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Sample records for activity remained stable

  1. Head direction maps remain stable despite grid map fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Jonathan R.; Derdikman, Dori

    2012-01-01

    Areas encoding space in the brain contain both representations of position (place cells and grid cells) and representations of azimuth (head direction cells). Previous studies have already suggested that although grid cells and head direction cells reside in the same brain areas, the calculation of head direction is not dependent on the calculation of position. Here we demonstrate that realignment of grid cells does not affect head direction tuning. We analyzed head direction cell data collected while rats performed a foraging task in a multi-compartment environment (the hairpin maze) vs. an open-field environment, demonstrating that the tuning of head direction cells did not change when the environment was divided into multiple sub-compartments, in the hairpin maze. On the other hand, as we have shown previously (Derdikman et al., 2009), the hexagonal firing pattern expressed by grid cells in the open-field broke down into repeating patterns in similar alleys when rats traversed the multi-compartment hairpin maze. The grid-like firing of conjunctive cells, which express both grid properties and head direction properties in the open-field, showed a selective fragmentation of grid-like firing properties in the hairpin maze, while the head directionality property of the same cells remained unaltered. These findings demonstrate that head direction is not affected during the restructuring of grid cell firing fields as a rat actively moves between compartments, thus strengthening the claim that the head direction system is upstream from or parallel to the grid-place system. PMID:22479237

  2. Does the centre of mass remain stable during complex human postural equilibrium tasks in weightlessness?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapley, Paul; Pozzo, Thierry

    In normal gravity conditions the execution of voluntary movement involves the displacement of body segments as well as the maintenance of a stable reference value for equilibrium control. It has been suggested that centre of mass (CM) projection within the supporting base (BS) is the stabilised reference for voluntary action, and is conserved in weightlessness. The purpose of this study was to determine if the CM is stabilised during whole body reaching movements executed in weightlessness. The reaching task was conducted by two cosmonauts aboard the Russian orbital station MIR, during the Franco-Russian mission ALTAIR, 1993. Movements of reflective markers were recorded using a videocamera, successive images being reconstructed by computer every 40ms. The position of the CM, ankle joint torques and shank and thigh angles were computed for each subject pre- in- and post-flight using a 7-link mathematical model. Results showed that both cosmonauts adopted a backward leaning posture prior to reaching movements. Inflight, the CM was displaced throughout values in the horizontal axis three times those of pre-flight measures. In addition, ankle dorsi flexor torques inflight increased to values double those of pre- and post-flight tests. This study concluded that CM displacements do not remain stable during complex postural equilibrium tasks executed in weightlessness. Furthermore, in the absence of gravity, subjects changed their strategy for producing ankle torque during spaceflight from a forward to a backward leaning posture.

  3. Plant stanol content remains stable during storage of cholesterol-lowering functional foods.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, V; Laakso, P; Kuusisto, P; Niemelä, J; Laitinen, K

    2016-04-01

    Plant stanols reduce the absorption of both dietary and biliary cholesterol. The aim of this study was to examine the stability of plant stanols in the form of plant stanol esters in spreads and biscuits stored under typical storage conditions. The plant stanol content of two commercial margarine-type spreads, containing 35% and 60% absorbable fat, was 6.5 and 6.4 g/100 g after production and remained unaltered when stored at 6 °C for a shelf life of 18 and 22 weeks, respectively. Comparable results were obtained for plant stanol ester ingredient stored under the same conditions and for plant stanol ester-containing biscuits stored at room temperature for up to 74 weeks. Furthermore, the peroxide value and free fatty acids showed that the quality of the food products remained good. The present study demonstrated that plant stanol esters as an ingredient and when added in food products, are stable whilst stored under the appropriate conditions.

  4. Impacts of global warming on phenology of spring leaf unfolding remain stable in the long run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanjiong; Rutishauser, This; Tao, Zexing; Zhong, Shuying; Ge, Quansheng; Dai, Junhu

    2016-07-01

    The impact of spring temperature forcing on the timing of leaf unfolding of plants (temperature sensitivity, ST) is one important indicator of how and to what degree plant species track climate change. Fu et al. (Nature 526:104-107, 2015) found that ST has significantly decreased from the 1980-1994 to the 1999-2013 period for seven mid-latitude tree species in Europe. However, long-term changes in ST over the past 60 years are still not clear. Here, using in situ observations of leaf unfolding for seven dominant European tree species, we analyze the temporal change in ST over decadal time scales extending the data series back to 1951. Our results demonstrate that ST shows no statistically significant change within shifting 30-year windows from 1951 to 2013 and remains stable between 1951-1980 and 1984-2013 (3.6 versus 3.7 days °C-1). This result suggests that the significant decrease in ST over the past 33 years could not be sustained when examining the trends of phenological responses in the long run. Therefore, we could not conclude that tree spring phenology advances will slow down in the future, and the ST changes in warming scenarios are still uncertain.

  5. Sensory Stimulation-Based Complete Protection from Ischemic Stroke Remains Stable at 4 Months Post-Occlusion of MCA.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Aneeka M; Lay, Christopher C; Davis, Melissa F; Frostig, Ron D

    2013-11-01

    Previous research from our lab has shown that when using a rodent model of ischemic stroke (permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion), mild sensory stimulation, when delivered within two hours of ischemic onset, completely protects the cortex from impending ischemic stroke damage when assessed 24 hours post-occlusion. However, the long-term stability of this protection remains unclear. Using intrinsic signal optical imaging for assessment of cortical function, laser speckle imaging for assessment of blood flow, a battery of behavioral tests and cresyl violet for histological assessment, the present study examined whether this protection was long-lasting. When assessed 4 months post-occlusion (this length of time being equivalent to 10-15 years in humans), rats receiving sensory stimulation treatment immediately after ischemic onset exhibit normal neuronal and vascular function, and they are behaviorally and histologically equivalent to healthy controls (surgical shams). Thus, the complete neuroprotection due to cortical activation via sensory stimulation remains stable with time. These findings add support to the translational potential of this sensory stimulation-based treatment.

  6. Quantifying Inter-Laboratory Variability in Stable Isotope Analysis of Ancient Skeletal Remains

    PubMed Central

    Pestle, William J.; Crowley, Brooke E.; Weirauch, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past forty years, stable isotope analysis of bone (and tooth) collagen and hydroxyapatite has become a mainstay of archaeological and paleoanthropological reconstructions of paleodiet and paleoenvironment. Despite this method's frequent use across anthropological subdisciplines (and beyond), the present work represents the first attempt at gauging the effects of inter-laboratory variability engendered by differences in a) sample preparation, and b) analysis (instrumentation, working standards, and data calibration). Replicate analyses of a 14C-dated ancient human bone by twenty-one archaeological and paleoecological stable isotope laboratories revealed significant inter-laboratory isotopic variation for both collagen and carbonate. For bone collagen, we found a sizeable range of 1.8‰ for δ13Ccol and 1.9‰ for δ15Ncol among laboratories, but an interpretatively insignificant average pairwise difference of 0.2‰ and 0.4‰ for δ13Ccol and δ15Ncol respectively. For bone hydroxyapatite the observed range increased to a troublingly large 3.5‰ for δ13Cap and 6.7‰ for δ18Oap, with average pairwise differences of 0.6‰ for δ13Cap and a disquieting 2.0‰ for δ18Oap. In order to assess the effects of preparation versus analysis on isotopic variability among laboratories, a subset of the samples prepared by the participating laboratories were analyzed a second time on the same instrument. Based on this duplicate analysis, it was determined that roughly half of the isotopic variability among laboratories could be attributed to differences in sample preparation, with the other half resulting from differences in analysis (instrumentation, working standards, and data calibration). These findings have serious implications for choices made in the preparation and extraction of target biomolecules, the comparison of results obtained from different laboratories, and the interpretation of small differences in bone collagen and hydroxyapatite isotope values

  7. Activated chemoreceptor arrays remain intact and hexagonally packed

    PubMed Central

    Briegel, Ariane; Beeby, Morgan; Thanbichler, Martin; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Bacterial chemoreceptors cluster into exquisitively sensitive, tunable, highly ordered, polar arrays. While these arrays serve as paradigms of cell signalling in general, it remains unclear what conformational changes transduce signals from the periplasmic tips, where attractants and repellents bind, to the cytoplasmic signalling domains. Conflicting reports support and contest the hypothesis that activation causes large changes in the packing arrangement of the arrays, up to and including their complete disassembly. Using electron cryotomography, here we show that in Caulobacter crescentus, chemoreceptor arrays in cells grown in different media and immediately after exposure to the attractant galactose all exhibit the same 12 nm hexagonal packing arrangement, array size and other structural parameters. ΔcheB and ΔcheR mutants mimicking attractant- or repellent-bound states prior to adaptation also show the same lattice structure. We conclude that signal transduction and amplification must be accomplished through only small, nanoscale conformational changes. PMID:21992450

  8. Long-term effects of STN DBS on mood: psychosocial profiles remain stable in a 3-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Iris; Kryspin-Exner, Ilse; Brücke, Thomas; Volc, Dieter; Alesch, François

    2008-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus significantly improves motor function in patients with severe Parkinson's disease. However, the effects on nonmotor aspects remain uncertain. The present study investigated the effects of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on mood and psychosocial functions in 33 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease in a three year follow-up. Methods Self-rating questionnaires were administered to 33 patients prior to surgery as well as three, six, twelve and 36 months after surgery. Results In the long run, motor function significantly improved after surgery. Mood and psychosocial functions transiently improved at one year but returned to baseline at 36 months after surgery. In addition, we performed cluster and discriminant function analyses and revealed four distinct psychosocial profiles, which remained relatively stable in the course of time. Two profiles featured impaired psychosocial functioning while the other two of them were characterized by greater psychosocial stability. Conclusion Compared to baseline no worsening in mood and psychosocial functions was found three years after electrode implantation. Moreover, patients can be assigned to four distinct psychosocial profiles that are relatively stable in the time course. Since these subtypes already exist preoperatively the extent of psychosocial support can be anticipatory adjusted to the patients' needs in order to enhance coping strategies and compliance. This would allow early detection and even prevention of potential psychiatric adverse events after surgery. Given adequate psychosocial support, these findings imply that patients with mild psychiatric disturbances should not be excluded from surgery. PMID:19014430

  9. Storage-stable foamable polyurethane is activated by heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Polyurethane foamable mixture remains inert in storage unit activated to produce a rapid foaming reaction. The storage-stable foamable composition is spread as a paste on the surface of an expandable structure and, when heated, yields a rigid open-cell polyurethane foam that is self-bondable to the substrate.

  10. Soil bacterial community structure remains stable over a 5-year chronosequence of insect-induced tree mortality.

    PubMed

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Knelman, Joseph E; Jones, Jennifer M; Beals, Stower C; Bowman, William D; Nemergut, Diana R

    2014-01-01

    Extensive tree mortality from insect epidemics has raised concern over possible effects on soil biogeochemical processes. Yet despite the importance of microbes in nutrient cycling, how soil bacterial communities respond to insect-induced tree mortality is largely unknown. We examined soil bacterial community structure (via 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing) and community assembly processes (via null deviation analysis) along a 5-year chronosequence (substituting space for time) of bark beetle-induced tree mortality in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA. We also measured microbial biomass and soil chemistry, and used in situ experiments to assess inorganic nitrogen mineralization rates. We found that bacterial community structure and assembly-which was strongly influenced by stochastic processes-were largely unaffected by tree mortality despite increased soil ammonium ([Formula: see text]) pools and reductions in soil nitrate ([Formula: see text]) pools and net nitrogen mineralization rates after tree mortality. Linear models suggested that microbial biomass and bacterial phylogenetic diversity are significantly correlated with nitrogen mineralization rates of this forested ecosystem. However, given the overall resistance of the bacterial community to disturbance from tree mortality, soil nitrogen processes likely remained relatively stable following tree mortality when considered at larger spatial and longer temporal scales-a supposition supported by the majority of available studies regarding biogeochemical effects of bark beetle infestations in this region. Our results suggest that soil bacterial community resistance to disturbance helps to explain the relatively weak effects of insect-induced tree mortality on soil N and C pools reported across the Rocky Mountains, USA. PMID:25566204

  11. Soil bacterial community structure remains stable over a 5-year chronosequence of insect-induced tree mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Knelman, Joseph E.; Jones, Jennifer M.; Beals, Stower C.; Bowman, William D.; Nemergut, Diana R.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive tree mortality from insect epidemics has raised concern over possible effects on soil biogeochemical processes. Yet despite the importance of microbes in nutrient cycling, how soil bacterial communities respond to insect-induced tree mortality is largely unknown. We examined soil bacterial community structure (via 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing) and community assembly processes (via null deviation analysis) along a 5-year chronosequence (substituting space for time) of bark beetle-induced tree mortality in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA. We also measured microbial biomass and soil chemistry, and used in situ experiments to assess inorganic nitrogen mineralization rates. We found that bacterial community structure and assembly—which was strongly influenced by stochastic processes—were largely unaffected by tree mortality despite increased soil ammonium (NH4+) pools and reductions in soil nitrate (NO3−) pools and net nitrogen mineralization rates after tree mortality. Linear models suggested that microbial biomass and bacterial phylogenetic diversity are significantly correlated with nitrogen mineralization rates of this forested ecosystem. However, given the overall resistance of the bacterial community to disturbance from tree mortality, soil nitrogen processes likely remained relatively stable following tree mortality when considered at larger spatial and longer temporal scales—a supposition supported by the majority of available studies regarding biogeochemical effects of bark beetle infestations in this region. Our results suggest that soil bacterial community resistance to disturbance helps to explain the relatively weak effects of insect-induced tree mortality on soil N and C pools reported across the Rocky Mountains, USA. PMID:25566204

  12. Reading Ability as an Estimator of Premorbid Intelligence: Does It Remain Stable Among Ethnically Diverse HIV+ Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, J. Pat; Fellows, Robert P.; Rivera-Mindt, Monica; Morgello, Susan; Byrd, Desiree A.

    2015-01-01

    The Wide Range Achievement Test, 3rd edition, Reading-Recognition subtest (WRAT-3 RR) is an established measure of premorbid ability. Furthermore, its long-term reliability is not well documented, particularly in diverse populations with CNS-relevant disease. Objective: We examined test-retest reliability of the WRAT-3 RR over time in an HIV+ sample of predominantly racial/ethnic minority adults. Method: Participants (N = 88) completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery, including the WRAT-3 RR, on at least two separate study visits. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were computed using scores from baseline and follow-up assessments to determine the test-retest reliability of the WRAT-3 RR across racial/ethnic groups and changes in medical (immunological) and clinical (neurocognitive) factors. Additionally, Fisher’s Z tests were used to determine the significance of the differences between ICCs. Results: The average test-retest interval was 58.7 months (SD=36.4). The overall WRAT-3 RR test-retest reliability was high (r = .97, p < .001), and remained robust across all demographic, medical, and clinical variables (all r’s > .92). Intraclass correlation coefficients did not differ significantly between the subgroups tested (all Fisher’s Z p’s > .05). Conclusions: Overall, this study supports the appropriateness of word-reading tests, such as the WRAT-3 RR, for use as stable premorbid IQ estimates among ethnically diverse groups. Moreover, this study supports the reliability of this measure in the context of change in health and neurocognitive status, and in lengthy inter-test intervals. These findings offer strong rationale for reading as a “hold” test, even in the presence of a chronic, variable disease such as HIV. PMID:26689235

  13. The hippocampus remains activated over the long term for the retrieval of truly episodic memories.

    PubMed

    Harand, Caroline; Bertran, Françoise; La Joie, Renaud; Landeau, Brigitte; Mézenge, Florence; Desgranges, Béatrice; Peigneux, Philippe; Eustache, Francis; Rauchs, Géraldine

    2012-01-01

    The role of the hippocampus in declarative memory consolidation is a matter of intense debate. We investigated the neural substrates of memory retrieval for recent and remote information using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). 18 young, healthy participants learned a series of pictures. Then, during two fMRI recognition sessions, 3 days and 3 months later, they had to determine whether they recognized or not each picture using the "Remember/Know" procedure. Presentation of the same learned images at both delays allowed us to track the evolution of memories and distinguish consistently episodic memories from those that were initially episodic and then became familiar or semantic over time and were retrieved without any contextual detail. Hippocampal activation decreased over time for initially episodic, later semantic memories, but remained stable for consistently episodic ones, at least in its posterior part. For both types of memories, neocortical activations were observed at both delays, notably in the ventromedial prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. These activations may reflect a gradual reorganization of memory traces within neural networks. Our data indicate maintenance and strengthening of hippocampal and cortico-cortical connections in the consolidation and retrieval of episodic memories over time, in line with the Multiple Trace theory (Nadel and Moscovitch, 1997). At variance, memories becoming semantic over time consolidate through strengthening of cortico-cortical connections and progressive disengagement of the hippocampus. PMID:22937055

  14. Health benefits in 2007: premium increases fall to an eight-year low, while offer rates and enrollment remain stable.

    PubMed

    Claxton, Gary; Gabel, Jon; DiJulio, Bianca; Pickreign, Jeremy; Whitmore, Heidi; Finder, Benjamin; Jacobs, Paul; Hawkins, Samantha

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a survey of 1,997 public and private employers with three or more workers, conducted during the first five months of 2007. Premiums increased 6.1 percent from spring 2006 to spring 2007--the lowest rate of increase since 1999. Enrollment in different types of health plans did not change significantly, and high-deductible health plans with a savings option did not experience major growth in enrollment. Despite the comparatively modest increase in premiums during a period of strong economic growth, the percentage of workers obtaining coverage from their employer remained statistically unchanged.

  15. Stable isotopic characterization of active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    PubMed

    Jasper, J P; Westenberger, B J; Spencer, J A; Buhse, L F; Nasr, M

    2004-04-01

    Stable isotopic characterization or "fingerprinting" of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) is a highly-specific means of defining the provenance of these pharmaceutical materials. The isotopic analysts in this study were provided with 20 blind samples of four APIs (tropicamide, hydrocortisone, quinine HCL, and tryptophan) from one-to-five production batch(es) from one-to-five manufacturer(s). Only the chemical identity of the APIs was initially provided to the isotopic analysts. Depending on the API chemical composition, isotopic ratios of either three or four elements (13C/12C, 15N/14N, 18O/16O, and/or D/H) were measured by either elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS: carbon (delta13C) and nitrogen (delta15N)) or by thermal conversion-EA/IRMS (TCEA/IRMS; hydrogen (deltaD) and oxygen (delta15N)); in all cases, the isotopic results are reported in the standard delta-notation which represents part-per-thousand () variations from the isotopic ratios of international standards. The stable isotopic analyses of the four suites of APIs spanned broad ranges in absolute value (deltadelta) and in estimated specificity (a product of dynamic ranges (DR, unitless)--note that these are upper limits of specificity because some of these isotope values may be partially interdependent). The five samples of tropicamide from one production batch and one manufacturer demonstrated the narrowest ranges (deltadelta13C=0.13 ; deltadelta15N=0.52 ; deltadelta18O=0.24 ; deltadeltaD=2.8 ) and the smallest specificity of 1:30.9. By contrast, the five samples of tryptophan that came from five separate manufacturers had some of the widest isotopic ranges observed (deltadelta13C=21.32 ; deltadelta15N=5.26 ; deltadelta18O=22.07 ; deltadeltaD=55.3 ) and had the largest specificity of 1:19.6 x 10(6). The isotopic provenance of the four suites of APIs readily emerged from bivariate plots of selected isotope ratios, particularly deltaD versus delta18O.

  16. Field Documentation of Unusual Post-Mortem Arthropod Activity on Human Remains.

    PubMed

    Pechal, Jennifer L; Benbow, M Eric; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Crippen, Tawni L; Tarone, Aaron M; Singh, Baneshwar; Lenhart, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    During a forensic investigation, the presence of physical marks on human remains can influence the interpretation of events related to the death of an individual. Some tissue injury on human remains can be misinterpreted as ante- or peri-mortem wounds by an investigator when in reality the markings resulted from post-mortem arthropod activity. Unusual entomological data were collected during a study examining the decomposition of a set of human remains in San Marcos, Texas. An adult female Pediodectes haldemani (Girard) (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) and an Armadillidium cf. vulgare (Isopoda: Armadilidiidae) were documented feeding on the remains. Both arthropods produced physical marks or artifacts on the remains that could be misinterpreted as attack, abuse, neglect, or torture. Additionally, red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), were observed constructing structures in the mark produced by the P. haldemani feeding. These observations provide insight into the potential of post-mortem arthropod damage to human remains, which previously had not been described for these taxa, and therefore, physical artifacts on any remains found in similar circumstances may result from arthropod activity and not ante- or peri-mortem wounds. PMID:26336287

  17. Field Documentation of Unusual Post-Mortem Arthropod Activity on Human Remains.

    PubMed

    Pechal, Jennifer L; Benbow, M Eric; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Crippen, Tawni L; Tarone, Aaron M; Singh, Baneshwar; Lenhart, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    During a forensic investigation, the presence of physical marks on human remains can influence the interpretation of events related to the death of an individual. Some tissue injury on human remains can be misinterpreted as ante- or peri-mortem wounds by an investigator when in reality the markings resulted from post-mortem arthropod activity. Unusual entomological data were collected during a study examining the decomposition of a set of human remains in San Marcos, Texas. An adult female Pediodectes haldemani (Girard) (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) and an Armadillidium cf. vulgare (Isopoda: Armadilidiidae) were documented feeding on the remains. Both arthropods produced physical marks or artifacts on the remains that could be misinterpreted as attack, abuse, neglect, or torture. Additionally, red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), were observed constructing structures in the mark produced by the P. haldemani feeding. These observations provide insight into the potential of post-mortem arthropod damage to human remains, which previously had not been described for these taxa, and therefore, physical artifacts on any remains found in similar circumstances may result from arthropod activity and not ante- or peri-mortem wounds.

  18. The antimicrobial activity of embalming chemicals and topical disinfectants on the microbial flora of human remains.

    PubMed

    Burke, P A; Sheffner, A L

    1976-10-01

    The antimicrobial activity of embalming chemicals an topical disinfectants was evaluated to determine the degree of disinfection achieved during the embalming of human remains. The administration of arterial and cavity embalming chemicals resulted in a 99% reduction of the postmortem microbial population after 2 hours of contact. This level of disinfection was maintained for the 24 hours test period. Topical disinfection of the body orifices was also observed. Therefore, it is probable that present embalming practices reduce the hazard from transmission of potentially infectious microbial agents within the immediate environment of embalmed human remains.

  19. Palaeodiet reconstruction in a woman with probable celiac disease: a stable isotope analysis of bone remains from the archaeological site of Cosa (Italy).

    PubMed

    Scorrano, Gabriele; Brilli, Mauro; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Giustini, Francesca; Pacciani, Elsa; Chilleri, Filberto; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Rickards, Olga

    2014-07-01

    Stable isotope analysis in the reconstruction of human palaeodiets can yield clues to early human subsistence strategies, origins and history of farming and pastoralist societies, and intra- and intergroup social differentiation. In the last 10 years, the method has been extended to the pathological investigation. Stable isotope analysis to better understand a diet-related disease: celiac disease in ancient human bones was carried out. To do this, we analyzed the nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of human (n = 37) and faunal (n = 8) bone remains from the archaeological site of Cosa at Ansedonia, on the Tyrrhenian coast near Orbetello (Tuscany), including the skeletal remains of a young woman (late 1st century-early 2nd century Common Era [CE]) with morphological and genetic features suggestive of celiac disease. We compared the young woman's isotopic data with those of other individuals recovered at the same site but from two later time periods (6th century CE; 11-12th century CE) and with literature data from other Italian archaeological sites dating to the same period. Her collagen δ(13) C and δ(15) N values differed from those of the samples at the same site, and from most but not all of the contemporary sites. Although the woman's diet appears distinct, chronic malnutrition resulting from severe malabsorption of essential nutrients due to celiac disease may have affected the isotopic composition of her bone collagen. PMID:24706415

  20. Palaeodiet reconstruction in a woman with probable celiac disease: a stable isotope analysis of bone remains from the archaeological site of Cosa (Italy).

    PubMed

    Scorrano, Gabriele; Brilli, Mauro; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Giustini, Francesca; Pacciani, Elsa; Chilleri, Filberto; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Rickards, Olga

    2014-07-01

    Stable isotope analysis in the reconstruction of human palaeodiets can yield clues to early human subsistence strategies, origins and history of farming and pastoralist societies, and intra- and intergroup social differentiation. In the last 10 years, the method has been extended to the pathological investigation. Stable isotope analysis to better understand a diet-related disease: celiac disease in ancient human bones was carried out. To do this, we analyzed the nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of human (n = 37) and faunal (n = 8) bone remains from the archaeological site of Cosa at Ansedonia, on the Tyrrhenian coast near Orbetello (Tuscany), including the skeletal remains of a young woman (late 1st century-early 2nd century Common Era [CE]) with morphological and genetic features suggestive of celiac disease. We compared the young woman's isotopic data with those of other individuals recovered at the same site but from two later time periods (6th century CE; 11-12th century CE) and with literature data from other Italian archaeological sites dating to the same period. Her collagen δ(13) C and δ(15) N values differed from those of the samples at the same site, and from most but not all of the contemporary sites. Although the woman's diet appears distinct, chronic malnutrition resulting from severe malabsorption of essential nutrients due to celiac disease may have affected the isotopic composition of her bone collagen.

  1. A few-polyhedra mutant and wild-type nucleopolyhedrovirus remain as a stable polymorphism during serial coinfection in Trichoplusia ni.

    PubMed

    Bull, James C; Godfray, H C J; O'Reilly, David R

    2003-04-01

    Few-polyhedra (FP) mutants of nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs) are a well-known phenomenon during serial passage of virus in cell culture. Under these circumstances such mutants produce low yields of occlusion bodies (OBs) and poorly occlude virions, but they are selected for through advantageous rates of budded virus replication. Spontaneous insertion of transposable elements originating from host cell DNA into the viral fp25 gene has been shown to be a common cause of the phenotype. A model of NPV population genetics predicts that mutants with these characteristics might persist within stable polymorphisms in viral populations during serial passage of virus in vivo. However, this hypothesis was previously untested, and FP mutants have not been recovered from field isolates of NPVs. We isolated and characterized an FP mutant that arose during routine passage of Autographa californica multinucleocapsid NPV (AcMNPV) in cell culture and identified a transposable element within the fp25 gene. We tracked the fates of coinfecting wild-type and FP mutant AcMNPV strains through serial passage in fifth-instar Trichoplusia ni larvae. The levels of both strains remained stable during successive rounds of infection. We applied the data obtained to a model of NPV population genetics in order to derive the frequency distribution of the multiplicity of cell infection in infected insects and estimated that 4.3 baculovirus genomes per OB-producing cell would account for this equilibrium.

  2. Stable Isotopic signatures of Adélie penguin remains provide long-term paleodietary records in Northern Victoria Land (Ross Sea, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzini, Sandra; Baroni, Carlo; Fallick, Anthony Edward; Baneschi, Ilaria; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Dallai, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    The stable isotopes geochemistry of carbon and nitrogen provides a powerful tools for investigating in animal dietary patterns and shifts during the past. The signature of C and N isotopes provide direct information about the diet of an individual and its dietary patterns, especially when the dietary sources consist of prey from different trophic levels (i.e. different C and N isotopic composition) (DeNiro and Epstein 1978, Minawaga and Wada 1984, Koch et al. 1994, Hobson 1995). By analyzing the isotopic composition of penguin remains, we present a new detailed Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) paleodietary record for the area of Terra Nova Bay (Victoria Land, Ross Sea). Adélie penguins primarily feed on fish (mainly the silverfish Pleuragramma antarcticum) and krill (Euphausia superba, Euphausia cristallorophias) (Ainley 2002, Lorenzini et al. 2009) that belonging to two different trophic levels. Consequently, they are characterized by different isotopic signatures. Specifically, we analyzed 13C/12C and 15N/14N ratios of more than one thousand of modern and fossil Adélie penguin eggshell and guano samples collected from ornithogenic soils (penguin guano-formed) dated back to ≈7,200 years BP (Baroni and Orombelli 1994, Lambert et al. 2002, Baroni and Hall 2004, Hall et al. 2006). The expanded database of stable isotope values obtained from Adélie penguin remains define a detailed paleodietary record with an excellent temporal continuity over all the investigated time period. Our data indicate a significant dietary shift between fish and krill, with a gradual decrease from past to present time in the proportion of fish compared to krill in Adélie penguin diet. From 7200 yrs BP to 2000 yrs BP, δ13C and δ15N values indicate fish as the most eaten prey. The dietary contribution of lower-trophic prey in penguin diet started becoming evident not earlier than 2000 yrs BP, when the δ13C values reveal a mixed diet based on fish and krill consumption. Modern

  3. Highly Stable and Active Catalyst for Sabatier Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Jianli; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active Ru/TiO2 catalysts for Sabatier reaction have been developed. The catalysts have shown to be stable under repeated shutting down/startup conditions. When the Ru/TiO2 catalyst is coated on the engineered substrate Fe-CrAlY felt, activity enhancement is more than doubled when compared with an identically prepared engineered catalyst made from commercial Degussa catalyst. Also, bimetallic Ru-Rh/TiO2 catalysts show high activity at high throughput.

  4. Deadlift muscle force and activation under stable and unstable conditions.

    PubMed

    Chulvi-Medrano, Iván; García-Massó, Xavier; Colado, Juan C; Pablos, Carlos; de Moraes, Joao Alves; Fuster, Maria A

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the production of force and paraspinal muscle activity between deadlifts carried out in a standard way and with different instability devices (Bosu and T-Bow). Deadlifts involve the performance of muscle activities with dynamic and isometric characteristics. Thirty-one subjects participated voluntarily in the study. Initially, they performed an isometric test for 5 seconds in each condition. After that, they performed a set of 5 repetitions with 70% of the maximum isometric force obtained in each one of the previously evaluated conditions. During the isometric tests, records of electromyographic activity and force production were obtained, whereas during the dynamic tests, only the electromyographic activity was registered. The subjects produced more force and muscle activity on the stable surface than under the other conditions during the isometric test (p < 0.05), and the same differences in muscle activity were observed during the dynamic test (p < 0.05). These data show that the performance of deadlifts under stable conditions favors a higher production of maximum strength and muscle activity. Therefore, we conclude that the use of instability devices in deadlift training does not increase performance, nor does it provide greater activation of the paraspinal muscles, leading us to question their value in the performance of other types of exercises. PMID:20885194

  5. [Effects of no-tillage and stubble-remaining on soil enzyme activities in broadcasting rice seedlings paddy field].

    PubMed

    Ren, Wan-Jun; Huang, Yun; Wu, Jin-Xiu; Liu, Dai-Yin; Yang, Wen-Yu

    2011-11-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of four cultivation modes (conventional tillage, no-tillage, conventional tillage + stubble-remaining, and no-tillage + stubble-remaining) on the activities of urease, acid phosphatase, protease, and cellulose in different soil layers in a broadcasting rice seedlings paddy field. Under the four cultivation modes, the activities of test enzymes were higher in upper than in deeper soil layers, and had a greater difference between the soil layers under no-tillage + stubble-remaining. In upper soil layers, the activities of test enzymes were higher in the treatments of no-tillage than in the treatments of conventional tillage, being the highest under no-tillage + stubble-remaining and the lowest under conventional tillage. In deeper soil layers, the test enzyme activities were the highest under conventional tillage + stubble-remaining, followed by no-tillage + stubble-remaining, no-tillage, and conventional tillage. During the growth period of rice, soil urease and cellulose activities were lower at tillering stage, increased to the maximum at booting stage, and decreased then, soil acid phosphatase activity was higher at tillering stage but lower at elongating stage, whereas soil protease activity peaked at tillering and heading stages.

  6. Remaining Uncertainties in the Causes of Past and Future Atlantic Hurricane Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossin, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    There is no debate that hurricane activity in the North Atlantic has increased substantially since the relatively quiescent period of the 1970s and 1980s, but there is still uncertainty in the dominant cause of the increase. Increases in anthropogenic greenhouse gases (aGHG) have contributed to the observed increase in tropical sea surface temperatures (SST) over the past century, while shorter-term decadal variability in regions where hurricanes form and track is generally dominated by 1) internal variability, 2) natural factors such as volcanic eruptions and mineral aerosol variability, and 3) changes in anthropogenic aerosols. Direct SST warming from globally well-mixed aGHG is understood to have a much smaller effect on hurricane formation and intensification compared to the effect of regional warming due to changes in the three factors noted above. While most recent papers implicate both internal and external anthropogenic causes for the presently heightened Atlantic hurricane activity, some show that internal variability dominates and others show that anthropogenic factors dominate. In the Atlantic, model projection-based consensus indicates no change in storm frequency over the next century but the uncertainty is large and spans -50% to +50%. Mean storm intensity and rainfall rates are projected to increase with continued warming, and the models tend to agree better when projecting these measures of activity. Models that are capable of producing very strong hurricanes usually project increases in the frequency of the most intense hurricanes. This measure is highly relevant to physical and societal impacts. In the Atlantic, model-based consensus indicates substantial increases in the strongest hurricanes, but the uncertainty is large and spans -100% to +200% change over the next century.

  7. The active outer shell of Earth: What remains to be explored in carbon and life interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boetius, Antje

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in methods and technologies have allowed us to explore the interaction between life and abiotic resources from nano to megascales in space and time, and this has set new challenges to the geosciences. This lecture aims at discussing key biological factors in the question of the dynamics of carbon reservoirs and fluxes on Earth, and the challenges to the geosciences to incorporate and further this knowledge. Humans themselves as one such biological factor have considerably changed the dynamics of carbon and other elements, with repercussions to most other life forms on Earth. Which other life forms shape carbon fluxes and reservoirs, and what do we know about their key traits in catalyzing geochemical reactions, their past and their future? I will use case studies from my own research field - geobiology of the oceans and the cryosphere - and from other geoscience areas to highlight the considerable non-linearity introduced by life to element fluxes and the environment; and discuss advances but also gaps in knowledge and research approaches concerning assessing and predicting carbon transformations in the active outer shell of Earth.

  8. cVEMP morphology changes with recording electrode position, but single motor unit activity remains constant.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Sally M; Colebatch, James G; Borire, Adeniyi; Straumann, Dominik; Weber, Konrad P

    2016-04-15

    Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) recorded over the lower quarter of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle in normal subjects may have opposite polarity to those recorded over the midpoint. It has thus been suggested that vestibular projections to the lower part of SCM might be excitatory rather than inhibitory. We tested the hypothesis that the SCM muscle receives both inhibitory and excitatory vestibular inputs. We recorded cVEMPs in 10 normal subjects with surface electrodes placed at multiple sites along the anterior (sternal) component of the SCM muscle. We compared several reference sites: sternum, ipsilateral and contralateral earlobes, and contralateral wrist. In five subjects, single motor unit responses were recorded at the upper, middle, and lower parts of the SCM muscle using concentric needle electrodes. The surface cVEMP had the typical positive-negative polarity at the midpoint of the SCM muscle. In all subjects, as the recording electrode was moved toward each insertion point, p13 amplitude became smaller and p13 latency increased, then the polarity inverted to a negative-positive waveform (n1-p1). Changing the reference site did not affect reflex polarity. There was a significant short-latency change in activity in 61/63 single motor units, and in each case this was a decrease or gap in firing, indicating an inhibitory reflex. Single motor unit recordings showed that the reflex was inhibitory along the entire SCM muscle. The cVEMP surface waveform inversion near the mastoid and sternal insertion points likely reflects volume conduction of the potential occurring with increasing distance from the motor point. PMID:26796756

  9. How a protein can remain stable in a solvent with high content of urea: insights from molecular dynamics simulation of Candida antarctica lipase B in urea : choline chloride deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Monhemi, Hassan; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Bozorgmehr, Mohammad Reza

    2014-07-28

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are utilized as green and inexpensive alternatives to classical ionic liquids. It has been known that some of DESs can be used as solvent in the enzymatic reactions to obtain very green chemical processes. DESs are quite poorly understood at the molecular level. Moreover, we do not know much about the enzyme microstructure in such systems. For example, how some hydrolase can remain active and stable in a deep eutectic solvent including 9 M of urea? In this study, the molecular dynamics of DESs as a liquid was simulated at the molecular level. Urea : choline chloride as a well-known eutectic mixture was chosen as a model DES. The behavior of the lipase as a biocatalyst was studied in this system. For comparison, the enzyme structure was also simulated in 8M urea. The thermal stability of the enzyme was also evaluated in DESs, water, and 8M urea. The enzyme showed very good conformational stability in the urea : choline chloride mixture with about 66% urea (9 M) even at high temperatures. The results are in good agreement with recent experimental observations. In contrast, complete enzyme denaturation occurred in 8M urea with only 12% urea in water. It was found that urea molecules denature the enzyme by interrupting the intra-chain hydrogen bonds in a "direct denaturation mechanism". However, in a urea : choline chloride deep eutectic solvent, as a result of hydrogen bonding with choline and chloride ions, urea molecules have a low diffusion coefficient and cannot reach the protein domains. Interestingly, urea, choline, and chloride ions form hydrogen bonds with the surface residues of the enzyme which, instead of lipase denaturation, leads to greater enzyme stability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in which the microstructural properties of a macromolecule are examined in a deep eutectic solvent.

  10. How a protein can remain stable in a solvent with high content of urea: insights from molecular dynamics simulation of Candida antarctica lipase B in urea : choline chloride deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Monhemi, Hassan; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Bozorgmehr, Mohammad Reza

    2014-07-28

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are utilized as green and inexpensive alternatives to classical ionic liquids. It has been known that some of DESs can be used as solvent in the enzymatic reactions to obtain very green chemical processes. DESs are quite poorly understood at the molecular level. Moreover, we do not know much about the enzyme microstructure in such systems. For example, how some hydrolase can remain active and stable in a deep eutectic solvent including 9 M of urea? In this study, the molecular dynamics of DESs as a liquid was simulated at the molecular level. Urea : choline chloride as a well-known eutectic mixture was chosen as a model DES. The behavior of the lipase as a biocatalyst was studied in this system. For comparison, the enzyme structure was also simulated in 8M urea. The thermal stability of the enzyme was also evaluated in DESs, water, and 8M urea. The enzyme showed very good conformational stability in the urea : choline chloride mixture with about 66% urea (9 M) even at high temperatures. The results are in good agreement with recent experimental observations. In contrast, complete enzyme denaturation occurred in 8M urea with only 12% urea in water. It was found that urea molecules denature the enzyme by interrupting the intra-chain hydrogen bonds in a "direct denaturation mechanism". However, in a urea : choline chloride deep eutectic solvent, as a result of hydrogen bonding with choline and chloride ions, urea molecules have a low diffusion coefficient and cannot reach the protein domains. Interestingly, urea, choline, and chloride ions form hydrogen bonds with the surface residues of the enzyme which, instead of lipase denaturation, leads to greater enzyme stability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in which the microstructural properties of a macromolecule are examined in a deep eutectic solvent. PMID:24930496

  11. Optically pure, water-stable metallo-helical ‘flexicate’ assemblies with antibiotic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howson, Suzanne E.; Bolhuis, Albert; Brabec, Viktor; Clarkson, Guy J.; Malina, Jaroslav; Rodger, Alison; Scott, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The helicates—chiral assemblies of two or more metal atoms linked by short or relatively rigid multidentate organic ligands—may be regarded as non-peptide mimetics of α-helices because they are of comparable size and have shown some relevant biological activity. Unfortunately, these beautiful helical compounds have remained difficult to use in the medicinal arena because they contain mixtures of isomers, cannot be optimized for specific purposes, are insoluble, or are too difficult to synthesize. Instead, we have now prepared thermodynamically stable single enantiomers of monometallic units connected by organic linkers. Our highly adaptable self-assembly approach enables the rapid preparation of ranges of water-stable, helicate-like compounds with high stereochemical purity. One such iron(II) ‘flexicate’ system exhibits specific interactions with DNA, promising antimicrobial activity against a Gram-positive bacterium (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA252), but also, unusually, a Gram-negative bacterium (Escherichia coli, MC4100), as well as low toxicity towards a non-mammalian model organism (Caenorhabditis elegans).

  12. Model of complex chiral drug metabolic systems and numerical simulation of the remaining chirality toward analysis of dynamical pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Yoshiyuki; Asahi, Toru

    2015-05-21

    In this study, systems of complicated pathways involved in chiral drug metabolism were investigated. The development of chiral drugs resulted in significant improvement in the remedies available for the treatment of various severe sicknesses. Enantiopure drugs undergo various biological transformations that involve chiral inversion and thus result in the generation of multiple enantiomeric metabolites. Identification of the specific active substances determining a given drug׳s efficacy among such a mixture of different metabolites remains a challenge. To comprehend this complexity, we constructed a mathematical model representing the complicated metabolic pathways simultaneously involving chiral inversion. Moreover, this model is applied to the metabolism of thalidomide, which has recently been revived as a potentially effective prescription drug for a number of intractable diseases. The numerical simulation results indicate that retained chirality in the metabolites reflects the original chirality of the unmetabolized drug, and a higher level of enantiomeric purity is preserved during spontaneous degradation. In addition, chirality remaining after equilibration is directly related to the rate constant not only for chiral inversion but also for generation and degradation. Furthermore, the retention of chirality is quantitatively predictable using this combination of kinetic parameters. Our simulation results well explain the behavior of thalidomide in the practical biological experimental data. Therefore, this model promises a comprehensive understanding of dynamic metabolic systems involving chiral drugs that express multiple enantiospecific drug efficacies.

  13. Model of complex chiral drug metabolic systems and numerical simulation of the remaining chirality toward analysis of dynamical pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Yoshiyuki; Asahi, Toru

    2015-05-21

    In this study, systems of complicated pathways involved in chiral drug metabolism were investigated. The development of chiral drugs resulted in significant improvement in the remedies available for the treatment of various severe sicknesses. Enantiopure drugs undergo various biological transformations that involve chiral inversion and thus result in the generation of multiple enantiomeric metabolites. Identification of the specific active substances determining a given drug׳s efficacy among such a mixture of different metabolites remains a challenge. To comprehend this complexity, we constructed a mathematical model representing the complicated metabolic pathways simultaneously involving chiral inversion. Moreover, this model is applied to the metabolism of thalidomide, which has recently been revived as a potentially effective prescription drug for a number of intractable diseases. The numerical simulation results indicate that retained chirality in the metabolites reflects the original chirality of the unmetabolized drug, and a higher level of enantiomeric purity is preserved during spontaneous degradation. In addition, chirality remaining after equilibration is directly related to the rate constant not only for chiral inversion but also for generation and degradation. Furthermore, the retention of chirality is quantitatively predictable using this combination of kinetic parameters. Our simulation results well explain the behavior of thalidomide in the practical biological experimental data. Therefore, this model promises a comprehensive understanding of dynamic metabolic systems involving chiral drugs that express multiple enantiospecific drug efficacies. PMID:25791284

  14. Fatty acid synthesis and pyruvate metabolism pathways remain active in dihydroartemisinin-induced dormant ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nanhua; LaCrue, Alexis N; Teuscher, Franka; Waters, Norman C; Gatton, Michelle L; Kyle, Dennis E; Cheng, Qin

    2014-08-01

    Artemisinin (ART)-based combination therapy (ACT) is used as the first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria worldwide. However, despite high potency and rapid action, there is a high rate of recrudescence associated with ART monotherapy or ACT long before the recent emergence of ART resistance. ART-induced ring-stage dormancy and recovery have been implicated as possible causes of recrudescence; however, little is known about the characteristics of dormant parasites, including whether dormant parasites are metabolically active. We investigated the transcription of 12 genes encoding key enzymes in various metabolic pathways in P. falciparum during dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-induced dormancy and recovery. Transcription analysis showed an immediate downregulation for 10 genes following exposure to DHA but continued transcription of 2 genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins. Transcription of several additional genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins, particularly of genes encoding enzymes in pyruvate metabolism and fatty acid synthesis pathways, was also maintained. Additions of inhibitors for biotin acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase and enoyl-acyl carrier reductase of the fatty acid synthesis pathways delayed the recovery of dormant parasites by 6 and 4 days, respectively, following DHA treatment. Our results demonstrate that most metabolic pathways are downregulated in DHA-induced dormant parasites. In contrast, fatty acid and pyruvate metabolic pathways remain active. These findings highlight new targets to interrupt recovery of parasites from ART-induced dormancy and to reduce the rate of recrudescence following ART treatment.

  15. Stable aqueous dispersions of optically and electronically active phosphorene

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joohoon; Wells, Spencer A.; Wood, Joshua D.; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Liu, Xiaolong; Ryder, Christopher R.; Zhu, Jian; Guest, Jeffrey R.; Husko, Chad A.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and exploiting the remarkable optical and electronic properties of phosphorene require mass production methods that avoid chemical degradation. Although solution-based strategies have been developed for scalable exfoliation of black phosphorus, these techniques have thus far used anhydrous organic solvents in an effort to minimize exposure to known oxidants, but at the cost of limited exfoliation yield and flake size distribution. Here, we present an alternative phosphorene production method based on surfactant-assisted exfoliation and postprocessing of black phosphorus in deoxygenated water. From comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic analysis, this approach is shown to yield phosphorene dispersions that are stable, highly concentrated, and comparable to micromechanically exfoliated phosphorene in structure and chemistry. Due to the high exfoliation efficiency of this process, the resulting phosphorene flakes are thinner than anhydrous organic solvent dispersions, thus allowing the observation of layer-dependent photoluminescence down to the monolayer limit. Furthermore, to demonstrate preservation of electronic properties following solution processing, the aqueous-exfoliated phosphorene flakes are used in field-effect transistors with high drive currents and current modulation ratios. Overall, this method enables the isolation and mass production of few-layer phosphorene, which will accelerate ongoing efforts to realize a diverse range of phosphorene-based applications. PMID:27092006

  16. Ternary dendritic nanowires as highly active and stable multifunctional electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoojin; Jin, Haneul; Kim, Ho Young; Yoon, Jisun; Park, Jongsik; Baik, Hionsuck; Joo, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2016-08-18

    Multimetallic nanocatalysts with a controlled structure can provide enhanced catalytic activity and durability by exploiting electronic, geometric, and strain effects. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel ternary nanocatalyst based on Mo doped PtNi dendritic nanowires (Mo-PtNi DNW) and its bifunctional application in the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) at the anode and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode for direct methanol fuel cells. An unprecedented Mo-PtNi DNW structure can combine multiple structural attributes of the 1D nanowire morphology and dendritic surfaces. In the MOR, Mo-PtNi DNW exhibits superior activity to Pt/C and Mo doped Pt dendritic nanowires (Mo-Pt DNW), and excellent durability. Furthermore, Mo-PtNi DNW demonstrates excellent activity and durability for the ORR. This work highlights the important role of compositional and structural control in nanocatalysts for boosting catalytic performances. PMID:27507777

  17. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality. PMID:27640818

  18. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport.

    PubMed

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality. PMID:27640818

  19. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-09-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality.

  20. A Stable, Commercially Available Sulfenyl Chloride for the Activation of Thioglycosides in Conjunction with Silver Trifluoromethanesulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Crich, David; Cai, Feng; Yang, Fan

    2008-01-01

    p-Nitrobenzenesulfenyl chloride is a stable commercially available sulfenyl chloride that, in conjunction with silver triflate, cleanly activates a wide range of thioglycosides for glycosylation at −78 °C in CH2Cl2. PMID:18374318

  1. Enzymatic activity inside and outside of water-stable aggregates in soils under different land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbuz, S. A.; Yaroslavtseva, N. V.; Kholodov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    A method is presented for assessing the distribution of enzymatic activity inside and outside of water-stable aggregates. Two samples of water-stable aggregates >1 mm have been isolated from dry aggregates of 1-2 mm. To determine the enzymatic activity, a substrate has been added to one of the samples without disaggregation; the other sample has been preliminarily disaggregated. Enzymatic activity within waterstable aggregates has been assessed from the difference between the obtained results under the supposition that the penetration of substrate within the water-saturated aggregates is hampered, and enzymatic reactions occur only at the periphery. The levels and distributions of enzymatic (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and catalase) activities in water-stable aggregates of soddy-podzolic soils under forest and plowland and typical chernozems of long-term field experiments have been studied. The peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and catalase activities of water-stable aggregates vary from 6 to 23, from 7 to 30, and from 5 to 7 mmol/(g h), respectively. The ratio between the enzymatic activities inside and outside of soil aggregates showed a higher dependence on soil type and land use, as well as on the input of organic matter and the structural state, than the general activity level in water-stable aggregates.

  2. Stable heterologous expression of biologically active terpenoids in green plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Ikram, N. Kusaira B. K.; Zhan, Xin; Pan, Xi-Wu; King, Brian C.; Simonsen, Henrik T.

    2015-01-01

    Plants biosynthesize a great diversity of biologically active small molecules of interest for fragrances, flavors, and pharmaceuticals. Among specialized metabolites, terpenoids represent the greatest molecular diversity. Many terpenoids are very complex, and total chemical synthesis often requires many steps and difficult chemical reactions, resulting in a low final yield or incorrect stereochemistry. Several drug candidates with terpene skeletons are difficult to obtain by chemical synthesis due to their large number of chiral centers. Thus, biological production remains the preferred method for industrial production for many of these compounds. However, because these chemicals are often found in low abundance in the native plant, or are produced in plants which are difficult to cultivate, there is great interest in engineering increased production or expression of the biosynthetic pathways in heterologous hosts. Although there are many examples of successful engineering of microbes such as yeast or bacteria to produce these compounds, this often requires extensive changes to the host organism's metabolism. Optimization of plant gene expression, post-translational protein modifications, subcellular localization, and other factors often present challenges. To address the future demand for natural products used as drugs, new platforms are being established that are better suited for heterologous production of plant metabolites. Specifically, direct metabolic engineering of plants can provide effective heterologous expression for production of valuable plant-derived natural products. In this review, our primary focus is on small terpenoids and we discuss the benefits of plant expression platforms and provide several successful examples of stable production of small terpenoids in plants. PMID:25852702

  3. Development of a New Generation of Stable, Tunable, and Catalytically Active Nanoparticles Produced by the Helium Nanodroplet Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiyuan; Ridge, Claron J; Zhao, Shen; Zakharov, Dmitri; Cen, Jiajie; Tong, Xiao; Connors, Eoghan; Su, Dong; Stach, Eric A; Lindsay, C Michael; Orlov, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are revolutionizing many areas of science and technology, often delivering unprecedented improvements to properties of the conventional materials. However, despite important advances in NPs synthesis and applications, numerous challenges still remain. Development of alternative synthetic method capable of producing very uniform, extremely clean and very stable NPs is urgently needed. If successful, such method can potentially transform several areas of nanoscience, including environmental and energy related catalysis. Here we present the first experimental demonstration of catalytically active NPs synthesis achieved by the helium nanodroplet isolation method. This alternative method of NPs fabrication and deposition produces narrowly distributed, clean, and remarkably stable NPs. The fabrication is achieved inside ultralow temperature, superfluid helium nanodroplets, which can be subsequently deposited onto any substrate. This technique is universal enough to be applied to nearly any element, while achieving high deposition rates for single element as well as composite core-shell NPs. PMID:27409518

  4. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators.

  5. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators. PMID:27016583

  6. Detergent-Stable Salt-Activated Proteinases from Virgibacillus halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 Isolated from Fish Sauce Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Montriwong, Aungkawipa; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2015-05-01

    The NaCl-activated and detergent-stable proteinases from Virgibacillus halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 isolated from fish sauce fermentation were purified and characterized. The enzymes with molecular masses of 20 and 36 kDa showed caseinolytic activity on a zymogram. Optimum azocaseinolytic activity was at 60 °C and pH 9. The proteolytic activity increased in the presence of 10 mM CaCl2 and 0.5 M NaCl and showed high stability at 0-2 M NaCl. The enzymes were stable at pH 4-10 and 10-50 °C. The enzymes preferably hydrolyzed Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and were completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), showing subtilisin-like characteristics. Activity and stability remained high in the presence of H2O2 and various surfactants. The enzymes exhibited high stability (>95%) in various organic solvents (DMSO, butanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetonitrile) at concentration of 50%. The V. halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 proteinases showed potential as a biocatalyst in aqueous-organic solvent systems and as an additive in laundry detergent.

  7. Detergent-Stable Salt-Activated Proteinases from Virgibacillus halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 Isolated from Fish Sauce Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Montriwong, Aungkawipa; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2015-05-01

    The NaCl-activated and detergent-stable proteinases from Virgibacillus halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 isolated from fish sauce fermentation were purified and characterized. The enzymes with molecular masses of 20 and 36 kDa showed caseinolytic activity on a zymogram. Optimum azocaseinolytic activity was at 60 °C and pH 9. The proteolytic activity increased in the presence of 10 mM CaCl2 and 0.5 M NaCl and showed high stability at 0-2 M NaCl. The enzymes were stable at pH 4-10 and 10-50 °C. The enzymes preferably hydrolyzed Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and were completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), showing subtilisin-like characteristics. Activity and stability remained high in the presence of H2O2 and various surfactants. The enzymes exhibited high stability (>95%) in various organic solvents (DMSO, butanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetonitrile) at concentration of 50%. The V. halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 proteinases showed potential as a biocatalyst in aqueous-organic solvent systems and as an additive in laundry detergent. PMID:25820449

  8. Activated carbon derived from waste coffee grounds for stable methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, K. Christian; Baek, Seung Bin; Lee, Wang-Geun; Meyyappan, M.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2015-09-01

    An activated carbon material derived from waste coffee grounds is shown to be an effective and stable medium for methane storage. The sample activated at 900 °C displays a surface area of 1040.3 m2 g-1 and a micropore volume of 0.574 cm3 g-1 and exhibits a stable CH4 adsorption capacity of ˜4.2 mmol g-1 at 3.0 MPa and a temperature range of 298 ± 10 K. The same material exhibits an impressive hydrogen storage capacity of 1.75 wt% as well at 77 K and 100 kPa. Here, we also propose a mechanism for the formation of activated carbon from spent coffee grounds. At low temperatures, the material has two distinct types with low and high surface areas; however, activation at elevated temperatures drives off the low surface area carbon, leaving behind the porous high surface area activated carbon.

  9. Aerobic exercise capacity remains normal despite impaired endothelial function in the micro- and macrocirculation of physically active IDDM patients.

    PubMed

    Veves, A; Saouaf, R; Donaghue, V M; Mullooly, C A; Kistler, J A; Giurini, J M; Horton, E S; Fielding, R A

    1997-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine if diabetes in the absence of neuropathy affects the exercising capacity of IDDM patients, and whether regular, intense training has a beneficial effect on endothelial function. Five groups of subjects were studied: 23 healthy control subjects who exercised regularly (age 33 +/- 6 years), 23 nonneuropathic type 1 diabetic patients who exercised regularly (age 33 +/- 6 years, IDDM duration 11 +/- 8 years), 7 neuropathic type 1 diabetic patients who exercised regularly (age 36 +/- 7 years, IDDM duration 22 +/- 8 years), 18 healthy subjects who did not exercise regularly (age 34 +/- 7 years), and 5 nonneuropathic type 1 diabetic patients who did not exercise regularly (age 31 +/- 4 years, IDDM duration 20 +/- 3 years). All groups were matched for age, sex, and body weight. No differences existed in the energy expenditure per week in physical activity among the three exercising groups or between the two nonexercising groups. The maximal oxygen uptake was similar between control and diabetic nonneuropathic exercisers, and among diabetic neuropathic exercisers, control nonexercisers, and diabetic nonexercisers; however, a significant difference existed between the first two and the last three groups (P < 0.0001). A stepwise increase was found in the resting heart rate among the groups, ranging from the lowest in control exercisers to the highest in diabetic nonexercisers, but the maximal heart rate was lower only in diabetic neuropathic exercisers compared with all other groups (P < 0.05). Assessments of endothelial function in both macro- and microcirculation were performed in 12 control exercisers, 10 diabetic nonneuropathic exercisers, 5 diabetic neuropathic exercisers, 17 control nonexercisers, and 4 diabetic nonexercisers. When all diabetic patients were considered as one group and all control subjects as another, the microcirculation endothelial function in the diabetic group was reduced compared with the control subjects

  10. Toxins vapC and pasB from prokaryotic TA modules remain active in mammalian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wieteska, Łukasz; Skulimowski, Aleksander; Cybula, Magdalena; Szemraj, Janusz

    2014-10-01

    Among the great number of addictive modules which have been discovered, only a few have been characterized. However, research concerning the adoption of toxins from these systems shows their great potential as a tool for molecular biology and medicine. In our study, we tested two different toxins derived from class II addictive modules, pasAB from plasmid pTF-FC2 (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) and vapBC 2829Rv (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), in terms of their usefulness as growth inhibitors of human cancer cell lines, namely KYSE 30, MCF-7 and HCT 116. Transfection of the pasB and vapC genes into the cells was conducted with the use of two different expression systems. Cellular effects, such as apoptosis, necrosis and changes in the cell cycle, were tested by applying flow cytometry with immunofluorescence staining. Our findings demonstrated that toxins VapC and PasB demonstrate proapoptotic activity in the human cancer cells, regardless of the expression system used. As for the toxin PasB, observed changes were more subtle than for the VapC. The level of expression for both the genes was monitored by QPCR and did not reveal statistically significant differences within the same cell line.

  11. STABLE NITROGEN ISOTOPES AS INDICATORS OF ANTHOPOGENIC ACTIVITIES IN SMALL FRESHWATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable nitrogen isotope ratios ( 15N) were measured in fish, mussel, and sediment samples taken from 17 small freshwater sites to examine food chain length and trophic position across sites affected by differing levels of anthropogenic activity. Both shoreline development and fis...

  12. Shoulder muscular activity during isometric three-point kneeling exercise on stable and unstable surfaces.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Rodrigo Cappato; de Andrade, Rodrigo; Tucci, Helga Tatiana; Martins, Jaqueline; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if performing isometric 3-point kneeling exercises on a Swiss ball influenced the isometric force output and EMG activities of the shoulder muscles when compared with performing the same exercises on a stable base of support. Twenty healthy adults performed the isometric 3-point kneeling exercises with the hand placed either on a stable surface or on a Swiss ball. Surface EMG was recorded from the posterior deltoid, pectoralis major, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, upper trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles using surface differential electrodes. All EMG data were reported as percentages of the average root mean square (RMS) values obtained in maximum voluntary contractions for each muscle studied. The highest load value was obtained during exercise on a stable surface. A significant increase was observed in the activation of glenohumeral muscles during exercises on a Swiss ball. However, there were no differences in EMG activities of the scapulothoracic muscles. These results suggest that exercises performed on unstable surfaces may provide muscular activity levels similar to those performed on stable surfaces, without the need to apply greater external loads to the musculoskeletal system. Therefore, exercises on unstable surfaces may be useful during the process of tissue regeneration.

  13. Single nanowire on graphene (SNOG) as an efficient, reproducible, and stable SERS-active platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hongki; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Lee, Dong-Il; Lee, Jiyoung; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Hyoban; Kang, Taejoon; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-04-01

    Developing a well-defined nanostructure that can provide strong, reproducible, and stable SERS signals is quite important for the practical application of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors. We report here a novel single nanowire (NW) on graphene (SNOG) structure as an efficient, reproducible, and stable SERS-active platform. Au NWs having a well-defined single-crystal geometry on a monolayer graphene-coated metal film can form a well-defined, continuous nanogap structure that provides extremely reproducible and stable SERS signals. The in-NW reproducibility was verified by 2-dimensional Raman mapping, and the NW-to-NW reproducibility was verified by the cumulative curves of 32 SERS spectra. The simulation also indicated that a highly regular, line-shaped hot spot formed between the Au NW and graphene. Furthermore, SNOG platforms showed improved photostability and long-term oxidation immunity. We anticipate that SNOG platforms will be appropriate for practical biological and chemical sensor applications that demand reproducible, stable, and strong signal production.Developing a well-defined nanostructure that can provide strong, reproducible, and stable SERS signals is quite important for the practical application of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors. We report here a novel single nanowire (NW) on graphene (SNOG) structure as an efficient, reproducible, and stable SERS-active platform. Au NWs having a well-defined single-crystal geometry on a monolayer graphene-coated metal film can form a well-defined, continuous nanogap structure that provides extremely reproducible and stable SERS signals. The in-NW reproducibility was verified by 2-dimensional Raman mapping, and the NW-to-NW reproducibility was verified by the cumulative curves of 32 SERS spectra. The simulation also indicated that a highly regular, line-shaped hot spot formed between the Au NW and graphene. Furthermore, SNOG platforms showed improved photostability and long

  14. A General Method for Multimetallic Platinum Alloy Nanowires as Highly Active and Stable Oxygen Reduction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Yao, Jianlin; Guo, Jun; Lu, Gang; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-25

    An unconventional class of high-performance Pt alloy multimetallic nanowires (NWs) is produced by a general method. The obtained PtNi NWs exhibit amazingly specific and mass oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities with improvement factors of 51.1 and 34.6 over commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively, and are also stable in ORR conditions, making them among the most efficient electrocatalysts for ORR.

