase Enzyme Activity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Omid; Zargari, Mehryar; Varshi, Gharmohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plasma selenium (Se) concentration and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Pxs) enzyme activity of the patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are usually lower than healthy individuals; however, the effect of Se supplementation on the GSH-Pxs activity in those patients remains unclear. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of Se supplementation on plasma Se concentration and red blood cell (RBC) GSH-Pxs activity in patients with different stages of CKD. Patients and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, forty-five patients with CKD who attended in a nephrology clinic were recruited. The patients were randomly allocated into three groups according to their creatinine clearance rate and were supplemented with daily Se 200 mcg for three months. Plasma Se concentration and RBC GSH-Pxs activity were measured in each patient at the beginning and at the end of the study. This clinical trial was registered in the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (www.irct.ir) with registration number ID of IRCT201305318501N2. Results: Plasma Se concentration and RBC GSH-Pxs activity increased significantly in all three groups of patients with CKD (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between three groups regarding baseline plasma Se (P = 0.268) and RBC GSH-Pxs activity (P = 0.741). Conclusions: Se supplementation can increase plasma Se concentration and RBC GSH-Pxs activity in patients with different stages of CKD. PMID:25032143

  3. Plastid-Localized Glutathione Reductase2–Regulated Glutathione Redox Status Is Essential for Arabidopsis Root Apical Meristem Maintenance[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Pasternak, Taras; Eiblmeier, Monika; Ditengou, Franck; Kochersperger, Philip; Sun, Jiaqiang; Wang, Hui; Rennenberg, Heinz; Teale, William; Paponov, Ivan; Zhou, Wenkun; Li, Chuanyou; Li, Xugang; Palme, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione is involved in thiol redox signaling and acts as a major redox buffer against reactive oxygen species, helping to maintain a reducing environment in vivo. Glutathione reductase (GR) catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) into reduced glutathione (GSH). The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes two GRs: GR1 and GR2. Whereas the cytosolic/peroxisomal GR1 is not crucial for plant development, we show here that the plastid-localized GR2 is essential for root growth and root apical meristem (RAM) maintenance. We identify a GR2 mutant, miao, that displays strong inhibition of root growth and severe defects in the RAM, with GR activity being reduced to ∼50%. miao accumulates high levels of GSSG and exhibits increased glutathione oxidation. The exogenous application of GSH or the thiol-reducing agent DTT can rescue the root phenotype of miao, demonstrating that the RAM defects in miao are triggered by glutathione oxidation. Our in silico analysis of public microarray data shows that auxin and glutathione redox signaling generally act independently at the transcriptional level. We propose that glutathione redox status is essential for RAM maintenance through both auxin/PLETHORA (PLT)-dependent and auxin/PLT-independent redox signaling pathways. PMID:24249834

  4. A cyanobacterial protein with similarity to phytochelatin synthases catalyzes the conversion of glutathione to gamma-glutamylcysteine and lacks phytochelatin synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Harada, Emiko; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Clemens, Stephan

    2004-12-01

    Phytochelatins are glutathione-derived, non-translationally synthesized peptides essential for cadmium and arsenic detoxification in plant, fungal and nematode model systems. Recent sequencing programs have revealed the existence of phytochelatin synthase-related genes in a wide range of organisms that have not been reported yet to produce phytochelatins. Among those are several cyanobacteria. We have studied one of the encoded proteins (alr0975 from Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120) and demonstrate here that it does not possess phytochelatin synthase activity. Instead, this protein catalyzes the conversion of glutathione to gamma-glutamylcysteine. The thiol spectrum of yeast cells expressing alr0975 shows the disappearance of glutathione and the formation of a compound that by LC-MSMS analysis was unequivocally identified as gamma-glutamylcysteine. Purified recombinant protein catalyzes the respective reaction. Unlike phytochelatin synthesis, the conversion of glutathione to gamma-glutamylcysteine is not dependent on activation by metal cations. No evidence was found for the accumulation of phytochelatins in cyanobacteria even after prolonged exposure to toxic Cd2+ concentrations. Expression of alr0975 was detected in Nostoc sp. cells with an antiserum raised against the protein. No indication for a responsiveness of expression to toxic metal exposure was found. Taken together, these data provide further evidence for possible additional functions of phytochelatin synthase-related proteins in glutathione metabolism and provide a lead as to the evolutionary history of phytochelatin synthesis.

  5. Glutathione transferases and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Fiorile, Maria Carmela; Primavera, Alessandra; Lo Bello, Mario

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial agreement that the unbalance between oxidant and antioxidant species may affect the onset and/or the course of a number of common diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Many studies suggest a crucial role for oxidative stress in the first phase of aging, or in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neurological ones. Particularly, the role exerted by glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes (Glutathione Transferases) in the nervous system appears more relevant, this latter tissue being much more vulnerable to toxins and oxidative stress than other tissues such as liver, kidney or muscle. The present review addresses the question by focusing on the results obtained by specimens from patients or by in vitro studies using cells or animal models related to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In general, there is an association between glutathione depletion and Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a significant decrease of glutathione transferase activity in selected areas of brain and in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was found. For some glutathione transferase genes there is also a correlation between polymorphisms and onset/outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, there is a general agreement about the protective effect exerted by glutathione and glutathione transferases but no clear answer about the mechanisms underlying this crucial role in the insurgence of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Selenium-Enriched Foods Are More Effective at Increasing Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) Activity Compared with Selenomethionine: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, Emma N.; Hesketh, John E.; Sinclair, Bruce R.; Koolaard, John P.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium may play a beneficial role in multi-factorial illnesses with genetic and environmental linkages via epigenetic regulation in part via glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. A meta-analysis was undertaken to quantify the effects of dietary selenium supplementation on the activity of overall GPx activity in different tissues and animal species and to compare the effectiveness of different forms of dietary selenium. GPx activity response was affected by both the dose and form of selenium (p < 0.001). There were differences between tissues on the effects of selenium supplementation on GPx activity (p < 0.001); however, there was no evidence in the data of differences between animal species (p = 0.95). The interactions between dose and tissue, animal species and form were significant (p < 0.001). Tissues particularly sensitive to changes in selenium supply include red blood cells, kidney and muscle. The meta-analysis identified that for animal species selenium-enriched foods were more effective than selenomethionine at increasing GPx activity. PMID:25268836

  7. Glutathione peroxidase activity in a healthy Canadian population. Effects of age, smoking and drinking habits, exercise and oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    L'abbe, M R; Collins, M W; Trick, K D; Laffey, P J

    1992-01-01

    The activity of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHPx) has been suggested as an indicator of selenium status. The purpose of this study was to measure the activity of this enzyme in a large sample of healthy, free-living Canadians to determine normal distributions and the effects of age, smoking, and drinking habits, exercise, and the use of oral contraceptives (OCs) or estrogen replacement therapy. The population consisted of 386 self-selected subjects between the ages of 24 and 75. Erythrocyte SeGSHPx activity was 21.5 +or- 7 (Mean +or- SD) and 33.6 +or- 8U/g Hb and plasma activity was 226 +or- 31 and 214 +or- 38 U/L for males (n=239) and females (n=147), respectively. Erythrocyte activity was significantly higher in females and males (p0.01). The Se form of GSHPx accounted for 76% and 54% of total activity in plasma and erythrocytes, respectively. No differences due to age were seen in males, although plasma SeGSHPx, non-SeGSHPx, and total GSHPx activities were elevated in females 65 years of age and older. Cigarette smoking significantly elevated erythrocyte SeGSHPx and total activity in male subjects. This elevation did not vary with the amount smoked and was not seen in ex-smokers. Drinking elevated erythrocyte non-SeGSHPx and total activity in male subjects with the highest activity seen in drinkers who also smoked. No significant differences were seen with level of exercise except for a slight elevation with vigorous exercise. Estrogen use significantly elevated erythrocyte SeGSHPx, non-SeGSHPx, and total activities in both pre- and postmenopausal women. These data suggest that some lifestyle factors can have small but significant effects of GSHPx activity and must be controlled for when population-based surveys are being conducted.

  8. Effects of enteric bacterial and cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharides, and of microcystin-LR, on glutathione S-transferase activities in zebra fish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Best, J H; Pflugmacher, S; Wiegand, C; Eddy, F B; Metcalf, J S; Codd, G A

    2002-10-30

    Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) can produce a variety of toxins including hepatotoxins e.g. microcystins, and endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The combined effects of such toxins on fish are little known. This study examines the activities of microsomal (m) and soluble (s) glutathione S-transferases (GST) from embryos of the zebra fish, Danio rerio at the prim six embryo stage, which had been exposed since fertilisation to LPS from different sources. A further aim was to see how activity was affected by co-exposure to LPS and microcystin-LR (MC-LR). LPS were obtained from Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, a laboratory culture of Microcystis CYA 43 and natural cyanobacterial blooms of Microcystis and Gloeotrichia. Following in vivo exposure of embryos to each of the LPS preparations, mGST activity was significantly reduced (from 0.50 to between 0.06 and 0.32 nanokatals per milligram (nkat mg(-1)) protein). sGST activity in vivo was significantly reduced (from 1.05 to between 0.19 and 0.22 nkat mg(-1) protein) after exposure of embryos to each of the cyanobacterial LPS preparations, but not in response to S. typhimurium or E. coli LPS. Activities of both m- and sGSTs were reduced after co-exposure to MC-LR and cyanobacterial LPS, but only mGST activity was reduced in the S. typhimurium and E. coli LPS-treated embryos. In vitro preparations of GST from adult and prim six embryo D. rerio showed no significant changes in enzyme activity in response to the LPS preparations with the exception of Gloeotrichia bloom LPS, where mGST was reduced in adult and embryo preparations. The present study represents the first investigations into the effects of cyanobacterial LPS on the phase-II microcystin detoxication mechanism. LPS preparations, whether from axenic cyanobacteria or cyanobacterial blooms, are potentially capable of significantly reducing activity of both the s- and mGSTs, so reducing the capacity of D. rerio to detoxicate microcystins. The

  9. Concerted action of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase in preventing redox cycling of dihydroxypyrimidines, and their role in antioxidant defence.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, C C; Munday, R

    1990-01-01

    Dialuric Acid, the reduced form of the beta-cell toxin alloxan, and the related fava bean derivatives divicine and isouramil, autoxidize rapidly in neutral solution by a radical mechanism. GSH promotes redox cycling of each compound, with concomitant GSH oxidation and H2O2 production. With superoxide dismutase present, there is a lag period in which little oxidation occurs, followed by rapid oxidation. GSH extends this lag and decreases the subsequent rate of oxidation, so that with superoxide dismutase and a sufficient excess of GSH, coupled oxidation of GSH and each pyrimidine is almost completely suppressed. This mechanism may be a means whereby GSH in combination with superoxide dismutase protects against the cytotoxic effects of these reactive pyrimidines. Superoxide dismutase may also protect cells against oxidative stress in other situations where GSH acts as a radical scavenger, and we propose that the concerted action of GSH and superoxide dismutase constitutes an important antioxidant defence. PMID:2354807

  10. Effects of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb, Zn) on fish glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, A; Dogan, Z; Kanak, E G; Atli, G; Canli, M

    2015-03-01

    The glutathione metabolism contains crucial antioxidant molecules to defend the organisms against oxidants. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the response of the glutathione metabolism in the liver of freshwater fish Oreochromis niloticus exposed to metals (Cu, Cd, Cr, Pb, Zn) in different periods. Fish were exposed to metals (as 1 μg/mL) individually for 1, 7, and 14 days and subsequently antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, GPX; glutathione reductase, GR and glutathione S-transferase, GST) and glutathione levels (total glutathione, tGSH; reduced glutathione, rGSH; oxidized glutathione, GSSG and GSH/GSSG ratios) in the liver were measured. There was no fish mortality during the experiments, except Cu exposure. The antioxidant enzymes responded differently to metal exposures depending on metal types and exposure durations. GPX activity increased only after Cd exposure, while GST activity increased following 7 days of all metal exposures. However, GR activity did not alter in most cases. Total GSH and GSH/GSSG levels generally decreased, especially after 7 days. Data showed that metal exposures significantly altered the response of antioxidant system parameters, particularly at day 7 and some recovery occurred after 14 days. This study suggests that the response of antioxidant system could help to predict metal toxicity in the aquatic environments and be useful as an "early warning tool" in natural monitoring studies.

  11. Blood and tissue selenium concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activities in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zachara, B A; Szewczyk-Golec, K; Tyloch, J; Wolski, Z; Szylberg, T; Stepien, S; Kwiatkowski, S; Bloch-Boguslawska, E; Wasowicz, W

    2005-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men and a leading cause of cancer death. Prostatic gland accumulates reasonably high amount of selenium (Se), the element that prevents the development of PC. It is hypothesized that some selenoproteins inhibit the transformation of normal prostate epithelium into neoplasm. We studied Se levels in whole blood, plasma and prostate of 32 PC and 40 benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) patients and in the control group composed of 39 healthy subjects. The selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) was also measured in the patients' red cells, plasma and prostate tissue. Se concentration in whole blood and plasma in both groups of patients was lower as compared with controls, while in prostate gland it was significantly higher in PC than in BPH patients and controls. Red cell GSH-Px activity was the same in PC patients and controls but significantly lower in BPH patients. Plasma GSH-Px activity was significantly lower in PC patients than in the control group, and prostate GSH-Px activity was significantly lower in PC patients as compared with BPH patients. Since Se has anticancer properties, it is very likely that its low level in blood may facilitate the development of cancer. A higher level of Se in prostate of PC patients has no influence on GSH-Px activity in the gland. PMID:15875088

  12. Glutathione transferases P1/P2 regulate the timing of signaling pathway activations and cell cycle progression during mouse liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pajaud, J; Ribault, C; Ben Mosbah, I; Rauch, C; Henderson, C; Bellaud, P; Aninat, C; Loyer, P; Morel, F; Corlu, A

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GST) are phase II enzymes catalyzing the detoxification of endogenous noxious compounds and xenobiotics. They also regulate phosphorylation activities of MAPKinases in a catalytic-independent manner. Previous studies have demonstrated the regulation of JNK-dependent pathway by GSTP1/2. Considering the crucial role of JNK in the early steps of the hepatocyte cell cycle, we sought to determine whether GSTP1/2 were essential for hepatocyte proliferation following partial hepatectomy (PH). Using a conventional double knockout mouse model for the Gstp1 and Gstp2 genes, we found that the lack of GSTP1/P2 reduced the rate of DNA replication and mitotic index during the first wave of hepatocyte proliferation. The lowered proliferation was associated with the decrease in TNFalpha and IL-6 plasma concentrations, reduced hepatic HGF expression and delayed and/or altered activation of STAT3, JNK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. In addition, the expression and/or activation of cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D1, CDK4, E2F1 and MCM7 was postponed demonstrating that the absence of GSTP1/2 delayed the entry into and progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle and impaired the synchrony of proliferation in hepatocytes following PH. Furthermore, while JNK and its downstream targets c-Jun and ATF2 were activated during the early steps of the liver regeneration in wild-type animals, the constitutively active JNK found in the quiescent liver of Gstp1/2 knockout mice underwent a decrease in its activity after PH. Transient induction of antioxidant enzymes and nitric oxide synthase were also delayed or repressed during the regenerative response. Altogether our results demonstrate that GSTP1/2 are a critical regulators of hepatocyte proliferation in the initial phases of liver regeneration.

  13. Glutathione transferases P1/P2 regulate the timing of signaling pathway activations and cell cycle progression during mouse liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pajaud, J; Ribault, C; Ben Mosbah, I; Rauch, C; Henderson, C; Bellaud, P; Aninat, C; Loyer, P; Morel, F; Corlu, A

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) are phase II enzymes catalyzing the detoxification of endogenous noxious compounds and xenobiotics. They also regulate phosphorylation activities of MAPKinases in a catalytic-independent manner. Previous studies have demonstrated the regulation of JNK-dependent pathway by GSTP1/2. Considering the crucial role of JNK in the early steps of the hepatocyte cell cycle, we sought to determine whether GSTP1/2 were essential for hepatocyte proliferation following partial hepatectomy (PH). Using a conventional double knockout mouse model for the Gstp1 and Gstp2 genes, we found that the lack of GSTP1/P2 reduced the rate of DNA replication and mitotic index during the first wave of hepatocyte proliferation. The lowered proliferation was associated with the decrease in TNFalpha and IL-6 plasma concentrations, reduced hepatic HGF expression and delayed and/or altered activation of STAT3, JNK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. In addition, the expression and/or activation of cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D1, CDK4, E2F1 and MCM7 was postponed demonstrating that the absence of GSTP1/2 delayed the entry into and progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle and impaired the synchrony of proliferation in hepatocytes following PH. Furthermore, while JNK and its downstream targets c-Jun and ATF2 were activated during the early steps of the liver regeneration in wild-type animals, the constitutively active JNK found in the quiescent liver of Gstp1/2 knockout mice underwent a decrease in its activity after PH. Transient induction of antioxidant enzymes and nitric oxide synthase were also delayed or repressed during the regenerative response. Altogether our results demonstrate that GSTP1/2 are a critical regulators of hepatocyte proliferation in the initial phases of liver regeneration. PMID:25590808

  14. Oligo-carrageenan kappa increases NADPH, ascorbate and glutathione syntheses and TRR/TRX activities enhancing photosynthesis, basal metabolism, and growth in Eucalyptus trees

    PubMed Central

    González, Alberto; Moenne, Fabiola; Gómez, Melissa; Sáez, Claudio A.; Contreras, Rodrigo A.; Moenne, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    In order to analyze the effect of OC kappa in redox status, photosynthesis, basal metabolism and growth in Eucalyptus globulus, trees were treated with water (control), with OC kappa at 1 mg mL−1, or treated with inhibitors of NAD(P)H, ascorbate (ASC), and glutathione (GSH) syntheses and thioredoxin reductase (TRR) activity, CHS-828, lycorine, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), and auranofin, respectively, and with OC kappa, and cultivated for 4 months. Treatment with OC kappa induced an increase in NADPH, ASC, and GSH syntheses, TRR and thioredoxin (TRX) activities, photosynthesis, growth and activities of basal metabolism enzymes such as rubisco, glutamine synthetase (GlnS), adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR), involved in C, N, and S assimilation, respectively, Krebs cycle and purine/pyrimidine synthesis enzymes. Treatment with inhibitors and OC kappa showed that increases in ASC, GSH, and TRR/TRX enhanced NADPH synthesis, increases in NADPH and TRR/TRX enhanced ASC and GSH syntheses, and only the increase in NADPH enhanced TRR/TRX activities. In addition, the increase in NADPH, ASC, GSH, and TRR/TRX enhanced photosynthesis and growth. Moreover, the increase in NADPH, ASC and TRR/TRX enhanced activities of rubisco, Krebs cycle, and purine/pyrimidine synthesis enzymes, the increase in GSH, NADPH, and TRR/TRX enhanced APR activity, and the increase in NADPH and TRR/TRX enhanced GlnS activity. Thus, OC kappa increases NADPH, ASC, and GSH syntheses leading to a more reducing redox status, the increase in NADPH, ASC, GSH syntheses, and TRR/TRX activities are cross-talking events leading to activation of photosynthesis, basal metabolism, and growth in Eucalyptus trees. PMID:25352851

  15. Proanthocyanidins inhibit Ascaris suum glutathione-S-transferase activity and increase susceptibility of larvae to levamisole in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tina V A; Fryganas, Christos; Acevedo, Nathalie; Caraballo, Luis; Thamsborg, Stig M; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Williams, Andrew R

    2016-08-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAC) are a class of plant secondary metabolites commonly found in the diet that have shown potential to control gastrointestinal nematode infections. The anti-parasitic mechanism(s) of PAC remain obscure, however the protein-binding properties of PAC suggest that disturbance of key enzyme functions may be a potential mode of action. Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are essential for parasite detoxification and have been investigated as drug and vaccine targets. Here, we show that purified PAC strongly inhibit the activity of both recombinant and native GSTs from the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum. As GSTs are involved in detoxifying xenobiotic substances within the parasite, we hypothesised that this inhibition may render parasites hyper-susceptible to anthelmintic drugs. Migration inhibition assays with A. suum larvae demonstrated that the potency of levamisole (LEV) and ivermectin (IVM) were significantly increased in the presence of PAC purified from pine bark (4.6-fold and 3.2-fold reduction in IC50 value for LEV and IVM, respectively). Synergy analysis revealed that the relationship between PAC and LEV appeared to be synergistic in nature, suggesting a specific enhancement of LEV activity, whilst the relationship between PAC and IVM was additive rather than synergistic, suggesting independent actions. Our results demonstrate that these common dietary compounds may increase the efficacy of synthetic anthelmintic drugs in vitro, and also suggest one possible mechanism for their well-known anti-parasitic activity. PMID:27094225

  16. Proanthocyanidins inhibit Ascaris suum glutathione-S-transferase activity and increase susceptibility of larvae to levamisole in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tina V A; Fryganas, Christos; Acevedo, Nathalie; Caraballo, Luis; Thamsborg, Stig M; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Williams, Andrew R

    2016-08-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAC) are a class of plant secondary metabolites commonly found in the diet that have shown potential to control gastrointestinal nematode infections. The anti-parasitic mechanism(s) of PAC remain obscure, however the protein-binding properties of PAC suggest that disturbance of key enzyme functions may be a potential mode of action. Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are essential for parasite detoxification and have been investigated as drug and vaccine targets. Here, we show that purified PAC strongly inhibit the activity of both recombinant and native GSTs from the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum. As GSTs are involved in detoxifying xenobiotic substances within the parasite, we hypothesised that this inhibition may render parasites hyper-susceptible to anthelmintic drugs. Migration inhibition assays with A. suum larvae demonstrated that the potency of levamisole (LEV) and ivermectin (IVM) were significantly increased in the presence of PAC purified from pine bark (4.6-fold and 3.2-fold reduction in IC50 value for LEV and IVM, respectively). Synergy analysis revealed that the relationship between PAC and LEV appeared to be synergistic in nature, suggesting a specific enhancement of LEV activity, whilst the relationship between PAC and IVM was additive rather than synergistic, suggesting independent actions. Our results demonstrate that these common dietary compounds may increase the efficacy of synthetic anthelmintic drugs in vitro, and also suggest one possible mechanism for their well-known anti-parasitic activity.

  17. DNA damage and effects on glutathione-S-transferase activity induced by atrazine exposure in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lusheng; Dong, Xiaoli; Xie, Hui; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jinhua; Su, Jun; Yu, Changwei

    2011-10-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of atrazine (2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-S-triazine) on the activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and DNA damage in males and females of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish were exposed to control and three treatments (0.01, 0.1, and 1 mg/L) of atrazine for 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 days. The results indicated that, for males, the GST activity at lower atrazine concentrations (0.01 and 0.1 mg/L) was markedly higher than that of the controls throughout the duration of the experiment while there was a significant inhibition of the GST activity at 1 mg/L atrazine at days 5 and 20. For females, a significant increase was detected at 0.1 mg/L on the days 5 and 15 and at 0.01 mg/L on day 20. The DNA damage in zebrafish was evaluated using the comet assay; the olive tail moments obtained for hepatopancreas were enhanced after treatment with different concentrations of atrazine on days 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25. The DNA damage increased with increasing atrazine concentrations, indicating that genotoxicity of atrazine and significant differences was found compared to the controls. In conclusion, these findings provide further evidence of the effects of atrazine on aquatic ecosystems.

  18. Selenium dependent glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in the retina of preterm human infants

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, H.; Hittner, H.; Barron, S.; Mehta, R.; Kretzer, F.

    1986-03-01

    GSH-Px activity was determined in the retina of 15 preterm human neonates with gestational ages of 17-28 weeks and birth weights of 120 to 960 g. GSH-Px activity was measured using the coupled assay. The infants survived from 0.5 to 9 hours after parturition. The retinas were removed within 3 hours of autopsy. Through electronmicroscopy, there was verification that the entire retina was removed and no contamination of other eye tissues occurred. After removal, the retinas were immediately dissolved in phosphate buffered pH 7.0 saline for assay of GSH-Px activity. The mean GSH-Px activity was 19.44 +/- 6.44 with a range of 11.1 to 32.8 units NAPH/sub 2/ oxidized/min/g protein. There was a negative correlation between birth weight and GSH-Px activity (r = -0.86) and between week of gestation and GSH-Px activity (r = -0.91). The neonatal retina GSH-Px activity was 2 to 15 times higher than found in adult retinas. Thus, this research demonstrates that selenium dependent GSH-Px activity is elevated in the preterm neonate's retina which indicates that retina GSH-Px activity may be an important antioxidation system in the premature neonate.

  19. FAD-induced in vitro activation of glutathione reductase in the lens of B2 deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Ono, S; Hirano, H

    1984-04-01

    We studied the FAD-induced in vitro stimulation of lenticular glutathione reductase in riboflavin-deficient rats. The stimulatory effect of FAD on lenticular glutathione reductase in rats fed a B2-deficient diet for 4 weeks was remarkably higher than in paired control rats fed a B2-supplemented basal diet and control rats had ad libitum access to a B2-supplemented basal diet. The in vitro FAD stimulation effect on rat lenticular glutathione reductase represents a sensitive indicator of the B2 deficient status.

  20. Redox regulation of antioxidant enzymes: post-translational modulation of catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity by resveratrol in diabetic rat liver.

    PubMed

    Sadi, Gökhan; Bozan, Davut; Yildiz, Huseyin Bekir

    2014-08-01

    Resveratrol is a strong antioxidant that exhibits blood glucose-lowering effects, which might contribute to its usefulness in preventing complications associated with diabetes. The present study aimed to investigate resveratrol effects on catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) gene and protein expression, their phosphorylation states and activities in rat liver of STZ-induced diabetes. Diabetes increased the levels of total protein phosphorylation and p-CAT, while mRNA expression, protein levels, and activity were reduced. Although diabetes induced transcriptional repression over GPx, it did not affect the protein levels and activity. When resveratrol was administered to diabetic rats, an increase in activity was associated with an increase in p-GPx levels. Decrease in Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) gene expression in diabetes were associated with a decrease in CAT and GPx mRNA expression. A possible compensatory mechanism for reduced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes is proved to be nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2 and NFκB in diabetes which is confirmed by the increase in nuclear and decrease in cytoplasmic protein levels of Nrf2 and NFκB. Taken together, these findings revealed that an increase in the oxidized state in diabetes intricately modified the cellular phosphorylation status and regulation of antioxidant enzymes. Gene regulation of antioxidant enzymes was accompanied by nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and NFκB. Resveratrol administration also activated a coordinated cytoprotective response against diabetes-induced changes in liver tissues.

  1. A disulfide bound-molecular beacon as a fluorescent probe for the detection of reduced glutathione and its application in cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yingshu; Wang, Hao; Sun, Yuanshun; Qu, Bin

    2012-03-28

    A disulfide-bound molecular beacon (MB) is reported to respond sensitively to changing levels of glutathione in vitro. Importantly, this successful application of a MB has exciting potential for monitoring cellular thiol.

  2. Oxidative status, in vitro iron-induced lipid oxidation and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in rhea meat.

    PubMed

    Terevinto, A; Ramos, A; Castroman, G; Cabrera, M C; Saadoun, A

    2010-04-01

    Rhea (Rhea americana) muscles Obturatorius medialis (OM) Iliotibialis lateralis (IL) and Iliofibularis (I), obtained from farmed animals, were evaluated regarding their oxidative/antioxidant status. The mean level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) expressed as malonaldehyde (MDA) content was of 0.84 mg MDA/kg wet tissue for the three muscles. TBARS level was significantly higher in IL than OM and I, with the two latter showing similar levels. The mean level of carbonyl proteins expressed as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) was 1.59 nmol DNPH mg(-1). Carbonyl protein levels were significantly different (P<0.05) between the three muscles (IL>OM>I). Iron-induced TBARS generation was not significantly different between the three muscles at any time, nor for each muscle during the 5 h of the experiment. Superoxide dismutase activity in IL muscle was significantly higher (P<0.05) than in I muscle. However, the difference between IL and OM muscles was not significant. The differences between the three muscles became not significant when the results were expressed by mg of protein contained in the extract, instead by g of wet tissue. No differences were found for catalase (micromol of discomposed H(2)O(2) min(-1) g(-1) wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) and glutathione peroxidase (micromol ol of oxidized NADPH min(-1) g(-1) of wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) activities between the three muscles.

  3. Dimethyl fumarate and monoethyl fumarate exhibit differential effects on KEAP1, NRF2 activation, and glutathione depletion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Melanie S; Matos, Maria F; Li, Bing; Hronowski, Xiaoping; Gao, Benbo; Juhasz, Peter; Rhodes, Kenneth J; Scannevin, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (also known as gastro-resistant dimethyl fumarate), an oral therapeutic containing dimethyl fumarate (DMF) as the active ingredient, is currently approved for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis. DMF is also a component in a distinct mixture product with 3 different salts of monoethyl fumarate (MEF), which is marketed for the treatment of psoriasis. Previous studies have provided insight into the pharmacologic properties of DMF, including modulation of kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1), activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) pathway, and glutathione (GSH) modulation; however, those of MEF remain largely unexplored. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effects of DMF and MEF on KEAP1 modification, activation of the NRF2 pathway, and GSH conjugation. Using mass spectrometry, DMF treatment resulted in a robust modification of specific cysteine residues on KEAP1. In comparison, the overall degree of KEAP1 modification following MEF treatment was significantly less or undetectable. Consistent with KEAP1 cysteine modification, DMF treatment resulted in nuclear translocation of NRF2 and a robust transcriptional response in treated cells, as did MEF; however, the responses to MEF were of a lower magnitude or distinct compared to DMF. DMF was also shown to produce an acute concentration-dependent depletion of GSH; however, GSH levels eventually recovered and rose above baseline by 24 hours. In contrast, MEF did not cause acute reductions in GSH, but did produce an increase by 24 hours. Overall, these studies demonstrate that DMF and MEF are both pharmacologically active, but have differing degrees of activity as well as unique actions. These differences would be expected to result in divergent effects on downstream biology. PMID:25793262

  4. Tyrosine 8 contributes to catalysis but is not required for activity of rat liver glutathione S-transferase, 1-1.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Barycki, J. J.; Colman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Reaction of rat liver glutathione S-transferase, isozyme 1-1, with 4-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoic acid (4-FSB), a xenobiotic substrate analogue, results in a time-dependent inactivation of the enzyme to a final value of 35% of its original activity when assayed at pH 6.5 with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate. The rate of inactivation exhibits a nonlinear dependence on the concentration of 4-FSB from 0.25 mM to 9 mM, characterized by a KI of 0.78 mM and kmax of 0.011 min-1. S-Hexylglutathione or the xenobiotic substrate analogue, 2,4-dinitrophenol, protects against inactivation of the enzyme by 4-FSB, whereas S-methylglutathione has little effect on the reaction. These experiments indicate that reaction occurs within the active site of the enzyme, probably in the binding site of the xenobiotic substrate, close to the glutathione binding site. Incorporation of [3,5-3H]-4-FSB into the enzyme in the absence and presence of S-hexylglutathione suggests that modification of one residue is responsible for the partial loss of enzyme activity. Tyr 8 and Cys 17 are shown to be the reaction targets of 4-FSB, but only Tyr 8 is protected against 4-FSB by S-hexylglutathione. DTT regenerates cysteine from the reaction product of cysteine and 4-FSB, but does not reactivate the enzyme. These results show that modification of Tyr 8 by 4-FSB causes the partial inactivation of the enzyme. The Michaelis constants for various substrates are not changed by the modification of the enzyme. The pH dependence of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction of glutathione with CDNB for the modified enzyme, as compared with the native enzyme, reveals an increase of about 0.9 in the apparent pKa, which has been interpreted as representing the ionization of enzyme-bound glutathione; however, this pKa of about 7.4 for modified enzyme remains far below the pK of 9.1 for the -SH of free glutathione. Previously, it was considered that Tyr 8 was essential for GST catalysis. In contrast, we conclude that

  5. Dysregulation of Glutathione Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, William M.; Wilson-Delfosse, Amy L.; Mieyal, John. J.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are increasingly implicated in the induction and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Friedreich’s ataxia. In this review background is provided on the steady-state synthesis, regulation, and transport of glutathione, with primary focus on the brain. A brief overview is presented on the distinct but vital roles of glutathione in cellular maintenance and survival, and on the functions of key glutathione-dependent enzymes. Major contributors to initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases are considered, including oxidative stress, protein misfolding, and protein aggregation. In each case examples of key regulatory mechanisms are identified that are sensitive to changes in glutathione redox status and/or in the activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes. Mechanisms of dysregulation of glutathione and/or glutathione-dependent enzymes are discussed that are implicated in pathogenesis of each neurodegenerative disease. Limitations in information or interpretation are identified, and possible avenues for further research are described with an aim to elucidating novel targets for therapeutic interventions. The pros and cons of administration of N-acetylcysteine or glutathione as therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases, as well as the potential utility of serum glutathione as a biomarker, are critically evaluated. PMID:23201762

  6. Arsenic tolerance in mesquite (Prosopis sp.): low molecular weight thiols synthesis and glutathione activity in response to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Mokgalaka-Matlala, Ntebogeng S; Flores-Tavizón, Edith; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-09-01

    The effects of arsenic stress on the production of low molecular weight thiols (LMWT), glutathione S-transferase activity (GST) and sulfur metabolism of mesquite plant (Prosopis sp.) were examined in hydroponic culture at different arsenic [As(III) and (V)] concentrations. The production of LMWT was dependent on As speciation and concentration in the growth medium. The roots of As(III) treated plants produced significantly higher LMWT levels than As(V) treated roots at the same concentration of As applied. In leaves, the thiols content increased with increasing As(III) and (V) concentrations in the medium. Hypersensitivity of the plant to high As concentrations was observed by a significant decrease of LMWT produced in the roots at 50 mg/L treatment in both As(III) and (V) treatments. Sulfur was translocated from roots and accumulated mainly in the shoots. In response to As-induced phytotoxicity, the plants slightly increased the sulfur content in the roots at the highest As treatment. Compared with As(V)-treated plants, As(III)-treated roots and leaves showed significantly higher GST activity. The roots of both As(III) and (V) treated plants showed an initial increase in GST at low As concentration (5 mg/L), followed by significant inhibition up to 50 mg/L. The leaves had the highest GST activity, an indication of the ability of the plant to detoxify As in the leaves than in the roots. The correlation between LMWT content, S content and GST activity may be an indication these parameters may be used as biomarkers of As stress in mesquite.

  7. Salinity influences glutathione S-transferase activity and lipid peroxidation responses in the Crassostrea gigas oyster exposed to diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Juliano; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves; da Silva, Angela Zaccaron; Guzenski, João; Ferreira, Jaime Fernando; Di Mascio, Paolo; Marques, Maria Risoleta Freire; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias

    2011-04-15

    Biochemical responses in bivalve mollusks are commonly employed in environmental studies as biomarkers of aquatic contamination. The present study evaluated the possible influence of salinity (35, 25, 15 and 9ppt) in the biomarker responses of Crassostrea gigas oysters exposed to diesel at different nominal concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1mL.L(-1)) using a semi-static exposure system. Salinity alone did not resulted in major changes in the gill's catalase activity (CAT), glutathione S-transferase activity (GST) and lipid peroxidation levels (measured as malondialdehyde, MDA), but influenced diesel related responses. At 25ppt salinity, but not at the other salinity levels, oysters exposed to diesel showed a strikingly positive concentration-dependent GST response. At 25ppt and 1mL.L(-1) diesel, the GST activity in the gills remained elevated, even after one week of depuration in clean water. The increased MDA levels in the oysters exposed to diesel comparing to control groups at 9, 15 and 35ppt salinities suggest the occurrence of lipid peroxidation in those salinities, but not at 25ppt salinity. The MDA quickly returned to basal levels after 24h of depuration. CAT activity was unaltered by the treatments employed. High toxicity for 1mL.L(-1) diesel was observed only at 35ppt salinity, but not in the other salinities. Results from this study strongly suggest that salinity influences the diesel related biomarker responses and toxicity in C. gigas, and that some of those responses remain altered even after depuration.

  8. Activation of a Novel c-Myc-miR27-Prohibitin 1 Circuitry in Cholestatic Liver Injury Inhibits Glutathione Synthesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Heping; Li, Tony W.H.; Zhou, Yu; Peng, Hui; Liu, Ting; Zandi, Ebrahim; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz; Mato, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: We showed that chronic cholestatic liver injury induced the expression of c-Myc but suppressed that of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL, composed of catalytic and modifier subunits GCLC and GCLM, respectively). This was associated with reduced nuclear antioxidant response element (ARE) binding by nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). Here, we examined whether c-Myc is involved in this process. Results: Similar to bile duct ligation (BDL), lithocholic acid (LCA) treatment in vivo induced c-Myc but suppressed GCL subunits expression at day 14. Nrf2 expression and Nrf2 ARE binding fell markedly. However, Nrf2 heterodimerization with MafG was enhanced by LCA, which prompted us to examine whether LCA treatment in vivo altered proteins that bind to ARE using biotinylated ARE in pull-down assay followed by proteomics. LCA treatment enhanced c-Myc but lowered prohibitin 1 (PHB1) binding to ARE. This was a result of c-Myc-mediated induction of microRNA 27a/b (miR27a/b), which target both PHB1 and Nrf2 to reduce their expression. Knockdown of c-Myc or miR27a/b attenuated LCA-mediated suppression of Nrf2, PHB1, and GCL subunit expression, whereas overexpression of PHB1 protected against the fall in Nrf2 and GCL subunits. Both c-Myc and PHB1 directly interact with Nrf2 but c-Myc lowers Nrf2 binding to ARE while PHB1 enhances it. Innovation: This is the first work that shows how activation of this circuit in cholestatic liver injury inhibits GCL expression. Conclusions: LCA feeding and BDL activate c-Myc-miR27a/b-PHB1 circuit, with the consequence of inhibiting Nrf2 expression and ARE binding, resulting in decreased reduced glutathione synthesis and antioxidant capacity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 259–274. PMID:25226451

  9. Red blood cell and plasma glutathione peroxidase activities and selenium concentration in patients with chronic kidney disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronisław A; Gromadzińska, Jolanta; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Zbróg, Zbigniew

    2006-01-01

    The metabolism of oxygen in aerobic organisms leads to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These entities are able to oxidize almost all classes of macromolecules, including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. The physiological level of ROS is usually regulated by antioxidant defense mechanisms. There are at least three groups of antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutases, catalases and glutathione peroxidases (GSH-Pxs) which neutralize ROS. The trace elements (copper, zinc and selenium) bound to the active sites of the above listed enzymes play an important role in the antioxidant defense system. In mammals, a major function of selenium (Se) and Se-dependent GSH-Pxs is to protect cells from oxidative stress. Selenium concentrations and GSH-Px activities are altered in blood components of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The Se level is frequently lower than in healthy subjects and the concentration very often decreases gradually with advancing stage of the disease. Studies on red cell GSH-Px activity in CKD patients reported its values significantly lower, significantly higher and lower or higher, but not significantly as compared with healthy subjects. On the other hand, all authors who studied plasma GSH-Px activity have shown significantly lower values than in healthy subjects. The degree of the reduction decreases gradually with the progression of the disease. High inverse correlations were seen between plasma GSH-Px activity and creatinine level. A gradual decrease in plasma GSH-Px activity in CKD patients is due to the fact that this enzyme is synthesized predominantly in the kidney and thus the impairment of this organ is the cause of the enzyme's lower activity. Se supplementation to CKD patients has a slightly positive effect in the incipient stage of the disease, but usually no effect was observed in end-stage CKD. Presently, kidney transplantation is the only treatment that may restore plasma Se level and GSH-Px activity in patients

  10. Biliary transport of glutathione S-conjugate by rat liver canalicular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Akerboom, T P; Sies, H; Kinne, R; Thao, T; Arias, I M

    1984-04-25

    Transport of S-dinitrophenyl glutathione, a model compound of glutathione S-conjugates, was studied in isolated rat liver canalicular membrane vesicles by a rapid filtration technique. The membrane vesicles exhibited time-dependent uptake of [2-3H]glycine-glutathione conjugate into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space. Inactivation of vesicle-associated gamma-glutamyltransferase by affinity labeling with L-(alpha-S,5S)-alpha-amino-3-chloro-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazole-acetic acid had no effect on the initial rate of transport. Chemical analysis revealed that the intact glutathione conjugate accounted for most vesicle-associated radioactivity, reflecting the low transferase activity in the liver and membrane vesicles. The initial rate of transport followed saturation kinetics with respect to conjugate concentrations; an apparent Km of 1.0 mM and Vmax of 1.7 nmol/mg of protein X 20 s were calculated. These results indicate that transport of the glutathione S-conjugate across the canalicular membranes is a carrier-mediated process. Sodium chloride in the transport medium could be replaced by KCl, LiCl, or choline chloride without any changes in transport activity. The rate of conjugate transport was enhanced by a valinomycin-induced K+ diffusion potential (vesicle-inside-positive). The rate of conjugate uptake was enhanced by replacing KCl in the transport medium with K gluconate, providing a less permeant anion, and was reduced by replacing KCl with KSCN, providing a more permeant anion. These data indicate that conjugate transport is electrogenic and involves the transfer of negative charge. Transport of S-dinitrophenyl glutathione was inhibited by S-benzyl glutathione, oxidized glutathione, or reduced glutathione. This transport system in canalicular membranes may function in biliary secretion of glutathione S-conjugates of xenobiotics whose synthesis in hepatocytes requires glutathione S-transferases.

