Science.gov

Sample records for activity remain largely

  1. Activated chemoreceptor arrays remain intact and hexagonally packed

    PubMed Central

    Briegel, Ariane; Beeby, Morgan; Thanbichler, Martin; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Bacterial chemoreceptors cluster into exquisitively sensitive, tunable, highly ordered, polar arrays. While these arrays serve as paradigms of cell signalling in general, it remains unclear what conformational changes transduce signals from the periplasmic tips, where attractants and repellents bind, to the cytoplasmic signalling domains. Conflicting reports support and contest the hypothesis that activation causes large changes in the packing arrangement of the arrays, up to and including their complete disassembly. Using electron cryotomography, here we show that in Caulobacter crescentus, chemoreceptor arrays in cells grown in different media and immediately after exposure to the attractant galactose all exhibit the same 12 nm hexagonal packing arrangement, array size and other structural parameters. ΔcheB and ΔcheR mutants mimicking attractant- or repellent-bound states prior to adaptation also show the same lattice structure. We conclude that signal transduction and amplification must be accomplished through only small, nanoscale conformational changes. PMID:21992450

  2. Spot market activity remains weak as prices continue to fall

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    A summary of financial data for the uranium spot market in November 1996 is provided. Price ranges for the restricted and unrestricted markets, conversion, and separative work are listed, and total market volume and new contracts are noted. Transactions made are briefly described. Deals made and pending in the spot concentrates, medium and long-term, conversion, and markets are listed for U.S. and non-U.S. buyers. Spot market activity increased in November with just over 1.0 million lbs of U3O8 equivalent being transacted compared to October`s total of 530,000 lbs of U3O8 equivalent. The restricted uranium spot market price range slipped from $15.50-$15.70/lb U3O8 last month to $14.85/lb - $15.25/lb U3O8 this month. The unrestricted uranium spot market price range also slipped to $14.85/lb - $15.00/lb this month from $15.00/lb - $15.45/lb in October. Spot prices for conversion and separative work units remained at their October levels.

  3. Field Documentation of Unusual Post-Mortem Arthropod Activity on Human Remains.

    PubMed

    Pechal, Jennifer L; Benbow, M Eric; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Crippen, Tawni L; Tarone, Aaron M; Singh, Baneshwar; Lenhart, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    During a forensic investigation, the presence of physical marks on human remains can influence the interpretation of events related to the death of an individual. Some tissue injury on human remains can be misinterpreted as ante- or peri-mortem wounds by an investigator when in reality the markings resulted from post-mortem arthropod activity. Unusual entomological data were collected during a study examining the decomposition of a set of human remains in San Marcos, Texas. An adult female Pediodectes haldemani (Girard) (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) and an Armadillidium cf. vulgare (Isopoda: Armadilidiidae) were documented feeding on the remains. Both arthropods produced physical marks or artifacts on the remains that could be misinterpreted as attack, abuse, neglect, or torture. Additionally, red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), were observed constructing structures in the mark produced by the P. haldemani feeding. These observations provide insight into the potential of post-mortem arthropod damage to human remains, which previously had not been described for these taxa, and therefore, physical artifacts on any remains found in similar circumstances may result from arthropod activity and not ante- or peri-mortem wounds. PMID:26336287

  4. Remaining Uncertainties in the Causes of Past and Future Atlantic Hurricane Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossin, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    There is no debate that hurricane activity in the North Atlantic has increased substantially since the relatively quiescent period of the 1970s and 1980s, but there is still uncertainty in the dominant cause of the increase. Increases in anthropogenic greenhouse gases (aGHG) have contributed to the observed increase in tropical sea surface temperatures (SST) over the past century, while shorter-term decadal variability in regions where hurricanes form and track is generally dominated by 1) internal variability, 2) natural factors such as volcanic eruptions and mineral aerosol variability, and 3) changes in anthropogenic aerosols. Direct SST warming from globally well-mixed aGHG is understood to have a much smaller effect on hurricane formation and intensification compared to the effect of regional warming due to changes in the three factors noted above. While most recent papers implicate both internal and external anthropogenic causes for the presently heightened Atlantic hurricane activity, some show that internal variability dominates and others show that anthropogenic factors dominate. In the Atlantic, model projection-based consensus indicates no change in storm frequency over the next century but the uncertainty is large and spans -50% to +50%. Mean storm intensity and rainfall rates are projected to increase with continued warming, and the models tend to agree better when projecting these measures of activity. Models that are capable of producing very strong hurricanes usually project increases in the frequency of the most intense hurricanes. This measure is highly relevant to physical and societal impacts. In the Atlantic, model-based consensus indicates substantial increases in the strongest hurricanes, but the uncertainty is large and spans -100% to +200% change over the next century.

  5. Silent Students' Participation in a Large Active Learning Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Active learning in large science classrooms furthers opportunities for students to engage in the content and in meaningful learning, yet students can still remain anonymously silent. This study aims to understand the impact of active learning on these silent students in a large General Chemistry course taught via Socratic questioning and…

  6. The active outer shell of Earth: What remains to be explored in carbon and life interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boetius, Antje

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in methods and technologies have allowed us to explore the interaction between life and abiotic resources from nano to megascales in space and time, and this has set new challenges to the geosciences. This lecture aims at discussing key biological factors in the question of the dynamics of carbon reservoirs and fluxes on Earth, and the challenges to the geosciences to incorporate and further this knowledge. Humans themselves as one such biological factor have considerably changed the dynamics of carbon and other elements, with repercussions to most other life forms on Earth. Which other life forms shape carbon fluxes and reservoirs, and what do we know about their key traits in catalyzing geochemical reactions, their past and their future? I will use case studies from my own research field - geobiology of the oceans and the cryosphere - and from other geoscience areas to highlight the considerable non-linearity introduced by life to element fluxes and the environment; and discuss advances but also gaps in knowledge and research approaches concerning assessing and predicting carbon transformations in the active outer shell of Earth.

  7. Pros: concurrent chemo-radiotherapy remains the ideal treatment in fit patients with large volume unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rabatic, Bryan M.

    2016-01-01

    The debate of treating stage III, large volume non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with definitive chemo-radiotherapy continues to be waged. A physically fit patient, having large volume and unresectable disease is the ideal candidate for this treatment approach. The ability of this patient population to successfully complete, and thereby benefit from an aggressive, combined treatment to improve local control and survival, drives the recommendation of treating oncologists for this approach. Until a phase III trial proves otherwise, concurrent chemo-radiotherapy will remain the ideal treatment for fit patients having large volume unresectable stage III NSCLC. PMID:27186513

  8. Model of complex chiral drug metabolic systems and numerical simulation of the remaining chirality toward analysis of dynamical pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Yoshiyuki; Asahi, Toru

    2015-05-21

    In this study, systems of complicated pathways involved in chiral drug metabolism were investigated. The development of chiral drugs resulted in significant improvement in the remedies available for the treatment of various severe sicknesses. Enantiopure drugs undergo various biological transformations that involve chiral inversion and thus result in the generation of multiple enantiomeric metabolites. Identification of the specific active substances determining a given drug׳s efficacy among such a mixture of different metabolites remains a challenge. To comprehend this complexity, we constructed a mathematical model representing the complicated metabolic pathways simultaneously involving chiral inversion. Moreover, this model is applied to the metabolism of thalidomide, which has recently been revived as a potentially effective prescription drug for a number of intractable diseases. The numerical simulation results indicate that retained chirality in the metabolites reflects the original chirality of the unmetabolized drug, and a higher level of enantiomeric purity is preserved during spontaneous degradation. In addition, chirality remaining after equilibration is directly related to the rate constant not only for chiral inversion but also for generation and degradation. Furthermore, the retention of chirality is quantitatively predictable using this combination of kinetic parameters. Our simulation results well explain the behavior of thalidomide in the practical biological experimental data. Therefore, this model promises a comprehensive understanding of dynamic metabolic systems involving chiral drugs that express multiple enantiospecific drug efficacies. PMID:25791284

  9. Patterns of seismic activity preceding large earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Bruce E.; Carlson, J. M.; Langer, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    A mechanical model of seismic faults is employed to investigate the seismic activities that occur prior to major events. The block-and-spring model dynamically generates a statistical distribution of smaller slipping events that precede large events, and the results satisfy the Gutenberg-Richter law. The scaling behavior during a loading cycle suggests small but systematic variations in space and time with maximum activity acceleration near the future epicenter. Activity patterns inferred from data on seismicity in California demonstrate a regional aspect; increased activity in certain areas are found to precede major earthquake events. One example is given regarding the Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989 which is located near a fault section associated with increased activity levels.

  10. Large active retrodirective arrays for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    An active retrodirective array (ARA) transmits a beam toward the apparent source of an illuminating signal called the pilot. The term active implies that the array produces, not merely reflects, RF power. Retrodirectivity is achieved by retransmitting from each element of the array a signal whose phase is the conjugate of that received by the element. The problem of supplying the correct phase reference to the phase conjugation circuit (PCC) is solved by central phasing. A new form of central phasing suitable for very large arrays is outlined. ARAs may serve simultaneously as transmitting and receiving satellite antennas for space applications. Precision pointing and input-output isolation is provided by exact frequency-translating PCCs. A two-element ARA breadboard has been built and tested.

  11. Triggering of volcanic activity by large earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avouris, D.; Carn, S. A.; Waite, G. P.

    2011-12-01

    Statistical analysis of temporal relationships between large earthquakes and volcanic eruptions suggests seismic waves may trigger eruptions even over great distances, although the causative mechanism is not well constrained. In this study the relationship between large earthquakes and subtle changes in volcanic activity was investigated in order to gain greater insight into the relationship between dynamic stress and volcanic response. Daily measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), onboard the Aura satellite, provide constraints on volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates as a measure of subtle changes in activity. An SO2 timeseries was produced from OMI data for thirteen persistently active volcanoes. Seismic surface-wave amplitudes were modeled from the source mechanisms of moment magnitude (Mw) ≥7 earthquakes, and peak dynamic stress (PDS) was calculated. The SO2 timeseries for each volcano was used to calculate a baseline threshold for comparison with post-earthquake emission. Delay times for an SO2 response following each earthquake at each volcano were analyzed and compared to a random catalog. The delay time analysis was inconclusive. However, an analysis based on the occurrence of large earthquakes showed a response at most volcanoes. Using the PDS calculations as a filtering criterion for the earthquake catalog, the SO2 mass for each volcano was analyzed in 28-day windows centered on the earthquake origin time. If the average SO2 mass after the earthquake was greater than an arbitrary percentage of pre-earthquake mass, we identified the volcano as having a response to the event. This window analysis provided insight on what type of volcanic activity is more susceptible to triggering by dynamic stress. The volcanoes with lava lakes included in this study, Ambrym, Gaua, Villarrica, and Erta Ale, showed a clear response to dynamic stress while the volcanoes with lava domes, Merapi, Semeru, and Bagana showed no response at all. Perhaps

  12. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators. PMID:27016583

  13. In vivo tendon forces correlate with activity level and remain bounded: evidence in a rabbit flexor tendon model.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, P; Butler, D L; Korvick, D L; Proch, F S

    1998-11-01

    While some tendons and ligaments in the lower extremity develop peak forces proportional to the intensity of activity (Komi 1990; Komi et al., 1992; Korvick et al., 1996), others maintain a steady force regardless of activity level (Herzog et al., 1993; Prilutsky et al., 1994). Investigators (Biewener et al., 1988; Korvick et al., 1996) have also shown that peak knee and ankle tendon forces approach one-quarter to one-third of ultimate or failure force values. In the rabbit flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon model we tested several hypotheses, chiefly that peak in vivo forces not only increase with increasing activity but do not exceed one-third of their ultimate or failure values. The FDP tendon was instrumented in three animals, and each rabbit subjected to an experimental design involving three activity levels. Peak tensile forces and rates of rise and fall in tendon force increased significantly with increasing activity (p < 0.01). Further, the tendon maintained a non-zero force level throughout all trials. For the most vigorous activity, inclined hopping, tensile forces and stresses were, on average, within 30% of the tendon's ultimate force and stress values, respectively. Such in vivo measurements in different tendon systems should help investigators better understand the recruitment and contribution of important muscle-tendon units to joint stability and gait. PMID:9880061

  14. Large Active Retrodirective Arrays for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    An active retrodirective array (ARA) electronically points a microwave beam back at the apparent source of an incident pilot signal. Retrodirectivity is the result of phase conjugation of the pilot signal received by each element of the array. The problem of supplying the correct phase reference to the phase conjugation circuit (PCC) associated with each element of the array is solved by central phasing. By eliminating the need for structural rigidity, central phasing confers a decisive advantage on ARA's as large spaceborne antennas. A new form of central phasing suitable for very large arrays is described. ARA's may easily be modified to serve both as transmitting and receiving arrays simultaneously. Two new kinds of exact, frequency translating PCC's are described. Such PCC's provide the ARA with input-output isolation and freedom from squint. The pointing errors caused by the radial and transverse components of the ARA's velocity, by the propagation medium, and by multipath are discussed. A two element ARA breadboard was built and tested at JPL. Its performance is limited primarily by multipath induced errors.

  15. Serum Paraoxonase Activity and Malondialdehyde Serum Concentrations Remain Unaffected in Response to Hydroxyurea Therapy in β-Thalassemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Zohaib, Muhammad; Ansari, Saqib H; Hashim, Zehra; Shamsi, Tahir S; Zarina, Shamshad

    2016-07-01

    β-Thalassemia is the most common hereditary disorder characterized by reduced production of β-globin chains of hemoglobin A (HbA). In recent years, hydroxyurea (HU) has shown promising therapeutic benefits in patients with β-thalassemia by fetal hemoglobin augmentation. We have analyzed effects of hydroxyurea treatment on oxidative stress in β-thalassemia patients by assessing activities of paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase along with malondialdehyde (MDA) and total reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations. Blood samples from 159 individuals including 56 HU-treated and 58 untreated β-thalassemia patients and 45 healthy controls were analyzed. PON activity was found to be highest in healthy individuals (177.76 ± 4.44 U/mL) as compared to treated (52.67 ± 3.65 U/mL) and untreated (55.11 ± 3.26 U/mL) patients. A similar trend was observed in the case of arylesterase activity in normal, β-thalassemia-treated, and untreated (210.0 ± 11.25 U/mL, 163.03 ± 9.04 U/mL, 139.77 ± 10.10 U/mL) subjects. Serum MDA concentrations (2.59 ± 0.09 nmol/mL, 2.45 ± 0.08 nmol/mL, and 1.15 ± 0.05 nmol/mL) and total ROS concentrations (3.73 ± 0.20 nmol/mL, 3.54 ± 0.23 nmol/mL, and 2.45 ± 0.14 nmol/mL) were significantly elevated in both groups (untreated and treated) as compared to healthy individuals (P < .01). Oxidative stress was found to be markedly elevated in β-thalassemia patients as compared to healthy controls. Insignificant differences were, however, observed in mean concentrations of PON1 paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, serum MDA concentration and total ROS concentrations between HU-treated and untreated patients. We propose that HU therapy alone seems to be ineffective in managing oxidative stress and is likely to offer a better clinical outcome when supplemented with efficient iron chelation therapy and antioxidants. PMID:26608512

  16. How Large Scales Flows May Influence Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Large scale flows within the solar convection zone are the primary drivers of the Sun's magnetic activity cycle and play important roles in shaping the Sun's magnetic field. Differential rotation amplifies the magnetic field through its shearing action and converts poloidal field into toroidal field. Poleward meridional flow near the surface carries magnetic flux that reverses the magnetic poles at about the time of solar maximum. The deeper, equatorward meridional flow can carry magnetic flux back toward the lower latitudes where it erupts through the surface to form tilted active regions that convert toroidal fields into oppositely directed poloidal fields. These axisymmetric flows are themselves driven by large scale convective motions. The effects of the Sun's rotation on convection produce velocity correlations that can maintain both the differential rotation and the meridional circulation. These convective motions can also influence solar activity directly by shaping the magnetic field pattern. While considerable theoretical advances have been made toward understanding these large scale flows, outstanding problems in matching theory to observations still remain.

  17. A Large Proportion of the Mexican Population Remained Susceptible to A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection One Year after the Emergence of 2009 Influenza Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Veguilla, Vic; López-Gatell, Hugo; López-Martínez, Irma; Aparicio-Antonio, Rodrigo; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Rojo-Medina, Julieta; Gross, Felicia Liaini; Jefferson, Stacie N.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic initially affected Mexico from April 2009 to July 2010. By August 2010, a fourth of the population had received the monovalent vaccine against the pandemic virus (A(H1N1)pdm09). To assess the proportion of the Mexican population who remained potentially susceptible to infection throughout the summer of 2010, we estimated the population seroprevalence to A(H1N1)pdm09 in a serosurvey of blood donors. Methods We evaluated baseline cross-reactivity to the pandemic strain and set the threshold for seropositivity using pre-pandemic (2005–2008) stored serum samples and sera from confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infected individuals. Between June and September 2010, a convenience sample serosurvey of adult blood donors, children, and adolescents was conducted in six states of Mexico. Sera were tested by the microneutralization (MN) and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays, and regarded seropositive if antibody titers were equal or exceeded 1:40 for MN and 1:20 for HI. Age-standardized seroprevalence were calculated using the 2010 National Census population. Results Sera from 1,484 individuals were analyzed; 1,363 (92%) were blood donors, and 121 (8%) children or adolescents aged ≤19 years. Mean age (standard deviation) was 31.4 (11.5) years, and 276 (19%) were women. A total of 516 (35%) participants declared history of influenza vaccination after April 2009. The age-standardized seroprevalence to A(H1N1)pdm09 was 48% by the MN and 41% by the HI assays, respectively. The youngest quintile, aged 1 to 22 years, had the highest the seroprevalence; 61% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 56, 66%) for MN, and 56% (95% CI: 51, 62%) for HI. Conclusions Despite high transmission of A(H1N1)pdm09 observed immediately after its emergence and extensive vaccination, over a half of the Mexican population remained potentially susceptible to A(H1N1)pdm09 infection. Subsequent influenza seasons with high transmission of A(H1N1)pdm09, as 2011–2012 and

  18. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 141-C Large Animal Barn and Biology Laboratory (Hog Barn), Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-027

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-05-24

    The 141-C waste site is a former large animal barn and biology laboratory within the 100-F Area experimental animal farm. Strontium-90, arsenic, and multiple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were detected within residual demolition debris at concentrations exceeding cleanup criteria. The site has been remediated by removing approximately 900 bank cubic meters of soil and debris within the former building footprint to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  19. Large-scale recording of astrocyte activity

    PubMed Central

    Nimmerjahn, Axel; Bergles, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are highly ramified glial cells found throughout the central nervous system (CNS). They express a variety of neurotransmitter receptors that can induce widespread chemical excitation, placing these cells in an optimal position to exert global effects on brain physiology. However, the activity patterns of only a small fraction of astrocytes have been examined and techniques to manipulate their behavior are limited. As a result, little is known about how astrocytes modulate CNS function on synaptic, microcircuit, or systems levels. Here, we review current and emerging approaches for visualizing and manipulating astrocyte activity in vivo. Deciphering how astrocyte network activity is controlled in different physiological and pathological contexts is critical for defining their roles in the healthy and diseased CNS. PMID:25665733

  20. Spatiotemporal dynamics of large-scale brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, Jeremy

    Understanding the dynamics of large-scale brain activity is a tough challenge. One reason for this is the presence of an incredible amount of complexity arising from having roughly 100 billion neurons connected via 100 trillion synapses. Because of the extremely high number of degrees of freedom in the nervous system, the question of how the brain manages to properly function and remain stable, yet also be adaptable, must be posed. Neuroscientists have identified many ways the nervous system makes this possible, of which synaptic plasticity is possibly the most notable one. On the other hand, it is vital to understand how the nervous system also loses stability, resulting in neuropathological diseases such as epilepsy, a disease which affects 1% of the population. In the following work, we seek to answer some of these questions from two different perspectives. The first uses mean-field theory applied to neuronal populations, where the variables of interest are the percentages of active excitatory and inhibitory neurons in a network, to consider how the nervous system responds to external stimuli, self-organizes and generates epileptiform activity. The second method uses statistical field theory, in the framework of single neurons on a lattice, to study the concept of criticality, an idea borrowed from physics which posits that in some regime the brain operates in a collectively stable or marginally stable manner. This will be examined in two different neuronal networks with self-organized criticality serving as the overarching theme for the union of both perspectives. One of the biggest problems in neuroscience is the question of to what extent certain details are significant to the functioning of the brain. These details give rise to various spatiotemporal properties that at the smallest of scales explain the interaction of single neurons and synapses and at the largest of scales describe, for example, behaviors and sensations. In what follows, we will shed some

  1. Flexible and mechanical strain resistant large area SERS active substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. P.; Chu, Hsiaoyun; Abell, Justin; Tripp, Ralph A.; Zhao, Yiping

    2012-05-01

    We report a cost effective and facile way to synthesize flexible, uniform, and large area surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates using an oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique. The flexible SERS substrates consist of 1 μm long, tilted silver nanocolumnar films deposited on flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets using OAD. The SERS enhancement activity of these flexible substrates was determined using 10-5 M trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl) ethylene (BPE) Raman probe molecules. The in situ SERS measurements on these flexible substrates under mechanical (tensile/bending) strain conditions were performed. Our results show that flexible SERS substrates can withstand a tensile strain (ε) value as high as 30% without losing SERS performance, whereas the similar bending strain decreases the SERS performance by about 13%. A cyclic tensile loading test on flexible PDMS SERS substrates at a pre-specified tensile strain (ε) value of 10% shows that the SERS intensity remains almost constant for more than 100 cycles. These disposable and flexible SERS substrates can be integrated with biological substances and offer a novel and practical method to facilitate biosensing applications.

  2. Comparative efficacy of photo-activated disinfection and calcium hydroxide for disinfection of remaining carious dentin in deep cavities: a clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sidhartha; Shah, Naseem

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To comparatively evaluate the efficacy of photo-activated disinfection (PAD), calcium hydroxide (CH) and their combination on the treatment outcome of indirect pulp treatment (IPT). Materials and Methods Institutional ethical clearance and informed consent of the patients were taken. The study was also registered with clinical registry of India. Sixty permanent molars exhibiting deep occlusal carious lesion in patients with the age range of 18 - 22 yr were included. Clinical and radiographic evaluation and set inclusion and exclusion criteria's were followed. Gross caries excavation was accomplished. In group I (n = 20) PAD was applied for sixty seconds. In group II (n = 20), CH was applied to the remaining carious dentin, while in group III (n = 20), PAD application was followed by CH placement. The teeth were permanently restored. They were clinically and radiographically followed-up at 45 day, 6 mon and 12 mon. Relative density of the remaining affected dentin was measured by 'Radiovisiography (RVG) densitometric' analysis. Results Successful outcome with an increase in radiographic grey values were observed in all three groups. However, on inter-group comparison, this change was not significant (p > 0.05). Conclusions PAD and CH both have equal disinfection efficacy in the treatment of deep carious dentin. PAD alone is as effective for treatment of deep carious lesion as calcium hydroxide and hence can be used as an alternative to CH. They can be used independently in IPT, since combining both does not offer any additional therapeutic benefits. PMID:25110643

  3. [PALEOPATHOLOGY OF HUMAN REMAINS].

    PubMed

    Minozzi, Simona; Fornaciari, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases induce alterations in the human skeleton, leaving traces of their presence in ancient remains. Paleopathological examination of human remains not only allows the study of the history and evolution of the disease, but also the reconstruction of health conditions in the past populations. This paper describes the most interesting diseases observed in skeletal samples from the Roman Imperial Age necropoles found in urban and suburban areas of Rome during archaeological excavations in the last decades. The diseases observed were grouped into the following categories: articular diseases, traumas, infections, metabolic or nutritional diseases, congenital diseases and tumours, and some examples are reported for each group. Although extensive epidemiological investigation in ancient skeletal records is impossible, the palaeopathological study allowed to highlight the spread of numerous illnesses, many of which can be related to the life and health conditions of the Roman population. PMID:27348992

  4. Propellant-remaining modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgovitsky, S.

    1991-01-01

    A successful satellite mission is predicted upon the proper maintenance of the spacecraft's orbit and attitude. One requirement for planning and predicting the orbit and attitude is the accurate estimation of the propellant remaining onboard the spacecraft. Focuss is on the three methods that were developed for calculating the propellant budget: the errors associated with each method and the uncertainties in the variables required to determine the propellant remaining that contribute to these errors. Based on these findings, a strategy is developed for improved propellant-remaining estimation. The first method is based on Boyle's law, which related the values of pressure, volume, and temperature (PVT) of an ideal gas. The PVT method is used for the monopropellant and the bipropellant engines. The second method is based on the engine performance tests, which provide data that relate thrust and specific impulse associated with a propellant tank to that tank's pressure. Two curves representing thrust and specific impulse as functions of pressure are then generated using a polynomial fit on the engine performance data. The third method involves a computer simulation of the propellant system. The propellant flow is modeled by creating a conceptual model of the propulsion system configuration, taking into account such factors as the propellant and pressurant tank characteristics, thruster functionality, and piping layout. Finally, a thrust calibration technique is presented that uses differential correction with the computer simulation method of propellant-remaining modeling. Thrust calibration provides a better assessment of thruster performance and therefore enables a more accurate estimation of propellant consumed during a given maneuver.

  5. Fabricating large two-dimensional single colloidal crystals by doping with active particles.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, B; Filion, L; Dijkstra, M

    2016-04-14

    Using simulations we explore the behaviour of two-dimensional colloidal (poly)crystals doped with active particles. We show that these active dopants can provide an elegant new route to removing grain boundaries in polycrystals. Specifically, we show that active dopants both generate and are attracted to defects, such as vacancies and interstitials, which leads to clustering of dopants at grain boundaries. The active particles both broaden and enhance the mobility of the grain boundaries, causing rapid coarsening of the crystal domains. The remaining defects recrystallize upon turning off the activity of the dopants, resulting in a large-scale single-domain crystal. PMID:26936131

  6. ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION (ASD) DEMONSTRATION IN A LARGE BUILDING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the feasibility of implementing radon resistant construction techniques -- especially active soil depressurization (ASD) -- in new large buildings in Florida. Indoor radon concentrations and radon entry were monitored in a finished bui...

  7. Implementing Small-Group Activities in Large Lecture Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazedjian, Ani; Kolkhorst, Brittany Boyle

    2007-01-01

    This study examines student perceptions regarding the effectiveness of small-group work in a large lecture class. The article considers and illustrates from students' perspectives the ways in which small-group activities could enhance comprehension of course material, reduce anonymity associated with large lecture classes, and promote student…

  8. Large scale organization of rat sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large activation spreads

    PubMed Central

    Frostig, Ron D.; Xiong, Ying; Chen-Bee, Cynthia H.; Kvašňák, Eugen; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    Parcellation according to function (e.g., visual, somatosensory, auditory, motor) is considered a fundamental property of sensorimotor cortical organization, traditionally defined from cytoarchitectonics and mapping studies relying on peak evoked neuronal activity. In the adult rat, stimulation of single whiskers evokes peak activity at topographically appropriate locations within somatosensory cortex and provides an example of cortical functional specificity. Here, we show that single whisker stimulation also evokes symmetrical areas of supra- and sub-threshold neuronal activation that spread extensively away from peak activity, effectively ignoring cortical borders by spilling deeply into multiple cortical territories of different modalities (auditory, visual and motor), where they were blocked by localized neuronal activity blocker injections and thus ruled out as possibly due to ‘volume conductance’. These symmetrical activity spreads were supported by underlying border-crossing, long-range horizontal connections as confirmed with transection experiments and injections of anterograde neuronal tracer experiments. We found such large evoked activation spreads and their underlying connections irrespective of whisker identity, cortical layer, or axis of recorded responses, thereby revealing a large scale nonspecific organization of sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large symmetrical activation spreads. Because the large activation spreads and their underlying horizontal connections ignore anatomical borders between cortical modalities, sensorimotor cortex could therefore be viewed as a continuous entity rather than a collection of discrete, delineated unimodal regions – an organization that could co-exist with established specificity of cortical organization and that could serve as a substrate for associative learning, direct multimodal integration and recovery of function following injury. PMID:19052219

  9. Large-scale organization of rat sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large activation spreads.

    PubMed

    Frostig, Ron D; Xiong, Ying; Chen-Bee, Cynthia H; Kvasnák, Eugen; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2008-12-01

    Parcellation according to function (e.g., visual, somatosensory, auditory, motor) is considered a fundamental property of sensorimotor cortical organization, traditionally defined from cytoarchitectonics and mapping studies relying on peak evoked neuronal activity. In the adult rat, stimulation of single whiskers evokes peak activity at topographically appropriate locations within somatosensory cortex and provides an example of cortical functional specificity. Here, we show that single whisker stimulation also evokes symmetrical areas of suprathreshold and subthreshold neuronal activation that spread extensively away from peak activity, effectively ignoring cortical borders by spilling deeply into multiple cortical territories of different modalities (auditory, visual and motor), where they were blocked by localized neuronal activity blocker injections and thus ruled out as possibly caused by "volume conductance." These symmetrical activity spreads were supported by underlying border-crossing, long-range horizontal connections as confirmed with transection experiments and injections of anterograde neuronal tracer experiments. We found such large evoked activation spreads and their underlying connections regardless of whisker identity, cortical layer, or axis of recorded responses, thereby revealing a large scale nonspecific organization of sensorimotor cortex based on a motif of large symmetrical activation spreads. Because the large activation spreads and their underlying horizontal connections ignore anatomical borders between cortical modalities, sensorimotor cortex could therefore be viewed as a continuous entity rather than a collection of discrete, delineated unimodal regions, an organization that could coexist with established specificity of cortical organization and that could serve as a substrate for associative learning, direct multimodal integration and recovery of function after injury. PMID:19052219

  10. How Large Scale Flows in the Solar Convection Zone may Influence Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Large scale flows within the solar convection zone are the primary drivers of the Sun s magnetic activity cycle. Differential rotation can amplify the magnetic field and convert poloidal fields into toroidal fields. Poleward meridional flow near the surface can carry magnetic flux that reverses the magnetic poles and can convert toroidal fields into poloidal fields. The deeper, equatorward meridional flow can carry magnetic flux toward the equator where it can reconnect with oppositely directed fields in the other hemisphere. These axisymmetric flows are themselves driven by large scale convective motions. The effects of the Sun s rotation on convection produce velocity correlations that can maintain the differential rotation and meridional circulation. These convective motions can influence solar activity themselves by shaping the large-scale magnetic field pattern. While considerable theoretical advances have been made toward understanding these large scale flows, outstanding problems in matching theory to observations still remain.

  11. Distributed active control of large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, C. C.; Baz, A.

    1986-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the research work performed at the Catholic University of America on the research grant entitled Distributed Active Control of Large Flexible Space Structures, funded by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, under grant number NAG5-749, during the period of March 15, 1986 to September 15, 1986.

  12. Large roads reduce bat activity across multiple species.

    PubMed

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  13. Large Roads Reduce Bat Activity across Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  14. The Jasper Ridge elevated CO{sub 2} experiment: Root acid phosphatase activity in Bromus hordeaceus and Avena barbata remains unchanged under elevated [CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Cardon, Z.G.; Jackson, R.

    1995-06-01

    Root acid phosphatase activity increases phosphate available to plants by cleaving phosphate esters in soil organic matter. Because of increased plant growth potential under elevated [CO{sub 2}], we hypothesized that high [CO{sub 2}]-grown plants might exhibit higher phosphatase activity than low [CO{sub 2}]-grown plants. We assayed phosphatase activity in two species grown on two substrates (Bromus on serpentine soil and Bromus and Avena on sandstone soil) under high and low [CO{sub 2}] and under several nutrient treatments. Phosphatase activity was expressed per gram fresh weight of roots. Phosphatase activity of Bromus roots (on sandstone) was first assayed in treatments where only P and K, or only N, were added to soil. Bromus roots in this case showed strong induction of phosphatase activity when N only had been added to soil, indicating that Bromus regulated its phosphatase activity in response to phosphate availability. Both Bromus and Avena growing in sandstone, and Bromus growing in serpentine, showed enhanced phosphatase activity at high nutrient (N, P, and K) levels over that at low nutrient levels, but no differences between phosphatase activity were apparent between [CO{sub 2}] treatments. The increased phosphatase activity at high N, P, and K may indicate enhanced {open_quotes}growth demand{close_quotes} (reflected in higher biomass) in both Avena and Bromus. In contrast, though Bromus {open_quotes}growth demand{close_quotes} (biomass) increased under high [CO{sub 2}] on sandstone, phosphatase activity did not increase.

  15. Robustness of active modal damping of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Michael

    1987-01-01

    The method of active modal damping (AMD) is reviewed, and the pinhole/occulter facility (P/OF) is presented as a design example. This system is a large space system composed of a flexible beam, a gimbal-pointing system, and an optical alignment system mounted in the Shuttle cargo bay and excited by typical Shuttle disturbances. The AMD system performance is compared with that of a series-compensated control system.

  16. Active Exploration of Large 3D Model Repositories.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; Cao, Yan-Pei; Lai, Yu-Kun; Huang, Hao-Zhi; Kobbelt, Leif; Hu, Shi-Min

    2015-12-01

    With broader availability of large-scale 3D model repositories, the need for efficient and effective exploration becomes more and more urgent. Existing model retrieval techniques do not scale well with the size of the database since often a large number of very similar objects are returned for a query, and the possibilities to refine the search are quite limited. We propose an interactive approach where the user feeds an active learning procedure by labeling either entire models or parts of them as "like" or "dislike" such that the system can automatically update an active set of recommended models. To provide an intuitive user interface, candidate models are presented based on their estimated relevance for the current query. From the methodological point of view, our main contribution is to exploit not only the similarity between a query and the database models but also the similarities among the database models themselves. We achieve this by an offline pre-processing stage, where global and local shape descriptors are computed for each model and a sparse distance metric is derived that can be evaluated efficiently even for very large databases. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by interactively exploring a repository containing over 100 K models. PMID:26529460

  17. Radio Coronal Magnetography of a Large Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Timothy S.; Gary, Dale E.; White, Stephen; Fleishman, Gregory; Chen, Bin

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative knowledge of coronal magnetic fields is fundamental to understanding energetic phenomena such as solar flares. Flares occur in solar active regions where strong, non-potential magnetic fields provide free energy. While constraints on the coronal magnetic field topology are readily available through high resolution SXR and EUV imaging of solar active regions, useful quantitative measurements of coronal magnetic fields have thus far been elusive. Recent progress has been made at infrared (IR) wavelengths in exploiting both the Zeeman and Hanle effects to infer the line-of-sight magnetic field strength or the orientation of the magnetic field vector in the plane of the sky above the solar limb. However, no measurements of coronal magnetic fields against the solar disk are possible using IR observations. Radio observations of gyroresonance emission from active regions offer the means of measuring coronal magnetic fields above the limb and on the solar disk. In particular, for plasma plasma conditions in the solar corona, active regions typically become optically thick to emission over a range of radio frequencies through gyroresonance absorption at a low harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. The specific range of resonant frequencies depends on the range of coronal magnetic field strengths present in the active region.The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array was used in November 2014 to image NOAA/USAF active region AR12209 over a continuous frequency range of 1-8 GHz, corresponding to a wavelength range of 3.75-30 cm. This frequency range is sensitive to coronal magnetic field strengths ranging from ~120-1400G. The active region was observed on four different dates - November 18, 20, 22, and 24 - during which the active region longitude ranged from -15 to +70 degrees, providing a wide range of aspect angles. In this paper we provide a preliminary description of the coronal magnetic field measurements derived from the radio observations.

  18. Technologies for imaging neural activity in large volumes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Na; Freeman, Jeremy; Smith, Spencer L

    2016-08-26

    Neural circuitry has evolved to form distributed networks that act dynamically across large volumes. Conventional microscopy collects data from individual planes and cannot sample circuitry across large volumes at the temporal resolution relevant to neural circuit function and behaviors. Here we review emerging technologies for rapid volume imaging of neural circuitry. We focus on two critical challenges: the inertia of optical systems, which limits image speed, and aberrations, which restrict the image volume. Optical sampling time must be long enough to ensure high-fidelity measurements, but optimized sampling strategies and point-spread function engineering can facilitate rapid volume imaging of neural activity within this constraint. We also discuss new computational strategies for processing and analyzing volume imaging data of increasing size and complexity. Together, optical and computational advances are providing a broader view of neural circuit dynamics and helping elucidate how brain regions work in concert to support behavior. PMID:27571194

  19. Large-scale cortical correlation structure of spontaneous oscillatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Joerg F.; Hawellek, David J.; Corbetta, Maurizio; Siegel, Markus; Engel, Andreas K.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the brain-wide correlation of electrophysiological signals. Here we show that spontaneous oscillatory neuronal activity exhibits frequency-specific spatial correlation structure in the human brain. We developed an analysis approach that discounts spurious correlation of signal power caused by the limited spatial resolution of electrophysiological measures. We applied this approach to source estimates of spontaneous neuronal activity reconstructed from magnetoencephalography (MEG). Overall, correlation of power across cortical regions was strongest in the alpha to beta frequency range (8–32 Hz) and correlation patterns depended on the underlying oscillation frequency. Global hubs resided in the medial temporal lobe in the theta frequency range (4–6 Hz), in lateral parietal areas in the alpha to beta frequency range (8–23 Hz), and in sensorimotor areas for higher frequencies (32–45 Hz). Our data suggest that interactions in various large-scale cortical networks may be reflected in frequency specific power-envelope correlations. PMID:22561454

  20. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  1. Regional Triggering of Volcanic Activity Following Large Magnitude Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill-Butler, Charley; Blackett, Matthew; Wright, Robert

    2015-04-01

    There are numerous reports of a spatial and temporal link between volcanic activity and high magnitude seismic events. In fact, since 1950, all large magnitude earthquakes have been followed by volcanic eruptions in the following year - 1952 Kamchatka M9.2, 1960 Chile M9.5, 1964 Alaska M9.2, 2004 & 2005 Sumatra-Andaman M9.3 & M8.7 and 2011 Japan M9.0. While at a global scale, 56% of all large earthquakes (M≥8.0) in the 21st century were followed by increases in thermal activity. The most significant change in volcanic activity occurred between December 2004 and April 2005 following the M9.1 December 2004 earthquake after which new eruptions were detected at 10 volcanoes and global volcanic flux doubled over 52 days (Hill-Butler et al. 2014). The ability to determine a volcano's activity or 'response', however, has resulted in a number of disparities with <50% of all volcanoes being monitored by ground-based instruments. The advent of satellite remote sensing for volcanology has, therefore, provided researchers with an opportunity to quantify the timing, magnitude and character of volcanic events. Using data acquired from the MODVOLC algorithm, this research examines a globally comparable database of satellite-derived radiant flux alongside USGS NEIC data to identify changes in volcanic activity following an earthquake, February 2000 - December 2012. Using an estimate of background temperature obtained from the MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) product (Wright et al. 2014), thermal radiance was converted to radiant flux following the method of Kaufman et al. (1998). The resulting heat flux inventory was then compared to all seismic events (M≥6.0) within 1000 km of each volcano to evaluate if changes in volcanic heat flux correlate with regional earthquakes. This presentation will first identify relationships at the temporal and spatial scale, more complex relationships obtained by machine learning algorithms will then be examined to establish favourable

  2. The long-term hospitalization experience following military service in the 1991 Gulf War among veterans remaining on active duty, 1994–2004

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Tomoko I; DeBakey, Samar F; Nagaraj, Barbara E; Bellis, Kimberly S; Smith, Besa; Smith, Tyler C; Gackstetter, Gary D

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite more than a decade of extensive, international efforts to characterize and understand the increased symptom and illness-reporting among veterans of the 1991 Gulf War, concern over possible long-term health effects related to this deployment continue. The purpose of this study was to describe the long-term hospitalization experience of the subset of U.S. Gulf War veterans still on active duty between 1994 and 2004. Methods Gulf War veterans on active duty rosters as of October 1, 1994, were identified (n = 211 642) and compared with veterans who had separated from military service and then assessed for attrition at three-year intervals during a 10-year follow-up period, examining demographic and military service characteristics, Gulf War exposure variables, and hospitalization data. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to evaluate independent predictors of all-cause hospitalization among those still on active duty and to estimate cumulative probability of hospitalization, 1994–2004, by service branch. Results Members of our 1994 active duty cohort were more likely to be officers, somewhat older, and married compared with those who had separated from the military after serving in the 1991 Gulf War. Selected war-related exposures or experiences did not appear to influence separation with the exception of in-theater presence during the brief ground combat phase. Overall the top three diagnostic categories for hospitalizations were musculo-skeletal, injury and poisoning, and digestive disorders. Diseases of the circulatory system and symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions increased proportionately over time. In-theater hospitalization was the only significant independent predictor of long-term hospitalization risk among selected war-related exposures or experiences examined. The cumulative probability of hospitalization was highest for Army and lowest for Marines. Conclusion Our results were generally consistent with a previous

  3. LARGE PARTICLES IN ACTIVE ASTEROID P/2010 A2

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David; Ishiguro, Masateru; Agarwal, Jessica

    2013-02-10

    The previously unknown asteroid P/2010 A2 rose to prominence in 2010 by forming a transient, comet-like tail consisting of ejected dust. The observed dust production was interpreted as the result of either a hypervelocity impact with a smaller body or a rotational disruption. We have re-observed this object, finding that large particles remain a full orbital period after the initial outburst. In the intervening years, particles smaller than {approx}3 mm in radius have been dispersed by radiation pressure, leaving only larger particles in the trail. Since the total mass is dominated by the largest particles, the radiation pressure filtering allows us to obtain a more reliable estimate of the debris mass than was previously possible. We find that the mass contained in the debris is {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} kg (assumed density 3000 kg m{sup -3}), the ratio of the total debris mass to the nucleus mass is {approx}0.1, and that events like P/2010 A2 contribute <3% to the Zodiacal dust production rate. Physical properties of the nucleus and debris are also determined.

  4. Large Particles in Active Asteroid P/2010 A2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewitt, David; Ishiguro, Masateru; Agarwal, Jessica

    2013-02-01

    The previously unknown asteroid P/2010 A2 rose to prominence in 2010 by forming a transient, comet-like tail consisting of ejected dust. The observed dust production was interpreted as the result of either a hypervelocity impact with a smaller body or a rotational disruption. We have re-observed this object, finding that large particles remain a full orbital period after the initial outburst. In the intervening years, particles smaller than ~3 mm in radius have been dispersed by radiation pressure, leaving only larger particles in the trail. Since the total mass is dominated by the largest particles, the radiation pressure filtering allows us to obtain a more reliable estimate of the debris mass than was previously possible. We find that the mass contained in the debris is ~5 × 108 kg (assumed density 3000 kg m-3), the ratio of the total debris mass to the nucleus mass is ~0.1, and that events like P/2010 A2 contribute <3% to the Zodiacal dust production rate. Physical properties of the nucleus and debris are also determined. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  5. Large-Scale Chaos and Fluctuations in Active Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Sandrine; Peshkov, Anton; Aranson, Igor S.; Bertin, Eric; Ginelli, Francesco; Chaté, Hugues

    2014-07-01

    We show that dry active nematics, e.g., collections of shaken elongated granular particles, exhibit large-scale spatiotemporal chaos made of interacting dense, ordered, bandlike structures in a parameter region including the linear onset of nematic order. These results are obtained from the study of both the well-known (deterministic) hydrodynamic equations describing these systems and of the self-propelled particle model they were derived from. We prove, in particular, that the chaos stems from the generic instability of the band solution of the hydrodynamic equations. Revisiting the status of the strong fluctuations and long-range correlations in the particle model, we show that the giant number fluctuations observed in the chaotic phase are a trivial consequence of density segregation. However anomalous, curvature-driven number fluctuations are present in the homogeneous quasiordered nematic phase and characterized by a nontrivial scaling exponent.

  6. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  7. Temporally-stable active precision mount for large optics.

    PubMed

    Reinlein, Claudia; Damm, Christoph; Lange, Nicolas; Kamm, Andreas; Mohaupt, Matthias; Brady, Aoife; Goy, Matthias; Leonhard, Nina; Eberhardt, Ramona; Zeitner, Uwe; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-06-13

    We present a temporally-stable active mount to compensate for manufacturing-induced deformations of reflective optical components. In this paper, we introduce the design of the active mount, and its evaluation results for two sample mirrors: a quarter mirror of 115 × 105 × 9 mm3, and a full mirror of 228 × 210 × 9 mm3. The quarter mirror with 20 actuators shows a best wavefront error rms of 10 nm. Its installation position depending deformations are addressed by long-time measurements over 14 weeks indicating no significance of the orientation. Size-induced differences of the mount are studied by a full mirror with 80 manual actuators arranged in the same actuator pattern as the quarter mirror. This sample shows a wavefront error rms of (27±2) nm over a measurement period of 46 days. We conclude that the developed mount is suitable to compensate for manufacturing-induced deformations of large reflective optics, and likely to be included in the overall systems alignment procedure. PMID:27410369

  8. Modelling large scale human activity in San Francisco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Marta

    2010-03-01

    Diverse group of people with a wide variety of schedules, activities and travel needs compose our cities nowadays. This represents a big challenge for modeling travel behaviors in urban environments; those models are of crucial interest for a wide variety of applications such as traffic forecasting, spreading of viruses, or measuring human exposure to air pollutants. The traditional means to obtain knowledge about travel behavior is limited to surveys on travel journeys. The obtained information is based in questionnaires that are usually costly to implement and with intrinsic limitations to cover large number of individuals and some problems of reliability. Using mobile phone data, we explore the basic characteristics of a model of human travel: The distribution of agents is proportional to the population density of a given region, and each agent has a characteristic trajectory size contain information on frequency of visits to different locations. Additionally we use a complementary data set given by smart subway fare cards offering us information about the exact time of each passenger getting in or getting out of the subway station and the coordinates of it. This allows us to uncover the temporal aspects of the mobility. Since we have the actual time and place of individual's origin and destination we can understand the temporal patterns in each visited location with further details. Integrating two described data set we provide a dynamical model of human travels that incorporates different aspects observed empirically.

  9. Is Active Learning Like Broccoli? Student Perceptions of Active Learning in Large Lecture Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, C. Veronica; Cardaciotto, LeeAnn

    2011-01-01

    Although research suggests that active learning is associated with positive outcomes (e.g., memory, test performance), use of such techniques can be difficult to implement in large lecture-based classes. In the current study, 1,091 students completed out-of-class group exercises to complement course material in an Introductory Psychology class.…

  10. Where do those remains come from?

    PubMed

    Nociarová, Dominika; Adserias, M Jose; Malgosa, Assumpció; Galtés, Ignasi

    2014-12-01

    Part of the study of skeletal remains or corpses in advance decay located in the field involves determining their origin. They may be the result of criminal activity, accident, unearthed because of erosion, or they may also have originated from a cemetery. The discovery site, condition of the remains, and the associated artifacts, are factors that could be helpful for the forensic anthropologist to identify the origin of the remains. In order to contribute to this recognition, an analysis was made of the exhumations of 168 unclaimed human remains from the cemetery of Terrassa (Catalonia, Spain). This investigation presents a description of artifacts and conditions of remains that could indicate that the human remains may have originated from a cemetery. PMID:25459276

  11. Multistability in Large Scale Models of Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Golos, Mathieu; Jirsa, Viktor; Daucé, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Noise driven exploration of a brain network’s dynamic repertoire has been hypothesized to be causally involved in cognitive function, aging and neurodegeneration. The dynamic repertoire crucially depends on the network’s capacity to store patterns, as well as their stability. Here we systematically explore the capacity of networks derived from human connectomes to store attractor states, as well as various network mechanisms to control the brain’s dynamic repertoire. Using a deterministic graded response Hopfield model with connectome-based interactions, we reconstruct the system’s attractor space through a uniform sampling of the initial conditions. Large fixed-point attractor sets are obtained in the low temperature condition, with a bigger number of attractors than ever reported so far. Different variants of the initial model, including (i) a uniform activation threshold or (ii) a global negative feedback, produce a similarly robust multistability in a limited parameter range. A numerical analysis of the distribution of the attractors identifies spatially-segregated components, with a centro-medial core and several well-delineated regional patches. Those different modes share similarity with the fMRI independent components observed in the “resting state” condition. We demonstrate non-stationary behavior in noise-driven generalizations of the models, with different meta-stable attractors visited along the same time course. Only the model with a global dynamic density control is found to display robust and long-lasting non-stationarity with no tendency toward either overactivity or extinction. The best fit with empirical signals is observed at the edge of multistability, a parameter region that also corresponds to the highest entropy of the attractors. PMID:26709852

  12. Multistability in Large Scale Models of Brain Activity.

    PubMed

    Golos, Mathieu; Jirsa, Viktor; Daucé, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    Noise driven exploration of a brain network's dynamic repertoire has been hypothesized to be causally involved in cognitive function, aging and neurodegeneration. The dynamic repertoire crucially depends on the network's capacity to store patterns, as well as their stability. Here we systematically explore the capacity of networks derived from human connectomes to store attractor states, as well as various network mechanisms to control the brain's dynamic repertoire. Using a deterministic graded response Hopfield model with connectome-based interactions, we reconstruct the system's attractor space through a uniform sampling of the initial conditions. Large fixed-point attractor sets are obtained in the low temperature condition, with a bigger number of attractors than ever reported so far. Different variants of the initial model, including (i) a uniform activation threshold or (ii) a global negative feedback, produce a similarly robust multistability in a limited parameter range. A numerical analysis of the distribution of the attractors identifies spatially-segregated components, with a centro-medial core and several well-delineated regional patches. Those different modes share similarity with the fMRI independent components observed in the "resting state" condition. We demonstrate non-stationary behavior in noise-driven generalizations of the models, with different meta-stable attractors visited along the same time course. Only the model with a global dynamic density control is found to display robust and long-lasting non-stationarity with no tendency toward either overactivity or extinction. The best fit with empirical signals is observed at the edge of multistability, a parameter region that also corresponds to the highest entropy of the attractors. PMID:26709852

  13. Geomagnetic Activity Indicates Large Amplitude for Sunspot Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, D. H.; Wilson, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The level of geomagnetic activity near the time of solar activity minimum has been shown to be a reliable indicator for the amplitude of the following solar activity maximum. The geomagnetic activity index aa can be split into two components: one associated with solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections which follows the solar activity cycle and a second component associated with recurrent high speed solar wind streams which is out of phase with the solar activity cycle. This second component often peaks before solar activity minimum and has been one of the most reliable indicators for the amplitude of the following maximum. The size of the recent maximum in this second component indicates that solar activity cycle 24 will be much higher than average - similar in size to cycles 21 and 22.

  14. Active versus passive damping in large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Gary L.; Mclaren, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal passive and active damping control can be considered in the context of a general control/structure optimization problem. Using a mean square output response approach, it is shown that the weight sensitivity of the active and passive controllers can be used to determine an optimal mix of active and passive elements in a flexible structure.

  15. Content and Access Remain Key

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Linda B.

    2007-01-01

    It is impossible to review the year's outstanding government publication landscape without acknowledging that change remains paramount. Just as striking, however, is that these changes go hand in hand with some familiar constants. Within this shifting environment, there are the consistency and dependability of government information itself,…

  16. Chandra Reveals Remains of Giant Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo taken by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory that reveals the remains of an explosion in the form of two enormous arcs of multimillion-degree gas in the galaxy Centaurus A that appear to be part of a ring 25,000 light years in diameter. The size and location of the ring suggest that it could have been an explosion that occurred about 10 million years ago. A composite image made with radio (red and green), optical (yellow-orange), and X-ray data (blue) presents a sturning tableau of a turbulent galaxy. A broad band of dust and cold gas is bisected at an angle by opposing jets of high-energy particles blasting away from the supermassive black hole in the nucleus. Lying in a plane perpendicular to the jets are the two large arcs of x-ray emitting multi-million degree gas. This discovery can help astronomers better understand the cause and effect of violent outbursts from the vicinity of supermassive black holes of active galaxies. The Chandra program is managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

  17. Consistent estimation of complete neuronal connectivity in large neuronal populations using sparse "shotgun" neuronal activity sampling.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the properties of recently proposed "shotgun" sampling approach for the common inputs problem in the functional estimation of neuronal connectivity. We study the asymptotic correctness, the speed of convergence, and the data size requirements of such an approach. We show that the shotgun approach can be expected to allow the inference of complete connectivity matrix in large neuronal populations under some rather general conditions. However, we find that the posterior error of the shotgun connectivity estimator grows quickly with the size of unobserved neuronal populations, the square of average connectivity strength, and the square of observation sparseness. This implies that the shotgun connectivity estimation will require significantly larger amounts of neuronal activity data whenever the number of neurons in observed neuronal populations remains small. We present a numerical approach for solving the shotgun estimation problem in general settings and use it to demonstrate the shotgun connectivity inference in the examples of simulated synfire and weakly coupled cortical neuronal networks. PMID:27515518

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Large-Conductance Ca2+-Activated Potassium Channel Activation by Ginseng Gintonin

    PubMed Central

    Choi, S. H.; Lee, B. H.; Hwang, S. H.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, H. C.; Rhim, H. W.; Nah, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Gintonin is a unique lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand found in Panax ginseng. Gintonin induces transient [Ca2+]i through G protein-coupled LPA receptors. Large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels are expressed in blood vessels and neurons and play important roles in blood vessel relaxation and attenuation of neuronal excitability. BKCa channels are activated by transient [Ca2+]i and are regulated by various Ca2+-dependent kinases. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of BKCa channel activation by gintonin. BKCa channels are heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Gintonin treatment induced BKCa channel activation in oocytes expressing the BKCa channel α subunit in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 0.71 ± 0.08 µg/mL). Gintonin-mediated BKCa channel activation was blocked by a PKC inhibitor, calphostin, and by the calmodulin inhibitor, calmidazolium. Site-directed mutations in BKCa channels targeting CaM kinase II or PKC phosphorylation sites but not PKA phosphorylation sites attenuated gintonin action. Mutations in the Ca2+ bowl and the regulator of K+ conductance (RCK) site also blocked gintonin action. These results indicate that gintonin-mediated BKCa channel activations are achieved through LPA1 receptor-phospholipase C-IP3-Ca2+-PKC-calmodulin-CaM kinase II pathways and calcium binding to the Ca2+ bowl and RCK domain. Gintonin could be a novel contributor against blood vessel constriction and over-excitation of neurons. PMID:23662129

  19. ActiveSeismoPick3D - automatic first arrival determination for large active seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffrath, Marcel; Küperkoch, Ludger; Wehling-Benatelli, Sebastian; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We developed a tool for automatic determination of first arrivals in active seismic data based on an approach, that utilises higher order statistics (HOS) and the Akaike information criterion (AIC), commonly used in seismology, but not in active seismics. Automatic picking is highly desirable in active seismics as the number of data provided by large seismic arrays rapidly exceeds of what an analyst can evaluate in a reasonable amount of time. To bring the functionality of automatic phase picking into the context of active data, the software package ActiveSeismoPick3D was developed in Python. It uses a modified algorithm for the determination of first arrivals which searches for the HOS maximum in unfiltered data. Additionally, it offers tools for manual quality control and postprocessing, e.g. various visualisation and repicking functionalities. For flexibility, the tool also includes methods for the preparation of geometry information of large seismic arrays and improved interfaces to the Fast Marching Tomography Package (FMTOMO), which can be used for the prediction of travel times and inversion for subsurface properties. Output files are generated in the VTK format, allowing the 3D visualization of e.g. the inversion results. As a test case, a data set consisting of 9216 traces from 64 shots was gathered, recorded at 144 receivers deployed in a regular 2D array of a size of 100 x 100 m. ActiveSeismoPick3D automatically checks the determined first arrivals by a dynamic signal to noise ratio threshold. From the data a 3D model of the subsurface was generated using the export functionality of the package and FMTOMO.

  20. Simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and Very Large Array (VLA) observations of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Very Large Array observations at 20 cm wavelength can detect the hot coronal plasma previously observed at soft x ray wavelengths. Thermal cyclotron line emission was detected at the apex of coronal loops where the magnetic field strength is relatively constant. Detailed comparison of simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Satellite and VLA data indicate that physical parameters such as electron temperature, electron density, and magnetic field strength can be obtained, but that some coronal loops remain invisible in either spectral domain. The unprecedent spatial resolution of the VLA at 20 cm wavelength showed that the precursor, impulsive, and post-flare components of solar bursts originate in nearby, but separate loops or systems of loops.. In some cases preburst heating and magnetic changes are observed from loops tens of minutes prior to the impulsive phase. Comparisons with soft x ray images and spectra and with hard x ray data specify the magnetic field strength and emission mechanism of flaring coronal loops. At the longer 91 cm wavelength, the VLA detected extensive emission interpreted as a hot 10(exp 5) K interface between cool, dense H alpha filaments and the surrounding hotter, rarefield corona. Observations at 91 cm also provide evidence for time-correlated bursts in active regions on opposite sides of the solar equator; they are attributed to flare triggering by relativistic particles that move along large-scale, otherwise-invisible, magnetic conduits that link active regions in opposite hemispheres of the Sun.

  1. Active control of large space structures: An introduction and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, G. B., III; Tollison, D. K.; Waites, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the large space structure (LSS) control system design problem is presented. The LSS is defined as a class of system, and LSS modeling techniques are discussed. Model truncation, control system objectives, current control law design techniques, and particular problem areas are discussed.

  2. Large Strain Transparent Magneto-Active Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoonessi, Mitra (Inventor); Meador, Michael A (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A large strain polymer nanocomposite actuator is provided that upon subjected to an external stimulus, such as a magnetic field (static or electromagnetic field), an electric field, thermal energy, light, etc., will deform to thereby enable mechanical manipulations of structural components in a remote and wireless manner.

  3. Hot spots remain the exception

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This article is a survey of the drilling activity and petroleum activity in Africa. The areas which seem to hold the highest promise for new discoveries or increased exports are Egypt's Western Desert which seems to offer the possibility of significant oil discoveries. In addition, Nigeria has dramatically increased its exploration activity which is counter to the global trend in 1986. Areas where activity is decreasing are Cameroon, South Africa. It is pointed out that the Gabon crude oil reserves may have been raised 60% by a single on-shore discovery.

  4. Scaling and Criticality in Large-Scale Neuronal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkenkaer-Hansen, K.

    The human brain during wakeful rest spontaneously generates large-scale neuronal network oscillations at around 10 and 20 Hz that can be measured non-invasively using magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG). In this chapter, spontaneous oscillations are viewed as the outcome of a self-organizing stochastic process. The aim is to introduce the general prerequisites for stochastic systems to evolve to the critical state and to explain their neurophysiological equivalents. I review the recent evidence that the theory of self-organized criticality (SOC) may provide a unifying explanation for the large variability in amplitude, duration, and recurrence of spontaneous network oscillations, as well as the high susceptibility to perturbations and the long-range power-law temporal correlations in their amplitude envelope.