  15. Highly stable redox-active molecular layers by covalent grafting to conductive diamond.

    PubMed

    Ruther, Rose E; Rigsby, Matthew L; Gerken, James B; Hogendoorn, Stephanie R; Landis, Elizabeth C; Stahl, Shannon S; Hamers, Robert J

    2011-04-20

    We demonstrate a modular "click"-based functionalization scheme that allows inexpensive conductive diamond samples to serve as an ultrastable platform for surface-tethered electrochemically active molecules stable out to ∼1.3 V vs Ag/AgCl. We have cycled surface-tethered Ru(tpy)(2) to this potential more than 1 million times with little or no degradation in propylene carbonate and only slightly reduced stability in water and acetonitrile. PMID:21438578

  16. The Serratia marcescens hemolysin is secreted but not activated by stable protoplast-type L-forms of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Sieben, S; Hertle, R; Gumpert, J; Braun, V

    1998-10-01

    The outer-membrane protein ShlB of Serratia marcescens activates and secretes hemolytic ShlA into the culture medium. Without ShlB, inactive ShlA (termed ShlA*) remains in the periplasm. Since Proteus mirabilis L-form cells lack an outer membrane and a periplasm, it was of interest to determine in which compartment recombinant ShlA* and ShlB are localized and whether ShlB activates ShlA*. The cloned shlB and shlA genes were transcribed in P. mirabilis stable L-form cells by the temperature-inducible phage T7 RNA polymerase. Radiolabeling, Western blotting, and complementation with C-terminally truncated ShlA (ShlA255) identified inactive ShlA* in the culture supernatant. ShlB remained cell-bound and did not activate ShlA without integration in an outer membrane. Although hemolytic ShlA added to L-form cells had access to the cytoplasmic membrane, it did not affect L-form cells. Synthesis of the large ShlA protein (165 kDa) in P. mirabilis L-form cells under phage T7 promoter control demonstrates that L-form cells are suitable for the synthesis and secretion of large recombinant proteins. This property and the easy isolation of released proteins make L-form cells suitable for the biotechnological production of proteins.

  17. Identification of functional targets of the Zta transcriptional activator by formation of stable preinitiation complex intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, P

    1994-01-01

    Transcriptional activator proteins stimulate the formation of a preinitiation complex that may be distinct from a basal-level transcription complex in its composition and stability. Components of the general transcription factors that form activator-dependent stable intermediates were determined by the use of Sarkosyl and oligonucleotide challenge experiments. High-level transcriptional activation by the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded Zta protein required an activity in the TFIID fraction that is distinct from the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and the TBP-associated factors. This additional activity copurifies with and is likely to be identical to the previously defined coactivator, USA (M. Meisterernst, A. L. Roy, H. M. Lieu, and R. G. Roeder, Cell 66:981-994, 1991). The formation of a stable preinitiation complex intermediate resistant to Sarkosyl required the preincubation of the promoter DNA with Zta, holo-TFIID (TBP and TBP-associated factors), TFIIB, TFIIA, and the coactivator USA. The formation of a Zta response element-resistant preinitiation complex required the preincubation of promoter DNA with Zta, holo-TFIID, TFIIB, and TFIIA. Agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift showed that a preformed Zta-holo-TFIID-TFIIA complex was resistant to Sarkosyl and to Zta response element oligonucleotide challenge. DNase I footprinting suggests that only Zta, holo-TFIID, and TFIIA make significant contacts with the promoter DNA. These results provide functional and physical evidence that the Zta transcriptional activator influences at least two distinct steps in preinitiation complex assembly, the formation of the stable holo-TFIID-TFIIA-promoter complex and the subsequent binding of TFIIB and a USA-like coactivator. Images PMID:7969171

  18. Pt5Gd as a highly active and stable catalyst for oxygen electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Escribano, María; Verdaguer-Casadevall, Arnau; Malacrida, Paolo; Grønbjerg, Ulrik; Knudsen, Brian P; Jepsen, Anders K; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-10-10

    The activity and stability of Pt(5)Gd for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been studied, using a combination of electrochemical measurements, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS), and density functional theory calculations. Sputter-cleaned, polycrystalline Pt(5)Gd shows a 5-fold increase in ORR activity, relative to pure Pt at 0.9 V, approaching the most active in the literature for catalysts prepared in this way. AR-XPS profiles after electrochemical measurements in 0.1 M HClO(4) show the formation of a thick Pt overlayer on the bulk Pt(5)Gd, and the enhanced ORR activity can be explained by means of compressive strain effects. Furthermore, these novel bimetallic electrocatalysts are highly stable, which, in combination with their enhanced activity, makes them very promising for the development of new cathode catalysts for fuel cells. PMID:22998588

  19. Identification of active aerobic methanotrophs in plateau wetlands using DNA stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongcui; Cui, Xiaoyong; Dumont, Marc G

    2016-08-01

    Sedge-dominated wetlands on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau are methane emission centers. Methanotrophs at these sites play a role in reducing methane emissions, but relatively little is known about the composition of active methanotrophs in these wetlands. Here, we used DNA stable isotope probing to identify the key active aerobic methanotrophs in three sedge-dominated wetlands on the plateau. We found that Methylocystis species were active in two peatlands, Hongyuan and Dangxiong. Methylobacter species were found to be active only in Dangxiong peat. Hongyuan peat had the highest methane oxidation rate, and cross-feeding of carbon from methanotrophs to methylotrophic Hyphomicrobium species was observed. Owing to a low methane oxidation rate during the incubation, the labeling of methanotrophs in Maduo wetland samples was not detected. Our results indicate that there are large differences in the activity of methanotrophs in the wetlands of this region. PMID:27369086

  20. Enhancement of the aspartame precursor synthetic activity of an organic solvent-stable protease.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Tsuchiyama, Shotaro; Yasuda, Masahiro; Doukyu, Noriyuki

    2010-03-01

    The PST-01 protease is highly stable and catalyzes the synthesis of the aspartame precursor with high reaction yields in the presence of organic solvents. However, the synthesis rate using the PST-01 protease was slower than that observed when thermolysin was used. Structural comparison of both enzymes showed particular amino acid differences near the active center. These few residue differences in the PST-01 protease were mutated to match those amino acid types found in thermolysin. The mutated PST-01 proteases at the 114th residue from tyrosine to phenylalanine showed enhancement of synthetic activity. This activity was found to be similar to thermolysin. In addition, mutating the residue in the PST-01 protease with arginine and serine showed more improvement of the activity. The mutant PST-01 protease should be more useful than thermolysin for the synthesis of the aspartame precursor, because this enzyme has higher stability and activity in the presence of organic solvents. The results show the potential of organic solvent-stable enzymes as industrial catalysts.

  1. Activation of the heat-stable polypeptide of the ATP-dependent proteolytic system.

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanover, A; Heller, H; Katz-Etzion, R; Hershko, A

    1981-01-01

    It had been shown previously that the heat-stable polypeptide of the ATP-dependent proteolytic system of reticulocytes, designated APF-1, forms covalent conjugates with protein substrates in an ATP-requiring process. We now describe an enzyme that carries out the activation by ATP of the polypeptide with pyrophosphate displacement. The formation of AMP-polypeptide and transfer of the polypeptide to a secondary acceptor are suggested by an APF-1 requirement for ATP-PPi and ATP-AMP exchange reactions, respectively. With radiolabeled polypeptide, an ATP-dependent labeling of the enzyme was shown to be by a linkage that is acid stable but is labile to treatment with mild alkali, hydroxylamine, borohydride, or mercuric salts. It therefore appears that the AMP-polypeptide undergoes attack by an -SH group of the enzyme to form a thiolester. PMID:6262770

  2. Influence of an active stable system on the behavior and body condition of Icelandic horses.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, G; Bentke, A; Rose-Meierhöfer, S; Berg, W; Mazetti, P; Hardarson, G H

    2012-10-01

    Horses are often stabled in individual boxes, a method that does not meet their natural needs and may cause psychical and musculoskeletal diseases. This problem is particularly evident in Iceland, where horses often spend the long winter periods in cramped boxes. The aim of this study was to analyze the suitability of a group housing system in Iceland, but the results are also applicable to horses of other regions. Eight Icelandic horses were observed in an active stable system, and their behavior and time budget were recorded. Movement and lying behavior were studied with ALT (Activity, Lying, Temperature detection) pedometers. The effect of an automatic concentrate feeding station (CFS) on the horses' behavior was examined. In the first period of investigation, the horses were fed concentrates manually, and in the second period, they were fed with the CFS. Additional behavioral observations and a determination of social hierarchy occurred directly or by video surveillance. The physical condition of the horses was recorded by body weight (BW) measurement and body condition scoring (BCS). The results showed a significant increase between the first and second trial periods in both the activity (P < 0.001) and the lying time (P = 0.003) of the horses with use of the CFS. However, there was no significant change in BW during the first period without the CFS (P = 0.884) or during the second period with the CFS (P = 0.540). The BCS of the horses was constant at a very good level during both trial periods, and the horses showed a low level of aggression, a firm social hierarchy and behavioral synchronization. This study concludes that group housing according to the active stable principle is a welfare-friendly option for keeping horses and is a suitable alternative to conventional individual boxes. PMID:22717220

  3. Heat stable antimicrobial activity of Burkholderia gladioli OR1 against clinical drug resistant isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Pratibha; Anand, Vivek; Chander, Jagdish; Singh, Inder Pal; Singh, Tej Vir; Tewari, Rupinder

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Drug resistant microbes are a serious challenge to human health. During the search for novel antibiotics/inhibitors from the agricultural soil, a bacterial colony was found to inhibit the growth of clinical isolates including Staphylococcus (resistant to amikacin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, clinafloxacin, erythromycin, gentamicin and methicillin) and Candida (resistant to fluconazole and itraconazole). The culture was identified as Burkholderia gladioli and produced at least five different antimicrobial compounds which were highly stable at high temperature (121°C) and in the broad pH range (3.0-11.0). We report here the antimicrobial activity of B. gladioli against drug resistant bacterial pathogens. Methods: The bacterial culture was identified using morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques. The antimicrobial activity of the identified organism against a range of microbial pathogens was checked by Kirby-Bauer's disc diffusion method. The antimicrobial compounds in the cell free supernatant were chloroform-extracted and separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Results: B. gladioli OR1 exhibited broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against drug resistant clinical isolates belonging to various genera of bacteria (Staphylococcus, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Acinetobacter and Citrobacter) and a fungus (Candida). Based on TLC profile and bioautography studies, the chloroform extract of B. gladioli OR1 consisted of at least three anti-staphylococcal and two anti-Candida metabolites. The antimicrobial activity was heat stable (121°C/20 min) as well as pH stable (3.0-11.0). Interpretation & conclusions: The bacterial soil isolate, B. gladioli OR1 possessed the ability to kill various drug resistant bacteria and a fungus. This organism produced many antimicrobial metabolites which might have the potential to be used as antibiotics in future. PMID:22771597

  4. Measurement of Microbial Activity and Growth in the Ocean by Rates of Stable Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Karl, David M.

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple and extremely sensitive technique for measuring rates of stable ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was devised and applied to bacterial cultures and seawater samples. The procedure is based upon the uptake and incorporation of exogenous radiolabeled adenine into cellular RNA. To calculate absolute rates of synthesis, measurements of the specific radioactivity of the intracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate pools (precursor to RNA) and of the total amount of radioactivity incorporated into stable cellular RNA per unit time are required. Since the rate of RNA synthesis is positively correlated with growth rate, measurements of RNA synthesis should be extremely useful for estimating and comparing the productivities of microbial assemblages in nature. Adenosine 5′-triphosphate, adenylate energy charge, and rates of stable RNA synthesis have been measured at a station located in the Columbian Basin of the Caribbean Sea. A subsurface peak in RNA synthesis (and therefore growth) was located within the dissolved oxygen minimum zone (450 m), suggesting in situ microbiological utilization of dissolved molecular oxygen. Calculations of the specific rates of RNA synthesis (i.e., RNA synthesis per unit of biomass) revealed that the middepth maximum corresponded to the highest specific rate of growth (420 pmol of adenine incorporated into RNA·day−1) of all depths sampled, including the euphotic zone. The existence of an intermediate depth zone of active microbial growth may be an important site for nutrient regeneration and may serve as a source of reduced carbon for mesopelagic and deep sea environments. PMID:16345461

  5. Cardiovascular events occur independently of high on-aspirin platelet reactivity and residual COX-1 activity in stable cardiovascular patients.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Miyata, Shigeki; Kada, Akiko; Kawamura, Atsushi; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Furui, Eisuke; Takiuchi, Shin; Taomoto, Katsushi; Kario, Kazuomi; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Saito, Kozue; Nagao, Takehiko; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hosomi, Naohisa; Tanaka, Keiji; Kaikita, Koichi; Katayama, Yasuo; Abumiya, Takeo; Nakane, Hiroshi; Wada, Hideo; Hattori, Akira; Kimura, Kazumi; Isshiki, Takaaki; Nishikawa, Masakatsu; Yamawaki, Takemori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Okada, Hiromi; Ogawa, Hisao; Minematsu, Kazuo; Miyata, Toshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have indicated that approximately 25 % of patients treated with aspirin exhibit high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR), which is potentially associated with cardiovascular events (CVEs). However, this association is still controversial, since the mechanisms by which HTPR contributes to CVEs remain unclear and a no standardised definition of HTPR has been established. To determine whether HTPR is associated with CVE recurrence and what type of assay would best predict CVE recurrence, we conducted a multicentre prospective cohort study of 592 stable cardiovascular outpatients treated with aspirin monotherapy for secondary prevention. Their HTPR was determined by arachidonic acid- or collagen-induced aggregation assays using two different agonist concentrations. Residual cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity was assessed by measuring serum thromboxane (TX)B2 or urinary 11-dehydro TXB2. Shear-induced platelet thrombus formation was also examined. We followed all patients for two years to evaluate how these seven indexes were related to the recurrence of CVEs (cerebral infarction, transient ischaemic attack, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, revascularisation, other arterial thrombosis, or cardiovascular death). Of 583 patients eligible for the analysis, CVEs occurred in 69 (11.8 %). A Cox regression model identified several classical risk factors associated with CVEs. However, neither HTPR nor high residual COX-1 activity was significantly associated with CVEs, even by applying cut-off values suggested in previous reports or a receiver-operating characteristic analysis. In conclusion, recurrence of CVEs occurred independently of HTPR and residual COX-1 activity. Thus, our findings do not support the use of platelet or COX-1 functional testing for predicting clinical outcomes in stable cardiovascular patients. PMID:27098431

  6. Use of stable isotope-labelled cells to identify active grazers of picocyanobacteria in ocean surface waters

    PubMed Central

    Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Thompson, Anne; Waldbauer, Jacob; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2009-01-01

    Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria. They represent a significant fraction of the total primary production of the world oceans and comprise a major fraction of the prey biomass available to phagotrophic protists. Despite relatively rapid growth rates, picocyanobacterial cell densities in open-ocean surface waters remain fairly constant, implying steady mortality due to viral infection and consumption by predators. There have been several studies on grazing by specific protists on Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in culture, and of cell loss rates due to overall grazing in the field. However, the specific sources of mortality of these primary producers in the wild remain unknown. Here, we use a modification of the RNA stable isotope probing technique (RNA-SIP), which involves adding labelled cells to natural seawater, to identify active predators that are specifically consuming Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean. Four major groups were identified as having their 18S rRNA highly labelled: Prymnesiophyceae (Haptophyta), Dictyochophyceae (Stramenopiles), Bolidomonas (Stramenopiles) and Dinoflagellata (Alveolata). For the first three of these, the closest relative of the sequences identified was a photosynthetic organism, indicating the presence of mixotrophs among picocyanobacterial predators. We conclude that the use of RNA-SIP is a useful method to identity specific predators for picocyanobacteria in situ, and that the method could possibly be used to identify other bacterial predators important in the microbial food-web. PMID:19196281

  7. Use of stable isotope-labelled cells to identify active grazers of picocyanobacteria in ocean surface waters.

    PubMed

    Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Thompson, Anne; Waldbauer, Jacob; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2009-02-01

    Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria. They represent a significant fraction of the total primary production of the world oceans and comprise a major fraction of the prey biomass available to phagotrophic protists. Despite relatively rapid growth rates, picocyanobacterial cell densities in open-ocean surface waters remain fairly constant, implying steady mortality due to viral infection and consumption by predators. There have been several studies on grazing by specific protists on Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in culture, and of cell loss rates due to overall grazing in the field. However, the specific sources of mortality of these primary producers in the wild remain unknown. Here, we use a modification of the RNA stable isotope probing technique (RNA-SIP), which involves adding labelled cells to natural seawater, to identify active predators that are specifically consuming Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean. Four major groups were identified as having their 18S rRNA highly labelled: Prymnesiophyceae (Haptophyta), Dictyochophyceae (Stramenopiles), Bolidomonas (Stramenopiles) and Dinoflagellata (Alveolata). For the first three of these, the closest relative of the sequences identified was a photosynthetic organism, indicating the presence of mixotrophs among picocyanobacterial predators. We conclude that the use of RNA-SIP is a useful method to identity specific predators for picocyanobacteria in situ, and that the method could possibly be used to identify other bacterial predators important in the microbial food-web.

  8. IP receptor-dependent activation of PPAR{gamma} by stable prostacyclin analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Falcetti, Emilia; Flavell, David M.; Staels, Bart; Tinker, Andrew; Haworth, Sheila G.; Clapp, Lucie H. . E-mail: l.clapp@ucl.ac.uk

    2007-09-07

    Stable prostacyclin analogues can signal through cell surface IP receptors or by ligand binding to nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). So far these agents have been reported to activate PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{delta} but not PPAR{gamma}. Given PPAR{gamma} agonists and prostacyclin analogues both inhibit cell proliferation, we postulated that the IP receptor might elicit PPAR{gamma} activation. Using a dual luciferase reporter gene assay in HEK-293 cells stably expressing the IP receptor or empty vector, we found that prostacyclin analogues only activated PPAR{gamma} in the presence of the IP receptor. Moreover, the novel IP receptor antagonist, RO1138452, but not inhibitors of the cyclic AMP pathway, prevented activation. Likewise, the anti-proliferative effects of treprostinil observed in IP receptor expressing cells, were partially inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist, GW9662. We conclude that PPAR{gamma} is activated through the IP receptor via a cyclic AMP-independent mechanism and contributes to the anti-growth effects of prostacyclin analogues.

  9. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vera P; Wezendonk, Tim A; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A; Koeken, Ard C J; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-03-05

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation.

  10. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Vera P.; Wezendonk, Tim A.; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A. Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A.; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A.; Koeken, Ard C. J.; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R.; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation.

  11. Stable Silver Nanoparticles Synthesis by Citrus Sinensis (Orange) and Assessing Activity Against Food Poisoning Microbes.

    PubMed

    Naila, Arooj; Nadia, Dar; Zahoor, Qadir Samra

    2014-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles are considered as good antimicrobial agent. AgNPs were synthesized by mixing silver nitrate solution with citrus sinesis extract for 2 h at 37 °C and analyzed by UV-visible spectra, SEM, XRD, and FTIR. AgNPs were tested against B. subtilis, Shigella, S. aureus, and E. coli. Minimum inhibitory concentration of AgNPs was 20 µg/mL for B. subtilis and Shigella and 30 µg/mL for S. aureus and E. coli. Antibiofilm activity (80% to 90%) was observed at 25 µg/mL. AgNPs were stable for five months with sustained antimicrobial activity. Biosynthesized AgNPs can be used to inhibit food poisoning microbial growth.

  12. Stable Silver Nanoparticles Synthesis by Citrus Sinensis (Orange) and Assessing Activity Against Food Poisoning Microbes.

    PubMed

    Naila, Arooj; Nadia, Dar; Zahoor, Qadir Samra

    2014-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles are considered as good antimicrobial agent. AgNPs were synthesized by mixing silver nitrate solution with citrus sinesis extract for 2 h at 37 °C and analyzed by UV-visible spectra, SEM, XRD, and FTIR. AgNPs were tested against B. subtilis, Shigella, S. aureus, and E. coli. Minimum inhibitory concentration of AgNPs was 20 µg/mL for B. subtilis and Shigella and 30 µg/mL for S. aureus and E. coli. Antibiofilm activity (80% to 90%) was observed at 25 µg/mL. AgNPs were stable for five months with sustained antimicrobial activity. Biosynthesized AgNPs can be used to inhibit food poisoning microbial growth. PMID:25341818

  13. Tooth Enamel Oxygen and Carbon Isotope Variations in Modern Central Asian Horses: Development of a Calibration Database for the Interpretation of Stable Isotope Signals Preserved in Fossil Horse Remains from Archaeological Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, M. T.; Rosenmeier, M. F.; Allard, F.; Olsen, S. L.

    2005-12-01

    Recent studies of early nomadic pastoralism within Central Asia have focused on the rich archaeological history of Mongolia and specifically the examination of so-called khirigsuur sites. These monumental Bronze Age (first and second millennium B.C.) structures consist of stone constructions that contain abundant horse remains (typically skulls) and occasionally human burials. Isotopic analysis of horse remains preserved within these sites may provide a wealth of paleoclimatic information. However, the accuracy of climate reconstructions from fossil teeth collected at archaeological sites in Mongolia is currently limited by insufficient knowledge of the relationship between local environmental conditions and tooth enamel isotope ratios as well as uncertainties attributed to intra-population variability. In this study we measured the oxygen and carbon isotope (δ18O and δ13C) values of enamel samples from modern horse teeth collected along a nearly 550 km latitudinal (northwest-southeast) transect within central Mongolia. Preliminary results suggest that modern tooth enamel records local environmental conditions, although δ18O and δ13C values are not always a direct proxy for climate and vegetation cover. The modern samples serve as a baseline for interpreting isotope signals preserved in fossil horses and thereby increase the accuracy of paleoclimatic reconstructions. Approximately one-hundred individuals were examined from highly varied geographic zones (forest steppe, grassland steppe, dry steppe, and semi-desert) and compared with the δ18O of meteoric waters and δ13C values of local vegetation. Oxygen isotope ratios of bulk enamel samples (spanning the entire vertical axis of tooth growth) parallel spatial trends observed in isotopic composition of meteoric waters and major north-south gradients in temperature and precipitation. Average δ13C values similarly increase with decreasing geographic latitude and likely correspond to documented increases in the

  14. Number of accelerometer monitoring days needed for stable group-level estimates of activity.

    PubMed

    Wolff-Hughes, Dana L; McClain, James J; Dodd, Kevin W; Berrigan, David; Troiano, Richard P

    2016-09-01

    To determine the number and distribution of days required to produce stable group-level estimates of a 7 d mean for common accelerometer-derived activity measures. Data from the 2003-2006 NHANES were used in this analysis. The sample included 986 youth (6-19 year) and 2532 adults (⩾20 year) with 7 d of  ⩾10 h of wear. Accelerometer measures included minutes of inactive, light physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA); and total activity counts/d. Twenty-five alternative protocols were bootstrapped with 50 000 samples drawn for each protocol. Alternative protocols included: 1-6 random days, Saturday plus 1-5 random weekdays (WD), Sunday plus 1-5 random WD, 1 random weekend day (WE) plus 1-5 WD, and both WE plus 1-4 random WD. Relative difference was calculated between the 7 d mean and alternative protocol mean (((alternative protocol mean - 7 d mean)/7 d mean) (*) 100). Adult MVPA is used as an example; however, similar trends were observed across age groups and variables except adult inactive time, which was stable across protocols. The 7 d mean for adult MVPA was 44.1(0.9) min d(-1). The mean bias for any 1-6 random days ranged from  -0.0(0.3) to 0.0(0.2) min d(-1) with a relative difference of  -0.1 to 0.0%. For protocols with non-random components, bias ranged from  -1.4(0.2) to 0.6(0.1) min d(-1) with relative difference ranging from  -7.2 to 3.1%. Simulation data suggest that stable estimates of group-level means can be obtained from as few as one randomly selected monitoring day from a sampled week. On the other hand, estimates using non-random selection of weekend days may be significantly biased. Purposeful sampling that disproportionally forces inclusion of weekend data in analyses should be discouraged. PMID:27510765

  15. The ATP-activated hexameric helicase of bacteriophage T4 (gp41) forms a stable primosome with a single subunit of T4-coded primase (gp61).

    PubMed

    Dong, F; von Hippel, P H

    1996-08-01

    We have examined the formation of the primosome subassembly of the bacteriophage T4-coded DNA replication (elongation) complex from its helicase, primase, and DNA components. Previously, we had shown that the T4 helicase (gp41) exists in solution in a stable monomer left and right arrow dimer equilibrium at physiological protein (and salt) concentrations and forms a hexamer upon activation by ATP (or GTP) binding (Dong, F., Gogol, E. P., and von Hippel, P. H.(1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 7462-7473). Here we report that the T4 primase (gp61) is a monomer in solution under the same conditions, and that the ATP-activated helicase binds to a single gp61 primase molecule on appropriate DNA templates to reconstitute a stable primosome. We show that: (i) the gp41 helicase alone does not form a stable complex with DNA templates, although this helicase by itself can carry out moderately processive ATP-driven translocation along single-stranded DNA (Young, M. C., Schultz, D. E., Ring, D., and von Hippel, P. H.(1994) J. Mol. Biol. 235, 1447-1458); (ii) the primase alone does form a stable complex with DNA; (iii) the helicase can bind to the primase-DNA complex in the presence of ATP or GTP to form a stable ternary complex; (iv) this complex consists of six helicase subunits and one primase subunit; and (v) the reconstituted primosome is stable for at least 10 to 20 min after NTP cleavage and dissociation of the hydrolysis products. These results strongly suggest that the functional T4 DNA replication primosome consists of an integrated 6:1 helicase-primase complex bound to DNA, and that the ATP-activated helicase hexamer remains intact throughout the processive DNA replication process. PMID:8702659

  16. A stable phage lysin (Cpl-1) dimer with increased antipneumococcal activity and decreased plasma clearance.

    PubMed

    Resch, Gregory; Moreillon, Philippe; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2011-12-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) produce endolysins (lysins) as part of their lytic cycle in order to degrade the peptidoglycan layer of the infected bacteria for subsequent release of phage progeny. Because these enzymes maintain their lytic and lethal activity against Gram-positive bacteria when added extrinsically to the cells, they have been actively exploited as novel anti-infectives, sometimes termed enzybiotics. As with other relatively small peptides, one issue in their clinical development is their rapid inactivation through proteolytic degradation, immunological blockage and renal clearance. The antipneumococcal lysin Cpl-1 was shown to escape both proteolysis and immunological blockage. However, its short plasma half-life (20.5 min in mice) may represent a shortcoming for clinical usefulness. Here we report the construction of a Cpl-1 dimer with a view to increasing both the antipneumococcal specific activity and plasma half-life of Cpl-1. Dimerisation was achieved by introducing specific cysteine residues at the C-terminal end of the enzyme, thus favouring disulphide bonding. Compared with the native monomer, the constructed dimer demonstrated a two-fold increase in specific antipneumococcal activity and a ca. ten-fold decrease in plasma clearance. As several lysins are suspected to dimerise on contact with their cell wall substrate to be fully active, stable pre-dimerised enzymes may represent a more efficient alternative to the native monomer. PMID:21982146

  17. Very stable high molecular mass multiprotein complex with DNase and amylase activities in human milk.

    PubMed

    Soboleva, Svetlana E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Verkhovod, Timofey D; Buneva, Valentina N; Sedykh, Sergey E; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-01-01

    For breastfed infants, human milk is more than a source of nutrients; it furnishes a wide array of proteins, peptides, antibodies, and other components promoting neonatal growth and protecting infants from viral and bacterial infection. It has been proposed that most biological processes are performed by protein complexes. Therefore, identification and characterization of human milk components including protein complexes is important for understanding the function of milk. Using gel filtration, we have purified a stable high molecular mass (~1000 kDa) multiprotein complex (SPC) from 15 preparations of human milk. Light scattering and gel filtration showed that the SPC was stable in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl and MgCl2 but dissociated efficiently under the conditions that destroy immunocomplexes (2 M MgCl2 , 0.5 M NaCl, and 10 mM DTT). Such a stable complex is unlikely to be a casual associate of different proteins. The relative content of the individual SPCs varied from 6% to 25% of the total milk protein. According to electrophoretic and mass spectrometry analysis, all 15 SPCs contained lactoferrin (LF) and α-lactalbumin as major proteins, whereas human milk albumin and β-casein were present in moderate or minor amounts; a different content of IgGs and sIgAs was observed. All SPCs efficiently hydrolyzed Plasmid supercoiled DNA and maltoheptaose. Some freshly prepared SPC preparations contained not only intact LF but also small amounts of its fragments, which appeared in all SPCs during their prolonged storage; the fragments, similar to intact LF, possessed DNase and amylase activities. LF is found in human epithelial secretions, barrier body fluids, and in the secondary granules of leukocytes. LF is a protein of the acute phase response and nonspecific defense against different types of microbial and viral infections. Therefore, LF complexes with other proteins may be important for its functions not only in human milk.

  18. Human Tissue Kallikrein Activity in Angiographically Documented Chronic Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Estêvão Lanna; Magalhães, Carolina Antunes; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; Mandil, Ari; Garcia, José Carlos Faria; Araújo, Rosanã Aparecida; Figueiredo, Amintas Fabiano de Souza; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Background Human tissue kallikrein (hK1) is a key enzyme in the kallikrein–kinin system (KKS). hK1-specific amidase activity is reduced in urine samples from hypertensive and heart failure (HF) patients. The pathophysiologic role of hK1 in coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unclear. Objective To evaluate hK1-specific amidase activity in the urine of CAD patients Methods Sixty-five individuals (18–75 years) who underwent cardiac catheterism (CATH) were included. Random midstream urine samples were collected immediately before CATH. Patients were classified in two groups according to the presence of coronary lesions: CAD (43 patients) and non-CAD (22 patients). hK1 amidase activity was estimated using the chromogenic substrate D-Val-Leu-Arg-Nan. Creatinine was determined using Jaffé’s method. Urinary hK1-specific amidase activity was expressed as µM/(min · mg creatinine) to correct for differences in urine flow rates. Results Urinary hK1-specific amidase activity levels were similar between CAD [0.146 µM/(min ·mg creatinine)] and non-CAD [0.189 µM/(min . mg creatinine)] patients (p = 0.803) and remained similar to values previously reported for hypertensive patients [0.210 µM/(min . mg creatinine)] and HF patients [0.104 µM/(min . mg creatinine)]. CAD severity and hypertension were not observed to significantly affect urinary hK1-specific amidase activity. Conclusion CAD patients had low levels of urinary hK1-specific amidase activity, suggesting that renal KKS activity may be reduced in patients with this disease. PMID:26351984

  19. Heat stable antimicrobial activity of Allium ascalonicum against bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Amin, M; Kapadnis, B P

    2005-08-01

    To study antimicrobial activity of shallot in comparison with that of garlic and onion against 23 strains of fungi and bacteria, water extracts of garlic, shallot and onion bulbs were prepared. Each extract was studied in different forms for their antimicrobial activity viz., fresh extract, dry extract and autoclaved extract. Minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal lethal concentrations of these extracts were determined against all organisms by broth dilution susceptibility test. Fresh extract of garlic showed greater antimicrobial activity as compared to similar extracts of onion and shallot. However, dried and autoclaved extracts of shallot showed more activity than similar extracts of onion and garlic. Fungi were more sensitive to shallot extract than bacteria. Amongst bacteria, B. cereus was most sensitive (MIC=5 mg ml(-1)). The lowest minimum bactericidal concentration of shallot extract amongst bacteria tested was 5 mg ml(-1) for B. cereus. Amongst fungi, Aureobasidium pullulans and Microsporum gypseum were most sensitive (MIC= 0.15 mg ml(-1)). The lowest minimum lethal concentration was 2.5 mg ml(-1) for Microsporum gypseum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. It was therefore, expected that the antimicrobial principle of shallot was different than the antimicrobial compounds of onion and garlic. In addition, the antimicrobial component of the shallot extract was stable at 121 degrees C.

  20. Atomic layer deposition encapsulated activated carbon electrodes for high voltage stable supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kijoo; Cho, Moonkyu; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-01-28

    Operating voltage enhancement is an effective route for high energy density supercapacitors. Unfortunately, widely used activated carbon electrode generally suffers from poor electrochemical stability over 2.5 V. Here we present atomic layer deposition (ALD) encapsulation of activated carbons for high voltage stable supercapacitors. Two-nanometer-thick Al2O3 dielectric layers are conformally coated at activated carbon surface by ALD, well-maintaining microporous morphology. Resultant electrodes exhibit excellent stability at 3 V operation with 39% energy density enhancement from 2.5 V operation. Because of the protection of surface functional groups and reduction of electrolyte degradation, 74% of initial voltage was maintained 50 h after full charge, and 88% of capacitance was retained after 5000 cycles at 70 °C accelerated test, which correspond to 31 and 17% improvements from bare activated carbon, respectively. This ALD-based surface modification offers a general method to enhance electrochemical stability of carbon materials for diverse energy and environmental applications.

  1. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-01-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm−2 and 100 mA cm−2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation. PMID:26892437

  2. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-02-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm-2 and 100 mA cm-2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.

  3. A highly-active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-02-19

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superiormore » activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm–2 and 100 mA cm–2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Lastly, phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.« less

  4. Propellant-remaining modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgovitsky, S.

    1991-01-01

    A successful satellite mission is predicted upon the proper maintenance of the spacecraft's orbit and attitude. One requirement for planning and predicting the orbit and attitude is the accurate estimation of the propellant remaining onboard the spacecraft. Focuss is on the three methods that were developed for calculating the propellant budget: the errors associated with each method and the uncertainties in the variables required to determine the propellant remaining that contribute to these errors. Based on these findings, a strategy is developed for improved propellant-remaining estimation. The first method is based on Boyle's law, which related the values of pressure, volume, and temperature (PVT) of an ideal gas. The PVT method is used for the monopropellant and the bipropellant engines. The second method is based on the engine performance tests, which provide data that relate thrust and specific impulse associated with a propellant tank to that tank's pressure. Two curves representing thrust and specific impulse as functions of pressure are then generated using a polynomial fit on the engine performance data. The third method involves a computer simulation of the propellant system. The propellant flow is modeled by creating a conceptual model of the propulsion system configuration, taking into account such factors as the propellant and pressurant tank characteristics, thruster functionality, and piping layout. Finally, a thrust calibration technique is presented that uses differential correction with the computer simulation method of propellant-remaining modeling. Thrust calibration provides a better assessment of thruster performance and therefore enables a more accurate estimation of propellant consumed during a given maneuver.

  5. Reproducible, stable and fast electrochemical activity from easy to make graphene on copper electrodes.

    PubMed

    Bosch-Navarro, Concha; Laker, Zachary P L; Rourke, Jonathan P; Wilson, Neil R

    2015-11-28

    The electrochemical activity of graphene is of fundamental importance to applications from energy storage to sensing, but has proved difficult to unambiguously determine due to the challenges innate to fabricating well defined graphene electrodes free from contamination. Here, we report the electrochemical activity of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene grown on copper foil without further treatment, through appropriate choice of electrolyte. Fast electron transfer kinetics are observed for both inner and outer sphere redox couples with fully covered graphene on copper electrodes (k° = 0.014 ± 0.001 cm s(-1) or k° = 0.012 ± 0.001 cm s(-1) for potassium ferrocyanide(II) and hexaamineruthenium(III) chloride, respectively). Unlike highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrodes, the electrochemical response of the graphene on copper electrodes is stable, with no apparent electrode fouling even with inner sphere redox couples, and reproducible independent of the time between growth and measurement. Comparison between fully covered electrodes, and partial coverage of graphene with varying graphene grain sizes (from roughly 50 μm to <10 μm) shows that in this instance the basal plane of graphene is electrochemically active. These CVD grown graphene on copper electrodes are quick, cheap and reproducible to make and hence provide a convenient platform for further investigation of graphene electrochemistry and the effect of covalent and non-covalent modification. PMID:26477748

  6. FIS-dependent trans activation of stable RNA operons of Escherichia coli under various growth conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, L; Verbeek, H; Vijgenboom, E; van Drunen, C; Vanet, A; Bosch, L

    1992-01-01

    In Escherichia coli transcription of the tRNA operon thrU (tufB) and the rRNA operon rrnB is trans-activated by the protein FIS. This protein, which stimulates the inversion of various viral DNA segments, binds specifically to a cis-acting sequence (designated UAS) upstream of the promoter of thrU (tufB) and the P1 promoter of the rrnB operon. There are indications that this type of regulation is representative for the regulation of more stable RNA operons. In the present investigation we have studied UAS-dependent transcription activation of the thrU (tufB) operon in the presence and absence of FIS during a normal bacterial growth cycle and after a nutritional shift-up. In early log phase the expression of the operon rises steeply in wild-type cells, whereafter it declines. Concomitantly, a peak of the cellular FIS concentration is observed. Cells in the stationary phase are depleted of FIS. The rather abrupt increase of transcription activation depends on the nutritional quality of the medium. It is not seen in minimal medium. After a shift from minimal to rich medium, a peak of transcription activation and of FIS concentration is measured. This peak gets higher as the medium gets more strongly enriched. We conclude that a correlation between changes of the UAS-dependent activation of the thrU (tufB) operon and changes of the cellular FIS concentration under a variety of experimental conditions exists. This correlation strongly suggests that the production of FIS responds to environmental signals, thereby trans-activating the operon. Cells unable to produce FIS (fis cells) also show an increase of operon transcription in the early log phase and after a nutritional shift-up, albeit less pronounced than that wild-type cells. Presumably it is controlled by the ribosome feedback regulatory system. cis activation of the operon by the upstream activator sequence is apparent in the absence of FIS. This activation is constant throughout the entire growth cycle and is

  7. Attributing Climate Conditions for Stable Malaria Transmission to Human Activity in sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldrake, L.; Mitchell, D.; Allen, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature and precipitation limit areas of stable malaria transmission, but the effects of climate change on the disease remain controversial. Previously, studies have not separated the influence of anthropogenic climate change and natural variability, despite being an essential step in the attribution of climate change impacts. Ensembles of 2900 simulations of regional climate in sub-Saharan Africa for the year 2013, one representing realistic conditions and the other how climate might have been in the absence of human influence, were used to force a P.falciparium climate suitability model developed by the Mapping Malaria Risk in Africa project. Strongest signals were detected in areas of unstable transmission, indicating their heightened sensitivity to climatic factors. Evidently, impacts of human-induced climate change were unevenly distributed: the probability of conditions being suitable for stable malaria transmission were substantially reduced (increased) in the Sahel (Greater Horn of Africa (GHOA), particularly in the Ethiopian and Kenyan highlands). The length of the transmission season was correspondingly shortened in the Sahel and extended in the GHOA, by 1 to 2 months, including in Kericho (Kenya), where the role of climate change in driving recent malaria occurrence is hotly contested. Human-induced warming was primarily responsible for positive anomalies in the GHOA, while reduced rainfall caused negative anomalies in the Sahel. The latter was associated with anthropogenic impacts on the West African Monsoon, but uncertainty in the RCM's ability to reproduce precipitation trends in the region weakens confidence in the result. That said, outputs correspond well with broad-scale changes in observed endemicity, implying a potentially important contribution of anthropogenic climate change to the malaria burden during the past century. Results support the health-framing of climate risk and help indicate hotspots of climate vulnerability, providing

  8. Stable and unstable phases of elevated seismic activity at the persistently restless Telica Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Mel; Roman, Diana C.; Geirsson, Halldor; LaFemina, Peter; McNutt, Stephen R.; Muñoz, Angelica; Tenorio, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, is a persistently restless volcano with daily seismicity rates that can vary by orders of magnitude without apparent connection to eruptive activity. Low-frequency (LF) events are dominant and peaks in seismicity rate show little correlation with eruptive episodes, presenting a challenge for seismic monitoring and eruption forecasting. A short period seismic station (TELN) has been operated on Telica's summit since 1993, and in 2010 the installation of a six-station broadband seismic and eleven-station continuous GPS network (the TESAND network) was completed to document in detail the seismic characteristics of a persistently restless volcano. Between our study period of November 2009 and May 2013, over 400,000 events were detected at the TESAND summit station (TBTN), with daily event rates ranging from 5 to 1400. We present spectral analyses and classifications of ~ 200,000 events recorded by the TESAND network between April 2010 and March 2013, and earthquake locations for a sub-set of events between July 2010 and February 2012. In 2011 Telica erupted in a series of phreatic vulcanian explosions. Six months before the 2011 eruption, we observe a sudden decrease in LF events concurrent with a swarm of high-frequency (HF) events, followed by a decline in overall event rates, which reached a minimum at the eruption onset. We observe repeated periods of high and low seismicity rates and suggest these changes in seismicity represent repeated transitions between open-system and closed-system degassing. We suggest that these short- and long-term transitions between open to closed-system degassing form part of a long-term pattern of stable vs. unstable phases at Telica. Stable phases are characterised by steady high-rate seismicity and represent stable open-system degassing, whereas unstable phases are characterised by highly variable seismicity rates and represent repeated transitions from open to closed-system degassing, where the system is

  9. Synthesis of chemicals using solar energy with stable photoelectrochemically active heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Mubeen, Syed; Singh, Nirala; Lee, Joun; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin; McFarland, Eric W

    2013-05-01

    Efficient and cost-effective conversion of solar energy to useful chemicals and fuels could lead to a significant reduction in fossil hydrocarbon use. Artificial systems that use solar energy to produce chemicals have been reported for more than a century. However the most efficient devices demonstrated, based on traditionally fabricated compound semiconductors, have extremely short working lifetimes due to photocorrosion by the electrolyte. Here we report a stable, scalable design and molecular level fabrication strategy to create photoelectrochemically active heterostructure (PAH) units consisting of an efficient semiconductor light absorber in contact with oxidation and reduction electrocatalysts and otherwise protected by alumina. The functional heterostructures are fabricated by layer-by-layer, template-directed, electrochemical synthesis in porous anodic aluminum oxide membranes to produce high density arrays of electronically autonomous, nanostructured, corrosion resistant, photoactive units (~10(9)-10(10) PAHs per cm(2)). Each PAH unit is isolated from its neighbor by the transparent electrically insulating oxide cellular enclosure that makes the overall assembly fault tolerant. When illuminated with visible light, the free floating devices have been demonstrated to produce hydrogen at a stable rate for over 24 h in corrosive hydroiodic acid electrolyte with light as the only input. The quantum efficiency (averaged over the solar spectrum) for absorbed photons-to-hydrogen conversion was 7.4% and solar-to-hydrogen energy efficiency of incident light was 0.9%. The fabrication approach is scalable for commercial manufacturing and readily adaptable to a variety of earth abundant semiconductors which might otherwise be unstable as photoelectrocatalysts.

  10. Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, Simon A.; Smith, Paul J.; Wells, Peter P.; Chater, Philip A.; Carter, James H.; Morgan, David J.; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M.; Wagner, Jakob B.; Davies, Thomas E.; Lu, Li; Bartley, Jonathan K.; Taylor, Stuart H.; Spencer, Michael S.; Kiely, Christopher J.; Kelly, Gordon J.; Park, Colin W.; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-03-01

    Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable—and hence little known and largely ignored—georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions—a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide (refs 13, 14), a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts.

  11. Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kondrat, Simon A; Smith, Paul J; Wells, Peter P; Chater, Philip A; Carter, James H; Morgan, David J; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M; Wagner, Jakob B; Davies, Thomas E; Lu, Li; Bartley, Jonathan K; Taylor, Stuart H; Spencer, Michael S; Kiely, Christopher J; Kelly, Gordon J; Park, Colin W; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-03-01

    Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable--and hence little known and largely ignored--georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions--a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide (refs 13, 14), a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts. PMID:26878237

  12. How Stable Is Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehr, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Provides a problem where students are asked to find the point at which a soda can floating in some liquid changes its equilibrium between stable and unstable as the soda is removed from the can. Requires use of Newton's first law, center of mass, Archimedes' principle, stable and unstable equilibrium, and buoyant force position. (MVL)

  13. Light Stable Isotopes in Aquifers Affected by Mining Activities in a Brazilian Mining Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, R. M.; de Carvalho, J. B.

    2013-05-01

    Iron ore is presently a main item in the Brazilian commercial agenda. Large reserves have converted this utility into an important source of export earnings and, secondarily, of raw materials for the domestic industry. Parallel to a boom in mining activities in the last years environmental impacts and a stress on natural resources have soared. A region exhibiting pronouncedly intensive mining activities lies in the central part of the State of Minas Gerais, the third economy of the federation. Mines are sited right beside the capital and neighbor towns amounting to nearly five million inhabitants and a pronounced dependence on groundwater resources. Besides, this region is a water divide enclosing the sources of main contributors to the most strategic fluvial basins in the country. Iron ore is by large the main mineral but other metals (including gold and uranium), as well as non-metals such as limestone, quartz and granite, also occur. Given the significance of this commodity in the country's trade balance and the demand of water resources with acceptable quality for human consumption, the scale of ensuing water use conflicts caused by its exploration is wide ranging and has to be coped with well grounded environmental assessment approaches. Tracer hydrology techniques might be a valuable tool in this context. The characteristics of the area being impacted have been surveyed, including climate and pluviometry, stratigraphic litology, geological structure, use of soil, mineral resources and their exploration, surface and ground water hydrology and their sundry uses. Data to be processed have been procured at local public agencies but as regard local hydrological features, particularly isotopic compositions, ad hoc surveys and methodologies were required. One instance concerns pluviometric isotopy due to the alpine character of the surveyed region altitude and temperature effects might take place. Hence different sites were monitored; cumulative pluviometer samples

  14. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324

    PubMed Central

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 105 U mg−1 protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/Km) of 4.7 × 108 M−1 s−1 within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  15. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Painter, Meghan M; Morrison, James H; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Watzlawik, Jens O; Papke, Louisa M; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Matchett, William E; Turkowski, Kari L; Poeschla, Eric M; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection. PMID:26633895

  16. Polyaniline hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods with long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Susanta; Khan, Hasmat; Biswas, Indranil; Jana, Sunirmal

    2016-10-01

    We report surfactant/template free precursor solution based synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods by a two-step process. Initially, ZnO nanorods have been prepared at 95 °C, followed by hybridization (coating) of PANI onto the ZnO via in situ polymerization of aniline monomer, forming ZnO-PANI nanohybrid (ZP). The structural properties of ZP have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. The presence of surface defects especially the oxygen vacancies in ZnO has been characterized by photoluminescence emission, high resolution TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman spectral measurements. The chemical interaction of PANI with ZnO has been examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and XPS analyses. A significant enhancement in visible absorption of ZP sample is found as evidenced from UV-vis diffused reflectance spectral study. BET nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm shows an improved textural property (pore size, pore volume) of ZP. Moreover, a long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity (PEC) of ZP is found compare to pristine ZnO. The synergic effect of PANI hybridization and the presence of surface defects in ZnO NRs can enhance the PEC by prolonging the recombination rate of photogenerated charge carriers. The effect can also provide large number of active sites to make electrolyte diffusion and mass transportation easier in the nanohybrid. This simple synthesis strategy can be adopted for PANI hybridization with different metal oxide semiconductors towards enhancing PEC activity of the hybrid materials.

  17. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Painter, Meghan M; Morrison, James H; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Watzlawik, Jens O; Papke, Louisa M; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Matchett, William E; Turkowski, Kari L; Poeschla, Eric M; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection.

  18. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Meghan M.; Morrison, James H.; Zoecklein, Laurie J.; Rinkoski, Tommy A.; Watzlawik, Jens O.; Papke, Louisa M.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Bieber, Allan J.; Matchett, William E.; Turkowski, Kari L.; Poeschla, Eric M.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection. PMID:26633895

  19. Stable 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid analog relaxes coronary arteries through potassium channel activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqi; Gauthier, Kathryn M; Reddy, L Manmohan; Sangras, Bhavani; Sharma, Kamalesh K; Nithipatikom, Kasem; Falck, John R; Campbell, William B

    2005-04-01

    5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (5,6-EET) is a cytochrome P450 epoxygenase metabolite of arachidonic acid that causes vasorelaxation. However, investigations of its role in biological systems have been limited by its chemical instability. We developed a stable agonist of 5,6-EET, 5-(pentadeca-3(Z),6(Z),9(Z)-trienyloxy)pentanoic acid (PTPA), in which the 5,6-epoxide was replaced with a 5-ether. PTPA obviates chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis. In bovine coronary artery rings precontracted with U46619, PTPA (1 nmol/L to 10 micromol/L) induced concentration-dependent relaxations, with maximal relaxation of 86+/-5% and EC50 of 1 micromol/L. The relaxations were inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (10 micromol/L; max relaxation 43+/-9%); the ATP-sensitive K+ channel inhibitor glybenclamide (10 micromol/L; max relaxation 49+/-6%); and the large conductance calcium-activated K+ channel inhibitor iberiotoxin (100 nmol/L; max relaxation 38+/-6%) and abolished by the combination of iberiotoxin with indomethacin or glybenclamide or increasing extracellular K+ to 20 mmol/L. Whole-cell outward K+ current was increased nearly 6-fold by PTPA (10 micromol/L), which was also blocked by iberiotoxin. Additionally, we synthesized 5-(pentadeca-6(Z),9(Z)-dienyloxy)pentanoic acid and 5-(pentadeca-3(Z),9(Z)-dienyloxy)pentanoic acid (PDPA), PTPA analogs that lack the 8,9 or 11,12 double bonds of arachidonic acid and therefore are not substrates for cyclooxygenase. The PDPAs caused concentration-dependent relaxations (max relaxations 46+/-13% and 52+/-7%, respectively; EC50 1micromol/L), which were not altered by glybenclamide but blocked by iberiotoxin. These studies suggested that PTPA induces relaxation through 2 mechanisms: (1) cyclooxygenase-dependent metabolism to 5-ether-containing prostaglandins that activate ATP-sensitive K+ channels and (2) activation of smooth muscle large conductance calcium-activated K+ channels. PDPAs only activate large conductance calcium-activated

  20. Field-Scale Stable-Isotope Probing of Active Methanotrophs in a Landfill-Cover Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Henneberger, R.; Chiri, E.

    2012-12-01

    The greenhouse gas methane (CH4) is an important contributor to global climate change. While its atmospheric concentration is increasing, a large portion of produced CH4 never reaches the atmosphere, but is consumed by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). The latter are ubiquitous in soils and utilize CH4 as sole source of energy and carbon. Among other methods, MOB may be differentiated based on characteristic phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). Stable-isotope probing (SIP) on PLFA has been widely applied to identify active members of MOB communities in laboratory incubation studies, but results are often difficult to extrapolate to the field. Thus, novel field-scale approaches are needed to link activity and identity of MOB in their natural environment. We present results of field experiments in which we combined PLFA-SIP with gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) to label active MOB at the field-scale while simultaneously quantifying CH4 oxidation activity. During a SIP-GPPT, a mixture of reactive (here 13CH4, O2) and non-reactive tracer gases (e.g., Ar, Ne, He) is injected into the soil at a location of interest. Thereafter, gas flow is reversed and the gas mixture diluted with soil air is extracted from the same location and sampled periodically. Rate constants for CH4 oxidation can be calculated by analyzing breakthrough curves of 13CH4 and a suitable non-reactive tracer gas. SIP-GPPTs were performed in a landfill-cover soil, and feasibility of this novel approach was tested at several locations along a gradient of MOB activity and soil temperature. Soil samples were collected before and after SIP-GPPTs, total PLFA were extracted, and incorporation of 13C in the polar lipid fraction was analyzed. Potential CH4 oxidation rates derived from SIP-GPPTs were similar to those derived from regular GPPTs (using unlabeled CH4) performed at the same locations prior to SIP-GPPTs, indicating that application of 13CH4 did not adversely affect bacterial CH4 oxidation rates. Rates

  1. A novel subtilase with NaCl-activated and oxidant-stable activity from Virgibacillus sp. SK37

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Microbial proteases are one of the most commercially valuable enzymes, of which the largest market share has been taken by subtilases or alkaline proteases of the Bacillus species. Despite a large amount of information on microbial proteases, a search for novel proteases with unique properties is still of interest for both basic and applied aspects of this highly complex class of enzymes. Oxidant stable proteases (OSPs) have been shown to have a wide application in the detergent and bleaching industries and recently have become one of the most attractive enzymes in various biotechnological applications. Results A gene encoding a novel member of the subtilase superfamily was isolated from Virgibacillus sp. SK37, a protease-producing bacterium isolated from Thai fish sauce fermentation. The gene was cloned by an activity-based screening of a genomic DNA expression library on Luria-Bertani (LB) agar plates containing 1 mM IPTG and 3% skim milk. Of the 100,000 clones screened, all six isolated positive clones comprised one overlapping open reading frame of 45% identity to the aprX gene from Bacillus species. This gene, designated aprX-sk37 was cloned into pET21d(+) and over-expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3). The enzyme product, designated AprX-SK37, was purified by an immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography to apparent homogeneity and characterized. The AprX-SK37 enzyme showed optimal catalytic conditions at pH 9.5 and 55°C, based on the azocasein assay containing 5 mM CaCl2. Maximum catalytic activity was found at 1 M NaCl with residual activity of 30% at 3 M NaCl. Thermal stability of the enzyme was also enhanced by 1 M NaCl. The enzyme was absolutely calcium-dependent, with optimal concentration of CaCl2 at 15 mM. Inhibitory effects by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid indicated that this enzyme is a metal-dependent serine protease. The enzyme activity was sensitive towards reducing agents, urea, and SDS, but

  2. Structural features of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin that activates membrane-associated guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Shimonishi, Y

    2004-03-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxin (ST), a small peptide of 18 or 19 amino acid residues produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, is the cause of acute diarrhea in infants and travelers in developing countries. ST triggers a biological response by binding to a membrane-associated guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) which is located on intestinal epithelial cell membranes. This binding causes an increase in the concentration of cGMP as a second messenger in cells and activates protein kinase A and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Here we describe the crystal structure of an ST at 0.89 A resolution. The molecule has a ring-shaped molecular architecture consisting of six peptide molecules with external and internal diameters of approximately 35 and 7 A, respectively and a thickness of approximately 11 A. The conserved residues at the central portion of ST are distributed on the outer surface of the ring-shaped peptide hexamer, suggesting that the hexamer may be implicated in the association with GC-C through these invariant residues. PMID:15049831

  3. Dihydronepetalactones deter feeding activity by mosquitoes, stable flies, and deer ticks.

    PubMed

    Feaster, John E; Scialdone, Mark A; Todd, Robin G; Gonzalez, Yamaira I; Foster, Joseph P; Hallahan, David L

    2009-07-01

    The essential oil of catmint, Nepeta cataria L., contains nepetalactones, that, on hydrogenation, yield the corresponding dihydronepetalactone (DHN) diastereomers. The DHN diastereomer (4R,4aR,7S,7aS)-4,7-dimethylhexahydrocyclopenta[c]pyran-1(3H)-one, DHN 1) was evaluated as mosquito repellent, as was the mixture of diastereomers {mostly (4S,4aR,7S,7aR)-4,7-dimethylhexahydrocyclopenta[c]pyran-1(3H)-one, DHN 2} present after hydrogenation of catmint oil itself. The repellency of these materials to Aedes aegypti L. and Anopheles albimanus Wiedemann mosquitoes was tested in vitro and found to be comparable to that obtained with the well-known insect repellent active ingredient N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET). DHN 1 and DHN 2 also repelled the stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans L., in this study. DHN 1, DHN 2, and p-menthane-3,8-diol (PMD), another natural monoterpenoid repellent, gave comparable levels of repellency against An. albimanus and S. calcitrans. Laboratory testing of DHN 1 and DHN 2 using human subjects with An. albimanus mosquitoes was carried out. Both DHN 1 and DHN 2 at 10% (wt:vol) conferred complete protection from bites for significant periods of time (3.5 and 5 h, respectively), with DHN2 conferring protection statistically equivalent to DEET. The DHN 1 and DHN 2 diastereomers were also efficaceous against black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis Say) nymphs.

  4. Gold-doped graphene: A highly stable and active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbov, Sergey; Alcántara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2015-04-01

    In addressing the growing need of renewable and sustainable energy resources, hydrogen-fuel-cells stand as one of the most promising routes to transform the current energy paradigm into one that integrally fulfills environmental sustainability. Nevertheless, accomplishing this technology at a large scale demands to surpass the efficiency and enhance the cost-effectiveness of platinum-based cathodes, which catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this work, our first-principles calculations show that Au atoms incorporated into graphene di-vacancies form a highly stable and cost-effective electrocatalyst that is, at the same time, as or more (dependently of the dopant concentration) active toward ORR than the best-known Pt-based electrocatalysts. We reveal that partial passivation of defected-graphene by gold atoms reduces the reactivity of C dangling bonds and increases that of Au, thus optimizing them for catalyzing the ORR and yielding a system of high thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities. We also demonstrate that the linear relation among the binding energies of the reaction intermediates assumed in computational high-throughput material screening does not hold, at least for this non-purely transition-metal material. We expect Au-doped graphene to finally overcome the cathode-related challenge hindering the realization of hydrogen-fuel cells as the leading means of powering transportation and portable devices.

  5. Mesoporous graphene-like nanobowls as Pt electrocatalyst support for highly active and stable methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zaoxue; He, Guoqiang; Jiang, Zhifeng; Wei, Wei; Gao, Lina; Xie, Jimin

    2015-06-01

    Mesoporous graphene-like nanobowls (GLBs) with high surface area of 1091 m2 g-1, high pore volume of 2.7 cm3 g-1 and average pore diameter of 9.8 nm are synthesized through template method. The GLBs with inherent excellent electrical conductivity and chemical inertia show the properties of well mass transfer, poison resistance and stable loading of smaller Pt particles. Therefore, the Pt/GLB catalyst shows much higher activity and stability than that of commercial Pt/C (TKK) for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Therein, the peak current density on Pt/GLB (2075 mA mgPt-1) for MOR is 2.87 times that of commercial Pt/C (723 mA mgPt-1); and the onset potential for the MOR on the former is negatively shifted about 160 mV compared with that on the latter. The catalytic performances of the Pt/GLB are also better than those of the Pt loading on mesoporous amorphous carbon nanobowls (Pt/BLC), indicating promotion effect of graphite on Pt catalytic performance.

  6. Gold-doped graphene: A highly stable and active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stolbov, Sergey Alcántara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2015-04-21

    In addressing the growing need of renewable and sustainable energy resources, hydrogen-fuel-cells stand as one of the most promising routes to transform the current energy paradigm into one that integrally fulfills environmental sustainability. Nevertheless, accomplishing this technology at a large scale demands to surpass the efficiency and enhance the cost-effectiveness of platinum-based cathodes, which catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this work, our first-principles calculations show that Au atoms incorporated into graphene di-vacancies form a highly stable and cost-effective electrocatalyst that is, at the same time, as or more (dependently of the dopant concentration) active toward ORR than the best-known Pt-based electrocatalysts. We reveal that partial passivation of defected-graphene by gold atoms reduces the reactivity of C dangling bonds and increases that of Au, thus optimizing them for catalyzing the ORR and yielding a system of high thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities. We also demonstrate that the linear relation among the binding energies of the reaction intermediates assumed in computational high-throughput material screening does not hold, at least for this non-purely transition-metal material. We expect Au-doped graphene to finally overcome the cathode-related challenge hindering the realization of hydrogen-fuel cells as the leading means of powering transportation and portable devices.

