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Sample records for activity respiratory bursts

  1. Phosphoproteins and the activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, N.; Curnutte, J.T.; Babior, B.M.

    1987-05-01

    The respiratory burst oxidase is a neutrophil enzyme that converts oxygen to O/sub 2//sup -/. It is dormant in resting cells but is activated when the cells are exposed to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PMA also induces the incorporation of /sup 32/P into certain neutrophil proteins. To determine whether phosphorylation of these proteins is related to oxidase activation, protein phosphorylation was studied in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (GCD), a group of inherited conditions in which oxidase activity is missing. In normals, neutrophil activation by PMA is associated with the phosphorylation inter alia of 48K proteins at pI 7.3 and 7.8. There is also inconstant phosphorylation of a 48K protein at pI 6.8. In 4 patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), phosphorylation of pp48/6.8 and pp48/7.3 was absent, while in autosomal recessive CGD, phosphorylation of all 3 of these proteins was absent in 3 patients and significantly diminished in a fourth. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of these proteins is related to the activation of the respiratory burst oxidase. By peptide mapping, these 3 proteins appear to consist of a single peptide species whose pI variability may be due to post-translational modification. The only phosphoamino acid found in pp48/7.3 was phosphoserine.

  2. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  3. Hypertonic saline activation of p38 MAPK primes the PMN respiratory burst.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, D J; Moore, E E; Biffl, W L; Gonzalez, R J; Moore, H B; Silliman, C C

    2001-10-01

    Investigation of hypertonic saline (HTS) modulation of neutrophils (PMN) cytotoxic responses has generated seemingly contradictory results. Clinically relevant levels of HTS attenuate receptor-mediated p38 MAPK signaling, whereas higher levels activate p38 MAPK. Concurrently, HTS exerts a dose-dependent attenuation of the PMN respiratory burst, most notably at concentrations where p38 MAPK is activated. We hypothesized that HTS-mediated p38 MAPK activation augments the PMN respiratory burst on return to normotonicity. We found that although clinically relevant levels of HTS (Na+ > or = 200 mM) did not activate p38 MAPK, higher concentrations (Na+ > or = 300 mM) resulted in activation comparable with that after PAF stimulation. Transient stimulation with high levels of HTS primed the PMN respiratory burst in response to fMLP and PMA. This effect was attenuated by pretreatment with SB 203580, a p38 MAPK specific inhibitor. We conclude that severe osmotic shock primes the respiratory burst via p38 MAPK signaling, further supporting the role of this signaling cascade in PMN priming. PMID:11580111

  4. Inhibition of human monocyte respiratory burst, degranulation, phospholipid methylation and bactericidal activity by pneumolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Nandoskar, M; Ferrante, A; Bates, E J; Hurst, N; Paton, J C

    1986-01-01

    The interaction between the pneumococcal toxin pneumolysin and human monocytes was examined. At non-cytotoxic concentrations (0.5-2.5 HU/10(6) cells) pneumolysin depressed the oxygen-dependent respiratory burst in monocytes, induced by opsonized zymosan or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). This included depressed hexose-monophosphate shunt activity and hydrogen peroxide production. The toxin also depressed the ability of monocytes to degranulate (measured by release of lysozyme) in response to the above stimuli. Phospholipid transmethylation was also markedly decreased by pretreating monocytes with pneumolysin. These effects on monocyte functions were accompanied by a decreased ability of pneumolysin-treated monocytes to kill Streptococcus pneumoniae, the organism that produces the toxin. Cholesterol, which inhibits the haemolytic activity of the toxin, was shown to abrogate the effects of pneumolysin on monocytes. PMID:3804376

  5. Respiratory burst activity of intestinal macrophages in normal and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Y R; Wu, K C; Jewell, D P

    1989-01-01

    Macrophages isolated from normal mucosa (greater than 5 cm from tumour) and inflamed mucosa (from patients with inflammatory bowel disease) of colon and ileum were studied for their ability to undergo a respiratory burst as assessed by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium to formazan. Using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonised zymosan as triggers, only a minority (median: 8% for zymosan and 9% for PMA) of macrophages isolated from normal colonic mucosa demonstrated release of oxygen radicals. In contrast, a significantly greater (median: 17% for zymosan and 45% for PMA) proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colonic mucosa were able to undergo respiratory burst. Studies with normal and inflamed ileum showed similar results. Stimulation of macrophages isolated from normal colon with interferon-gamma produced only a small increase in the proportion of cells showing release of oxygen radicals. We conclude that the respiratory burst capacity of majority of macrophages isolated from normal colon and ileum is downregulated and a greater proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colon and ileum are able to undergo a respiratory burst. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2511088

  6. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst.

    PubMed

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-10-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (-0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (-0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (-0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with relation to

  7. Ceruloplasmin decreases respiratory burst reaction during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Varfolomeeva, Elena Y; Semenova, Elena V; Sokolov, Alexey V; Aplin, Kirill D; Timofeeva, Kseniya E; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Filatov, Michael V

    2016-08-01

    Testing of pregnant women reveals weakening of neutrophil-mediated effector functions, such as reactive oxygen species generation. This study provides data confirming the phenomenon, gained through application of the flow cytometry technique. Key factors influencing neutrophil functional activity in blood plasma of pregnant women have not been detected so far. At the same time, concentration of ceruloplasmin - a copper-containing glycoprotein - is known to increase in blood significantly during pregnancy. We observed the negative correlation between ceruloplasmin concentration in blood plasma of pregnant women and the intensity of respiratory burst of neutrophils. Fractionation of plasma using gel-filtration revealed that ceruloplasmin-containing fraction demonstrated suppression of the respiratory burst reaction. Partial elimination of ceruloplasmin from the blood of pregnant women, performed with the help of specific antibodies and followed by immunoprecipitation, leads to an increased respiratory burst reaction. On the contrary, addition of ceruloplasmin to blood samples of healthy donors noticeably decreases the respiratory burst reaction. The results presented prove that change in ceruloplasmin level in plasma is necessary and sufficient for modulating the ability of neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species during pregnancy. PMID:27266720

  8. Inhibition of respiratory burst activity in alveolar macrophages by bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids: characterization of drug-cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, J Y; Barger, M W; Ma, J K; Castranova, V

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of various bisbenzylisoquinoline (BBIQ) alkaloids on respiratory burst activity of alveolar macrophages and to characterize the interaction of these drugs with alveolar phagocytes. BBIQ alkaloids were chosen for study because they exhibit a wide range of antifibrotic potencies in a rat model, with tetrandrine being very effective and tubocurarine being ineffective. These drugs inhibited zymosan-stimulated oxygen consumption with a potency sequence of tetrandrine (TT) approximately fangchinoline (FA) > berbamine (BE) approximately cepharanthine (CE) approximately cycleanine (CY) > tubocurarine (TU). This inhibition of respiratory burst activity could not be attributed to a drug-induced decline in the ATP content of these pneumocytes. Drug binding to alveolar macrophages was directly dependent on temperature and drug concentration. The sequence for binding capacity was FA > TT approximately BE approximately CY > CE > TU. Therefore, there was no simple relationship between binding capacity and inhibitory potency. Binding capacity was not related to lipophilicity of these alkaloids. In addition, tetrandrine failed to bind to metabolically dead cells or sonicated macrophage preparations. These data suggest that the interaction of BBIQ alkaloids with phagocytes is not simply nonspecific binding to membrane lipids. Alteration of the cytoskeletal system with vinblastine, taxol, or cytochalasin B decreased tetrandrine binding by approximately 33% when added separately and by 93% when added jointly. Pre-exposure of alveolar macrophages to stimulants increased the ability of BBIQ alkaloids to inhibit both oxygen consumption and superoxide release. These data suggest that the mechanism by which BBIQ alkaloids inhibit activation of phagocytes involves microtubules and bules and microfilaments. Pre-exposure of macrophages to stimulants would change the conformation of cytoskeletal components and may make these structures

  9. The respiratory burst is not required for killing of intracellular and extracellular parasites by a lymphokine-activated macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Scott, P; James, S; Sher, A

    1985-06-01

    The macrophage cell line, IC-21, was found to be incapable of producing the oxygen products associated with the respiratory burst. However, IC-21 cells were activated by lymphokine (LK) to kill intracellular (Leishmania donovani amastigotes) and extracellular (Schistosoma mansoni larvae) parasites, as well as tumor cells. In each case, the cytotoxicity exhibited by activated IC-21 cells and activated peritoneal macrophages was indistinguishable. However, nonactivated IC-21 cells were unable to kill L. donovani log-growth phase promastigotes, while nonactivated peritoneal macrophages destroyed greater than 90% of the initial infection. These results indicate that amastigotes and schistosome larvae are susceptible to killing by nonoxidative cytotoxic mechanism induced by lymphokine activation but, on the other hand, support the concept that the killing of log-growth phase promastigotes by nonactivated cells is dependent upon the respiratory burst. We propose that the IC-21 cell line may be a useful model for studying nonoxidative killing functions of activated macrophages. PMID:2988973

  10. Vanillin suppresses Kupffer cell-related colloidal carbon-induced respiratory burst activity in isolated perfused rat liver: anti-inflammatory implications.