  11. Alterations in superoxide dismutase activities, lipid peroxidation and glutathione levels in thinner inhaled rat lungs: relationship between histopathological properties.

    PubMed

    Ulakoğlu, E Z; Saygi, A; Gümüştaş, M K; Zor, E; Oztek, I; Kökoğlu, E

    1998-09-01

    Paint thinner has widespread use in industry. The use of thinner among children as a narcotic agent has become a social and health problem. There is some evidence that organic solvents may express their toxicity by the way of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced cell damage. ROS has been shown to induce lipid peroxidation in biological membranes. This study examined peroxidative and histopathological changes in the rat lung, during 5 weeks of thinner inhalation. Significant increases were found in lipid peroxidation (MDA+4-DHA) levels related to the duration of inhalation. As opposed to increases in the lipid peroxidation levels, significant decreases in superoxide dismutase activities and glutathione levels were observed from the third inhalation week to the end of the fifth week. At the beginning of the inhalation slight inflammatory changes, intraalveolar and interstitial extravasation and oedema in lung parenchyma were noted. As the inhalation period extended, chronic inflammatory changes, alveolar epithelial proliferation, collapse, emphysematous changes and interstitial fibrosis in lung were detected. PMID:9782071

  12. Relationships between silicon content and glutathione peroxidase activity in tissues of rats receiving lithium in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kiełczykowska, Małgorzata; Musik, Irena; Pasternak, Kazimierz

    2008-02-01

    Lithium salts are widely used in psychiatry, but their presence in organism can result in both beneficial and adverse effects. Silicon, the third most abundant trace element in humans as well as antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx) play important roles in organism. The disturbance of their level can cause severe disorders. The aim of our work was to evaluate the influence of Li2CO3 administration in drinking water for a period of 4 weeks on Si content and GPx activity in the tissues of liver, kidney, brain and femoral muscle in rats. The concentrations of provided solutions were 0.7, 1.4, 2.6, 3.6, 7.1 and 10.7 mmol Li+ x dm-3. GPx activity was decreased versus control as a consequence of Li treatment, particularly in kidney and brain. This effect could be suggested to contribute to renal abnormalities which could occur during Li therapy. Si tissue level was significantly enhanced versus control in liver and femoral muscle in groups receiving high Li doses. In brain no well-marked changes were observed, whereas in kidney we observed the depletion in low-Li-groups, restoration of Si level in higher-Li-groups and unexpected decrease in the highest-Li-group. Positive correlations between Si content and GPx activity in the tissues of kidney (r = 0.677) and brain (r = 0.790) as well as negative correlation (r = -0.819) in femoral muscle were found. We consider that our results give some reason for suggesting that monitoring of silicon level in patients undergoing Li therapy could be recommended. However, more investigations should be performed, particularly regarding the relationships between Si and GPx in blood and urine Si excretion during lithium administration.

  13. Purification of glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes from tumour and nontumour human stomach and inhibitory effects of some heavy metals on enzymes activities.

    PubMed

    Demirdag, Ramazan; Yerlikaya, Emrah; Kufrevioglu, Omer Irfan; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2013-10-01

    In this study, glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzyme was purified from nontumour and tumour human gastric tissue and in vitro effects of heavy metals on the enzyme were examined. GST was purified 3089 fold with a specific activity of 20 U/mg and a yield of 78% from gastric tumour tissue; and 1185 fold with a specific activity of 5.69 U/mg and a yield of 50% from nontumour tissue by using glutathione-agarose affinity column, respectively. Enzyme purity was verified by SDS-PAGE and subunit molecular mass was calculated around 26 kDa. The molecular weight of the enzyme was calculated as 52 kDa by using Sephadex G-75 gel filtration column. Then, inhibitory effects of metal ions on the enzymes were investigated. Mg(2+) and Cd(2+) had inhibitory effect on the enzymes activities. Other kinetic properties of the enzymes were also determined.

  14. Glutathione, glutathione-related enzymes, and oxidative stress in individuals with subacute occupational exposure to lead.

    PubMed

    Dobrakowski, Michał; Pawlas, Natalia; Hudziec, Edyta; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Agnieszka; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of subacute exposure to lead on the glutathione-related antioxidant defense and oxidative stress parameters in 36 males occupationally exposed to lead for 40±3.2days. Blood lead level in the examined population increased significantly by 359% due to lead exposure. Simultaneously, erythrocyte glutathione level decreased by 16%, whereas the activity of glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and leukocytes decreased by 28% and 10%, respectively. Similarly, the activity of glutathione-S-transferase in erythrocytes decreased by 45%. However, the activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes and leukocytes increased by 26% and 6%, respectively, whereas the total oxidant status value in leukocytes increased by 37%. Subacute exposure to lead results in glutathione pool depletion and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products; however, it does not cause DNA damage. Besides, subacute exposure to lead modifies the activity of glutathione-related enzymes. PMID:27331344

  15. Molecular mechanisms of reduced glutathione transport: role of the MRP/CFTR/ABCC and OATP/SLC21A families of membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ballatori, Nazzareno . E-mail: Ned_Ballatori@urmc.rochester.edu; Hammond, Christine L.; Cunningham, Jennifer B.; Krance, Suzanne M.; Marchan, Rosemarie

    2005-05-01

    The initial step in reduced glutathione (GSH) turnover in all mammalian cells is its transport across the plasma membrane into the extracellular space; however, the mechanisms of GSH transport are not clearly defined. GSH export is required for the delivery of its constituent amino acids to other tissues, detoxification of drugs, metals, and other reactive compounds of both endogenous and exogenous origin, protection against oxidant stress, and secretion of hepatic bile. Recent studies indicate that some members of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP/CFTR or ABCC) family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, as well as some members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP or SLC21A) family of transporters contribute to this process. In particular, five of the 12 members of the MRP/CFTR family appear to mediate GSH export from cells namely, MRP1, MRP2, MRP4, MRP5, and CFTR. Additionally, two members of the OATP family, rat Oatp1 and Oatp2, have been identified as GSH transporters. For the Oatp1 transporter, efflux of GSH may provide the driving force for the uptake of extracellular substrates. In humans, OATP-B and OATP8 do not appear to transport GSH; however, other members of this family have yet to be characterized in regards to GSH transport. In yeast, the ABC proteins Ycf1p and Bpt1p transport GSH from the cytosol into the vacuole, whereas Hgt1p mediates GSH uptake across the plasma membrane. Because transport is a key step in GSH homeostasis and is intimately linked to its biological functions, GSH export proteins are likely to modulate essential cellular functions.

  16. Glutathione-induced radical formation on lactoperoxidase does not correlate with the enzyme's peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Marcelo G; Siraki, Arno G; Bhattacharjee, Suchandra; Mason, Ronald P

    2007-04-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is believed to serve as a mediator of host defense against invading pathogens. The protein is more abundant in body fluids such as milk, saliva, and tears. Lactoperoxidase is known to mediate the oxidation of halides and (pseudo)halides in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to reactive intermediates presumably involved in pathogen killing. More recently, LPO has been shown to oxidize a wide diversity of thiol compounds to thiyl free radicals, which ultimately lead to the formation of a protein radical characterized by DMPO-immunospin trapping. In the same study by our group the authors claimed that a consequence of this protein radical formation was the inactivation of LPO (Guo et al., J. Biol. Chem.279:13272-13283; 2004). Here we demonstrate that although thiyl radical formation does lead to LPO radical production, the formation of this radical is unrelated to the enzyme's activity. We suggest the source of this misleading interpretation to be the binding of GSH to ELISA plates, which interferes with ABTS and guaiacol oxidation. In addition, DMPO-GSH-nitrone adducts bind to ELISA plates, leading to ambiguities of interpretation since we have demonstrated that DMPO-GSH nitrone does not bind to LPO, and only LPO-protein-DMPO-nitrone adducts can be detected by Western blot.

  17. Reducing Skin Picking via Competing Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Thompson, Ada; Reske, Cara L.; Gable, Lauren M.; Barton-Arwood, Sally

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the outcomes of a competing activities intervention to decrease skin picking exhibited by a 9-year-old student with comorbid diagnoses. Results of an ABCBAB design revealed that the use of student-selected manipulatives resulted in reduced skin picking. (Contains 1 figure.)

  18. The influence of atmospheric chromium on selenium content and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood of tannery workers.

    PubMed

    Gromadzińska, J; Wasowicz, W; Sklodowska, M; Bulikowski, W; Rydzyński, K

    1996-12-01

    The concentration of selenium and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were determined in blood of 34 workers of a tannery in Gniezno, Poland, who worked in an area containing chromium compounds. Fourteen workers were exposed to chromium compounds at concentrations of 0.11 +/- 0.07 mg Cr/m3 (mean +/- SD) and 20 at concentrations 5-10 times lower i.e., 0.022 +/- 0.009 mg Cr/m3. Excretion of Se in urine was measured in all of the investigated workers. Decreased Se concentration in whole blood and blood plasma and elevated TBARS concentration in blood plasma were found in the whole group of investigated tanners as compared to controls. Tanners working in areas with high chromium concentrations had a statistically significant decrease in Se concentration in blood and plasma and decreased urinary excretion of the microelement as compared with other tanners. TBARS concentration was 2.5 times lower in workers exposed to higher chromium concentrations (p < 0.005) than in other workers. Positive linear correlations were found between the concentration of Se in blood and the amount of the element excreted in urine (r = 0.48; p < 0.005), the concentration of Se in blood plasma and in urine (r = 0.46; p < 0.01), and the concentration of Se in blood and erythrocyte GSH-Px activity (r = 0.42; p < 0.02). The observed differences between Se concentration in blood and urine of tannery workers and people who are not employed in the industry may indicate a kind of specific adaptation of the body to the working environment containing chromium compounds.

  19. Probucol increases striatal glutathione peroxidase activity and protects against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced pro-oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Colle, Dirleise; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Hartwig, Juliana Montagna; dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; Zimmermann, Luciana Teixeira; Hort, Mariana Appel; Farina, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by symptoms attributable to the death of striatal and cortical neurons. The molecular mechanisms mediating neuronal death in HD involve oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an irreversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, in rodents has been proposed as a useful experimental model of HD. This study evaluated the effects of probucol, a lipid-lowering agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, on the biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress, as well as on the behavioral parameters related to motor function in an in vivo HD model based on 3-NP intoxication in rats. Animals were treated with 3.5 mg/kg of probucol in drinking water daily for 2 months and, subsequently, received 3-NP (25 mg/kg i.p.) once a day for 6 days. At the end of the treatments, 3-NP-treated animals showed a significant decrease in body weight, which corresponded with impairment on motor ability, inhibition of mitochondrial complex II activity and oxidative stress in the striatum. Probucol, which did not rescue complex II inhibition, protected against behavioral and striatal biochemical changes induced by 3-NP, attenuating 3-NP-induced motor impairments and striatal oxidative stress. Importantly, probucol was able to increase activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an enzyme important in mediating the detoxification of peroxides in the central nervous system. The major finding of this study was that probucol protected against 3-NP-induced behavioral and striatal biochemical changes without affecting 3-NP-induced mitochondrial complex II inhibition, indicating that long-term probucol treatment resulted in an increased resistance against neurotoxic events (i.e., increased oxidative damage) secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction. These data appeared to be of great relevance when

  20. Cardiac Energy Dependence on Glucose Increases Metabolites Related to Glutathione and Activates Metabolic Genes Controlled by Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Pascual, Florencia; Cooper, Daniel E.; Ellis, Jessica M.; Paul, David S.; Willis, Monte S.; Patterson, Cam; Jia, Wei; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long chain acyl‐CoA synthetases (ACSL) catalyze long‐chain fatty acids (FA) conversion to acyl‐CoAs. Temporal ACSL1 inactivation in mouse hearts (Acsl1H−/−) impaired FA oxidation and dramatically increased glucose uptake, glucose oxidation, and mTOR activation, resulting in cardiac hypertrophy. We used unbiased metabolomics and gene expression analyses to elucidate the cardiac cellular response to increased glucose use in a genetic model of inactivated FA oxidation. Methods and Results Metabolomics analysis identified 60 metabolites altered in Acsl1H−/− hearts, including 6 related to glucose metabolism and 11 to cysteine and glutathione pathways. Concurrently, global cardiac transcriptional analysis revealed differential expression of 568 genes in Acsl1H−/− hearts, a subset of which we hypothesized were targets of mTOR; subsequently, we measured the transcriptional response of several genes after chronic mTOR inhibition via rapamycin treatment during the period in which cardiac hypertrophy develops. Hearts from Acsl1H−/− mice increased expression of several Hif1α‐responsive glycolytic genes regulated by mTOR; additionally, expression of Scl7a5, Gsta1/2, Gdf15, and amino acid‐responsive genes, Fgf21, Asns, Trib3, Mthfd2, were strikingly increased by mTOR activation. Conclusions The switch from FA to glucose use causes mTOR‐dependent alterations in cardiac metabolism. We identified cardiac mTOR‐regulated genes not previously identified in other cellular models, suggesting heart‐specific mTOR signaling. Increased glucose use also changed glutathione‐related pathways and compensation by mTOR. The hypertrophy, oxidative stress, and metabolic changes that occur within the heart when glucose supplants FA as a major energy source suggest that substrate switching to glucose is not entirely benign. PMID:25713290

  1. The influence of atmospheric chromium on selenium content and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood of tannery workers.

    PubMed Central

    Gromadzińska, J; Wasowicz, W; Sklodowska, M; Bulikowski, W; Rydzyński, K

    1996-01-01

    The concentration of selenium and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were determined in blood of 34 workers of a tannery in Gniezno, Poland, who worked in an area containing chromium compounds. Fourteen workers were exposed to chromium compounds at concentrations of 0.11 +/- 0.07 mg Cr/m3 (mean +/- SD) and 20 at concentrations 5-10 times lower i.e., 0.022 +/- 0.009 mg Cr/m3. Excretion of Se in urine was measured in all of the investigated workers. Decreased Se concentration in whole blood and blood plasma and elevated TBARS concentration in blood plasma were found in the whole group of investigated tanners as compared to controls. Tanners working in areas with high chromium concentrations had a statistically significant decrease in Se concentration in blood and plasma and decreased urinary excretion of the microelement as compared with other tanners. TBARS concentration was 2.5 times lower in workers exposed to higher chromium concentrations (p < 0.005) than in other workers. Positive linear correlations were found between the concentration of Se in blood and the amount of the element excreted in urine (r = 0.48; p < 0.005), the concentration of Se in blood plasma and in urine (r = 0.46; p < 0.01), and the concentration of Se in blood and erythrocyte GSH-Px activity (r = 0.42; p < 0.02). The observed differences between Se concentration in blood and urine of tannery workers and people who are not employed in the industry may indicate a kind of specific adaptation of the body to the working environment containing chromium compounds. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9118872

  2. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) family in barley: identification of members, enzyme activity, and gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammad Kazem; Shobbar, Zahra-Sadat; Shahbazi, Maryam; Abedini, Raha; Zare, Sajjad

    2013-09-15

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is one of the most important cereals in many developing countries where drought stress considerably diminishes agricultural production. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs EC 2.5.1.18) are multifunctional enzymes which play a crucial role in cellular detoxification and oxidative stress tolerance. In this study, 84 GST genes were identified in barley by a comprehensive in silico approach. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis grouped these HvGST proteins in eight classes. The largest numbers of the HvGST genes (50) were included in the Tau class followed by 21 genes in Phi, five in Zeta, two in DHAR, two in EF1G, two in Lambda, and one each in TCHQD and Theta classes. Phylogenetic analysis of the putative GSTs from Arabidopsis, rice, and barley indicated that major functional diversification within the GST family predated the monocot/dicot divergence. However, intra-specious duplication seems to be common. Expression patterns of five GST genes from Phi and Tau classes were investigated in three barley genotypes (Yusof [drought-tolerant], Moroc9-75 [drought-sensitive], and HS1 [wild ecotype]) under control and drought-stressed conditions, during the vegetative stage. All investigated genes were up-regulated significantly under drought stress and/or showed a higher level of transcripts in the tolerant cultivar. Additionally, GST enzyme activity was superior in Yusof and induced in the extreme-drought-treated leaves, while it was not changed in Moroc9-75 under drought conditions. Moreover, the lowest and highest levels of lipid peroxidation were observed in the Yusof and Moroc9-75 cultivars, respectively. Based on the achieved results, detoxification and antioxidant activity of GSTs might be considered an important factor in the drought tolerance of barley genotypes for further investigations.

  3. Activating Attachments Reduces Memories of Traumatic Images.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Richard A; Foord, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Emotional memories, and especially intrusive memories, are a common feature of many psychological disorders, and are overconsolidated by stress. Attachment theory posits that activation of mental representations of attachment figures can reduce stress and boost coping. This study tested the proposition that attachment activation would reduce consolidation of emotional and intrusive memories. Sixty-seven undergraduate students viewed subliminal presentations of traumatic and neutral images, which were preceded by subliminal presentations of either attachment-related images or non-attachment-related images; free recall and intrusive memories were assessed two days later. Participants with low avoidant attachment tendencies who received the attachment primes recalled fewer memories and reported fewer intrusions than those who received the non-attachment primes. Unexpectedly, those with high anxious attachment tendencies reported fewer memories. These findings generally accord with attachment theory, and suggest that consolidation of emotional memories can be moderated by activation of attachment representations. PMID:27631498

  4. Activating Attachments Reduces Memories of Traumatic Images.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Richard A; Foord, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Emotional memories, and especially intrusive memories, are a common feature of many psychological disorders, and are overconsolidated by stress. Attachment theory posits that activation of mental representations of attachment figures can reduce stress and boost coping. This study tested the proposition that attachment activation would reduce consolidation of emotional and intrusive memories. Sixty-seven undergraduate students viewed subliminal presentations of traumatic and neutral images, which were preceded by subliminal presentations of either attachment-related images or non-attachment-related images; free recall and intrusive memories were assessed two days later. Participants with low avoidant attachment tendencies who received the attachment primes recalled fewer memories and reported fewer intrusions than those who received the non-attachment primes. Unexpectedly, those with high anxious attachment tendencies reported fewer memories. These findings generally accord with attachment theory, and suggest that consolidation of emotional memories can be moderated by activation of attachment representations.

  5. Activating Attachments Reduces Memories of Traumatic Images

    PubMed Central

    Foord, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Emotional memories, and especially intrusive memories, are a common feature of many psychological disorders, and are overconsolidated by stress. Attachment theory posits that activation of mental representations of attachment figures can reduce stress and boost coping. This study tested the proposition that attachment activation would reduce consolidation of emotional and intrusive memories. Sixty-seven undergraduate students viewed subliminal presentations of traumatic and neutral images, which were preceded by subliminal presentations of either attachment-related images or non-attachment-related images; free recall and intrusive memories were assessed two days later. Participants with low avoidant attachment tendencies who received the attachment primes recalled fewer memories and reported fewer intrusions than those who received the non-attachment primes. Unexpectedly, those with high anxious attachment tendencies reported fewer memories. These findings generally accord with attachment theory, and suggest that consolidation of emotional memories can be moderated by activation of attachment representations. PMID:27631498

  6. Improvement of oxidized glutathione fermentation by thiol redox metabolism engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Aoki, Naoko; Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Nishida, Keiji; Araki, Michihiro; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tripeptide widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. In industrial fermentation, glutathione is currently produced primarily using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Intracellular glutathione exists in two forms; the majority is present as reduced glutathione (GSH) and a small amount is present as oxidized glutathione (GSSG). However, GSSG is more stable than GSH and is a more attractive form for the storage of glutathione extracted from yeast cells after fermentation. In this study, intracellular GSSG content was improved by engineering thiol oxidization metabolism in yeast. An engineered strain producing high amounts of glutathione from over-expression of glutathione synthases and lacking glutathione reductase was used as a platform strain. Additional over-expression of thiol oxidase (1.8.3.2) genes ERV1 or ERO1 increased the GSSG content by 2.9-fold and 2.0-fold, respectively, compared with the platform strain, without decreasing cell growth. However, over-expression of thiol oxidase gene ERV2 showed almost no effect on the GSSG content. Interestingly, ERO1 over-expression did not decrease the GSH content, raising the total glutathione content of the cell, but ERV1 over-expression decreased the GSH content, balancing the increase in the GSSG content. Furthermore, the increase in the GSSG content due to ERO1 over-expression was enhanced by additional over-expression of the gene encoding Pdi1, whose reduced form activates Ero1 in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that engineering the thiol redox metabolism of S. cerevisiae improves GSSG and is critical to increasing the total productivity and stability of glutathione.

  7. Influence of glutathione and glutathione S-transferases on DNA interstrand cross-link formation by 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)hydrazine, the active anticancer moiety generated by laromustine.

    PubMed

    Penketh, Philip G; Patridge, Eric; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Baumann, Raymond P; Zhu, Rui; Ishiguro, Kimiko; Sartorelli, Alan C

    2014-08-18

    Prodrugs of 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)hydrazine (90CE) are promising anticancer agents. The 90CE moiety is a readily latentiated, short-lived (t1/2 ∼ 30 s) chloroethylating agent that can generate high yields of oxophilic electrophiles responsible for the chloroethylation of the O-6 position of guanine in DNA. These guanine O-6 alkylations are believed to be responsible for the therapeutic effects of 90CE and its prodrugs. Thus, 90CE demonstrates high selectivity toward tumors with diminished levels of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (MGMT), the resistance protein responsible for O(6)-alkylguanine repair. The formation of O(6)-(2-chloroethyl)guanine lesions ultimately leads to the generation of highly cytotoxic 1-(N(3)-cytosinyl),-2-(N(1)-guaninyl)ethane DNA interstrand cross-links via N(1),O(6)-ethanoguanine intermediates. The anticancer activity arising from this sequence of reactions is thus identical to this component of the anticancer activity of the clinically used chloroethylnitrosoureas. Herein, we evaluate the ability of glutathione (GSH) and other low molecular weight thiols, as well as GSH coupled with various glutathione S-transferase enzymes (GSTs) to attenuate the final yields of cross-links generated by 90CE when added prior to or immediately following the initial chloroethylation step to determine the major point(s) of interaction. In contrast to studies utilizing BCNU as a chloroethylating agent by others, GSH (or GSH/GST) did not appreciably quench DNA interstrand cross-link precursors. While thiols alone offered little protection at either alkylation step, the GSH/GST couple was able to diminish the initial yields of cross-link precursors. 90CE exhibited a very different GST isoenzyme susceptibility to that reported for BCNU, this could have important implications in the relative resistance of tumor cells to these agents. The protection afforded by GSH/GST was compared to that produced by MGMT.

  8. Effect of fish oil on glutathione redox system in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sorto-Gomez, Tania E; Ortiz, Genaro G; Pacheco-Moises, Fermín P; Torres-Sanchez, Erandis D; Ramirez-Ramirez, Viridiana; Macias-Islas, Miguel A; de la Rosa, Alfredo Celis; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory and autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are implicated in the induction and progression of MS. Evidence suggests that Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of fish oil on the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), content of reduced and oxidized glutathione, and GSH/GSSG ratio in MS. 50 patients with relapsing-remitting MS were enrolled. The experimental group received orally 4 g/day of fish oil for 12 months. Fish oil supplementation resulted in a significant increase in n-3 fatty acids and a decrease n-6 fatty acids. No differences in glutathione reductase activity, content of reduced and oxidized glutathione, and GSH/GSSG ratio were found. Conclusion: Glutathione reductase activity was not significantly different between the groups; however, fish oil supplementation resulted in smaller increase in GR compared with control group, suggesting a possible effect on antioxidant defence mechanisms. PMID:27335704

  9. Differential Activation of Diverse Glutathione Transferases of Clonorchis sinensis in Response to the Host Bile and Oxidative Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-An; Ahn, Do-Whan; Lee, Eung-Goo; Kim, Seon-Hee; Cai, Guo-Bin; Kang, Insug; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Kong, Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Background Clonorchis sinensis causes chronic cumulative infections in the human hepatobiliary tract and is intimately associated with cholangiocarcinoma. Approximately 35 million people are infected and 600 million people are at risk of infections worldwide. C. sinensis excretory-secretory products (ESP) constitute the first-line effector system affecting the host-parasite interrelationship by interacting with bile fluids and ductal epithelium. However, the secretory behavior of C. sinensis in an environment close to natural host conditions is unclear. C. sinensis differs from Fasciola hepatica in migration to, and maturation in, the hepatic bile duct, implying that protein profile of the ESP of these two trematodes might be different from each other. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted systemic approaches to analyze the C. sinensis ESP proteome and the biological reactivity of C. sinensis glutathione transferases (GSTs), such as global expression patterns and induction profiles under oxidative stress and host bile. When we observed ex host excretion behavior of C. sinensis in the presence of 10% host bile, the global proteome pattern was not significantly altered, but the amount of secretory proteins was increased by approximately 3.5-fold. Bioactive molecules secreted by C. sinensis revealed universal/unique features in relation to its intraluminal hydrophobic residing niche. A total of 38 protein spots identified abundantly included enzymes involved in glucose metabolism (11 spots, 28.9%) and diverse-classes of glutathione transferases (GSTs; 10 spots, 26.3%). Cathepsin L/F (four spots, 10.5%) and transporter molecules (three spots, 7.9%) were also recognized. The universal secretory proteins found in other parasites, such as several enzymes involved in glucose metabolism and oxygen transporters, were commonly detected. C. sinensis secreted less cysteine proteases and fatty acid binding proteins compared to other tissue-invading or intravascular

  10. Glutathione metabolic genes coordinately respond to heavy metals and jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, C; Oliver, D J

    1998-01-01

    Glutathione plays a pivotal role in protecting plants from environmental stresses, oxidative stress, xenobiotics, and some heavy metals. Arabidopsis plants treated with cadmium or copper responded by increasing transcription of the genes for glutathione synthesis, gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione synthetase, as well as glutathione reductase. The response was specific for those metals whose toxicity is thought to be mitigated through phytochelatins, and other toxic and nontoxic metals did not alter mRNA levels. Feeding experiments suggested that neither oxidative stress, as results from exposure to H2O2, nor oxidized or reduced glutathione levels were responsible for activating transcription of these genes. Jasmonic acid also activated the same suite of genes, which suggests that it might be involved in the signal transduction pathway for copper and cadmium. Jasmonic acid treatment increased mRNA levels and the capacity for glutathione synthesis but did not alter the glutathione content in unstressed plants, which supports the idea that the glutathione concentration is controlled at multiple levels. PMID:9724699

  11. Effect of polyphenols extracted from tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seed coat on pathophysiological changes and red blood cell glutathione peroxidase activity in heat-stressed broilers.

    PubMed

    Aengwanich, Worapol; Suttajit, Maitree

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of polyphenols extracted from the tamarind seed coat (PETSC) on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, red blood cell parameters and bilirubin in heat-stressed broilers. One hundred forty-seven broilers, 18-days old were divided into two groups. In group 1, broilers were maintained at an environmental temperature of 26 ± 2 °C throughout the experimental period. In group 2, the broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C (cyclic temperature: 26 ± 2 °C; -38 ± 2 °C; and -26 ± 2 °C, and broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C for 6 h/ day) and received PETSC at a concentration of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 mg/kg in their diet ad libitum. Parameters were investigated on days 1, 7, 14 and 21 of the experimental period. Results showed that GPx activity of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC in their diet was lower (P < 0.05) than that in broilers fed the other concentrations. The mean total red blood cell count and hemoglobin concentration of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg PETSC was higher (P < 0.05) than those in broilers in group 1 and those fed the other concentrations. The mean bilirubin level in the excreta of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC was lower (P < 0.05) than that in broilers that received 0, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg of PETSC. This showed that PETSC could reduce GPx activity and bilirubin in feces, and increase red blood cell parameters in heat-stressed broilers.

  12. Effect of polyphenols extracted from tamarind ( Tamarindus indica L.) seed coat on pathophysiological changes and red blood cell glutathione peroxidase activity in heat-stressed broilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aengwanich, Worapol; Suttajit, Maitree

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of polyphenols extracted from the tamarind seed coat (PETSC) on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, red blood cell parameters and bilirubin in heat-stressed broilers. One hundred forty-seven broilers, 18-days old were divided into two groups. In group 1, broilers were maintained at an environmental temperature of 26 ± 2 °C throughout the experimental period. In group 2, the broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C (cyclic temperature: 26 ± 2 °C; -38 ± 2 °C; and -26 ± 2 °C, and broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C for 6 h/ day) and received PETSC at a concentration of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 mg/kg in their diet ad libitum. Parameters were investigated on days 1, 7, 14 and 21 of the experimental period. Results showed that GPx activity of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC in their diet was lower ( P < 0.05) than that in broilers fed the other concentrations. The mean total red blood cell count and hemoglobin concentration of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg PETSC was higher ( P < 0.05) than those in broilers in group 1 and those fed the other concentrations. The mean bilirubin level in the excreta of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC was lower ( P < 0.05) than that in broilers that received 0, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg of PETSC. This showed that PETSC could reduce GPx activity and bilirubin in feces, and increase red blood cell parameters in heat-stressed broilers.

  13. Comparative assay of glutathione S-transferase (GSTs) activity of excretory-secretory materials and somatic extract of Fasciola spp parasites.

    PubMed

    Alirahmi, Heshmatollah; Farahnak, Ali; Golmohamadi, Taghi; Esharghian, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Fascioliasis is a worldwide parasitic disease in human and domestic animals. The causative agents of fascioliasis are Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. In the recent years, fasciola resistance to drugs has been reported in the many of publications. Fasciola spp has detoxification system including GST enzyme which may be responsible for its resistance. Therefore , the aim of the study was to assay of GST enzyme activity in fasciola parasites. Fasciola gigantica and Fasciola hepatica helminths were collected from abattoir as a live and cultured in buffer media for 4 h at 37 °C. Excretory-Secretory products were collected and stored in -80◦C. F. gigantica and Fasciola hepatica were homogenized with homogenizing buffer in a glass homogenizer to prepare of somatic extract. Suspension was then centrifuged and supernatant was stored at -80°C. In order to assay the enzyme activity, excretory-secretory and somatic extracts in the form of cocktails (potassium phosphate buffer, reduced glutathione and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene substrates) were prepared and their absorbance recorded for 5 minutes at 340 nm. The total and specific GST activity of F. gigantica somatic and ES products were obtained as 2916.00, 272.01 micromole/minute and 1.33, 1.70 micromole/minute/mg protein, respectively. Fasciola hepatica also showed 2705.00, 276.86 micromole/minute and 1.33, 1.52 micromole/minute/mg protein, respectively. These results are important for analysis of parasite survival / resistance to drugs which use for treatment of fascioliasis.

  14. Effect of polyphenols extracted from tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seed coat on pathophysiological changes and red blood cell glutathione peroxidase activity in heat-stressed broilers.

    PubMed

    Aengwanich, Worapol; Suttajit, Maitree

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of polyphenols extracted from the tamarind seed coat (PETSC) on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, red blood cell parameters and bilirubin in heat-stressed broilers. One hundred forty-seven broilers, 18-days old were divided into two groups. In group 1, broilers were maintained at an environmental temperature of 26 ± 2 °C throughout the experimental period. In group 2, the broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C (cyclic temperature: 26 ± 2 °C; -38 ± 2 °C; and -26 ± 2 °C, and broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C for 6 h/ day) and received PETSC at a concentration of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 mg/kg in their diet ad libitum. Parameters were investigated on days 1, 7, 14 and 21 of the experimental period. Results showed that GPx activity of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC in their diet was lower (P < 0.05) than that in broilers fed the other concentrations. The mean total red blood cell count and hemoglobin concentration of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg PETSC was higher (P < 0.05) than those in broilers in group 1 and those fed the other concentrations. The mean bilirubin level in the excreta of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC was lower (P < 0.05) than that in broilers that received 0, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg of PETSC. This showed that PETSC could reduce GPx activity and bilirubin in feces, and increase red blood cell parameters in heat-stressed broilers. PMID:22434485

  15. Effect of selenium-enriched probiotics on laying performance, egg quality, egg selenium content, and egg glutathione peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Cuiling; Zhao, Yuxin; Liao, Shengfa F; Chen, Fu; Qin, Shunyi; Wu, Xianshi; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Kehe

    2011-11-01

    A 35-day experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of selenium-enriched probiotics (SP) on laying performance, egg quality, egg selenium (Se) content, and egg glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity. Five hundred 58-week-old Rohman laying hens were randomly allotted to 5 dietary treatments of 100 each. Each treatment had 5 replicates, and each replicate had 5 cages with 4 hens per cage. The SP was supplemented to a corn-soybean-meal basal diet at 3 different levels that supplied total Se at 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg. The basal diet served as a blank control, while the basal diet with supplemental probiotics served as a probiotics control. The results showed that dietary SP supplementation not only increased (p < 0.05) the rate of egg laying, day egg weight, mean egg weight, egg Se content, and egg GPX activity but also decreased (p < 0.05) the feed:egg ratio and egg cholesterol content. The egg Se content was gradually increased (p < 0.05) along with the increasing level of dietary Se. The SP supplementation also slowed down (p < 0.05) the drop of Haugh units (HU) of eggs stored at room temperature. The egg GPX activity had a positive correlation (p < 0.01) with egg Se content and a negative correlation (p < 0.01) with egg HU drop. These results suggested that Se contents, GPX activity, and HU of eggs were affected by the dietary Se level, whereas the egg-laying performance and egg cholesterol content were affected by the dietary probiotics. It was concluded that this SP is an effective feed additive that combines the organic Se benefit for hen and human health with the probiotics benefit for laying hen production performance. It was also suggested that the eggs from hens fed this SP can serve as a nutraceutical food with high Se and low cholesterol contents for both healthy people and patients with hyperlipidemia, fatty liver, or cardiovascular disease. PMID:21942342

  16. Profiling cellular bioenergetics, glutathione levels, and caspase activities in stomach biopsies of patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Alfazari, Ali S; Al-Dabbagh, Bayan; Al-Dhaheri, Wafa; Taha, Mazen S; Chebli, Ahmad A; Fontagnier, Eva M; Koutoubi, Zaher; Kochiyi, Jose; Karam, Sherif M; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To measure biochemical parameters in stomach biopsies and test their suitability as diagnostic biomarkers for gastritis and precancerous lesions. METHODS: Biopsies were obtained from the stomachs of two groups of patients (n = 40) undergoing fiber-optic endoscopy due to upper gastrointestinal symptoms. In the first group (n = 17), only the corpus region was examined. Biopsies were processed for microscopic examination and measurement of mitochondrial O2 consumption (cellular respiration), cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), glutathione (GSH), and caspase activity. In the second group of patients (n = 23), both corpus and antral regions were studied. Some biopsies were processed for microscopic examination, while the others were used for measurements of cellular respiration and GSH level. RESULTS: Microscopic examinations of gastric corpus biopsies from 17 patients revealed normal mucosae in 8 patients, superficial gastritis in 7 patients, and chronic atrophic gastritis in 1 patient. In patients with normal histology, the rate (mean ± SD) of cellular respiration was 0.17 ± 0.02 μmol/L O2 min-1 mg-1, ATP content was 487 ± 493 pmol/mg, and GSH was 469 ± 98 pmol/mg. Caspase activity was detected in 3 out of 8 specimens. The values of ATP and caspase activity were highly variable. The presence of superficial gastritis had insignificant effects on the measured biomarkers. In the patient with atrophic gastritis, cellular respiration was high and ATP was relatively low, suggesting uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation. In the second cohort of patients, the examined biopsies showed either normal or superficial gastritis. The rate of cellular respiration (O2. μmol/L min-1 mg-1) was slightly higher in the corpus than the antrum (0.18 ± 0.05 vs 0.15 ± 0.04, P = 0.019). The value of GSH was about the same in both tissues (310 ± 135 vs 322 ± 155, P = 0.692). CONCLUSION: The corpus mucosa was metabolically more active than the antrum tissue. The data in this

  17. Glutathione transferases: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Aaron

    2011-05-01

    The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are one of the most important families of detoxifying enzymes in nature. The classic activity of the GSTs is conjugation of compounds with electrophilic centers to the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), but many other activities are now associated with GSTs, including steroid and leukotriene biosynthesis, peroxide degradation, double-bond cis-trans isomerization, dehydroascorbate reduction, Michael addition, and noncatalytic "ligandin" activity (ligand binding and transport). Since the first GST structure was determined in 1991, there has been an explosion in structural data across GSTs of all three families: the cytosolic GSTs, the mitochondrial GSTs, and the membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG family). In this review, the major insights into GST structure and function will be discussed.