  7. Identification of functionally active aerobic methanotrophs in sediments from an arctic lake using stable isotope probing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Catranis, Catharine; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Arctic lakes are a significant source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4), but the role that methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) play in limiting the overall CH4 flux is poorly understood. Here, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques to identify the metabolically active aerobic methanotrophs in upper sediments (0–1 cm) from an arctic lake in northern Alaska sampled during ice-free summer conditions. The highest CH4 oxidation potential was observed in the upper sediment (0–1 cm depth) with 1.59 μmol g wet weight-1 day-1 compared with the deeper sediment samples (1–3 cm, 3–5 cm and 5–10 cm), which exhibited CH4 oxidation potentials below 0.4 μmol g wet weight-1 day-1. Both type I and type II methanotrophs were directly detected in the upper sediment total communities using targeted primer sets based on 16S rRNA genes. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and functional genes (pmoA and mxaF) in the 13C-DNA from the upper sediment indicated that type I methanotrophs, mainly Methylobacter, Methylosoma, Methylomonas and Methylovulum miyakonense, dominated the assimilation of CH4. Methylotrophs, including the genera Methylophilus and/or Methylotenera, were also abundant in the 13CDNA. Our results show that a diverse microbial consortium acquired carbon from CH4 in the sediments of this arctic lake.

  8. Stable brain ATM message and residual kinase-active ATM protein in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiali; Chen, Jianmin; Vinters, Harry V; Gatti, Richard A; Herrup, Karl

    2011-05-18

    The gene that is mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), ATM, is catalytically activated in response to DNA damage. Yet a full accounting for the CNS deficits in human A-T or its mouse models remains elusive. We have analyzed the CNS phenotypes of two mouse Atm alleles--Atm(tm1Bal) (Bal) and Atm(tm1Awb) (Awb). Neither mutant has detectable mRNA or protein in peripheral tissues. In brain, although Bal/Bal mice have no ATM protein, they have nearly normal amounts of Atm mRNA. Bal/Bal neurons exhibit extensive cell cycle reentry and degeneration in both cortex and cerebellum. Unexpectedly, in Awb/Awb mice a novel mRNA is found in which the engineered mutation is excised. This mRNA is apparently translated and produces a catalytically active ATM protein that responds to DNA damage by phosphorylating p53 and Chk2. Prompted by these results, we examined eight cases of human A-T and found evidence for residual ATM protein in seven of them. These findings offer important new insights into the human disease and the role of brain ATM activity in the severity of the neurological symptoms of A-T.

  9. Cortical activity is more stable when sensory stimuli are consciously perceived

    PubMed Central

    Schurger, Aaron; Sarigiannidis, Ioannis; Naccache, Lionel; Sitt, Jacobo D.; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2015-01-01

    According to recent evidence, stimulus-tuned neurons in the cerebral cortex exhibit reduced variability in firing rate across trials, after the onset of a stimulus. However, in order for a reduction in variability to be directly relevant to perception and behavior, it must be realized within trial—the pattern of activity must be relatively stable. Stability is characteristic of decision states in recurrent attractor networks, and its possible relevance to conscious perception has been suggested by theorists. However, it is difficult to measure on the within-trial time scales and broadly distributed spatial scales relevant to perception. We recorded simultaneous magneto- and electroencephalography (MEG and EEG) data while subjects observed threshold-level visual stimuli. Pattern-similarity analyses applied to the data from MEG gradiometers uncovered a pronounced decrease in variability across trials after stimulus onset, consistent with previous single-unit data. This was followed by a significant divergence in variability depending upon subjective report (seen/unseen), with seen trials exhibiting less variability. Applying the same analysis across time, within trial, we found that the latter effect coincided in time with a difference in the stability of the pattern of activity. Stability alone could be used to classify data from individual trials as “seen” or “unseen.” The same metric applied to EEG data from patients with disorders of consciousness exposed to auditory stimuli diverged parametrically according to clinically diagnosed level of consciousness. Differences in signal strength could not account for these results. Conscious perception may involve the transient stabilization of distributed cortical networks, corresponding to a global brain-scale decision. PMID:25847997

  10. Dimensional and Mechanical Dynamics of Active and Stable Edges in Motile Fibroblasts Investigated by Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotsch, Christian; Jacobson, Ken; Radmacher, Manfred

    1999-02-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) was employed to investigate the extension and retraction dynamics of protruding and stable edges of motile 3T3 fibroblasts in culture. Such dynamics closely paralleled the results of earlier studies employing video microscopy that indicated that the AFM force-mapping technique does not appreciably perturb these dynamics. Force scans permitted height determinations of active and stable edges. Whereas the profiles of active edges are flat with average heights of 0.4-0.8 μ m, stable edges smoothly ascend to 2-3 μ m within about 6 μ m of the edge. In the region of the leading edge, the height fluctuates up to 50% (SD) of the mean value, much more than the stable edge; this fluctuation presumably reflects differences in underlying cytoskeletal activity. In addition, force mapping yields an estimate of the local Young's modulus or modulus of elasticity (E, the cortical stiffness). This stiffness will be related to "cortical tension," can be accurately calculated for the stable edges, and is ≈ 12 kPa in this case. The thinness of the leading edge precludes accurate estimation of the E values, but within 4 μ m of the margin it is considerably smaller than that for stable edges, which have an upper limit of 3-5 kPa. Although blebbing cannot absolutely be ruled out as a mechanism of extension, the data are consistent with an actin polymerization and/or myosin motor mechanism in which the average material properties of the extending margin would be nearly constant to the edge. Because the leading edge is softer than the stable edge, these data also are consistent with the notion that extension preferentially occurs in regions of lower cortical tension.

  11. Identifying Low pH Active and Lactate-Utilizing Taxa within Oral Microbiome Communities from Healthy Children Using Stable Isotope Probing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Jeffrey S.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Majors, Paul D.; Mcateer, Kathleen; Allen, Lisa Z.; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2012-03-05

    Many human microbial infectious diseases including dental caries are polymicrobial in nature and how these complex multi-species communities evolve from a healthy to a diseased state is not well understood. Although many health- or disease-associated oral microbes have been characterized in vitro, their physiology in vivo in the presence of the complex oral microbiome is difficult to determine with current approaches. In addition, about half of these oral species remain uncultivated to date and little is known except their 16S rRNA sequence. Lacking culture-based physiological analyses, the functional roles of uncultivated microorganisms will remain enigmatic despite their apparent disease correlation. To start addressing these knowledge gaps, we applied a novel combination of in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) with RNA and DNA based Stable Isotope Probing (SIP) to oral plaque communities from healthy children for temporal monitoring of carbohydrate utilization, organic acid production and identification of metabolically active and inactive bacterial species.

  12. Cellular Metabolic Activity and the Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Intracellular Water and Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer-Martin, H. W.; Hegg, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular water is an important pool of oxygen and hydrogen atoms for biosynthesis. Intracellular water is usually assumed to be isotopically identical to extracellular water, but an unexpected experimental result caused us to question this assumption. Heme O isolated from Escherichia coli cells grown in 95% H218O contained only a fraction of the theoretical value of labeled oxygen at a position where the O atom was known to be derived from water. In fact, fewer than half of the oxygen atoms were labeled. In an effort to explain this surprising result, we developed a method to determine the isotope ratios of intracellular water in cultured cells. The results of our experiments showed that during active growth, up to 70% of the oxygen atoms and 50% of the hydrogen atoms in the intracellular water of E. coli are generated during metabolism and can be isotopically distinct from extracellular water. The fraction of isotopically distinct atoms was substantially less in stationary phase and chilled cells, consistent with our hypothesis that less metabolically-generated water would be present in cells with lower metabolic activity. Our results were consistent with and explained the result of the heme O labeling experiment. Only about 40% of the O atoms on the heme O molecule were labeled because, presumably, only about 40% of the water inside the cells was 18O water that had diffused in from the culture medium. The rest of the intracellular water contained 16O atoms derived from either nutrients or atmospheric oxygen. To test whether we could also detect metabolically-derived hydrogen atoms in cellular constituents, we isolated fatty acids from log-phase and stationary phase E. coli and determined the H isotope ratios of individual fatty acids. The results of these experiments showed that environmental water contributed more H atoms to fatty acids isolated in stationary phase than to the same fatty acids isolated from log-phase cells. Stable isotope analyses of

  13. Dihydronepetalactones deter feeding activity by mosquitoes, stable flies, and deer ticks.

    PubMed

    Feaster, John E; Scialdone, Mark A; Todd, Robin G; Gonzalez, Yamaira I; Foster, Joseph P; Hallahan, David L

    2009-07-01

    The essential oil of catmint, Nepeta cataria L., contains nepetalactones, that, on hydrogenation, yield the corresponding dihydronepetalactone (DHN) diastereomers. The DHN diastereomer (4R,4aR,7S,7aS)-4,7-dimethylhexahydrocyclopenta[c]pyran-1(3H)-one, DHN 1) was evaluated as mosquito repellent, as was the mixture of diastereomers {mostly (4S,4aR,7S,7aR)-4,7-dimethylhexahydrocyclopenta[c]pyran-1(3H)-one, DHN 2} present after hydrogenation of catmint oil itself. The repellency of these materials to Aedes aegypti L. and Anopheles albimanus Wiedemann mosquitoes was tested in vitro and found to be comparable to that obtained with the well-known insect repellent active ingredient N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET). DHN 1 and DHN 2 also repelled the stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans L., in this study. DHN 1, DHN 2, and p-menthane-3,8-diol (PMD), another natural monoterpenoid repellent, gave comparable levels of repellency against An. albimanus and S. calcitrans. Laboratory testing of DHN 1 and DHN 2 using human subjects with An. albimanus mosquitoes was carried out. Both DHN 1 and DHN 2 at 10% (wt:vol) conferred complete protection from bites for significant periods of time (3.5 and 5 h, respectively), with DHN2 conferring protection statistically equivalent to DEET. The DHN 1 and DHN 2 diastereomers were also efficaceous against black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis Say) nymphs. PMID:19645285

  14. A Calcium-Dependent Plasticity Rule for HCN Channels Maintains Activity Homeostasis and Stable Synaptic Learning

    PubMed Central

    Honnuraiah, Suraj; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical and computational frameworks for synaptic plasticity and learning have a long and cherished history, with few parallels within the well-established literature for plasticity of voltage-gated ion channels. In this study, we derive rules for plasticity in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, and assess the synergy between synaptic and HCN channel plasticity in establishing stability during synaptic learning. To do this, we employ a conductance-based model for the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, and incorporate synaptic plasticity through the well-established Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM)-like rule for synaptic plasticity, wherein the direction and strength of the plasticity is dependent on the concentration of calcium influx. Under this framework, we derive a rule for HCN channel plasticity to establish homeostasis in synaptically-driven firing rate, and incorporate such plasticity into our model. In demonstrating that this rule for HCN channel plasticity helps maintain firing rate homeostasis after bidirectional synaptic plasticity, we observe a linear relationship between synaptic plasticity and HCN channel plasticity for maintaining firing rate homeostasis. Motivated by this linear relationship, we derive a calcium-dependent rule for HCN-channel plasticity, and demonstrate that firing rate homeostasis is maintained in the face of synaptic plasticity when moderate and high levels of cytosolic calcium influx induced depression and potentiation of the HCN-channel conductance, respectively. Additionally, we show that such synergy between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity enhances the stability of synaptic learning through metaplasticity in the BCM-like synaptic plasticity profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the synergistic interaction between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity preserves robustness of information transfer across the neuron under a rate-coding schema. Our results establish specific physiological roles

  15. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  16. The Jasper Ridge elevated CO{sub 2} experiment: Root acid phosphatase activity in Bromus hordeaceus and Avena barbata remains unchanged under elevated [CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Cardon, Z.G.; Jackson, R.

    1995-06-01

    Root acid phosphatase activity increases phosphate available to plants by cleaving phosphate esters in soil organic matter. Because of increased plant growth potential under elevated [CO{sub 2}], we hypothesized that high [CO{sub 2}]-grown plants might exhibit higher phosphatase activity than low [CO{sub 2}]-grown plants. We assayed phosphatase activity in two species grown on two substrates (Bromus on serpentine soil and Bromus and Avena on sandstone soil) under high and low [CO{sub 2}] and under several nutrient treatments. Phosphatase activity was expressed per gram fresh weight of roots. Phosphatase activity of Bromus roots (on sandstone) was first assayed in treatments where only P and K, or only N, were added to soil. Bromus roots in this case showed strong induction of phosphatase activity when N only had been added to soil, indicating that Bromus regulated its phosphatase activity in response to phosphate availability. Both Bromus and Avena growing in sandstone, and Bromus growing in serpentine, showed enhanced phosphatase activity at high nutrient (N, P, and K) levels over that at low nutrient levels, but no differences between phosphatase activity were apparent between [CO{sub 2}] treatments. The increased phosphatase activity at high N, P, and K may indicate enhanced {open_quotes}growth demand{close_quotes} (reflected in higher biomass) in both Avena and Bromus. In contrast, though Bromus {open_quotes}growth demand{close_quotes} (biomass) increased under high [CO{sub 2}] on sandstone, phosphatase activity did not increase.

  17. Episodic nature of earthquake activity in stable continental regions revealed by palaeoseismicity studies of Australian and North American Quaternary faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; Machette, M.N.; Bowman, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Palaeoseismic investigations of recent faulting in stable continental regions of Australia, North America and India show that these faults typically have a long-term behaviour characterised by episodes of activity separated by quiescent intervals of at least 10 000 and commonly 100 000 years or more. Long recurrence intervals such as these are well documented by detailed studies of the faults that ruptured during the 1986 Marryat Creek, South Australia and 1988 Tennant Creek, Northern Territory earthquakes. Thus, neotectonic features associated with stable continental region faults such as scarps and grabens commonly have subtle geomorphic expression and may be poorly preserved. Many potentially hazardous faults in stable continental regions are aseismic, which is one reason why the inventory of these faults is incomplete. Although they may be currently aseismic, faults in stable continental regions that are favourably oriented for movement in the current stress field could produce damaging earthquakes, often in unexpected places. Comprehensive palaeoseismic investigations of modern and prehistoric faulting events in stable continental regions are needed to understand the long-term behaviour of these faults, and thereby, improve seismic-hazard assessments.

  18. Teleseismic P and S Delay Times within Tectonically Active and Stable North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, X.; van der Lee, S.

    2009-12-01

    We have measured teleseismic P and S relative delay times within 1) Stable North America (SNA) using waveforms from IRIS PASSCAL seismic arrays MOMA (Fischer et al., 1995), ABBA (Roecker and Beavan, 1995), Abitibi (Hearn and Mareschal, 1996), and FLED (Wysession and Fischer, 2001), and 2) Tectonically-active North America (TNA) using Earthscope's Transportable Array (TA). To study the contribution of mantle structure to these delays we subtracted delays predicted for topography and crustal structure, using CRUST 2.0 (Bassin et al., 2000). Preliminary analyses of delay times from earthquakes with Mw>=6.5 show surprising differences between the heterogeneity of the mantle beneath SNA and TNA. While the range of delay times is expectedly small for an intra-shield array such as Abitibi, the range of delay times from Proterozoic basement in the midwest to Paleozoic margin in New England is much larger and slightly exceeds that for the TA in TNA. This suggests that that the mantle of SNA is slightly more heterogeneous than TNA, despite there being relatively little surface expression of this heterogeneity. Patterns of P and S relative delay times measured in TNA correlate better with surface tectonics, suggesting that the mantle in TNA has a greater effect on the surface geology than in SNA. The central and southern Basin and Range are characterized by positive delays. As shown in previous studies, the Snake River Plain is also well delineated by positive delays. These delays exhibit a significant peak at station H17A in Yellowstone National Park. Teleseismic P and S waves arriving at stations in the Rocky Mountains are much faster, including in northern Idaho and western Washington, but not in western Oregon. For both SNA and TNA, the measured S and P delay times have a significant linear correlation, with S delays at approximately 3 times the P delays, which confirms the dominant effect of mantle temperature on mantle velocity structure. However, the slope of this

  19. Monocyte Caspase-1 Is Released in a Stable, Active High Molecular Weight Complex Distinct from the Unstable Cell Lysate-Activated Caspase-1

    PubMed Central

    Shamaa, Obada R.; Mitra, Srabani; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Wewers, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes utilize caspase-1 activation as a means to respond to danger signals. Although caspase-1 was discovered using highly concentrated cell extracts that spontaneously activate caspase-1, it is now clear that in live cell models caspase-1 activation occurs in the process of its cellular release and is not an intracellular event. Therefore, we compared the characteristics of caspase-1 activation in the cell lysate model to that of caspase-1 that is released in response to exogenous inflammasome activation. Whereas both models generated active caspase-1, the cell-lysate induced caspase-1 required highly concentrated cell lysates and had a short half-life (~15 min) whereas, the activation induced released caspase-1 required 2–3 log fold fewer cells and was stable for greater than 12 h. Both forms were able to cleave proIL-1beta but unexpectedly, the released activity was unable to be immunodepleted by caspase-1 antibodies. Size exclusion chromatography identified two antigenic forms of p20 caspase-1 in the activation induced released caspase-1: one at the predicted size of tetrameric, p20/p10 caspase-1 and the other at >200 kDa. However, only the high molecular weight form had stable functional activity. These results suggest that released caspase-1 exists in a unique complex that is functionally stable and protected from immunodepletion whereas cell-extract generated active caspase-1 is rapidly inhibited in the cytosolic milieu. PMID:26599267

  20. Exceptionally stable, redox-active supramolecular protein assemblies with emergent properties.

    PubMed

    Brodin, Jeffrey D; Carr, Jessica R; Sontz, Pamela A; Tezcan, F Akif

    2014-02-25

    The designed assembly of proteins into well-defined supramolecular architectures not only tests our understanding of protein-protein interactions, but it also provides an opportunity to tailor materials with new physical and chemical properties. Previously, we described that RIDC3, a designed variant of the monomeric electron transfer protein cytochrome cb562, could self-assemble through Zn(2+) coordination into uniform 1D nanotubes or 2D arrays with crystalline order. Here we show that these 1D and 2D RIDC3 assemblies display very high chemical stabilities owing to their metal-mediated frameworks, maintaining their structural order in ≥90% (vol/vol) of several polar organic solvents including tetrahydrofuran (THF) and isopropanol (iPrOH). In contrast, the unassembled RIDC3 monomers denature in ∼30% THF and 50% iPrOH, indicating that metal-mediated self-assembly also leads to considerable stabilization of the individual building blocks. The 1D and 2D RIDC3 assemblies are highly thermostable as well, remaining intact at up to ∼70 °C and ∼90 °C, respectively. The 1D nanotubes cleanly convert into the 2D arrays on heating above 70 °C, a rare example of a thermal crystalline-to-crystalline conversion in a biomolecular assembly. Finally, we demonstrate that the Zn-directed RIDC3 assemblies can be used to spatiotemporally control the templated growth of small Pt(0) nanocrystals. This emergent function is enabled by and absolutely dependent on both the supramolecular assembly of RIDC3 molecules (to form a periodically organized structural template) and their innate redox activities (to direct Pt(2+) reduction). PMID:24516140

  1. Exceptionally stable, redox-active supramolecular protein assemblies with emergent properties

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, Jeffrey D.; Carr, Jessica R.; Sontz, Pamela A.; Tezcan, F. Akif

    2014-01-01

    The designed assembly of proteins into well-defined supramolecular architectures not only tests our understanding of protein–protein interactions, but it also provides an opportunity to tailor materials with new physical and chemical properties. Previously, we described that RIDC3, a designed variant of the monomeric electron transfer protein cytochrome cb562, could self-assemble through Zn2+ coordination into uniform 1D nanotubes or 2D arrays with crystalline order. Here we show that these 1D and 2D RIDC3 assemblies display very high chemical stabilities owing to their metal-mediated frameworks, maintaining their structural order in ≥90% (vol/vol) of several polar organic solvents including tetrahydrofuran (THF) and isopropanol (iPrOH). In contrast, the unassembled RIDC3 monomers denature in ∼30% THF and 50% iPrOH, indicating that metal-mediated self-assembly also leads to considerable stabilization of the individual building blocks. The 1D and 2D RIDC3 assemblies are highly thermostable as well, remaining intact at up to ∼70 °C and ∼90 °C, respectively. The 1D nanotubes cleanly convert into the 2D arrays on heating above 70 °C, a rare example of a thermal crystalline-to-crystalline conversion in a biomolecular assembly. Finally, we demonstrate that the Zn-directed RIDC3 assemblies can be used to spatiotemporally control the templated growth of small Pt0 nanocrystals. This emergent function is enabled by and absolutely dependent on both the supramolecular assembly of RIDC3 molecules (to form a periodically organized structural template) and their innate redox activities (to direct Pt2+ reduction). PMID:24516140

  2. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  3. Autonomous control for mechanically stable navigation of microscale implants in brain tissue to record neural activity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sindhu; Kumar, Swathy Sampath; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2016-08-01

    Emerging neural prosthetics require precise positional tuning and stable interfaces with single neurons for optimal function over a lifetime. In this study, we report an autonomous control to precisely navigate microscale electrodes in soft, viscoelastic brain tissue without visual feedback. The autonomous control optimizes signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of single neuronal recordings in viscoelastic brain tissue while maintaining quasi-static mechanical stress conditions to improve stability of the implant-tissue interface. Force-displacement curves from microelectrodes in in vivo rodent experiments are used to estimate viscoelastic parameters of the brain. Using a combination of computational models and experiments, we determined an optimal movement for the microelectrodes with bidirectional displacements of 3:2 ratio between forward and backward displacements and a inter-movement interval of 40 s for minimizing mechanical stress in the surrounding brain tissue. A regulator with the above optimal bidirectional motion for the microelectrodes in in vivo experiments resulted in significant reduction in the number of microelectrode movements (0.23 movements/min) and longer periods of stable SNR (53 % of the time) compared to a regulator using a conventional linear, unidirectional microelectrode movement (with 1.48 movements/min and stable SNR 23 % of the time).

  4. Autonomous control for mechanically stable navigation of microscale implants in brain tissue to record neural activity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sindhu; Kumar, Swathy Sampath; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2016-08-01

    Emerging neural prosthetics require precise positional tuning and stable interfaces with single neurons for optimal function over a lifetime. In this study, we report an autonomous control to precisely navigate microscale electrodes in soft, viscoelastic brain tissue without visual feedback. The autonomous control optimizes signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of single neuronal recordings in viscoelastic brain tissue while maintaining quasi-static mechanical stress conditions to improve stability of the implant-tissue interface. Force-displacement curves from microelectrodes in in vivo rodent experiments are used to estimate viscoelastic parameters of the brain. Using a combination of computational models and experiments, we determined an optimal movement for the microelectrodes with bidirectional displacements of 3:2 ratio between forward and backward displacements and a inter-movement interval of 40 s for minimizing mechanical stress in the surrounding brain tissue. A regulator with the above optimal bidirectional motion for the microelectrodes in in vivo experiments resulted in significant reduction in the number of microelectrode movements (0.23 movements/min) and longer periods of stable SNR (53 % of the time) compared to a regulator using a conventional linear, unidirectional microelectrode movement (with 1.48 movements/min and stable SNR 23 % of the time). PMID:27457752

  5. Acetoxybenzhydrols as highly active and stable analogues of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol, a potent antiallergic principal from Alpinia galanga.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Manse, Yoshiaki; Morimoto, Takayuki; Qilong, Wang; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Muraoka, Osamu

    2009-06-01

    Through SAR studies on 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (1) against Type I antiallergic activity by indexing release of beta-hexosaminidase, a marker of antigen-IgE-mediated degranulation in RBL-2H3 cells, more stable and potent analogue, 4-(methoxycarbonyloxyphenylmethyl)phenyl acetate (16), has been developed. The compound 16 also strongly inhibited the antigen-IgE-mediated TNF-alpha and IL-4 production.

  6. Minimum chemical requirements for adhesin activity of the acid-stable part of Candida albicans cell wall phosphomannoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Kanbe, T; Cutler, J E

    1998-12-01

    This study was conducted to define adhesive characteristics of the acid-stable moiety of the Candida albicans phosphomannoprotein complex (PMPC) on adherence of this fungus to marginal zone macrophages of the mouse spleen. Complete digestion of the acid-stable moiety (Fr.IIS) of the C. albicans PMPC with an alpha-mannosidase or hydrolysis with 0.6 N sulfuric acid destroyed adhesin activity, as determined by the inability of the soluble digests to inhibit yeast cell adherence to the splenic marginal zone. Fr.IIS adhesin activity was decreased following digestion with an alpha-1,2-specific mannosidase. Oligomannosyls consisting of one to six mannose units, which were isolated from the acid-stable part of the PMPC, did not inhibit yeast cell binding and thus do not function alone as adhesin sites in the PMPC. To gain more insight into the minimum requirements for adhesin activity, PMPCs were isolated from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type strain and from mutant strains mnn1, mnn2, and mnn4; the PMPCs were designated scwt/Fr.II, scmn1/Fr.II, scmn2/Fr.II, and scmn4/Fr.II, respectively. S. cerevisiae scmn2/Fr.II lacks oligomannosyl side chain branches from the outer core mannan, and scmn2/Fr.II was the only PMPC without adhesin activity. S. cerevisiae scwt/Fr.II, scmn1/Fr.II, and scmn4/Fr.II showed adhesin activities less than that of C. albicans Fr.II. These three S. cerevisiae PMPCs are generally similar to Fr. IIS, except that the S. cerevisiae structure has fewer and shorter side chains. Immunofluorescence microscopy show that the acid-stable part of the PMPC is displayed homogeneously on the C. albicans yeast cell surface, which would be expected for a surface adhesin. Our results indicate that both the mannan core and the oligomannosyl side chains are responsible for the adhesin activity of the acid-stable part of the PMPC. PMID:9826359

  7. Stable Radical Content and Anti-Radical Activity of Roasted Arabica Coffee: From In-Tact Bean to Coffee Brew

    PubMed Central

    Troup, Gordon J.; Navarini, Luciano; Liverani, Furio Suggi; Drew, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    The roasting of coffee beans generates stable radicals within melanoidins produced by non-enzymatic browning. Roasting coffee beans has further been suggested to increase the antioxidant (AO) capacity of coffee brews. Herein, we have characterized the radical content and AO capacity of brews prepared from Coffea arabica beans sourced directly from an industrial roasting plant. In-tact beans exhibited electron paramagnetic resonance signals arising from Fe3+, Mn2+ and at least three distinct stable radicals as a function of roasting time, whose intensity changed upon grinding and ageing. In coffee brews, the roasting-induced radicals were harboured within the high molecular weight (> 3 kD) melanoidin-containing fraction at a concentration of 15 nM and was associated with aromatic groups within the melanoidins. The low molecular weight (< 3 kD) fraction exhibited the highest AO capacity using DPPH as an oxidant. The AO activity was not mediated by the stable radicals or by metal complexes within the brew. While other non-AO functions of the roasting-induced radical and metal complexes may be possible in vivo, we confirm that the in vitro antiradical activity of brewed coffee is dominated by low molecular weight phenolic compounds. PMID:25856192

  8. Stable radical content and anti-radical activity of roasted Arabica coffee: from in-tact bean to coffee brew.

    PubMed

    Troup, Gordon J; Navarini, Luciano; Suggi Liverani, Furio; Drew, Simon C

    2015-01-01

    The roasting of coffee beans generates stable radicals within melanoidins produced by non-enzymatic browning. Roasting coffee beans has further been suggested to increase the antioxidant (AO) capacity of coffee brews. Herein, we have characterized the radical content and AO capacity of brews prepared from Coffea arabica beans sourced directly from an industrial roasting plant. In-tact beans exhibited electron paramagnetic resonance signals arising from Fe3+, Mn2+ and at least three distinct stable radicals as a function of roasting time, whose intensity changed upon grinding and ageing. In coffee brews, the roasting-induced radicals were harboured within the high molecular weight (> 3 kD) melanoidin-containing fraction at a concentration of 15 nM and was associated with aromatic groups within the melanoidins. The low molecular weight (< 3 kD) fraction exhibited the highest AO capacity using DPPH as an oxidant. The AO activity was not mediated by the stable radicals or by metal complexes within the brew. While other non-AO functions of the roasting-induced radical and metal complexes may be possible in vivo, we confirm that the in vitro antiradical activity of brewed coffee is dominated by low molecular weight phenolic compounds. PMID:25856192

  9. Hydrolytically Stable Nanoporous Thorium Mixed Phosphite and Pyrophosphate Framework Generated from Redox-Active Ionothermal Reactions.

    PubMed

    Gui, Daxiang; Zheng, Tao; Chen, Lanhua; Wang, Yanlong; Li, Yuxiang; Sheng, Daopeng; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2016-04-18

    The first thorium framework compound with mixed-valent phosphorus-based (phosphite and pyrophosphate) ligands, [BMMim]2[Th3(PO3)4(H2P2O7)3] (ThP-1), was synthesized by ionothermal reactions concurrent with the partial oxidation of phosphoric acid. The overall structural topology of ThP-1 highly resembles that of MOF-5, containing only one type of three-dimensional channels with a window size of 11.32 Å × 11.32 Å. ThP-1 has a free void volume of 50.8%, making it one of the most porous purely inorganic actinide-based framework materials. More importantly, ThP-1 is highly stable in aqueous solutions over an extremely wide pH range from 1 to 14 and thus may find potential applications in selective ion exchange and catalysis. PMID:27015432

  10. Influence of uranium (VI) on the metabolic activity of stable multispecies biofilms studied by oxygen microsensors and fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk-Bärsch, Evelyn; Grossmann, Kay; Arnold, Thuro; Hofmann, Susann; Wobus, Axel

    2008-11-01

    The effect of uranium added in ecologically relevant concentrations (1 × 10 -5 and 1 × 10 -6 M) to stable multispecies biofilms was studied by electrochemical oxygen microsensors with tip diameters of 10 μm and by confocal laser fluorescence microscopy (CLSM). The microsensor profile measurements in the stable multispecies biofilms exposed to uranium showed that the oxygen concentration decreased faster with increasing biofilm depth compared to the uranium free biofilms. In the uranium containing biofilms, the oxygen consumption, calculated from the steady-state microprofiles, showed high consumption rates of up to 61.7 nmol cm -3 s -1 in the top layer (0-70 μm) and much lower consumption rates in the lower zone of the biofilms. Staining experiments with 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) confirmed the high respiratory activities of the bacteria in the upper layer. Analysis of the amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments showed that the addition of uranium in ecologically relevant concentrations did not change the bacterial diversity in the stable multispecies biofilms and is therefore not responsible for the different oxygen profiles in the biofilms. The fast decrease in the oxygen concentrations in the biofilm profiles showed that the bacteria in the top region of the biofilms, i.e., the metabolically most active biofilm zone, battle the toxic effects of aqueous uranium with an increased respiratory activity. This increased respiratory activity results in O 2 depleted zones closer to the biofilm/air interface which may trigger uranium redox processes, since suitable redox partners, e.g., extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and other organics (e.g., metabolites), are sufficiently available in the biofilm porewaters. Such redox reactions may lead to precipitation of uranium (IV) solids and consequently to a removal of uranium from the aqueous phase.

  11. Isotope Tales: Remaining Problems, Unsolvable Questions, and Gentle Successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    fogel, marilyn; bradley, christina; newsome, seth; filipp, fabian

    2014-05-01

    Earth's biomes function and adapt today as climate changes and ecosystems and the organisms within them adapt. Stable isotope biogeochemistry has had a major influence in understanding climate perturbations and continues to be an active area of research on many fronts. Banking on the success of compound specific stable isotope analyses of amino acids, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen isotopes continue to reveal subtle shifts in oceanic food webs and metabolic changes in microbes, plants, and animals. A biochemical understanding of exactly how organisms process and partition stable isotopes during metabolism remains unsolved, but is required if this field is to move beyond description to quantitation. Although the patterns of carbon and nitrogen isotopes are fairly well established in the common amino acids, we need to consider specifics: How do shifting metabolic pathways (metabolomics) influence the outcome of stable isotope partitioning? What influence does the gut microflora in animals have on isotopic labeling? What are the intramolecular isotope patterns of common amino acids and what do they tell us? What can be learned with other isotope systems, such as hydrogen? Results and ideas of how to move forward in this field will be presented starting at the molecular level and ending with ecosystems.

  12. Antioxidative Activity after Rosuvastatin Treatment in Patients with Stable Ischemic Heart Disease and Decreased High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Park, Do-Sim; Park, Hyun Young; Rhee, Sang Jae; Kim, Nam-Ho; Oh, Seok Kyu; Jeong, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The clinical significance of statin-induced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) changes is not well known. We investigated whether rosuvastatin-induced HDL-C changes can influence the anti-oxidative action of high-density lipoprotein particle. Subjects and Methods A total of 240 patients with stable ischemic heart disease were studied. Anti-oxidative property was assessed by paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity. We compared the lipid profile and PON1 activity at baseline and at 8 weeks after rosuvastatin 10 mg treatment. Results Rosuvastatin treatment increased the mean HDL-C concentration by 1.9±9.2 mg/dL (6.4±21.4%). HDL-C increased in 138 patients (57.5%), but decreased in 102 patients (42.5%) after statin treatment. PON1 activity increased to 19.1% in all patients. In both, the patients with increased HDL-C and with decreased HDL-C, PON1 activity significantly increased after rosuvastatin treatment (+19.3% in increased HDL-C responder; p=0.018, +18.8% in decreased HDL-C responder; p=0.045 by paired t-test). Baseline PON1 activity modestly correlated with HDL-C levels (r=0.248, p=0.009); however, the PON1 activity evaluated during the course of the treatment did not correlate with HDL-C levels (r=0.153, p=0.075). Conclusion Rosuvastatin treatment improved the anti-oxidative properties as assessed by PON1 activity, regardless of on-treatment HDL-C levels, in patients with stable ischemic heart disease. PMID:27275167

  13. Using Stable Isotopes to Assess Reduced Physical Activity of Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter S. W.; Joughlin, C.

    1993-01-01

    This study found that the physical activity levels of 10 children with Prader-Willi syndrome were significantly reduced in comparison to children without the syndrome. Increasing activity levels in children with Prader-Willi syndrome is suggested as a way to raise total energy expenditure and control weight gain. (Author/JDD)

  14. Stable isotopes as tracers of methane dynamics in Everglades marshes with and without active populations of methane oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happell, James D.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Whiting, Gary J.; Showers, William J.

    1993-01-01

    The stable carbon isotopic composition of CH4 is used to study the processes that affect it during transport through plants from sediment to the atmosphere. The enhancement of CH4 flux from Cladium and Eleocharis over the flux from open water or clipped sites indicated that these plants served as gas conduits between the sediments and the atmosphere. Lowering of the water table below the sediment surface caused an Everglades sawgrass marsh to shift from emission of CH4 to consumption of atmospheric CH4. Cladium transported gases passively mainly via molecular diffusion and/or effusion instead of actively via bulk flow. Stable isotropic data gave no evidence that CH4 oxidation was occurring in the rhizosphere of Cladium. Both CH4 stable carbon isotope and flux data indicated a lack of CH4 oxidation at the sediment-water interface in Everglades marl soils and its presence in peat soils where 40 to 92 percent of the flux across the sediment-water interface was oxidized.

  15. Functionally stable plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in a family with cardiovascular disease and vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Agirbasli, Mehmet; Eren, Mesut; Yasar, Songul; Delil, Kenan; Goktay, Fatih; Oner, Ebru Toksoy; Vaughan, Douglas E

    2014-07-01

    Vitiligo is a common skin condition with a complex pathophysiology characterized by the lack of pigmentation due to melanocyte degeneration. In this study, we investigated PAI-1 antigen (Ag) and activity levels in a 34 year old male with extensive vascular disease, alopecia areata and vitiligo. Fasting PAI-1 Ag and activity levels were measured at 9 a.m. in the subject and family members. Both PAI-1 Ag (67 ± 38 vs. 18.6 ± 6.5 ng/ml, P < 0.001) and specific activity (15.8 ± 10.0 vs. 7.6 ± 6.0 IU/pmol, P < 0.04) levels of PAI-1 were moderately elevated in subjects compared to the controls. PAI-1 kinetic studies demonstrated a markedly enhanced stability of plasma PAI-1 activity in the family members. Specific activity at 16 h was significantly higher than expected activity levels (0.078 ± 0.072 vs. 0.001 ± 0.001 IU/ng/ml, P < 0.001). While the exact mechanism of increased stability of PAI-1 activity in vitiligo is not known, it is likely due to post-translational modifications or increased binding affinity for a stabilizing cofactor. In conclusion, enhanced stability of PAI-1 may contribute to the pathophysiology of vascular disease and associated melanocyte degeneration. Systemic or local treatment with PAI-1 inhibitors may offer a potential treatment alternative to the near orphan status for vitiligo drug development. PMID:24197654

  16. Cationic Silica-Supported N-Heterocyclic Carbene Tungsten Oxo Alkylidene Sites: Highly Active and Stable Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Pucino, Margherita; Mougel, Victor; Schowner, Roman; Fedorov, Alexey; Buchmeiser, Michael R; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-03-18

    Designing supported alkene metathesis catalysts with high activity and stability is still a challenge, despite significant advances in the last years. Described herein is the combination of strong σ-donating N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with weak σ-donating surface silanolates and cationic tungsten sites leading to highly active and stable alkene metathesis catalysts. These well-defined silica-supported catalysts, [(≡SiO)W(=O)(=CHCMe2 Ph)(IMes)(OTf)] and [(≡SiO)W(=O)(=CHCMe2 Ph)(IMes)(+) ][B(Ar(F) )4 (-) ] [IMes=1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-imidazol-2-ylidene, B(Ar(F) )4 =B(3,5-(CF3 )2 C6 H3 )4 ] catalyze alkene metathesis, and the cationic species display unprecedented activity for a broad range of substrates, especially for terminal olefins with turnover numbers above 1.2 million for propene.

  17. Cationic Silica-Supported N-Heterocyclic Carbene Tungsten Oxo Alkylidene Sites: Highly Active and Stable Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Pucino, Margherita; Mougel, Victor; Schowner, Roman; Fedorov, Alexey; Buchmeiser, Michael R; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-03-18

    Designing supported alkene metathesis catalysts with high activity and stability is still a challenge, despite significant advances in the last years. Described herein is the combination of strong σ-donating N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with weak σ-donating surface silanolates and cationic tungsten sites leading to highly active and stable alkene metathesis catalysts. These well-defined silica-supported catalysts, [(≡SiO)W(=O)(=CHCMe2 Ph)(IMes)(OTf)] and [(≡SiO)W(=O)(=CHCMe2 Ph)(IMes)(+) ][B(Ar(F) )4 (-) ] [IMes=1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-imidazol-2-ylidene, B(Ar(F) )4 =B(3,5-(CF3 )2 C6 H3 )4 ] catalyze alkene metathesis, and the cationic species display unprecedented activity for a broad range of substrates, especially for terminal olefins with turnover numbers above 1.2 million for propene. PMID:26928967

  18. Lévy stable noise-induced transitions: stochastic resonance, resonant activation and dynamic hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2009-05-01

    A standard approach to analysis of noise-induced effects in stochastic dynamics assumes a Gaussian character of the noise term describing interaction of the analyzed system with its complex surroundings. An additional assumption about the existence of timescale separation between the dynamics of the measured observable and the typical timescale of the noise allows external fluctuations to be modeled as temporally uncorrelated and therefore white. However, in many natural phenomena the assumptions concerning the above mentioned properties of 'Gaussianity' and 'whiteness' of the noise can be violated. In this context, in contrast to the spatiotemporal coupling characterizing general forms of non-Markovian or semi-Markovian Lévy walks, so called Lévy flights correspond to the class of Markov processes which can still be interpreted as white, but distributed according to a more general, infinitely divisible, stable and non-Gaussian law. Lévy noise-driven non-equilibrium systems are known to manifest interesting physical properties and have been addressed in various scenarios of physical transport exhibiting a superdiffusive behavior. Here we present a brief overview of our recent investigations aimed at understanding features of stochastic dynamics under the influence of Lévy white noise perturbations. We find that the archetypal phenomena of noise-induced ordering are robust and can be detected also in systems driven by memoryless, non-Gaussian, heavy-tailed fluctuations with infinite variance.

  19. (15)N- and (2)H proteomic stable isotope probing links nitrogen flow to archaeal heterotrophic activity.

    PubMed

    Justice, Nicholas B; Li, Zhou; Wang, Yingfeng; Spaudling, Susan E; Mosier, Annika C; Hettich, Robert L; Pan, Chongle; Banfield, Jillian F

    2014-10-01

    Understanding how individual species contribute to nutrient transformations in a microbial community is critical to prediction of overall ecosystem function. We conducted microcosm experiments in which floating acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial biofilms were submerged - recapitulating the final stage in a natural biofilm life cycle. Biofilms were amended with either (15)NH4(+) or deuterium oxide ((2)H2O) and proteomic stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to track the extent to which different members of the community used these molecules in protein synthesis across anaerobic iron-reducing, aerobic iron-reducing and aerobic iron-oxidizing environments. Sulfobacillus spp. synthesized (15)N-enriched protein almost exclusively under iron-reducing conditions whereas the Leptospirillum spp. synthesized (15)N-enriched protein in all conditions. There were relatively few (15)N-enriched archaeal proteins, and all showed low atom% enrichment, consistent with Archaea synthesizing protein using the predominantly (14)N biomass derived from recycled biomolecules. In parallel experiments using (2)H2O, extensive archaeal protein synthesis was detected in all conditions. In contrast, the bacterial species showed little protein synthesis using (2)H2O. The nearly exclusive ability of Archaea to synthesize proteins using (2)H2O may be due to archaeal heterotrophy, whereby Archaea offset deleterious effects of (2)H by accessing (1)H generated by respiration of organic compounds.

  20. Physicochemically and pharmacokinetically stable nonapeptide KISS1 receptor agonists with highly potent testosterone-suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Asami, Taiji; Nishizawa, Naoki; Matsui, Hisanori; Takatsu, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Atsuko; Kiba, Atsushi; Terada, Michiko; Nishibori, Kimiko; Nakayama, Masaharu; Ban, Junko; Matsumoto, Shin-ichi; Tarui, Naoki; Ikeda, Yukihiro; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Kusaka, Masami; Ohtaki, Tetsuya; Kitada, Chieko

    2014-07-24

    Modifications of metastin(45-54) produced peptide analogues with higher metabolic stability than metastin(45-54). N-terminally truncated nonapeptide 4 ([D-Tyr46,D-Pya(4)47,azaGly51,Arg(Me)53]metastin(46-54)) is a representative compound with both potent agonistic activity and metabolic stability. Although 4 had more potent testosterone-suppressant activity than metastin, it possessed physicochemical instability at pH 7 and insufficient in vivo activity. Instability at pH 7 was dependent upon Asn48 and Ser49; substitution of Ser49 with Thr49 reduced this instability and maintained KISS1 receptor agonistic activity. Furthermore, [D-Tyr46,D-Trp47,Thr49,azaGly51,Arg(Me)53,Trp54]metastin(46-54) (14) showed 2-fold greater [Ca2+]i-mobilizing activity than metastin(45-54) and an apparent increase in physicochemical stability. N-terminal acetylation of 14 resulted in the most potent analogue, 22 (Ac-[D-Tyr46,D-Trp47,Thr49,azaGly51,Arg(Me)53,Trp54]metastin(46-54)). With continuous administration, 22 possessed 10-50-fold more potent testosterone-suppressive activity in rats than 4. These results suggested that a controlled release of short-length KISS1 receptor agonists can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and reduce testosterone levels. Compound 22 was selected for further preclinical evaluation for hormone-dependent diseases.

  1. Design of active and stable Co-Mo-Sx chalcogels as pH-universal catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Staszak-Jirkovský, Jakub; Malliakas, Christos D; Lopes, Pietro P; Danilovic, Nemanja; Kota, Subrahmanyam S; Chang, Kee-Chul; Genorio, Bostjan; Strmcnik, Dusan; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Markovic, Nenad M

    2016-02-01

    Three of the fundamental catalytic limitations that have plagued the electrochemical production of hydrogen for decades still remain: low efficiency, short lifetime of catalysts and a lack of low-cost materials. Here, we address these three challenges by establishing and exploring an intimate functional link between the reactivity and stability of crystalline (CoS2 and MoS2) and amorphous (CoSx and MoSx) hydrogen evolution catalysts. We propose that Co(2+) and Mo(4+) centres promote the initial discharge of water (alkaline solutions) or hydronium ions (acid solutions). We establish that although CoSx materials are more active than MoSx they are also less stable, suggesting that the active sites are defects formed after dissolution of Co and Mo cations. By combining the higher activity of CoSx building blocks with the higher stability of MoSx units into a compact and robust CoMoSx chalcogel structure, we are able to design a low-cost alternative to noble metal catalysts for efficient electrocatalytic production of hydrogen in both alkaline and acidic environments.

  2. Design of active and stable Co-Mo-Sx chalcogels as pH-universal catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszak-Jirkovský, Jakub; Malliakas, Christos D.; Lopes, Pietro P.; Danilovic, Nemanja; Kota, Subrahmanyam S.; Chang, Kee-Chul; Genorio, Bostjan; Strmcnik, Dusan; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2016-02-01

    Three of the fundamental catalytic limitations that have plagued the electrochemical production of hydrogen for decades still remain: low efficiency, short lifetime of catalysts and a lack of low-cost materials. Here, we address these three challenges by establishing and exploring an intimate functional link between the reactivity and stability of crystalline (CoS2 and MoS2) and amorphous (CoSx and MoSx) hydrogen evolution catalysts. We propose that Co2+ and Mo4+ centres promote the initial discharge of water (alkaline solutions) or hydronium ions (acid solutions). We establish that although CoSx materials are more active than MoSx they are also less stable, suggesting that the active sites are defects formed after dissolution of Co and Mo cations. By combining the higher activity of CoSx building blocks with the higher stability of MoSx units into a compact and robust CoMoSx chalcogel structure, we are able to design a low-cost alternative to noble metal catalysts for efficient electrocatalytic production of hydrogen in both alkaline and acidic environments.

  3. Design of active and stable Co-Mo-Sx chalcogels as pH-universal catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Staszak-Jirkovský, Jakub; Malliakas, Christos D; Lopes, Pietro P; Danilovic, Nemanja; Kota, Subrahmanyam S; Chang, Kee-Chul; Genorio, Bostjan; Strmcnik, Dusan; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Markovic, Nenad M

    2016-02-01

    Three of the fundamental catalytic limitations that have plagued the electrochemical production of hydrogen for decades still remain: low efficiency, short lifetime of catalysts and a lack of low-cost materials. Here, we address these three challenges by establishing and exploring an intimate functional link between the reactivity and stability of crystalline (CoS2 and MoS2) and amorphous (CoSx and MoSx) hydrogen evolution catalysts. We propose that Co(2+) and Mo(4+) centres promote the initial discharge of water (alkaline solutions) or hydronium ions (acid solutions). We establish that although CoSx materials are more active than MoSx they are also less stable, suggesting that the active sites are defects formed after dissolution of Co and Mo cations. By combining the higher activity of CoSx building blocks with the higher stability of MoSx units into a compact and robust CoMoSx chalcogel structure, we are able to design a low-cost alternative to noble metal catalysts for efficient electrocatalytic production of hydrogen in both alkaline and acidic environments. PMID:26618882

  4. Use of stable emulsion to improve stability, activity, and enantioselectivity of lipase immobilized in a membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Giorno, L; Li, N; Drioli, E

    2003-12-20

    The enantiocatalytic performance of immobilized lipase in an emulsion membrane reactor using stable emulsion prepared by membrane emulsification technology was studied. The production of optical pure (S)-naproxen from racemic naproxen methyl ester was used as a model reaction system. The O/W emulsion, containing the substrate in the organic phase, was fed to the enzyme membrane reactor from shell-to-lumen. The enzyme was immobilized in the sponge layer (shell side) of capillary polyamide membrane with 50 kDa cut-off. The aqueous phase was able to permeate through the membrane while the microemulsion was retained by the thin selective layer. Therefore, the substrate was kept in the enzyme-loaded membrane while the water-soluble product was continuously removed from the reaction site. The results show that lipase maintained stable activity during the entire operation time (more than 250 h), showing an enantiomeric excess (96 +/- 2%) comparable to the free enzyme (98 +/- 1%) and much higher compared to similar lipase-loaded membrane reactors used in two-separate phase systems (90%). The results demonstrate that immobilized enzymes can achieve high stability as well as high catalytic activity and enantioselectivity. PMID:14595780

  5. Urinary neopterin, a non-invasive marker of mammalian cellular immune activation, is highly stable under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Heistermann, Michael; Higham, James P

    2015-01-01

    Studying immunity and immune function in ecology and evolution requires field studies, but there has been a dearth of non-invasive markers of immune activation available for studying large wild mammals. Recently, we analytically and biologically validated the measurement of urinary neopterin (NEO), a biomarker of cellular immune activation, in captive macaques. However, applying this to free-ranging settings is complicated by issues involving sample collection, processing, storage, and transport. Here, we collected urine samples from captive macaques and undertook experiments simulating common field issues. We tested the effects on urinary NEO sample measurements following: dirt and faecal contamination; storage at room temperature; differences in processing and long-term storage methods (freezing, lyophilising, blotting onto filter paper); and freeze-thaw cycles. Our results show that concentrations of urinary NEO are highly stable--they are not affected by soil or faecal contamination, can be collected on filter paper and stored for many months frozen or lyophilised with minimal effect, and are resistant to multiple 24 hr freeze-thaws. With the addition of a biocidal preservative, concentrations are even stable at room temperature for long periods. Urinary NEO is remarkably resilient, and is highly suitable for non-invasive field studies of cellular immune responses in wild large mammals.

  6. Urinary neopterin, a non-invasive marker of mammalian cellular immune activation, is highly stable under field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Heistermann, Michael; Higham, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Studying immunity and immune function in ecology and evolution requires field studies, but there has been a dearth of non-invasive markers of immune activation available for studying large wild mammals. Recently, we analytically and biologically validated the measurement of urinary neopterin (NEO), a biomarker of cellular immune activation, in captive macaques. However, applying this to free-ranging settings is complicated by issues involving sample collection, processing, storage, and transport. Here, we collected urine samples from captive macaques and undertook experiments simulating common field issues. We tested the effects on urinary NEO sample measurements following: dirt and faecal contamination; storage at room temperature; differences in processing and long-term storage methods (freezing, lyophilising, blotting onto filter paper); and freeze-thaw cycles. Our results show that concentrations of urinary NEO are highly stable – they are not affected by soil or faecal contamination, can be collected on filter paper and stored for many months frozen or lyophilised with minimal effect, and are resistant to multiple 24 hr freeze-thaws. With the addition of a biocidal preservative, concentrations are even stable at room temperature for long periods. Urinary NEO is remarkably resilient, and is highly suitable for non-invasive field studies of cellular immune responses in wild large mammals. PMID:26549509

  7. Consumption of terrestrial organic matter by estuarine molluscs determined by analysis of their stable isotopes and cellulase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Emily S.; Kasai, Akihide; Ueno, Masahiro; Kurikawa, Yoshiro; Tsuchiya, Kanako; Toyohara, Haruhiko; Ishihi, Yuka; Yokoyama, Hisashi; Yamashita, Yoh

    2010-02-01

    We examined the feeding niche of four species of molluscs by analysis of their stable isotope signatures and cellulase activities to determine if they could utilize terrestrial organic matter. The molluscs and potential food sources were collected from the upper, middle and lower estuary of the Yura River from spring 2007 to winter 2008. All species showed positive cellulase activity which highlighted their potential to digest terrestrial organic matter. Consumption and assimilation of terrestrial organic matter by estuarine molluscs however varied spatially and temporally, reflecting species-specific differences in feeding niche and in response to variations in food availability in the estuary. Thus, terrestrial primary production in the catchment area supports secondary production of molluscs in the Yura River estuary.

  8. A Stable Bacterial Peroxidase with Novel Halogenating Activity and an Autocatalytically Linked Heme Prosthetic Group*

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Markus; Gruber, Clemens; Bellei, Marzia; Pirker, Katharina F.; Zamocky, Marcel; Kroiss, Daniela; Teufer, Stefan A.; Hofbauer, Stefan; Soudi, Monika; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships of the main evolutionary lines of the mammalian peroxidases lactoperoxidase and myeloperoxidase revealed the presence of novel bacterial heme peroxidase subfamilies. Here, for the first time, an ancestral bacterial heme peroxidase is shown to possess a very high bromide oxidation activity (besides conventional peroxidase activity). The recombinant protein allowed monitoring of the autocatalytic peroxide-driven formation of covalent heme to protein bonds. Thereby, the high spin ferric rhombic heme spectrum became similar to lactoperoxidase, the standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple shifted to more positive values (−145 ± 10 mV at pH 7), and the conformational and thermal stability of the protein increased significantly. We discuss structure-function relationships of this new peroxidase in relation to its mammalian counterparts and ask for its putative physiological role. PMID:23918925

  9. Stable isolated metal atoms as active sites for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun; Chen, Jian Fu; Li, Yu Hang; Yuan, Wen Tao; Zhou, Ying; Zheng, Li Rong; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P; Wang, Yun; Zhao, Hui Jun; Wang, Yong; Yang, Hua Gui

    2014-02-17

    The process of using solar energy to split water to produce hydrogen assisted by an inorganic semiconductor is crucial for solving our energy crisis and environmental problems in the future. However, most semiconductor photocatalysts would not exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity without loading suitable co-catalysts. Generally, the noble metals have been widely applied as co-catalysts, but always agglomerate during the loading process or photocatalytic reaction. Therefore, the utilization efficiency of the noble co-catalysts is still very low on a per metal atom basis if no obvious size effect exists, because heterogeneous catalytic reactions occur on the surface active atoms. Here, for the first time, we have synthesized isolated metal atoms (Pt, Pd, Rh, or Ru) stably by anchoring on TiO2 , a model photocatalystic system, by a facile one-step method. The isolated metal atom based photocatalysts show excellent stability for H2 evolution and can lead to a 6-13-fold increase in photocatalytic activity over the metal clusters loaded on TiO2 by the traditional method. Furthermore, the configurations of isolated atoms as well as the originality of their unusual stability were analyzed by a collaborative work from both experiments and theoretical calculations.

  10. A facile stable-isotope dilution method for determination of sphingosine phosphate lyase activity.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jung H; Eltanawy, Abeer; Rangan, Apoorva; Saba, Julie D

    2016-01-01

    A new technique for quantifying sphingosine phosphate lyase activity in biological samples is described. In this procedure, 2-hydrazinoquinoline is used to convert (2E)-hexadecenal into the corresponding hydrazone derivative to improve ionization efficiency and selectivity of detection. Combined utilization of liquid chromatographic separation and multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry allows for simultaneous quantification of the substrate S1P and product (2E)-hexadecenal. Incorporation of (2E)- d5-hexadecenal as an internal standard improves detection accuracy and precision. A simple one-step derivatization procedure eliminates the need for further extractions. Limits of quantification for (2E)-hexadecenal and sphingosine-1-phosphate are 100 and 50fmol, respectively. The assay displays a wide dynamic detection range useful for detection of low basal sphingosine phosphate lyase activity in wild type cells, SPL-overexpressing cell lines, and wild type mouse tissues. Compared to current methods, the capacity for simultaneous detection of sphingosine-1-phosphate and (2E)-hexadecenal greatly improves the accuracy of results and shows excellent sensitivity and specificity for sphingosine phosphate lyase activity detection.

  11. Biochemical Characterization of a Thiol-Activated, Oxidation Stable Keratinase from Bacillus pumilus KS12

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Rinky; Sharma, Richa; Gupta, Rani

    2010-01-01

    An extracellular keratinase from Bacillus pumilus KS12 was purified by DEAE ion exchange chromatography. It was a 45 kDa monomer as determined by SDS PAGE analysis. It was found to be an alkaline, serine protease with pH and temperature optima of 10 and 60°C, respectively. It was thiol activated with two- and eight-fold enhancement in presence of 10 mM DTT and β-mercaptoethanol, respectively. In addition, its activity was stimulated in the presence of various surfactants, detergents, and oxidizing agents where a nearly 2- to 3-fold enhancement was observed in presence of H2O2 and NaHClO3. It hydrolyzed broad range of complex substrates including feather keratin, haemoglobin, fibrin, casein,and α-keratin. Analysis of amidolytic activity revealed that it efficiently cleaved phenylalanine → leucine → alanine- p-nitroanilides. It also cleaved insulin B chain between Val2- Asn3, Leu6-Cys7 and His10-Leu11 residues. PMID:21048858

  12. Where do those remains come from?

    PubMed

    Nociarová, Dominika; Adserias, M Jose; Malgosa, Assumpció; Galtés, Ignasi

    2014-12-01

    Part of the study of skeletal remains or corpses in advance decay located in the field involves determining their origin. They may be the result of criminal activity, accident, unearthed because of erosion, or they may also have originated from a cemetery. The discovery site, condition of the remains, and the associated artifacts, are factors that could be helpful for the forensic anthropologist to identify the origin of the remains. In order to contribute to this recognition, an analysis was made of the exhumations of 168 unclaimed human remains from the cemetery of Terrassa (Catalonia, Spain). This investigation presents a description of artifacts and conditions of remains that could indicate that the human remains may have originated from a cemetery. PMID:25459276

  13. Correction: Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Parapat, Riny Y; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    Correction for 'Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions' by Riny Y. Parapat et al., Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 796-805. PMID:26961853

  14. Correction: Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parapat, Riny Y.; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2016-03-01

    Correction for `Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions' by Riny Y. Parapat et al., Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 796-805.

  15. Muscle activity and spine load during pulling exercises: influence of stable and labile contact surfaces and technique coaching.

    PubMed

    McGill, Stuart M; Cannon, Jordan; Andersen, Jordan T

    2014-10-01

    This study examined pulling exercises performed on stable surfaces and unstable suspension straps. Specific questions included: which exercises challenged particular muscles, what was the magnitude of resulting spine load, and did technique coaching influence results. Fourteen males performed pulling tasks while muscle activity, external force, and 3D body segment motion were recorded. These data were processed and input to a sophisticated and anatomically detailed 3D model that used muscle activity and body segment kinematics to estimate muscle force, in this way the model was sensitive to each individual's choice of motor control for each task. Muscle forces and linked segment joint loads were used to calculate spine loads. There were gradations of muscle activity and spine load characteristics to every task. It appears that suspension straps alter muscle activity less in pulling exercises, compared to studies reporting on pushing exercises. The chin-up and pull-up exercises created the highest spine load as they required the highest muscle activation, despite the body "hanging" under tractioning gravitational load. Coaching shoulder centration through retraction increased spine loading but undoubtedly adds proximal stiffness. An exercise atlas of spine compression was constructed to help with the decision making process of exercise choice for an individual. PMID:25066518

  16. Colloidally stable surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles: Preparation, characterization and anti-tumor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macková, Hana; Horák, Daniel; Donchenko, Georgiy Viktorovich; Andriyaka, Vadim Ivanovich; Palyvoda, Olga Mikhailovna; Chernishov, Vladimir Ivanovich; Chekhun, Vasyl Fedorovich; Todor, Igor Nikolaevich; Kuzmenko, Oleksandr Ivanovich

    2015-04-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were obtained by co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides and subsequent oxidation with sodium hypochlorite and coated with poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) [P(DMAAm-AA)]. They were characterized by a range of methods including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), elemental analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. The effect of superparamagnetic P(DMAAm-AA)-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on oxidation of blood lipids, glutathione and proteins in blood serum was detected using 2-thiobarbituric acid and the ThioGlo fluorophore. Finally, mice received magnetic nanoparticles administered per os and the antitumor activity of the particles was tested on Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in male mice line C57BL/6 as an experimental in vivo metastatic tumor model; the tumor size was measured and the number of metastases in lungs was determined. Surface-modified γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles showed higher antitumor and antimetastatic activities than commercial CuFe2O4 particles and the conventional antitumor agent cisplatin.