  5. Active Commuting Patterns at a Large, Midwestern College Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bopp, Melissa; Kaczynski, Andrew; Wittman, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To understand patterns and influences on active commuting (AC) behavior. Participants: Students and faculty/staff at a university campus. Methods: In April-May 2008, respondents answered an online survey about mode of travel to campus and influences on commuting decisions. Hierarchical regression analyses predicted variance in walking…

  6. Large heterogeneities in comet 67P as revealed by active pits from sinkhole collapse.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Bodewits, Dennis; Besse, Sébastien; Sierks, Holger; Barbieri, Cesare; Lamy, Philippe; Rodrigo, Rafael; Koschny, Detlef; Rickman, Hans; Keller, Horst Uwe; Agarwal, Jessica; A'Hearn, Michael F; Auger, Anne-Thérèse; Barucci, M Antonella; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Bertini, Ivano; Capanna, Claire; Cremonese, Gabriele; Da Deppo, Vania; Davidsson, Björn; Debei, Stefano; De Cecco, Mariolino; El-Maarry, Mohamed Ramy; Ferri, Francesca; Fornasier, Sonia; Fulle, Marco; Gaskell, Robert; Giacomini, Lorenza; Groussin, Olivier; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurélie; Gutierrez-Marques, P; Gutiérrez, Pedro J; Güttler, Carsten; Hoekzema, Nick; Höfner, Sebastian; Hviid, Stubbe F; Ip, Wing-Huen; Jorda, Laurent; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kovacs, Gabor; Kramm, Rainer; Kührt, Ekkehard; Küppers, Michael; La Forgia, Fiorangela; Lara, Luisa M; Lazzarin, Monica; Lee, Vicky; Leyrat, Cédric; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lopez Moreno, Josè J; Lowry, Stephen; Magrin, Sara; Maquet, Lucie; Marchi, Simone; Marzari, Francesco; Massironi, Matteo; Michalik, Harald; Moissl, Richard; Mottola, Stefano; Naletto, Giampiero; Oklay, Nilda; Pajola, Maurizio; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Thomas, Nicolas; Toth, Imre; Tubiana, Cecilia

    2015-07-01

    Pits have been observed on many cometary nuclei mapped by spacecraft. It has been argued that cometary pits are a signature of endogenic activity, rather than impact craters such as those on planetary and asteroid surfaces. Impact experiments and models cannot reproduce the shapes of most of the observed cometary pits, and the predicted collision rates imply that few of the pits are related to impacts. Alternative mechanisms like explosive activity have been suggested, but the driving process remains unknown. Here we report that pits on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko are active, and probably created by a sinkhole process, possibly accompanied by outbursts. We argue that after formation, pits expand slowly in diameter, owing to sublimation-driven retreat of the walls. Therefore, pits characterize how eroded the surface is: a fresh cometary surface will have a ragged structure with many pits, while an evolved surface will look smoother. The size and spatial distribution of pits imply that large heterogeneities exist in the physical, structural or compositional properties of the first few hundred metres below the current nucleus surface. PMID:26135448

  7. Large heterogeneities in comet 67P as revealed by active pits from sinkhole collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Bodewits, Dennis; Besse, Sébastien; Sierks, Holger; Barbieri, Cesare; Lamy, Philippe; Rodrigo, Rafael; Koschny, Detlef; Rickman, Hans; Keller, Horst Uwe; Agarwal, Jessica; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Auger, Anne-Thérèse; Barucci, M. Antonella; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Bertini, Ivano; Capanna, Claire; Cremonese, Gabriele; da Deppo, Vania; Davidsson, Björn; Debei, Stefano; de Cecco, Mariolino; El-Maarry, Mohamed Ramy; Ferri, Francesca; Fornasier, Sonia; Fulle, Marco; Gaskell, Robert; Giacomini, Lorenza; Groussin, Olivier; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurélie; Gutierrez-Marques, P.; Gutiérrez, Pedro J.; Güttler, Carsten; Hoekzema, Nick; Höfner, Sebastian; Hviid, Stubbe F.; Ip, Wing-Huen; Jorda, Laurent; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kovacs, Gabor; Kramm, Rainer; Kührt, Ekkehard; Küppers, Michael; La Forgia, Fiorangela; Lara, Luisa M.; Lazzarin, Monica; Lee, Vicky; Leyrat, Cédric; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lopez Moreno, Josè J.; Lowry, Stephen; Magrin, Sara; Maquet, Lucie; Marchi, Simone; Marzari, Francesco; Massironi, Matteo; Michalik, Harald; Moissl, Richard; Mottola, Stefano; Naletto, Giampiero; Oklay, Nilda; Pajola, Maurizio; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Thomas, Nicolas; Toth, Imre; Tubiana, Cecilia

    2015-07-01

    Pits have been observed on many cometary nuclei mapped by spacecraft. It has been argued that cometary pits are a signature of endogenic activity, rather than impact craters such as those on planetary and asteroid surfaces. Impact experiments and models cannot reproduce the shapes of most of the observed cometary pits, and the predicted collision rates imply that few of the pits are related to impacts. Alternative mechanisms like explosive activity have been suggested, but the driving process remains unknown. Here we report that pits on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko are active, and probably created by a sinkhole process, possibly accompanied by outbursts. We argue that after formation, pits expand slowly in diameter, owing to sublimation-driven retreat of the walls. Therefore, pits characterize how eroded the surface is: a fresh cometary surface will have a ragged structure with many pits, while an evolved surface will look smoother. The size and spatial distribution of pits imply that large heterogeneities exist in the physical, structural or compositional properties of the first few hundred metres below the current nucleus surface.

  8. Leisure Time Physical Activity of Moderate to Vigorous Intensity and Mortality: A Large Pooled Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Steven C.; Patel, Alpa V.; Matthews, Charles E.; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Park, Yikyung; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Linet, Martha S.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Visvanathan, Kala; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Thun, Michael; Gapstur, Susan M.; Hartge, Patricia; Lee, I-Min

    2012-01-01

    Background Leisure time physical activity reduces the risk of premature mortality, but the years of life expectancy gained at different levels remains unclear. Our objective was to determine the years of life gained after age 40 associated with various levels of physical activity, both overall and according to body mass index (BMI) groups, in a large pooled analysis. Methods and Findings We examined the association of leisure time physical activity with mortality during follow-up in pooled data from six prospective cohort studies in the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium, comprising 654,827 individuals, 21–90 y of age. Physical activity was categorized by metabolic equivalent hours per week (MET-h/wk). Life expectancies and years of life gained/lost were calculated using direct adjusted survival curves (for participants 40+ years of age), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) derived by bootstrap. The study includes a median 10 y of follow-up and 82,465 deaths. A physical activity level of 0.1–3.74 MET-h/wk, equivalent to brisk walking for up to 75 min/wk, was associated with a gain of 1.8 (95% CI: 1.6–2.0) y in life expectancy relative to no leisure time activity (0 MET-h/wk). Higher levels of physical activity were associated with greater gains in life expectancy, with a gain of 4.5 (95% CI: 4.3–4.7) y at the highest level (22.5+ MET-h/wk, equivalent to brisk walking for 450+ min/wk). Substantial gains were also observed in each BMI group. In joint analyses, being active (7.5+ MET-h/wk) and normal weight (BMI 18.5–24.9) was associated with a gain of 7.2 (95% CI: 6.5–7.9) y of life compared to being inactive (0 MET-h/wk) and obese (BMI 35.0+). A limitation was that physical activity and BMI were ascertained by self report. Conclusions More leisure time physical activity was associated with longer life expectancy across a range of activity levels and BMI groups. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23139642

  9. Transparent Large Strain Thermoplastic Polyurethane Magneto-Active Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Carpen, Ileana; Peck, John; Sola, Francisco; Bail, Justin; Lerch, Bradley; Meador, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Smart adaptive materials are an important class of materials which can be used in space deployable structures, morphing wings, and structural air vehicle components where remote actuation can improve fuel efficiency. Adaptive materials can undergo deformation when exposed to external stimuli such as electric fields, thermal gradients, radiation (IR, UV, etc.), chemical and electrochemical actuation, and magnetic field. Large strain, controlled and repetitive actuation are important characteristics of smart adaptive materials. Polymer nanocomposites can be tailored as shape memory polymers and actuators. Magnetic actuation of polymer nanocomposites using a range of iron, iron cobalt, and iron manganese nanoparticles is presented. The iron-based nanoparticles were synthesized using the soft template (1) and Sun's (2) methods. The nanoparticles shape and size were examined using TEM. The crystalline structure and domain size were evaluated using WAXS. Surface modifications of the nanoparticles were performed to improve dispersion, and were characterized with IR and TGA. TPU nanocomposites exhibited actuation for approximately 2wt% nanoparticle loading in an applied magnetic field. Large deformation and fast recovery were observed. These nanocomposites represent a promising potential for new generation of smart materials.

  10. Heterogeneities in ICC Ca2+ activity within canine large intestine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Tai; Hennig, Grant W.; Park, Kyu Joo; Bayguinov, Peter O.; Ward, Sean M.; Sanders, Kenton M.; Smith, Terence K.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims In human and canine colon, both slow (slow waves, 2–8/min) and fast (myenteric potential oscillations; MPOs, 16–20/min) electrical rhythms in the smooth muscle originate at the submucosal and myenteric borders, respectively. We used Ca2+ imaging to investigate whether ICC at these borders generated distinct rhythms. Methods Segments of canine colon were pinned submucosal or myenteric surface uppermost, or cut in cross-section. Tissues were loaded with a Ca2+ indicator (fluo-4) and activity was monitored at 36.5±0.5°C using a CCD camera. Results Rhythmic, biphasic Ca2+ transients (5–8/min), similar in waveform to electrical slow waves, propagated without decrement as a wave front through the ICC-SM network (2–5mm/s), decaying exponentially through the thickness of the CM. In contrast, rhythmic intracellular Ca2+ waves (~16/min) and spontaneous reductions in Ca2+ were observed in ICC-MY. Normally, intracellular Ca2+ waves were unsynchronized between adjacent ICC-MY, although excitatory nerve activity synchronized activity. In addition, spontaneous reductions in Ca2+ were observed that inhibited Ca2+ waves. L-NA (100µM; NO antagonist) blocked the reductions in Ca2+ and increased the frequency (~19/min) of intracellular Ca2+ waves within ICC-MY. Conclusions ICC-SM form a tightly coupled network that is able to generate and propagate slow waves. In contrast, Ca2+ transients in ICC-MY, which are normally not synchronized, have a similar duration and frequency as MPOs. Like MPOs, their activity is inhibited by nitrergic nerves and synchronized by excitatory nerves. PMID:19268670

  11. Fault analysis and detection in large active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Charles D.; Furber, Mark E.; Jordan, David C.; Blaszak, David D.

    1995-05-01

    Active optical systems are complex systems that may be expected to operate in hostile environments such as space. The ability of such a system either to tolerate failures of components or to reconfigure to accommodate failed components could significantly increase the useful lifetime of the system. Active optical systems often contain hundreds of actuators and sensor channels but have an inherent redundancy, i.e., more actuators or sensor channels than the minimum needed to achieve the required performance. A failure detection and isolation system can be used to find and accommodate failures. One type of failure is the failure of an actuator. The effect of actuator failure on the ability of a deformable mirror to correct aberrations is analyzed using a finite-element model of the deformable mirror, and a general analytical procedure for determining the effect of actuator failures on system performance is given. The application of model-based failure detection, isolation and identification algorithms to active optical systems is outlined.

  12. Large active retrodirective arrays for solar power satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1978-01-01

    An active retrodirective array (ARA) transmits a beam toward the apparent source of an illuminating signal called the pilot. The array produces the RF power. Retrodirectivity is achieved by retransmitting from each element of the array a signal whose phase is the 'conjugate' of that received by the element. Application of the ARA to the solar power satellite concept has been proposed. A method of providing a reference phase is described, called 'central phasing', which eliminates the need for a rigid structure ordinarily needed in order to realize accurate retrodirectivity.

  13. When and how to activate large new hydropower reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geressu, Robel; Harou, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Water resources system planners are increasingly required to address multiple long and short-term management objectives and the trade-offs these imply. Expansion planning in hydropower reservoir systems, where assets either temporarily or permanently reduce each other's performance, is a complex and potentially conflictual task requiring attention to multiple impacts. This paper proposes a multi-criteria scheduling approach considering many objectives and their associated uncertainties. The method considers the coordination and flexibility of reservoir operation in different expansion stages. The impact of abstraction (i.e., during filling of new reservoirs) and regulation of inflows by upstream reservoirs, is represented by simultaneously optimizing the storage size of reservoirs. Sensitivity analysis of performance given financial uncertainty and hydrological variability reveals which expansion schedules are robust to a wide range of future conditions. This informs how alternative designs compare in multiple performance dimensions and can serve stakeholders with differing attitudes towards risk and opportunity. The method is applied to proposed Blue Nile hydropower reservoirs to find efficient new dam activation schedules considering energy revenues, downstream release requirements, and energy generation during reservoir filling periods. Results take the form of Pareto-optimal trade-offs where each point on the curve or surface represents asset choices, size, activation date, and filling period reservoir operating rules. The results help explore the complex planning and management issues involved in the Blue Nile and demonstrate a possible approach to negotiate the design, filling and coordinated use of hydropower reservoirs.

  14. Multidisciplinary analysis of actively controlled large flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Paul A.; Young, John W.; Sutter, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    The control of Flexible Structures (COFS) program has supported the development of an analysis capability at the Langley Research Center called the Integrated Multidisciplinary Analysis Tool (IMAT) which provides an efficient data storage and transfer capability among commercial computer codes to aid in the dynamic analysis of actively controlled structures. IMAT is a system of computer programs which transfers Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) configurations, structural finite element models, material property and stress information, structural and rigid-body dynamic model information, and linear system matrices for control law formulation among various commercial applications programs through a common database. Although general in its formulation, IMAT was developed specifically to aid in the evaluation of the structures. A description of the IMAT system and results of an application of the system are given.

  15. Active assembly for large-scale manufacturing of integrated nanostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Spoerke, Erik David; Bunker, Bruce Conrad; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Bachand, George David; Hendricks, Judy K.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2007-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins are protein-based biological agents that work cooperatively to facilitate the organization and transport of nanomaterials within living organisms. This report describes the application of these biological agents as tools in a novel, interdisciplinary scheme for assembling integrated nanostructures. Specifically, selective chemistries were used to direct the favorable adsorption of active motor proteins onto lithographically-defined gold electrodes. Taking advantage of the specific affinity these motor proteins have for microtubules, the motor proteins were used to capture polymerized microtubules out of suspension to form dense patterns of microtubules and microtubule bridges between gold electrodes. These microtubules were then used as biofunctionalized templates to direct the organization of functionalized nanocargo including single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles. This biologically-mediated scheme for nanomaterials assembly has shown excellent promise as a foundation for developing new biohybrid approaches to nanoscale manufacturing.

  16. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  17. Pancreatic Stem Cells Remain Unresolved

    PubMed Central

    Morahan, Grant

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is caused by absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency of insulin-secreting islet β cells. An ideal treatment of diabetes would, therefore, be to replace the lost or deficient β cells, by transplantation of donated islets or differentiated endocrine cells or by regeneration of endogenous islet cells. Due to their ability of unlimited proliferation and differentiation into all functional lineages in our body, including β cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are ideally placed as cell sources for a diabetic transplantation therapy. Unfortunately, the inability to generate functional differentiated islet cells from pluripotent stem cells and the poor availability of donor islets have severely restricted the broad clinical use of the replacement therapy. Therefore, endogenous sources that can be directed to becoming insulin-secreting cells are actively sought after. In particular, any cell types in the developing or adult pancreas that may act as pancreatic stem cells (PSC) would provide an alternative renewable source for endogenous regeneration. In this review, we will summarize the latest progress and knowledge of such PSC, and discuss ways that facilitate the future development of this often controversial, but crucial research. PMID:25132582

  18. 76 FR 81481 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Notice of Intent to Renew Collection, Large Trader Reports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... COMMISSION Agency Information Collection Activities: Notice of Intent to Renew Collection, Large Trader.... Large Trader Reports, OMB Control No. 3038-0009--Extension Parts 15 through 19 and 21 of the Commission's regulations under the Commodity Exchange Act (Act) require large trader reports from...

  19. A novel method for the activity measurement of large-area beta reference sources.

    PubMed

    Stanga, D; De Felice, P; Keightley, J; Capogni, M; Ioan, M R

    2016-03-01

    A novel method has been developed for the activity measurement of large-area beta reference sources. It makes use of two emission rate measurements and is based on the weak dependence between the source activity and the activity distribution for a given value of transmission coefficient. The method was checked experimentally by measuring the activity of two ((60)Co and (137)Cs) large-area reference sources constructed from anodized aluminum foils. Measurement results were compared with the activity values measured by gamma spectrometry. For each source, they agree within one standard uncertainty and also agree within the same limits with the certified values of the source activity. PMID:26701656

  20. Analysis and Management of Large-Scale Activities Based on Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaofan; Ji, Jingwei; Lu, Ligang; Wang, Zhiyi

    Based on the concepts of system safety engineering, life-cycle and interface that comes from American system safety standard MIL-STD-882E, and apply them to the process of risk analysis and management of large-scale activities. Identify the involved personnel, departments, funds and other contents throughout the life cycle of large-scale activities. Recognize and classify the ultimate risk sources of people, objects and environment of large-scale activities from the perspective of interface. Put forward the accident cause analysis model according to the previous large-scale activities' accidents and combine with the analysis of the risk source interface. Analyze the risks of each interface and summary various types of risks the large-scale activities faced. Come up with the risk management consciousness, policies and regulations, risk control and supervision departments improvement ideas.

  1. Radio-selected Binary Active Galactic Nuclei from the Very Large Array Stripe 82 Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hai; Myers, A. D.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Yan, Lin; Wrobel, J. M.; Stockton, A.

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy mergers play an important role in the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes. Simulations suggest that tidal interactions could enhance black hole accretion, which can be tested by the fraction of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) among galaxy mergers. However, determining the fraction requires a statistical sample of binaries. We have identified kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs directly from high-resolution radio imaging. Inside the 92 deg2 covered by the high-resolution Very Large Array survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field, we identified 22 grade A and 30 grade B candidates of binary radio AGNs with angular separations less than 5'' (10 kpc at z = 0.1). Eight of the candidates have optical spectra for both components from the SDSS spectroscopic surveys and our Keck program. Two grade B candidates are projected pairs, but the remaining six candidates are all compelling cases of binary AGNs based on either emission line ratios or the excess in radio power compared to the Hα-traced star formation rate. Only two of the six binaries were previously discovered by an optical spectroscopic search. Based on these results, we estimate that ~60% of our binary candidates would be confirmed once we obtain complete spectroscopic information. We conclude that wide-area high-resolution radio surveys offer an efficient method to identify large samples of binary AGNs. These radio-selected binary AGNs complement binaries identified at other wavelengths and are useful for understanding the triggering mechanisms of black hole accretion. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  2. RADIO-SELECTED BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FROM THE VERY LARGE ARRAY STRIPE 82 SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Hai; Myers, A. D.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Yan, Lin; Wrobel, J. M.; Stockton, A.

    2015-01-20

    Galaxy mergers play an important role in the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes. Simulations suggest that tidal interactions could enhance black hole accretion, which can be tested by the fraction of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) among galaxy mergers. However, determining the fraction requires a statistical sample of binaries. We have identified kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs directly from high-resolution radio imaging. Inside the 92 deg{sup 2} covered by the high-resolution Very Large Array survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field, we identified 22 grade A and 30 grade B candidates of binary radio AGNs with angular separations less than 5'' (10 kpc at z = 0.1). Eight of the candidates have optical spectra for both components from the SDSS spectroscopic surveys and our Keck program. Two grade B candidates are projected pairs, but the remaining six candidates are all compelling cases of binary AGNs based on either emission line ratios or the excess in radio power compared to the Hα-traced star formation rate. Only two of the six binaries were previously discovered by an optical spectroscopic search. Based on these results, we estimate that ∼60% of our binary candidates would be confirmed once we obtain complete spectroscopic information. We conclude that wide-area high-resolution radio surveys offer an efficient method to identify large samples of binary AGNs. These radio-selected binary AGNs complement binaries identified at other wavelengths and are useful for understanding the triggering mechanisms of black hole accretion.

  3. Large space antenna communications systems: Integrated Langley Research Center/Jet Propulsion Laboratory development activities. 2: Langley Research Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, T. G.; Bailey, M. C.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1983-01-01

    The electromagnetic analysis activities at the Langley Research Center are resulting in efficient and accurate analytical methods for predicting both far- and near-field radiation characteristics of large offset multiple-beam multiple-aperture mesh reflector antennas. The utilization of aperture integration augmented with Geometrical Theory of Diffraction in analyzing the large reflector antenna system is emphasized.

  4. Passive and Active Vibrations Allow Self-Organization in Large-Scale Electromechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, Arturo; Fortuna, Carlo Famoso Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the role of passive and active vibrations for the control of nonlinear large-scale electromechanical systems is investigated. The mathematical model of the system is discussed and detailed experimental results are shown in order to prove that coupling the effects of feedback and vibrations elicited by proper control signals makes possible to regularize imperfect uncertain large-scale systems.

  5. A Fundamental Study for Efficient Implementaion of Online Collaborative Activities in Large-Scale Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuba, Ryuichi; Suzuki, Yusei; Kubota, Shin-Ichiro; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    We study tactics for writing skills development through cross-disciplinary learning in online large-scale classes, and particularly are interested in implementation of online collaborative activities such as peer reviewing of writing. The goal of our study is to carry out collaborative works efficiently via online effectively in large-scale…

  6. NeuroCa: integrated framework for systematic analysis of spatiotemporal neuronal activity patterns from large-scale optical recording data

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Jee; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Optical recording facilitates monitoring the activity of a large neural network at the cellular scale, but the analysis and interpretation of the collected data remain challenging. Here, we present a MATLAB-based toolbox, named NeuroCa, for the automated processing and quantitative analysis of large-scale calcium imaging data. Our tool includes several computational algorithms to extract the calcium spike trains of individual neurons from the calcium imaging data in an automatic fashion. Two algorithms were developed to decompose the imaging data into the activity of individual cells and subsequently detect calcium spikes from each neuronal signal. Applying our method to dense networks in dissociated cultures, we were able to obtain the calcium spike trains of ∼1000 neurons in a few minutes. Further analyses using these data permitted the quantification of neuronal responses to chemical stimuli as well as functional mapping of spatiotemporal patterns in neuronal firing within the spontaneous, synchronous activity of a large network. These results demonstrate that our method not only automates time-consuming, labor-intensive tasks in the analysis of neural data obtained using optical recording techniques but also provides a systematic way to visualize and quantify the collective dynamics of a network in terms of its cellular elements. PMID:26229973

  7. ActivitySim: large-scale agent based activity generation for infrastructure simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gali, Emmanuel; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Mniszewski, Sue; Cuellar, Leticia; Teuscher, Christof

    2008-01-01

    The United States' Department of Homeland Security aims to model, simulate, and analyze critical infrastructure and their interdependencies across multiple sectors such as electric power, telecommunications, water distribution, transportation, etc. We introduce ActivitySim, an activity simulator for a population of millions of individual agents each characterized by a set of demographic attributes that is based on US census data. ActivitySim generates daily schedules for each agent that consists of a sequence of activities, such as sleeping, shopping, working etc., each being scheduled at a geographic location, such as businesses or private residences that is appropriate for the activity type and for the personal situation of the agent. ActivitySim has been developed as part of a larger effort to understand the interdependencies among national infrastructure networks and their demand profiles that emerge from the different activities of individuals in baseline scenarios as well as emergency scenarios, such as hurricane evacuations. We present the scalable software engineering principles underlying ActivitySim, the socia-technical modeling paradigms that drive the activity generation, and proof-of-principle results for a scenario in the Twin Cities, MN area of 2.6 M agents.

  8. Comparison of ground and aerial application, fungicide deposition and biological activity in large pecan tree canopies.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study was conducted to determine vertical spray deposition in pecan canopies of large trees and to estimate the biological activity of the deposited fungicides. Tracer elements were used at molar concentrations equivalent to the molar amount of active ingredient found in the recommended rates o...

  9. Implementing Experiential Learning Activities in a Large Enrollment Introductory Food Science and Human Nutrition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohn, Dawn M.; Schmidt, Shelly J.

    2008-01-01

    Experiential learning activities are often viewed as impractical, and potentially unfeasible, instructional tools to employ in a large enrollment course. Research has shown, though, that the metacognitive skills that students utilize while participating in experiential learning activities enable them to assess their true level of understanding and…

  10. Unraveling Kinase Activation Dynamics Using Kinase-Substrate Relationships from Temporal Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Rima; Yang, Pengyi; Vafaee, Fatemeh; Fazakerley, Daniel; Humphrey, Sean; James, David; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    In response to stimuli, biological processes are tightly controlled by dynamic cellular signaling mechanisms. Reversible protein phosphorylation occurs on rapid time-scales (milliseconds to seconds), making it an ideal carrier of these signals. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have led to the identification of many tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites, yet for the majority of these the kinase is unknown and the underlying network topology of signaling networks therefore remains obscured. Identifying kinase substrate relationships (KSRs) is therefore an important goal in cell signaling research. Existing consensus sequence motif based prediction algorithms do not consider the biological context of KSRs, and are therefore insensitive to many other mechanisms guiding kinase-substrate recognition in cellular contexts. Here, we use temporal information to identify biologically relevant KSRs from Large-scale In Vivo Experiments (KSR-LIVE) in a data-dependent and automated fashion. First, we used available phosphorylation databases to construct a repository of existing experimentally-predicted KSRs. For each kinase in this database, we used time-resolved phosphoproteomics data to examine how its substrates changed in phosphorylation over time. Although substrates for a particular kinase clustered together, they often exhibited a different temporal pattern to the phosphorylation of the kinase. Therefore, although phosphorylation regulates kinase activity, our findings imply that substrate phosphorylation likely serve as a better proxy for kinase activity than kinase phosphorylation. KSR-LIVE can thereby infer which kinases are regulated within a biological context. Moreover, KSR-LIVE can also be used to automatically generate positive training sets for the subsequent prediction of novel KSRs using machine learning approaches. We demonstrate that this approach can distinguish between Akt and Rps6kb1, two kinases that share the same linear consensus motif

  11. Unraveling Kinase Activation Dynamics Using Kinase-Substrate Relationships from Temporal Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Studies.

    PubMed

    Domanova, Westa; Krycer, James; Chaudhuri, Rima; Yang, Pengyi; Vafaee, Fatemeh; Fazakerley, Daniel; Humphrey, Sean; James, David; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    In response to stimuli, biological processes are tightly controlled by dynamic cellular signaling mechanisms. Reversible protein phosphorylation occurs on rapid time-scales (milliseconds to seconds), making it an ideal carrier of these signals. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have led to the identification of many tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites, yet for the majority of these the kinase is unknown and the underlying network topology of signaling networks therefore remains obscured. Identifying kinase substrate relationships (KSRs) is therefore an important goal in cell signaling research. Existing consensus sequence motif based prediction algorithms do not consider the biological context of KSRs, and are therefore insensitive to many other mechanisms guiding kinase-substrate recognition in cellular contexts. Here, we use temporal information to identify biologically relevant KSRs from Large-scale In Vivo Experiments (KSR-LIVE) in a data-dependent and automated fashion. First, we used available phosphorylation databases to construct a repository of existing experimentally-predicted KSRs. For each kinase in this database, we used time-resolved phosphoproteomics data to examine how its substrates changed in phosphorylation over time. Although substrates for a particular kinase clustered together, they often exhibited a different temporal pattern to the phosphorylation of the kinase. Therefore, although phosphorylation regulates kinase activity, our findings imply that substrate phosphorylation likely serve as a better proxy for kinase activity than kinase phosphorylation. KSR-LIVE can thereby infer which kinases are regulated within a biological context. Moreover, KSR-LIVE can also be used to automatically generate positive training sets for the subsequent prediction of novel KSRs using machine learning approaches. We demonstrate that this approach can distinguish between Akt and Rps6kb1, two kinases that share the same linear consensus motif

  12. Association of Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma and Active Toxoplasmosis in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Sayyahfar, Shirin; Karimi, Abdollah; Gharib, Atoosa; Fahimzad, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a subset of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and an unusual disease in children. Case Presentation: Herein we have reported a 7- year- old girl with a large necrotic skin ulcer on the chest caused by systemic form of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and simultaneous active toxoplasmosis diagnosed by PCR on lymph node specimen. There were few reports showing a role for toxoplasma infection to cause some malignancies such as lymphoma in adults. Conclusions: Based to our knowledge, this has been the first report of simultaneous systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma and active toxoplasmosis, documented by positive PCR on tissue biopsy in a child. This case report has suggested more attention to the accompanying Toxoplasma gondii infection as a probable cause of some types of lymphomas. PMID:26478795

  13. Sustaining Community Participation: What Remains After the Money Ends?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkansa, Grace Akukwe; Chapman, David W.

    2006-12-01

    SUSTAINING COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION: WHAT REMAINS AFTER THE MONEY ENDS? - A major concern confronting development specialists in the education sector is the sustainability of project activities and outcomes, that is, their ability to persist once external funding ends. The increased attention of international development-assistance organizations to sustainability reflects the greater recent focus on outcome-based funding. The present study investigates differences between six communities in Ghana that varied in their ability to sustain externally initiated community-participation activities beyond the life of the external development-assistance project that promoted those activities. It was hypothesized that high- and low-sustaining communities differ in eight managerial and socio-cultural dimensions suggested by earlier research to be important for sustainability of community-level activities: planning, transparency, leadership, and participation, on one hand, and, on the other, social cohesion, resources, community skills, and valuing of education. Findings indicate that leadership and social cohesion are the two most vital elements in the sustainability of organizational structures intended to promote community participation in the oversight of local schools. Other factors suggested by the model are largely subsumed under leadership, so that the model can be simplified.

  14. Active compensation of large dispersion of femtosecond pulses for precision laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Lee, Keunwoo; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2011-02-28

    We describe an active way of compensation for large dispersion induced in the femtosecond light pulses travelling in air for laser ranging. The pulse duration is consistently regulated at 250 fs by dispersion control, allowing sub-micrometer resolution in measuring long distances by means of time-of-flight measurement. This method could facilitate more reliable applications of femtosecond pulses for satellite laser ranging, laser altimetry and active LIDAR applications. PMID:21369227

  15. A modified method for the characterisation and activity determination of large area sources.

    PubMed

    Svec, A; Janssen, H; Pernická, L; Klein, R

    2006-01-01

    Large area sources emitting alpha and beta radiations, respectively, are often used for calibrations of surface contamination monitors and meters. It is well known, however, that their properties are strongly influenced by their construction and by their active layer preparation. Non-uniformity of activity distributions over the active surface and the thickness of absorption and backscattering layers cause changes not only in the ratio of particle emission rate and activity but also in emitted particle spectra distributions. Consequently, different sources need to be characterised by one or more parameters related to their emitted particle spectra and used for their activity determination. A modified method based on simple particle absorption spectrometry has been developed. The correlation between a source characteristic parameter and its radiation detection efficiency is utilised for its activity estimation. PMID:16549354

  16. Support of an Active Science Project by a Large Information System: Lessons for the EOS Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelici, Gary L.; Skiles, J. W.; Popovici, Lidia Z.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of large information systems to support the changing data requirements of active science projects is being tested in a NASA collaborative study. This paper briefly profiles both the active science project and the large information system involved in this effort and offers some observations about the effectiveness of the project support. This is followed by lessons that are important for those participating in large information systems that need to support active science projects or that make available the valuable data produced by these projects. We learned in this work that it is difficult for a large information system focused on long term data management to satisfy the requirements of an on-going science project. For example, in order to provide the best service, it is important for all information system staff to keep focused on the needs and constraints of the scientists in the development of appropriate services. If the lessons learned in this and other science support experiences are not applied by those involved with large information systems of the EOS (Earth Observing System) era, then the final data products produced by future science projects may not be robust or of high quality, thereby making the conduct of the project science less efficacious and reducing the value of these unique suites of data for future research.

  17. A Simple and Effective Protein Folding Activity Suitable for Large Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive hands-on simulation of protein folding suitable for use in large lecture classes. This activity uses a minimum of parts, tools, and skill to simulate some of the fundamental principles of protein folding. The major concepts targeted are that proteins begin as linear polypeptides and fold to…

  18. Using Technology To Implement Active Learning in Large Classes. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerace, William J.; Dufresne, Robert J.; Leonard, William J.

    An emerging technology, classroom communication systems (CCSs), has the potential to transform the way we teach science in large-lecture settings. CCSs can serve as catalysts for creating a more interactive, student-centered classroom in the lecture hall, thereby allowing students to become more actively involved in constructing and using…

  19. Implementation and Evaluation of a Values Clarification Activity for a Large Undergraduate Human Sexuality Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederer, Alyssa M.

    2016-01-01

    Values clarification is an important tool that helps individuals to clarify their beliefs about sexuality-related issues. This lesson plan provides instructions for a 1-hour values clarification activity for a large undergraduate human sexuality course that serves as an introduction to course content and tone, stimulates students' initial thinking…

  20. Active Learning in a Large Medical Classroom Setting for Teaching Renal Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.; Stevenson, Frazier T.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an active learning exercise which has been used to replace some lecture hours in the renal portion of an integrated, organ system-based curriculum for first-year medical students. The exercise takes place in a large auditorium with ~150 students. The authors, who are faculty members, lead the discussions,…

  1. Chronic, Wireless Recordings of Large Scale Brain Activity in Freely Moving Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, David A.; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Hanson, Timothy L.; Dimitrov, Dragan F.; Lehew, Gary; Meloy, Jim; Rajangam, Sankaranarayani; Subramanian, Vivek; Ifft, Peter J.; Li, Zheng; Ramakrishnan, Arjun; Tate, Andrew; Zhuang, Katie; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in techniques for recording large-scale brain activity contribute to both the elucidation of neurophysiological principles and the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). Here we describe a neurophysiological paradigm for performing tethered and wireless large-scale recordings based on movable volumetric three-dimensional (3D) multielectrode implants. This approach allowed us to isolate up to 1,800 units per animal and simultaneously record the extracellular activity of close to 500 cortical neurons, distributed across multiple cortical areas, in freely behaving rhesus monkeys. The method is expandable, in principle, to thousands of simultaneously recorded channels. It also allows increased recording longevity (5 consecutive years), and recording of a broad range of behaviors, e.g. social interactions, and BMI paradigms in freely moving primates. We propose that wireless large-scale recordings could have a profound impact on basic primate neurophysiology research, while providing a framework for the development and testing of clinically relevant neuroprostheses. PMID:24776634

  2. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca(2+), possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus. PMID:27445840

  3. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca2+, possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus.

  4. Reflector adjustment for a large radio telescope based on active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tongying; Zhang, Zhenchao; Li, Aihua; Wang, You

    2012-09-01

    The reflector deformation caused by gravity, temperature, humidity, wind loading and so on can reduce the global performance of a large radio telescope. In this paper, considering the characteristics of the primary reflector of a 13.7 m millimeter-wave telescope a novel reflector adjustment method based on active optics has therefore been proposed to control the active surface of the reflector through the communication between the active surface computer and embedded intelligent controller with a large quantity of displacement actuators, in which the active surface computer estimates and controls the real time active surface figure at any elevation angle, reduces or eliminates the adverse effects of the reflector deformation to increase the resolution and sensitivity of the radio telescope due to the more radio signals collected. A Controller Area Network /Ethernet protocol converter is designed for the communication between the active surface control computer as a host computer in Ethernet and the displacement actuator controller in Controller Area Network. The displacement actuator is driven by a stepper motor and controlled by an intelligent controller with the data from the active surface computer. The closed-loop control of the stepper motor improves the control accuracy greatly through the feedback link based on the optical encoder.

  5. Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen has growth-promoting and inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingwei; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Paulson, Kelly G; Nghiem, Paul; DeCaprio, James A

    2013-06-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive form of skin cancer. In at least 80% of all MCC, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) DNA has undergone clonal integration into the host cell genome, and most tumors express the MCPyV large and small T antigens. In all cases of MCC reported to date, the integrated MCPyV genome has undergone mutations in the large T antigen. These mutations result in expression of a truncated large T antigen that retains the Rb binding or LXCXE motif but deletes the DNA binding and helicase domains. However, the transforming functions of full-length and truncated MCPyV large T antigen are unknown. We compared the transforming activities of full-length, truncated, and alternatively spliced 57kT forms of MCPyV large T antigen. MCPyV large T antigen could bind to Rb but was unable to bind to p53. Furthermore, MCPyV-truncated large T antigen was more effective than full-length and 57kT large T antigen in promoting the growth of human and mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, expression of the MCPyV large T antigen C-terminal 100 residues could inhibit the growth of several different cell types. These data imply that the deletion of the C terminus of MCPyV large T antigen found in MCC serves not only to disrupt viral replication but also results in the loss of a distinct growth-inhibitory function intrinsic to this region. PMID:23514892

  6. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T Antigen Has Growth-Promoting and Inhibitory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jingwei; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Paulson, Kelly G.; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive form of skin cancer. In at least 80% of all MCC, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) DNA has undergone clonal integration into the host cell genome, and most tumors express the MCPyV large and small T antigens. In all cases of MCC reported to date, the integrated MCPyV genome has undergone mutations in the large T antigen. These mutations result in expression of a truncated large T antigen that retains the Rb binding or LXCXE motif but deletes the DNA binding and helicase domains. However, the transforming functions of full-length and truncated MCPyV large T antigen are unknown. We compared the transforming activities of full-length, truncated, and alternatively spliced 57kT forms of MCPyV large T antigen. MCPyV large T antigen could bind to Rb but was unable to bind to p53. Furthermore, MCPyV-truncated large T antigen was more effective than full-length and 57kT large T antigen in promoting the growth of human and mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, expression of the MCPyV large T antigen C-terminal 100 residues could inhibit the growth of several different cell types. These data imply that the deletion of the C terminus of MCPyV large T antigen found in MCC serves not only to disrupt viral replication but also results in the loss of a distinct growth-inhibitory function intrinsic to this region. PMID:23514892

  7. Preparation of activated carbon with large specific surface area from reed black liquor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Zhang, J P; Yang, G; Li, Z H

    2007-05-01

    Activated carbon with large specific surface area and well-developed porosity was prepared from pyrolysis of K2CO3-impregnated lignin precipitated from reed pulp black liquors. The impregnation ratio was 1:1. The effect of activation temperature upon the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area and pore volume of the carbon was closely investigated. Increasing activation temperature led to an opening and widening of the porous structure below 800'C. Above 800'C, the excess widening of pore led to the decrease of BET surface area and micropore volume. The BET surface area and pore volume of the carbon activated at 800 degrees C were 1395 m(2) g(-1) and 0.7702 ml g(-1) , respectively. The potential application of the carbon activated at 800 degrees C for removal of Cr (VI) was also investigated. The experimental results showed that it had good adsorption capacity. PMID:17615958

  8. Active polishing technology for large aperture aspherical mirror and ultra thin mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xaingqun; Gao, Bilie; Li, Xinnan

    2006-02-01

    Some results on active polishing technology for large aperture aspherical mirrors and ultra thin mirrors, which have been developed in recent years in Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, CAS, are presented in this paper. There are two polishing methods developed for the large aperture ultra thin mirrors with two different trial mirrors respectively. One is a hexagonal mirror with diagonal size of 1100mm, and thickness of 25mm by no-separate support method specially for polish the sub-mirror of Schmidt corrector of LAMOST, which is a national large scientific project of China. Another is a circular mirror with 1035mm in diameter and 26mm in thickness by active support method. The active stressed polishing technology developed for large aperture aspherical mirror with fast f ratio, and a paraboloidal mirror with a diameter of 910mm and an f ratio 2 as was successfully polished. The computer controlled polishing is also different from the normal way in the system. Some complicated aspects were added. The results showed the final surface accuracy of all these trial mirrors is better than expected requirements for normal application in astronomical telescopes.

  9. Spontaneous Neuronal Activity in Developing Neocortical Networks: From Single Cells to Large-Scale Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Heiko J.; Sinning, Anne; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Stüttgen, Maik C.; Kirischuk, Sergei; Kilb, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal activity has been shown to be essential for the proper formation of neuronal circuits, affecting developmental processes like neurogenesis, migration, programmed cell death, cellular differentiation, formation of local and long-range axonal connections, synaptic plasticity or myelination. Accordingly, neocortical areas reveal distinct spontaneous and sensory-driven neuronal activity patterns already at early phases of development. At embryonic stages, when immature neurons start to develop voltage-dependent channels, spontaneous activity is highly synchronized within small neuronal networks and governed by electrical synaptic transmission. Subsequently, spontaneous activity patterns become more complex, involve larger networks and propagate over several neocortical areas. The developmental shift from local to large-scale network activity is accompanied by a gradual shift from electrical to chemical synaptic transmission with an initial excitatory action of chloride-gated channels activated by GABA, glycine and taurine. Transient neuronal populations in the subplate (SP) support temporary circuits that play an important role in tuning early neocortical activity and the formation of mature neuronal networks. Thus, early spontaneous activity patterns control the formation of developing networks in sensory cortices, and disturbances of these activity patterns may lead to long-lasting neuronal deficits. PMID:27252626

  10. Spontaneous Neuronal Activity in Developing Neocortical Networks: From Single Cells to Large-Scale Interactions.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Sinning, Anne; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Stüttgen, Maik C; Kirischuk, Sergei; Kilb, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal activity has been shown to be essential for the proper formation of neuronal circuits, affecting developmental processes like neurogenesis, migration, programmed cell death, cellular differentiation, formation of local and long-range axonal connections, synaptic plasticity or myelination. Accordingly, neocortical areas reveal distinct spontaneous and sensory-driven neuronal activity patterns already at early phases of development. At embryonic stages, when immature neurons start to develop voltage-dependent channels, spontaneous activity is highly synchronized within small neuronal networks and governed by electrical synaptic transmission. Subsequently, spontaneous activity patterns become more complex, involve larger networks and propagate over several neocortical areas. The developmental shift from local to large-scale network activity is accompanied by a gradual shift from electrical to chemical synaptic transmission with an initial excitatory action of chloride-gated channels activated by GABA, glycine and taurine. Transient neuronal populations in the subplate (SP) support temporary circuits that play an important role in tuning early neocortical activity and the formation of mature neuronal networks. Thus, early spontaneous activity patterns control the formation of developing networks in sensory cortices, and disturbances of these activity patterns may lead to long-lasting neuronal deficits. PMID:27252626

  11. Large-scale filament formation inhibits the activity of CTP synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Rachael M; Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Lorestani, Alexander; Charles, Emeric J; Habrian, Chris H; Hansen, Jesse M; Li, Hsin-Jung; Baldwin, Enoch P; Wingreen, Ned S; Kollman, Justin M; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-01-01

    CTP Synthetase (CtpS) is a universally conserved and essential metabolic enzyme. While many enzymes form small oligomers, CtpS forms large-scale filamentous structures of unknown function in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. By simultaneously monitoring CtpS polymerization and enzymatic activity, we show that polymerization inhibits activity, and CtpS's product, CTP, induces assembly. To understand how assembly inhibits activity, we used electron microscopy to define the structure of CtpS polymers. This structure suggests that polymerization sterically hinders a conformational change necessary for CtpS activity. Structure-guided mutagenesis and mathematical modeling further indicate that coupling activity to polymerization promotes cooperative catalytic regulation. This previously uncharacterized regulatory mechanism is important for cellular function since a mutant that disrupts CtpS polymerization disrupts E. coli growth and metabolic regulation without reducing CTP levels. We propose that regulation by large-scale polymerization enables ultrasensitive control of enzymatic activity while storing an enzyme subpopulation in a conformationally restricted form that is readily activatable. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03638.001 PMID:25030911

  12. Natural Bile Acids and Synthetic Analogues Modulate Large Conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) Channel Activity in Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alejandro M.; Walsh, John V.; Singer, Joshua J.

    2002-01-01

    Bile acids have been reported to produce relaxation of smooth muscle both in vitro and in vivo. The cellular mechanisms underlying bile acid–induced relaxation are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate, using patch-clamp techniques, that natural bile acids and synthetic analogues reversibly increase BKCa channel activity in rabbit mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells. In excised inside-out patches bile acid–induced increases in channel activity are characterized by a parallel leftward shift in the activity-voltage relationship. This increase in BKCa channel activity is not due to Ca2+-dependent mechanism(s) or changes in freely diffusible messengers, but to a direct action of the bile acid on the channel protein itself or some closely associated component in the cell membrane. For naturally occurring bile acids, the magnitude of bile acid–induced increase in BKCa channel activity is inversely related to the number of hydroxyl groups in the bile acid molecule. By using synthetic analogues, we demonstrate that such increase in activity is not affected by several chemical modifications in the lateral chain of the molecule, but is markedly favored by polar groups in the side of the steroid rings opposite to the side where the methyl groups are located, which stresses the importance of the planar polarity of the molecule. Bile acid–induced increases in BKCa channel activity are also observed in smooth muscle cells freshly dissociated from rabbit main pulmonary artery and gallbladder, raising the possibility that a direct activation of BKCa channels by these planar steroids is a widespread phenomenon in many smooth muscle cell types. Bile acid concentrations that increase BKCa channel activity in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells are found in the systemic circulation under a variety of human pathophysiological conditions, and their ability to enhance BKCa channel activity may explain their relaxing effect on smooth muscle. PMID:11865021

  13. Imaging large-scale cellular activity in spinal cord of freely behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Kohei J; Shekhtmeyster, Pavel; Merten, Katharina; Arena, Alexander; Cook, Daniela; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Ngo, Alexander; Nimmerjahn, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Sensory information from mechanoreceptors and nociceptors in the skin plays key roles in adaptive and protective motor behaviours. To date, very little is known about how this information is encoded by spinal cord cell types and their activity patterns, particularly under freely behaving conditions. To enable stable measurement of neuronal and glial cell activity in behaving mice, we have developed fluorescence imaging approaches based on two- and miniaturized one-photon microscopy. We show that distinct cutaneous stimuli activate overlapping ensembles of dorsal horn neurons, and that stimulus type and intensity is encoded at the single-cell level. In contrast, astrocytes show large-scale coordinated calcium responses to intense but not weak sensory inputs. Sensory-evoked activity is potently suppressed by anaesthesia. By revealing the cellular and computational logic of spinal cord networks under behaving conditions, our approach holds promise for better understanding of healthy and aberrant spinal cord processes. PMID:27121084

  14. Activity sampling of nurses of a sub-acute ward of a large hospital.

    PubMed

    Bobdey, C S; Sandhu, M S; Urmil, A C; Dayakar, T

    1992-07-01

    A study was conducted in a 43 bedded subacute family ward of a large hospital to find out the adequacy and efficiency of its nursing service. Activity analysis in respect of nurses was carried out by Activity Sampling Technique. The study revealed that out of 334 activities, observed, 78 (23.3%) were non-productive, whereas 256 (76.7%) were productive. Out of the productive activities, 148 (44.3%) were for direct patient care mainly comprising of 46 (31.1% for carrying out technical procedures, 36 (24.32%) for determining patients' needs, 20 (13.15%) for preparing patients for various procedures and 15 (10.14%) for assisting in technical procedures. Number wise the nurses were found to be adequate. PMID:10130935

  15. Imaging large-scale cellular activity in spinal cord of freely behaving mice

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Kohei J.; Shekhtmeyster, Pavel; Merten, Katharina; Arena, Alexander; Cook, Daniela; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Ngo, Alexander; Nimmerjahn, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Sensory information from mechanoreceptors and nociceptors in the skin plays key roles in adaptive and protective motor behaviours. To date, very little is known about how this information is encoded by spinal cord cell types and their activity patterns, particularly under freely behaving conditions. To enable stable measurement of neuronal and glial cell activity in behaving mice, we have developed fluorescence imaging approaches based on two- and miniaturized one-photon microscopy. We show that distinct cutaneous stimuli activate overlapping ensembles of dorsal horn neurons, and that stimulus type and intensity is encoded at the single-cell level. In contrast, astrocytes show large-scale coordinated calcium responses to intense but not weak sensory inputs. Sensory-evoked activity is potently suppressed by anaesthesia. By revealing the cellular and computational logic of spinal cord networks under behaving conditions, our approach holds promise for better understanding of healthy and aberrant spinal cord processes. PMID:27121084

  16. Holographic fiber bundle system for patterned optogenetic activation of large-scale neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Farah, Nairouz; Levinsky, Alexandra; Brosh, Inbar; Kahn, Itamar; Shoham, Shy

    2015-10-01

    Optogenetic perturbation has become a fundamental tool in controlling activity in neurons. Used to control activity in cell cultures, slice preparations, anesthetized and awake behaving animals, optical control of cell-type specific activity enables the interrogation of complex systems. A remaining challenge in developing optical control tools is the ability to produce defined light patterns such that power-efficient, precise control of neuronal populations is obtained. Here, we describe a system for patterned stimulation that enables the generation of structured activity in neurons by transmitting optical patterns from computer-generated holograms through an optical fiber bundle. The system couples the optical system to versatile fiber bundle configurations, including coherent or incoherent bundles composed of hundreds of up to several meters long fibers. We describe the components of the system, a method for calibration, and a detailed power efficiency and spatial specificity quantification. Next, we use the system to precisely control single-cell activity as measured by extracellular electrophysiological recordings in ChR2-expressing cortical cell cultures. The described system complements recent descriptions of optical control systems, presenting a system suitable for high-resolution spatiotemporal optical control of wide-area neural networks in vitro and in vivo, yielding a tool for precise neural system interrogation. PMID:26793741

  17. Targeting Large Kinase Active Site with Rigid, Bulky Octahedral Ruthenium Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimoska, Jasna; Feng, Li; Harms, Klaus; Yi, Chunling; Kissil, Joseph; Marmorstein, Ronen; Meggers, Eric

    2009-09-02

    A strategy for targeting protein kinases with large ATP-binding sites by using bulky and rigid octahedral ruthenium complexes as structural scaffolds is presented. A highly potent and selective GSK3 and Pim1 half-sandwich complex NP309 was successfully converted into a PAK1 inhibitor by making use of the large octahedral compounds {Lambda}-FL172 and {Lambda}-FL411 in which the cyclopentadienyl moiety of NP309 is replaced by a chloride and sterically demanding diimine ligands. A 1.65 {angstrom}cocrystal structure of PAK1 with {Lambda}-FL172 reveals how the large coordination sphere of the ruthenium complex matches the size of the active site and serves as a yardstick to discriminate between otherwise closely related binding sites.

  18. CNTF-Treated Astrocyte Conditioned Medium Enhances Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel Activity in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-08-01

    Seizure activity is linked to astrocyte activation as well as dysfunctional cortical neuron excitability produced from changes in calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channel function. Ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) can be used to investigate the peripheral effects of activated astrocytes upon cortical neurons. However, CNTF-ACM's effect upon KCa channel activity in cultured cortical neurons has not yet been investigated. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed in rat cortical neurons to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon charybdotoxin-sensitive large-conductance KCa (BK) channel currents and apamin-sensitive small-conductance KCa (SK) channel current. Biotinylation and RT-PCR were applied to assess CNTF-ACM's effects upon the protein and mRNA expression, respectively, of the SK channel subunits SK2 and SK3 and the BK channel subunits BKα1 and BKβ3. An anti-fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) monoclonal neutralizing antibody was used to assess the effects of the FGF-2 component of CNTF-ACM. CNTF-ACM significantly increased KCa channel current density, which was predominantly attributable to gains in BK channel activity (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM produced a significant increase in BKα1 and BKβ3 expression (p < 0.05) but had no significant effect upon SK2 or SK3 expression (p > 0.05). Blocking FGF-2 produced significant reductions in KCa channel current density (p > 0.05) as well as BKα1 and BKβ3 expression in CNTF-ACM-treated neurons (p > 0.05). CNTF-ACM significantly enhances BK channel activity in rat cortical neurons and that FGF-2 is partially responsible for these effects. CNTF-induced astrocyte activation results in secretion of neuroactive factors which may affect neuronal excitability and resultant seizure activity in mammalian cortical neurons. PMID:27097551

  19. Conceptual design of large-bore superconducting quadrupoles with active magnetic shielding for the AHF

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Kashikhin et al.

    2003-06-09

    The Advanced Hydrotest Facility, under study by LANL, uses large-bore superconducting quadrupole magnets. In the paper we discuss the conceptual design of such quadrupoles using active shielding. The magnets are specified to achieve gradients of up to 24 T/m with a 28-cm warm bore and to have 0.01% field quality. Concepts for quench protection and the magnet cryosystems are also briefly discussed to confirm the viability of the proposed design.

  20. Ion exchange using poorly activated supports, an easy way for purification of large proteins.

    PubMed

    Pessela, Benevides C C; Munilla, Roberto; Betancor, Lorena; Fuentes, Manuel; Carrascosa, Alfonso V; Vian, Alejandro; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, Jose M

    2004-04-23

    Ion-exchange chromatography using commercial ionic supports is a commonly used technique for protein purification. However, selective adsorption of a target protein from a given extract onto commercial ion exchangers seems to be quite complex since they are designed to adsorb the maximum percentage of proteins with the opposite charge. In this paper, ion-exchanger supports with different activation degrees (from 1 to 40 micromol of amino groups per g of agarose) have been prepared and used for the purification of large proteins. These kinds of proteins have large surfaces to interact by many points with the support. Therefore, it was possible to purify large proteins as beta-galactosidase from Thermus sp. strain T2 from a crude extract from Escherichia coli or bovine liver catalase from a commercial preparation, with tailor-made ion-exchanger supports. A simple step of adsorption/desorption on lowly activated supports rendered both enzymes rather pure as confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Moreover, this strategy makes also easy the desorption step that requires rather low NaCl concentrations, which may become a serious problem for desorption of large proteins when using conventional supports, due to their ability of generating a very strong adsorption. PMID:15116925

  1. Toys Remain Viral Playground for 24 Hours

    MedlinePlus

    ... a toy's surface at typical indoor temperatures and humidity levels. Specifically, they tested the ability of so- ... East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). At 60 percent relative humidity, 1 percent of the virus remained infectious on ...

  2. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    it has died," said co-author Scott Chapman, also of Cambridge University. "This means we don't have to catch the black holes in the act to witness the big impact they have." This is the first X-ray ghost ever seen after the demise of radio-bright jets. Astronomers have observed extensive X-ray emission with a similar origin, but only from galaxies with radio emission on large scales, signifying continued eruptions. In HDF 130, only a point source is detected in radio images, coinciding with the massive elliptical galaxy seen in its optical image. This radio source indicates the presence of a growing supermassive black hole. People Who Read This Also Read... Milky Way's Super-efficient Particle Accelerators Caught in The Act NASA Joins "Around the World in 80 Telescopes" Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Galaxies Coming of Age in Cosmic Blobs "This result hints that the X-ray sky should be littered with such ghosts," said co-author Caitlin Casey, also of Cambridge, "especially if black hole eruptions are as common as we think they are in the early Universe." The power contained in the black hole eruption was likely to be considerable, equivalent to about a billion supernovas. The energy is dumped into the surroundings and transports and heats the gas. "Even after the ghost disappears, most of the energy from the black hole's eruption remains", said Fabian. "Because they're so powerful, these eruptions can have profound effects lasting for billions of years." The details of Chandra's data of HDF 130 helped secure its true nature. For example, in X-rays, HDF 130 has a cigar-like shape that extends for some 2.2 million light years. The linear shape of the X-ray source is consistent with the shape of radio jets and not with that of a galaxy cluster, which is expected to be circular. The energy distribution of the X-rays is also consistent with the interpretation of an X-ray ghost. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandr

  3. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    it has died," said co-author Scott Chapman, also of Cambridge University. "This means we don't have to catch the black holes in the act to witness the big impact they have." This is the first X-ray ghost ever seen after the demise of radio-bright jets. Astronomers have observed extensive X-ray emission with a similar origin, but only from galaxies with radio emission on large scales, signifying continued eruptions. In HDF 130, only a point source is detected in radio images, coinciding with the massive elliptical galaxy seen in its optical image. This radio source indicates the presence of a growing supermassive black hole. People Who Read This Also Read... Milky Way's Super-efficient Particle Accelerators Caught in The Act NASA Joins "Around the World in 80 Telescopes" Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Galaxies Coming of Age in Cosmic Blobs "This result hints that the X-ray sky should be littered with such ghosts," said co-author Caitlin Casey, also of Cambridge, "especially if black hole eruptions are as common as we think they are in the early Universe." The power contained in the black hole eruption was likely to be considerable, equivalent to about a billion supernovas. The energy is dumped into the surroundings and transports and heats the gas. "Even after the ghost disappears, most of the energy from the black hole's eruption remains", said Fabian. "Because they're so powerful, these eruptions can have profound effects lasting for billions of years." The details of Chandra's data of HDF 130 helped secure its true nature. For example, in X-rays, HDF 130 has a cigar-like shape that extends for some 2.2 million light years. The linear shape of the X-ray source is consistent with the shape of radio jets and not with that of a galaxy cluster, which is expected to be circular. The energy distribution of the X-rays is also consistent with the interpretation of an X-ray ghost. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra

  4. CURRENT HELICITY OF ACTIVE REGIONS AS A TRACER OF LARGE-SCALE SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, H.; Moss, D.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Kuzanyan, K.; Sokoloff, D.

    2012-05-20

    We demonstrate that the current helicity observed in solar active regions traces the magnetic helicity of the large-scale dynamo generated field. We use an advanced two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamo saturation based on the evolution of the magnetic helicity and algebraic quenching. For comparison, we also studied a more basic two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with simple algebraic alpha-quenching only. Using these numerical models we obtained butterfly diagrams both for the small-scale current helicity and also for the large-scale magnetic helicity, and compared them with the butterfly diagram for the current helicity in active regions obtained from observations. This comparison shows that the current helicity of active regions, as estimated by -A {center_dot} B evaluated at the depth from which the active region arises, resembles the observational data much better than the small-scale current helicity calculated directly from the helicity evolution equation. Here B and A are, respectively, the dynamo generated mean magnetic field and its vector potential. A theoretical interpretation of these results is given.

  5. Semi-active damping of large space truss structures using friction joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, Lothar; Albrecht, Hans; Wirnitzer, Jan

    2002-11-01

    The low structural damping of large space structures and the stringent positioning requirements in missions demand effective vibration suppression. The semi-active approach at hand is based on friction damping due to interfacial slip in semi-active joints which can be controlled by varying the normal pressure in the contact area using a piezo-stack actuator. This paper focuses on the modeling, identification and model reduction of a large space structure with semi-active joints. For the purpose of model identification and model reduction, the nonlinear friction forces transmitted in the joints are considered as external forces acting on the linear tress structure. Experimental Modal Analysis results are used to update the FE model of the truss structure and the parameters of the nonlinear friction model are identified from measured responses of an isolated joint. The model of the linear subsystem is reduced by a combination of balanced reduction and matching moments method. The modal truncation is based on controllability and observability gramians. To improve the fidelity locations conventional connections are replaced by adaptive joints, each with a local feedback controller for the adaptation of the normal force. Simulation results of a 10-bay truss structure with semi-active joints show the potential of the present approach.

  6. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology

    PubMed Central

    Siegford, Janice M.; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K.; Daigle, Courtney L.; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.; Hernandez, Carlos E.; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Tracking of individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. We describe several tracking systems that are currently in use for laying hens and review each, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suited, and relevant issues to fit the best technology for the intended purpose. Abstract Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns

  7. Large Solar Energetic Particle Events Associated With Filament Eruptions Outside Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Xie, H.; Thakur, N.; Kahler, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    We report on four large filament eruptions (FEs) from solar cycles 23 and 24 that were associated with large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and interplanetary type II radio bursts. The post-eruption arcades corresponded mostly to C-class soft X-ray enhancements, but an M1.0 flare was associated with one event. However, the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were fast (speeds approx. 1000 km/s) and appeared as halo CMEs in the coronagraph field of view. The interplanetary type II radio bursts occurred over a wide wavelength range, indicating the existence of strong shocks throughout the inner heliosphere. No metric type II bursts were present in three events, indicating that the shocks formed beyond 2-3 Rs. In one case, there was a metric type II burst with low starting frequency, indicating a shock formation height of approx.2 Rs. The FE-associated SEP events did have softer spectra (spectral index >4) in the 10-100 MeV range, but there were other low-intensity SEP events with spectral indices ?4. Some of these events are likely FE-SEP events, but were not classified as such in the literature because they occurred close to active regions. Some were definitely associated with large active region flares, but the shock formation height was large. We definitely find a diminished role for flares and complex type III burst durations in these large SEP events. Fast CMEs and shock formation at larger distances from the Sun seem to be the primary characteristics of the FE-associated SEP events.

  8. Large Solar Energetic Particle Events Associated with Filament Eruptions Outside of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Mäkelä, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Xie, H.; Thakur, N.; Kahler, S. W.

    2015-06-01

    We report on four large filament eruptions (FEs) from solar cycles 23 and 24 that were associated with large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and interplanetary type II radio bursts. The post-eruption arcades corresponded mostly to C-class soft X-ray enhancements, but an M1.0 flare was associated with one event. However, the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were fast (speeds ˜ 1000 km s-1) and appeared as halo CMEs in the coronagraph field of view. The interplanetary type II radio bursts occurred over a wide wavelength range, indicating the existence of strong shocks throughout the inner heliosphere. No metric type II bursts were present in three events, indicating that the shocks formed beyond 2-3 Rs. In one case, there was a metric type II burst with low starting frequency, indicating a shock formation height of ˜2 Rs. The FE-associated SEP events did have softer spectra (spectral index >4) in the 10-100 MeV range, but there were other low-intensity SEP events with spectral indices ≥4. Some of these events are likely FE-SEP events, but were not classified as such in the literature because they occurred close to active regions. Some were definitely associated with large active region flares, but the shock formation height was large. We definitely find a diminished role for flares and complex type III burst durations in these large SEP events. Fast CMEs and shock formation at larger distances from the Sun seem to be the primary characteristics of the FE-associated SEP events.

  9. Ciguatera: recent advances but the risk remains.

    PubMed

    Lehane, L; Lewis, R J

    2000-11-01

    Ciguatera is an important form of human poisoning caused by the consumption of seafood. The disease is characterised by gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular disturbances. In cases of severe toxicity, paralysis, coma and death may occur. There is no immunity, and the toxins are cumulative. Symptoms may persist for months or years, or recur periodically. The epidemiology of ciguatera is complex and of central importance to the management and future use of marine resources. Ciguatera is an important medical entity in tropical and subtropical Pacific and Indian Ocean regions, and in the tropical Caribbean. As reef fish are increasingly exported to other areas, it has become a world health problem. The disease is under-reported and often misdiagnosed. Lipid-soluble, polyether toxins known as ciguatoxins accumulated in the muscles of certain subtropical and tropical marine finfish cause ciguatera. Ciguatoxins arise from biotransformation in the fish of less polar ciguatoxins (gambiertoxins) produced by Gambierdiscus toxicus, a marine dinoflagellate that lives on macroalgae, usually attached to dead coral. The toxins and their metabolites are concentrated in the food chain when carnivorous fish prey on smaller herbivorous fish. Humans are exposed at the end of the food chain. More than 400 species of fish can be vectors of ciguatoxins, but generally only a relatively small number of species are regularly incriminated in ciguatera. Ciguateric fish look, taste and smell normal, and detection of toxins in fish remains a problem. More than 20 precursor gambiertoxins and ciguatoxins have been identified in G. toxicus and in herbivorous and carnivorous fish. The toxins become more polar as they undergo oxidative metabolism and pass up the food chain. The main Pacific ciguatoxin (P-CTX-1) causes ciguatera at levels=0.1 microg/kg in the flesh of carnivorous fish. The main Caribbean ciguatoxin (C-CTX-1) is less polar and 10-fold less toxic than P-CTX-1. Ciguatoxins

  10. Coronal holes, large-scale magnetic field, and activity complexes in solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavastsherna, K. S.; Polyakow, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    A correlation among coronal holes (CH), a large-scale magnetic field (LMF), and activity complexes (AC) is studied in this work for 1997-2007 with the use of a coronal hole series obtained from observations at the Kitt Peak Observatory in the HeI 10830 Å line in 1975-2003 and SOHO/EIT-195 Å in 1996-2012 (Tlatov et al., 2014), synoptic Hα charts from Kislovodsk Mountain Astonomical Station, and the catalog of AC cores (Yazev, 2012). From the imposition of CH boundaries on Hα charts, which characterize the positions of neutral lines of the radial components of a large-scale solar magnetic field, it turns out that 70% of CH are located in unipolar regions of their sign during the above period, 10% are in the region of an opposite sign, and 20% are mainly very large CH, which are often crossed by the neutral lines of several unipolar regions. Data on mutual arrangement of CH and AC cores were obtained. It was shown that only some activity comples cores have genetic relationships with CH.