  18. Genetic study of glutathione accumulation during cold hardening in wheat.

    PubMed

    Kocsy, G; Szalai, G; Vágújfalvi, A; Stéhli, L; Orosz, G; Galiba, G

    2000-01-01

    The effect of cold hardening on the accumulation of glutathione (GSH) and its precursors was studied in the shoots and roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cv. Cheyenne (Ch, frost-tolerant) and cv. Chinese Spring (CS, moderately frost-sensitive), in a T. spelta L. accession (Tsp, frost-sensitive) and in chromosome substitution lines CS (Ch 5A) and CS (Tsp 5A). The fast induction of total glutathione accumulation was detected during the first 3 d of hardening in the shoots, especially in the frost-tolerant Ch and CS (Ch 5A). This observation was corroborated by the study of de novo GSH synthesis using [(35)S]sulfate. In Ch and CS (Ch 5A) the total cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine (precursors of GSH), hydroxymethylglutathione and GSH contents were greater during the 51-d treatment than in the sensitive genotypes. After 35 d hardening, when the maximum frost tolerance was observed, greater ratios of reduced to oxidised hydroxymethylglutathione and glutathione were detected in Ch and CS (Ch 5A) compared to the sensitive genotypes. A correspondingly greater glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity was also found in Ch and CS (Ch 5A). It can be assumed that chromosome 5A of wheat has an influence on GSH accumulation and on the ratio of reduced to oxidised glutathione as part of a complex regulatory function during hardening. Consequently, GSH may contribute to the enhancement of frost tolerance in wheat. PMID:10664136

  19. Assessment of Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Mineral Nutrients in Response to NaCl Stress and its Amelioration Through Glutathione in Chickpea.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Vinay; Kumar, Dinesh; Agrawal, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Salinity stress has been reckoned as one of the major threat towards crop productivity as it causes significant decline in the yield. The impact of NaCl stress (0, 1, 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg L(-1)) as well as glutathione (10 mg L(-1)) either alone or in combination has been evaluated on the induction of multiple shoots, antioxidant enzymes' activity, lipid peroxidation, relative permeability, concentration of nutrients, photosynthetic pigments, protein and proline content of nodal segments of chickpea after 14 days of culture. The antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR) were found to be increased under salt stress as well as glutathione-supplemented medium. A significant decrease in the concentrations of chlorophylls a, b, total chlorophyll and carotenoid was observed under salt stress. Concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, carbon, magnesium and sulphur showed an initial increase up to 10 mg L(-1) NaCl, but a decline was seen at higher NaCl levels. Proline content and malondialdehyde concentration were found to be increased under salt stress. Three isoforms of SOD, one of CAT and four of GPX were expressed during native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis. However, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the stressed nodal explants revealed the over-expression of several polypeptide bands related to NaCl stress. These findings for the first time suggest that glutathione (GSH) helps in ameliorating NaCl stress in nodal explants of chickpea by manipulating various biochemical and physiological responses of plants. PMID:26440314

  20. Probucol Increases Striatal Glutathione Peroxidase Activity and Protects against 3-Nitropropionic Acid-Induced Pro-Oxidative Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Colle, Dirleise; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Hartwig, Juliana Montagna; dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; Zimmermann, Luciana Teixeira; Hort, Mariana Appel; Farina, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by symptoms attributable to the death of striatal and cortical neurons. The molecular mechanisms mediating neuronal death in HD involve oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an irreversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, in rodents has been proposed as a useful experimental model of HD. This study evaluated the effects of probucol, a lipid-lowering agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, on the biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress, as well as on the behavioral parameters related to motor function in an in vivo HD model based on 3-NP intoxication in rats. Animals were treated with 3.5 mg/kg of probucol in drinking water daily for 2 months and, subsequently, received 3-NP (25 mg/kg i.p.) once a day for 6 days. At the end of the treatments, 3-NP-treated animals showed a significant decrease in body weight, which corresponded with impairment on motor ability, inhibition of mitochondrial complex II activity and oxidative stress in the striatum. Probucol, which did not rescue complex II inhibition, protected against behavioral and striatal biochemical changes induced by 3-NP, attenuating 3-NP-induced motor impairments and striatal oxidative stress. Importantly, probucol was able to increase activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an enzyme important in mediating the detoxification of peroxides in the central nervous system. The major finding of this study was that probucol protected against 3-NP-induced behavioral and striatal biochemical changes without affecting 3-NP-induced mitochondrial complex II inhibition, indicating that long-term probucol treatment resulted in an increased resistance against neurotoxic events (i.e., increased oxidative damage) secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction. These data appeared to be of great relevance when

  1. Isolation and identification of kahweol palmitate and cafestol palmitate as active constituents of green coffee beans that enhance glutathione S-transferase activity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Lam, L K; Sparnins, V L; Wattenberg, L W

    1982-04-01

    Glutathione (GSH) S-transferase is a major detoxification enzyme system that catalyzes the binding of a variety of electrophiles, including reactive forms of chemical carcinogens, to GSH. Green coffee beans fed in the diet induced increased GSH S-transferase activity in the mucosa of the small intestine and in the liver of mice. A potent compound that induces increased GSH S-transferase activity was isolated from green coffee beans and identified as kahweol palmitate. The corresponding free alcohol, kahweol, and its synthetic monoacetate are also potent inducers of the activity of GSH S-transferase. A similar diterpene ester, cafestol palmitate, isolated from green coffee beans was active but less so than was kahweol palmitate. Likewise, the corresponding alcohol, cafestol, and its monoacetate showed moderate potency as inducers of increased GSH S-transferase activity. Kahweol palmitate and cafestol palmitate were extracted from green coffee beans into petroleum ether. The petroleum ether extract was fractionated by preparative normal-phase and reverse-phase liquid chromatographies successively. Final purification with silver nitrate-impregnated thin-layer chromatography yielded the pure palmitates of cafestol and kahweol. The structures were determined by examination of the spectroscopic data of the esters and their parent alcohols and by derivative comparison. PMID:7059995

  2. Measurement of malondialdehyde, glutathione, and glutathione peroxidase in SLE patients.

    PubMed

    Gheita, Tamer A; Kenawy, Sanaa A

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to chronic inflammation of tissues and plays a central role in immunomodulation, which may lead to autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome. Markers of oxidative damage include malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidant scavengers as glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH Px), which all correlate well with SLE disease activity. Amelioration of some clinical manifestations of SLE may be expected by targeting lipid peroxidation with dietary or pharmacological antioxidants. Here, we describe the detection of the key players of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in SLE.

  3. Glutathione analogue sorbents selectively bind glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Castro, V M; Kelley, M K; Engqvist-Goldstein, A; Kauvar, L M

    1993-06-01

    Novel affinity sorbents for glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were created by binding glutathione (GSH) analogues to Sepharose 6B. The GSH molecule was modified at the glycine moiety and at the group attached to the sulphur of cysteine. When tested by affinity chromatography in a flow-through microplate format, several of these sorbents selectively bound GST isoenzymes. gamma E-C(Hx)-phi G (glutathione with a hexyl moiety bound to cysteine and phenylglycine substituted for glycine) specifically bound rat GST 7-7, the Pi-class isoenzyme, from liver, kidney and small intestine. gamma E-C(Bz)-beta A (benzyl bound to cysteine and beta-alanine substituted for glycine) was highly selective for rat subunits 3 and 4, which are Mu-class isoenzymes. By allowing purification of the isoenzymes under mild conditions that preserve activity, the novel sorbents should be useful in characterizing the biological roles of GSTs in both normal animal and cancer tissues.

  4. Chronic Glutathione Depletion Confers Protection against Alcohol-induced Steatosis: Implication for Redox Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Singh, Surendra; Matsumoto, Akiko; Manna, Soumen K; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Golla, Srujana; Murphy, Robert C; Dong, Hongbin; Song, Byoung-Joon; Gonzalez, Frank J; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is not well established. However, oxidative stress and associated decreases in levels of glutathione (GSH) are known to play a central role in ALD. The present study examines the effect of GSH deficiency on alcohol-induced liver steatosis in Gclm knockout (KO) mice that constitutively have ≈15% normal hepatic levels of GSH. Following chronic (6 week) feeding with an ethanol-containing liquid diet, the Gclm KO mice were unexpectedly found to be protected against steatosis despite showing increased oxidative stress (as reflected in elevated levels of CYP2E1 and protein carbonyls). Gclm KO mice also exhibit constitutive activation of liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 target genes, and show enhanced ethanol clearance, altered hepatic lipid profiles in favor of increased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and concordant changes in expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. In summary, our data implicate a novel mechanism protecting against liver steatosis via an oxidative stress adaptive response that activates the AMPK pathway. We propose redox activation of the AMPK may represent a new therapeutic strategy for preventing ALD. PMID:27403993

  5. Chronic Glutathione Depletion Confers Protection against Alcohol-induced Steatosis: Implication for Redox Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Singh, Surendra; Matsumoto, Akiko; Manna, Soumen K.; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Golla, Srujana; Murphy, Robert C.; Dong, Hongbin; Song, Byoung-Joon; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is not well established. However, oxidative stress and associated decreases in levels of glutathione (GSH) are known to play a central role in ALD. The present study examines the effect of GSH deficiency on alcohol-induced liver steatosis in Gclm knockout (KO) mice that constitutively have ≈15% normal hepatic levels of GSH. Following chronic (6 week) feeding with an ethanol-containing liquid diet, the Gclm KO mice were unexpectedly found to be protected against steatosis despite showing increased oxidative stress (as reflected in elevated levels of CYP2E1 and protein carbonyls). Gclm KO mice also exhibit constitutive activation of liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway and nuclear factor-erythroid 2–related factor 2 target genes, and show enhanced ethanol clearance, altered hepatic lipid profiles in favor of increased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and concordant changes in expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. In summary, our data implicate a novel mechanism protecting against liver steatosis via an oxidative stress adaptive response that activates the AMPK pathway. We propose redox activation of the AMPK may represent a new therapeutic strategy for preventing ALD. PMID:27403993

  6. Interaction of Omega, Sigma, and Theta glutathione transferases with p38b mitogen-activated protein kinase from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakul, J; Janphen, K; Saisawang, C; Ketterman, A J

    2014-05-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a diverse family of phase II detoxification enzymes found in almost all organisms. Besides playing a major role in the detoxification of xenobiotic and toxic compounds, GSTs are also involved in the regulation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction by interaction with proteins in the pathway. An in vitro study was performed for Theta, Omega, Sigma GSTs and their interaction with MAP kinase p38b protein from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae). The study included the effects of all five Omega class GSTs (DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, DmGSTO2b, DmGSTO3, DmGSTO4), all five Theta class GSTs (DmGSTT1, DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3a, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTT4), and one Sigma class glutathione transferase on the activity of Drosophila p38b, including the reciprocal effect of this kinase protein on glutathione transferase activity. It was found that DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTO1, and DmGSTO3 activated p38b significantly. Substrate specificities of GSTs were also altered after co-incubation with p38b. Although p38b activated DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, and DmGSTT2, it inhibited DmGSTT3b and DmGSTO3 activity toward xenobiotic and physiological substrates tested. These results suggest a novel link between Omega and Theta GSTs with the p38b MAP kinase pathway.

  7. Interaction of Omega, Sigma, and Theta Glutathione Transferases with p38b Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase from the Fruit Fly, Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wongtrakul, J.; Janphen, K.; Saisawang, C.; Ketterman, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a diverse family of phase II detoxification enzymes found in almost all organisms. Besides playing a major role in the detoxification of xenobiotic and toxic compounds, GSTs are also involved in the regulation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction by interaction with proteins in the pathway. An in vitro study was performed for Theta, Omega, Sigma GSTs and their interaction with MAP kinase p38b protein from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae). The study included the effects of all five Omega class GSTs (DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, DmGSTO2b, DmGSTO3, DmGSTO4), all five Theta class GSTs (DmGSTT1, DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3a, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTT4), and one Sigma class glutathione transferase on the activity of Drosophila p38b, including the reciprocal effect of this kinase protein on glutathione transferase activity. It was found that DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTO1, and DmGSTO3 activated p38b significantly. Substrate specificities of GSTs were also altered after co-incubation with p38b. Although p38b activated DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, and DmGSTT2, it inhibited DmGSTT3b and DmGSTO3 activity toward xenobiotic and physiological substrates tested. These results suggest a novel link between Omega and Theta GSTs with the p38b MAP kinase pathway. PMID:25373207

  8. S-(4-bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)glutathione: A new affinity label for the 4-4 isoenzyme of rat liver glutathione S-transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Katusz, R.M.; Colman, R.F. )

    1991-11-26

    S-(4-Bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)glutathione (S-BDB-G), a reactive analogue of glutathione, has been synthesized and characterized by UV spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography, as well as by bromide and primary amine analysis. Incubation of S-BDB-G (200 {mu}M) with the 4-4 isoenzyme of rat liver glutathione S-transferase at pH 6.5 and 25C results in a time-dependent inactivation of the enzyme. The k{sub obs} exhibits a nonlinear dependence on S-BDB-G concentration from 50 to 1000 {mu}M. Modified enzyme, prepared by incubating glutathione S-transferase with ({sup 3}H)S-BDB-G in the absence or in the presence of S-hexylglutathione, was reduced with NaBH{sub 4}, carboxymethylated, and digested with trypsin. The tryptic digest was fractionated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Two radioactive peptides were identified. These results suggest that S-BDB-G functions as an affinity label at or near the active site of glutathione S-transferase and that modification of one site per enzyme subunit causes inactivation. It is proposed that the new compound, S-(4-bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)glutathione, may have general applicability as an affinity label of other enzymes with glutathione binding sites.

  9. The biological functions of glutathione revisited in arabidopsis transgenic plants with altered glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Xiang, C; Werner, B L; Christensen, E M; Oliver, D J

    2001-06-01

    A functional analysis of the role of glutathione in protecting plants from environmental stress was undertaken by studying Arabidopsis that had been genetically modified to have altered glutathione levels. The steady-state glutathione concentration in Arabidopsis plants was modified by expressing the cDNA for gamma-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase (GSH1) in both the sense and antisense orientation. The resulting plants had glutathione levels that ranged between 3% and 200% of the level in wild-type plants. Arabidopsis plants with low glutathione levels were hypersensitive to Cd due to the limited capacity of these plants to make phytochelatins. Plants with the lowest levels of reduced glutathione (10% of wild type) were sensitive to as little as 5 microM Cd, whereas those with 50% wild-type levels required higher Cd concentrations to inhibit growth. Elevating glutathione levels did not increase metal resistance. It is interesting that the plants with low glutathione levels were also less able to accumulate anthocyanins supporting a role for glutathione S-transferases for anthocyanin formation or for the vacuolar localization and therefore accumulation of these compounds. Plants with less than 5% of wild-type glutathione levels were smaller and more sensitive to environmental stress but otherwise grew normally. PMID:11402187

  10. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vivek Kumar; Bains, Rhythm

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO), is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials. PMID:26604952

  11. Endurance Training and Glutathione-Dependent Antioxidant Defense Mechanism in Heart of the Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gül, Mustafa; Atalay, Mustafa; Hänninen, Osmo

    2003-01-01

    Regular physical exercise beneficially influences cardiac antioxidant defenses in normal rats. The aim of this study was to test whether endurance training can strengthen glutathione-dependent antioxidant defense mechanism and decrease lipid peroxidation in heart of the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Redox status of glutathione in blood of diabetic rats in response to training and acute exercise was also examined. Eight weeks of treadmill training increased the endurance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. It did not affect glutathione level in heart tissue at rest and also after exercise. On the other hand, endurance training decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in heart, while glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase activities were not affected either by acute exhaustive exercise or endurance training. Reduced and oxidized glutathione levels in blood were not affected by either training or acute exercise. Conjugated dienes levels in heart tissue were increased by acute exhaustive exercise and also 8 weeks treadmill training. Longer duration of exhaustion in trained group may have contributed to the increased conjugated dienes levels in heart after acute exercise. Our results suggest that endurance type exercise may make heart more susceptible to oxidative stress. Therefore it may be wise to combine aerobic exercise with insulin treatment to prevent its adverse effects on antioxidant defense in heart in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:24616611

  12. Aphicidal Activity of Illicium verum Fruit Extracts and Their Effects on the Acetylcholinesterase and Glutathione S-transferases Activities in Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ben-Guo; Wang, Sa; Dou, Ting-Ting; Liu, Su; Li, Mao-Ye; Hua, Ri-Mao; Li, Shi-Guang; Lin, Hua-Feng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the aphicidal activity and underlying mechanism of Illicium verum Hook. f. that is used as both food and medicine. The contact toxicity of the extracts from I. verum fruit with methyl alcohol (MA), ethyl acetate (EA), and petroleum ether (PE) against Myzus persicae (Sulzer), and the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) of M. persicae after contact treatment were tested. The results showed that MA, EA, and PE extracts of 1.000 mg/l caused, respectively, M. persicae mortalities of 68.93%, 89.95% and 74.46%, and the LC50 of MA, EA, and PE extracts were 0.31, 0.14 and 0.27 mg/l at 72 h after treatment, respectively; the activities of AChE and GSTs in M. persicae were obviously inhibited by the three extracts, as compared with the control, with strong dose and time-dependent effects, the inhibition rates on the whole reached more than 50.00% at the concentration of 1.000 mg/l at 72 h after treatment. The inhibition of the extracts on AChE and GSTs activities (EA extract > PE extract > MA extract) were correlated with theirs contact toxic effects, so it is inferred that the decline of the metabolic enzymes activities may be one of important reasons of M. persicae death. The study results suggested that I. verum extracts have potential as a eco-friendly biopesticide in integrated pest management against M. persicae. PMID:26826651

  13. Aphicidal Activity of Illicium verum Fruit Extracts and Their Effects on the Acetylcholinesterase and Glutathione S-transferases Activities in Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ben-Guo; Wang, Sa; Dou, Ting-Ting; Liu, Su; Li, Mao-Ye; Hua, Ri-Mao; Li, Shi-Guang; Lin, Hua-Feng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the aphicidal activity and underlying mechanism of Illicium verum Hook. f. that is used as both food and medicine. The contact toxicity of the extracts from I. verum fruit with methyl alcohol (MA), ethyl acetate (EA), and petroleum ether (PE) against Myzus persicae (Sulzer), and the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) of M. persicae after contact treatment were tested. The results showed that MA, EA, and PE extracts of 1.000 mg/l caused, respectively, M. persicae mortalities of 68.93%, 89.95% and 74.46%, and the LC50 of MA, EA, and PE extracts were 0.31, 0.14 and 0.27 mg/l at 72 h after treatment, respectively; the activities of AChE and GSTs in M. persicae were obviously inhibited by the three extracts, as compared with the control, with strong dose and time-dependent effects, the inhibition rates on the whole reached more than 50.00% at the concentration of 1.000 mg/l at 72 h after treatment. The inhibition of the extracts on AChE and GSTs activities (EA extract > PE extract > MA extract) were correlated with theirs contact toxic effects, so it is inferred that the decline of the metabolic enzymes activities may be one of important reasons of M. persicae death. The study results suggested that I. verum extracts have potential as a eco-friendly biopesticide in integrated pest management against M. persicae. PMID:26826651

  14. Aphicidal Activity of Illicium verum Fruit Extracts and Their Effects on the Acetylcholinesterase and Glutathione S-transferases Activities in Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ben-Guo; Wang, Sa; Dou, Ting-Ting; Liu, Su; Li, Mao-Ye; Hua, Ri-Mao; Li, Shi-Guang; Lin, Hua-Feng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the aphicidal activity and underlying mechanism of Illicium verum Hook. f. that is used as both food and medicine. The contact toxicity of the extracts from I. verum fruit with methyl alcohol (MA), ethyl acetate (EA), and petroleum ether (PE) against Myzus persicae (Sulzer), and the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) of M. persicae after contact treatment were tested. The results showed that MA, EA, and PE extracts of 1.000 mg/l caused, respectively, M. persicae mortalities of 68.93%, 89.95% and 74.46%, and the LC50 of MA, EA, and PE extracts were 0.31, 0.14 and 0.27 mg/l at 72 h after treatment, respectively; the activities of AChE and GSTs in M. persicae were obviously inhibited by the three extracts, as compared with the control, with strong dose and time-dependent effects, the inhibition rates on the whole reached more than 50.00% at the concentration of 1.000 mg/l at 72 h after treatment. The inhibition of the extracts on AChE and GSTs activities (EA extract > PE extract > MA extract) were correlated with theirs contact toxic effects, so it is inferred that the decline of the metabolic enzymes activities may be one of important reasons of M. persicae death. The study results suggested that I. verum extracts have potential as a eco-friendly biopesticide in integrated pest management against M. persicae.

  15. Maximal enzyme activities, and myoglobin and glutathione concentrations in heart, liver and skeletal muscle of the Northern Short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda; Insectivora: Soricidae).

    PubMed

    Stewart, J M; Woods, A K; Blakely, J A

    2005-07-01

    We measured the enzymes of glycolysis, Krebs Cycle, beta-oxidation and electron transport in the heart, liver and skeletal muscle of the Northern Short-tailed Shrew, Blarina brevicauda. Additionally, we measured the amount of myoglobin in skeletal and heart muscle as well as the concentration of glutathione in heart. The picture that emerges is of an aerobically well-endowed animal with constrained anaerobic capacity as indicated by small activities of glycolytic enzymes and creatine kinase. Lipid metabolism and amino acid transamination, as well as gluconeogenesis, are predominant in processing carbon resources and probably reflect the large contribution lipid and protein make to the diet of this carnivore. The citrate synthase activity is the largest of any reported value for vertebrate heart (250 U/g). The additional, very active cytochrome c oxidase activity (220 U/g) and large myoglobin concentrations (8 mg/g) in heart are clearly the underpinnings of the rapid metabolic rates reported for small insectivores. The potential for generation of reactive oxygen species must be great since the total glutathione concentration (165 mumol/g) is 300-fold greater in shrew hearts than in hearts of rats. PMID:15914053

  16. Quantitative structure activity relationship model for predicting the depletion percentage of skin allergic chemical substances of glutathione.

    PubMed

    Si, Hongzong; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Kejun; Duan, Yun-Bo; Yuan, Shuping; Fu, Aiping; Hu, Zhide

    2007-05-22

    A quantitative model was developed to predict the depletion percentage of glutathione (DPG) compounds by gene expression programming (GEP). Each kind of compound was represented by several calculated structural descriptors involving constitutional, topological, geometrical, electrostatic and quantum-chemical features of compounds. The GEP method produced a nonlinear and five-descriptor quantitative model with a mean error and a correlation coefficient of 10.52 and 0.94 for the training set, 22.80 and 0.85 for the test set, respectively. It is shown that the GEP predicted results are in good agreement with experimental ones, better than those of the heuristic method.

  17. The biochemical adaptations of spotted wing drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to fresh fruits reduced fructose concentrations and glutathione-S transferase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America, because the females have a serrated ovipositor enabling them to infest ripening almost all small fruits before harvest. Also flies are strongly attracted to fresh fruits rath...

  18. Caribbean yellow band disease compromises the activity of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in the reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata exposed to anthracene.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia; Cróquer, Aldo

    2016-05-01

    Healthy and diseased corals are threatened by different anthropogenic sources, such as pollution, a problem expected to become more severe in the near future. Despite the fact that coastal pollution and coral diseases might represent a serious threat to coral reef health, there is a paucity of controlled experiments showing whether the response of diseased and healthy corals to xenobiotics differs. In this study, we exposed healthy and Caribbean yellow band disease (CYBD)-affected Orbicella faveolata colonies to 3 sublethal concentrations of anthracene to test if enzymatic responses to this hydrocarbon were compromised in CYBD-affected tissues. For this, a 2-factorial fully orthogonal design was used in a controlled laboratory bioassay, using tissue condition (2 levels: apparently healthy and diseased) and pollutant concentration (4 levels: experimental control, 10, 30 and 100 ppb concentration) as fixed factors. A permutation-based ANOVA (PERMANOVA) was used to test the effects of condition and concentration on the specific activity of 3 enzymatic biomarkers: catalase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase. We found a significant interaction between the concentration of anthracene and the colony condition for catalase (Pseudo-F = 3.84, df = 3, p < 0.05) and glutathione S-transferase (Pseudo-F = 3.29, df = 3, p < 0.05). Moreover, our results indicated that the enzymatic response to anthracene in CYBD-affected tissues was compromised, as the activity of these enzymes decreased 3- to 4-fold compared to healthy tissues. These results suggest that under a potential scenario of increasing hydrocarbon coastal pollution, colonies of O. faveolata affected with CYBD might become more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of chemical pollution.

  19. Caribbean yellow band disease compromises the activity of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in the reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata exposed to anthracene.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia; Cróquer, Aldo

    2016-05-01

    Healthy and diseased corals are threatened by different anthropogenic sources, such as pollution, a problem expected to become more severe in the near future. Despite the fact that coastal pollution and coral diseases might represent a serious threat to coral reef health, there is a paucity of controlled experiments showing whether the response of diseased and healthy corals to xenobiotics differs. In this study, we exposed healthy and Caribbean yellow band disease (CYBD)-affected Orbicella faveolata colonies to 3 sublethal concentrations of anthracene to test if enzymatic responses to this hydrocarbon were compromised in CYBD-affected tissues. For this, a 2-factorial fully orthogonal design was used in a controlled laboratory bioassay, using tissue condition (2 levels: apparently healthy and diseased) and pollutant concentration (4 levels: experimental control, 10, 30 and 100 ppb concentration) as fixed factors. A permutation-based ANOVA (PERMANOVA) was used to test the effects of condition and concentration on the specific activity of 3 enzymatic biomarkers: catalase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase. We found a significant interaction between the concentration of anthracene and the colony condition for catalase (Pseudo-F = 3.84, df = 3, p < 0.05) and glutathione S-transferase (Pseudo-F = 3.29, df = 3, p < 0.05). Moreover, our results indicated that the enzymatic response to anthracene in CYBD-affected tissues was compromised, as the activity of these enzymes decreased 3- to 4-fold compared to healthy tissues. These results suggest that under a potential scenario of increasing hydrocarbon coastal pollution, colonies of O. faveolata affected with CYBD might become more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of chemical pollution. PMID:27137073

  20. Selenium levels, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activity in the blood of women with gestosis and imminent premature labour.

    PubMed

    Gromadzinska, J; Wasowicz, W; Krasomski, G; Broniarczyk, D; Andrijewski, M; Rydzynski, K; Wolkanin, P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate antioxidant status, monitored by selenium and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance concentrations in blood plasma, and glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes and blood plasma in women with gestosis (n = 26), imminent premature labour (n = 48) and normal pregnancy (n = 23) during 19-38 weeks of pregnancy. Selenium concentrations in blood plasma were significantly higher in women with pathological pregnancies than in normal (45.5 +/- 10.5 micrograms l-1, p < 0.01 and 44.1 +/- 11.6 micrograms l-1, p < 0.05 vs. 38.6 +/- 8.3 micrograms l-1, respectively). In all groups of pregnant women Se concentrations were extremely low as compared with non-pregnant females. Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in blood plasma was significantly higher in complicated pregnancies than in healthy ones. There were no significant differences in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance concentrations between all groups of pregnant women. Statistically significant correlations were found between blood plasma Se concentrations and GSH-Px activity in healthy pregnant (r = 0.53, p < 0.01), imminent premature labour (r = 0.39, p < 0.01), and non-pregnant females (r = 0.56, p < 0.001). PMID:9581018

  1. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, P<0.02). After 4 weeks of balneotherapy, the mean level of GSH showed no changes; however, in well-controlled patients (FPG <150 mg/dl), the level increased ( P<0.01) and in poorly controlled patients (FPG >150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities and the levels of FPG ( r=-0.430, P<0.05). After balneotherapy, the activity increased in 5 patients, decreased in 3 patients and showed no changes (alteration within ±3%) in all the other patients. From these findings in diabetic patients we concluded: (1) platelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  2. Glutathione Production in Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachhawat, Anand K.; Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Kaur, Jaspreet; Kasturia, Neha; Thakur, Anil; Kaur, Hardeep; Kumar, Akhilesh; Yadav, Amit

    Glutathione, γ -glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine, is the most abundant non-protein thiol found in almost all eukaryotic cells (and in some prokaryotes). The tripeptide, which is synthesized non-ribosomally by the consecutive action of two soluble enzymes, is needed for carrying out numerous functions in the cell, most important of which is the maintenance of the redox buffer. The cycle of glutathione biosynthesis and degradation forms part of the γ -glutamyl cycle in most organisms although the latter half of the pathway has not been demonstrated in yeasts. Our current understanding of how glutathione levels are controlled at different levels in the cell is described. Several different routes and processes have been attempted to increase commercial production of glutathione using both yeast and bacteria. In this article we discuss the history of glutathione production in yeast. The current bottlenecks for increased glutathione production are presented based on our current understanding of the regulation of glutathione homeostasis, and possible strategies for overcoming these limitations for further enhancing and improving glutathione production are discussed

  3. Effect of ovariectomy and sex hormone replacement on glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes in rat hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hambali, Z; Ngah, W Z; Wahid, S A; Kadir, K A

    1995-01-01

    The effects of ovariectomy and hormone replacement in control and carcinogen treated female rats were investigated by measuring whole blood and liver glutathione (WGSH, HGSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GRx) and histological evaluation. Hepatocarcinogenesis was induced by diethylnitrosamine and 2-acetylaminofluorene. In control rats not receiving carcinogen, ovariectomy significantly increased the GST and GRx activities. Replacement with either estrogen or progesterone reduced the GST activities to below intact female values whereas replacement of both hormones together brought the GST activities to that of intact females. GRx activities were brought to intact female values by replacement with estrogen or progesterone, either singly or in combination. Neither ovariectomy nor sex hormone/s replacement influenced the levels of WGSH, HGSH and GPx activities. Carcinogen administration to intact rats increased all the parameters measured. Ovariectomized rats treated with carcinogen showed lower GPx and GRx activities at 2 mths. However, replacement with either progesterone or combined estrogen and progesterone increased GPx and GRx activities to original values. On the other hand GST and GPx activities in ovariectomized rats which had carcinogen treatment were lower than intact rats after 5 mths. Replacement with hormones either singly or both brought GST and GPx activities up to intact rat levels receiving carcinogen. The levels of WGSH, HGSH and GRx activities (5 mths) in carcinogen treated rats were not influenced by ovariectomy and/or hormone/s replacement. The results from this study suggested that ovariectomy reduced the severity of hepatocarcinogenesis which was restored by sex hormone/s replacement.

  4. Liv.52 attenuate copper induced toxicity by inhibiting glutathione depletion and increased antioxidant enzyme activity in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Patki, Pralhad Sadashiv

    2010-07-01

    Altered copper metabolism plays a pivotal role in the onset of several hepatic disorders and glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in its homeostasis. Hepatic diseases are often implicated with decreased content of intracellular GSH. GSH depleted cells are prone to increased oxidative damage eventually leading to its death. Liv.52 is used to treat hepatic ailments since long time. Hence, in the present study the potential cytoprotective effect of Liv.52 against toxicity induced by copper (Cu2+) was evaluated in HepG2 cells. Cu2+ at 750 microM induced cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells as determined by MTT assay. The toxicity was brought about by increased lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation and decreased GSH content. But, upon treatment with Liv.52 cell death induced by Cu2+ was significantly abrogated by inhibition of lipid peroxidation by 58% and DNA fragmentation by 37%. Liv.52 increased the GSH content by 74%. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase were increased by 46%, 22% and 81% respectively in Liv.52 treated cells. Thus, it is apparent from these results that Liv.52 abrogates Cu2+ induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells by inhibiting lipid peroxidation and increased GSH content and antioxidant enzyme activity.

  5. Germinating Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Seedlings Attenuated Selenite-Induced Toxicity by Activating the Antioxidant Enzymes and Mediating the Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang; Zhang, Hong; Lai, Furao; Wu, Hui

    2016-02-17

    Selenite can enhance the selenium nutrition level of crops, but excessive selenite may be toxic to plant growth. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the role of selenite in production and detoxification of oxidative toxicity, peanut seedlings were developed with sodium selenite (0, 3, and 6 mg/L). The effects of selenite on antioxidant capacity, transcript levels of antioxidant enzyme genes, and enzyme activities in hypocotyl were investigated. The CuZn-SOD, GSH-Px, GST, and APX gene expression levels and their enzyme activities in selenite treatments were 1.0-3.6-fold of the control. Selenite also significantly increased the glutathione and ascorbate concentrations by mediating the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, and the selenite-induced hydrogen peroxide may act as a second messenger in the signaling pathways. This work has revealed a complex antioxidative response to selenite in peanut seedling. Understanding these mechanisms may help future research in increasing selenite tolerance and selenium accumulation in peanut and other crops.

  6. Glutathione transferase activity and expression patterns during grain filling in flag leaves of wheat genotypes differing in drought tolerance: Response to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Gallé, Agnes; Csiszár, Jolán; Secenji, Maria; Guóth, Adrienn; Cseuz, László; Tari, Irma; Györgyey, János; Erdei, László

    2009-11-15

    Total glutathione S-transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18) and glutathione peroxidase (GPOX) activity were measured spectrophotometrically in Triticum aestivum cv. MV Emese and cv. Plainsman (drought tolerant) and cv. GK Elet and Cappelle Desprez (drought-sensitive) flag leaves under control and drought stress conditions during the grain-filling period, in order to reveal possible roles of different GST classes in the senescence of flag leaves. Six wheat GSTs, members of 3 GST classes, were selected and their regulation by drought and senescence was investigated. High GPOX activity (EC 1.11.1.9) was observed in well-watered controls of the drought-tolerant Plainsman cultivar. At the same time, TaGSTU1B and TaGSTF6 sequences, investigated by real-time PCR, showed high-expression levels that increased with time, indicating that the gene products of these genes may play important roles in monocarpic senescence of wheat. Expression of these genes was also induced by drought stress in all of the four investigated cultivars, but extremely high transcript amounts were detected in cv. Plainsman. Our data indicate genotypic variations of wheat GSTs. Expression levels and early induction of two senescence-associated GSTs under drought during grain filling in flag leaves correlated with high yield stability.

  7. Glutathione level after long-term occupational elemental mercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kobal, Alfred Bogomir Prezelj, Marija; Horvat, Milena; Krsnik, Mladen; Gibicar, Darija; Osredkar, Josko

    2008-05-15

    Many in vitro and in vivo studies have elucidated the interaction of inorganic mercury (Hg) and glutathione. However, human studies are limited. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of remote long-term intermittent occupational elemental Hg vapour (Hg{sup o}) exposure on erythrocyte glutathione levels and some antioxidative enzyme activities in ex-mercury miners in the period after exposure. The study included 49 ex-mercury miners divided into subgroups of 28 still active, Hg{sup o}-not-exposed miners and 21 elderly retired miners, and 41 controls, age-matched to the miners subgroup. The control workers were taken from 'mercury-free works'. Reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized disulphide glutathione (GSSG) concentrations in haemolysed erythrocytes were determined by capillary electrophoresis, while total glutathione (total GSH) and the GSH/GSSG ratio were calculated from the determined values. Catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in erythrocytes were measured using commercially available reagent kits, while urine Hg (U-Hg) concentrations were determined by cold vapour atomic absorption (CVAAS). No correlation of present U-Hg levels, GSH, GSSG, and antioxidative enzymes with remote occupational biological exposure indices were found. The mean CAT activity in miners and retired miners was significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the controls. No differences in mean GPx activity among the three groups were found, whereas the mean GR activity was significantly higher (p<0.05) in miners than in retired miners. The mean concentrations of GSH (mmol/g Hb) in miners (13.03{+-}3.71) were significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the control group (11.68{+-}2.66). No differences in mean total GSH, GSSG levels, and GSH/GSSG ratio between miners and controls were found. A positive correlation between GSSG and present U-Hg excretion (r=0.41, p=0.001) in the whole group of ex-mercury miners was observed. The

  8. Cardiovascular function following reduced aerobic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, P. B.; Welch-O'Connor, R. M.; Shi, X.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a sustained reduction of physical activity (deconditioning) would alter the cardiovascular regulatory function. METHODS: Nineteen young, healthy volunteers participated in physical deconditioning for a period of 8 wk. Before (pre) and following (post) physical deconditioning, the responses of heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured by Finapres), central venous pressure (CVP), stroke volume (SV, Doppler), and forearm blood flow (FBF, plethysmography) were determined during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The carotid baroreflex (CBR) function was assessed using a train of pulsatile neck pressure (NP) and suction, and the aortic baroreflex control of HR was assessed during steady-state phenylephrine (PE) infusion superimposed by LBNP and NP to counteract the PE increased CVP and carotid sinus pressure, respectively. RESULTS: Active physical deconditioning significantly decreased maximal oxygen uptake (-7%) and LBNP tolerance (-13%) without a change in baseline hemodynamics. Plasma volume (-3% at P = 0.135), determined by Evans Blue dilution, and blood volume (-4% at P = 0.107) were not significantly altered. During LBNP -20 to -50 torr, there was a significantly greater drop of SV per unit decrease in CVP in the post- (14.7 +/- 1.6%/mm Hg) than predeconditioning (11.2 +/- 0.7%/mm Hg) test accompanied by a greater tachycardia. Deconditioning increased the aortic baroreflex sensitivity (pre vs post: -0.61 +/- 0.12 vs -0.84 +/- 0.14 bpm.mm-1 Hg, P = 0.009) and the slope of forearm vascular resistance (calculated from [MAP-CVP]/FBF) to CVP (-2.75 +/- 0.26 vs -4.94 +/- 0.97 PRU/mm Hg, P = 0.086). However, neither the CBR-HR (-0.28 +/- 0.03 VS -0.39 +/- 0.10 bpm.mm-1 Hg) nor the CBR-MAP (-0.37 +/- 0.16 vs -0.25 +/- 0.07 mm Hg/mm Hg) gains were statistically different between pre- and postdeconditioning. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the functional modification of the cardiac pressure

  9. Induction of Apoptosis by [8]-shogaol via Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, Glutathione Depletion and Caspase Activation in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Po-Chuen; Chen, Yi-Own; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Chen, Fu-An; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Chang, Ing-Shing; Wu, Hou; Sang, Shengmin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    Ginger, the rhizome of Zingiber officinale, is a traditional medicine with carminative effect, anti-nausea, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. This study examined the growth inhibitory effects of [8]-shogaol, one of pungent phenolic compounds in ginger, on human leukemia HL-60 cells. It demonstrated that [8]-shogaol was able to induce apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with [8]-shogaol caused a rapid loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytosol, and subsequent induction of procaspase-9 and procaspase-3 processing. Taken together, these results suggest for the first time that ROS production and depletion of the glutathione that committed to [8]-shogaol-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. PMID:20163181

  10. In vitro and in vivo effects of heavy metals on mussel digestive gland hexokinase activity: the role of glutathione.

    PubMed

    Canesi, L; Ciacci, C; Piccoli, G; Stocchi, V; Viarengo, A; Gallo, G

    1998-08-01

    Hexokinase (E.C. 2.7.1.1), the enzyme responsible for glucose phosphorylation to G-6P, is inactivated by SH reagents and oxyradicals, and its inhibition has been involved in heavy metal toxicity in mammalian systems. In this work, the possibility that hexokinase activity could be affected by both heavy metal binding and oxidative stress conditions also in mussel tissues (Mytilus galloprovincialis Lam.) was investigated. The results obtained in vitro demonstrate that heavy metals inhibited digestive gland hexokinase (with Cd2+ > Cu2+ > Hg2+ > Zn2+ > Pb2+) and suggest a role for GSH in the protection against the heavy metal effects. Hexokinase activity was also reduced by addition of iron/ascorbate, indicating a susceptibility of the enzyme to metal-mediated oxyradical production. The effects of Cu2+ treatment (3 days, 40 micrograms l-1 per animal) on hexokinase activity and on the GSH/GSSG status were then evaluated in mussels exposed to a cycle of air exposure/reimmersion. In Cu-exposed mussels, a significant decrease in hexokinase activity and a parallel reduction in tissue GSH levels were observed, suggesting that the two effects of metal treatment could be related; however, hexokinase activity progressively recovered during air exposure and reimmersion, whereas the level of GSH showed a further decrease during air exposure followed by recovery after reimmersion. The in vitro results therefore indicate that mussel digestive gland hexokinase is susceptible to inactivation by heavy metal binding and suggest a role for GSH in the protection against the effects of heavy metals. The effects of copper were confirmed by the results obtained in vivo. The possible relationship between hexokinase activity and the level of GSH in the digestive gland of control and Cu-exposed mussels during air exposure and reimmersion are discussed, taking into account the balance between pro-oxidant and antioxidant processes at different stages of exposure.

  11. Substrate profiling of glutathione S-transferase with engineered enzymes and matched glutathione analogues.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shan; Zhang, Lei; Adilijiang, Gulishana; Liu, Jieyuan; Luo, Minkui; Deng, Haiteng

    2014-07-01

    The identification of specific substrates of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is important for understanding drug metabolism. A method termed bioorthogonal identification of GST substrates (BIGS) was developed, in which a reduced glutathione (GSH) analogue was developed for recognition by a rationally engineered GST to label the substrates of the corresponding native GST. A K44G-W40A-R41A mutant (GST-KWR) of the mu-class glutathione S-transferases GSTM1 was shown to be active with a clickable GSH analogue (GSH-R1) as the cosubstrate. The GSH-R1 conjugation products can react with an azido-based biotin probe for ready enrichment and MS identification. Proof-of-principle studies were carried to detect the products of GSH-R1 conjugation to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and dopamine quinone. The BIGS technology was then used to identify GSTM1 substrates in the Chinese herbal medicine Ganmaocongji.