    PubMed

    Galgani, José E; Núñez, Bárbara; Videla, Luis A

    2012-12-01

    The inhibition of NADPH oxidase has become a potential therapeutic target for oxidative stress-related diseases. We investigated whether vanillin modifies hepatic O(2) consumption associated with Kupffer cell functioning. The influence of vanillin on Kupffer cell functioning was studied in isolated perfused rat liver by colloidal carbon (CC) infusion (0.5 mg ml(-1)), concomitantly with sinusoidal efflux of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as an organ viability parameter. CC infusion increased the rate of O(2) consumption of the liver above basal values, an effect that represents the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells. However, CC-dependent respiratory burst activity was suppressed by previous infusion of 2 mM vanillin. Vanillin did not affect the liver CC uptake rate and liver sinusoidal efflux of LDH efflux. These findings, elicited by vanillin, were reproduced by the well-established NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. In conclusion, vanillin suppresses the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells as assessed in intact liver, which may be associated with the inhibition of macrophage NADPH oxidase activity. Such a finding may have relevance in conditions underlying Kupffer cell-dependent up-regulation of the expression and release of pro-inflammatory mediators by redox-dependent mechanisms. PMID:23007174

  11. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Imaging during Respiratory Burst in Human Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Prasad, Ankush; Matsuoka, Ryo; Aoyagi, Shigeo; Matsue, Tomokazu; Kasai, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes, consume oxygen and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to external stimuli. Among the various ROS, the superoxide anion radical is known to be primarily produced by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hydrogen (NADPH) oxidase. In the current study, we attempt to evaluate the respiratory burst by monitoring the rapid consumption of oxygen by using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) imaging. The respiratory burst was measured in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells) derived from an acute monocytic leukemia patient under the effect of the exogenous addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which acts as a differentiation inducer. SECM imaging composed of a microelectrode was used to compare oxygen consumption between normal cellular respiration and during respiratory burst in THP-1 cells. Two-dimensional respiratory activity imaging was performed using XY-scan. In addition, the quantitative evaluation of oxygen consumption in THP-1 cells was performed using a Z-scan. The results obtained show higher consumption of oxygen in cells undergoing respiratory burst. SECM imaging is thus claimed to be a highly sensitive and appropriate technique compared to other existing techniques available for evaluating oxidative stress in human cells, making it potentially useful for widespread applications in biomedical research and clinical trials. PMID:26903876

  12. Activation of NF-κB and respiratory burst following Aspergillus fumigatus stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sun, He; Xu, Xiao-yong; Tian, Xiao-li; Shao, Hong-tao; Wu, Xiao-dong; Wang, Quan; Su, Xin; Shi, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Dectin-2, a C-type lectin receptor (CLR), plays an essential role in mediating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and anti-fungal immunity in response to Candida albicans infection. However, the molecular mechanisms and function of Dectin-2 signaling in response to infection by the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus have not been characterized. In order to characterize Dectin-2 signaling in response to A. fumigatus infection, activation of Dectin-2 was analyzed at both transcriptional and translational levels. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) phosphorylation, NF-κB activation and cytokine production downstream of Dectin-2 activation were also investigated. In addition, Dectin-2-Syk function and its ability to mediate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and elimination of A. fumigatus conidia was examined. We demonstrate that Syk is involved in Dectin-2-induced IκBα (inhibitor of kappa B protein) phosphorylation and NF-κB activation following A. fumigatus stimulation in a time dependent manner. Silencing of Dectin-2 and Syk as well as Syk inhibition blocks NF-κB activation and cytokine secretion. Furthermore, the killing of A. fumigatus conidia and ROS production are significantly affected by Dectin-2 or Syk silencing as well as Syk inhibition. Swelling and germination of the fungus followed by hyphae formation and not the resting and heat-inactivated form of A. fumigatus mediate the activation of Dectin-2 signaling. In conclusion, Syk plays an essential role in IκBα kinase phosphorylation, NF-κB activation, and ROS production mediated by Dectin-2 activation in response to A. fumigatus infection. PMID:23886693

  13. Ambroxol inhibits neutrophil respiratory burst activated by alpha chain integrin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peroni, D G; Moser, S; Gallo, G; Pigozzi, R; Tenero, L; Zanoni, L; Boner, A L; Piacentini, G L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-oxidant effect(s) of Ambroxol on neutrophils activated by ligand-binding of the drug with membrane-associated adhesion integrin CD11a and to estimate dose-response changes in oxygen free radical production. The amount of free radical production by anti-CD11a- and anti-CD4-coated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and challenged with increasing concentration of Ambroxol, was evaluated within a time frame of 90 minutes. A significant dose-dependent effect response of Ambroxol on O2‾ production by cells coated with anti-CD11a antibody was observed. This preliminary study opens a new perspective on the therapeutic role of Ambroxol as an antioxidant drug and for its potential use in controlling oxidative stress, particularly in leukocyte-dependent inflammation. PMID:24355223

  14. Respiratory neuron characterization reveals intrinsic bursting properties in isolated adult turtle brainstems (Trachemys scripta).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephen M; Hedrick, Michael S; Krause, Bryan M; Nilles, Jacob P; Chapman, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    It is not known whether respiratory neurons with intrinsic bursting properties exist within ectothermic vertebrate respiratory control systems. Thus, isolated adult turtle brainstems spontaneously producing respiratory motor output were used to identify and classify respiratory neurons based on their firing pattern relative to hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity. Most respiratory neurons (183/212) had peak activity during the expiratory phase, while inspiratory, post-inspiratory, and novel pre-expiratory neurons were less common. During synaptic blockade conditions, ∼10% of respiratory neurons fired bursts of action potentials, with post-inspiratory cells (6/9) having the highest percentage of intrinsic burst properties. Most intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons were clustered at the level of the vagus (X) nerve root. Synaptic inhibition blockade caused seizure-like activity throughout the turtle brainstem, which shows that the turtle respiratory control system is not transformed into a network driven by intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons. We hypothesize that intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons are evolutionarily conserved and represent a potential rhythmogenic mechanism contributing to respiration in adult turtles. PMID:25462012

  15. Respiratory Burst Process in Diabetic Children

    PubMed Central

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Taheri, Soodabeh; Jouybar, Reza; Hashemnia, Mohammadreza; Karimi, Abdollah; Shoja, Seyed Abdolmajid

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased rate of infections in diabetes mellitus (DM) is an accepted fact. Pathophysiologically, several tasks of the immune system could be involved including polymorphonuclear (PMN) functions. Objectives The aim of this research was to evaluate the respiratory burst process of PMNs that is an essential part of phagocytosis, in children with DM. Patients and Methods Fifty two children with insulin dependent diabetes and 29 non-diabetic children were enrolled in this cross sectional study from 2010 to 2011. Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test was done on PMNs taken from their heparinized blood. The resultant data was analyzed by SPSS version 16. P values were considered significant when it was under 0.05. Results Mean NBTs were 72.1 ± 15.84 and 94.68 ± 5.31 in diabetics and non-diabetics, respectively (P < 0.001). Using Pearson correlation, there was no significant correlation between the NBT level and age, gender, duration of diabetes, daily insulin usage and blood HbA1C level. Conclusions Compared to non-diabetics, respiratory burst process of polymorphonuclears is obviously decreased in diabetic children. This can explain one of the mechanisms involved in the increased rate of infections in DM.

  16. Intracellular shunting of O2− contributes to charge compensation and preservation of neutrophil respiratory burst in the absence of voltage-gated proton channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Decleva, Eva; Menegazzi, Renzo; Fasolo, Alba; Defendi, Federica; Sebastianutto, Michele; Dri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Proton efflux via voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) is considered to mediate the charge compensation necessary to preserve NADPH oxidase activity during the respiratory burst. Using the Hv1 inhibitor Zn2+, we found that the PMA-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils is inhibited when assessed as extracellular production of O2− and H2O2, in accordance with literature studies, but, surprisingly, unaffected when measured as oxygen consumption or total (extracellular plus intracellular) H2O2 production. Furthermore, we show that inhibiting Hv1 with Zn2+ results in an increased production of intracellular ROS. Similar results, i.e. decreased extracellular and increased intracellular ROS production, were obtained using a human granulocyte-like cell line with severely impaired Hv1 expression. Acidic extracellular pH, which dampens proton efflux, also augmented intracellular production of H2O2. Zinc caused an increase in the rate but not in the extent of depolarization and cytosolic acidification indicating that mechanisms other than proton efflux take part in charge compensation. Our results suggest a hitherto unpredicted mechanism of charge compensation whereby, in the absence of proton efflux, part of O2− generated within gp91phox in the plasma membrane is shunted intracellularly down electrochemical gradient to dampen excessive depolarization. This would preserve NADPH oxidase activity under conditions such as the inflammatory exudate in which the acidic pH hinders charge compensation by proton efflux. PMID:23578765

  17. Lipoic acid suppression of neutrophil respiratory burst: effect of NADPH.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Heidi C; Rancourt, Raymond C; White, Carl W

    2008-02-01

    Lipoic acid (LA) and its reduced product dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) are potent antioxidants with capacity to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and recycle endogenous antioxidants. LA may increase cellular glutathione (GSH), an antioxidant lacking in the lung's epithelial lining fluid in lung disorders such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Neutrophils (PMN) are key innate responders and are pivotal in clearing bacterial infection, therefore it is crucial to understand the impact LA may have on their function. Circulating neutrophils were isolated from healthy volunteers and pretreated with LA or diluent. Cells were subsequently activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 100 ng/ml) to induce ROS production. SOD-inhibitable reduction of acetylated cytochrome c demonstrated the PMA-dependent respiratory burst was suppressed by LA. Oxygen consumption also was diminished when PMA-stimulated cells were pretreated with LA. PMN respiratory burst was partially restored by addition of NADPH but not other pyridine nucleotides. LA did not inhibit glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity of PMN. These data together suggest that the reduction of LA to DHLA using cellular NADPH may limit the capacity of the PMN NADPH oxidase to produce superoxide. Further studies will be required to determine if LA can diminish excessive superoxide produced by PMN and/or alveolar macrophages in IPF or relevant disease models in vivo. PMID:18158760

  18. Modulatory effect of fatty acids on fungicidal activity, respiratory burst and TNF-α and IL-6 production in J774 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Martins de Lima-Salgado, Thais; Coccuzzo Sampaio, Sandra; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Curi, Rui

    2011-04-01

    The reported effects of different families of fatty acids (FA; SFA, MUFA, n-3 and n-6 PUFA) on human health and the importance of macrophage respiratory burst and cytokine release to immune defence led us to examine the influence of palmitic acid (PA), oleic acid (OA), linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, EPA and DHA on macrophage function. We determined fungicidal activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytokine production after the treatment of J774 cells with non-toxic concentrations of the FA. PA had a late and discrete stimulating effect on ROS production, which may be associated with the reduced fungicidal activity of the cells after treatment with this FA. OA presented a sustained stimulatory effect on ROS production and increased fungicidal activity of the cells, suggesting that enrichment of diets with OA may be beneficial for pathogen elimination. The effects of PUFA on ROS production were time- and dose-dependently regulated, with no evident differences between n-3 and n-6 PUFA. It was worth noting that most changes induced after stimulation of the cells with lipopolysaccharide were suppressed by the FA. The present results suggest that supplementation of the diet with specific FA, not classes of FA, might enable an improvement in host defence mechanisms or a reduction in adverse immunological reactions. PMID:21232170