  11. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology.

    PubMed

    Siegford, Janice M; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K; Daigle, Courtney L; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Hernandez, Carlos E; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns with selecting focal birds. PMID:26848693

  12. Large-Scale Coronal Heating from "Cool" Activity in the Solar Magnetic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    In Fe XII images from SOHO/EIT, the quiet solar corona shows structure on scales ranging from sub-supergranular (i.e., bright points and coronal network) to multi-supergranular (large-scale corona). In Falconer et al 1998 (Ap.J., 501, 386) we suppressed the large-scale background and found that the network-scale features are predominantly rooted in the magnetic network lanes at the boundaries of the supergranules. Taken together, the coronal network emission and bright point emission are only about 5% of the entire quiet solar coronal Fe XII emission. Here we investigate the relationship between the large-scale corona and the network as seen in three different EIT filters (He II, Fe IX-X, and Fe XII). Using the median-brightness contour, we divide the large-scale Fe XII corona into dim and bright halves, and find that the bright-half/dim half brightness ratio is about 1.5. We also find that the bright half relative to the dim half has 10 times greater total bright point Fe XII emission, 3 times greater Fe XII network emission, 2 times greater Fe IX-X network emission, 1.3 times greater He II network emission, and has 1.5 times more magnetic flux. Also, the cooler network (He II) radiates an order of magnitude more energy than the hotter coronal network (Fe IX-X, and Fe XII). From these results we infer that: 1) The heating of the network and the heating of the large-scale corona each increase roughly linearly with the underlying magnetic flux. 2) The production of network coronal bright points and heating of the coronal network each increase nonlinearly with the magnetic flux. 3) The heating of the large-scale corona is driven by widespread cooler network activity rather than by the exceptional network activity that produces the network coronal bright points and the coronal network. 4) The large-scale corona is heated by a nonthermal process since the driver of its heating is cooler than it is. This work was funded by the Solar Physics Branch of NASA's office of

  13. The effect of local and large-scale environments on nuclear activity and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argudo-Fernández, M.; Shen, S.; Sabater, J.; Duarte Puertas, S.; Verley, S.; Yang, X.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are one of the main drivers for the transition from star-forming disk to passive spheroidal galaxies, however, the role of large-scale environment versus one-on-one interactions in triggering different types of AGN is still uncertain. We present a statistical study of the prevalence of the nuclear activity in isolated galaxies and physically bound isolated pairs. Aims: For the purpose of this study we considered optically and radio selected nuclear activity types. We aim to assess the effect of one-on-one interaction on the fraction of AGN and the role of their large-scale environment. Methods: To study the effect of one-on-one interaction on the fraction of AGN in isolated galaxy pairs, we compare these AGN with a sample of isolated galaxies homogeneously selected under the same isolation criterion. We examine the effect of the large-scale environment by comparing isolated systems with control samples of single galaxies and galaxy pairs. We use the tidal strength parameter to quantify the effects of local and large-scale environments. Results: In general we found no difference in the prevalence of optical AGN for the considered samples. For massive galaxies, the fraction of optical AGN in isolated galaxies is slightly higher than that in the control samples. Also, the fraction of passives in high mass isolated galaxies is smaller than in any other sample. Generally, there is no dependence on optical nuclear activity with local environment. On the other hand, we found evidence that radio AGN are strongly affected by the local environment. Conclusions: The optical AGN phenomenon is related to cold gas accretion, while radio AGN are related to hot gas accretion. In this context, there is more cold gas, fuelling the central optical AGN, in isolated systems. Our results are in agreement with a scenario where cold gas accretion by secular evolution is the main driver of optical AGN, while hot gas accretion and one

  14. Modeling activities on the negative-ion-based Neutral Beam Injectors of the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Chitarin, G.; Pilan, N.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.

    2011-09-26

    At the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) large-scaled negative ion sources have been widely used for the Neutral Beam Injectors (NBIs) mounted on the Large Helical Device (LHD), which is the world-largest superconducting helical system. These injectors have achieved outstanding performances in terms of beam energy, negative-ion current and optics, and represent a reference for the development of heating and current drive NBIs for ITER.In the framework of the support activities for the ITER NBIs, the PRIMA test facility, which includes a RF-drive ion source with 100 keV accelerator (SPIDER) and a complete 1 MeV Neutral Beam system (MITICA) is under construction at Consorzio RFX in Padova.An experimental validation of the codes has been undertaken in order to prove the accuracy of the simulations and the soundness of the SPIDER and MITICA design. To this purpose, the whole set of codes have been applied to the LHD NBIs in a joint activity between Consorzio RFX and NIFS, with the goal of comparing and benchmarking the codes with the experimental data. A description of these modeling activities and a discussion of the main results obtained are reported in this paper.

  15. Research of active panel technology for large aperture millimeter-wave/sub-millimeter-wave telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuhao; Cui, Xiangqun

    2010-05-01

    As Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) project was completed successfully, indicating the key technology of active optics has been mastered by the Chinese astronomical community, experts of Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology (NIAOT), builders of this project, started to consider how to use the technology developed in large optical telescope such as LAMOST to improve the performance of millimeterwave / sub-millimeter-wave telescope. In order to do more research work about active optics of millimeter submillimeter band and improve the performance of Delingha 13.7m millimeter-wave telescope, researchers of NIAOT intend to upgrade the reflect panel accuracy of this telescope. This paper will introduce the preliminary work of the accuracy-upgrading task, numerical simulation of the 13.7m telescope. In this presentation, the primary reflector finite element model (FEM) construction, gravity and thermal deformation, and modal analyze are described. The result shows that the gravity and thermal distortion of the reflector are contributed mostly by the back-structure and the active support for the panels is very necessary to restrain this kind of distortion.

  16. Evaluation of a large capacity heat pump concept for active cooling of hypersonic aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagel, L. L.; Herring, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of engineering analyses assessing the conceptual feasibility of a large capacity heat pump for enhancing active cooling of hypersonic aircraft structure are presented. A unique heat pump arrangement which permits cooling the structure of a Mach 6 transport to aluminum temperatures without the aid of thermal shielding is described. The selected concept is compatible with the use of conventional refrigerants, with Freon R-11 selected as the preferred refrigerant. Condenser temperatures were limited to levels compatible with the use of conventional refrigerants by incorporating a unique multipass condenser design, which extracts mechanical energy from the hydrogen fuel, prior to each subsequent pass through the condenser. Results show that it is technically feasible to use a large capacity heat pump in lieu of external shielding. Additional analyses are required to optimally apply this concept.

  17. Curvature wavefront sensing performance evaluation for active correction of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

    PubMed

    Manuel, Anastacia M; Phillion, Donald W; Olivier, Scot S; Baker, Kevin L; Cannon, Brice

    2010-01-18

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, modified Paul-Baker design, with an 8.4-meter primary mirror, a 3.4-m secondary, and a 5.0-m tertiary, along with three refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat focal plane with a field of view of 9.6 square degrees. In order to maintain image quality during operation, the deformations and rigid body motions of the three large mirrors must be actively controlled to minimize optical aberrations, which arise primarily from forces due to gravity and thermal expansion. We describe the methodology for measuring the telescope aberrations using a set of curvature wavefront sensors located in the four corners of the LSST camera focal plane. We present a comprehensive analysis of the wavefront sensing system, including the availability of reference stars, demonstrating that this system will perform to the specifications required to meet the LSST performance goals. PMID:20173981

  18. Introductory Biology Courses: A Framework To Support Active Learning in Large Enrollment Introductory Science Courses

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Active learning and research-oriented activities have been increasingly used in smaller, specialized science courses. Application of this type of scientific teaching to large enrollment introductory courses has been, however, a major challenge. The general microbiology lecture/laboratory course described has been designed to incorporate published active-learning methods. Three major case studies are used as platforms for active learning. Themes from case studies are integrated into lectures and laboratory experiments, and in class and online discussions and assignments. Students are stimulated to apply facts to problem-solving and to learn research skills such as data analysis, writing, and working in teams. This course is feasible only because of its organizational framework that makes use of teaching teams (made up of faculty, graduate assistants, and undergraduate assistants) and Web-based technology. Technology is a mode of communication, but also a system of course management. The relevance of this model to other biology courses led to assessment and evaluation, including an analysis of student responses to the new course, class performance, a university course evaluation, and retention of course learning. The results are indicative of an increase in student engagement in research-oriented activities and an appreciation of real-world context by students. PMID:15917873

  19. Making large class basic histology lectures more interactive: The use of draw-along mapping techniques and associated educational activities.

    PubMed

    Kotzé, Sanet Henriët; Mole, Calvin Gerald

    2015-01-01

    At Stellenbosch University, South Africa, basic histology is taught to a combination class of almost 400 first-year medical, physiotherapy, and dietetic students. Many students often find the amount of work in basic histology lectures overwhelming and consequently loose interest. The aim was to determine if a draw-along mapping activity would focus students during large class lectures. After each lecture on three basic histology tissues, a guided draw-along mapping session covering the work from the lecture was introduced in the form of a click-advance PowerPoint presentation which was used to demonstrate the unfolding of an "ideal" map. The lecturer simultaneously drew a similar map using an overhead projector allowing the students to draw their own maps on blank sheets of paper along with the lecturer. Students remained attentive during the activity and many participated in answering informal questions posed by the lecturer as the map-making session progressed. After the last session, students completed an anonymous, voluntary questionnaire (response rate of 78%). The majority of students found the draw-along maps useful (94%) and believed that its use should be continued in the future (93%). A significant increase (P < 0.001) was found in the test results of student cohorts who were given the current intervention compared to cohorts from previous years who were given mind maps as handouts only or had no intervention. The use of the draw-along mapping sessions were successful in focusing students during large class lectures while also providing them with a useful tool for their studies. PMID:25650015

  20. Structural basis for the superior activity of the large isoform of snow flea antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Mok, Yee-Foong; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Graham, Laurie A; Celik, Yeliz; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2010-03-23

    The snow flea (Hypogastrum harveyi) is protected from freezing at sub-zero temperatures by a glycine-rich antifreeze protein (AFP) that binds to seed ice crystals and prevents them from growing larger. This AFP is hyperactive and comprises two isoforms [Graham, L. A., and Davies, P. L. (2005) Science 310, 461]. The larger isoform (15.7 kDa) exhibits several-fold higher activity than the smaller isoform (6.5 kDa), although it is considerably less abundant. To establish the molecular basis for this difference in activity, we determined the sequence of the large isoform. The primary sequences of these two isoforms are surprisingly divergent. However, both contain tripeptide repeats and turn motifs that enabled us to build a three-dimensional model of the large isoform based upon the six-polyproline helix structure of the small isoform. Our model contains 13 polyproline type II helices connected by proline-containing loops stacked into two flat sheets oriented antiparallel to one another. The structure is strictly amphipathic, with a hydrophilic surface on one side and a hydrophobic, putative ice-binding surface on the other. The putative ice-binding site is approximately twice as large in area as that of the small isoform, providing an explanation for the difference in activity that is consistent with other examples noted. By tagging the recombinant AFP with green fluorescent protein, we observed its binding to multiple planes of ice, especially the basal plane. This finding supports the correlation between AFP hyperactivity and basal plane binding first observed with spruce budworm AFP. PMID:20158269

  1. Active and passive acoustic imaging inside a large-scale polyaxial hydraulic fracture test

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, S.D.; Dudley, J.W. II; Shlyapobersky, J.

    1999-07-01

    An automated laboratory hydraulic fracture experiment has been assembled to determine what rock and treatment parameters are crucial to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of field hydraulic fractures. To this end a large (460 mm cubic sample) polyaxial cell, with servo-controlled X,Y,Z, pore pressure, crack-mouth-opening-displacement, and bottom hole pressure, was built. Active imaging with embedded seismic diffraction arrays images the geometry of the fracture. Preliminary tests indicate fracture extent can be imaged to within 5%. Unique embeddible high-fidelity particle velocity AE sensors were designed and calibrated to allow determination of fracture source kinematics.

  2. Catholic Identity Remains a Public Relations Asset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Eileen

    2004-01-01

    The massive sex scandal that rocked the Roman Catholic Church raises a question as to whether Catholic identity remains an asset that the nation's 8,000 Catholic schools should continue to promote. This case study found that continuing to promote Catholic identity has had no adverse effect on recruitment and enrollment at four Omaha, Nebraska,…

  3. Essential Qualities of Math Teaching Remain Unknown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    According to a new federal report, the qualities of an effective mathematics teacher remain frustratingly elusive. The report of the National Mathematics Advisory Panel does not show what college math content and coursework are most essential for teachers. While the report offered numerous conclusions about math curriculum, cognition, and…

  4. Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

  5. Predicting the remaining service life of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, J.F.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear power plants are providing, currently, about 17 percent of the U.S. electricity and many of these plants are approaching their licensed life of 40 years. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are carrying out a program to develop a methodology for assessing the remaining safe-life of the concrete components and structures in nuclear power plants. This program has the overall objective of identifying potential structural safety issues, as well as acceptance criteria, for use in evaluations of nuclear power plants for continued service. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is contributing to this program by identifying and analyzing methods for predicting the remaining life of in-service concrete materials. This report examines the basis for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials of nuclear power facilities. Methods for predicting the service life of new and in-service concrete materials are analyzed. These methods include (1) estimates based on experience, (2) comparison of performance, (3) accelerated testing, (4) stochastic methods, and (5) mathematical modeling. New approaches for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials are proposed and recommendations for their further development given. Degradation processes are discussed based on considerations of their mechanisms, likelihood of occurrence, manifestations, and detection. They include corrosion, sulfate attack, alkali-aggregate reactions, frost attack, leaching, radiation, salt crystallization, and microbiological attack.

  6. Odor analysis of decomposing buried human remains

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, Arpad Alexander; Smith, Rob R; Thompson, Cyril V; Burnett, Michael N; Dulgerian, Nishan; Eckenrode, Brian A

    2008-01-01

    This study, conducted at the University of Tennessee's Anthropological Research Facility (ARF), lists and ranks the primary chemical constituents which define the odor of decomposition of human remains as detected at the soil surface of shallow burial sites. Triple sorbent traps were used to collect air samples in the field and revealed eight major classes of chemicals which now contain 478 specific volatile compounds associated with burial decomposition. Samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and were collected below and above the body, and at the soil surface of 1.5-3.5 ft. (0.46-1.07 m) deep burial sites of four individuals over a 4-year time span. New data were incorporated into the previously established Decompositional Odor Analysis (DOA) Database providing identification, chemical trends, and semi-quantitation of chemicals for evaluation. This research identifies the 'odor signatures' unique to the decomposition of buried human remains with projected ramifications on human remains detection canine training procedures and in the development of field portable analytical instruments which can be used to locate human remains in shallow burial sites.

  7. An investigation of large inhibitors binding to phosphoglycerate kinase and their effect on anion activation.

    PubMed

    Joao, H C; Williams, R J; Littlechild, J A; Nagasuma, R; Watson, H C

    1992-05-01

    This study extends, to a series of larger anions, our earlier investigation of the interaction of the trypanocidal drug suramin and other small negatively charged molecules with yeast phosphoglycerate kinase. 1H-NMR structural studies of phosphoglycerate kinase in the presence of varying concentrations of these large molecules (designed to mimic, at one end, the anionic charge distribution in the substrate 3-phosphoglycerate, while possibly being able to interact across the cleft of the enzyme) including inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate, 4-amino-6-trichloroethenyl-1,3- benzenedisulphonamide, gallic acid and sulphasalazine are described. The anion activation and/or inhibition of the enzyme by these molecules are also reported. Evidence that binding to the general anion site in the 'basic patch' region of the protein may be responsible for either the activating or inhibiting effects, while binding at the hydrophobic (catalytic) site leads to inhibition only is presented. A reaction scheme which explains these observations is given. PMID:1349525

  8. Seasonal prediction of lightning activity in North Western Venezuela: Large-scale versus local drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Á. G.; Díaz-Lobatón, J.; Chourio, X.; Stock, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    The Lake Maracaibo Basin in North Western Venezuela has the highest annual lightning rate of any place in the world (~ 200 fl km- 2 yr- 1), whose electrical discharges occasionally impact human and animal lives (e.g., cattle) and frequently affect economic activities like oil and natural gas exploitation. Lightning activity is so common in this region that it has a proper name: Catatumbo Lightning (plural). Although short-term lightning forecasts are now common in different parts of the world, to the best of the authors' knowledge, seasonal prediction of lightning activity is still non-existent. This research discusses the relative role of both large-scale and local climate drivers as modulators of lightning activity in the region, and presents a formal predictability study at seasonal scale. Analysis of the Catatumbo Lightning Regional Mode, defined in terms of the second Empirical Orthogonal Function of monthly Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS-TRMM) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) satellite data for North Western South America, permits the identification of potential predictors at seasonal scale via a Canonical Correlation Analysis. Lightning activity in North Western Venezuela responds to well defined sea-surface temperature patterns (e.g., El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Atlantic Meridional Mode) and changes in the low-level meridional wind field that are associated with the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone migrations, the Caribbean Low Level Jet and tropical cyclone activity, but it is also linked to local drivers like convection triggered by the topographic configuration and the effect of the Maracaibo Basin Nocturnal Low Level Jet. The analysis indicates that at seasonal scale the relative contribution of the large-scale drivers is more important than the local (basin-wide) ones, due to the synoptic control imposed by the former. Furthermore, meridional CAPE transport at 925 mb is identified as the best potential predictor for lightning activity in the Lake

  9. Activation process in excitable systems with multiple noise sources: Large number of units.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Perc, Matjaž; Todorović, Kristina; Kostić, Srdjan; Burić, Nikola

    2015-12-01

    We study the activation process in large assemblies of type II excitable units whose dynamics is influenced by two independent noise terms. The mean-field approach is applied to explicitly demonstrate that the assembly of excitable units can itself exhibit macroscopic excitable behavior. In order to facilitate the comparison between the excitable dynamics of a single unit and an assembly, we introduce three distinct formulations of the assembly activation event. Each formulation treats different aspects of the relevant phenomena, including the thresholdlike behavior and the role of coherence of individual spikes. Statistical properties of the assembly activation process, such as the mean time-to-first pulse and the associated coefficient of variation, are found to be qualitatively analogous for all three formulations, as well as to resemble the results for a single unit. These analogies are shown to derive from the fact that global variables undergo a stochastic bifurcation from the stochastically stable fixed point to continuous oscillations. Local activation processes are analyzed in the light of the competition between the noise-led and the relaxation-driven dynamics. We also briefly report on a system-size antiresonant effect displayed by the mean time-to-first pulse. PMID:26764779

  10. Activation process in excitable systems with multiple noise sources: Large number of units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franović, Igor; Perc, Matjaž; Todorović, Kristina; Kostić, Srdjan; Burić, Nikola

    2015-12-01

    We study the activation process in large assemblies of type II excitable units whose dynamics is influenced by two independent noise terms. The mean-field approach is applied to explicitly demonstrate that the assembly of excitable units can itself exhibit macroscopic excitable behavior. In order to facilitate the comparison between the excitable dynamics of a single unit and an assembly, we introduce three distinct formulations of the assembly activation event. Each formulation treats different aspects of the relevant phenomena, including the thresholdlike behavior and the role of coherence of individual spikes. Statistical properties of the assembly activation process, such as the mean time-to-first pulse and the associated coefficient of variation, are found to be qualitatively analogous for all three formulations, as well as to resemble the results for a single unit. These analogies are shown to derive from the fact that global variables undergo a stochastic bifurcation from the stochastically stable fixed point to continuous oscillations. Local activation processes are analyzed in the light of the competition between the noise-led and the relaxation-driven dynamics. We also briefly report on a system-size antiresonant effect displayed by the mean time-to-first pulse.

  11. Comparative analyses of Podospora anserina secretomes reveal a large array of lignocellulose-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Poidevin, Laetitia; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Levasseur, Anthony; Herpoël-Gimbert, Isabelle; Chevret, Didier; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; Heiss-Blanquet, Senta; Record, Eric

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the coprophilous fungus Podospora anserina harbors a large and highly diverse set of putative lignocellulose-acting enzymes. In this study, we investigated the enzymatic diversity of a broad range of P. anserina secretomes induced by various carbon sources (dextrin, glucose, xylose, arabinose, lactose, cellobiose, saccharose, Avicel, Solka-floc, birchwood xylan, wheat straw, maize bran, and sugar beet pulp (SBP)). Compared with the Trichoderma reesei enzymatic cocktail, P. anserina secretomes displayed similar cellulase, xylanase, and pectinase activities and greater arabinofuranosidase, arabinanase, and galactanase activities. The secretomes were further tested for their capacity to supplement a T. reesei cocktail. Four of them improved significantly the saccharification yield of steam-exploded wheat straw up to 48 %. Fine analysis of the P. anserina secretomes produced with Avicel and SBP using proteomics revealed a large array of CAZymes with a high number of GH6 and GH7 cellulases, CE1 esterases, GH43 arabinofuranosidases, and AA1 laccase-like multicopper oxidases. Moreover, a preponderance of AA9 (formerly GH61) was exclusively produced in the SBP condition. This study brings additional insights into the P. anserina enzymatic machinery and will facilitate the selection of promising targets for the development of future biorefineries. PMID:24695830

  12. Synthesis of extremely large mesoporous activated carbon and its unique adsorption for giant molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Kakii, Takuhiro; Hirota, Yoshifumi

    1996-02-01

    The steam invigoration of pitches (softening points 85 and 280{degrees}C) homogenized with 1-3 wt% of organo rare0earth metal complexes such as Ln(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3} or Ln(acac) (Ln=Y, Yb) at 930{degrees}C provided activated carbons with an extremely high mesopore ration, >70%. The resulted activated carbon selectively adsorbs giant molecules such as Vitamin B{sub 12}, blue acid 90 dye, dextran, nystatin, and humic acid, reflecting their large mesopore volumes. To understand what kind of carbon skeleton in pitch is suited for generation of high mesopore ration, the steam invigoration of a series of condensed polynuclear aromatics (COPNA) resins prepared from naphthlene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene, or perylene and p-xylene-{alpha},{alpha}{prime}-diol were conducted in the presence of rare-earth metal complexes. As a result, COPNA resins containing phenanthrene, perylene, and pyrene generated large mesopore volume. 35 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Three-element trap filter radiometer based on large active area silicon photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Salim, S G R; Anhalt, K; Taubert, D R; Hollandt, J

    2016-05-20

    This paper shows the opto-mechanical design of a new filter radiometer built at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany, for the accurate determination of the thermodynamic temperature of high-temperature blackbodies. The filter radiometer is based on a three-element reflection-type trap detector that uses three large active area silicon photodiodes. Its spectral coverage and field of view are defined by a detachable narrow-band filter and a diamond-turned precision aperture, respectively. The temperature of the filter radiometer is stabilized using a water-streamed housing and is measured using a thin-film platinum thermometer placed onto the first photodiode element. The trap "mount" has been made as compact as possible, which, together with the large active area of the chosen photodiodes, allows a wide field of view. This work presents the design of the filter radiometer and discusses the criteria that have been considered in order for the filter radiometer to suit the application. PMID:27411121

  14. Corrugated paraffin nanocomposite films as large stroke thermal actuators and self-activating thermal interfaces.

    PubMed

    Copic, Davor; Hart, A John

    2015-04-22

    High performance active materials are of rapidly growing interest for applications including soft robotics, microfluidic systems, and morphing composites. In particular, paraffin wax has been used to actuate miniature pumps, solenoid valves, and composite fibers, yet its deployment is typically limited by the need for external volume constraint. We demonstrate that compact, high-performance paraffin actuators can be made by confining paraffin within vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) films. This large-stroke vertical actuation is enabled by strong capillary interaction between paraffin and CNTs and by engineering the CNT morphology by mechanical compression before capillary-driven infiltration of the molten paraffin. The maximum actuation strain of the corrugated CNT-paraffin films (∼0.02-0.2) is comparable to natural muscle, yet the maximum stress is limited to ∼10 kPa by collapse of the CNT network. We also show how a CNT-paraffin film can serve as a self-activating thermal interface that closes a gap when it is heated. These new CNT-paraffin film actuators could be produced by large-area CNT growth, infiltration, and lamination methods, and are attractive for use in miniature systems due to their self-contained design. PMID:25822633

  15. Active Control of Jet Noise Using Observable Inferred Decomposition and Large Window PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Zachary; Berry, Matthew; Low, Kerwin; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd; Gogineni, Sivaram; Glauser, Mark

    2012-11-01

    In this investigation, we seek to find sources of noise created in the near-region of a highly subsonic jet, with a nozzle diameter of 2''. Using large window PIV alongside simultaneous hydrodynamic and acoustic pressure, we focus on observing flow structures created in the collapse of the potential core. Correlations can be made between the low-dimensional velocity field (using POD) and the far-field acoustics in an effort to identify loud modes in the flow. An advanced reduced order model known as Observable Inferred Decomposition (OID) is used to form closed-loop controllers for noise reduction in the far-field. With this technique, we find low-dimensional representations of near-field velocity and far-field pressure - finding a linear mapping between the two fields. Then, we obtain acoustically optimized modes in the flow field and seek to drive these modes to zero using active control strategies. For flow control, synthetic jet actuators are used as shear layer excitation. A large range of tests are explored, varying Mach number and flow control configurations. Finally, large PIV windows will allow us to investigate several diameters of the flow field in the streamwise plane.

  16. LArGe R&D for active background suppression in Gerda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Barnabé-Heider, M.; Budjáš, D.; Cattadori, C.; D'Andragora, A.; Gangapshev, A.; Gusev, K.; Heisel, M.; Junker, M.; Klimenko, A.; Schönert, S.; Smolnikov, A.; Zuzel, G.

    2012-07-01

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m3, 1.4tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 103 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of the order 10-2 cts/(keV-kg-y), which is at the level of the GERDA phase I design goal. As a consequence of these results, the development of an active liquid argon veto in GERDA is pursued.

  17. Active Self-Testing Noise Measurement Sensors for Large-Scale Environmental Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10. PMID:24351634

  18. Large-scale pattern formation in active particles suspensions: from interacting microtubules to swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor

    2006-03-01

    We consider two biological systems of active particles exhibiting large-scale collective behavior: microtubules interacting with molecular motors and hydrodynamically entrained swimming bacteria. Starting from a generic stochastic microscopic model of inelastically colliding polar rods with an anisotropic interaction kernel, we derive set of equations for the local rods concentration and orientation. Above certain critical density of rods the model exhibits orientational instability and onset of large-scale coherence. For the microtubules and molecular motors system we demonstrate that the orientational instability leads to the formation of vortices and asters seen in recent experiments. Similar approach is applied to colonies of swimming bacteria Bacillus subtilis confined in thin fluid film. The model is formulated in term of two-dimensional equations for local density and orientation of bacteria coupled to the low Reynolds number Navier-Stokes equation for the fluid flow velocity. The collective swimming of bacteria is represented by additional source term in the Navier-Stokes equation. We demonstrate that this system exhibits formation of dynamic large-scale patterns with the typical scale determined by the density of bacteria.

  19. Zolpidem Reduces Hippocampal Neuronal Activity in Freely Behaving Mice: A Large Scale Calcium Imaging Study with Miniaturized Fluorescence Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Berdyyeva, Tamara; Otte, Stephani; Aluisio, Leah; Ziv, Yaniv; Burns, Laurie D.; Dugovic, Christine; Yun, Sujin; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic drugs for cognitive and psychiatric disorders are often characterized by their molecular mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate a new approach to elucidate drug action on large-scale neuronal activity by tracking somatic calcium dynamics in hundreds of CA1 hippocampal neurons of pharmacologically manipulated behaving mice. We used an adeno-associated viral vector to express the calcium sensor GCaMP3 in CA1 pyramidal cells under control of the CaMKII promoter and a miniaturized microscope to observe cellular dynamics. We visualized these dynamics with and without a systemic administration of Zolpidem, a GABAA agonist that is the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of insomnia in the United States. Despite growing concerns about the potential adverse effects of Zolpidem on memory and cognition, it remained unclear whether Zolpidem alters neuronal activity in the hippocampus, a brain area critical for cognition and memory. Zolpidem, when delivered at a dose known to induce and prolong sleep, strongly suppressed CA1 calcium signaling. The rate of calcium transients after Zolpidem administration was significantly lower compared to vehicle treatment. To factor out the contribution of changes in locomotor or physiological conditions following Zolpidem treatment, we compared the cellular activity across comparable epochs matched by locomotor and physiological assessments. This analysis revealed significantly depressive effects of Zolpidem regardless of the animal’s state. Individual hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differed in their responses to Zolpidem with the majority (∼65%) significantly decreasing the rate of calcium transients, and a small subset (3%) showing an unexpected and significant increase. By linking molecular mechanisms with the dynamics of neural circuitry and behavioral states, this approach has the potential to contribute substantially to the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:25372144

  20. Chromosome instability in diffuse large B cell lymphomas is suppressed by activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandiran, Sampath; Adon, Arsene; Guo, Xiangxue; Wang, Yi; Wang, Huichen; Chen, Zhengjia; Kowalski, Jeanne; Sunay, Ustun R.; Young, Andrew N.; Brown, Theresa; Mar, Jessica C.; Du, Yuhong; Fu, Haian; Mann, Karen P.; Natkunam, Yasodha; Boise, Lawrence H.; Saavedra, Harold I.; Lossos, Izidore S.; Bernal-Mizrachi, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of lymphoma in the United States. DLBCL comprises biologically distinct subtypes including germinal center-like (GCB) and activated-B-cell-like DLBCL (ABC). The most aggressive type, ABC-DLBCL, displays dysregulation of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathway as well as genomic instability. Although, much is known about the tumorigenic roles of the canonical NF-kB pathway, the precise role of the noncanonical NF-kB pathway remains unknown. Here we show that activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway regulates chromosome stability, DNA damage response and centrosome duplication in DLBCL. Analysis of 92 DLBCL samples revealed that activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway is associated with low levels of DNA damage and centrosome amplification. Inhibiting the noncanonical pathway in lymphoma cells uncovered baseline DNA damage and prevented doxorubicin-induced DNA damage repair. In addition, it triggered centrosome amplification and chromosome instability, indicated by anaphase bridges, multipolar spindles and chromosome missegregation. We determined that the noncanonical NF-κB pathway execute these functions through the regulation of GADD45α and REDD1 in a p53-independent manner, while it collaborates with p53 to regulate cyclin G2 expression. Furthermore, this pathway regulates GADD45α, REDD1 and cyclin G2 through direct binding of NF-κB sites to their promoter region. Overall, these results indicate that the noncanonical NF-κB pathway plays a central role in maintaining genome integrity in DLBCL. Our data suggests that inhibition of the noncanonical NF-kB pathway should be considered as an important component in DLBCL therapeutic approach. PMID:25359525

  1. Mill and the right to remain uninformed.

    PubMed

    Strasser, M

    1986-08-01

    In a recent article in the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, David Ost (1984) claims that patients do not have a right to waive their right to information. He argues that patients cannot make informed rational decisions without full information and thus, a right to waive information would involve a right to avoid one's responsibility to act as an autonomous moral agent. In support of his position, Ost cites a passage from Mill. Yet, a correct interpretation of the passage in question would support one's right to remain uninformed in certain situations. If the information would hurt one's chances for survival or hurt one's ability to make calm, rational decisions, then one not only does not have a duty to find out the information, but one's exercising one's right to remain uninformed may be the only rational course of action to take. PMID:3540171

  2. Explosives remain preferred methods for platform abandonment

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsipher, A.; Daniel, W. IV; Kiesler, J.E.; Mackey, V. III

    1996-05-06

    Economics and safety concerns indicate that methods involving explosives remain the most practical and cost-effective means for abandoning oil and gas structures in the Gulf of Mexico. A decade has passed since 51 dead sea turtles, many endangered Kemp`s Ridleys, washed ashore on the Texas coast shortly after explosives helped remove several offshore platforms. Although no relationship between the explosions and the dead turtles was ever established, in response to widespread public concern, the US Minerals Management Service (MMS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) implemented regulations limiting the size and timing of explosive charges. Also, more importantly, they required that operators pay for observers to survey waters surrounding platforms scheduled for removal for 48 hr before any detonations. If observers spot sea turtles or marine mammals within the danger zone, the platform abandonment is delayed until the turtles leave or are removed. However, concern about the effects of explosives on marine life remains.

  3. Remains of Comet-Shoemaker/Levy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration of the Comet-Shoemaker/Levy collision shows the first piece of the remains of the comet crashing into Jupiter. This event occurred in 1994 after tidal forces from Jupiter caused the comet to break up into 21 separate pieces. Although on a very different scale, the physical mechanism for the breakup of Shoemaker/Levy also caused the tidal disruption of the star in RX J1242-11. (Illustration: SEDS/D. Seal (edited by CXC/M. Weiss)

  4. Active suspension design for a Large Space Structure ground test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Thomas J. H.; Schlegel, Clemens

    1993-01-01

    The expected future high performance requirements for Large Space Structures (LSS) enforce technology innovations such as active vibration damping techniques e.g., by means of structure sensors and actuators. The implementation of new technologies like that requires an interactive and integrated structural and control design with an increased effort in hardware validation by ground testing. During the technology development phase generic system tests will be most important covering verification and validation aspects up to the preparation and definition of relevant space experiments. For many applications using advanced designs it is deemed necessary to improve existing testing technology by further reducing disturbances and gravity coupling effects while maintaining high performance reliability. A key issue in this context is the improvement of suspension techniques. The ideal ground test facility satisfying these requirements completely will never be found. The highest degree of reliability will always be obtained by passive suspension methods taking into account severe performance limitations such as non-zero rigid body modes, restriction of degrees of freedom of motion and frequency response limitations. Passive compensation mechanisms, e.g., zero-spring-rate mechanisms, either require large moving masses or they are limited with respect to low-frequency performance by friction, stiction or other non-linear effects. With active suspensions these limitations can be removed to a large extent thereby increasing the range of applications. Despite an additional complexity which is associated with a potential risk in reliability their development is considered promising due to the amazing improvement of real-time control technology which is still continuing.

  5. Direct Dating of Hominids Remains In Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Falguères, C.

    When archaeological sites are associated with human remains, it is relevant to be able to date those valuable remains for different reasons. The main one is that it avoids the stratigraphical problems which can be due to intrusive burials in the sequence. The other reason consists in the fact that human bones may be encountered out of established stratigraphical context. On the other hand, the majority of dating methods currently used are destructive and can not be applied on these precious samples particularly when they are older than 40,000 years and can not be dated by radiocarbon. Since several years, we have developped a completely non-destructive method which consists in the measurement of human remains using the gamma -ray spectrometry. This technique has been used recently by other laboratories. We present here two important cases for the knowledge of human evolution in Eurasia. The first example is Qafzeh site in Israel where many human skeletons have been unearthed from burials associated with fauna and lithic artefacts. This site has been dated by several independent radiometric methods. So, it was possible to compare our gamma results with the other results yielded by the different methods. The second case concerns the most evolved Homo erectus found in Java, Indonesia, at Ngandong site, close to the Solo river. A recent debate has been focused on the age of these fossils and their direct dating is of outmost importance for the knowledge of settlement of Modern Humans in South-East Asia.

  6. Horizon: A Proposal for Large Aperture, Active Optics in Geosynchronous Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis; Jenstrom, Del

    2000-01-01

    In 1999, NASA's New Millennium Program called for proposals to validate new technology in high-earth orbit for the Earth Observing-3 (NMP EO3) mission to fly in 2003. In response, we proposed to test a large aperture, active optics telescope in geosynchronous orbit. This would flight-qualify new technologies for both Earth and Space science: 1) a future instrument with LANDSAT image resolution and radiometric quality watching continuously from geosynchronous station, and 2) the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) for deep space imaging. Six enabling technologies were to be flight-qualified: 1) a 3-meter, lightweight segmented primary mirror, 2) mirror actuators and mechanisms, 3) a deformable mirror, 4) coarse phasing techniques, 5) phase retrieval for wavefront control during stellar viewing, and 6) phase diversity for wavefront control during Earth viewing. Three enhancing technologies were to be flight- validated: 1) mirror deployment and latching mechanisms, 2) an advanced microcontroller, and 3) GPS at GEO. In particular, two wavefront sensing algorithms, phase retrieval by JPL and phase diversity by ERIM International, were to sense optical system alignment and focus errors, and to correct them using high-precision mirror mechanisms. Active corrections based on Earth scenes are challenging because phase diversity images must be collected from extended, dynamically changing scenes. In addition, an Earth-facing telescope in GEO orbit is subject to a powerful diurnal thermal and radiometric cycle not experienced by deep-space astronomy. The Horizon proposal was a bare-bones design for a lightweight large-aperture, active optical system that is a practical blend of science requirements, emerging technologies, budget constraints, launch vehicle considerations, orbital mechanics, optical hardware, phase-determination algorithms, communication strategy, computational burdens, and first-rate cooperation among earth and space scientists, engineers and managers

  7. Evaluation of surveillance methods for monitoring house fly abundance and activity on large commercial dairy operations.

    PubMed

    Gerry, Alec C; Higginbotham, G E; Periera, L N; Lam, A; Shelton, C R

    2011-06-01

    Relative house fly, Musca domestica L., activity at three large dairies in central California was monitored during the peak fly activity period from June to August 2005 by using spot cards, fly tapes, bait traps, and Alsynite traps. Counts for all monitoring methods were significantly related at two of three dairies; with spot card counts significantly related to fly tape counts recorded the same week, and both spot card counts and fly tape counts significantly related to bait trap counts 1-2 wk later. Mean fly counts differed significantly between dairies, but a significant interaction between dairies sampled and monitoring methods used demonstrates that between-dairy comparisons are unwise. Estimate precision was determined by the coefficient of variability (CV) (or SE/mean). Using a CV = 0.15 as a desired level of estimate precision and assuming an integrate pest management (IPM) action threshold near the peak house fly activity measured by each monitoring method, house fly monitoring at a large dairy would require 12 spot cards placed in midafternoon shaded fly resting sites near cattle or seven bait traps placed in open areas near cattle. Software (FlySpotter; http://ucanr.org/ sites/FlySpotter/download/) using computer vision technology was developed to count fly spots on a scanned image of a spot card to dramatically reduce time invested in monitoring house flies. Counts provided by the FlySpotter software were highly correlated to visual counts. The use of spot cards for monitoring house flies is recommended for dairy IPM programs. PMID:21735934

  8. Why are the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes so large? Generation of an active trimeric complex.

    PubMed

    Marrott, Nia L; Marshall, Jacqueline J T; Svergun, Dmitri I; Crennell, Susan J; Hough, David W; van den Elsen, Jean M H; Danson, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The four-component polypeptides of the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex from the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum assemble to give an active multienzyme complex possessing activity with the branched-chain 2-oxoacids derived from leucine, isoleucine and valine, and with pyruvate. The dihydrolipoyl acyl-transferase (E2) core of the complex is composed of identical trimer-forming units that assemble into a novel 42-mer structure comprising octahedral and icosahedral geometric aspects. From our previously determined structure of this catalytic core, the inter-trimer interactions involve a tyrosine residue near the C-terminus secured in a hydrophobic pocket of an adjacent trimer like a ball-and-socket joint. In the present study, we have deleted the five C-terminal amino acids of the E2 polypeptide (IIYEI) and shown by equilibrium centrifugation that it now only assembles into a trimeric enzyme. This was confirmed by SAXS analysis, although this technique showed the presence of approximately 20% hexamers. The crystal structure of the trimeric truncated E2 core has been determined and shown to be virtually identical with the ones observed in the 42-mer, demonstrating that removal of the C-terminal anchor does not significantly affect the individual monomer or trimer structures. The truncated E2 is still able to bind both 2-oxoacid decarboxylase (E1) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) components to give an active complex with catalytic activity similar to the native multienzyme complex. This is the first report of an active mini-complex for this enzyme, and raises the question of why all 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes assemble into such large structures. PMID:25088564

  9. Up-Regulatory Effects of Curcumin on Large Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qijing; Tao, Jie; Hei, Hongya; Li, Fangping; Wang, Yunman; Peng, Wen; Zhang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Large conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels (BK) are targets for research that explores therapeutic means to various diseases, owing to the roles of the channels in mediating multiple physiological processes in various cells and tissues. We investigated the pharmacological effects of curcumin, a compound isolated from the herb Curcuma longa, on BK channels. As recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp, curcumin increased BK (α) and BK (α+β1) currents in transfected HEK293 cells as well as the current density of BK in A7r5 smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner. By incubating with curcumin for 24 hours, the current density of exogenous BK (α) in HEK293 cells and the endogenous BK in A7r5 cells were both enhanced notably, though the steady-state activation of the channels did not shift significantly, except for BK (α+β1). Curcumin up-regulated the BK protein expression without changing its mRNA level in A7r5 cells. The surface expression and the half-life of BK channels were also increased by curcumin in HEK293 cells. These effects of curcumin were abolished by MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Curcumin also increased ERK 1/2 phosphorylation, while inhibiting ERK by U0126 attenuated the curcumin-induced up-regulation of BK protein expression. We also observed that the curcumin-induced relaxation in the isolated rat aortic rings was significantly attenuated by paxilline, a BK channel specific blocker. These results show that curcumin enhances the activity of the BK channels by interacting with BK directly as well as enhancing BK protein expression through inhibiting proteasomal degradation and activating ERK signaling pathway. The findings suggest that curcumin is a potential BK channel activator and provide novel insight into its complicated pharmacological effects and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26672753

  10. Up-Regulatory Effects of Curcumin on Large Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Hongya; Li, Fangping; Wang, Yunman; Peng, Wen; Zhang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Large conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels (BK) are targets for research that explores therapeutic means to various diseases, owing to the roles of the channels in mediating multiple physiological processes in various cells and tissues. We investigated the pharmacological effects of curcumin, a compound isolated from the herb Curcuma longa, on BK channels. As recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp, curcumin increased BK (α) and BK (α+β1) currents in transfected HEK293 cells as well as the current density of BK in A7r5 smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner. By incubating with curcumin for 24 hours, the current density of exogenous BK (α) in HEK293 cells and the endogenous BK in A7r5 cells were both enhanced notably, though the steady-state activation of the channels did not shift significantly, except for BK (α+β1). Curcumin up-regulated the BK protein expression without changing its mRNA level in A7r5 cells. The surface expression and the half-life of BK channels were also increased by curcumin in HEK293 cells. These effects of curcumin were abolished by MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Curcumin also increased ERK 1/2 phosphorylation, while inhibiting ERK by U0126 attenuated the curcumin-induced up-regulation of BK protein expression. We also observed that the curcumin-induced relaxation in the isolated rat aortic rings was significantly attenuated by paxilline, a BK channel specific blocker. These results show that curcumin enhances the activity of the BK channels by interacting with BK directly as well as enhancing BK protein expression through inhibiting proteasomal degradation and activating ERK signaling pathway. The findings suggest that curcumin is a potential BK channel activator and provide novel insight into its complicated pharmacological effects and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26672753

  11. Constitutive NF-κB Activation Underlines Major Mechanism of Drug Resistance in Relapsed Refractory Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), encompassing 30–40% of the estimated 70,000 cases of NHL in 2014 in the USA. Despite major improvements with immune-chemotherapy, the fraction of patients who still succumb to a refractory or relapsed disease remains high. This review addresses whether the better understanding of the biology of DLBCL defines new therapeutic avenues that may overcome the emerging resistance of this disease to traditional immune-chemotherapy, such as rituximab in combination with traditional chemotherapy agents. Emerging targeted therapy for relapsed refractory DLBCL encompasses more complex molecular abnormalities involving signaling pathways other than NF-κB as mechanism of resistance to immune-chemotherapy. Our review suggests that NF-κB pathway is an important crossroad where other pathways converge as phenotype of resistance that emerges in patients who fail frontline and salvage immune-chemotherapy. Future efforts should aim at targeting the role of NF-κB resistance in clinical trials, where novel agents like lenalidomide and proteasome inhibitors with established activity in this perspective will be an important component in combination therapy, along with new monoclonal antibody, BTK-inhibitors, and other novel therapy agents. PMID:25984532

  12. Regulation of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels by S-palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Shipston, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    BK (large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium) channels are important determinants of physiological control in the nervous, endocrine and vascular systems with channel dysfunction associated with major disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. Thus the mechanisms that control channel surface expression and/or activity are important determinants of their (patho)physiological function. BK channels are S-acylated (palmitoylated) at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus of the pore-forming α-subunit. Palmitoylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas palmitoylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. Recent studies are beginning to reveal mechanistic insights into how palmitoylation controls channel trafficking and cross-talk with phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways. Intriguingly, each site of palmitoylation is regulated by distinct zDHHCs (palmitoyl acyltransferases) and APTs (acyl thioesterases). This supports that different mechanisms may control substrate specificity by zDHHCs and APTs even within the same target protein. As palmitoylation is dynamically regulated, this fundamental post-translational modification represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease. PMID:23356260

  13. Optimal placement of semi-active joints in large-space truss structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirnitzer, Jan; Kistner, A.; Gaul, Lothar

    2002-06-01

    The low structural damping of large space structures and the stringent positioning requirements in missions demand effective vibration suppression. The semi-active approach at hand is based on friction damping due to interfacial slip in semi-active joints which can be controlled by varying the normal pressure in the contact area using a piezo-disc actuator. This paper focuses on the optimal placement of semi-active joints for vibration suppression. The proposed method uses optimality criteria for actuator and sensor locations based on eigenvalues of the controllability and observability gramians. It is stated as a nonlinear multicriteria optimization problem with discrete variables which is solved by a stochastic search algorithm. As final step in the design procedure, parameters of the local feedback controllers assigned to each adaptive joint are optimized with respect to transient response of the structure. The present method is applied to a 10-bay truss structure. Simulation runs of the controlled structure are used to verify the optimization results.

  14. Why Do Some Cores Remain Starless?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anathpindika, S.

    2016-08-01

    Prestellar cores, by definition, are gravitationally bound but starless pockets of dense gas. Physical conditions that could render a core starless (in the local Universe) is the subject of investigation in this work. To this end, we studied the evolution of four starless cores, B68, L694-2, L1517B, L1689, and L1521F, a VeLLO. We demonstrate: (i) cores contracted in quasistatic manner over a timescale on the order of ~ 105 yr. Those that remained starless briefly acquired a centrally concentrated density configuration that mimicked the profile of a unstable BonnorEbert sphere before rebounding, (ii) three cores viz. L694-2, L1689-SMM16, and L1521F remained starless despite becoming thermally super-critical. By contrast, B68 and L1517B remained sub-critical; L1521F collapsed to become a VeLLO only when gas-cooling was enhanced by increasing the size of dust-grains. This result is robust, for other starless cores viz. B68, L694-2, L1517B, and L1689 could also be similarly induced to collapse. The temperature-profile of starless cores and those that collapsed was found to be radically different. While in the former type, only very close to the centre of a core was there any evidence of decline in gas temperature, by contrast, a core of the latter type developed a more uniformly cold interior. Our principle conclusions are: (a) thermal super-criticality of a core is insufficient to ensure it will become protostellar, (b) potential star-forming cores (the VeLLO L1521F here), could be experiencing dust-coagulation that must enhance gasdust coupling and in turn lower gas temperature, thereby assisting collapse. This also suggests, mere gravitational/virial boundedness of a core is insufficient to ensure it will form stars.

  15. The identification of submerged skeletonized remains.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W; Both, Katrin; Simpson, Ellie

    2008-03-01

    Examination was undertaken of skeletonized remains contained within 2 rubber boots dredged by a fishing boat from a depth of 145 m, approximately 185 km off the southern Australian coast in the Great Australian Bight. The boots had been manufactured in Australia in July 1993 and were of a type commonly used by local fishermen. Examination of the lower legs and feet revealed well-preserved bones with arthritic changes in keeping with an older male. DNA analyses using reference samples taken from relatives of fishermen who had disappeared in the area resulted in the identification of the victim as a 52-year-old prawn fisherman who had been swept off a boat over a decade earlier. DNA stability had been maintained by the low light, cold temperatures, and alkaline pH of the ocean floor. Integration of pathologic, anthropologic, and biologic analyses with police investigations enabled a positive identification to be made despite the unusual nature of the location of the remains and the time lapse since the disappearance of the victim. PMID:19749621

  16. Shotgun microbial profiling of fossil remains.

    PubMed

    Der Sarkissian, C; Ermini, L; Jónsson, H; Alekseev, A N; Crubezy, E; Shapiro, B; Orlando, L

    2014-04-01

    Millions to billions of DNA sequences can now be generated from ancient skeletal remains thanks to the massive throughput of next-generation sequencing platforms. Except in cases of exceptional endogenous DNA preservation, most of the sequences isolated from fossil material do not originate from the specimen of interest, but instead reflect environmental organisms that colonized the specimen after death. Here, we characterize the microbial diversity recovered from seven c. 200- to 13 000-year-old horse bones collected from northern Siberia. We use a robust, taxonomy-based assignment approach to identify the microorganisms present in ancient DNA extracts and quantify their relative abundance. Our results suggest that molecular preservation niches exist within ancient samples that can potentially be used to characterize the environments from which the remains are recovered. In addition, microbial community profiling of the seven specimens revealed site-specific environmental signatures. These microbial communities appear to comprise mainly organisms that colonized the fossils recently. Our approach significantly extends the amount of useful data that can be recovered from ancient specimens using a shotgun sequencing approach. In future, it may be possible to correlate, for example, the accumulation of postmortem DNA damage with the presence and/or abundance of particular microbes. PMID:24612293

  17. Decomposition Technique for Remaining Useful Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar (Inventor); Goebel, Kai F. (Inventor); Saxena, Abhinav (Inventor); Celaya, Jose R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic tool disclosed here decomposes the problem of estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of a component or sub-system into two separate regression problems: the feature-to-damage mapping and the operational conditions-to-damage-rate mapping. These maps are initially generated in off-line mode. One or more regression algorithms are used to generate each of these maps from measurements (and features derived from these), operational conditions, and ground truth information. This decomposition technique allows for the explicit quantification and management of different sources of uncertainty present in the process. Next, the maps are used in an on-line mode where run-time data (sensor measurements and operational conditions) are used in conjunction with the maps generated in off-line mode to estimate both current damage state as well as future damage accumulation. Remaining life is computed by subtracting the instance when the extrapolated damage reaches the failure threshold from the instance when the prediction is made.

  18. So close: remaining challenges to eradicating polio.

    PubMed

    Toole, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative, launched in 1988, is close to achieving its goal. In 2015, reported cases of wild poliovirus were limited to just two countries - Afghanistan and Pakistan. Africa has been polio-free for more than 18 months. Remaining barriers to global eradication include insecurity in areas such as Northwest Pakistan and Eastern and Southern Afghanistan, where polio cases continue to be reported. Hostility to vaccination is either based on extreme ideologies, such as in Pakistan, vaccination fatigue by parents whose children have received more than 15 doses, and misunderstandings about the vaccine's safety and effectiveness such as in Ukraine. A further challenge is continued circulation of vaccine-derived poliovirus in populations with low immunity, with 28 cases reported in 2015 in countries as diverse as Madagascar, Ukraine, Laos, and Myanmar. This paper summarizes the current epidemiology of wild and vaccine-derived poliovirus, and describes the remaining challenges to eradication and innovative approaches being taken to overcome them. PMID:26971523

  19. Determination of paleoseismic activity over a large time-scale: Fault scarp dating with 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozafari Amiri, Nasim; Tikhomirov, Dmitry; Sümer, Ökmen; Özkaymak, Çaǧlar; Uzel, Bora; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Vockenhuber, Christof; Sözbilir, Hasan; Akçar, Naki

    2016-04-01

    Bedrock fault scarps are the most direct evidence of past earthquakes to reconstruct seismic activity in a large time-scale using cosmogenic 36Cl dating if built in carbonates. For this method, a surface along the fault scarp with a minimum amount of erosion is required to be chosen as an ideal target point. The section of the fault selected for sampling should cover at least two meters of the fault surface from the lower part of the scarp, where intersects with colluvium wedge. Ideally, sampling should be performed on a continuous strip along the direction of the fault slip direction. First, samples of 10 cm high and 15 cm wide are marked on the fault surface. Then, they are collected using cutters, hammer and chisel in a thickness of 3 cm. The main geometrical factors of scarp dip, scarp height, top surface dip and colluvium dip are also measured. Topographic shielding in the sampling spot is important to be estimated as well. Moreover, density of the fault scarp and colluvium are calculated. The physical and chemical preparations are carried in laboratory for AMS and chemical analysis of the samples. A Matlab® code is used for modelling of seismically active periods based on increasing production rate of 36Cl following each rupture, when a buried section of a fault is exposed. Therefore, by measuring the amount of cosmogenic 36Cl versus height, the timing of major ruptures and their offsets are determined. In our study, Manastır, Mugırtepe and Rahmiye faults in Gediz graben, Priene-Sazlı, Kalafat and Yavansu faults in Büyük Menderes graben and Ören fault in Gökava half-graben have been examined in the seismically active region of Western Turkey. Our results reconstruct at least five periods of high seismic activity during the Holocene time, three of which reveal seismic ruptures beyond the historical pre-existing data.

  20. Active and total microbial communities in forest soil are largely different and highly stratified during decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Baldrian, Petr; Kolařík, Miroslav; Štursová, Martina; Kopecký, Jan; Valášková, Vendula; Větrovský, Tomáš; Žifčáková, Lucia; Šnajdr, Jaroslav; Rídl, Jakub; Vlček, Čestmír; Voříšková, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Soils of coniferous forest ecosystems are important for the global carbon cycle, and the identification of active microbial decomposers is essential for understanding organic matter transformation in these ecosystems. By the independent analysis of DNA and RNA, whole communities of bacteria and fungi and its active members were compared in topsoil of a Picea abies forest during a period of organic matter decomposition. Fungi quantitatively dominate the microbial community in the litter horizon, while the organic horizon shows comparable amount of fungal and bacterial biomasses. Active microbial populations obtained by RNA analysis exhibit similar diversity as DNA-derived populations, but significantly differ in the composition of microbial taxa. Several highly active taxa, especially fungal ones, show low abundance or even absence in the DNA pool. Bacteria and especially fungi are often distinctly associated with a particular soil horizon. Fungal communities are less even than bacterial ones and show higher relative abundances of dominant species. While dominant bacterial species are distributed across the studied ecosystem, distribution of dominant fungi is often spatially restricted as they are only recovered at some locations. The sequences of cbhI gene encoding for cellobiohydrolase (exocellulase), an essential enzyme for cellulose decomposition, were compared in soil metagenome and metatranscriptome and assigned to their producers. Litter horizon exhibits higher diversity and higher proportion of expressed sequences than organic horizon. Cellulose decomposition is mediated by highly diverse fungal populations largely distinct between soil horizons. The results indicate that low-abundance species make an important contribution to decomposition processes in soils. PMID:21776033

  1. From baseline to epileptiform activity: A path to synchronized rhythmicity in large-scale neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusterman, Vladimir; Troy, William C.

    2008-06-01

    In large-scale neural networks in the brain the emergence of global behavioral patterns, manifested by electroencephalographic activity, is driven by the self-organization of local neuronal groups into synchronously functioning ensembles. However, the laws governing such macrobehavior and its disturbances, in particular epileptic seizures, are poorly understood. Here we use a mean-field population network model to describe a state of baseline physiological activity and the transition from the baseline state to rhythmic epileptiform activity. We describe principles which explain how this rhythmic activity arises in the form of spatially uniform self-sustained synchronous oscillations. In addition, we show how the rate of migration of the leading edge of the synchronous oscillations can be theoretically predicted, and compare the accuracy of this prediction with that measured experimentally using multichannel electrocorticographic recordings obtained from a human subject experiencing epileptic seizures. The comparison shows that the experimentally measured rate of migration of the leading edge of synchronous oscillations is within the theoretically predicted range of values. Computer simulations have been performed to investigate the interactions between different regions of the brain and to show how organization in one spatial region can promote or inhibit organization in another. Our theoretical predictions are also consistent with the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in particular with observations that lower-frequency electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms entrain larger areas of the brain than higher-frequency rhythms. These findings advance the understanding of functional behavior of interconnected populations and might have implications for the analysis of diverse classes of networks.

  2. -Graphy: The Remains of a British Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Graham P.

    2007-01-01

    Within Britain, geography as a discipline has been criticized recently for failing either to add to or teach knowledge about the world at large. Instead it has concentrated first at university and then in schools on spatial social science, with examples drawn overwhelmingly from the white Western world. The recent history of geography is reviewed…

  3. Mapping the Daily Progression of Large Wildland Fires Using MODIS Active Fire Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veraverbeke, Sander; Sedano, Fernando; Hook, Simon J.; Randerson, James T.; Jin, Yufang; Rogers, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    High temporal resolution information on burned area is a prerequisite for incorporating bottom-up estimates of wildland fire emissions in regional air transport models and for improving models of fire behavior. We used the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) active fire product (MO(Y)D14) as input to a kriging interpolation to derive continuous maps of the evolution of nine large wildland fires. For each fire, local input parameters for the kriging model were defined using variogram analysis. The accuracy of the kriging model was assessed using high resolution daily fire perimeter data available from the U.S. Forest Service. We also assessed the temporal reporting accuracy of the MODIS burned area products (MCD45A1 and MCD64A1). Averaged over the nine fires, the kriging method correctly mapped 73% of the pixels within the accuracy of a single day, compared to 33% for MCD45A1 and 53% for MCD64A1.

  4. Large segmented UV-optical space telescope using a Hybrid Sensor Active Control (HSAC) architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Dean, Bruce; Hyde, Tupper; Oegerle, Bill; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Smith, J. Scott

    2009-08-01

    Future large UV-optical space telescopes offer new and exciting windows of scientific parameter space. These telescopes can be placed at L2 and borrow heavily from the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) heritage. For example, they can have similar deployment schemes, hexagonal mirrors, and use Wavefront Sensing and Control (WFSC) technologies developed for JWST. However, a UV-optical telescope requires a 4x improvement in wavefront quality over JWST to be diffraction-limited at 500 nm. Achieving this tolerance would be difficult using a passive thermal architecture such as the one employed on JWST. To solve this problem, our team has developed a novel Hybrid Sensor Active Control (HSAC) architecture that provides a cost effective approach to building a segmented UV-optical space telescope. In this paper, we show the application of this architecture to the ST-2020 mission concept and summarize the technology development requirements.

  5. Large-Area, Highly Ordered Array of Graphitic Carbon Materials Using Surface Active Chitosan Prepatterns.

    PubMed

    Baek, Youn-Kyoung; Kim, Dae Woo; Yang, Seung Bo; Lee, Jung-Goo; Kim, Young Kuk; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that chitosan prepatterns can generate not only highly periodic DNA pattern but also various types of graphitic carbon materials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic results revealed that the graphitic carbon materials were selectively deposited on the surface of the periodic chitosan patterns by the electrostatic interaction between protonated amine groups of chitosan and the negative charged carbon materials. One proof-of-concept application of the system to the fabrication of electrical devices based on the micropatterns of SWNTs and RGO was also demonstrated. The strategy to use highly surface active chitosan pattern that can easily fabricate highly periodic pattern via a variety of lithographic tools may pave the way for the production of periodic arrays of graphitic carbon materials for large area device integration. PMID:26353637

  6. Correlation Analysis of Optical and Radio Light Curves for a Large Sample of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, S. D.; Smith, A. G.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.

    1995-08-01

    The Rosemary Hill Observatory has accumulated internally consistent light curves extending over as much as 26 years for a large sample of active galactic nuclei. Forty-six of these optical records have been compared with similar radio records from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory and the Algonquin Radio Observatory. For 18 objects, pairs of records were sufficiently long and unconfused to allow reliable application of the Discrete Correlation Function analysis; this group included 8 BL Lacertids, 8 quasars, and 2 Seyfert galaxies. Nine of the 18 sources showed positive radio-optical correlations, with the radio events lagging the optical by intervals ranging from 0 to 14 months. Consistent with the relativistic beaming model of the BL Lacertids, the group displaying correlations was dominated by this type of object.

  7. Directed Evolution of RebH for Site Selective Halogenation of Large, Biologically Active Molecules**

    PubMed Central

    Payne, James T.; Poor, Catherine B.