  17. Volume 1, 1st Edition, Multiscale Tailoring of Highly Active and Stable Nanocomposite Catalysts, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Veser, Goetz

    2009-08-31

    Nanomaterials have gained much attention as catalysts since the discovery of exceptional CO oxidation activity of nanoscale gold by Haruta. However, many studies avoid testing nanomaterials at the high-temperatures relevant to reactions of interest for the production of clean energy (T > 700°C). The generally poor thermal stability of catalytically active noble metals has thus far prevented significant progress in this area. We have recently overcome the poor thermal stability of nanoparticles by synthesizing a platinum barium-hexaaluminate (Pt-BHA) nanocomposite which combines the high activity of noble metal nanoparticles with the thermal stability of hexaaluminates. This Pt-BHA nanocomposite demonstrates excellent activity, selectivity, and long-term stability in CPOM. Pt-BHA is anchored onto a variety of support structures in order to improve the accessibility, safety, and reactivity of the nanocatalyst. Silica felts prove to be particularly amenable to this supporting procedure, with the resulting supported nanocatalyst proving to be as active and stable for CPOM as its unsupported counterpart. Various pre-treatment conditions are evaluated to determine their effectiveness in removing residual surfactant from the active nanoscale platinum particles. The size of these particles is measured across a wide temperature range, and the resulting “plateau” of stability from 600-900°C can be linked to a particle caging effect due to the structure of the supporting ceramic framework. The nanocomposites are used to catalyze the combustion of a dilute methane stream, and the results indicate enhanced activity for both Pt-BHA as well as ceria-doped BHA, as well as an absence of internal mass transfer limitations at the conditions tested. In water-gas shift reaction, nanocomposite Pt-BHA shows stability during prolonged WGS reaction and no signs of deactivation during start-up/shut-down of the reactor. The chemical and thermal stability, low molecular weight, and

  18. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems. PMID:27124717

  19. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; Huang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendous challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]

  20. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; Huang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendousmore » challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]« less

  1. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems.

  2. Highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalysts based on molybdenum compounds on carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid support.

    PubMed

    Youn, Duck Hyun; Han, Suenghoon; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Jae Yul; Park, Hunmin; Choi, Sun Hee; Lee, Jae Sung

    2014-05-27

    Highly active and stable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution have been developed on the basis of molybdenum compounds (Mo2C, Mo2N, and MoS2) on carbon nanotube (CNT)-graphene hybrid support via a modified urea-glass route. By a simple modification of synthetic variables, the final phases are easily controlled from carbide, nitride to sulfide with homogeneous dispersion of nanocrystals on the CNT-graphene support. Among the prepared catalysts, Mo2C/CNT-graphene shows the highest activity for hydrogen evolution reaction with a small onset overpotential of 62 mV and Tafel slope of 58 mV/dec as well as an excellent stability in acid media. Such enhanced catalytic activity may originate from its low hydrogen binding energy and high conductivity. Moreover, the CNT-graphene hybrid support plays crucial roles to enhance the activity of molybdenum compounds by alleviating aggregation of the nanocrystals, providing a large area to contact with electrolyte, and facilitating the electron transfer.

  3. 5'-(E)-Vinylphosphonate: A Stable Phosphate Mimic Can Improve the RNAi Activity of siRNA-GalNAc Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Rubina; Willoughby, Jennifer L S; Liu, Jingxuan; Foster, Donald J; Brigham, Benjamin; Theile, Christopher S; Charisse, Klaus; Akinc, Akin; Guidry, Erin; Pei, Yi; Strapps, Walter; Cancilla, Mark; Stanton, Matthew G; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Manoharan, Muthiah; Meyers, Rachel; Maier, Martin A; Jadhav, Vasant

    2016-06-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing requires siRNA loading into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Presence of 5'-phosphate (5'-P) is reported to be critical for efficient RISC loading of the antisense strand (AS) by anchoring it to the mid-domain of the Argonaute2 (Ago2) protein. Phosphorylation of exogenous duplex siRNAs is thought to be accomplished by cytosolic Clp1 kinase. However, although extensive chemical modifications are essential for siRNA-GalNAc conjugate activity, they can significantly impair Clp1 kinase activity. Here, we further elucidated the effect of 5'-P on the activity of siRNA-GalNAc conjugates. Our results demonstrate that a subset of sequences benefit from the presence of exogenous 5'-P. For those that do, incorporation of 5'-(E)-vinylphosphonate (5'-VP), a metabolically stable phosphate mimic, results in up to 20-fold improved in vitro potency and up to a threefold benefit in in vivo activity by promoting Ago2 loading and enhancing metabolic stability.

  4. Identification of ciliate grazers of autotrophic bacteria in ammonia-oxidizing activated sludge by RNA stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ana Maria; Matz, Carsten; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Manefield, Mike

    2010-04-01

    It is well understood that protozoa play a major role in controlling bacterial biomass and regulating nutrient cycling in the environment. Little is known, however, about the movement of carbon from specific reduced substrates, through functional groups of bacteria, to particular clades of protozoa. In this study we first identified the active protozoan phylotypes present in activated sludge, via the construction of an rRNA-derived eukaryote clone library. Most of the sequences identified belonged to ciliates of the subclass Peritrichia and amoebae, confirming the dominance of surface-associated protozoa in the activated sludge environment. We then demonstrated that (13)C-labeled protozoan RNA can be retrieved from activated sludge amended with (13)C-labeled protozoa or (13)C-labeled Escherichia coli cells by using an RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) approach. Finally, we used RNA-SIP to track carbon from bicarbonate and acetate into protozoa under ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying conditions, respectively. RNA-SIP analysis revealed that the peritrich ciliate Epistylis galea dominated the acquisition of carbon from bacteria with access to CO(2) under ammonia-oxidizing conditions, while there was no evidence of specific grazing on acetate consumers under denitrifying conditions.

  5. Highly stable and re-dispersible nano Cu hydrosols with sensitively size-dependent catalytic and antibacterial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Pengli; Li, Gang; Wang, Wenzhao; Chen, Liang; Lu, Daoqiang Daniel; Sun, Rong; Zhou, Feng; Wong, Chingping

    2015-08-01

    Highly stable monodispersed nano Cu hydrosols were facilely prepared by an aqueous chemical reduction method through selecting copper hydroxide (Cu(OH)2) as the copper precursor, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and ethanol amine (EA) as the complexing agents, and hydrazine hydrate as the reducing agent. The size of the obtained Cu colloidal nanoparticles was controlled from 0.96 to 26.26 nm by adjusting the dosage of the copper precursor. Moreover, the highly stable nano Cu hydrosols could be easily concentrated and re-dispersed in water meanwhile maintaining good dispersibility. A model catalytic reaction of reducing p-nitrophenol with NaBH4 in the presence of nano Cu hydrosols with different sizes was performed to set up the relationship between the apparent kinetic rate constant (kapp) and the particle size of Cu catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the corresponding kapp showed an obvious size-dependency. Calculations revealed that kapp was directly proportional to the surface area of Cu catalyst nanoparticles, and also proportional to the reciprocal of the particle size based on the same mass of Cu catalysts. This relationship might be a universal principle for predicting and assessing the catalytic efficiency of Cu nanoparticles. The activation energy (Ea) of this catalytic reaction when using 0.96 nm Cu hydrosol as a catalyst was calculated to be 9.37 kJ mol-1, which is considered an extremely low potential barrier. In addition, the synthesized nano Cu hydrosols showed size-dependent antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and the minimal inhibitory concentration of the optimal sample was lower than 5.82 μg L-1.Highly stable monodispersed nano Cu hydrosols were facilely prepared by an aqueous chemical reduction method through selecting copper hydroxide (Cu(OH)2) as the copper precursor, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and ethanol amine (EA) as the complexing agents, and hydrazine hydrate as the reducing agent. The size of the

  6. Highly stable and re-dispersible nano Cu hydrosols with sensitively size-dependent catalytic and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Pengli; Li, Gang; Wang, Wenzhao; Chen, Liang; Lu, Daoqiang Daniel; Sun, Rong; Zhou, Feng; Wong, Chingping

    2015-08-28

    Highly stable monodispersed nano Cu hydrosols were facilely prepared by an aqueous chemical reduction method through selecting copper hydroxide (Cu(OH)2) as the copper precursor, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and ethanol amine (EA) as the complexing agents, and hydrazine hydrate as the reducing agent. The size of the obtained Cu colloidal nanoparticles was controlled from 0.96 to 26.26 nm by adjusting the dosage of the copper precursor. Moreover, the highly stable nano Cu hydrosols could be easily concentrated and re-dispersed in water meanwhile maintaining good dispersibility. A model catalytic reaction of reducing p-nitrophenol with NaBH4 in the presence of nano Cu hydrosols with different sizes was performed to set up the relationship between the apparent kinetic rate constant (kapp) and the particle size of Cu catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the corresponding kapp showed an obvious size-dependency. Calculations revealed that kapp was directly proportional to the surface area of Cu catalyst nanoparticles, and also proportional to the reciprocal of the particle size based on the same mass of Cu catalysts. This relationship might be a universal principle for predicting and assessing the catalytic efficiency of Cu nanoparticles. The activation energy (Ea) of this catalytic reaction when using 0.96 nm Cu hydrosol as a catalyst was calculated to be 9.37 kJ mol(-1), which is considered an extremely low potential barrier. In addition, the synthesized nano Cu hydrosols showed size-dependent antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and the minimal inhibitory concentration of the optimal sample was lower than 5.82 μg L(-1). PMID:26219381

  7. Highly stable and re-dispersible nano Cu hydrosols with sensitively size-dependent catalytic and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Pengli; Li, Gang; Wang, Wenzhao; Chen, Liang; Lu, Daoqiang Daniel; Sun, Rong; Zhou, Feng; Wong, Chingping

    2015-08-28

    Highly stable monodispersed nano Cu hydrosols were facilely prepared by an aqueous chemical reduction method through selecting copper hydroxide (Cu(OH)2) as the copper precursor, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and ethanol amine (EA) as the complexing agents, and hydrazine hydrate as the reducing agent. The size of the obtained Cu colloidal nanoparticles was controlled from 0.96 to 26.26 nm by adjusting the dosage of the copper precursor. Moreover, the highly stable nano Cu hydrosols could be easily concentrated and re-dispersed in water meanwhile maintaining good dispersibility. A model catalytic reaction of reducing p-nitrophenol with NaBH4 in the presence of nano Cu hydrosols with different sizes was performed to set up the relationship between the apparent kinetic rate constant (kapp) and the particle size of Cu catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the corresponding kapp showed an obvious size-dependency. Calculations revealed that kapp was directly proportional to the surface area of Cu catalyst nanoparticles, and also proportional to the reciprocal of the particle size based on the same mass of Cu catalysts. This relationship might be a universal principle for predicting and assessing the catalytic efficiency of Cu nanoparticles. The activation energy (Ea) of this catalytic reaction when using 0.96 nm Cu hydrosol as a catalyst was calculated to be 9.37 kJ mol(-1), which is considered an extremely low potential barrier. In addition, the synthesized nano Cu hydrosols showed size-dependent antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and the minimal inhibitory concentration of the optimal sample was lower than 5.82 μg L(-1).

  8. Content and Access Remain Key

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Linda B.

    2007-01-01

    It is impossible to review the year's outstanding government publication landscape without acknowledging that change remains paramount. Just as striking, however, is that these changes go hand in hand with some familiar constants. Within this shifting environment, there are the consistency and dependability of government information itself,…

  9. Stable and catalytically active iron porphyrin-based porous organic polymer: Activity as both a redox and Lewis acid catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Oveisi, Ali R.; Zhang, Kainan; Khorramabadi-zad, Ahmad; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    A new porphyrin-based porous organic polymer (POP) with BET surface area ranging from 780 to 880 m2/g was synthesized in free-base form via the reaction of meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin and a rigid trigonal building block, hexahydroxytriphenylene. The material was then metallated with Fe(III) imparting activity for Lewis acid catalysis (regioselective methanolysis ring-opening of styrene oxide), oxidative cyclization catalysis (conversion of bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)methanes to the corresponding spirodienone), and a tandem catalytic processes: an in situ oxidation-cyclic aminal formation-oxidation sequence, which selectively converts benzyl alcohol to 2-phenyl-quinazolin-4(3H)-one. Notably, the catalyst is readily recoverable and reusable, with little loss in catalytic activity. PMID:26177563

  10. Production of Silver Nanoparticles with Strong and Stable Antimicrobial Activity against Highly Pathogenic and Multidrug Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Amr T. M.; Alshammari, Ahmad S.; Al-Brahim, Hessa; Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To synthesize, characterize, and analyze antimicrobial activity of AgNPs of Escherichia hermannii (SHE), Citrobacter sedlakii (S11P), and Pseudomonas putida (S5). Methods. The synthesized AgNPs were examined using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) and, zeta potential, and the size and the morphology obtained from the three different isolates were also confirmed by TEM. Results. Among the three isolates tested, SHE showed the best antimicrobial activity due to the presence of small (4–12 nm) and stable (−22 mV) AgNPs. Stability of AgNPs was also investigated and found to be dependent on the nature of isolates. Conclusion. Produced AgNPs showed particle stability and antimicrobial efficacy up to 90 days of production. Our AgNPs exhibited greater antimicrobial activity compared with gentamicin against P. aeruginosa isolates and vancomycin against S. aureus and MRSA isolates at very low concentration (0.0002 mg per Microliters). PMID:25093206

  11. An Off-Line Implementation of the Stable Isotope Technique for Measurements of Alternative Respiratory Pathway Activities1

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Oscar W.; Waldron, Susan; Jones, Hamlyn G.

    2001-01-01

    In situ measurements of alternative respiratory pathway activity are needed to provide insight into the energy efficiency of plant metabolism under various conditions in the field. The only reliable method at present to measure alternative oxidase (AOX) activity is through measurement of changes in δ18O(O2), which to date has only been used in laboratory environments. We have developed a cuvette system to measure partitioning of electrons to AOX that is suitable for off-line use and for field experiments. Plant samples are enclosed in airtight cuvettes and O2 consumption is monitored. Gas samples from the cuvette are stored in evacuated gas containers until measurement of δ18O(O2). We have validated this method using differing plant material to assess AOX activity. Fractionation factors were calculated from δ18O(O2) measurements, which could be measured with an accuracy and precision to 0.1‰ and 0.3‰, respectively. Potential sources of error are discussed and quantified. Our method provides results similar to those obtained with laboratory incubations on-line to a mass spectrometer but greatly increases the potential for adoption of the stable isotope method. PMID:11706206

  12. Stable isotope probing analysis of the diversity and activity of methanotrophic bacteria in soils from the Canadian high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Christine; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2010-09-01

    The melting of permafrost and its potential impact on CH(4) emissions are major concerns in the context of global warming. Methanotrophic bacteria have the capacity to mitigate CH(4) emissions from melting permafrost. Here, we used quantitative PCR (qPCR), stable isotope probing (SIP) of DNA, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting, and sequencing of the 16S rRNA and pmoA genes to study the activity and diversity of methanotrophic bacteria in active-layer soils from Ellesmere Island in the Canadian high Arctic. Results showed that most of the soils had the capacity to oxidize CH(4) at 4 degrees C and at room temperature (RT), but the oxidation rates were greater at RT than at 4 degrees C and were significantly enhanced by nutrient amendment. The DGGE banding patterns associated with active methanotrophic bacterial populations were also different depending on the temperature of incubation and the addition of nutrients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA and pmoA genes indicated a low diversity of the active methanotrophic bacteria, with all methanotroph 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences being related to type I methanotrophs from Methylobacter and Methylosarcina. The dominance of type I methanotrophs over type II methanotrophs in the native soil samples was confirmed by qPCR of the 16S rRNA gene with primers specific for these two groups of bacteria. The 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences related to those of Methylobacter tundripaludum were found in all soils, regardless of the incubation conditions, and they might therefore play a role in CH(4) degradation in situ. This work is providing new information supporting the potential importance of Methylobacter spp. in Arctic soils found in previous studies and contributes to the limited body of knowledge on methanotrophic activity and diversity in this extreme environment. PMID:20622133

  13. Stable Isotope Probing Analysis of the Diversity and Activity of Methanotrophic Bacteria in Soils from the Canadian High Arctic ▿

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, Christine; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    The melting of permafrost and its potential impact on CH4 emissions are major concerns in the context of global warming. Methanotrophic bacteria have the capacity to mitigate CH4 emissions from melting permafrost. Here, we used quantitative PCR (qPCR), stable isotope probing (SIP) of DNA, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting, and sequencing of the 16S rRNA and pmoA genes to study the activity and diversity of methanotrophic bacteria in active-layer soils from Ellesmere Island in the Canadian high Arctic. Results showed that most of the soils had the capacity to oxidize CH4 at 4°C and at room temperature (RT), but the oxidation rates were greater at RT than at 4°C and were significantly enhanced by nutrient amendment. The DGGE banding patterns associated with active methanotrophic bacterial populations were also different depending on the temperature of incubation and the addition of nutrients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA and pmoA genes indicated a low diversity of the active methanotrophic bacteria, with all methanotroph 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences being related to type I methanotrophs from Methylobacter and Methylosarcina. The dominance of type I methanotrophs over type II methanotrophs in the native soil samples was confirmed by qPCR of the 16S rRNA gene with primers specific for these two groups of bacteria. The 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences related to those of Methylobacter tundripaludum were found in all soils, regardless of the incubation conditions, and they might therefore play a role in CH4 degradation in situ. This work is providing new information supporting the potential importance of Methylobacter spp. in Arctic soils found in previous studies and contributes to the limited body of knowledge on methanotrophic activity and diversity in this extreme environment. PMID:20622133

  14. Stable isotope probing analysis of the diversity and activity of methanotrophic bacteria in soils from the Canadian high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Christine; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2010-09-01

    The melting of permafrost and its potential impact on CH(4) emissions are major concerns in the context of global warming. Methanotrophic bacteria have the capacity to mitigate CH(4) emissions from melting permafrost. Here, we used quantitative PCR (qPCR), stable isotope probing (SIP) of DNA, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting, and sequencing of the 16S rRNA and pmoA genes to study the activity and diversity of methanotrophic bacteria in active-layer soils from Ellesmere Island in the Canadian high Arctic. Results showed that most of the soils had the capacity to oxidize CH(4) at 4 degrees C and at room temperature (RT), but the oxidation rates were greater at RT than at 4 degrees C and were significantly enhanced by nutrient amendment. The DGGE banding patterns associated with active methanotrophic bacterial populations were also different depending on the temperature of incubation and the addition of nutrients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA and pmoA genes indicated a low diversity of the active methanotrophic bacteria, with all methanotroph 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences being related to type I methanotrophs from Methylobacter and Methylosarcina. The dominance of type I methanotrophs over type II methanotrophs in the native soil samples was confirmed by qPCR of the 16S rRNA gene with primers specific for these two groups of bacteria. The 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences related to those of Methylobacter tundripaludum were found in all soils, regardless of the incubation conditions, and they might therefore play a role in CH(4) degradation in situ. This work is providing new information supporting the potential importance of Methylobacter spp. in Arctic soils found in previous studies and contributes to the limited body of knowledge on methanotrophic activity and diversity in this extreme environment.

  15. Evaluation of autotrophic growth of ammonia-oxidizers associated with granular activated carbon used for drinking water purification by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jia; Kasuga, Ikuro; Kurisu, Futoshi; Furumai, Hiroaki; Shigeeda, Takaaki

    2013-12-01

    Nitrification is an important biological function of granular activated carbon (GAC) used in advanced drinking water purification processes. Newly discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have challenged the traditional understanding of ammonia oxidation, which considered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) as the sole ammonia-oxidizers. Previous studies demonstrated the predominance of AOA on GAC, but the contributions of AOA and AOB to ammonia oxidation remain unclear. In the present study, DNA-stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to investigate the autotrophic growth of AOA and AOB associated with GAC at two different ammonium concentrations (0.14 mg N/L and 1.4 mg N/L). GAC samples collected from three full-scale drinking water purification plants in Tokyo, Japan, had different abundance of AOA and AOB. These samples were fed continuously with ammonium and (13)C-bicarbonate for 14 days. The DNA-SIP analysis demonstrated that only AOA assimilated (13)C-bicarbonate at low ammonium concentration, whereas AOA and AOB exhibited autotrophic growth at high ammonium concentration. This indicates that a lower ammonium concentration is preferable for AOA growth. Since AOA could not grow without ammonium, their autotrophic growth was coupled with ammonia oxidation. Overall, our results point towards an important role of AOA in nitrification in GAC filters treating low concentration of ammonium.

  16. Antihepatitis B virus activity of a protein-enriched fraction from housefly (Musca domestica) in a stable HBV-producing cell line.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuemei; Jin, Xiaobao; Wang, Jie; Chu, Fujiang; Zhu, Jiayong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem. Although several vaccines and therapeutic strategies are currently being implemented to combat HBV virus, effective antiviral therapy against HBV infection has not been fully developed. Alternative strategies and new drugs to combat this disease are urged. Insects and insect derivatives are a large and unexploited source of potentially useful compounds for modern medicine. In the present study, we investigated the first anti-HBV activity of a protein-enriched fraction (PE) from the larvae of the housefly (Musca domestica) in a stable HBV-producing cell line. HBsAg and HBeAg in the culture medium were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HBV-DNA was quantified by fluorescent quantification PCR. HBV core protein was assayed by immunofluorescent staining. Results indicate PE treatment inhibited both HBsAg, HBeAg secretion, and HBV-DNA replication. Furthermore, PE could also suppress HBV core protein expression. PE could be a potential candidate for the development of a novel and effective drug for the treatment of HBV infection.

  17. Co-digestion of molasses or kitchen waste with high-rate activated sludge results in a diverse microbial community with stable methane production.

    PubMed

    De Vrieze, Jo; Plovie, Kristof; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2015-04-01

    Kitchen waste and molasses are organic waste streams with high organic content, and therefore are interesting substrates for renewable energy production by means of anaerobic digestion. Both substrates, however, often cause inhibition of the anaerobic digestion process, when treated separately, hence, co-digestion with other substrates is required to ensure stable methane production. In this research, A-sludge (sludge harvested from a high rate activated sludge system) was used to stabilize co-digestion with kitchen waste or molasses. Lab-scale digesters were fed with A-sludge and kitchen waste or molasses for a total period of 105 days. Increased methane production values revealed a stabilizing effect of concentrated A-sludge on kitchen waste digestion. Co-digestion of molasses with A-sludge also resulted in a higher methane production. Volumetric methane production rates up to 1.53 L L(-1) d(-1) for kitchen waste and 1.01 L L(-1) d(-1) for molasses were obtained by co-digestion with A-sludge. The stabilizing effect of A-sludge was attributed to its capacity to supplement various nutrients. Microbial community results demonstrated that both reactor conditions and substrate composition determined the nature of the bacterial community, although there was no direct influence of micro-organisms in the substrate itself, while the methanogenic community profile remained constant as long as optimal conditions were maintained.

  18. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics. PMID:27430635

  19. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics.

  20. The examination of skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Knight, B

    1985-01-01

    In summary, unless the more sophisticated methods listed in the references are repeated and more success obtained with a series of bone samples of known date, no physico-chemical or morphological techniques have yet been devised that will determine date independently of environmental deterioration. The only exception is the radiocarbon estimation in bones of greater antiquity than those of medico-legal interest. The best mentor in the examination of skeletal remains is experience. Unfortunately, the majority of samples brought to the medical examiner remain of unknown provenance, and this prevents the doctor from checking his expertise against the true facts of identity and dating. The main point to bear in mind is that the tendency toward overinterpretation and dogmatic opinion should be avoided where the available data do not merit such a degree of certainty. There is no advantage in offering unfounded opinions to the investigators, since this might merely mislead them and perhaps cause them to exclude a class of possible identities because the doctor has unwisely told them to look only within a certain bracket of date and identifiable factors. As in any branch of forensic medicine, it is dangerous to speculate where the facts cannot firmly support the opinion.

  1. Influences of the substrate feeding regime on methanogenic activity in biogas reactors approached by molecular and stable isotope methods.

    PubMed

    Lv, Z; Leite, A F; Harms, H; Richnow, H H; Liebetrau, J; Nikolausz, M

    2014-10-01

    In order to better understand the effects of the substrate feeding regime on methanogenesis during anaerobic digestion in biogas reactors, four continuous stirred tank reactors operated under mesophilic conditions were investigated. In addition to standard physicochemical parameters, the stable isotopic signatures of CH4 and CO2 before and after daily feeding were analyzed. The activity of the methanogens was assessed by methyl coenzyme M reductase alpha-subunit (mcrA/mrtA) gene transcript analysis. Two different feeding regimes i.e. single vs. double consecutive feeding of the otherwise same daily maize silage load were investigated. During the first phase, a single feeding of the whole daily dose increased the biogas production within 70-80 min from around 0.5 to 2.0 L/h. This increase was associated with a transient increase of the acetic acid concentration and a corresponding decrease of the pH. Only moderate increase in biogas yield and VFA concentration (mainly acetate) was observed when the daily substrate was apportioned into two feedings. However, the overall daily gas production was similar in both cases. Regardless of the feeding regime, significantly depleted δ(13)CH4 and minor changes in the CO2 content of biogas were observed after feeding, which were followed by enrichment of δ(13)CH4. This period was associated with detectable changes in activity of methanogenic communities monitored by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis based on the transcripts of mcrA/mrtA genes. Methanoculleus and Methanobacterium spp. were the predominant methanogens in all reactors, while Methanosarcina spp. activity was only significant in two reactors. The activity of Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina spp. increased after the feeding in these reactors, which was followed by a depletion of δ(13)C in the produced gas. In both reactors, the less depleted isotopic values were detected before the second feeding, when Methanobacterium was the most

  2. Biologically active and thermally stable polymeric Schiff base and its metal polychelates: Their synthesis and spectral aspects.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Raza; Hasnain, Sumaiya

    2015-09-01

    New metal polychelates of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) obtained by the interaction of metal acetates with polymeric Schiff base containing formaldehyde and piperazine, have been investigated. Structural and spectroscopic properties have been evaluated by elemental analysis, FT-IR and (1)H-NMR. Geometry of the chelated polymers was confirmed by magnetic susceptibility measurements, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Electron Spin Resonance. The molecular weight of the polymer was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that metal polychelates were more thermally stable than their corresponding ligand. All compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, (bacteria) and Candida albicans, Microsporum canis, Cryptococcus neoformans (fungi) by agar well diffusion method. Interestingly, the polymeric Schiff base was found to be antimicrobial in nature but less effective as compared to the metal polychelates. On the basis of thermal and antimicrobial behavior, these polymers hold potential applications as thermally resistant antimicrobial and antifouling coating materials as well as antimicrobial packaging materials.

  3. Biologically active and thermally stable polymeric Schiff base and its metal polychelates: Their synthesis and spectral aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasool, Raza; Hasnain, Sumaiya

    2015-09-01

    New metal polychelates of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) obtained by the interaction of metal acetates with polymeric Schiff base containing formaldehyde and piperazine, have been investigated. Structural and spectroscopic properties have been evaluated by elemental analysis, FT-IR and 1H-NMR. Geometry of the chelated polymers was confirmed by magnetic susceptibility measurements, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Electron Spin Resonance. The molecular weight of the polymer was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that metal polychelates were more thermally stable than their corresponding ligand. All compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, (bacteria) and Candida albicans, Microsporum canis, Cryptococcus neoformans (fungi) by agar well diffusion method. Interestingly, the polymeric Schiff base was found to be antimicrobial in nature but less effective as compared to the metal polychelates. On the basis of thermal and antimicrobial behavior, these polymers hold potential applications as thermally resistant antimicrobial and antifouling coating materials as well as antimicrobial packaging materials.

  4. Photon activation therapy of RG2 glioma carrying Fischer rats using stable thallium and monochromatic synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Ceberg, Crister; Jönsson, Bo-Anders; Prezado, Yolanda; Pommer, Tobias; Nittby, Henrietta; Englund, Elisabet; Grafström, Gustav; Edvardsson, Anneli; Stenvall, Anna; Strömblad, Susanne; Wingårdh, Karin; Persson, Bertil; Elleaume, Hélène; Baldetorp, Bo; Salford, Leif G; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2012-12-21

    75 RG2 glioma-carrying Fischer rats were treated by photon activation therapy (PAT) with monochromatic synchrotron radiation and stable thallium. Three groups were treated with thallium in combination with radiation at different energy; immediately below and above the thallium K-edge, and at 50 keV. Three control groups were given irradiation only, thallium only, or no treatment at all. For animals receiving thallium in combination with radiation to 15 Gy at 50 keV, the median survival time was 30 days, which was 67% longer than for the untreated controls (p = 0.0020) and 36% longer than for the group treated with radiation alone (not significant). Treatment with thallium and radiation at the higher energy levels were not effective at the given absorbed dose and thallium concentration. In the groups treated at 50 keV and above the K-edge, several animals exhibited extensive and sometimes contra-lateral edema, neuronal death and frank tissue necrosis. No such marked changes were seen in the other groups. The results were discussed with reference to Monte Carlo calculated electron energy spectra and dose enhancement factors.

  5. Photon activation therapy of RG2 glioma carrying Fischer rats using stable thallium and monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceberg, Crister; Jönsson, Bo-Anders; Prezado, Yolanda; Pommer, Tobias; Nittby, Henrietta; Englund, Elisabet; Grafström, Gustav; Edvardsson, Anneli; Stenvall, Anna; Strömblad, Susanne; Wingårdh, Karin; Persson, Bertil; Elleaume, Hélène; Baldetorp, Bo; Salford, Leif G.; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2012-12-01

    75 RG2 glioma-carrying Fischer rats were treated by photon activation therapy (PAT) with monochromatic synchrotron radiation and stable thallium. Three groups were treated with thallium in combination with radiation at different energy; immediately below and above the thallium K-edge, and at 50 keV. Three control groups were given irradiation only, thallium only, or no treatment at all. For animals receiving thallium in combination with radiation to 15 Gy at 50 keV, the median survival time was 30 days, which was 67% longer than for the untreated controls (p = 0.0020) and 36% longer than for the group treated with radiation alone (not significant). Treatment with thallium and radiation at the higher energy levels were not effective at the given absorbed dose and thallium concentration. In the groups treated at 50 keV and above the K-edge, several animals exhibited extensive and sometimes contra-lateral edema, neuronal death and frank tissue necrosis. No such marked changes were seen in the other groups. The results were discussed with reference to Monte Carlo calculated electron energy spectra and dose enhancement factors.

  6. Biologically active and thermally stable polymeric Schiff base and its metal polychelates: Their synthesis and spectral aspects.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Raza; Hasnain, Sumaiya

    2015-09-01

    New metal polychelates of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) obtained by the interaction of metal acetates with polymeric Schiff base containing formaldehyde and piperazine, have been investigated. Structural and spectroscopic properties have been evaluated by elemental analysis, FT-IR and (1)H-NMR. Geometry of the chelated polymers was confirmed by magnetic susceptibility measurements, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Electron Spin Resonance. The molecular weight of the polymer was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that metal polychelates were more thermally stable than their corresponding ligand. All compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, (bacteria) and Candida albicans, Microsporum canis, Cryptococcus neoformans (fungi) by agar well diffusion method. Interestingly, the polymeric Schiff base was found to be antimicrobial in nature but less effective as compared to the metal polychelates. On the basis of thermal and antimicrobial behavior, these polymers hold potential applications as thermally resistant antimicrobial and antifouling coating materials as well as antimicrobial packaging materials. PMID:25955762

  7. Design of robust-stable and quadratic finite-horizon optimal controllers with low trajectory sensitivity for uncertain active suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shinn-Horng; Chou, Jyh-Horng; Zheng, Liang-An; Lin, Sheng-Kai

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a design method for designing the robust-stable and quadratic-finite-horizon-optimal controllers of uncertain active suspension systems. The method integrates a robust stabilisability condition, the orthogonal functions approach (OFA) and the hybrid Taguchi-genetic algorithm (HTGA). Using the integrative computational method, a robust-stable and quadratic-finite-horizon-optimal controller with low-trajectory sensitivity can be obtained such that (i) the active suspension system with elemental parametric uncertainties is stabilised and (ii) a quadratic-finite-horizon-integral performance index including a quadratic trajectory sensitivity term for the nominal active suspension system is minimised. The robust stabilisability condition is proposed in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Based on the OFA, an algebraic algorithm only involving the algebraic computation is derived for solving the nominal active suspension feedback dynamic equations. By using the OFA and the LMI-based robust stabilisability condition, the dynamic optimisation problem for the robust-stable and quadratic-finite-horizon-optimal controller design of the linear uncertain active suspension system is transformed into a static-constrained-optimisation problem represented by the algebraic equations with constraint of LMI-based robust stabilisability condition; thus greatly simplifies the design problem. Then, for the static-constrained-optimisation problem, the HTGA is employed to find the robust-stable and quadratic-finite-horizon-optimal controllers of the linear uncertain active suspension systems. A design example is given to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed integrative computational approach.

  8. Monthly continuous erythropoietin receptor activator treatment maintains stable hemoglobin levels in routine clinical management of hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Thomas; Leistikow, Frank; Hartmann, Hagen-Georg; Vollgraf, Günter; Dellanna, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Once-monthly administration of CERA, a continuous erythropoietin receptor activator, has shown equivalent efficacy to shorter-acting erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) that require more frequent dosing, but data on routine use of once-monthly CERA in hemodialysis patients are lacking. Study on Efficacy, Safety and Applicability of Mircera (SESAM) was a prospective, multicenter, noninterventional trial with a duration of up to 9 months (month 0-5 "titration phase"; month 6-8 "evaluation phase") to test the stability of Hb control in hemodialysis patients under routine conditions. Patient selection, Hb targets and CERA dosing were at the discretion of the local nephrologist. 918 patients from 92 German nephrology centers were included. Ninety-three percent were on ESA treatment prior to study entry. The mean number of CERA dose changes during the study was 1.9 ± 1.9 per patient. Mean Hb level was 11.4 ± 1.2 g/dL at baseline and 11.7 ± 1.4 g/dL at the end of the 8-month study. During the evaluation phase (months 6-8), 15.6%, 40.3%, and 66.0% of patients had stable Hb (i.e., at least two values) in the ranges 11-12, 10-12, and 10-13 g/dL, respectively. The mean intra-individual fluctuation in Hb was 1.4 ± 0.7 g/dL during the study (0.5 ± 0.4 g/dL during the 3-month evaluation phase). More than 90% of patients, and > 80% of physicians, rated CERA therapy as "very good" or "good" throughout the study. Four patients (0.4%) discontinued prematurely due to adverse drug reactions. Once-monthly CERA therapy maintains stable Hb values with low intra-individual variability and few dose adaptations in hemodialysis patients when administered entirely according to local practice, and the regimen was well-tolerated.

  9. Platinum-Promoted Ga/Al2O3 as Highly Active, Selective, and Stable Catalyst for the Dehydrogenation of Propane**

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Jesper J H B; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Ines D; Luo, Lin; Stears, Brien A; Malek, Andrzej; Barton, David G; Kilos, Beata A; Kaminsky, Mark P; Verhoeven, Tiny W G M; Koers, Eline J; Baldus, Marc; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2014-01-01

    A novel catalyst material for the selective dehydrogenation of propane is presented. The catalyst consists of 1000 ppm Pt, 3 wt % Ga, and 0.25 wt % K supported on alumina. We observed a synergy between Ga and Pt, resulting in a highly active and stable catalyst. Additionally, we propose a bifunctional active phase, in which coordinately unsaturated Ga3+ species are the active species and where Pt functions as a promoter. PMID:24989975

  10. Campomanesia adamantium Peel Extract in Antidiarrheal Activity: The Ability of Inhibition of Heat-Stable Enterotoxin by Polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Lescano, Caroline Honaiser; de Oliveira, Ivan Pires; Zaminelli, Tiago; Baldivia, Débora da Silva; da Silva, Luan Ramos; Napolitano, Mauro; Silvério, Camila Bitencourt Mendes; Lincopan, Nilton; Sanjinez-Argandoña, Eliana Janet

    2016-01-01

    Campomanesia adamantium (Myrtaceae) is a medicinal plant distributed in Brazilian Cerrado. Different parts of this plant are used in popular medicine for treatment of several diseases like fever, diarrhea, hypercholesterolemia and rheumatism. The aim of this work was to evaluate the inhibition of heat-stable enterotoxin type A (STa) by gallic acid present in the peel of C. adamantium fruit and assays to assess the antidiarrheal activity, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic properties of peel extract using the T84 cell line model. The possible inhibition exerted by the gallic acid of the peel extract on the STa peptide was inferred by molecular dynamics simulations. The antidiarrheal effects were investigated measuring cGMP accumulation in cells after stimulation by STa toxin and antibacterial activity was assessed. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed by inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2. MTT and LDH assays were used to evaluate any possible cytotoxic action while the CyQUANT test was used to investigate the effect on cell proliferation. A representation showing how the possible interactions between STa and the gallic acid of the extract might reduce the action of the enterotoxin is presented. C. adamantium peel extract significantly decreased the levels of cGMP in T84 cells. However, no effect on the species of microorganisms was observed. The extract also inhibited COX-1 (IC50 255.70 ± 0.04 ng/mL) and COX-2 (IC50 569.50 ± 0.11 ng/mL) enzymes. Cytotoxicity assay have shown significant changes in cells treated with the extract, which inhibited the cell proliferation until 72 hours of treatment. Direct interactions of phenolic compounds present in the extract with the STa toxin may limit its activity. Curative effect in the diarrhea treatment and its anti-inflammatory action is based on the pharmacological properties, mechanism of action of the C. adamantium peel extract, and no toxic effects of the peel extract presented on this work. PMID:27764241

  11. Ordered mesoporous platinum@graphitic carbon embedded nanophase as a highly active, stable, and methanol-tolerant oxygen reduction electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhangxiong; Lv, Yingying; Xia, Yongyao; Webley, Paul A; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2012-02-01

    Highly ordered mesoporous platinum@graphitic carbon (Pt@GC) composites with well-graphitized carbon frameworks and uniformly dispersed Pt nanoparticles embedded within the carbon pore walls have been rationally designed and synthesized. In this facile method, ordered mesoporous silica impregnated with a variable amount of Pt precursor is adopted as the hard template, followed by carbon deposition through a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process with methane as a carbon precursor. During the CVD process, in situ reduction of Pt precursor, deposition of carbon, and graphitization can be integrated into a single step. The mesostructure, porosity and Pt content in the final mesoporous Pt@GC composites can be conveniently adjusted over a wide range by controlling the initial loading amount of Pt precursor and the CVD temperature and duration. The integration of high surface area, regular mesopores, graphitic nature of the carbon walls as well as highly dispersed and spatially embedded Pt nanoparticles in the mesoporous Pt@GC composites make them excellent as highly active, extremely stable, and methanol-tolerant electrocatalysts toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). A systematic study by comparing the ORR performance among several carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts suggests the overwhelmingly better performance of the mesoporous Pt@GC composites. The structural, textural, and framework properties of the mesoporous Pt@GC composites are extensively studied and strongly related to their excellent ORR performance. These materials are highly promising for fuel cell applications and the synthesis method is quite applicable for constructing mesoporous graphitized carbon materials with various embedded nanophases.

  12. Stable Self-Assembly of Bovine α-Lactalbumin Exhibits Target-Specific Antiproliferative Activity in Multiple Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, Sailendra; Paul, Subhankar

    2015-12-30

    Self-assembly of a protein is a natural phenomenon; however, the process can be performed under a suitable condition in vitro. Since proteins are nontoxic, biodegradable, and biocompatible in nature, they are used in various industrial applications such as biocatalyst, therapeutic agent, and drug carriers. Moreover, their flexible structural state and specific activity are being used as sensors and immensely attract many new applications. However, the inherent potential of protein self-assembly for various applications is yet to be explored in detail. In this study, spherical self-assembly of bovine α-lactalbumin (nsBLA) was synthesized using an optimized ethanol-mediated desolvation process with an average diameter of approximately 300 nm. The self-assembly was found to be highly stable against thermal, pH, and proteases stress. When nsBLA was administered in various cancer cells, it demonstrated high cytotoxicity in three different cancer cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, whereas it exhibited negligible toxicity in normal human and murine cells. When nsBLA was conjugated with folic acid, it improved the cytotoxicity and perhaps mediated through enhanced cellular uptake in cancer cells through binding with folate receptors. Further, experimental results confirmed that the cancer cell death induced by nsBLA was not caused by apoptosis but a necrotic-like death mechanism. When compared with a well-known protein-based anticancer agent BAMLET (bovine α-lactalbumin made lethal against tumor cell), the self-assembled BLA clearly exhibited higher cytotoxicity to cancer cells than BAMLET. While BAMLET exhibits poor biocompatibility, our nsBLA demonstrated excellent biocompatibility to normal cells. Therefore, in this study, we prepared self-assembled α-lactalbumin that exhibits strong inherent antiproliferative potential in multiple cancer cells which can be used for efficient therapeutic approach in cancer.

  13. Neuronal avalanches are diverse and precise activity patterns that are stable for many hours in cortical slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Beggs, John M; Plenz, Dietmar

    2004-06-01

    A major goal of neuroscience is to elucidate mechanisms of cortical information processing and storage. Previous work from our laboratory (Beggs and Plenz, 2003) revealed that propagation of local field potentials (LFPs) in cortical circuits could be described by the same equations that govern avalanches. Whereas modeling studies suggested that these "neuronal avalanches" were optimal for information transmission, it was not clear what role they could play in information storage. Work from numerous other laboratories has shown that cortical structures can generate reproducible spatiotemporal patterns of activity that could be used as a substrate for memory. Here, we show that although neuronal avalanches lasted only a few milliseconds, their spatiotemporal patterns were also stable and significantly repeatable even many hours later. To investigate these issues, we cultured coronal slices of rat cortex for 4 weeks on 60-channel microelectrode arrays and recorded spontaneous extracellular LFPs continuously for 10 hr. Using correlation-based clustering and a global contrast function, we found that each cortical culture spontaneously produced 4736 +/- 2769 (mean +/- SD) neuronal avalanches per hour that clustered into 30 +/- 14 statistically significant families of spatiotemporal patterns. In 10 hr of recording, over 98% of the mutual information shared by these avalanche patterns were retained. Additionally, jittering analysis revealed that the correlations between avalanches were temporally precise to within +/-4 msec. The long-term stability, diversity, and temporal precision of these avalanches indicate that they fulfill many of the requirements expected of a substrate for memory and suggest that they play a central role in both information transmission and storage within cortical networks.

  14. A self-reductive mesoporous CuO(x)/Fe/silicate nanocomposite as a highly active and stable catalyst for methanol reforming.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Yan-Wun; Lin, Ran-Jin; Chang, Ching-Chun; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Lin, Hong-Ping; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2011-09-01

    A simple and convenient one-pot synthetic route to directly prepare a self-reductive mesoporous copper-iron-silicate (CuO(x)-Fe-silicate)-based catalyst has been developed. The resultant catalyst is highly active and stable in methanol reforming without needing a pre-reduction procedure. PMID:21773606

  15. Pancreatic stem cells remain unresolved.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is caused by absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency of insulin-secreting islet β cells. An ideal treatment of diabetes would, therefore, be to replace the lost or deficient β cells, by transplantation of donated islets or differentiated endocrine cells or by regeneration of endogenous islet cells. Due to their ability of unlimited proliferation and differentiation into all functional lineages in our body, including β cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are ideally placed as cell sources for a diabetic transplantation therapy. Unfortunately, the inability to generate functional differentiated islet cells from pluripotent stem cells and the poor availability of donor islets have severely restricted the broad clinical use of the replacement therapy. Therefore, endogenous sources that can be directed to becoming insulin-secreting cells are actively sought after. In particular, any cell types in the developing or adult pancreas that may act as pancreatic stem cells (PSC) would provide an alternative renewable source for endogenous regeneration. In this review, we will summarize the latest progress and knowledge of such PSC, and discuss ways that facilitate the future development of this often controversial, but crucial research.

  16. Subnanometer Molybdenum Sulfide on Carbon Nanotubes as a Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Yang, Zhi; Shen, Juanxia; Nie, Huagui; Cai, Qiran; Li, Luhua; Ge, Mengzhan; Gu, Cancan; Chen, Xi'an; Yang, Keqin; Zhang, Lijie; Chen, Ying; Huang, Shaoming

    2016-02-10

    Electrochemically splitting water for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has been viewed as a promising approach to produce renewable and clean hydrogen energy. However, searching for cheap and efficient HER electrocatalysts to replace the currently used Pt-based catalysts remains an urgent task. Herein, we develop a one-step carbon nanotube (CNT) assisted synthesis strategy with CNTs' strong adsorbability to mediate the growth of subnanometer-sized MoS(x) on CNTs. The subnanometer MoS(x)-CNT hybrids achieve a low overpotential of 106 mV at 10 mA cm(-2), a small Tafel slope of 37 mV per decade, and an unprecedentedly high turnover frequency value of 18.84 s(-1) at η = 200 mV among all reported non-Pt catalysts in acidic conditions. The superior performance of the hybrid catalysts benefits from the presence of a higher number of active sites and the abundant exposure of unsaturated S atoms rooted in the subnanometer structure, demonstrating a new class of subnanometer-scale catalysts.

  17. Enzymatic activities and stable isotope patterns of ectomycorrhizal fungi in relation to phylogeny and exploration types in an afrotropical rain forest.

    PubMed

    Tedersoo, Leho; Naadel, Triin; Bahram, Mohammad; Pritsch, Karin; Buegger, Franz; Leal, Miguel; Kõljalg, Urmas; Põldmaa, Kadri

    2012-09-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi obtain both mineral and simple organic nutrients from soil and transport these to plant roots. Natural abundance of stable isotopes (¹⁵N and ¹³C) in fruit bodies and potential enzymatic activities of ECM root tips provide insights into mineral nutrition of these mutualistic partners. By combining rDNA sequence analysis with enzymatic and stable isotope assays of root tips, we hypothesized that phylogenetic affinities of ECM fungi are more important than ECM exploration type, soil horizon and host plant in explaining the differences in mineral nutrition of trees in an African lowland rainforest. Ectomycorrhizal fungal species belonging to extraradical mycelium-rich morphotypes generally displayed the strongest potential activities of degradation enzymes, except for laccase. The signature of ¹⁵N was determined by the ECM fungal lineage, but not by the exploration type. Potential enzymatic activities of root tips were unrelated to ¹⁵N signature of ECM root tip. The lack of correlation suggests that these methods address different aspects in plant nutrient uptake. Stable isotope analysis of root tips could provide an additional indirect assessment of fungal and plant nutrition that enables enhancement of taxonomic coverage and control for soil depth and internal nitrogen cycling in fungal tissues.

  18. SUMO-Mediated Inhibition of Glucocorticoid Receptor Synergistic Activity Depends on Stable Assembly at the Promoter But Not on DAXX

    PubMed Central

    Holmstrom, Sam R.; Chupreta, Sergey; So, Alex Yick-Lun; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple transcription factors, including members of the nuclear receptor family, harbor one or more copies of a short regulatory motif that limits synergistic transactivation in a context-dependent manner. These synergy control (SC) motifs exert their effects by serving as sites for posttranslational modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins. By analyzing the requirements for both synergy control and SUMOylation in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), we find that an intact ligand-binding domain and an engaged DNA- binding domain dimerization interface are necessary for effective synergy control. However, these features, which promote stable assembly of GR-DNA complexes, are required downstream of SUMOylation because their disruption or deletion does not interfere with SUMO modification. Remarkably, in the absence of these features, sensitivity to the effects of SUMOylation can be restored simply by stabilization of DNA interactions through a heterologous DNA binding domain. The data indicate that stable interaction with DNA is an important prerequisite for SUMO-dependent transcriptional inhibition. Analysis of genomic regions occupied by GR indicates that the effects of SC motif SUMOylation are most evident at multiple, near-ideal GR binding sites and that SUMOylation selectively affects the induction of linked endogenous genes. Although the SUMO-binding protein DAXX has been proposed to mediate the inhibitory effects of GR SUMOylation, we find that inhibition by DAXX is independent of GR SUMOylation. Furthermore, neither expression nor knockdown of DAXX influences SUMO effects on GR. We therefore propose that stable binding of GR to multiple sites on DNA allows for the SUMO-dependent recruitment of inhibitory factors distinct from DAXX. PMID:18562626

  19. New spatial cognition tests for mice: passive place avoidance on stable and active place avoidance on rotating arenas.

    PubMed

    Cimadevilla, J M; Fenton, A A; Bures, J

    2001-03-15

    Dry arenas are a convenient tool for assessing the spatial navigation abilities of rodents. In this paper, mice must avoid a punished sector of a dry arena from which they are expelled by a puff of compressed air. The position of the punished sector is defined relative to the coordinate system of the room. In a stable environment the mice can use both extramaze and intramaze landmarks to orient themselves accurately. However, when the shock area is defined by extramaze landmarks, continuous rotation of the arena at 1 rpm makes it impossible to solve the avoidance task using arena-based cues or idiothesis. The avoidance can only be solved by paying attention to extramaze cues. Our protocol tested spatial abilities on stable and rotating arenas. The acquisition of the task was manifested under both conditions by a significant improvement of performance within the first session (short-term memory component) and at the beginning of the 24-h delayed second session (long-term memory component).

  20. Stable Unhappy Marriages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Tim B.; Albrecht, Stan L.

    1991-01-01

    Examined prevalence and determinants of stable unhappy marriage using data from national survey. Results indicated age, lack of prior marital experience, commitment to marriage as an institution, low social activity, lack of control over one's life, and belief that divorce would detract from happiness were all predictive of stability in unhappy…

  1. Stable transmission of slow highly charged ions through tapered glass capillary with active discharging method for sub-micron sized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tokihiro; Kojima, Takao M.; Natsume, Yoshio; Kimura, Jun; Abe, Tomoko

    2016-09-01

    Stable transmission of a sub-μm-sized Ar8+ beam of 64-104-keV energy through glass tandem optics was achieved. The optics consisted of a 4-electrode tapered capillary and a sub-μm-sized tapered capillary tip, arranged in series. To actively discharge the capillary, and thus obtain stable transmission, an electrode was applied with a mechanical relay closing at a 0.01-0.1 Hz frequency. Transmitted beams were observed for tip outlets' diameters of 0.75 and 2.0 μm. When only a 4-electrode capillary was used, a beam density enhancement with a multiplicity of 14 times of the input beam density was achieved. A transmission efficiency up to 70% was observed with good reproducibility when the electrodes were biased with appropriate voltages.

  2. X-ray, FT-IR, NMR and PM5 structural studies and antibacterial activity of unexpectedly stable salinomycin-benzotriazole intermediate ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huczyński, Adam; Janczak, Jan; Antoszczak, Michał; Stefańska, Joanna; Brzezinski, Bogumil

    2012-08-01

    The unexpectedly stable benzotriazole ester of salinomycin (SAL-HOBt) - an intermediate product of the amidation reaction of salinomycin has been isolated and structurally characterised (using a single crystal) by X-ray, FT-IR, NMR and semiempirical methods. The results of the X-ray and spectroscopic studies demonstrated that this intermediate ester exist in the solid state and in solution exclusively as the stable O-acyl form. The molecular structure of SAL-HOBt is stabilised by relatively weak intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The PM5 calculation of possible structures of SAL-HOBt has shown that the O-acyl form is more energetically favourable than its N-oxide-N-acyl isomers. The antimicrobial tests show that SAL-HOBt is active against Gram-positive bacteria and clinical isolates methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 1-2 μg/ml).

  3. The Active Partition Gene incC of IncP Plasmids Is Required for Stable Maintenance in a Broad Range of Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Azeem; Figurski, David H.

    2002-01-01

    Plasmids of incompatibility group P (IncP) are capable of replication and stable inheritance in a wide variety of gram-negative bacteria. Three determinants of IncP plasmids are components of an active partition locus that is predicted to function in the segregation of plasmid copies to daughter cells. These determinants are incC, which codes for a member of the ParA family of partition ATPases; korB, which specifies a DNA-binding protein that also functions as a global transcriptional repressor; and OB, the DNA target for KorB, which occurs at multiple locations on IncP plasmids. To determine the importance and host range of the IncC/KorB partition system in the maintenance of IncP plasmids, we constructed an in-frame deletion of incC in the otherwise intact 60-kb IncPα plasmid R995. R995ΔincC was found to be highly unstable in Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, whereas wild-type R995 is stable in all these hosts. In addition, R995ΔincC could not be established in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. trans-Complementation analysis showed that the coding region for IncC2 polypeptide, which is expressed from an internal translational start within the incC gene, was sufficient to restore stable maintenance to wild-type levels. The results show that the IncC/KorB active partition system of IncP plasmids is remarkably proficient for stable maintenance in diverse bacteria. PMID:11872733

  4. Stable Charged Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, H.; Quandt, M.; Graham, N.

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius {approx_equal}10{sup -18} m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  5. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored. PMID:21469786

  6. Stable Relationships: Horse Care Activities. Level 3. 4-H Skills for Life Animal Series. National 4-H Curriculum. BU-08055

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neiberger-Miller, Ami

    2004-01-01

    This is the third in a series of five horse project activity guides for youth. Levels 1-3 focus on "horse-less" activities, while Levels 4 and 5 zero in on riding and horsemanship. Each guide has an achievement program to encourage youth to learn and develop life skills. The assistance of a horse project helper in completing the achievement…

  7. α-Lytic protease can exist in two separately stable conformations with different His57 mobilities and catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Kristin Coffman; Sudmeier, James L.; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2005-01-01

    α-Lytic protease is a bacterial serine protease widely studied as a model system of enzyme catalysis. Here we report that lyophilization induces a structural change in the enzyme that is not reversed by redissolution in water. The structural change reduces the mobility of the active-site histidine residue and the catalytic activity of the enzyme. The application of mild pressure to solutions of the altered enzyme reverses the lyophilization-induced structural change and restores the mobility of the histidine residue and the enzyme's catalytic activity. This effect of lyophilization permits a unique opportunity for investigating the relationship between histidine ring dynamics and catalytic activity. The results demonstrate that His57 in resting enzymes is more mobile than previously thought, especially when protonated. The histidine motion and its correlation to enzyme activity lend support to the reaction-driven ring flip hypothesis. PMID:15657134

  8. Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Parapat, Riny Y; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2013-01-21

    We recently introduced a new method to synthesize an active and stable Pt catalyst, namely thermo-destabilization of microemulsions (see R. Y. Parapat, V. Parwoto, M. Schwarze, B. Zhang, D. S. Su and R. Schomäcker, J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22 (23), 11605-11614). We are able to produce Pt nanocrystals with a small size (2.5 nm) of an isotropic structure i.e. truncated octahedral and deposit them well on support materials. Although we have obtained good results, the performance of the catalyst still needed to be improved and optimized. We followed the strategy to retain the small size but change the shape to an anisotropic structure of Pt nanocrystals which produces more active sites by means of a weaker reducing agent. We found that our catalysts are more active than those we reported before and even show the potential to be applied in a challenging reaction such as hydrogenation of levulinic acid. PMID:23235742

  9. Comparison of methods for simultaneous identification of bacterial species and determination of metabolic activity by protein-based stable isotope probing (Protein-SIP) experiments.

    PubMed

    Jehmlich, Nico; Schmidt, Frank; Taubert, Martin; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Vogt, Carsten

    2009-06-01

    We developed a concept for analysing carbon and nitrogen fluxes in microbial communities by employing protein-based stable isotope probing (Protein-SIP) in metabolic labelling experiments with stable isotope labelled substrates. For identification of microbial species intact protein profiling (IPP) can be used, whereas the assessment of their metabolic activity is achieved by shotgun mass mapping (SMM). Microbial cultures were grown on substrates containing (13)C or (15)N. For identification of species we tested both the IPP and the SMM approaches. Mass spectra (MALDI-MS) were taken from mixtures of either intact proteins or peptides from tryptic digestion for generating species-specific peak patterns. In the case of SMM, the fragmentation of peptides was additionally used to obtain sequence information for species identification. Mass spectra of peptide sequences allow calculation of the amount of (13)C or (15)N incorporation within peptides for determining metabolic activity of the specific species. The comparison of IPP and SMM revealed a higher robustness of species identification by SMM. In addition, the assessment of incorporation levels of (13)C and (15)N into peptides by SMM revealed a lower uncertainty (0.5-0.8 atom %) compared to IPP (6.4-8.9 atom %). The determination of metabolic activity and function of individual species by Protein-SIP can help to analyse carbon and nitrogen fluxes within microbial communities.

  10. How stable are the 'stable ancient shields'?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Giulio; Mattila, Jussi

    2014-05-01

    "Archean cratons are relatively flat, stable regions of the crust that have remained undeformed since the Precambrian, forming the ancient cores of the continents" (King, EPSL, 2005). While this type of statement is supported by a wealth of constraints in the case of episodes of thoroughgoing ductile deformation affecting shield regions of Archean and also Peleoproterozoic age, a growing amount of research indicates that shields are not nearly as structurally stable within the broad field of environmental conditions leading to brittle deformation. In fact, old crystalline basements usually present compelling evidence of long brittle deformation histories, often very complex and challenging to unfold. Recent structural and geochronological studies point to a significant mechanical instability of the shield areas, wherein large volumes of 'stable' rocks actually can become saturated with fractures and brittle faults soon after regional cooling exhumes them to below c. 300-350° C. How cold, rigid and therefore strong shields respond to applied stresses remains, however, still poorly investigated and understood. This in turn precludes a better definition of the shallow rheological properties of large, old crystalline blocks. In particular, we do not yet have good constraints on the mechanisms of mechanical reactivation that control the partial (if not total) accommodation of new deformational episodes by preexisting structures, which remains a key to untangle brittle histories lasting several hundred Myr. In our analysis, we use the Svecofennian Shield (SS) as an example of a supposedly 'stable' region with Archean nucleii and Paleoproterozoic cratonic areas to show how it is possible to unravel the details of brittle histories spanning more than 1.5 Gyr. New structural and geochronological results from Finland are integrated with a review of existing data from Sweden to explore how the effects of far-field stresses are partitioned within a shield, which was growing

  11. Cu-SSZ-39, an active and hydrothermally stable catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx.

    PubMed

    Moliner, Manuel; Franch, Cristina; Palomares, Eduardo; Grill, Marie; Corma, Avelino

    2012-08-25

    A Cu-exchanged SSZ-39 zeolite has been synthesized and tested for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx. This material shows an excellent catalytic activity, and most importantly, an extraordinary hydrothermal stability.

  12. Ajoene, a stable garlic by-product, inhibits high fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis and oxidative injury through LKB1-dependent AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang Yeob; Ki, Sung Hwan; Kim, Young Woo; Noh, Kyoung; Lee, Da Yeon; Kang, Bomi; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Jeon, Raok; Kim, Eun Hyun; Hwang, Se Jin; Kim, Sang Geon

    2011-01-15

    Hepatic steatosis, a hepatic component of metabolic syndrome, is common and may progress to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The liver X receptor-α (LXRα)-sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) pathway plays a key role in hepatic steatosis. This study investigated the potential of ajoene, a stable garlic by-product, to inhibit high fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis and the underlying mechanism. Ajoene treatment attenuated fat accumulation and induction of lipogenic genes in the liver of HFD-fed mice. Blood biochemical analyses and histopathologic examinations showed that ajoene prevented liver injury with the inhibition of oxidative stress, as evidenced by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation and nitrotyrosinylation. Moreover, ajoene treatment inhibited LXRα agonist (T0901317)-mediated SREBP-1c activation, and transactivation of the lipogenic target genes in hepatocytes. Ajoene was found to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via LKB1, responsible for the inhibition of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase-1 (S6K1). The ability of ajoene to repress T0901317-induced SREBP-1c expression was antagonized by inhibition of AMPK or activation of S6K1, supporting the role of these kinases in the antisteatotic effect. Our results demonstrate that ajoene has an effect of activating AMPK through LKB1 and inhibit S6K1 activity, contributing to the prevention of SREBP-1c-mediated hepatic lipogenesis via the inhibition of LXRα activity.

  13. The comparison of Neoprene palumbo and Genu direxa stable orthosis effects on pain and activity of daily living in patients with patellofemoral syndrome: a randomized blinded clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Mohammad Sadegh; Dehghan, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most common disorders of the knee. Conservative approaches, as well as surgery, can decrease pain and the syndrome’s progress effectively. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of neoprene palumbo orthosis (NPO) and Genu direxa stable orthosis (GDSO) on pain and the activities of daily living (ADL). Methods Thirty patients (males, ages 18 to 40) participated in this randomized blinded clinical trial. All of them were diagnosed with patella femoral pain syndrome. The participants were divided randomly into two groups of 15, with one group using neoprene palumbo (intervention group) and the other group using Genu direxa stable orthoses (control group). Using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), pain intensity and activities of daily living (ADL) and joint stiffness were analyzed before treatment and after three weeks of treatment. Data were analyzed using paired samples t-test and independent samples t-test. Results Both orthoses reduced the patients’ pain. Both group showed meaningful improvement in pain reduction and ADL increase after using orthosis in each group. In comparing the variables, no significant differences were found between pain severity and ADL (p = 0.592, p = 0.887). In both groups, the mean of pain severity was different before, during, and after using orthosis (p < 0.05). Conclusion The results of this study indicated that Neoprene palumbo and genudirexa stable orthoses improved the signs of patello femoral pain syndrome, including pain intensity and ADL. PMID:26516437

  14. ADAP interactions with talin and kindlin promote platelet integrin αIIbβ3 activation and stable fibrinogen binding

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jian; Kahner, Bryan; Ye, Feng; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Shattil, Sanford J.