  19. Protein Kinase B (AKT) Mediates Phospholipase D Activation via ERK1/2 and Promotes Respiratory Burst Parameters in Formylpeptide-stimulated Neutrophil-like HL-60 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Satyananda; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Raoul-Des-Essarts, Yannick; Dang, Pham My-Chan; El-Benna, Jamel; Périanin, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD), a major source of lipid second messengers (phosphatidic acid, diglycerides) in many cell types, is tightly regulated by protein kinases, but only a few of them have been identified. We show here that protein kinase B (AKT) is a novel major signaling effector of PLD activity induced by the formylpeptide f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) in human neutrophil-like HL-60 cells (dHL-60 cells). AKT inhibition with the selective antagonist AKTib1/2 almost completely prevented fMLP-mediated activity of PLD, its upstream effector ERK1/2, but not p38 MAPK. Immunoprecipitation studies show that phosphorylated AKT, ERK, and PLD2 form a complex induced by fMLP, which can be prevented by AKTib1/2. In cell-free systems, AKT1 stimulated PLD activity via activation of ERK. AKT1 actually phosphorylated ERK2 as a substrate (Km 1 μm). Blocking AKT activation with AKTib1/2 also prevented fMLP- but not phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-mediated NADPH oxidase activation (respiratory burst, RB) of dHL-60 cells. Impaired RB was associated with defective membrane translocation of NADPH oxidase components p67phox and p47phox, ERK, AKT1, AKT2, but not AKT3. Depletion of AKT1 or AKT2 with antisense oligonucleotides further indicates a partial contribution of both isoforms in fMLP-induced activation of ERK, PLD, and RB, with a predominant role of AKT1. Thus, formylpeptides induce sequential activation of AKT, ERK1/2, and PLD, which represents a novel signaling pathway. A major primarily role of this AKT signaling pathway also emerges in membrane recruitment of NOX2 components p47phox, p67phox, and ERK, which may contribute to assembly and activation of the RB motor system, NADPH oxidase. PMID:20693286

  20. Iron Inhibits Respiratory Burst of Peritoneal Phagocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gotfryd, Kamil; Jurek, Aleksandra; Kubit, Piotr; Klein, Andrzej; Turyna, Bohdan

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This study examines the effects of iron ions Fe3+ on the respiratory burst of phagocytes isolated from peritoneal effluents of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, as an in vitro model of iron overload in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Material and Methods. Respiratory burst of peritoneal phagocytes was measured by chemiluminescence method. Results. At the highest used concentration of iron ions Fe3+ (100 μM), free radicals production by peritoneal phagocytes was reduced by 90% compared to control. Conclusions. Iron overload may increase the risk of infectious complications in ESRD patients. PMID:22203913

  1. The phagocytosis-associated respiratory burst in human monocytes is associated with increased uptake of glutathione.

    PubMed

    Seres, T; Knickelbein, R G; Warshaw, J B; Johnston, R B

    2000-09-15

    During the phagocytic respiratory burst, oxygen is converted to potent cytotoxic oxidants. Monocytes and macrophages are potentially long-lived, and we have hypothesized that protective mechanisms against oxidant stress are varied and fully expressed in these cells. We report here that the respiratory burst in monocytes is accompanied by an increase in the uptake of [35S]glutathione ([35S]GSH) after 20-30 min to levels up to 10-fold greater than those at baseline. By 30 min, 49% of the cell-associated radioactivity was in the cytosol, 41% was in membrane, and 10% was associated with the nuclear fraction. GSH uptake was inhibited by catalase, which removes hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and micromolar H2O2 stimulated GSH uptake effectively in monocytes and also lymphocytes. Oxidation of GSH to glutathione disulfide with H2O2 and glutathione peroxidase prevented uptake. Acivicin, which inhibits GSH breakdown by gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), had no effect on the enhanced uptake seen during the respiratory burst. Uptake of cysteine or cystine, possible products of GGT activity, stayed the same or decreased during the respiratory burst. These results suggest that a GGT-independent mechanism is responsible for the enhanced GSH uptake seen during the respiratory burst. We describe here a sodium-independent, methionine-inhibitable transport system with a Km (8.5 microM) for GSH approximating the plasma GSH concentration. These results suggest that monocytes have a specific GSH transporter that is triggered by the release of H2O2 during the respiratory burst and that induces the uptake of GSH into the cell. Such a mechanism has the potential to protect the phagocyte against oxidant damage. PMID:10975851

  2. Phagocytic activity, respiratory burst, cytoplasmic free-Ca(2+) concentration and apoptotic cell ratio of haemocytes from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon under acute copper stress.

    PubMed

    Xian, Jian-An; Wang, An-Li; Ye, Chao-Xia; Chen, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular toxicity of copper-induced injury to the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. The 24h, 48h, 72h and 96h LC(50) (median lethal concentration) of Cu(2+) on P. monodon (11.63+/-1.14g) were found to be 3.49, 1.54, 0.73 and 0.40mgL(-1), respectively. Total haemocyte count (THC), phagocytic activity, respiratory burst (RB), cytoplasmic free-Ca(2+) (cf-Ca(2+)) concentration and apoptotic cell ratio of shrimp were determined after exposure to different concentrations of Cu(2+) (0, 0.05, 0.5, 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1)) for 0, 6, 12, 24 and 48h. There was no significant effect on the analytic indicator of shrimp exposed to 0.05mgL(-1) Cu(2+). THC decreased after Cu-exposure to 0.5mgL(-1) for 48h, 1.5mgL(-1) for 24h and 3.5mgL(-1) for 12h. Phagocytic activity decreased in P. monodon following 48h exposure to 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). RB was induced after 6h exposure to 0.5, 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). cf-Ca(2+) concentration increased after 48h exposure to 0.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+), and 12h exposure to 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). The percentage of apoptotic cells increased to 9.5%, 16.3% and 18.6% respectively following 48h exposure to 0.5, 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). These results indicate that Cu can induce oxidative stress, elevation of cf-Ca(2+) and cell apoptosis, and inhibit phagocytic activity in the shrimp P. monodon, and the lethal injury of Cu(2+) to P. monodon may be mainly due to the sharp reduction of THC caused by ROS-induced apoptosis. PMID:20398793

  3. 5-HT3 receptor-dependent modulation of respiratory burst frequency, regularity, and episodicity in isolated adult turtle brainstems

    PubMed Central

    Bartman, Michelle E.; Wilkerson, Julia E.R.; Johnson, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the role of central serotonin 5-HT3 receptors in respiratory motor control, respiratory motor bursts were recorded from hypoglossal (XII) nerve rootlets on isolated adult turtle brainstems during bath-application of 5-HT3 receptor agonists and antagonists. mCPBG and PBG (5-HT3 receptor agonists) acutely increased XII burst frequency and regularity, and decreased bursts/episode. Tropisetron and MDL72222 (5-HT3 antagonists) increased bursts/episode, suggesting endogenous 5-HT3 receptor activation modulates burst timing in vitro. Tropisetron blocked all mCPBG effects, and the PBG-induced reduction in bursts/episode. Tropisetron application following mCPBG application did not reverse the long-lasting (2 h) mCPBG-induced decrease in bursts/episode. We conclude that endogenous 5-HT3 receptor activation regulates respiratory frequency, regularity, and episodicity in turtles and may induce a form of respiratory plasticity with the long-lasting changes in respiratory regularity. PMID:20399913

  4. Biodegradation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Macrophages through Respiratory Burst Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jie; Wan, Bin; Yang, Yu; Ren, Xiao-Min; Guo, Liang-Hong; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2016-01-01

    The biodegradation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may be one of major determinants of the toxic outcomes in exposed individuals. In this study, we employed a macrophage/monocyte model, Raw264.7, to investigate the feasibility of regulating the biodegradation of three types of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) (pristine, ox-, and OH-SWCNTs) by respiratory burst modulation. An artificial fluid mimicking the enzymatic reactions of respiratory burst was constituted to reveal the role of respiratory burst played in SWCNT biodegradation. The biodegradation of SWCNTs were characterized by Raman, ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed significantly accelerated biodegradation of ox-SWCNTs and OH-SWCNTs in macrophages activated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which could be prevented by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), whereas p-SWCNTs were resistant to biodegradation. Similar tendencies were observed by using the in vitro enzymatic system, and the degradation rates of these SWCNTs are in the order of OH-SWCNTs > ox-SWCNTs >> p-SWCNTs, suggesting a pivotal role of respiratory burst in accelerating the biodegradation of SWCNTs and that defect sites on SWCNTs might be a prerequisite for the biodegradation to occur. Our findings might provide invaluable clues on the development of intervention measurements for relieving the side effects of SWCNTs and would help to design safer SWCNT products with higher biodegradability and less toxicity. PMID:27011169

  5. Inhibitory effect of salmeterol on the respiratory burst of adherent human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Morone, P; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1996-10-01

    Human neutrophils, plated in fibronectin-coated wells and stimulated with N-formyl-methionylleucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), were found to undergo a massive and prolonged respiratory burst, as measured by monitoring superoxide production. The beta 2-agonist salmeterol inhibited the respiratory burst in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, salbutamol was ineffective. Moreover, the neutrophil respiratory burst was partially suppressed by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the phosphodiesterase type IV (PDE-IV) inhibitor RO 20-1724. When salmeterol was used in combination with PGE2 or RO 20-1724, additive inhibitory effects were observed. The inhibitory activity of salmeterol was not reversed in the presence of the beta-blocker propranolol, and did not correlate with its ability of increasing cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. Finally, the compounds used did not affect neutrophil adherence to fibronectin-coated wells. The results suggest that salmeterol is capable of down-regulating the neutrophil oxidative response to fMLP, also of co-operating with PGE2 and PDE-IV inhibitor RO 20-1724 in a manner not related to its beta 2-receptor binding activity. In other words, salmeterol displays neutrophil-directed effects, susceptible to be amplified by natural mediators such as PGE2 or PDE-IV inhibitors, consistent with possible anti-inflammatory properties of the drug. PMID:8870705

  6. Inhibitory effect of salmeterol on the respiratory burst of adherent human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    OTTONELLO, L; MORONE, P; DAPINO, P; DALLEGRI, F

    1996-01-01

    Human neutrophils, plated in fibronectin-coated wells and stimulated with n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), were found to undergo a massive and prolonged respiratory burst, as measured by monitoring superoxide production. The β2-agonist salmeterol inhibited the respiratory burst in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, salbutamol was ineffective. Moreover, the neutrophil respiratory burst was partially suppressed by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the phosphodiesterase type IV (PDE-IV) inhibitor RO 20-1724. When salmeterol was used in combination with PGE2 or RO 20-1724, additive inhibitory effects were observed. The inhibitory activity of salmeterol was not reversed in the presence of the β-blocker propranolol, and did not correlate with its ability of increasing cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. Finally, the compounds used did not affect neutrophil adherence to fibronectin-coated wells. The results suggest that salmeterol is capable of down-regulating the neutrophil oxidative response to fMLP, also of co-operating with PGE2 and PDE-IV inhibitor RO 20-1724 in a manner not related to its β2-receptor binding activity. In other words, salmeterol displays neutrophil-directed effects, susceptible to be amplified by natural mediators such as PGE2 or PDE-IV inhibitors, consistent with possible anti-inflammatory properties of the drug. PMID:8870705