  12. Gender differences in glutathione metabolism in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Honglei; Harrell, Lindy E; Shenvi, Swapna; Hagen, Tory; Liu, Rui-Ming

    2005-03-15

    The mechanism underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disease, is still an area of significant controversy. Oxidative damage of macromolecules has been suggested to play an important role in the development of AD; however, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we showed that the concentration of glutathione (GSH), the most abundant intracellular free thiol and an important antioxidant, was decreased in red blood cells from male AD patients compared with age- and gender-matched controls. However, there was no difference in blood GSH concentration between the female patients and female controls. The decrease in GSH content in red blood cells from male AD patients was associated with reduced activities of glutamate cysteine ligase and glutathione synthase, the two enzymes involved in de novo GSH synthesis, with no change in the amount of oxidized glutathione or the activity of glutathione reductase, suggesting that a decreased de novo GSH synthetic capacity is responsible for the decline in GSH content in AD. These results showed for the first time that GSH metabolism was regulated differently in male and female AD patients. PMID:15693022

  13. In vitro Effects of Four Native Brazilian Medicinal Plants in CYP3A4 mRNA Gene Expression, Glutathione Levels, and P-Glycoprotein Activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzari, Andre L D A; Milton, Flora; Frangos, Samantha; Carvalho, Ana C B; Silveira, Dâmaris; de Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco; Prieto, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Erythrina mulungu Benth. (Fabaceae), Cordia verbenacea A. DC. (Boraginaceae), Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae) and Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) are medicinal plant species native to Brazil shortlisted by the Brazilian National Health System for future clinical use. However, nothing is known about their effects in metabolic and transporter proteins, which could potentially lead to herb-drug interactions (HDI). In this work, we assess non-toxic concentrations (100 μg/mL) of the plant infusions for their in vitro ability to modulate CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression and intracellular glutathione levels in HepG2 cells, as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity in vincristine-resistant Caco-2 cells (Caco-2 VCR). Their mechanisms of action were further studied by measuring the activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) in transiently co-transfected HeLa cells and the inhibition of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in HepG2 cells. Our results show that P-gp activity was not affected in any case and that only Solanum paniculatum was able to significantly change CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression (twofold decrease, p < 0.05), this being correlated with an antagonist effect upon hPXR (EC50 = 0.38 mg/mL). Total intracellular glutathione levels were significantly depleted by exposure to Solanum paniculatum (-44%, p < 0.001), Lippia sidoides (-12%, p < 0.05) and Cordia verbenacea (-47%, p < 0.001). The latter plant extract was able to decrease GGT activity (-48%, p < 0.01). In conclusion, this preclinical study shows that the administration of some of these herbal medicines may be able to cause disturbances to metabolic mechanisms in vitro. Although Erythrina mulungu appears safe in our tests, active pharmacovigilance is recommended for the other three species, especially in the case of Solanum paniculatum. PMID:27594838

  14. In vitro Effects of Four Native Brazilian Medicinal Plants in CYP3A4 mRNA Gene Expression, Glutathione Levels, and P-Glycoprotein Activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzari, Andre L D A; Milton, Flora; Frangos, Samantha; Carvalho, Ana C B; Silveira, Dâmaris; de Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco; Prieto, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Erythrina mulungu Benth. (Fabaceae), Cordia verbenacea A. DC. (Boraginaceae), Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae) and Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) are medicinal plant species native to Brazil shortlisted by the Brazilian National Health System for future clinical use. However, nothing is known about their effects in metabolic and transporter proteins, which could potentially lead to herb-drug interactions (HDI). In this work, we assess non-toxic concentrations (100 μg/mL) of the plant infusions for their in vitro ability to modulate CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression and intracellular glutathione levels in HepG2 cells, as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity in vincristine-resistant Caco-2 cells (Caco-2 VCR). Their mechanisms of action were further studied by measuring the activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) in transiently co-transfected HeLa cells and the inhibition of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in HepG2 cells. Our results show that P-gp activity was not affected in any case and that only Solanum paniculatum was able to significantly change CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression (twofold decrease, p < 0.05), this being correlated with an antagonist effect upon hPXR (EC50 = 0.38 mg/mL). Total intracellular glutathione levels were significantly depleted by exposure to Solanum paniculatum (-44%, p < 0.001), Lippia sidoides (-12%, p < 0.05) and Cordia verbenacea (-47%, p < 0.001). The latter plant extract was able to decrease GGT activity (-48%, p < 0.01). In conclusion, this preclinical study shows that the administration of some of these herbal medicines may be able to cause disturbances to metabolic mechanisms in vitro. Although Erythrina mulungu appears safe in our tests, active pharmacovigilance is recommended for the other three species, especially in the case of Solanum paniculatum.

  15. In vitro Effects of Four Native Brazilian Medicinal Plants in CYP3A4 mRNA Gene Expression, Glutathione Levels, and P-Glycoprotein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzari, Andre L. D. A.; Milton, Flora; Frangos, Samantha; Carvalho, Ana C. B.; Silveira, Dâmaris; de Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco; Prieto, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Erythrina mulungu Benth. (Fabaceae), Cordia verbenacea A. DC. (Boraginaceae), Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae) and Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) are medicinal plant species native to Brazil shortlisted by the Brazilian National Health System for future clinical use. However, nothing is known about their effects in metabolic and transporter proteins, which could potentially lead to herb-drug interactions (HDI). In this work, we assess non-toxic concentrations (100 μg/mL) of the plant infusions for their in vitro ability to modulate CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression and intracellular glutathione levels in HepG2 cells, as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity in vincristine-resistant Caco-2 cells (Caco-2 VCR). Their mechanisms of action were further studied by measuring the activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) in transiently co-transfected HeLa cells and the inhibition of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in HepG2 cells. Our results show that P-gp activity was not affected in any case and that only Solanum paniculatum was able to significantly change CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression (twofold decrease, p < 0.05), this being correlated with an antagonist effect upon hPXR (EC50 = 0.38 mg/mL). Total intracellular glutathione levels were significantly depleted by exposure to Solanum paniculatum (-44%, p < 0.001), Lippia sidoides (-12%, p < 0.05) and Cordia verbenacea (-47%, p < 0.001). The latter plant extract was able to decrease GGT activity (-48%, p < 0.01). In conclusion, this preclinical study shows that the administration of some of these herbal medicines may be able to cause disturbances to metabolic mechanisms in vitro. Although Erythrina mulungu appears safe in our tests, active pharmacovigilance is recommended for the other three species, especially in the case of Solanum paniculatum.

  16. In vitro Effects of Four Native Brazilian Medicinal Plants in CYP3A4 mRNA Gene Expression, Glutathione Levels, and P-Glycoprotein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzari, Andre L. D. A.; Milton, Flora; Frangos, Samantha; Carvalho, Ana C. B.; Silveira, Dâmaris; de Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco; Prieto, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Erythrina mulungu Benth. (Fabaceae), Cordia verbenacea A. DC. (Boraginaceae), Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae) and Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) are medicinal plant species native to Brazil shortlisted by the Brazilian National Health System for future clinical use. However, nothing is known about their effects in metabolic and transporter proteins, which could potentially lead to herb-drug interactions (HDI). In this work, we assess non-toxic concentrations (100 μg/mL) of the plant infusions for their in vitro ability to modulate CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression and intracellular glutathione levels in HepG2 cells, as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity in vincristine-resistant Caco-2 cells (Caco-2 VCR). Their mechanisms of action were further studied by measuring the activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) in transiently co-transfected HeLa cells and the inhibition of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in HepG2 cells. Our results show that P-gp activity was not affected in any case and that only Solanum paniculatum was able to significantly change CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression (twofold decrease, p < 0.05), this being correlated with an antagonist effect upon hPXR (EC50 = 0.38 mg/mL). Total intracellular glutathione levels were significantly depleted by exposure to Solanum paniculatum (-44%, p < 0.001), Lippia sidoides (-12%, p < 0.05) and Cordia verbenacea (-47%, p < 0.001). The latter plant extract was able to decrease GGT activity (-48%, p < 0.01). In conclusion, this preclinical study shows that the administration of some of these herbal medicines may be able to cause disturbances to metabolic mechanisms in vitro. Although Erythrina mulungu appears safe in our tests, active pharmacovigilance is recommended for the other three species, especially in the case of Solanum paniculatum. PMID:27594838

  17. A KS-type dehydrin and its related domains reduce Cu-promoted radical generation and the histidine residues contribute to the radical-reducing activities

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Masakazu

    2013-01-01

    Dehydrin is a plant disordered protein whose functions are not yet totally understood. Here it is reported that a KS-type dehydrin can reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from Cu. AtHIRD11, which is the Arabidopsis KS-type dehydrin, inhibited generation of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals in the Cu–ascorbate system. The radical-reducing activity of AtHIRD11 was stronger than those of radical-silencing peptides such as glutathione and serum albumin. The addition of Cu2+ reduced the disordered state, decreased the trypsin susceptibility, and promoted the self-association of AtHIRD11. Domain analyses indicated that the five domains containing histidine showed ROS-reducing activities. Histidine/alanine substitutions indicated that histidine is a crucial residue for reducing ROS generation. Using the 27 peptides which are related to the KnS-type dehydrins of 14 plant species, it was found that the strengths of ROS-reducing activities can be determined by two factors, namely the histidine contents and the length of the peptides. The degree of ROS-reducing activities of a dehydrin can be predicted using these indices. PMID:23382551

  18. Oxidative stress protection and glutathione metabolism in response to hydrogen peroxide and menadione in riboflavinogenic fungus Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S; Chandra, T S

    2014-11-01

    Ashbya gossypii is a plant pathogen and a natural overproducer of riboflavin and is used for industrial riboflavin production. A few literature reports depict a link between riboflavin overproduction and stress in this fungus. However, the stress protection mechanisms and glutathione metabolism are not much explored in A. gossypii. In the present study, an increase in the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase was observed in response to hydrogen peroxide and menadione. The lipid peroxide and membrane lipid peroxide levels were increased by H2O2 and menadione, indicating oxidative damage. The glutathione metabolism was altered with a significant increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) and a decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in the presence of H2O2 and menadione. Expression of the genes involved in stress mechanism was analyzed in response to the stressors by semiquantitative RT-PCR. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of CTT1, SOD1, GSH1, YAP1, and RIB3 were increased by H2O2 and menadione, indicating the effect of stress at the transcriptional level. A preliminary bioinformatics study for the presence of stress response elements (STRE)/Yap response elements (YRE) depicted that the glutathione metabolic genes, stress genes, and the RIB genes hosted either STRE/YRE, which may enable induction of these genes during stress. PMID:25178419

  19. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  20. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-10-07

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  1. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

    1985-04-11

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

  2. The effect of aluminium-stress and exogenous spermidine on chlorophyll degradation, glutathione reductase activity and the photosystem II D1 protein gene (psbA) transcript level in lichen Xanthoria parietina.

    PubMed

    Sen, Gulseren; Eryilmaz, Isil Ezgi; Ozakca, Dilek

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of short-term aluminium toxicity and the application of spermidine on the lichen Xanthoria parietina were investigated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. Our results suggest that aluminium stress leads to physiological processes in a dose-dependent manner through differences in lipid peroxidation rate, chlorophyll content and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity in aluminium and spermidine treated samples. The expression of the photosystem II D1 protein (psbA) gene was quantified using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Increased glutathione reductase activity and psbA mRNA transcript levels were observed in the X. parietina thalli that were treated with spermidine before aluminium-stress. The results showed that the application of spermidine could mitigate aluminium-induced lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll degradation on lichen X. parietina thalli through an increase in psbA transcript levels and activity of glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes.

  3. Behavioral Intervention to Reduce AIDS Risk Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Randomly assigned homosexual men (N=104) with history of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) risk behavior to experimental and control groups. Experimentals received AIDS risk education, cognitive-behavioral self-management training, sexual assertion training, and social support development training. Experimentals greatly reduced frequency…

  4. Glutathione S-transferase class {pi} polymorphism in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Aivaliotis, M.J.; Cantu, T.; Gilligan, R.

    1995-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) comprises a family of isozymes with broad substrate specificities. One or more GST isozymes are present in most animal tissues and function in several detoxification pathways through the conjugation of reduced glutathione with various electrophiles, thereby reducing their potential toxicity. Four soluble GST isozymes encoded by genes on different chromosomes have been identified in humans. The acidic class pi GST, GSTP (previously designated GST-3), is widely distributed in adult tissues and appears to be the only GST isozyme present in leukocytes and placenta. Previously reported electrophoretic analyses of erythrocyte and leukocyte extracts revealed single bands of activity, which differed slightly in mobility between the two cell types, or under other conditions, a two-banded pattern. To our knowledge, no genetically determined polymorphisms have previously been reported in GSTP from any species. We now report a polymorphism of GSTP in baboon leukocytes, and present family data that verifies autosomal codominant inheritance. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. [Glutathione redox system, immune status, antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides in hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Tapbergenov, S O; Sovetov, B S; Bekbosynova, R B; Bolysbekova, S M

    2015-01-01

    The immune status, components of the glutathione redox system, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides have been investigated in animals with experimental hypothyroidism. On day 8 after an increase in the number of leukocytes, lymphocytes, T-helpers and T-suppressors as well as increased number of B-lymphocytes was found in blood of thyroidectomized rats. This was accompanied by decreased activity of adenosine deaminase (AD), AMP-deaminase (AMPD), and 5'-nucleotidase (5'N) in blood, but the ratio of enzyme activity AD/AMPD increased. These changes in the activity of enzymes, involved in purine catabolism can be regarded as increased functional relationships between T and B lymphocytes in hypothyroidism. The functional changes of immune system cells were accompanied by increased activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), a decrease in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and the ratio GH/GPx. Thyroidectomized rats had increased amounts of total, oxidized (GSSG) and reduced glutathione (GSH), but the ratio GSH/GSSG decerased as compared with control animals. In the liver, hypothyroidism resulted in activation of SOD, GPx, decreased activity of GR and decreased ratio GR/GPx. At the same time, the levels of total, oxidized, and reduced glutathione increased, but the ratio GSH/GSSG as well as activities of enzymes involved in purine nucleotide metabolism ratio (and their ratio 5'N/AD + AMPD) decreased. All these data suggest a functional relationship of the glutathione redox system not only with antioxidant enzymes, but also activity of enzymes involved purine nucleotide metabolism and immune status.

  6. Stimuli Reduce the Dimensionality of Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The activity of ensembles of simultaneously recorded neurons can be represented as a set of points in the space of firing rates. Even though the dimension of this space is equal to the ensemble size, neural activity can be effectively localized on smaller subspaces. The dimensionality of the neural space is an important determinant of the computational tasks supported by the neural activity. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the sensory cortex of alert rats during periods of ongoing (inter-trial) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that dimensionality grows linearly with ensemble size, and grows significantly faster during ongoing activity compared to evoked activity. We explain these results using a spiking network model based on a clustered architecture. The model captures the difference in growth rate between ongoing and evoked activity and predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size that could be tested in high-density multi-electrode recordings. Moreover, we present a simple theory that predicts the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality. This upper bound is inversely proportional to the amount of pair-wise correlations and, compared to a homogeneous network without clusters, it is larger by a factor equal to the number of clusters. The empirical estimation of such bounds depends on the number and duration of trials and is well predicted by the theory. Together, these results provide a framework to analyze neural dimensionality in alert animals, its behavior under stimulus presentation, and its theoretical dependence on ensemble size, number of clusters, and correlations in spiking network models. PMID:26924968

  7. Stimuli Reduce the Dimensionality of Cortical Activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The activity of ensembles of simultaneously recorded neurons can be represented as a set of points in the space of firing rates. Even though the dimension of this space is equal to the ensemble size, neural activity can be effectively localized on smaller subspaces. The dimensionality of the neural space is an important determinant of the computational tasks supported by the neural activity. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the sensory cortex of alert rats during periods of ongoing (inter-trial) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that dimensionality grows linearly with ensemble size, and grows significantly faster during ongoing activity compared to evoked activity. We explain these results using a spiking network model based on a clustered architecture. The model captures the difference in growth rate between ongoing and evoked activity and predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size that could be tested in high-density multi-electrode recordings. Moreover, we present a simple theory that predicts the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality. This upper bound is inversely proportional to the amount of pair-wise correlations and, compared to a homogeneous network without clusters, it is larger by a factor equal to the number of clusters. The empirical estimation of such bounds depends on the number and duration of trials and is well predicted by the theory. Together, these results provide a framework to analyze neural dimensionality in alert animals, its behavior under stimulus presentation, and its theoretical dependence on ensemble size, number of clusters, and correlations in spiking network models. PMID:26924968

  8. Temperature-driven switching of the catalytic activity of artificial glutathione peroxidase by the shape transition between the nanotubes and vesicle-like structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Zou, Huixin; Dong, Zeyuan; Zhou, Lipeng; Li, Jiaxi; Luo, Quan; Zhu, Junyan; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-04-15

    Smart supramolecular nanoenzymes with temperature-driven switching property have been successfully constructed by the self-assembly of supra-amphiphiles formed by the cyclodextrin-based host-guest chemistry. The self-assembled nanostructures were catalyst-functionalized and thermosensitively-functionalized through conveniently linking the catalytic center of glutathione peroxidase and thermosensitive polymer to the host cyclodextrin molecules.The ON-OFF switches for the peroxidase activity by reversible transformation of nanostructures from tube to sphere have been achieved through changing the temperature. We anticipate that such intelligent enzyme mimics could be developed to use in an antioxidant medicine with controlled catalytic efficiency according to the needs of the human body in the future. PMID:24654792

  9. Effect of glutathione depletion on Ifosfamide nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Garimella-Krovi, Sudha; Springate, James E

    2008-09-01

    Kidney injury is an important side effect of the chemotherapeutic agent ifosfamide in humans. Previous studies have shown that treatment with ifosfamide reduces kidney glutathione and that the toxicity of ifosfamide is enhanced in glutathione-depleted renal tubule cells in vitro. In this study, we examined the effect of glutathione depletion on ifosfamide nephrotoxicity in vivo using rats treated with the glutathione-depleting agent buthionine sulfoximine. Animals received 80 mg/kg ifosfamide intraperitoneally daily for three days with or without buthionine sulfoximine in drinking water. Buthionine sulfoximine produced a significant fall in renal glutathione content but did not affect kidney function. Ifosfamide-treated rats developed low-grade glucosuria, phosphaturia and proteinuria that worsened with concomitant buthionine sulfoximine therapy. These findings indicate that glutathione depletion exacerbates ifosfamide nephrotoxicity in rats and suggest that pharmacological methods for replenishing intracellular glutathione may be effective in ameliorating ifosfamide-induced renal injury.

  10. Accumulation of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and activities of cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase in crabs (Eriocheir japonicus) from Japanese rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Mayumi; Iwata, Hisato; Kazusaka, Akio; Fujita, Shoichi; Sakiyama, Takanori; Fukushima, Minoru

    1998-08-01

    The hepatopancreases of freshwater crabs (Eriocheir japonicus) collected from three Japanese rivers were analyzed for planar halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs), including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST)-dependent enzyme activities in the crab hepatopancreas were also measured to examine their potential as biomarkers for the contaminants. Crabs from the Tone River, which runs through industrial, agricultural, and urban areas, have the highest concentrations of HAHs (4,100 pg/g fat weight), followed by those from the Barato River (2,430--2,970 pg/g fat weight), whereas crabs from the Shiribetsu River were relatively less contaminated (1,350--1,800 pg/g fat weight). Identification and numerous PCDD and PCDF congeners in crabs from the Barato and Shiribetsu Rivers were notably contaminated with 1,3,6,8- and 1,3,7,9-TeCDD congeners, which suggests that a possible source was chlornitrofen, which has been extensively used in paddy fields as a herbicide. Calculation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) showed that the causal contaminants of higher TEQs in crabs from the Tone River (94.7 TEQ picograms per gram fat weight) were PCDDs and PCDFs, although the most important contributor to the total TEQs was coplanar PCBs (49.95%). The crab hepatopancreas appeared to have abilities to transfer glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-nitrobenzene (CDNB) and 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene (DCNB). The crabs with the highest TEQ levels showed the highest GST activities.

  11. Interaction between mercury (Hg), arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) affects the activity of glutathione S-transferase in breast milk; possible relationship with fish and sellfish intake.

    PubMed

    Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; Celis de la Rosa, Alfredo de Jesús; Acosta-Vargas, Baudilio; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía Celina; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-08-01

    Breast milk is regarded as an ideal source of nutrients for the growth and development of neonates, but it can also be a potential source of pollutants. Mothers can be exposed to different contaminants as a result of their lifestyle and environmental pollution. Mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) could adversely affect the development of fetal and neonatal nervous system. Some fish and shellfish are rich in selenium (Se), an essential trace element that forms part of several enzymes related to the detoxification process, including glutathione S-transferase (GST). The goal of this study was to determine the interaction between Hg, As and Se and analyze its effect on the activity of GST in breast milk. Milk samples were collected from women between day 7 and 10 postpartum. The GST activity was determined spectrophotometrically; total Hg, As and Se concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. To explain the possible association of Hg, As and Se concentrations with GST activity in breast milk, generalized linear models were constructed. The model explained 44% of the GST activity measured in breast milk. The GLM suggests that GST activity was positively correlated with Hg, As and Se concentrations. The activity of the enzyme was also explained by the frequency of consumption of marine fish and shellfish in the diet of the breastfeeding women.

  12. Tuning the activity of glutathione peroxidase mimics through intramolecular Se···N,O interactions: a DFT study incorporating solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE).

    PubMed

    Bayse, Craig A; Pavlou, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Diaryl diselenide mimics of the antioxidant selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase (GPx) often incorporate intramolecular Se···N,O interactions to enhance their GPx-like activity. Although the strength of the interaction is defined by the Lewis basicity of the donating group and the strength of the Se-X bond, there is not a clear relationship between the interaction and the GPx-like activity. Density-functional theory and natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations are used to show the range of Se···N,O interactions for various functional groups. The strongest interactions are found for groups which stabilize the donor-acceptor interaction through aromatic stabilization. The activation barriers for the GPx-like mechanism of activity of several substituted areneselenols are calculated using DFT and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE), a technique that incorporates networks of solvent molecules into the theoretical model to facilitate proton transfer between sites in the reactant and product. DFT-SAPE models show that, in addition to decreasing the barrier to oxidation of the selenol, Se···N,O interactions generally increase the barriers for selenenic acid reduction and selenol regeneration because the Se···N,O interaction must be broken for the reaction to proceed. Calculated activation barriers for the rate-determining step are consistent with the relative experimental GPx-like activities of a series of diaryl diselenides.

  13. Interaction between mercury (Hg), arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) affects the activity of glutathione S-transferase in breast milk; possible relationship with fish and sellfish intake.

    PubMed

    Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; Celis de la Rosa, Alfredo de Jesús; Acosta-Vargas, Baudilio; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía Celina; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-01-01

    Breast milk is regarded as an ideal source of nutrients for the growth and development of neonates, but it can also be a potential source of pollutants. Mothers can be exposed to different contaminants as a result of their lifestyle and environmental pollution. Mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) could adversely affect the development of fetal and neonatal nervous system. Some fish and shellfish are rich in selenium (Se), an essential trace element that forms part of several enzymes related to the detoxification process, including glutathione S-transferase (GST). The goal of this study was to determine the interaction between Hg, As and Se and analyze its effect on the activity of GST in breast milk. Milk samples were collected from women between day 7 and 10 postpartum. The GST activity was determined spectrophotometrically; total Hg, As and Se concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. To explain the possible association of Hg, As and Se concentrations with GST activity in breast milk, generalized linear models were constructed. The model explained 44% of the GST activity measured in breast milk. The GLM suggests that GST activity was positively correlated with Hg, As and Se concentrations. The activity of the enzyme was also explained by the frequency of consumption of marine fish and shellfish in the diet of the breastfeeding women. PMID:25208800

  14. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G; Butler, Mark S; Montgomery, A Bruce; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26169405

  15. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G; Butler, Mark S; Montgomery, A Bruce; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance.

  16. Glutathione S-transferase activities in African catfish injected with β-naphthoflavone: effects of ploidy, gender, dose, and sampling time.

    PubMed

    Karami, A; Courtenay, S C

    2015-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) are considered among the most controversial biomarkers of water pollutants in fish with little known about factors influencing their activities. The objective of this study was to investigate how gender, dose, ploidy, and sampling time alter hepatic GST activities in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) following β-naphthoflavone (β-NF) injection. Newly matured male and female diploid and triploid fish were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with 0, 15, or 75 mg/kg of β-NF, and livers were excised 24, 48, and 72 h post-injection. Results showed that hepatic GST activities were significantly inhibited by both doses of β-NF. Inhibition was greater in females than males, but no significant differences were observed between diploid and triploid fish. Enzymatic activities differed over time with lowest levels 72 h post-injection. These results extend our understanding of GST activity in fish and highlight the necessity of considering confounding factors when comparing different studies.

  17. Glutathione S-transferase activities in African catfish injected with β-naphthoflavone: effects of ploidy, gender, dose, and sampling time.

    PubMed

    Karami, A; Courtenay, S C

    2015-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) are considered among the most controversial biomarkers of water pollutants in fish with little known about factors influencing their activities. The objective of this study was to investigate how gender, dose, ploidy, and sampling time alter hepatic GST activities in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) following β-naphthoflavone (β-NF) injection. Newly matured male and female diploid and triploid fish were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with 0, 15, or 75 mg/kg of β-NF, and livers were excised 24, 48, and 72 h post-injection. Results showed that hepatic GST activities were significantly inhibited by both doses of β-NF. Inhibition was greater in females than males, but no significant differences were observed between diploid and triploid fish. Enzymatic activities differed over time with lowest levels 72 h post-injection. These results extend our understanding of GST activity in fish and highlight the necessity of considering confounding factors when comparing different studies. PMID:26452505

  18. Dysregulation of Glutathione Homeostasis Causes Oxido-reductive Stress and Cardiomyopathy in R120GCryAB Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Namakkal S.; Connell, Patrice; Christians, Elisabeth S.; Yan, Liang-Jun; Taylor, Ryan P.; Orosz, Andras; Zhang, Xia Q.; Stevenson, Tamara J.; Peshock, Ronald M.; Leopold, Jane A.; Barry, William H.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Odelberg, Shannon J.; Benjamin, Ivor J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Oxidative stress is widely implicated in pathogenic states including heart failure. In contrast, the role of ‘reductive stress,’ defined as the abnormal increase of reducing equivalents (e.g., glutathione, NADPH), remains controversial. Here we show that transgenic mice overexpressing cardiac-specific human R120G αB-crystallin (hR120GCryAB Tg) recapitulate protein aggregation cardiomyopathy and are under reductive stress linked to glutathione homeostasis. In myopathic hearts, increased recycling of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) and GSH/GSSG ratios were due to augmented expression and enzymatic activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase. The intercross of hR120GCryAB Tg cardiomyopathic animals with G6PD-deficient (20% normal G6PD activity) mice rescues hR120GCryAB Tg/G6PDmut progeny from increased G6PD activity, cardiac hypertrophy, and protein aggregation. These findings demonstrate that dysregulation of G6PD activity is necessary and sufficient for maladaptive reductive stress and suggest a novel therapeutic target for abrogating R120GCryAB cardiomyopathy and heart failure in humans. PMID:17693254

  19. The effects of acute acetaminophen toxicity on hepatic mRNA expression of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, and levels of peroxynitrite, nitric oxide, reduced glutathione, and malondialdehyde in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Cigremis, Yilmaz; Turel, Huseyin; Adiguzel, Kevser; Akgoz, Muslum; Kart, Asim; Karaman, Musa; Ozen, Hasan

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the regulation of antioxidant system under acetaminophen (AAP) toxicity. Twelve male New Zealand rabbits were divided into two groups with the following treatments: Group 1 animals were intraperitoneally injected with single saline (control). Group 2 animals were treated with intraperitoneal injection of AAP at a dose of 250 mg/kg body weight. Four hours following the treatments, blood samples were collected and the rabbits were sacrificed to collect liver samples. Hepatocellular damage was evaluated by aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels as well as histopathological examinations and immunohistochemical analysis. Tissue-reduced glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide (NO(.)), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also measured. mRNA expression levels of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that liver GSH was reduced significantly in AAP-treated rabbits (P < 0.05), while MDA and NO(.) levels were increased when they were compared to control (P < 0.05). Blood AST and ALT levels were also increased following AAP treatment (P < 0.05). Hepatocellular degeneration and severe necrosis were detected in histopathological examinations. Increased immunostaining was observed for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitrotyrosine in the liver. There were no changes in mRNA expression levels of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px after AAP treatment compared to control group. These results suggest that the expression of these enzymes, which are involved in the antioxidant system, may not be altered after AAP toxicity, although classical toxic changes such as depletion of GSH, hepatocellular necrosis, and increased immunostaining for iNOS and nitrotyrosine were detected.

  20. Elevated hepatic gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase activity and abnormal sulfate levels in liver and muscle tissue may explain abnormal cysteine and glutathione levels in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Gross, A; Hack, V; Stahl-Hennig, C; Dröge, W

    1996-11-20

    To establish whether the low cysteine and glutathione levels in HIV-infected patients and SIV-infected rhesus macaques may be consequences of an abnormal cysteine catabolism, we analyzed sulfate and glutathione levels in macaques. Muscle tissue (m. vastus lateralis and m. gastrocnemius) of SIV-infected macaques (n = 25) had higher sulfate and lower glutathione and glutamate levels than that of uninfected controls (n =9). Hepatic tissue, in contrast, showed decreased sulfate and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels, and increased gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS) activity. These findings suggest drainage of the cysteine pool by increased cysteine catabolism in skeletal muscle tissue, and by increased hepatic glutathione biosynthesis. Cachectic macaques also showed increased urea levels and decreased glutamine/urea ratios in the liver, which are obviously related to the abnormal urea excretion and negative nitrogen balance commonly observed in cachexia. As urea production and net glutamine synthesis in the liver are strongly influenced by proton-generating processes, the abnormal hepatic urea production may be the direct consequence of the cysteine deficiency and the decreased catabolic conversion of cysteine into sulfate and protons in the liver.

  1. Simultaneous femtomole determination of cysteine, reduced and oxidized glutathione, and phytochelatin in maize (Zea mays L.) kernels using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Potesil, David; Petrlova, Jitka; Adam, Vojtech; Vacek, Jan; Klejdus, Borivoj; Zehnalek, Josef; Trnkova, Libuse; Havel, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2005-08-19

    Thiol compounds such as cysteine (Cys), reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) gluathione, and phytochelatins (PCs) play an important role in heavy metal detoxification in plants. These thiols are biological active compounds whose function is elimination of oxidative stress in plant cells. The aim of our work was to optimise sensitive and rapid method of high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detector (HPLC-ED) for determination of the abovementioned thiol compounds in maize (Zea mays L.) kernels. New approach for evaluation of HPLC-ED parameters is described. The most suitable isocratic mobile phase for the separation and detection of Cys, GSH, GSSG and PC2 consisted of methanol (MeOH) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). In addition, the influence of concentrations of TFA and ratio of MeOH:TFA on chromatographic separation and detection of the thiol compounds were studied. The mobile phase consisting from methanol and 0.05% (v/v) TFA in ratio 97:3 (%; v/v) was found the most suitable for the thiol compounds determination. Optimal flow rate of the mobile phase was 0.18 ml min(-1) and the column and detector temperature 35 degrees C. Hydrodynamic voltammograms of all studied compounds was obtained due to the selection of the most effective working electrodes potentials. Two most effective detection potentials were selected: 780 mV for the GSSG and PC2 and 680 mV for determination of Cys and GSH. The optimised HPLC-ED method was capable to determine femtomole levels of studied compounds. The detection limits (3 S/N) of the studied thiol compounds were for cysteine 112.8 fmol, GSH 63.5 fmol, GSSG 112.2 fmol and PC2 2.53 pmol per injection (5 microl). The optimised HPLC-ED method was applied to study of the influence of different cadmium concentrations (0, 10 and 100 microM Cd) on content of Cys, GSH, GSSG and PC2 in maize kernels. According to the increasing time of Cd treatment, content of GSH, GSSG and PC2 in maize kernels increased but content

  2. Modulation of the Activities of Catalase, Cu-Zn, Mn Superoxide Dismutase, and Glutathione Peroxidase in Adipocyte from Ovariectomised Female Rats with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Rebeca Cambray; Zuñiga-Muñoz, Alejandra; Guarner Lans, Verónica; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Tena Betancourt, Carlos Alberto; Pérez-Torres, Israel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between estrogen removal, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress generated by obesity in a MS female rat model. Thirty two female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: Control (C), MS, MS ovariectomized (Ovx), and MS Ovx plus estradiol (E2). MS was induced by administering 30% sucrose to drinking water for 24 weeks. After sacrifice, intra-abdominal fat was dissected; adipocytes were isolated and lipid peroxidation, non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity, and the activities of Cu-Zn and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined. There were no significant differences in the activities of Cu-Zn, Mn SOD, CAT, and GPx between the C and MS groups, but in the MS Ovx group there was a statistically significant decrease in the activities of these enzymes when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. The increased lipid peroxidation and nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity found in MS Ovx was significantly decreased when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. In conclusion, the removal of E2 by ovariectomy decreases the activity of the antioxidant enzymes in the intra-abdominal tissue of MS female rats; this is reflected by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity. PMID:24987414

  3. Selenium Deficiency Reduces the Abundance of mRNA for Se-Dependent Glutathione Peroxidase 1 by a UGA-Dependent Mechanism Likely To Be Nonsense Codon-Mediated Decay of Cytoplasmic mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Patrick M.; Reddy, C. Channa; Maquat, Lynne E.

    1998-01-01

    The mammalian mRNA for selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase 1 (Se-GPx1) contains a UGA codon that is recognized as a codon for the nonstandard amino acid selenocysteine (Sec). Inadequate concentrations of selenium (Se) result in a decrease in Se-GPx1 mRNA abundance by an uncharacterized mechanism that may be dependent on translation, independent of translation, or both. In this study, we have begun to elucidate this mechanism. We demonstrate using hepatocytes from rats fed either a Se-supplemented or Se-deficient diet for 9 to 13 weeks that Se deprivation results in an ∼50-fold reduction in Se-GPx1 activity and an ∼20-fold reduction in Se-GPx1 mRNA abundance. Reverse transcription-PCR analyses of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions revealed that Se deprivation has no effect on the levels of either nuclear pre-mRNA or nuclear mRNA but reduces the level of cytoplasmic mRNA. The regulation of Se-GPx1 gene expression by Se was recapitulated in transient transfections of NIH 3T3 cells, and experiments were extended to examine the consequences of converting the Sec codon (TGA) to either a termination codon (TAA) or a cysteine codon (TGC). Regardless of the type of codon, an alteration in the Se concentration was of no consequence to the ratio of nuclear Se-GPx1 mRNA to nuclear Se-GPx1 pre-mRNA. The ratio of cytoplasmic Se-GPx1 mRNA to nuclear Se-GPx1 mRNA from the wild-type (TGA-containing) allele was reduced twofold when cells were deprived of Se for 48 h after transfection, which has been shown to be the extent of the reduction for the endogenous Se-GPx1 mRNA of cultured cells incubated as long as 20 days in Se-deficient medium. In contrast to the TGA allele, Se had no effect on expression of either the TAA allele or the TGC allele. Under Se-deficient conditions, the TAA and TGC alleles generated, respectively, 1.7-fold-less and 3-fold-more cytoplasmic Se-GPx1 mRNA relative to the amount of nuclear Se-GPx1 mRNA than the TGA allele. These results indicate that (i

  4. Fisetin attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced cell damage by scavenging reactive oxygen species and activating protective functions of cellular glutathione system.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Cha, Ji Won; Zheng, Jian; Yao, Cheng Wen; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can induce cell damage by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in DNA damage and cell death. The aim of this study is to elucidate the protective effects of fisetin (3,7,3',4',-tetrahydroxy flavone) against H2O2-induced cell damage. Fisetin reduced the level of superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical in cell free system, and intracellular ROS generated by H2O2. Moreover, fisetin protected against H2O2-induced membrane lipid peroxidation, cellular DNA damage, and protein carbonylation, which are the primary cellular outcomes of H2O2 treatment. Furthermore, fisetin increased the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, which is decreased by H2O2. Conversely, a GSH inhibitor abolished the cytoprotective effect of fisetin against H2O2-induced cells damage. Taken together, our results suggest that fisetin protects against H2O2-induced cell damage by inhibiting ROS generation, thereby maintaining the protective role of the cellular GSH system.

  5. Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides from Microcystis on Glutathione-Based Detoxification Pathways in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; Gantar, Miroslav; Mayer, Gregory D.; Gibbs, Patrick D. L.; Berry, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria (“blue-green algae”) are recognized producers of a diverse array of toxic secondary metabolites. Of these, the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), produced by all cyanobacteria, remain to be well investigated. In the current study, we specifically employed the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo to investigate the effects of LPS from geographically diverse strains of the widespread cyanobacterial genus, Microcystis, on several detoxifying enzymes/pathways, including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)/glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), and compared observed effects to those of heterotrophic bacterial (i.e., E. coli) LPS. In agreement with previous studies, cyanobacterial LPS significantly reduced GST in embryos exposed to LPS in all treatments. In contrast, GPx moderately increased in embryos exposed to LPS, with no effect on reciprocal GR activity. Interestingly, total glutathione levels were elevated in embryos exposed to Microcystis LPS, but the relative levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH/GSSG) were, likewise, elevated suggesting that oxidative stress is not involved in the observed effects as typical of heterotrophic bacterial LPS in mammalian systems. In further support of this, no effect was observed with respect to CAT or SOD activity. These findings demonstrate that Microcystis LPS affects glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish embryo, and more generally, that this model is well suited for investigating the apparent toxicophore of cyanobacterial LPS, including possible differences in structure-activity relationships between heterotrophic and cyanobacterial LPS, and teleost fish versus mammalian systems. PMID:22822454

  6. Pharmacogenetics of azathioprine in inflammatory bowel disease: a role for glutathione-S-transferase?

    PubMed

    Stocco, Gabriele; Pelin, Marco; Franca, Raffaella; De Iudicibus, Sara; Cuzzoni, Eva; Favretto, Diego; Martelossi, Stefano; Ventura, Alessandro; Decorti, Giuliana

    2014-04-01

    Azathioprine is a purine antimetabolite drug commonly used to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In vivo it is active after reaction with reduced glutathione (GSH) and conversion to mercaptopurine. Although this reaction may occur spontaneously, the presence of isoforms M and A of the enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST) may increase its speed. Indeed, in pediatric patients with IBD, deletion of GST-M1, which determines reduced enzymatic activity, was recently associated with reduced sensitivity to azathioprine and reduced production of azathioprine active metabolites. In addition to increase the activation of azathioprine to mercaptopurine, GSTs may contribute to azathioprine effects even by modulating GSH consumption, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, genetic polymorphisms in genes for GSTs may be useful to predict response to azathioprine even if more in vitro and clinical validation studies are needed.

  7. Differential effects of sodium selenite and nano-Se on growth performance, tissue se distribution, and glutathione peroxidase activity of avian broiler.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanbo

    2009-05-01

    The present research evaluated differential effects of sodium selenite and nano-Se on growth performance, tissue Se distribution, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity of avian broiler. Broilers were randomly segregated into 12 groups so that three replicates were available for each of the three treatments (T-1, T-2, and T-3) and control groups. The control groups were fed basal diets without Se addition. T-1, T-2, and T-3 were fed with diets containing 0.2 mg kg(-1) sodium selenite, 0.2 mg kg(-1) nano-Se, and 0.5 mg kg(-1) nano-Se, respectively. Compared with the control, Se supplementation remarkably improved daily weight gain and survival rate and decreased feed conversion ratio (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference was observed between T-1, T-2, and T-3. The tissue Se content was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in Se-supplemented groups than the control, and T-3 showed the highest. Furthermore, higher Se content was observed in liver, and there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) compared with that in muscle. As for serum and hepatic GSH-Px activities, Se supplementation remarkably improved GSH-Px activity (P < 0.05), and there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between treatments (T-1, T-2, and T-3). PMID:18972070

  8. A Glutathione S-Transferase with Activity towards cis-1,2-Dichloroepoxyethane Is Involved in Isoprene Utilization by Rhodococcus sp. Strain AD45

    PubMed Central

    van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.; Kingma, Jaap; van den Wijngaard, Arjan J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    1998-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45 was isolated from an enrichment culture on isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene). Isoprene-grown cells of strain AD45 oxidized isoprene to 3,4-epoxy-3-methyl-1-butene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene to cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane, and trans-1,2-dichloroethene to trans-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane. Isoprene-grown cells also degraded cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane and trans-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane. All organic chlorine was liberated as chloride during degradation of cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane. A glutathione (GSH)-dependent activity towards 3,4-epoxy-3-methyl-1-butene, epoxypropane, cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane, and trans-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane was detected in cell extracts of cultures grown on isoprene and 3,4-epoxy-3-methyl-1-butene. The epoxide-degrading activity of strain AD45 was irreversibly lost upon incubation of cells with 1,2-epoxyhexane. A conjugate of GSH and 1,2-epoxyhexane was detected in cell extracts of cells exposed to 1,2-epoxyhexane, indicating that GSH is the physiological cofactor of the epoxide-transforming activity. The results indicate that a GSH S-transferase is involved in the metabolism of isoprene and that the enzyme can detoxify reactive epoxides produced by monooxygenation of chlorinated ethenes. PMID:9687433

  9. 1,4-Naphthoquinones and Others NADPH-Dependent Glutathione Reductase-Catalyzed Redox Cyclers as Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Belorgey, Didier; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The homodimeric flavoenzyme glutathione reductase catalyzes NADPH-dependent glutathione disulfide reduction. This reaction is important for keeping the redox homeostasis in human cells and in the human pathogen Plasmodium falciparum. Different types of NADPH-dependent disulfide reductase inhibitors were designed in various chemical series to evaluate the impact of each inhibition mode on the propagation of the parasites. Against malaria parasites in cultures the most potent and specific effects were observed for redox-active agents acting as subversive substrates for both glutathione reductases of the Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. In their oxidized form, these redox-active compounds are reduced by NADPH-dependent flavoenzyme-catalyzed reactions in the cytosol of infected erythrocytes. In their reduced forms, these compounds can reduce molecular oxygen to reactive oxygen species, or reduce oxidants like methemoglobin, the major nutrient of the parasite, to indigestible hemoglobin. Furthermore, studies on a fluorinated suicide-substrate of the human glutathione reductase indicate that the glutathione reductase-catalyzed bioactivation of 3-benzylnaphthoquinones to the corresponding reduced 3-benzoyl metabolites is essential for the observed antimalarial activity. In conclusion, the antimalarial lead naphthoquinones are suggested to perturb the major redox equilibria of the targeted cells. These effects result in development arrest of the parasite and contribute to the removal of the parasitized erythrocytes by macrophages. PMID:23116403

  10. Oxaloacetate activates brain mitochondrial biogenesis, enhances the insulin pathway, reduces inflammation and stimulates neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Harris, Janna L; Carl, Steven M; E, Lezi; Lu, Jianghua; Eva Selfridge, J; Roy, Nairita; Hutfles, Lewis; Koppel, Scott; Morris, Jill; Burns, Jeffrey M; Michaelis, Mary L; Michaelis, Elias K; Brooks, William M; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-12-15

    Brain bioenergetic function declines in some neurodegenerative diseases, this may influence other pathologies and administering bioenergetic intermediates could have therapeutic value. To test how one intermediate, oxaloacetate (OAA) affects brain bioenergetics, insulin signaling, inflammation and neurogenesis, we administered intraperitoneal OAA, 1-2 g/kg once per day for 1-2 weeks, to C57Bl/6 mice. OAA altered levels, distributions or post-translational modifications of mRNA and proteins (proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α, PGC1 related co-activator, nuclear respiratory factor 1, transcription factor A of the mitochondria, cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 isoform 1, cAMP-response element binding, p38 MAPK and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) in ways that should promote mitochondrial biogenesis. OAA increased Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin and P70S6K phosphorylation. OAA lowered nuclear factor κB nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratios and CCL11 mRNA. Hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA, doublecortin mRNA, doublecortin protein, doublecortin-positive neuron counts and neurite length increased in OAA-treated mice. (1)H-MRS showed OAA increased brain lactate, GABA and glutathione thereby demonstrating metabolic changes are detectable in vivo. In mice, OAA promotes brain mitochondrial biogenesis, activates the insulin signaling pathway, reduces neuroinflammation and activates hippocampal neurogenesis.