    2014-01-01

    ADAP is a hematopoietic-restricted adapter protein that promotes integrin activation and is a carrier for other adapter proteins, Src kinase–associated phosphoprotein 1 (SKAP1) and SKAP2. In T lymphocytes, SKAP1 is the ADAP-associated molecule that activates integrins through direct linkages with Rap1 effectors (regulator of cell adhesion and polarization enriched in lymphoid tissues; Rap1-interacting adapter molecule). ADAP also promotes integrin αIIbβ3 activation in platelets, which lack SKAP1, suggesting an ADAP integrin–regulatory pathway different from those in lymphocytes. Here we characterized a novel association between ADAP and 2 essential integrin-β cytoplasmic tail-binding proteins involved in αIIbβ3 activation, talin and kindlin-3. Glutathione S-transferase pull-downs identified distinct regions in ADAP necessary for association with kindlin or talin. ADAP was physically proximal to talin and kindlin-3 in human platelets, as assessed biochemically, and by immunofluorescence microscopy and proximity ligation. Relative to wild-type mouse platelets, ADAP-deficient platelets exhibited reduced co-localization of talin with αIIbβ3, and reduced irreversible fibrinogen binding in response to a protease activated receptor 4 (PAR4) thrombin receptor agonist. When ADAP was heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells co-expressing αIIbβ3, talin, PAR1, and kindlin-3, it associated with an αIIbβ3/talin complex and enabled kindlin-3 to promote agonist-dependent ligand binding to αIIbβ3. Thus, ADAP uniquely promotes activation of and irreversible fibrinogen binding to platelet αIIbβ3 through interactions with talin and kindlin-3. PMID:24523237

  15. Spatial patterning of vulture scavenged human remains.

    PubMed

    Spradley, M Katherine; Hamilton, Michelle D; Giordano, Alberto

    2012-06-10

    This article presents the results of a pilot study on the effects of vulture modification to human remains. A donated body from the Willed Body Donation Program was placed at the Forensic Anthropology Research Facility (FARF), an outdoor human decomposition laboratory located at Texas State University-San Marcos. The effects of vulture scavenging on the timing and sequence, and the rate of skeletonization, disarticulation, and dispersal were observed via a motion sensing camera and direct observation. Using GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and GPS (Global Positioning System) technologies and spatial analytical methods, the transport of skeletal elements was mapped in order to analyze dispersal and terrain-influenced patterns of active vulture scavenging. Results showed that the initial scavenging took place 37 days after placement at FARF. This delay in scavenging differs from previous research. After the initial appearance of the vultures, the body was reduced from a fully-fleshed individual to a skeleton within only 5h. This underscores the potential for errors in postmortem interval estimations made at vulture scavenged scenes. Additionally, spatial analysis showed that skeletal elements were dispersed by vultures to lower elevations, and that the disarticulation and dispersal of the skeletal elements occurs early in the scavenging sequence.

  16. Smart Point Cloud: Definition and Remaining Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poux, F.; Hallot, P.; Neuville, R.; Billen, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dealing with coloured point cloud acquired from terrestrial laser scanner, this paper identifies remaining challenges for a new data structure: the smart point cloud. This concept arises with the statement that massive and discretized spatial information from active remote sensing technology is often underused due to data mining limitations. The generalisation of point cloud data associated with the heterogeneity and temporality of such datasets is the main issue regarding structure, segmentation, classification, and interaction for an immediate understanding. We propose to use both point cloud properties and human knowledge through machine learning to rapidly extract pertinent information, using user-centered information (smart data) rather than raw data. A review of feature detection, machine learning frameworks and database systems indexed both for mining queries and data visualisation is studied. Based on existing approaches, we propose a new 3-block flexible framework around device expertise, analytic expertise and domain base reflexion. This contribution serves as the first step for the realisation of a comprehensive smart point cloud data structure.

  17. Seasonality and daily flight activity of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) on dairy farms in Saraburi Province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Phasuk, Jumnongjit; Prabaripai, Atchariya; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of seasonal abundance and flight activity patterns are required to design effective management programs for insect pests of humans and livestock. In this study, the seasonality and daily flight activity of Stomoxys species were observed on two dairy farms in Saraburi Province, Thailand. Data were assessed throughout 1 year using Vavoua traps from September 2010 to August 2011. A total of 2,520 individuals belonging to four species were collected. Most Stomoxys species peaked in September (rainy season) and gradually decreased in number toward February (dry season); a second peak occurred between March and April (hot season). Stomoxys calcitrans was caught throughout the year and was the most abundant species in this study. The total number of males and females of S. calcitrans differed significantly among seasons and time intervals. The weather parameters of relative humidity and light intensity were significantly correlated with S. calcitrans abundance. PMID:23673316

  18. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4+ CD25+ T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4+ CD25− T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80–100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4+ subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:24601987

  19. Hidden faults in the Gobi Desert (Inner Mongolia, China) - evidence for fault activity in a previously tectonically stable zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudersdorf, Andreas; Haedke, Hanna; Reicherter, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    The Gaxun Nur Basin (GNB, also Ejina Basin, Hei River Basin, Ruoshui Basin) north of the Tibetan Plateau and the Hexi Corridor is an endorheic basin bounded by the Bei Shan ranges in the west, the Gobi Altai mountains in the north and the Badain Jaran sand desert in the east. The basin is fed from the south by the braided drainage system of the Hei He (Hei River) and its tributaries, which originate in the Qilian Shan; terminal lakes like the dried Gaxun Nur and Sogo Nur are and have been temporal. The sedimentary succession of up to 300 m comprises intercalations of not only alluvial deposits but also lake sediments and playa evaporites. The basin has been regarded as tectonically inactive by earlier authors; however, the dating of sediments from an earlier drill core in the basin center provided some implications for tectonic activity. Subsequent remote sensing efforts revealed large lineaments throughout the basin which are now considered as possible fault line fingerprints. We investigated well preserved Yardangs (clay terraces) in the northeastern part of the GNB, in the vicinity of the Juyanze (paleo) lake, and found evidence for Holocene active tectonics (seismites). We present a lithological analysis of the relevant sequences and conclusions on the recent tectonic activity within the study area.

  20. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-07-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4(+)  CD25(+) T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4(+)  CD25(-) T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80-100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4(+) subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments.

  1. Solvothermal synthesis of stable nanoporous polymeric bases-crystalline TiO2 nanocomposites: visible light active and efficient photocatalysts for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fujian; Kong, Weiping; Wang, Liang; Noshadi, Iman; Zhang, Zhonghua; Qi, Chenze

    2015-02-01

    Visible light active and stable nanoporous polymeric base-crystalline TiO2 nanocomposites were solvothermally synthesized from in situ copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) with 1-vinylimidazolate (VI) or 4-vinylpyridine (Py) in the presence of tetrabutyl titanate without the use of any other additives (PDVB-VI-TiO2-x, PDVB-Py-TiO2-x, where x stands for the molar ratio of TiO2 to VI or Py), which showed excellent activity with respect to catalyzing the degradation of organic pollutants of p-nitrophenol (PNP) and rhodamine-B (RhB). TEM and SEM images show that PDVB-VI-TiO2-x and PDVB-Py-TiO2-x have abundant nanopores, and TiO2 nanocrystals with a high degree of crystallinity were homogeneously embedded in the PDVB-VI-TiO2-x and PDVB-Py-TiO2-x, forming a stable ‘brick-and-mortar’ nanostructure. PDVB-VI and PDVB-Py supports act as the glue linking TiO2 nanocrystals to form nanopores and constraining the agglomeration of TiO2 nanocrystals. XPS spectra show evidence of unique interactions between TiO2 and basic sites in these samples. UV diffuse reflectance shows that PDVB-VI-TiO2-x and PDVB-Py-TiO2-x exhibit a unique response to visible light. Catalytic tests show that the PDVB-VI-TiO2-x and PDVB-Py-TiO2-x were active in catalyzing the degradation of PNP and RhB organic pollutants under visible light irradiation. The enhanced activities of the PDVB-VI-TiO2-x and PDVB-Py-TiO2-x were ascribed to synergistic effects between abundant nanopores and the unique optical adsorption of visible light in the samples.

  2. Formation of Kokumi-Enhancing γ-Glutamyl Dipeptides in Parmesan Cheese by Means of γ-Glutamyltransferase Activity and Stable Isotope Double-Labeling Studies.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Hedda; Behr, Jürgen; Ehrmann, Matthias A; Vogel, Rudi F; Hofmann, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Recently, γ-glutamyl dipeptides (γ-GPs) were found to be responsible for the attractive kokumi flavor of Parmesan cheese (PC). Quantitation of γ-GPs and their parent amino acids in 13-, 24-, and 30-month ripened PC samples by LC-MS/MS and stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA), in-cheese (13)C-labeling studies, followed by analysis of the γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity revealed γ-GPs to be generated most efficiently after 24 months of ripening by a GGT-catalyzed transfer of the γ-glutamyl moiety of L-glutamine onto various acceptor amino acids released upon casein proteolysis. Following the identification of milk as a potential GGT source in PC, the functionality of the milk's GGT to generate the target γ-GPs was validated by stable isotope double-labeling (SIDL) experiments. Therefore, raw and heat-treated milk samples were incubated with L-glutamine-[U-(13)C] and acceptor amino acids (X) and the hetero- (γ-Glu-[(13)C5]-X) and homotranspeptidation products (γ-Glu-Gln-[(13)C10]) were quantitated by LC-MS/MS-SIDA using γ-Glu-Ala-[(13)C3] as the internal standard. High GGT activity to generate the γ-GPs and preference for L-phenylalanine and L-methionine as acceptor amino acids were found in raw milk and milk samples heat-treated for 10 min up to a maximum of 65 °C. In comparison, GGT activity and SIDL studies performed with inoculated Lactobacillus strains, including Lactobacillus harbinensis and Lactobacillus casei identified in PC by means of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, did not show any significant GGT activity and unequivocally demonstrated unpasteurized cow's milk, rather than microorganisms, as a key factor in γ-glutamyl dipeptide generation in Parmesan cheese.

  3. Formation of Kokumi-Enhancing γ-Glutamyl Dipeptides in Parmesan Cheese by Means of γ-Glutamyltransferase Activity and Stable Isotope Double-Labeling Studies.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Hedda; Behr, Jürgen; Ehrmann, Matthias A; Vogel, Rudi F; Hofmann, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Recently, γ-glutamyl dipeptides (γ-GPs) were found to be responsible for the attractive kokumi flavor of Parmesan cheese (PC). Quantitation of γ-GPs and their parent amino acids in 13-, 24-, and 30-month ripened PC samples by LC-MS/MS and stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA), in-cheese (13)C-labeling studies, followed by analysis of the γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity revealed γ-GPs to be generated most efficiently after 24 months of ripening by a GGT-catalyzed transfer of the γ-glutamyl moiety of L-glutamine onto various acceptor amino acids released upon casein proteolysis. Following the identification of milk as a potential GGT source in PC, the functionality of the milk's GGT to generate the target γ-GPs was validated by stable isotope double-labeling (SIDL) experiments. Therefore, raw and heat-treated milk samples were incubated with L-glutamine-[U-(13)C] and acceptor amino acids (X) and the hetero- (γ-Glu-[(13)C5]-X) and homotranspeptidation products (γ-Glu-Gln-[(13)C10]) were quantitated by LC-MS/MS-SIDA using γ-Glu-Ala-[(13)C3] as the internal standard. High GGT activity to generate the γ-GPs and preference for L-phenylalanine and L-methionine as acceptor amino acids were found in raw milk and milk samples heat-treated for 10 min up to a maximum of 65 °C. In comparison, GGT activity and SIDL studies performed with inoculated Lactobacillus strains, including Lactobacillus harbinensis and Lactobacillus casei identified in PC by means of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, did not show any significant GGT activity and unequivocally demonstrated unpasteurized cow's milk, rather than microorganisms, as a key factor in γ-glutamyl dipeptide generation in Parmesan cheese. PMID:26866784

  4. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that...

  5. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing.

    PubMed

    Donner, E; Scheckel, K; Sekine, R; Popelka-Filcoff, R S; Bennett, J W; Brunetti, G; Naidu, R; McGrath, S P; Lombi, E

    2015-10-01

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that biosolids Ag concentrations have decreased significantly over recent decades. XANES revealed the importance of reduced-sulfur binding environments for Ag speciation in materials ranging from freshly produced sludge to biosolids weathered under ambient environmental conditions for more than 50 years. Isotopic dilution with (110 m)Ag showed that Ag was predominantly non-labile in both fresh and aged biosolids (13.7% mean lability), with E-values ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg and 5 mM CaNO3 extractable Ag from 1.2 to 609 μg/kg (0.002-3.4% of the total Ag). This study indicates that at the time of soil application, biosolids Ag will be predominantly Ag-sulfides and characterised by low isotopic lability.

  6. Stable Ectopic Expression of ST6GALNAC5 Induces Autocrine MET Activation and Anchorage-Independence in MDCK Cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia; Bottaro, Donald P; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Shiloach, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex cancer progression that can boost the metastatic potential of transformed cells by inducing migration, loss of cell adhesion, and promoting proliferation under anchorage-independent conditions. A DNA microarray analysis was performed comparing parental anchorage-dependent MDCK cells and anchorage-independent MDCK cells that were engineered to express human siat7e (ST6GALNAC5). The comparison identified several genes involved in the EMT process that were differentially expressed between the anchorage-dependent and the anchorage-independent MDCK cell lines. The hepatocyte growth factor gene (hgf) was found to be over-expressed in the engineered MDCK-siat7e cells at both transcription and protein expression levels. Phosphorylation analysis of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase confirmed the activation of an autocrine loop of the HGF/ MET signaling pathway in the MDCK-siat7e cells. When MET activities were suppressed by using the small-molecular inhibitor drug PF-02341066 (Crizotinib), the anchorage-independent MDCK-siat7e cells reverted to the cellular morphology of the parental anchorage-dependent MDCK cells. These observations indicate that the MET receptor plays a central role in the growth properties of the MDCK cells and its phosphorylation status is likely dependent on sialylation. Further investigation of the downstream signaling targets in the MET network showed that the degree of MDCK cell adhesion correlated with secretion levels of a matrix metalloproteinase, MMP1, suggesting a role of metalloproteinases in the EMT process. These results demonstrate that in addition to its application in biotechnology processes, MDCK-siat7e may serve as a model cell for metastasis studies to decipher the sequence of events leading up to the activation of EMT. PMID:26848584

  7. Stable Ectopic Expression of ST6GALNAC5 Induces Autocrine MET Activation and Anchorage-Independence in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chia; Bottaro, Donald P.; Betenbaugh, Michael J.; Shiloach, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex cancer progression that can boost the metastatic potential of transformed cells by inducing migration, loss of cell adhesion, and promoting proliferation under anchorage-independent conditions. A DNA microarray analysis was performed comparing parental anchorage-dependent MDCK cells and anchorage-independent MDCK cells that were engineered to express human siat7e (ST6GALNAC5). The comparison identified several genes involved in the EMT process that were differentially expressed between the anchorage-dependent and the anchorage-independent MDCK cell lines. The hepatocyte growth factor gene (hgf) was found to be over-expressed in the engineered MDCK-siat7e cells at both transcription and protein expression levels. Phosphorylation analysis of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase confirmed the activation of an autocrine loop of the HGF/ MET signaling pathway in the MDCK-siat7e cells. When MET activities were suppressed by using the small-molecular inhibitor drug PF-02341066 (Crizotinib), the anchorage-independent MDCK-siat7e cells reverted to the cellular morphology of the parental anchorage-dependent MDCK cells. These observations indicate that the MET receptor plays a central role in the growth properties of the MDCK cells and its phosphorylation status is likely dependent on sialylation. Further investigation of the downstream signaling targets in the MET network showed that the degree of MDCK cell adhesion correlated with secretion levels of a matrix metalloproteinase, MMP1, suggesting a role of metalloproteinases in the EMT process. These results demonstrate that in addition to its application in biotechnology processes, MDCK-siat7e may serve as a model cell for metastasis studies to decipher the sequence of events leading up to the activation of EMT. PMID:26848584

  8. Active stable maintenance functions in low copy-number plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria I. Partition systems.

    PubMed

    Dmowski, Michał; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2013-01-01

    Low copy number plasmids cannot rely on the random segregation during bacterial cell division. To be stably maintained in the population they evolved two types of mechanisms (i) partition systems (PAR) that actively separate replicated plasmid molecules to the daughter cells and (ii) toxin-andidote systems (TA) that act after cell division to kill plasmid-less cells. Our knowledge of partition systems has been based mainly on analysis of plasmids from Gram-negative bacteria. Now, numerous partition systems of plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria have also been characterized and make significant contribution to our understanding of these mechanisms.

  9. Stable N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-palladium(0) complexes as active catalysts for olefin cyclopropanation reactions with ethyl diazoacetate.

    PubMed

    Martín, Carmen; Molina, Francisco; Alvarez, Eleuterio; Belderrain, Tomás R

    2011-12-23

    The Pd(0) complexes [(NHC)PdL(n)] (NHC=N-heterocyclic carbene ligand; L=styrene for n=2 or PR(3) for n=1) efficiently catalyse olefin cyclopropanation by using ethyl diazoacetate (EDA) as the carbene source with activities that improve on previously described catalytic systems based on this metal. Mechanistic studies have shown that all of these catalyst precursors deliver the same catalytic species in solution, that is, [(IPr)Pd(sty)], a 14e(-) unsaturated intermediate that further reacts with EDA to afford [(IPr)Pd(=CHCO(2)Et)(sty)], from which the cyclopropane is formed.

  10. An mDia1-INF2 formin activation cascade facilitated by IQGAP1 regulates stable microtubules in migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Francesca; Andres-Delgado, Laura; Qu, Xiaoyi; Nik, Sara; Ramalingam, Nagendran; Kremer, Lenor; Alonso, Miguel A.; Gundersen, Gregg G.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple formins regulate microtubule (MT) arrays, but whether they function individually or in a common pathway is unknown. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) stimulates the formation of stabilized detyrosinated MTs (Glu MTs) in NIH3T3 fibroblasts through RhoA and the formin mDia1. Here we show that another formin, INF2, is necessary for mDia1-mediated induction of Glu MTs and regulation of MT dynamics and that mDia1 can be bypassed by activating INF2. INF2 localized to MTs after LPA treatment in an mDia1-dependent manner, suggesting that mDia1 regulates INF2. Mutants of either formin that disrupt their interaction failed to rescue MT stability in cells depleted of the respective formin, and the mDia1-interacting protein IQGAP1 regulated INF2’s localization to MTs and the induction of Glu MTs by either formin. The N-terminus of IQGAP1 associated with the C-terminus of INF2 directly, suggesting the possibility of a tripartite complex stimulated by LPA. Supporting this, the interaction of mDia1 and INF2 was induced by LPA and dependent on IQGAP1. Our data highlight a unique mechanism of formin action in which mDia1 and INF2 function in series to stabilize MTs and point to IQGAP1 as a scaffold that facilitates the activation of one formin by another. PMID:27030671

  11. Active faulting in apparently stable peninsular India: Rift inversion and a Holocene-age great earthquake on the Tapti Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copley, Alex; Mitra, Supriyo; Sloan, R. Alastair; Gaonkar, Sharad; Reynolds, Kirsty

    2014-08-01

    We present observations of active faulting within peninsular India, far from the surrounding plate boundaries. Offset alluvial fan surfaces indicate one or more magnitude 7.6-8.4 thrust-faulting earthquakes on the Tapti Fault (Maharashtra, western India) during the Holocene. The high ratio of fault displacement to length on the alluvial fan offsets implies high stress-drop faulting, as has been observed elsewhere in the peninsula. The along-strike extent of the fan offsets is similar to the thickness of the seismogenic layer, suggesting a roughly equidimensional fault rupture. The subsiding footwall of the fault is likely to have been responsible for altering the continental-scale drainage pattern in central India and creating the large west flowing catchment of the Tapti river. A preexisting sedimentary basin in the uplifting hanging wall implies that the Tapti Fault was active as a normal fault during the Mesozoic and has been reactivated as a thrust, highlighting the role of preexisting structures in determining the rheology and deformation of the lithosphere. The slip sense of faults and earthquakes in India suggests that deformation south of the Ganges foreland basin is driven by the compressive force transmitted between India and the Tibetan Plateau. The along-strike continuation of faulting to the east of the Holocene ruptures we have studied represents a significant seismic hazard in central India.

  12. The Presence of a Stable Block bounded by Active Zones (Mobile Belts) in the southwestern North American Proterozoic craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodell, P.; Martinez P, C.; Mahar, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Bouguer gravity data, initial Sr isotope values, zircon U-Pb, and multiple occurrences of felsic Proterozoic rocks, have revealed an elevated, less deformed, felsic cratonic block in the northern Mexico. The block is situated in western Chihuahua and is bounded by active zones or mobile belts on three sides, and is here referred to as the Western Chihuahua Cratonic Block (WCCB). Bouguer gravity data clearly indicate a region of a highly negative anomaly (< -200 mgal) in contrast to adjoining areas. The region is large and the anomaly is relatively smooth over broad areas; the WCCB appears as a smaller version of the Colorado Plateau. The block is characterized by high initial Sr isotope ratios (<0.706). Several occurrences of Proterozoic rocks are located within or next to the WCCB, and they reveal the character of the Bouguer anomaly. On the east, at Los Filtros, Proterozoic rocks crop out in a basement cored uplift interpreted to having been derived from the WCCB during the Ouachita orogeny. At Sierra La Mojina boulders of 1.1 Ga granites are found in Permian conglomerates. And at Basasiachic, xenoliths of 1.1 Ga granites are present in ash flow tuffs. Establishment of the Precambrian character of the WCCB is of importance, and these multiple occurrences are evidence. Prior studies of the Sierra Madre Occidental suggest that the region was uplifted because of a vast Cenozoic batholith presumed to lie under the SLIP (Silicic Large Igneous Province), the Upper Volcanic Series. The present study challenges that conclusion and maintains the SMO is underlain by Proterozoic silicic crust. The geology of age dated samples supports this. The WCCB is surrounded on three sides by Active Zones or Mobile Belts, which have been active extensional and translational zones periodically over a long period of time. On the east are the Paleozoic Pedrogosa Basin, Mesozoic Chihuahua Trough and Cenozoic Rio Grande Rift, the first two of which also continue around the northern border

  13. Polyhedral Palladium–Silver Alloy Nanocrystals as Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalysts for the Formic Acid Oxidation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Geng-Tao; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Yu; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Polyhedral noble–metal nanocrystals have received much attention and wide applications as electrical and optical devices as well as catalysts. In this work, a straightforward and effective hydrothermal route for the controllable synthesis of the high-quality Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons with uniform size is presented. The morphology, composition and structure of the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are fully characterized by the various physical techniques, demonstrating the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are highly alloying. The formation/growth mechanisms of the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are explored and discussed based on the experimental observations and discussions. As a preliminary electrochemical application, the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are applied in the formic acid oxidation reaction, which shows higher electrocatalytic activity and stability than commercially available Pd black due to the “synergistic effects” between Pd and Ag atoms. PMID:26329555

  14. Polyhedral Palladium-Silver Alloy Nanocrystals as Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalysts for the Formic Acid Oxidation Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Geng-Tao; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Yu; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2015-09-01

    Polyhedral noble-metal nanocrystals have received much attention and wide applications as electrical and optical devices as well as catalysts. In this work, a straightforward and effective hydrothermal route for the controllable synthesis of the high-quality Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons with uniform size is presented. The morphology, composition and structure of the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are fully characterized by the various physical techniques, demonstrating the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are highly alloying. The formation/growth mechanisms of the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are explored and discussed based on the experimental observations and discussions. As a preliminary electrochemical application, the Pd-Ag alloy polyhedrons are applied in the formic acid oxidation reaction, which shows higher electrocatalytic activity and stability than commercially available Pd black due to the “synergistic effects” between Pd and Ag atoms.

  15. Validating the Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus in Shelf-Stable, Ready-to-Eat Snack Sausages with Varying Combinations of pH and Water Activity.

    PubMed

    Tilkens, Blair L; King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2015-06-01

    Shelf-stable, ready-to-eat meat and poultry products represent a large sector of the meat snack category in the meat and poultry industry. Determining the physiochemical conditions that prevent the growth of foodborne pathogens, namely, Staphylococcus aureus postprocessing, is not entirely clear. Until recently, pH and water activity (a(w)) criteria for shelf stability has been supported from the U.S. Department of Agriculture training materials. However, concern about the source and scientific validity of these critical parameters has brought their use into question. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate different combinations of pH and aw that could be used for establishing scientifically supported shelf stability criteria defined as preventing S. aureus growth postprocessing. Snack sausages were manufactured with varying pH (5.6, 5.1, and 4.7) and a(w) (0.96, 0.92, and 0.88) to achieve a total of nine treatments. The treatments were inoculated with a three-strain mixture of S. aureus, with populations measured at days 0, 7, 14, and 28 during 21 °C storage. Results revealed treatments with a pH ≤ 5.1 and a(w) ≤ 0.96 did not support the growth of S. aureus and thus could be considered shelf stable for this pathogen. The results provide validated shelf stability parameters to inhibit growth of S. aureus in meat and poultry products.

  16. Semimetallic MoP2: an active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst over the whole pH range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Zonghua; Saana Amiinu, Ibrahim; Wang, Min; Yang, Yushi; Mu, Shichun

    2016-04-01

    Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm-2, the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices.Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm-2, the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00820h

  17. Progress in Synthesis of Highly Active and Stable Nickel-Based Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Kawi, Sibudjing; Kathiraser, Yasotha; Ni, Jun; Oemar, Usman; Li, Ziwei; Saw, Eng Toon

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, rising anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (mainly CO2 and CH4 ) have increased alarm due to escalating effects of global warming. The dry carbon dioxide reforming of methane (DRM) reaction is a sustainable way to utilize these notorious greenhouse gases. This paper presents a review of recent progress in the development of nickel-based catalysts for the DRM reaction. The enviable low cost and wide availability of nickel compared with noble metals is the main reason for persistent research efforts in optimizing the synthesis of nickel-based catalysts. Important catalyst features for the rational design of a coke-resistant nickel-based nanocatalyst for the DRM reaction are also discussed. In addition, several innovative developments based on salient features for the stabilization of nickel nanocatalysts through various means (which include functionalization with precursors, synthesis by plasma treatment, stabilization/confinement on mesoporous/microporous/carbon supports, and the formation of metal oxides) are highlighted. The final part of this review covers major issues and proposed improvement strategies pertaining to the rational design of nickel-based catalysts with high activity and stability for the DRM reaction.

  18. Progress in Synthesis of Highly Active and Stable Nickel-Based Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Kawi, Sibudjing; Kathiraser, Yasotha; Ni, Jun; Oemar, Usman; Li, Ziwei; Saw, Eng Toon

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, rising anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (mainly CO2 and CH4 ) have increased alarm due to escalating effects of global warming. The dry carbon dioxide reforming of methane (DRM) reaction is a sustainable way to utilize these notorious greenhouse gases. This paper presents a review of recent progress in the development of nickel-based catalysts for the DRM reaction. The enviable low cost and wide availability of nickel compared with noble metals is the main reason for persistent research efforts in optimizing the synthesis of nickel-based catalysts. Important catalyst features for the rational design of a coke-resistant nickel-based nanocatalyst for the DRM reaction are also discussed. In addition, several innovative developments based on salient features for the stabilization of nickel nanocatalysts through various means (which include functionalization with precursors, synthesis by plasma treatment, stabilization/confinement on mesoporous/microporous/carbon supports, and the formation of metal oxides) are highlighted. The final part of this review covers major issues and proposed improvement strategies pertaining to the rational design of nickel-based catalysts with high activity and stability for the DRM reaction. PMID:26440576

  19. Role of pH in the formation of structurally stable and catalytically active supported gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Lupini, Andrew R; Dudney, Nancy J

    2009-01-01

    We report the investigation of titania (Degussa P25) supported gold catalysts prepared by magnetron sputtering. Catalysts grown on natural fumed titania were structurally unstable, resulting in the rapid coarsening of 2.4 nm gold clusters into large {approx}20 nm gold clusters in a few days at room temperature under normal atmospheric conditions. However, treating the titania support powder to a mock deposition-precipitation process, at pH 4, followed by the subsequent deposition of gold onto this treated powder produced a remarkable enhancement in gold particle stability and a 20-fold enhancement of catalytic activity. Furthermore, it was found that treating the titania under basic conditions (pH 10) resulted in a further enhancement of structural stability and a further doubling of the reaction rate to 0.28 mol of CO/mol of Au {center_dot} s. This enhancement cannot be attributed to removing surface Cl{sup -} species from the titania, the formation of oxygen vacancies on the TiO{sub 2} surface, or an electronic effect. Instead, it appears to be associated with the formation of strongly bound hydroxyl species on the TiO{sub 2} surface. The formation of surface hydroxyls during the deposition-precipitation method is coincidental and contributes significantly to the properties of Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts.

  20. Semimetallic MoP2: an active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst over the whole pH range.

    PubMed

    Pu, Zonghua; Saana Amiinu, Ibrahim; Wang, Min; Yang, Yushi; Mu, Shichun

    2016-04-28

    Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices. PMID:27065023

  1. Cross-linked enzyme aggregates of Mung bean epoxide hydrolases: a highly active, stable and recyclable biocatalyst for asymmetric hydrolysis of epoxides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-Yang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Lou, Wen-Yong; Zong, Min-Hua

    2013-06-20

    A highly active and stable cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) of epoxide hydrolases (EHs) from Mung bean, which plays a crucial role in synthesis of valuable enantiopure diols, were successfully prepared and characterized. Under the optimum preparation conditions, the activity recovery of CLEAs recorded 92%. The CLEAs were more efficient than the free enzyme in catalyzing asymmetric hydrolysis of styrene oxide to (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol in organic solvent-containing biphasic system. The biocatalytic reaction performed in n-hexane/buffer biphasic system had a clearly faster initial reaction rate, much higher product yield and product e.e. value than that in aqueous medium. Moreover, the optimal volume ratio of n-hexane to buffer, reaction temperature, buffer pH value and substrate concentration for the enzymatic hydrolysis were found to be 1:1, 40 °C, 7.5 and 30 mM, respectively, under which the initial reaction rate, product yield and product e.e. value were 13.26 mM/h, 46% and 93.5%, respectively. The CLEAs retained more than 50% of their initial activity after 8 batches of re-use in phosphate buffer and maintained 53% of their original activity after 8 reaction cycle in biphasic system. The efficient biocatalytic process with CLEAs proved to be feasible on a 250-mL preparative scale, exhibiting great potential for asymmetric synthesis of chiral diols.

  2. Highly stable sub-5 nm Sn₆O₄(OH)₄ nanocrystals with ultrahigh activity as advanced photocatalytic materials for photodegradation of methyl orange.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Wu, Q L; Liu, P; Liang, Y; Li, H B; Wu, M M; Yang, G W

    2014-04-01

    Among numerous active photocatalytic materials, Sn-based oxide nanomaterials are promising photocatalytic materials in environmental protection measures such as water remediation due to their excellent physicochemical property. Research on photocatalytic nanomaterials for photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) so far has focused on TiO₂-based nanostructures; e.g., TiO₂-P25 is recognized to be the best commercial photocatalyst to date, rather than Sn-based oxide nanomaterials, in spite of their impressive acid- and alkali-resistant properties and high stability. Here, we demonstrate very high photocatalytic activity of highly stable sub-5 nm hydromarchite (Sn₆O₄(OH)₄) nanocrystals synthesized by a simple and environmentally friendly laser-based technique. These Sn₆O₄(OH)₄ nanocrystals exhibit ultrahigh photocatalytic performance for photodegradation of MO and their degradation efficiency is far superior to that of TiO₂-P25. The detailed investigations demonstrated that the great photocatalytic activity results from the ultrafine size and unique surface activity induced by the laser-based technique. Mass production of reactive species of hydroxyl radicals was detected in the experiments due to the appropriate bandgap of Sn₆O₄(OH)₄ nanocrystals. These findings actually open a door to applications of Sn-based oxide nanomaterials as advanced photocatalytic materials.

  3. Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parapat, Riny Y.; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2012-12-01

    We recently introduced a new method to synthesize an active and stable Pt catalyst, namely thermo-destabilization of microemulsions (see R. Y. Parapat, V. Parwoto, M. Schwarze, B. Zhang, D. S. Su and R. Schomäcker, J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22 (23), 11605-11614). We are able to produce Pt nanocrystals with a small size (2.5 nm) of an isotropic structure i.e. truncated octahedral and deposit them well on support materials. Although we have obtained good results, the performance of the catalyst still needed to be improved and optimized. We followed the strategy to retain the small size but change the shape to an anisotropic structure of Pt nanocrystals which produces more active sites by means of a weaker reducing agent. We found that our catalysts are more active than those we reported before and even show the potential to be applied in a challenging reaction such as hydrogenation of levulinic acid.We recently introduced a new method to synthesize an active and stable Pt catalyst, namely thermo-destabilization of microemulsions (see R. Y. Parapat, V. Parwoto, M. Schwarze, B. Zhang, D. S. Su and R. Schomäcker, J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22 (23), 11605-11614). We are able to produce Pt nanocrystals with a small size (2.5 nm) of an isotropic structure i.e. truncated octahedral and deposit them well on support materials. Although we have obtained good results, the performance of the catalyst still needed to be improved and optimized. We followed the strategy to retain the small size but change the shape to an anisotropic structure of Pt nanocrystals which produces more active sites by means of a weaker reducing agent. We found that our catalysts are more active than those we reported before and even show the potential to be applied in a challenging reaction such as hydrogenation of levulinic acid. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32122j

  4. Toys Remain Viral Playground for 24 Hours

    MedlinePlus

    ... a toy's surface at typical indoor temperatures and humidity levels. Specifically, they tested the ability of so- ... East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). At 60 percent relative humidity, 1 percent of the virus remained infectious on ...

  5. Identification of metabolically active bacteria in the gut of the generalist Spodoptera littoralis via DNA stable isotope probing using 13C-glucose.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yongqi; Arias-Cordero, Erika M; Boland, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Guts of most insects are inhabited by complex communities of symbiotic nonpathogenic bacteria. Within such microbial communities it is possible to identify commensal or mutualistic bacteria species. The latter ones, have been observed to serve multiple functions to the insect, i.e. helping in insect reproduction(1), boosting the immune response(2), pheromone production(3), as well as nutrition, including the synthesis of essential amino acids(4,) among others.     Due to the importance of these associations, many efforts have been made to characterize the communities down to the individual members. However, most of these efforts were either based on cultivation methods or relied on the generation of 16S rRNA gene fragments which were sequenced for final identification. Unfortunately, these approaches only identified the bacterial species present in the gut and provided no information on the metabolic activity of the microorganisms. To characterize the metabolically active bacterial species in the gut of an insect, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) in vivo employing (13)C-glucose as a universal substrate. This is a promising culture-free technique that allows the linkage of microbial phylogenies to their particular metabolic activity. This is possible by tracking stable, isotope labeled atoms from substrates into microbial biomarkers, such as DNA and RNA(5). The incorporation of (13)C isotopes into DNA increases the density of the labeled DNA compared to the unlabeled ((12)C) one. In the end, the (13)C-labeled DNA or RNA is separated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation from the (12)C-unlabeled similar one(6). Subsequent molecular analysis of the separated nucleic acid isotopomers provides the connection between metabolic activity and identity of the species. Here, we present the protocol used to characterize the metabolically active bacteria in the gut of a generalist insect (our model system), Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae). The

  6. Identification of Metabolically Active Bacteria in the Gut of the Generalist Spodoptera littoralis via DNA Stable Isotope Probing Using 13C-Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Guts of most insects are inhabited by complex communities of symbiotic nonpathogenic bacteria. Within such microbial communities it is possible to identify commensal or mutualistic bacteria species. The latter ones, have been observed to serve multiple functions to the insect, i.e. helping in insect reproduction1, boosting the immune response2, pheromone production3, as well as nutrition, including the synthesis of essential amino acids4, among others.     Due to the importance of these associations, many efforts have been made to characterize the communities down to the individual members. However, most of these efforts were either based on cultivation methods or relied on the generation of 16S rRNA gene fragments which were sequenced for final identification. Unfortunately, these approaches only identified the bacterial species present in the gut and provided no information on the metabolic activity of the microorganisms. To characterize the metabolically active bacterial species in the gut of an insect, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) in vivo employing 13C-glucose as a universal substrate. This is a promising culture-free technique that allows the linkage of microbial phylogenies to their particular metabolic activity. This is possible by tracking stable, isotope labeled atoms from substrates into microbial biomarkers, such as DNA and RNA5. The incorporation of 13C isotopes into DNA increases the density of the labeled DNA compared to the unlabeled (12C) one. In the end, the 13C-labeled DNA or RNA is separated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation from the 12C-unlabeled similar one6. Subsequent molecular analysis of the separated nucleic acid isotopomers provides the connection between metabolic activity and identity of the species. Here, we present the protocol used to characterize the metabolically active bacteria in the gut of a generalist insect (our model system), Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae). The phylogenetic analysis of the DNA

  7. Development of shelf-stable, ready-to-eat (RTE) shrimps ( Litopenaeus vannamei ) using water activity lowering agent by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongbo; Xue, Changhu; Xue, Yong; Su, Wei; Li, Zhaojie; Cong, Haihua

    2013-12-01

    Three water-activity-lowering agents (composite phosphate, sorbitol and glycerol) were used to develop a kind of shelf-stable, ready-to-eat (RTE) shrimp. Formula of water-activity- lowering agents was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) using a central composite design. Model equation was proposed with regard to the contents of composite phosphate (X1), sorbitol (X 2) and glycerol (X3) : [Formula: see text]. The model with a very low probability value (P < 0.0003) was highly significant and the value of lack-of-fit was 0.4028, indicating that the model could predict water activity of shrimps using different agents. Composite phosphate of 0.22%, sorbitol of 3.12% and glycerol of 2.51% were found to be the optimal condition to obtain the lowest water activity of 0.884. Compared to the control shrimps, RTE shrimps treated with water-activity-lowering agents had a longer shelflife and higher sensorial acceptability. During storage at temperature of 35 °C, the quality of RTE shrimps in term of appearance, flavor and texture was found to be superior to the untreated ones. Texture profile, TBARS value, contents of astaxanthin and free amino acid of treated samples were found to be decreased slower from origin value compared to that of untreated samples. These RTE shrimps were biologically safe and sensorially acceptable after 30 days of storage at temperature of 35 °C. Briefly, the application of water-activity-lowering agents extent the shelflife of RTE shrimps obviously and would be beneficial for the exploitation of white shrimp. PMID:24426026

  8. Measurement of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity in tumour cells using stable isotope dilution HPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guohui; Zhao, Lijiao; Fan, Tengjiao; Ren, Ting; Zhong, Rugang

    2016-10-15

    The repair of DNA mediated by O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) provides protection against DNA damage from endogenous or exogenous alkylation of the O(6) position of guanine. However, this repair acts as a double-edged sword in cancer treatment, as it not only protects normal cells from chemotherapy-associated toxicities, but also results in cancer cell resistance to guanine O(6)-alkylating antitumour agents. Thus, AGT plays an important role in predicting the individual susceptibility to guanine O(6)-alkylating carcinogens and chemotherapies. Accordingly, it is necessary to establish a quantitative method for determining AGT activity with high accuracy, sensitivity and practicality. Here, we describe a novel nonradioactive method for measuring AGT activity using stable isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). This method is based on the irreversibility of the removal of the O(6)-alkyl group from guanine by AGT and on the high affinity of O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG) as an AGT substrate. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS was used to measure the AGT activities in cell protein extracts from eight tumour lines, demonstrating that AGT activity was quite variable among different cell lines, ranging from nondetectable to 1021 fmol/mg protein. The experiments performed in intact tumour cells yielded similar results but exhibited slightly higher activities than those observed in cell protein extracts. The accuracy of this method was confirmed by an examination of AGT expression levels using western blotting analysis. To our knowledge, this method is the first mass spectrometry-based AGT activity assay, and will likely provide assistance in the screening of cancer risk or the application of chemotherapies. PMID:27544051

  9. Measurement of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity in tumour cells using stable isotope dilution HPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guohui; Zhao, Lijiao; Fan, Tengjiao; Ren, Ting; Zhong, Rugang

    2016-10-15

    The repair of DNA mediated by O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) provides protection against DNA damage from endogenous or exogenous alkylation of the O(6) position of guanine. However, this repair acts as a double-edged sword in cancer treatment, as it not only protects normal cells from chemotherapy-associated toxicities, but also results in cancer cell resistance to guanine O(6)-alkylating antitumour agents. Thus, AGT plays an important role in predicting the individual susceptibility to guanine O(6)-alkylating carcinogens and chemotherapies. Accordingly, it is necessary to establish a quantitative method for determining AGT activity with high accuracy, sensitivity and practicality. Here, we describe a novel nonradioactive method for measuring AGT activity using stable isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). This method is based on the irreversibility of the removal of the O(6)-alkyl group from guanine by AGT and on the high affinity of O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG) as an AGT substrate. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS was used to measure the AGT activities in cell protein extracts from eight tumour lines, demonstrating that AGT activity was quite variable among different cell lines, ranging from nondetectable to 1021 fmol/mg protein. The experiments performed in intact tumour cells yielded similar results but exhibited slightly higher activities than those observed in cell protein extracts. The accuracy of this method was confirmed by an examination of AGT expression levels using western blotting analysis. To our knowledge, this method is the first mass spectrometry-based AGT activity assay, and will likely provide assistance in the screening of cancer risk or the application of chemotherapies.

  10. Research potential and limitations of trace analyses of cremated remains.

    PubMed

    Harbeck, Michaela; Schleuder, Ramona; Schneider, Julius; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Grupe, Gisela

    2011-01-30

    Human cremation is a common funeral practice all over the world and will presumably become an even more popular choice for interment in the future. Mainly for purposes of identification, there is presently a growing need to perform trace analyses such as DNA or stable isotope analyses on human remains after cremation in order to clarify pending questions in civil or criminal court cases. The aim of this study was to experimentally test the potential and limitations of DNA and stable isotope analyses when conducted on cremated remains. For this purpose, tibiae from modern cattle were experimentally cremated by incinerating the bones in increments of 100°C until a maximum of 1000°C was reached. In addition, cremated human remains were collected from a modern crematory. The samples were investigated to determine level of DNA preservation and stable isotope values (C and N in collagen, C and O in the structural carbonate, and Sr in apatite). Furthermore, we assessed the integrity of microstructural organization, appearance under UV-light, collagen content, as well as the mineral and crystalline organization. This was conducted in order to provide a general background with which to explain observed changes in the trace analyses data sets. The goal is to develop an efficacious screening method for determining at which degree of burning bone still retains its original biological signals. We found that stable isotope analysis of the tested light elements in bone is only possible up to a heat exposure of 300°C while the isotopic signal from strontium remains unaltered even in bones exposed to very high temperatures. DNA-analyses seem theoretically possible up to a heat exposure of 600°C but can not be advised in every case because of the increased risk of contamination. While the macroscopic colour and UV-fluorescence of cremated bone give hints to temperature exposure of the bone's outer surface, its histological appearance can be used as a reliable indicator for the

  11. Comparison of the effects of combination atorvastatin (40 mg) + ezetimibe (10 mg) versus atorvastatin (40 mg) alone on secretory phospholipase A2 activity in patients with stable coronary artery disease or coronary artery disease equivalent.

    PubMed

    Azar, Mireille; Valentin, Emmanuel; Badaoui, Georges; Kassab, Roland; Sarkis, Antoine; Azar, Rabih R

    2011-06-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) is an enzyme that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and of adverse cardiovascular events. It is currently the target of emerging therapeutic agents. Our study was designed to investigate the effect of aggressive lowering of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol with ezetimibe and atorvastatin on sPLA2 activity. We randomized 100 patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) or CAD equivalent (diabetes, stroke, or peripheral vascular disease) to receive ezetimibe 10 mg/day in association with atorvastatin 40 mg/day (combination therapy group) versus atorvastatin 40 mg/day and placebo (monotherapy group). Patients on statin therapy before inclusion were allowed to enter the study as long as the potency of the statin was lower than atorvastatin 40 mg/day. Lipid profile, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and sPLA activity were measured at baseline and after 8 weeks of therapy. The decrease in LDL cholesterol was more significant in the combination therapy group, but the decrease in hs-CRP was similar. sPLA2 activity significantly decreased in the ezetimibe/atorvastatin group from 29 U/ml (interquartile range 23 to 35) to 26 U/ml (23 to 29, p = 0.001) but remained similar in the placebo/atorvastatin group (23 U/ml, 19 to 32, vs 22 U/ml, 19 to 28, p = NS). In a multivariate stepwise linear regression model, change in sPLA2 correlated with change in hs-CRP (p <0.001), baseline LDL cholesterol level (p = 0.001), body mass index (p = 0.003), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.04) and combination therapy with ezetimibe/atorvastatin (p = 0.05). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that coadministration of ezetimibe and atorvastatin decreases sPLA2 activity.

  12. New Indole Tubulin Assembly Inhibitors Cause Stable Arrest of Mitotic Progression, Enhanced Stimulation of Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxic Activity, and Repression of Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Verrico, Annalisa; Miele, Andrea; Monti, Ludovica; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Ricci, Biancamaria; Soriani, Alessandra; Santoni, Angela; Caraglia, Michele; Porto, Stefania; Pozzo, Eleonora Da; Martini, Claudia; Brancale, Andrea; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Bigogno, Chiara; Dondio, Giulio; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2015-01-01

    We designed 39 new 2-phenylindole derivatives as potential anticancer agents bearing the 3,4,5-trimethox-yphenyl moiety with a sulfur, ketone, or methylene bridging group at position 3 of the indole and with halogen or methoxy substituent(s) at positions 4–7. Compounds 33 and 44 strongly inhibited the growth of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing multi-drug-resistant cell lines NCI/ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5. At 10 nM, 33 and 44 stimulated the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. At 20–50 nM, 33 and 44 arrested >80% of HeLa cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, with stable arrest of mitotic progression. Cell cycle arrest was followed by cell death. Indoles 33, 44, and 81 showed strong inhibition of the SAG-induced Hedgehog signaling activation in NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells with IC50 values of 19, 72, and 38 nM, respectively. Compounds of this class potently inhibited tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth, including stimulation of natural killer cell cytotoxic activity and repression of Hedgehog-dependent cancer. PMID:26132075

  13. Myosin II ATPase activity mediates the long-term potentiation-induced exodus of stable F-actin bound by drebrin A from dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Mizui, Toshiyuki; Sekino, Yuko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Yuta; Takahashi, Hideto; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Kojima, Masami; Shirao, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin) from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1) chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2) Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3) the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement.

  14. Myosin II ATPase Activity Mediates the Long-Term Potentiation-Induced Exodus of Stable F-Actin Bound by Drebrin A from Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Mizui, Toshiyuki; Sekino, Yuko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Yuta; Takahashi, Hideto; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Kojima, Masami; Shirao, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin) from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1) chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2) Ca2+ influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3) the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement. PMID:24465547

  15. Ciguatera: recent advances but the risk remains.

    PubMed

    Lehane, L; Lewis, R J

    2000-11-01

    Ciguatera is an important form of human poisoning caused by the consumption of seafood. The disease is characterised by gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular disturbances. In cases of severe toxicity, paralysis, coma and death may occur. There is no immunity, and the toxins are cumulative. Symptoms may persist for months or years, or recur periodically. The epidemiology of ciguatera is complex and of central importance to the management and future use of marine resources. Ciguatera is an important medical entity in tropical and subtropical Pacific and Indian Ocean regions, and in the tropical Caribbean. As reef fish are increasingly exported to other areas, it has become a world health problem. The disease is under-reported and often misdiagnosed. Lipid-soluble, polyether toxins known as ciguatoxins accumulated in the muscles of certain subtropical and tropical marine finfish cause ciguatera. Ciguatoxins arise from biotransformation in the fish of less polar ciguatoxins (gambiertoxins) produced by Gambierdiscus toxicus, a marine dinoflagellate that lives on macroalgae, usually attached to dead coral. The toxins and their metabolites are concentrated in the food chain when carnivorous fish prey on smaller herbivorous fish. Humans are exposed at the end of the food chain. More than 400 species of fish can be vectors of ciguatoxins, but generally only a relatively small number of species are regularly incriminated in ciguatera. Ciguateric fish look, taste and smell normal, and detection of toxins in fish remains a problem. More than 20 precursor gambiertoxins and ciguatoxins have been identified in G. toxicus and in herbivorous and carnivorous fish. The toxins become more polar as they undergo oxidative metabolism and pass up the food chain. The main Pacific ciguatoxin (P-CTX-1) causes ciguatera at levels=0.1 microg/kg in the flesh of carnivorous fish. The main Caribbean ciguatoxin (C-CTX-1) is less polar and 10-fold less toxic than P-CTX-1. Ciguatoxins

  16. Identification of infant skeletal remains: case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, M; Miyasaka, S; Sato, H; Miyake, B; Seta, S

    1989-12-01

    Three cases of infant skeletal remains were described from the view point of personal identification. The age was exactly estimated from union of ossification centers, dental calcification and eruption. While, the sex estimation was not highly reliable, because sex differences had not clearly appeared in infant skeletons, and it was rather difficult in some cases. In infant skeletal remains, age estimation is especially important to help personal identification. The most recent photograph of a presumed person should be used for personal identification by superimposition technique since the size and proportion of infant skull constantly change as a result of its development.

  17. A dual-targeting PDGFRβ/VEGF-A molecule assembled from stable antibody fragments demonstrates anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, Debra G; Frank, Amanda; Vu, Tuyen; Ardourel, Dan; Ostrander, Craig; Stevens, Brenda; Julien, Susan; Franke, Secil; Meengs, Brent; Brody, Jennifer; Presnell, Scott; Hamacher, Nels B; Lantry, Megan; Wolf, Anitra; Bukowski, Tom; Rosler, Robert; Yen, Cindy; Anderson-Haley, Monica; Brasel, Kenneth; Pan, Qi; Franklin, Hank; Thompson, Penny; Dodds, Mike; Underwood, Sara; Peterson, Scott; Sivakumar, Pallavur V; Snavely, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Targeting angiogenesis is a promising approach to the treatment of solid tumors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Inhibition of vascularization has been validated by the successful marketing of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target specific growth factors or their receptors, but there is considerable room for improvement in existing therapies. Combination of mAbs targeting both the VeGF and pDGF pathways has the potential to increase the efficacy of anti-angiogenic therapy without the accompanying toxicities of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the inability to combine efficiently with traditional chemotherapeutics. However, development costs and regulatory issues have limited the use of combinatorial approaches for the generation of more efficacious treatments. The concept of mediating disease pathology by targeting two antigens with one therapeutic was proposed over two decades ago. While mAbs are particularly suitable candidates for a dual-targeting approach, engineering bispecificity into one molecule can be difficult due to issues with expression and stability, which play a significant role in manufacturability. Here, we address these issues upstream in the process of developing a bispecific antibody (bsAb). Single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) targeting pDGFRβ and VeGF-A were selected for superior stability. the scFvs were fused to both termini of human Fc to generate a bispecific, tetravalent molecule. resulting molecule displays potent activity, binds both targets simultaneously, and is stable in serum. assembly of a bsAb using stable monomeric units allowed development of an anti-pDGFRB/VeGF-A antibody capable of attenuating angiogenesis through two distinct pathways and represents an efficient method for rapid engineering of dual-targeting molecules. PMID:20065654

  18. A step toward the development of high-temperature stable ionic liquid-in-oil microemulsions containing double-chain anionic surface active ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vishal Govind; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Surajit; Mandal, Sarthak; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2013-06-20

    Owing to their fascinating properties and wide range of potential applications, interest in nonaqueous microemulsions has escalated in the past decade. In the recent past, nonaqueous microemulsions containing ionic liquids (ILs) have been utilized in performing chemical reactions, preparation of nanomaterials, synthesis of nanostructured polymers, and drug delivery systems. The most promising fact about IL-in-oil microemulsions is their high thermal stability compared to that of aqueous microemulsions. Recently, surfactant-like properties of surface active ionic liquids (SAILs) have been used for preparation of microemulsions with high-temperature stability and temperature insensitivity. However, previously described methods present a limited possibility of developing IL-in-oil microemulsions with a wide range of thermal stability. With our previous work, we introduced a novel method of creating a huge number of IL-in-oil microemulsions (Rao, V. G.; Ghosh, S.; Ghatak, C.; Mandal, S.; Brahmachari, U.; Sarkar, N. J. Phys. Chem. B2012, 116, 2850-2855), composed of a SAIL as a surfactant, room-temperature ionic liquids as a polar phase, and benzene as a nonpolar phase. The use of benzene as a nonpolar solvent limits the application of the microemulsions to temperatures below 353 K. To overcome this limitation, we have synthesized N,N-dimethylethanolammonium 1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (DAAOT), which was used as a surfactant. DAAOT in combination with isopropyl myristate (IPM, as an oil phase) and ILs (as a polar phase) produces a huge number of high-temperature stable IL-in-oil microemulsions. By far, this is the first report of a huge number of high-temperature stable IL-in-oil microemulsions. In particular, we demonstrate the wide range of thermal stability of [C6mim][TF2N]/DAAOT/IPM microemulsions by performing a phase behavior study, dynamic light scattering measurements, and (1)H NMR measurements and by using coumarin-480 (C-480) as a fluorescent probe

  19. Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

  20. Predicting the remaining service life of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, J.F.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear power plants are providing, currently, about 17 percent of the U.S. electricity and many of these plants are approaching their licensed life of 40 years. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are carrying out a program to develop a methodology for assessing the remaining safe-life of the concrete components and structures in nuclear power plants. This program has the overall objective of identifying potential structural safety issues, as well as acceptance criteria, for use in evaluations of nuclear power plants for continued service. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is contributing to this program by identifying and analyzing methods for predicting the remaining life of in-service concrete materials. This report examines the basis for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials of nuclear power facilities. Methods for predicting the service life of new and in-service concrete materials are analyzed. These methods include (1) estimates based on experience, (2) comparison of performance, (3) accelerated testing, (4) stochastic methods, and (5) mathematical modeling. New approaches for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials are proposed and recommendations for their further development given. Degradation processes are discussed based on considerations of their mechanisms, likelihood of occurrence, manifestations, and detection. They include corrosion, sulfate attack, alkali-aggregate reactions, frost attack, leaching, radiation, salt crystallization, and microbiological attack.

  1. Mill and the right to remain uninformed.

    PubMed

    Strasser, M

    1986-08-01

    In a recent article in the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, David Ost (1984) claims that patients do not have a right to waive their right to information. He argues that patients cannot make informed rational decisions without full information and thus, a right to waive information would involve a right to avoid one's responsibility to act as an autonomous moral agent. In support of his position, Ost cites a passage from Mill. Yet, a correct interpretation of the passage in question would support one's right to remain uninformed in certain situations. If the information would hurt one's chances for survival or hurt one's ability to make calm, rational decisions, then one not only does not have a duty to find out the information, but one's exercising one's right to remain uninformed may be the only rational course of action to take.

  2. Explosives remain preferred methods for platform abandonment

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsipher, A.; Daniel, W. IV; Kiesler, J.E.; Mackey, V. III

    1996-05-06

    Economics and safety concerns indicate that methods involving explosives remain the most practical and cost-effective means for abandoning oil and gas structures in the Gulf of Mexico. A decade has passed since 51 dead sea turtles, many endangered Kemp`s Ridleys, washed ashore on the Texas coast shortly after explosives helped remove several offshore platforms. Although no relationship between the explosions and the dead turtles was ever established, in response to widespread public concern, the US Minerals Management Service (MMS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) implemented regulations limiting the size and timing of explosive charges. Also, more importantly, they required that operators pay for observers to survey waters surrounding platforms scheduled for removal for 48 hr before any detonations. If observers spot sea turtles or marine mammals within the danger zone, the platform abandonment is delayed until the turtles leave or are removed. However, concern about the effects of explosives on marine life remains.

  3. Either Kras activation or Pten loss similarly enhance the dominant-stable CTNNB1-induced genetic program to promote granulosa cell tumor development in the ovary and testis.

    PubMed

    Richards, J S; Fan, H-Y; Liu, Z; Tsoi, M; Laguë, M-N; Boyer, A; Boerboom, D

    2012-03-22

    WNT, RAS or phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathways control specific stages of ovarian follicular development. To analyze the functional interactions of these pathways in granulosa cells during follicular development in vivo, we generated specific mutant mouse models. Stable activation of the WNT signaling effector β-catenin (CTNNB1) in granulosa cells results in the formation of premalignant lesions that develop into granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) spontaneously later in life or following targeted deletion of the tumor suppressor gene Pten. Conversely, expression of oncogenic KRAS(G12D) dramatically arrests proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in granulosa cells, and consequently, small abnormal follicle-like structures devoid of oocytes accumulate in the ovary. Because of the potent anti-proliferative effects of KRAS(G12D) in granulosa cells, we sought to determine whether KRAS(G12D) would block precancerous lesion and tumor formation in follicles of the CTNNB1-mutant mice. Unexpectedly, transgenic Ctnnb1;Kras-mutant mice exhibited increased GC proliferation, decreased apoptosis and impaired differentiation and developed early-onset GCTs leading to premature death in a manner similar to the Ctnnb1;Pten-mutant mice. Microarray and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that gene regulatory processes induced by CTNNB1 were mostly enhanced by either KRAS activation or Pten loss in remarkably similar patterns and degree. The concomitant activation of CTNNB1 and KRAS in Sertoli cells also caused testicular granulosa cell tumors that showed gene expression patterns that partially overlapped those observed in GCTs of the ovary. Although the mutations analyzed herein have not yet been linked to adult GCTs in humans, they may be related to juvenile GCTs or to tumors in other tissues where CTNNB1 is mutated. Importantly, the results provide strong evidence that CTNNB1 is the driver in these contexts and that KRAS(G12D) and Pten loss promote the program set

  4. Diagnosis and quantification of glycerol assimilating denitrifying bacteria in an integrated fixed-film activated sludge reactor via 13C DNA stable-isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huijie; Chandran, Kartik

    2010-12-01

    Glycerol, a byproduct of biodiesel and oleo-chemical manufacturing operations, represents an attractive alternate to methanol as a carbon and electron donor for enhanced denitrification. However, unlike methanol, little is known about the diversity and activity of glycerol assimilating bacteria in activated sludge. In this study, the microbial ecology of glycerol assimilating denitrifying bacteria in a sequencing batch integrated fixed film activated sludge (SB-IFAS) reactor was investigated using (13)C-DNA stable isotope probing (SIP). During steady state SB-IFAS reactor operation, near complete nitrate removal (92.7 ± 5.8%) was achieved. Based on (13)C DNA clone libraries obtained after 360 days of SB-IFAS reactor operation, bacteria related to Comamonas spp. and Diaphorobacter spp. dominated in the suspended phase communities. (13)C assimilating members in the biofilm community were phylogenetically more diverse and were related to Comamonas spp., Bradyrhizobium spp., and Tessaracoccus spp. Possibly owing to greater substrate availability in the suspended phase, the glycerol-assimilating denitrifying populations (quantified by real-time PCR) were more abundant therein than in the biofilm phase. The biomass in the suspended phase also had a higher specific denitrification rate than the biofilm phase (p = 4.33e-4), and contributed to 69.7 ± 4.5% of the overall N-removal on a mass basis. The kinetics of glycerol based denitrification by suspended phase biomass were approximately 3 times higher than with methanol. Previously identified methanol assimilating denitrifying bacteria were not associated with glycerol assimilation, thereby suggesting limited cross-utilization of these two substrates for denitrification in the system tested.