  7. Intracellular shunting of O{sub 2}{sup −} contributes to charge compensation and preservation of neutrophil respiratory burst in the absence of voltage-gated proton channel activity

    SciTech Connect

    Decleva, Eva; Menegazzi, Renzo; Fasolo, Alba; Defendi, Federica

    2013-07-15

    Proton efflux via voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) is considered to mediate the charge compensation necessary to preserve NADPH oxidase activity during the respiratory burst. Using the Hv1 inhibitor Zn{sup 2+}, we found that the PMA-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils is inhibited when assessed as extracellular production of O{sub 2}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in accordance with literature studies, but, surprisingly, unaffected when measured as oxygen consumption or total (extracellular plus intracellular) H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Furthermore, we show that inhibiting Hv1 with Zn{sup 2+} results in an increased production of intracellular ROS. Similar results, i.e. decreased extracellular and increased intracellular ROS production, were obtained using a human granulocyte-like cell line with severely impaired Hv1 expression. Acidic extracellular pH, which dampens proton efflux, also augmented intracellular production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Zinc caused an increase in the rate but not in the extent of depolarization and cytosolic acidification indicating that mechanisms other than proton efflux take part in charge compensation. Our results suggest a hitherto unpredicted mechanism of charge compensation whereby, in the absence of proton efflux, part of O{sub 2}{sup −} generated within gp91{sup phox} in the plasma membrane is shunted intracellularly down electrochemical gradient to dampen excessive depolarization. This would preserve NADPH oxidase activity under conditions such as the inflammatory exudate in which the acidic pH hinders charge compensation by proton efflux. Highlights: • Neutrophils’ respiratory burst is not inhibited by the H{sup +} channel inhibitor Zn{sup 2+}. • Intracellular production of O{sub 2}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is increased in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}. • Intracellular H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production is increased in H{sup +} channels knock-down cells. • Zn{sup 2+} increases the rate but not the extent of

  8. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits phrenic motor facilitation.

    PubMed

    Mahamed, Safraaz; Strey, Kristi A; Mitchell, Gordon S; Baker-Herman, Tracy L

    2011-03-15

    We hypothesized that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits compensatory mechanisms of plasticity that enhance respiratory motor output. In urethane-anesthetized and ventilated rats, we reversibly reduced respiratory neural activity for 25-30 min using: hypocapnia (end tidal CO(2)=30 mmHg), isoflurane (~1%) or high frequency ventilation (HFV; ~100 breaths/min). In all cases, increased phrenic burst amplitude was observed following restoration of respiratory neural activity (hypocapnia: 92±22%; isoflurane: 65±22%; HFV: 54±13% baseline), which was significantly greater than time controls receiving the same surgery, but no interruptions in respiratory neural activity (3±5% baseline, p<0.05). Hypocapnia also elicited transient increases in respiratory burst frequency (9±2 versus 1±1bursts/min, p<0.05). Our results suggest that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a unique form of plasticity in respiratory motor control which we refer to as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF may prevent catastrophic decreases in respiratory motor output during ventilatory control disorders associated with abnormal respiratory activity. PMID:21167322

  9. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits phrenic motor facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Mahamed, Safraaz; Strey, Kristi A.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Baker-Herman, Tracy L.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits compensatory mechanisms of plasticity that enhance respiratory motor output. In urethane-anesthetized and ventilated rats, we reversibly reduced respiratory neural activity for 25–30 min using: hypocapnia (end tidal CO2 = 30 mmHg), isoflurane (~ 1%) or high frequency ventilation (HFV; ~100 breaths/min). In all cases, increased phrenic burst amplitude was observed following restoration of respiratory neural activity (hypocapnia: 92 ± 22%; isoflurane: 65 ± 22%; HFV: 54 ± 13% baseline), which was significantly greater than time controls receiving the same surgery, but no interruptions in respiratory neural activity (3 ± 5% baseline, p<0.05). Hypocapnia also elicited transient increases in respiratory burst frequency (9 ± 2 versus 1 ± 1 bursts/min, p<0.05). Our results suggest that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a unique form of plasticity in respiratory motor control which we refer to as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF may prevent catastrophic decreases in respiratory motor output during ventilatory control disorders associated with abnormal respiratory activity. PMID:21167322

  10. A study of granulocyte respiratory burst in patients with allergic bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Vargas, L; Patiño, P J; Montoya, F; Vanegas, A C; Echavarría, A; García de Olarte, D

    1998-02-01

    The respiratory burst of phagocytes plays an important role in the tissue damage that accompanies the inflammatory response. One of these conditions is allergic bronchial asthma, therefore, to evaluate the activation state of peripheral granulocytes the generation of reactive oxygen metabolites was evaluated using Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LCL) and reduction of cytochrome C by superoxide. The resting granulocytes of the asthmatic patients under crisis showed a higher LCL compared to the noncrisis patients and control subjects. The granulocytes stimulated with PMA presented a significant increase in the respiratory burst in both groups of asthmatics. The granulocytes of noncrisis asthmatics challenged with Ops-Zym and with fMLP + Ops-Zym showed a higher metabolic activity, whereas the asthmatics under crisis presented no difference between reactive oxygen generation and that of the control group. The quantitative analysis of superoxide generation by granulocytes of the same patients did not show differences among the groups. Our findings suggest that the granulocytes of crisis and noncrisis asthmatics seem to be in a hyperreactive state and with a higher metabolic response when compared to the control group. However, the patients present a different behavior depending on stimulus used to activate cells. This could indicate that in peripheral blood exist different granulocyte populations depending on the inflammatory response taking place in the respiratory tract. PMID:9484649

  11. What doesn't kill you makes you stronger: the anti-inflammatory effect of neutrophil respiratory burst.

    PubMed

    Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-16

    In this issue of Immunity, Campbell et al. (2014) demonstrate that hypoxia caused by the respiratory burst of infiltrating neutrophils activates hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in epithelial cells and protects the mucosa cells in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24439260

  12. Macrophage synthesis of nitrite, nitrate, and N-nitrosamines: precursors and role of the respiratory burst

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, R.; Stuehr, D.J.; Marletta, M.A.

    1987-09-01

    The macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 when activated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide and interferon-..gamma.. synthesized nitrite (NO/sub 2//sup -/) and nitrate (NO/sub 3//sup -/). Medium change after the activation showed that L-arginine was the only amino acid essential for this synthesis. D-Arginine would not substitute for L-arginine. Other analogues that could replace L-arginine were L-homoarginine, L-arginine methyl ester, L-arginamide, and the peptide L-arginyl-L-aspartate. L-Argininic acid, L-agmatine, L-ornithine, urea, L-citrulline, and ammonia were among the nonprecursors, while L-canavanine inhibited this L-arginine-derived NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesis. When morpholine was added to the culture medium of the activated RAW 264.7 macrophages, N-nitrosation took place, generating N-nitrosomorpholine. GC/MS experiments using L-(guanido-/sup 15/N/sub 2/)arginine established that the NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ and the nitrosyl group of N-nitrosomorpholine were derived exclusively from one or both of the terminal guanido nitrogens of arginine. Chromatographic analysis showed that the other product of the L-arginine synthesis of NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ was L-citrulline. The role of the respiratory burst in NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesis was examined using the macrophage cell lines J774.16 and J774 C3C. Both cell lines synthesized similar amounts of NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/. However, J774 C3C cells do not produce superoxide and hence do not exhibit the respiratory burst. Additional experiments also ruled out the involvement of the respiratory burst in NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesis.

  13. Alterations of the respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from diabetic children. A chemiluminescence study.

    PubMed

    Kantar, A; Wilkins, G; Swoboda, B; Littarru, G P; Bertoli, E; Catassi, C; Coppa, G; Giorgi, P L

    1990-05-01

    The respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was investigated in 24 children with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and 24 healthy controls. This oxygen dependent, membrane associated process generates a number of toxic oxygen metabolites which are implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial damage. The activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was studied in terms of luminol amplified chemiluminescence. It was found that the resting luminol amplified chemiluminescence activity of isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes from diabetic children was significantly higher than that of controls (342,000 +/- 174,000 cpm vs. 165,000 +/- 82,000 cpm, p less than 0.01). The addition of respiratory burst inhibitors caused a significant reduction of basal chemiluminescence (greater than 80%). When the ratio of phorbol myristate acetate stimulated activity to basal activity was calculated and used as an activation index, it was found to be significantly reduced in diabetics relative to controls (4.29 +/- 2.46 vs. 8.34 +/- 3.21, p less than 0.01). These observations suggest that increased release of toxic oxygen metabolites from polymorphonuclear leukocytes in diabetic subjects may play a role in the development of diabetic angiopathies. PMID:2166990

  14. The respiratory burst of granulocytes: modulation by inflammatory mediators and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, S; Ohsaka, A; Yuo, A; Takaku, F; Saito, M

    1988-12-01

    Prior exposure of granulocytes to inflammatory mediators such as chemotactic factors, colony-stimulating factors and tumor necrosis factor primes the cells for enhanced activity of the respiratory burst, which appears not only to play an essential role in the increased host-defenses against invading microorganisms but also to be responsible for tissue damage at the inflammatory sites. The molecular basis for this priming is presently under investigation. Changes in one or more of the signal transduction events may lead to more efficient stimulation of the NADPH oxidase responsible for the respiratory burst. The mechanisms of priming appear to be different according to the priming stimuli: the chemotactic peptide and the Ca2+ ionophore may prime the cells by causing an increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+; phorbol esters by activating protein kinase C; and colony-stimulating factors and tumor necrosis factor by activating the distinct mechanism, which is independent of an increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ and activation of protein kinase C. PMID:3078751

  15. Anti-inflammatory properties of clovamide and Theobroma cacao phenolic extracts in human monocytes: evaluation of respiratory burst, cytokine release, NF-κB activation, and PPARγ modulation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawu; Locatelli, Monica; Bardelli, Claudio; Amoruso, Angela; Coisson, Jean Daniel; Travaglia, Fabiano; Arlorio, Marco; Brunelleschi, Sandra

    2011-05-25

    There is a great interest in the potential health benefits of biologically active phenolic compounds in cocoa (Theobroma cacao) and dark chocolate. We investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of clovamide (a N-phenylpropenoyl-L-amino acid amide present in cocoa beans) and two phenolic extracts from unroasted and roasted cocoa beans, by evaluating superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production, cytokine release, and NF-κB activation in human monocytes stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The effects of rosmarinic acid are shown for comparison. Clovamide and rosmarinic acid inhibited PMA-induced O(2)(-) production and cytokine release (with a bell-shaped curve and maximal inhibition at 10-100 nM), as well as PMA-induced NF-κB activation; the two cocoa extracts were less effective. In all tests, clovamide was the most potent compound and also enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activity, which may exert anti-inflammatory effects. These findings indicate clovamide as a possible bioactive compound with anti-inflammatory activity in human cells. PMID:21486087

  16. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A; Hohl, Tobias M

    2016-04-15

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ(-/-) leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ(+/+) counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ(-/-) neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus-challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. PMID:26908736

  17. Chemoattractant-induced respiratory burst: increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations are essential and synergize with a kinetically distinct second signal.