    2015-01-01

    We recently characterized the substrate scope of wild-type RebH and evolved variants of this enzyme with improved stability for biocatalysis. The substrate scopes of both RebH and the stabilized variants, however, are limited primarily to compounds similar in size to tryptophan. We have now used a substrate walking approach to further evolve RebH variants with expanded substrate scope. Two particularly notable variants were identified: 3-SS, which provides high conversion of tricyclic tryptoline derivatives; and 4-V, which accepts a broad range of large indoles and carbazoles. This constitutes the first reported use of directed evolution to enable functionalization of substrates not accepted by wild-type RebH and demonstrates the utility of RebH variants for site-selective halogenation of biologically active compounds. PMID:25678465

  8. Response of extratropical cyclone activity to the Kuroshio large meander in northern winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Masamitsu; Kawamura, Ryuichi; Mori, Masato; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2013-06-01

    We examined possible responses of cyclone activities to the bimodal path states of the Kuroshio Current [i.e., large meander (LM) and non-LM (NLM)] by using the long-term reanalysis data and the 20th century hindcast experiment of a high-resolution atmosphere-ocean coupled model. Compared with a seasonal mean cyclone track frequency for the LM and NLM periods, a primary cyclone track shifts southward in association with the meander of Kuroshio Current. Composite analyses of the hindcast experiment showed remarkable atmospheric responses accompanying the Kuroshio LM. The Kuroshio LM causes a decrease in latent heat flux in the south of Japan and a southward shift of the near-surface baroclinic zone. Distinctive decreases in thermodynamic fluxes inhibit the rapid development of cyclones in the meander region, eventually inducing positive sea level pressure anomalies downstream from that region.

  9. Enhancing Cognitive Abilities with Comprehensive Training: A Large, Online, Randomized, Active-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Joseph L.; Nelson, Rolf A.; Thomason, Moriah E.; Sternberg, Daniel A.; Katovich, Kiefer; Farzin, Faraz; Scanlon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of studies have demonstrated gains in cognitive ability following cognitive training interventions. However, other studies have not shown such gains, and questions remain regarding the efficacy of specific cognitive training interventions. Cognitive training research often involves programs made up of just one or a few exercises, targeting limited and specific cognitive endpoints. In addition, cognitive training studies typically involve small samples that may be insufficient for reliable measurement of change. Other studies have utilized training periods that were too short to generate reliable gains in cognitive performance. Methods The present study evaluated an online cognitive training program comprised of 49 exercises targeting a variety of cognitive capacities. The cognitive training program was compared to an active control condition in which participants completed crossword puzzles. All participants were recruited, trained, and tested online (N = 4,715 fully evaluable participants). Participants in both groups were instructed to complete one approximately 15-minute session at least 5 days per week for 10 weeks. Results Participants randomly assigned to the treatment group improved significantly more on the primary outcome measure, an aggregate measure of neuropsychological performance, than did the active control group (Cohen’s d effect size = 0.255; 95% confidence interval = [0.198, 0.312]). Treatment participants showed greater improvements than controls on speed of processing, short-term memory, working memory, problem solving, and fluid reasoning assessments. Participants in the treatment group also showed greater improvements on self-reported measures of cognitive functioning, particularly on those items related to concentration compared to the control group (Cohen’s d = 0.249; 95% confidence interval = [0.191, 0.306]). Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that a varied training program composed of a number of

  10. TFT-Based Active Pixel Sensors for Large Area Thermal Neutron Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnen, George

    Due to diminishing availability of 3He, which is the critical component of neutron detecting proportional counters, large area flexible arrays are being considered as a potential replacement for neutron detection. A large area flexible array, utilizing semiconductors for both charged particle detection and pixel readout, ensures a large detection surface area in a light weight rugged form. Such a neutron detector could be suitable for deployment at ports of entry. The specific approach used in this research, uses a neutron converter layer which captures incident thermal neutrons, and then emits ionizing charged particles. These ionizing particles cause electron-hole pair generation within a single pixel's integrated sensing diode. The resulting charge is then amplified via a low-noise amplifier. This document begins by discussing the current state of the art in neutron detection and the associated challenges. Then, for the purpose of resolving some of these issues, recent design and modeling efforts towards developing an improved neutron detection system are described. Also presented is a low-noise active pixel sensor (APS) design capable of being implemented in low temperature indium gallium zinc oxide (InGaZnO) or amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor process compatible with plastic substrates. The low gain and limited scalability of this design are improved upon by implementing a new multi-stage self-resetting APS. For each APS design, successful radiation measurements are also presented using PiN diodes for charged particle detection. Next, detection array readout methodologies are modeled and analyzed, and use of a matched filter readout circuit is described as well. Finally, this document discusses detection diode integration with the designed TFT-based APSs.

  11. Heterogeneity-induced large deviations in activity and (in some cases) entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingrich, Todd R.; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2014-10-01

    We solve a simple model that supports a dynamic phase transition and show conditions for the existence of the transition. Using methods of large deviation theory we analytically compute the probability distribution for activity and entropy production rates of the trajectories on a large ring with a single heterogeneous link. The corresponding joint rate function demonstrates two dynamical phases—one localized and the other delocalized, but the marginal rate functions do not always exhibit the underlying transition. Symmetries in dynamic order parameters influence the observation of a transition, such that distributions for certain dynamic order parameters need not reveal an underlying dynamical bistability. Solution of our model system furthermore yields the form of the effective Markov transition matrices that generate dynamics in which the two dynamical phases are at coexistence. We discuss the implications of the transition for the response of bacterial cells to antibiotic treatment, arguing that even simple models of a cell cycle lacking an explicit bistability in configuration space will exhibit a bistability of dynamical phases.

  12. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules. PMID:26760444

  13. Techniques for extracting single-trial activity patterns from large-scale neural recordings.

    PubMed

    Churchland, Mark M; Yu, Byron M; Sahani, Maneesh; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2007-10-01

    Large, chronically implanted arrays of microelectrodes are an increasingly common tool for recording from primate cortex and can provide extracellular recordings from many (order of 100) neurons. While the desire for cortically based motor prostheses has helped drive their development, such arrays also offer great potential to advance basic neuroscience research. Here we discuss the utility of array recording for the study of neural dynamics. Neural activity often has dynamics beyond that driven directly by the stimulus. While governed by those dynamics, neural responses may nevertheless unfold differently for nominally identical trials, rendering many traditional analysis methods ineffective. We review recent studies - some employing simultaneous recording, some not - indicating that such variability is indeed present both during movement generation and during the preceding premotor computations. In such cases, large-scale simultaneous recordings have the potential to provide an unprecedented view of neural dynamics at the level of single trials. However, this enterprise will depend not only on techniques for simultaneous recording but also on the use and further development of analysis techniques that can appropriately reduce the dimensionality of the data, and allow visualization of single-trial neural behavior. PMID:18093826

  14. Giant stellar arcs in the Large Magellanic Cloud: a possible link with past activity of the Milky Way nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Yuri N.

    2013-02-01

    The origin of the giant stellar arcs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remains a controversial issue, one that has been discussed since 1966. No other star/cluster arc is so perfect a segment of a circle; moreover, there is another similar arc nearby. Many hypotheses were advanced to explain these arcs and all but one of these was disproved. It was proposed in 2004 that the origin of these arcs was a bow shock from the jet that is intermittently fired by the Milky Way nucleus; during its last episode of activity the jet was pointed toward the LMC. Quite recently, evidence for such a jet indeed appeared. We suggest that it was once energetic enough to trigger star formation in the LMC, and if the jet opening angle was about 2° then it could push out H i gas from a region of about 2 kpc in size, forming a cavity LMC4, but also squeeze two dense clouds that occurred in the same area, causing the formation of stars along their surfaces facing the core of the Milky Way. As a result, spherical segments of stellar shells might arise, visible now as the arcs named the Quadrant and Sextant, the apexes of which point towards the centre of the Milky Way. The orientation of both arcs could be the key to unlocking their origin. Here we give data that confirm the above hypothesis, amongst which are the radial velocities of stars inside and outside the larger of the LMC arcs. The probability is low that a jet from an active galactic nucleus (AGN) points towards a nearby galaxy and triggers star formation there, but a few other examples are now known or suspected.

  15. Interior of control house showing remains of controller. Moving the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of control house showing remains of controller. Moving the handle rotated the vertical shaft and porcelain cams to engage various electrical switches and activate the lift mechanism. All electrical components have been removed. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  16. Improvements on GPS Location Cluster Analysis for the Prediction of Large Carnivore Feeding Activities: Ground-Truth Detection Probability and Inclusion of Activity Sensor Measures

    PubMed Central

    Blecha, Kevin A.; Alldredge, Mat W.

    2015-01-01

    Animal space use studies using GPS collar technology are increasingly incorporating behavior based analysis of spatio-temporal data in order to expand inferences of resource use. GPS location cluster analysis is one such technique applied to large carnivores to identify the timing and location of feeding events. For logistical and financial reasons, researchers often implement predictive models for identifying these events. We present two separate improvements for predictive models that future practitioners can implement. Thus far, feeding prediction models have incorporated a small range of covariates, usually limited to spatio-temporal characteristics of the GPS data. Using GPS collared cougar (Puma concolor) we include activity sensor data as an additional covariate to increase prediction performance of feeding presence/absence. Integral to the predictive modeling of feeding events is a ground-truthing component, in which GPS location clusters are visited by human observers to confirm the presence or absence of feeding remains. Failing to account for sources of ground-truthing false-absences can bias the number of predicted feeding events to be low. Thus we account for some ground-truthing error sources directly in the model with covariates and when applying model predictions. Accounting for these errors resulted in a 10% increase in the number of clusters predicted to be feeding events. Using a double-observer design, we show that the ground-truthing false-absence rate is relatively low (4%) using a search delay of 2–60 days. Overall, we provide two separate improvements to the GPS cluster analysis techniques that can be expanded upon and implemented in future studies interested in identifying feeding behaviors of large carnivores. PMID:26398546

  17. Tularemia vaccines: recent developments and remaining hurdles.

    PubMed

    Conlan, J Wayne

    2011-04-01

    Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen of humans and other mammals. Its inhaled infectious dose is very low and can result in very high mortality. Historically, subsp. tularensis was developed as a biological weapon and there are now concerns about its abuse as such by terrorists. A live attenuated vaccine developed pragmatically more than half a century ago from the less virulent holarctica subsp. is the sole prophylactic available, but it remains unlicensed. In recent years several other potential live, killed and subunit vaccine candidates have been developed and tested in mice for their efficacy against respiratory challenge with subsp. tularensis. This article will review these vaccine candidates and the development hurdles they face. PMID:21526941

  18. Some remaining problems in HCDA analysis. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.W.

    1981-01-01

    The safety assessment and licensing of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) requires an analysis on the capability of the reactor primary system to sustain the consequences of a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). Although computational methods and computer programs developed for HCDA analyses can predict reasonably well the response of the primary containment system, and follow up the phenomena of HCDA from the start of excursion to the time of dynamic equilibrium in the system, there remain areas in the HCDA analysis that merit further analytical and experimental studies. These are the analysis of fluid impact on reactor cover, three-dimensional analysis, the treatment of the perforated plates, material properties under high strain rates and under high temperatures, the treatment of multifield flows, and the treatment of prestressed concrete reactor vessels. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the structural mechanics of HCDA analysis in these areas where improvements are needed.

  19. Large-Scale Activity in the Bastille Day 2000 Solar Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertok, I. M.; Grechnev, V. V.

    2005-06-01

    We have analyzed dimmings, i.e., regions of temporarily reduced brightness, and manifestations of a coronal wave in the famous event of 14 July 2000 using images produced with the EUV telescope SOHO/EIT. Our analysis was inspired by a paper by Andrews (2001, Solar Phys. 204, 181 (Paper I)), in which this event was studied using running-difference EIT images at 195 Å formed by subtraction of a previous image from each current one. Such images emphasize changes of the brightness, location, and configuration of observed structures occurring during the 12-min interval between two subsequent heliograms. However, they distort the picture of large-scale disturbances caused by a CME, particularly, dimmings. A real picture of dimmings can be obtained from fixed-base difference ‘de-rotated’ images. The latter are formed in two stages: first, the solar rotation is compensated using three-dimensional rotation of all images (‘de-rotation’) to the time of a pre-event heliogram, here 10:00 UT, and then the base heliogram is subtracted from all others. We show real dimmings to be essentially different from those described by Andrews (Paper I). The restructuring of large-scale magnetic fields in the corona in connection with the CME was accompanied by the appearance and growth of two large dimmings. One of them was located along the central meridian, southward of the eruption center, at the place of the pre-eruption arcade. Another dimming occupied the space between the flare region and a remote western active region. Several smaller dimmings were observed virtually over the whole solar disk, especially, within the northwest quadrant. We have also revealed a propagating disturbance with properties of a coronal wave in the northern polar sector, where no dimmings were observed. This fact is discussed in the context of probable association between dimmings and coronal waves. Having suppressed the ‘snowstorm’ produced in the EIT images by energetic particles, we have

  20. Packing of Large Two- and Three-Photon Activity Into Smallest Possible Unsymmetrical Fluorene Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Kundi, Varun; Thankachan, Pompozhi Protasis

    2016-05-01

    The quantum chemical study of one-, two-, and three-photon absorption (1PA, 2PA, and 3PA) properties for a set of compact fluorene derivatives (FD) with combination of different donor and acceptor moieties on both sides of fluorene ring system is presented. The main goal of the study is to pack large two-photon (2P) and three-photon (3P) activity into smallest possible chromophore. Linear, quadratic, and cubic response time-dependent density functional theory was used to calculate 1PA, 2PA, and 3PA properties, respectively. We used CAMB3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory for all the property calculations. The 2P and 3P transition probabilities were recalculated using two-state model approach and found to be in good agreement with the response theory results for first excited state. To include the contributions from higher states, the three-state model was also employed to recalculate the 2P transition probabilities and found to be in excellent agreement with response theory. The 2P/3P tensor elements were also analyzed to find reasons behind large 2P/3P activities. All the orbitals involved in transition processes were studied in detail by both molecular orbital pictures (qualitatively) and overlap diagnostic Λ-values (quantitatively). The study reveals that the novel fluorene derivatives FD-12 and FD-13 have shown large 2PA cross-section values of 1100 G.M. and 1030 G.M.; and 3PA transition probabilities of 6.10 × 10(10) a.u. and 4.85 × 10(10) a.u., respectively, for transition S0 → S1. The largest 3PA transition probability of 4.04 × 10(11) a.u. was found with FD-12 for S0 → S2 excitation. The linear relationship between Λ-values and 2PA cross-section values was also studied. PMID:27054876

  1. Active alignment and vibration control system for a large airborne optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienholz, David A.

    2000-04-01

    Airborne optical or electro-optical systems may be too large for all elements to be mounted on a single integrating structure, other than the aircraft fuselage itself. An active system must then be used to maintain the required alignment between elements. However the various smaller integrating structures (benches) must still be isolated from high- frequency airframe disturbances that could excite resonances outside the bandwidth of the alignment control system. The combined active alignment and vibration isolation functions must be performed by flight-weight components, which may have to operate in vacuum. A testbed system developed for the Air Force Airborne Laser program is described. The payload, a full-scale 1650-lb simulated bench, is mounted in six degrees- of-freedom to a vibrating platform by a set of isolator- actuators. The mounts utilize a combination of pneumatics and magnetics to perform the dual functions of low-frequency alignment and high-frequency isolation. Test results are given and future directions for development are described.

  2. Vertebrate Protein CTCF and its Multiple Roles in a Large-Scale Regulation of Genome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, L.G; Akopov, S.B; Didych, D.A; Sverdlov, E.D

    2009-01-01

    The CTCF transcription factor is an 11 zinc fingers multifunctional protein that uses different zinc finger combinations to recognize and bind different sites within DNA. CTCF is thought to participate in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains and regulation of imprinting. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites in the human and other genomes within a framework of the loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. We also tried to formulate possible lines of studies on a variety of CTCF functions which probably depend on its ability to specifically bind DNA, interact with other proteins and form di- and multimers. These three fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator and a constitutive dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s). PMID:20119526

  3. Vertebrate Protein CTCF and its Multiple Roles in a Large-Scale Regulation of Genome Activity.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, L G; Akopov, S B; Didych, D A; Sverdlov, E D

    2009-08-01

    The CTCF transcription factor is an 11 zinc fingers multifunctional protein that uses different zinc finger combinations to recognize and bind different sites within DNA. CTCF is thought to participate in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains and regulation of imprinting. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites in the human and other genomes within a framework of the loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. We also tried to formulate possible lines of studies on a variety of CTCF functions which probably depend on its ability to specifically bind DNA, interact with other proteins and form di- and multimers. These three fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator and a constitutive dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s). PMID:20119526

  4. Anatomical connectivity and the resting state activity of large cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Pinotsis, D.A.; Hansen, E.; Friston, K.J.; Jirsa, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses mathematical modelling and simulations to explore the dynamics that emerge in large scale cortical networks, with a particular focus on the topological properties of the structural connectivity and its relationship to functional connectivity. We exploit realistic anatomical connectivity matrices (from diffusion spectrum imaging) and investigate their capacity to generate various types of resting state activity. In particular, we study emergent patterns of activity for realistic connectivity configurations together with approximations formulated in terms of neural mass or field models. We find that homogenous connectivity matrices, of the sort of assumed in certain neural field models give rise to damped spatially periodic modes, while more localised modes reflect heterogeneous coupling topologies. When simulating resting state fluctuations under realistic connectivity, we find no evidence for a spectrum of spatially periodic patterns, even when grouping together cortical nodes into communities, using graph theory. We conclude that neural field models with translationally invariant connectivity may be best applied at the mesoscopic scale and that more general models of cortical networks that embed local neural fields, may provide appropriate models of macroscopic cortical dynamics over the whole brain. PMID:23085498

  5. The primary role of active large sand seas in forming warm-desert loess sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouvi, O.; Enzel, Y.; Amit, R.; Gillespie, A.

    2009-12-01

    Loess is a widespread aeolian deposit in warm deserts and their semiarid margins. It is commonly dominated by coarse silts. Quartz particles, commonly angular, are the main component (commonly 50%-70%) of this coarse silt fraction. Despite intensive research during the past century on loess formation, the origin of these coarse quartz silts comprising most of desert loess remains one of the fundamental debated problems in sedimentology and Quaternary geology. The ongoing debate is focused on the first stage of loess formation - the production of the quartz silt grains. Therefore this debate influences interpretations of past environmental and climatic changes. Although laboratory experiments indicate the potential of spalling coarse silt grains from abrading sand grains during saltation, field-based evidence is rare and the concept has been minimized and even rejected. We examined in detail data available for several well-known loess zones in subtropical deserts (including: Sahara, Sinai-Negev, Arabia) and show that all these, desert loess sequences are located downwind of adjacent sand dunes/seas both during the late Pleistocene as indicated by dune directions and even at present as indicated by wind data and drift analyses. Additional observations include: (a) mineralogical similarity between the loess and the upwind sand dunes, (b) temporal association of intensified erg activity and loess formation, and (c) grain-size mode reduction of loess with distance from ergs. Where there is no loess sequence downwind of ergs, there is an ocean, sometimes with reported silts (interpreted as dust) in coastal and deeper sea cores. These observations suggest that sand dunes must have been an important source for desert loess. We postulate that the silt grains are generated through active aeolian abrasion of sand grains during episodes of intense windy conditions, in most cases in glacial times. Thus our findings stress that the primary role of active ergs and aeolian

  6. GMP cryopreservation of large volumes of cells for regenerative medicine: active control of the freezing process.

    PubMed

    Massie, Isobel; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphrey; Fuller, Barry; Gibbons, Stephanie; Morris, G John

    2014-09-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are increasingly required in regenerative medicine applications but must deliver functional products at clinical scale and comply with Good Manufacturing Process (GMP). While GMP cryopreservation is achievable on a small scale using a Stirling cryocooler-based controlled rate freezer (CRF) (EF600), successful large-scale GMP cryopreservation is more challenging due to heat transfer issues and control of ice nucleation, both complex events that impact success. We have developed a large-scale cryocooler-based CRF (VIA Freeze) that can process larger volumes and have evaluated it using alginate-encapsulated liver cell (HepG2) spheroids (ELS). It is anticipated that ELS will comprise the cellular component of a bioartificial liver and will be required in volumes of ∼2 L for clinical use. Sample temperatures and Stirling cryocooler power consumption was recorded throughout cooling runs for both small (500 μL) and large (200 mL) volume samples. ELS recoveries were assessed using viability (FDA/PI staining with image analysis), cell number (nuclei count), and function (protein secretion), along with cryoscanning electron microscopy and freeze substitution techniques to identify possible injury mechanisms. Slow cooling profiles were successfully applied to samples in both the EF600 and the VIA Freeze, and a number of cooling and warming profiles were evaluated. An optimized cooling protocol with a nonlinear cooling profile from ice nucleation to -60°C was implemented in both the EF600 and VIA Freeze. In the VIA Freeze the nucleation of ice is detected by the control software, allowing both noninvasive detection of the nucleation event for quality control purposes and the potential to modify the cooling profile following ice nucleation in an active manner. When processing 200 mL of ELS in the VIA Freeze-viabilities at 93.4% ± 7.4%, viable cell numbers at 14.3 ± 1.7 million nuclei/mL alginate, and protein secretion at 10.5 ± 1.7

  7. GMP Cryopreservation of Large Volumes of Cells for Regenerative Medicine: Active Control of the Freezing Process

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Isobel; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphrey; Gibbons, Stephanie; Morris, G. John

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are increasingly required in regenerative medicine applications but must deliver functional products at clinical scale and comply with Good Manufacturing Process (GMP). While GMP cryopreservation is achievable on a small scale using a Stirling cryocooler-based controlled rate freezer (CRF) (EF600), successful large-scale GMP cryopreservation is more challenging due to heat transfer issues and control of ice nucleation, both complex events that impact success. We have developed a large-scale cryocooler-based CRF (VIA Freeze) that can process larger volumes and have evaluated it using alginate-encapsulated liver cell (HepG2) spheroids (ELS). It is anticipated that ELS will comprise the cellular component of a bioartificial liver and will be required in volumes of ∼2 L for clinical use. Sample temperatures and Stirling cryocooler power consumption was recorded throughout cooling runs for both small (500 μL) and large (200 mL) volume samples. ELS recoveries were assessed using viability (FDA/PI staining with image analysis), cell number (nuclei count), and function (protein secretion), along with cryoscanning electron microscopy and freeze substitution techniques to identify possible injury mechanisms. Slow cooling profiles were successfully applied to samples in both the EF600 and the VIA Freeze, and a number of cooling and warming profiles were evaluated. An optimized cooling protocol with a nonlinear cooling profile from ice nucleation to −60°C was implemented in both the EF600 and VIA Freeze. In the VIA Freeze the nucleation of ice is detected by the control software, allowing both noninvasive detection of the nucleation event for quality control purposes and the potential to modify the cooling profile following ice nucleation in an active manner. When processing 200 mL of ELS in the VIA Freeze—viabilities at 93.4%±7.4%, viable cell numbers at 14.3±1.7 million nuclei/mL alginate, and protein secretion at 10.5±1.7

  8. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324

    PubMed Central

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 105 U mg−1 protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/Km) of 4.7 × 108 M−1 s−1 within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  9. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324.

    PubMed

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 10(5) U mg(-1) protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (K cat/K m ) of 4.7 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t 1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t 1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  10. Body size prediction from juvenile skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher

    2007-05-01

    There are currently no methods for predicting body mass from juvenile skeletal remains and only a very limited number for predicting stature. In this study, stature and body mass prediction equations are generated for each year from 1 to 17 years of age using a subset of the Denver Growth Study sample, followed longitudinally (n = 20 individuals, 340 observations). Radiographic measurements of femoral distal metaphyseal and head breadth are used to predict body mass and long bone lengths are used to predict stature. In addition, pelvic bi-iliac breadth and long bone lengths are used to predict body mass in older adolescents. Relative prediction errors are equal to or smaller than those associated with similar adult estimation formulae. Body proportions change continuously throughout growth, necessitating age-specific formulae. Adult formulae overestimate stature and body mass in younger juveniles, but work well in 17-year-olds from the sample, indicating that in terms of body proportions they are representative of the general population. To illustrate use of the techniques, they are applied to the juvenile Homo erectus (ergaster) KNM-WT 15000 skeleton. New body mass and stature estimates for this specimen are similar to previous estimates derived using other methods. Body mass estimates range from 50 to 53 kg, and stature was probably slightly under 157 cm, although a precise stature estimate is difficult to determine due to differences in linear body proportions between KNM-WT 15000 and the Denver reference sample. PMID:17295297

  11. The Third Catalog of Active Galactic Nuclei Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carpenter, B.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Abrusco, R.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Furniss, A. K.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kataoka, J.; Kawano, T.; Krauss, F.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Leto, C.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Ojha, R.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paggi, A.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romani, R. W.; Salvetti, D.; Schaal, M.; Schinzel, F. K.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, L.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Zimmer, S.

    2015-09-01

    The third catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Fermi-LAT (3LAC) is presented. It is based on the third Fermi-LAT catalog (3FGL) of sources detected between 100 MeV and 300 GeV with a Test Statistic greater than 25, between 2008 August 4 and 2012 July 31. The 3LAC includes 1591 AGNs located at high Galactic latitudes (| b| \\gt 10^\\circ ), a 71% increase over the second catalog based on 2 years of data. There are 28 duplicate associations, thus 1563 of the 2192 high-latitude gamma-ray sources of the 3FGL catalog are AGNs. Most of them (98%) are blazars. About half of the newly detected blazars are of unknown type, i.e., they lack spectroscopic information of sufficient quality to determine the strength of their emission lines. Based on their gamma-ray spectral properties, these sources are evenly split between flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and BL Lacs. The most abundant detected BL Lacs are of the high-synchrotron-peaked (HSP) type. About 50% of the BL Lacs have no measured redshifts. A few new rare outliers (HSP-FSRQs and high-luminosity HSP BL Lacs) are reported. The general properties of the 3LAC sample confirm previous findings from earlier catalogs. The fraction of 3LAC blazars in the total population of blazars listed in BZCAT remains non-negligible even at the faint ends of the BZCAT-blazar radio, optical, and X-ray flux distributions, which hints that even the faintest known blazars could eventually shine in gamma-rays at LAT-detection levels. The energy-flux distributions of the different blazar populations are in good agreement with extrapolation from earlier catalogs.

  12. A Large-N Mixed Sensor Active + Passive Seismic Array near Sweetwater, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklage, M.; Hollis, D.; Gridley, J. M.; Woodward, R.; Spriggs, N.

    2014-12-01

    A collaborative high-density seismic survey using broadband and short period seismic sensors was conducted March 7 - April 30, 2014 near Sweetwater, TX. The objective of the survey was to use a combination of controlled source shot slices and passive seismic recordings recorded by multiple types of sensors with different bandwidths and sensitivities to image the subsurface. The broadband component of the survey consisted of 25 continuously recording seismic stations comprised of 20 Trillium Compact Posthole sensors from Nanometrics and 5 Polar Trillium 120PHQs from the IRIS/PASSCAL Instrument Center (PIC). The broadband stations also utilized 25 Centaur digitizers from Nanometrics as well as 25 polar quick deploy enclosures from the PIC. The broadband array was designed to maximize horizontal traveling seismic energy for surface wave analysis over the primary target area with sufficient offset for imaging objectives at depth. The short period component of the survey consisted of 2639 receiver locations using Zland nodes from NodalSeismic. The nodes are further divided into 3 sub-arrays: 1) outlier array 2) active source array 3) backbone array. The outlier array consisted of 25 continuously recording nodes distributed around the edge of the survey at a distance of ~5 km from the survey boundary, and provided valuable constraints to passive data analysis techniques at the edge of the survey boundary. The active source patch consisted of densely spaced nodes that were designed to record signals from a Vibroseis source truck for active source reflection processing and imaging. The backbone array consisted of 292 nodes that covered the entirety of the survey area to maximize the value of the passive data analysis. By utilizing continuous recording and smartly designed arrays for measuring local and regional earthquakes we can incorporate velocity information derived from passive data analysis into the active source processing workflow to produce a superior subsurface

  13. Proton-synchrotron radiation of large-scale jets in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F. A.

    2002-05-01

    The X-radiation of large-scale extragalactic jets poses a serious challenge for the conventional electron-synchrotron or inverse Compton models suggested to explain the overall non-thermal emission of the resolved knots and hotspots. In this paper I propose an alternative mechanism for X-ray emission - synchrotron radiation by extremely high-energy protons - and discuss implications of this model for the extended jet features resolved by Chandra in several prominent radio galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) - Pictor A, 3C 120, PKS 0637-752 and 3C 273. I show that if protons are indeed accelerated to energies E p >=1018 eV, it is possible to construct a realistic model that allows an effective cooling of protons via synchrotron radiation on quite `comfortable' time-scales of about 107 -108 yr, i.e. on time-scales that provide effective propagation of protons over the jet structures on kpc scales. This explains quite naturally the diffuse character of the observed X-ray emission, as well as the broad range of spectral X-ray indices observed from different objects. Yet, as long as the proton synchrotron cooling time is comparable with both the particle escape time and the age of the jet, the proton-synchrotron model offers an adequate radiation efficiency. The model requires relatively large magnetic field of about 1mG, and proton acceleration rates ranging from L p ~1043 to 1046 ergs-1 . These numbers could be reduced significantly if the jet structures are moving relativistically towards the observer. I discuss also possible contributions of synchrotron radiation by secondary electrons produced at interactions of relatively low energy (E p <=1013 eV) protons with the compressed gas in the jet structures. This is an interesting possibility which however requires a very large product of the ambient gas density and total amount of accelerated protons. Therefore it could be treated as a viable working hypothesis only if one can reduce the intrinsic X

  14. Gaining A Geological Perspective Through Active Learning in the Large Lecture Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapp, J. L.; Richardson, R. M.; Slater, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    NATS 101 A Geological Perspective is a general education course taken by non science majors. We offer 600 seats per semester, with four large lecture sections taught by different faculty members. In the past we have offered optional once a week study groups taught by graduate teaching assistants. Students often feel overwhelmed by the science and associated jargon, and many are prone to skipping lectures altogether. Optional study groups are only attended by ~50% of the students. Faculty members find the class to be a lot of work, mainly due to the grading it generates. Activities given in lecture are often short multiple choice or true false assignments, limiting the depth of understanding we can evaluate. Our students often lack math and critical thinking skills, and we spend a lot of time in lecture reintroducing ideas students should have already gotten from the text. In summer 2007 we were funded to redesign the course. Our goals were to 1) cut the cost of running the course, and 2) improve student learning. Under our redesign optional study groups were replaced by once a week mandatory break out sessions where students complete activities that have been introduced in lecture. Break out sessions substitute for one hour of lecture, and are run by undergraduate preceptors and graduate teaching assistants (GTAs). During the lecture period, lectures themselves are brief with a large portion of the class devoted to active learning in small groups. Weekly reading quizzes are submitted via the online course management system. Break out sessions allow students to spend more time interacting with their fellow students, undergraduate preceptors, and GTAs. They get one on one help in break out sessions on assignments designed to enhance the lecture material. The active lecture format means less of their time is devoted to listening passively to a lecture, and more time is spent peer learning an interacting with the instructor. Completing quizzes online allows students

  15. ACTIVE LONGITUDES REVEALED BY LARGE-SCALE AND LONG-LIVED CORONAL STREAMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing

    2011-07-10

    We use time-series ultraviolet full sun images to construct limb-synoptic maps of the Sun. On these maps, large-scale, long-lived coronal streamers appear as repetitive sinusoid-like arcs projected over the polar regions. They are caused by high altitude plasma produced from sunspot-rich regions at latitudes generally far from the poles. The non-uniform longitudinal distribution of these streamers reveals four longitudinal zones at the surface of the Sun from which sunspots erupt preferentially over the 5 year observing interval (2006 January to 2011 April). Spots in these zones (or clusters) have individual lifetimes short compared to the lifetimes of the coronal features which they sustain, and they erupt at different times. The four sunspot clusters contain >75% of all numbered sunspots in this period. They occupy two distinct longitudinal zones separated by {approx}180{sup 0} and each spanning {approx}100{sup 0} in longitude. The rotation rates of the spot clusters are {approx}5% faster than the rates at both the surface and the bottom of the convection zone. While no convincing theoretical framework exists to interpret the sunspot clusters in the longitude-time space, their persistent and nonuniform distribution indicates long-lived, azimuthal structures beneath the surface, and are compatible with the existence of previously reported active longitudes on the Sun.

  16. Four-point probe electrical resistivity scanning system for large area conductivity and activation energy mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimanovich, Klimentiy; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Keller, David A.; Rühle, Sven; Anderson, Assaf Y.; Zaban, Arie

    2014-05-01

    The electrical properties of metal oxides play a crucial role in the development of new photovoltaic (PV) systems. Here we demonstrate a general approach for the determination and analysis of these properties in thin films of new metal oxide based PV materials. A high throughput electrical scanning system, which facilitates temperature dependent measurements at different atmospheres for highly resistive samples, was designed and constructed. The instrument is capable of determining conductivity and activation energy values for relatively large sample areas, of about 72 × 72 mm2, with the implementation of geometrical correction factors. The efficiency of our scanning system was tested using two different samples of CuO and commercially available Fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates. Our high throughput tool was able to identify the electrical properties of both resistive metal oxide thin film samples with high precision and accuracy. The scanning system enabled us to gain insight into transport mechanisms with novel compositions and to use those insights to make smart choices when choosing materials for our multilayer thin film all oxide photovoltaic cells.

  17. Denitrification in a large river: consideration of geomorphic controls on microbial activity and community structure.

    PubMed

    Tatariw, Corianne; Chapman, Elise L; Sponseller, Ryan A; Mortazavi, Behzad; Edmonds, Jennifer W

    2013-10-01

    Ecological theory argues that the controls over ecosystem processes are structured hierarchically, with broader-scale drivers acting as constraints over the interactions and dynamics at nested levels of organization. In river ecosystems, these interactions may arise from broadscale variation in channel form that directly shapes benthic habitat structure and indirectly constrains resource supply and biological activity within individual reaches. To evaluate these interactions, we identified sediment characteristics, water chemistry, and denitrifier community structure as factors influencing benthic denitrification rates in a sixth-order river that flows through two physiographic provinces and the transitional zone between them, each with distinct geomorphological properties. We found that denitrification rates tracked spatial changes in sediment characteristics and varied seasonally with expected trends in stream primary production. Highest rates were observed during the spring and summer seasons in the physiographic province dominated by fine-grained sediments, illustrating how large-scale changes in river structure can constrain the location of denitrification hotspots. In addition, nirS and nirK community structure each responded differently to variation in channel form, possibly due to changes in dissolved oxygen and organic matter supply. This shift in denitrifier community structure coincident with higher rates of N removal via denitrification suggests that microbial community structure may influence biogeochemical processes. PMID:24358711

  18. Reconstruction of the solar coronal magnetic field, from active region to large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, T.; Canou, A.; Delyon, F.; Aly, J. J.; Frey, P.; Alauzet, F.

    2011-12-01

    The low solar corona is dominated by the magnetic field which is created inside the sun by a dynamo process and then emerges into the atmosphere. This magnetic field plays an important role in most structures and phenomena observed at various wavelengths such as prominences, small and large scale eruptive events, and continuous heating of the plasma, and therefore it is important to understand its three-dimensional properties in order to elaborate efficient theoretical models. Unfortunately, the magnetic field is difficult to measure locally in the hot and tenuous corona. But this can be done at the level of the cooler and denser photosphere, and several instruments with high resolution vector magnetographs are currently available (THEMIS, Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM), the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter (ASP), SOLIS, HINODE, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), or will be shortly available by future telescopes such as EST and solar missions as SOLAR-ORBITER. This has lead solar physicists to develop an approach which consists in " reconstructing" the coronal magnetic field from boundary data given on the photosphere. We will discuss some of the issues encountered in solving this problem as well our recent progress and results at the scale of active region scales or the larger one such as full sun scale.

  19. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-15

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface B{sub tw} reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field 〈B{sub t}〉 increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (〈B{sub t}〉-B{sub tw})/B{sub pw}, where B{sub pw} is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  20. In-flight aberrations corrections for large space telescopes using active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, M.; Ferrari, M.; Hugot, E.; Lemaitre, G.

    2010-07-01

    The need for both high quality images and light structures is a constant concern in the conception of space telescopes. The goal here is to determine how an active optics system could be embarked on a satellite in order to correct the wave front deformations of the optical train. The optical aberrations appearing in a space environment are due to mirrors' deformations, with three main origins: the thermal variations, the weightlessness in space with respect to the Assemblage, Integration and Testing (AIT) conditions on ground and the use of large weightlighted primary mirrors. We are developing a model of deformable mirror as minimalist as possible, especially in term of number of actuators, which is able to correct the first Zernike polynomials in the specified range of amplitude and precision. Flight constraints as weight, volume and power consumption have to be considered. Firstly, such a system is designed according to the equations from the elasticity theory: we determine the geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the mirror, the location of the forces to be applied and the way to apply them. The concept is validated with a Finite Element Analysis (FEA), allowing optimizing the system by taking into account parameters absent from the theory. At the end of the program the mirror will be realized and characterized in a representative optical configuration.

  1. DYNAMICS OF LARGE FRAGMENTS IN THE TAIL OF ACTIVE ASTEROID P/2010 A2

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Jessica; Jewitt, David; Weaver, Harold

    2013-05-20

    We examine the motions of large fragments at the head of the dust tail of the active asteroid P/2010 A2. In previous work, we showed that these fragments were ejected from the primary nucleus in early 2009, either following a hypervelocity impact or by rotationally induced breakup. Here, we follow their positions through a series of Hubble Space Telescope images taken during the first half of 2010. The orbital evolution of each fragment allows us to constrain its velocity relative to the main nucleus after leaving its sphere of gravitational influence. We find that the fragments constituting a prominent X-shaped tail feature were emitted in a direction opposite to the motion of the asteroid and toward the south of its orbital plane. Derived emission velocities of these primary fragments range between 0.02 and 0.3 m s{sup -1}, comparable to the {approx}0.08 m s{sup -1} gravitational escape speed from the nucleus. Their sizes are on the order of decimeters or larger. We obtain the best fits to our data with ejection velocity vectors lying in a plane that includes the nucleus. This may suggest that the cause of the disruption of P/2010 A2 is rotational breakup.

  2. Active edge control in the precessions polishing process for manufacturing large mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Wei; Walker, David; Yu, Gouyo

    2014-09-01

    The segmentation of the primary mirror is the only promising solution for building the next generation of ground telescopes. However, manufacturing segmented mirrors presents its own challenges. The edge mis-figure impacts directly on the telescope's scientific output. The `Edge effect' significantly dominates the polishing precision. Therefore, the edge control is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues in the segment production that needs to be addressed urgently. This paper reports an active edge control technique for the mirror segments fabrication using the Precession's polishing technique. The strategy in this technique requires that the large spot be selected on the bulk area for fast polishing, and the small spot is used for edge figuring. This can be performed by tool lift and optimizing the dell time to compensate for non-uniform material removal at the edge zone. This requires accurate and stable edge tool influence functions. To obtain the full tool influence function at the edge, we have demonstrated in previous work a novel hybrid-measurement method which uses both simultaneous phase interferometry and profilometry. In this paper, the edge effect under `Bonnet tool' polishing is investigated. The pressure distribution is analyzed by means of finite element analysis (FEA). According to the `Preston' equation, the shape of the edge tool influence functions is predicted. With this help, the multiple process parameters at the edge zone are optimized. This is demonstrated on a 200mm crosscorners hexagonal part with a result of PV less than 200nm for entire surface.

  3. Hurricane activity and the large-scale pattern of spread of an invasive plant species.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Ganesh P; Cronin, James T

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances are a primary facilitator of the growth and spread of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms, on the broad geographic patterns of invasive species growth and spread have not been investigated. We used historical aerial imagery to determine the growth rate of invasive Phragmites australis patches in wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These were relatively undisturbed wetlands where P. australis had room for unrestricted growth. Over the past several decades, invasive P. australis stands expanded in size by 6-35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over that same time period, we found that the frequency of hurricane-force winds explained 81% of the variation in P. australis growth over this broad geographic range. The expansion of P. australis stands was strongly and positively correlated with hurricane frequency. In light of the many climatic models that predict an increase in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes over the next century, these results suggest a strong link between climate change and species invasion and a challenging future ahead for the management of invasive species. PMID:24878928

  4. Oxygen-activated growth and bandgap tunability of large single-crystal bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yufeng; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yuanyue; Chen, Hua; Wang, Xiaohan; Tan, Cheng; Nie, Shu; Suk, Ji Won; Jiang, Tengfei; Liang, Tengfei; Xiao, Junfeng; Ye, Wenjing; Dean, Cory R; Yakobson, Boris I; McCarty, Kevin F; Kim, Philip; Hone, James; Colombo, Luigi; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2016-05-01

    Bernal (AB)-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) is a semiconductor whose bandgap can be tuned by a transverse electric field, making it a unique material for a number of electronic and photonic devices. A scalable approach to synthesize high-quality BLG is therefore critical, which requires minimal crystalline defects in both graphene layers and maximal area of Bernal stacking, which is necessary for bandgap tunability. Here we demonstrate that in an oxygen-activated chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process, half-millimetre size, Bernal-stacked BLG single crystals can be synthesized on Cu. Besides the traditional 'surface-limited' growth mechanism for SLG (1st layer), we discovered new microscopic steps governing the growth of the 2nd graphene layer below the 1st layer as the diffusion of carbon atoms through the Cu bulk after complete dehydrogenation of hydrocarbon molecules on the Cu surface, which does not occur in the absence of oxygen. Moreover, we found that the efficient diffusion of the carbon atoms present at the interface between Cu and the 1st graphene layer further facilitates growth of large domains of the 2nd layer. The CVD BLG has superior electrical quality, with a device on/off ratio greater than 10(4), and a tunable bandgap up to ∼100 meV at a displacement field of 0.9 V nm(-1). PMID:26828845

  5. Porous capsules with a large number of active sites: nucleation/growth under confined conditions.

    PubMed

    Garai, Somenath; Rubčić, Mirta; Bögge, Hartmut; Gouzerh, Pierre; Müller, Achim

    2015-03-01

    This work deals with the generation of large numbers of active sites and with ensuing nucleation/ growth processes on the inside wall of the cavity of porous nanocapsules of the type (pentagon)12(linker)30≡{(Mo(VI))Mo(VI)5}12{Mo(V)2(ligand)}30. A first example refers to sulfur dioxide capture through displacement of acetate ligands, while the grafted sulfite ligands are able to trap {MoO3H}(+) units thereby forming unusual {(O2SO)3MoO3H}(5-) assemblies. A second example relates to the generation of open coordination sites through release of carbon dioxide upon mild acidification of a carbonate-type capsule. When the reaction is performed in the presence of heptamolybdate ions, MoO4(2-) ions enter the cavity where they bind to the inside wall while forming new types of polyoxomolybdate architectures, thereby extending the molybdenum oxide skeleton of the capsule. Parallels can be drawn with Mo-storage proteins and supported MoO3 catalysts, making the results relevant to molybdenum biochemistry and to catalysis. PMID:25653204

  6. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-01

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface Btw reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (-Btw)/Bpw, where Bpw is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  7. Large zinc cation occupancy of octahedral sites in mechanically activated zinc ferrite powders

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, S. A.; Harris, V. G.; Hamdeh, H. H.; Ho, J. C.

    2000-05-08

    The cation site occupancy of a mechanically activated nanocrystalline zinc ferrite powder was determined as (Zn{sub 0.55}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 0.18}{sup 3+}){sub tet}[Zr{sub 0.45}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 1.82}{sup 3+}]{sub oct}O{sub 4} through analysis of extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements, showing a large redistribution of cations between sites compared to normal zinc ferrite samples. The overpopulation of cations in the octahedral sites was attributed to the ascendance in importance of the ionic radii over the crystal energy and bonding coordination in determining which interstitial sites are occupied in this structurally disordered powder. Slight changes are observed in the local atomic environment about the zinc cations, but not the iron cations, with respect to the spinel structure. The presence of Fe{sup 3+} on both sites is consistent with the measured room temperature magnetic properties. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Ganesh P.; Cronin, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances are a primary facilitator of the growth and spread of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms, on the broad geographic patterns of invasive species growth and spread have not been investigated. We used historical aerial imagery to determine the growth rate of invasive Phragmites australis patches in wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These were relatively undisturbed wetlands where P. australis had room for unrestricted growth. Over the past several decades, invasive P. australis stands expanded in size by 6–35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over that same time period, we found that the frequency of hurricane-force winds explained 81% of the variation in P. australis growth over this broad geographic range. The expansion of P. australis stands was strongly and positively correlated with hurricane frequency. In light of the many climatic models that predict an increase in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes over the next century, these results suggest a strong link between climate change and species invasion and a challenging future ahead for the management of invasive species. PMID:24878928

  9. Dynamics of large-scale brain activity in normal arousal states and epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Rennie, C. J.; Rowe, D. L.

    2002-04-01

    Links between electroencephalograms (EEGs) and underlying aspects of neurophysiology and anatomy are poorly understood. Here a nonlinear continuum model of large-scale brain electrical activity is used to analyze arousal states and their stability and nonlinear dynamics for physiologically realistic parameters. A simple ordered arousal sequence in a reduced parameter space is inferred and found to be consistent with experimentally determined parameters of waking states. Instabilities arise at spectral peaks of the major clinically observed EEG rhythms-mainly slow wave, delta, theta, alpha, and sleep spindle-with each instability zone lying near its most common experimental precursor arousal states in the reduced space. Theta, alpha, and spindle instabilities evolve toward low-dimensional nonlinear limit cycles that correspond closely to EEGs of petit mal seizures for theta instability, and grand mal seizures for the other types. Nonlinear stimulus-induced entrainment and seizures are also seen, EEG spectra and potentials evoked by stimuli are reproduced, and numerous other points of experimental agreement are found. Inverse modeling enables physiological parameters underlying observed EEGs to be determined by a new, noninvasive route. This model thus provides a single, powerful framework for quantitative understanding of a wide variety of brain phenomena.

  10. Oxygen-activated growth and bandgap tunability of large single-crystal bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yufeng; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yuanyue; Chen, Hua; Wang, Xiaohan; Tan, Cheng; Nie, Shu; Suk, Ji Won; Jiang, Tengfei; Liang, Tengfei; Xiao, Junfeng; Ye, Wenjing; Dean, Cory R.; Yakobson, Boris I.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Kim, Philip; Hone, James; Colombo, Luigi; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2016-05-01

    Bernal (AB)-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) is a semiconductor whose bandgap can be tuned by a transverse electric field, making it a unique material for a number of electronic and photonic devices. A scalable approach to synthesize high-quality BLG is therefore critical, which requires minimal crystalline defects in both graphene layers and maximal area of Bernal stacking, which is necessary for bandgap tunability. Here we demonstrate that in an oxygen-activated chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process, half-millimetre size, Bernal-stacked BLG single crystals can be synthesized on Cu. Besides the traditional ‘surface-limited’ growth mechanism for SLG (1st layer), we discovered new microscopic steps governing the growth of the 2nd graphene layer below the 1st layer as the diffusion of carbon atoms through the Cu bulk after complete dehydrogenation of hydrocarbon molecules on the Cu surface, which does not occur in the absence of oxygen. Moreover, we found that the efficient diffusion of the carbon atoms present at the interface between Cu and the 1st graphene layer further facilitates growth of large domains of the 2nd layer. The CVD BLG has superior electrical quality, with a device on/off ratio greater than 104, and a tunable bandgap up to ∼100 meV at a displacement field of 0.9 V nm‑1.

  11. Promotoras as Data Collectors in a Large Study of Physical Activity in Parks

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Terry; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Rios, Muriel; Cohen, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    There is a large literature on promotores’ involvement in health promotion and a smaller literature on their roles in data collection, most often among predominantly Latino populations. But the extent to which promotores can be successful as the primary data collectors across racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse neighborhoods is less well documented. In a study of physical activity in 50 urban neighborhood parks, we found that a team of Spanish/English bilingual promotoras (female promotores) successfully implemented a direct observation protocol in all participant neighborhoods and achieved high interrater reliability (.80-.98). Overall, they were also effective in administering surveys to park users and residents across the racially/ethnically diverse neighborhoods. The promotoras brought to the project important language skills and cultural sensitivity, surveying experience, and familiarity with human subjects and confidentiality issues. Their extensive field experience gained over the course of a long-term collaborative effort helped improve survey and observation protocols. The promotoras reported gaining professional skills, which can strengthen their contributions to other projects. The promotoras were accustomed to being a source of information, and collecting rather than providing information was challenging for some and had to be addressed in order to avoid contamination across study groups. PMID:25649234

  12. Four-point probe electrical resistivity scanning system for large area conductivity and activation energy mapping.

    PubMed

    Shimanovich, Klimentiy; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Keller, David A; Rühle, Sven; Anderson, Assaf Y; Zaban, Arie

    2014-05-01

    The electrical properties of metal oxides play a crucial role in the development of new photovoltaic (PV) systems. Here we demonstrate a general approach for the determination and analysis of these properties in thin films of new metal oxide based PV materials. A high throughput electrical scanning system, which facilitates temperature dependent measurements at different atmospheres for highly resistive samples, was designed and constructed. The instrument is capable of determining conductivity and activation energy values for relatively large sample areas, of about 72 × 72 mm(2), with the implementation of geometrical correction factors. The efficiency of our scanning system was tested using two different samples of CuO and commercially available Fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates. Our high throughput tool was able to identify the electrical properties of both resistive metal oxide thin film samples with high precision and accuracy. The scanning system enabled us to gain insight into transport mechanisms with novel compositions and to use those insights to make smart choices when choosing materials for our multilayer thin film all oxide photovoltaic cells. PMID:24880411

  13. Cohort Profile of the Goals Study: A Large-Scale Research of Physical Activity in Dutch Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Renate H. M.; van Dijk, Martin L.; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The GOALS study (Grootschalig Onderzoek naar Activiteiten van Limburgse Scholieren [Large-scale Research of Activities in Dutch Students]) was set up to investigate possible associations between different forms of physical activity and inactivity with cognitive performance, academic achievement and mental well-being. It was conducted at a…

  14. 77 FR 60133 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Large Yachts Imported for Sale AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland... concerning Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale. This request for comment is being made... Large Yachts Imported for Sale. OMB Number: 1651-0080. Form Number: None. Abstract: This collection...

  15. Recovery of human remains after shark attack.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W; James, Ross A; Heath, Karen J

    2006-09-01

    Two cases of fatal shark attack are reported where the only tissues recovered were fragments of lung. Case 1: An 18-year-old male who was in the sea behind a boat was observed by friends to be taken by a great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias). The shark dragged him under the water and then, with a second shark, dismembered the body. Witnesses noted a large amount of blood and unrecognizable body parts coming to the surface. The only tissues recovered despite an intensive beach and sea search were 2 fragments of lung. Case 2: A 19-year-old male was attacked by a great white shark while diving. A witness saw the shark swim away with the victim's body in its mouth. Again, despite intensive beach and sea searches, the only tissue recovered was a single piece of lung, along with pieces of wetsuit and diving equipment. These cases indicate that the only tissue to escape being consumed or lost in fatal shark attacks, where there is a significant attack with dismemberment and disruption of the integrity of the body, may be lung. The buoyancy of aerated pulmonary tissue ensures that it rises quickly to the surface, where it may be recovered by searchers soon after the attack. Aeration of the lung would be in keeping with death from trauma rather than from drowning and may be a useful marker in unwitnessed deaths to separate ante- from postmortem injury, using only relatively small amounts of tissues. Early organ recovery enhances the identification of human tissues as the extent of morphologic alterations by putrefactive processes and sea scavengers will have been minimized. DNA testing is also possible on such recovered fragments, enabling confirmation of the identity of the victim. PMID:16936505

  16. Large historical earthquakes and tsunamis in a very active tectonic rift: the Gulf of Corinth, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Ioanna; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos

    2014-05-01

    The Gulf of Corinth is an active tectonic rift controlled by E-W trending normal faults with an uplifted footwall in the south and a subsiding hangingwall with antithetic faulting in the north. Regional geodetic extension rates up to about 1.5 cm/yr have been measured, which is one of the highest for tectonic rifts in the entire Earth, while seismic slip rates up to about 1 cm/yr were estimated. Large earthquakes with magnitudes, M, up to about 7 were historically documented and instrumentally recorded. In this paper we have compiled historical documentation of earthquake and tsunami events occurring in the Corinth Gulf from the antiquity up to the present. The completeness of the events reported improves with time particularly after the 15th century. The majority of tsunamis were caused by earthquake activity although the aseismic landsliding is a relatively frequent agent for tsunami generation in Corinth Gulf. We focus to better understand the process of tsunami generation from earthquakes. To this aim we have considered the elliptical rupture zones of all the strong (M≥ 6.0) historical and instrumental earthquakes known in the Corinth Gulf. We have taken into account rupture zones determined by previous authors. However, magnitudes, M, of historical earthquakes were recalculated from a set of empirical relationships between M and seismic intensity established for earthquakes occurring in Greece during the instrumental era of seismicity. For this application the macroseismic field of each one of the earthquakes was identified and seismic intensities were assigned. Another set of empirical relationships M/L and M/W for instrumentally recorded earthquakes in the Mediterranean region was applied to calculate rupture zone dimensions; where L=rupture zone length, W=rupture zone width. The rupture zones positions were decided on the basis of the localities of the highest seismic intensities and co-seismic ground failures, if any, while the orientation of the maximum

  17. The Active and Periactive Zone Organization and the Functional Properties of Small and Large Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Raquel; Tabares, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The arrival of an action potential (AP) at a synaptic terminal elicits highly synchronized quanta release. Repetitive APs produce successive synaptic vesicle (SV) fusions that require management of spent SV components in the presynaptic membrane with minimum disturbance of the secretory apparatus. To this end, the synaptic machinery is structured accordingly to the strength and the range of frequencies at which each particular synapse operates. This results in variations in the number and dimension of Active Zones (AZs), amount and distribution of SVs, and probably, in the primary endocytic mechanisms they use. Understanding better how these structural differences determine the functional response in each case has been a matter of long-term interest. Here we review the structural and functional properties of three distinct types of synapses: the neuromuscular junction (NMJ; a giant, highly reliable synapse that must exocytose a large number of quanta with each stimulus to guarantee excitation of the postsynaptic cell), the hippocampal excitatory small synapse (which most often has a single release site and a relatively small pool of vesicles), and the cerebellar mossy fiber-granule cell synapse (which possesses hundreds of release sites and is able to translocate, dock and prime vesicles at high speed). We will focus on how the release apparatus is organized in each case, the relative amount of vesicular membrane that needs to be accommodated within the periAZ upon stimulation, the different mechanisms for retrieving the excess of membrane and finally, how these factors may influence the functioning of the release sites. PMID:27252645

  18. The Active and Periactive Zone Organization and the Functional Properties of Small and Large Synapses.

    PubMed

    Cano, Raquel; Tabares, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The arrival of an action potential (AP) at a synaptic terminal elicits highly synchronized quanta release. Repetitive APs produce successive synaptic vesicle (SV) fusions that require management of spent SV components in the presynaptic membrane with minimum disturbance of the secretory apparatus. To this end, the synaptic machinery is structured accordingly to the strength and the range of frequencies at which each particular synapse operates. This results in variations in the number and dimension of Active Zones (AZs), amount and distribution of SVs, and probably, in the primary endocytic mechanisms they use. Understanding better how these structural differences determine the functional response in each case has been a matter of long-term interest. Here we review the structural and functional properties of three distinct types of synapses: the neuromuscular junction (NMJ; a giant, highly reliable synapse that must exocytose a large number of quanta with each stimulus to guarantee excitation of the postsynaptic cell), the hippocampal excitatory small synapse (which most often has a single release site and a relatively small pool of vesicles), and the cerebellar mossy fiber-granule cell synapse (which possesses hundreds of release sites and is able to translocate, dock and prime vesicles at high speed). We will focus on how the release apparatus is organized in each case, the relative amount of vesicular membrane that needs to be accommodated within the periAZ upon stimulation, the different mechanisms for retrieving the excess of membrane and finally, how these factors may influence the functioning of the release sites. PMID:27252645

  19. Estrogenic Activity and Estrogens of Surface Waters in Proximity to a Large Dairy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large concentrated animal farms have been the subject of intense public scrutiny, in part due to concern about environmental release of endocrine disruptors. To assess the potential impact of a large dairy herd (greater than 2000 milking head) using best management practices, area surface waters and...

  20. 77 FR 73671 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Federal Register (77 FR 60133) on October 2, 2012, allowing for a 60-day comment period. This notice... Large Yachts Imported for Sale AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... Large Yachts Imported for Sale. This is a proposed extension of an information collection that...

  1. New fossil cercopithecid remains from the Humpata Plateau, southern Angola.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, N G

    1994-08-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to describe and identify the well-preserved cranial remains of a fossil cercopithecid recently recovered from sites on the Humpata Plateau in southern Angola. In the past, papionin fossils recovered from the Angolan site of Tchiua (Leba) have been referred to various taxa, including Dinopithecus ingens, Parapapio sp., and Papio (Dinopithecus) quadratirostris. Comparison of the new Angolan papionin cranial remains with those previously described from the Humpata Plateau and a large range of living and fossil Papionini revealed that the range of metrical and morphological variation present in the Humpata papionin sample was consistent with that found in a single extant papionin species. The Humpata cranial remains bear the largest number of similarities to Theropithecus baringensis R. Leakey, 1969, and it is to this species that the remains are hereby referred. This assignment is based on a suite of 11 shared attributes of the Humpata papionin fossils and the type specimen of T. baringensis, KNM BC2, which include: large molar teeth of relatively low relief with pinched cusps and with a prominent distal fovea on M3; a small, low cranial vault with little mid-parietal expansion; a bow-shaped supraorbital torus; trapezoidal, inferiorly tapering orbits; a functional complex related to the presence of a large and vertically oriented anterior temporalis muscle; a large infratemporal fossa with an anteromedially oriented posterior border; a long muzzle with a steep interorbital drop, shallow incisive arc, flattened dorsum, and rounded maxillary ridges; nasal bones that extend across the breadth of the posterior margin of the nasal aperture and then taper markedly as they approach nasion; prominent, inferiorly divergent mental ridges; and relatively shallow mandibular fossae that are long, elliptical in shape, and extend to the level of the M3. The results of the current study suggest that T. baringensis (now including the Humpata

  2. Continuous monitoring of a large active earth flow using an integrated GPS - automatic total station approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, A.

    2009-04-01

    Landslide monitoring has evolved as a crucial tool in civil protection to mitigate and prevent disasters. The research presents an approach to continuous monitoring of a large-scale active earth flow using a system that integrates surface measurements obtained by a GPS and an automatic total station. With the data obtained from the system the landslide can be monitored in near-real-time and surface displacements can be directly utilized to provide early warning of slope movements and to study the behavior of the landslide, e.g. to predict timing and mechanisms of future failure. The Valoria landslide located in the northern Apennines of Italy was reactivated in 2001, 2005 and 2007 damaging roads and endangering houses. A monitoring system was installed in 2007-2008 in the frame of a civil protection plan aimed at risk mitigation. The system consists of an automatic total station measuring about 40 prisms located in the landslide to a maximum distance of 1.800 km; one double-frequency GPS receiver connects in streaming by wireless communication with 4 single-frequency GPS in side the flow. Until December 2007 the monitoring network was operated with periodic static surveying followed by the data post-processing. From September 2007 until March 2008 the landslide deformation was evaluated by periodic surveys with the total station and the GPS system. This first measure showed that the displacements were influenced by the rainfall events and by the snow melting. The total displacements measured vary from centimeter scale in the crown zone, where retrogressive movements were in progress, to over 50 m in the flow track zone. Starting in March 2008 data acquisition by the total station system and GPS were automated in order to allow continuous and near-real-time data processing. The displacement data collected in one and a half year of continuous operation show different acceleration and deceleration phases as a result of the pore water pressure distribution inside the

  3. Large, colorful, or noisy? Attribute- and modality-specific activations during retrieval of perceptual attribute knowledge.