  5. Purification and characterization of a salt-activated and organic solvent-stable heterotrimer proteinase from Virgibacillus sp. SK33 isolated from Thai fish sauce.

    PubMed

    Sinsuwan, Sornchai; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2010-01-13

    A NaCl-activated proteinase produced by Virgibacillus sp. SK33 was purified to homogeneity using phenyl-Sepharose and Sephadex G-75 with a yield of 12% and purification of 2.6-fold. A single protein was detected at approximately 32 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. However, three subunits with molecular weights of 27,858, 33,918, and 35,368 Da were obtained from MALDI-TOF mass spectra, implying that the enzyme was a heterotrimer. The isoelectric point of the proteinase was 5.4. Optimum catalytic activity was at 55 degrees C and pH 7.5. The enzyme showed serine characteristics as it was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. The purified proteinase showed broad specificity toward oxidized insulin B including Gln4, Cys7, Glu13, Ala14, Leu15,17, Tyr16,26, Arg22, Phe24,25, and Lys29. Dominant cleavage sites of the enzyme were Tyr16-Leu17 and Phe25-Tyr26, indicating that it preferably hydrolyzed aromatic amino acids located on the P1 site. Among various substrates studied, the enzyme hydrolyzed anchovy protein to the greatest extent at 4 M NaCl. Activity increased with either CaCl2 or NaCl concentration with the maximum 2-fold increase at either 50 mM CaCl2 or 4 M NaCl. The enzyme was also highly stable up to 500 mM CaCl2 or 4 M NaCl. The proteinase showed high stability in various organic solvents (25%, v/v) including dimethylsulfoxide, methanol, acetonitrile, and ethanol. Results of peptide mass fingerprint and de novo peptide sequencing showed that the purified proteinase is a novel proteinase. The proteinase from Virgibacillus sp. SK33 could have a potential application in high ionic strength environments and aqueous-organic solvent systems. PMID:19938835

  6. Stable phase-shift despite quasi-rhythmic movements: a CPG-driven dynamic model of active tactile exploration in an insect

    PubMed Central

    Harischandra, Nalin; Krause, André F.; Dürr, Volker

    2015-01-01

    An essential component of autonomous and flexible behavior in animals is active exploration of the environment, allowing for perception-guided planning and control of actions. An important sensory system involved is active touch. Here, we introduce a general modeling framework of Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) for movement generation in active tactile exploration behavior. The CPG consists of two network levels: (i) phase-coupled Hopf oscillators for rhythm generation, and (ii) pattern formation networks for capturing the frequency and phase characteristics of individual joint oscillations. The model captured the natural, quasi-rhythmic joint kinematics as observed in coordinated antennal movements of walking stick insects. Moreover, it successfully produced tactile exploration behavior on a three-dimensional skeletal model of the insect antennal system with physically realistic parameters. The effect of proprioceptor ablations could be simulated by changing the amplitude and offset parameters of the joint oscillators, only. As in the animal, the movement of both antennal joints was coupled with a stable phase difference, despite the quasi-rhythmicity of the joint angle time courses. We found that the phase-lead of the distal scape-pedicel (SP) joint relative to the proximal head-scape (HS) joint was essential for producing the natural tactile exploration behavior and, thus, for tactile efficiency. For realistic movement patterns, the phase-lead could vary within a limited range of 10–30° only. Tests with artificial movement patterns strongly suggest that this phase sensitivity is not a matter of the frequency composition of the natural movement pattern. Based on our modeling results, we propose that a constant phase difference is coded into the CPG of the antennal motor system and that proprioceptors are acting locally to regulate the joint movement amplitude. PMID:26347644

  7. Application of RNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP) to Link Community Activity with Microorganisms Responsible for Autotrophy in the Subseafloor at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Fortunato, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The global ocean comprises the Earth's largest biome, with microorganisms playing a dominant biogeochemical role. However, the potential for production of new microbial biomass within the subseafloor is rarely considered in traditional oceanographic paradigms of carbon cycling or microbial food webs. In this study, we used RNA Stable Isotope Probing (RNA SIP) to determine the microbial community composition and genetic repertoire of active subseafloor autotrophs in warm venting fluids from Axial Seamount. RNA is a responsive biomarker because it is a reflection of cellular activity independent of replication, and RNA SIP thus provides access to both the function of a microbial community and the phylogeny of the organisms accountable for key functions. Diffuse fluids were incubated shipboard at 30°C, 55°C, and 80°C with 13DIC and H2. Metatranscriptomic sequencing of both the enriched and non-enriched RNA was carried out from 13C and 12C controls. In addition, filtered fluid samples were preserved in situ for comparative meta -transcriptomic and -genomic analyses. Diverse lineages of bacteria and archaea and accompanying metabolisms were detected in situ, but RNA SIP results show dominance of three different groups of autotrophs active under each experimental condition. At 30°C, members of the Sulfurimonas genus dominated, with genes for hydrogen oxidation, nitrate reduction, and carbon fixation via the rTCA cycle highly expressed. At 55°C, both Caminibacter and Nautilia transcripts were detected for rTCA cycle, hydrogen oxidation, and nitrate reduction. At 80°C, transcripts for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis mediated by members of Methanocaldococcus were detected. These results suggest the subseafloor hosts various anaerobic chemolithoautotrophs that span a wide temperature range, with hydrogen playing a key role in microbial metabolism. Complementary experiments are currently being carried out on the seafloor with a novel in situ incubator unit to provide

  8. Direct Dating of Hominids Remains In Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Falguères, C.

    When archaeological sites are associated with human remains, it is relevant to be able to date those valuable remains for different reasons. The main one is that it avoids the stratigraphical problems which can be due to intrusive burials in the sequence. The other reason consists in the fact that human bones may be encountered out of established stratigraphical context. On the other hand, the majority of dating methods currently used are destructive and can not be applied on these precious samples particularly when they are older than 40,000 years and can not be dated by radiocarbon. Since several years, we have developped a completely non-destructive method which consists in the measurement of human remains using the gamma -ray spectrometry. This technique has been used recently by other laboratories. We present here two important cases for the knowledge of human evolution in Eurasia. The first example is Qafzeh site in Israel where many human skeletons have been unearthed from burials associated with fauna and lithic artefacts. This site has been dated by several independent radiometric methods. So, it was possible to compare our gamma results with the other results yielded by the different methods. The second case concerns the most evolved Homo erectus found in Java, Indonesia, at Ngandong site, close to the Solo river. A recent debate has been focused on the age of these fossils and their direct dating is of outmost importance for the knowledge of settlement of Modern Humans in South-East Asia.

  9. Distribution of albatross remains in the Far East regions during the Holocene, based on zooarchaeological remains.

    PubMed

    Eda, Masaki; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2004-07-01

    Many albatross remains have been found in the Japanese Islands and the surrounding areas, such as Sakhalin and South Korea. These remains are interesting for two reasons: numerous sites from which albatross remains have been found are located in coastal regions of the Far East where no albatrosses have been distributed recently, and there are some sites in which albatross remains represent a large portion of avian remains, although albatrosses are not easily preyed upon by human beings. We collected data on albatross remains from archaeological sites in the Far East regions during the Holocene and arranged the remains geographically, temporally and in terms of quantity. Based on these results, we showed that coastal areas along the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan have rarely been used by albatrosses in Modern times, though formerly there were many albatrosses. We proposed two explanations for the shrinkage of their distributional range: excessive hunting in the breeding areas, and distributional changes of prey for albatrosses. PMID:15277721

  10. The Bacterial Communities of Full-Scale Biologically Active, Granular Activated Carbon Filters Are Stable and Diverse and Potentially Contain Novel Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    LaPara, Timothy M; Hope Wilkinson, Katheryn; Strait, Jacqueline M; Hozalski, Raymond M; Sadowksy, Michael J; Hamilton, Matthew J

    2015-10-01

    The bacterial community composition of the full-scale biologically active, granular activated carbon (BAC) filters operated at the St. Paul Regional Water Services (SPRWS) was investigated using Illumina MiSeq analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. These bacterial communities were consistently diverse (Shannon index, >4.4; richness estimates, >1,500 unique operational taxonomic units [OTUs]) throughout the duration of the 12-month study period. In addition, only modest shifts in the quantities of individual bacterial populations were observed; of the 15 most prominent OTUs, the most highly variable population (a Variovorax sp.) modulated less than 13-fold over time and less than 8-fold from filter to filter. The most prominent population in the profiles was a Nitrospira sp., representing 13 to 21% of the community. Interestingly, very few of the known ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB; <0.07%) and no ammonia-oxidizing Archaea were detected in the profiles. Quantitative PCR of amoA genes, however, suggested that AOB were prominent in the bacterial communities (amoA/16S rRNA gene ratio, 1 to 10%). We conclude, therefore, that the BAC filters at the SPRWS potentially contained significant numbers of unidentified and novel ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms that possess amoA genes similar to those of previously described AOB. PMID:26209671

  11. The Bacterial Communities of Full-Scale Biologically Active, Granular Activated Carbon Filters Are Stable and Diverse and Potentially Contain Novel Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Hope Wilkinson, Katheryn; Strait, Jacqueline M.; Hozalski, Raymond M.; Sadowksy, Michael J.; Hamilton, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community composition of the full-scale biologically active, granular activated carbon (BAC) filters operated at the St. Paul Regional Water Services (SPRWS) was investigated using Illumina MiSeq analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. These bacterial communities were consistently diverse (Shannon index, >4.4; richness estimates, >1,500 unique operational taxonomic units [OTUs]) throughout the duration of the 12-month study period. In addition, only modest shifts in the quantities of individual bacterial populations were observed; of the 15 most prominent OTUs, the most highly variable population (a Variovorax sp.) modulated less than 13-fold over time and less than 8-fold from filter to filter. The most prominent population in the profiles was a Nitrospira sp., representing 13 to 21% of the community. Interestingly, very few of the known ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB; <0.07%) and no ammonia-oxidizing Archaea were detected in the profiles. Quantitative PCR of amoA genes, however, suggested that AOB were prominent in the bacterial communities (amoA/16S rRNA gene ratio, 1 to 10%). We conclude, therefore, that the BAC filters at the SPRWS potentially contained significant numbers of unidentified and novel ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms that possess amoA genes similar to those of previously described AOB. PMID:26209671

  12. The Bacterial Communities of Full-Scale Biologically Active, Granular Activated Carbon Filters Are Stable and Diverse and Potentially Contain Novel Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    LaPara, Timothy M; Hope Wilkinson, Katheryn; Strait, Jacqueline M; Hozalski, Raymond M; Sadowksy, Michael J; Hamilton, Matthew J

    2015-10-01

    The bacterial community composition of the full-scale biologically active, granular activated carbon (BAC) filters operated at the St. Paul Regional Water Services (SPRWS) was investigated using Illumina MiSeq analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. These bacterial communities were consistently diverse (Shannon index, >4.4; richness estimates, >1,500 unique operational taxonomic units [OTUs]) throughout the duration of the 12-month study period. In addition, only modest shifts in the quantities of individual bacterial populations were observed; of the 15 most prominent OTUs, the most highly variable population (a Variovorax sp.) modulated less than 13-fold over time and less than 8-fold from filter to filter. The most prominent population in the profiles was a Nitrospira sp., representing 13 to 21% of the community. Interestingly, very few of the known ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB; <0.07%) and no ammonia-oxidizing Archaea were detected in the profiles. Quantitative PCR of amoA genes, however, suggested that AOB were prominent in the bacterial communities (amoA/16S rRNA gene ratio, 1 to 10%). We conclude, therefore, that the BAC filters at the SPRWS potentially contained significant numbers of unidentified and novel ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms that possess amoA genes similar to those of previously described AOB.

  13. High reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory with a poly(4-vinyl phenol) charge trapping layer based on a pn-heterojunction active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Lanyi; Ying, Jun; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Letian; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate a high reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based nonvolatile memory (NVM) with a polymer poly(4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) as the charge trapping layer. In the unipolar OFETs, the inreversible shifts of the turn-on voltage (Von) and severe degradation of the memory window (ΔVon) at programming (P) and erasing (E) voltages, respectively, block their application in NVMs. The obstacle is overcome by using a pn-heterojunction as the active layer in the OFET memory, which supplied a holes and electrons accumulating channel at the supplied P and E voltages, respectively. Both holes and electrons transferring from the channels to PVP layer and overwriting the trapped charges with an opposite polarity result in the reliable bidirectional shifts of Von at P and E voltages, respectively. The heterojunction OFET exhibits excellent nonvolatile memory characteristics, with a large ΔVon of 8.5 V, desired reading (R) voltage at 0 V, reliable P/R/E/R dynamic endurance over 100 cycles and a long retention time over 10 years.

  14. Stable Suppression of Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity during Anoxia in the Foot Muscle of Littorina littorea and the Potential Role of Acetylation as a Novel Posttranslational Regulatory Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Ali; Dawson, Neal J; Bell, Ryan A V; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-01-01

    The intertidal marine snail, Littorina littorea, has evolved to withstand extended bouts of oxygen deprivation brought about by changing tides or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Survival is dependent on a strong suppression of its metabolic rate and a drastic reorganization of its cellular biochemistry in order to maintain energy balance under fixed fuel reserves. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a crucial enzyme of anaerobic metabolism as it is typically responsible for the regeneration of NAD(+), which allows for the continued functioning of glycolysis in the absence of oxygen. This study compared the kinetic and structural characteristics of the D-lactate specific LDH (E.C. 1.1.1.28) from foot muscle of aerobic control versus 24 h anoxia-exposed L. littorea. Anoxic LDH displayed a near 50% decrease in V max (pyruvate-reducing direction) as compared to control LDH. These kinetic differences suggest that there may be a stable modification and regulation of LDH during anoxia, and indeed, subsequent dot-blot analyses identified anoxic LDH as being significantly less acetylated than the corresponding control enzyme. Therefore, acetylation may be the regulatory mechanism that is responsible for the suppression of LDH activity during anoxia, which could allow for the production of alternative glycolytic end products that in turn would increase the ATP yield under fixed fuel reserves. PMID:24233354

  15. Stable Suppression of Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity during Anoxia in the Foot Muscle of Littorina littorea and the Potential Role of Acetylation as a Novel Posttranslational Regulatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Ali; Dawson, Neal J.; Bell, Ryan A. V.; Storey, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    The intertidal marine snail, Littorina littorea, has evolved to withstand extended bouts of oxygen deprivation brought about by changing tides or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Survival is dependent on a strong suppression of its metabolic rate and a drastic reorganization of its cellular biochemistry in order to maintain energy balance under fixed fuel reserves. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a crucial enzyme of anaerobic metabolism as it is typically responsible for the regeneration of NAD+, which allows for the continued functioning of glycolysis in the absence of oxygen. This study compared the kinetic and structural characteristics of the D-lactate specific LDH (E.C. 1.1.1.28) from foot muscle of aerobic control versus 24 h anoxia-exposed L. littorea. Anoxic LDH displayed a near 50% decrease in Vmax (pyruvate-reducing direction) as compared to control LDH. These kinetic differences suggest that there may be a stable modification and regulation of LDH during anoxia, and indeed, subsequent dot-blot analyses identified anoxic LDH as being significantly less acetylated than the corresponding control enzyme. Therefore, acetylation may be the regulatory mechanism that is responsible for the suppression of LDH activity during anoxia, which could allow for the production of alternative glycolytic end products that in turn would increase the ATP yield under fixed fuel reserves. PMID:24233354

  16. Phytosynthesis of stable Au, Ag and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles using J. Sambac leaves extract, and their enhanced antimicrobial activity in presence of organic antimicrobials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yallappa, S.; Manjanna, J.; Dhananjaya, B. L.

    2015-02-01

    A green chemistry approach for the synthesis of Au, Ag and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles (NPs) using the corresponding metal precursors and Jasminum sambac leaves extract as both reducing and capping media, under microwave irradiation, is reported. During the formation, as expected, the reaction mixture shows marginal decrease in pH and an increase in solution potential. The formation of NPs is evident from their surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak observed at ∼555 nm for Au, ∼435 nm for Ag and ∼510 nm for Au-Ag alloy. The XRD pattern shows fcc structure while the FTIR spectra indicate the presence of plant residues adsorbed on these NPs. Such a bio-capping of NPs is characterized by their weight loss, ∼35% due to thermal degradation of biomass, as observed in TG analysis. The colloidal dispersion of NPs is stable for about 6 weeks. The near spherical shape of NPs (ϕ20-50 nm) is observed by FE-SEM/TEM images and EDAX gives the expected elemental composition. Furthermore, these NPs showed enhanced antimicrobial activity (∼1-4-fold increase in zone of inhibition) in combination with antimicrobials against test strains. Thus, the phytosynthesized NPs could be used as effective growth inhibitors for various microorganisms.

  17. Identification and functional characterization of a stable, centrally active derivative of the neurotensin (8-13) fragment as a potential first-in-class analgesic.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Francis M; Shaner, Brooke E; May, Lisa A; Zotian, Lyndsay; Brower, Justin O; Woods, R Jeremy; Cash, Michael; Morrow, Dustin; Massa, Fabienne; Mazella, Jean; Dix, Thomas A

    2010-06-24

    The neurotensin hexapapetide fragment NT(8-13) is a potent analgesic when administered directly to the central nervous system but does not cross the blood-brain barrier. A total of 43 novel derivatives of NT(8-13) were evaluated, with one, ABS212 (1), being most active in four rat models of pain when administered peripherally. Compound 1 binds to human neurotensin receptors 1 and 2 with IC(50) of 10.6 and 54.2 nM, respectively, and tolerance to the compound in a rat pain model did not develop after 12 days of daily administration. When it was administered peripherally, serum levels and neurotensin receptor binding potency of 1 peaked within 5 min and returned to baseline within 90-120 min; however, analgesic activity remained near maximum for >240 min. This could be due to its metabolism into an active fragment; however, all 4- and 5-mer hydrolysis products were inactive. This pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic dichotomy is discussed. Compound 1 is a candidate for development as a first-in-class analgesic.

  18. Why Do Some Cores Remain Starless?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anathpindika, S.

    2016-08-01

    Prestellar cores, by definition, are gravitationally bound but starless pockets of dense gas. Physical conditions that could render a core starless (in the local Universe) is the subject of investigation in this work. To this end, we studied the evolution of four starless cores, B68, L694-2, L1517B, L1689, and L1521F, a VeLLO. We demonstrate: (i) cores contracted in quasistatic manner over a timescale on the order of ~ 105 yr. Those that remained starless briefly acquired a centrally concentrated density configuration that mimicked the profile of a unstable BonnorEbert sphere before rebounding, (ii) three cores viz. L694-2, L1689-SMM16, and L1521F remained starless despite becoming thermally super-critical. By contrast, B68 and L1517B remained sub-critical; L1521F collapsed to become a VeLLO only when gas-cooling was enhanced by increasing the size of dust-grains. This result is robust, for other starless cores viz. B68, L694-2, L1517B, and L1689 could also be similarly induced to collapse. The temperature-profile of starless cores and those that collapsed was found to be radically different. While in the former type, only very close to the centre of a core was there any evidence of decline in gas temperature, by contrast, a core of the latter type developed a more uniformly cold interior. Our principle conclusions are: (a) thermal super-criticality of a core is insufficient to ensure it will become protostellar, (b) potential star-forming cores (the VeLLO L1521F here), could be experiencing dust-coagulation that must enhance gasdust coupling and in turn lower gas temperature, thereby assisting collapse. This also suggests, mere gravitational/virial boundedness of a core is insufficient to ensure it will form stars.

  19. An amorphous CoSe film behaves as an active and stable full water-splitting electrocatalyst under strongly alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Liu, Qian; Asiri, Abdullah M; Luo, Yonglan; Sun, Xuping

    2015-12-01

    It is attractive but still remains a big challenge to develop non-noble metal bifunctional electrocatalysts efficient for both oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) under alkaline conditions. Herein, an amorphous CoSe film electrodeposited on a Ti mesh (a-CoSe/Ti) is demonstrated to exhibit high electrocatalytic activity and stability for both reactions in 1.0 M KOH. It needs overpotentials of 292 and 121 mV to drive 10 mA cm(-2) for OER and HER, respectively. The two-electrode alkaline water electrolyzer affords a water-splitting current of 10 mA cm(-2) at a cell voltage of 1.65 V. This work offers an attractive cost-effective catalytic material toward full water splitting applications.

  20. So close: remaining challenges to eradicating polio.

    PubMed

    Toole, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative, launched in 1988, is close to achieving its goal. In 2015, reported cases of wild poliovirus were limited to just two countries - Afghanistan and Pakistan. Africa has been polio-free for more than 18 months. Remaining barriers to global eradication include insecurity in areas such as Northwest Pakistan and Eastern and Southern Afghanistan, where polio cases continue to be reported. Hostility to vaccination is either based on extreme ideologies, such as in Pakistan, vaccination fatigue by parents whose children have received more than 15 doses, and misunderstandings about the vaccine's safety and effectiveness such as in Ukraine. A further challenge is continued circulation of vaccine-derived poliovirus in populations with low immunity, with 28 cases reported in 2015 in countries as diverse as Madagascar, Ukraine, Laos, and Myanmar. This paper summarizes the current epidemiology of wild and vaccine-derived poliovirus, and describes the remaining challenges to eradication and innovative approaches being taken to overcome them.

  1. Decomposition Technique for Remaining Useful Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar (Inventor); Goebel, Kai F. (Inventor); Saxena, Abhinav (Inventor); Celaya, Jose R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic tool disclosed here decomposes the problem of estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of a component or sub-system into two separate regression problems: the feature-to-damage mapping and the operational conditions-to-damage-rate mapping. These maps are initially generated in off-line mode. One or more regression algorithms are used to generate each of these maps from measurements (and features derived from these), operational conditions, and ground truth information. This decomposition technique allows for the explicit quantification and management of different sources of uncertainty present in the process. Next, the maps are used in an on-line mode where run-time data (sensor measurements and operational conditions) are used in conjunction with the maps generated in off-line mode to estimate both current damage state as well as future damage accumulation. Remaining life is computed by subtracting the instance when the extrapolated damage reaches the failure threshold from the instance when the prediction is made.

  2. Spatially and size selective synthesis of Fe-based nanoparticles on ordered mesoporous supports as highly active and stable catalysts for ammonia decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, An-Hui; Nitz, Joerg-Joachim; Comotti, Massimiliano; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Schlichte, Klaus; Lehmann, Christian W; Terasaki, Osamu; Schüth, Ferdi

    2010-10-13

    Uniform and highly dispersed γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles with a diameter of ∼6 nm supported on CMK-5 carbons and C/SBA-15 composites were prepared via simple impregnation and thermal treatment. The nanostructures of these materials were characterized by XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, XPS, SEM, TEM, and nitrogen sorption. Due to the confinement effect of the mesoporous ordered matrices, γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles were fully immobilized within the channels of the supports. Even at high Fe-loadings (up to about 12 wt %) on CMK-5 carbon no iron species were detected on the external surface of the carbon support by XPS analysis and electron microscopy. Fe(2)O(3)/CMK-5 showed the highest ammonia decomposition activity of all previously described Fe-based catalysts in this reaction. Complete ammonia decomposition was achieved at 700 °C and space velocities as high as 60,000 cm(3) g(cat)(-1) h(-1). At a space velocity of 7500 cm(3) g(cat)(-1) h(-1), complete ammonia conversion was maintained at 600 °C for 20 h. After the reaction, the immobilized γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles were found to be converted to much smaller nanoparticles (γ-Fe(2)O(3) and a small fraction of nitride), which were still embedded within the carbon matrix. The Fe(2)O(3)/CMK-5 catalyst is much more active than the benchmark NiO/Al(2)O(3) catalyst at high space velocity, due to its highly developed mesoporosity. γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles supported on carbon-silica composites are structurally much more stable over extended periods of time but less active than those supported on carbon. TEM observation reveals that iron-based nanoparticles penetrate through the carbon layer and then are anchored on the silica walls, thus preventing them from moving and sintering. In this way, the stability of the carbon-silica catalyst is improved. Comparison with the silica supported iron oxide catalyst reveals that the presence of a thin layer of carbon is essential for increased catalytic activity. PMID:20849104

  3. Interior of control house showing remains of controller. Moving the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of control house showing remains of controller. Moving the handle rotated the vertical shaft and porcelain cams to engage various electrical switches and activate the lift mechanism. All electrical components have been removed. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  4. Some remaining problems in HCDA analysis. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.W.

    1981-01-01

    The safety assessment and licensing of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) requires an analysis on the capability of the reactor primary system to sustain the consequences of a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). Although computational methods and computer programs developed for HCDA analyses can predict reasonably well the response of the primary containment system, and follow up the phenomena of HCDA from the start of excursion to the time of dynamic equilibrium in the system, there remain areas in the HCDA analysis that merit further analytical and experimental studies. These are the analysis of fluid impact on reactor cover, three-dimensional analysis, the treatment of the perforated plates, material properties under high strain rates and under high temperatures, the treatment of multifield flows, and the treatment of prestressed concrete reactor vessels. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the structural mechanics of HCDA analysis in these areas where improvements are needed.

  5. Environmental threats to buried archaeological remains.

    PubMed

    Nord, Anders G; Tronner, Kate; Mattsson, Einar; Borg, Gunnar Ch; Ullén, Inga

    2005-05-01

    The last century's environmental pollution has created health problems, acidification of ground and lakes, and serious damage to our cultural heritage. Outdoor monuments suffer from this pollution, but so do buried archaeological remains. However, research on the deterioration of archaeological artifacts underground has so far been limited, and it is important to draw attention to this neglected field. This article presents results obtained at the Swedish National Heritage Board on the degradation of archaeological objects of bronze and iron and of bones from prehistoric graves, materials of which seem to be most affected by pollutants. The investigation methods, which were employed, are described. Other relevant studies are briefly reviewed. It is obvious that the deterioration rate of archaeological artifacts, especially of inorganic materials, has accelerated in recent years, and that this increased deterioration to a large part can be attributed to anthropogenic pollution. Regions that might be endangered are exemplified.

  6. Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina) Updated:Aug 24,2016 You may have heard the term “angina pectoris” or “stable angina” in your doctor’s office, but ...

  7. Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts for Methane Steam Reforming: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Kovarik, Libor; Wan, Haiying; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gerber, Mark A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2014-07-01

    In this work we present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of stable MgAl2O4 spinel-supported Rh and Ir catalysts for the steam methane reforming (SMR) reaction. Firstly, catalytic performance for a series of noble metal catalysts supported on MgAl2O4 spinel was evaluated for SMR at 600-850°C. Turnover rate at 850°C follows the order: Pd > Pt > Ir > Rh > Ru > Ni. However, Rh and Ir were found to have the best combination of activity and stability for methane steam reforming in the presence of simulated biomass-derived syngas. It was found that highly dispersed ~2 nm Rh and ~1 nm Ir clusters were formed on the MgAl2O4 spinel support. Scanning Transition Electron Microscopy (STEM) images show that excellent dispersion was maintained even under challenging high temperature conditions (e.g. at 850°C in the presence of steam) while Ir and Rh catalysts supported on Al2O3 were observed to sinter at increased rates under the same conditions. These observations were further confirmed by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations which find that ~1 nm Rh and Ir particles (50-atom cluster) bind strongly to the MgAl2O4 surfaces via a redox process leading to a strong metal-support interaction, thus helping anchor the metal clusters and reduce the tendency to sinter. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that these supported smaller Rh and Ir particles have a lower work function than larger more bulk-like ones, which enables them to activate both water and methane more effectively than larger particles, yet have a minimal influence on the relative stability of coke precursors. In addition, theoretical mechanistic studies were used to probe the relationship between structure and reactivity. Consistent with the experimental observations, our theoretical modeling results also suggest that the small spinel-supported Ir particle catalyst is more active than the counterpart of Rh catalyst for SMR. This work was financially supported by the

  8. Preparation of Ni@C-Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)S nanocomposites with highly efficient and stable photocatalytic hydrogen production activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyan; Zhuang, Chuansheng; Li, Kan; Peng, Tianyou

    2015-04-28

    A series of carbon-coated Ni (Ni@C)-Cd0.8Zn0.2S nanocomposites were fabricated via a facile hydrothermal process using pre-prepared Ni@C as a starting material. The obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis diffuse reflectance absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron microscopy. It was found that the introduction of Ni@C nanoparticles can improve both the visible light-induced photocatalytic H2 production activity and stability of the Cd0.8Zn0.2S solid solution, and the Ni nanoparticles encapsulated by several graphite-like carbon layers show high chemical and thermal stability. Among those products with various Ni@C contents, the 5 wt% Ni@C-Cd0.8Zn0.2S nanocomposite exhibits the maximum photoactivity (969.5 μmol h(-1)) for H2 production, which is ∼3.10 times higher than that (312.6 μmol h(-1)) of pristine Cd0.8Zn0.2S. This significant enhancement in the photoactivity by loading Ni@C nanoparticles can be attributed to the metallic Ni in the Ni@C acting as a co-catalyst, while the graphite-like carbon shells acting as the Cd0.8Zn0.2S nanoparticles' support and electron acceptor, which causes an effective photogenerated carrier separation in space and an improvement in the photoactivity and stability for H2 production. The present findings demonstrate a cost reduction strategy by using a non-noble metal co-catalyst for efficient and stable light-to-hydrogen energy conversion. PMID:25824696

  9. Inhaler devices: what remains to be done?

    PubMed

    Smith, Ian J; Bell, John; Bowman, Nic; Everard, Mark; Stein, Stephen; Weers, Jeffry G

    2010-12-01

    The 1000 Years of Pharmaceutical Aerosols Conference convened posing the question; "what remains to be done?" When applying this question to the topic of inhaler devices, two hugely different perspectives could be taken. On the one hand, it could be argued that because there is an array of delivery systems available and the industry, prescribing physicians and patients alike have considerable choice, why would we believe it necessary to do anything further? On the other hand, as an industry, we are constantly reminded by our "customers" that the inhaler devices available are less than adequate, and in some cases woefully inadequate, that they are not "patient" friendly, not intuitive to use and importantly do nothing to encourage the patient to take the medication as intended and as prescribed. So, taking the second point of view as more reflective of reality--the Voice of the Customer--our starting point must be that there is still much to do in the field of inhaler devices. The purpose of this article is to outline some key basic requirements for inhaler design and perhaps to question some of the entrenched thinking that has pervaded inhaler product design for too many years.

  10. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  11. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  12. Stable Translocation Intermediates Jam Global Protein Export in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites and Link the PTEX Component EXP2 with Translocation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mesén-Ramírez, Paolo; Reinsch, Ferdinand; Blancke Soares, Alexandra; Bergmann, Bärbel; Ullrich, Ann-Katrin; Tenzer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Protein export is central for the survival and virulence of intracellular P. falciparum blood stage parasites. To reach the host cell, exported proteins cross the parasite plasma membrane (PPM) and the parasite-enclosing parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), a process that requires unfolding, suggestive of protein translocation. Components of a proposed translocon at the PVM termed PTEX are essential in this phase of export but translocation activity has not been shown for the complex and questions have been raised about its proposed membrane pore component EXP2 for which no functional data is available in P. falciparum. It is also unclear how PTEX mediates trafficking of both, soluble as well as transmembrane proteins. Taking advantage of conditionally foldable domains, we here dissected the translocation events in the parasite periphery, showing that two successive translocation steps are needed for the export of transmembrane proteins, one at the PPM and one at the PVM. Our data provide evidence that, depending on the length of the C-terminus of the exported substrate, these steps occur by transient interaction of the PPM and PVM translocon, similar to the situation for protein transport across the mitochondrial membranes. Remarkably, we obtained constructs of exported proteins that remained arrested in the process of being translocated across the PVM. This clogged the translocation pore, prevented the export of all types of exported proteins and, as a result, inhibited parasite growth. The substrates stuck in translocation were found in a complex with the proposed PTEX membrane pore component EXP2, suggesting a role of this protein in translocation. These data for the first time provide evidence for EXP2 to be part of a translocating entity, suggesting that PTEX has translocation activity and provide a mechanistic framework for the transport of soluble as well as transmembrane proteins from the parasite boundary into the host cell. PMID:27168322

  13. Emergence of a Stable Cortical Map for Neuroprosthetic Control

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Karunesh; Carmena, Jose M.

    2009-01-01

    Cortical control of neuroprosthetic devices is known to require neuronal adaptations. It remains unclear whether a stable cortical representation for prosthetic function can be stored and recalled in a manner that mimics our natural recall of motor skills. Especially in light of the mixed evidence for a stationary neuron-behavior relationship in cortical motor areas, understanding this relationship during long-term neuroprosthetic control can elucidate principles of neural plasticity as well as improve prosthetic function. Here, we paired stable recordings from ensembles of primary motor cortex neurons in macaque monkeys with a constant decoder that transforms neural activity to prosthetic movements. Proficient control was closely linked to the emergence of a surprisingly stable pattern of ensemble activity, indicating that the motor cortex can consolidate a neural representation for prosthetic control in the presence of a constant decoder. The importance of such a cortical map was evident in that small perturbations to either the size of the neural ensemble or to the decoder could reversibly disrupt function. Moreover, once a cortical map became consolidated, a second map could be learned and stored. Thus, long-term use of a neuroprosthetic device is associated with the formation of a cortical map for prosthetic function that is stable across time, readily recalled, resistant to interference, and resembles a putative memory engram. PMID:19621062

  14. Pressure activated stability-bypass-control valves to increase the stable airflow range of a Mach 2.5 inlet with 40 percent internal contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, G. A.; Sanders, B. W.

    1974-01-01

    The throat of a Mach 2.5 inlet with a coldpipe termination was fitted with a stability-bypass system. The inlet stable airflow range provided by various stability-bypass entrance configurations in alternate combination with several stability-bypass exit controls was determined for both steady-state conditions and internal transient pulses. Transient results were also obtained for the inlet with a choke point at the diffuser exit. Instart angles of attack were determined for the various stability-bypass entrance configurations. The response of the inlet-coldpipe system to internal and external oscillating disturbances was determined. Poppet valves at the stability-bypass exit provided an inlet stable airflow range of 28 percent or greater at all static and transient conditions.

  15. Leprosy: ancient disease remains a public health problem nowadays*

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Leandro Fonseca; Chiacchio, Nilton Di; Noriega, Angélica Fonseca; Pereira, Gilmayara Alves Abreu Maciel; Vieira, Marina Lino

    2016-01-01

    Despite being an ancient disease, leprosy remains a public health problem in several countries - particularly in India, Brazil and Indonesia. The current operational guidelines emphasize the evaluation of disability from the time of diagnosis and stipulate as fundamental principles for disease control: early detection and proper treatment. Continued efforts are needed to establish and improve quality leprosy services. A qualified primary care network that is integrated into specialized service and the development of educational activities are part of the arsenal in the fight against the disease, considered neglected and stigmatizing. PMID:27579761

  16. Leprosy: ancient disease remains a public health problem nowadays.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Leandro Fonseca; Chiacchio, Nilton Di; Noriega, Angélica Fonseca; Pereira, Gilmayara Alves Abreu Maciel; Vieira, Marina Lino

    2016-01-01

    Despite being an ancient disease, leprosy remains a public health problem in several countries -particularly in India, Brazil and Indonesia. The current operational guidelines emphasize the evaluation of disability from the time of diagnosis and stipulate as fundamental principles for disease control: early detection and proper treatment. Continued efforts are needed to establish and improve quality leprosy services. A qualified primary care network that is integrated into specialized service and the development of educational activities are part of the arsenal in the fight against the disease, considered neglected and stigmatizing. PMID:27579761

  17. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  18. Development of a Safety Management Web Tool for Horse Stables

    PubMed Central

    Leppälä, Jarkko; Kolstrup, Christina Lunner; Pinzke, Stefan; Rautiainen, Risto; Saastamoinen, Markku; Särkijärvi, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary A new web tool for equine activities, InnoHorse, was developed to support horse stable managers in business, safety, pasture and manure management. The aim of the safety section of the web tool was to raise awareness of safety issues in daily horse stable activities. This section contains a safety checklist, stable safety map and good practices to support human health and horse welfare and to prevent injuries in horse-related activities. Reviews of the literature and statistics, empirical horse stable case studies, expert panel workshops and stakeholder interviews were utilized in designing the web tool. Abstract Managing a horse stable involves risks, which can have serious consequences for the stable, employees, clients, visitors and horses. Existing industrial or farm production risk management tools are not directly applicable to horse stables and they need to be adapted for use by managers of different types of stables. As a part of the InnoEquine project, an innovative web tool, InnoHorse, was developed to support horse stable managers in business, safety, pasture and manure management. A literature review, empirical horse stable case studies, expert panel workshops and stakeholder interviews were carried out to support the design. The InnoHorse web tool includes a safety section containing a horse stable safety map, stable safety checklists, and examples of good practices in stable safety, horse handling and rescue planning. This new horse stable safety management tool can also help in organizing work processes in horse stables in general. PMID:26569319

  19. Taphonomy of the Tianyuandong human skeleton and faunal remains.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Jalvo, Yolanda; Andrews, Peter; Tong, HaoWen

    2015-06-01

    Tianyuan Cave is an Upper Palaeolithic site, 6 km from the core area of the Zhoukoudian Site Complex. Tianyuandong (or Tianyuan Cave) yielded one ancient (though not the earliest) fossil skeleton of Homo sapiens in China (42-39 ka cal BP). Together with the human skeleton, abundant animal remains were found, but no stone tools were recovered. The animal fossil remains are extremely fragmentary, in contrast to human skeletal elements that are, for the most part, complete. We undertook a taphonomic study to investigate the circumstances of preservation of the human skeleton in Tianyuan Cave, and in course of this we considered four hypotheses: funerary ritual, cannibalism, carnivore activity or natural death. Taphonomic results characterize the role of human action in the site and how these agents acted in the past. Because of disturbance of the human skeleton during its initial excavation, it is not known if it was in a grave cut or if there was any funerary ritual. No evidence was found for cannibalism or carnivore activity in relation to the human skeleton, suggesting natural death as the most reasonable possibility. PMID:25929706

  20. Taphonomy of the Tianyuandong human skeleton and faunal remains.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Jalvo, Yolanda; Andrews, Peter; Tong, HaoWen

    2015-06-01

    Tianyuan Cave is an Upper Palaeolithic site, 6 km from the core area of the Zhoukoudian Site Complex. Tianyuandong (or Tianyuan Cave) yielded one ancient (though not the earliest) fossil skeleton of Homo sapiens in China (42-39 ka cal BP). Together with the human skeleton, abundant animal remains were found, but no stone tools were recovered. The animal fossil remains are extremely fragmentary, in contrast to human skeletal elements that are, for the most part, complete. We undertook a taphonomic study to investigate the circumstances of preservation of the human skeleton in Tianyuan Cave, and in course of this we considered four hypotheses: funerary ritual, cannibalism, carnivore activity or natural death. Taphonomic results characterize the role of human action in the site and how these agents acted in the past. Because of disturbance of the human skeleton during its initial excavation, it is not known if it was in a grave cut or if there was any funerary ritual. No evidence was found for cannibalism or carnivore activity in relation to the human skeleton, suggesting natural death as the most reasonable possibility.

  1. Evolutionary origin of asymptotically stable consensus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chang-Bing; Wu, Bin; Wang, Jian-Bo; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Consensus is widely observed in nature as well as in society. Up to now, many works have focused on what kind of (and how) isolated single structures lead to consensus, while the dynamics of consensus in interdependent populations remains unclear, although interactive structures are everywhere. For such consensus in interdependent populations, we refer that the fraction of population adopting a specified strategy is the same across different interactive structures. A two-strategy game as a conflict is adopted to explore how natural selection affects the consensus in such interdependent populations. It is shown that when selection is absent, all the consensus states are stable, but none are evolutionarily stable. In other words, the final consensus state can go back and forth from one to another. When selection is present, there is only a small number of stable consensus state which are evolutionarily stable. Our study highlights the importance of evolution on stabilizing consensus in interdependent populations. PMID:24699444

  2. Novel Molecular Insights into Classical and Alternative Activation States of Microglia as Revealed by Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC)-based Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Temin, Harris; Culver-Cochran, Ashley E.; Chaput, Dale; Carlson, Christina M.; Kuehl, Melanie; Burkhardt, Brant R.; Bickford, Paula C.; Liu, Bin; Stevens, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, have been shown to display a complex spectrum of roles that span from neurotrophic to neurotoxic depending on their activation status. Microglia can be classified into four stages of activation, M1, which most closely matches the classical (pro-inflammatory) activation stage, and the alternative activation stages M2a, M2b, and M2c. The alternative activation stages have not yet been comprehensively analyzed through unbiased, global-scale protein expression profiling. In this study, BV2 mouse immortalized microglial cells were stimulated with agonists specific for each of the four stages and total protein expression for 4644 protein groups was quantified using SILAC-based proteomic analysis. After validating induction of the various stages through a targeted cytokine assay and Western blotting of activation states, the data revealed novel insights into the similarities and differences between the various states. The data identify several protein groups whose expression in the anti-inflammatory, pro-healing activation states are altered presumably to curtail inflammatory activation through differential protein expression, in the M2a state including CD74, LYN, SQST1, TLR2, and CD14. The differential expression of these proteins promotes healing, limits phagocytosis, and limits activation of reactive nitrogen species through toll-like receptor cascades. The M2c state appears to center around the down-regulation of a key member in the formation of actin-rich phagosomes, SLP-76. In addition, the proteomic data identified a novel activation marker, DAB2, which is involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is significantly different between M2a and either M1 or M2b states. Western blot analysis of mouse primary microglia stimulated with the various agonists of the classical and alternative activation states revealed a similar trend of DAB2 expression compared with BV2 cells. PMID:26424600

  3. Novel Molecular Insights into Classical and Alternative Activation States of Microglia as Revealed by Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC)-based Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bell-Temin, Harris; Culver-Cochran, Ashley E; Chaput, Dale; Carlson, Christina M; Kuehl, Melanie; Burkhardt, Brant R; Bickford, Paula C; Liu, Bin; Stevens, Stanley M

    2015-12-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, have been shown to display a complex spectrum of roles that span from neurotrophic to neurotoxic depending on their activation status. Microglia can be classified into four stages of activation, M1, which most closely matches the classical (pro-inflammatory) activation stage, and the alternative activation stages M2a, M2b, and M2c. The alternative activation stages have not yet been comprehensively analyzed through unbiased, global-scale protein expression profiling. In this study, BV2 mouse immortalized microglial cells were stimulated with agonists specific for each of the four stages and total protein expression for 4644 protein groups was quantified using SILAC-based proteomic analysis. After validating induction of the various stages through a targeted cytokine assay and Western blotting of activation states, the data revealed novel insights into the similarities and differences between the various states. The data identify several protein groups whose expression in the anti-inflammatory, pro-healing activation states are altered presumably to curtail inflammatory activation through differential protein expression, in the M2a state including CD74, LYN, SQST1, TLR2, and CD14. The differential expression of these proteins promotes healing, limits phagocytosis, and limits activation of reactive nitrogen species through toll-like receptor cascades. The M2c state appears to center around the down-regulation of a key member in the formation of actin-rich phagosomes, SLP-76. In addition, the proteomic data identified a novel activation marker, DAB2, which is involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is significantly different between M2a and either M1 or M2b states. Western blot analysis of mouse primary microglia stimulated with the various agonists of the classical and alternative activation states revealed a similar trend of DAB2 expression compared with BV2 cells.

  4. Zooxanthellae Harvested by Ciliates Associated with Brown Band Syndrome of Corals Remain Photosynthetically Competent▿

    PubMed Central

    Ulstrup, Karin E.; Kühl, Michael; Bourne, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Brown band syndrome is a new coral affliction characterized by a local accumulation of yet-unidentified ciliates migrating as a band along the branches of coral colonies. In the current study, morphologically intact zooxanthellae (= Symbiodinium) were observed in great numbers inside the ciliates (>50 dinoflagellates per ciliate). Microscale oxygen measurements and variable chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis along with microscopic observations demonstrated that zooxanthellae within the ciliates are photosynthetically competent and do not become compromised during the progression of the brown band zone. Zooxanthellae showed similar trends in light acclimation in a comparison of rapid light curve and steady-state light curve measures of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence. Extended light exposure of steady-state light curves resulted in higher quantum yields of photosystem II. The brown band tissue exhibited higher photosynthetically active radiation absorptivity, indicating more efficient light absorption due to a higher density of zooxanthellae in the ciliate-dominated zone. This caused relatively higher gross photosynthesis rates in the zone with zooxanthella-containing ciliates compared to healthy coral tissue. The observation of photosynthetically active intracellular zooxanthellae in the ciliates suggests that the latter can benefit from photosynthates produced by ingested zooxanthellae and from photosynthetic oxygen production that alleviates diffusion limitation of oxic respiration in the densely populated brown band tissue. It remains to be shown whether the zooxanthellae form a stable symbiotic association with the ciliate or are engulfed incidentally during grazing on coral tissue and then maintained as active inside the ciliate for a period before being digested and replaced by new zooxanthellae. PMID:17259357

  5. Oyster viperin retains direct antiviral activity and its transcription occurs via a signalling pathway involving a heat-stable haemolymph protein.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Speck, Peter; Geng, Lu; Raftos, David; Beard, Michael R; Helbig, Karla J

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the response of non-model invertebrates, such as oysters, to virus infection. The vertebrate innate immune system detects virus-derived nucleic acids to trigger the type I IFN pathway, leading to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) that exert antiviral functions. Invertebrates were thought to lack the IFN pathway based on the absence of IFN or ISGs encoded in model invertebrate genomes. However, the oyster genome encodes many ISGs, including the well-described antiviral protein viperin. In this study, we characterized oyster viperin and showed that it localizes to caveolin-1 and inhibits dengue virus replication in a heterologous model. In a second set of experiments, we have provided evidence that the haemolymph from poly(I : C)-injected oysters contains a heat-stable, protease-susceptible factor that induces haemocyte transcription of viperin mRNA in conjunction with upregulation of IFN regulatory factor. Collectively, these results support the concept that oysters have antiviral systems that are homologous to the vertebrate IFN pathway.

  6. Establishment of stable dominance interactions in prairie vole peers: relationships with alcohol drinking and activation of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Anacker, Allison M J; Smith, Monique L; Ryabinin, Andrey E

    2014-01-01

    Dominance hierarchies are an important aspect of group-living as they determine individual access to resources. The existence of dominance ranks in access to space has not been described in socially monogamous, communally nesting prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster). Here, we tested whether dominance could be assessed using the tube test. We also tested whether dominance related to alcohol intake, similar to what has been demonstrated in nonmonogamous species. Same-sex pairs of unfamiliar peers were tested in a series of three trials of the tube test, then paired and allowed individual access to alcohol and water for 4 days, and then tested again in the tube test. For all pairs, the same subjects won the majority of trials before and after alcohol drinking. The number of wins negatively correlated with alcohol intake on the first day of drinking and positively correlated with levels of Fos in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus following the tube test in a separate group of voles. Dominance was not related to Fos levels in other brain regions examined. Together, these results indicate that prairie voles quickly establish stable dominance ranks through a process possibly involving the hypothalamus and suggest that dominance is linked to alcohol drinking.

  7. Water-soluble and photo-stable silver(I) dicarboxylate complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline ligands: Antimicrobial and anticancer chemotherapeutic potential, DNA interactions and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Laura; Dixit, Vidya; Assad, Letícia O N; Ribeiro, Thales P; Queiroz, Daniela D; Kellett, Andrew; Casey, Alan; Colleran, John; Pereira, Marcos D; Rochford, Garret; McCann, Malachy; O'Shea, Denis; Dempsey, Rita; McClean, Siobhán; Kia, Agnieszka Foltyn-Arfa; Walsh, Maureen; Creaven, Bernadette; Howe, Orla; Devereux, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The complexes [Ag2(OOC-(CH2)n-COO)] (n=1-10) (1-10) were synthesised and reacted with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) to yield derivatives formulating as [Ag2(phen)x(OOC-(CH2)y-COO)]·zH2O (x=2 or 3; y=1-10; z=1-4) (11-20) which are highly water-soluble and photo-stable in aqueous solution. The phen derivatives 11-20 exhibit chemotherapeutic potential against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and against cisplatin-sensitive breast (MCF-7) and resistant ovarian (SKOV-3) cancer cell lines. Cyclic voltammetric analysis and DNA binding and intercalation studies indicate that the mechanism of action of 11-20 is significantly different to that of their silver(I) dicarboxylate precursors and they do not induce DNA damage or ROS generation in mammalian cells. The representative complexes 9 and 19 (containing the undecanedioate ligand) were both found to significantly reduce superoxide and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress in the yeast S. cerevisiae. PMID:26986979

  8. Establishment of stable dominance interactions in prairie vole peers: relationships with alcohol drinking and activation of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Anacker, Allison M. J.; Smith, Monique L.; Ryabinin, Andrey E.

    2014-01-01

    Dominance hierarchies are an important aspect of group-living as they determine individual access to resources. The existence of dominance ranks in access to space has not been described in socially monogamous, communally nesting prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster). Here we tested whether dominance could be assessed using the tube test. We also tested whether dominance related to alcohol intake, similar to what has been demonstrated in non-monogamous species. Same-sex pairs of unfamiliar peers were tested in a series of three trials of the tube test, then paired and allowed individual access to alcohol and water for four days, and then tested again in the tube test. For all pairs, the same subjects won the majority of trials before and after alcohol drinking. The number of wins negatively correlated with alcohol intake on the first day of drinking, and positively correlated with levels of Fos in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus following the tube test in a separate group of voles. Dominance was not related to Fos levels in other brain regions examined. Together, these results indicate that prairie voles quickly establish stable dominance ranks through a process possibly involving the hypothalamus, and suggest that dominance is linked to alcohol drinking. PMID:24963825

  9. The Stable Pairing Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwell, Raymond N.; Seabold, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The Gale-Shapley stable marriage theorem is a fascinating piece of twentieth-century mathematics that has many practical applications--from labor markets to school admissions--yet is accessible to secondary school mathematics students. David Gale and Lloyd Shapley were both mathematicians and economists who published their work on the Stable…

  10. Stable Ejection Seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    Drogue chute for ejection seat slows down seat in more stable fashion than conventional parachutes and thus improves chances for survival. Square drogue linked to seat from its corners suppresses tendency of seat to rotate in pitch and yaw. New parachute expected to reduce dynamic forces on ejected person and extend maximum possible ejection altitude by 50 percent. Used at high or low speeds.

  11. Stable isotope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  12. Cerebral blood flow decreases with time whereas cerebral oxygen consumption remains stable during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Prough, D.S.; Rogers, A.T.; Stump, D.A.; Roy, R.C.; Cordell, A.R.; Phipps, J.; Taylor, C.L. )

    1991-02-01

    Recent investigations demonstrate that cerebral blood flow (CBF) progressively declines during hypothermic, nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). If CBF declines because of brain cooling, the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2) should decline in parallel with the reduction in CBF. Therefore we studied the response of CBF, the cerebral arteriovenous oxygen content difference (A-VDcereO2) and CMRO2 as a function of the duration of CPB in humans. To do this, we compared the cerebrovascular response to changes in the PaCO2. Because sequential CBF measurements using xenon 133 (133Xe) clearance must be separated by 15-25 min, we hypothesized that a time-dependent decline in CBF would accentuate the CBF reduction caused by a decrease in PaCO2, but would blunt the CBF increase associated with a rise in PaCO2. We measured CBF in 25 patients and calculated the cerebral arteriovenous oxygen content difference using radial arterial and jugular venous bulb blood samples. Patients were randomly assigned to management within either a lower (32-48 mm Hg) or higher (50-71 mm Hg) range of PaCO2 uncorrected for temperature. Each patient underwent two randomly ordered sets of measurements, one at a lower PaCO2 and the other at a higher PaCO2 within the respective ranges. Cerebrovascular responsiveness to changes in PaCO2 was calculated as specific reactivity (SR), the change in CBF divided by the change in PaCO2, expressed in mL.100 g-1.min-1.mm Hg-1.

  13. Blood vitamin D(3) metabolite concentrations of adult female bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) remain stable after ceasing UVb exposure.

    PubMed

    Oonincx, D G A B; van de Wal, M D; Bosch, G; Stumpel, J B G; Heijboer, A C; van Leeuwen, J P T M; Hendriks, W H; Kik, M

    2013-07-01

    Vitamin D deficiency can lead to several health problems collectively called metabolic bone disease (MBD). One commonly kept reptile species prone to develop MBD if managed incorrectly is the bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps). This study aimed to determine the extent to which adult female bearded dragons fed a diet low in vitamin D can use stored vitamin D and its metabolites to maintain plasma 25(OH)D(3) and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) concentrations after discontinuing UVb exposure. Blood samples of healthy adult female bearded dragons, exposed to UVb radiation for over 6 months were collected (day 0) after which UVb exposure was discontinued for 83 days and blood was collected. Blood plasma was analysed for concentrations of total Ca, total P, ionized Ca, uric acid, 25(OH)D(3) and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3). There was no significant change in plasma 25(OH)D(3) and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) concentrations during the study. While total Ca and P in whole blood was found to significantly decrease over time (P < 0.0088 and 0.0016, respectively), values were within the reference range. Plasma ionized Ca tended (P = 0.0525) to decrease during the study. Adult female bearded dragons, previously exposed to UVb, are able to maintain blood vitamin D metabolite concentrations when UVb exposure is discontinued for a period of up to 83 days. PMID:23648288

  14. A stable isotope study of fossil mammal remains from the Paglicci cave, Southern Italy. N and C as palaeoenvironmental indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacumin, P.; Bocherens, H.; Delgado Huertas, A.; Mariotti, A.; Longinelli, A.

    1997-04-01

    A set of 102 tooth and bone samples of Pleistocene age (32,600-13,300 yr BP) belonging to the species Cervus elaphus, Bos primigenius and Equus caballus and coming from the Paglicci cave (Southern Italy) was studied for the carbon (δ 13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) isotopic composition of bone and dentine collage and for the carbon (δ 13C c) isotopic composition of tooth enamel carbonate. The amount of collagen extracted from bone and tooth samples (mg/g) was rather variable, representing approximately only 0.5-15% of the collagen present in a fresh bone. However, the loss of an important fraction of the original collagen during diagenesis did not change the in vivo isotopic composition. In general, when the δ 13C of both collagen and carbonate and the δ 15N of collagen obtained from each level for the three species are compared, wild ox shows the most increased values, deer the most decreased values and horse shows intermediate results. These differences are probably related to distinct diets or to differences in their physiological behaviour. However, the isotopic results suggest that the three species considered lived in an open environment with a diet based on C 3 plants. The stratigraphic sequence of light and heavy nitrogen isotope values between 19,000 and 15,000 may be related to shifts from arid to humid conditions, while the overall trend shown by δ 13C toward lighter values may be related to a progressive development of a forest habitat.

  15. Preschool Children’s Memory for Word Forms Remains Stable Over Several Days, but Gradually Decreases after 6 Months

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Katherine R.; McGregor, Karla K.; Waldier, Brigitte; Curran, Maura K.; Gomez, Rebecca L.; Samuelson, Larissa K.

    2016-01-01

    Research on word learning has focused on children’s ability to identify a target object when given the word form after a minimal number of exposures to novel word-object pairings. However, relatively little research has focused on children’s ability to retrieve the word form when given the target object. The exceptions involve asking children to recall and produce forms, and children typically perform near floor on these measures. In the current study, 3- to 5-year-old children were administered a novel test of word form that allowed for recognition memory and manual responses. Specifically, when asked to label a previously trained object, children were given three forms to choose from: the target, a minimally different form, and a maximally different form. Children demonstrated memory for word forms at three post-training delays: 10 mins (short-term), 2–3 days (long-term), and 6 months to 1 year (very long-term). However, children performed worse at the very long-term delay than the other time points, and the length of the very long-term delay was negatively related to performance. When in error, children were no more likely to select the minimally different form than the maximally different form at all time points. Overall, these results suggest that children remember word forms that are linked to objects over extended post-training intervals, but that their memory for the forms gradually decreases over time without further exposures. Furthermore, memory traces for word forms do not become less phonologically specific over time; rather children either identify the correct form, or they perform at chance. PMID:27729880

  16. Blood vitamin D(3) metabolite concentrations of adult female bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) remain stable after ceasing UVb exposure.

    PubMed

    Oonincx, D G A B; van de Wal, M D; Bosch, G; Stumpel, J B G; Heijboer, A C; van Leeuwen, J P T M; Hendriks, W H; Kik, M

    2013-07-01

    Vitamin D deficiency can lead to several health problems collectively called metabolic bone disease (MBD). One commonly kept reptile species prone to develop MBD if managed incorrectly is the bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps). This study aimed to determine the extent to which adult female bearded dragons fed a diet low in vitamin D can use stored vitamin D and its metabolites to maintain plasma 25(OH)D(3) and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) concentrations after discontinuing UVb exposure. Blood samples of healthy adult female bearded dragons, exposed to UVb radiation for over 6 months were collected (day 0) after which UVb exposure was discontinued for 83 days and blood was collected. Blood plasma was analysed for concentrations of total Ca, total P, ionized Ca, uric acid, 25(OH)D(3) and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3). There was no significant change in plasma 25(OH)D(3) and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) concentrations during the study. While total Ca and P in whole blood was found to significantly decrease over time (P < 0.0088 and 0.0016, respectively), values were within the reference range. Plasma ionized Ca tended (P = 0.0525) to decrease during the study. Adult female bearded dragons, previously exposed to UVb, are able to maintain blood vitamin D metabolite concentrations when UVb exposure is discontinued for a period of up to 83 days.

  17. Two-level systems and boson peak remain stable in 110-million-year-old amber glass.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castañeda, Tomás; Jiménez-Riobóo, Rafael J; Ramos, Miguel A

    2014-04-25

    The two most prominent and ubiquitous features of glasses at low temperatures, namely the presence of tunneling two-level systems and the so-called boson peak in the reduced vibrational density of states, are shown to persist essentially unchanged in highly stabilized glasses, contrary to what was usually envisaged. Specifically, we have measured the specific heat of 110 million-year-old amber samples from El Soplao (Spain), both at very low temperatures and around the glass transition Tg. In particular, the amount of two-level systems, assessed at the lowest temperatures, was surprisingly found to be exactly the same for the pristine hyperaged amber as for the, subsequently, partially and fully rejuvenated samples.

  18. Two-level systems and boson peak remain stable in 110-million-year-old amber glass.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castañeda, Tomás; Jiménez-Riobóo, Rafael J; Ramos, Miguel A

    2014-04-25

    The two most prominent and ubiquitous features of glasses at low temperatures, namely the presence of tunneling two-level systems and the so-called boson peak in the reduced vibrational density of states, are shown to persist essentially unchanged in highly stabilized glasses, contrary to what was usually envisaged. Specifically, we have measured the specific heat of 110 million-year-old amber samples from El Soplao (Spain), both at very low temperatures and around the glass transition Tg. In particular, the amount of two-level systems, assessed at the lowest temperatures, was surprisingly found to be exactly the same for the pristine hyperaged amber as for the, subsequently, partially and fully rejuvenated samples. PMID:24815658

  19. Stable expression of rat cytochrome P-450IIB1 cDNA in Chinese hamster cells (V79) and metabolic activation of aflatoxin B sub 1

    SciTech Connect

    Doehmer, J.; Dogra, S.; Friedberg, T.; Monier, S.; Adesnik, M.; Glatt, H.; Oesch, F. )

    1988-08-01

    V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts are widely used for mutagenicity testing but have the serious limitation that they do not express cytochromes P-450, which are needed for the activation of many promutagens to mutagenic metabolites. A full-length cDNA clone encoding the monooxygenase cytochrome P-450IIB1 under control of the simian virus 40 early promoter was constructed and cointroduced with the selection marker neomycin phosphotransferase (conferring resistance to G418) into V79 Chinese hamster cells. G418-resistant cells were selected, established as cell lines, and tested for cytochrome P-450IIB1 expression and enzymatic activity. Two cell lines (SD1 and SD3) were found that stably produce cytochrome P-450IIB1. Although purified cytochromes P-450 possess monooxygenase activity only after reconstitution with cytochrome P-450 reductase and phospholipid, the gene product of the construct exhibited this activity. This implies that the gene product is intracellularly localized in a way that allows access to the required components. If compared with V79 cells, the mutation rate for the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltranferase (HPRT) locus in SD1 cells is markedly increased when exposed to aflatoxin B{sub 1}, which is activated by this enzyme.