    PubMed Central

    Foyouzi-Youssefi, R; Petersson, F; Lew, D P; Krause, K H; Nüsse, O

    1997-01-01

    The role of the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) and its relationship to other second messengers in the signalling between chemoattractant [e.g. N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (fMLP)] receptors and the NADPH oxidase is still poorly understood. In this study, we have used thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the Ca2+-ATPase of intracellular stores, as a tool to selectively manipulate Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. We thereby temporarily separated the Ca2+ signal from other signals generated by fMLP and analysed the consequences on the respiratory burst. Under all conditions investigated, the extent of fMLP-induced respiratory burst activation was critically determined by [Ca2+]c elevation. fMLP was unable to activate the respiratory burst without [Ca2+]c elevation. Thapsigargin-induced Ca2+ influx activated the respiratory burst in the absence of fMLP, but only to approx. 20% of the values observed in the presence of fMLP. The second signal generated by fMLP did not activate the respiratory burst by itself, but acted in synergy with [Ca2+]c elevation. The second signal was long lasting (>15 min) provided that there was no rise in [Ca2+]c and that the receptor was continuously occupied. The second signal was inactivated by high [Ca2+]c elevation. Our results demonstrate that [Ca2+]c elevations are an essential step in the signalling between the fMLP receptor and NADPH oxidase. They also provide novel information about the properties of the second Ca2+-independent signal that activates the respiratory burst in synergy with [Ca2+]c. PMID:9148740

  18. Standardization of the antibody-dependent respiratory burst assay with human neutrophils and Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn, David; Miura, Kazutoyo; Fay, Michael P.; Williams, Andrew R.; Murungi, Linda M.; Shi, Jianguo; Hodgson, Susanne H.; Douglas, Alexander D.; Osier, Faith H.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Diakite, Mahamadou; Pleass, Richard J.; Long, Carole A.; Draper, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of naturally-acquired and vaccine-induced immunity to blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria is of long-standing interest. However, the field has suffered from a paucity of in vitro assays that reproducibly measure the anti-parasitic activity induced by antibodies in conjunction with immune cells. Here we optimize the antibody-dependent respiratory burst (ADRB) assay, which assesses the ability of antibodies to activate the release of reactive oxygen species from human neutrophils in response to P. falciparum blood-stage parasites. We focus particularly on assay parameters affecting serum preparation and concentration, and importantly assess reproducibility. Our standardized protocol involves testing each serum sample in singlicate with three independent neutrophil donors, and indexing responses against a standard positive control of pooled hyper-immune Kenyan sera. The protocol can be used to quickly screen large cohorts of samples from individuals enrolled in immuno-epidemiological studies or clinical vaccine trials, and requires only 6 μL of serum per sample. Using a cohort of 86 samples, we show that malaria-exposed individuals induce higher ADRB activity than malaria-naïve individuals. The development of the ADRB assay complements the use of cell-independent assays in blood-stage malaria, such as the assay of growth inhibitory activity, and provides an important standardized cell-based assay in the field. PMID:26373337

  19. beta. -Endorphin and related peptides suppress phorbol myristate acetate-induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamant, M.; Henricks, P.A.J.; Nijkamp, F.P.; de Wied, D. )

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the immunomodulatory effect of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-E) and shorter pro-opiomelancortin (POMC) fragments was evaluated by assessing their influence on respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). The effect of the peptides on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen metabolites was measured in a lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) assay. Both POMC peptides with opiate-like activity and their non-opioid derivatives were tested. With the exception of {alpha}-E, PMA-stimulated respiratory burst was suppressed by all POMC fragments tested. A U-shaped dose-response relation was observed. Doses lower than 10{sup {minus}17}M and higher than 10{sup {minus}8}M were without effect. {beta}-E and dT{beta}E both suppressed PMA-induced oxidative burst in human PMN at physiological concentrations. {gamma}-E and dT{gamma}E proved to be less potent inhibitors, reaching maximal effect at higher concentrations. DE{gamma}E exerted an even less pronounced but still significant suppressive effect at the concentration of 10{sup {minus}10}M. None of the endorphins tested was shown to affect resting oxidative metabolism in the PMN. The modulatory effects of the opioid peptides could not be blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone.

  20. αVβ3 Integrin Regulation of Respiratory Burst in Fibrinogen Adherent Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Yeong; Skokos, Eleni A.; Myer, Deborah J.; Agaba, Perez; Gonzalez, Anjelica L.

    2015-01-01

    In response to inflammatory stimuli, microvascular endothelial cells become activated, initiating the capture and exit of neutrophils from the blood vessel and into the extravascular extracellular matrix (ECM). In the extravascular space, neutrophils bind to ECM proteins, regulating cellular functions via signaling through adhesion molecules known as integrins. The αVβ3 integrin is an important mediator of neutrophil adhesion to ECM proteins containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide sequence, including fibrinogen and fibronectin. Despite the abundance of RGD sequence in the ECM, adhesion molecule-mediated neutrophil activity has been focused on the β2 (Mac-1, CD11b/CD18) and β1 integrin response to matrix proteins. Here we investigated αVβ3 integrin-mediated reactive oxidant suppression as a consequence of human neutrophil adhesion to RGD containing proteins. Using integrin ligand-modified (poly)ethylene glycol hydrogels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) sensitive fluorescent probes (dihydrotetramethylrhosamine, H2TMRos), we evaluated integrin–peptide interactions that effectively regulate ROS generation. This study demonstrates that neutrophil adhesion suppresses ROS production in an αVβ3-dependent manner. Additionally, we determine that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in the respiratory burst signaling pathway is interrupted by integrin-mediated adhesion. These data indicate that ECM/integrin interactions can induce αVβ3-mediated adhesion dependent downstream signaling of ROS regulation via a Mac-1 independent mechanism. PMID:25632307

  1. Identifying Crucial Parameter Correlations Maintaining Bursting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons) allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO) model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron) and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency) similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, Leak; a persistent K current, K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, P) that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of Leak, K2, and P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained. PMID:24945358

  2. Influence of Rhodococcus equi on the respiratory burst of resident alveolar macrophages from horses

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbaugh, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the etiologic agent of a devastating pneumonia of sporadic incidence in foals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of R. equi on the superoxide anion production, measured spectrophotometrically as the reduction of cytochrome C, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity, measured by /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ liberation from /sup 14/C-1-D-glucose, of alveolar macrophages from horses. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from 6 anesthetized, healthy, light-breed, adult horses by bronchoalveolar lavage. Following a randomized complete block design, the suspension of cells was divided into aliquots of 10/sup 6/ viable alveolar macrophages which were exposed to 1, 10 or 100 g. of opsonized R. equi or opsonized zymosan A at 37 C for 2 hours. In this study the respiratory burst of equine alveolar macrophages was only evidenced by the hexose monophosphate shunt activity and superoxide anion was not coincidentally produced. Rhodococcus equi did not adversely affect that response. The insignificant superoxide anion production by the alveolar macrophages suggests that this may not be a significant oxygen metabolite in those cells.

  3. Phasic Motor Activity of Respiratory and Non-Respiratory Muscles in REM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Fraigne, Jimmy J.; Orem, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we quantified the profiles of phasic activity in respiratory muscles (diaphragm, genioglossus and external intercostal) and non-respiratory muscles (neck and extensor digitorum) across REM sleep. We hypothesized that if there is a unique pontine structure that controls all REM sleep phasic events, the profiles of the phasic twitches of different muscle groups should be identical. Furthermore, we described how respiratory parameters (e.g., frequency, amplitude, and effort) vary across REM sleep to determine if phasic processes affect breathing. Methods: Electrodes were implanted in Wistar rats to record brain activity and muscle activity of neck, extensor digitorum, diaphragm, external intercostal, and genioglossal muscles. Ten rats were studied to obtain 313 REM periods over 73 recording days. Data were analyzed offline and REM sleep activity profiles were built for each muscle. In 6 animals, respiratory frequency, effort, amplitude, and inspiratory peak were also analyzed during 192 REM sleep periods. Results: Respiratory muscle phasic activity increased in the second part of the REM period. For example, genioglossal activity increased in the second part of the REM period by 63.8% compared to the average level during NREM sleep. This profile was consistent between animals and REM periods (η2 = 0.58). This increased activity seen in respiratory muscles appeared as irregular bursts and trains of activity that could affect rythmo-genesis. Indeed, the increased integrated activity seen in the second part of the REM period in the diaphragm was associated with an increase in the number (28.3%) and amplitude (30%) of breaths. Non-respiratory muscle phasic activity in REM sleep did not have a profile like the phasic activity of respiratory muscles. Time in REM sleep did not have an effect on nuchal activity (P = 0.59). Conclusion: We conclude that the concept of a common pontine center controlling all REM phasic events is not supported by our

  4. Burst of succinate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activity in concert with the expression of genes coding for respiratory chain proteins underlies short-term beneficial physiological stress in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zakharchenko, Marina V; Zakharchenko, A V; Khunderyakova, N V; Tutukina, M N; Simonova, M A; Vasilieva, A A; Romanova, O I; Fedotcheva, N I; Litvinova, E G; Maevsky, E I; Zinchenko, V P; Berezhnov, A V; Morgunov, I G; Gulayev, A A; Kondrashova, M N