    PubMed

    Kellenbach, M L; Brett, M; Patterson, K

    2001-09-01

    Position emission tomography was used to investigate whether retrieval of perceptual knowledge from long-term memory activates unique cortical regions associated with the modality and/or attribute type retrieved. Knowledge about the typical color, size, and sound of common objects and animals was probed, in response to written words naming the objects. Relative to a nonsemantic control task, all the attribute judgments activated similar left temporal and frontal regions. Visual (color, size) knowledge selectively activated the right posterior inferior temporal (PIT) cortex, whereas sound judgments elicited selective activation in the left posterior superior temporal gyrus and the adjacent parietal cortex. All of the attribute judgments activated a left PIT region, but color retrieval generated more activation in this area. Size judgments activated the right medial parietal cortex. These results indicate that the retrieval of perceptual semantic information activates not only a general semantic network, but also cortical areas specialized for the modality and attribute type of the knowledge retrieved. PMID:12467121

  4. Large Conductance Ca2+-Activated and Voltage-Activated K+ Channels Contribute to the Rise and Maintenance of Estrogen-Induced Uterine Vasodilation and Maintenance of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Uterine blood flow (UBF) increases greater than 4-fold 90 min after systemic estradiol-17β (E2β) in nonpregnant sheep and remains elevated longer than 6–8 h; mean arterial pressure (MAP) is unchanged. Large-conductance Ca+2-activated (BKCa) and voltage-activated (KV) K+ channels contribute to the acute rise in UBF; their role in maintaining UBF and MAP longer than 90 min is unknown. We examined this in five nonpregnant, ovariectomized ewes with uterine artery (UA) flow probes and catheters in a UA for infusion of K+ channel inhibitors and uterine vein to sample venous effluent. Animals received systemic E2β (1.0 μg/kg; control), E2β+UA tetraethylammonium (TEA; 0.4–0.8 mm, n = 4), and E2β+UA 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 0.01–0.08 mm, n = 4) to block BKCa and KV, respectively, while monitoring MAP, heart rate, and UBF. Uterine cGMP synthesis was measured. Ninety minutes after E2β, UBF rose 4.5-fold, uterine vascular resistance (UVR) fell greater than 5-fold and MAP was unchanged [78 ± 0.8 (sem) vs. 77 ± 1.5 mm Hg] in control studies and before UA inhibition with TEA and 4-AP. Between 90 and 120min, UBF, UVR, and MAP were unchanged after E2β alone. E2β+TEA dose dependently decreased ipsilateral UBF and increased UVR (24 ± 8.9 and 38 ± 16%, respectively, at 0.8 mm; P < 0.03); MAP was unchanged. Contralateral UBF/UVR were unaffected. E2β+4-AP also dose dependently decreased ipsilateral UBF and increased UVR (27 ± 5.3 and 76 ± 18%, respectively, at 0.08 mm; P < 0.001); however, MAP rose 27 ± 6.9% (P ≤ 0.006). E2β increased uterine cGMP synthesis greater than 3.5-fold and was unaffected by local K+ channel inhibition. BKCa and KV contribute to the rise and maintenance of E2β-induced uterine vasodilation, which is partially cGMP dependent. Systemic vascular KV also contributes to maintaining MAP after systemic E2β. PMID:23070547

  5. Improvement of spatial learning by facilitating large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel with transcranial magnetic stimulation in Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Furong; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Li; Sun, Peng; Luo, Xianwen; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Sugai, Tokio; Yamamoto, Ryo; Kato, Nobuo

    2015-10-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is fragmentarily reported to be beneficial to Alzheimer's patients. Its underlying mechanism was investigated. TMS was applied at 1, 10 or 15 Hz daily for 4 weeks to young Alzheimer's disease model mice (3xTg), in which intracellular soluble amyloid-β is notably accumulated. Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) was tested after behavior. TMS ameliorated spatial learning deficits and enhanced LTP in the same frequency-dependent manner. Activity of the large conductance calcium-activated potassium (Big-K; BK) channels was suppressed in 3xTg mice and recovered by TMS frequency-dependently. These suppression and recovery were accompanied by increase and decrease in cortical excitability, respectively. TMS frequency-dependently enhanced the expression of the activity-dependently expressed scaffold protein Homer1a, which turned out to enhance BK channel activity. Isopimaric acid, an activator of the BK channel, magnified LTP. Amyloid-β lowering was detected after TMS in 3xTg mice. In 3xTg mice with Homer1a knocked out, amyloid-β lowering was not detected, though the TMS effects on BK channel and LTP remained. We concluded that TMS facilitates BK channels both Homer1a-dependently and -independently, thereby enhancing hippocampal LTP and decreasing cortical excitability. Reduced excitability contributed to amyloid-β lowering. A cascade of these correlated processes, triggered by TMS, was likely to improve learning in 3xTg mice. PMID:26051398

  6. Island of the Sharks Activity Guide To Accompany the Large-Format Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gowell, Elizabeth Tayntor

    This document targets upper elementary and middle school students and provides activities to understand what the ocean floor looks like, the interactions of ocean communities, and the true nature of sharks. The activities are developed at three levels: beginner, intermediate, and advanced. The twelve activities include: (1) "Ocean Detectives"; (2)…

  7. Study of new FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator as active media of large EMCal of ALICE at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg A. Grachov et al.

    2004-05-04

    The current conceptual design of proposed Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC is based largely on the scintillating mega-tile/fiber technology implemented in CDF Endplug upgrade project and in both barrel and endcap electromagnetic calorimeters of the STAR. The cost of scintillating material leads us to the choice of extruded polystyrene based scintillator, which is available in new FNAL-NICADD facility. Result of optical measurements, such as light yield and light yield variation, show that it is possible to use this material as active media of Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC.

  8. Modern hunting behavior in the early Middle Paleolithic: faunal remains from Misliya Cave, Mount Carmel, Israel.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Reuven; Bar-Oz, Guy; Weinstein-Evron, Mina

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the behavioral adaptations and subsistence strategies of Middle Paleolithic humans is critical in the debate over the evolution and manifestations of modern human behavior. The study of faunal remains plays a central role in this context. Until now, the majority of Levantine archaeofaunal evidence was derived from late Middle Paleolithic sites. The discovery of faunal remains from Misliya Cave, Mount Carmel, Israel (>200 ka), allowed for detailed taphonomic and zooarchaeological analyses of these early Middle Paleolithic remains. The Misliya Cave faunal assemblage is overwhelmingly dominated by ungulate taxa. The most common prey species is the Mesopotamian fallow deer (Dama mesopotamica), followed closely by the mountain gazelle (Gazella gazella). Some aurochs (Bos primigenius) remains are also present. Small-game species are rare. The fallow deer mortality pattern is dominated by prime-aged individuals. A multivariate taphonomic analysis demonstrates (1) that the assemblage was created solely by humans occupying the cave and was primarily modified by their food-processing activities; and (2) that gazelle carcasses were transported complete to the site, while fallow deer carcasses underwent some field butchery. The new zooarchaeological data from Misliya Cave, particularly the abundance of meat-bearing limb bones displaying filleting cut marks and the acquisition of prime-age prey, demonstrate that early Middle Paleolithic people possessed developed hunting capabilities. Thus, modern large-game hunting, carcass transport, and meat-processing behaviors were already established in the Levant in the early Middle Paleolithic, more than 200 ka ago. PMID:17669471

  9. Can the activities of the large scale cortical network be expressed by neural energy? A brief review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rubin; Zhu, Yating

    2016-02-01

    This paper mainly discusses and summarize that the changes of biological energy in the brain can be expressed by the biophysical energy we constructed. Different from the electrochemical energy, the biophysical energy proposed in the paper not only can be used to simulate the activity of neurons but also be used to simulate the neural activity of large scale cortical networks, so that the scientific nature of the neural energy coding was discussed. PMID:26834857

  10. OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND MINE MANAGER'S HOME, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHEAST. RIGHT, TAILINGS PILES ARE AT CENTER WITH CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS TO THE LEFT OF THE PILES. PARKING LOT IS AT UPPER LEFT. THE AREA BETWEEN THE COLLAPSED TANK AT CENTER LEFT AND THE REMAINS OF THE MANAGER'S HOUSE AT LOWER RIGHT IS A TAILINGS HOLDING AREA. TAILINGS FROM THE MILL WERE HELD HERE. THE LARGE SETTLING TANKS WERE CHARGED FROM THIS HOLDING AREA BY A TRAM ON RAILS AND BY A SLUICEWAY SEEN AS THE DARK SPOT ON THE CENTER LEFT EDGE OF THE FRAME. AFTER THE TAILINGS WERE LEACHED, THEY WERE DEPOSITED ON THE LARGE WASTE PILE AT CENTER RIGHT. THE TANK AT CENTER RIGHT EDGE IS WHERE THE WATER PIPELINE ENTERED THE WORKS. A STRAIGHT LINE OF POSTS IN THE GROUND GO ACROSS THE CENTER FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, WHICH ORIGINALLY SUSPENDED THE WATER PIPELINE GOING FROM THE WATER HOLDING TANK AT RIGHT UP TO THE SECONDARY WATER TANKS ABOVE THE MILL. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  11. Complex active regions as the main source of extreme and large solar proton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkov, V. N.

    2013-12-01

    A study of solar proton sources indicated that solar flare events responsible for ≥2000 pfu proton fluxes mostly occur in complex active regions (CARs), i.e., in transition structures between active regions and activity complexes. Different classes of similar structures and their relation to solar proton events (SPEs) and evolution, depending on the origination conditions, are considered. Arguments in favor of the fact that sunspot groups with extreme dimensions are CARs are presented. An analysis of the flare activity in a CAR resulted in the detection of "physical" boundaries, which separate magnetic structures of the same polarity and are responsible for the independent development of each structure.

  12. Active Learning in Large Classes: Can Small Interventions Produce Greater Results than Are Statistically Predictable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adrian, Lynne M.

    2010-01-01

    Six online postings and six one-minute papers were added to an introductory first-year class, forming 5 percent of the final grade, but represented significant intervention in class functioning and amount of active learning. Active learning produced results in student performance beyond the percentage of the final grade it constituted. (Contains 1…

  13. Large Variation Found in the Phytochemical and Antioxidant Activity of Peach and Plum Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nineteen peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] genotypes and forty-five plum (Prunus salicina Erhr. and hybrids) genotypes with different flesh and skin color were analyzed for their antioxidant content and antioxidant activity. Anthocyanin content, phenolic content and antioxidant activity were higher...

  14. Associations between Grades and Physical Activity and Food Choices: Results from YRBS from a Large Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelling, Anastasia; Belson, Sarah Irvine; Beard, Jonathan; Young, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between television viewing time, physical activity level, food consumption patterns, and academic performance of adolescents in a large urban school district in the USA where health disparities are prevalent, particularly among minority residents. Design/Methodology/Approach: The…

  15. Silent and Vocal Students in a Large Active Learning Chemistry Classroom: Comparison of Performance and Motivational Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Active learning is becoming more prevalent in large science classrooms, and this study shows the impact on performance of being vocal during Socratic questioning in a General Chemistry course. 800 college students over a two year period were given a pre and post-test using the Chemistry Concept Reasoning Test. The pre-test results showed that…

  16. Long-term market brisk, spot remains sluggish

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    Spot market activity totaled almost 54,000 lbs of U3O8 equivalent. The restricted uranium spot market price range had a slight increase from a high last month of $15.60/lb U3O8 to a hgih this month of $16.00/lb U3O8. The unrestricted uranium spot market price range remained at last month`s prices for the first time in recent weeks. Spot prices for conversion and SWU also held steady at their March levels.

  17. Leprosy: ancient disease remains a public health problem nowadays*

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Leandro Fonseca; Chiacchio, Nilton Di; Noriega, Angélica Fonseca; Pereira, Gilmayara Alves Abreu Maciel; Vieira, Marina Lino

    2016-01-01

    Despite being an ancient disease, leprosy remains a public health problem in several countries - particularly in India, Brazil and Indonesia. The current operational guidelines emphasize the evaluation of disability from the time of diagnosis and stipulate as fundamental principles for disease control: early detection and proper treatment. Continued efforts are needed to establish and improve quality leprosy services. A qualified primary care network that is integrated into specialized service and the development of educational activities are part of the arsenal in the fight against the disease, considered neglected and stigmatizing. PMID:27579761

  18. Leprosy: ancient disease remains a public health problem nowadays.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Leandro Fonseca; Chiacchio, Nilton Di; Noriega, Angélica Fonseca; Pereira, Gilmayara Alves Abreu Maciel; Vieira, Marina Lino

    2016-01-01

    Despite being an ancient disease, leprosy remains a public health problem in several countries -particularly in India, Brazil and Indonesia. The current operational guidelines emphasize the evaluation of disability from the time of diagnosis and stipulate as fundamental principles for disease control: early detection and proper treatment. Continued efforts are needed to establish and improve quality leprosy services. A qualified primary care network that is integrated into specialized service and the development of educational activities are part of the arsenal in the fight against the disease, considered neglected and stigmatizing. PMID:27579761

  19. Large plasmaspheric electric fields at L approximately 2 measured by the S3-3 satellite during strong geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.; Pinto, O., Jr.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Mozer, F. S.

    1986-01-01

    Large plasmaspheric electric fields at L is approximately 2 measured by the S3-3 satellite during strong geomagnetic activity are reported. Since these measurements have amplitudes comparable to those of the local corotation electric field, during such events the plasmasphere is expected to get strongly altered event at such low L-values. Furthermore, those measurements could contribute to the understanding of the physics of the convection/electric field penetration to the low latitude plasmaphere as well as the disturbed dynamo, during strong geomagnetic activity. For this purpose, critical parameters related to geomagnetic activity are also presented for the reported electric field events.

  20. Sandia Laboratories in-house activities in support of solar thermal large power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The development of thermal energy storage subsystems for solar thermal large power applications is described. The emphasis is on characterizing the behavior of molten nitrate salts with regard to thermal decomposition, environmental interactions, and corrosion. Electrochemical techniques to determine the ionic species in the melt and for use in real time studies of corrosion are also briefly discussed.

  1. Transforming a Large-Lecture Course into an Active, Engaging, and Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoerger, Sharon; Krieger, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, a large lecture hall course follows a teacher-centered approach to instruction. This was the case for the "gateway" course in the undergraduate Information Technology and Informatics (ITI) major in the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. This paper describes the journey…

  2. Active Removal of Large Debris: System Approach of Desorbiting Concepts and Technological Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Patrice; Rembala, Richard; Teti, Frank; Bakouche, Charles; Billot, Carole

    2013-08-01

    The threat induced by large space debris, dead satellites or rocket bodies, in Low Earth Orbit has been identified years ago. A first part of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) study was dedicated to identify mission architectures that can fulfil the objective to eliminate the necessary number of critical debris. Those potential solutions and architectures have been compared taking into account cost considerations. The present paper reports the first results of the OTV step2 study funded by CNES that addresses different solutions for large debris removal. It compares different desorbiting concepts from selected single to multiple debris complying with the Space Law, i.e. able to ensure controlled re entries. Different capture options are presented, including sensors needs and an analysis of the problems posed by different solutions. The overall performances of the concepts are compared, showing the adequacy, the limits of each solutions and application domains.

  3. Taphonomy of the Tianyuandong human skeleton and faunal remains.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Jalvo, Yolanda; Andrews, Peter; Tong, HaoWen

    2015-06-01

    Tianyuan Cave is an Upper Palaeolithic site, 6 km from the core area of the Zhoukoudian Site Complex. Tianyuandong (or Tianyuan Cave) yielded one ancient (though not the earliest) fossil skeleton of Homo sapiens in China (42-39 ka cal BP). Together with the human skeleton, abundant animal remains were found, but no stone tools were recovered. The animal fossil remains are extremely fragmentary, in contrast to human skeletal elements that are, for the most part, complete. We undertook a taphonomic study to investigate the circumstances of preservation of the human skeleton in Tianyuan Cave, and in course of this we considered four hypotheses: funerary ritual, cannibalism, carnivore activity or natural death. Taphonomic results characterize the role of human action in the site and how these agents acted in the past. Because of disturbance of the human skeleton during its initial excavation, it is not known if it was in a grave cut or if there was any funerary ritual. No evidence was found for cannibalism or carnivore activity in relation to the human skeleton, suggesting natural death as the most reasonable possibility. PMID:25929706

  4. Active control of adaptive optics system in a large segmented mirror telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, M.; Agrawal, B. N.

    2014-02-01

    For a large adaptive optics system such as a large segmented mirror telescope (SMT), it is often difficult, although not impossible, to directly apply common multi-input multi-output (MIMO) controller design methods due to the computational burden imposed by the large dimension of the system model. In this article, a practical controller design method is proposed which significantly reduces the system dimension for a system where the dimension required to represent the dynamics of the plant is much smaller than the dimension of the full plant model. The proposed method decouples the dynamic and static parts of the plant model by a modal decomposition technique to separately design a controller for each part. Two controllers are then combined using the so-called sensitivity decoupling method so that the resulting feedback loop becomes the superposition of the two individual feedback loops of the dynamic and static parts. A MIMO controller was designed by the proposed method using the H ∞ loop-shaping technique for an SMT model to be compared with other controllers proposed in the literature. Frequency-domain analysis and time-domain simulation results show the superior performance of the proposed controller.

  5. Dynamics of the Polar Cusps for Active Solar Wind Conditions: Large-scale Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchem, J.; Richard, R. L.; Escoubet, C. P.; Taylor, M. G.; Laakso, H. E.; Masson, A.; Dandouras, I. S.; Reme, H.; Pitout, F.; Lucek, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The energy-latitude dispersion of precipitating particles observed by spacecraft near the high-latitude dayside magnetosphere offers a unique opportunity to investigate the large-scale topology and dynamics of the polar cusps. In particular, consecutive crossings of the cusps made by the Cluster spacecraft in a string of pearl configuration are particularly well suited for investigating the temporal and spatial evolution of precipitating particles as solar wind discontinuities interact with the dayside magnetopause. We present the results of large-scale simulation studies based on Cluster observations of ion dispersions following rapid changes in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). First, we use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to follow the evolution of the global topology of the magnetic field during the events. Subsequently, the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields predicted by the MHD simulations are utilized to compute the trajectories of large samples of solar wind ions launched upstream of the bow shock. We assess the results of the studies by comparing Cluster ion measurements with ion dispersions calculated from the simulations along the spacecraft trajectories and discuss the temporal evolution and spatial extent of precipitating particles in the context of the reconnection process at the dayside magnetopause.

  6. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  7. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  8. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  9. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  10. A Delicate Balance: Integrating Active Learning into a Large Lecture Course

    PubMed Central

    Cotner, Sehoya H.; Baepler, Paul M.; Decker, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    A lecture section of introductory biology that historically enrolled more than 500 students was split into two smaller sections of approximately 250 students each. A traditional lecture format was followed in the “traditional” section; lecture time in the “active” section was drastically reduced in favor of a variety of in-class student-centered activities. Students in both sections took unannounced quizzes and multiple-choice exams. Evaluation consisted of comparisons of student survey responses, scores on standardized teaching evaluation forms, section averages and attendance, and open-ended student comments on end-of-term surveys. Results demonstrate that students perform as well, if not better, in an active versus traditional environment. However, student concerns about instructor expectations indicate that a judicious balance of student-centered activities and presentation-style instruction may be the best approach. PMID:19047423

  11. Lessons learned with the Active Phasing Experiment: comparison of four optical phasing sensors on a segmented Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Surdej, I.

    The adaptive optics capabilities are strongly limited by the quality of the phasing of the primary mirror of the extremely large telescope. Up to date, the Keck telescopes are the only segmented telescope phased with a quality enabling the application of adaptive optics. The Active Phasing Experiment has been installed at the Namyth focus of the Very Large Telescope Melipal during the last 6 months. Its purpose is to understand and compare different technological concepts for an optical phasing sensor dedicated to the European Extremely Large Telescope. The pupil of the telescope is segmented in 61 hexagonal segments by projecting it on an Active Segmented Mirror. The ASM is controlled by a dual wavenlength interferometer made by Fogale Nanotech with a nanometric precision. The segmented pupil is distributed in parallel to four optical phasing sensors. They are a pyramid sensor, a curvature sensor, a phase filtering sensor and a ShackHartmann sensor. They have been developed respectively by Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Florenze, Instituto Astrofisica Canarias in Tenerife, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille and ESO. The global behaviour of the optical phasing sensors will be described and preliminary results of the Active Phasing Experiments obtained on sky will be explained. The extrapolation of the results to the EELT and the potential consequences for the adaptive optics will be given. The Active Phasing Experiment has been financed by the European Union and the European Southern Observatory via the Sixth European Union Framework Program for Research and Technological Development under the contract number 011863.

  12. Large enhancement of photocatalytic activity by chemical etching of TiO2 crystallized glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kazuki; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ihara, Rie; Terakado, Nobuaki; Fujiwara, Takumi; Kato, Hideki; Kakihana, Masato

    2014-10-01

    The authors aim to report the largest enhancement of photocatalytic activity by chemical etching in anatase-type TiO2 crystallized glass. Optimization of several conditions for crystallization behavior and chemical etching to realize the nano-structured ceramics (NSC) has been performed in the crystallized glass. NSC-fabrication by chemical etching in the crystallized glass is one of the most effective solutions to provide bulk materials with high specific surface area. We have found that the best condition for the NSC fabrication as a novel bulk photocatalyst in our glass system, and have obtained 16 times higher catalytic activity than that of non-etched one.

  13. Detection of Buried Human Remains Using Bioreporter Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, A. Dr.; Singleton, G. B.

    2001-10-01

    The search for buried human remains is a difficult, laborious and time-consuming task for law enforcement agencies. This study was conducted as a proof of principle demonstration to test the concept of using bioreporter microorganisms as a means to cover large areas in such a search. These bioreporter microorganisms are affected by a particular component of decaying organic matter that is distinct from decaying vegetation. The diamino compounds cadaverine and putrescine were selected as target compounds for the proof-of-principle investigation, and a search for microorganisms and genes that are responsive to either of these compounds was conducted. One recombinant clone was singled out for characterization based on its response to putrescine. The study results show that small concentrations of putrescine increased expression from this bioreporter construct. Although the level of increase was small (making it difficult to distinguish the signal from background), the results demonstrate the principle that bioreporters can be used to detect compounds resulting from decaying human remains and suggest that a wider search for target compounds should be conducted.

  14. Measuring activity in the ubiquitin-proteasome system: From large scale discoveries to single cells analysis

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Adam T.; Woss, Gregery S.; Park, Jessica H.; Waters, Marcey L.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is the primary pathway responsible for the recognition and degradation of misfolded, damaged, or tightly regulated proteins in addition to performing essential roles in DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, cell migration, and the immune response. While traditional biochemical techniques have proven useful in the identification of key proteins involved in this pathway, the implementation of novel reporters responsible for measuring enzymatic activity of the UPS have provided valuable insight into the effectiveness of therapeutics and role of the UPS in various human diseases such as multiple myeloma and Huntington’s disease. These reporters, usually consisting of a recognition sequences fused to an analytical handle, are designed to specifically evaluate enzymatic activity of certain members of the UPS including the proteasome, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs). This review highlights the more commonly used reporters employed in a variety of scenarios ranging from high-throughput screening of novel inhibitors to single cell microscopy techniques measuring E3 ligase or proteasome activity. Finally, recent work is presented highlighting the development of novel degron-based substrate designed to overcome the limitations of current reporting techniques in measuring E3 ligase and proteasome activity in patient samples. PMID:23686610

  15. A Controlled Trial of Active versus Passive Learning Strategies in a Large Group Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haidet, Paul; Morgan, Robert O.; O'Malley, Kimberly; Moran, Betty Jeanne; Richards, Boyd F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of active and didactic teaching strategies on learning- and process-oriented outcomes. Design: Controlled trial. Setting: After-hours residents' teaching session. Participants: Family and Community Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Pediatrics residents at two academic medical institutions. Interventions: We…

  16. Wireless Laptops as Means for Promoting Active Learning in Large Lecture Halls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Miri; Lipson, Alberta; Lerman, Steven

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that examined the use of wireless laptops for promoting active learning in lecture halls. The study examined students' behavior in class and their perceptions of the new learning environment throughout three consecutive semesters. An online survey revealed that students have highly positive perceptions about the use…

  17. Differential segmental strain during active lengthening in a large biarticular thigh muscle during running

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jennifer A.; Ellerby, David J.; Marsh, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The iliotibialis lateralis pars postacetabularis (ILPO) is the largest muscle in the hindlimb of the guinea fowl and is thought to play an important role during the stance phase of running, both absorbing and producing work. Using sonomicrometry and electromyography, we examined whether the ILPO experiences differential strain between proximal, central and distal portions of the posterior fascicles. When the ILPO is being lengthened while active, the distal portion was found to lengthen significantly more than either the proximal or central portions of the muscle. Our data support the hypothesis that the distal segment lengthened farther and faster because it began activity at shorter sarcomere lengths on the ascending limb of the length–tension curve. Probably because of the self-stabilizing effects of operating on the ascending limb of the length–tension curve, all segments reached the end of lengthening and started shortening at the same sarcomere length. During shortening, this similarity in sarcomere length among the segments was maintained, as predicted from force–velocity effects, and shortening strain was similar in all segments. The differential active strain during active lengthening is thus ultimately determined by differences in strain during the passive portion of the cycle. The sarcomere lengths of all segments of the fascicles were similar at the end of active shortening, but after the passive portion of the cycle the distal segment was shorter. Differential strain in the segments during the passive portion of the cycle may be caused by differential joint excursions at the knee and hip acting on the ends of the muscle and being transmitted differentially by the passive visco-elastic properties of the muscle. Alternatively, the differential passive strain could be due to the action of active or passive muscles in the thigh that transmit force to the IPLO in shear. Based on basic sarcomere dynamics we predict that differential strain is

  18. The large N-terminal region of the Brr2 RNA helicase guides productive spliceosome activation.

    PubMed

    Absmeier, Eva; Wollenhaupt, Jan; Mozaffari-Jovin, Sina; Becke, Christian; Lee, Chung-Tien; Preussner, Marco; Heyd, Florian; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; Santos, Karine F; Wahl, Markus C

    2015-12-15

    The Brr2 helicase provides the key remodeling activity for spliceosome catalytic activation, during which it disrupts the U4/U6 di-snRNP (small nuclear RNA protein), and its activity has to be tightly regulated. Brr2 exhibits an unusual architecture, including an ∼ 500-residue N-terminal region, whose functions and molecular mechanisms are presently unknown, followed by a tandem array of structurally similar helicase units (cassettes), only the first of which is catalytically active. Here, we show by crystal structure analysis of full-length Brr2 in complex with a regulatory Jab1/MPN domain of the Prp8 protein and by cross-linking/mass spectrometry of isolated Brr2 that the Brr2 N-terminal region encompasses two folded domains and adjacent linear elements that clamp and interconnect the helicase cassettes. Stepwise N-terminal truncations led to yeast growth and splicing defects, reduced Brr2 association with U4/U6•U5 tri-snRNPs, and increased ATP-dependent disruption of the tri-snRNP, yielding U4/U6 di-snRNP and U5 snRNP. Trends in the RNA-binding, ATPase, and helicase activities of the Brr2 truncation variants are fully rationalized by the crystal structure, demonstrating that the N-terminal region autoinhibits Brr2 via substrate competition and conformational clamping. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms that prevent premature and unproductive tri-snRNP disruption and suggest novel principles of Brr2-dependent splicing regulation. PMID:26637280

  19. The large N-terminal region of the Brr2 RNA helicase guides productive spliceosome activation

    PubMed Central

    Absmeier, Eva; Wollenhaupt, Jan; Mozaffari-Jovin, Sina; Becke, Christian; Lee, Chung-Tien; Preussner, Marco; Heyd, Florian; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; Santos, Karine F.; Wahl, Markus C.

    2015-01-01

    The Brr2 helicase provides the key remodeling activity for spliceosome catalytic activation, during which it disrupts the U4/U6 di-snRNP (small nuclear RNA protein), and its activity has to be tightly regulated. Brr2 exhibits an unusual architecture, including an ∼500-residue N-terminal region, whose functions and molecular mechanisms are presently unknown, followed by a tandem array of structurally similar helicase units (cassettes), only the first of which is catalytically active. Here, we show by crystal structure analysis of full-length Brr2 in complex with a regulatory Jab1/MPN domain of the Prp8 protein and by cross-linking/mass spectrometry of isolated Brr2 that the Brr2 N-terminal region encompasses two folded domains and adjacent linear elements that clamp and interconnect the helicase cassettes. Stepwise N-terminal truncations led to yeast growth and splicing defects, reduced Brr2 association with U4/U6•U5 tri-snRNPs, and increased ATP-dependent disruption of the tri-snRNP, yielding U4/U6 di-snRNP and U5 snRNP. Trends in the RNA-binding, ATPase, and helicase activities of the Brr2 truncation variants are fully rationalized by the crystal structure, demonstrating that the N-terminal region autoinhibits Brr2 via substrate competition and conformational clamping. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms that prevent premature and unproductive tri-snRNP disruption and suggest novel principles of Brr2-dependent splicing regulation. PMID:26637280

  20. Potentiometric bioimaging with a large-scale integration (LSI)-based electrochemical device for detection of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yusuke; Ino, Kosuke; Sakamoto, Chika; Inoue, Kumi Y; Matsudaira, Masahki; Suda, Atsushi; Kunikata, Ryota; Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Abe, Hiroya; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2016-03-15

    This paper describes potentiometric bioimaging for enzyme activity using a large-scale integration (LSI)-based electrochemical device with 400 sensors. Potentiometric detection is useful for bioimaging because redox species are not consumed or produced during the detection process; therefore, there is no effect on cell activity and the detectable signal is sustained. In this study, the potentiometer mode of the LSI-based device was applied for the detection of glucose oxidase (GOx) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The enzyme activities were quantitatively detected within the concentration ranges of 25-250 μg/mL and 0.10-5.0 ng/mL. In addition, GOx activity in hydrogels and the ALP activity of embryoid bodies (EBs) from embryonic stem (ES) cells were successfully imaged based on detection of the open circuit potentials of individual sensors in real time. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of potentiometric imaging using LSI-based electrochemical arrays to detect enzyme activity in ES cells. The LSI-based device is thus demonstrated to be a promising tool for bioimaging of enzyme activity. PMID:26499066

  1. Morphotectonic evolution of passive margins undergoing active surface processes: large-scale experiments using numerical models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, Romain; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Extension of the continental lithosphere can lead to the formation of a wide range of rifted margins styles with contrasting tectonic and geomorphological characteristics. It is now understood that many of these characteristics depend on the manner extension is distributed depending on (among others factors) rheology, structural inheritance, thermal structure and surface processes. The relative importance and the possible interactions of these controlling factors is still largely unknown. Here we investigate the feedbacks between tectonics and the transfers of material at the surface resulting from erosion, transport, and sedimentation. We use large-scale (1200 x 600 km) and high-resolution (~1km) numerical experiments coupling a 2D upper-mantle-scale thermo-mechanical model with a plan-form 2D surface processes model (SPM). We test the sensitivity of the coupled models to varying crust-lithosphere rheology and erosional efficiency ranging from no-erosion to very efficient erosion. We discuss how fast, when and how the topography of the continents evolves and how it can be compared to actual passive margins escarpment morphologies. We show that although tectonics is the main factor controlling the rift geometry, transfers of masses at the surface affect the timing of faulting and the initiation of sea-floor spreading. We discuss how such models may help to understand the evolution of high-elevated passive margins around the world.

  2. Convergent mutations and kinase fusions lead to oncogenic STAT3 activation in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Ramona; Abate, Francesco; Lasorsa, Elena; Tabbo', Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Chiesa, Nicoletta; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Barbarossa, Luigi; Ercole, Elisabetta; Todaro, Maria; Boi, Michela; Acquaviva, Andrea; Ficarra, Elisa; Novero, Domenico; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tousseyn, Thomas; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kenner, Lukas; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Tzankov, Alexander; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Paulli, Marco; Weisenburger, Dennis; Chan, Wing C; Iqbal, Javeed; Piris, Miguel A; Zamo', Alberto; Ciardullo, Carmela; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Shultz, Leonard D; Mevellec, Laurence; Vialard, Jorge E; Piva, Roberto; Bertoni, Francesco; Rabadan, Raul; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2015-04-13

    A systematic characterization of the genetic alterations driving ALCLs has not been performed. By integrating massive sequencing strategies, we provide a comprehensive characterization of driver genetic alterations (somatic point mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions) in ALK(-) ALCLs. We identified activating mutations of JAK1 and/or STAT3 genes in ∼20% of 88 [corrected] ALK(-) ALCLs and demonstrated that 38% of systemic ALK(-) ALCLs displayed double lesions. Recurrent chimeras combining a transcription factor (NFkB2 or NCOR2) with a tyrosine kinase (ROS1 or TYK2) were also discovered in WT JAK1/STAT3 ALK(-) ALCL. All these aberrations lead to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway, which was proved oncogenic. Consistently, JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition impaired cell growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25873174

  3. Large Conductance, Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels (BKCa) and Arteriolar Myogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Michael A.; Yang, Yan; Ella, Srikanth R.; Davis, Michael J.; Braun, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Myogenic, or pressure-induced, vasoconstriction is critical for local blood flow autoregulation. Underlying this VSM response are events including membrane depolarization, Ca2+ entry and mobilization, and activation of contractile proteins. BKCa has been implicated in several of these steps including, 1) channel closure causing membrane depolarization, and 2) channel opening causing hyperpolarization to oppose excessive pressure-induced vasoconstriction. As multiple mechanisms regulate BKCa activity, (subunit composition, Em and Ca2+ levels, post-translational modification) tissue level diversity is predicted. Importantly, heterogeneity may contribute to tissue-specific differences in regulation of myogenic vasoconstriction, allowing local hemodynamics to be matched to metabolic requirements. Knowledge of such variability will be important to exploiting the BKCa channel as a therapeutic target and understanding systemic effects of its pharmacological manipulation. PMID:20178789

  4. High speed large viewing angle shutters for triple-flash active glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillaud, B.; Bellini, B.; de Bougrenet de la Tocnaye, J.-L.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new generation of liquid crystal shutters for active glasses, well suited to 3-D cinema current trends, involving triple flash regimes. Our technology uses a composite smectic C* liquid crystal mixture1. In this paper we focus on the electro-optical characterization of composite smectic-based shutters, and compare their performance with nematic ones, demonstrating their advantages for the new generation of 3-D cinema and more generally 3-D HDTV.

  5. Large effects from small exposures. I. Mechanisms for endocrine-disrupting chemicals with estrogenic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Welshons, Wade V; Thayer, Kristina A; Judy, Barbara M; Taylor, Julia A; Curran, Edward M; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2003-01-01

    Information concerning the fundamental mechanisms of action of both natural and environmental hormones, combined with information concerning endogenous hormone concentrations, reveals how endocrine-disrupting chemicals with estrogenic activity (EEDCs) can be active at concentrations far below those currently being tested in toxicological studies. Using only very high doses in toxicological studies of EEDCs thus can dramatically underestimate bioactivity. Specifically: a) The hormonal action mechanisms and the physiology of delivery of EEDCs predict with accuracy the low-dose ranges of biological activity, which have been missed by traditional toxicological testing. b) Toxicology assumes that it is valid to extrapolate linearly from high doses over a very wide dose range to predict responses at doses within the physiological range of receptor occupancy for an EEDC; however, because receptor-mediated responses saturate, this assumption is invalid. c) Furthermore, receptor-mediated responses can first increase and then decrease as dose increases, contradicting the assumption that dose-response relationships are monotonic. d) Exogenous estrogens modulate a system that is physiologically active and thus is already above threshold, contradicting the traditional toxicological assumption of thresholds for endocrine responses to EEDCs. These four fundamental issues are problematic for risk assessment methods used by regulatory agencies, because they challenge the traditional use of extrapolation from high-dose testing to predict responses at the much lower environmentally relevant doses. These doses are within the range of current exposures to numerous chemicals in wildlife and humans. These problems are exacerbated by the fact that the type of positive and negative controls appropriate to the study of endocrine responses are not part of traditional toxicological testing and are frequently omitted, or when present, have been misinterpreted. PMID:12826473

  6. The architecture of the active surface control system of the Large Millimeter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souccar, Kamal; Wallace, Gary; Grosslein, Ron; Schloerb, F. Peter

    2014-07-01

    One of the fundamental design principles of the LMT is that its segmented primary surface must be active: the position and orientation of each of the segments must be moved in order to maintain the precise parabolic surface that is required by the specifications. Consequently, a system of actuators, one at the corner of each segment, is used to move the segments to counteract surface deformations attributed to gravity or thermal effects. A new control system was designed and built within the project to implement an active surface at the LMT. The technical concept for the active surface control system is to provide a set of bus boxes with built-in control and I/O capabilities to run four actuators each. Bus boxes read the LVDT sensor position and limit switch status for each actuator and use this information to drive the actuator's DC motor, closing the position loop. Each bus box contains a DC power supply for the electronics, a second DC power supply for the motors, an embedded controller with I/O to close the position loop, and a custom printed circuit board to condition the LVDT signals and drive the motors. An interface printed circuit board resides in each actuator providing a single connector access to the LVDT, the motor, and the limit switches. During the fall of 2013, 84 bus boxes were commissioned to control the 336 actuators of the inner three rings of the telescope. The surface correction model was determined using holography measurements and the active surface system has been in regular use during the scientific observation at the LMT.

  7. Large scale screening of commonly used Iranian traditional medicinal plants against urease activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study H. pylori infection is an important etiologic impetus usually leading to gastric disease and urease enzyme is the most crucial role is to protect the bacteria in the acidic environment of the stomach. Then urease inhibitors would increase sensitivity of the bacteria in acidic medium. Methods 137 Iranian traditional medicinal plants were examined against Jack bean urease activity by Berthelot reaction. Each herb was extracted using 50% aqueous methanol. The more effective extracts were further tested and their IC50 values were determined. Results 37 plants out of the 137 crude extracts revealed strong urease inhibitory activity (more than 70% inhibition against urease activity at 10 mg/ml concentration). Nine of the whole studied plants crude extracts were found as the most effective with IC50 values less than 500 μg/ml including; Rheum ribes, Sambucus ebulus, Pistachia lentiscus, Myrtus communis, Areca catechu, Citrus aurantifolia, Myristica fragrans, Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Nicotiana tabacum. Conclusions The most potent urease inhibitory was observed for Sambucus ebulus and Rheum ribes extracts with IC50 values of 57 and 92 μg/ml, respectively. PMID:23351780

  8. Space Active Optics: toward optimized correcting mirrors for future large spaceborne observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Lemaitre, Gérard; Liotard, Arnaud

    2011-10-01

    Wave-front correction in optical instruments is often needed, either to compensate Optical Path Differences, off-axis aberrations or mirrors deformations. Active optics techniques are developed to allow efficient corrections with deformable mirrors. In this paper, we will present the conception of particular deformation systems which could be used in space telescopes and instruments in order to improve their performances while allowing relaxing specifications on the global system stability. A first section will be dedicated to the design and performance analysis of an active mirror specifically designed to compensate for aberrations that might appear in future 3m-class space telescopes, due to lightweight primary mirrors, thermal variations or weightless conditions. A second section will be dedicated to a brand new design of active mirror, able to compensate for given combinations of aberrations with a single actuator. If the aberrations to be corrected in an instrument and their evolutions are known in advance, an optimal system geometry can be determined thanks to the elasticity theory and Finite Element Analysis.

  9. "Recent" macrofossil remains from the Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duc, Cynthia; de Vernal, Anne; Archambault, Philippe; Brice, Camille; Roberge, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The examination of surface sediment samples collected from 17 sites along the Lomonosov Ridge at water depths ranging from 737 to 3339 meters during Polarstern Expedition PS87 in 2014 (Stein, 2015), indicates a rich biogenic content almost exclusively dominated by calcareous remains. Amongst biogenic remains, microfossils (planktic and benthic foraminifers, pteropods, ostracods, etc.) dominate but millimetric to centrimetric macrofossils occurred frequently at the surface of the sediment. The macrofossil remains consist of a large variety of taxa, including gastropods, bivalvia, polychaete tubes, scaphopods, echinoderm plates and spines, and fish otoliths. Among the Bivalvia, the most abundant taxa are Portlandia arctica, Hyalopecten frigidus, Cuspidaria glacilis, Policordia densicostata, Bathyarca spp., and Yoldiella spp. Whereas a few specimens are well preserved and apparently pristine, most mollusk shells displayed extensive alteration features. Moreover, most shells were covered by millimeter scale tubes of the serpulid polychaete Spirorbis sp. suggesting transport from low intertidal or subtidal zone. Both the ecological affinity and known geographic distribution of identified bivalvia as named above support the hypothesis of transportation rather than local development. In addition to mollusk shells, more than a hundred fish otoliths were recovered in surface sediments. The otoliths mostly belong to the Gadidae family. Most of them are well preserved and without serpulid tubes attached to their surface, suggesting a local/regional origin, unlike the shell remains. Although recovered at the surface, the macrofaunal assemblages of the Lomonosov Ridge do not necessarily represent the "modern" environments as they may result from reworking and because their occurrence at the surface of the sediment may also be due to winnowing of finer particles. Although the shells were not dated, we suspect that their actual ages may range from modern to several thousands of

  10. Oxygen-Activated Growth and Bandgap Tunability of Large Single-Crystal Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yufeng; Hone, James; Ruoff, Rodney; Colombo, Luigi; the Hone group Team

    Distinct from zero-bandgap single-layer graphene, Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) is a semiconductor whose bandgap can be tuned by a transverse electric field, making it a unique material for a number of electronic and photonic devices. In this presentation, we will focus on the most recent progress in the identification of new growth mechanisms towards large-area single-layer BLG on Copper: multiple control experiments and first-principles calculations are used to support the proposed mechanisms. We emphasize that trace amount of impurities on metal surface are critical to initiate graphene growth and affect the growth kinetics. Furthermore, contrary to the traditional viewpoint that graphene growth is always surface-limited process, our new observations strongly suggest that metal bulk plays a role to feed carbon species for graphene growth. State-of-the-art structural characterizations and electrical transport measurements of the CVD graphene layers will be presented as well.

  11. Large loop conformation sampling using the activation relaxation technique, ART-nouveau method.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-07-01

    We present an adaptation of the ART-nouveau energy surface sampling method to the problem of loop structure prediction. This method, previously used to study protein folding pathways and peptide aggregation, is well suited to the problem of sampling the conformation space of large loops by targeting probable folding pathways instead of sampling exhaustively that space. The number of sampled conformations needed by ART nouveau to find the global energy minimum for a loop was found to scale linearly with the sequence length of the loop for loops between 8 and about 20 amino acids. Considering the linear scaling dependence of the computation cost on the loop sequence length for sampling new conformations, we estimate the total computational cost of sampling larger loops to scale quadratically compared to the exponential scaling of exhaustive search methods. PMID:22488731

  12. Large Meridian Circle of the Belgrade Observatory: Four Decades of Activity and Existence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajkovska, V.; Protitch-Benishek, V.; Sadzakov, S.

    2008-10-01

    The authors find that the three important Jubilees, 120 years since the foundation of the Observatory, 150 years from the birth of its founder and first Director Milan Nedeljković (1857-1950) and 75 years of the presence and work at the present location appear as a special occasion to present some less known, or till this moment completely unknown, facts concerning one of the three important instruments for fundamental astrometry, Large Meridian Circle, which marked crucial moments during the four decades of its use. In the paper in extenso, which will be published elsewhere, the authors give some photographs of this instrument belonging to a private photodocumentation for the first time, as well as a complete bibliography of papers concerning all the phases of its existence.

  13. Large-scale, dynamic transformations in fuel moisture drive wildfire activity across southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, R. H.; Boer, M. M.; Resco de Dios, V.; Caccamo, G.; Bradstock, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence of large, high-intensity wildfires requires plant biomass, or fuel, that is sufficiently dry to burn. This poses the question, what is "sufficiently dry"? Until recently, the ability to address this question has been constrained by the spatiotemporal scale of available methods to monitor the moisture contents of both dead and live fuels. Here we take advantage of recent developments in macroscale monitoring of fuel moisture through a combination of remote sensing and climatic modeling. We show there are clear thresholds of fuel moisture content associated with the occurrence of wildfires in forests and woodlands. Furthermore, we show that transformations in fuel moisture conditions across these thresholds can occur rapidly, within a month. Both the approach presented here, and our findings, can be immediately applied and may greatly improve fire risk assessments in forests and woodlands globally.

  14. Simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and very large array observations of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, K. R.

    1986-01-01

    The research deals mainly with Very Large Array and Solar Maximum Mission observations of the ubiquitous coronal loops that dominate the structure of the low corona. As illustrated, the observations of thermal cyclotron lines at microwave wavelengths provide a powerful new method of accurately specifying the coronal magnetic field strength. Processes are delineated that trigger solar eruptions from coronal loops, including preburst heating and the magnetic interaction of coronal loops. Evidence for coherent burst mechanisms is provided for both the Sun and nearby stars, while other observations suggest the presence of currents that may amplify the coronal magnetic field to unexpectedly high levels. The existence is reported of a new class of compact, variable moving sources in regions of apparently weak photospheric field.

  15. Total reconstitution of active large ribosomal subunits of the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed Central

    Londei, P; Teixidò, J; Acca, M; Cammarano, P; Amils, R

    1986-01-01

    The large ribosomal subunit of the extremely thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus has been reconstituted from the completely dissociated RNA and proteins by a two-step incubation procedure at high temperatures. Successful reconstitution requires a preliminary incubation of the ribosomal components for 45 min at 65 degrees C, followed by a second heat-treatment at 80 degrees C for 60 min. Structural reassembly depends upon high concentrations of K+ (300-400 mM) and Mg2+ (20-40 mM) ions. In addition, complete recovery of subunit function stringently requires the presence of a polyamine, thermine (or spermine). The reconstituted archaebacterial subunits are essentially indistinguishable from the native ones by a number of structural and functional criteria. Images PMID:3083401

  16. Experimental results of active control on a large structure to suppress vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Three design methods, Linear Quadratic Gaussian with Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR), H-infinity, and mu-synthesis, are used to obtain compensators for suppressing the vibrations of a 10-bay vertical truss structure, a component typical of what may be used to build a large space structure. For the design process the plant dynamic characteristics of the structure were determined experimentally using an identification method. The resulting compensators were implemented on a digital computer and tested for their ability to suppress the first bending mode response of the 10-bay vertical truss. Time histories of the measured motion are presented, and modal damping obtained during the experiments are compared with analytical predictions. The advantages and disadvantages of using the various design methods are discussed.

  17. Large scale study on measurement of respiration activity (AT(4)) by Sapromat and OxiTop.

    PubMed

    Binner, Erwin; Böhm, Katharina; Lechner, Peter

    2012-10-01

    In the run-up for amending the Austrian landfill ordinance, parameters were developed to assess the stability/reactivity of mechanically-biologically pretreated residual wastes. The Landfill Ordinance 2008 regulates limit values for Respiration Activity (="Atmungsaktivität") RA(4) (AT(4))<7mgO(2)*(g dry matter (DM))(-1), Gas Generation Sum GS(21)<20Nl*kgDM(-1) and alternatively Gas Evolution (="Gasbildung") GB(21)<20Nl*kgDM(-1). Methods for analysing these parameters were established by the Austrian Standards Institute (2004). As laboratory practice shows, these methods also are used for the assessment of other wastes (sewage sludge, commercial waste, material from abandoned sites, biowaste compost). For measurement of respiration activity in Austria mainly two methods are used: the Sapromat®-method and the OxiTop®-method. Whether respectively to what extent these two methods give same results, is discussed in this paper. Since 2009 at ABF-BOKU 169 respiration activity tests of samples taken from different stages of MBT - as well as biowaste composting processes, materials from landfills as well as abandoned sites and residues from anaerobic treatment plants were analysed parallel by Sapromat® and OxiTop®. The results manifest very strong correlation between the Sapromat® and OxiTop® method. The correlation coefficient is 0.993. As a very clear tendency OxiTop® gives lower amounts than Sapromat®. In average the lower values of OxiTop® are around 88%. PMID:22704002

  18. A large family of anti-activators accompanying XylS/AraC family regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Yan, Michael B; Tran, Minh; Wright, Nathan; Luzader, Deborah H; Kendall, Melissa M; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P

    2016-07-01

    AraC Negative Regulators (ANR) suppress virulence genes by directly down-regulating AraC/XylS members in Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we sought to investigate the distribution and molecular mechanisms of regulatory function for ANRs among different bacterial pathogens. We identified more than 200 ANRs distributed in diverse clinically important gram negative pathogens, including Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Citrobacter spp., enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and members of the Pasteurellaceae. By employing a bacterial two hybrid system, pull down assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we demonstrate that Aar (AggR-activated regulator), a prototype member of the ANR family in EAEC, binds with high affinity to the central linker domain of AraC-like member AggR. ANR-AggR binding disrupted AggR dimerization and prevented AggR-DNA binding. ANR homologs of Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and ETEC were capable of complementing Aar activity by repressing aggR expression in EAEC strain 042. ANR homologs of ETEC and Vibrio cholerae bound to AggR as well as to other members of the AraC family, including Rns and ToxT. The predicted proteins of all ANR members exhibit three highly conserved predicted α-helices. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggest that at least predicted α-helices 2 and 3 are required for Aar activity. In sum, our data strongly suggest that members of the novel ANR family act by directly binding to their cognate AraC partners. PMID:27038276

  19. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of novel large network polystyrene-immobilized organic bases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tassi, Marco; Bartollini, Elena; Adriaensens, Peter; Bianchi, Luca; Barkakaty, Balaka; Carleer, Robert; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; Marrocchi, Assunta; Vaccaro, Luigi

    2015-12-07

    In view of searching for efficient polymeric supports for organic bases to be used in environmentally friendly reaction conditions, novel gel-type cross-linked polystyrenes functionalized with diethylamine and 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene, have been prepared. Moreover, the structural properties and morphology of these catalysts have been determined by extensive solid state NMR experiments, FTIR spectroscopy and SEM/TEM microscopy. SPACeR-supported bases were found to exhibit high catalytic activity in the epoxide ring opening by phenols. Finally, a range of β-substituted alcohols have been readily and regioselectively synthesized.

  20. APE: the Active Phasing Experiment to test new control system and phasing technology for a European Extremely Large Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Yaitskova, N.; Derie, F.; Constanza, A.; Brast, R.; Buzzoni, B.; Delabre, B.; Dierickx, P.; Dupuy, C.; Esteves, R.; Frank, C.; Guisard, S.; Karban, R.; Koenig, E.; Kolb, J.; Nylund, M.; Noethe, L.; Surdej, I.; Courteville, A.; Wilhelm, R.; Montoya, L.; Reyes, M.; Esposito, S.; Pinna, E.; Dohlen, K.; Ferrari, M.; Langlois, M.

    2005-08-01

    The future European Extremely Large Telescope will be composed of one or two giant segmented mirrors (up to 100 m of diameter) and of several large monolithic mirrors (up to 8 m in diameter). To limit the aberrations due to misalignments and defective surface quality it is necessary to have a proper active optics system. This active optics system must include a phasing system to limit the degradation of the PSF due to misphasing of the segmented mirrors. We will present the lastest design and development of the Active Phasing Experiment that will be tested in laboratory and on-sky connected to a VLT at Paranal in Chile. It includes an active segmented mirror, a static piston plate to simulate a secondary segmented mirror and of four phasing wavefront sensors to measure the piston, tip and tilt of the segments and the aberrations of the VLT. The four phasing sensors are the Diffraction Image Phase Sensing Instrument developed by Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, the Pyramid Phasing Sensor developed by Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, the Shack-Hartmann Phasing Sensor developed by the European Southern Observatory and the Zernike Unit for Segment phasing developed by Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille. A reference measurement of the segmented mirror is made by an internal metrology developed by Fogale Nanotech. The control system of Active Phasing Experiment will perform the phasing of the segments, the guiding of the VLT and the active optics of the VLT. These activities are included in the Framework Programme 6 of the European Union.

  1. Mechanical determinants of bone form: insights from skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Ruff, C B

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of skeletal remains from humans living in the past forms an important complement to observational and experimental studies of living humans and animal models. Including earlier humans in such analyses increases the range of variation in both behavior and body size and shape that are represented, and can provide insights into the adaptive potential of the modern human skeleton. I review here a variety of studies of archaeological and paleontological remains that have investigated differences in skeletal structure from a mechanical perspective, focusing in particular on diaphyseal strength of the limb bones. Several conclusions can be drawn from these studies: 1) there has been a decline in overall skeletal strength relative to body size over the course of human evolution that has become progressively steeper in recent millennia, probably due to increased sedentism and technological advancement; 2) differences in pelvic structure and hip mechanical loadings affect femoral shape; 3) activity patterns affect overall strength and shape of both the lower and upper limb bones; and 4) responsiveness to changes in mechanical loading varies between skeletal features (e.g., articulations versus diaphyses) and by age. PMID:16172511

  2. The effect of large aspect ratio wing yaw on active separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewes, Philipp; Taubert, Lutz; Wygnanski, Israel

    2014-11-01

    The applicability of the boundary layer independence principle to turbulent boundary layers developing on infinitely yawed wings, suggested that active separation control might be carried out differently to the two presumably independent developing boundary layers. At low incidence or flap deflection the control of the spanwise component of the flow is effective provided the aggregate number of actuators is small. In this case the actuator jets provide jet-curtains that virtually eliminate the spanwise flow component of the flow in their vicinity. At higher incidence or flap deflection, the focus of the active separation control has to shift to the chordwise component that has to overcome a high adverse pressure gradient. The idea was proven experimentally on a flapped wing based on a NACA 0012 airfoil that could be swept back and forward while being suspended from a ceiling of a wind tunnel connected to a six-component balance. The experiments were carried out at Reynolds numbers varying between 300,000 and 500,000. The project was supported in part by a grant from AFOSR.

  3. BrainModes: a principled approach to modeling and measuring large-scale neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Breakspear, Michael J; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Ritter, Petra

    2009-09-30

    Complex systems, such as the brain, exhibit multiple levels of organization due to processes which support the separation of scales across time and/or space. That is, cooperative phenomena--or "modes" of activity--occurring at one scale give rise to coherent spatiotemporal structures at a coarser scale. In turn, structures at the coarser scale constrain--and hence influence--emerging activity at a finer scale. BrainModes is an annual scientific summit which seeks to bring together experimental, computational and theoretical neuroscientists engaged at different levels of organization, with the goal of advancing a principled approach to understanding brain function based on the concept of cooperative phenomena in complex systems. Phenomena of particular interest include synchronization, stochastic influences, and spatiotemporal processes in both healthy and pathological states such as seizures. This Special Issue reports the 2008 BrainModes Workshop, held in Amsterdam (December 2008) which focused on the application of this framework to the analysis of brain oscillations and synchronization phenomena across time scales. PMID:19607859

  4. A Helioseismic Survey to Investigate Relationships between Subsurface Flows beneath Large Active Regions and Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Douglas; Leka, K D.; Barnes, Graham

    2014-06-01

    A survey of the subsurface flow properties of about 120 of the largest active regions, determined from the application of helioseismic holography to Dopplergrams obtained with the HMI instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, is being carried out. The overriding goal is to characterize differences in the subsurface flows between active regions associated with eruptive flares and the flows observed in relatively quiescent regions. Applications to flare forecasting comprise only one part of this investigation, since the potential response of the subsurface environment to eruptive events during and after their occurrence is also of scientific interest. Other priorities include understanding the limitations of the helioseismic methods, identifying and correcting systematic effects, and validating the reliability of the measurements using artificial data. While inversions to determine the variation with depth of subsurface flows are planned, preliminary results will be discussed which make use of proxies for near-surface depth-integrated properties, including the horizontal component of the flow divergence and the vertical component of the flow vorticity.This work is supported by the Solar Terrestrial Program of the National Science Foundation, through grant AGS-1127327, and by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration SBIR program.

  5. Active structural growth in central Taiwan in relationship to large earthquakes and pore-fluid pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Li-Fan

    Central Taiwan is subject to a substantial long-term earthquake risk with a population of five million and two disastrous earthquakes in the last century, the 1935 ML=7.1 Tuntzuchiao and 1999 Mw=7.6 Chi-Chi earthquakes. Rich data from these earthquakes combined with substantial surface and subsurface data accumulated from petroleum exploration form the basis for these studies of the growth of structures in successive large earthquakes and their relationships to pore-fluid pressures. Chapter 1 documents the structural context of the bedding-parallel Chelungpu thrust that slipped in the Chi-Chi earthquake by showing for this richly instrumented earthquake the close geometric relationships between the complex 3D fault shape and the heterogeneous coseismic displacements constrained by geodesy and seismology. Chapter 2 studies the accumulation of deformation by successive large earthquakes by studying the deformation of flights of fluvial terraces deposited over the Chelungpu and adjacent Changhua thrusts, showing the deformation on a timescale of tens of thousands of years. Furthermore these two structures, involving the same stratigraphic sequence, show fundamentally different kinematics of deformation with associated contrasting hanging-wall structural geometries. The heights and shapes of deformed terraces allowed testing of existing theories of fault-related folding. Furthermore terrace dating constrains a combined shortening rate of 37 mm/yr, which is 45% of the total Taiwan plate-tectonic rate, and indicates a substantial earthquake risk for the Changhua thrust. Chapter 3 addresses the long-standing problem of the mechanics of long-thing thrust sheets, such as the Chelungpu and Changhua thrusts in western Taiwan, by presenting a natural test for the classic Hubbert-Rubey hypothesis, which argues that ambient excess pore-fluid pressure substantially reduces the effective fault friction allowing the thrusts to move. Pore-fluid pressure data obtained from 76 wells

  6. [What remains is what should remain: using estates to construct biographies].

    PubMed

    Füssl, Wilhelm

    2014-09-01

    Estates play a major role in historical research, especially biographic research, for they supplement the official writings surrounding the individual view of a historical figure. But they nonetheless reflect only a small part of the scientific and private activities of a researcher. Moreover, before being handed over to an archive, they are also often filtered by the researchers themselves, by family members, and/or by successors to the historical figure's post. The history of an estate is thus of great importance to research. With an eye to the estates of natural scientists, the present text uses a concept of estates that includes not only the surviving texts but also artifacts with which the scientists worked. The focus will be on three physicists--Ernst Mach, Walther Gerlach, and Philipp Lenard--in order to investigate the significance of these objects for their respective biographies and for the history of physics. PMID:25296527

  7. Large-Scale Variational Two-Electron Reduced-Density-Matrix-Driven Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field Methods.

    PubMed

    Fosso-Tande, Jacob; Nguyen, Truong-Son; Gidofalvi, Gergely; DePrince, A Eugene

    2016-05-10

    A large-scale implementation of the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method is presented. The active space is described using the variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix (v2RDM) approach, and the algorithm is applicable to much larger active spaces than can be treated using configuration-interaction-driven methods. Density fitting or Cholesky decomposition approximations to the electron repulsion integral tensor allow for the simultaneous optimization of large numbers of external orbitals. We have tested the implementation by evaluating singlet-triplet energy gaps in the linear polyacene series and two dinitrene biradical compounds. For the acene series, we report computations that involve active spaces consisting of as many as 50 electrons in 50 orbitals and the simultaneous optimization of 1892 orbitals. For the dinitrene compounds, we find that the singlet-triplet gaps obtained from v2RDM-driven CASSCF with partial three-electron N-representability conditions agree with those obtained from configuration-interaction-driven approaches to within one-third of 1 kcal mol(-1). When enforcing only the two-electron N-representability conditions, v2RDM-driven CASSCF yields less accurate singlet-triplet energy gaps in these systems, but the quality of the results is still far superior to those obtained from standard single-reference approaches. PMID:27065086

  8. Antibacterial activity of large-area monolayer graphene film manipulated by charge transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Hongqin; Zhang, Miao; Zheng, Xiaohu; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Xuanyong; Wang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has attracted increasing attention for potential applications in biotechnology due to its excellent electronic property and biocompatibility. Here we use both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) to investigate the antibacterial actions of large-area monolayer graphene film on conductor Cu, semiconductor Ge and insulator SiO2. The results show that the graphene films on Cu and Ge can surprisingly inhibit the growth of both bacteria, especially the former. However, the proliferation of both bacteria cannot be significantly restricted by the graphene film on SiO2. The morphology of S. aureus and E. coli on graphene films further confirms that the direct contact of both bacteria with graphene on Cu and Ge can cause membrane damage and destroy membrane integrity, while no evident membrane destruction is induced by graphene on SiO2. From the viewpoint of charge transfer, a plausible mechanism is proposed here to explain this phenomenon. This study may provide new insights for the better understanding of antibacterial actions of graphene film and for the better designing of graphene-based antibiotics or other biomedical applications. PMID:24619247

  9. Antibacterial activity of large-area monolayer graphene film manipulated by charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Hongqin; Zhang, Miao; Zheng, Xiaohu; di, Zengfeng; Liu, Xuanyong; Wang, Xi

    2014-03-01

    Graphene has attracted increasing attention for potential applications in biotechnology due to its excellent electronic property and biocompatibility. Here we use both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) to investigate the antibacterial actions of large-area monolayer graphene film on conductor Cu, semiconductor Ge and insulator SiO2. The results show that the graphene films on Cu and Ge can surprisingly inhibit the growth of both bacteria, especially the former. However, the proliferation of both bacteria cannot be significantly restricted by the graphene film on SiO2. The morphology of S. aureus and E. coli on graphene films further confirms that the direct contact of both bacteria with graphene on Cu and Ge can cause membrane damage and destroy membrane integrity, while no evident membrane destruction is induced by graphene on SiO2. From the viewpoint of charge transfer, a plausible mechanism is proposed here to explain this phenomenon. This study may provide new insights for the better understanding of antibacterial actions of graphene film and for the better designing of graphene-based antibiotics or other biomedical applications.

  10. Broadband standoff detection of large molecules by mid-infrared active coherent laser spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Neil A; Molero, Francisco; Weidmann, Damien

    2015-01-26

    A widely tunable active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS) has been demonstrated for standoff detection of broadband absorbers in the 1280 to 1318 cm-1 spectral region using an external cavity quantum cascade laser as a mid-infrared source. The broad tuning range allows detection and quantification of vapor phase molecules, such as dichloroethane, ethylene glycol dinitrate, and tetrafluoroethane. The level of confidence in molecular mixing ratios retrieved from interfering spectral measurements is assessed in a quantitative manner. A first qualitative demonstration of condensed phase chemical detection on nitroacetanilide has also been conducted. Detection performances of the broadband ACLaS have been placed in the context of explosive detection and compared to that obtained using distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers. PMID:25835851

  11. Phase-B activities for the Large Isotope Spectrometer for Astromag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, Richard A.; Stone, E. C.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the LISA experiment are to (1) extend measurements of the isotopic composition of cosmic ray elements from Be to Ni (Z = 4 to 28) into the energy range beyond 1 GeV per nucleon; (2) to measure the energy spectra of heavy elements up to energies greater than 100 GeV/nucleon with good statistical accuracy; and (3) to search for heavy anti-matter with Z greater than 2 in cosmic rays. This grant focussed on defining the Cherenkov subsystem of the LISA experiment. The Phase-B efforts included the following activities: (1) definition of the LISA Cherenkov counters for the Space Station version of Astromag; (2) testing of the 5-inch fine mesh photomultipliers; (3) development of the aerogel radiator; and (4) study of a free-flyer version of Astromag.