  20. The effect of stable macromolecular complexes of ionic polyphosphazene on HIV Gag antigen and on activation of human dendritic cells and presentation to T-cells.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine D; Ninković, Jana; Prokopowicz, Zofia M; Mancuso, Christy J; Marin, Alexander; Andrianov, Alexander K; Dowling, David J; Levy, Ofer

    2014-10-01

    Neonates and infants are susceptible to infection due to distinct immune responses in early life. Therefore, development of vaccine formulation and delivery systems capable of activating human newborn leukocytes is of global health importance. Poly[di(carboxylatophenoxy)phosphazene] (PCPP) belongs to a family of ionic synthetic polyphosphazene polyelectrolyte compounds that can form non-covalent interactions with protein antigens and demonstrate adjuvant activity in animals and in human clinical trials. However, little is known about their ability to activate human immune cells. In this study, we characterized the effects of PCPP alone or in combination with a model antigen (recombinant HIV-Gag (Gag)), on the maturation, activation and antigen presentation by human adult and newborn dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. PCPP treatment induced DC activation as assessed by upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine production. Studies benchmarking PCPP to Alum, the most commonly used vaccine adjuvant, demonstrated that both triggered cell death and release of danger signals in adult and newborn DCs. When complexed with Gag antigen, PCPP maintained its immunostimulatory characteristics while permitting internalization and presentation of Gag by DCs to HIV-Gag-specific CD4(+) T cell clones. The PCPP vaccine formulation outlined here has intrinsic adjuvant activity, can facilitate effective delivery of antigen to DCs, and may be advantageous for induction of beneficial T cell-mediated immunity. Moreover, polyphosphazenes can further reduce cost of vaccine production and distribution through their dose-sparing and antigen-stabilizing properties, thus potentially eliminating the need for cold chain distribution. PMID:25023392

  1. Applications of stable isotope analysis in mammalian ecology.

    PubMed

    Walter, W David; Kurle, Carolyn M; Hopkins, John B

    2014-01-01

    In this editorial, we provide a brief introduction and summarize the 10 research articles included in this Special Issue on Applications of stable isotope analysis in mammalian ecology. The first three articles report correction and discrimination factors that can be used to more accurately estimate the diets of extinct and extant mammals using stable isotope analysis. The remaining seven applied research articles use stable isotope analysis to address a variety of wildlife conservation and management questions from the oceans to the mountains.

  2. US Public Health Preparedness for Zika and Other Threats Remains Vulnerable.

    PubMed

    Duchin, Jeffrey S

    2016-04-01

    The unanticipated global outbreak of Zika virus infection is the most current but certainly not the last emerging infectious disease challenge to confront the US public heath system. Despite a number of such threats in recent years, significant gaps remain in core areas of public health system readiness. Stable, sustained investments are required to establish a solid foundation for achieving necessary national public health emergency preparedness and response capacity.

  3. Handbook of stable strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Skoryna, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: chemistry of strontium; biogeochemistry of strontium; uptake of stable strontium by plants and effects on plant growth; divalent cation-dependent deposits in paramecium; effects of strontium ion on the hydrolysis of ATP; stronium ions and membranes - screening versus binding at charged surfaces; mitochondrial granules in the liver of rats kept on stable strontium supplementation; divalent cations and regulation of cyclic nucleotides in nervous systems; strontium as the substitute for calcium in the excitation-contraction coupling of crayfish muscle fibers; hemodynamic effects of strontium in the dog; some mechanical characteristics of strontium-mediated contractions in heart muscle; effects of calcium, magnesium, and strontium on drug-receptor interactions; strontium and histamine secretion; and effects of strontium in human dental enamel.

  4. Stable glow discharge detector

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2004-05-18

    A highly sensitive electronic ion cell for the measurement of trace elements in He carrier gas which involves glow discharge. A constant wave (CW) stable glow discharge detector which is controlled through a biased resistor, can detect the change of electron density caused by impurities in the He carrier gas by many orders of magnitude larger than that caused by direct ionization or electron capture. The stable glow discharge detector utilizes a floating pseudo-electrode to form a probe in or near the plasma and a solid rod electrode. By using this probe, the large variation of electron density due to trace amounts of impurities can be directly measured. The solid rod electrode provides greater stability and thus easier alignment.

  5. Stable isotopes in mineralogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Stable isotope fractionations between minerals are functions of the fundamental vibrational frequencies of the minerals and therefore bear on several topics of mineralogical interest. Isotopic compositions of the elements H, C, O, Si, and S can now be determined routinely in almost any mineral. A summary has been made of both published and new results of laboratory investigations, analyses of natural materials, and theoretical considerations which bear on the importance of temperature, pressure, chemical composition and crystal structure to the isotopic properties of minerals. It is shown that stable isotope studies can sometimes provide evidence for elucidating details of crystal structure and can be a powerful tool for use in tracing the reaction paths of mineralogical reactions. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Stable local oscillator module.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  7. Th17/Treg-related cytokine imbalance in sulfur mustard exposed and stable chronic obstructive pulmonary (COPD) patients: correlation with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Imani, Saber; Salimian, Jafar; Fu, Junjiang; Ghanei, Mostafa; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigated expression changes of Th17/Treg-related cytokine in transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLBs) of sulfur mustard (SM) exposure, stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and also compared it with a healthy control (HC) group. Here, ROR-γt, FoxP3, and Treg/Th17-related cytokines (IL-10, IL-17A, IL-6, and TGF-β1) were assessed using a combination of RT-QPCR and ELISA in 11 SM-exposed cases, 9 patients with GOLD stage II COPD diagnosed, and 8 HC. Our results showed that the levels of Foxp3 expression were lower and ROR-γt expression was higher in SM and COPD patients when compared with HC (all p values were less than 0.001). The relative Foxp3 expressions and Foxp3/ROR-γt ratio were positively correlated with FEV1 (%) pred (R = 0.682 and R = 0.602, respectively; p ≤ 0.001). However, the relative ROR-γt expressions were inversely correlated with FEV1 (%) pred (R= -0.75, p = 0.003) and relative Foxp3 expression (R= -0.704, p = 0.003). The mRNA and protein expression of IL-10 were significantly decreased in SM and COPD patients compared with HC (p < 0.001). An increase of IL-17A (∼7.2 fold) and TGF-β1 (∼5.6 fold) are involved in the lung exacerbation of SM and COPD patients. The expression of IL-6 was variable between three groups (p ≥ 0.05). In addition, an inverse correlation were observed between FEV1 (%) pred and expressions of IL-17A (R= -0.741), IL-6 (R= -0.673) and TGF-β1 (R= -0.632) (p ≤ 0.001). Instead, positive correlation was found between IL-10 ratios and FEV1 (%) pred (R = 0.777, p = 0.001). These findings suggest that Treg/Th17-mediated distributions are involved in the progression of chronic lung injury of SM and COPD patients.

  8. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  9. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  10. 7 CFR 160.29 - Containers to remain intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Containers to remain intact. 160.29 Section 160.29... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Analysis, Inspection, and Grading on Request § 160.29 Containers to remain intact... the containers holding such naval stores remain intact as sampled until the analysis,...

  11. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  12. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  13. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  14. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  15. Hollow CoP nanopaticle/N-doped graphene hybrids as highly active and stable bifunctional catalysts for full water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xianbo; Zhang, Shen; Li, Chunyan; Zhu, Chunling; Chen, Yujin; Gao, Peng; Qi, Lihong; Zhang, Xitian

    2016-05-01

    An alkaline electrolyzer fabricated by employing hollow CoP nanoparticles/N-doped graphene as bifunctional catalysts exhibits remarkable activity with a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at a cell voltage of 1.58 V and considerable stability over 65 h of continuous electrolysis operation, favorably comparable to the integrated performance of commercial Pt/C and IrO2.An alkaline electrolyzer fabricated by employing hollow CoP nanoparticles/N-doped graphene as bifunctional catalysts exhibits remarkable activity with a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at a cell voltage of 1.58 V and considerable stability over 65 h of continuous electrolysis operation, favorably comparable to the integrated performance of commercial Pt/C and IrO2. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedures, Fig. S1-S17 and Tables S1-S5. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01867j

  16. Delta inulin: a novel, immunologically active, stable packing structure comprising β-D-[2 -> 1] poly(fructo-furanosyl) α-D-glucose polymers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Peter D; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2011-05-01

    We report a novel isoform of β-D-[2 → 1] poly(fructo-furanosyl) α-D-glucose termed delta inulin (DI), comparing it with previously described alpha (AI), beta (BI) and gamma (GI) isoforms. In vitro, DI is the most immunologically active weight/weight in human complement activation and in binding to monocytes and regulating their chemokine production and cell surface protein expression. In vivo, this translates into potent immune adjuvant activity, enhancing humoral and cellular responses against co-administered antigens. As a biocompatible polysaccharide particle, DI is safe and well tolerated by subcutaneous or intramuscular injection. Physico-chemically, DI forms as an insoluble precipitate from an aqueous solution of suitable AI, BI or GI held at 37-48°C, whereas the precipitate from the same solution at lower temperatures has the properties of AI or GI. DI can also be produced by heat conversion of GI suspensions at 56°C, whereas GI is converted from AI at 45°C. DI is distinguished from GI by its higher temperature of solution in dilute aqueous suspension and by its lower solubility in dimethyl sulfoxide, both consistent with greater hydrogen bonding in DI's polymer packing structure. DI suspensions can be dissolved by heat, re-precipitated by cooling as AI and finally re-converted back to DI by repeated heat treatment. Thus, DI, like the previously described inulin isoforms, reflects the formation of a distinct polymer aggregate packing structure via reversible noncovalent bonding. DI forms the basis for a potent new human vaccine adjuvant and further swells the growing family of carbohydrate structures with immunological activity.

  17. Delta inulin: a novel, immunologically active, stable packing structure comprising β-D-[2 -> 1] poly(fructo-furanosyl) α-D-glucose polymers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Peter D; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2011-05-01

    We report a novel isoform of β-D-[2 → 1] poly(fructo-furanosyl) α-D-glucose termed delta inulin (DI), comparing it with previously described alpha (AI), beta (BI) and gamma (GI) isoforms. In vitro, DI is the most immunologically active weight/weight in human complement activation and in binding to monocytes and regulating their chemokine production and cell surface protein expression. In vivo, this translates into potent immune adjuvant activity, enhancing humoral and cellular responses against co-administered antigens. As a biocompatible polysaccharide particle, DI is safe and well tolerated by subcutaneous or intramuscular injection. Physico-chemically, DI forms as an insoluble precipitate from an aqueous solution of suitable AI, BI or GI held at 37-48°C, whereas the precipitate from the same solution at lower temperatures has the properties of AI or GI. DI can also be produced by heat conversion of GI suspensions at 56°C, whereas GI is converted from AI at 45°C. DI is distinguished from GI by its higher temperature of solution in dilute aqueous suspension and by its lower solubility in dimethyl sulfoxide, both consistent with greater hydrogen bonding in DI's polymer packing structure. DI suspensions can be dissolved by heat, re-precipitated by cooling as AI and finally re-converted back to DI by repeated heat treatment. Thus, DI, like the previously described inulin isoforms, reflects the formation of a distinct polymer aggregate packing structure via reversible noncovalent bonding. DI forms the basis for a potent new human vaccine adjuvant and further swells the growing family of carbohydrate structures with immunological activity. PMID:21147758

  18. The Receiver of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirA Histidine Kinase Forms a Stable Interaction with VirG to Activate Virulence Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wise, Arlene A; Binns, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens carries a virulence gene system that is required for the initiation of crown gall tumors on susceptible plants. Expression of the vir genes is activated by the VirA/VirG two component regulatory system. VirA is a histidine kinase which signals the presence of certain chemicals found at the site of a plant wound. The receiver domain located at its carboxyl terminus defines VirA as a hybrid histidine kinase. Here, we show that the VirA receiver interacts with the DNA-binding domain of VirG. This finding supports the hypothesis that the receiver acts as a recruiting factor for VirG. In addition, we show that removal of the VirA receiver allowed vir gene expression in response to glucose in a dose dependent manner, indicating that the receiver controls VirG activation and suggesting that the supplementary ChvE-sugar signal increases this activity. PMID:26779177

  19. The Receiver of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirA Histidine Kinase Forms a Stable Interaction with VirG to Activate Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Arlene A.; Binns, Andrew N.

    2016-01-01

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens carries a virulence gene system that is required for the initiation of crown gall tumors on susceptible plants. Expression of the vir genes is activated by the VirA/VirG two component regulatory system. VirA is a histidine kinase which signals the presence of certain chemicals found at the site of a plant wound. The receiver domain located at its carboxyl terminus defines VirA as a hybrid histidine kinase. Here, we show that the VirA receiver interacts with the DNA-binding domain of VirG. This finding supports the hypothesis that the receiver acts as a recruiting factor for VirG. In addition, we show that removal of the VirA receiver allowed vir gene expression in response to glucose in a dose dependent manner, indicating that the receiver controls VirG activation and suggesting that the supplementary ChvE-sugar signal increases this activity. PMID:26779177

  20. Sol-gel low-temperature synthesis of stable anatase-type TiO2 nanoparticles under different conditions and its photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Behnajady, Mohammad A; Eskandarloo, Hamed; Modirshahla, Nasser; Shokri, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    In this work, TiO(2) nanoparticles in anatase phase was prepared by sol-gel low temperature method from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) as titanium precursor in the presence of acetic acid (AcOH). The effects of synthesis parameters such as AcOH and water ratios, sol formation time, synthesis and calcination temperature on the photocatalytic activity of TiO(2) nanoparticles were evaluated. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis reflectance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller techniques. Photocatalytic activity of anatase TiO(2) nanoparticles determined in the removal of C. I. Acid Red 27 (AR27) under UV light irradiation. Results indicate that with increasing AcOH/TTIP molar ratio from 1 to 10, sol formation time from 1 to 3 h and synthesis temperature from 0 to 25°C, increases crystallite size of synthesized nanoparticles. It was found that optimal conditions for low temperature preparation of anatase-type TiO(2) nanoparticles with high photocatalytic activity were as follows: TTIP:AcOH:water molar ratio 1:1:200, sol formation time 1 h, synthesis temperature 0°C and calcination temperature 450°C. PMID:21668867

  1. Done that: short-term repetition related modulations of motor cortex activity as a stable signature for overnight motor memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Gabitov, Ella; Manor, David; Karni, Avi

    2014-12-01

    An almost universally accepted tacit expectation is that learning and memory consolidation processes must be reflected in the average brain activity in brain areas relevant to task performance. Motor cortex (M1) plasticity has been implicated in motor skill acquisition and its consolidation. Nevertheless, no consistent pattern of changes in the average signal, related to motor learning or motor memory consolidation following a single session of training, has emerged from imaging studies. Here we show that the pattern and magnitude of short-term brain activity modulations in response to task repetition, in M1, may provide a robust signature for effective motor memory consolidation processes. We studied participants during the paced performance of a finger-to-thumb opposition sequence (FOS), intensively trained a day earlier, and a similarly constructed untrained FOS. In addition to within-session "on-line" gains, most participants expressed delayed, consolidation-phase gains in the performance of the trained FOS. The execution of the trained FOS induced repetition enhancements in the contralateral M1 and bilaterally in the medial-temporal lobes, offsetting novelty-related repetition suppression effects. Moreover, the M1 modulations were positively correlated with the magnitude of each participant's overnight delayed gains but not with absolute performance levels. Our results suggest that short-term enhancements of brain signals upon task repetition reflect the effectiveness of overnight motor memory consolidation. We propose that procedural memory consolidation processes may affect the excitation-inhibition balance within cortical representations of the trained movements; this new balance is better reflected in repetition effects than in the average level of evoked neural activity. PMID:24893741

  2. Remaining Useful Life Estimation in Prognosis: An Uncertainty Propagation Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankararaman, Shankar; Goebel, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of remaining useful life is significant in the context of prognostics and health monitoring, and the prediction of remaining useful life is essential for online operations and decision-making. However, it is challenging to accurately predict the remaining useful life in practical aerospace applications due to the presence of various uncertainties that affect prognostic calculations, and in turn, render the remaining useful life prediction uncertain. It is challenging to identify and characterize the various sources of uncertainty in prognosis, understand how each of these sources of uncertainty affect the uncertainty in the remaining useful life prediction, and thereby compute the overall uncertainty in the remaining useful life prediction. In order to achieve these goals, this paper proposes that the task of estimating the remaining useful life must be approached as an uncertainty propagation problem. In this context, uncertainty propagation methods which are available in the literature are reviewed, and their applicability to prognostics and health monitoring are discussed.

  3. A simple method for preparation of Ag nanofilm used as active, stable, and biocompatible SERS substrate by using electrostatic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renming; Si, Minzhen; Kang, Yipu; Zi, Xingfa; Liu, Zhenquan; Zhang, Deqing

    2010-03-01

    A new SERS-active Ag nanofilm on the surface of a glass slide has been prepared by a low-cost electrochemical strategy using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at a proper voltage. The two-dimensional morphology of the Ag nanofilm has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The average size of the aggregated particles on the surface of the Ag nanofilm is up to ca. 200+/-50 nm, which is much larger than that of PVA-protected Ag colloidal nanoparticles (PVA-Ag CNPs, 45+/-8 nm). Meanwhile, many nano-scale regions with average sizes of ca. 300+/-50 nm are formed between the adjacent Ag nanoparticles. By the SERS measurements of human serum (HS) and hemoglobin (Hb), this Ag nanofilm is shown to be an excellent SERS substrate with good stability and biocompatibility. As the fabrication process of this SERS substrate is simple and inexpensive, this method may be used in large-scale preparation of substrates that have been widely applied in Raman analysis. In addition, this SERS-active Ag nanofilm can serve as a novel SERS substrate in biochemical analysis due to the biocompatibility.

  4. An alkaline-active and alkali-stable pectate lyase from Streptomyces sp. S27 with potential in textile industry.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Meng, Kun; Shi, Pengjun; Luo, Huiying; Huang, Huoqing; Tu, Tao; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2012-06-01

    A pectate lyase gene (pl-str) was cloned from Streptomyces sp. S27 and expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta. The full-length pl-str consists of 972 bp and encodes for a protein of 323 amino acids without signal peptide that belongs to family PF00544. The recombinant enzyme (r-PL-STR) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity using Ni²⁺-NTA chromatography and showed apparent molecular mass of ~35 kDa. The pH optimum of r-PL-STR was found to be 10.0, and it exhibited >70% of the maximal activity at pH 12.0. After incubation at 37°C for 1 h without substrate, the enzyme retained more than 55% activity at pH 7.0-12.0. Compared with the commercial complex enzyme Scourzyme(@)301L from Novozymes, purified r-PL-STR showed similar efficacy in reducing the intrinsic viscosity of polygalacturonic acid (49.0 vs. 49.7%). When combined with cellulase and α-amylase, r-PL-STR had comparable performance in bioscouring of jute fabric (22.39 vs. 22.99%). Thus, r-PL-STR might represent a good candidate for use in alkaline industries such as textile. PMID:22278674

  5. Stable activity of a deubiquitylating enzyme (Usp2-cc) in the presence of high concentrations of urea and its application to purify aggregation-prone peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Shahnawaz, Mohammad; Thapa, Arjun; Park, Il-Seon . E-mail: parkis@chosun.ac.kr

    2007-08-03

    Chemical synthesis of long or aggregation-prone peptide has been problematic. Its biological production has an advantage in that point, but it often forms inclusion body which creates difficulties in recovery of targets. As a deubiquitylating enzyme (Usp2-cc) was shown in this study to maintain its activity even in the presence of up to 4 M urea, target peptide was purified by a single step of chromatography after overexpression as inclusion body, solubilization in urea and cleavage by the enzyme from the fusion protein consisting of GroES (used for high expression and easy to handle), ubiquitin (as a cleavage site) and target peptide. This system is a convenient tool for production of peptides that are difficult to be chemically synthesized and biologically purified.

  6. Active stable maintenance functions in low copy-number plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria II. Post-segregational killing systems.

    PubMed

    Dmowski, Michał; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2013-01-01

    Active support is needed for low copy-number plasmids to be stably maintained in bacterial cells. The mechanisms that fulfill this role are (i) partition systems (PAR) acting to separate plasmid molecules to daughter cells and (ii) toxin-andidote (TA) (post-segregational killing-PSK) systems which arrest cell growth until the plasmid reaches the correct copy-number or kill the cells that have not inherited the plasmid. Our knowledge of toxin-antidote systems comes mainly from studies on Gram-negative bacteria. However, some addiction systems of Gram-positive bacteria have been characterized in detail or recently identified. Altogether, they bring new interesting data on toxin-antidote functioning in bacteria.

  7. Stable activity of a deubiquitylating enzyme (Usp2-cc) in the presence of high concentrations of urea and its application to purify aggregation-prone peptides.

    PubMed

    Shahnawaz, Mohammad; Thapa, Arjun; Park, Il-Seon

    2007-08-01

    Chemical synthesis of long or aggregation-prone peptide has been problematic. Its biological production has an advantage in that point, but it often forms inclusion body which creates difficulties in recovery of targets. As a deubiquitylating enzyme (Usp2-cc) was shown in this study to maintain its activity even in the presence of up to 4M urea, target peptide was purified by a single step of chromatography after overexpression as inclusion body, solubilization in urea and cleavage by the enzyme from the fusion protein consisting of GroES (used for high expression and easy to handle), ubiquitin (as a cleavage site) and target peptide. This system is a convenient tool for production of peptides that are difficult to be chemically synthesized and biologically purified. PMID:17560941

  8. Preexisting Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Activating Antibody Responses Are Stable Longitudinally and Cross-reactive Responses Are Not Boosted by Recent Influenza Exposure.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Sophie A; Zhang, Yanyu; Chan, Ka Y; Leung, Kathy; Wu, Joseph T; Poon, Leo L M

    2016-10-15

    Cross-reactive influenza virus-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-activating antibodies are readily detected in healthy adults. However, little is known about the kinetics of these ADCC responses. We used retrospective serial blood samples from healthy donors to investigate this topic. All donors had ADCC responses against 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus (A[H1N1]pdm09) and avian influenza A(H7N9) virus hemagglutinins (HAs) despite being seronegative for these viruses in standard hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization serological assays. A(H1N1)pdm09 exposure did not boost ADCC responses specific for H7 HA antigens. H7 HA ADCC responses were variable longitudinally within donors, suggesting that these cross-reactive antibodies are unstable. We found no correlation between ADCC responses to the H7 HA and either influenza virus-specific immunoglobulin G1 concentration or age. PMID:27493238

  9. Dynamically stable, self-similarly evolving, and self-organized states of high beta tokamak and reversed pinch plasmas and advanced active control

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi; Fukasawa, Toshinobu

    2009-11-15

    Generalized simultaneous eigenvalue equations derived from a generalized theory of self-organization are applied to a set of simultaneous equations for two-fluid model plasmas. An advanced active control by using theoretical time constants is proposed by predicting quantities to be controlled. Typical high beta numerical configurations are presented for the ultra low q tokamak plasmas and the reversed-field pinch (RFP) ones in cylindrical geometry by solving the set of simultaneous eigenvalue equations. Improved confinement with no detectable saw-teeth oscillations in tokamak experiments is reasonably explained by the shortest time constant of ion flow. The shortest time constant of poloidal ion flow is shown to be a reasonable mechanism for suppression of magnetic fluctuations by pulsed poloidal current drives in RFP experiments. The bifurcation from basic eigenmodes to mixed ones deduced from stability conditions for eigenvalues is shown to be a good candidate for the experimental bifurcation from standard RFP plasmas to their improved confinement regimes.

  10. Stable line defects in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-11-01

    Line defects in two-dimensional (2D) materials greatly modulate various properties of their pristine form. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, we investigate the structural reconstructions of different kinds of grain boundaries in the silicene sheets. It is evident that depending upon the presence of silicon adatoms and edge shape of grain boundaries (i.e., armchair or zigzag), stable extended line defects (ELDs) can be introduced in a controlled way. Further studies show the stability of these line-defects in silicene, grown on Ag(111) surface at room-temperature. Importantly, unlike most of the 2D sheet materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, 5-5-8 line defects modify the nonmagnetic semimetallic pristine silicene sheet to spin-polarized metal. As ferromagnetically ordered magnetic moments remain strongly localized at the line defect, a one-dimensional spin channel gets created in silicene. Interestingly, these spin channels are quite stable because, unlike the edge of nanoribbons, structural reconstruction or contamination cannot destroy the ordering of magnetic moments here. Zigzag silicene nanoribbons with a 5-5-8 line defect also exhibit various interesting electronic and magnetic properties depending upon their width as well as the nature of the magnetic coupling between edge and defect spin states. Upon incorporation of other ELDs, such as 4-4-4 and 4-8 defects, 2D sheets and nanoribbons of silicene show a nonmagnetic metallic or semiconducting ground state. Highlighting the controlled formation of ELDs and consequent emergence of technologically important properties in silicene, we propose new routes to realize silicene-based nanoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  11. Paleoproxies: Heavy Stable Isotope Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, T. F.; Hippler, D.; Siebert, C.; Kramers, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Recent advances in isotope ratio mass spectrometry, namely multiple collector ICP-MS and refined TIMS techniques, will significantly enhance the ability to measure heavy stable isotope fractionation, which will lead to the development of a wide array of process-identifying (bio)-geochemical tools. Thus far research in this area is not easily assessable to scientists outside the isotope field. This is due to the fact that analyzing heavy stable isotopes does not provide routine numbers which are per se true (the preciser the truer) but is still a highly experimental field. On the other hand resolving earth science problems requires specialists familiar with the environment being studied. So what is in there for paleoceanographers? In a first order approach, relating isotope variations to physical processes is straightforward. A prominent example are oxygen isotope variations with temperature. The total geological signal is of course far more complicated. At low temperatures, heavy stable isotopes variations have been reported for e.g. Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Mo and Tl. Fractionation mechanisms and physical parameters responsible for the observed variations are not yet resolved for most elements. Significant equilibrium isotope fractionation is expected from redox reactions of transition metals. However a difference in coordination number between two coexisting speciations of an element in the same oxidation state can also cause fractionation. Protonation of dissolved Mo is one case currently discussed. For paleoceanography studies, a principal distinction between transition metals essential for life (V to Zn plus Mo) or not will be helpful. In case of the former group, distinction between biogenic and abiogenic isotope fractionation will remain an important issue. For example, abiotic Fe redox reactions result in isotope fractionations indistinguishable in direction and magnitude from microbial effects. Only a combination of different stable isotope systems bears the

  12. Canonical Wnt signaling in the oligodendroglial lineage--puzzles remain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fuzheng; Lang, Jordan; Sohn, Jiho; Hammond, Elizabeth; Chang, Marcello; Pleasure, David

    2015-10-01

    The straightforward concept that accentuated Wnt signaling via the Wnt-receptor-β-catenin-TCF/LEF cascade (also termed canonical Wnt signaling or Wnt/β-catenin signaling) delays or blocks oligodendrocyte differentiation is very appealing. According to this concept, canonical Wnt signaling is responsible for remyelination failure in multiple sclerosis and for persistent hypomyelination in periventricular leukomalacia. This has given rise to the hope that pharmacologically inhibiting this signaling will be of therapeutic potential in these disabling neurological disorders. But current studies suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays distinct roles in oligodendrogenesis, oligodendrocyte differentiation, and myelination in a context-dependent manner (central nervous system regions, developmental stages), and that Wnt/β-catenin signaling interplays with, and is subjected to regulation by, other central nervous system factors and signaling pathways. On this basis, we propose the more nuanced concept that endogenous Wnt/β-catenin activity is delicately and temporally regulated to ensure the seamless development of oligodendroglial lineage cells in different contexts. In this review, we discuss the role Wnt/β-catenin signaling in oligodendrocyte development, focusing on the interpretation of disparate results, and highlighting areas where important questions remain to be answered about oligodendroglial lineage Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:25782433

  13. Stable predictive control horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Raúl; Favela, Antonio; Raimondi, Angelo; Nevado, Antonio; Requena, Ricardo; Beltrán-Carbajal, Francisco

    2012-04-01

    The stability theory of predictive and adaptive predictive control for processes of linear and stable nature is based on the hypothesis of a physically realisable driving desired trajectory (DDT). The formal theoretical verification of this hypothesis is trivial for processes with a stable inverse, but it is not for processes with an unstable inverse. The extended strategy of predictive control was developed with the purpose of overcoming methodologically this stability problem and it has delivered excellent performance and stability in its industrial applications given a suitable choice of the prediction horizon. From a theoretical point of view, the existence of a prediction horizon capable of ensuring stability for processes with an unstable inverse was proven in the literature. However, no analytical solution has been found for the determination of the prediction horizon values which guarantee stability, in spite of the theoretical and practical interest of this matter. This article presents a new method able to determine the set of prediction horizon values which ensure stability under the extended predictive control strategy formulation and a particular performance criterion for the design of the DDT generically used in many industrial applications. The practical application of this method is illustrated by means of simulation examples.

  14. Stable microbial community composition on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Musilova, Michaela; Tranter, Martyn; Bennett, Sarah A; Wadham, Jemma; Anesio, Alexandre M

    2015-01-01

    The first molecular-based studies of microbes in snow and on glaciers have only recently been performed on the vast Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). Aeolian microbial seeding is hypothesized to impact on glacier surface community compositions. Localized melting of glacier debris (cryoconite) into the surface ice forms cryoconite holes, which are considered 'hot spots' for microbial activity on glaciers. To date, few studies have attempted to assess the origin and evolution of cryoconite and cryoconite hole communities throughout a melt season. In this study, a range of experimental approaches was used for the first time to study the inputs, temporal and structural transformations of GrIS microbial communities over the course of a whole ablation season. Small amounts of aeolian (wind and snow) microbes were potentially seeding the stable communities that were already present on the glacier (composed mainly of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria). However, the dominant bacterial taxa in the aeolian samples (Firmicutes) did not establish themselves in local glacier surface communities. Cryoconite and cryoconite hole community composition remained stable throughout the ablation season following the fast community turnover, which accompanied the initial snow melt. The presence of stable communities in cryoconite and cryoconite holes on the GrIS will allow future studies to assess glacier surface microbial diversity at individual study sites from sampling intervals of short duration only. Aeolian inputs also had significantly different organic δ(13)C values (-28.0 to -27.0‰) from the glacier surface values (-25.7 to -23.6‰), indicating that in situ microbial processes are important in fixing new organic matter and transforming aeolian organic carbon. The continuous productivity of stable communities over one melt season makes them important contributors to biogeochemical nutrient cycling on glaciers.

  15. Differences in unilateral chest press muscle activation and kinematics on a stable versus unstable surface while holding one versus two dumbbells.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jeffrey M; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Oppenheimer, Nicole E; Feser, Erin H

    2015-01-01

    Training the bench press exercise on a traditional flat bench does not induce a level of instability as seen in sport movements and activities of daily living. Twenty participants were recruited to test two forms of instability: using one dumbbell rather than two and lifting on the COR bench compared to a flat bench. Electromyography (EMG) amplitudes of the pectoralis major, middle trapezius, external oblique, and internal oblique were recorded and compared. Differences in range of motion (ROM) were evaluated by measuring an angular representation of the shoulder complex. Four separate conditions of unilateral bench press were tested while lifting on a: flat bench with one dumbbell, flat bench with two dumbbells, COR Bench with one dumbbell, and COR Bench with two dumbbells. The results imply that there are no differences in EMG amplitude or ROM between the COR bench and traditional bench. However, greater ROM was found to be utilized in the single dumbbell condition, both in the COR bench and the flat bench.

  16. Activation of electrophilicity of stable Y-delocalized carbamate cations in intramolecular aromatic substitution reaction: evidence for formation of diprotonated carbamates leading to generation of isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Kurouchi, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Hiromichi; Nakamura, Satoshi; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2012-10-19

    Although cations with three heteroatoms, such as monoprotonated guanidine and urea, are stabilized by Y-shaped conjugation and such Y-conjugated cations are sufficiently basic to be further protonated (or protosolvated) to dications in strongly acid media, only O-monoprotonated species have been detected in the case of carbamates even in magic acid. We found that the trifluoromethanesulfonic acid-catalyzed cyclization of arylethylcarbamates proceeds to afford dihydroisoquinolones in high yield. In strong acids, methyl carbamates are fully O-monoprotonated, and these monocations do not undergo cyclization even under heating. But, as the acidity of the reaction medium is further increased, the cyclization reaction of methyl phenethylcarbamates starts to proceed as a first-order reaction, with a linear relationship between rate and acidity. The sign and magnitude of the entropy of activation ΔS(‡) were found to be similar to those of other A(Ac)1 reactions. These results strongly support the idea that further protonation of the O-protonated carbamates is involved in the cyclization, but the concentration of the dications is very low and suggests that the rate-determining step is dissociation of methanol from the diprotonated carbamate to generate protonated isocyanate, which reacts with the aromatic ring. Therefore, O-protonated carbamates are weak bases in sharp contrast to other Y-shaped monocations.

  17. Differences in unilateral chest press muscle activation and kinematics on a stable versus unstable surface while holding one versus two dumbbells

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Jeffrey M.; Oppenheimer, Nicole E.; Feser, Erin H.

    2015-01-01

    Training the bench press exercise on a traditional flat bench does not induce a level of instability as seen in sport movements and activities of daily living. Twenty participants were recruited to test two forms of instability: using one dumbbell rather than two and lifting on the COR bench compared to a flat bench. Electromyography (EMG) amplitudes of the pectoralis major, middle trapezius, external oblique, and internal oblique were recorded and compared. Differences in range of motion (ROM) were evaluated by measuring an angular representation of the shoulder complex. Four separate conditions of unilateral bench press were tested while lifting on a: flat bench with one dumbbell, flat bench with two dumbbells, COR Bench with one dumbbell, and COR Bench with two dumbbells. The results imply that there are no differences in EMG amplitude or ROM between the COR bench and traditional bench. However, greater ROM was found to be utilized in the single dumbbell condition, both in the COR bench and the flat bench. PMID:26528421

  18. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Frameworks: Highly Stable Charge-Separated States through Strut/Guest-to-Strut Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Nivedita; Jayaramulu, Kolleboyina; Kiran, Venkayala; Rao, K Venkata; Sampath, Srinivasan; George, Subi J; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2015-08-10

    Molecular organization of donor and acceptor chromophores in self-assembled materials is of paramount interest in the field of photovoltaics or mimicry of natural light-harvesting systems. With this in mind, a redox-active porous interpenetrated metal-organic framework (MOF), {[Cd(bpdc)(bpNDI)]⋅4.5 H2 O⋅DMF}n (1) has been constructed from a mixed chromophoric system. The μ-oxo-bridged secondary building unit, {Cd2 (μ-OCO)2 }, guides the parallel alignment of bpNDI (N,N'-di(4-pyridyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide) acceptor linkers, which are tethered with bpdc (bpdcH2 =4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylic acid) linkers of another entangled net in the framework, resulting in photochromic behaviour through inter-net electron transfer. Encapsulation of electron-donating aromatic molecules in the electron-deficient channels of 1 leads to a perfect donor-acceptor co-facial organization, resulting in long-lived charge-separated states of bpNDI. Furthermore, 1 and guest encapsulated species are characterised through electrochemical studies for understanding of their redox properties. PMID:26206156

  19. Detection of the Remaining Files Copied from Removable Storage Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, Chikako; Andoh, Yuu; Nishida, Makoto

    This paper proposes a method for detecting remaining files copied from removable storage medium. The proposed method logs events that the database of a file system, “Folder”, is changed. The remaining file can be detected by tracing the sequence of logs using path/file-name matching. Our experimental result suggests that the proposed method can accurately detect remaining files left on the computer.

  20. High-Resolution structure of the stable plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 variant 14-1B in its proteinase-cleaved form: A new tool for detailed interaction studies and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, J.; Gettins, P.

    2008-10-22

    Wild-type plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) rapidly converts to the inactive latent state under conditions of physiological pH and temperature. For in vivo studies of active PAI-1 in cell culture and in vivo model systems, the 14-1B PAI-1 mutant (N150H-K154T-Q319L-M354I), with its stabilized active conformation, has thus become the PAI-1 of choice. As a consequence of the increased stability, the only two forms likely to be encountered are the active or the cleaved form, the latter either free or complexed with target proteinase. We hereby report the first structure of the stable 14-1B PAI-1 variant in its reactive center cleaved form, to a resolution of 2.0 {angstrom}. The >99% complete structure represents the highest resolved structure of free cleaved PAI-1. This high-resolution structure should be of great use for drug target development and for modeling protein-protein interactions such as those of PAI-1 with vitronectin.

  1. Bioactive compound loaded stable silver nanoparticle synthesis from microwave irradiated aqueous extracellular leaf extracts of Naringi crenulata and its wound healing activity in experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswari, T; Thiyagarajan, M; Geetha, N; Venkatachalam, P

    2014-07-01

    An efficient and eco-friendly protocol for the synthesis of bioactive silver nanoparticles was developed using Naringi crenulata leaf extracts via microwave irradiation method. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized by treating N. crenulata leaf extracts with 1mM of aqueous silver nitrate solution. An effective bioactive compound such as alkaloids, phenols, saponins and quinines present in the N. crenulata reduces the Ag(+) into Ag(0). The synthesized silver nanoparticles were monitored by UV-vis spectrophotometer and further characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). UV-vis spectroscopy showed maximum absorbance at 390nm due to surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs. From FESEM results, an average crystal size of the synthesized nanoparticle was 72-98nm. FT-IR results showed sharp absorption peaks and they were assigned to phosphine, alkyl halides and sulfonate groups. Silver nanoparticles synthesized were generally found to be spherical and cubic shape. Topical application of ointment prepared from silver nanoparticles of N. crenulata were formulated and evaluated in vivo using the excision wound healing model on Wistar albino rats. The measurement of the wound areas was performed on 3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th and 15th days and the percentage of wound closures was calculated accordingly. By the 15th day, the ointment base containing 5% (w/w) of silver nanoparticles showed 100% wound healing activity compared with that of the reference as well as control bases. The results strongly suggested that the batch C ointment containing silver nanaoparticles synthesized from the leaf extracts of N. crenulata was found to be very effective in wound repair and encourages harnessing the potentials of the plant biomolecules loaded silver nanoparticle in the treatment of tropical diseases including wound healing. PMID:24681224

  2. Synthesis and characterization of high photocatalytic activity and stable Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers for photocatalytic degradation of black liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Li; Long, Qiyi; Yin, Chao

    2014-11-01

    The TiO2 fiber was prepared by using cotton fiber as a template, and then Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers were synthesized via in situ Ag3PO4 particles onto the surface of TiO2 fiber. Their structure and physical properties were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), specific surface analyzer, X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis absorption spectra and photoluminescence spectra (PL). SEM analysis indicated that the well-defined surface morphology of natural cotton fiber was mostly preserved in TiO2 and Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers. Compared with TiO2 fiber, the absorbance wavelengths of Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers were apparently red shifted and the PL intensities revealed a significant decrease. By using the photocatalytic degradation of black liquor as a model reaction, the visible light and ultraviolet light catalytic efficiencies of TiO2, Ag3PO4 and Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers were evaluated. The reaction results showed that Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers had stronger photocatalytic activity and excellent chemical stability in repeated and long-term applications. Therefore, the prepared Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers could act as an efficient catalyst for the photocatalytic degradation of black liquor, which suggested their promising applications. It was proposed that the •OH radicals played the leading role in the photocatalytic degradation of the black liquor by Ag3PO4/TiO2 fibers system.

  3. Th-1 biased immunomodulation and synergistic antileishmanial activity of stable cationic lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticle: biodistribution and toxicity assessment of encapsulated amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Asthana, Shalini; Jaiswal, Anil K; Gupta, Pramod K; Dube, Anuradha; Chourasia, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    To address issues related to Amphotericin B (AmpB) clinical applications, we developed macrophage targeted cationic stearylamine lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNPs) with complementary characteristics of both polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes, for enhancement of therapeutic efficacy and diminishing toxic effect of encapsulated AmpB. The LPNPs (size 198.3 ± 3.52 nm, PDI 0.135 ± 0.03, zeta potential +31.6 ± 1.91 mV) provide core-shell type structure which has the ability to encapsulate amphiphilic AmpB in higher amount (Encapsulation efficiency 96.1 ± 2.01%), sustain drug release and stabilize formulation tremendously. Attenuated erythrocytes and J774A.1 toxicity of LPNPs demonstrated safe applicability for parenteral administration. Elevated macrophage uptake of LPNPs, rapid plasma clearance and higher drug allocation in macrophage abundant liver and spleen illustrated admirable antileishmanial efficacy of AmpB-LPNPs in vitro (IC50, 0.16 ± 0.04 μg AmpB/ml) and in vivo (89.41 ± 3.58% parasite inhibition) against visceral leishmaniasis models. Augmentation in antileishmanial activity due to Th-1 biased immune-alteration mediated by drug-free LPNPs which elevated microbicidal mediators of macrophages. Moreover, minimal distribution to kidney tissues and low level of nephrotoxicity markers (creatinine and BUN) demonstrated the safety profile of AmpB-LPNPs. Conclusively, reliable safety and macrophage directed therapeutic performance of AmpB-LPNPs suggest it as promising alternative to commercial AmpB-formulations for the eradication of intra-macrophage diseases.

  4. Bioactive compound loaded stable silver nanoparticle synthesis from microwave irradiated aqueous extracellular leaf extracts of Naringi crenulata and its wound healing activity in experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswari, T; Thiyagarajan, M; Geetha, N; Venkatachalam, P

    2014-07-01

    An efficient and eco-friendly protocol for the synthesis of bioactive silver nanoparticles was developed using Naringi crenulata leaf extracts via microwave irradiation method. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized by treating N. crenulata leaf extracts with 1mM of aqueous silver nitrate solution. An effective bioactive compound such as alkaloids, phenols, saponins and quinines present in the N. crenulata reduces the Ag(+) into Ag(0). The synthesized silver nanoparticles were monitored by UV-vis spectrophotometer and further characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). UV-vis spectroscopy showed maximum absorbance at 390nm due to surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs. From FESEM results, an average crystal size of the synthesized nanoparticle was 72-98nm. FT-IR results showed sharp absorption peaks and they were assigned to phosphine, alkyl halides and sulfonate groups. Silver nanoparticles synthesized were generally found to be spherical and cubic shape. Topical application of ointment prepared from silver nanoparticles of N. crenulata were formulated and evaluated in vivo using the excision wound healing model on Wistar albino rats. The measurement of the wound areas was performed on 3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th and 15th days and the percentage of wound closures was calculated accordingly. By the 15th day, the ointment base containing 5% (w/w) of silver nanoparticles showed 100% wound healing activity compared with that of the reference as well as control bases. The results strongly suggested that the batch C ointment containing silver nanaoparticles synthesized from the leaf extracts of N. crenulata was found to be very effective in wound repair and encourages harnessing the potentials of the plant biomolecules loaded silver nanoparticle in the treatment of tropical diseases including wound healing.

  5. San Andres Rift, Nicaraguan Shelf: A 346-Km-Long, North-South Rift Zone Actively Extending the Interior of the "Stable" Caribbean Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, L. C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The San Andres rift (SAR) is an active, 015°-trending, bathymetric and structural rift basin that extends for 346 km across the Nicaraguan platform and varies in bathymetric width from 11-27 km and in water depth from 1,250 to 2,500 m. We used four 2D regional seismic lines tied to two offshore, industry wells located west of the SAR on the Nicaraguan platform to map normal faults, transfer faults, and possibly volcanic features with the rift. The Colombian islands of San Andres (26 km2) and Providencia (17 km2) are footwall uplifts along west-dipping, normal fault bounding the eastern margin of the rift. Mapping indicates the pre-rift section is Late Cretaceous to Oligocene in age and that the onset of rifting began in the early to middle Miocene as shown by wedging of the Miocene and younger sedimentary fill controlled by north-south-striking normal faults. Structural restorations at two locations across the rift shows that the basin opened mainly by dip-slip fault motions producing a total, east-west extension of 18 km in the north and 15 km in the south. Structural restoration shows the rift formed on a 37-km-wide, elongate basement high - possibly of late Cretaceous, volcanic origin and related to the Caribbean large igneous province. Previous workers have noted that the SAR is associated with province of Pliocene to Quaternary seamounts and volcanoes which range from non-alkaline to mildly alkaline, including volcanic rocks on Providencia described as andesites and rhyolites. The SAR forms one of the few recognizable belts of recorded seismicity within the Caribbean plate. The origin of the SAR is related to Miocene and younger left-lateral displacement along the Pedro Banks fault to the north and the southwestern Hess fault to the south. We propose that the amount of left-lateral displacement that created the rift is equivalent to the amount of extension that formed it: 18-20 km.

  6. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9-4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  7. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9-4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  8. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9–4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  9. Highly stable piezo-immunoglobulin-biosensing of a SiO2/ZnO nanogenerator as a self-powered/active biosensor arising from the field effect influenced piezoelectric screening effect.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yayu; Fu, Yongming; Wang, Penglei; Xing, Lili; Xue, Xinyu

    2015-02-01

    Highly stable piezo-immunoglobulin-biosensing has been realized from a SiO2/ZnO nanowire (NW) nanogenerator (NG) as a self-powered/active biosensor. The piezoelectric output generated by the SiO2/ZnO NW NG can act not only as a power source for driving the device, but also as a sensing signal for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG). The stability of the device is very high, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) ranges from 1.20% to 4.20%. The limit of detection (LOD) of IgG on the device can reach 5.7 ng mL(-1). The response of the device is in a linear relationship with IgG concentration. The biosensing performance of SiO2/ZnO NWs is much higher than that of bare ZnO NWs. A SiO2 layer uniformly coated on the surface of the ZnO NW acts as the gate insulation layer, which increases mechanical robustness and protects it from the electrical leakages and short circuits. The IgG biomolecules modified on the surface of the SiO2/ZnO NW act as a gate potential, and the field effect can influence the surface electron density of ZnO NWs, which varies the screening effect of free-carriers on the piezoelectric output. The present results demonstrate a feasible approach for a highly stable self-powered/active biosensor.

  10. Stable lepton mass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domcke, Valerie; Romanino, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We study natural lepton mass matrices, obtained assuming the stability of physical flavour observables with respect to the variations of individual matrix elements. We identify all four possible stable neutrino textures from algebraic conditions on their entries. Two of them turn out to be uniquely associated to specific neutrino mass patterns. We then concentrate on the semi-degenerate pattern, corresponding to an overall neutrino mass scale within the reach of future experiments. In this context we show that i) the neutrino and charged lepton mixings and mass matrices are largely constrained by the requirement of stability, ii) naturalness considerations give a mild preference for the Majorana phase most relevant for neutrinoless double- β decay, α ˜ π/2, and iii) SU(5) unification allows to extend the implications of stability to the down quark sector. The above considerations would benefit from an experimental determination of the PMNS ratio | U 32 /U 31|, i.e. of the Dirac phase δ.

  11. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  12. 49 CFR 845.51 - Investigation to remain open.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Investigation to remain open. 845.51 Section 845.51 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION... § 845.51 Investigation to remain open. Accident investigations are never officially closed but are...

  13. 49 CFR 845.51 - Investigation to remain open.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Investigation to remain open. 845.51 Section 845... § 845.51 Investigation to remain open. Accident investigations are never officially closed but are kept open for the submission of new and pertinent evidence by any interested person. If the Board finds...

  14. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  15. Genetic analysis of the skeletal remains attributed to Francesco Petrarca.

    PubMed

    Caramelli, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Capelli, Cristian; Lari, Martina; Sampietro, María Lourdes; Gigli, Elena; Milani, Lucio; Pilli, Elena; Guimaraes, Silvia; Chiarelli, Brunetto; Marin, Vito Terribile Wien; Casoli, Antonella; Stanyon, Roscoe; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Barbujani, Guido

    2007-11-15

    We report on the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis of the supposed remains of Francesco Petrarca exhumed in November 2003, from the S. Maria Assunta church, in Arquà Padua (Italy) where he died in 1374. The optimal preservation of the remains allowed the retrieval of sufficient mtDNA for genetic analysis. DNA was extracted from a rib and a tooth and mtDNA sequences were determined in multiple clones using the strictest criteria currently available for validation of ancient DNA sequences, including independent replication. MtDNA sequences from the tooth and rib were not identical, suggesting that they belonged to different individuals. Indeed, molecular gender determination showed that the postcranial remains belonged to a male while the skull belonged to a female. Historical records indicated that the remains were violated in 1630, possibly by thieves. These results are consistent with morphological investigations and confirm the importance of integrating molecular and morphological approaches in investigating historical remains.

  16. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  17. Paraoxonase-1 and Simvastatin Treatment in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is the crucial antioxidant marker of high-density lipoproteins. The present study is aimed at assessing the effect of simvastatin treatment on PON1 activity and its relationship to Q192R and M55L polymorphisms in subjects with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods. The patient group was composed of 53 individuals with stable CAD, and the control group included 53 sex-matched police officers without CAD. CAD patients were treated with simvastatin 40mg/day for 12 months. Respectively, flow mediated dilatation (FMD), serum hs-CRP and TNF-α levels, urinary 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations, and PON1 activity were evaluated in definitive intervals. Results. There was no effect of simvastatin treatment on urinary 8-iso-PGF2α. Simvastatin treatment significantly increased FMD value, decreased CRP and TNF-α concentration. After adjusting for PON1 genotypes, significantly higher PON1 activity was noted in the 192R allele carriers, in both groups. Regardless of genotype, PON1 activity remained stable after simvastatin treatment. Conclusions. The present study confirms a positive effect of simvastatin therapy on endothelial function and inflammatory markers in secondary prevention. Simvastatin treatment shows no effects on PON1 activity and 8-isoprostanes level. The effect of simvastatin therapy on PON1 activity is not modulated by Q192R and M55L polymorphisms. PMID:27213056

  18. Stable and Continuous Long-term Enzymatic Reaction using an Enzyme-Nanofiber Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Hwang, Ee Taek; Kim, Byoung Chan; Lee, Sun Mi; Sang, Byoung-In; Choi, Yong Su; Kim, Jungbae; Gu, Man Bock

    2007-07-01

    This study shows the preparation and application of enzyme-nanofiber composites for long-term stable operation. The enzyme-nanofiber composite was prepared by coating an enzyme-aggregate, the esterase from Rhizopus oryzae, on the surface of the nanofibers. The activity and stability of the esterase-nanofiber composite was evaluated by measuring the production of p-nitrophenol from the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate. It was found that enzyme-nanofiber was very stable, even when the fibers were shaken in glasses, preserving 80 % of the initial activity for 100 days. In addition, the enzyme nanofiber composite was repeatedly used in 30 cycles of substrate hydrolysis and still remained active. Consequently, the esterase-nanofiber composite was finally employed to find its feasibility of long-term and stable continuous substrate hydrolysis reaction. In the sample reactor, the production of p-nitrophenol was consistent for 400 hr. Additionally, it was found that the production of p-nitrophenol proportionally decreased as the dilution rate was increased, showing the relationship between the efficiency of hydrolysis and the retention time within the reactor. This study demonstrates that the enzyme-nanofiber composite can be used in both repeated-batch and continuous modes for long-term stable operation.

  19. Development of shelf stable protein rich composite cereal bar.

    PubMed

    Padmashree, Ananthan; Sharma, Gopal Kumar; Srihari, Kadaba Anantharaman; Bawa, Amarinder Singh

    2012-06-01

    Protein rich composite cereal bar based on cereal ingredients was prepared using semi automatic tablet making machine, packed in poly propylene (PP), paper aluminium foil polyethylene (PFP), metallised polyester (MP) followed by vacuum packing in metallized polyester films. Proximate composition, mineral contents as well as changes in peroxide value (PV), free fatty acid value (FFA), thiobarbituric acid value (TBA), browning, fatty acid profile, vitamins, effect of water activity on lipid peroxidation, fortification with vitamins and minerals, microbiological as well as sensory parameters during storage under ambient (15-34°C) and 37°C temperature conditions were studied. Composite cereal bar remained shelf stable for 3 months in PP and 6 months in PFP, MP and MP plus vacuum packing under ambient and 37°C temperature conditions. PMID:23729853

  20. Properties and effects of remaining carbon from waste plastics gasifying on iron scale reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongmin; Chen, Shuwen; Miao, Xincheng; Yuan, Hao

    2011-06-01

    The carbonous activities of three kinds of carbon-bearing materials gasified from plastics were tested with coal coke as reference. The results showed that the carbonous activities of these remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. Besides, the fractal analyses showed that the porosities of remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. It revealed that these kinds of remaining carbon-bearing materials are conducive to improve the kinetics conditions of gas-solid phase reaction in iron scale reduction.

  1. Construct validity of Stable-2000 and Stable-2007 scores.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Kevin L; Babchishin, Kelly M

    2012-02-01

    We addressed the construct validity of Stable-2000 and Stable-2007 scores by examining correlations between selected items and validated independent measures of relevant constructs in samples of convicted sex offenders. In Study 1, the Child Molester Attitudes item of the Stable-2000 shared 23% of the variance with a self-report measure of beliefs supportive of child molestation, r(19) = .48. The Deviant Sexual Interests items of the Stable-2000 and Stable-2007 shared 7% to 66% of the variance, respectively, with an offense-history-based measure of pedophilic interests, r(18) = .27 for the Stable-2000 and r(11) = .81 for the Stable-2007. In Study 2, the Lovers/Intimate Partners, General Social Rejection/Loneliness, Rapist Attitudes, and Child Molester Attitudes items of the Stable-2000 shared 4% to 19% of the variance with self-report measures of, respectively, intimacy, r(90) = -.44; loneliness, r(88) = .34; beliefs supportive of rape, r(72) = .21; and beliefs supportive of child molestation, r(78) = .36. The results generally suggest that the Stable items examined are associated with measures of similar constructs; however, the degree of convergence was lower than expected. More systematic and comprehensive research is needed to examine convergence of the Stable items with other relevant measures and additional aspects of construct validity. Such efforts will provide a clearer understanding of dynamic risk factors, appropriate areas of focus for treatment efforts, and, more generally, why some sex offenders recidivate.

  2. The non-homologous end-joining pathway is involved in stable transformation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Saika, Hiroaki; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Toki, Seiichi

    2014-01-01

    Stable transformation with T-DNA needs the coordinated activities of many proteins derived from both host plant cells and Agrobacterium. In dicot plants, including Arabidopsis, it has been suggested that non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ)—one of the main DNA double-strand break repair pathways—is involved in the T-DNA integration step that is crucial to stable transformation. However, how this pathway is involved remains unclear as results with NHEJ mutants in Arabidopsis have given inconsistent results. Recently, a system for visualization of stable expression of genes located on T-DNA has been established in rice callus. Stable expression was shown to be reduced significantly in NHEJ knock-down rice calli, suggesting strongly that NHEJ is involved in Agrobacterium-mediated stable transformation in rice. Since rice transformation is now efficient and reproducible, rice is a good model plant in which to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of T-DNA integration. PMID:25368624

  3. 6. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL NAILED TO POSTS WITHIN CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL NAILED TO POSTS WITHIN CANAL CONSTRUCTED TO PROTECT OUTSIDE CANAL BANK. VIEW IS TO THE WEST. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  4. 7. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL WITHIN CANAL CONSTRUCTED TO PROTECT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. REMAINS OF PLANK WALL WITHIN CANAL CONSTRUCTED TO PROTECT OUTSIDE CANAL BANK, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. NOTE CROSS SUPPORT POLES EXTENDING TO HILLSIDE. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  5. 53. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST SHOWING THE REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST SHOWING THE REMAINS OF A WOODEN SETTLING BOX IN THE BACKGROUND RIGHT. AMALGAMATING PANS IN THE FOREGROUND. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  6. 11. DOUBLE CURVED RACK. UPPER PORTION ROTATES; LOWER PORTION REMAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DOUBLE CURVED RACK. UPPER PORTION ROTATES; LOWER PORTION REMAINS STATIONARY. DISCARDED ROLLER NEAR CENTER OF FRAME. - Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, Bridge No. Z-6, Spanning North Branch of Chicago River, South of Cortland Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  7. Looking east inside of casthouse no. 6 at the remains ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east inside of casthouse no. 6 at the remains of slag runner and slag notch of blast furnace no. 6. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  8. 60. NORTHEASTERN VIEW OF THE REMAINS OF THE DOROTHY SIX ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. NORTHEASTERN VIEW OF THE REMAINS OF THE DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE COMPLEX. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  9. 59. REMAINS OF THE DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE COMPLEX LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. REMAINS OF THE DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE COMPLEX LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE LADLE HOUSE IS ON THE RIGHT. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  10. 14. VIEW LOOKING WEST, GRAIN LEG REMAINS AND CHUTE OPENING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW LOOKING WEST, GRAIN LEG REMAINS AND CHUTE OPENING OVER RECEIVING HOPPER, ON TRACK DECK - West Shore Railroad, Pier 7 Grain Elevator, Hudson River & Pershing Road vicinity, West New York, Hudson County, NJ

  11. 13. VIEW LOOKING EAST, REMAINS OF HATCH COVER AND CHUTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW LOOKING EAST, REMAINS OF HATCH COVER AND CHUTE TO SMALL HOPPER, GRAIN LEGS, AND CONVEYOR DRIVE SHAFT FROM TRACK DECK - West Shore Railroad, Pier 7 Grain Elevator, Hudson River & Pershing Road vicinity, West New York, Hudson County, NJ

  12. 7. Detail view: east side of north end, showing remains ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail view: east side of north end, showing remains of Fort San Antonio - Puente Guillermo Esteves, Spanning San Antonio Channel at PR-25 (Juan Ponce de Leon Avenue), San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  13. 25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food cooked on the stove was served to workers in the eating area to the left of the counter (off picture). - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  14. 4. Band Wheel and Walking Beam Mechanism, Including Remains of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Band Wheel and Walking Beam Mechanism, Including Remains of Frame Belt House, Looking Southeast - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  15. 33. VIEW SHOWING THE REMAINS OF THE ORIGINAL ARIZONA CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. VIEW SHOWING THE REMAINS OF THE ORIGINAL ARIZONA CANAL HEADING, ARIZONA DAM, LOOKING EAST Photographer: Mark Durben, December 1990 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 7. VIEW SOUTH, REMAINS OF ORIGINAL STONE ABUTMENTS ON HILLSIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW SOUTH, REMAINS OF ORIGINAL STONE ABUTMENTS ON HILLSIDE SOUTH OF BRIDGE, EAST END - Cincinnati, Jackson & Mackinaw Railroad Bridge, Abandonned Penn Central Route, spanning Tom's Run, Farmersville, Montgomery County, OH

  17. 12. DETAIL VIEW NORTHWEST OF BOILER REMAINS, WITH FRAGMENTS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW NORTHWEST OF BOILER REMAINS, WITH FRAGMENTS OF SEVEN-PISTON UNDERFEED STOKER - Turners Falls Power & Electric Company, Hampden Station, East bank of Connecticut River, Chicopee, Hampden County, MA

  18. 7. VIEW OF VESSEL FROM PORT BON, SHOWING REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF VESSEL FROM PORT BON, SHOWING REMAINS OF MAIN CABIN. AFT CABIN STILL STANDS ON STERN IN BACKGROUND - Motorized Sailing Vessel "Fox", Beached on East Bank ofBayou Lafourche, Larose, Lafourche Parish, LA

  19. 11. Remains of Douglasfir cordwood abandoned when kilns ceased operation, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Remains of Douglas-fir cordwood abandoned when kilns ceased operation, looking northeast. - Warren King Charcoal Kilns, 5 miles west of Idaho Highway 28, Targhee National Forest, Leadore, Lemhi County, ID

  20. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the southwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  1. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the west-northwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  2. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the south - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  3. View of remains of Feature 17, a cottage, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of remains of Feature 17, a cottage, view to the northwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  4. View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 1, the remains of and administration building, view to the north - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  5. View of the remains of Feature 19, a cottage, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the remains of Feature 19, a cottage, view to the west-northwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  6. View of Feature 3, the remains of an administration building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Feature 3, the remains of an administration building, view to the south - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  7. 13. View South, showing the remaining pier footings for the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View South, showing the remaining pier footings for the steam engine water tower for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad. - Cotton Hill Station Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 16, Cotton Hill, Fayette County, WV

  8. 6. REMAINS OF 48' MILL SHIPPING BUILDING. THE END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. REMAINS OF 48' MILL SHIPPING BUILDING. THE END OF THE MILL TABLE IS VISIBLE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, 48" Plate Mill, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  9. 21. Detail of remains of machinery house viewed from below ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Detail of remains of machinery house viewed from below anchor-span deck, showing drawspan cable running back to the winding drum of the winch; view to northeast. - Summer Street Bridge, Spanning Reserved Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  10. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, with floor boards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, with floor boards removed, showing cross beams, foundation sill and mortises, and horizontal wall boards. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  11. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, wall boards, tenoned uprights and mortised sill beams. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  12. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill with most floorboards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill with most floorboards removed, showing cross beams with mortises, vertical wall boards, and horizontal floor boards. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  13. Cellar: Detail of paired relieving arch and remains of herringbone ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cellar: Detail of paired relieving arch and remains of herringbone brick pattern from earlier cooking fireplace at back, southeast wall looking southeast - Kingston-Upon-Hill, Kitts Hummock Road, Dover, Kent County, DE

  14. Detail view looking northeast at ramp 3. View shows remaining ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view looking northeast at ramp 3. View shows remaining stone inlay to provide traction surface. - Naval Air Station North Island, Seaplane Ramps Nos. 2, 3 & 4, North Island, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  15. 11. LOOKING SOUTH AT THE ONLY REMAINING PART OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. LOOKING SOUTH AT THE ONLY REMAINING PART OF THE NORTH SIDE OF ORIGINAL LAB, FROM COURTYARD. - U.S. Geological Survey, Rock Magnetics Laboratory, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, San Mateo County, CA

  16. View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of submerged remains of Read Sawmill, showing floor boards, cross beams and notches for wall post beams. - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  17. The taphonomy of human remains in a glacial environment.