  11. Ralstonia solanacearum Type III Effector RipAY Is a Glutathione-Degrading Enzyme That Is Activated by Plant Cytosolic Thioredoxins and Suppresses Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Tadashi; Nakano, Masahito; Oda, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum uses a large repertoire of type III effector proteins to succeed in infection. To clarify the function of effector proteins in host eukaryote cells, we expressed effectors in yeast cells and identified seven effector proteins that interfere with yeast growth. One of the effector proteins, RipAY, was found to share homology with the ChaC family proteins that function as γ-glutamyl cyclotransferases, which degrade glutathione (GSH), a tripeptide that plays important roles in the plant immune system. RipAY significantly inhibited yeast growth and simultaneously induced rapid GSH depletion when expressed in yeast cells. The in vitro GSH degradation activity of RipAY is specifically activated by eukaryotic factors in the yeast and plant extracts. Biochemical purification of the yeast protein identified that RipAY is activated by thioredoxin TRX2. On the other hand, RipAY was not activated by bacterial thioredoxins. Interestingly, RipAY was activated by plant h-type thioredoxins that exist in large amounts in the plant cytosol, but not by chloroplastic m-, f-, x-, y- and z-type thioredoxins, in a thiol-independent manner. The transient expression of RipAY decreased the GSH level in plant cells and affected the flg22-triggered production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and expression of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) marker genes in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These results indicate that RipAY is activated by host cytosolic thioredoxins and degrades GSH specifically in plant cells to suppress plant immunity. PMID:27073091

  12. Changes in biosynthesis and metabolism of glutathione upon ochratoxin A stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhao, Weiwei; Hao, Junran; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Wu, Weihong; Yang, Zhuojun; Liang, Zhihong; Huang, Kunlun

    2014-06-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most toxic mycotoxins, which is toxic to plants and simulates oxidative stress. Glutathione is an important antioxidant in plants and is closely associated with detoxification in cells. We have previously shown that OTA exposure induces obvious expression differences in genes associated with glutathione metabolism. To characterize glutathione metabolism and understand its role in OTA phytotoxicity, we observed the accumulation of GSH in the detached leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana under OTA treatment. OTA stimulated a defense response through enhancing glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase activities, and the transcript levels of these enzymes were increased to maintain the total glutathione content. Moreover, the level of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) was increased and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle fluctuated in response to OTA. The depletion of glutathione using buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, inhibitor of glutamate-cysteine ligase) had no profound effect on OTA toxicity, as glutathione was regenerated through the ascorbate-glutathione cycle to maintain the total glutathione content. The ROS, MDA and GSH accumulation was significantly affected in the mutant gsh1, gr1 and gpx2 after treatment with OTA, which indicated that glutathione metabolism is directly involved in the oxidative stress response of Arabidopsis thaliana subjected to OTA. In conclusion, date demonstrate that glutathione-associated metabolism is closely related with OTA stress and glutathione play a role in resistance of Arabidopsis subjected to OTA.

  13. Effect of selenium supplementation on the level of glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in the nursing rat

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, S.P.; Hittner, H.M.; Strength, D.R.; Kretzer, F.; Lane, H.W.

    1986-03-01

    Prevention of retinopathy of prematurity using vitamin E as an antioxidant has been demonstrated. The purpose of this experiment was to study the antioxidant system, GSH-Px, (a selenoenzyme), in the retina. The effect of i.p. administration and dietary Se as selenite or selenomethionine (selmet) on tissue GSH-Px activity was determined in nursing pups. Dams were randomized into 3 dietary treatments (Basal, 0.15 ppm selenite, and 0.15 ppm selmet) and mated. Pups were sacrificed at 0, 7, and 14 days after delivery and GSH-Px was measured in pup eyes, hearts, livers, and kidneys, and dam livers. The pups of the dams consuming the Basal diet were divided into 4 i.p. groups: none, saline, selenite, and selmet (3 ..mu..g Se/kg body wt). The i.p. Se had no effect on GSH-Px activity in eye or heart, but significantly increased GSH-Px activity in liver and kidney with no difference between selenite and selmet. The pups of the dams consuming selenite and selmet diets showed significantly higher GSH-Px activity in all tissues studied than those consuming the Basal diet. For all tissues GSH-Px activity was higher for pups and dams fed selmet than those fed selenite. This research demonstrates that there was a difference in selenium availability between diet and i.p. administration.

  14. Role of glutathione metabolism and glutathione-related antioxidant defense systems in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robaczewska, J; Kedziora-Kornatowska, K; Kozakiewicz, M; Zary-Sikorska, E; Pawluk, H; Pawliszak, W; Kedziora, J

    2016-06-01

    The risk of developing chronic hypertension increases with age. Among others factors, increased oxidative stress is a well-recognized etiological factor for the development of hypertension. The co-occurrence of oxidative stress and hypertension may occur as a consequence of a decrease in antioxidant defense system activity or elevated reactive oxygen species generation. Glutathione is a major intracellular thiol-disulfide redox buffer that serves as a cofactor for many antioxidant enzymes. Glutathione-related parameters are altered in hypertension, suggesting that there is an association between the glutathione-related redox system and hypertension. In this review, we provide mechanistic explanations for how glutathione maintains blood pressure. More specifically, we discuss glutathione's role in combating oxidative stress and maintaining nitric oxide bioavailability via the formation of nitrosothiols and nitrosohemoglobin. Although impaired vasodilator responses are observed in S-nitrosothiol-deficient red blood cells, this potential hypertensive mechanism is currently overlooked in the literature. Here we fill in this gap by discussing the role of glutathione in nitric oxide metabolism and controlling blood pressure. We conclude that disturbances in glutathione metabolism might explain age-dependent increases in blood pressure. PMID:27511994

  15. Reassessing cellular glutathione homoeostasis: novel insights revealed by genetically encoded redox probes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Bruce

    2014-08-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant small molecule thiol in nearly all eukaryotes. Whole-cell levels of oxidized (GSSG) and reduced (GSH) glutathione are variable and responsive to genetic and chemical manipulations, which has led to their relative levels being widely used as a marker of the 'cellular redox state' and to indicate the level of 'oxidative stress' experienced by cells, tissues and organisms. However, the applicability of glutathione as a marker for a generalized 'cellular redox state' is questionable, especially in the light of recent observations in yeast cells. In yeast, whole-cell GSSG changes are almost completely dependent upon the activity of an ABC-C (ATP-binding cassette-C) transporter, Ycf1 (yeast cadmium factor 1), which mediates sequestration of GSSG to the vacuole. In the absence of Ycf1 whole-cell GSSG content is strongly decreased and extremely robust to perturbation. These observations are consistent with highly specific redox-sensitive GFP probe-based measurements of the cytosolic glutathione pool and indicate that cytosolic GSSG reductive systems are easily able to reduce nearly all GSSG formed, even following treatment with large concentrations of oxidant. In the present paper, I discuss the consequences of these new findings for our understanding of glutathione homoeostasis in the eukaryotic cell.

  16. Effect of Nrf2 activators on release of glutathione, cysteinylglycine and homocysteine by human U373 astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Steele, Megan L; Fuller, Stacey; Patel, Mili; Kersaitis, Cindy; Ooi, Lezanne; Münch, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Neurons rely on the release and subsequent cleavage of GSH to cysteinylglycine (CysGly) by astrocytes in order to maintain optimal intracellular GSH levels. In neurodegenerative diseases characterised by oxidative stress, neurons need an optimal GSH supply to defend themselves against free radicals released from activated microglia and astroglia. The rate of GSH synthesis is controlled largely by the activity of γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase. Expression of γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase and of the Xc- system, which facilitates cystine uptake, is regulated by the redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Compounds that can activate the Nrf2-ARE pathway, referred to as 'Nrf2 activators' are receiving growing attention due to their potential as GSH-boosting drugs. This study compares four known Nrf2 activators, R-α-Lipoic acid (LA), tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ), sulforaphane (SFN) and Polygonum cuspidatum extract containing 50% resveratrol (PC-Res) for their effects on astroglial release of GSH and CysGly. GSH levels increased dose-dependently in response to all four drugs. Sulforaphane produced the most potent effect, increasing GSH by up to 2.4-fold. PC-Res increased GSH up to 1.6-fold, followed by TBHQ (1.5-fold) and LA (1.4-fold). GSH is processed by the ectoenzyme, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, to form CysGly. Once again, SFN produced the most potent effect, increasing CysGly by up to 1.7-fold, compared to control cells. TBHQ and PC-Res both induced fold increases of 1.3, followed by LA with a fold increase of 1.2. The results from the present study showed that sulforaphane, followed by lipoic acid, resveratrol and Polygonum multiflorum were all identified as potent "GSH and Cys-Gly boosters". PMID:24191238

  17. Influence of dietary nano elemental selenium on growth performance, tissue selenium distribution, meat quality, and glutathione peroxidase activity in Guangxi Yellow chicken.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Wang, Y

    2011-03-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate the effect of feed supplementation with nano elemental Se (Nano-Se) on growth performance, tissue Se distribution, meat quality, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in Guangxi Yellow chicken. Four treatments (control, T-1, T-2, and T-3 treatment groups) with 3 replicates of 30 chickens each were carried out. Diets for the control, T-1, T-2, and T-3 groups consisted of the basal diet supplemented with, respectively, 0.00, 0.10, 0.30, and 0.50 mg/kg of Nano-Se. Improved final BW, daily BW gain (DWG), feed conversion ratios, and survival rate (P < 0.05) were observed in the groups supplemented with Nano-Se as compared with the control groups after 90 d of feeding. The groups that received Nano-Se showed higher (P < 0.05) hepatic and muscle Se contents, drip loss percentage, inosine 5'-monophosphate content, and GSH-Px activities in the serum and liver than that did the control groups. For the T-2 and T-3 groups, a significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed in final BW, DWG, muscle Se content, breast drip loss, and GSH-Px activities in the serum and liver compared with the T-1 group. However, no significant differences were observed in final BW, DWG, and GSH-Px activities in the serum and liver between the T-2 and T-3 groups. It could be concluded from this study that supplementing diets with 0.30 mg/kg of Nano-Se for was effective in increasing the growth performance and feed conversion ratios of chickens, the Se content of tissues, and the quality of the meat. PMID:21325242

  18. Cholinesterase and glutathione S-transferase activities of three mollusc species from the NW Portuguese coast in relation to the 'Prestige' oil spill.

    PubMed

    Tim-Tim, Ana L S; Morgado, Fernando; Moreira, Susana; Rangel, Rui; Nogueira, António J A; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2009-12-01

    In November 2002, the tanker 'Prestige' released about 19,000 tonnes of a heavy fuel oil (no. 6) before sinking with about 58,000 tonnes of its cargo, 135 miles from Cabo Finisterra (Spain). A considerable part of the released fuel oil reached the Galician coast, causing a heavy black tide and an ecological disaster. Although the black tide did not reach the NW coast of Portugal, it is possible that some of the fuel oil or its components also arrived to this area directly through the sea water and/or indirectly through the food chain. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate possible changes in two widely used biomarkers, the activity of the enzymes cholinesterases (ChE) and glutathione S-transferases (GST), of three molluscs (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Nucella lapillus and Monodonta lineata) from wild populations of the NW Portuguese coast in relation to the 'Prestige' oil spill. Molluscs were collected seasonally before (autumn 2002) and after (winter 2002/2003), spring and summer 2003) the oil spill at several sites along the Portuguese NW coast. Enzymatic activities determined before the accident were compared with those determined at different times after the oil spill taking into consideration abiotic factors. Information from different parameters was integrated by Redundancy Analysis and Principal Response Curves (PRC). Results show that GST and ChE activities were influenced by abiotic factors. Despite this influence, the results of PRC analysis also suggest that some of the fuel oil reached the NW Portuguese coast changing the patterns of ChE and GST activities of local populations of rocky shore species. Furthermore, the present study highlights the need of long-term monitoring with wild populations to assess both historical and punctual effects of pollution in the marine environment.

  19. Sex- and age-dependent activity of glutathione peroxidase in reproductive organs in pre- and post-pubertal cattle in relation to total antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Kankofer, M; Wawrzykowski, J; Giergiel, M

    2013-08-01

    Antioxidative/oxidative balance is crucial for proper functioning of cells and tissues. It is suggested that this balance can be partly controlled by sex steroid hormones and in consequence can exhibit age- and sex-related dependency. The aim of present study was to describe sex- and age-related changes in the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) with respect to total antioxidant activity (TAC) in reproductive organs of cattle. Biological samples were collected from slaughterhouse and comprised of ovaries, uterus, testes as well as livers as reference tissue. Animals were divided into group of bulls (aged between 13 and 24 months; n = 12), cows (aged between 14 and 27 months; n = 12) and female calves (aged between 2 weeks and 2 months; n = 12). Examined parameters were determined spectrophotometrically and the presence of GSH-Px isoform was confirmed by Western blotting technique. Activity of GSH-Px in genital tissues regardless of sex was significantly higher than in livers, while TAC showed opposite relationship. The differences in antioxidative parameters between testes and mature ovaries (e.g. GSH-Px-1.42 ± 0.47 nkat/mg prot vs. 1.08 ± 0.24 and 1.15 ± 0.23) were noticed as well as in chosen values between cows and female calves. Western blotting allowed the detection of cytosolic GSH-Px in all examined tissues with molecular weight around 21 kDa as monomer and around 84 kDa as tetramer depending on conditions of electrophoresis. The results may confirm the influence and regulatory role of sex steroid hormones on GSH-Px activity because the alterations were sex and age dependent. PMID:23740597

  20. β-Elemonic acid inhibits the cell proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells: The role of MAPK, ROS activation and glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsu-Tuan; Lu, Chien-Lin; Lin, Hen-I; Chen, Bing-Fang; Jow, Guey-Mei

    2016-01-01

    β-elemonic acid, a known triterpene, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects, yet research on the pharmacological effects of β-elemonic acid is rare. We investigated the anticancer effects and the related molecular mechanisms of β-elemonic acid on human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells. The effects of β-elemonic acid on the growth of A549 cells were studied using a 3-(4,5)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was detected using Annexin V staining. The effect of β-elemonic acid on the cell cycle of A549 cells was assessed using the propidium iodide method. The change in reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected using a dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay with microscopic examination. The expression levels of Bcl-2 family proteins, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family proteins and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) were detected using western blot analysis. Our data revealed that β-elemonic acid strongly induced human A549 lung cancer cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner as determined by the MTT assay. β-elemonic acid-induced cell death was considered to be apoptotic when the phosphatidylserine exposure was observed using Annexin V staining. The death of human A549 lung cancer cells was caused by apoptosis induced by activation of ROS activity, increase in the sub-G1 proportion, downregulation of Bcl-2 expression, upregulation of Bax expression and inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathways. These results clearly demonstrated that β-elemonic acid inhibits proliferation by inducing hypoploid cells and cell apoptosis. Moreover, the anticancer effects of β-elemonic acid were related to the MAPK signaling pathway, ROS activation and glutathione depletion in human A549 lung cancer cells.

  1. Sex- and age-dependent activity of glutathione peroxidase in reproductive organs in pre- and post-pubertal cattle in relation to total antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Kankofer, M; Wawrzykowski, J; Giergiel, M

    2013-08-01

    Antioxidative/oxidative balance is crucial for proper functioning of cells and tissues. It is suggested that this balance can be partly controlled by sex steroid hormones and in consequence can exhibit age- and sex-related dependency. The aim of present study was to describe sex- and age-related changes in the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) with respect to total antioxidant activity (TAC) in reproductive organs of cattle. Biological samples were collected from slaughterhouse and comprised of ovaries, uterus, testes as well as livers as reference tissue. Animals were divided into group of bulls (aged between 13 and 24 months; n = 12), cows (aged between 14 and 27 months; n = 12) and female calves (aged between 2 weeks and 2 months; n = 12). Examined parameters were determined spectrophotometrically and the presence of GSH-Px isoform was confirmed by Western blotting technique. Activity of GSH-Px in genital tissues regardless of sex was significantly higher than in livers, while TAC showed opposite relationship. The differences in antioxidative parameters between testes and mature ovaries (e.g. GSH-Px-1.42 ± 0.47 nkat/mg prot vs. 1.08 ± 0.24 and 1.15 ± 0.23) were noticed as well as in chosen values between cows and female calves. Western blotting allowed the detection of cytosolic GSH-Px in all examined tissues with molecular weight around 21 kDa as monomer and around 84 kDa as tetramer depending on conditions of electrophoresis. The results may confirm the influence and regulatory role of sex steroid hormones on GSH-Px activity because the alterations were sex and age dependent.

  2. Glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) inhibition and anti-inflammation activity of the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Kwon; Lee, Dong-Ryung; Choi, Bong-Keun; Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the anti-cancer properties of soil-borne actinobacteria, MJM 8637, the glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) assay, anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α assay, the level of antioxidant potential by DPPH radical scavenging activity, NO scavenging activity, and ABTS radical scavenging activity in ethyl acetate extract were determined. The 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed that Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637, which was isolated from Hambak Mountain, Korea, has 99.5% similarity to Streptomyces atratus strain NBRC 3897. The physiological and the morphological characteristics of the strain MJM 8637 were also identified. The ethyl acetate extract of MJM 8637 inhibited TNF-α production approximately 61.8% at concentration 100 μg/ml. The IC50 value of the strain MJM 8637 extract on GST-pi was identified to be 120.2 ± 1.6 μg/ml. In DPPH, NO, and ABTS radical scavenging assays, the IC50 values of the strain MJM 8637 extract were found to be 977.2 μg/ml, 1143.7 μg/ml, and 454.4 μg/ml, respectively. The ethyl acetate extract of the strain MJM 8637 showed 97.2 ± 1.3% of cell viability at 100 μg/ml in RAW 264.7 cell viability assay. The results obtained from this study suggest that the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637 could be considered as a potential source of drug for the cancers that have multidrug resistance with its GST-pi inhibition and anti-inflammation activities, and low cytotoxicity.

  3. Glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) inhibition and anti-inflammation activity of the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Kwon; Lee, Dong-Ryung; Choi, Bong-Keun; Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the anti-cancer properties of soil-borne actinobacteria, MJM 8637, the glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) assay, anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α assay, the level of antioxidant potential by DPPH radical scavenging activity, NO scavenging activity, and ABTS radical scavenging activity in ethyl acetate extract were determined. The 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed that Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637, which was isolated from Hambak Mountain, Korea, has 99.5% similarity to Streptomyces atratus strain NBRC 3897. The physiological and the morphological characteristics of the strain MJM 8637 were also identified. The ethyl acetate extract of MJM 8637 inhibited TNF-α production approximately 61.8% at concentration 100 μg/ml. The IC50 value of the strain MJM 8637 extract on GST-pi was identified to be 120.2 ± 1.6 μg/ml. In DPPH, NO, and ABTS radical scavenging assays, the IC50 values of the strain MJM 8637 extract were found to be 977.2 μg/ml, 1143.7 μg/ml, and 454.4 μg/ml, respectively. The ethyl acetate extract of the strain MJM 8637 showed 97.2 ± 1.3% of cell viability at 100 μg/ml in RAW 264.7 cell viability assay. The results obtained from this study suggest that the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637 could be considered as a potential source of drug for the cancers that have multidrug resistance with its GST-pi inhibition and anti-inflammation activities, and low cytotoxicity. PMID:26587003

  4. Octopus S-crystallins with endogenous glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity: sequence comparison and evolutionary relationships with authentic GST enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, S H; Yu, C W; Lin, C W; Pan, F M; Lu, S F; Lee, H J; Chang, G G

    1995-01-01

    S-Crystallin is a major protein present in the lenses of cephalopods (octopus and squid). To facilitate the cloning of this crystallin gene, cDNA was constructed from the poly(A)+ mRNA of octopus lenses, and amplified by PCR for nucleotide sequencing. Sequencing of 10 of 15 positive clones coding for this crystallin revealed three distinct S-crystallin isoforms with 61-64% identity in nucleotide sequences and 42-58% similarity in amino acid sequences when compared with homologous crystallins in squid lenses. These charge-isomeric crystallins also show between 26 and 33% amino acid sequence identity to four major classes of glutathione S-transferase (GST), a major detoxification enzyme present in most mammalian tissues. For further analysis, expression of one of the S-crystallin cDNAs was carried out in the bacterial expression system pQE-30, and the S-crystallin protein produced in Escherichia coli was purified to homogeneity to determine the enzymic properties. We found that the expressed octopus S-crystallin possessed much lower GST activity than the authentic GSTs from other tissues. Sequence comparison and construction of phylogenetic trees for S-crystallins from squid and octopus lenses and various classes of GSTs revealed that S-crystallins represent a multigene family which is structurally related to Alpha-class GSTs and probably derived from the ancestral GST by gene duplication and subsequent multiple mutational substitutions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7639695

  5. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced alterations of glutathione status in immortalized rat dopaminergic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Drechsel, Derek A.; Liang, L.-P.; Patel, Manisha . E-mail: manisha.patel@uchsc.edu

    2007-05-01

    Decreased glutathione levels associated with increased oxidative stress are a hallmark of numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. GSH is an important molecule that serves as an anti-oxidant and is also a major determinant of cellular redox environment. Previous studies have demonstrated that neurotoxins can cause changes in reduced and oxidized GSH levels; however, information regarding steady state levels remains unexplored. The goal of this study was to characterize changes in cellular GSH levels and its regulatory enzymes in a dopaminergic cell line (N27) following treatment with the Parkinsonian toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP{sup +}). Cellular GSH levels were initially significantly decreased 12 h after treatment, but subsequently recovered to values greater than controls by 24 h. However, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels were increased 24 h following treatment, concomitant with a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio prior to cell death. In accordance with these changes, ROS levels were also increased, confirming the presence of oxidative stress. Decreased enzymatic activities of glutathione reductase and glutamate-cysteine ligase by 20-25% were observed at early time points and partly account for changes in GSH levels after MPP{sup +} exposure. Additionally, glutathione peroxidase activity was increased 24 h following treatment. MPP{sup +} treatment was not associated with increased efflux of glutathione to the medium. These data further elucidate the mechanisms underlying GSH depletion in response to the Parkinsonian toxin, MPP{sup +}.

  6. Glutathione Metabolism and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smeyne, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    It has been established that oxidative stress, defined as the condition when the sum of free radicals in a cell exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell, contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Glutathione is a ubiquitous thiol tripeptide that acts alone, or in concert with enzymes within cells to reduce superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals and peroxynitrites. In this review, we examine the synthesis, metabolism and functional interactions of glutathione, and discuss how this relates to protection of dopaminergic neurons from oxidative damage and its therapeutic potential in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23665395

  7. Characterization of recombinant glutathione reductase from the psychrophilic Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mikyoung; Barnwell, Callie V; Grunden, Amy M

    2015-07-01

    Glutathione reductases catalyze the reduction of oxidized glutathione (glutathione disulfide, GSSG) using NADPH as the substrate to produce reduced glutathione (GSH), which is an important antioxidant molecule that helps maintain the proper reducing environment of the cell. A recombinant form of glutathione reductase from Colwellia psychrerythraea, a marine psychrophilic bacterium, has been biochemically characterized to determine its molecular and enzymatic properties. C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was shown to be a homodimer with a molecular weight of 48.7 kDa using SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and gel filtration. The C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase sequence shows significant homology to that of Escherichia coli glutathione reductase (66 % identity), and it possesses the FAD and NADPH binding motifs, as well as absorption spectrum features which are characteristic of flavoenzymes such as glutathione reductase. The psychrophilic C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase exhibits higher k cat and k cat/K m at lower temperatures (4 °C) compared to mesophilic Baker's yeast glutathione reductase. However, C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was able to complement an E. coli glutathione reductase deletion strain in oxidative stress growth assays, demonstrating the functionality of C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase over a broad temperature range, which suggests its potential utility as an antioxidant enzyme in heterologous systems. PMID:26101017

  8. Recreational Activities to Reduce Behavioural Symptoms in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kolanowski, Ann; Fick, Donna M.; Buettner, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Few clinicians have an educational grounding in the use of nonpharmacological therapies for people with dementia. In this article, we explore the utility of recreational activities as one nonpharmacological intervention that has demonstrated effectiveness for reducing the behavioural symptoms of dementia. The implementation of effective recreational activities involves three components: understanding the evidence for this approach; acknowledging the need to reduce medications that have the potential to interfere with activity effectiveness; and individualizing activities so that the maximum benefit from the intervention is obtained. PMID:20046903

  9. Maintaining good hearing: calorie restriction, Sirt3, and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Han, Chul; Someya, Shinichi

    2013-10-01

    Reducing calorie intake extends the lifespan of a variety of experimental models and delays progression of age-related hearing loss (AHL). AHL is a common feature of aging and is characterized by age-related decline of hearing associated with loss of sensory hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons, and/or stria vascularis degeneration in the cochlea. Sirtuins are a family of NAD(+)-dependent enzymes that regulate lifespan in lower organisms and have emerged as broad regulators of cellular fate. Our recent study indicated that mitochondrial Sirt3, a member of the sirtuin family, mediates the anti-aging effects of calorie restriction (CR) on AHL in mice. Interestingly, we also found that weight loss alone may not be sufficient for maintaining normal hearing. How does CR slow the progression of AHL through regulation of Sirt3? Here we review the evidence that during CR, Sirt3 slows the progression of AHL by promoting the glutathione-mediated mitochondrial antioxidant defense system in mice. A significant reduction in food consumption in one's daily life may not be a desirable and realistic option for most people. Therefore, identification/discovery of compounds that induce the activation of SIRT3 or glutathione reductase, or that increase mitochondrial glutathione levels has potential for maintaining good hearing through mimicking the anti-aging effects of CR in human inner ear cells. PMID:23454634

  10. Glutathione levels discriminate between oxidative stress and transforming growth factor-beta signaling in activated rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    De Bleser, P J; Xu, G; Rombouts, K; Rogiers, V; Geerts, A

    1999-11-26

    Reactive oxygen species are implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, human immunodeficiency virus, and liver fibrosis. With respect to liver fibrosis, we have investigated differences in antioxidant enzymes expression in stellate cells (SCs) and parenchymal cells from normal and CCl(4)-treated rat livers. We observed an increase in the expression of catalase in activated SCs. Treatment with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) increased the production of H(2)O(2). Treatment with catalase decreased TGF-beta expression. Addition of H(2)O(2) resulted in increased TGF-beta production. 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole abolished the capacity of SCs to remove H(2)O(2). A paradoxical increase in capacity was observed when the cells were pretreated with diethyl maleate. Treatment with 3-amino-1, 2,4-triazole increased TGF-beta production. A paradoxical decrease of TGF-beta production was observed with diethyl maleate. Treatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine resulted in increased TGF-beta production. TGF-beta decreased the capacity of the SCs to remove H(2)O(2.) An increase in the capacity to remove H(2)O(2) was observed when TGF-beta was removed by neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, our results suggest: 1) a link between cellular GSH levels and TGF-beta production and 2) that cellular GSH levels discriminate whether H(2)O(2) is the result of oxidative stress or acts as second messenger in the TGF-beta signal transduction pathway.

  11. Systematic review of active workplace interventions to reduce sickness absence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The workplace is used as a setting for interventions to prevent and reduce sickness absence, regardless of the specific medical conditions and diagnoses. Aims To give an overview of the general effectiveness of active workplace interventions aimed at preventing and reducing sickness absence. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Psych-info, and ISI web of knowledge on 27 December 2011. Inclusion criteria were (i) participants over 18 years old with an active role in the intervention, (ii) intervention done partly or fully at the workplace or at the initiative of the workplace and (iii) sickness absence reported. Two reviewers independently screened articles, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. A narrative synthesis was used. Results We identified 2036 articles of which, 93 were assessed in full text. Seventeen articles were included (2 with low and 15 with medium risk of bias), with a total of 24 comparisons. Five interventions from four articles significantly reduced sickness absence. We found moderate evidence that graded activity reduced sickness absence and limited evidence that the Sheerbrooke model (a comprehensive multidisciplinary intervention) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) reduced sickness absence. There was moderate evidence that workplace education and physical exercise did not reduce sickness absence. For other interventions, the evidence was insufficient to draw conclusions. Conclusions The review found limited evidence that active workplace interventions were not generally effective in reducing sickness absence, but there was moderate evidence of effect for graded activity and limited evidence for the effectiveness of the Sheerbrooke model and CBT. PMID:23223750

  12. Biliary excretion of acetaminophen-glutathione as an index of toxic activation of acetaminophen: effect of chemicals that alter acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Madhu, C.; Gregus, Z.; Klaassen, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    Acetaminophen (AA) is converted, presumably by cytochrome P-450, to an electrophile which is conjugated with glutathione (GS). AA-GS is excreted into bile, therefore the biliary excretion rate of AA-GS may reflect the rate of activation of AA in vivo. In order to test this hypothesis, the effect of agents capable of altering the activation of AA including cytochrome P-450 inducers and inhibitors, cobaltous chloride which decreases the amount of P-450, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors (indomethacin and naproxen), antioxidants (butylated hydroxyanisole, alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid and ascorbic acid palmitate) and other chemicals known to decrease AA hepatotoxicity (dimethylsulfoxide and cysteamine), on the biliary excretion of AA-GS was studied in hamsters, the species most sensitive to AA-induced hepatotoxicity. The biliary excretion of AA-GS increased linearly up to 1 mmol/kg of AA i.v., but at higher dosages exhibited saturation kinetics. Dosages above 0.5 mmol/kg lowered hepatic GS concentration. Of the cytochrome P-450 inducers, 3-methylcholanthrene and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, increased the biliary excretion of AA-GS (2.9- and 3.2-fold, respectively) whereas ethanol and isoniazid did not affect it, and pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile tended to decrease it (43%). Phenobarbital tended to increase the biliary excretion of AA-GS, but not in a statistically significant manner. Several cytochrome P-450 inhibitors (metyrapone, 8-methoxypsoralen, 2-(4,6-dichloro-biphenyloxy) ethylamine, alpha-naphthoflavone and cimetidine) decreased the biliary excretion of AA-GS, although SKF 525-A and piperonyl butoxide did not. Cobaltous chloride decreased dramatically the biliary excretion of AA-GS.

  13. Effects of organosulfur compounds from garlic and onions on benzo[a]pyrene-induced neoplasia and glutathione S-transferase activity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sparnins, V L; Barany, G; Wattenberg, L W

    1988-01-01

    In the present study, eight organosulfur compounds from garlic and onions were studied for their inhibitory effects on benzo[a]pyrene (BP)-induced neoplasia of forestomach and lung of female A/J mice when administered 96 and 48 h prior to carcinogen challenge. These compounds had one, two or three linearly connected sulfur atoms. They included the four allyl group-containing derivatives: allyl methyl trisulfide (AMT), allyl methyl disulfide (AMD), diallyl trisulfide (DAT), and diallyl sulfide (DAS), and also four corresponding saturated compounds in which propyl groups were substituted for the allyl groups. All four allylic compounds inhibited BP-induced neoplasia of the forestomach. The saturated analogs were almost without inhibitory activity, indicating the importance of the allyl groups. DAT, which contains two allyl groups, was more potent than AMT, which contains only one allyl group, thus providing further evidence for the role of allyl groups in the inhibitory effects observed. DAS and AMD, but not DAT or AMT, inhibited pulmonary adenoma formation. The fact that in the lung the monosulfide and disulfide inhibited, but the trisulfide did not inhibit, indicates that the number of sulfur atoms in the molecule can control the organ sites at which protection against carcinogenesis will occur. All four allylic compounds induced increased glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in the forestomach, but varied in their capacity to induce GST in lung, liver and small bowel. Their saturated analogs produced little or no induction. In evaluating relationships between diet and cancer, it would be useful to consider the possible role of garlic and onion organosulfur compounds as protective agents. In addition, further studies of this class of chemicals might lead to the identification and development of useful new chemopreventive compounds. PMID:3335037

  14. Expression of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase pi in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutathione (GSH) is one of the most important agents of the antioxidant defense system of the cell because, in conjunction with the enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione S transferase pi (GSTpi), it plays a central role in the detoxification and biotransformation of chemotherapeutic drugs. This study evaluated the expression of GSH and the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes by immunohistochemistry in 30 canine mammary tumors, relating the clinicopathological parameters, clinical outcome and survival of the bitches. In an in vitro study, the expression of the genes glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC) and glutathione synthetase (GSS) that synthesize GSH and GSH-Px gene were verified by qPCR and subjected to treatment with doxorubicin, to check the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Results The immunohistochemical expression of GSH, GSH-Px and GSTpi was compared with the clinical and pathological characteristics and the clinical outcome in the bitches, including metastasis and death. The results showed that high immunoexpression of GSH was correlated to the absence of tumor ulceration and was present in dogs without metastasis (P < 0.05). There was significant correlation of survival with the increase of GSH (P < 0.05). The expression of the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes showed no statistically significant correlation with the analyzed variables (p > 0.05). The analysis of the relative expression of genes responsible for the synthesis of GSH (GCLC and GSS) and GSH-Px by quantitative PCR was done with cultured cells of 10 tumor fragments from dogs with mammary tumors. The culture cells showed a decrease in GCLC and GSS expression when compared with no treated cells (P < 0.05). High GSH immunoexpression was associated with better clinical outcomes. Conclusion Therefore, high expression of the GSH seems to play an important role in the clinical outcome of patients with mammary tumors and suggest its use as prognostic marker. The in

  15. Gastroprotective effect of desmosdumotin C isolated from Mitrella kentii against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal hemorrhage in rats: possible involvement of glutathione, heat-shock protein-70, sulfhydryl compounds, nitric oxide, and anti-Helicobacter pylori activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitrella kentii (M. kentii) (Bl.) Miq, is a tree-climbing liana that belongs to the family Annonaceae. The plant is rich with isoquinoline alkaloids, terpenylated dihydrochalcones and benzoic acids and has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study is to assess the gastroprotective effects of desmosdumotin C (DES), a new isolated bioactive compound from M. kentii, on gastric ulcer models in rats. Methods DES was isolated from the bark of M. kentii. Experimental rats were orally pretreated with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of the isolated compound and were subsequently subjected to absolute ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer. Gross evaluation, mucus content, gastric acidity and histological gastric lesions were assessed in vivo. The effects of DES on the anti-oxidant system, non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) content, nitric oxide (NO)level, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme activity, bcl-2-associated X (Bax) protein expression and Helicabacter pylori (H pylori) were also investigated. Results DES pre-treatment at the administered doses significantly attenuated ethanol-induced gastric ulcer; this was observed by decreased gastric ulcer area, reduced or absence of edema and leucocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control group. It was found that DES maintained glutathione (GSH) level, decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, increased NP-SH content and NO level and inhibited COX-2 activity. The compound up regulated heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and down regulated Bax protein expression in the ulcerated tissue. DES showed interesting anti-H pylori effects. The efficacy of DES was accomplished safely without any signs of toxicity. Conclusions The current study reveals that DES demonstrated gastroprotective effects which could be attributed to its antioxidant effect, activation of HSP-70 protein, intervention with COX-2 inflammatory pathway and potent anti H pylori effect. PMID:23866830

  16. PKLR promotes colorectal cancer liver colonization through induction of glutathione synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Alexander; Loo, Jia Min; Mital, Rohit; Weinberg, Ethan M.; Man, Fung Ying; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Paty, Philip B.; Saltz, Leonard; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Tavazoie, Sohail F.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver is a major cause of cancer-related death; however, the genes and pathways that govern this metastatic colonization event remain poorly characterized. Here, using a large-scale in vivo RNAi screen, we identified liver and red blood cell pyruvate kinase (PKLR) as a driver of metastatic liver colonization. PKLR expression was increased in liver metastases as well as in primary colorectal tumors of patients with metastatic disease. Evaluation of a murine liver colonization model revealed that PKLR promotes cell survival in the tumor core during conditions of high cell density and oxygen deprivation by increasing glutathione, the primary endogenous antioxidant. PKLR negatively regulated the glycolytic activity of PKM2, the major pyruvate kinase isoenzyme known to regulate cellular glutathione levels. Glutathione is critical for metastasis, and we determined that the rate-limiting enzyme of glutathione synthesis, GCLC, becomes overexpressed in patient liver metastases, promotes cell survival under hypoxic and cell-dense conditions, and mediates metastatic liver colonization. RNAi-mediated inhibition of glutathione synthesis impaired survival of multiple colon cancer cell lines, and pharmacological targeting of this metabolic pathway reduced colonization in a primary patient-derived xenograft model. Our findings highlight the impact of metabolic reprogramming within the niche as metastases progress and suggest clinical potential for targeting this pathway in colorectal cancer. PMID:26784545

  17. Yeast mitochondrial glutathione is an essential antioxidant with mitochondrial thioredoxin providing a back-up system

    PubMed Central

    Gostimskaya, Irina; Grant, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione is an abundant, low-molecular-weight tripeptide whose biological importance is dependent upon its redox-active free sulphydryl moiety. Its role as the main determinant of thiol-redox control has been challenged such that it has been proposed to play a crucial role in iron–sulphur clusters maturation, and only a minor role in thiol redox regulation, predominantly as a back-up system for the cytoplasmic thioredoxin system. Here, we have tested the importance of mitochondrial glutathione in thiol-redox regulation. Glutathione reductase (Glr1) is an oxidoreductase which converts oxidized glutathione to its reduced form. Yeast Glr1 localizes to both the cytosol and mitochondria and we have used a Glr1M1L mutant that is constitutively localized to the cytosol to test the requirement for mitochondrial Glr1. We show that the loss of mitochondrial Glr1 specifically accounts for oxidant sensitivity of a glr1 mutant. Loss of mitochondrial Glr1 does not influence iron–sulphur cluster maturation and we have used targeted roGFP2 fluorescent probes to show that oxidant sensitivity is linked to an altered redox environment. Our data indicate mitochondrial glutathione is crucial for mitochondrial thiol-redox regulation, and the mitochondrial thioredoxin system provides a back-up system, but cannot bear the redox load of the mitochondria on its own. PMID:26898146

  18. Sodium arsenite induced reactive oxygen species generation, nuclear factor (erythroid-2 related) factor 2 activation, heme oxygenase-1 expression, and glutathione elevation in Chang human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Li, Xin; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Yi; Xu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huihui; Hou, Yongyong; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan

    2013-07-01

    Liver is one of the major target organs of arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis. Nuclear factor (erythroid-2 related) factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor, regulating critically cellular defense responses against the toxic metallic arsenic in many cell types and tissues. This study was conducted to evaluate the hepato-cellular Nrf2 and Nrf2-regulated antioxidant reactions of sodium arsenite exposure in Chang human hepatocytes. Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein levels were detected by Western blot, and Nrf2-regulated HO-1 mRNA expressions were determined using semiquantitative RT-PCR by 0∼50 μmol/L of sodium arsenite exposure for 2, 6, 12, and 24 h. We also observed the changes of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and total cellular glutathione (GSH) by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry, respectively. Our results showed that intracellular ROS were both dose- and time-dependent induced by inorganic arsenic; Cellular Nrf2 protein levels increased rapidly after 2 h of exposure, elevated significantly at 6 h, and reached the maximum at 12 h. The endogenous Nrf2-regulated downstream HO-1 mRNA and protein were also induced dramatically and lasted for as long as 24 h. In addition, intracellular GSH levels elevated in consistent with Nrf2 activation. Our findings here suggest that inorganic arsenic alters cellular redox balance in hepatocytes to trigger Nrf2-regulated antioxidant responses promptly, which may represent an adaptive cell defense mechanism against inorganic arsenic induced liver injuries and hepatoxicity.