  12. Large-scale performance and design for construction activity erosion control best management practices.

    PubMed

    Faucette, L B; Scholl, B; Beighley, R E; Governo, J

    2009-01-01

    The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Phase II requires construction activities to have erosion and sediment control best management practices (BMPs) designed and installed for site storm water management. Although BMPs are specified on storm water pollution prevention plans (SWPPPs) as part of the construction general permit (GP), there is little evidence in the research literature as to how BMPs perform or should be designed. The objectives of this study were to: (i) comparatively evaluate the performance of common construction activity erosion control BMPs under a standardized test method, (ii) evaluate the performance of compost erosion control blanket thickness, (iii) evaluate the performance of compost erosion control blankets (CECBs) on a variety of slope angles, and (iv) determine Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) cover management factors (C factors) for these BMPs to assist site designers and engineers. Twenty-three erosion control BMPs were evaluated using American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) D-6459, standard test method for determination of ECB performance in protecting hill slopes from rainfall induced erosion, on 4:1 (H:V), 3:1, and 2:1 slopes. Soil loss reduction for treatments exposed to 5 cm of rainfall on a 2:1 slope ranged from-7 to 99%. For rainfall exposure of 10 cm, treatment soil loss reduction ranged from 8 to 99%. The 2.5 and 5 cm CECBs significantly reduced erosion on slopes up to 2:1, while CECBs < 2.5 cm are not recommended on slopes >or= 4:1 when rainfall totals reach 5 cm. Based on the soil loss results, USLE C factors ranged from 0.01 to 0.9. These performance and design criteria should aid site planners and designers in decision-making processes. PMID:19398523

  13. Linking anti-predator behaviour to prey demography reveals limited risk effects of an actively hunting large carnivore.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Arthur D; Kauffman, Matthew J; McWhirter, Douglas E; Jimenez, Michael D; Cook, Rachel C; Cook, John G; Albeke, Shannon E; Sawyer, Hall; White, P J

    2013-08-01

    Ecological theory predicts that the diffuse risk cues generated by wide-ranging, active predators should induce prey behavioural responses but not major, population- or community-level consequences. We evaluated the non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of an active predator, the grey wolf (Canis lupus), by simultaneously tracking wolves and the behaviour, body fat, and pregnancy of elk (Cervus elaphus), their primary prey in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. When wolves approached within 1 km, elk increased their rates of movement, displacement and vigilance. Even in high-risk areas, however, these encounters occurred only once every 9 days. Ultimately, despite 20-fold variation in the frequency of encounters between wolves and individual elk, the risk of predation was not associated with elk body fat or pregnancy. Our findings suggest that the ecological consequences of actively hunting large carnivores, such as the wolf, are more likely transmitted by consumptive effects on prey survival than NCEs on prey behaviour. PMID:23750905

  14. Linking anti-predator behaviour to prey demography reveals limited risk effects of an actively hunting large carnivore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Arthur D.; Kauffman, Matthew J.; McWhirter, Douglas E.; Jimenez, Michael D.; Cook, Rachel C.; Cook, John G.; Albeke, Shannon E.; Sawyer, Hall; White, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that the diffuse risk cues generated by wide-ranging, active predators should induce prey behavioural responses but not major, population- or community-level consequences. We evaluated the non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of an active predator, the grey wolf (Canis lupus), by simultaneously tracking wolves and the behaviour, body fat, and pregnancy of elk (Cervus elaphus), their primary prey in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. When wolves approached within 1 km, elk increased their rates of movement, displacement and vigilance. Even in high-risk areas, however, these encounters occurred only once every 9 days. Ultimately, despite 20-fold variation in the frequency of encounters between wolves and individual elk, the risk of predation was not associated with elk body fat or pregnancy. Our findings suggest that the ecological consequences of actively hunting large carnivores, such as the wolf, are more likely transmitted by consumptive effects on prey survival than NCEs on prey behaviour.

  15. Stepwise calibration of the activated sludge model no. 1 at a partially denitrifying large wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Fall, C; Espinosa-Rodriguez, M A; Flores-Alamo, N; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Hooijmans, C M

    2011-11-01

    Activated sludge modeling technology is maturing; however, currently, there exists a great need to increase its use in daily engineering practice worldwide. A good way for building the capacities of the practitioners is to promote good modeling practices and standardize the protocols. In this study, a systematic procedure was proposed to calibrate the Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1) at a large wastewater treatment plant, by which the model adequately predicted the quality of the effluent and the sludge quantities. A hydraulics model was set up and validated through a tracer test. The Vesilind settling constants were measured and combined with the default value of the flocculent zone settling parameter, to calibrate the clarifiers. A virtual anoxic tank was installed in the return activated sludge to mimic the denitrification occurring in the settlers. In ASM1, the calibrated parameters were only two influent chemical oxygen demand fractions and one kinetic constant (oxygen half-saturation coefficient). PMID:22195426

  16. Large-Scale In-situ Experiments to Determine Geochemical Alterations and Microbial Activities at the Geological Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choung, S.; Francis, A. J.; Um, W.; Choi, S.; Kim, S.; Park, J.; Kim, S.

    2013-12-01

    The countries that have generated nuclear power have facing problems on the disposal of accumulated radioactive wastes. Geological disposal method has been chosen in many countries including Korea. A safety issue after the closure of geological repository has been raised, because microbial activities lead overpressure in the underground facilities through gas production. In particular, biodegradable organic materials derived from low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes play important role on microbial activities in the geological repository. This study performed large scale in-situ experiments using organic wastes and groundwater, and investigated geochemical alteration and microbial activities at early stage (~63 days) as representative of the period, after closure of the geological repository. The geochemical alteration controlled significantly the microorganism types and populations. Database of the biogeochemical alteration facilitates prediction of radionuclides' mobility and establishment of remedial strategy against unpredictable accidents and hazards at early stage right after closure of the geological repository.

  17. Attribution of ionospheric vertical plasma drift perturbations to large-scale waves and the dependence on solar activity (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Richmond, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we quantify the contribution of individual large-scale waves to ionospheric electrodynamics, and examine the dependence of the ionospheric perturbations on solar activity. We focus on migrating diurnal tide (DW1) plus mean winds, migrating semidiurnal tide (SW2), quasi-stationary planetary wave 1 (QSPW1), and nonmigrating semidiurnal westward wave 1 (SW1) under northern winter conditions, when QSPW1 and SW1 are climatologically strong. From TIME-GCM simulations under solar minimum conditions, we calculate equatorial vertical ExB drifts due to mean winds and DW1, SW2, SW1 and QSPW1. In particular, wind components of both SW2 and SW1 become large at mid to high latitudes in the E-region, and kernel functions obtained from numerical experiments reveal that they can significantly affect the equatorial ion drift, likely through modulating the E-region wind dynamo. The most evident changes of total ionospheric vertical drift when solar activity is increased are seen around dawn and dusk, reflecting the more dominant role of large F-region Pedersen conductivity and of the F-region dynamo under high solar activity. Therefore, the lower atmosphere driving of the ionospheric variability is more evident under solar minimum conditions, not only because variability is more identifiable in a quieter background, but also because the E-region wind dynamo is more significant. These numerical experiments also demonstrate that the amplitudes, phases and latitudinal and vertical structures of large-scale waves are important in quantifying the ionospheric responses.

  18. Isolation of a ribonuclease with antiproliferative and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities from Japanese large brown buckwheat seeds.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Susu; Yan, Juan; Ye, Xiujuan; Wu, Zujian; Ng, Tzibun

    2015-03-01

    A ribonuclease, with a molecular mass of 22.5 kDa and an N-terminal sequence exhibiting resemblance to previously isolated buckwheat storage proteins and allergens, was isolated from Japanese large brown buckwheat seeds. The ribonuclease was purified using a simple protocol that comprised ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Superdex 75. The ribonuclease exhibited low activity toward poly U, lower activity toward poly C, and very low activity toward poly A and poly G. The enzyme was activated upon exposure to 10 mM of Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) ions but was inhibited by Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+) ions at the same concentration. The optimum pH and optimum temperature for the enzyme were pH 9 and 60 °C, respectively. It inhibited proliferation of HepG2 hepatoma and MCF 7 breast cancer cells, with an IC50 value of 79.2 and 63.8 μM, respectively. It potently inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity with an IC50 of 48 μM. However, there were no antifungal and mitogenic activities. PMID:25503363

  19. Quantitative high-throughput screening: A titration-based approach that efficiently identifies biological activities in large chemical libraries

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, James; Auld, Douglas S.; Jadhav, Ajit; Johnson, Ronald L.; Simeonov, Anton; Yasgar, Adam; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical compounds to identify modulators of molecular targets is a mainstay of pharmaceutical development. Increasingly, HTS is being used to identify chemical probes of gene, pathway, and cell functions, with the ultimate goal of comprehensively delineating relationships between chemical structures and biological activities. Achieving this goal will require methodologies that efficiently generate pharmacological data from the primary screen and reliably profile the range of biological activities associated with large chemical libraries. Traditional HTS, which tests compounds at a single concentration, is not suited to this task, because HTS is burdened by frequent false positives and false negatives and requires extensive follow-up testing. We have developed a paradigm, quantitative HTS (qHTS), tested with the enzyme pyruvate kinase, to generate concentration–response curves for >60,000 compounds in a single experiment. We show that this method is precise, refractory to variations in sample preparation, and identifies compounds with a wide range of activities. Concentration–response curves were classified to rapidly identify pyruvate kinase activators and inhibitors with a variety of potencies and efficacies and elucidate structure–activity relationships directly from the primary screen. Comparison of qHTS with traditional single-concentration HTS revealed a high prevalence of false negatives in the single-point screen. This study demonstrates the feasibility of qHTS for accurately profiling every compound in large chemical libraries (>105 compounds). qHTS produces rich data sets that can be immediately mined for reliable biological activities, thereby providing a platform for chemical genomics and accelerating the identification of leads for drug discovery. PMID:16864780

  20. Postscript: Problems With the Security Motivation Model Remain Largely Unresolved: Response to Woody and Szechtman (2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven; McKay, Dean; Abramowitz, Jonathan S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper comments on the response offered by Szechtman and Woody to Taylor et al's initial comments on Szechtman and Woody's original article. Taylor et al highlight one problem with their model that Woody and Szechtman seem to think is unimportant: the treatment relevance of their model. The analogy of aspirin and colds was used, suggesting…

  1. Large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel involvement in suppression of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury after electroacupuncture at Shuigou (GV26) acupoint in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Shen, Yan; Lin, Hai-ping; Li, Zhuo; Chen, Ying-ying; Wang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Excess activation and expression of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa channels) may be an important mechanism for delayed neuronal death after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Electroacupuncture can regulate BKCa channels after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, but the precise mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we established a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Model rats received electroacupuncture of 1 mA and 2 Hz at Shuigou (GV26) for 10 minutes, once every 12 hours for a total of six times in 72 hours. We found that in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury rats, ischemic changes in the cerebral cortex were mitigated after electroacupuncture. Moreover, BKCa channel protein and mRNA expression were reduced in the cerebral cortex and neurological function noticeably improved. These changes did not occur after electroacupuncture at a non-acupoint (5 mm lateral to the left side of Shuigou). Thus, our findings indicate that electroacupuncture at Shuigou improves neurological function in rats following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, and may be associated with down-regulation of BKCa channel protein and mRNA expression. Additionally, our results suggest that the Shuigou acupoint has functional specificity. PMID:27482225

  2. A Large N400 but No BOLD Effect – Comparing Source Activations of Semantic Priming in Simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Geukes, Sebastian; Huster, René J.; Wollbrink, Andreas; Junghöfer, Markus; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Dobel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported neurophysiological effects of semantic priming in electroencephalography (EEG) and in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Because of differing methodological constraints, the comparability of the observed effects remains unclear. To directly compare EEG and fMRI effects and neural sources of semantic priming, we conducted a semantic word-picture priming experiment while measuring EEG and fMRI simultaneously. The visually presented primes were pseudowords, words unrelated to the target, semantically related words and the identical names of the target. Distributed source analysis of the event-related potentials (ERPs) successfully revealed a large effect of semantic prime-target relatedness (the N400 effect), which was driven by activations in a left-temporal source region. However, no significantly differing activations between priming conditions were found in the fMRI data. Our results support the notion that, for joint interpretations of existing EEG and fMRI studies of semantic priming, we need to fully appreciate the respective methodological limitations. Second, they show that simultaneous EEG-fMRI, including ERP source localization, is a feasible and promising methodological advancement for the investigation of higher-cognitive processes. Third, they substantiate the finding that, compared to fMRI, ERPs are often more sensitive to subtle cognitive effects. PMID:24391871

  3. Were Holocene large slumps in Lake Geneva off the city of Lausanne caused by fault activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia Demand, Jehanne; Marillier, François; Kremer, Katrina; Girardclos, Stéphanie

    2014-05-01

    Lake Geneva is set in an area where glacier advances and retreats have carved Tertiary Molasse rocks in front of the Alpine units. Glacial and lacustrine sediments have accumulated in the lake on top of the Molasse. Within Holocene sedimentary layers, seismic studies in the central part of Lake Geneva ("Grand-Lac") have shown the presence of several mass transport deposits (MTD). A large one, MTD A, is observed off the city of Lausanne. The depth of the associated failure scars (100 m water depth), its volume (~ 0.13 km3), and the occurrence of other smaller MTDs that were possibly co-deposited with MTD A point to the occurrence of a major slide event in the lake, most likely associated with an earthquake. Based on 14C dating, the sediment age model for MTD A gives an age interval of 1865-1608 BC (Kremer et al. 2014). To resolve the details of the MTDs off Lausanne, and to better understand its geological context different seismic systems were used. These were a 3.5 KHz pinger with a theoretical vertical resolution of 0.15 m and a multichannel system with water-gun or air-gun seismic sources with vertical resolution of 0.6 m and 1.1 m, respectively. After a first pass processing, the multi-channel data were reprocessed in order to take into account the shape of the streamer in the water and to enhance the results of migration. In addition to typical seismic images of MTDs observed in other alpine lakes such as chaotic or transparent seismic character between well-organized reflections, two intriguing positive water-bottom topographic features associated with apparent sub-vertical offsets are revealed by the seismic data. They are located in the near vicinity of the depot centers of the MTDs and conspicuously located near faults in the Tertiary Molasse. These are thrust faults that are offset by small strike-slip faults, and we suggest that the positive topographic features are linked to a compressive component within the sediments due to displacements along these

  4. Measuring the Impact of Active Learning in a Redesigned Large-enrollment Introductory Geoscience Survey Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.; Lyons, D. J.; Manhart, K.; Wehunt, M.; Kapp, J.; Richardson, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Over the past two years, faculty in the UA Geosciences engaged in a major course redesign effort with the goal of improving student learning and attitudes while, at the same time, dramatically reducing costs of offering such a course. The course serves as an undergraduate general education science requirement. Using a reformed teaching framework of learner-centered education, the large-enrollment, introductory geosciences survey course was overhauled to include interactive lectures, just-in-time online quizzes, a next- generation textbook, and weekly discussions lead by graduate students and undergraduate peer mentors. The Geosciences Concept Inventory (GCI) was given as a pre-test/post-test to students in the pre-modified course and the reformed course to compare student learning in terms of gain scores. Although the entire 78-items were administered, divided into three forms, only the 36-items that most directly related to course content were used for analysis. Students in the unmodified course had a pre-test GCI percentage correct of 28.67 (SD=11.45, n=96) which increased to 45.26 (SD=11.76, n=84) on the post-test. After course redesign, students had a pre-test GCI percentage correct of 38.62 (SD=8.42, n=144) which increased a post-test GCI score of 48.73 (SD=7.49, n=132). Although the gains from pre-test to post-test are statistically significant, the different in post-test GCI scores between the two groups is not. This is interpreted as students' knowledge levels, insofar as the GCI can measure, were equivalent in both courses. The Likert-style Attitudes Toward Science Survey was given as an end-of-class post-test to students in the pre-modified course and as a pre-test post-test the reformed course to compare student attitudes between the courses. The average ranking on a 5-point scale as a pre-test was 3.454 (SD=1.259, n=508) whereas the post-tests for the unmodified course was 3.49 (SD=1.05, n=101) and 3.50 (SD=1.127, n=369) for the reformed course. As is

  5. A new large-DNA-fragment delivery system based on integrase activity from an integrative and conjugative element.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Ryo; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2013-07-01

    During the past few decades, numerous plasmid vectors have been developed for cloning, gene expression analysis, and genetic engineering. Cloning procedures typically rely on PCR amplification, DNA fragment restriction digestion, recovery, and ligation, but increasingly, procedures are being developed to assemble large synthetic DNAs. In this study, we developed a new gene delivery system using the integrase activity of an integrative and conjugative element (ICE). The advantage of the integrase-based delivery is that it can stably introduce a large DNA fragment (at least 75 kb) into one or more specific sites (the gene for glycine-accepting tRNA) on a target chromosome. Integrase recombination activity in Escherichia coli is kept low by using a synthetic hybrid promoter, which, however, is unleashed in the final target host, forcing the integration of the construct. Upon integration, the system is again silenced. Two variants with different genetic features were produced, one in the form of a cloning vector in E. coli and the other as a mini-transposable element by which large DNA constructs assembled in E. coli can be tagged with the integrase gene. We confirmed that the system could successfully introduce cosmid and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNAs from E. coli into the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida in a site-specific manner. The integrase delivery system works in concert with existing vector systems and could thus be a powerful tool for synthetic constructions of new metabolic pathways in a variety of host bacteria. PMID:23686268

  6. A large hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines) revealed by magnetotelluric observations and its implications to the volcanic activity

    PubMed Central

    ALANIS, Paul K. B.; YAMAYA, Yusuke; TAKEUCHI, Akihiro; SASAI, Yoichi; OKADA, Yoshihiro; NAGAO, Toshiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The magnetotelluric 3D forward analyses indicate the existence of a large high resistivity anomaly (∼100 Ω·m) with a volume of at least 3 km × 3 km × 3 km, which is capped by a conductive layer (∼10 Ω·m), beneath the Main Crater. This high resistivity anomaly is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir, consisting of the aggregate of interconnected cracks in rigid and dense host rocks, which are filled with hydrothermal fluids coming from a magma batch below the reservoir. The hydrothermal fluids are considered partly in gas phase and liquid phase. The presence of such a large hydrothermal reservoir and the stagnant magma below may have influences on the volcano’s activity. Two possibilities are presented. First, the 30 January 1911 explosion event was a magmatic hydrothermal eruption rather than a base-surge associated with a phreato-magmatic eruption. Second, the earlier proposed four eruption series may be better interpreted by two cycles, each consisting of series of summit and flank eruptions. PMID:24126286

  7. Solar activity as a possible cause of large forest fires--a case study: analysis of the Portuguese forest fires.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J F P; Radovanovic, M

    2008-05-01

    Fires of large dimension destroy forests, harvests and housing objects. Apart from that combustion products and burned surfaces become large ecological problems. Very often fires emerge simultaneously on different locations of a region so a question could be asked if they always have been a consequence of negligence, pyromania, high temperatures or maybe there has been some other cause. This paper is an attempt of establishing the possible connection between forest fires that numerous satellites registered and activities happening on the Sun immediately before fires ignite. Fires emerged on relatively large areas from Portugal and Spain on August 2005, as well as on other regions of Europe. The cases that have been analyzed show that, in every concrete situation, an emission of strong electromagnetic and thermal corpuscular energy from highly energetic regions that were in geo-effective position had preceded the fires. Such emissions have, usually, very high energy and high speeds of particles and come from coronary holes that also have been either in the very structure or in the immediate closeness of the geo-effective position. It should also be noted that the solar wind directed towards the Earth becomes weaker with deeper penetration towards the topographic surface. However, the results presented in this paper suggest that, there is a strong causality relationship between solar activity and the ignition of these forest fires taking place in South-western Europe. PMID:18291443

  8. A large hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines) revealed by magnetotelluric observations and its implications to the volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Alanis, Paul K B; Yamaya, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Sasai, Yoichi; Okada, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Toshiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The magnetotelluric 3D forward analyses indicate the existence of a large high resistivity anomaly (∼100 Ω·m) with a volume of at least 3 km×3 km×3 km, which is capped by a conductive layer (∼10 Ω·m), beneath the Main Crater. This high resistivity anomaly is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir, consisting of the aggregate of interconnected cracks in rigid and dense host rocks, which are filled with hydrothermal fluids coming from a magma batch below the reservoir. The hydrothermal fluids are considered partly in gas phase and liquid phase. The presence of such a large hydrothermal reservoir and the stagnant magma below may have influences on the volcano's activity. Two possibilities are presented. First, the 30 January 1911 explosion event was a magmatic hydrothermal eruption rather than a base-surge associated with a phreato-magmatic eruption. Second, the earlier proposed four eruption series may be better interpreted by two cycles, each consisting of series of summit and flank eruptions. PMID:24126286

  9. Dynamics of the Active Altiplano Puna Magmatic Body: Large-Scale Melt Transport and Buoyant Upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, M.; Del Potro, R.

    2014-12-01

    A wide range of geophysical observations suggest that an active partially molten region (Altiplano Puna Magmatic Body or APMB) lies in the mid-upper crust of the Altiplano Puna Plateau, in the Central Andes, with its upper contact at around 20 km depth. In particular, gravity, magnetotellurics and seismics have helped delineating the overall geometry of this intrusive body, which is approximately 200 km in diameter and could be many kilometers thick. The average melt fraction is poorly constrained, although it has been suggested that it could be rather high, around ~15% or higher. In addition to constraining the general shape of the APMB, its dynamics can in principle be partially accessed through geodetic measurements at the surface. In fact, recent InSAR-related studies have shown a ground deformation rate in the order of centimeter per year, with a central uplifting region, centered roughly around a lava-dome complex type of system, Uturuncu volcano, surrounded by an extensive peripheral zone of subsidence. This wealth of observations has leaded us to propose two different hypotheses to partially explain the inner workings of the APMB: (i) the dynamic deformation of the uplift-subsidence of the surface is explained by the impingement of a buoyant melt-rich blob on the more brittle upper levels of the crust, and; (ii) such surface deformation could be associated to the poroviscous compaction induced by lateral melt transport toward a central region of ascent. Both scenarios are modeled numerically. In principle the two hypotheses could explain the rate and geometry of subsidence under some simplifications. We discuss the consequences of both hypotheses, and entertain the possibility of both processes operating together.

  10. Large steric effect in the substitution reaction of amines with phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleosides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Stronach, M. W.; Ketner, R. J.; Hurley, T. B.

    1995-01-01

    Aliphatic amines react with phosphoimidazolide-activated derivatives of guanosine and cytidine (ImpN) by replacing the imidazole group. The kinetics of reaction of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with glycine ethyl ester, glycinamide, 2-methoxyethylamine, n-butylamine, morpholine, dimethylamine (Me2NH), ethylmethylamine (EtNHMe), diethylamine (Et2NH), pyrrolidine, and piperidine were determined in water at 37 degrees C. With primary amines, a plot of the logarithm of the rate constant for attack by the amine on the protonated substrate, log kSH(A), versus the pKa of the amine exhibits a good linear correlation with a Bronsted slope, beta nuc = 0.48. Most of the secondary amines tested react with slightly higher reactivity than primary amines of similar pKa. Interestingly, some secondary amines show substantially lower reactivity than might be expected: EtNHMe reacts about eight times, and Et2NH at least 100 times, more slowly than Me2NH although all three amines are of similar basicity. For comparison, the kinetics of reaction of guanosine 5'-phosphoimidazolide (ImpG) and cytidine 5'-phosphoimidazolide (ImpC) were determined with Me2NH, EtNHMe, and Et2NH, and similar results were obtained. These results establish that the increased steric hindrance observed with the successive addition of ethyl groups are not due to any special steric requirements imposed by the guanosine or the methyl on the 2-methylimidazole leaving group of 2-MeImpG. It is concluded that addition of ethyl and, perhaps, groups larger than ethyl dramatically increases the kinetic barrier for addition of aliphatic secondary amines to the P-N bond of ImpN. This study supports the observation that the primary amino groups on the natural polyamines are at least 2 orders of magnitude more reactive than the secondary amino groups in the reaction with ImpN.

  11. Geomorphological observations of active faults in the epicentral region of the Huaxian large earthquake in 1556 in Shaanxi Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jian-Jun; Han, Mu-Kang; Chai, Bao-Long; Han, Heng-Yue

    1998-05-01

    The Huaxian magnitude 8 great earthquake of January 23, 1556, is the largest one recorded in the Weihe basin, Shaanxi Province, China and caused 830,000 people either injury or death. The epicenter is located in the southeastern part of the Weihe basin, around Huaxian City. Earthquakes are closely related to active faults and active faults are well developed in the epicentral area of the Huaxian large earthquake. Thus we will discuss the activity of the major faults in the epicentral area by geomorphological observations. There are three major fault sets in the study area: striking approximately east-west, northeast and northwest. These are inhomogeneous in spatial distribution, rates and manners of faulting, as shown by geomorphological observations such as faulted fluvial terraces and alluvial fans. The ages of the second and first terraces are around 20,000 and 5,000 years B.P. by thermoluminescent dating, Carbon-14 dating and archeology. The terraces were faulted by the North Huashan fault (F 1), the main boundary fault of Weihe basin and the Piedmont fault (F 2) after the second and the first terraces formed. The distribution of the displacement shows that the intersections of the North Huashan fault and the Chishui fault (F 4) striking northwest, and the western margin fault (F 5) of Tongguan loess tableland, have the largest in offsets in the area. Perhaps the Huanxian great earthquake in 1556 A.D. had a close relation to the North Huashan fault. The Weihe fault (F 3) striking east-west is also an active fault by analysis of the flood plain structure. Thus we should pay attention to the activities of the faults to take precautions against another possible large earthquake in this region.

  12. The Bacterial Tyrosine Kinase Activator TkmA Contributes to Biofilm Formation Largely Independently of the Cognate Kinase PtkA in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tantan; Greenwich, Jennifer; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Bacillus subtilis, biosynthesis of exopolysaccharide (EPS), a key biofilm matrix component, is regulated at the posttranslational level by the bacterial tyrosine kinase (BY-kinase) EpsB. EpsB, in turn, relies on the cognate kinase activator EpsA for activation. A concerted role of a second BY-kinase–kinase activator pair, PtkA and TkmA, respectively in biofilm formation was also indicated in previous studies. However, the exact functions of PtkA and TkmA in biofilm formation remain unclear. In this work, we show that the kinase activator TkmA contributes to biofilm formation largely independently of the cognate kinase, PtkA. We further show that the biofilm defect caused by a ΔtkmA mutation can be rescued by complementation by epsA, suggesting a functional overlap between TkmA and EpsA and providing a possible explanation for the role of TkmA in biofilm formation. We also show that the importance of TkmA in biofilm formation depends largely on medium conditions; the biofilm defect of ΔtkmA is very severe in the biofilm medium LBGM (lysogenic broth [LB] supplemented with 1% [vol/vol] glycerol and 100 μM MnSO4) but marginal in another commonly used biofilm medium, MSgg (5 mM potassium phosphate [pH 7.0], MOPS [100 mM morpholinepropanesulfonic acid] [pH 7.0], 2 mM MgCl2, 700 μM CaCl2, 50 μM MnCl2, 50 μM FeCl3, 1 μM ZnCl2, 2 μM thiamine, 0.5% glycerol, 0.5% glutamic acid, 50 μg/ml tryptophan, 50 μg/ml threonine, and 50 μg/ml phenylalanine). The molecular basis for the medium dependence is likely due to differential expression of tkmA and epsA in the two different media and complex regulation of these genes by both Spo0A and DegU. Our studies provide genetic evidence for possible cross talk between a BY-kinase activator (TkmA) and a noncognate kinase (EpsB) and an example of how environmental conditions may influence such cross talk in regulating biofilm formation in B. subtilis. IMPORTANCE In bacteria, biosynthesis of secreted polysaccharides

  13. Endogenous peroxidase activity in brush cell-like cells in the large intestine of the bullfrog tadpole, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, K; Ichikawa, Y; Nakamura, I

    1983-01-01

    A special cell type was identified in the mucosal epithelium of the large intestine of the tadpole of the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana. It is a slender, columnar cell, with a dark, basally situated nucleus. By electron microscopy the cell displays prominent bundles of filaments emerging from each microvillus and extending deep into the cytoplasm without ending in the terminal web. It has longer and more crowded microvilli than the absorptive cell. The specialized cell is also characterized by the presence of many apical vesicles and numerous subapical dense bodies. These cytological features suggest that it may be a brush cell (Rhodin and Dalhamn 1956). These cells displayed endogenous peroxidase activity in smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum, in the well-developed Golgi apparatus and in apical vesicles. Furthermore, peroxidase reaction product was frequently observed on their luminal surface membrane. These findings suggest that the brush cell in the large intestine of the bullfrog tadpole may be a secretory cell. PMID:6601990

  14. Film Excerpts Shown to Specifically Elicit Various Affects Lead to Overlapping Activation Foci in a Large Set of Symmetrical Brain Regions in Males

    PubMed Central

    Karama, Sherif; Armony, Jorge; Beauregard, Mario

    2011-01-01

    While the limbic system theory continues to be part of common scientific parlance, its validity has been questioned on multiple grounds. Nonetheless, the issue of whether or not there exists a set of brain areas preferentially dedicated to emotional processing remains central within affective neuroscience. Recently, a widespread neural reference space for emotion which includes limbic as well as other regions was characterized in a large meta-analysis. As methodologically heterogeneous studies go into such meta-analyses, showing in an individual study in which all parameters are kept constant, the involvement of overlapping areas for various emotion conditions in keeping with the neural reference space for emotion, would serve as valuable confirmatory evidence. Here, using fMRI, 20 young adult men were scanned while viewing validated neutral and effective emotion-eliciting short film excerpts shown to quickly and specifically elicit disgust, amusement, or sexual arousal. Each emotion-specific run included, in random order, multiple neutral and emotion condition blocks. A stringent conjunction analysis revealed a large overlap across emotion conditions that fit remarkably well with the neural reference space for emotion. This overlap included symmetrical bilateral activation of the medial prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate, the temporo-occipital junction, the basal ganglia, the brainstem, the amygdala, the hippocampus, the thalamus, the subthalamic nucleus, the posterior hypothalamus, the cerebellum, as well as the frontal operculum extending towards the anterior insula. This study clearly confirms for the visual modality, that processing emotional stimuli leads to widespread increases in activation that cluster within relatively confined areas, regardless of valence. PMID:21818311

  15. 7 CFR 160.29 - Containers to remain intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Containers to remain intact. 160.29 Section 160.29... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Analysis, Inspection, and Grading on Request § 160.29 Containers to remain intact... the containers holding such naval stores remain intact as sampled until the analysis,...

  16. Observing large-scale solar surface flows with GONG: Investigation of a key element in solar activity buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, John G.; Simon, George W.; Hathaway, David H.

    1996-01-01

    The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) solar telescope network has begun regular operations, and will provide continuous Doppler images of large-scale nearly-steady motions at the solar surface, primarily those due to supergranulation. Not only the Sun's well-known magnetic network, but also flux diffusion, dispersal, and concentration at the surface appear to be controlled by supergranulation. Through such magnetoconvective interactions, magnetic stresses develop, leading to solar activity. We show a Doppler movie made from a 45.5 hr time series obtained 1995 May 9-10 using data from three of the six GONG sites (Learmonth, Tenerife, Tucson), to demonstrate the capability of this system.

  17. Atomic data for stellar spectroscopy: recent successes and remaining needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Christopher; Lawler, James E.; Wood, Michael P.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth A.; Cowan, John J.

    2014-11-01

    Stellar chemical composition analyses provide vital insights into galactic nucleosynthesis. Atomic line data are critical inputs to stellar abundance computations. Recent lab studies have made significant progress in refining and extending knowledge of transition probabilities, isotopic wavelength shifts, and hyperfine substructure patterns for the absorption lines that are of most interest to stellar spectroscopists. The observable neutron-capture (n-capture) element species (Z \\gt 30) have been scrutinized in lab studies by several groups. For many species the uncertainties in experimental oscillator strengths are ≤slant 10%, which permits detailed assessment of rapid and slow n-capture nucleosynthesis contributions. In this review, extreme examples of r-process-enriched stars in the galactic halo will be shown, which suggest that the description of observable n-capture abundances in these stars is nearly complete. Unfortunately, there are serious remaining concerns about the reliability of observed abundances of lighter elements. In particular, it is not clear that line formation in real stellar atmospheres is being modeled correctly. But for many elements with Z \\lt 30 the atomic transition data are not yet settled. Highlights will be given of some recent large improvements, with suggestions for the most important needs for the near future.

  18. Carnivoran remains from the Malapa hominin site, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Brian F; Werdelin, Lars; Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Berger, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries at the new hominin-bearing deposits of Malapa, South Africa, have yielded a rich faunal assemblage associated with the newly described hominin taxon Australopithecus sediba. Dating of this deposit using U-Pb and palaeomagnetic methods has provided an age of 1.977 Ma, being one of the most accurately dated, time constrained deposits in the Plio-Pleistocene of southern Africa. To date, 81 carnivoran specimens have been identified at this site including members of the families Canidae, Viverridae, Herpestidae, Hyaenidae and Felidae. Of note is the presence of the extinct taxon Dinofelis cf. D. barlowi that may represent the last appearance date for this species. Extant large carnivores are represented by specimens of leopard (Panthera pardus) and brown hyaena (Parahyaena brunnea). Smaller carnivores are also represented, and include the genera Atilax and Genetta, as well as Vulpes cf. V. chama. Malapa may also represent the first appearance date for Felis nigripes (Black-footed cat). The geochronological age of Malapa and the associated hominin taxa and carnivoran remains provide a window of research into mammalian evolution during a relatively unknown period in South Africa and elsewhere. In particular, the fauna represented at Malapa has the potential to elucidate aspects of the evolution of Dinofelis and may help resolve competing hypotheses about faunal exchange between East and Southern Africa during the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene. PMID:22073222

  19. Carnivoran Remains from the Malapa Hominin Site, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Brian F.; Werdelin, Lars; Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Berger, Lee R.

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries at the new hominin-bearing deposits of Malapa, South Africa, have yielded a rich faunal assemblage associated with the newly described hominin taxon Australopithecus sediba. Dating of this deposit using U-Pb and palaeomagnetic methods has provided an age of 1.977 Ma, being one of the most accurately dated, time constrained deposits in the Plio-Pleistocene of southern Africa. To date, 81 carnivoran specimens have been identified at this site including members of the families Canidae, Viverridae, Herpestidae, Hyaenidae and Felidae. Of note is the presence of the extinct taxon Dinofelis cf. D. barlowi that may represent the last appearance date for this species. Extant large carnivores are represented by specimens of leopard (Panthera pardus) and brown hyaena (Parahyaena brunnea). Smaller carnivores are also represented, and include the genera Atilax and Genetta, as well as Vulpes cf. V. chama. Malapa may also represent the first appearance date for Felis nigripes (Black-footed cat). The geochronological age of Malapa and the associated hominin taxa and carnivoran remains provide a window of research into mammalian evolution during a relatively unknown period in South Africa and elsewhere. In particular, the fauna represented at Malapa has the potential to elucidate aspects of the evolution of Dinofelis and may help resolve competing hypotheses about faunal exchange between East and Southern Africa during the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene. PMID:22073222

  20. North-south asymmetry in small and large sunspot group activity and violation of even-odd solar cycle rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaraiah, J.

    2016-07-01

    According to Gnevyshev-Ohl (G-O) rule an odd-numbered cycle is stronger than its preceding even-numbered cycle. In the modern time the cycle pair (22, 23) violated this rule. By using the combined Greenwich Photoheliographic Results (GPR) and Solar Optical Observing Network (SOON) sunspot group data during the period 1874-2015, and Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD) of sunspot groups during the period 1974-2015, here we have found that the solar cycle pair (22, 23) violated the G-O rule because, besides during cycle 23 a large deficiency of small sunspot groups in both the northern and the southern hemispheres, during cycle 22 a large abundance of small sunspot groups in the southern hemisphere. In the case of large and small sunspot groups the cycle pair (22, 23) violated the G-O rule in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively, suggesting the north-south asymmetry in solar activity has a significant contribution in the violation of G-O rule. The amplitude of solar cycle 24 is smaller than that of solar cycle 23. However, Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) rate in the rising phases of the cycles 23 and 24 are almost same (even slightly large in cycle 24). From both the SOON and the DPD sunspot group data here we have also found that on the average the ratio of the number (counts) of large sunspot groups to the number of small sunspot groups is larger in the rising phase of cycle 24 than that in the corresponding phase of cycle 23. We suggest this could be a potential reason for the aforesaid discrepancy in the CME rates during the rising phases of cycles 23 and 24. These results have significant implication on solar cycle mechanism.

  1. Determination of the specific alpha activity of thick sources with a large area ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Djurasević, M; Vukanac, I; Kandić, A; Nadderd, L; Milosević, Z; Radenković, M

    2007-01-01

    A method for determining the specific alpha activity of thick sources using a large area ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector is presented. In this method a quadratic relationship between the detector response and window thickness is assumed. This method provides a quick estimation of alpha activity in the sample, so it is an indicative method. The aim of this experimental work is to approve theoretical assumption and to develop a standard routine method for absolute alpha measurements of thick contaminated environmental sources. For this purpose reference material U(3)O(8) and spiked standards of soil were used. Measurements of contaminated soil samples from south Serbia showed the practical application of this method. PMID:17383779

  2. Airway Hydration, Apical K(+) Secretion, and the Large-Conductance, Ca(2+)-activated and Voltage-dependent Potassium (BK) Channel.

    PubMed

    Kis, Adrian; Krick, Stefanie; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Large-conductance, calcium-activated, and voltage-gated K(+) (BK) channels are expressed in many tissues of the human body, where they play important roles in signaling not only in excitable but also in nonexcitable cells. Because BK channel properties are rendered in part by their association with four β and four γ subunits, their channel function can differ drastically, depending on in which cellular system they are expressed. Recent studies verify the importance of apically expressed BK channels for airway surface liquid homeostasis and therefore of their significant role in mucociliary clearance. Here, we review evidence that inflammatory cytokines, which contribute to airway diseases, can lead to reduced BK activity via a functional down-regulation of the γ regulatory subunit LRRC26. Therefore, manipulation of LRRC26 and pharmacological opening of BK channels represent two novel concepts of targeting epithelial dysfunction in inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:27115952

  3. Distinct isoform of FABP7 revealed by screening for retroelement-activated genes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lock, Frances E; Rebollo, Rita; Miceli-Royer, Katharine; Gagnier, Liane; Kuah, Sabrina; Babaian, Artem; Sistiaga-Poveda, Maialen; Lai, C Benjamin; Nemirovsky, Oksana; Serrano, Isabel; Steidl, Christian; Karimi, Mohammad M; Mager, Dixie L

    2014-08-26

    Remnants of ancient transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes. These sequences harbor multiple regulatory motifs and hence are capable of influencing expression of host genes. In response to environmental changes, TEs are known to be released from epigenetic repression and to become transcriptionally active. Such activation could also lead to lineage-inappropriate activation of oncogenes, as one study described in Hodgkin lymphoma. However, little further evidence for this mechanism in other cancers has been reported. Here, we reanalyzed whole transcriptome data from a large cohort of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) compared with normal B-cell centroblasts to detect genes ectopically expressed through activation of TE promoters. We have identified 98 such TE-gene chimeric transcripts that were exclusively expressed in primary DLBCL cases and confirmed several in DLBCL-derived cell lines. We further characterized a TE-gene chimeric transcript involving a fatty acid-binding protein gene (LTR2-FABP7), normally expressed in brain, that was ectopically expressed in a subset of DLBCL patients through the use of an endogenous retroviral LTR promoter of the LTR2 family. The LTR2-FABP7 chimeric transcript encodes a novel chimeric isoform of the protein with characteristics distinct from native FABP7. In vitro studies reveal a dependency for DLBCL cell line proliferation and growth on LTR2-FABP7 chimeric protein expression. Taken together, these data demonstrate the significance of TEs as regulators of aberrant gene expression in cancer and suggest that LTR2-FABP7 may contribute to the pathogenesis of DLBCL in a subgroup of patients. PMID:25114248

  4. Distinct isoform of FABP7 revealed by screening for retroelement-activated genes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lock, Frances E.; Rebollo, Rita; Miceli-Royer, Katharine; Gagnier, Liane; Kuah, Sabrina; Babaian, Artem; Sistiaga-Poveda, Maialen; Lai, C. Benjamin; Nemirovsky, Oksana; Serrano, Isabel; Steidl, Christian; Karimi, Mohammad M.; Mager, Dixie L.

    2014-01-01

    Remnants of ancient transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes. These sequences harbor multiple regulatory motifs and hence are capable of influencing expression of host genes. In response to environmental changes, TEs are known to be released from epigenetic repression and to become transcriptionally active. Such activation could also lead to lineage-inappropriate activation of oncogenes, as one study described in Hodgkin lymphoma. However, little further evidence for this mechanism in other cancers has been reported. Here, we reanalyzed whole transcriptome data from a large cohort of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) compared with normal B-cell centroblasts to detect genes ectopically expressed through activation of TE promoters. We have identified 98 such TE-gene chimeric transcripts that were exclusively expressed in primary DLBCL cases and confirmed several in DLBCL-derived cell lines. We further characterized a TE-gene chimeric transcript involving a fatty acid-binding protein gene (LTR2-FABP7), normally expressed in brain, that was ectopically expressed in a subset of DLBCL patients through the use of an endogenous retroviral LTR promoter of the LTR2 family. The LTR2-FABP7 chimeric transcript encodes a novel chimeric isoform of the protein with characteristics distinct from native FABP7. In vitro studies reveal a dependency for DLBCL cell line proliferation and growth on LTR2-FABP7 chimeric protein expression. Taken together, these data demonstrate the significance of TEs as regulators of aberrant gene expression in cancer and suggest that LTR2-FABP7 may contribute to the pathogenesis of DLBCL in a subgroup of patients. PMID:25114248

  5. Large, binge-type meals of high fat diet change feeding behaviour and entrain food anticipatory activity in mice*

    PubMed Central

    Bake, T.; Murphy, M.; Morgan, D.G.A.; Mercer, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Male C57BL/6 mice fed ad libitum on control diet but allowed access to a palatable high fat diet (HFD) for 2 h a day during the mid-dark phase rapidly adapt their feeding behaviour and can consume nearly 80% of their daily caloric intake during this 2 h-scheduled feed. We assessed food intake microstructure and meal pattern, and locomotor activity and rearing as markers of food anticipatory activity (FAA). Schedule fed mice reduced their caloric intake from control diet during the first hours of the dark phase but not during the 3-h period immediately preceding the scheduled feed. Large meal/binge-like eating behaviour during the 2-h scheduled feed was characterised by increases in both meal number and meal size. Rearing was increased during the 2-h period running up to scheduled feeding while locomotor activity started to increase 1 h before, indicating that schedule-fed mice display FAA. Meal number and physical activity changes were sustained when HFD was withheld during the anticipated scheduled feeding period, and mice immediately binged when HFD was represented after a week of this “withdrawal” period. These findings provide important context to our previous studies suggesting that energy balance systems in the hypothalamus are not responsible for driving these large, binge-type meals. Evidence of FAA in HFD dark phase schedule-fed mice implicates anticipatory processes in binge eating that do not involve immediately preceding hypophagia or regulatory homeostatic signalling. PMID:24631639

  6. Remaining Useful Life Estimation in Prognosis: An Uncertainty Propagation Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankararaman, Shankar; Goebel, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of remaining useful life is significant in the context of prognostics and health monitoring, and the prediction of remaining useful life is essential for online operations and decision-making. However, it is challenging to accurately predict the remaining useful life in practical aerospace applications due to the presence of various uncertainties that affect prognostic calculations, and in turn, render the remaining useful life prediction uncertain. It is challenging to identify and characterize the various sources of uncertainty in prognosis, understand how each of these sources of uncertainty affect the uncertainty in the remaining useful life prediction, and thereby compute the overall uncertainty in the remaining useful life prediction. In order to achieve these goals, this paper proposes that the task of estimating the remaining useful life must be approached as an uncertainty propagation problem. In this context, uncertainty propagation methods which are available in the literature are reviewed, and their applicability to prognostics and health monitoring are discussed.

  7. Using an active primary surface to correct for low-order manufacturing errors in secondary mirrors of large reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes-Medellin, German; Lovell, Amy J.; Enriquez, Rogerio; Smith, David R.

    2004-09-01

    In the fabrication of high-performance, low-cost secondary reflectors for radio telescopes, it is a significant challenge to avoid introduction of low-order surface errors such as astigmatism or coma. This arises primarily because low-order surface errors are easily induced by support structure placement or simple thermal variations in the manufacturing process. It is, of course, possible to bring these errors to within the required tolerance, but if an active primary reflector is present, it may be possible to relax the requirements on the secondary and perhaps lower its cost. In this paper, we take the Large Millimeter-wave Telescope (LMT/GTM) as an example system. We model the effects of correcting a deformed sub-reflector by using the existing segmented active primary. The sub-reflector deformation patterns employed are low-order (e.g., astigmatism or coma), but are allowed significant excursions from the nominal surface figure. For each case, we demonstrate the best theoretical performance, using the active primary to correct for the errors. Additionally, to determine whether such an approach would be practical, we also demonstrate the likely performance improvement that could be achieved using brief measurements on an astronomical source. In this approach, we introduce varying amounts of known low-order deformation patterns into the active primary and seek the combination that results in the maximum signal. Finally, we compare this result to the theoretical maximum and make recommendations on the practical utility of the approach.

  8. Testing promotes long-term learning via stabilizing activation patterns in a large network of brain areas.

    PubMed

    Keresztes, Attila; Kaiser, Daniel; Kovács, Gyula; Racsmány, Mihály

    2014-11-01

    The testing effect refers to the phenomenon that repeated retrieval of memories promotes better long-term retention than repeated study. To investigate the neural correlates of the testing effect, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging methods while participants performed a cued recall task. Prior to the neuroimaging experiment, participants learned Swahili-German word pairs, then half of the word pairs were repeatedly studied, whereas the other half were repeatedly tested. For half of the participants, the neuroimaging experiment was performed immediately after the learning phase; a 1-week retention interval was inserted for the other half of the participants. We found that a large network of areas identified in a separate 2-back functional localizer scan were active during the final recall of the word pair associations. Importantly, the learning strategy (retest or restudy) of the word pairs determined the manner in which the retention interval affected the activations within this network. Recall of previously restudied memories was accompanied by reduced activation within this network at long retention intervals, but no reduction was observed for previously retested memories. We suggest that retrieval promotes learning via stabilizing cue-related activation patterns in a network of areas usually associated with cognitive and attentional control functions. PMID:23796945

  9. Urinary Bladder-Relaxant Effect of Kurarinone Depending on Potentiation of Large-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sojung; Chae, Mee Ree; Lee, Byoung-Cheol; Kim, Yong-Chul; Choi, Jae Sue; Lee, Sung Won; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2016-08-01

    The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BKCa channel) plays critical roles in smooth muscle relaxation. In urinary bladder smooth muscle, BKCa channel activity underlies the maintenance of the resting membrane potential and repolarization of the spontaneous action potential triggering the phasic contraction. To identify novel BKCa channel activators, we screened a library of natural compounds using a cell-based fluorescence assay and a hyperactive mutant BKCa channel (Lee et al., 2013). From 794 natural compounds, kurarinone, a flavanone from Sophora flavescens, strongly potentiated BKCa channels. When treated from the extracellular side, this compound progressively shifted the conductance-voltage relationship of BKCa channels to more negative voltages and increased the maximum conductance in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas kurarinone strongly potentiated the homomeric BKCa channel composed of only the α subunit, its effects were much smaller on heteromeric channels coassembled with auxiliary β subunits. Although the activation kinetics was not altered significantly, the deactivation of BKCa channels was dramatically slowed by kurarinone treatment. At the single-channel level, kurarinone increased the open probability of the BKCa channel without affecting its single-channel conductance. Kurarinone potently relaxed acetylcholine-induced contraction of rat bladder smooth muscle and thus decreased the micturition frequency of rats with overactive bladder symptoms. These results indicate that kurarinone can directly potentiate BKCa channels and demonstrate the therapeutic potentials of kurarinone and its derivatives for developing antioveractive bladder medications and supplements. PMID:27251362

  10. When and where the aftershock activity was depressed: Contrasting decay patterns of the proximate large earthquakes in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogata, Y.; Jones, L.M.; Toda, S.

    2003-01-01

    Seismic quiescence has attracted attention as a possible precursor to a large earthquake. However, sensitive detection of quiescence requires accurate modeling of normal aftershock activity. We apply the epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model that is a natural extension of the modified Omori formula for aftershock decay, allowing further clusters (secondary aftershocks) within an aftershock sequence. The Hector Mine aftershock activity has been normal, relative to the decay predicted by the ETAS model during the 14 months of available data. In contrast, although the aftershock sequence of the 1992 Landers earthquake (M = 7.3), including the 1992 Big Bear earthquake (M = 6.4) and its aftershocks, fits very well to the ETAS up until about 6 months after the main shock, the activity showed clear lowering relative to the modeled rate (relative quiescence) and lasted nearly 7 years, leading up to the Hector Mine earthquake (M = 7.1) in 1999. Specifically, the relative quiescence occurred only in the shallow aftershock activity, down to depths of 5-6 km. The sequence of deeper events showed clear, normal aftershock activity well fitted to the ETAS throughout the whole period. We argue several physical explanations for these results. Among them, we strongly suspect aseismic slips within the Hector Mine rupture source that could inhibit the crustal relaxation process within "shadow zones" of the Coulomb's failure stress change. Furthermore, the aftershock activity of the 1992 Joshua Tree earthquake (M = 6.1) sharply lowered in the same day of the main shock, which can be explained by a similar scenario.

  11. Plasma myeloperoxidase level and polymorphonuclear leukocyte activation in horses suffering from large intestinal obstruction requiring surgery: preliminary results.

    PubMed Central

    Grulke, S; Benbarek, H; Caudron, I; Deby-Dupont, G; Mathy-Hartert, M; Farnir, F; Deby, C; Lamy, M; Serteyn, D

    1999-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a specific enzyme of neutrophil azurophilic granules with a strong oxidative activity. Thanks to a radioimmunoassay of equine myeloperoxidase, the authors have observed a significantly higher plasma level of MPO in horses operated for strangulation obstruction of the large intestine (n = 6) than in horses suffering from a non-strangulating displacement of the large intestine (n = 9). For the 2 groups, 3 phases were distinguished: reception (P1), intensive care (P2) and terminal phase (P3). The mean peak values of MPO for these phases were 121.6 ng/mL (P1), 168.6 ng/mL (P2), and 107.0 ng/mL (P3) for the non-strangulating group, and 242.6 ng/mL (P1); 426.0 ng/mL (P2), and 379.5 ng/mL (P3) for the strangulation group. The variations of the mean peak values of plasma MPO were significantly different between the 2 groups and between the different phases. A significant increase of the least square means of MPO was observed between P1 and P2. A significant decrease of the least square means of the number of circulating leukocytes was observed between P1 and P3. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation could play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute abdominal disease and endotoxic shock. PMID:10369573

  12. Lateral and feedforward inhibition suppress asynchronous activity in a large, biophysically-detailed computational model of the striatal network

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Jason T.; Halterman, Benjamin L.; Finkel, Leif H.; Wolf, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) receive lateral inhibitory projections from other MSNs and feedforward inhibitory projections from fast-spiking, parvalbumin-containing striatal interneurons (FSIs). The functional roles of these connections are unknown, and difficult to study in an experimental preparation. We therefore investigated the functionality of both lateral (MSN-MSN) and feedforward (FSI-MSN) inhibition using a large-scale computational model of the striatal network. The model consists of 2744 MSNs comprised of 189 compartments each and 121 FSIs comprised of 148 compartments each, with dendrites explicitly represented and almost all known ionic currents included and strictly constrained by biological data as appropriate. Our analysis of the model indicates that both lateral inhibition and feedforward inhibition function at the population level to limit non-ensemble MSN spiking while preserving ensemble MSN spiking. Specifically, lateral inhibition enables large ensembles of MSNs firing synchronously to strongly suppress non-ensemble MSNs over a short time-scale (10–30 ms). Feedforward inhibition enables FSIs to strongly inhibit weakly activated, non-ensemble MSNs while moderately inhibiting activated ensemble MSNs. Importantly, FSIs appear to more effectively inhibit MSNs when FSIs fire asynchronously. Both types of inhibition would increase the signal-to-noise ratio of responding MSN ensembles and contribute to the formation and dissolution of MSN ensembles in the striatal network. PMID:25505406

  13. LArGe: active background suppression using argon scintillation for the Gerda 0ν β β -experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Barnabé-Heider, M.; Budjáš, D.; Cattadori, C.; Gangapshev, A.; Gusev, K.; Heisel, M.; Junker, M.; Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Pelczar, K.; Schönert, S.; Smolnikov, A.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-10-01

    LArGe is a Gerda low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the Gerda experiment. Similar to Gerda, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m^3, 1.4 tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to Gerda. Suppression factors of a few times 10^3 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6)× 10^{-2} cts/(keV kg year) (90 % C.L.), which is at the level of Gerda Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural ^{42}Ar abundance (parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2ν β β -decay in natural germanium. These results show the effectivity of an active liquid argon veto in an ultra-low background environment. As a consequence, the implementation of a liquid argon veto in Gerda Phase II is pursued.

  14. The Properties of Large Amplitude Whistler Mode Waves in the Magnetosphere: Propagation and Relationship with Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Cattell, C. A.; Kellogg, P. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Goetz, K.; Breneman, A.; Kersten, K.

    2011-01-01

    Wepresent resultsof a studyof the characteristicsof very large amplitude whistler mode waves inside the terrestrial magnetosphere at radial distances of less than 15 RE using waveform capture data from the Wind spacecraft. We observed 247 whistler mode waves with at least one electric field component (105/247 had !80 mV/m peak!to!peak amplitudes) and 66 whistler mode waves with at least one search coil magnetic field component (38/66 had !0.8 nT peak!to!peak amplitudes). Wave vectors determined from events with three magnetic field components indicate that 30/46 propagate within 20 of the ambient magnetic field, though some are more oblique (up to "50 ). No relationship was observed between wave normal angle and GSM latitude. 162/247 of the large amplitude whistler mode waves were observed during magnetically active periods (AE > 200 nT). 217 out of 247 total whistler mode waves examined were observed inside the radiation belts. We present a waveform capture with the largest whistler wave magnetic field amplitude (^8 nT peak!to!peak) ever reported in the radiation belts. The estimated Poynting flux magnitude associated with this wave is ^300 mW/m2, roughly four orders of magnitude above estimates from previous satellite measurements. Such large Poynting flux values are consistent with rapid energization of electrons.

  15. Cognitive recovery by chronic activation of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Kang, Huicong; Li, Yongzhi; Shui, Yuan; Yamamoto, Ryo; Sugai, Tokio; Kato, Nobuo

    2015-05-01

    We previously showed that activity of the large conductance calcium-activated potassium (Big-K; BK) channels is suppressed in 3xTg Alzheimer disease (AD) model mice. However, its behavioral significance is not known. In the present report, ventricular injection of the BK channel activator isopimaric acid (ISO) was conducted to examine whether BK channel activation ameliorates cognition in 3xTg mice. The novel object recognition (NOR) test revealed that chronic injection of ISO improved non-spatial memory in 3xTg mice. In the Morris water maze, the probe test demonstrated an improved spatial memory after ISO injection. Electrophysiological underpinnings of the ISO effect were then examined in slices obtained from the mice after behavior. At hippocampal CA1 synapses, the basic synaptic transmission was abnormally elevated and long-term potentiation (LTP) was partially suppressed in 3xTg mice. These were both recovered by ISO treatment. We then confirmed suppressed BK channel activity in 3xTg mice by measuring the half-width of evoked action potentials. This was also recovered by ISO treatment. We previously showed that the recovery of BK channel activity accompanies reduction of neuronal excitability in pyramidal cells. Here again, pyramidal cell excitability, as assessed by calculating the frequency of evoked spikes, was elevated in the 3xTg mouse and was normalized by ISO. ELISA experiments demonstrated an ISO-induced reduction of Aβ1-42 content in hippocampal tissue in 3xTg mice. The present study thus suggests a potential therapeutic utility of BK channel activators for AD. PMID:25577958

  16. Mineralized Remains of Morphotypes of Filamentous Cyanobacteria in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The quest for conclusive evidence of microfossils in meteorites has been elusive. One difficulty arises from the fact than many abiotic or inorganic microstructures, mineral grains, and coating artifacts can mimic the smaller representatives of the microbial world that possess very simple morphologies (unicellular cocci or bacilli). However, there exist a wide variety of large, filamentous trichomic prokaryotic microorganisms (cyanobacteria and sulfur bacteria) with sufficiently well known and complex morphologies that they can be recognized and are known to be of unquestionable biogenic origin. The taphonomic modes of fossilization and their of their life habits and processes frequently result in distinctive chemical biosignatures associated with carbonization, silicification, calcification, phosphatization and metal-binding properties of their cell-walls, trichomes, sheaths and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Strong differences of mineral concentrations in closely associated and visibly differentiated cellular microstructures provide strong evidence of biogenicity. This evidence is further enhanced by the detection of recognizable and distinct microstructures (e.g., uniseriate or multiseriate filaments, trichomes, sheaths, cells of proper sizes and size distributions) and growth characteristics (e.g., basal or apical cells, true or false branching of trichomes, tapered or uniform filaments, robust or thin sheaths) and reproductive and nitrogen fixation habits (e.g., baeocytes, hormogonia, akinetes and heterocysts), Microfossils of cyanobacteria and cyanobacterial mats and stromatolites have been recognized a described from many of the most ancient rocks on Earth. The crucial problem lies in developing valid protocols and methodologies for establishing that the putative microfossils are truly indigenous and not merely recent microbial contaminants. During the past several years, we have conducted Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM

  17. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel holds the key to the conundrum of familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jo; Kang, Sun-Yang; Yi, Jin Woong; Kim, Seung-Min

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is an autosomal dominant channelopathy characterized by episodic attacks of muscle weakness and hypokalemia. Mutations in the calcium channel gene, CACNA1S, or the sodium channel gene, SCN4A, have been found to be responsible for HOKPP; however, the mechanism that causes hypokalemia remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to improve the understanding of this mechanism by investigating the expression of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channel genes in HOKPP patients. Methods We measured the intracellular calcium concentration with fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester in skeletal muscle cells of HOKPP patients and healthy individuals. We examined the mRNA and protein expression of KCa channel genes (KCNMA1, KCNN1, KCNN2, KCNN3, and KCNN4) in both cell types. Results Patient cells exhibited higher cytosolic calcium levels than normal cells. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the mRNA levels of the KCa channel genes did not significantly differ between patient and normal cells. However, western blot analysis showed that protein levels of the KCNMA1 gene, which encodes KCa1.1 channels (also called big potassium channels), were significantly lower in the membrane fraction and higher in the cytosolic fraction of patient cells than normal cells. When patient cells were exposed to 50 mM potassium buffer, which was used to induce depolarization, the altered subcellular distribution of BK channels remained unchanged. Conclusion These findings suggest a novel mechanism for the development of hypokalemia and paralysis in HOKPP and demonstrate a connection between disease-associated mutations in calcium/sodium channels and pathogenic changes in nonmutant potassium channels. PMID:25379045

  18. Multiple types of voltage-dependent Ca2+-activated K+ channels of large conductance in rat brain synaptosomal membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Farley, J.; Rudy, B.