    2013-01-01

    Conditions for the realization in rats of moderate physiological stress (PHS) (30-120 min) were selected, which preferentially increase adaptive restorative processes without adverse responses typical of harmful stress (HST). The succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KDH) activity and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria were measured in lymphocytes by the cytobiochemical method, which detects the regulation of mitochondria in the organism with high sensitivity. These mitochondrial markers undergo an initial 10-20-fold burst of activity followed by a decrease to a level exceeding the quiescent state 2-3-fold by 120 min of PHS. By 30-60 min, the rise in SDH activity was greater than in KDH activity, while the activity of KDH prevailed over that of SDH by 120 min. The attenuation of SDH hyperactivity during PHS occurs by a mechanism other than oxaloacetate inhibition developed under HST. The dynamics of SDH and KDH activity corresponds to the known physiological replacement of adrenergic regulation by cholinergic during PHS, which is confirmed here by mitochondrial markers because their activity reflects these two types of nerve regulation, respectively. The domination of cholinergic regulation provides the overrestoration of expenditures for activity. In essence, this phenomenon corresponds to the training of the organism. It was first revealed in mitochondria after a single short-time stress episode. The burst of ROS formation was congruous with changes in SDH and KDH activity, as well as in ucp2 and cox3 expression, while the activity of SDH was inversely dependent on the expression of the gene of its catalytic subunit in the spleen. As the SDH activity enhanced, the expression of the succinate receptor decreased with subsequent dramatic rise when the activity was becoming lower. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Bioenergetic dysfunction, adaption and therapy. PMID:22814171

  5. Reactive oxygen species and neutrophil respiratory burst cytochrome b558 are produced by kidney glomerular cells in passive Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, T J; Ullrich, R; Ojha, P; Poczewski, H; Verhoeven, A J; Kerjaschki, D

    1993-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the production of glomerular damage in passive Heymann nephritis (PHN), an experimental form of membranous nephropathy with neutrophil-independent proteinuria. Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies specific for cytochrome b558 (a major component of the oxidoreductase complex of the respiratory burst in stimulated neutrophilic granulocytes) showed that this enzyme is localized within visceral glomerular epithelial cells (GECs) in a dense, granular pattern in rats with PHN and proteinuria. By immunoelectron-microscopy, the cytochrome was found in membrane vesicles within the GEC and also extracellularly on the GEC membranes facing the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). By immunoblotting, cytochrome b558 was detected in highest concentration in lysates of isolated glomeruli from proteinuric rats. By contrast, only traces were found in normal glomeruli by immunohistochemistry. Depletion of complement abolished the expression of the cytochrome. Using an ultrastructural cerium-H2O2 histochemistry technique, the functional activity of the glomerular ROS-generating system was demonstrated exclusively in proteinuric PHN, where H2O2 was found in highest concentration within the GBM. These results provide evidence that in rats with PHN and proteinuria, the GECs express and externalize respiratory-burst enzymes that generate ROS in a manner similar to neutrophilic granulocytes, which could then lead to glomerular damage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8475113

  6. Genesis and Control of bursting activity in a neuronal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cymbalyuk, Gennady

    2005-11-01

    Neurons are observed in one of four fundamental activity modes: silence, sub-threshold oscillations, tonic spiking, and bursting. Neurons exhibit various activity regimes and regime transitions that reflect their complement of ionic channels and modulatory state. The leech presents unique opportunities for experimental and theoretical studies on the dynamics of neuronal activity. The central pattern generator controlling the leech's heartbeat contains identified pairs of mutually inhibitory neurons. Bursting activity of neurons is an oscillatory activity consisting of intervals of repetitive spiking separated by intervals of quiescence. It has been observed in neurons under normal and pathological conditions. Neurons which are capable of generating bursting activity endogenously play an important role in motor control and other brain functions. Burst duration, interburst interval and spike frequency are crucial temporal characteristics of bursting activity and thus have to be regulated. Application of the bifurcation theory of dynamical systems suggests new mechanism of how bursting activity can be generated by neurons and how burst duration can be regulated. Here we describe two mechanisms for the transition between tonic spiking and bursting. First mechanism describes a smooth, continuous and reversible transition from tonic spiking into bursting in a model neuron. The burst duration increases with no bound as 1/(a-a0)^1/2, where a0 is a parameter determining the transition. The characteristic features of this mechanism are that (a) the burst duration can be made arbitrarily long while (b) inter-burst interval does not depend on the parameter. The second mechanism is concerned with bi-stability where simultaneous tonic spiking and bursting activities co-exist in a neuron. The mechanism is based on a saddle-node periodic orbit bifurcation with non-central homoclinic orbits. This bifurcation describes a transition between three qualitatively different types of

  7. Priming of the neutrophil respiratory burst: role in host defense and inflammation.

    PubMed

    El-Benna, Jamel; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Marzaioli, Viviana; Marie, Jean-Claude; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Dang, Pham My-Chan

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils are the major circulating white blood cells in humans. They play an essential role in host defense against pathogens. In healthy individuals, circulating neutrophils are in a dormant state with very low efficiency of capture and arrest on the quiescent endothelium. Upon infection and subsequent release of pro-inflammatory mediators, the vascular endothelium signals to circulating neutrophils to roll, adhere, and cross the endothelial barrier. Neutrophils migrate toward the infection site along a gradient of chemo-attractants, then recognize and engulf the pathogen. To kill this pathogen entrapped inside the vacuole, neutrophils produce and release high quantities of antibacterial peptides, proteases, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The robust ROS production is also called 'the respiratory burst', and the NADPH oxidase or NOX2 is the enzyme responsible for the production of superoxide anion, leading to other ROS. In vitro, several soluble and particulate agonists induce neutrophil ROS production. This process can be enhanced by prior neutrophil treatment with 'priming' agents, which alone do not induce a respiratory burst. In this review, we will describe the priming process and discuss the beneficial role of controlled neutrophil priming in host defense and the detrimental effect of excessive neutrophil priming in inflammatory diseases. PMID:27558335

  8. Respiratory Burst Enzymes, Pro-Oxidants and Antioxidants Status in Bangladeshi Population with β-Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Faruk; Ismail, Md.; Tanu, Arifur Rahman; Shekhar, Hossain Uddin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress is intimately associated with many diseases, including β-thalassemia. Aim: The study was to estimate the status of respiratory burst enzymes, pro-oxidants, and antioxidants in β-thalassemia major patients in Bangladesh and to compare with apparently healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: A total of 49 subjects were recruited which included 25 patients (age range 5 to 40 years) with β-thalassemia major and 24 controls (age and sex matched). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) represented respiratory burst enzymes; malondialdehyde (MDA), lipid hydroperoxide (LHP), and xanthine oxidase (XO) were measured as pro-oxidants; and glutathione S transferase (GST), vitamin C (Vit.C), and glutathione (GSH) were the measured antioxidants. Results: The activity of SOD was significantly (P < 0.001) increased by about 79% and the activity of CAT was significantly (P < 0.001) decreased by more than 34% in the blood of β-thalassemia major patients compared to the control group. The content of pro-oxidants such as MDA, LHP, and XO was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in patients by about 228%, 241.3% and 148.1% respectively compared to control group. The level of GSH and Vit.C were significantly (P = 0.000) decreased in patients by about 59% and 81% versus the healthy group, respectively; and GST activity was significantly (P < 0.001) declined by 44.25% in patients group. Conclusion: β-thalassemia major patients demonstrate raised oxidative stress compared to healthy subjects. PMID:26199921

  9. Cardiorespiratory Coupling: Common Rhythms in Cardiac, Sympathetic, and Respiratory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dhingra, Rishi R.; Baekey, David M.; Galán, Roberto F.; Wehrwein, Erica; Morris, Kendall F.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory coupling is an encompassing term describing more than the well-recognized influences of respiration on heart rate and blood pressure. Our data indicate that cardiorespiratory coupling reflects a reciprocal interaction between autonomic and respiratory control systems, and the cardiovascular system modulates the ventilatory pattern as well. For example, cardioventilatory coupling refers to the influence of heart beats and arterial pulse pressure on respiration and is the tendency for the next inspiration to start at a preferred latency after the last heart beat in expiration. Multiple complementary, well-described mechanisms mediate respiration’s influence on cardiovascular function, whereas mechanisms mediating the cardiovascular system’s influence on respiration may only be through the baroreceptors but are just being identified. Our review will describe a differential effect of conditioning rats with either chronic intermittent or sustained hypoxia on sympathetic nerve activity but also on ventilatory pattern variability. Both intermittent and sustained hypoxia increase sympathetic nerve activity after 2 weeks but affect sympatho-respiratory coupling differentially. Intermittent hypoxia enhances sympatho-respiratory coupling, which is associated with low variability in the ventilatory pattern. In contrast, after constant hypobaric hypoxia, 1-to-1 coupling between bursts of sympathetic and phrenic nerve activity is replaced by 2-to-3 coupling. This change in coupling pattern is associated with increased variability of the ventilatory pattern. After baro-denervating hypobaric hypoxic-conditioned rats, splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity becomes tonic (distinct bursts are absent) with decreases during phrenic nerve bursts and ventilatory pattern becomes regular. Thus, conditioning rats to either intermittent or sustained hypoxia accentuates the reciprocal nature of cardiorespiratory coupling. Finally, identifying a compelling physiologic

  10. Inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity: protecting the drive to breathe in disorders that reduce respiratory neural activity.

    PubMed

    Strey, K A; Baertsch, N A; Baker-Herman, T L

    2013-11-01

    Multiple forms of plasticity are activated following reduced respiratory neural activity. For example, in ventilated rats, a central neural apnea elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal burst amplitude upon resumption of respiratory neural activity, forms of plasticity called inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF), respectively. Here, we provide a conceptual framework for plasticity following reduced respiratory neural activity to guide future investigations. We review mechanisms giving rise to iPMF and iHMF, present new data suggesting that inactivity-induced plasticity is observed in inspiratory intercostals (iIMF) and point out gaps in our knowledge. We then survey conditions relevant to human health characterized by reduced respiratory neural activity and discuss evidence that inactivity-induced plasticity is elicited during these conditions. Understanding the physiological impact and circumstances in which inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity is elicited may yield novel insights into the treatment of disorders characterized by reductions in respiratory neural activity. PMID:23816599

  11. Some features of active regions and bursts in millimetric range.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xingfeng; Yao, Jinxing

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics of active regions and bursts at mm wavelengths, observed with the 13.7 m radio telescope at Quinghai from Nov 16 to Dec 1, 1993, are analyzed. It appears that the active region collapsed and vanished while there occurred a coronal loop with two polarities. GRE bursts at mm wavelength may be interpreted by thermal gyro-resonance radiation and are part of the chromospheric eruption. There is no indication of FFS in 10 ms recordings.