  19. Systemic chromosome instability in Shugoshin-1 mice resulted in compromised glutathione pathway, activation of Wnt signaling and defects in immune system in the lung.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H Y; Kumar, G; Zhang, Y; Rubin, E; Lightfoot, S; Dai, W; Rao, C V

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic error-mediated chromosome instability (CIN) can lead to aneuploidy, chromothripsis, DNA damage and/or whole chromosome gain/loss. CIN may prompt rapid accumulation of mutations and genomic alterations. Thus, CIN can promote carcinogenesis. This CIN process results from a mutation in certain genes or environmental challenge such as smoking, and is highly prevalent in various cancers, including lung cancer. A better understanding of the effects of CIN on carcinogenesis will lead to novel methods for cancer prevention and treatment. Previously Shugoshin-1 (Sgo1(-/+)) mice, a transgenic mouse model of CIN, showed mild proneness to spontaneous lung and liver cancers. In this study, adoptive (T/B-cell based) immunity-deficient RAG1(-/-) Sgo1(-/+) double mutant mice developed lung adenocarcinomas more aggressively than did Sgo1(-/+) or RAG1(-/-) mice, suggesting immune system involvement in CIN-mediated lung carcinogenesis. To identify molecular causes of the lung adenocarcinoma, we used systems biology approach, comparative RNAseq, to RAG1(-/-) and RAG1(-/-) Sgo1(-/+). The comparative RNAseq data and follow-up analyses in the lungs of naive Sgo1(-/+) mice demonstrate that, (i) glutathione is depleted, making the tissue vulnerable to oxidative stress, (ii) spontaneous DNA damage is increased, (iii) oncogenic Wnt signaling is activated, (iv) both major branches of the immune system are weakened through misregulations in signal mediators such as CD80 and calreticulin and (v) the actin cytoskeleton is misregulated. Overall, the results show multi-faceted roles of CIN in lung carcinoma development in Sgo1(-/+) mice. Our model presents various effects of CIN and will help to identify potential targets to prevent CIN-driven carcinogenesis in the lung. PMID:27526110

  20. Systemic chromosome instability in Shugoshin-1 mice resulted in compromised glutathione pathway, activation of Wnt signaling and defects in immune system in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, H Y; Kumar, G; Zhang, Y; Rubin, E; Lightfoot, S; Dai, W; Rao, C V

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic error-mediated chromosome instability (CIN) can lead to aneuploidy, chromothripsis, DNA damage and/or whole chromosome gain/loss. CIN may prompt rapid accumulation of mutations and genomic alterations. Thus, CIN can promote carcinogenesis. This CIN process results from a mutation in certain genes or environmental challenge such as smoking, and is highly prevalent in various cancers, including lung cancer. A better understanding of the effects of CIN on carcinogenesis will lead to novel methods for cancer prevention and treatment. Previously Shugoshin-1 (Sgo1−/+) mice, a transgenic mouse model of CIN, showed mild proneness to spontaneous lung and liver cancers. In this study, adoptive (T/B-cell based) immunity-deficient RAG1−/− Sgo1−/+ double mutant mice developed lung adenocarcinomas more aggressively than did Sgo1−/+ or RAG1−/− mice, suggesting immune system involvement in CIN-mediated lung carcinogenesis. To identify molecular causes of the lung adenocarcinoma, we used systems biology approach, comparative RNAseq, to RAG1−/− and RAG1−/− Sgo1−/+. The comparative RNAseq data and follow-up analyses in the lungs of naive Sgo1−/+ mice demonstrate that, (i) glutathione is depleted, making the tissue vulnerable to oxidative stress, (ii) spontaneous DNA damage is increased, (iii) oncogenic Wnt signaling is activated, (iv) both major branches of the immune system are weakened through misregulations in signal mediators such as CD80 and calreticulin and (v) the actin cytoskeleton is misregulated. Overall, the results show multi-faceted roles of CIN in lung carcinoma development in Sgo1−/+ mice. Our model presents various effects of CIN and will help to identify potential targets to prevent CIN-driven carcinogenesis in the lung. PMID:27526110

  1. Sodium chloride enhances cadmium tolerance through reducing cadmium accumulation and increasing anti-oxidative enzyme activity in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing-Lin; Shang, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Jabeen, Zahra; Zhang, Guo-Ping

    2013-06-01

    The effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on cadmium (Cd) uptake, translocation, and oxidative stress was investigated using 2 tobacco cultivars differing in Cd tolerance. The growth inhibition of the tobacco plants exposed to Cd toxicity was in part alleviated by moderate addition of NaCl in the culture solution. Cadmium concentration of shoots and roots in the 2 cultivars increased with increasing Cd levels in the solution and decreased with the addition of NaCl. The addition of NaCl could alleviate the oxidative stress caused by Cd toxicity, as reflected by reduced production of malondialdehyde and recovered or enhanced activities of antioxidative enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The results also showed that the enhancement of antioxidative enzyme activity by NaCl for the tobacco plants exposed to Cd stress is related to induced Ca signaling.

  2. Glutathione system in young spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Arunkumar, Sundaram; Sirajudeen, K N S; Singh, H J

    2010-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) forms a part of the antioxidant system that plays a vital role in preventing oxidative stress, and an imbalance in the oxidant/antioxidant system has been linked to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of this study was to investigate the status of the GSH system in the kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Components of the GSH system, including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and total GSH content, were measured in the kidneys of 4, 6, 8, 12, and 16 weeks old SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Systolic blood pressure of SHR was significantly higher from the age of 6 weeks onwards compared with age-matched WKY rats. GPx activity in the SHR was significantly lower from the age of 8 weeks onwards when compared to that in age-matched WKY rats. No significant differences were evident in the GPx-1 protein abundance, and its relative mRNA levels, GR, GST activity, and total GSH content between SHR and age-matched WKY rats. The lower GPx activity suggests of an impairment of the GSH system in the SHR, which might be due to an abnormality in its protein rather than non-availability of a cofactor. Its role in the development of hypertension in SHR however remains unclear.

  3. Effects of Ambient Oxygen and of Fixed Nitrogen on Concentrations of Glutathione, Ascrobate, and Associated Enzymes in Soybean Root Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, David A.; Post, Christopher J.; Langeberg, Lorene

    1991-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) root nodules contain the enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle for defense against activated forms of oxygen. Nodulated roots of hydroponically grown soybean plants were exposed to atmospheres containing 2, 21, 50, or alternating 21 and 50 kilopascals of O2. The activities of ascorbate (ASC) peroxidase, monodehydroascorbate (MDHA) reductase, dehydroascorbate (DHA) reductase, and glutathione (GSSG) reductase were higher in nodules exposed to high pO2. Nodule contents of ascorbate and reduced glutathione were also greater in the high pO2 treatments. Treatment of nodulated plants with fixed nitrogen (urea) led to concomitant decreases in acetylene reduction activity, in leghemoglobin content, and in activities of ASC peroxidase, DHA reductase, and GSSG reductase. Activity of MDHA reductase and glutathione concentrations in nodules were not affected by treatment with urea. The enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle were also detected in uninfected soybean roots, although at levels substantially below those in nodules. These observations indicate that the ascorbate-glutathione cycle can adjust to varying physiological conditions in nodules and that there is a key link between N2 fixation and defenses against activated forms of oxygen. PMID:16668258

  4. Reduction in vitro of red cell glutathione reproduces defects of cellular sodium transport seen in oedematous malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Forrester, T; Golden, M; Brand, S; Swales, J

    1990-05-01

    Red cells in oedematous malnutrition (kwashiorkor) have an increased sodium content, 'leakiness' to sodium and enhanced sodium pumping. In non-oedematous malnutrition (marasmus) there is a reduction in the sodium pump activity. The explanation has hitherto been unknown but the glutathione content of red cells is low in kwashiorkor and normal in marasmus. We artificially lowered the glutathione content of normal red cells to values characteristic of mild oedematous malnutrition, using the enzyme inhibitors bischloronitrosourea (BCNU) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSOX). After preincubation, the cells were washed to remove the inhibitors and oxidized glutathione. Cellular content of sodium and potassium, and 86Rb influx were then measured. The reduction in glutathione reproduced the abnormalities of sodium content and flux observed in kwashiorkor. We suggest that oxidant stress in kwashiorkor, by reducing cellular glutathione, may affect cell membrane electrolyte transport. This may act through alterations in membrane sulfhydryl groups. Glutathione depletion may therefore play an important role in the clinical picture and natural history of oedematous malnutrition and may have relevance to other conditions where oxidant stress occurs.

  5. Reduced Chitinase Activities in Ant Plants of the Genus Macaranga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Martin; Fiala, Brigitte; Linsenmair, K. Eduard; Boller, Thomas

    Many plant species have evolved mutualistic associations with ants, protecting their host against detrimental influences such as herbivorous insects. Letourneau (1998) reported in the case of Piper that ants defend their plants principally against stem-boring insects and also reduce fungal infections on inflorescences. Macaranga plants that were experimentally deprived of their symbiotic Crematogaster ants suffered heavily from shoot borers and pathogenic fungi (Heil 1998). Here we report that ants seem to reduce fungal infections actively in the obligate myrmecophyte Macarangatriloba (Euphorbiaceae), while ant-free plants can be easily infected. We also found extremely low chitinase activity in Macaranga plants. The plants' own biochemical defense seems to be reduced, and low chitinase activity perhaps may represent a predisposition for the evolution of myrmecophytism. These plants are therefore highly dependent on their ants, which obviously function not only as an antiherbivore defense but also as an effective agent against fungal pathogens.

  6. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation.

  7. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation. PMID:26676512

  8. The influence of reduced glutathione on chromosome damage induced by X-rays or heavy ion beams of different LETs and on the interaction of DNA lesions induced by radiations and bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, A; Chatterjee, A

    2010-02-01

    It is thought that high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induces more complex DNA damage than low-LET particles, specifically clustered DNA damage that causes cells to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB) more slowly and leads to severe biological consequences. The present study aimed to investigate the role of exogenously added glutathione (GSH) on (12)C-beam (287keV/mum) and (7)Li-beam (60keV/mum) induced chromosome aberration (CA) formation, particularly on exchange aberration formation. In order to characterize the role of GSH in the joining of DNA DSBs, we induced DNA lesions with bleomycin (Blem) in conjunction with either high- or low-LET radiation (X-rays) since the chemistry of the free DNA ends created by Blem and X-rays is similar. CHO cells were exposed to reduced GSH at a concentration of 2mM for 3h before radiation. Treatment with Blem (20mug/ml) was carried out for 2h before the cells were exposed to radiation. Our results show that the frequency of chromosomal aberration increases with increased LET. Heavy ion exposed cells show a higher frequency of CA over time than do X-irradiated cells. An analysis of the first post-irradiation mitosis of exposed CHO cells shows that high-LET radiation induces more breaks than exchange-type aberrations and exogenous GSH has no influence on high-LET radiation-induced DNA damage. The DNA lesions induced by low-LET radiation interact relatively strongly with Blem-induced lesions whereas interaction between Blem and high-LET radiations was poor. This could be attributed to differences in repair kinetics and qualitative differences in the DNA lesions induced by Blem and high-LET radiation.

  9. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level. PMID:26091838

  10. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level.

  11. Glutathione and its related enzymes in the gonad of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Hamed, R R; Saleh, N S M; Shokeer, A; Guneidy, R A; Abdel-Ghany, S S

    2016-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) concentration, the activity of its metabolizing enzymes, glutathione transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and the antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT) in O. niloticus ovary and testis were examined. GSH concentration of O. niloticus testis exhibited high concentration (129 ± 21 nmol/g tissue) compared with GSH concentration (49.2 ± 8.3 nmol/g tissue) in the ovary. GST, GPx, GR, and CAT activities of O. niloticus testis exhibited high values compared with their corresponding values in ovary homogenates. However, protein concentration in ovary homogenates exhibited higher values (175 ± 40.6 mg) compared with testis homogenates (27.1 ± 3.7 mg). O. niloticus ovary was less effective in excretion of xenobiotices compared with the testis, where its function is mainly in increasing the protein content of the eggs; however, in O. niloticus testis, the glutathione cycle operated in accelerated way in the direction of reduced GSH production in order to protect the maturation stages in a save way. A simple reproducible procedure for the purification of GST from O. niloticus ovary was established. The enzymes proved to be homogenous as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and its molecular weight was calculated to be 25.1 kDa. GST of O. niloticus ovary exhibited maximum activity at pH 7.5. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) of the purified ovary GST for GSH and CDNB was 0.076 mM and 1.0 mM, respectively. Cibacron blue was the most potent inhibitor of ovary GST activity (IC50 value, concentration of inhibitor that will give 50% inhibition, equal 0.002 μM). The specific activity of GST toward different electrophilic substrates was determined. GST activity toward benzyl isothiocyanate was the highest compared with phenethyl isothiocyanate and allyl isothiocyanate.

  12. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials.

  13. [Optimization of a spectrophotometry assay of total and oxidized blood glutathione: comparison with a fluorimetric method].

    PubMed

    Coutelle, C; Iron, A; Higueret, D; Cassaigne, A

    1992-01-01

    We developed a method for the enzymatic assay of glutathione which is easy to practice, rapid, specific, based on the reaction of the thiol group of glutathione with dithiobis-nitrobenzoic acid after the action of glutathione reductase in the presence of NADPH. This spectrophotometric technique allowed, on the one hand, the determination of total glutathione and on the other hand, that of oxidized glutathione (disulfide), after the blockage of reduced glutathione by 2-vinyl-pyridine. The improvements of the assay of blood glutathione concerned the sample preparation, the reaction sensitivity, thanks to a better definition of the optimal pH and a reduction ot the blockage time by 2-vinyl-pyridine in well defined operating conditions. We compared the performances of our technique with a fluorimetric method. We used our method for the determination of total and oxidized blood glutathione in a control population.

  14. Effect of glutathione during bottle storage of sparkling wine.

    PubMed

    Webber, Vanessa; Dutra, Sandra Valduga; Spinelli, Fernanda Rodrigues; Carnieli, Gilberto João; Cardozo, Alejandro; Vanderlinde, Regina

    2017-02-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) is an efficient antioxidant on limiting browning, losing varietal aromas and off-flavor formation. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the effect of GSH addition (10, 20 and 30mgL(-1)) after the disgorging of the sparkling wine during storage. The sparkling wines were analyzed at 1, 6, 12 and 18months of storage according to the color index, concentration of the free SO2, phenolic compounds, catechin, epicatechin, caffeic acid, coumaric acid, acetaldehyde, total and reduced glutathione. The results show that GSH concentration decreased to the level of the control sparkling wine during the first 6months, and the total glutathione gradually declined up to 12months. The GSH reduces browning and acetaldehyde formation for up to 12months. However, the presence of glutathione had low or no influence on the concentration of free SO2, total phenolics, catechin, epicatechin, caffeic and coumaric acids. PMID:27596417

  15. Anticancer activity of a cis-dichloridoplatinum(ii) complex of a chelating nitrogen mustard: insight into unusual guanine binding mode and low deactivation by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Subhendu; Purkait, Kallol; Chatterjee, Saptarshi; Mukherjee, Arindam

    2016-02-28

    A pyridine ring containing a chelating nitrogen mustard ligand bis(2-chloroethyl)pyridylmethylamine hydrochloride (L2·HCl) was synthesized from bis(2-hydroxyethyl)pyridylmethylamine (L1) on reaction with thionyl chloride. Both the ligands upon reaction with cis-[PtCl2(DMSO)2] afforded square planar complexes cis-[PtCl2(L1)] (1) and cis-[PtCl2(L2)] (2) respectively. Both the complexes were characterized by NMR, IR, UV and elemental analysis. 2 crystallized in the P21/c space group. 2 shows greater solution stability than 1 in kinetic studies by 1H NMR. Both 1 and 2 bind the model nucleobase 9-ethylguanine (9-EtG) and form multiple mono-adducts. Existence of unusual N7,O6 chelated guanine bound 2 (2e) was traced. Binding studies of 2 with glutathione (GSH) show formation of a mono-adduct cis-[PtCl(L2)SG] (2c), which transformed within a day to give an aziridinium ion of L2 (2b) after loss of L2. In vitro cytotoxicity of ligands, complexes and the clinical anticancer drug cisplatin show that 2 is the most potent against MCF-7, A549 and MIA PaCa2 exhibiting IC50 values of 12.6 ± 0.8, 18.2 ± 1.8 and 4.2 ± 1.0 μM respectively. The in vitro cytotoxicity of 2 against MCF-7, A549 and MIA PaCa2 was also probed in hypoxia and in the presence and absence of added GSH. Even in the presence of excess GSH in hypoxia, 2 exhibits significant cytotoxicity against MIA PaCa2 and MCF-7 with IC50 of 4.4 ± 0.8 and 12.5 ± 1.1 μM respectively. Metal accumulation studies by ICP-MS display greater cellular internalization of 2, than 1 and cisplatin in MCF-7 cells. 2 arrests the cell cycle at sub G1 and G2/M phases in MCF-7 whereas cisplatin exhibits S phase arrest to be dominant with increase in concentration. Complex 2 exhibits a change in mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase activity and suggests apoptotic cell death through the intrinsic pathway. Moreover it is encouraging to find that 2 also restricts angiogenesis in chick embryo.

  16. Changes in hepatic cytosolic glutathione S-transferase activity and expression of its class-P during prenatal and postnatal period in rats treated with aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Faezeh; Allameh, Abdolamir; Dadkhah, Abolfazl; Forouzandeh, Mehdi; Kazemnejad, Somayeh; Sharifi, Roya

    2006-09-01

    The effect of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on the expression of glutathione S-transferase-P (GST-P) which is the major isoform of GST in developmental stages has been investigated in rat liver during prenatal and postnatal stages. Following administration of AFB1 (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 or 4.0 mg/kg bw) injected I.P on day 8.5 of gestation the number of dead or reabsorbed fetuses and malformed embryos were recorded. Then the fetal livers were processed for measurement of total GST and GST-P activities, using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and ethacrynic acid (ETA) as substrates respectively. RT-PCR using rat GST-P specific primers was performed on mRNA extracted from livers. Besides, the effects of AFB1 on hepatic GST and GST-P were assessed in groups of suckling rats directly injected with the toxin. The results show that a single dose of AFB1 (1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg bw) caused approximately 50-60% depletion in fetal liver GST towards CDNB. Postnatal experiments revealed that liver GST (using CDNB as substrate) was significantly induced (approximately 40%) in suckling rats injected with a single dose of AFB1 (3.0 mg AFB1/kg) 24 h before killing. Liver GST-P expression was unaffected due to AFB1 exposures of rats before and after the birth. This finding was substantiated by western blotting and RT-PCR techniques. These data suggest that AFB1-related induction in rat liver total GST after birth may be implicated in protective mechanisms against AFB1. In contrast, inhibition of this enzyme in fetal liver following placental transfer of the carcinogen may explain high susceptibility of fetal cells to trans-plancental aflatoxins. Furthermore, lack of influence of AFB1 on GST-P expression in developmental stages can role out the involvement of this class of GST in AFB1 biotransformation. PMID:16501953

  17. Glutathione peroxidase mimics as novel antioxidants from vegetables.

    PubMed

    Terao, Junji; Hiwada, Mio; Taguchi, Keiko; Takahara, Keigo; Mohri, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Vegetables are generally recognized as rich sources of dietary antioxidants for inhibiting lipid peroxidation. Here we investigated lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH)-reducing activity of several vegetables to estimate their role on the prevention of lipid peroxidation in food and the digestive tract. By using HPLC analysis, we screened vegetables possessing the ability to convert 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) to its reduced derivative, 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE). Welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.) was found to be highly active in the reduction of 13-HPODE among tested vegetables. There was no relationship between 13-HPODE reducing activity and GSH peroxidase (GPX) activity in the tested vegetables. 13-HPODE-reducing activity of welsh onion was enhanced by the addition of sulfhydryl compounds including glutathione (GSH). Neither GPX inhibitor nor heat treatment suppressed 13-HPODE-reducing activity effectively. These results suggest that welsh onion and other vegetables contain GPX mimics responsible for the reduction of LOOH. GPX mimics may be helpful in the attenuation of harmful effect of LOOH from food. PMID:15817993

  18. TA-3037A, a new inhibitor of glutathione S-transferase, produced by actinomycetes. I. Production, isolation, physico-chemical properties and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Komagata, D; Sawa, T; Muraoka, Y; Imada, C; Okami, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1992-07-01

    TA-3037A, a new inhibitor of glutathione S-transferase was discovered in the fermentation broth of Streptomyces sp. TA-3037. It was purified by chromatography followed by solvent extraction and then isolated as yellow needles. TA-3037A has the molecular formula of C16H11NO4. It was competitive with the substrate, and the inhibition constant (Ki) was 4.9 microM. PMID:1517156

  19. Reducing automatically activated racial prejudice through implicit evaluative conditioning.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael A; Fazio, Russell H

    2006-04-01

    The authors report a set of experiments that use an implicit evaluative conditioning procedure to reduce automatically activated racial prejudice in White participants in a short period and with relatively few trials. Experiment 1 demonstrated that participants were unaware of the repeated conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus (CS-US) pairings of Black-good and White-bad. In Experiment 2, the procedure was found to be effective in reducing prejudice as indicated by an evaluative priming measure of automatically activated racial attitudes. In Experiment 3, this reduction in prejudice was found to persist throughout a 2-day separation between the conditioning procedure and the administration of the dependent measure. The implications of the present findings for the persistence of automatically activated racial prejudice are discussed.

  20. Understanding the degradation of ascorbic acid and glutathione in relation to the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. italica cv. Bellstar) during storage and mechanical processing.

    PubMed

    Raseetha, Siva; Leong, Sze Ying; Burritt, David John; Oey, Indrawati

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to understand the degradation of ascorbic acid and glutathione content in broccoli florets (Brassica oleracea L. italica cv. Bellstar) during prolonged storage and subsequent mechanical processing. The initial content of total ascorbic acid and glutathione in broccoli florets averaged at 5.18 ± 0.23 and 0.70 ± 0.03 μmol/g fresh weight, respectively. Results showed that the content of ascorbic acid and glutathione in broccoli degraded during storage at 23°C, for at least 4.5-fold after 6 days of storage. On each day of storage, broccoli florets were mechanically processed, but the content of total ascorbic acid and glutathione was not significantly affected. When the mechanically processed broccoli florets were further incubated for up to 6h, the amount of ascorbic acid was greatly reduced as compared to glutathione. To obtain an in-depth understanding on the degradation of ascorbic acid and glutathione, the activity of enzymes involved in plant antioxidative system via ascorbate-glutathione cycle, as a response towards oxidative stress that took place during storage was determined in this study. The content of total ascorbic acid and glutathione in broccoli florets before and after mechanical processing were found to decrease concurrently with the activity of ascorbic acid peroxidase and glutathione reductase over the experimental storage duration. Meanwhile, the effect of oxidative stress on the content of ascorbic acid and glutathione was apparent during the 6h of incubation after mechanical processing. This phenomenon was demonstrated by the level of oxidative stress biomarkers examined, in which the formation of lipid peroxides, protein carbonyls and DNA oxidised products was positively associated with the degradation of total ascorbic acid and glutathione.

  1. A reduced energy supply strategy in active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichchou, M. N.; Loukil, T.; Bareille, O.; Chamberland, G.; Qiu, J.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, a control strategy is presented and numerically tested. This strategy aims to achieve the potential performance of fully active systems with a reduced energy supply. These energy needs are expected to be comparable to the power demands of semi-active systems, while system performance is intended to be comparable to that of a fully active configuration. The underlying strategy is called 'global semi-active control'. This control approach results from an energy investigation based on management of the optimal control process. Energy management encompasses storage and convenient restitution. The proposed strategy monitors a given active law without any external energy supply by considering purely dissipative and energy-demanding phases. Such a control law is offered here along with an analysis of its properties. A suboptimal form, well adapted for practical implementation steps, is also given. Moreover, a number of numerical experiments are proposed in order to validate test findings.

  2. Glutathione peroxidase and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase in tissues of Balb/C mice

    SciTech Connect

    Spallholz, J.E.; Roveri, A.; Yan, L.; Boylan, L.M.; Kang, C.R.; Ursini, F. Univ. of Padua )

    1991-03-11

    The two selenium (Se) enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxide (PHGPx) were assayed in tissues and organ homogenates of female Balb/C mice fed torula yeast diets containing 0.008, 0.2 and 1.0 ug/g Se as selenite for nine months. GPx activity was detected in all tissues and organs whereas PHGPx activity was not detectable in lung, large intestine, eye or thymus tissue. GPx activity nearly always exceeded PHGPx activity when tissues or organs contained both enzymes irrespective of dietary Se treatment. GPx activity in tissues was generally more susceptible to the dietary Se deficiency than was PHGPx activity when expressed as a percentage of the activity found in tissues and organs of mice fed supplemented Se diets. This limited study suggests that dietary Se may be more valued in supporting PHGPx activity than GPx activity in the course of a protracted dietary Se deficiency.

  3. Five decades with glutathione and the GSTome.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt

    2012-02-24

    Uncle Folke inspired me to become a biochemist by demonstrating electrophoresis experiments on butterfly hemolymph in his kitchen. Glutathione became the subject for my undergraduate project in 1964 and has remained a focal point in my research owing to its multifarious roles in the cell. Since the 1960s, the multiple forms of glutathione transferase (GST), the GSTome, were isolated and characterized, some of which were discovered in our laboratory. Products of oxidative processes were found to be natural GST substrates. Examples of toxic compounds against which particular GSTs provide protection include 4-hydroxynonenal and ortho-quinones, with possible links to the etiology of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and other degenerative conditions. The role of thioltransferase and glutathione reductase in the cellular reduction of disulfides and other oxidized forms of thiols was clarified. Glyoxalase I catalyzes still another glutathione-dependent detoxication reaction. The unusual steady-state kinetics of this zinc-containing enzyme initiated model discrimination by regression analysis. Functional properties of the enzymes have been altered by stochastic mutations based on DNA shuffling and rationally tailored by structure-based redesign. We found it useful to represent promiscuous enzymes by vectors or points in multidimensional substrate-activity space and visualize them by multivariate analysis. Adopting the concept "molecular quasi-species," we describe clusters of functionally related enzyme variants that may emerge in natural as well as directed evolution.

  4. [Experimental Evaluation of Radioprotective Efficacy of Synthetic Genistein on Criteria of Glutathione System and Lipid Peroxidation in Erythrocytes of Peripheral Blood in Irradiated Rats].

    PubMed

    Grebenyuk, A N; Tarumov, R A; Basharin, V A; Kovtun, V U

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate experimentally the radioprotective effectiveness of synthetic genistein in terms of the glutathione system and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes of irradiated rats. The animals were exposed to single acute X-ray irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy. Genistein was administered intraperitoneally at 200 mg/kg 1 hour before radiation exposure. The irradiation caused the initiation of lipid peroxidation in the background depletion of reduced glutathione. Decrease by 25% in the number of malondialdehyde in the rats treated with genistein was registered 5 min after irradiation compared with the control. It is established thatl day after irradiation the level of reduced glutathione in the rats treated with genistein was 26% higher. However, intraperitoneal administration of genistein did not cause statistically significant changes in the activity of glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase during the whole period of observation. The results suggest that the radioprotective effect of synthetic genistein is implemented, along with other mechanisms, by stimulating the glutathione system and reducing the severity of lipid peroxidation. PMID:26863780

  5. Glutathione-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles: electromagnetic interactions in a closely packed assembly.

    PubMed

    Basu, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2007-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles of variable sizes have been prepared by reducing HAuCl4 with trisodium citrate by Frens' method. The synthesized gold particles show intense surface plasmon band in the visible region. The optical resonances in the visible are due to the surface plasmon oscillation, which is a function of geometry of the particles. The work reported here describes the interaction between nanoscale gold particles and a biomolecule, glutathione at low pH. Glutathione, which is a major cellular antioxidant and consists of amino acids glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine, has been used as a molecular linker between the gold nanoparticles. In glutathione, the reactivity of the a-amines (adjacent to -COOH) is found to be pH-dependent. Linking via the a-amines are activated at low pH but suppressed at high pH due to electrostatic repulsive forces between the gold surfaces and the charged carboxylate groups. In colloidal solutions, the colour of gold nanoparticles may range from red to purple to blue, depending on the degree of aggregation as well as orientation of the individual particles within the aggregates. The citrate-functionalized gold nanoparticles with glutathione in variable acidic pH condition produce different but well-ordered aggregates. It is observed that a new peak appearing at a longer wavelength intensifies and shifts further to the red from the original peak position depending on the particle size, concentration of glutathione, and pH of the solution. The aggregates have been characterized by UV/Vis, FTIR, XRD, and TEM. On the basis of the first appearance of a clearly defined new peak at longer wavelength, a higher sensitivity of glutathione detection has been achieved with gold nanoparticles of larger dimension.

  6. Fluorescein-labeled glutathione to study protein S-glutathionylation.

    PubMed

    Landino, Lisa M; Brown, Carolyn M; Edson, Carolyn A; Gilbert, Laura J; Grega-Larson, Nathan; Wirth, Anna Jean; Lane, Kelly C

    2010-07-01

    Numerous studies of S-glutathionylation of cysteine thiols indicate that this protein modification plays a key role in redox regulation of proteins. To facilitate the study of protein S-glutathionylation, we developed a synthesis and purification to produce milligram quantities of fluorescein-labeled glutathione. The amino terminus of the glutathione tripeptide reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate readily in ammonium bicarbonate. Purification by solid phase extraction on C8 and C18 columns separated excess reactants from desired products. Both oxidized and reduced fluorescein-labeled glutathione reacted with a variety of thiol-containing proteins to yield fluorescent proteins. PMID:20156418

  7. Fluorescein-labeled glutathione to study protein S-glutathionylation.

    PubMed

    Landino, Lisa M; Brown, Carolyn M; Edson, Carolyn A; Gilbert, Laura J; Grega-Larson, Nathan; Wirth, Anna Jean; Lane, Kelly C

    2010-07-01

    Numerous studies of S-glutathionylation of cysteine thiols indicate that this protein modification plays a key role in redox regulation of proteins. To facilitate the study of protein S-glutathionylation, we developed a synthesis and purification to produce milligram quantities of fluorescein-labeled glutathione. The amino terminus of the glutathione tripeptide reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate readily in ammonium bicarbonate. Purification by solid phase extraction on C8 and C18 columns separated excess reactants from desired products. Both oxidized and reduced fluorescein-labeled glutathione reacted with a variety of thiol-containing proteins to yield fluorescent proteins.

  8. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  9. Mechanisms for redox actions of nicotine and glutathione in cell culture, relevant to periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tinti, Federico; Soory, Mena

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative effect of nicotine was investigated using androgen biomarkers of redox status and wound healing in fibroblasts; using the antioxidant glutathione for confirmation of responses. Cultures of human gingival (HGF) and periosteal fibroblasts (HPF) were incubated with substrates 14C-testosterone/14C-4-androstenedione in the presence or absence of serial concentrations of nicotine (N100-500), glutathione (G1–5) and their combinations, in medium. At 24 h the medium was solvent extracted for metabolites, separated by TLC and quantified using radioisotope scanning. Nicotine caused significant inhibition in yields of the physiologically active metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in HGF and HPF, overcome to varying degrees by the anti-oxidant glutathione (n = 6; p<0.01, one way ANOVA); this is suggestive of moderation of an oxidative mechanism induced by nicotine. Down-regulation of 5α-reductase activity by nicotine resulting in reduced yields of DHT was overcome by glutathione. Overcoming oxidative stress in a redox environment is applicable to treatment outcome. PMID:22876341

  10. Biological activity of oxidized and reduced iodinated bombesins

    SciTech Connect

    Vigna, S.R.; Giraud, A.S.; Reeve, J.R. Jr.; Walsh, J.H.

    1988-07-01

    A method is reported for preparing oxidized and reduced iodinated Tyr4-bombesin. Iodogen was used to iodinate Tyr4-bombesin and the reaction products were separated by reverse-phase HPLC. The peak of oxidized label was then reduced by incubation with 725 mM dithiothreitol at 80 degrees C (pH 8.0) for one hour and the reaction products separated by HPLC as before. The reduced but not oxidized peaks of /sup 125/I-Tyr4-bombesin stimulated amylase release from rat pancreatic acini in vitro. We conclude that oxidation of bombesin producing C-terminal methionine sulfoxide destroys the biological activity of the peptide and that this form of oxidation can be reversed.

  11. Withanolide A Prevents Neurodegeneration by Modulating Hippocampal Glutathione Biosynthesis during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Baitharu, Iswar; Jain, Vishal; Deep, Satya Narayan; Shroff, Sabita; Sahu, Jayanta Kumar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera root extract has been used traditionally in ayurvedic system of medicine as a memory enhancer. Present study explores the ameliorative effect of withanolide A, a major component of withania root extract and its molecular mechanism against hypoxia induced memory impairment. Withanolide A was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats before a period of 21 days pre-exposure and during 07 days of exposure to a simulated altitude of 25,000 ft. Glutathione level and glutathione dependent free radicals scavenging enzyme system, ATP, NADPH level, γ-glutamylcysteinyl ligase (GCLC) activity and oxidative stress markers were assessed in the hippocampus. Expression of apoptotic marker caspase 3 in hippocampus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional alteration and expression of GCLC and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)–related factor 2 (Nrf2) were investigated by real time PCR and immunoblotting respectively. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) level and impaired reduced gluatathione dependent free radical scavenging system in hippocampus resulting in elevated oxidative stress. Supplementation of withanolide A during hypoxic exposure increased GSH level, augmented GSH dependent free radicals scavenging system and decreased the number of caspase and hoescht positive cells in hippocampus. While withanolide A reversed hypoxia mediated neurodegeneration, administration of buthionine sulfoximine along with withanolide A blunted its neuroprotective effects. Exogenous administration of corticosterone suppressed Nrf2 and GCLC expression whereas inhibition of corticosterone synthesis upregulated Nrf2 as well as GCLC. Thus present study infers that withanolide A reduces neurodegeneration by restoring hypoxia induced glutathione depletion in hippocampus. Further, Withanolide A increases glutathione biosynthesis in neuronal cells by upregulating GCLC level through Nrf2 pathway in a corticosterone dependenet manner

  12. Glutamine attenuates post-traumatic glutathione depletion in human muscle.

    PubMed

    Fläring, U B; Rooyackers, O E; Wernerman, J; Hammarqvist, F

    2003-03-01

    Glutathione is quantitatively the most important endogenous scavenger system. Glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle is pronounced following major trauma and sepsis in intensive care unit patients. Also, following elective surgery, glutathione depletion occurs in parallel with a progressive decline in muscle glutamine concentration. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that glutamine supplementation may counteract glutathione depletion in a human trauma model. A homogeneous group of patients (n = 17) undergoing a standardized surgical procedure were prospectively randomly allocated to receive glutamine (0.56 g x day(-1) x kg(-1)) or placebo as part of isonitrogenous and isocaloric nutrition. Percutaneous muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken pre-operatively and at 24 and 72 h after surgery. The concentrations of muscle glutathione and related amino acids were determined in muscle tissue and plasma. In the control (unsupplemented) subjects, total muscle glutathione had decreased by 47+/-8% and 37+/-11% and reduced glutathione had decreased by 53+/-10% and 45+/-16% respectively at 24 and 72 h after surgery (P < 0.05). In contrast, in the glutamine-supplemented group, no significant post-operative decreases in total or reduced glutathione were seen following surgery. Muscle free glutamine had decreased at 72 h after surgery in both groups, by 41.4+/-14.8% (P < 0.05) in the glutamine-supplemented group and by 46.0+/-14.3% (P < 0.05) in the control group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that intravenous glutamine supplementation attenuates glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle in humans following standardized surgical trauma.

  13. Recent approaches for reducing hemolytic activity of chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Jeswani, Gunjan; Alexander, Amit; Saraf, Shailendra; Saraf, Swarnlata; Qureshi, Azra; Ajazuddin

    2015-08-10

    Drug induced hemolysis is a frequent complication associated with chemotherapy. It results from interaction of drug with erythrocyte membrane and leads to cell lysis. In recent past, various approaches were made to reduce drug-induced hemolysis, which includes drug polymer conjugation, drug delivery via colloidal carriers and hydrogels, co-administration of botanical agents and modification in molecular chemistry of drug molecules. The basic concept behind these strategies is to protect the red blood cells from membrane damaging effects of drugs. There are several examples of drug polymer conjugate that either are approved by Food and Drug Administration or are under clinical trial for delivering drugs with reduced toxicities. Likewise, colloidal carriers are also used successfully nowadays for the delivery of various chemotherapeutic agents like gemcitabine and amphotericin B with remarkable decrease in their hemolytic activity. Similarly, co-administration of botanical agents with drugs works as secondary system proving protection and strength to erythrocyte membranes. In addition to the above statement, interaction hindrance between RBC and drug molecule by molecular modification plays an important role in reducing hemolysis. This review predominantly describes the above recent approaches explored to achieve the reduced hemolytic activity of drugs especially chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26047758

  14. Mutagenic activation reduces carcinogenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene for mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, L P; Bogdanova, L A; Kaledin, V I

    2013-03-01

    Pentachlorophenol (aromatic amine and azo stain metabolic stimulation inhibitor) reduced the hepatocarcinogenic activity of 4-aminoazobenzene and reduced that of ortho-aminoazotoluene in suckling mice. Both 4-aminoazobenzene and ortho-aminoazotoluene exhibited mutagenic activity in Ames' test in vitro on S. typhimurium TA 98 strain with activation with liver enzymes; this mutagenic activity was similarly suppressed by adding pentachlorophenol into activation medium. Induction of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes, stimulating the mutagenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene, suppressed its carcinogenic effect on mouse liver. Hence, ortho-aminotoluene (the initial compound), but not its mutagenic metabolites, was the direct active hepatocarcinogen for mice.

  15. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A.

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  16. Association of mercury and selenium with altered glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in diving ducks from the San Francisco Bay region, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Pendleton, G.W.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Marn, C.M.

    1998-02-01

    Adult male greater scaup (Aythya marila), surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata), and ruddy ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) were collected from Suisun Bay and coastal Tomales Bay in the greater San Francisco Bay area to assess exposure to inorganic contaminants. Hepatic Se concentrations were highest in greater scaup and surf scoters in Suisun Bay, whereas hepatic Hg was highest in greater scaup and surf scoters from Tomales Bay. Hepatic Se and Hg were lower in ruddy ducks and did not differ between locations. Hepatic supernatants were assayed for enzymes related to glutathione metabolism and antioxidant activity, including glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH peroxidase), glutathione reductase (GSSG reductase), and glutathione-S-transferase (GSH transferase). Glutathione peroxidase activity was higher in surf scoters and ruddy ducks, and G-6-PDH was higher in greater scaup and surf scoters from Suisun Bay than Tomales Bay. Glutathione reductase (GSSG) was higher in SS from Suisun Bay. The ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) was greater in all species from Tomales Bay. The following significant relationships were found in one or more species with increasing hepatic Hg concentration; lower body, liver, and heart weights; decreased hepatic GSH concentration and G-6-PDH and GSH peroxidase activities; increased ratio of GSSG to GSH; and increased GSSG reductase activity. With increasing hepatic Se concentration, GSH peroxidase increased, but GSH decreased. It is concluded that measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. Concentrations of Hg and Se and the above variables affected have been associated with adverse effects on reproduction and neurological function in experimental studies with mallards.