    1988-01-01

    K+-selective ion channels from a mammalian brain synaptosomal membrane preparation were inserted into planar phospholipid bilayers on the tips of patch-clamp pipettes, and single-channel currents were measured. Multiple distinct classes of K+ channels were observed. We have characterized and described the properties of several types of voltage-dependent, Ca2+-activated K+ channels of large single-channel conductance (greater than 50 pS in symmetrical KCl solutions). One class of channels (Type I) has a 200-250-pS single-channel conductance. It is activated by internal calcium concentrations greater than 10(-7) M, and its probability of opening is increased by membrane depolarization. This channel is blocked by 1-3 mM internal concentrations of tetraethylammonium (TEA). These channels are similar to the BK channel described in a variety of tissues. A second novel group of voltage-dependent, Ca2+-activated K+ channels was also studied. These channels were more sensitive to internal calcium, but less sensitive to voltage than the large (Type I) channel. These channels were minimally affected by internal TEA concentrations of 10 mM, but were blocked by a 50 mM concentration. In this class of channels we found a wide range of relatively large unitary channel conductances (65-140 pS). Within this group we have characterized two types (75-80 pS and 120-125 pS) that also differ in gating kinetics. The various types of voltage-dependent, Ca2+-activated K+ channels described here were blocked by charybdotoxin added to the external side of the channel. The activity of these channels was increased by exposure to nanomolar concentrations of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These results indicate that voltage-dependent, charybdotoxin-sensitive Ca2+-activated K+ channels comprise a class of related, but distinguishable channel types. Although the Ca2+-activated (Type I and II) K+ channels can be distinguished by their single-channel properties, both could

  19. Canonical Wnt signaling in the oligodendroglial lineage--puzzles remain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fuzheng; Lang, Jordan; Sohn, Jiho; Hammond, Elizabeth; Chang, Marcello; Pleasure, David

    2015-10-01

    The straightforward concept that accentuated Wnt signaling via the Wnt-receptor-β-catenin-TCF/LEF cascade (also termed canonical Wnt signaling or Wnt/β-catenin signaling) delays or blocks oligodendrocyte differentiation is very appealing. According to this concept, canonical Wnt signaling is responsible for remyelination failure in multiple sclerosis and for persistent hypomyelination in periventricular leukomalacia. This has given rise to the hope that pharmacologically inhibiting this signaling will be of therapeutic potential in these disabling neurological disorders. But current studies suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays distinct roles in oligodendrogenesis, oligodendrocyte differentiation, and myelination in a context-dependent manner (central nervous system regions, developmental stages), and that Wnt/β-catenin signaling interplays with, and is subjected to regulation by, other central nervous system factors and signaling pathways. On this basis, we propose the more nuanced concept that endogenous Wnt/β-catenin activity is delicately and temporally regulated to ensure the seamless development of oligodendroglial lineage cells in different contexts. In this review, we discuss the role Wnt/β-catenin signaling in oligodendrocyte development, focusing on the interpretation of disparate results, and highlighting areas where important questions remain to be answered about oligodendroglial lineage Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:25782433

  20. Isotope Tales: Remaining Problems, Unsolvable Questions, and Gentle Successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    fogel, marilyn; bradley, christina; newsome, seth; filipp, fabian

    2014-05-01

    Earth's biomes function and adapt today as climate changes and ecosystems and the organisms within them adapt. Stable isotope biogeochemistry has had a major influence in understanding climate perturbations and continues to be an active area of research on many fronts. Banking on the success of compound specific stable isotope analyses of amino acids, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen isotopes continue to reveal subtle shifts in oceanic food webs and metabolic changes in microbes, plants, and animals. A biochemical understanding of exactly how organisms process and partition stable isotopes during metabolism remains unsolved, but is required if this field is to move beyond description to quantitation. Although the patterns of carbon and nitrogen isotopes are fairly well established in the common amino acids, we need to consider specifics: How do shifting metabolic pathways (metabolomics) influence the outcome of stable isotope partitioning? What influence does the gut microflora in animals have on isotopic labeling? What are the intramolecular isotope patterns of common amino acids and what do they tell us? What can be learned with other isotope systems, such as hydrogen? Results and ideas of how to move forward in this field will be presented starting at the molecular level and ending with ecosystems.

  1. The internal disruption as hard Magnetohydrodynamic limit of 1/2 sawtooth like activity in large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, J.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ohdachi, S.

    2012-08-15

    Large helical device (LHD) inward-shifted configurations are unstable to resistive MHD pressure-gradient-driven modes. Sawtooth like activity was observed during LHD operation. The main drivers are the unstable modes 1/2 and 1/3 in the middle and inner plasma region which limit the plasma confinement efficiency of LHD advanced operation scenarios. The aim of the present research is to study the hard MHD limit of 1/2 sawtooth like activity, not observed yet in LHD operation, and to predict its effects on the device performance. Previous investigations pointed out this system relaxation can be an internal disruption [J. Varela et al., 'Internal disruptions and sawtooth like activity in LHD,' 38th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics (2011), P5.077]. In the present work, we simulate an internal disruption; we study the equilibria properties before and after the disruptive process, its effects on the plasma confinement efficiency during each disruptive phase, the relation between the n/m = 1/2 hard MHD events and the soft MHD events, and how to avoid or reduce their adverse effects. The simulation conclusions point out that the large stochastic region in the middle plasma strongly deforms and tears the flux surfaces when the pressure gradient increases above the hard MHD limit. If the instability reaches the inner plasma, the iota profiles will be perturbed near the plasma core and three magnetic islands can appear near the magnetic axis. If the instability is strong enough to link the stochastic regions in the middle plasma (around the half minor radius {rho}) and the plasma core ({rho}<0.25), an internal disruption is driven.

  2. Inactivation Or Inhibition Of Neuronal Activity In The Medial Prefrontal Cortex Largely Reduces Pup Retrieval And Grouping in Maternal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Febo, Marcelo; Felix-Ortiz, Ada C.; Johnson, Tehya R.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research suggests that the maternal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) may play a role in maternal care and that cocaine sensitization before pregnancy can affect neuronal activity within this region. The present work was carried out to test whether the mPFC does actually play a role in the expression of maternal behaviors in the rats and to understand what specific behaviors this cortical area may modulate. In the first experiment, tetrodotoxin (TTX) was used to chemically inactivate the mPFC during tests for maternal behavior latencies. Lactating rats were tested on postpartum day 7–9. The results of this first experiment indicate that there is a large effect of TTX-induced inactivation on retrieval behavior latencies. TTX nearly abolished the expression of maternal retrieval of pups without significantly impairing locomotor activity. In the second experiment, GABA-mediated inhibition was used to test maternal behavior latencies and durations of maternal and other behaviors in postpartum dams. In agreement with experiment 1, it was observed that dams capable of retrieving are rendered incapable by inhibition in the mPFC. GABA-mediated inhibition in the mPFC largely reduced retrieval without altering other indices of maternal care and non-specific behavior such as ambulation time, self-grooming, and inactivity. Moreover, in both experiments dams were able to establish contact with pups within seconds. The overall results indicate that the mPFC may play an active role in modulating maternal care, particularly retrieval behavior. External factors that affect the function of the frontal cortical site may result in significant impairments in maternal goal-directed behavior as reported in our earlier work. PMID:20156425

  3. Ginsenoside Rg3 Enhances Large Conductance Ca2+-Activated Potassium Channel Currents: A Role of Tyr360 Residue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Hye; Shin, Tae-Joon; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Hwang, Sung Hee; Lee, Sang-Mok; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Park, Cheol-Seung; Ha, Tal Soo; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2011-01-01

    Ginsenosides, active ingredients of Panax ginseng, are known to exhibit neuroprotective effects. Large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels are key modulators of cellular excitability of neurons and vascular smooth muscle cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of ginsenosides on rat brain BKCa (rSlo) channel activity heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the molecular mechanisms how ginsenoside regulates the BKCa channel activity. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) enhanced outward BKCa channel currents. The Rg3-enhancement of outward BKCa channel currents was concentration-dependent, voltage-dependent, and reversible. The EC50 was 15.1 ± 3.1 μM. Rg3 actions were not desensitized by repeated treatment. Tetraetylammonium (TEA), a K+ channel blocker, inhibited BKCa channel currents. We examined whether extracellular TEA treatment could alter the Rg3 action and vice versa. TEA caused a rightward shift of the Rg3 concentration-response curve (i.e., much higher concentration of Rg3 is required for the activation of BKCa channel compared to the absence of TEA), while Rg3 caused a rightward shift of the TEA concentration-response curve in wild-type channels. Mutation of the extracellular TEA binding site Y360 to Y360I caused a rightward shift of the TEA concentration-response curve and almost abolished both the Rg3 action and Rg3-induced rightward shift of TEA concentration-response curve. These results indicate that Tyr360 residue of BKCa channel plays an important role in the Rg3-enhancement of BKCa channel currents. PMID:21191818

  4. Transcriptional activation by simian virus 40 large T antigen: interactions with multiple components of the transcription complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gruda, M C; Zabolotny, J M; Xiao, J H; Davidson, I; Alwine, J C

    1993-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen is a potent transcriptional activator of both viral and cellular promoters. Within the SV40 late promoter, a specific upstream element necessary for T-antigen transcriptional activation is the binding site for transcription-enhancing factor 1 (TEF-1). The promoter structure necessary for T-antigen-mediated transcriptional activation appears to be simple. For example, a promoter consisting of upstream TEF-1 binding sites (or other factor-binding sites) and a downstream TATA or initiator element is efficiently activated. It has been demonstrated that transcriptional activation by T antigen does not require direct binding to the DNA; thus, the most direct effect that T antigen could have on these simple promoters would be through protein-protein interactions with either upstream-bound transcription factors, the basal transcription complex, or both. To determine whether such interactions occur, full-length T antigen or segments of it was fused to the glutathione-binding site (GST fusions) or to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain (amino acids 1 to 147) (Gal4 fusions). With the GST fusions, it was found that TEF-1 and the TATA-binding protein (TBP) bound different regions of T antigen. A GST fusion containing amino acids 5 to 172 (region T1) efficiently bound TBP. TEF-1 bound neither region T1 nor a region between amino acids 168 and 373 (region T2); however, it bound efficiently to the combined region (T5) containing amino acids 5 to 383.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8423815

  5. Constitutive activation of the DNA damage response pathway as a novel therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Derenzini, Enrico; Agostinelli, Claudio; Imbrogno, Enrica; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Casadei, Beatrice; Brighenti, Elisa; Righi, Simona; Fuligni, Fabio; Di Rorà, Andrea Ghelli Luserna; Ferrari, Anna; Martinelli, Giovanni; Pileri, Stefano; Zinzani, Pier Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The recent finding that MYC-driven cancers are sensitive to inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, prompted us to investigate the role of DDR pathway as therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which frequently overexpresses the MYC oncogene. In a preliminary immunohistochemical study conducted on 99 consecutive DLBCL patients, we found that about half of DLBCLs showed constitutive expression of the phosphorylated forms of checkpoint kinases (CHK) and CDC25c, markers of DDR activation, and of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), marker of DNA damage and genomic instability. Constitutive γH2AX expression correlated with c-MYC levels and DDR activation, and defined a subset of tumors characterised by poor outcome. Next, we used the CHK inhibitor PF-0477736 as a tool to investigate whether the inhibition of the DDR pathway might represent a novel therapeutic approach in DLBCL. Submicromolar concentrations of PF-0477736 hindered proliferation in DLBCL cell lines with activated DDR pathway. These results were fully recapitulated with a different CHK inhibitor (AZD-7762). Inhibition of checkpoint kinases induced rapid DNA damage accumulation and apoptosis in DLBCL cell lines and primary cells. These data suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of DDR through targeting of CHK kinases may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in DLBCL. PMID:25544753

  6. Fabrication of large-scale gold nanoplate films as highly active SERS substrates for label-free DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Bi, Liyan; Rao, Yanying; Tao, Qin; Dong, Jian; Su, Ting; Liu, Fangjing; Qian, Weiping

    2013-05-15

    We introduce a simple but robust label-free method to detect DNA based on large-scale gold nanoplate (GNP) films with tunable localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and highly surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. The common probe molecule, Neil Blue A sulfate (NBA) is used for testing the SERS activity of the GNP films at very low concentrations. It is found that the SERS properties are highly dependent on the edge lengths of gold nanoplate and gold nanoplate density in the films. Multiple-layer GNP films which are constructed by gold nanoplate with an edge length of 134±6nm have the density of 916±40GNPsGNPs/spot. It shows the highest signal intensity with SERS enhancement factor (EF) as high as 5.4×10(7) and also has excellent stability, reproducibility and repeatability. The optimized SERS-active substrate with the largest enhancement ability could be used to detect double-strand DNA without a dye label, and the detection limit is down to 10(-6)mg/mL. PMID:23306075

  7. A large family of antivirulence regulators modulates the effects of transcriptional activators in Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Jo, Noah Y; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei Q; Nataro, James P

    2014-05-01

    We have reported that transcription of a hypothetical small open reading frame (orf60) in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) strain 042 is impaired after mutation of aggR, which encodes a global virulence activator. We have also reported that the cryptic orf60 locus was linked to protection against EAEC diarrhea in two epidemiologic studies. Here, we report that the orf60 product acts as a negative regulator of aggR itself. The orf60 protein product lacks homology to known repressors, but displays 44-100% similarity to at least fifty previously undescribed small (<10 kDa) hypothetical proteins found in many gram negative pathogen genomes. Expression of orf60 homologs from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) repressed the expression of the AraC-transcriptional ETEC regulator CfaD/Rns and its regulon in ETEC strain H10407. Complementation in trans of EAEC 042orf60 by orf60 homologs from ETEC and the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium resulted in dramatic suppression of aggR. A C. rodentium orf60 homolog mutant showed increased levels of activator RegA and increased colonization of the adult mouse. We propose the name Aar (AggR-activated regulator) for the clinically and epidemiologically important orf60 product in EAEC, and postulate the existence of a large family of homologs among pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae. We propose the name ANR (AraC Negative Regulators) for this family. PMID:24875828

  8. DS86 neutron dose: Monte Carlo analysis for depth profile of 152Eu activity in a large stone sample.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Iwatani, K; Oka, T; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Imanaka, T; Takada, J; Fujita, S; Hasai, H

    1999-06-01

    The depth profile of 152Eu activity induced in a large granite stone pillar by Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons was calculated by a Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). The pillar was on the Motoyasu Bridge, located at a distance of 132 m (WSW) from the hypocenter. It was a square column with a horizontal sectional size of 82.5 cm x 82.5 cm and height of 179 cm. Twenty-one cells from the north to south surface at the central height of the column were specified for the calculation and 152Eu activities for each cell were calculated. The incident neutron spectrum was assumed to be the angular fluence data of the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). The angular dependence of the spectrum was taken into account by dividing the whole solid angle into twenty-six directions. The calculated depth profile of specific activity did not agree with the measured profile. A discrepancy was found in the absolute values at each depth with a mean multiplication factor of 0.58 and also in the shape of the relative profile. The results indicated that a reassessment of the neutron energy spectrum in DS86 is required for correct dose estimation. PMID:10494148

  9. A Large Family of Antivirulence Regulators Modulates the Effects of Transcriptional Activators in Gram-negative Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Araceli E.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Jo, Noah Y.; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei Q.; Nataro, James P.

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that transcription of a hypothetical small open reading frame (orf60) in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) strain 042 is impaired after mutation of aggR, which encodes a global virulence activator. We have also reported that the cryptic orf60 locus was linked to protection against EAEC diarrhea in two epidemiologic studies. Here, we report that the orf60 product acts as a negative regulator of aggR itself. The orf60 protein product lacks homology to known repressors, but displays 44–100% similarity to at least fifty previously undescribed small (<10 kDa) hypothetical proteins found in many gram negative pathogen genomes. Expression of orf60 homologs from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) repressed the expression of the AraC-transcriptional ETEC regulator CfaD/Rns and its regulon in ETEC strain H10407. Complementation in trans of EAEC 042orf60 by orf60 homologs from ETEC and the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium resulted in dramatic suppression of aggR. A C. rodentium orf60 homolog mutant showed increased levels of activator RegA and increased colonization of the adult mouse. We propose the name Aar (AggR-activated regulator) for the clinically and epidemiologically important orf60 product in EAEC, and postulate the existence of a large family of homologs among pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae. We propose the name ANR (AraC Negative Regulators) for this family. PMID:24875828

  10. Active stall control for large offshore horizontal axis wind turbines; a conceptual study considering different actuation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, R.; van Bussel, G. J. W.; Timmer, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing size of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines and the trend to install wind farms further offshore demand more robust design options. If the pitch system could be eliminated, the availability of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines should increase. This research investigates the use of active stall control to regulate power production in replacement of the pitch system. A feasibility study is conducted using a blade element momentum code and taking the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW turbine as baseline case. Considering half of the blade span is equipped with actuators, the required change in the lift coefficient to regulate power was estimated in ΔCl = 0.7. Three actuation technologies are investigated, namely Boundary Layer Transpiration, Trailing Edge Jets and Dielectric Barrier Discharge actuators. Results indicate the authority of the actuators considered is not sufficient to regulate power, since the change in the lift coefficient is not large enough. Active stall control of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines appears feasible only if the rotor is re-designed from the start to incorporate active-stall devices.

  11. Constitutive activation of the DNA damage response pathway as a novel therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Derenzini, Enrico; Agostinelli, Claudio; Imbrogno, Enrica; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Casadei, Beatrice; Brighenti, Elisa; Righi, Simona; Fuligni, Fabio; Ghelli Luserna Di Rorà, Andrea; Ferrari, Anna; Martinelli, Giovanni; Pileri, Stefano; Zinzani, Pier Luigi

    2015-03-30

    The recent finding that MYC-driven cancers are sensitive to inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, prompted us to investigate the role of DDR pathway as therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which frequently overexpresses the MYC oncogene. In a preliminary immunohistochemical study conducted on 99 consecutive DLBCL patients, we found that about half of DLBCLs showed constitutive expression of the phosphorylated forms of checkpoint kinases (CHK) and CDC25c, markers of DDR activation, and of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), marker of DNA damage and genomic instability. Constitutive γH2AX expression correlated with c-MYC levels and DDR activation, and defined a subset of tumors characterised by poor outcome. Next, we used the CHK inhibitor PF-0477736 as a tool to investigate whether the inhibition of the DDR pathway might represent a novel therapeutic approach in DLBCL. Submicromolar concentrations of PF-0477736 hindered proliferation in DLBCL cell lines with activated DDR pathway. These results were fully recapitulated with a different CHK inhibitor (AZD-7762). Inhibition of checkpoint kinases induced rapid DNA damage accumulation and apoptosis in DLBCL cell lines and primary cells. These data suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of DDR through targeting of CHK kinases may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in DLBCL. PMID:25544753

  12. Sky-view factor visualization for detection of archaeological remains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokalj, Žiga; Oštir, Krištof; Zakšek, Klemen

    2013-04-01

    Many archaeological remains are covered by sand or vegetation but it still possible to detect them by remote sensing techniques. One of them is airborne laser scanning that enables production of digital elevation models (DEM) of very high resolution (better than 1 m) with high relative elevation accuracy (centimetre level), even under forest. Thus, it has become well established in archaeological applications. However, effective interpretation of digital elevation models requires appropriate data visualization. Analytical relief shading is used in most cases. Although widely accepted, this method has two major drawbacks: identifying details in deep shades and inability to properly represent linear features lying parallel to the light beam. Several authors have tried to overcome these limitations by changing the position of the light source or by filtering. This contribution addresses the DEM visualization problem by sky-view factor, a visualization technique based on diffuse light that overcomes the directional problems of hill-shading. Sky-view factor is a parameter that describes the portion of visible sky limited by relief. It can be used as a general relief visualization technique to show relief characteristics. In particular, we show that this visualization is a very useful tool in archaeology. Applying the sky-view factor for visualization purposes gives advantages over other techniques because it reveals small (or large, depending on the scale of the observed phenomenon and consequential algorithm settings) relief features while preserving the perception of general topography. In the case study (DEM visualization of a fortified enclosure of Tonovcov grad in Slovenia) we show that for the archaeological purposes the sky-view factor is the optimal DEM visualization method. Its ability to consider the neighborhood context makes it an outstanding tool when compared to other visualization techniques. One can choose a large search radius and the most important

  13. Using active learning strategies to investigate student learning and attitudes in a large enrollment, introductory geology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Stacy Jane

    There has been an increased emphasis for college instruction to incorporate more active and collaborative involvement of students in the learning process. These views have been asserted by The Association of American Colleges (AAC), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and The National Research Counsel (NRC), which are advocating for the modification of traditional instructional techniques to allow students the opportunity to be more cooperative (Task Group on General Education, 1988). This has guided educators and facilitators into shifting teaching paradigms from a teacher centered to a more student-centered curriculum. The present study investigated achievement outcomes and attitudes of learners in a large enrollment (n ~ 200), introductory geology course using a student centered learning cycle format of instruction versus another similar section that used a traditional lecture format. Although the course is a recruiting class for majors, over 95% of the students that enroll are non-majors. Measurements of academic evaluation were through four unit exams, classroom communication systems, weekly web-based homework, in-class activities, and a thematic collaborative poster/paper project and presentation. The qualitative methods to investigate the effectiveness of the teaching design included: direct observation, self-reporting about learning, and open-ended interviews. By disaggregating emerging data, we tried to concentrate on patterns and causal relationships between achievement performance and attitudes regarding learning geology. Statistical analyses revealed positive relationships between student engagement in supplemental activities and achievement mean scores within and between the two sections. Completing weekly online homework had the most robust relationship with overall achievement performance. Contrary to expectations, a thematic group project only led to modest gains in achievement performance, although the social and professional gains could be

  14. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Activated ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of Cytoplasmic Substrates Identified by Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Screen.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Arthur, Jonathan W; Graham, Mark E; Lavin, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated (ATM) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signaling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle checkpoints, initiating DNA repair, and regulating gene expression. ATM kinase can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including oxidative stress. Here, we confirmed activation of cytoplasmic ATM by autophosphorylation at multiple sites. Then we employed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to identify cytoplasmic proteins altered in their phosphorylation state in control and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells in response to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that ATM was activated by oxidative damage in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus and identified a total of 9,833 phosphorylation sites, including 6,686 high-confidence sites mapping to 2,536 unique proteins. A total of 62 differentially phosphorylated peptides were identified; of these, 43 were phosphorylated in control but not in A-T cells, and 19 varied in their level of phosphorylation. Motif enrichment analysis of phosphopeptides revealed that consensus ATM serine glutamine sites were overrepresented. When considering phosphorylation events, only observed in control cells (not observed in A-T cells), with predicted ATM sites phosphoSerine/phosphoThreonine glutamine, we narrowed this list to 11 candidate ATM-dependent cytoplasmic proteins. Two of these 11 were previously described as ATM substrates (HMGA1 and UIMCI/RAP80), another five were identified in a whole cell extract phosphoproteomic screens, and the remaining four proteins had not been identified previously in DNA damage response screens. We validated the phosphorylation of three of these proteins (oxidative stress responsive 1 (OSR1), HDGF, and ccdc82) as ATM dependent after H2O2 exposure, and another protein (S100A11) demonstrated ATM

  15. RNA-seq pinpoints a Xanthomonas TAL-effector activated resistance gene in a large-crop genome

    PubMed Central

    Strauß, Tina; van Poecke, Remco M. P.; Strauß, Annett; Römer, Patrick; Minsavage, Gerald V.; Singh, Sylvia; Wolf, Christina; Strauß, Axel; Kim, Seungill; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Yeom, Seon-In; Parniske, Martin; Stall, Robert E.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Choi, Doil; Prins, Marcel; Lahaye, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins of the plant pathogenic bacterial genus Xanthomonas bind to and transcriptionally activate host susceptibility genes, promoting disease. Plant immune systems have taken advantage of this mechanism by evolving TALE binding sites upstream of resistance (R) genes. For example, the pepper Bs3 and rice Xa27 genes are hypersensitive reaction plant R genes that are transcriptionally activated by corresponding TALEs. Both R genes have a hallmark expression pattern in which their transcripts are detectable only in the presence and not the absence of the corresponding TALE. By transcriptome profiling using next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq), we tested whether we could avoid laborious positional cloning for the isolation of TALE-induced R genes. In a proof-of-principle experiment, RNA-seq was used to identify a candidate for Bs4C, an R gene from pepper that mediates recognition of the Xanthomonas TALE protein AvrBs4. We identified one major Bs4C candidate transcript by RNA-seq that was expressed exclusively in the presence of AvrBs4. Complementation studies confirmed that the candidate corresponds to the Bs4C gene and that an AvrBs4 binding site in the Bs4C promoter directs its transcriptional activation. Comparison of Bs4C with a nonfunctional allele that is unable to recognize AvrBs4 revealed a 2-bp polymorphism within the TALE binding site of the Bs4C promoter. Bs4C encodes a structurally unique R protein and Bs4C-like genes that are present in many solanaceous genomes seem to be as tightly regulated as pepper Bs4C. These findings demonstrate that TALE-specific R genes can be cloned from large-genome crops with a highly efficient RNA-seq approach. PMID:23132937

  16. A Challenge for School Leaders: Gender Equity Issues Remain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragland, Joyce C.; Hatcher, Denise L.; Thomas, Jerald A., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Gender roles in North American education remain a pertinent and dynamic source of discourse. Many questions concerning gender bias remain. This study attempts to characterize a nine-year period of college students' recall of episodes of gender bias from their pre-college experiences. The survey instrument used in this research consisted of a nine…

  17. 49 CFR 845.51 - Investigation to remain open.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Investigation to remain open. 845.51 Section 845.51 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION... § 845.51 Investigation to remain open. Accident investigations are never officially closed but are...

  18. Detection of triazole deicing additives in soil samples from airports with low, mid, and large volume aircraft deicing activities.

    PubMed

    McNeill, K S; Cancilla, D A

    2009-03-01

    Soil samples from three USA airports representing low, mid, and large volume users of aircraft deicing fluids (ADAFs) were analyzed by LC/MS/MS for the presence of triazoles, a class of corrosion inhibitors historically used in ADAFs. Triazoles, specifically the 4-methyl-1H-benzotriazole and the 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole, were detected in a majority of samples and ranged from 2.35 to 424.19 microg/kg. Previous studies have focused primarily on ground and surface water impacts of larger volume ADAF users. The detection of triazoles in soils at low volume ADAF use airports suggests that deicing activities may have a broader environmental impact than previously considered. PMID:19082516

  19. The carboxyl-terminal domain of large T antigen rescues SV40 host range activity in trans independent of acetylation.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Danielle L; DeCaprio, James A

    2006-05-25

    The host range activity of SV40 has been described as the inability of mutant viruses with deletions in the C terminal region of large T Ag to replicate in certain types of African green monkey kidney cells. We constructed new mutant viruses expressing truncated T Ag proteins and found that these mutant viruses exhibited the host range phenotype. The host range phenotype was independent of acetylation of T Ag at lysine 697. Co-expression of the C terminal domain of T Ag (aa 627-708) in trans increased both T Ag and VP1 mRNA as well as protein levels for host range mutant viruses in the restrictive cell type. In addition, the T Ag 627-708 fragment promoted the productive lytic infection of host range mutant viruses in the nonpermissive cell type. The carboxyl-terminal region of T Ag contains a biological function essential for the SV40 viral life cycle. PMID:16510165

  20. Ex vivo bubble production from ovine large blood vessels: size on detachment and evidence of "active spots".

    PubMed

    Arieli, R; Marmur, A

    2014-08-15

    Nanobubbles formed on the hydrophobic silicon wafer were shown to be the source of gas micronuclei from which bubbles evolved during decompression. Bubbles were also formed after decompression on the luminal surface of ovine blood vessels. Four ovine blood vessels: aorta, pulmonary vein, pulmonary artery, and superior vena cava, were compressed to 1013 kPa for 21 h. They were then decompressed, photographed at 1-s intervals, and bubble size was measured on detachment. There were certain spots at which bubbles appeared, either singly or in a cluster. Mean detachment diameter was between 0.7 and 1.0 mm. The finding of active spots at which bubbles nucleate is a new, hitherto unreported observation. It is possible that these are the hydrophobic spots at which bubbles nucleate, stabilise, and later transform into the gas micronuclei that grow into bubbles. The possible neurological effects of these large arterial bubbles should be further explored. PMID:24933644

  1. Effects of collagen deposition on passive and active mechanical properties of large pulmonary arteries in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijie; Lakes, Roderic S; Eickhoff, Jens C; Chesler, Naomi C

    2013-11-01

    Proximal pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening is a strong predictor of mortality in pulmonary hypertension. Collagen accumulation is mainly responsible for PA stiffening in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH) in mouse models. We hypothesized that collagen cross-linking and the type I isoform are the main determinants of large PA mechanical changes during HPH, which we tested by exposing mice that resist type I collagen degradation (Col1a1[Formula: see text] and littermate controls (Col1a1[Formula: see text] to hypoxia for 10 days with or without [Formula: see text]-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) treatment to prevent cross-link formation. Static and dynamic mechanical tests were performed on isolated PAs with smooth muscle cells (SMC) in passive and active states. Percentages of type I and III collagen were quantified by histology; total collagen content and cross-linking were measured biochemically. In the SMC passive state, for both genotypes, hypoxia tended to increase PA stiffness and damping capacity, and BAPN treatment limited these increases. These changes were correlated with collagen cross-linking ([Formula: see text]). In the SMC active state, hypoxia increased PA dynamic stiffness and BAPN had no effect in Col1a1[Formula: see text] mice ([Formula: see text]). PA stiffness did not change in Col1a1[Formula: see text] mice. Similarly, damping capacity did not change for either genotype. Type I collagen accumulated more in Col1a1[Formula: see text] mice, whereas type III collagen increased more in Col1a1[Formula: see text] mice during HPH. In summary, PA passive mechanical properties (both static and dynamic) are related to collagen cross-linking. Type I collagen turnover is critical to large PA remodeling during HPH when collagen metabolism is not mutated and type III collagen may serve as a reserve. PMID:23377784

  2. Rates of ubiquitin conjugation increase when muscles atrophy, largely through activation of the N-end rule pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, V.; Baracos, V.; Sarraf, P.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The rapid loss of muscle mass that accompanies many disease states, such as cancer or sepsis, is primarily a result of increased protein breakdown in muscle, and several observations have suggested an activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Accordingly, in extracts of atrophying muscles from tumor-bearing or septic rats, rates of 125I-ubiquitin conjugation to endogenous proteins were found to be higher than in control extracts. On the other hand, in extracts of muscles from hypothyroid rats, where overall proteolysis is reduced below normal, the conjugation of 125I-ubiquitin to soluble proteins decreased by 50%, and treatment with triiodothyronine (T3) restored ubiquitination to control levels. Surprisingly, the N-end rule pathway, which selectively degrades proteins with basic or large hydrophobic N-terminal residues, was found to be responsible for most of these changes in ubiquitin conjugation. Competitive inhibitors of this pathway that specifically block the ubiquitin ligase, E3alpha, suppressed most of the increased ubiquitin conjugation in the muscle extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats. These inhibitors also suppressed ubiquitination in normal extracts toward levels in hypothyroid extracts, which showed little E3alpha-dependent ubiquitination. Thus, the inhibitors eliminated most of the differences in ubiquitination under these different pathological conditions. Moreover, 125I-lysozyme, a model N-end rule substrate, was ubiquitinated more rapidly in extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats, and more slowly in those from hypothyroid rats, than in controls. Thus, the rate of ubiquitin conjugation increases in atrophying muscles, and these hormone- and cytokine-dependent responses are in large part due to activation of the N-end rule pathway.

  3. Active learning in a large-enrollment introductory biology class: Problem solving, formative feedback, and teaching as learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robison, Diane F.

    The purpose of this study was to take a case study approach to exploring student learning experiences in a large enrollment introductory biology class. Traditionally such classes are taught through the lecture method with limited instructor-student interaction and minimal student-centered learning (Lewis & Woodward, 1984; Wulff, Nyqst, & Abbott, 1987). Biology 120 taught at Brigham Young University winter semester 2006 by John Bell was chosen as the case for the study due to its large enrollment (263) and its innovative pedagogy. In the classroom, students applied their learning through a variety of student-centered activities including solving problems, discussing concepts with peers, drawing diagrams, and voting. Outside of the classroom students were assigned, in addition to reading from the textbook and homework problems, to teach each week's concepts to another student. Formative feedback was emphasized in classroom activities and through a unique assessment system. Students took self-graded weekly assessments designed to provide regular and timely feedback on their performance. The only traditionally-graded assessment was the final exam. Students were expected to understand, apply, and think analytically with their knowledge and this was reflected in the assessment items. Student learning, as measured by a pretest and a posttest, increased from an average of 44% correct to 77% correct on a set of 22 items common to both tests. Responses to pre and post-surveys indicated that students increased in their orientation towards understanding as apposed to grades during the course. Qualitative data suggested that during the course many students deepened their learning approach and increased in feelings of personal control over their learning.

  4. Large fontanelles are a shared feature of haploinsufficiency of RUNX2 and its co-activator CBFB.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tomohide; Aramaki, Michihiko; Yoshihashi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Gen; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Takahashi, Takao; Ishii, Takashi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2004-12-01

    CBFB at 16q22 heterodimerizes with either RUNX2 (also known as CBFA1) or RUNX1 (CBFA2) to activate the transcription of downstream molecules. RUNX2 regulates osteoblast differentiation and chondrocyte maturation and its haploinsufficiency leads to cleidocranial dysplasia, characterized large fontanelles, hypoplasia or aplasia of the clavicles, hypoplasia of the distal phalanges, and a wide pubic symphysis. Complete loss of Runx1 or Cbfb in mice is lethal because of the absence of fetal liver hematopoiesis. Fetal rescue in Cbfb(-/-) mice by providing the Cbfb functions in the hematopoietic progenitors leads to wide fontanelle and delayed chondrocyte maturation, presumably resulting from the incomplete function of the transcriptional pathway mediated by the Cbfb-Runx2 heterodimer. The present report describes a patient with a small deletion of chromosome 16q22.1 encompassing CBFB. Skeletal abnormalities included a widely open fontanelle, multiple wormian bones along the sagittal suture, hypoplasia of the distal phalanges, and mildly shortened clavicles. G-banding analysis revealed a shortening of the 16q22.1 band. A fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, using the BAC probe spanning the CBFB locus at 16q22.1, revealed that the CBFB probe hybridized to only one of the two homologous chromosome 16 regions. Array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed that the deletion spans 1.2 megabases. In reviewing eight previously reported cases of 16q interstitial deletions involving band q22, large cranial sutures were noted in all but one case. Considering the phenotypic similarity of the 16q22 deletion case and Cbfb(-/-) mice rescued for hematopoiesis and the consistency of the phenotype among 16q22 deletion cases, we suggest that the common phenotypic feature of the 16q22 deletion, large fontanelles, can be attributed to a haploinsufficiency of CBFB. PMID:15566413

  5. The Radio/Gamma-Ray Connection in Active Galactic Nuclei in the Era of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Angelakis, E.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Gehrels, N.; Hays, E.; MeEnery, J. E.; Scargle, J. D.; Thompson, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of the correlation between radio and gamma-ray emission of the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by Fermi during its first year of operation, with the largest data sets ever used for this purpose.We use both archival interferometric 8.4 GHz data (from the Very Large Array and ATCA, for the full sample of 599 sources) and concurrent single-dish 15 GHz measurements from the OwensValley RadioObservatory (OVRO, for a sub sample of 199 objects). Our unprecedentedly large sample permits us to assess with high accuracy the statistical significance of the correlation, using a surrogate data method designed to simultaneously account for common-distance bias and the effect of a limited dynamical range in the observed quantities. We find that the statistical significance of a positive correlation between the centimeter radio and the broadband (E > 100 MeV) gamma-ray energy flux is very high for the whole AGN sample, with a probability of <10(exp -7) for the correlation appearing by chance. Using the OVRO data, we find that concurrent data improve the significance of the correlation from 1.6 10(exp -6) to 9.0 10(exp -8). Our large sample size allows us to study the dependence of correlation strength and significance on specific source types and gamma-ray energy band. We find that the correlation is very significant (chance probability < 10(exp -7)) for both flat spectrum radio quasars and BL Lac objects separately; a dependence of the correlation strength on the considered gamma-ray energy band is also present, but additional data will be necessary to constrain its significance.

  6. Delivering Science to Large Audiences: Experiments in Active Learning and Public Lectures at the University of Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, T.

    1999-12-01

    The problem of disseminating scientific knowledge to the broader community in an effective and efficient way is always with us. At the University of Michigan we have been addressing this problem in several ways. Every year we teach introductory physics to about 3000 students. We believe that, in addition to a pedagogical responsibility, this is an important opportunity for outreach. We report on a variety of approaches to active learning in large lecture classes which are aimed at aiding student comprehension of conceptual material. These have the side affect of improving their general impression of science. In addition to the traditional classroom, we have also engaged in a broader outreach program through the Saturday Morning Physics lecture series, which through a combination of programming and advertising draws audiences of 250 a week to 15 weeks of lectures on topics of current research. We conclude with some general observations about the relation between the success of these public lectures and our large lecture classes. This work is supported by a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, the University of Michigan, and the Ted Annis Foundation.

  7. Increased AMP‐activated protein kinase in skeletal muscles of Murphy Roth Large mice and its potential role in altered metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Berhanu, Tirsit K.; Holley‐Cuthrell, Jenan; Roberts, Nathan W.; Mull, Aaron J.; Heydemann, Ahlke

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Wild‐type Murphy Roth Large (MRL) mice have long been investigated for their superior healing ability when subjected to various wound and disease models. Despite this long history, the mechanisms causing their extraordinary healing ability remain undefined. As we have recently demonstrated that MRL mice with muscular dystrophy are resistant to the associated fibrosis and the Heber‐Katz group has demonstrated MRL mitochondrial mutations, we decided to investigate the skeletal muscle metabolic characteristics of the MRL mouse strain compared to the commonly utilized C57BL/6J control mouse strain. We now have evidence demonstrating an altered metabolism in the MRL quadriceps, triceps brachii, and diaphragm of 8‐week‐old animals compared to tissues from control animals. The MRL skeletal muscles have increased activated phosphorylated AMP‐activated protein kinase (pAMPK). The increased pAMPK signaling coincides with increased skeletal muscle mitochondrial content. These metabolic changes may compensate for insufficient oxidative phosphorylation which is demonstrated by altered quantities of proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation and ex vivo metabolic investigations. We also demonstrate that the MRL muscle cells have increased metabolic physiologic reserve. These data further the investigations into this important and unique mouse strain. Why the MRL mice have increased pAMPK and how increased pAMPK and the resultant metabolic alterations affect the healing ability in the MRL mouse strain is discussed. Understanding the molecular mechanisms surrounding the super healing characteristics of these mice will lead to relevant clinical intervention points. In conclusion, we present novel data of increased mitochondrial content, pAMPK, and glycolytic indicators in MRL skeletal muscles. PMID:24760507

  8. Head direction maps remain stable despite grid map fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Jonathan R.; Derdikman, Dori

    2012-01-01

    Areas encoding space in the brain contain both representations of position (place cells and grid cells) and representations of azimuth (head direction cells). Previous studies have already suggested that although grid cells and head direction cells reside in the same brain areas, the calculation of head direction is not dependent on the calculation of position. Here we demonstrate that realignment of grid cells does not affect head direction tuning. We analyzed head direction cell data collected while rats performed a foraging task in a multi-compartment environment (the hairpin maze) vs. an open-field environment, demonstrating that the tuning of head direction cells did not change when the environment was divided into multiple sub-compartments, in the hairpin maze. On the other hand, as we have shown previously (Derdikman et al., 2009), the hexagonal firing pattern expressed by grid cells in the open-field broke down into repeating patterns in similar alleys when rats traversed the multi-compartment hairpin maze. The grid-like firing of conjunctive cells, which express both grid properties and head direction properties in the open-field, showed a selective fragmentation of grid-like firing properties in the hairpin maze, while the head directionality property of the same cells remained unaltered. These findings demonstrate that head direction is not affected during the restructuring of grid cell firing fields as a rat actively moves between compartments, thus strengthening the claim that the head direction system is upstream from or parallel to the grid-place system. PMID:22479237

  9. Properties and effects of remaining carbon from waste plastics gasifying on iron scale reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongmin; Chen, Shuwen; Miao, Xincheng; Yuan, Hao

    2011-06-01

    The carbonous activities of three kinds of carbon-bearing materials gasified from plastics were tested with coal coke as reference. The results showed that the carbonous activities of these remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. Besides, the fractal analyses showed that the porosities of remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. It revealed that these kinds of remaining carbon-bearing materials are conducive to improve the kinetics conditions of gas-solid phase reaction in iron scale reduction. PMID:25084574

  10. Juvenile hormone-dopamine systems for the promotion of flight activity in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Ken; Nagao, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    The reproductive roles of dopamine and dopamine regulation systems are known in social hymenopterans, but the knowledge on the regulation systems in solitary species is still needed. To test the possibility that juvenile hormone (JH) and brain dopamine interact to trigger territorial flight behavior in males of a solitary bee species, the effects on biogenic amines of JH analog treatments and behavioral assays with dopamine injections in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata were quantified. Brain dopamine levels were significantly higher in methoprene-treated males than in control males 4 days after treatment, but were not significantly different after 7 days. Brain octopamine and serotonin levels did not differ between methoprene-treated and control males at 4 and 7 days after treatment. Injection of dopamine caused significantly higher locomotor activities and a shorter duration for flight initiation in experimental versus control males. These results suggest that brain dopamine can be regulated by JH and enhances flight activities in males. The JH-dopamine system in males of this solitary bee species is similar to that of males of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera.

  11. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression of the large subunit of the human lymphocyte activation antigen 4F2

    SciTech Connect

    Lumadue, J.A.; Glick, A.B.; Ruddle, F.H.

    1987-12-01

    Among the earliest expressed antigens on the surface of activated human lymphocytes is the surface antigen 4F2. The authors have used DNA-mediated gene transfer and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to obtain cell lines that contain the gene encoding the large subunit of the human 4F2 antigen in a mouse L-cell background. Human DNAs cloned from these cell lines were subsequently used as hybridization probes to isolate a full-length cDNA clone expressing 4F2. Sequence analysis of the coding region has revealed an amino acid sequence of 529 residues. Hydrophobicity plotting has predicted a probable structure for the protein that includes an external carboxyl terminus, an internal leader sequence, a single hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and two possible membrane-associated domains. The 4F2 cDNA detects a single 1.8-kilobase mRNA in T-cell and B-cell lines. RNA gel blot analysis of RNA derived from quiescent and serum-stimulated Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts reveals a cell-cycle modulation of 4F2 gene expression: the mRNA is present in quiescent fibroblasts but increases 8-fold 24-36 hr after stimulation, at the time of maximal DNA synthesis.

  12. Droplet interface bilayer reconstitution and activity measurement of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Barriga, Hanna M. G.; Booth, Paula; Haylock, Stuart; Bazin, Richard; Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) provide an exciting new platform for the study of membrane proteins in stable bilayers of controlled composition. To date, the successful reconstitution and activity measurement of membrane proteins in DIBs has relied on the use of the synthetic lipid 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC). We report the functional reconstitution of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) into DIBs composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), a lipid of significantly greater biological relevance than DPhPC. MscL functionality has been demonstrated using a fluorescence-based assay, showing that dye flow occurs across the DIB when MscL is gated by the cysteine reactive chemical 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl methane thiosulfonate bromide (MTSET). MscL has already been the subject of a number of studies investigating its interaction with the membrane. We propose that this method will pave the way for future MscL studies looking in detail at the effects of controlled composition or membrane asymmetry on MscL activity using biologically relevant lipids and will also be applicable to other lipid–protein systems, paving the way for the study of membrane proteins in DIBs with biologically relevant lipids. PMID:25008079

  13. Anti-L. donovani activity in macrophage/amastigote model of palmarumycin CP18 and its large scale production.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Humberto E; Teixeira, Eliane de Morais; Rabello, Ana; Higginbotham, Sarah; Cubilla-Ríos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Palmarumycin CP18, isolated from an extract of the fermentation broth and mycelium of the Panamanian endophytic fungus Edenia sp., was previously reported with strong and specific activity against Leishmania donovani. Here we report that when the same strain was cultured on different solid media--Harrold Agar, Leonian Agar, Potato dextrose Agar (PDA), Corn Meal Agar, Honey Peptone Agar, and eight vegetables (V8) Agar--in order to determine the optimal conditions for isolation of palmarumycin CP18, no signal for this compound was observed in any of the 1H NMR spectra of fractions obtained from these extracts. However, one extract, prepared from the fungal culture in PDA contained significant amounts of CJ-12,372, a possible biosynthetic precursor of palmarumycin CP18. Edenia sp. was cultivated on a large scale on PDA and CJ-12,372 was converted to palmarumycin CP18 by oxidation of its p-hydroquinone moiety with DDQ in dioxane. Palmarumycin CP18 showed anti-leishmanial activity against L. donovani in a macrophage/amastigote model, with IC50 values of 23.5 microM. PMID:24660473

  14. Experiment on large scale plume interaction with a stratified gas environment resembling the thermal activity of a autocatalytic recombiner

    SciTech Connect

    Mignot, G.; Kapulla, R.; Paladino, D.; Zboray, R.

    2012-07-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics codes (CFD) are increasingly being used to simulate containment conditions after various transient accident scenarios. Consequently, the reliability of such codes must be tested against experimental data. Such validation experiments related to gas mixing and hydrogen transport within containment compartments addressing the effect of heat source are presented in this paper. The experiments were conducted in the large-scale thermal-hydraulics PANDA facility located at the Paul-Scherrer-Inst. (PSI) in Switzerland, in the frame of the OECD/SETH-2 project. A 10 kW electric heater simulating the thermal activity of the autocatalytic recombiner was activated at full power in a containment vessel at the top of which a thick helium layer is initially present. The hot plume interacts with the bottom of the helium layer which is slowly eroded until complete break up at 1350 s. After final erosion of the layer a strong temperature and concentration gradient is maintained in the vessel below the heater inlet as well as in the adjacent vessel below the interconnecting pipe. A detailed characterization of the operating heater suggests the presence of cold gas ingress at the outlet that affects the flow in the chimney. This can be of concern if present in a real PAR unit. (authors)

  15. Activation of hepatitis B virus S promoter by the viral large surface protein via induction of stress in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Jensen, G; Yen, T S

    1997-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) codes for three forms of surface protein. The minor, large form is translated from transcripts specified by the preS1 promoter, while the middle and small forms are translated from transcripts specified by the downstream S promoter. When the large surface protein is overexpressed, the secretion of both subviral and virion particles is blocked within the secretory pathway. We show here that overexpression of the large surface protein leads to up to a 10-fold activation of the S promoter but not of an unrelated promoter. Neither the middle nor the small surface protein, nor a secretable form of the large surface protein, activates the S promoter, but agents that induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have an effect similar to that of the large surface protein. The large surface protein also activates the S promoter in the context of the entire viral genome. Therefore, it appears that HBV has evolved a feedback mechanism, such that ER stress induced by accumulation of the large surface protein increases the synthesis of the middle and small surface proteins, which in combination with the large surface protein can form mixed, secretable particles. In addition, like other agents that induce ER stress, the large surface protein can activate the cellular grp78 and grp94 promoters, raising the possibility that it may alter the physiology of the host cell. PMID:9311817

  16. S-acylation dependent post-translational cross-talk regulates large conductance calcium- and voltage- activated potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Shipston, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms that control surface expression and/or activity of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are important determinants of their (patho)physiological function. Indeed, BK channel dysfunction is associated with major human disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. S-acylation (S-palmitoylation) represents a major reversible, post-translational modification controlling the properties and function of many proteins including ion channels. Recent evidence reveals that both pore-forming and regulatory subunits of BK channels are S-acylated and control channel trafficking and regulation by AGC-family protein kinases. The pore-forming α-subunit is S-acylated at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus, each site being regulated by different palmitoyl acyl transferases (zDHHCs) and acyl thioesterases (APTs). S-acylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas S-acylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. S-acylation of the regulatory β4-subunit controls ER exit and surface expression of BK channels but does not affect ion channel kinetics at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, a significant number of previously identified BK-channel interacting proteins have been shown, or are predicted to be, S-acylated. Thus, the BK channel multi-molecular signaling complex may be dynamically regulated by this fundamental post-translational modification and thus S-acylation likely represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease. PMID:25140154

  17. S-acylation dependent post-translational cross-talk regulates large conductance calcium- and voltage- activated potassium (BK) channels

    PubMed Central

    Shipston, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms that control surface expression and/or activity of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are important determinants of their (patho)physiological function. Indeed, BK channel dysfunction is associated with major human disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. S-acylation (S-palmitoylation) represents a major reversible, post-translational modification controlling the properties and function of many proteins including ion channels. Recent evidence reveals that both pore-forming and regulatory subunits of BK channels are S-acylated and control channel trafficking and regulation by AGC-family protein kinases. The pore-forming α-subunit is S-acylated at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus, each site being regulated by different palmitoyl acyl transferases (zDHHCs) and acyl thioesterases (APTs). S-acylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas S-acylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. S-acylation of the regulatory β4-subunit controls ER exit and surface expression of BK channels but does not affect ion channel kinetics at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, a significant number of previously identified BK-channel interacting proteins have been shown, or are predicted to be, S-acylated. Thus, the BK channel multi-molecular signaling complex may be dynamically regulated by this fundamental post-translational modification and thus S-acylation likely represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease. PMID:25140154

  18. Residual laminin-binding activity and enhanced dystroglycan glycosylation by LARGE in novel model mice to dystroglycanopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kanagawa, Motoi; Nishimoto, Akemi; Chiyonobu, Tomohiro; Takeda, Satoshi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Wang, Fan; Fujikake, Nobuhiro; Taniguchi, Mariko; Lu, Zhongpeng; Tachikawa, Masaji; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Tajima, Youichi; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Endo, Tamao; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Campbell, Kevin P.; Toda, Tatsushi

    2009-01-01

    Hypoglycosylation and reduced laminin-binding activity of α-dystroglycan are common characteristics of dystroglycanopathy, which is a group of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), caused by a mutation in the fukutin gene, is a severe form of dystroglycanopathy. A retrotransposal insertion in fukutin is seen in almost all cases of FCMD. To better understand the molecular pathogenesis of dystroglycanopathies and to explore therapeutic strategies, we generated knock-in mice carrying the retrotransposal insertion in the mouse fukutin ortholog. Knock-in mice exhibited hypoglycosylated α-dystroglycan; however, no signs of muscular dystrophy were observed. More sensitive methods detected minor levels of intact α-dystroglycan, and solid-phase assays determined laminin binding levels to be ∼50% of normal. In contrast, intact α-dystroglycan is undetectable in the dystrophic Largemyd mouse, and laminin-binding activity is markedly reduced. These data indicate that a small amount of intact α-dystroglycan is sufficient to maintain muscle cell integrity in knock-in mice, suggesting that the treatment of dystroglycanopathies might not require the full recovery of glycosylation. To examine whether glycosylation defects can be restored in vivo, we performed mouse gene transfer experiments. Transfer of fukutin into knock-in mice restored glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. In addition, transfer of LARGE produced laminin-binding forms of α-dystroglycan in both knock-in mice and the POMGnT1 mutant mouse, which is another model of dystroglycanopathy. Overall, these data suggest that even partial restoration of α-dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin-binding activity by replacing or augmenting glycosylation-related genes might effectively deter dystroglycanopathy progression and thus provide therapeutic benefits. PMID:19017726

  19. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in purkinje cell plasma membranes are clustered at sites of hypolemmal microdomains.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Walter A; Ferraguti, Francesco; Fukazawa, Yugo; Kasugai, Yu; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Laake, Petter; Sexton, Joseph A; Ruth, Peter; Wietzorrek, Georg; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Storm, Johan F; Ottersen, Ole Petter

    2009-07-10

    Calcium-activated potassium channels have been shown to be critically involved in neuronal function, but an elucidation of their detailed roles awaits identification of the microdomains where they are located. This study was undertaken to unravel the precise subcellular distribution of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (called BK, KCa1.1, or Slo1) in the somatodendritic compartment of cerebellar Purkinje cells by means of postembedding immunogold cytochemistry and SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labeling (SDS-FRL). We found BK channels to be unevenly distributed over the Purkinje cell plasma membrane. At distal dendritic compartments, BK channels were scattered over the plasma membrane of dendritic shafts and spines but absent from postsynaptic densities. At the soma and proximal dendrites, BK channels formed two distinct pools. One pool was scattered over the plasma membrane, whereas the other pool was clustered in plasma membrane domains overlying subsurface cisterns. The labeling density ratio of clustered to scattered channels was about 60:1, established in SDS-FRL. Subsurface cisterns, also called hypolemmal cisterns, are subcompartments of the endoplasmic reticulum likely representing calciosomes that unload and refill Ca2+ independently. Purkinje cell subsurface cisterns are enriched in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors that mediate the effects of several neurotransmitters, hormones, and growth factors by releasing Ca2+ into the cytosol, generating local Ca2+ sparks. Such increases in cytosolic [Ca2+] may be sufficient for BK channel activation. Clustered BK channels in the plasma membrane may thus participate in building a functional unit (plasmerosome) with the underlying calciosome that contributes significantly to local signaling in Purkinje cells. PMID:19412945

  20. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa A.; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M.; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD “chaperone.” The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  1. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa A; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone." The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  2. Detail of roofline with view of remaining cupola in background; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of roofline with view of remaining cupola in background; camera facing southwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Old Administrative Offices, Eighth Street, north side between Railroad Avenue & Walnut Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  3. 53. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST SHOWING THE REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST SHOWING THE REMAINS OF A WOODEN SETTLING BOX IN THE BACKGROUND RIGHT. AMALGAMATING PANS IN THE FOREGROUND. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  4. 7. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL WITHIN CANAL CONSTRUCTED TO PROTECT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL WITHIN CANAL CONSTRUCTED TO PROTECT OUTSIDE CANAL BANK, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. NOTE CROSS SUPPORT POLES EXTENDING TO HILLSIDE. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  5. 6. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL NAILED TO POSTS WITHIN CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL NAILED TO POSTS WITHIN CANAL CONSTRUCTED TO PROTECT OUTSIDE CANAL BANK. VIEW IS TO THE WEST. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  6. 25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food cooked on the stove was served to workers in the eating area to the left of the counter (off picture). - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  7. The taphonomy of human remains in a glacial environment.

    PubMed

    Pilloud, Marin A; Megyesi, Mary S; Truffer, Martin; Congram, Derek

    2016-04-01

    A glacial environment is a unique setting that can alter human remains in characteristic ways. This study describes glacial dynamics and how glaciers can be understood as taphonomic agents. Using a case study of human remains recovered from Colony Glacier, Alaska, a glacial taphonomic signature is outlined that includes: (1) movement of remains, (2) dispersal of remains, (3) altered bone margins, (4) splitting of skeletal elements, and (5) extensive soft tissue preservation and adipocere formation. As global glacier area is declining in the current climate, there is the potential for more materials of archaeological and medicolegal significance to be exposed. It is therefore important for the forensic anthropologist to have an idea of the taphonomy in this setting and to be able to differentiate glacial effects from other taphonomic agents. PMID:26917542

  8. 11. DOUBLE CURVED RACK. UPPER PORTION ROTATES; LOWER PORTION REMAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DOUBLE CURVED RACK. UPPER PORTION ROTATES; LOWER PORTION REMAINS STATIONARY. DISCARDED ROLLER NEAR CENTER OF FRAME. - Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, Bridge No. Z-6, Spanning North Branch of Chicago River, South of Cortland Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  9. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the southwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  10. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the west-northwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  11. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the south - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  12. View of remains of Feature 17, a cottage, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of remains of Feature 17, a cottage, view to the northwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  13. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the north - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  14. View of the remains of Feature 19, a cottage, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the remains of Feature 19, a cottage, view to the west-northwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  15. View of Feature 3, the remains of an administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 3, the remains of an administration building, view to the south - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  16. 7. Detail view: east side of north end, showing remains ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail view: east side of north end, showing remains of Fort San Antonio - Puente Guillermo Esteves, Spanning San Antonio Channel at PR-25 (Juan Ponce de Leon Avenue), San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  17. Cellar: Detail of paired relieving arch and remains of herringbone ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cellar: Detail of paired relieving arch and remains of herringbone brick pattern from earlier cooking fireplace at back, southeast wall looking southeast - Kingston-Upon-Hill, Kitts Hummock Road, Dover, Kent County, DE

  18. 4. Band Wheel and Walking Beam Mechanism, Including Remains of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Band Wheel and Walking Beam Mechanism, Including Remains of Frame Belt House, Looking Southeast - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  19. 32. Interior view, encased fireplace and remains of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Interior view, encased - fireplace and remains of the hearth against the north wall, with scale l(note: hole punched through plaster allows access to the flues) - Kiskiack, Naval Mine Depot, State Route 238 vicinity, Yorktown, York County, VA

  20. 3. VIEW OF POWER PLANT LOOKING SOUTH INTO THE REMAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF POWER PLANT LOOKING SOUTH INTO THE REMAINS OF THE TURBINE FLUMES. - Potomac Power Plant, On West Virginia Shore of Potomac River, about 1 mile upriver from confluence with Shenandoah River, Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, WV

  1. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, with floor boards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, with floor boards removed, showing cross beams, foundation sill and mortises, and horizontal wall boards. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  2. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, wall boards, tenoned uprights and mortised sill beams. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  3. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill with most floorboards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill with most floorboards removed, showing cross beams with mortises, vertical wall boards, and horizontal floor boards. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  4. 11. Remains of Douglasfir cordwood abandoned when kilns ceased operation, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Remains of Douglas-fir cordwood abandoned when kilns ceased operation, looking northeast. - Warren King Charcoal Kilns, 5 miles west of Idaho Highway 28, Targhee National Forest, Leadore, Lemhi County, ID

  5. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, cross beams and notches for wall post beams. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  6. 13. View South, showing the remaining pier footings for the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View South, showing the remaining pier footings for the steam engine water tower for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad. - Cotton Hill Station Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 16, Cotton Hill, Fayette County, WV

  7. 1. VIEW SHOWING REMAINS OF CAMOUFLAGE COVERING CONCRETE FOOTING FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SHOWING REMAINS OF CAMOUFLAGE COVERING CONCRETE FOOTING FOR A GENERATOR PAD - Fort Cronkhite, Anti-Aircraft Battery No. 1, Concrete Footing-Generator Pad, Wolf Road, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  8. 13. REMAINING TOP PART OF SOUTH ELEVATION, HAMMER BUILDING, SINCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. REMAINING TOP PART OF SOUTH ELEVATION, HAMMER BUILDING, SINCE JOINED TO BUILDING 6. - Hughes Aircraft Company, Assembly & Manufacturing Building, 6775 Centinela Avenue, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 11. LOOKING SOUTH AT THE ONLY REMAINING PART OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. LOOKING SOUTH AT THE ONLY REMAINING PART OF THE NORTH SIDE OF ORIGINAL LAB, FROM COURTYARD. - U.S. Geological Survey, Rock Magnetics Laboratory, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, San Mateo County, CA

  10. 7. VIEW OF VESSEL FROM PORT BON, SHOWING REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF VESSEL FROM PORT BON, SHOWING REMAINS OF MAIN CABIN. AFT CABIN STILL STANDS ON STERN IN BACKGROUND - Motorized Sailing Vessel "Fox", Beached on East Bank ofBayou Lafourche, Larose, Lafourche Parish, LA

  11. 6. VIEW SOUTHWEST, COOLING TROUGH REMAINS Imperial Carbon Black ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SOUTHWEST, COOLING TROUGH REMAINS - Imperial Carbon Black Plant (Ruin), North side of North Fork of Hughes River along Bunnell Run Road just over 0.5 mile from its intersection with State Route 16, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  12. 3. VIEW NORTH, COOLING TANK REMAINS Imperial Carbon Black ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTH, COOLING TANK REMAINS - Imperial Carbon Black Plant (Ruin), North side of North Fork of Hughes River along Bunnell Run Road just over 0.5 mile from its intersection with State Route 16, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  13. Taphonomic Patterning of Cemetery Remains Received at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Boston, Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Pokines, James T; Zinni, Debra Prince; Crowley, Kate

    2016-01-01

    A sample of 49 cases of cemetery remains received at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Massachusetts (OCME-MA), in Boston was compared with published taphonomic profiles of cemetery remains. The present sample is composed of a cross section of typical cases in this region that ultimately are derived from modern to historical coffin burials and get turned over to or seized by law enforcement. The present sample was composed of a large portion of isolated remains, and most were completely skeletonized. The most prevalent taphonomic characteristics included uniform staining (77.6%), coffin wear (46.9%), and cortical Exfoliation (49.0%). Other taphonomic changes occurring due to later surface exposure of cemetery remains included subaerial weathering, animal gnawing, algae formation, and excavation marks. A case of one set of skeletal remains associated with coffin artifacts and cemetery offerings that was recovered from transported cemetery fill is also presented. PMID:26260865

  14. 52. VIEW OF REMAINS OF ORIGINAL 1907 CONTROL PANEL, LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. VIEW OF REMAINS OF ORIGINAL 1907 CONTROL PANEL, LOCATED ON NORTH WALL OF EAST END OF CONTROL ROOM. PORTIONS OF THIS PANEL REMAINED IN USE UNTIL THE PLANT CLOSED. THE METERS AND CONTROLS ARE MOUNTED ON SOAPSTONE PANELS. THE INSTRUMENT IN THE LEFT CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS A TIRRILL VOLTAGE REGULATOR. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  15. Headspace constituents of the tree remain of Cinnamomum camphora.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, M; Hashimoto, Y; Taniguchi, Y; Kubota, K

    2001-01-01

    The volatile ingredients isolated from a fresh tree of Cinnamomum camphora (camphor tree) and from a tree remain of C. camphora were collected by using headspace techniques and analyzed by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). 99.77% of the constituents consisting 23 components from the fresh tree, 98.68% of the constituents consisting 24 components from the tree remain were identified. Of these ingredients, camphor was obtained as the most abundant component. PMID:11547425

  16. A non-destructive method for dating human remains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lail, Warren K.; Sammeth, David; Mahan, Shannon; Nevins, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The skeletal remains of several Native Americans were recovered in an eroded state from a creek bank in northeastern New Mexico. Subsequently stored in a nearby museum, the remains became lost for almost 36 years. In a recent effort to repatriate the remains, it was necessary to fit them into a cultural chronology in order to determine the appropriate tribe(s) for consultation pursuant to the Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). Because the remains were found in an eroded context with no artifacts or funerary objects, their age was unknown. Having been asked to avoid destructive dating methods such as radiocarbon dating, the authors used Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) to date the sediments embedded in the cranium. The OSL analyses yielded reliable dates between A.D. 1415 and A.D. 1495. Accordingly, we conclude that the remains were interred somewhat earlier than A.D. 1415, but no later than A.D. 1495. We believe the remains are from individuals ancestral to the Ute Mouache Band, which is now being contacted for repatriation efforts. Not only do our methods contribute to the immediate repatriation efforts, they provide archaeologists with a versatile, non-destructive, numerical dating method that can be used in many burial contexts.