  12. Effect of cardiopulmonary C fibre activation on the firing activity of ventral respiratory group neurones in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C G; Bonham, A C

    1997-01-01

    1. Cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor stimulation elicits apnoea and rapid shallow breathing, but the effects on the firing activity of central respiratory neurones are not well understood. This study examined the responses of ventral respiratory group neurones: decrementing expiratory (Edec), augmenting expiratory (Eaug), and inspiratory (I) neurones during cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor-evoked apnoea and rapid shallow breathing. 2. Extracellular neuronal activity, phrenic nerve activity and arterial pressure were recorded in urethane-anaesthetized rats. Cardiopulmonary C fibre receptors were stimulated by right atrial injections of phenylbiguanide. Neurones were tested for antidromic activation from the contra- and ipsilateral ventral respiratory group (VRG), spinal cord and cervical vagus nerve. 3. Edec neurones discharged tonically during cardiopulmonary C fibre-evoked apnoea and rapid shallow breathing, displaying increased burst durations, number of impulses per burst, and mean impulse frequencies. Edec neurones recovered either with the phrenic nerve activity (25 s) or much later (3 min). 4. By contrast, the firing activity of Eaug and most I neurones was decreased, featuring decreased burst durations and number of impulses per burst and increased interburst intervals. Eaug activity recovered in approximately 3 min and inspiratory activity in approximately 1 min. 5. The results indicate that cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor stimulation causes tonic firing of Edec neurones and decreases in Eaug and I neuronal activity coincident with apnoea or rapid shallow breathing. PMID:9365917

  13. Peritoneal macrophages from patients with cirrhotic ascites show impaired phagocytosis and vigorous respiratory burst

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Abdel Motaal M.; Bomford, Adrian; Nouri-Aria, Kayhan T.; Davies, Ted; Smith, Roger; Williams, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients (CPs) are susceptible to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). Aim of this study was to examine if this susceptibility was related to peritoneal macrophages' (PMs) altered host defence. Absorbance of phagocytosed particles by PMs from CPs was lower than that of control (31.88% vs. 77.2%). Particle opsonisation increased the absorbance to 41% in CPs' PMs, and this value remains lower than the control; 77.2%. Respiratory burst (RB) was expressed as fluorescence index values, and these were higher in PMs from CPs than in controls (82 vs. 41, 73 vs. 26 and 71 vs. 26). IFN-γ made no further increase of RB values in PMs from CPs. CD14 expression was also higher in CPs' PMs. IFN-γ significantly downregulated CD14 expression in both CPs' PMs and control. Reduced phagocytosis by predominantly CD14-positive PMs from CPs could be related to intense RB. Findings suggest altered host defence that could contribute to susceptibility to SBP. PMID:24371553

  14. Potentiation of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes respiratory burst and phagocytosis by a standardized liver and spleen fraction of peptides.

    PubMed

    Cramer, R; Dri, P; Spessotto, P; Mittenzwei, H; Patriarca, P

    1993-06-01

    The effect of Factor AF2 (AF2), a xenogeneic fraction of peptides with a molecular weight of < 10,000 Dalton obtained from livers and spleens of newborn lambs, on the oxygen consumption and the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was studied. AF2 increased the oxygen uptake of PMN exposed both to serum-treated zymosan (STZ), a phagocytosable stimulus, and phorbol-myristate-acetate (PMA), a soluble stimulus. The potentiating effect of the drug was dose-dependent and more pronounced when suboptimal amounts of either stimulus were used. The phagocytic activity of PMN, as measured by the rate of mineral oil particles ingestion, was also increased by AF2 in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the drug may influence PMN behaviour in at least two ways: 1. by increasing the rate of phagocytosis, and 2. by potentiating the respiratory burst induced by soluble and particulate stimuli. The results are discussed in relation to the beneficial effects of AF2 in cancer patients under chemotherapy or radiation treatment. PMID:8352824

  15. Endothelin involvement in respiratory centre activity.

    PubMed

    Albertini, M; Lafortuna, C L; Ciminaghi, B; Mazzola, S; Clement, M G

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the role of endothelin (ET) in respiratory homeostasis we studied the effects of the ET(A) and ET(B) receptor blocking agent bosentan on respiratory mechanics and control in seven anaesthetised spontaneously breathing pigs, for 180 min after single bolus administration (20 mg/kg i.v.). The results show that the block of ET receptors induced a significant increase in compliance and decrease in resistance of the respiratory system, entailing a significant reduction of diaphragmatic electromyographic activity, without affecting the centroid frequency of the power spectrum. Bosentan administration induced a significant increase in tidal volume (V(T)), accompanied by a significant decrease in respiratory frequency, without any significant change in pulmonary ventilation, CO(2) arterial blood gas pressure or pH. Since the relationship between V(T) and inspiratory time remained substantially constant after bosentan administration, the changes in respiratory pattern appear to be the result of an upward shift in inspiratory off-switch threshold. Both inspiratory and expiratory times during occluded breathing were increased by block of ET receptors, suggesting also a central respiratory neuromodulator effect of ET. In conclusion the present results suggest that the block of ET receptors in spontaneously breathing pigs exerts a role on mechanical properties of the respiratory system as well as on peripheral and central mechanisms of breathing control. PMID:11728166

  16. Disparate effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on early neutrophil respiratory burst and fungicidal responses to Candida albicans hyphae in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, R D; Lyman, C A; Wysong, D R

    1991-01-01

    We examined effects of priming with recombinant human interferon-gamma (IFN) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) on neutrophil responses to Candida albicans hyphae. Both cytokines increased early superoxide generation after hyphal stimulation. The more pronounced effects of TNF were accompanied by an augmented surface membrane depolarization rate and were insensitive to both pertussis toxin and calcium ion chelation, but were negated by concomitant incubation with puromycin or cycloheximide during priming. IFN augmented hyphal killing despite its only minor enhancement of early respiratory burst responses, but TNF reduced neutrophil fungicidal activity to nearly 40% below those by unprimed control cells even though it enhanced early superoxide responses more dramatically. Though TNF-primed neutrophils killed hyphae at normal initial rates, IFN-primed or even unprimed cells manifested more fungicidal sustained activity. These disparate consequences of cytokine priming on hyphal destruction were paralleled by differences in late generation of potentially candidacidal oxidants, hydrogen peroxide, and hypochlorous acid. IFN added during priming failed to correct TNF-associated functional defects in neutrophil anti-Candida responses. Thus, augmentation of early respiratory burst responses to oxidant-sensitive organisms need not necessarily reflect concomitant salutary effects on microbicidal activity. Images PMID:1846880

  17. Respiratory-related hypoglossal nerve activity: influence of anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J C; St John, W M; Bartlett, D

    1983-09-01

    In decerebrate, vagotomized, paralyzed, and ventilated cats, phrenic and respiratory-related hypoglossal discharges were evident at normocapnic normoxia or hyperoxia. Both increased progressively in hypercapnia or hypoxia. With increasing drive, onset of inspiratory hypoglossal activity began earlier relative to phrenic onset; an early expiratory hypoglossal burst was also observed. Following subanesthetic doses of chloralose, halothane, ketamine, or pentobarbital, hypoglossal activity was depressed much more than phrenic discharge. In moderate hypercapnia or hypoxia, phrenic activity increased more than hypoglossal, whereas, at high drive, the latter rose more sharply in some cats. Electromyograms of the diaphragm and genioglossus were recorded in intact awake cats to determine if their responses and those of decerebrates are comparable. Respiratory-related genioglossal discharge was evident in normocapnia. We conclude that anesthesia suppresses hypoglossal motor activities much more than those of the bulbospinal-phrenic system. Data for decerebrate cats and unanesthetized cats or humans provide no evidence of a differential distribution of chemoreceptor afferents on hypoglossal and bulbospinal-phrenic neurons, as suggested by results in anesthetized animals. PMID:6629915

  18. Respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity is enhanced in male rat offspring following uteroplacental insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Menuet, C; Wlodek, M E; Fong, A Y; Allen, A M

    2016-06-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity to the cardiovascular system displays prominent respiratory-related modulation which leads to the generation of rhythmic oscillations in blood pressure called Traube-Hering waves. An amplification of this respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity is observed in hypertension of both genetic, the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and induced, chronic intermittent hypoxia or maternal protein restriction during gestation, origin. Male offspring of mothers with uteroplacental insufficiency, induced by bilateral uterine vessel ligation at 18 days of gestation, are also hypertensive in adulthood. In this study we examined whether these male offspring display altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity at pre-hypertensive ages compared to controls. Respiratory, cardiovascular and sympathetic parameters were examined using the working heart-brainstem preparation in 35 day old male rats that had reduced birth weight due to uteroplacental insufficiency. Whilst all respiratory parameters were not different between groups, we observed an enhanced respiratory-related burst of thoracic sympathetic nerve activity and amplified Traube-Hering waves in the growth-restricted group. This group also showed an increased sympathetic and bradycardic response to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The observations add support to the view that altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity represents a common mechanism involved in the development of several forms of hypertension. PMID:26593642

  19. Extracellular hydrogen peroxide, produced through a respiratory burst oxidase/superoxide dismutase pathway, directs ingrowth wall formation in epidermal transfer cells of Vicia faba cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue; Zhang, Hui-Ming; Andriunas, Felicity A; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2012-09-01

    The intricate, and often polarized, ingrowth walls of transfer cells (TCs) amplify their plasma membrane surface areas to confer a transport function of supporting high rates of nutrient exchange across apo-/symplasmic interfaces. The TC ingrowth wall comprises a uniform wall layer on which wall ingrowths are deposited. Signals and signal cascades inducing trans-differentiation events leading to formation of TC ingrowth walls are poorly understood. Vicia faba cotyledons offer a robust experimental model to examine TC induction as, when placed into culture, their adaxial epidermal cells rapidly (h) and synchronously form polarized ingrowth walls accessible for experimental observations. Using this model, we recently reported findings consistent with extracellular hydrogen peroxide, produced through a respiratory burst oxidase homolog/superoxide dismutase pathway, initiating cell wall biosynthetic activity and providing directional information guiding deposition of the polarized uniform wall. Our conclusions rested on observations derived from pharmacological manipulations of hydrogen peroxide production and correlative gene expression data sets. A series of additional studies were undertaken, the results of which verify that extracellular hydrogen peroxide contributes to regulating ingrowth wall formation and is generated by a respiratory burst oxidase homolog/superoxide dismutase pathway. PMID:22899058