    PubMed

    Pilloud, Marin A; Megyesi, Mary S; Truffer, Martin; Congram, Derek

    2016-04-01

    A glacial environment is a unique setting that can alter human remains in characteristic ways. This study describes glacial dynamics and how glaciers can be understood as taphonomic agents. Using a case study of human remains recovered from Colony Glacier, Alaska, a glacial taphonomic signature is outlined that includes: (1) movement of remains, (2) dispersal of remains, (3) altered bone margins, (4) splitting of skeletal elements, and (5) extensive soft tissue preservation and adipocere formation. As global glacier area is declining in the current climate, there is the potential for more materials of archaeological and medicolegal significance to be exposed. It is therefore important for the forensic anthropologist to have an idea of the taphonomy in this setting and to be able to differentiate glacial effects from other taphonomic agents. PMID:26917542

  18. Looking northeast at the remains of the steam Jenny which ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking northeast at the remains of the steam Jenny which drove the boiler stokes. - Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation, Allenport Works, Boiler House, Route 88 on West bank of Monongahela River, Allenport, Washington County, PA

  19. 3. INTERIOR OF THE WATER FILTRATION PLANT SHOWING REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR OF THE WATER FILTRATION PLANT SHOWING REMAINS OF THE FILTRATION APPARATUS. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  20. 1. VIEW SHOWING REMAINS OF CAMOUFLAGE COVERING CONCRETE FOOTING FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SHOWING REMAINS OF CAMOUFLAGE COVERING CONCRETE FOOTING FOR A GENERATOR PAD - Fort Cronkhite, Anti-Aircraft Battery No. 1, Concrete Footing-Generator Pad, Wolf Road, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  1. 1. SOUTHWEST FRONT AND SOUTHEAST SIDE OF BLACKSMITH SHOP REMAINS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTHWEST FRONT AND SOUTHEAST SIDE OF BLACKSMITH SHOP REMAINS, TENANT HOUSE IN BACKGROUND - Mount Etna Iron Works, Blacksmith Shop, East of U.S. Route 22 on T.R. 463, Williamsburg, Blair County, PA

  2. Stable face representations

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Rob; Burton, A. Mike

    2011-01-01

    Photographs are often used to establish the identity of an individual or to verify that they are who they claim to be. Yet, recent research shows that it is surprisingly difficult to match a photo to a face. Neither humans nor machines can perform this task reliably. Although human perceivers are good at matching familiar faces, performance with unfamiliar faces is strikingly poor. The situation is no better for automatic face recognition systems. In practical settings, automatic systems have been consistently disappointing. In this review, we suggest that failure to distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar face processing has led to unrealistic expectations about face identification in applied settings. We also argue that a photograph is not necessarily a reliable indicator of facial appearance, and develop our proposal that summary statistics can provide more stable face representations. In particular, we show that image averaging stabilizes facial appearance by diluting aspects of the image that vary between snapshots of the same person. We review evidence that the resulting images can outperform photographs in both behavioural experiments and computer simulations, and outline promising directions for future research. PMID:21536553

  3. Encapsulation of enzyme via one-step template-free formation of stable organic-inorganic capsules: A simple and efficient method for immobilizing enzyme with high activity and recyclability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renliang; Wu, Mengyun; Goldman, Mark J; Li, Zhi

    2015-06-01

    Enzyme encapsulation is a simple, gentle, and general method for immobilizing enzyme, but it often suffers from one or more problems regarding enzyme loading efficiency, enzyme leakage, mechanical stability, and recyclability. Here we report a novel, simple, and efficient method for enzyme encapsulation to overcome these problems by forming stable organic-inorganic hybrid capsules. A new, facile, one-step, and template-free synthesis of organic-inorganic capsules in aqueous phase were developed based on PEI-induced simultaneous interfacial self-assembly of Fmoc-FF and polycondensation of silicate. Addition of an aqueous solution of Fmoc-FF and sodium silicate into an aqueous solution of PEI gave a new class of organic-inorganic hybrid capsules (FPSi) with multi-layered structure in high yield. The capsules are mechanically stable due to the incorporation of inorganic silica. Direct encapsulation of enzyme such as epoxide hydrolase SpEH and BSA along with the formation of the organic-inorganic capsules gave high yield of enzyme-containing capsules (∼1.2 mm in diameter), >90% enzyme loading efficiency, high specific enzyme loading (158 mg protein g(-1) carrier), and low enzyme leakage (<3% after 48 h incubation). FPSi-SpEH capsules catalyzed the hydrolysis of cyclohexene oxide to give (1R, 2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diol in high yield and concentration, with high specific activity (6.94 U mg(-1) protein) and the same high enantioselectivity as the free enzyme. The immobilized SpEH demonstrated also excellent operational stability and recyclability: retaining 87% productivity after 20 cycles with a total reaction time of 80 h. The new enzyme encapsulation method is efficient, practical, and also better than other reported encapsulation methods.

  4. 52. VIEW OF REMAINS OF ORIGINAL 1907 CONTROL PANEL, LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. VIEW OF REMAINS OF ORIGINAL 1907 CONTROL PANEL, LOCATED ON NORTH WALL OF EAST END OF CONTROL ROOM. PORTIONS OF THIS PANEL REMAINED IN USE UNTIL THE PLANT CLOSED. THE METERS AND CONTROLS ARE MOUNTED ON SOAPSTONE PANELS. THE INSTRUMENT IN THE LEFT CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS A TIRRILL VOLTAGE REGULATOR. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  5. A non-destructive method for dating human remains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lail, Warren K.; Sammeth, David; Mahan, Shannon; Nevins, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The skeletal remains of several Native Americans were recovered in an eroded state from a creek bank in northeastern New Mexico. Subsequently stored in a nearby museum, the remains became lost for almost 36 years. In a recent effort to repatriate the remains, it was necessary to fit them into a cultural chronology in order to determine the appropriate tribe(s) for consultation pursuant to the Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). Because the remains were found in an eroded context with no artifacts or funerary objects, their age was unknown. Having been asked to avoid destructive dating methods such as radiocarbon dating, the authors used Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) to date the sediments embedded in the cranium. The OSL analyses yielded reliable dates between A.D. 1415 and A.D. 1495. Accordingly, we conclude that the remains were interred somewhat earlier than A.D. 1415, but no later than A.D. 1495. We believe the remains are from individuals ancestral to the Ute Mouache Band, which is now being contacted for repatriation efforts. Not only do our methods contribute to the immediate repatriation efforts, they provide archaeologists with a versatile, non-destructive, numerical dating method that can be used in many burial contexts.

  6. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. {yields} Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. {yields} Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  7. Isolation of isoprene degrading bacteria from soils, development of isoA gene probes and identification of the active isoprene-degrading soil community using DNA-stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    El Khawand, Myriam; Crombie, Andrew T; Johnston, Antonia; Vavlline, Dmitrii V; McAuliffe, Joseph C; Latone, Jacob A; Primak, Yuliya A; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Whited, Gregg M; McGenity, Terry J; Murrell, J Colin

    2016-09-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs), are an important element in the global carbon cycle, accounting for a significant proportion of fixed carbon. They contribute directly and indirectly to global warming and climate change and have a major effect on atmospheric chemistry. Plants emit isoprene to the atmosphere in similar quantities to emissions of methane from all sources and each accounts for approximately one third of total VOCs. Although methanotrophs, capable of growth on methane, have been intensively studied, we know little of isoprene biodegradation. Here, we report the isolation of two isoprene-degrading strains from the terrestrial environment and describe the design and testing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers targeting isoA, the gene encoding the active-site component of the conserved isoprene monooxygenase, which are capable of retrieving isoA sequences from isoprene-enriched environmental samples. Stable isotope probing experiments, using biosynthesized (13) C-labelled isoprene, identified the active isoprene-degrading bacteria in soil. This study identifies novel isoprene-degrading strains using both culture-dependent and, for the first time, culture-independent methods and provides the tools and foundations for continued investigation of the biogeography and molecular ecology of isoprene-degrading bacteria.

  8. [Modern biology, imagery and forensic medicine: contributions and limitations in examination of skeletal remains].

    PubMed

    Lecomte, Dominique; Plu, Isabelle; Froment, Alain

    2012-06-01

    Forensic examination is often requested when skeletal remains are discovered. Detailed visual observation can provide much information, such as the human or animal origin, sex, age, stature, and ancestry, and approximate time since death. New three-dimensional imaging techniques can provide further information (osteometry, facial reconstruction). Bone chemistry, and particularly measurement of stable or unstable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, yields information on diet and time since death, respectively. Genetic analyses of ancient DNA are also developing rapidly. Although seldom used in a judicial context, these modern anthropologic techniques are nevertheless available for the most complex cases.

  9. Quality of commercial shelf-stable soymilk products.

    PubMed

    Bai, Y; Wilson, L A; Glatz, B A

    1998-09-01

    Four brands of shelf-stable soymilks (three lots each) were evaluated for their quality. All samples were tested for trypsin inhibitor activity, microbial load (coliforms, aerobic mesophiles, and psychrotrophs), solids content, pH, color, and viscosity. Storage stability at 5 degrees C of the opened original containers was evaluated by microbiological analyses. Physical properties were consistent among three lots of the same brand, but varied among brands. Trypsin inhibitor activity ranged from 3.43 to 10.35 mg/g dried soymilk. The pH values of the soymilks varied between 6.41 and 7.34. Viscosity was measured between 16.5 and 26.4 mPa. Solids content varied considerably among soymilks, from 6.88 to 12.37% (wt/vol). Freshly opened commercial soymilk contained fewer than one microorganism per ml in all microbial counts. During storage at 5 degrees C, microbial counts increased sharply after 2 to 3 weeks. A single microorganism predominated in each stored sample. Shelf life (defined as the time during which aerobic mesophile counts remained below 10(6) CFU/ml) varied from 3 to 4 weeks. The appearance and pH of soymilks remained unchanged even after 4 weeks of storage. Five types of microorganisms were found in stored soymilk samples; none of them produced acid. PMID:9766068

  10. Barometric pressure fluctuations: effects on the activity of laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Sprott, R L

    1967-09-01

    Fluctuations in naturally occurring levels of barometric pressure appear to be an important determinant of activity in laboratory mice. In three experiments, activity was higher after increases in barometric pressure than it was after decreases. When the barometric pressure remained relatively stable, intermediate levels of activity were observed.

  11. Fluvial transport of human remains in the lower Mississippi River.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Helen E; Manhein, Mary H

    2002-07-01

    The Mississippi River has claimed many lives over the last several decades. A better understanding of the universal dynamics of its fluvial system can help direct the production of a predictive model regarding the transportation of human remains in the river. The model may then be applied to situations where the location and the identification of water victims are necessarily part of the recovery process. Results from the preliminary phase of a longitudinal project involving the transport of human remains in the Mississippi River are presented and represent the analyses of 233 case files of river victims. A provisional model for fluvial transport of human remains in the Mississippi River is proposed and examined. This model indicates that time in the river and distance a body travels are related. Such a model may assist in pinpointing entry location for unidentified human remains found in the river or on its banks. Further, it has the potential to provide local and regional law enforcement agencies, the United States Coast Guard, and other search and rescue organizations with primary search areas when someone is missing in the river. Other results from this study indicate that a relationship exists between the side of the river where victims enter the water and the side of the river where the remains are recovered. Finally, relationships are established between the length of time before recovery of the remains and state of preservation exhibited by those remains. A secondary benefit from this study is a database of river victims that can be used by a variety of different agencies.

  12. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  13. Forensic considerations when dealing with incinerated human dental remains.

    PubMed

    Reesu, Gowri Vijay; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Urs, Aadithya B

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the human dental identification process relies upon sufficient post-mortem data being recovered to allow for a meaningful comparison with ante-mortem records of the deceased person. Teeth are the most indestructible components of the human body and are structurally unique in their composition. They possess the highest resistance to most environmental effects like fire, desiccation, decomposition and prolonged immersion. In most natural as well as man-made disasters, teeth may provide the only means of positive identification of an otherwise unrecognizable body. It is imperative that dental evidence should not be destroyed through erroneous handling until appropriate radiographs, photographs, or impressions can be fabricated. Proper methods of physical stabilization of incinerated human dental remains should be followed. The maintenance of integrity of extremely fragile structures is crucial to the successful confirmation of identity. In such situations, the forensic dentist must stabilise these teeth before the fragile remains are transported to the mortuary to ensure preservation of possibly vital identification evidence. Thus, while dealing with any incinerated dental remains, a systematic approach must be followed through each stage of evaluation of incinerated dental remains to prevent the loss of potential dental evidence. This paper presents a composite review of various studies on incinerated human dental remains and discusses their impact on the process of human identification and suggests a step by step approach. PMID:25572078

  14. Identification of the remains of King Richard III.

    PubMed

    King, Turi E; Fortes, Gloria Gonzalez; Balaresque, Patricia; Thomas, Mark G; Balding, David; Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Neumann, Rita; Parson, Walther; Knapp, Michael; Walsh, Susan; Tonasso, Laure; Holt, John; Kayser, Manfred; Appleby, Jo; Forster, Peter; Ekserdjian, David; Hofreiter, Michael; Schürer, Kevin

    2014-12-02

    In 2012, a skeleton was excavated at the presumed site of the Grey Friars friary in Leicester, the last-known resting place of King Richard III. Archaeological, osteological and radiocarbon dating data were consistent with these being his remains. Here we report DNA analyses of both the skeletal remains and living relatives of Richard III. We find a perfect mitochondrial DNA match between the sequence obtained from the remains and one living relative, and a single-base substitution when compared with a second relative. Y-chromosome haplotypes from male-line relatives and the remains do not match, which could be attributed to a false-paternity event occurring in any of the intervening generations. DNA-predicted hair and eye colour are consistent with Richard's appearance in an early portrait. We calculate likelihood ratios for the non-genetic and genetic data separately, and combined, and conclude that the evidence for the remains being those of Richard III is overwhelming.

  15. Characterization of the volatile organic compounds present in the headspace of decomposing animal remains, and compared with human remains.

    PubMed

    Cablk, Mary E; Szelagowski, Erin E; Sagebiel, John C

    2012-07-10

    Human Remains Detection (HRD) dogs can be a useful tool to locate buried human remains because they rely on olfactory rather than visual cues. Trained specifically to locate deceased humans, it is widely believed that HRD dogs can differentiate animal remains from human remains. This study analyzed the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in the headspace above partially decomposed animal tissue samples and directly compared them with results published from human tissues using established solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods. Volatile organic compounds present in the headspace of four different animal tissue samples (bone, muscle, fat and skin) from each of cow, pig and chicken were identified and compared to published results from human samples. Although there were compounds common to both animal and human remains, the VOC signatures of each of the animal remains differed from those of humans. Of particular interest was the difference between pigs and humans, because in some countries HRD dogs are trained on pig remains rather than human remains. Pig VOC signatures were not found to be a subset of human; in addition to sharing only seven of thirty human-specific compounds, an additional nine unique VOCs were recorded from pig samples which were not present in human samples. The VOC signatures from chicken and human samples were most similar sharing the most compounds of the animals studied. Identifying VOCs that are unique to humans may be useful to develop human-specific training aids for HRD canines, and may eventually lead to an instrument that can detect clandestine human burial sites.

  16. {13C }/{12C } ratios of pleistocene mummified remains from beringia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombin, Miguel; Muehlenbachs, Karlis

    1985-01-01

    During the Quaternary glacial episodes, when sea level was considerably lower, Asia and North America were linked by large extensions of circumarctic land (Beringia), which remained unglaciated. This land mass served not only as a biogeographical bridge for plants, animals, and humans, but also supported a biome very different from present tundra or boreal coniferous forests, which was dominated by steppes and a rich mammalian megafauna. Carbon stable isotope ratios of Beringian late Pleistocene mummified remains of bison, equids, mammoth, caribou, musk-ox, moose, woolly rhino, and other undetermined species, found preserved in permafrost, indicate that these megaherbivores fed exclusively on C 3 plants, and that C 4 grasses were not differentially ingested by bison, as previously suggested. Paleoclimatic constraints probably prevented the formation of a warm-season (C 4) guild during the later part of the growing season in the steppes of Beringia during the last glaciation.

  17. Concentration of stable elements in food products

    SciTech Connect

    Montford, M.A.; Shank, K.E.; Hendricks, C.; Oakes, T.W.

    1980-01-01

    Food samples were taken from commercial markets and analyzed for stable element content. The concentrations of most stable elements (Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hf, I, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sr, Ta, Th, Ti, V, Zn, Zr) were determined using multiple-element neutron activation analysis, while the concentrations of other elements (Cd, Hg, Ni, Pb) were determined using atomic absorption. The relevance of the concentrations found are noted in relation to other literature values. An earlier study was extended to include the determination of the concentration of stable elements in home-grown products in the vicinity of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Comparisons between the commercial and local food-stuff values are discussed.

  18. Cutmarked human remains bearing Neandertal features and modern human remains associated with the Aurignacian at Les Rois.

    PubMed

    Ramirez Rozzi, Fernando V; d'Errico, Francesco; Vanhaeren, Marian; Grootes, Pieter M; Kerautret, Bertrand; Dujardin, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    The view that Aurignacian technologies and their associated symbolic manifestations represent the archaeologicalproxy for the spread of Anatomically Modern Humans into Europe, is supported by few diagnostic human remains, including those from the Aurignacian site of Les Rois in south-western France. Here we reassess the taxonomic attribution of the human remains, their cultural affiliation, and provide five new radiocarbon dates for the site. Patterns of tooth growth along with the morphological and morphometric analysis of the human remains indicate that a juvenile mandible showing cutmarks presents some Neandertal features, whereas another mandible is attributed to Anatomically Modern Humans. Reappraisal of the archaeological sequence demonstrates that human remains derive from two layers dated to 28-30 kyr BP attributed to the Aurignacian, the only cultural tradition detected at the site. Three possible explanations may account for this unexpected evidence. The first one is that the Aurignacian was exclusively produced by AMH and that the child mandible from unit A2 represents evidence for consumption or, more likely, symbolic use of a Neandertal child by Aurignacian AMH The second possible explanation is that Aurignacian technologies were produced at Les Rois by human groups bearing both AMH and Neandertal features. Human remains from Les Rois would be in this case the first evidence of a biological contact between the two human groups. The third possibility is that all human remains from Les Rois represent an AMH population with conserved plesiomorphic characters suggesting a larger variation in modern humans from the Upper Palaeolithic.

  19. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found.

  20. Classification of pelvic ring fractures in skeletonized human remains.

    PubMed

    Báez-Molgado, Socorro; Bartelink, Eric J; Jellema, Lyman M; Spurlock, Linda; Sholts, Sabrina B

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic ring fractures are associated with high rates of mortality and thus can provide key information about circumstances surrounding death. These injuries can be particularly informative in skeletonized remains, yet difficult to diagnose and interpret. This study adapted a clinical system of classifying pelvic ring fractures according to their resultant degree of pelvic stability for application to gross human skeletal remains. The modified Tile criteria were applied to the skeletal remains of 22 individuals from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México that displayed evidence of pelvic injury. Because these categories are tied directly to clinical assessments concerning the severity and treatment of injuries, this approach can aid in the identification of manner and cause of death, as well as interpretations of possible mechanisms of injury, such as those typical in car-to-pedestrian and motor vehicle accidents. PMID:25381919

  1. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found. PMID:25677640

  2. Osteometric sex determination of burned human skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, D; Thompson, T J U; Cunha, E

    2013-10-01

    Sex determination of human burned skeletal remains is extremely hard to achieve because of heat-related fragmentation, warping and dimensional changes. In particular, the latter is impeditive of osteometric analyses that are based on references developed on unburned bones. New osteometric references were thus obtained which allow for more reliable sex determinations. The calcined remains of cremated Portuguese individuals were examined and specific standard measurements of the humerus, femur, talus and calcaneus were recorded. This allowed for the compilation of new sex discriminating osteometric references which were then tested on independent samples with good results. Both the use of simple section points and of logistic regression equations provided successful sex classification scores. These references may now be used for the sex determination of burned skeletons. Its reliability is highest for contemporary Portuguese remains but nonetheless these results have important repercussion for forensic research. More conservative use of these references may also prove valuable for other populations as well as for archaeological research.

  3. OVERVIEW OF REMAINS OF DEWATERING BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD CYANIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF REMAINS OF DEWATERING BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD CYANIDE PROCESSING AREA. WATER USED IN PROCESSING AT THE STAMP MILL WAS CIRCULATED HERE FOR RECLAMATION. SANDS WERE SETTLED OUT AND DEPOSITED IN ONE OF TWO TAILINGS HOLDING AREAS. CLEARED WATER WAS PUMPED BACK TO THE MILL FOR REUSE. THIS PROCESS WAS ACCOMPLISHED BY THE USE OF SETTLING CONES, EIGHT FEET IN DIAMETER AND SIX FEET HIGH. THE REMAINS OF FOUR CONES ARE AT CENTER, BEHIND THE TANK IN THE FOREGROUND. TO THE LEFT IS THE MAIN ACCESS ROAD BETWEEN THE MILL AND THE PARKING LOT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  4. Quantification of Biochar's 'Stable' Carbon on Centennial Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Anna; Bird, Michael

    2014-05-01

    A basic requirement for any biochar offset methodology is for the carbon in biochar to be stable and remain sequestered on centennial timescales. It is well known that a variable component of most biochar is labile (degradable on annual/decadal timescales) and hence only a proportion of total carbon in biochar provides long-term carbon sequestration. This stable fraction of biochar is in the form of polycyclic aromatic carbon (PAC) but small ring size compounds (

  5. DETAIL VIEW OF FILTER PRESS REMAINS, BOILER, SECONDARY ORE BIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF FILTER PRESS REMAINS, BOILER, SECONDARY ORE BIN, TRAM TRESTLE AND WATER TANK, LOOKING NORTHWEST. HIS VIEW IS TAKEN FROM THE THIRD LEVEL OF THE MILL, NEARBY THE BLACKSMITH'S FORGE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  6. 15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, through which the fish tumbled as the cylinder revolved. Note geared ring around cylinder, and the small drive shaft by which it was driven. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  7. 8. NORTHWEST VIEW OF REMAINS OF CAST HOUSE No. 2. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. NORTHWEST VIEW OF REMAINS OF CAST HOUSE No. 2. BLAST FURNACE No. 1 IS ON THE RIGHT, AND HOIST HOUSE No. 2 IS ON THE LEFT. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  8. 17. DETAIL OF THE REMAINS OF BLAST FURNACE No. 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL OF THE REMAINS OF BLAST FURNACE No. 2 LOOKING EAST. THE BUSTLE PIPE IS VISIBLE ACROSS THE CENTER OF THE IMAGE. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  9. 15. NORTHERN VIEW OF THE REMAINS OF BLAST FURNACE No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NORTHERN VIEW OF THE REMAINS OF BLAST FURNACE No. 2 IN LOWER CENTER OF PHOTO AT THE BASE OF HOT BLAST STOVES. HOIST HOUSE No. 2 IS ON THE LEFT. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  10. 6. Remains Beneath Collapsed Engine House Roof, Showing Foundation Timbers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Remains Beneath Collapsed Engine House Roof, Showing Foundation Timbers and Automobile Engine Connected to Pulley Wheel, Looking Southwest - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  11. Aftermath. The remains of the southwest end of the bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aftermath. The remains of the southwest end of the bridge lie next to the southwest pier. View is south-southeast from confluence of Trinity and South Fork Trinity Rivers - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  12. 3. GENERAL VIEW OF REMAINS OF 40" BLOOMING MILL; THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL VIEW OF REMAINS OF 40" BLOOMING MILL; THE ENGINE ROOM CONTAINING THE MESTA-CORLISS STEAM ENGINE, IS LOCATED AT THE FAR END OF THE MILL AS SEEN TO THE FAR RIGHT (THE BUILDING WITH THE SHED ROOF). - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  13. 19. REMAINS OF FLYWHEEL OF No. 1 PRESS PUMPING ENGINE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. REMAINS OF FLYWHEEL OF No. 1 PRESS PUMPING ENGINE. GEARS ON EITHER SIDE OF THE FLYWHEEL WERE TURNED INTERMEDIATE GEARS WHICH POWERED THE PUMPS. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Press Shop No. 1, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  14. Downsized Weather Satellite Program on Track, But Uncertainty Remains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-06-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) was downsized after a review that was required when the program far exceeded its budget and schedule. A year later, NPOESS-a major civilian and military weather satellite program-appears to be proceeding well with its new schedule and budget. However, whether the program will remain on track is uncertain.

  15. Plans and objectives of the remaining Apollo missions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    The three remaining Apollo missions will have significantly increased scientific capabilities. These result from increased payload, more time on the surface, improved range, and more sophisticated experiments on the surface and in orbit. Landing sites for the last three missions will be carefully selected to maximize the total scientific return.

  16. 5. View of remaining rock ledge from construction of passage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of remaining rock ledge from construction of passage to enter mill (Riverdale Cotton Mill was built into the side of a hill). Partially subterranean area was popular with employees trying to escape the heat of the mill, now an unofficial smoking area. - Riverdale Cotton Mill, Corner of Middle & Lower Streets, Valley, Chambers County, AL

  17. Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. 51 in Spring Gap, Maryland, looking northeast. (Compare with HAER MD-115 photos taken 1988). - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  18. Neanderthal infant and adult infracranial remains from Marillac (Charente, France).

    PubMed

    Dolores Garralda, María; Maureille, Bruno; Vandermeersch, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    At the site of Marillac, near the Ligonne River in Marillac-le-Franc (Charente, France), a remarkable stratigraphic sequence has yielded a wealth of archaeological information, palaeoenvironmental data, as well as faunal and human remains. Marillac must have been a sinkhole used by Neanderthal groups as a hunting camp during MIS 4 (TL date 57,600 ± 4,600BP), where Quina Mousterian lithics and fragmented bones of reindeer predominate. This article describes three infracranial skeleton fragments. Two of them are from adults and consist of the incomplete shafts of a right radius (Marillac 24) and a left fibula (Marillac 26). The third fragment is the diaphysis of the right femur of an immature individual (Marillac 25), the size and shape of which resembles those from Teshik-Tash and could be assigned to a child of a similar age. The three fossils have been compared with the remains of other Neanderthals or anatomically Modern Humans (AMH). Furthermore, the comparison of the infantile femora, Marillac 25 and Teshik-Tash, with the remains of several European children from the early Middle Ages clearly demonstrates the robustness and rounded shape of both Neanderthal diaphyses. Evidence of peri-mortem manipulations have been identified on all three bones, with spiral fractures, percussion pits and, in the case of the radius and femur, unquestionable cutmarks made with flint implements, probably during defleshing. Traces of periostosis appear on the fibula fragment and on the immature femoral diaphysis, although their aetiology remains unknown. PMID:24919796

  19. Liposomes remain intact when complexed with polycationic brushes.

    PubMed

    Yaroslavov, Alexander A; Sybachin, Andrei V; Schrinner, Marc; Ballauff, Matthias; Tsarkova, Larisa; Kesselman, Ellina; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Menger, Fredric M

    2010-05-01

    Anionic liposomes adsorb onto the surface of spherical polymer particles bearing grafted linear cationic macromolecules. The size, shape, and encapsulation ability of the liposomes remain unchanged upon adsorption, thus providing immobilized self-organizing containers that have potential applications in the biomedical field. PMID:20387892

  20. Authentic leadership: becoming and remaining an authentic nurse leader.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Lin G

    2012-11-01

    This article explores how chief nurse executives became and remained authentic leaders. Using narrative inquiry, this qualitative study focused on the life stories of participants. Results demonstrate the importance of reframing, reflection in alignment with values, and the courage needed as nurse leaders progress to authenticity.

  1. Robotics to Enable Older Adults to Remain Living at Home

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Alan J.; Adair, Brooke; Ozanne, Elizabeth; Said, Catherine; Santamaria, Nick; Morris, Meg E.

    2012-01-01

    Given the rapidly ageing population, interest is growing in robots to enable older people to remain living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of the scientific literature, from 1990 to the present, on the use of robots in aged care. The key research questions were as follows: (1) what is the range of robotic devices available to enable older people to remain mobile, independent, and safe? and, (2) what is the evidence demonstrating that robotic devices are effective in enabling independent living in community dwelling older people? Following database searches for relevant literature an initial yield of 161 articles was obtained. Titles and abstracts of articles were then reviewed by 2 independent people to determine suitability for inclusion. Forty-two articles met the criteria for question 1. Of these, 4 articles met the criteria for question 2. Results showed that robotics is currently available to assist older healthy people and people with disabilities to remain independent and to monitor their safety and social connectedness. Most studies were conducted in laboratories and hospital clinics. Currently limited evidence demonstrates that robots can be used to enable people to remain living at home, although this is an emerging smart technology that is rapidly evolving. PMID:23304507

  2. REAR DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. THRUST REVERSER REMAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REAR DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. THRUST REVERSER REMAINS OPEN. MECHANICS JONI BAINE (R) AND BILL THEODORE(L) OPEN FLAP CARRIAGE ACCESS WITH AN IMPACT GUN. THEY WILL CHECK TRANSMISSION FLUID AND OIL THE JACK SCREW. AT FAR LEFT UTILITY MECHANICS BEGIN BODY POLISHING. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  3. Neanderthal infant and adult infracranial remains from Marillac (Charente, France).

    PubMed

    Dolores Garralda, María; Maureille, Bruno; Vandermeersch, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    At the site of Marillac, near the Ligonne River in Marillac-le-Franc (Charente, France), a remarkable stratigraphic sequence has yielded a wealth of archaeological information, palaeoenvironmental data, as well as faunal and human remains. Marillac must have been a sinkhole used by Neanderthal groups as a hunting camp during MIS 4 (TL date 57,600 ± 4,600BP), where Quina Mousterian lithics and fragmented bones of reindeer predominate. This article describes three infracranial skeleton fragments. Two of them are from adults and consist of the incomplete shafts of a right radius (Marillac 24) and a left fibula (Marillac 26). The third fragment is the diaphysis of the right femur of an immature individual (Marillac 25), the size and shape of which resembles those from Teshik-Tash and could be assigned to a child of a similar age. The three fossils have been compared with the remains of other Neanderthals or anatomically Modern Humans (AMH). Furthermore, the comparison of the infantile femora, Marillac 25 and Teshik-Tash, with the remains of several European children from the early Middle Ages clearly demonstrates the robustness and rounded shape of both Neanderthal diaphyses. Evidence of peri-mortem manipulations have been identified on all three bones, with spiral fractures, percussion pits and, in the case of the radius and femur, unquestionable cutmarks made with flint implements, probably during defleshing. Traces of periostosis appear on the fibula fragment and on the immature femoral diaphysis, although their aetiology remains unknown.

  4. MDs remain sceptical as chelation therapy goes mainstream in Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, M

    1997-01-01

    The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan recently agreed to allow physicians to administer chelation therapy. Supporters, relying on anecdotal evidence, say it works wonders in overcoming heart disease, but many physicians remain profoundly sceptical. In Saskatchewan, the college decision has proved popular with patients but has drawn an angry reaction from doctors. PMID:9307563

  5. 4. An interior view of remaining duct system and grain ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. An interior view of remaining duct system and grain separating equipment is situated within the 'Landmark' (1940) in the section above the silo portion of the structure. - Quaker Oats Cereal Factory, Southeast corner of Broadway & Mill Streets, Akron, Summit County, OH

  6. 18. A view looking southeast at the remains of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. A view looking southeast at the remains of the director's office, his reception room and a portion of the elevator lobby. These two rooms were equipped with their own air conditioners. - John T. Beasley Building, 632 Cherry Street (between Sixth & Seventh Streets), Terre Haute, Vigo County, IN

  7. Community assembly: alternative stable states or alternative transient states?

    PubMed Central

    Fukami, Tadashi; Nakajima, Mifuyu

    2011-01-01

    The concept of alternative stable states has long been a dominant framework for studying the influence of historical contingency in community assembly. This concept focuses on stable states, yet many real communities are kept in a transient state by disturbance, and the utility of predictions for stable states in explaining transient states remains unclear. Using a simple model of plant community assembly, we show that the conditions under which historical contingency affects community assembly can differ greatly for stable versus transient states. Differences arise because the contribution of such factors as mortality rate, environmental heterogeneity and plant-soil feedback to historical contingency changes as community assembly proceeds. We also show that transient states can last for a long time relative to immigration rate and generation time. These results argue for a conceptual shift of focus from alternative stable states to alternative transient states for understanding historical contingency in community assembly. PMID:21790934

  8. The Effects of Soil Texture on the Ability of Human Remains Detection Dogs to Detect Buried Human Remains.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Michael B; Hodges, Theresa K; Wescott, Daniel J; Aitkenhead-Peterson, Jacqueline A

    2016-05-01

    Despite technological advances, human remains detection (HRD) dogs still remain one of the best tools for locating clandestine graves. However, soil texture may affect the escape of decomposition gases and therefore the effectiveness of HDR dogs. Six nationally credentialed HRD dogs (three HRD only and three cross-trained) were evaluated on novel buried human remains in contrasting soils, a clayey and a sandy soil. Search time and accuracy were compared for the clayey soil and sandy soil to assess odor location difficulty. Sandy soil (p < 0.001) yielded significantly faster trained response times, but no significant differences were found in performance accuracy between soil textures or training method. Results indicate soil texture may be significant factor in odor detection difficulty. Prior knowledge of soil texture and moisture may be useful for search management and planning. Appropriate adjustments to search segment sizes, sweep widths and search time allotment depending on soil texture may optimize successful detection.

  9. Stable Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard; Rumana, Umme

    2016-01-01

    Classical angina refers to typical substernal discomfort triggered by effort or emotions, relieved with rest or nitroglycerin. The well-accepted pathogenesis is an imbalance between oxygen supply and demand. Goals in therapy are improvement in quality of life by limiting the number and severity of attacks, protection against future lethal events, and measures to lower the burden of risk factors to slow disease progression. New pathophysiological data, drugs, as well as conceptual and technological advances have improved patient care over the past decade. Behavioral changes to improve diets, increase physical activity, and encourage adherence to cardiac rehabilitation programs, are difficult to achieve but are effective. PMID:26567972

  10. 30 CFR 285.303 - How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain... Renewable Energy Activities Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.303 How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect? Your ROW grant or RUE grant will remain in effect for as long as the...

  11. 30 CFR 585.303 - How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain... Row Grants and Rue Grants § 585.303 How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect? Your ROW grant or RUE grant will remain in effect for as long as the associated activities are...

  12. 30 CFR 585.303 - How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain... Row Grants and Rue Grants § 585.303 How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect? Your ROW grant or RUE grant will remain in effect for as long as the associated activities are...

  13. Tempered stable Lévy motion driven by stable subordinator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Janusz; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka

    2013-08-01

    In this article we propose a new model for financial data description. Combining two independent mechanisms, namely the tempered stable process and inverse stable subordinator, we obtain a new model which captures not only the tempered stable character of the underlying data but also such a property as periods in which the values of an asset stay on the same level. Moreover, we classify our system to the family of subdiffusive processes and investigate its tail behavior. We describe in detail testing and estimation procedures for the proposed model. In the last step we calibrate our model to the real data.

  14. Stable solid-phase Rh antigen.

    PubMed

    Yared, M A; Moise, K J; Rodkey, L S

    1997-12-01

    Numerous investigators have attempted to isolate the Rh antigens in a stable, immunologically reactive form since the discovery of the Rh system over 56 years ago. We report here a successful and reproducible approach to solubilizing and adsorbing the human Rh antigen(s) to a solid-phase matrix in an antigenically active form. Similar results were obtained with rabbit A/D/F red blood cell antigens. The antigen preparation was made by dissolution of the red blood cell membrane lipid followed by fragmentation of the residual cytoskeleton in an EDTA solution at low ionic strength. The antigenic activity of the soluble preparations was labile in standard buffers but was stable in zwitterionic buffers for extended periods of time. Further studies showed that the antigenic activity of these preparations was enhanced, as was their affinity for plastic surfaces, in the presence of acidic zwitterionic buffers. Adherence to plastic surfaces at low pH maintained antigenic reactivity and specificity for antibody was retained. The data show that this approach yields a stable form of antigenically active human Rh D antigen that could be used in a red blood cell-free assay for quantitative analysis of Rh D antibody and for Rh D antibody immunoadsorption and purification.

  15. Dental DNA fingerprinting in identification of human remains

    PubMed Central

    Girish, KL; Rahman, Farzan S; Tippu, Shoaib R

    2010-01-01

    The recent advances in molecular biology have revolutionized all aspects of dentistry. DNA, the language of life yields information beyond our imagination, both in health or disease. DNA fingerprinting is a tool used to unravel all the mysteries associated with the oral cavity and its manifestations during diseased conditions. It is being increasingly used in analyzing various scenarios related to forensic science. The technical advances in molecular biology have propelled the analysis of the DNA into routine usage in crime laboratories for rapid and early diagnosis. DNA is an excellent means for identification of unidentified human remains. As dental pulp is surrounded by dentin and enamel, which forms dental armor, it offers the best source of DNA for reliable genetic type in forensic science. This paper summarizes the recent literature on use of this technique in identification of unidentified human remains. PMID:21731342

  16. Identifying and Reducing Remaining Stocks of Rinderpest Virus.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Keith; Visser, Dawid; Evans, Brian; Vallat, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    In 2011, the world was declared free from rinderpest, one of the most feared and devastating infectious diseases of animals. Rinderpest is the second infectious disease, after smallpox, to have been eradicated. However, potentially infectious rinderpest virus material remains widely disseminated among research and diagnostic facilities across the world and poses a risk for disease recurrence should it be released. Member Countries of the World Organisation for Animal Health and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations are committed to destroying remaining stocks of infectious material or ensuring that it is stored under international supervision in a limited number of approved facilities. To facilitate this commitment and maintain global freedom from rinderpest, World Organisation for Animal Health Member Countries must report annually on rinderpest material held in their countries. The first official surveys, conducted during 2013-2015, revealed that rinderpest material was stored in an unacceptably high number of facilities and countries. PMID:26584400

  17. Mineral remains of early life on Earth? On Mars?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iberall, Robbins E.; Iberall, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The oldest sedimentary rocks on Earth, the 3.8-Ga Isua Iron-Formation in southwestern Greenland, are metamorphosed past the point where organic-walled fossils would remain. Acid residues and thin sections of these rocks reveal ferric microstructures that have filamentous, hollow rod, and spherical shapes not characteristic of crystalline minerals. Instead, they resemble ferric-coated remains of bacteria. Because there are no earlier sedimentary rocks to study on Earth, it may be necessary to expand the search elsewhere in the solar system for clues to any biotic precursors or other types of early life. A study of morphologies of iron oxide minerals collected in the southern highlands during a Mars sample return mission may therefore help to fill in important gaps in the history of Earth's earliest biosphere. -from Authors

  18. USING CONDITION MONITORING TO PREDICT REMAINING LIFE OF ELECTRIC CABLES.

    SciTech Connect

    LOFARO,R.; SOO,P.; VILLARAN,M.; GROVE,E.

    2001-03-29

    Electric cables are passive components used extensively throughout nuclear power stations to perform numerous safety and non-safety functions. It is known that the polymers commonly used to insulate the conductors on these cables can degrade with time; the rate of degradation being dependent on the severity of the conditions in which the cables operate. Cables do not receive routine maintenance and, since it can be very costly, they are not replaced on a regular basis. Therefore, to ensure their continued functional performance, it would be beneficial if condition monitoring techniques could be used to estimate the remaining useful life of these components. A great deal of research has been performed on various condition monitoring techniques for use on electric cables. In a research program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, several promising techniques were evaluated and found to provide trendable information on the condition of low-voltage electric cables. These techniques may be useful for predicting remaining life if well defined limiting values for the aging properties being measured can be determined. However, each technique has advantages and limitations that must be addressed in order to use it effectively, and the necessary limiting values are not always easy to obtain. This paper discusses how condition monitoring measurements can be used to predict the remaining useful life of electric cables. The attributes of an appropriate condition monitoring technique are presented, and the process to be used in estimating the remaining useful life of a cable is discussed along with the difficulties that must be addressed.

  19. Skeletal preservation of children's remains in the archaeological record.

    PubMed

    Manifold, B M

    2015-12-01

    Taphonomy is an important consideration in the reconstruction of past environments and events. Taphonomic alterations and processes are commonly encountered on human skeletal remains in both archaeological and forensic contexts. It is these processes that can alter the appearance of bone after death and the properties of the bones influence their reaction to these processes thus leading to differential preservation within a skeletal sample, none more so than the remains of children. This study investigates the skeletal preservation of 790 child and adolescent skeletons from six contrasting early and late medieval cemeteries from Britain in an attempt to assess whether geographical location and geology had an effect on the overall preservation of the skeletons. Skeletons were examined from six cemeteries, namely; Auldhame in Scotland, Edix Hill and Great Chesterford from Cambridgeshire; St Oswald's Priory from Gloucester and Wharram Percy from Yorkshire, and finally, the site of Llandough in Wales. The state of preservation was assessed using the anatomical preservation index (AP1), qualitative bone index (QBI) and the bone representation index (BRI). Also the presence of natural and artificial taphonomic processes was recorded for each skeleton. The results show a specific pattern of preservation and representation for non-adult remains across all sites with some differences in the states of preservation from different geographical locations and geological influences. Children under two years of age were found to be less affected by taphonomic processes than their older counterparts.

  20. Direct dating of Early Upper Palaeolithic human remains from Mladec.

    PubMed

    Wild, Eva M; Teschler-Nicola, Maria; Kutschera, Walter; Steier, Peter; Trinkaus, Erik; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2005-05-19

    The human fossil assemblage from the Mladec Caves in Moravia (Czech Republic) has been considered to derive from a middle or later phase of the Central European Aurignacian period on the basis of archaeological remains (a few stone artefacts and organic items such as bone points, awls, perforated teeth), despite questions of association between the human fossils and the archaeological materials and concerning the chronological implications of the limited archaeological remains. The morphological variability in the human assemblage, the presence of apparently archaic features in some specimens, and the assumed early date of the remains have made this fossil assemblage pivotal in assessments of modern human emergence within Europe. We present here the first successful direct accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of five representative human fossils from the site. We selected sample materials from teeth and from one bone for 14C dating. The four tooth samples yielded uncalibrated ages of approximately 31,000 14C years before present, and the bone sample (an ulna) provided an uncertain more-recent age. These data are sufficient to confirm that the Mladec human assemblage is the oldest cranial, dental and postcranial assemblage of early modern humans in Europe and is therefore central to discussions of modern human emergence in the northwestern Old World and the fate of the Neanderthals.

  1. Microsatellites identify depredated waterfowl remains from glaucous gull stomachs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, K.T.; Bowman, T.D.

    1998-01-01

    Prey remains can provide valuable sources of information regarding causes of predation and the species composition of a predator's diet. Unfortunately, the highly degraded state of many prey samples from gastrointestinal tracts often precludes unambiguous identification. We describe a procedure by which PCR amplification of taxonomically informative microsatellite loci were used to identify species of waterfowl predated by glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus). We found that one microsatellite locus unambiguously distinguished between species of the subfamily Anserinae (whistling ducks, geese and swans) and those of the subfamily Anatidae (all other ducks). An additional locus distinguished the remains of all geese and swan species known to nest on the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta in western Alaska. The study focused on two waterfowl species which have experienced precipitous declines in population numbers: emperor geese (Chen canagica) and spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri). No evidence of predation on spectacled eiders was observed. Twenty-six percent of all glaucous gull stomachs examined contained the remains of juvenile emperor geese.

  2. Osteometric sex determination of burned human skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, D; Thompson, T J U; Cunha, E

    2013-10-01

    Sex determination of human burned skeletal remains is extremely hard to achieve because of heat-related fragmentation, warping and dimensional changes. In particular, the latter is impeditive of osteometric analyses that are based on references developed on unburned bones. New osteometric references were thus obtained which allow for more reliable sex determinations. The calcined remains of cremated Portuguese individuals were examined and specific standard measurements of the humerus, femur, talus and calcaneus were recorded. This allowed for the compilation of new sex discriminating osteometric references which were then tested on independent samples with good results. Both the use of simple section points and of logistic regression equations provided successful sex classification scores. These references may now be used for the sex determination of burned skeletons. Its reliability is highest for contemporary Portuguese remains but nonetheless these results have important repercussion for forensic research. More conservative use of these references may also prove valuable for other populations as well as for archaeological research. PMID:24112343

  3. Prognostic modelling options for remaining useful life estimation by industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikorska, J. Z.; Hodkiewicz, M.; Ma, L.

    2011-07-01

    Over recent years a significant amount of research has been undertaken to develop prognostic models that can be used to predict the remaining useful life of engineering assets. Implementations by industry have only had limited success. By design, models are subject to specific assumptions and approximations, some of which are mathematical, while others relate to practical implementation issues such as the amount of data required to validate and verify a proposed model. Therefore, appropriate model selection for successful practical implementation requires not only a mathematical understanding of each model type, but also an appreciation of how a particular business intends to utilise a model and its outputs. This paper discusses business issues that need to be considered when selecting an appropriate modelling approach for trial. It also presents classification tables and process flow diagrams to assist industry and research personnel select appropriate prognostic models for predicting the remaining useful life of engineering assets within their specific business environment. The paper then explores the strengths and weaknesses of the main prognostics model classes to establish what makes them better suited to certain applications than to others and summarises how each have been applied to engineering prognostics. Consequently, this paper should provide a starting point for young researchers first considering options for remaining useful life prediction. The models described in this paper are Knowledge-based (expert and fuzzy), Life expectancy (stochastic and statistical), Artificial Neural Networks, and Physical models.

  4. Stable isotopes in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Marsh, Julian B; Das, Sai Krupa; Welty, Francine K

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is recognized as a major public health problem. Obesity is a multifactorial disease and is often associated with a wide range of comorbidities including hypertension, non-insulin dependent (Type II) diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease, all of which contribute to morbidity and mortality. This review deals with stable isotope mass spectrometric methods and the application of stable isotopes to metabolic studies of obesity. Body composition and total energy expenditure (TEE) can be measured by mass spectrometry using stable isotope labeled water, and the metabolism of protein, lipid, and carbohydrate can be measured using appropriate labeled tracer molecules.

  5. Cardiac work remains high after strength exercise in elderly.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, A C C; Kanegusuku, H; Chehuen, M R; Costa, L A R; Wallerstein, L F; Dias da Silva, V J; Mello, M T; Ugrinowitsch, C; Forjaz, C L M

    2013-05-01

    Moderate- to high-intensity strength training is recommended for healthy adults. In young subjects, a single session of strength training decreases blood pressure, while heart rate and cardiac work remain elevated afterwards. However, these effects have not been clearly demonstrated in elderly subjects. To investigate this issue, 16 elderly subjects each underwent a Control and an Exercise (3 sets, 8 RM, 9 exercises) session conducted in random order. Haemodynamic variables and heart rate variability were measured before and after the interventions. Systolic blood pressure did not change after the exercise session but did increase after the control session (+8.1±1.6 mm Hg, P≤0.05). Diastolic blood pressure, as well as systemic vascular resistance increased similarly after both sessions. Cardiac output and stroke volume decreased, while heart rate, rate-pressure product and the low- to high-frequency ratio of heart rate variability increased only after the exercise session ( - 0.5±0.1 L/min, - 9.3±2.0 ml,+3.8±1.6 bpm, +579.3±164.1 mmHg.bpm and +0.71±0.34, P≤0.05). Ambulatory blood pressure was similar after both sessions, while heart rate and rate pressure product remained higher after the exercise session for up to 4.5 h. After a single session of strength training, cardiac sympathetic modulation and heart rate remain elevated in elderly subjects, keeping cardiac work elevated for a long period of time.

  6. Latissimus dorsi flap remains an excellent choice for breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Erez G; Perdikis, Galen; McLaughlin, Sarah A; Terkonda, Sarvam P; Waldorf, James C

    2006-01-01

    Latissimus dorsi flap has been unfairly relegated to a second option in breast reconstruction. One hundred consecutive latissimus dorsi muscle flaps (LDMF) with tissue-expander reconstruction were studied, mean follow-up 34.5 months (range, 1-175), 50 immediate, 50 delayed. With attention to a few technical details, excellent esthetic, soft reconstructions were achieved. Complications included 1 partial flap loss; 2 patients required inframammary fold revision; and 6 patients required surgery for capsular contracture. Donor-site seroma occurred in 34 patients; 6 required operative revision. Results were similar in the immediate versus the delayed groups. LDMF remains an esthetic, reliable, safe reconstructive choice.

  7. Tuberculosis remains a challenge despite economic growth in Panama.

    PubMed

    Tarajia, M; Goodridge, A

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease associated with inequality, and wise investment of economic resources is considered critical to its control. Panama has recently secured its status as an upper-middle-income country with robust economic growth. However, the prioritisation of resources for TB control remains a major challenge. In this article, we highlight areas that urgently require action to effectively reduce TB burden to minimal levels. Our conclusions suggest the need for fund allocation and a multidisciplinary approach to ensure prompt laboratory diagnosis, treatment assurance and workforce reinforcement, complemented by applied and operational research, development and innovation.

  8. Remaining challenges in childhood cancer and newer targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Malcolm A; Reaman, Gregory H

    2015-02-01

    Despite the enormously important and gratifying advances in cancer treatment outcomes for children with cancer, cancer remains the biggest cause of death from disease in children. Because the etiology and biology of cancers that occur in children differ dramatically from those that occur in adults, the immediate extrapolation of efficacy and safety of new cancer drugs to childhood cancer indications is not possible. We discuss factors that will play key roles in guiding pediatric oncologists as they select lines of research to pursue in their quest for more effective treatments for children with cancer.

  9. Yellow Fever Remains a Potential Threat to Public Health.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Monath, Thomas P

    2016-08-01

    Yellow fever (YF) remains a serious public health threat in endemic countries. The recent re-emergence in Africa, initiating in Angola and spreading to Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, with imported cases in China and Kenya is of concern. There is such a shortage of YF vaccine in the world that the World Health Organization has proposed the use of reduced doses (1/5) during emergencies. In this short communication, we discuss these and other problems including the risk of spread of YF to areas free of YF for decades or never before affected by this arbovirus disease.

  10. Remains to be transmitted: Primo Levi's traumatic dream.

    PubMed

    Blévis, Jean-Jacques

    2004-07-01

    Drawing on the writings of Primo Levi and the psychoanalysis of Jacques Lacan, the author attempts to conceive psychic trauma as a coalescence of traumas, since this is perhaps the only way to prevent a subject from being forced back into identification with the catastrophic event, whatever that may have been. A recurrent dream of Primo Levi's suggests to the author the way that traumas may have coalesced within Levi. The hope would be to restore the entire significance of what remains from that traumatic event to the speech (parole) of the Other, to the speech of every human, even the most helpless, bruised, or destroyed among us. PMID:15287444

  11. "Recent" macrofossil remains from the Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duc, Cynthia; de Vernal, Anne; Archambault, Philippe; Brice, Camille; Roberge, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The examination of surface sediment samples collected from 17 sites along the Lomonosov Ridge at water depths ranging from 737 to 3339 meters during Polarstern Expedition PS87 in 2014 (Stein, 2015), indicates a rich biogenic content almost exclusively dominated by calcareous remains. Amongst biogenic remains, microfossils (planktic and benthic foraminifers, pteropods, ostracods, etc.) dominate but millimetric to centrimetric macrofossils occurred frequently at the surface of the sediment. The macrofossil remains consist of a large variety of taxa, including gastropods, bivalvia, polychaete tubes, scaphopods, echinoderm plates and spines, and fish otoliths. Among the Bivalvia, the most abundant taxa are Portlandia arctica, Hyalopecten frigidus, Cuspidaria glacilis, Policordia densicostata, Bathyarca spp., and Yoldiella spp. Whereas a few specimens are well preserved and apparently pristine, most mollusk shells displayed extensive alteration features. Moreover, most shells were covered by millimeter scale tubes of the serpulid polychaete Spirorbis sp. suggesting transport from low intertidal or subtidal zone. Both the ecological affinity and known geographic distribution of identified bivalvia as named above support the hypothesis of transportation rather than local development. In addition to mollusk shells, more than a hundred fish otoliths were recovered in surface sediments. The otoliths mostly belong to the Gadidae family. Most of them are well preserved and without serpulid tubes attached to their surface, suggesting a local/regional origin, unlike the shell remains. Although recovered at the surface, the macrofaunal assemblages of the Lomonosov Ridge do not necessarily represent the "modern" environments as they may result from reworking and because their occurrence at the surface of the sediment may also be due to winnowing of finer particles. Although the shells were not dated, we suspect that their actual ages may range from modern to several thousands of

  12. Why assisted suicide must remain illegal in the UK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Vicky; Scott, Helen

    Many people with life-limiting disease are vulnerable to emotional distress associated with physical, spiritual, psychological and social stressors. Psychological stress and affective disorders have the potential to influence decision making, particularly at the end of life. This article discusses the main reasons why assisted suicide and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) should remain illegal in the UK. In particular, it explores the problems associated with safeguarding 'vulnerable' patient groups and assessing mental capacity. The article also examines guidance for nurses regarding what to do if a patient asks for assistance to die or for information on assisted suicide and PAS. PMID:22272539

  13. Major remaining technical issues in coal-fired MHD technology

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D.; Johnson, T.R.; Petrick, M.; Redman, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    A recent assessment of the current status of MHD technology has revealed significant progress in recent years toward establishing the technical base required for commercial coal-fired MHD power plants. The review also identified the many major technical issues that remain. Here attention is directed only to these major areas, to provide perspective regarding the diversity of additional development work required, and to indicate those aspects deserving priority. The underlying assumption is that a systematic development of a sound and broad technical base will be more cost-effective than initially building a large-scale integrated system to acquire operating experience.

  14. Encephalitozoon cuniculi in Raw Cow's Milk Remains Infectious After Pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Tomanová, Vendula; Samková, Eva; Koubová, Jana; Kotková, Michaela; Hlásková, Lenka; McEvoy, John; Sak, Bohumil

    2016-02-01

    This study describes the prevalence of Encephalitozoon cuniculi in raw cow's milk and evaluates the effect of different milk pasteurization treatments on E. cuniculi infectivity for severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Using a nested polymerase chain reaction approach, 1 of 50 milking cows was found to repeatedly shed E. cuniculi in its feces and milk. Under experimental conditions, E. cuniculi spores in milk remained infective for SCID mice following pasteurization treatments at 72 °C for 15 s or 85 °C for 5 s. Based on these findings, pasteurized cow's milk should be considered a potential source of E. cuniculi infection in humans.

  15. Kidney disease in children: latest advances and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John F; Goldstein, Stuart L; Pape, Lars; Schaefer, Franz; Shroff, Rukshana C; Warady, Bradley A

    2016-03-01

    To mark World Kidney Day 2016, Nature Reviews Nephrology invited six leading researchers to highlight the key advances and challenges within their specialist field of paediatric nephrology. Here, advances and remaining challenges in the fields of prenatal patterning, acute kidney injury, renal transplantation, genetics, cardiovascular health, and growth and nutrition, are all discussed within the context of paediatric and neonatal patients with kidney disease. Our global panel of researchers describe areas in which further studies and clinical advances are needed, and suggest ways in which research in these areas should progress to optimize renal care and long-term outcomes for affected patients.

  16. Studies on protozoa in ancient remains - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Frías, Liesbeth; Leles, Daniela; Araújo, Adauto

    2013-01-01

    Paleoparasitological research has made important contributions to the understanding of parasite evolution and ecology. Although parasitic protozoa exhibit a worldwide distribution, recovering these organisms from an archaeological context is still exceptional and relies on the availability and distribution of evidence, the ecology of infectious diseases and adequate detection techniques. Here, we present a review of the findings related to protozoa in ancient remains, with an emphasis on their geographical distribution in the past and the methodologies used for their retrieval. The development of more sensitive detection methods has increased the number of identified parasitic species, promising interesting insights from research in the future. PMID:23440107

  17. Yellow Fever Remains a Potential Threat to Public Health.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Monath, Thomas P

    2016-08-01

    Yellow fever (YF) remains a serious public health threat in endemic countries. The recent re-emergence in Africa, initiating in Angola and spreading to Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, with imported cases in China and Kenya is of concern. There is such a shortage of YF vaccine in the world that the World Health Organization has proposed the use of reduced doses (1/5) during emergencies. In this short communication, we discuss these and other problems including the risk of spread of YF to areas free of YF for decades or never before affected by this arbovirus disease. PMID:27400066

  18. Why assisted suicide must remain illegal in the UK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Vicky; Scott, Helen

    Many people with life-limiting disease are vulnerable to emotional distress associated with physical, spiritual, psychological and social stressors. Psychological stress and affective disorders have the potential to influence decision making, particularly at the end of life. This article discusses the main reasons why assisted suicide and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) should remain illegal in the UK. In particular, it explores the problems associated with safeguarding 'vulnerable' patient groups and assessing mental capacity. The article also examines guidance for nurses regarding what to do if a patient asks for assistance to die or for information on assisted suicide and PAS.

  19. Declined Neural Efficiency in Cognitively Stable Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Thomas; Yakupov, Renat; Nakama, Helenna; Crocket, Grace; Cole, Michael; Watters, Michael; Ricardo-Dukelow, Mary Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether brain activation changes in clinically and neurocognitively normal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected and in HIV-seronegative control (SN) participants over a 1-year period. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in 32 SN and 31 HIV patients (all with stable combination antiretroviral treatment) at baseline and after 1 year. Each participant performed a set of visual attention tasks with increasing attentional load (from tracking two, three, or four balls). All HIV and SN participants had normal neuropsychological function at both examinations. Results Over 1 year, HIV patients showed no change in their neurocognitive status or in task performance during fMRI. However, HIV patients showed significant 1-year increases in fMRI signals in the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices for the more difficult tasks, whereas SN control participants showed only decreases in brain activation in these regions. This resulted in significant interactions between HIV status and time of study in left insula, left parietal, left temporal, and several frontal regions (left and right middle frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate). Interpretation Because fMRI task performance remained unchanged in both groups, the HIV patients appeared to maintain performance by increasing usage of the attention network, whereas the control participants reduced usage of the attention network after 1 year. These findings suggest improved efficiency or a practice effect in the SN participants but declined efficiency of the neural substrate in HIV patients, possibly because of ongoing brain injury associated with the HIV infection, despite their apparent stable clinical course. PMID:19334060

  20. Earthquakes in Stable Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Arch C.; Kanter, Lisa R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are some of the reasons for earthquakes which occur in stable crust away from familiar zones at the ends of tectonic plates. Crust stability and the reactivation of old faults are described using examples from India and Australia. (CW)