  17. Flipped Classroom Modules for Large Enrollment General Chemistry Courses: A Low Barrier Approach to Increase Active Learning and Improve Student Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichler, Jack F.; Peeples, Junelyn

    2016-01-01

    In the face of mounting evidence revealing active learning approaches result in improved student learning outcomes compared to traditional passive lecturing, there is a growing need to change the way instructors teach large introductory science courses. However, a large proportion of STEM faculty continues to use traditional instructor-centered…

  18. Reframing Perceptions of the Lecture from Challenges to Opportunities: Embedding Active Learning and Formative Assessment into the Teaching of Large Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winstone, Naomi; Millward, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Teaching and assessing large classes can be reframed from focusing on overcoming difficulties with large classes, to seeking the unique educational opportunities provided by such learning environments. We discuss data and examples illustrating how active learning and formative assessment can be successfully embedded into the teaching of large…

  19. Active Tectonics In The Rukwa Rift (sw Tanzania): A Study of The Potential For Large Earthquakes In A Continental Rift.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervyn, F.

    The Rukwa rift is a deep sedimentary basin that is considered as a tectonic trans- fer zone between the Tanganyika and the Malawi troughs. The tectonic evolution of the depression is controlled by the reactivation of proterozoic structures and started with the deposition of the permo-triasic Karoo sediments. In the southeast, the rift is divided into two facing half graben separated by a Precambrian horst, whereas its northwestern part has a more symmetrical graben structure. Although most of the vertical displacement is accommodated by the Lupa eastern boundary fault, onshore shallow seismic profiles have confirmed the co-occurrence of intrabasin synthetic- and strike-slip faults within the sub surface sediments. Both normal and dextral strike-slip movement are indeed observed in the basin in response to the E-W to WNW-SSE ex- tension. The region has a moderate seismic activity and the earthquakes magnitude is generally below M 6.5. However, a M 7.4 earthquake occurred in the Rukwa region in 1910 but its exact location remains uncertain. The current research aimed at the identi- fication of active faults within the recent deposits of the basin by the combination in a GIS of radar interferometric data with topographical and geological maps, geophysical data, and field observations. Radar interferometry (InSAR) was found to be especially suitable for DEM computation in low relief areas where available topographic data are limited in accuracy. Numerous topographic lineaments were observed on InSAR DEM, and follow two main directions, both oblique to the main NW-SE trend of the rift. On the one hand, the GIS analysis confirms that the observed lineaments corre- spond to real natural alignment such like the drainage for example, and are therefore not related to atmospheric artefacts. On the other hand, the field observations revealed that in most cases, the topographic lineaments are very subtle and difficult to identify. However, direct correlations with tectonic

  20. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of the large deformation bending and folding behavior of magneto-active elastomer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Robert; Roche, Juan; Lofland, Samuel E.; vonLockette, Paris R.

    2014-09-01

    This work seeks to provide a framework for the numerical simulation of magneto-active elastomer (MAE) composite structures for use in origami engineering applications. The emerging field of origami engineering employs folding techniques, an array of crease patterns traditionally on a single flat sheet of paper, to produce structures and devices that perform useful engineering operations. Effective means of numerical simulation offer an efficient way to optimize the crease patterns while coupling to the performance and behavior of the active material. The MAE materials used herein are comprised of nominally 30% v/v, 325 mesh barium hexafarrite particles embedded in Dow HS II silicone elastomer compound. These particulate composites are cured in a magnetic field to produce magneto-elastic solids with anisotropic magnetization, e.g. they have a preferred magnetic axis parallel to the curing axis. The deformed shape and/or blocked force characteristics of these MAEs are examined in three geometries: a monolithic cantilever as well as two- and four-segment composite accordion structures. In the accordion structures, patches of MAE material are bonded to a Gelest OE41 unfilled silicone elastomer substrate. Two methods of simulation, one using the Maxwell stress tensor applied as a traction boundary condition and another employing a minimum energy kinematic (MEK) model, are investigated. Both methods capture actuation due to magnetic torque mechanisms that dominate MAE behavior. Comparison with experimental data show good agreement with only a single adjustable parameter, either an effective constant magnetization of the MAE material in the finite element models (at small and moderate deformations) or an effective modulus in the minimum energy model. The four-segment finite element model was prone to numerical locking at large deformation. The effective magnetization and modulus values required are a fraction of the actual experimentally measured values which suggests a

  1. Large-Scale Phosphoprotein Analysis in Medicago truncatula Roots Provides Insight into in Vivo Kinase Activity in Legumes1[W

    PubMed Central

    Grimsrud, Paul A.; den Os, Désirée; Wenger, Craig D.; Swaney, Danielle L.; Schwartz, Daniel; Sussman, Michael R.; Ané, Jean-Michel; Coon, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation in legumes requires the development of root organs called nodules and their infection by symbiotic rhizobia. Over the last decade, Medicago truncatula has emerged as a major model plant for the analysis of plant-microbe symbioses and for addressing questions pertaining to legume biology. While the initiation of symbiosis and the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules depend on the activation of a protein phosphorylation-mediated signal transduction cascade in response to symbiotic signals produced by the rhizobia, few sites of in vivo phosphorylation have previously been identified in M. truncatula. We have characterized sites of phosphorylation on proteins from M. truncatula roots, from both whole cell lysates and membrane-enriched fractions, using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Here, we report 3,457 unique phosphopeptides spanning 3,404 nonredundant sites of in vivo phosphorylation on 829 proteins in M. truncatula Jemalong A17 roots, identified using the complementary tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation methods electron transfer dissociation and collision-activated dissociation. With this being, to our knowledge, the first large-scale plant phosphoproteomic study to utilize electron transfer dissociation, analysis of the identified phosphorylation sites revealed phosphorylation motifs not previously observed in plants. Furthermore, several of the phosphorylation motifs, including LxKxxs and RxxSxxxs, have yet to be reported as kinase specificities for in vivo substrates in any species, to our knowledge. Multiple sites of phosphorylation were identified on several key proteins involved in initiating rhizobial symbiosis, including SICKLE, NUCLEOPORIN133, and INTERACTING PROTEIN OF DMI3. Finally, we used these data to create an open-access online database for M. truncatula phosphoproteomic data. PMID:19923235

  2. Large-scale phosphoprotein analysis in Medicago truncatula roots provides insight into in vivo kinase activity in legumes.

    PubMed

    Grimsrud, Paul A; den Os, Désirée; Wenger, Craig D; Swaney, Danielle L; Schwartz, Daniel; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel; Coon, Joshua J

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation in legumes requires the development of root organs called nodules and their infection by symbiotic rhizobia. Over the last decade, Medicago truncatula has emerged as a major model plant for the analysis of plant-microbe symbioses and for addressing questions pertaining to legume biology. While the initiation of symbiosis and the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules depend on the activation of a protein phosphorylation-mediated signal transduction cascade in response to symbiotic signals produced by the rhizobia, few sites of in vivo phosphorylation have previously been identified in M. truncatula. We have characterized sites of phosphorylation on proteins from M. truncatula roots, from both whole cell lysates and membrane-enriched fractions, using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Here, we report 3,457 unique phosphopeptides spanning 3,404 nonredundant sites of in vivo phosphorylation on 829 proteins in M. truncatula Jemalong A17 roots, identified using the complementary tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation methods electron transfer dissociation and collision-activated dissociation. With this being, to our knowledge, the first large-scale plant phosphoproteomic study to utilize electron transfer dissociation, analysis of the identified phosphorylation sites revealed phosphorylation motifs not previously observed in plants. Furthermore, several of the phosphorylation motifs, including LxKxxs and RxxSxxxs, have yet to be reported as kinase specificities for in vivo substrates in any species, to our knowledge. Multiple sites of phosphorylation were identified on several key proteins involved in initiating rhizobial symbiosis, including SICKLE, NUCLEOPORIN133, and INTERACTING PROTEIN OF DMI3. Finally, we used these data to create an open-access online database for M. truncatula phosphoproteomic data. PMID:19923235

  3. Identification of the remains of King Richard III.

    PubMed

    King, Turi E; Fortes, Gloria Gonzalez; Balaresque, Patricia; Thomas, Mark G; Balding, David; Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Neumann, Rita; Parson, Walther; Knapp, Michael; Walsh, Susan; Tonasso, Laure; Holt, John; Kayser, Manfred; Appleby, Jo; Forster, Peter; Ekserdjian, David; Hofreiter, Michael; Schürer, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a skeleton was excavated at the presumed site of the Grey Friars friary in Leicester, the last-known resting place of King Richard III. Archaeological, osteological and radiocarbon dating data were consistent with these being his remains. Here we report DNA analyses of both the skeletal remains and living relatives of Richard III. We find a perfect mitochondrial DNA match between the sequence obtained from the remains and one living relative, and a single-base substitution when compared with a second relative. Y-chromosome haplotypes from male-line relatives and the remains do not match, which could be attributed to a false-paternity event occurring in any of the intervening generations. DNA-predicted hair and eye colour are consistent with Richard's appearance in an early portrait. We calculate likelihood ratios for the non-genetic and genetic data separately, and combined, and conclude that the evidence for the remains being those of Richard III is overwhelming. PMID:25463651

  4. Identification of the remains of King Richard III

    PubMed Central

    King, Turi E.; Fortes, Gloria Gonzalez; Balaresque, Patricia; Thomas, Mark G.; Balding, David; Delser, Pierpaolo Maisano; Neumann, Rita; Parson, Walther; Knapp, Michael; Walsh, Susan; Tonasso, Laure; Holt, John; Kayser, Manfred; Appleby, Jo; Forster, Peter; Ekserdjian, David; Hofreiter, Michael; Schürer, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a skeleton was excavated at the presumed site of the Grey Friars friary in Leicester, the last-known resting place of King Richard III. Archaeological, osteological and radiocarbon dating data were consistent with these being his remains. Here we report DNA analyses of both the skeletal remains and living relatives of Richard III. We find a perfect mitochondrial DNA match between the sequence obtained from the remains and one living relative, and a single-base substitution when compared with a second relative. Y-chromosome haplotypes from male-line relatives and the remains do not match, which could be attributed to a false-paternity event occurring in any of the intervening generations. DNA-predicted hair and eye colour are consistent with Richard’s appearance in an early portrait. We calculate likelihood ratios for the non-genetic and genetic data separately, and combined, and conclude that the evidence for the remains being those of Richard III is overwhelming. PMID:25463651

  5. Energetic ion losses caused by magnetohydrodynamic activity resonant and non-resonant with energetic ions in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kunihiro; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Toi, Kazuo; Shimizu, Akihiro; Spong, Donald A.; Osakabe, Masaki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; the LHD Experiment Group

    2014-09-01

    Experiments to reveal energetic ion dynamics associated with magnetohydrodynamic activity are ongoing in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Interactions between beam-driven toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) and energetic ions have been investigated. Energetic ion losses induced by beam-driven burst TAEs have been observed using a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) in neutral beam-heated high β plasmas. The loss flux of co-going beam ions increases as the TAE amplitude increases. In addition to this, the expulsion of beam ions associated with edge-localized modes (ELMs) has been also recognized in LHD. The SLIP has indicated that beam ions having co-going and barely co-going orbits are affected by ELMs. The relation between ELM amplitude and ELM-induced loss has a dispersed structure. To understand the energetic ion loss process, a numerical simulation based on an orbit-following model, DELTA5D, that incorporates magnetic fluctuations is performed. The calculation result shows that energetic ions confined in the interior region are lost due to TAE instability, with a diffusive process characterizing their loss. For the ELM, energetic ions existing near the confinement/loss boundary are lost through a convective process. We found that the ELM-induced loss flux measured by SLIP changes with the ELM phase. This relation between the ELM amplitude and measured ELM-induced loss results in a more dispersed loss structure.

  6. A search for pair haloes around active galactic nuclei through a temporal analysis of Fermi-Large Area Telescope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, D. A.; Moraghan, A.

    2016-04-01

    We develop a method to search for pair haloes around active galactic nuclei (AGN) through a temporal analysis of γ-ray data. The basis of our method is an analysis of the spatial distributions of photons coming from AGN flares and from AGN quiescent states and a further comparison of these two spatial distributions. This method can also be used for a reconstruction of a point spread function (PSF). We found no evidence for a pair halo component through this method by applying it to the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data in the energy bands of 4.5-6, 6-10, and >10 GeV and set upper limits on the fraction of photons attributable to a pair halo component. An illustration of how to reconstruct the PSF of Fermi-LAT is given. We demonstrate that the PSF reconstructed by using this method is in good agreement with that which was obtained by using the γ-ray data taken by LAT in the direction of the Crab pulsar and nebula.

  7. Inhibition of COP9-signalosome (CSN) deneddylating activity and tumor growth of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas by doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Pulvino, Mary; Chen, Luojing; Oleksyn, David; Li, Jing; Compitello, George; Rossi, Randy; Spence, Stephen; Balakrishnan, Vijaya; Jordan, Craig; Poligone, Brian; Casulo, Carla; Burack, Richard; Shapiro, Joel L.; Bernstein, Steven; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Deshaies, Raymond J.; Land, Hartmut; Zhao, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    In searching for small-molecule compounds that inhibit proliferation and survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells and may, therefore, be exploited as potential therapeutic agents for this disease, we identified the commonly used and well-tolerated antibiotic doxycycline as a strong candidate. Here, we demonstrate that doxycycline inhibits the growth of DLBCL cells both in vitro and in mouse xenograft models. In addition, we show that doxycycline accumulates in DLBCL cells to high concentrations and affects multiple signaling pathways that are crucial for lymphomagenesis. Our data reveal the deneddylating activity of COP-9 signalosome (CSN) as a novel target of doxycycline and suggest that doxycycline may exert its effects in DLBCL cells in part through a CSN5-HSP90 pathway. Consistently, knockdown of CSN5 exhibited similar effects as doxycycline treatment on DLBCL cell survival and HSP90 chaperone function. In addition to DLBCL cells, doxycycline inhibited growth of several other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells in vitro. Together, our results suggest that doxycycline may represent a promising therapeutic agent for DLBCL and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas subtypes. PMID:26142707

  8. Occurrence of anomalous seismic activity preceding large to great earthquakes in northeast India region with special reference to 6 August 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, H. N.; Shanker, D.; Singh, V. P.

    2005-02-01

    Seismicity database from 1860 to 1985 of northeast India region bounded by the area 20°-32°N and 82°-100°E have been analyzed for the identification of precursory swarm/anomalous seismic activity preceding large to great earthquakes with M ≥ 7.5. It is observed that with the exception of three earthquakes (1908, 1912 and 1918), the large earthquakes of 1897, 1946, 1947, 1950 and 1951/1952 were preceded by well-developed epoch of swarm/anomalous seismic activity in space and time well before their occurrence. The seismicity is observed to fluctuate in the order of low-high-low ranging from 0-0.5, 01-33 to 0-0.7 events/year prior to these mainshocks during the epochs of normal/background, swarm/anomalous and gap/quiescence, respectively. The duration of precursory gap is observed to vary from 11 to 17 years for mainshocks of M 7.5-8.0, and from 23 to 27 years for M 8.7 and this period is dependent on the magnitude of the mainshocks. Using the values of magnitude of mainshock ( Mm), average magnitude of swarm ( Mp) and the precursory time gap ( Tp), the following predictive equations are established for the region: M=1.37M-1.40 M=3log⁡T-3.27 All the major earthquakes with mb ≥ 6.1 occurred during 1963-1988 have been investigated for their association with anomalous seismicity/precursory swarms using the events with cutoff magnitude mb ≥ 4.5. Eleven such events have occurred in the region during the period except one earthquake of 29 May 1976. All the remaining 10 earthquakes were associated in some forms of anomalous seismicity epochs. Well-defined patterns of anomalous seismicity are observed prior to 1964-1965, 12 August 1976 and 30 December 1984 ( mb 5.6). All these mainshocks are preceded by seismicity patterns in the order of low-high-low similar to that observed prior to the mainshocks from 1897 to 1962. The anomalous seismicity epoch is delineated with extremely high annual earthquake frequency, which was preceded and followed by extremely low

  9. The TIR/BB-loop mimetic AS-1 attenuates mechanical stress-induced cardiac fibroblast activation and paracrine secretion via modulation of large tumor suppressor kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Fan, Min; Song, Juan; He, Yijie; Shen, Xin; Li, Jiantao; Que, Linli; Zhu, Guoqing; Zhu, Quan; Cai, Xin; Ha, Tuanzhu; Chen, Qi; Xu, Yong; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua

    2016-06-01

    The TIR/BB-loop mimetic AS-1 has been reported to prevent cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R)-mediated myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-dependent signaling. To date, it remains unknown whether and if so how AS-1 contributes to mechanical stress (MS)-induced cardiac fibroblast activation, a key process in pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Here, we show that phosphorylation and expression of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1), a key molecule in the Hippo-Yes associated protein (YAP) signaling pathway, were down-regulated in primary neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NRCFs) in response to MS and in the hearts of mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) procedure; AS-1 treatment was able to restore LATS1 phosphorylation and expression both in vitro and in vivo. AS-1 treatment suppressed the induction of proliferation, differentiation and collagen synthesis in response to MS in NRCFs. AS-1 also ameliorated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis through dampening paracrine secretion of stretched cardiac fibroblasts. In mice, AS-1 treatment could protect against TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy, myocardial fibrosis and heart failure. Of note, LATS1 depletion using siRNA completely abrogated the inhibitory effects of AS-1 on NRCFs under MS including accelerated proliferation, differentiation, enhanced ability to produce collagen and augmented paracrine secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Therefore, our results delineate a previously unrecognized role for LATS1 in cardiac fibroblast to mediate the beneficial effects of AS-1 in preventing pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling and heart failure. PMID:26964796

  10. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina Maria; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in energetic metabolism, epigenetics, protein folding, as well as in a number of diverse regulatory processes. The problem of localisation of flavin cofactor synthesis events and in particular of the FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) in HepG2 cells is addressed here by confocal microscopy in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalysed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesising activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone". The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear or a mitochondrial enzyme that is lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, EC 1.-.-.-) and dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4), respectively which carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, assisted by tetrahydrofolate used to form 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells.

  11. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found. PMID:25677640

  12. Field contamination of skeletonized human remains with exogenous DNA.

    PubMed

    Edson, Suni M; Christensen, Alexander F

    2013-01-01

    The Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory reports the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of over 800 skeletal samples a year for the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command-Central Identification Laboratory. These sequences are generated from degraded skeletal remains that are presumed to belong to U.S. service members missing from past military conflicts. In the laboratory, it is possible to control for contamination of remains; however, in the field, it can be difficult to prevent modern DNA from being transferred to skeletal elements and being carried forward through the analysis process. Four such cases are described here along with the controls in place in the laboratory to eliminate the possibility of the exogenous DNA being reported as authentic. In each case, the controls implemented by the laboratories prevented the false reporting of contaminant exogenous DNA from remains that were either faunal or human, but lacked endogenous DNA. PMID:22994903

  13. OVERVIEW OF REMAINS OF DEWATERING BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD CYANIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF REMAINS OF DEWATERING BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD CYANIDE PROCESSING AREA. WATER USED IN PROCESSING AT THE STAMP MILL WAS CIRCULATED HERE FOR RECLAMATION. SANDS WERE SETTLED OUT AND DEPOSITED IN ONE OF TWO TAILINGS HOLDING AREAS. CLEARED WATER WAS PUMPED BACK TO THE MILL FOR REUSE. THIS PROCESS WAS ACCOMPLISHED BY THE USE OF SETTLING CONES, EIGHT FEET IN DIAMETER AND SIX FEET HIGH. THE REMAINS OF FOUR CONES ARE AT CENTER, BEHIND THE TANK IN THE FOREGROUND. TO THE LEFT IS THE MAIN ACCESS ROAD BETWEEN THE MILL AND THE PARKING LOT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  14. The adjuvant activity of a non-toxic, water-soluble glycopeptide present in large quantities in the culture filtrate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain DT.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Tull, D E; Shimono, T; Kotani, S; Kato, M; Ogawa, Y; Yamamura, Y; Koga, T; Pearson, C M

    1975-01-01

    A water-soluble mycobacterial glycopeptide was obtained in large quantities from the culture supernatant fluid of M. tuberculosis strain DT. This glycopeptide was strongly adjuvant-active when injected, in a water-in-oil emulsion contianing ovalbumin, into guinea-pigs. In addition, it was devoid of cord factor toxicity in mice, polyarthritogenic activity in rats and cavity stimulating activity in rabbit lungs. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 8 PMID:806515

  15. Teacher Retention: Why Do Beginning Teachers Remain in the Profession?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Duane; Marlow, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    As beginning teachers continue to leave the profession within the first several years of entering, educators must identify factors which cause teachers to remain in the profession, as well as factors related to attrition if the current teacher shortage is to be remedied. The purpose of this study was to examine the reported attitudes of beginning…

  16. 5. View of remaining rock ledge from construction of passage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of remaining rock ledge from construction of passage to enter mill (Riverdale Cotton Mill was built into the side of a hill). Partially subterranean area was popular with employees trying to escape the heat of the mill, now an unofficial smoking area. - Riverdale Cotton Mill, Corner of Middle & Lower Streets, Valley, Chambers County, AL

  17. 11. ENTRY STAIRWELL TO CABLE TUNNEL. REMAINS OF ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. ENTRY STAIRWELL TO CABLE TUNNEL. REMAINS OF ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION STATIONS AT LEFT, TRACKSIDE CAMERA STAND AT FAR RIGHT. Looking northeast toward launch pad. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing Control Blockhouse, South of Sled Track at east end, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. 51 in Spring Gap, Maryland, looking northeast. (Compare with HAER MD-115 photos taken 1988). - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  19. 3. GENERAL VIEW OF REMAINS OF 40" BLOOMING MILL; THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL VIEW OF REMAINS OF 40" BLOOMING MILL; THE ENGINE ROOM CONTAINING THE MESTA-CORLISS STEAM ENGINE, IS LOCATED AT THE FAR END OF THE MILL AS SEEN TO THE FAR RIGHT (THE BUILDING WITH THE SHED ROOF). - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  20. 18. A view looking southeast at the remains of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. A view looking southeast at the remains of the director's office, his reception room and a portion of the elevator lobby. These two rooms were equipped with their own air conditioners. - John T. Beasley Building, 632 Cherry Street (between Sixth & Seventh Streets), Terre Haute, Vigo County, IN

  1. 6. Remains Beneath Collapsed Engine House Roof, Showing Foundation Timbers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Remains Beneath Collapsed Engine House Roof, Showing Foundation Timbers and Automobile Engine Connected to Pulley Wheel, Looking Southwest - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  2. DETAIL VIEW OF FILTER PRESS REMAINS, BOILER, SECONDARY ORE BIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF FILTER PRESS REMAINS, BOILER, SECONDARY ORE BIN, TRAM TRESTLE AND WATER TANK, LOOKING NORTHWEST. HIS VIEW IS TAKEN FROM THE THIRD LEVEL OF THE MILL, NEARBY THE BLACKSMITH'S FORGE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. Neanderthal infant and adult infracranial remains from Marillac (Charente, France).

    PubMed

    Dolores Garralda, María; Maureille, Bruno; Vandermeersch, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    At the site of Marillac, near the Ligonne River in Marillac-le-Franc (Charente, France), a remarkable stratigraphic sequence has yielded a wealth of archaeological information, palaeoenvironmental data, as well as faunal and human remains. Marillac must have been a sinkhole used by Neanderthal groups as a hunting camp during MIS 4 (TL date 57,600 ± 4,600BP), where Quina Mousterian lithics and fragmented bones of reindeer predominate. This article describes three infracranial skeleton fragments. Two of them are from adults and consist of the incomplete shafts of a right radius (Marillac 24) and a left fibula (Marillac 26). The third fragment is the diaphysis of the right femur of an immature individual (Marillac 25), the size and shape of which resembles those from Teshik-Tash and could be assigned to a child of a similar age. The three fossils have been compared with the remains of other Neanderthals or anatomically Modern Humans (AMH). Furthermore, the comparison of the infantile femora, Marillac 25 and Teshik-Tash, with the remains of several European children from the early Middle Ages clearly demonstrates the robustness and rounded shape of both Neanderthal diaphyses. Evidence of peri-mortem manipulations have been identified on all three bones, with spiral fractures, percussion pits and, in the case of the radius and femur, unquestionable cutmarks made with flint implements, probably during defleshing. Traces of periostosis appear on the fibula fragment and on the immature femoral diaphysis, although their aetiology remains unknown. PMID:24919796

  4. 5. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT UPPER GUIDE WALL REMAINS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT UPPER GUIDE WALL REMAINS AND LAND WALL FROM THE OHIO RIVER. - Ohio Slack Water Dams, Lock & Dam No. 4, East bank of Ohio River at mile point 18.6, along State Route 65, Ambridge, Beaver County, PA

  5. Robotics to Enable Older Adults to Remain Living at Home

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Alan J.; Adair, Brooke; Ozanne, Elizabeth; Said, Catherine; Santamaria, Nick; Morris, Meg E.

    2012-01-01

    Given the rapidly ageing population, interest is growing in robots to enable older people to remain living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of the scientific literature, from 1990 to the present, on the use of robots in aged care. The key research questions were as follows: (1) what is the range of robotic devices available to enable older people to remain mobile, independent, and safe? and, (2) what is the evidence demonstrating that robotic devices are effective in enabling independent living in community dwelling older people? Following database searches for relevant literature an initial yield of 161 articles was obtained. Titles and abstracts of articles were then reviewed by 2 independent people to determine suitability for inclusion. Forty-two articles met the criteria for question 1. Of these, 4 articles met the criteria for question 2. Results showed that robotics is currently available to assist older healthy people and people with disabilities to remain independent and to monitor their safety and social connectedness. Most studies were conducted in laboratories and hospital clinics. Currently limited evidence demonstrates that robots can be used to enable people to remain living at home, although this is an emerging smart technology that is rapidly evolving. PMID:23304507

  6. As Year Ends, Questions Remain for New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2008-01-01

    In rebuilding public schooling in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, education reformers have managed to hire energetic teachers, break ground on a few new school buildings, raise public confidence, and show progress on test scores. But fundamental questions remain as the 2007-08 academic year draws to a close, including how the city's…

  7. Plans and objectives of the remaining Apollo missions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    The three remaining Apollo missions will have significantly increased scientific capabilities. These result from increased payload, more time on the surface, improved range, and more sophisticated experiments on the surface and in orbit. Landing sites for the last three missions will be carefully selected to maximize the total scientific return.

  8. Administrative Climate and Novices' Intent to Remain Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pogodzinski, Ben; Youngs, Peter; Frank, Kenneth A.; Belman, Dale

    2012-01-01

    Using survey data from novice teachers at the elementary and middle school level across 11 districts, multilevel logistic regressions were estimated to examine the association between novices' perceptions of the administrative climate and their desire to remain teaching within their schools. We find that the probability that a novice teacher…

  9. Robotics to enable older adults to remain living at home.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Alan J; Adair, Brooke; Miller, Kimberly; Ozanne, Elizabeth; Said, Catherine; Santamaria, Nick; Morris, Meg E

    2012-01-01

    Given the rapidly ageing population, interest is growing in robots to enable older people to remain living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of the scientific literature, from 1990 to the present, on the use of robots in aged care. The key research questions were as follows: (1) what is the range of robotic devices available to enable older people to remain mobile, independent, and safe? and, (2) what is the evidence demonstrating that robotic devices are effective in enabling independent living in community dwelling older people? Following database searches for relevant literature an initial yield of 161 articles was obtained. Titles and abstracts of articles were then reviewed by 2 independent people to determine suitability for inclusion. Forty-two articles met the criteria for question 1. Of these, 4 articles met the criteria for question 2. Results showed that robotics is currently available to assist older healthy people and people with disabilities to remain independent and to monitor their safety and social connectedness. Most studies were conducted in laboratories and hospital clinics. Currently limited evidence demonstrates that robots can be used to enable people to remain living at home, although this is an emerging smart technology that is rapidly evolving. PMID:23304507

  10. 15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, through which the fish tumbled as the cylinder revolved. Note geared ring around cylinder, and the small drive shaft by which it was driven. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  11. REAR DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. THRUST REVERSER REMAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REAR DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. THRUST REVERSER REMAINS OPEN. MECHANICS JONI BAINE (R) AND BILL THEODORE(L) OPEN FLAP CARRIAGE ACCESS WITH AN IMPACT GUN. THEY WILL CHECK TRANSMISSION FLUID AND OIL THE JACK SCREW. AT FAR LEFT UTILITY MECHANICS BEGIN BODY POLISHING. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  12. Aftermath. The remains of the southwest end of the bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aftermath. The remains of the southwest end of the bridge lie next to the southwest pier. View is south-southeast from confluence of Trinity and South Fork Trinity Rivers - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  13. Continuous, Large-Scale Processing of Seismic Archives for High-Resolution Monitoring of Seismic Activity and Seismogenic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Archives of digital seismic data recorded by seismometer networks around the world have grown tremendously over the last several decades helped by the deployment of seismic stations and their continued operation within the framework of monitoring earthquake activity and verification of the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. We show results from our continuing effort in developing efficient waveform cross-correlation and double-difference analysis methods for the large-scale processing of regional and global seismic archives to improve existing earthquake parameter estimates, detect seismic events with magnitudes below current detection thresholds, and improve real-time monitoring procedures. We demonstrate the performance of these algorithms as applied to the 28-year long seismic archive of the Northern California Seismic Network. The tools enable the computation of periodic updates of a high-resolution earthquake catalog of currently over 500,000 earthquakes using simultaneous double-difference inversions, achieving up to three orders of magnitude resolution improvement over existing hypocenter locations. This catalog, together with associated metadata, form the underlying relational database for a real-time double-difference scheme, DDRT, which rapidly computes high-precision correlation times and hypocenter locations of new events with respect to the background archive (http://ddrt.ldeo.columbia.edu). The DDRT system facilitates near-real-time seismicity analysis, including the ability to search at an unprecedented resolution for spatio-temporal changes in seismogenic properties. In areas with continuously recording stations, we show that a detector built around a scaled cross-correlation function can lower the detection threshold by one magnitude unit compared to the STA/LTA based detector employed at the network. This leads to increased event density, which in turn pushes the resolution capability of our location algorithms. On a global scale, we are currently building

  14. Ultra-large Angle Curved Reflectors and Their Applications to Passive and Active Photonic Integrated Circuit Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhenyu

    semiconductor optical amplifier (CR-SOA) based on InGaAsP platform, their design, fabrication, and testing are discussed in details. Design of Photonic integrated interconnection makes use of curved reflector to focus or collimated light beams so as to realize waveguide turning, offsetting, and crossing. Design of CR-SOA takes advantage of the capability of curved reflectors to expand light beam in extreme tight space to realize large area amplification and compact device footprint. Major nano-fabrication processes that are used in developing designed devices are introduced and discussed. Lithography and dry etching are two common processes in pattern defining. Quantum well intermixing is utilized for convenient integration of passive active devices. Other nano-fabrication techniques involved are also discussed. Lastly, we present various testing techniques as well as their theoretical background. We focus on discussion of testing curved reflector semiconductor optical amplifier (CR-SOA). Techniques to improve characterization of CR-SOA such as cooling stage and pulsed large current source are introduced. Measurement results are presented and discussed in details.

  15. An integrated approach for monitoring efficiency and investments of activated sludge-based wastewater treatment plants at large spatial scale.

    PubMed

    De Gisi, Sabino; Sabia, Gianpaolo; Casella, Patrizia; Farina, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    WISE, the Water Information System for Europe, is the web-portal of the European Commission (EU) that disseminates the quality state of the receiving water bodies and the efficiency of the municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in order to monitor advances in the application of both the Water Framework Directive (WFD) as well as the Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive (UWWTD). With the intention to develop WISE applications, the aim of the work was to define and apply an integrated approach capable of monitoring the efficiency and investments of activated sludge-based WWTPs located in a large spatial area, providing the following outcomes useful to the decision-makers: (i) the identification of critical facilities and their critical processes by means of a Performance Assessment System (PAS), (ii) the choice of the most suitable upgrading actions, through a scenario analysis. (iii) the assessment of the investment costs to upgrade the critical WWTPs and (iv) the prioritization of the critical facilities by means of a multi-criteria approach which includes the stakeholders involvement, along with the integration of some technical, environmental, economic and health aspects. The implementation of the proposed approach to a high number of municipal WWTPs highlighted how the PAS developed was able to identify critical processes with a particular effectiveness in identifying the critical nutrient removal ones. In addition, a simplified approach that considers the cost related to a basic-configuration and those for the WWTP integration, allowed to link the critical processes identified and the investment costs. Finally, the questionnaire for the acquisition of data such as that provided by the Italian Institute of Statistics, the PAS defined and the database on the costs, if properly adapted, may allow for the extension of the integrated approach on an EU-scale by providing useful information to water utilities as well as institutions. PMID:25863511

  16. Geochemical Uniformity over 30 Million Years of Volcanic Activity in the Caribbean Large Igneous Province: Evidence from Curacao and Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewen, M. W.; Kent, A. J.; Duncan, R. A.; Krawl, K.; Michael, P. J.; Graham, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations from Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) lavas, dikes, and sills from Curacao and Haiti record almost 30 million years of volcanism, beginning at ~93 Ma and continuing until ~63 Ma, with peak activity at 93-90, 86-85, 80-76 and 66-63 Ma. A variety of rock types are apparent. Despite the significant age range evident in our sample set, which includes picritic to tholeitic pillow lavas, thick hyaloclastite sequences, and poikolitic sills, compositions show only subtle compositional differences between groups of different age. Most whole rock samples appear to derive from a similar mantle source peridotite and to have undergone a common set differentiation processes (primarily partial melting followed by fractionation of olivine, clinopyroxene, and plagioclase). The recognition of this range of ages and compositional similarities poses important questions for the extent and cause of CLIP magmatism. We present new 40Ar-39Ar ages and major and trace elements for whole rock, minerals and glass samples from throughout the exposed volcanic sections at the two locations. Hyaloclastite glasses have also been analyzed by FTIR for volatile abundances. Unlike major element compositions of whole rock samples, major element and volatile analyses of hyaloclastite glasses reveal the presence of at least three distinct magma series. In addition, variations in Cl and Cl/K suggest that differences exist in the degree to which magmatic systems interact with seawater-derived components. One He-isotopic analysis from a Haiti picrite (3He/4He = 12.3 Ra) is consistent with other isotopic evidence for a significant mantle plume contribution to CLIP construction. Future work will focus on trace element modeling to further constrain magma sources and extents of melting, and on expanding the number of samples for which we have age control.

  17. Loss of DNA-binding and new transcriptional trans-activation function in polyomavirus large T-antigen with mutation of zinc finger motif.

    PubMed Central

    Bergqvist, A; Nilsson, M; Bondeson, K; Magnusson, G

    1990-01-01

    A putative zinc finger in polyomavirus large T-antigen was investigated. We were unable to demonstrate unequivocally a requirement for zinc in specific DNA-binding using the chelating agent 1, 10-phenanthroline. An involvement of the putative zinc finger in specific DNA-binding was nevertheless suggested by the properties of a mutant protein with a cys----ser replacement in the finger motif. Probably as a result of the defective DNA-binding, the mutant protein had lost its activity in initiation of viral DNA-replication and in negative regulation of viral early transcription. However, the trans-activation of the viral late promoter was normal. The analysis also revealed a previously unrecognized activity of large T-antigen. The mutant protein trans-activated the viral early promoter. In the wild-type protein this activity is probably concealed by the separate, negative regulatory function. Images PMID:2160069

  18. Identifying and Reducing Remaining Stocks of Rinderpest Virus.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Keith; Visser, Dawid; Evans, Brian; Vallat, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    In 2011, the world was declared free from rinderpest, one of the most feared and devastating infectious diseases of animals. Rinderpest is the second infectious disease, after smallpox, to have been eradicated. However, potentially infectious rinderpest virus material remains widely disseminated among research and diagnostic facilities across the world and poses a risk for disease recurrence should it be released. Member Countries of the World Organisation for Animal Health and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations are committed to destroying remaining stocks of infectious material or ensuring that it is stored under international supervision in a limited number of approved facilities. To facilitate this commitment and maintain global freedom from rinderpest, World Organisation for Animal Health Member Countries must report annually on rinderpest material held in their countries. The first official surveys, conducted during 2013-2015, revealed that rinderpest material was stored in an unacceptably high number of facilities and countries. PMID:26584400

  19. Mineral remains of early life on Earth? On Mars?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iberall, Robbins E.; Iberall, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The oldest sedimentary rocks on Earth, the 3.8-Ga Isua Iron-Formation in southwestern Greenland, are metamorphosed past the point where organic-walled fossils would remain. Acid residues and thin sections of these rocks reveal ferric microstructures that have filamentous, hollow rod, and spherical shapes not characteristic of crystalline minerals. Instead, they resemble ferric-coated remains of bacteria. Because there are no earlier sedimentary rocks to study on Earth, it may be necessary to expand the search elsewhere in the solar system for clues to any biotic precursors or other types of early life. A study of morphologies of iron oxide minerals collected in the southern highlands during a Mars sample return mission may therefore help to fill in important gaps in the history of Earth's earliest biosphere. -from Authors

  20. Mandibular remains support taxonomic validity of Australopithecus sediba.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Darryl J; DeWitt, Thomas J; Carlson, Keely B; Brophy, Juliet K; Schroeder, Lauren; Ackermann, Rebecca R; Churchill, Steven E; Berger, Lee R

    2013-04-12

    Since the announcement of the species Australopithecus sediba, questions have been raised over whether the Malapa fossils represent a valid taxon or whether inadequate allowance was made for intraspecific variation, in particular with reference to the temporally and geographically proximate species Au. africanus. The morphology of mandibular remains of Au. sediba, including newly recovered material discussed here, shows that it is not merely a late-surviving morph of Au. africanus. Rather-as is seen elsewhere in the cranium, dentition, and postcranial skeleton-these mandibular remains share similarities with other australopiths but can be differentiated from the hypodigm of Au. africanus in both size and shape as well as in their ontogenetic growth trajectory. PMID:23580533

  1. Dental DNA fingerprinting in identification of human remains

    PubMed Central

    Girish, KL; Rahman, Farzan S; Tippu, Shoaib R

    2010-01-01

    The recent advances in molecular biology have revolutionized all aspects of dentistry. DNA, the language of life yields information beyond our imagination, both in health or disease. DNA fingerprinting is a tool used to unravel all the mysteries associated with the oral cavity and its manifestations during diseased conditions. It is being increasingly used in analyzing various scenarios related to forensic science. The technical advances in molecular biology have propelled the analysis of the DNA into routine usage in crime laboratories for rapid and early diagnosis. DNA is an excellent means for identification of unidentified human remains. As dental pulp is surrounded by dentin and enamel, which forms dental armor, it offers the best source of DNA for reliable genetic type in forensic science. This paper summarizes the recent literature on use of this technique in identification of unidentified human remains. PMID:21731342

  2. Late Pleistocene human remains from Wezmeh Cave, western Iran.

    PubMed

    Trinkaus, Erik; Biglari, Fereidoun; Mashkour, Marjan; Monchot, Hervé; Reyss, Jean-Louis; Rougier, Hélène; Heydari, Saman; Abdi, Kamyar

    2008-04-01

    Paleontological analysis of remains from Wezmeh Cave in western Iran have yielded a Holocene Chalcolithic archeological assemblage, a rich Late Pleistocene carnivore faunal assemblage, and an isolated unerupted human maxillary premolar (P(3) or possibly P(4)). Species representation and U-series dating of faunal teeth place the carnivore assemblage during oxygen isotope stages (OIS) 3 and 2, and noninvasive gamma spectrometry dating of the human premolar places it at least as old as early OIS 2. The human premolar crown morphology is not diagnostic of late archaic versus early modern human affinities, but its buccolingual diameter places it at the upper limits of Late Pleistocene human P(3) and P(4) dimensions and separate from a terminal Pleistocene regional sample. Wezmeh Cave therefore provides additional Paleolithic human remains from the Zagros Mountains and further documents Late Pleistocene human association with otherwise carnivore-dominated cave assemblages. PMID:18000894

  3. USING CONDITION MONITORING TO PREDICT REMAINING LIFE OF ELECTRIC CABLES.

    SciTech Connect

    LOFARO,R.; SOO,P.; VILLARAN,M.; GROVE,E.

    2001-03-29

    Electric cables are passive components used extensively throughout nuclear power stations to perform numerous safety and non-safety functions. It is known that the polymers commonly used to insulate the conductors on these cables can degrade with time; the rate of degradation being dependent on the severity of the conditions in which the cables operate. Cables do not receive routine maintenance and, since it can be very costly, they are not replaced on a regular basis. Therefore, to ensure their continued functional performance, it would be beneficial if condition monitoring techniques could be used to estimate the remaining useful life of these components. A great deal of research has been performed on various condition monitoring techniques for use on electric cables. In a research program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, several promising techniques were evaluated and found to provide trendable information on the condition of low-voltage electric cables. These techniques may be useful for predicting remaining life if well defined limiting values for the aging properties being measured can be determined. However, each technique has advantages and limitations that must be addressed in order to use it effectively, and the necessary limiting values are not always easy to obtain. This paper discusses how condition monitoring measurements can be used to predict the remaining useful life of electric cables. The attributes of an appropriate condition monitoring technique are presented, and the process to be used in estimating the remaining useful life of a cable is discussed along with the difficulties that must be addressed.

  4. Belarus ratifies START I pact; Ukraine remains last holdout

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, D.

    1993-03-01

    The Belarus Parliment ratified START I by a vote of 218 to 1 on February 4, 1993. The Parliment also voted to accede to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty as a non-nuclear weapon state. The Parliment also passed two companion accords with Russia to coordinate the withdrawal of the ICBMs now in Belarus and to define the legal states of those weapons. Ukraine remains the only party to START I that has not yet approved the treaty.

  5. Direct dating of Early Upper Palaeolithic human remains from Mladec.

    PubMed

    Wild, Eva M; Teschler-Nicola, Maria; Kutschera, Walter; Steier, Peter; Trinkaus, Erik; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2005-05-19

    The human fossil assemblage from the Mladec Caves in Moravia (Czech Republic) has been considered to derive from a middle or later phase of the Central European Aurignacian period on the basis of archaeological remains (a few stone artefacts and organic items such as bone points, awls, perforated teeth), despite questions of association between the human fossils and the archaeological materials and concerning the chronological implications of the limited archaeological remains. The morphological variability in the human assemblage, the presence of apparently archaic features in some specimens, and the assumed early date of the remains have made this fossil assemblage pivotal in assessments of modern human emergence within Europe. We present here the first successful direct accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of five representative human fossils from the site. We selected sample materials from teeth and from one bone for 14C dating. The four tooth samples yielded uncalibrated ages of approximately 31,000 14C years before present, and the bone sample (an ulna) provided an uncertain more-recent age. These data are sufficient to confirm that the Mladec human assemblage is the oldest cranial, dental and postcranial assemblage of early modern humans in Europe and is therefore central to discussions of modern human emergence in the northwestern Old World and the fate of the Neanderthals. PMID:15902255

  6. Microsatellites identify depredated waterfowl remains from glaucous gull stomachs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, K.T.; Bowman, T.D.

    1998-01-01

    Prey remains can provide valuable sources of information regarding causes of predation and the species composition of a predator's diet. Unfortunately, the highly degraded state of many prey samples from gastrointestinal tracts often precludes unambiguous identification. We describe a procedure by which PCR amplification of taxonomically informative microsatellite loci were used to identify species of waterfowl predated by glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus). We found that one microsatellite locus unambiguously distinguished between species of the subfamily Anserinae (whistling ducks, geese and swans) and those of the subfamily Anatidae (all other ducks). An additional locus distinguished the remains of all geese and swan species known to nest on the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta in western Alaska. The study focused on two waterfowl species which have experienced precipitous declines in population numbers: emperor geese (Chen canagica) and spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri). No evidence of predation on spectacled eiders was observed. Twenty-six percent of all glaucous gull stomachs examined contained the remains of juvenile emperor geese.

  7. Osteometric sex determination of burned human skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, D; Thompson, T J U; Cunha, E

    2013-10-01

    Sex determination of human burned skeletal remains is extremely hard to achieve because of heat-related fragmentation, warping and dimensional changes. In particular, the latter is impeditive of osteometric analyses that are based on references developed on unburned bones. New osteometric references were thus obtained which allow for more reliable sex determinations. The calcined remains of cremated Portuguese individuals were examined and specific standard measurements of the humerus, femur, talus and calcaneus were recorded. This allowed for the compilation of new sex discriminating osteometric references which were then tested on independent samples with good results. Both the use of simple section points and of logistic regression equations provided successful sex classification scores. These references may now be used for the sex determination of burned skeletons. Its reliability is highest for contemporary Portuguese remains but nonetheless these results have important repercussion for forensic research. More conservative use of these references may also prove valuable for other populations as well as for archaeological research. PMID:24112343

  8. Skeletal preservation of children's remains in the archaeological record.

    PubMed

    Manifold, B M

    2015-12-01

    Taphonomy is an important consideration in the reconstruction of past environments and events. Taphonomic alterations and processes are commonly encountered on human skeletal remains in both archaeological and forensic contexts. It is these processes that can alter the appearance of bone after death and the properties of the bones influence their reaction to these processes thus leading to differential preservation within a skeletal sample, none more so than the remains of children. This study investigates the skeletal preservation of 790 child and adolescent skeletons from six contrasting early and late medieval cemeteries from Britain in an attempt to assess whether geographical location and geology had an effect on the overall preservation of the skeletons. Skeletons were examined from six cemeteries, namely; Auldhame in Scotland, Edix Hill and Great Chesterford from Cambridgeshire; St Oswald's Priory from Gloucester and Wharram Percy from Yorkshire, and finally, the site of Llandough in Wales. The state of preservation was assessed using the anatomical preservation index (AP1), qualitative bone index (QBI) and the bone representation index (BRI). Also the presence of natural and artificial taphonomic processes was recorded for each skeleton. The results show a specific pattern of preservation and representation for non-adult remains across all sites with some differences in the states of preservation from different geographical locations and geological influences. Children under two years of age were found to be less affected by taphonomic processes than their older counterparts. PMID:26391374

  9. Equol increases cerebral blood flow in rats via activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Song, Zheng; Zhao, Li-Mei; Li, Gui-Rong; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of equol on cerebral blood flow and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The regional cerebral blood flow in parietal lobe of rats was measured by using a laser Doppler flowmetry. Isolated cerebral basilar artery and mesenteric artery rings from rats were used for vascular reactivity measurement with a multi wire myography system. Outward K(+) current in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery, large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel current in BK-HEK 293 cells stably expressing both human α (hSlo)- and β1-subunits, and hSlo channel current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells expressing only the α-subunit of BK channels were recorded with whole cell patch-clamp technique. The results showed that equol significantly increased regional cerebral blood flow in rats, and produced a concentration-dependent but endothelium-independent relaxation in rat cerebral basilar arteries. Both paxilline and iberiotoxin, two selective BK channel blockers, significantly inhibited equol-induced vasodilation in cerebral arteries. Outward K(+) currents in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery were increased by equol and fully reversed by washout or blockade of BK channels with iberiotoxin. Equol remarkably enhanced human BK current in BK-HEK 293 cells, but not hSlo current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells, and the increase was completely abolished by co-application of paxilline. Our findings provide the first information that equol selectively stimulates BK channel current by acting on its β1 subunit, which may in turn contribute to the equol-mediated vasodilation and cerebral blood flow increase. PMID:26995303

  10. Large area CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis: Analysis, modeling, and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy; Konstantinidis, Anastasios C.; Patel, Tushita

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Large area x-ray imagers based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been proposed for various medical imaging applications including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The low electronic noise (50–300 e{sup −}) of CMOS APS x-ray imagers provides a possible route to shrink the pixel pitch to smaller than 75 μm for microcalcification detection and possible reduction of the DBT mean glandular dose (MGD). Methods: In this study, imaging performance of a large area (29 × 23 cm{sup 2}) CMOS APS x-ray imager [Dexela 2923 MAM (PerkinElmer, London)] with a pixel pitch of 75 μm was characterized and modeled. The authors developed a cascaded system model for CMOS APS x-ray imagers using both a broadband x-ray radiation and monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The experimental data including modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were theoretically described using the proposed cascaded system model with satisfactory consistency to experimental results. Both high full well and low full well (LFW) modes of the Dexela 2923 MAM CMOS APS x-ray imager were characterized and modeled. The cascaded system analysis results were further used to extract the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for microcalcifications with sizes of 165–400 μm at various MGDs. The impact of electronic noise on CNR was also evaluated. Results: The LFW mode shows better DQE at low air kerma (K{sub a} < 10 μGy) and should be used for DBT. At current DBT applications, air kerma (K{sub a} ∼ 10 μGy, broadband radiation of 28 kVp), DQE of more than 0.7 and ∼0.3 was achieved using the LFW mode at spatial frequency of 0.5 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) and Nyquist frequency ∼6.7 lp/mm, respectively. It is shown that microcalcifications of 165–400 μm in size can be resolved using a MGD range of 0.3–1 mGy, respectively. In comparison to a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system (at

  11. R-CVP regimen is active in frail elderly patients aged 80 or over with diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Laribi, Kamel; Denizon, Nathalie; Bolle, Delphine; Truong, Catherine; Besançon, Anne; Sandrini, Jeremy; Anghel, Andreaa; Farhi, Jonathan; Ghnaya, Habib; Baugier de Materre, Alix

    2016-10-01

    Patients aged 80 or over with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) often have comorbidities that increase drug toxicity and prevent the use of otherwise optimal treatment. We performed a retrospective analysis of 43 patients aged 80 or over (median age: 83; range: 80-93) unable to receive treatment with anthracyclines, at diagnosis of DLBCL, treated with an R-CVP treatment (standard R-CHOP without doxorubicin). The patients had one or more comorbidities: 18 patients (41.9 %) had a performance status (PS) of 3; 23 patients (53.5 %) had low creatinine clearance; 12 patients (27.9 %) had low left ventricular ejection fraction; seven patients (16.3 %) had poor hepatic function; and 26 patients (60.5 %) had a Charlson index score ≥4. Thirty patients (70 %) had two or three adverse factors according to the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index. Twenty-five patients (58.1 %) received eight cycles of R-CVP, but the full eight cycles could not be given to 18 patients (41.9 %). The OR rate was 58.1 % (CR 37.2 %). There were 34 deaths (79 %) during treatment and follow-up. Ten patients (23.3 %) died early from toxicity before interim evaluation; all had PS 3. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 52.6 months. The overall 2-year survival rate was 31.9 % and the median OS was 12.6 months. The median OS for patients who completed the entire treatment was 26.4 months. The median PFS was 11.2 months. In multivariate analyses, OS was only affected by performance status ≥2 and Charlson index score ≥4. The R-CVP regimen can be active in elderly frail patients aged 80 or more with DLBCL, but systematic geriatric assessment is required so that those unsuitable for chemotherapy are excluded. PMID:27485454

  12. Overexpression of the Large-Conductance, Ca2+-Activated K+ (BK) Channel Shortens Action Potential Duration in HL-1 Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stimers, Joseph R.; Song, Li; Rusch, Nancy J.; Rhee, Sung W.

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome is characterized by a prolongation of the interval between the Q wave and the T wave on the electrocardiogram. This abnormality reflects a prolongation of the ventricular action potential caused by a number of genetic mutations or a variety of drugs. Since effective treatments are unavailable, we explored the possibility of using cardiac expression of the large-conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel to shorten action potential duration (APD). We hypothesized that expression of the pore-forming α subunit of human BK channels (hBKα) in HL-1 cells would shorten action potential duration in this mouse atrial cell line. Expression of hBKα had minimal effects on expression levels of other ion channels with the exception of a small but significant reduction in Kv11.1. Patch-clamped hBKα expressing HL-1 cells exhibited an outward voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive K+ current, which was inhibited by the BK channel blocker iberiotoxin (100 nM). This BK current phenotype was not detected in untransfected HL-1 cells or in HL-1 null cells sham-transfected with an empty vector. Importantly, APD in hBKα-expressing HL-1 cells averaged 14.3 ± 2.8 ms (n = 10), which represented a 53% reduction in APD compared to HL-1 null cells lacking BKα expression. APD in the latter cells averaged 31.0 ± 5.1 ms (n = 13). The shortened APD in hBKα-expressing cells was restored to normal duration by 100 nM iberiotoxin, suggesting that a repolarizing K+ current attributed to BK channels accounted for action potential shortening. These findings provide initial proof-of-concept that the introduction of hBKα channels into a cardiac cell line can shorten APD, and raise the possibility that gene-based interventions to increase hBKα channels in cardiac cells may hold promise as a therapeutic strategy for long QT syndrome. PMID:26091273

  13. Simultaneous Binding of Basic Peptides at Intracellular Sites on a Large Conductance Ca2+-activated K+ Channel

    PubMed Central

    Favre, Isabelle; Moczydlowski, Edward

    1999-01-01

    The homologous Kunitz inhibitor proteins, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and dendrotoxin I (DTX-I), interact with large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (maxi-KCa) by binding to an intracellular site outside of the pore to produce discrete substate events. In contrast, certain homologues of the Shaker ball peptide produce discrete blocking events by binding within the ion conduction pathway. In this study, we investigated ligand interactions of these positively charged peptide molecules by analysis of single maxi-KCa channels in planar bilayers recorded in the presence of DTX-I and BPTI, or DTX-I and a high-affinity homologue of ball peptide. Both DTX-I (Kd, 16.5 nM) and BPTI (Kd, 1,490 nM) exhibit one-site binding kinetics when studied alone; however, records in the presence of DTX-I plus BPTI demonstrate simultaneous binding of these two molecules. The affinity of BPTI (net charge, +6) decreases by 11.7-fold (Kd, 17,500 nM) when DTX-I (net charge, +10) is bound and, conversely, the affinity of DTX-I decreases by 10.8-fold (Kd, 178 nM) when BPTI is bound. The ball peptide homologue (BP; net charge, +6) exhibits high blocking affinity (Kd, 7.2 nM) at a single site when studied alone, but has 8.0-fold lower affinity (Kd, 57 nM) for blocking the DTX-occupied channel. The affinity of DTX-I likewise decreases by 8.4-fold (Kd, 139 nM) when BP is bound. These results identify two types of negatively coupled ligand–ligand interactions at distinct sites on the intracellular surface of maxi-KCa channels. Such antagonistic ligand interactions explain how the binding of BPTI or DTX-I to four potentially available sites on a tetrameric channel protein can exhibit apparent one-site kinetics. We hypothesize that negatively coupled binding equilibria and asymmetric changes in transition state energies for the interaction between DTX-I and BP originate from repulsive electrostatic interactions between positively charged peptide ligands on the channel surface

  14. Differential sensitivity of medium- and large-sized striatal neurons to NMDA but not kainate receptor activation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, C; Itri, J N; Flores-Hernández, J; Hurst, R S; Calvert, C R; Levine, M S

    2001-11-01

    Infrared videomicroscopy and differential interference contrast optics were used to identify medium- and large-sized neurons in striatal slices from young rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were obtained to compare membrane currents evoked by application of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and kainate. Inward currents and current densities induced by NMDA were significantly smaller in large- than in medium-sized striatal neurons. The negative slope conductance for NMDA currents was greater in medium- than in large-sized neurons and more depolarization was required to remove the Mg2+ blockade. In contrast, currents induced by kainate were significantly greater in large-sized neurons whilst current densities were approximately equal in both cell types. Spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents occurred frequently in medium-sized neurons but were relatively infrequent in large-sized neurons. Excitatory postsynaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation were smaller in large- than in medium-sized neurons. A final set of experiments assessed a functional consequence of the differential sensitivity of medium- and large-sized neurons to NMDA. Cell swelling was used to examine changes in somatic area in both neuronal types after prolonged application of NMDA or kainate. NMDA produced a time-dependent increase in somatic area in medium-sized neurons whilst it produced only minimal changes in large interneurons. In contrast, application of kainate produced significant swelling in both medium- and large-sized cells. We hypothesize that reduced sensitivity to NMDA may be due to variations in receptor subunit composition and/or the relative density of receptors in the two cell types. These findings help define the conditions that put neurons at risk for excitotoxic damage in neurological disorders. PMID:11860453

  15. Yellow Fever Remains a Potential Threat to Public Health.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Monath, Thomas P

    2016-08-01

    Yellow fever (YF) remains a serious public health threat in endemic countries. The recent re-emergence in Africa, initiating in Angola and spreading to Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, with imported cases in China and Kenya is of concern. There is such a shortage of YF vaccine in the world that the World Health Organization has proposed the use of reduced doses (1/5) during emergencies. In this short communication, we discuss these and other problems including the risk of spread of YF to areas free of YF for decades or never before affected by this arbovirus disease. PMID:27400066

  16. Encephalitozoon cuniculi in Raw Cow's Milk Remains Infectious After Pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Tomanová, Vendula; Samková, Eva; Koubová, Jana; Kotková, Michaela; Hlásková, Lenka; McEvoy, John; Sak, Bohumil

    2016-02-01

    This study describes the prevalence of Encephalitozoon cuniculi in raw cow's milk and evaluates the effect of different milk pasteurization treatments on E. cuniculi infectivity for severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Using a nested polymerase chain reaction approach, 1 of 50 milking cows was found to repeatedly shed E. cuniculi in its feces and milk. Under experimental conditions, E. cuniculi spores in milk remained infective for SCID mice following pasteurization treatments at 72 °C for 15 s or 85 °C for 5 s. Based on these findings, pasteurized cow's milk should be considered a potential source of E. cuniculi infection in humans. PMID:26650923

  17. Studies on protozoa in ancient remains - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Frías, Liesbeth; Leles, Daniela; Araújo, Adauto

    2013-01-01

    Paleoparasitological research has made important contributions to the understanding of parasite evolution and ecology. Although parasitic protozoa exhibit a worldwide distribution, recovering these organisms from an archaeological context is still exceptional and relies on the availability and distribution of evidence, the ecology of infectious diseases and adequate detection techniques. Here, we present a review of the findings related to protozoa in ancient remains, with an emphasis on their geographical distribution in the past and the methodologies used for their retrieval. The development of more sensitive detection methods has increased the number of identified parasitic species, promising interesting insights from research in the future. PMID:23440107

  18. Remains to be transmitted: Primo Levi's traumatic dream.

    PubMed

    Blévis, Jean-Jacques

    2004-07-01

    Drawing on the writings of Primo Levi and the psychoanalysis of Jacques Lacan, the author attempts to conceive psychic trauma as a coalescence of traumas, since this is perhaps the only way to prevent a subject from being forced back into identification with the catastrophic event, whatever that may have been. A recurrent dream of Primo Levi's suggests to the author the way that traumas may have coalesced within Levi. The hope would be to restore the entire significance of what remains from that traumatic event to the speech (parole) of the Other, to the speech of every human, even the most helpless, bruised, or destroyed among us. PMID:15287444

  19. Research potential and limitations of trace analyses of cremated remains.

    PubMed

    Harbeck, Michaela; Schleuder, Ramona; Schneider, Julius; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Grupe, Gisela

    2011-01-30

    Human cremation is a common funeral practice all over the world and will presumably become an even more popular choice for interment in the future. Mainly for purposes of identification, there is presently a growing need to perform trace analyses such as DNA or stable isotope analyses on human remains after cremation in order to clarify pending questions in civil or criminal court cases. The aim of this study was to experimentally test the potential and limitations of DNA and stable isotope analyses when conducted on cremated remains. For this purpose, tibiae from modern cattle were experimentally cremated by incinerating the bones in increments of 100°C until a maximum of 1000°C was reached. In addition, cremated human remains were collected from a modern crematory. The samples were investigated to determine level of DNA preservation and stable isotope values (C and N in collagen, C and O in the structural carbonate, and Sr in apatite). Furthermore, we assessed the integrity of microstructural organization, appearance under UV-light, collagen content, as well as the mineral and crystalline organization. This was conducted in order to provide a general background with which to explain observed changes in the trace analyses data sets. The goal is to develop an efficacious screening method for determining at which degree of burning bone still retains its original biological signals. We found that stable isotope analysis of the tested light elements in bone is only possible up to a heat exposure of 300°C while the isotopic signal from strontium remains unaltered even in bones exposed to very high temperatures. DNA-analyses seem theoretically possible up to a heat exposure of 600°C but can not be advised in every case because of the increased risk of contamination. While the macroscopic colour and UV-fluorescence of cremated bone give hints to temperature exposure of the bone's outer surface, its histological appearance can be used as a reliable indicator for the

  20. Reintegration of the regenerated and the remaining tissues during joint regeneration in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takeshi; Yamada, Shigehito

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Urodele amphibians, such as newts, can regenerate a functional limb, including joints, after amputation at any level along the proximal−distal axis of the limb. The blastema can regenerate the limb morphology largely independently of the stump after proximal−distal identity has been established, but the remaining and regenerated tissues must be structurally reintegrated (matched in size and shape). Here we used newt joint regeneration as a model to investigate reintegration, because a functionally interlocking joint requires structural integration between its opposing skeletal elements. After forelimbs were amputated at the elbow joint, the joint was regenerated between the remaining and regenerated skeletal elements. The regenerated cartilage was thick around the amputated joint to make a reciprocally interlocking joint structure with the remaining bone. Furthermore, during regeneration, the extracellular matrix of the remaining tissues was lost, suggesting that the remaining tissues might contribute to the morphogenesis of regenerating cartilage. Our results showed that the area of the regenerated cartilage matched the area of the apposed remaining cartilage, thus contributing to formation of a functional structure.