  17. Knee loading reduces MMP13 activity in the mouse cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Moderate loads with knee loading enhance bone formation, but its effects on the maintenance of the knee are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of knee loading on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase13 (MMP13) and evaluated the role of p38 MAPK and Rac1 GTPase in the regulation of MMP13. Methods Knee loading (0.5–3 N for 5 min) was applied to the right knee of surgically-induced osteoarthritis (OA) mice as well as normal (non-OA) mice, and MMP13 activity in the femoral cartilage was examined. The sham-loaded knee was used as a non-loading control. We also employed primary non-OA and OA human chondrocytes as well as C28/I2 chondrocyte cells, and examined MMP13 activity and molecular signaling in response to shear at 2–20 dyn/cm2. Results Daily knee loading at 1 N for 2 weeks suppressed cartilage destruction in the knee of OA mice. Induction of OA elevated MMP13 activity and knee loading at 1 N suppressed this elevation. MMP13 activity was also increased in primary OA chondrocytes, and this increase was attenuated by applying shear at 10 dyn/cm2. Load-driven reduction in MMP13 was associated with a decrease in the phosphorylation level of p38 MAPK (p-p38) and NFκB (p-NFκB). Molecular imaging using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique showed that Rac1 activity was reduced by shear at 10 dyn/cm2 and elevated by it at 20 dyn/cm2. Silencing Rac1 GTPase significantly reduced MMP13 expression and p-p38 but not p-NFκB. Transfection of a constitutively active Rac1 GTPase mutant increased MMP13 activity, while a dominant negative mutant decreased it. Conclusions Knee loading reduces MMP13 activity at least in part through Rac1-mediated p38 MAPK signaling. This study suggests the possibility of knee loading as a therapy not only for strengthening bone but also preventing tissue degradation of the femoral cartilage. PMID:24180431

  18. Efflux of glutathione and glutathione complexes from human erythrocytes in response to inorganic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Deniz; Cakir, Yeliz

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate if arsenic exposure results in glutathione efflux from human erythrocytes. Arsenite significantly depleted intracellular nonprotein thiol level in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The intracellular nonprotein thiol level was decreased to 0.767 ± 0.0017 μmol/ml erythrocyte following exposure to 10 mM of arsenite for 4 h. Extracellular nonprotein thiol level was increased concomitantly with the intracellular decrease and reached to 0.481 ± 0.0005 μmol/ml erythrocyte in 4 h. In parallel with the change in extracellular nonprotein thiol levels, significant increases in extracellular glutathione levels were detected. Extracellular glutathione levels reached to 0.122 ± 0.0013, 0.226 ± 0.003, and 0.274 ± 0.004 μmol/ml erythrocyte with 1, 5, and 10 mM of arsenite, respectively. Dimercaptosuccinic acid treatment of supernatants significantly increased the glutathione levels measured in the extracellular media. Utilization of MK571 and verapamil, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and Pgp inhibitors, decreased the rate of glutathione efflux from erythrocytes suggesting a role for these membrane transporters in the process. The results of the present study indicate that human erythrocytes efflux glutathione in reduced free form and in conjugated form or forms that can be recovered with dimercaptosuccinic acid when exposed to arsenite. PMID:22890881

  19. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  20. Effects of mercury and selenium on glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    Earlier studies reported on the toxicity and related oxidative stress of different forms of Se, including seleno-D,L-methionine, in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). This study compares the effects of Se (seleno-D,L-methionine) and Hg (methylmercury chloride) separately and in combination. Mallard drakes received one of the following diets: untreated feed (controls), or feed containing 10 ppm Se, 10 ppm Hg, or 10 ppm Se in combination with 10 ppm Hg. After 10 weeks, blood, liver, and brain samples were collected for biochemical assays. The following clinical and biochemical alterations occurred in response to mercury exposure: hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations decreased; activities of the enzymes glutathione (GSH) peroxidase (plasma and liver), glutathione-S-transferase (liver), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) (liver and brain) decreased; hepatic oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentration increased relative to reduced glutathione (GSH); and lipid peroxidation in the brain was evident as detected by increased thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS). Effects of Se alone included increased hepatic GSSG reductase activity and brain TBARS concentration. Se in combination with Hg partially or totally alleviated effects of Hg on GSH peroxidase, G-6-PDH, and GSSG. These findings are compared in relation to field observations for diving ducks and other aquatic birds. It is concluded that since both Hg and excess Se can affect thiol status, measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. The ability of Se to restore the activities of G-6-PDH, GSH peroxidase, and glutathione status involved in antioxidative defense mechanisms may be crucial to biological protection from the toxic effects of methyl mercury.

  1. Large Roads Reduce Bat Activity across Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  2. Alterations in the glutathione metabolism could be implicated in the ischemia-induced small intestinal cell damage in horses

    PubMed Central

    Marañón, Gonzalo; Manley, William; Cayado, Patricia; García, Cruz; de la Muela, Mercedes Sánchez; Vara, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Background Colic could be accompanied by changes in the morphology and physiology of organs and tissues, such as the intestine. This process might be, at least in part, due to the accumulation of oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), secondary to intestinal ischemia. Glutathione (GSH), being the major intracellular thiol, provides protection against oxidative injury. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ischemia-induced intestinal injury could be related with alterations in GSH metabolism. Results Ischemia induced a significant increase in lipid hydroperoxides, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, and a reduction in reduced glutathione, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, as well as in methionine-adenosyl-transferase and methyl-transferase activities. Conclusion Our results suggest that ischemia induces harmful effects on equine small intestine, probably due to an increase in oxidative damage and proinflammatory molecules. This effect could be mediated, at least in part, by impairment in glutathione metabolism. PMID:19296836

  3. Arabidopsis Glutathione Transferases U24 and U25 Exhibit a Range of Detoxification Activities with the Environmental Pollutant and Explosive, 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Vanda; Tzafestas, Kyriakos; Sparrow, Helen; Johnston, Emily J.; Brentnall, Andrew S.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Rylott, Elizabeth L.; Bruce, Neil C.

    2014-01-01

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a major worldwide military pollutant. The presence of this toxic and highly persistent pollutant, particularly at military sites and former manufacturing facilities, presents various health and environmental concerns. Due to the chemically resistant structure of TNT, it has proven to be highly recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Here, we demonstrate the importance of two glutathione transferases (GSTs), GST-U24 and GST-U25, from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that are specifically up-regulated in response to TNT exposure. To assess the role of GST-U24 and GST-U25, we purified and characterized recombinant forms of both enzymes and demonstrated the formation of three TNT glutathionyl products. Importantly, GST-U25 catalyzed the denitration of TNT to form 2-glutathionyl-4,6-dinitrotoluene, a product that is likely to be more amenable to subsequent biodegradation in the environment. Despite the presence of this biochemical detoxification pathway in plants, physiological concentrations of GST-U24 and GST-U25 result in only a limited innate ability to cope with the levels of TNT found at contaminated sites. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GST-U24 and GST-U25 exhibit significantly enhanced ability to withstand and detoxify TNT, properties that could be applied for in planta detoxification of TNT in the field. The overexpressing lines removed significantly more TNT from soil and exhibited a corresponding reduction in glutathione levels when compared with wild-type plants. However, in the absence of TNT, overexpression of these GSTs reduces root and shoot biomass, and although glutathione levels are not affected, this effect has implications for xenobiotic detoxification. PMID:24733884

  4. Ageing of glutathione reductase in the lens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W Z; Augusteyn, R C

    1994-07-01

    The distribution of glutathione reductase activity in concentric layers from the lens has been determined as a function of age for 16 species. Primate lenses have almost ten times the level of glutathione reductase found in other species. Comparison with the activity of hexokinase revealed that this is not due to a higher overall rate of metabolism in these lenses. By contrast, the higher activity found in bird and fish lenses reflects a higher metabolic activity in these tissues. In all species, a gradient of activity was observed with the highest specific activity in the outermost cortical fibres, decreasing to virtually no activity in the inner parts of the tissue. No alterations were found in this gradient with increasing age, other than an increase in the amount of nuclear tissue essentially devoid of activity. The maximum activity in the outer cortical fibres was the same, regardless of the age of the lens. The time taken, in different species, for the specific activity to decrease by half, was estimated from the rate of protein accumulation. This time was found to vary from a few days to several years, indicating that the decrease in activity is not due to ageing but rather, it is related to the maturation of fibre cells. These observations are discussed in terms of current concepts of lens ageing and cataract formation. PMID:7835401

  5. Reduced brain activation in violent adolescents during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yi; Mei, Yi; Du, XiaoXia; Xie, Bin; Shao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control have been linked to aggression and violent behaviour. This study aimed to observe whether violent adolescents show different brain activation patterns during response inhibition and to ascertain the roles these brain regions play. A self-report method and modified overt aggression scale (MOAS) were used to evaluate violent behaviour. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 22 violent adolescents and 17 matched healthy subjects aged 12 to 18 years. While scanning, a go/no-go task was performed. Between-group comparisons revealed that activation in the bilateral middle and superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, and right orbitofrontal area (BA11) regions were significantly reduced in the violent group compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the violent group had more widespread activation in the prefrontal cortex than that observed in the control group. Activation of the prefrontal cortex in the violent group was widespread but lacking in focus, failing to produce intensive activation in some functionally related regions during response inhibition. PMID:26888566

  6. Glutathione transferase gene family from the housefly Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Syvanen, M; Zhou, Z H; Wang, J Y

    1994-10-17

    Three new glutathione transferase (GST) genes from the housefly Musca domestica are described. These genes, identified as MdGST-2, -3, and -4, were from cDNA clones obtained from a cDNA bank in phage lambda. The bank was prepared using poly(A)+ RNA from a housefly that is highly resistant to organophosphate insecticides because of enhanced expression of multiple members of the glutathione transferase gene family. The DNA sequence of each is reported and has a complete open reading frame that specified an amino acid sequence similar to other dipteran glutathione transferases. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we can conclude that the insect glutathione transferase gene family falls into two groups, each of which evolves at a different rate, presumably due to differences in functional constraints. We show that MdGST-1 (and their homologues from Drosophila and Lucilia) evolve at a significantly slower rate than the other members of the gene family. Each housefly GST cDNA was inserted into a bacterial plasmid expression system and a glutathione transferase activity was expressed in Escherichia coli. The transcription pattern of each of these glutathione transferases was examined in a variety of different housefly strains that are known to differ in their resistance to organophosphate insecticides due to different patterns of glutathione transferase expression. We found that the level of transcription for two of our clones was positively correlated with the level of organophosphate resistance.

  7. Response of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle to re-aeration following hypoxia in lupine roots.

    PubMed

    Garnczarska, Małgorzata

    2005-06-01

    The response of the enzymes and metabolites of the ascorbate-glutathione pathway to oxidative stress caused by re-aeration following hypoxia was studied in roots of hydroponically grown lupine (Lupinus luteus L. cv. Juno) seedlings. Lupine roots were deprived of oxygen by subjecting them to hypoxia for 48 and 72 h and then re-aerated for up to 4 h. An increased content of total ascorbate was observed in lupine roots immediately after hypoxia, whereas total glutathione level decreased. However, a significant increase in the reduced forms of both metabolites was found directly after hypoxia. Re-admission of oxygen caused the decrease of the ratios of reduced to oxidized forms of ascorbate and glutathione, indicating oxidative stress. While monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR, EC 1.6.5.4) activity remained unaltered during re-aeration the increase in activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) was observed 30 min after transfer from hypoxic condition. Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.8.5.1) activity approached the control level during a whole re-aeration period. Native gel electrophoresis combined with specific activity staining revealed seven isoforms of APX, five isoforms of GR and three different proteins with DHA reductase activity in roots extracts. However, immediately after hypoxic treatment APX-5 isoform and GR-1 isoform were not observed in roots. This experimental system was also used to investigate superoxide anion level in roots utilizing the superoxide anion-specific indicator dihydroethidium (DHE). Intense DHE-derived fluorescence was found in re-aerated root tips as compared to control roots, indicating that re-aeration induced superoxide anion production in hypoxically pretreated roots.

  8. Reduced phospholipase A2 activity is not accompanied by reduced arachidonic acid release.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, H; Maxwell, P; Hack, N; Skorecki, K

    1994-01-14

    Arachidonic acid release in cells highly over expressing cytosolic phospholipase A2 has been attributed to mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 on serine-505. To investigate the role of cytosolic phospholipase A2 in cellular physiology, we attempted to inhibit cytosolic phospholipase A2 in the intact cell employing an antisense RNA strategy. Swiss 3T3 cells were stably transfected with an antisense cytosolic phospholipase A2 expression vector. A clone of cells with reduced immunodetectable cytosolic phospholipase A2, compared to a vector transfected cell line, was identified by Western blotting and a corresponding decrease in phospholipase A2 activity was confirmed by enzymatic assay in cell free extracts. However, arachidonic acid release from intact cells in response to agonists was not different between antisense and control cell lines. Thus, arachidonic acid release in intact cells with decreased cytosolic phospholipase A2 activity is likely to be modulated by rate limiting factors that are extrinsic to cytosolic phospholipase A2.

  9. Autophagy Activation by Rapamycin Reduces Severity of Experimental Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Caramés, Beatriz; Hasegawa, Akihiko; Taniguchi, Noboru; Miyaki, Shigeru; Blanco, Francisco J.; Lotz, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with cell death and extracellular matrix degradation in articular cartilage. Autophagy is an essential cellular homeostasis mechanism that was found to be deficient in aging and OA cartilage. This study determined whether pharmacological inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a key inhibitor of autophagy, has disease-modifying activity in experimental OA. Methods Experimental OA was induced by transection of the medial meniscotibial ligament and the medial collateral ligament in 2-month old C57Bl/6 mice (n=36). Rapamycin (1 mg/kg weight/day) (n=18 mice) or DMSO vehicle control (n=18 mice) was administered intraperitoneally for 10 weeks. Histopathological changes in articular cartilage and synovium were examined by using semiquantitative scoring systems. Rapamycin effects on mTOR signaling, autophagy, cartilage homeostasis and inflammation were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Results Rapamycin affected the mTOR signaling pathway in mouse knee joints as indicated by inhibition of ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation, a target of mTOR and activation of LC3, a main marker of autophagy. The severity of cartilage degradation was significantly (P < 0.01) reduced in the rapamycin treated group compared to the control group and this was associated with a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in synovitis. Rapamycin treatment also maintained cartilage cellularity, and decreased ADAMTS-5 and IL-1β expression in articular cartilage. Conclusions These results suggest that rapamycin, at least in part by autophagy activation, reduces the severity of experimental OA. Pharmacological activation of autophagy may be an effective therapeutic approach for OA. PMID:22084394

  10. Reduced Presynaptic Dopamine Activity in Adolescent Dorsal Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Marguerite; Bondi, Corina; Torres, Gonzalo; Moghaddam, Bita

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence coincides with symptomatic onset of several psychiatric illnesses including schizophrenia and addiction. Excess limbic dopamine activity has been implicated in these vulnerabilities. We combined molecular and dynamic indices of dopamine neurotransmission to assess dopamine function in adolescent rats in two functionally distinct striatal subregions: nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum (DS). In adolescents, we find an overall reduction in dopamine availability selective to the DS. Dopamine release in the DS, but not in the NAc, was less responsive to amphetamine in adolescents compared to adults. The dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, nomifensine, similarly inhibited basal and amphetamine-induced dopamine release in either regions of both the age groups, suggesting that the reduced effectiveness of amphetamine is not due to differences in DAT function. Furthermore, DAT and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 expressions were similar in the DS and NAc of adolescent rats. In contrast, expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was reduced in the DS, but not in the NAc, of adolescents compared to adults. Behaviorally, adolescents were less sensitive to amphetamine but more sensitive to a TH inhibitor. These data indicate that, in contrast to the general notion that dopamine is hyperactive in adolescents, there is diminished presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescents that is selective to the DS and may result from attenuated TH activity. Given recent reports of altered dopamine activity in associative/dorsal striatum of individuals at a clinically high risk of psychosis, our data further support the idea that dorsal, as opposed to ventral, regions of the striatum are a locus of vulnerability for psychosis. PMID:23358239

  11. Reduced presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescent dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Marguerite; Bondi, Corina; Torres, Gonzalo; Moghaddam, Bita

    2013-06-01

    Adolescence coincides with symptomatic onset of several psychiatric illnesses including schizophrenia and addiction. Excess limbic dopamine activity has been implicated in these vulnerabilities. We combined molecular and dynamic indices of dopamine neurotransmission to assess dopamine function in adolescent rats in two functionally distinct striatal subregions: nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum (DS). In adolescents, we find an overall reduction in dopamine availability selective to the DS. Dopamine release in the DS, but not in the NAc, was less responsive to amphetamine in adolescents compared to adults. The dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, nomifensine, similarly inhibited basal and amphetamine-induced dopamine release in either regions of both the age groups, suggesting that the reduced effectiveness of amphetamine is not due to differences in DAT function. Furthermore, DAT and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 expressions were similar in the DS and NAc of adolescent rats. In contrast, expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was reduced in the DS, but not in the NAc, of adolescents compared to adults. Behaviorally, adolescents were less sensitive to amphetamine but more sensitive to a TH inhibitor. These data indicate that, in contrast to the general notion that dopamine is hyperactive in adolescents, there is diminished presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescents that is selective to the DS and may result from attenuated TH activity. Given recent reports of altered dopamine activity in associative/dorsal striatum of individuals at a clinically high risk of psychosis, our data further support the idea that dorsal, as opposed to ventral, regions of the striatum are a locus of vulnerability for psychosis.

  12. Amodiaquine failure associated with erythrocytic glutathione in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Zuluaga, Lina; Pabón, Adriana; López, Carlos; Ochoa, Aleida; Blair, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Objective To establish the relationship between production of glutathione and the therapeutic response to amodiaquine (AQ) monotherapy in Plasmodium falciparum non-complicated malaria patients. Methodology Therapeutic response to AQ was evaluated in 32 patients with falciparum malaria in two townships of Antioquia, Colombia, and followed-up for 28 days. For every patient, total glutathione and enzymatic activity (glutathione reductase, GR, and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, γ-GCS) were determined in parasitized erythrocytes, non-infected erythrocytes and free parasites, on the starting day (day zero, before ingestion of AQ) and on the day of failure (in case of occurrence). Results There was found an AQ failure of 31.25%. Independent of the therapeutic response, on the starting day and on the day of failure, lower total glutathione concentration and higher GR activities in parasitized erythrocytes were found, compared with non-infected erythrocytes (p < 0.003). In addition, only on the day of failure, γ-GCS activity of parasitized erythrocytes was higher, compared with that of healthy erythrocytes (p = 0.01). Parasitized and non-parasitized erythrocytes in therapeutic failure patients (TF) had higher total glutathione on the starting day compared with those of adequate clinical response (ACR) (p < 0.02). Parasitized erythrocytes of TF patients showed lower total glutathione on the failure day, compared with starting day (p = 0.017). No differences was seen in the GR and γ-GCS activities by compartment, neither between the two therapeutic response groups nor between the two treatment days. Conclusion This study is a first approach to explaining P. falciparum therapeutic failure in humans through differences in glutathione metabolism in TF and ACR patients. These results suggest a role for glutathione in the therapeutic failure to antimalarials. PMID:17451604

  13. Application of glutathione to roots selectively inhibits cadmium transport from roots to shoots in oilseed rape

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione is a tripeptide involved in various aspects of plant metabolism. This study investigated the effects of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) applied to specific organs (source leaves, sink leaves, and roots) on cadmium (Cd) distribution and behaviour in the roots of oilseed rape plants (Brassica napus) cultured hydroponically. The translocation ratio of Cd from roots to shoots was significantly lower in plants that had root treatment of GSH than in control plants. GSH applied to roots reduced the Cd concentration in the symplast sap of root cells and inhibited root-to-shoot Cd translocation via xylem vessels significantly. GSH applied to roots also activated Cd efflux from root cells to the hydroponic solution. Inhibition of root-to-shoot translocation of Cd was visualized, and the activation of Cd efflux from root cells was also shown by using a positron-emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS). This study investigated a similar inhibitory effect on root-to-shoot translocation of Cd by the oxidized form of glutathione, GSSG. Inhibition of Cd accumulation by GSH was abolished by a low-temperature treatment. Root cells of plants exposed to GSH in the root zone had less Cd available for xylem loading by actively excluding Cd from the roots. Consequently, root-to-shoot translocation of Cd was suppressed and Cd accumulation in the shoot decreased. PMID:23364937

  14. Active fans and grizzly bears: Reducing risks for wilderness campers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakals, M. E.; Wilford, D. J.; Wellwood, D. W.; MacDougall, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    Active geomorphic fans experience debris flows, debris floods and/or floods (hydrogeomorphic processes) that can be hazards to humans. Grizzly bears ( Ursus arctos) can also be a hazard to humans. This paper presents the results of a cross-disciplinary study that analyzed both hydrogeomorphic and grizzly bear hazards to wilderness campers on geomorphic fans along a popular hiking trail in Kluane National Park and Reserve in southwestern Yukon Territory, Canada. Based on the results, a method is proposed to reduce the risks to campers associated with camping on fans. The method includes both landscape and site scales and is based on easily understood and readily available information regarding weather, vegetation, stream bank conditions, and bear ecology and behaviour. Educating wilderness campers and providing a method of decision-making to reduce risk supports Parks Canada's public safety program; a program based on the principle of user self-sufficiency. Reducing grizzly bear-human conflicts complements the efforts of Parks Canada to ensure a healthy grizzly bear population.

  15. Lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol Reduces Experimental Atherosclerosis through Activation of Nrf2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhekang; Chen, Minjie; Xie, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xiaoke; Kherada, Nisharahmed; Desikan, Rajagopal; Mihai, Georgeta; Burns, Patrick; Sun, Qinghua; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Objective Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and Nrf2 is the transcriptional factor central in cellular antioxidant responses. In the present study, we investigate the effect of a dihydrolipoic acid derivative lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol (LMDP) on the progression of atherosclerosis and test whether its effect on atherosclerosis is mediated by Nrf2. Methods and Results Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning and en face analysis reveal that 14 weeks of treatment with LMDP markedly reduced atherosclerotic burden in a rabbit balloon vascular injury model. Myograph analyses show decreased aortic contractile response to phenylephrine and increased aortic response to acetylcholine and insulin in LMDP-treated animals, suggesting that LMDP inhibits atherosclerosis through improving vascular function. A role of Nrf2 signaling in mediating the amelioration of vascular function by LMDP was supported by increased Nrf2 translocation into nuclear and increased expression of Nrf2 target genes. Furthermore, chemotaxis analysis with Boydem chamber shows that leukocytes isolated from LMDP-treated rabbits had reduced chemotaxis, and knock-down of Nrf2 significantly reduced the effect of LMDP on the chemotaxis of mouse macrophages. Conclusion Our results support that LMDP has an anti-atherosclerotic effect likely through activation of Nrf2 signaling and subsequent inhibition of macrophage chemotaxis. PMID:26859892

  16. Human hsp27, Drosophila hsp27 and human alphaB-crystallin expression-mediated increase in glutathione is essential for the protective activity of these proteins against TNFalpha-induced cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Mehlen, P; Kretz-Remy, C; Préville, X; Arrigo, A P

    1996-01-01

    Expression of small stress proteins (shsp) enhances the survival of mammalian cells exposed to heat or oxidative injuries. Recently, we have shown that the expression of shsp from different species, such as human hsp27, Drosophila hsp27 or human alphaB-crystallin protected murine L929 cells against cell death induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNFalpha), hydrogen peroxide or menadione. Here, we report that, in growing L929 cell lines, the presence of these shsp decreased the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). shsp expression also abolished the burst of intracellular ROS induced by TNFalpha. Several downstream effects resulting from the TNFalpha-mediated ROS increment, such as NF-kappaB activation, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, were inhibited by shsp expression. We also report that the expression of these different shsp raised the total glutathione level in both L929 cell lines and transiently transfected NIH 3T3-ras cells. This phenomenon was essential for the shsp-mediated decrease in ROS and resistance against TNFalpha. Our results therefore suggest that the protective activity shared by human hsp27, Drosophila hsp27 and human alphaB-crystallin against TNFalpha-mediated cell death and probably other types of oxidative stress results from their conserved ability to raise the intracellular concentration of glutathione. Images PMID:8654367

  17. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Kathleen A.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R. Todd; Brewer, Judson A.

    2015-01-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest despite other studies reporting differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, this study compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity, and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies have used small groups, whereas the current study tested these hypotheses in a larger group. Results indicate that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network relative to an active task in meditators compared to controls. Regions of the default mode showing a group by task interaction include the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task. PMID:25904238

  18. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2015-09-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest, despite other studies having reported differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, in this study we compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate the findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation, beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies had used small groups, whereas in the present study we tested these hypotheses in a larger group. The results indicated that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network, relative to an active task, for meditators as compared to controls. Regions of the default mode network showing a Group × Task interaction included the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that the suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and they suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task.

  19. Activation of Melatonin Receptors Reduces Relapse-Like Alcohol Consumption.

    PubMed

    Vengeliene, Valentina; Noori, Hamid R; Spanagel, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous synchronizer of biological rhythms and a modulator of physiological functions and behaviors of all mammals. Reduced levels of melatonin and a delay of its nocturnal peak concentration have been found in alcohol-dependent patients and rats. Here we investigated whether the melatonergic system is a novel target to treat alcohol addiction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to long-term voluntary alcohol consumption with repeated abstinence phases. Circadian drinking rhythmicity and patterns were registered with high temporal resolution by a drinkometer system and analyzed by Fourier analysis. We examined potential antirelapse effect of the novel antidepressant drug agomelatine. Given that agomelatine is a potent MT1 and MT2 receptor agonist and a 5-HT2C antagonist we also tested the effects of melatonin itself and the 5-HT2C antagonist SB242084. All drugs reduced relapse-like drinking. Agomelatine and melatonin administered at the end of the light phase led to very similar changes on all measures of the post-abstinence drinking behavior, suggesting that effects of agomelatine on relapse-like behavior are mostly driven by its melatonergic activity. Both drugs caused a clear phase advance in the diurnal drinking pattern when compared with the control vehicle-treated group and a reduced frequency of approaches to alcohol bottles. Melatonin given at the onset of the light phase had no effect on the circadian phase and very small effects on alcohol consumption. We conclude that targeting the melatonergic system in alcohol-dependent individuals can induce a circadian phase advance, which may restore normal sleep architecture and reduce relapse behavior.

  20. Activation of Melatonin Receptors Reduces Relapse-Like Alcohol Consumption.

    PubMed

    Vengeliene, Valentina; Noori, Hamid R; Spanagel, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous synchronizer of biological rhythms and a modulator of physiological functions and behaviors of all mammals. Reduced levels of melatonin and a delay of its nocturnal peak concentration have been found in alcohol-dependent patients and rats. Here we investigated whether the melatonergic system is a novel target to treat alcohol addiction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to long-term voluntary alcohol consumption with repeated abstinence phases. Circadian drinking rhythmicity and patterns were registered with high temporal resolution by a drinkometer system and analyzed by Fourier analysis. We examined potential antirelapse effect of the novel antidepressant drug agomelatine. Given that agomelatine is a potent MT1 and MT2 receptor agonist and a 5-HT2C antagonist we also tested the effects of melatonin itself and the 5-HT2C antagonist SB242084. All drugs reduced relapse-like drinking. Agomelatine and melatonin administered at the end of the light phase led to very similar changes on all measures of the post-abstinence drinking behavior, suggesting that effects of agomelatine on relapse-like behavior are mostly driven by its melatonergic activity. Both drugs caused a clear phase advance in the diurnal drinking pattern when compared with the control vehicle-treated group and a reduced frequency of approaches to alcohol bottles. Melatonin given at the onset of the light phase had no effect on the circadian phase and very small effects on alcohol consumption. We conclude that targeting the melatonergic system in alcohol-dependent individuals can induce a circadian phase advance, which may restore normal sleep architecture and reduce relapse behavior. PMID:25994077

  1. Purification and Characterization of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase, and Glutathione Reductase from Rat Heart and Inhibition Effects of Furosemide, Digoxin, and Dopamine on the Enzymes Activities.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate characterization and purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase from rat heart and the inhibitory effect of three drugs. The purification of the enzymes was performed using 2',5'-ADP sepharose 4B affinity material. The subunit and the natural molecular weights were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Biochemical characteristics such as the optimum temperature, pH, stable pH, and salt concentration were examined for each enzyme. Types of product inhibition and Ki values with Km and Vmax values of the substrates and coenzymes were determined. According to the obtained Ki and IC50 values, furosemide, digoxin, and dopamine showed inhibitory effect on the enzyme activities at low millimolar concentrations in vitro conditions. Dopamine inhibited the activity of these enzymes as competitive, whereas furosemide and digoxin inhibited the activity of the enzyme as noncompetitive.

  2. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient γ-ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Timothy O; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-06-01

    Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M(2) seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione depletion

  3. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient γ -ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Timothy O.; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M2 seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione

  4. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient γ-ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Timothy O; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-06-01

    Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M(2) seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione depletion

  5. PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism reduces enzymatic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaogan; Wang Zhaoqi; Tong Weimin . E-mail: tong@iarc.fr; Shen Yan

    2007-03-02

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) modifies a variety of nuclear proteins by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, and plays diverse roles in molecular and cellular processes. A common PARP1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at codon 762, resulting in the substitution of alanine (Ala) for valine (Val) in the catalytic domain has been implicated in susceptibility to cancer. To characterize the functional effect of this polymorphism on PARP1, we performed in vitro enzymatic analysis on PARP1-Ala762 and PARP1-Val762. We found that PARP1-Ala762 displayed 57.2% of the activity of PARP1-Val762 for auto-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and 61.9% of the activity of PARP1-Val762 for trans-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of histone H1. The kinetic characterization revealed that the K {sub m} of PARP1-Ala762 was increased to a 1.2-fold of the K {sub m} of PARP1-Val762 for trans-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Thus, the PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism reduces the enzymatic activity of PARP1 by increasing K {sub m}. This finding suggests that different levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP1 might aid in understanding Cancer risk of carriers of the PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism.

  6. Glutathione S-conjugates as prodrugs to target drug-resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Emma E.; Dilda, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Living organisms are continuously exposed to xenobiotics. The major phase of enzymatic detoxification in many species is the conjugation of activated xenobiotics to reduced glutathione (GSH) catalyzed by the glutathione-S-transferase (GST). It has been reported that some compounds, once transformed into glutathione S-conjugates, enter the mercapturic acid pathway whose end products are highly reactive and toxic for the cell responsible for their production. The cytotoxicity of these GSH conjugates depends essentially on GST and gamma-glutamyl transferases (γGT), the enzymes which initiate the mercapturic acid synthesis pathway. Numerous studies support the view that the expression of GST and γGT in cancer cells represents an important factor in the appearance of a more aggressive and resistant phenotype. High levels of tumor GST and γGT expression were employed to selectively target tumor with GST- or γGT-activated drugs. This strategy, explored over the last two decades, has recently been successful using GST-activated nitrogen mustard (TLK286) and γGT-activated arsenic-based (GSAO and Darinaparsin) prodrugs confirming the potential of GSH-conjugates as anticancer drugs. PMID:25157234

  7. Expression Patterns of Genes Involved in Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle in Aphid-Infested Maize (Zea mays L.) Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Reduced forms of ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) are among the most important non-enzymatic foliar antioxidants in maize (Zea mays L.). The survey was aimed to evaluate impact of bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) or grain aphid (Sitobion avenae F.) herbivory on expression of genes related to ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in seedlings of six maize varieties (Ambrozja, Nana, Tasty Sweet, Touran, Waza, Złota Karłowa), differing in resistance to the cereal aphids. Relative expression of sixteen maize genes encoding isoenzymes of ascorbate peroxidase (APX1, APX2, APX3, APX4, APX5, APX6, APX7), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR1, MDHAR2, MDHAR3, MDHAR4), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1, DHAR2, DHAR3) and glutathione reductase (GR1, GR2) was quantified. Furthermore, effect of hemipterans’ attack on activity of APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR enzymes, and the content of reduced and oxidized ascorbate and glutathione in maize plants were assessed. Seedling leaves of more resistant Z. mays varieties responded higher elevations in abundance of target transcripts. In addition, earlier and stronger aphid-triggered changes in activity of APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR enzymes, and greater modulations in amount of the analyzed antioxidative metabolites were detected in foliar tissues of highly resistant Ambrozja genotype in relation to susceptible Tasty Sweet plants. PMID:26907270

  8. High resistance to helium embrittlement in reduced activation martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Kasada, R.; Morishita, K.; Sugano, R.; Hasegawa, A.; Abe, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Matsui, H.; Yoshida, N.; Wirth, B. D.; Rubia, T. D.

    2002-12-01

    Reduced activation martensitic steels (RAMSs) are the prime candidate structural material for the DEMO reactor and beyond where the material has been considered to suffer severe embrittlement caused by high-dose neutron irradiation and several thousands appm of transmutated helium. However, recent several works show high resistance to helium embrittlement of RAMS. Good performance of RAMS in the presence of rather high concentration of helium is considered to be due to high trapping capacity for helium atoms in the martensitic structure that consists of dislocations, lath boundaries, grain boundaries and carbide/matrix interfaces. To make clear the role of dislocations in trapping helium, thermal helium desorption spectra were measured for iron specimens annealed at different temperatures after cold work. A desorption peak, which increased its height with increasing dislocation density, was observed at around 550 °C, suggesting that dislocations trap helium atoms. A molecular dynamics simulation study for investigating the helium trapping behavior at helium-vacancy complexes suggests that helium is rather strongly bound to the complexes and increases the binding energy of vacancy to the complex, resulting in increasing stability of the complexes at elevated temperatures by reducing thermal emission of vacancies.

  9. Reduced Switching Frequency Active Harmonic Elimination for Multilevel Converters

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Zhong; Tolbert, Leon M; Chiasson, John N; Ozpineci, Burak

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a reduced switching-frequency active-harmonic-elimination method (RAHEM) to eliminate any number of specific order harmonics of multilevel converters. First, resultant theory is applied to transcendental equations to eliminate low-order harmonics and to determine switching angles for a fundamental frequency-switching scheme. Next, based on the number of harmonics to be eliminated, Newton climbing method is applied to transcendental equations to eliminate high-order harmonics and to determine switching angles for the fundamental frequency-switching scheme. Third, the magnitudes and phases of the residual lower order harmonics are computed, generated, and subtracted from the original voltage waveform to eliminate these low-order harmonics. Compared to the active-harmonic-elimination method (AHEM), which generates square waves to cancel high-order harmonics, RAHEM has lower switching frequency. The simulation results show that the method can effectively eliminate all the specific harmonics, and a low total harmonic distortion (THD) near sine wave is produced. An experimental 11-level H-bridge multilevel converter with a field-programmable gate-array controller is employed to experimentally validate the method. The experimental results show that RAHEM does effectively eliminate any number of specific harmonics, and the output voltage waveform has low switching frequency and low THD.

  10. α-Lipoic acid protects against the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by cadmium in HepG2 cells through regeneration of glutathione by glutathione reductase via Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunli; Zhou, Xue; Zhang, Jiayu; Wang, Jiachun; Xie, Hong; Wu, Zhigang

    2016-07-01

    α-Lipoic acid (α-LA) is a potent natural antioxidant, which is capable of regenerating glutathione (GSH). However, the mechanisms by which α-LA regenerates reduced glutathione (rGSH) via the reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) by glutathione reductase (GR) are still not well understood. In the present study, we investigated if α-LA replenished rGSH by GR via Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway in cadmium-treated HepG2 cells. We found that α-LA antagonized the oxidative damage and alleviated the cytotoxicity in cadmium-induced HepG2 cells by regeneration of rGSH. α-LA regenerated rGSH by activating Nrf2 signaling pathway via promoting the nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which upregulates the transcription of GR, and thus increased the activity of GR. Our results indicated that α-LA was an effective agent to antagonize the oxidative stress and alleviate the cytotoxicity in cadmium-treated HepG2 cells by regenerating rGSH through activating Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  11. α-Lipoic acid protects against the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by cadmium in HepG2 cells through regeneration of glutathione by glutathione reductase via Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunli; Zhou, Xue; Zhang, Jiayu; Wang, Jiachun; Xie, Hong; Wu, Zhigang

    2016-07-01

    α-Lipoic acid (α-LA) is a potent natural antioxidant, which is capable of regenerating glutathione (GSH). However, the mechanisms by which α-LA regenerates reduced glutathione (rGSH) via the reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) by glutathione reductase (GR) are still not well understood. In the present study, we investigated if α-LA replenished rGSH by GR via Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway in cadmium-treated HepG2 cells. We found that α-LA antagonized the oxidative damage and alleviated the cytotoxicity in cadmium-induced HepG2 cells by regeneration of rGSH. α-LA regenerated rGSH by activating Nrf2 signaling pathway via promoting the nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which upregulates the transcription of GR, and thus increased the activity of GR. Our results indicated that α-LA was an effective agent to antagonize the oxidative stress and alleviate the cytotoxicity in cadmium-treated HepG2 cells by regenerating rGSH through activating Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:27343752

  12. Determination of muscle activity during running at reduced body weight.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, Jaco; Scharf, Jennifer; Forrest, Dana; Dufek, Janet S; Masumoto, K; Mercer, J A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how lower extremity muscles are influenced by body weight support during running at different speeds. Nine participants (age 24 ± 2 years, height 1.75 ± 0.12 m, mass 73.5 ± 15.7 kg) ran at 100%, 115%, and 125% of preferred speed at 100%, 90%, 80%, 70%, and 60% of body weight on a treadmill that provided body weight support. Preferred speed was self-selected by each participant and represented a speed that he or she could sustain if going for a 30 min run. Electromyography (EMG) data were recorded (1000 Hz, 1 min) from the bicep femoris, rectus femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius for each condition together with knee angle (electrogoniometer). Average and root mean square EMG were calculated across 30 s. Muscle patterns were determined by smoothing (low-pass filter, 4 Hz) and extracting patterns for 49 cycles defined by consecutive maximum knee flexion angles. Repeated-measures analyses of variance were used to compare average and root mean square across body weight and speeds. Correlations were computed between the 100% speed/100% body weight condition and all other conditions per muscle. There was no interaction between body weight and speed (P > 0.05). Average and root mean square decreased as body weight decreased for all muscles (P < 0.05) and increased across speeds for all muscles (P < 0.05). Correlations for all muscles between conditions were high (range: 0.921-0.999). Although a percent reduction in body weight did not lead to the same reduction in muscle activity, it was clear that reducing body weight leads to a reduction in muscle activity with no changes in muscle activity patterns. PMID:21170806

  13. Structural isomerization of synephrine influences its uptake and ensuing glutathione depletion in rat-isolated cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Luciana Grazziotin; Costa, Vera Marisa; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Carvalho, Félix; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Remião, Fernando

    2011-08-01

    Synephrine is a natural compound, frequently added to ephedra-free dietary supplements for weight-loss, due to its effects as a nonspecific adrenergic agonist. Though only p-synephrine has been documented in plants, the presence of m-synephrine has also been reported in weight-loss products. The use of synephrine in dietary supplements was accompanied by reports of adverse effects, especially at the cardiovascular level. It is well known that the imbalance in cardiac glutathione levels can increase the risk of cardiomyopathy. The present work aimed to study the role of organic cation-mediated transport of m- and p-synephrine and the possibility that p- and m-synephrine induce intracellular changes in glutathione levels in calcium-tolerant freshly isolated cardiomyocytes from adult rat. After a 3 h incubation with 1 mM p- or m-synephrine, the intracellular content of synephrine was measured by gas chromatography/ion trap-mass spectrometry (GC/IT-MS); cell viability and intracellular glutathione levels were also determined. To evaluate the potential protective effects of antioxidants against the adverse effects elicited by m-synephrine, cells were pre-incubated for 30 min with Tiron (100 μM) or N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) (1 mM). To assess the influence of α(1)-adrenoceptors activation in glutathione depletion, a study with prazosin (100 nM) was also performed. The results obtained provide evidence that organic cation transporters OCT3 and OCT1 play a major role in m- and p-synephrine-mediated transport into the cardiomyocytes. The importance of these transporters seems similar for both isomers, although p-synephrine enters more into the cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, only m-synephrine induced intracellular total glutathione (GSHt) and reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion. NAC and Tiron were able to counteract the m-synephrine-induced GSH and GSHt decrease. On the other hand, the incubation with prazosin was not able to change m-synephrine-induced glutathione

  14. A high-performance liquid chromatography-based assay of glutathione transferase omega 1 supported by glutathione or non-physiological reductants.

    PubMed

    Németi, Balázs; Poór, Miklós; Gregus, Zoltán

    2015-01-15

    The unusual glutathione S-transferase GSTO1 reduces, rather than conjugates, endo- and xenobiotics, and its role in diverse cellular processes has been proposed. GSTO1 has been assayed spectrophotometrically by measuring the disappearance of its substrate, S-(4-nitrophenacyl)glutathione (4-NPG), in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol that regenerates GSTO1 from its mixed disulfide. To assay GSTO1 in rat liver cytosol, we have developed a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based procedure with two main advantages: (i) it measures the formation of the 4-NPG reduction product 4-nitroacetophenone, thereby offering improved sensitivity and accuracy, and (ii) it can use glutathione, the physiological reductant of GSTO1, which is impossible to do with the spectrophotometric procedure. Using the new assay, we show that (i) the GSTO1-catalyzed reduction of 4-NPG in rat liver cytosol also yields 1-(4-nitrophenyl)ethanol, whose formation from 4-nitroacetophenone requires NAD(P)H; (ii) the two assays measure comparable activities with 2-mercaptoethanol or tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine used as reductant; (iii) the cytosolic reduction of 4-NPG is inhibited by GSTO1 inhibitors (KT53, 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate, and zinc), although the inhibitory effect is strikingly influenced by the type of reductant in the assay and by the sequence of reductant and inhibitor addition. Characterization of GSTO1 inhibitors with the improved assay provides better understanding of interaction of these chemicals with the enzyme.

  15. Interplay between Superoxide Dismutase, Glutathione Peroxidase, and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma Polymorphisms on the Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease among Han Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Chen, Yen-Ching; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Chang, Chen-Chih; Yen, Chung-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), play an important role in the risk for cancer and metabolic disorders. However, little is known regarding the effect of antioxidant SNPs on renal events. Methods. We prospectively enrolled multicenter patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and those without chronic kidney disease (CKD) of Han Chinese origin, with SOD2 (Val16Ala), GPX1 (Pro197Leu), and PPAR-γ (Pro12Ala, C161T) genotyped. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the significant risk determinants for ESRD. Results. Compared to ESRD patients, non-CKD subjects were more likely to have T allele at SOD2 Val16Ala (p = 0.036) and CC genotype at PPAR-γ Pro12Ala (p = 0.028). Regression analysis showed that TT genotype of SOD2 Val16Ala conferred significantly lower ESRD risk among patients without diabetes (odds ratio 0.699; p = 0.018). GPX1 SNP alone did not alter the risk. We detected significant interactions between SNPs including PPAR-γ Pro12Ala, C161T, and GPX1 regarding the risk of ESRD. Conclusion. This is the first and largest study on the association between adverse renal outcomes and antioxidant SNPs among Han Chinese population. Determination of SOD2 and PPAR-γ SNPs status might assist in ESRD risk estimation. PMID:26881045

  16. The biological importance of glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin backup systems in bivalves during peroxide exposure.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Rafael; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Uliano-Silva, Marcela; Delapedra, Gabriel; Arl, Miriam; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2014-10-01

    Organic peroxide elimination in eukaryotes essentially depends on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx) enzymes, which are supported by their respective electron donors, glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx). This system depends on the ancillary enzymes glutathione reductase (GR) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) to maintain GSH and Trx in their reduced state. This study discusses the biological importance of GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx during cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) exposure in brown mussel Perna perna. ZnCl2 or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenze (CDNB) was used to decrease GR and TrxR activities in gills, as already reported with mammals and bivalves. ZnCl2 exposure lowered GR activity (28%), impaired the in vivo CHP decomposition and decreased the survival rates under CHP exposure. CDNB decreased GR (54%) and TrxR (73%) activities and induced glutathione depletion (99%), promoting diminished peroxide elimination and survival rates at a greater extent than ZnCl2. CDNB also increased the susceptibility of hemocytes to CHP toxicity. Despite being toxic and causing mortality at longer exposures, short (2 h) exposure to CHP promoted an up regulation of GSH (50 and 100 μM CHP) and protein-thiol (100 μM CHP) levels, which was blocked by ZnCl2 or CDNB pre-exposure. Results highlight the biological importance of GSH, GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx activities, contributing to organic peroxides elimination and mussel survival under oxidative challenges. To our knowledge, this is the first work that demonstrates, albeit indirectly, the biological importance of GPx/GR/GSH and Prx/TrxR/Trx systems on in vivo organic peroxide elimination in bivalves.

  17. Tritium retention in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Y.; Abe, S.; Matsuyama, M.; Alimov, V.K.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Bobyr, N.P.; Cherkez, D.I.; Khripunov, B.I.; Golubeva, A.V.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Klimov, N.S.; Chernov, V.M.; Oyaidzu, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are structural material candidates for breeding blankets of future fusion reactors. Therefore, tritium (T) retention in RAFM steels is an important problem in assessing the T inventory of blankets. In this study, specimens of RAFM steels were subjected to irradiation of 20 MeV W ions to 0.54 displacements per atom (dpa), exposure to high flux D plasmas at 400 and 600 K and that to pulsed heat loads. The specimens thus prepared were exposed to DT gas at 473 K. Despite severe modification in the surface morphology, heat loads had negligible effects on T retention. Significant increase in T retention at the surface and/or subsurface was observed after D plasma exposure. However, T trapped at the surface/subsurface layer was easily removed by maintaining the specimens in the air at about 300 K. Displacement damage led to increase in T retention in the bulk due to the trapping effects of defects, and T trapped was stable at 300 K. It was therefore concluded that displacement damages had the largest influence on T retention under the present conditions.

  18. Reducing implant-related infections: active release strategies.

    PubMed

    Hetrick, Evan M; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2006-09-01

    Despite sterilization and aseptic procedures, bacterial infection remains a major impediment to the utility of medical implants including catheters, artificial prosthetics, and subcutaneous sensors. Indwelling devices are responsible for over half of all nosocomial infections, with an estimate of 1 million cases per year (2004) in the United States alone. Device-associated infections are the result of bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation at the implantation site. Although useful for relieving associated systemic infections, conventional antibiotic therapies remain ineffective against biofilms. Unfortunately, the lack of a suitable treatment often leaves extraction of the contaminated device as the only viable option for eliminating the biofilm. Much research has focused on developing polymers that resist bacterial adhesion for use as medical device coatings. This tutorial review focuses on coatings that release antimicrobial agents (i.e., active release strategies) for reducing the incidence of implant-associated infection. Following a brief introduction to bacteria, biofilms, and infection, the development and study of coatings that slowly release antimicrobial agents such as antibiotics, silver ions, antibodies, and nitric oxide are covered. The success and limitations of these strategies are highlighted.

  19. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  20. Exposure to cadmium changes the content of glutathione in maize seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Rauser, W.E.

    1987-04-01

    Glutathione may be involved in the biosynthesis of Cd-binding peptides known as phytochelatins. Five-day old maize seedlings in hydroponic culture were exposed to 3 ..mu..M CdSO/sub 4/ for 2, 6 and 12 hours and 1, 2 and 3 days. Total glutathione (glutathione + glutathione disulfide) in roots and shoots was measured enzymatically. Exposure to Cd for 12 hours or longer reduced root elongation growth. Shoots contained more glutathione than did roots. Within 2 hours of exposure to Cd the glutathione content declined by 47% of control and stayed low for a day. Shoot glutathione decreased gradually and less markedly (by 34% in 24 hours). Following the decline in the first day the glutathione per seedling increased with time in the presence of Cd. Cadmium-binding peptide in roots increased during the recovery phase. If glutathione is a substrate for Cd-binding peptide synthesis, such a use accounts for only part of the decline in root glutathione observed during the first day.

  1. Raloxifene and Tamoxifen Reduce PARP Activity, Cytokine and Oxidative Stress Levels in the Brain and Blood of Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Yazğan, Betül; Yazğan, Yener; Övey, İshak Suat; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that 17β-estradiol (E2) has an antioxidant role on neurological systems in the brain. Raloxifene (RLX) and tamoxifen (TMX) are selective estrogen receptor modulators. An E2 deficiency stimulates mitochondrial functions for promoting apoptosis and increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, RLX and TMX may reduce the mitochondrial ROS production via their antioxidant properties in the brain and erythrocytes of ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We aimed to investigate the effects of E2, RLX, and TMX on oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cytokine production in the brain and erythrocytes of OVX rats.Forty female rats were divided into five groups. The first group was used as a control group. The second group was the OVX group. The third, fourth, and fifth groups were OVX + E2, OVX + TMX, and OVX + RLX groups, respectively. E2, TMX, and RLX were given subcutaneously to the OVX + E2 and OVX + TMX, OVX + RLX groups for 14 days after the ovariectomy respectively.While brain and erythrocyte lipid peroxidation levels were high in the OVX group, they were low in the OVX + E2, OVX + RLX, and OVX + TMX groups. OVX + E2, OVX + RLX, and OVX + TMX treatments increased the lowered glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes and the brain and reduced glutathione and vitamin E concentrations in the brain. β-carotene and vitamin A concentrations in the brain and TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-1β levels in the plasma of the five groups were not significantly changed by the treatments. However, increased plasma IL-4 levels and Western blot results for brain poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in the OVX groups were decreased by E2, TMX, and RLX treatments, although proapoptotic procaspase 3 and 9 activities were increased by the treatments.In conclusion, we observed that E2, RLX, and TMX administrations were beneficial on oxidative stress, inflammation, and PARP levels in the serum and brain of OVX rats by

  2. Glutathione is required for efficient production of infectious picornavirus virions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Allen D. . E-mail: smitha@ba.ars.usda.gov; Dawson, Harry . E-mail: dawsonh@ba.ars.usda.gov

    2006-09-30

    Glutathione is an intracellular reducing agent that helps maintain the redox potential of the cell and is important for immune function. The drug L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) selectively inhibits glutathione synthesis. Glutathione has been reported to block replication of HIV, HSV-1, and influenza virus, whereas cells treated with BSO exhibit increased replication of Sendai virus. Pre-treatment of HeLa cell monolayers with BSO inhibited replication of CVB3, CVB4, and HRV14 with viral titers reduced by approximately 6, 5, and 3 log{sub 1}, respectively. The addition of glutathione ethyl ester, but not dithiothreitol or 2-mercaptoethanol, to the culture medium reversed the inhibitory effect of BSO. Viral RNA and protein synthesis were not inhibited by BSO treatment. Fractionation of lysates from CVB3-infected BSO-treated cells on cesium chloride and sucrose gradients revealed that empty capsids but not mature virions were being produced. The levels of the 5S and 14S assembly intermediates, however, were not affected by BSO treatment. These results demonstrate that glutathione is important for production of mature infectious picornavirus virions.

  3. Bioaccumulation of Cry1Ab Protein from an Herbivore Reduces Anti-Oxidant Enzyme Activities in Two Spider Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Tian, Yun; Tian, Yixing; Song, Qisheng

    2014-01-01

    Cry proteins are expressed in rice lines for lepidopteran pest control. These proteins can be transferred from transgenic rice plants to non-target arthropods, including planthoppers and then to a predatory spider. Movement of Cry proteins through food webs may reduce fitness of non-target arthropods, although recent publications indicated no serious changes in non-target populations. Nonetheless, Cry protein intoxication influences gene expression in Cry-sensitive insects. We posed the hypothesis that Cry protein intoxication influences enzyme activities in spiders acting in tri-trophic food webs. Here we report on the outcomes of experiments designed to test our hypothesis with two spider species. We demonstrated that the movement of CryAb protein from Drosophila culture medium into fruit flies maintained on the CryAb containing medium and from the flies to the spiders Ummeliata insecticeps and Pardosa pseudoannulata. We also show that the activities of three key metabolic enzymes, acetylcholine esterase (AchE), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly influenced in the spiders after feeding on Cry1Ab-containing fruit flies. We infer from these data that Cry proteins originating in transgenic crops impacts non-target arthropods at the physiological and biochemical levels, which may be one mechanism of Cry protein-related reductions in fitness of non-target beneficial predators. PMID:24454741

  4. Glutathione production by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing bifunctional glutathione synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important bioactive substance applied widely in pharmaceutical and food industries. Due to the strong product inhibition in the GSH biosynthetic pathway, high levels of intracellular content, yield and productivity of GSH are difficult to achieve. Recently, a novel bifunctional GSH synthetase was identified to be less sensitive to GSH. A recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing gshF encoding the bifunctional glutathione synthetase of Streptococcus thermophilus was constructed for GSH production. In this study, efficient GSH production using this engineered strain was investigated. The cultivation process was optimized by controlling dissolved oxygen (DO), amino acid addition and glucose feeding. 36.8 mM (11.3 g/L) GSH were formed at a productivity of 2.06 mM/h when the amino acid precursors (75 mM each) were added and glucose was supplied as the sole carbon and energy source. PMID:26586402

  5. Effects of selenium content in green parts of plants on the amount of ATP and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzyme activity at various growth stages of wheat and oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Kaklewski, Krzysztof; Nowak, Janina; Ligocki, Marek

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this experiment, conducted under greenhouse conditions, was to assess the influence of various H(2)SeO(3) concentrations added to soil (0.05, 0.15, and 0.45mMkg(-1)) on selenium and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, and on the activity of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in green parts of wheat and oilseed rape. Selenium uptake by the test plants was found to vary, with content increasing from one developmental stage to the next over four stages of the developmental cycle. At the lowest H(2)SeO(3) dose (0.05mMkg(-1)), the wheat plants took up much more selenium than did the oilseed rape plants, while the amount of selenium taken up at higher doses (0.15 and 0.45mMkg(-1)) was markedly higher in rape. The increasing Se content in the wheat to about 10mgkg(-1) (in the dark) and to about 16mgkg(-1) (in the light) was accompanied by a concurrent increase in the ATP content, which remained unchanged in the light-exposed plants, while clearly decreasing in those kept in the dark. On the other hand, the ATP content of the light-exposed oilseed rape was maintained at a stable level to about 10mg Sekg(-1), following which ATP content was observed to decrease. In contrast, the tendency for the ATP content to decrease appeared immediately in the dark. The increasing plant selenium concentration was accompanied by decreased APX activity in wheat, increased activity in oilseed rape, no major change in the dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activity in oilseed rape and a slight increase in wheat to about 8mg Sekg(-1), followed by a reduction. The glutathione reductase (GR) activity in wheat differed from the activity of DHAR; an increase in the selenium content to about 8mgkg(-1) was accompanied by a distinct reduction, while a significant increase was observed at higher selenium contents; in oilseed rape, the activity was observed to increase slightly within a narrow range of selenium contents (up to 5mgkg(-1)), and to decrease thereafter.

  6. Glutathione transferases in the bioactivation of azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Modén, Olof; Mannervik, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    The prodrug azathioprine is primarily used for maintaining remission in inflammatory bowel disease, but approximately 30% of the patients suffer adverse side effects. The prodrug is activated by glutathione conjugation and release of 6-mercaptopurine, a reaction most efficiently catalyzed by glutathione transferase (GST) A2-2. Among five genotypes of GST A2-2, the variant A2*E has threefold-fourfold higher catalytic efficiency with azathioprine, suggesting that the expression of A2*E could boost 6-mercaptopurine release and adverse side effects in treated patients. Structure-activity studies of the GST A2-2 variants and homologous alpha class GSTs were made to delineate the determinants of high catalytic efficiency compared to other alpha class GSTs. Engineered chimeras identified GST peptide segments of importance, and replacing the corresponding regions in low-activity GSTs by these short segments produced chimeras with higher azathioprine activity. By contrast, H-site mutagenesis led to decreased azathioprine activity when active-site positions 208 and 213 in these favored segments were mutagenized. Alternative substitutions indicated that hydrophobic residues were favored. A pertinent question is whether variant A2*E represents the highest azathioprine activity achievable within the GST structural framework. This issue was addressed by mutagenesis of H-site residues assumed to interact with the substrate based on molecular modeling. The mutants with notably enhanced activities had small or polar residues in the mutated positions. The most active mutant L107G/L108D/F222H displayed a 70-fold enhanced catalytic efficiency with azathioprine. The determination of its structure by X-ray crystallography showed an expanded H-site, suggesting improved accommodation of the transition state for catalysis.

  7. Characterization of the Conformational Alterations, Reduced Anticoagulant Activity, and Enhanced Antiangiogenic Activity of Prelatent Antithrombin*

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Benjamin; Swanson, Richard; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Ramirez, Ben; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G. W.; Olson, Steven T.

    2008-01-01

    A conformationally altered prelatent form of antithrombin that possesses both anticoagulant and antiangiogenic activities is produced during the conversion of native to latent antithrombin (Larsson, H., Akerud, P., Nordling, K., Raub-Segall, E., Claesson-Welsh, L., and Björk, I. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 11996–12002). Here, we show that the previously characterized prelatent antithrombin is a mixture of native antithrombin and a modified, true prelatent antithrombin that are resolvable by heparin-agarose chromatography. Kinetic analyses revealed that prelatent antithrombin is an intermediate in the conversion of native to latent antithrombin whose formation is favored by stabilizing anions of the Hofmeister series. Purified prelatent antithrombin had reduced anticoagulant function compared with native antithrombin, due to a reduced heparin affinity and consequent impaired ability of heparin to either bridge prelatent antithrombin and coagulation proteases in a ternary complex or to induce full conformational activation of the serpin. Significantly, prelatent antithrombin possessed an antiangiogenic activity more potent than that of latent antithrombin, based on the relative abilities of the two forms to inhibit endothelial cell growth. The prelatent form was conformationally altered from native antithrombin as judged from an attenuation of tryptophan fluorescence changes following heparin activation and a reduced thermal stability. The alterations are consistent with the limited structural changes involving strand 1C observed in a prelatent form of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (Dupont, D. M., Blouse, G. E., Hansen, M., Mathiasen, L., Kjelgaard, S., Jensen, J. K., Christensen, A., Gils, A., Declerck, P. J., Andreasen, P. A., and Wind, T. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 36071–36081), since the 1H NMR spectrum, electrophoretic mobility, and proteolytic susceptibility of prelatent antithrombin most resemble those of native rather than those of latent antithrombin

  8. Heparins with reduced anti-coagulant activity reduce myocardial reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Barry, William H; Kennedy, Thomas P

    2011-05-01

    Heparin which is desulfated at the 2-O and 3-O positions (ODSH) has reduced anti-coagulant properties, and reduced interaction with heparin antibodies. Because of the reduced anti-coagulant effect, ODSH can be safely administered to animals and humans intravenously at doses up to 20 mg/kg, resulting in a serum concentration of up to 250µg/ml. Administration of ODSH causes a 35% reduction in infarct size in dogs and pigs subjected to coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion when given 5 min before reperfusion. ODSH has anti-inflamatory effects, manifest as a decrease in neutrophil infiltration into ischemic tissue at high doses, but this effect does not entirely account for the reduction in infarct size. ODSH decreases Na(+) and Ca(2+) loading in isolated cardiac myocytes subjected to simulated ischemia. This effect appears due to an ODSH-induced reduction in an enhanced Na(+) influx via the Na channel in the membrane of cardiac myocyes caused by oxygen radicals generated during ischemia and reperfusion. Reduction in Na(+) influx decreases Ca(2+) loading by reducing Ca2(+) influx via Na/Ca exchange, thus reducing Ca(2+) - dependent reperfusion injury. ODSH does not appear to interact with antibodies to the heparin/platelet factor 4 complex, and does not cause heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Because of these therapeutic and safety considerations, ODSH would appear to be a promising heparin derivative for prevention of reperfusion injury in humans undergoing thrombolytic or catheter-based reperfusion for acute myocardial infarction. The review article discussed the use of heparin and the discussion of some of the important patents, including: US6489311; US7478358; PCTUS2008070836 and PCTUS2009037836.

  9. Formation of an adduct between fosfomycin and glutathione: a new mechanism of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Arca, P; Rico, M; Braña, A F; Villar, C J; Hardisson, C; Suárez, J E

    1988-01-01

    Plasmid-borne resistance to fosfomycin in bacteria is due to modification of the antibiotic molecule by a glutathione S-transferase that catalyzes the formation of a covalent bond between the sulfhydryl residue of the cysteine in glutathione and the C-1 of fosfomycin. This reaction results in opening of the epoxide ring of the antibiotic to form an inactive adduct, the structure of which was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance. Dialyzed extracts prepared from resistant Escherichia coli strains were unable to modify fosfomycin unless exogenous glutathione was added to the reaction mixtures. Similarly, mutants defective in glutathione biosynthesis were susceptible to fosfomycin, despite harboring a resistance plasmid. Extracts of resistant but not susceptible strains could join glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, confirming the nature of the enzymatic activity. Adduct formation appeared to be specific for glutathione: none of the other thiols tested (cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, and dithiothreitol) could modify fosfomycin. PMID:3056239

  10. Three-dimensional structure of a Bombyx mori Omega-class glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Suzuki, Mamoru; Higashiura, Akifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-09-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major phase II detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here we report the crystal structure of an Omega-class glutathione transferase of Bombyx mori, bmGSTO, to gain insight into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of bmGSTO complexed with glutathione determined at a resolution of 2.5Å reveals that it exists as a dimer and is structurally similar to Omega-class GSTs with respect to its secondary and tertiary structures. Analysis of a complex between bmGSTO and glutathione showed that bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site (G-site). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTO mutants indicated that amino acid residues Leu62, Lys65, Lys77, Val78, Glu91 and Ser92 in the G-site contribute to catalytic activity.

  11. Structural characterization of the catalytic site of a Nilaparvata lugens delta-class glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a major class of detoxification enzymes that play a central role in the defense against environmental toxicants and oxidative stress. Here, we studied the crystal structure of a delta-class glutathione transferase from Nilaparvata lugens, nlGSTD, to gain insights into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of nlGSTD in complex with glutathione, determined at a resolution of 1.7Å, revealed that it exists as a dimer and its secondary and tertiary structures are similar to those of other delta-class GSTs. Analysis of a complex between nlGSTD and glutathione showed that the bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of nlGSTD mutants indicated that amino acid residues Ser11, His52, Glu66, and Phe119 contribute to catalytic activity.

  12. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity. PMID:24927388

  13. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity.

  14. Oxadiazole 2-oxides are toxic to the human hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum, however glutathione reductase is not the primary target

    PubMed Central

    Treger, Rebecca S.; Cook, Aaron; Rai, Ganesha; Maloney, David J.; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Thomas, Craig J.; Williams, David L.; Cappello, Michael; Vermeire, Jon J.

    2012-01-01

    Hookworm disease, characterized by severe anemia and cognitive and growth delays, currently affects an estimated 740 million people worldwide. Despite the prevalence of this parasitic disease, few effective drug therapies are in use today, and the heavy reliance upon benzimidazoles highlights the need for the development of novel chemotherapies. Recent work with the trematode parasite Schistosoma mansoni has identified oxadiazole 2-oxides as effective antischistosomal compounds that function by targeting and inhibiting the antioxidant enzyme, thioredoxin glutathione reductase. In this study, a related enzyme, glutathione reductase, from the human hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum was identified and characterized, and its in vitro activity in the presence of the oxadiazole 2-oxides was analyzed. Ex vivo worm killing assays were also conducted to establish the relationship between a given compound’s effect upon worm survival and inhibition of recombinant glutathione reductase (rAceGR). Finally, the in vivo anthelminthic efficacy of furoxan (Fx) was assessed in the hamster model of hookworm infection. The predicted amino acid sequence of AceGR contained a prototypical glutathione reductase active site sequence, but no thioredoxin reductase consensus sequences, suggesting that the glutathione and thioredoxin pathways of A. ceylanicum are distinct. Although 10 of the 42 oxadiazole 2-oxides tested inhibited rAceGR activity by at least 50%, and 15 compounds were toxic to parasites ex vivo, little overlap existed between these two results. We therefore suggest that AceGR is not the primary target of the oxadiazole 2-oxides in effecting parasite death. Lastly, oral treatment of A. ceylanicum infected hamsters with furoxan resulted in significantly improved weight gains and reduced intestinal worm burdens compared to vehicle treated controls, supporting continued development of this molecule as a novel anthelminthic. PMID:22844653

  15. Diallyl disulphide depletes glutathione in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lemar, Katey M.; Aon, Miguel A.; Cortassa, Sonia; O’Rourke, Brian; T. Müller, Carsten; Lloyd, David

    2008-01-01

    Using two-photon scanning laser microscopy, we investigated the effect of an Allium sativum (garlic) constituent, diallyl disulphide (DADS), on key physiological functions of the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. A short 30 min exposure to 0.5 mm DADS followed by removal induced 70% cell death (50% necrotic, 20% apoptotic) within 2 h, increasing to 75% after 4 h. The early intracellular events associated with DADS-induced cell death were monitored with two-photon fluorescence microscopy to track mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NADH or reduced glutathione (GSH) under aerobic conditions. DADS treatment decreased intracellular GSH and elevated intracellular ROS levels. Additionally, DADS induced a marked decrease of ΔΨm and lowered respiration in cell suspensions and isolated mitochondria. In vitro kinetic experiments in cell-free extracts suggest that glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is one of the intracellular targets of DADS. Additional targets were also identified, including inhibition of a site or sites between complexes II-IV in the electron transport chain, as well as the mitochondrial ATP-synthase. The results indicate that DADS is an effective antifungal agent able to trigger cell death in Candida, most probably by eliciting oxidative stress as a consequence of thiol depletion and impaired mitochondrial function. PMID:17534841

  16. Anxiety modulates cognitive deficits in a perinatal glutathione deficit animal model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Preissmann, D; Dépré, M; Schenk, F; Gisquet-Verrier, P

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated long-term repercussion of early glutathione deficit by l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) injections as a rat model of schizophrenia. BSO rats were tested through various behavioral tasks requiring animals to take into account previously delivered information. We showed that relative to controls, BSO rats (1) were less active and more anxious in an Elevated Plus Maze test, allowing us to split them into two subgroups with high and low anxiety levels; (2) demonstrated normal abilities of behavioral flexibility tested with a rat-adapted version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), with even higher abilities in anxious BSO rats suggesting reduced interference of previously acquired rules; (3) did not forage normally in radial arm mazes and mainly used clockwise strategies; (4) exhibited a lack of habituation during a startle response task; and (5) showed a normal prepulse inhibition of the startle response (PPI) and a normal conditioned taste aversion (CTA). All these results indicate that early glutathione deficit provokes persistent changes in adulthood and improves the validity of this animal model of schizophrenia. They further suggest difficulties binding temporally separated events (WCST), except when the salience of this information is very strong (CTA). We propose that the transient glutathione deficit during cerebral development could alter a "cognitive binding" process in interaction with the emotional state that could possibly account for the disruption of integrative function that characterizes schizophrenia. PMID:27485658

  17. Increased glutathione contributes to stress tolerance and global translational changes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mei-Chun; Ko, Ko; Chang, Wan-Ling; Kuo, Wen-Chieh; Chen, Guan-Hong; Lin, Tsan-Piao

    2015-09-01

    Although glutathione is well known for its reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging function and plays a protective role in biotic stress, its regulatory function in abiotic stress still remains to be elucidated. Our previous study showed that exogenously applied reduced glutathione (GSH) could improve abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. Here, we report that endogenously increased GSH also conferred tolerance to drought and salt stress in Arabidopsis. Moreover, both exogenous and endogenous GSH delayed senescence and flowering time. Polysomal profiling results showed that global translation was enhanced after GSH treatment and by the induced increase of GSH level by salt stress. By performing transcriptomic analyses of steady-state and polysome-bound mRNAs in GSH-treated plants, we reveal that GSH has a substantial impact on translation. Translational changes induced by GSH treatment target numerous hormones and stress signaling molecules, which might contribute to the enhanced stress tolerance in GSH-treated plants. Our translatome analysis also revealed that abscisic acid (ABA), auxin and jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis, as well as signaling genes, were activated during GSH treatment, which has not been reported in previously published transcriptomic data. Together, our data suggest that the increased glutathione level results in stress tolerance and global translational changes. PMID:26213235

  18. Anxiety modulates cognitive deficits in a perinatal glutathione deficit animal model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Preissmann, D; Dépré, M; Schenk, F; Gisquet-Verrier, P

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated long-term repercussion of early glutathione deficit by l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) injections as a rat model of schizophrenia. BSO rats were tested through various behavioral tasks requiring animals to take into account previously delivered information. We showed that relative to controls, BSO rats (1) were less active and more anxious in an Elevated Plus Maze test, allowing us to split them into two subgroups with high and low anxiety levels; (2) demonstrated normal abilities of behavioral flexibility tested with a rat-adapted version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), with even higher abilities in anxious BSO rats suggesting reduced interference of previously acquired rules; (3) did not forage normally in radial arm mazes and mainly used clockwise strategies; (4) exhibited a lack of habituation during a startle response task; and (5) showed a normal prepulse inhibition of the startle response (PPI) and a normal conditioned taste aversion (CTA). All these results indicate that early glutathione deficit provokes persistent changes in adulthood and improves the validity of this animal model of schizophrenia. They further suggest difficulties binding temporally separated events (WCST), except when the salience of this information is very strong (CTA). We propose that the transient glutathione deficit during cerebral development could alter a "cognitive binding" process in interaction with the emotional state that could possibly account for the disruption of integrative function that characterizes schizophrenia.

  19. Antenna-specific glutathione S-transferase in male silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang; Hu, Xiao-Ming; Zhong, Xiao-Wu; Chen, Quan-Mei; Xia, Qing-You; Zhao, Ping

    2014-04-29

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that are widely distributed in different species. GSTs detoxify exogenous and endogenous substances by conjugation to reduced glutathione. We characterized BmGSTD4, an antenna-specific GST, in male silkmoths. The full-length mRNA of Bmgstd4 was cloned by RACE-PCR and contained an open reading frame of 738 bp encoding a 245 amino acid protein. The antenna specificity of BmGSTD4 was validated at the mRNA and protein levels and BmGSTD4 was shown to localize in the sensillum of male silkmoth antennae. Homology modeling and multi-sequence alignment suggested that BmGSTD4 was a typical GST belonging to the δ class and had a canonical GST fold with a conserved N-terminus, including a glutathione-binding site and a C-terminal domain harboring a hydrophobic substrate-binding site. Restricted expression of BmGSTD4 in silkmoth antennae combined with GST activity suggested that BmGSTD4 was involved in the detoxification of harmful chemicals.

  20. Piano Playing Reduces Stress More than Other Creative Art Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyoshima, Kumiko; Fukui, Hajime; Kuda, Kiyoto

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the physiological effects of creative art activities. In this study, the effects of creative art activities on human stress were investigated, and their effects were compared in 57 healthy college students (27 males and 30 females). Subjects were divided into four groups, each of which participated in 30-minute…

  1. Active Coping Reduces Reports of Pain from Childbirth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined pain and negative moods during labor in relation to instructions to monitor labor contractions and LaMaze class attendance. In Study 1, pain and negative moods showed sharp decline at Stage 2 (active labor) for women who monitored and LaMaze participants; in Study 2, LaMaze participants reported decline in pain during active labor and…

  2. Effects of Dietary Pb and Cd and Their Combination on Glutathion-S-Transferase and Catalase Enzyme Activities in Digestive Gland and Foot of the Green Garden Snail, Cantareus apertus (Born, 1778).

    PubMed

    Mleiki, Anwar; Marigómez, Ionan; El Menif, Najoua Trigui

    2015-06-01

    The present study was focused on the assessment of glutathion-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) activities in the digestive gland and foot of the land snail, Cantareus apertus (Born, 1778), exposed to different nominal dietary concentrations of Pb (25 and 2500 mg Pb/Kg), Cd (5 and 100 mg Cd/Kg) and their combination (25 mg Pb + 5 mg Cd/Kg and 2500 mg Pb + 100 mg Cd/Kg) for 7 and 60 days. GST activity was significantly increased after 7 and 60 days exposure to the highest concentration of Pb, Cd and their combination. The levels of CAT activity were different in the two studied organs but in both cases it resulted increased after 7 and 60 days of exposure, which varied significantly between metals and dietary concentrations. Therefore, it can be concluded that GST and CAT enzymes in digestive gland and foot of C. apertus are responsive to Cd, Pb and their combination, whereby they are suitable to be included in a battery of biomarkers for ecosystem health assessment in metal polluted soils using this species as sentinel.

  3. Cheminformatics Models for Inhibitors of Schistosoma mansoni Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sonam; Jamal, Salma; Open Source Drug Discovery Consortium

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by a parasite Schistosoma mansoni and affects over 200 million annually. There is an urgent need to discover novel therapeutic options to control the disease with the recent emergence of drug resistance. The multifunctional protein, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), an essential enzyme for the survival of the pathogen in the redox environment has been actively explored as a potential drug target. The recent availability of small-molecule screening datasets against this target provides a unique opportunity to learn molecular properties and apply computational models for discovery of activities in large molecular libraries. Such a prioritisation approach could have the potential to reduce the cost of failures in lead discovery. A supervised learning approach was employed to develop a cost sensitive classification model to evaluate the biological activity of the molecules. Random forest was identified to be the best classifier among all the classifiers with an accuracy of around 80 percent. Independent analysis using a maximally occurring substructure analysis revealed 10 highly enriched scaffolds in the actives dataset and their docking against was also performed. We show that a combined approach of machine learning and other cheminformatics approaches such as substructure comparison and molecular docking is efficient to prioritise molecules from large molecular datasets. PMID:25629082

  4. Competition between glutathione and protein thiols for disulphide-bond formation.

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, J W; Kaiser, C A

    1999-07-01

    It has long been assumed that the oxidized form of glutathione, the tripeptide glutamate-cysteine-glycine, is a source of oxidizing equivalents needed for the formation of disulphide bonds in proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), although the in vivo function of glutathione in the ER has never been studied directly. Here we show that the major pathway for oxidation in the yeast ER, defined by the protein Ero1, is responsible for the oxidation of both glutathione and protein thiols. However, mutation and overexpression studies show that glutathione competes with protein thiols for the oxidizing machinery. Thus, contrary to expectation, cellular glutathione contributes net reducing equivalents to the ER; these reducing equivalents can buffer the ER against transient hyperoxidizing conditions. PMID:10559898

  5. Reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetyl cysteine reduces methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia without affecting motor activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Bortell, Nikki; Galmozzi, Andrea; Conti, Bruno; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia G.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a potentially lethal side effect of Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse, which involves the participation of peripheral thermogenic sites such as the Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT). In a previous study we found that the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) can prevent the high increase in temperature in a mouse model of Meth-hyperthermia. Here, we have further explored the ability of NAC to modulate Meth-induced hyperthermia in correlation with changes in BAT. We found that NAC treatment in controls causes hypothermia, and, when administered prior or upon the onset of Meth-induced hyperthermia, can ameliorate the temperature increase and preserve mitochondrial numbers and integrity, without affecting locomotor activity. This was different from Dantrolene, which decreased motor activity without affecting temperature. The effects of NAC were seen in spite of its inability to recover the decrease of mitochondrial superoxide induced in BAT by Meth. In addition, NAC did not prevent the Meth-induced decrease of BAT glutathione. Treatment with S-adenosyl-L-methionine, which improves glutathione activity, had an effect in ameliorating Meth-induced hyperthermia, but also modulated motor activity. This suggests a role for the remaining glutathione for controlling temperature. However, the mechanism by which NAC operates is independent of glutathione levels in BAT and specific to temperature. Our results show that, in spite of the absence of a clear mechanism of action, NAC is a pharmacological tool to examine the dissociation between Meth-induced hyperthermia and motor activity, and a drug of potential utility in treating the hyperthermia associated with Meth-abuse. PMID:26346736

  6. Association of mercury and selenium with altered glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in diving ducks from the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Marn, C.M.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    Adult male greater scaup (Aythya marila) (GS), surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)(SS), and ruddy ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) (RD) were collected from Suisun Bay and coastal Tomales Bay in the greater San Francisco Bay area to assess exposure to inorganic contaminants. Hepatic selenium (Se) concentrations were highest in GS (geometric mean = 67 ppm, dw) and SS (119 ppm) in Suisun Bay, whereas hepatic mercury (Hg) was highest (19 ppm) in GS and SS from Tomales Bay. Hepatic Se and Hg were lower in RD and did not differ between locations. Hepatic supernatants were assayed for enzymes related to glutathione metabolism and antioxidant activity including: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-peroxidase), glutathione reductase (GSSG-reductase), and glutathione-S-transferase (GSH-transferase). GSH-peroxidase activity was higher in SS and RD, and G-6-PDH higher in GS and SS from Suisun Bay than Tomales Bay. GSSG-reductase was higher in SS from Suisun Bay. The ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) was greater in all species from Tomales Bay. The following significant relationships were found in one or more species with increasing hepatic Hg concentration: lower body, liver and heart weights; decreased hepatic GSH concentration, G-6-PDH and GSH-peroxidase activities; increased ratio of GSSG to GSH, and increased GSSG-reductase activity. With increasing hepatic Se concentration, GSH-peroxidase increased but GSH decreased. It is concluded that measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. Concentrations of mercury and selenium and variable affected have been associated with adverse effects on reproduction and neurological function in experimental studies with mallards.

  7. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ben Ameur, Salma; Aloulou, Hajer; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Kamoun, Thouraya; Kaabachi, Naziha; Hachicha, Mongia

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare disorder of glutathione metabolism with varying clinical severity. Patients may present with hemolytic anemia alone or together with acidosis and central nervous system impairment. Diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detection of elevated concentrations of 5-oxoproline in urine and low glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes or cultured skin fibroblasts. The prognosis seems to depend on early diagnosis and treatment. We report a 4 months old Tunisian male infant who presented with severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap and hemolytic anemia. High level of 5-oxoproline was detected in her urine and diagnosis of GSSD was made. Treatment consists of the correction of acidosis, blood transfusion, and supplementation with antioxidants. He died of severe metabolic acidosis and sepsis at the age of 15 months.

  8. Effect of Zirconium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Glutathione Peroxidase Enzyme in PC12 and N2a Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Asadpour, Elham; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Boroushaki, Mohammad Taher

    2014-01-01

    Today, special attention is paid to the use of zirconium dioxide nanoparticle (nano-ZrO2), a neutral bioceramic metal, particularly for drug and gene delivery in medicine. However, there are some reports implying that use of nano-ZrO2 is associated with cytotoxic effects like inhibiting the cell proliferation, DNA damage and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined whether nano-ZrO2 alters cell viability and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in two neuronal cell lines. The PC12 and N2a cells were cultured in the absence or presence of varying concentrations (31.25-2000 µg/mL) of nano-ZrO2 for 12, 24 or 48 h. The cell viability was evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay and GPx activity was determined by quantifying the rate of oxidation of the reduced glutathione to the oxidized glutathione. Nano-ZrO2 caused a significant reduction in cell viability and GPx activity after 12, 24 and 48 h, as compared with control group. These effects were concentration dependent and started from 250 µg/mL. The present study demonstrated that nano-ZrO2, at concentrations of > 250 µg/mL, has antiproliferative effects via reducing the cell defense mechanism against oxidative stress. PMID:25587301

  9. Subnormothermic Perfusion in the Isolated Rat Liver Preserves the Antioxidant Glutathione and Enhances the Function of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Norma; Sanchez-Nuño, Sergio; Dewey, Shannamar; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of oxidative stress is suggested to be one of the main mechanisms to explain the benefits of subnormothermic perfusion against ischemic liver damage. In this study we investigated the early cellular mechanisms induced in isolated rat livers after 15 min perfusion at temperatures ranging from normothermia (37°C) to subnormothermia (26°C and 22°C). Subnormothermic perfusion was found to maintain hepatic viability. Perfusion at 22°C raised reduced glutathione levels and the activity of glutathione reductase; however, lipid and protein oxidation still occurred as determined by malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts, and advanced oxidation protein products. In livers perfused at 22°C the lysosomal and ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) were both activated. The 26S chymotrypsin-like (β5) proteasome activity was significantly increased in the 26°C (46%) and 22°C (42%) groups. The increased proteasome activity may be due to increased Rpt6 Ser120 phosphorylation, which is known to enhance 26S proteasome activity. Together, our results indicate that the early events produced by subnormothermic perfusion in the liver can induce oxidative stress concomitantly with antioxidant glutathione preservation and enhanced function of the lysosomal and UPS systems. Thus, a brief hypothermia could trigger antioxidant mechanisms and may be functioning as a preconditioning stimulus. PMID:27800122

  10. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cel