  20. Triggering of respiratory burst by tumor necrosis factor in neutrophils adherent to fibronectin. Evidence for a crucial role of CD18 glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Scirocco, M; Barbera, P; Dallegri, F

    1994-03-01

    Human neutrophils, plated on fibronectin (FN)-coated wells, were found to release large quantities of superoxide anion (O2-) in response to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). The O2- release was completely inhibited by two monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs, MHM23 and TS1/18) against CD18 glycoproteins. An independently derived anti-CD18 MoAb (60.3) was ineffective. These MoAbs failed to inhibit neutrophil adhesion to FN-coated surfaces. Moreover, neutrophils incubated for 30 min on FN and then washed to remove non-adherent cells, were responsive to TNF-alpha in the presence of anti-CD18 MoAbs MHM23 and TS1/18. Consequently, the CD18-dependent capacitation of the respiratory burst can occur before TNF-alpha triggering. Finally, neutrophils plated on FN in the presence of anti-CD18 MoAbs and then washed, i.e. adherent cells blocked in their surface CD18 molecules, released O2- after adding TNF-alpha but only in the absence of additional anti-CD18 MoAbs. This is consistent with a TNF-alpha ability to induce rapid expression and activation of new oxidative burst-capacitating CD18 molecules. The results suggest that the anchorage of neutrophils to FN surfaces depends on adherence molecules apparently unrelated to CD18, probably the so-called fibronectin receptors (FNRs), whereas the capacitation of the respiratory burst in response to TNF-alpha requires the intervention of CD18 glycoproteins, available on the membrane of "resting" neutrophils or mobilized to the cell surface by TNF-alpha. PMID:7915871

  1. Random bursts determine dynamics of active filaments.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph A; Suzuki, Ryo; Schaller, Volker; Aranson, Igor S; Bausch, Andreas R; Frey, Erwin

    2015-08-25

    Constituents of living or synthetic active matter have access to a local energy supply that serves to keep the system out of thermal equilibrium. The statistical properties of such fluctuating active systems differ from those of their equilibrium counterparts. Using the actin filament gliding assay as a model, we studied how nonthermal distributions emerge in active matter. We found that the basic mechanism involves the interplay between local and random injection of energy, acting as an analog of a thermal heat bath, and nonequilibrium energy dissipation processes associated with sudden jump-like changes in the system's dynamic variables. We show here how such a mechanism leads to a nonthermal distribution of filament curvatures with a non-Gaussian shape. The experimental curvature statistics and filament relaxation dynamics are reproduced quantitatively by stochastic computer simulations and a simple kinetic model. PMID:26261319

  2. Random bursts determine dynamics of active filaments

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Christoph A.; Suzuki, Ryo; Schaller, Volker; Aranson, Igor S.; Bausch, Andreas R.; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Constituents of living or synthetic active matter have access to a local energy supply that serves to keep the system out of thermal equilibrium. The statistical properties of such fluctuating active systems differ from those of their equilibrium counterparts. Using the actin filament gliding assay as a model, we studied how nonthermal distributions emerge in active matter. We found that the basic mechanism involves the interplay between local and random injection of energy, acting as an analog of a thermal heat bath, and nonequilibrium energy dissipation processes associated with sudden jump-like changes in the system’s dynamic variables. We show here how such a mechanism leads to a nonthermal distribution of filament curvatures with a non-Gaussian shape. The experimental curvature statistics and filament relaxation dynamics are reproduced quantitatively by stochastic computer simulations and a simple kinetic model. PMID:26261319

  3. SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during Its Most Prolific Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderHorst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gorgone, N. M.; Kaneko, Y.; Baring, M. G.; Guiriec, S.; Gogus, E,; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Lin, L.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Chaplin, V. L.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; Goldstein, A.; Gruber, D.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2012-01-01

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties.We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J15505418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E(sub peak) and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BBfits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature.We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  4. SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during its Most Prolific Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gorgone, N. M.; Kaneko, Y.; Baring, M. G.; Guiriec, S.; Göǧüş, E.; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Lin, L.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Chaplin, V. L.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; Goldstein, A.; Gruber, D.; Harding, A. K.; Kaper, L.; von Kienlin, A.; van der Klis, M.; McBreen, S.; Mcenery, J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pe'er, A.; Preece, R. D.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Rau, A.; Wachter, S.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Woods, P. M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2012-04-01

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E peak and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BB fits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high-temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature. We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  5. SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS DETECTED WITH THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR DURING ITS MOST PROLIFIC ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Horst, A. J.; Finger, M. H.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kaneko, Y.; Goegues, E.; Lin, L.; Baring, M. G.; Guiriec, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, V. L.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Bissaldi, E.; Gruber, D.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; and others

    2012-04-20

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E{sub peak} and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BB fits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high-temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature. We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  6. Macrophage-stimulating protein differently affects human alveolar macrophages from smoker and non-smoker patients: evaluation of respiratory burst, cytokine release and NF-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Gunella, Gabriele; Bardelli, Claudio; Amoruso, Angela; Viano, Ilario; Balbo, Piero; Brunelleschi, Sandra

    2006-06-01

    Macrophage activation is a key feature of inflammatory reactions occurring during bacterial infections, immune responses and tissue injury. We previously demonstrated that human macrophages of different origin express the tyrosine kinase receptor recepteur d'origine nantaise, the human receptor for MSP (RON) and produce superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) when challenged with macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP), the endogenous ligand for RON. This study was aimed to evaluate the role of MSP in alveolar macrophages (AM) isolated from healthy volunteers and patients with interstitial lung diseases (sarcoidosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), either smokers or non-smokers, by evaluating the respiratory burst, cytokine release and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation. MSP effects were compared with those induced by known AM stimuli, for example, phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide.MSP evokes O(2)(-) production, cytokine release and NF-kappaB activation in a concentration-dependent manner. By evaluating the respiratory burst, we demonstrate a significantly increased O(2)(-) production in AM from healthy smokers or smokers with pulmonary fibrosis, as compared to non-smokers, thus suggesting MSP as an enhancer of cigarette smoke toxicity. Besides inducing interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, MSP triggers an enhanced tumor necrosis factor-alpha release, especially in healthy and pulmonary fibrosis smokers. On the contrary, MSP-induced IL-10 release is higher in AM from healthy non-smokers. MSP activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB; this effect is more potent in healthy and fibrosis smokers (2.5-fold increase in p50 subunit translocation). This effect is receptor-mediated, as it is prevented by a monoclonal anti-human MSP antibody. The higher effectiveness of MSP in AM from healthy smokers and patients with pulmonary fibrosis is suggestive of its role in these clinical conditions

  7. Quantifying bursting neuron activity from calcium signals using blind deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Park, In Jun; Bobkov, Yuriy V; Ache, Barry W; Principe, Jose C

    2013-09-15

    Advances in calcium imaging have enabled studies of the dynamic activity of both individual neurons and neuronal assemblies. However, challenges, such as unknown nonlinearities in the spike-calcium relationship, noise, and the often relatively low temporal resolution of the calcium signal compared to the time-scale of spike generation, restrict the accurate estimation of action potentials from the calcium signal. Complex neuronal discharge, such as the activity demonstrated by bursting and rhythmically active neurons, represents an even greater challenge for reconstructing spike trains based on calcium signals. We propose a method using blind calcium signal deconvolution based on an information-theoretic approach. This model is meant to maximise the output entropy of a nonlinear filter where the nonlinearity is defined by the cumulative distribution function of the spike signal. We tested our maximum entropy (ME) algorithm using bursting olfactory receptor neurons (bORNs) of the lobster olfactory organ. The advantage of the ME algorithm is that the filter can be trained online based only on the statistics of the spike signal, without any assumptions regarding the unknown transfer function characterizing the relation between the spike and calcium signal. We show that the ME method is able to more accurately reconstruct the timing of the first and last spikes of a burst compared to other methods and that it improves the temporal precision fivefold compared to direct timing resolution of calcium signal. PMID:23711821

  8. Activity of bulbar respiratory neurons during fictive coughing and swallowing in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Y; Tanaka, I; Ezure, K

    1994-01-01

    1. The behaviour of medullary respiratory neurons was studied during fictive coughing and swallowing evoked by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in decerebrate, paralysed and artificially ventilated cats. Fictive coughing, swallowing and respiration were monitored by recording activities of the phrenic, hypoglossal and abdominal nerves. 2. Extracellular recordings were made from respiratory neurons in the ventral respiratory group (VRG) and in the Bötzinger complex (BOT). The neuronal types analysed included decrementing inspiratory neurons (I-DEC), augmenting expiratory neurons (E-AUG) and decrementing expiratory neurons (E-DEC) from the BOT area, and augmenting inspiratory neurons (I-AUG) and augmenting expiratory neurons (E-AUG) from the VRG area. 3. During fictive coughing, all the inspiratory and expiratory neurons were active during the inspiratory and expiratory phases of coughing, respectively. The firing of both I-DEC and I-AUG neurons was increased and prolonged in association with the augmented inspiratory activity of the phrenic nerve. The activity of E-AUG neurons of the VRG did not parallel the abdominal nerve activity, suggesting the existence of additional neurons which participate in the generation of abdominal nerve activity during fictive coughing. 4. During fictive swallowing, half of I-DEC neurons fired transiently at the onset of hypoglossal bursts associated with swallowing; the firing was suppressed during the rest of the hypoglossal bursts. Other I-DEC neurons were silent during hypoglossal bursts. Some I-AUG neurons fired during the initial half of hypoglossal bursts, and others were silent. The brief phrenic activity accompanying the swallowing might have originated from this activity in I-AUG neurons. The discharges of all E-AUG neurons (BOT and VRG) and the majority of E-DEC BOT neurons were suppressed during swallowing. 5. We conclude that these five types of respiratory neurons of the BOT and VRG are

  9. Does oral supplementation of a fermented papaya preparation correct respiratory burst function of innate immune cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients?

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Ryan; Banerjee, Jaideep; Rauckhorst, Adam; Pfeiffer, Douglas R; Gordillo, Gayle M; Khanna, Savita; Osei, Kwame; Roy, Sashwati

    2015-02-01

    Fermented papaya preparation (FPP) is a nutritional supplement reported to act as an antioxidant by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and removing "bad ROS," while inducing "respiratory burst" production of necessary "good ROS." We sought to investigate the safety of oral administration of FPP (9 g/day, 6 weeks) to T2D patients with regard to its effect on the hyperglycemia status of these patients. Peripheral blood was collected during a baseline visit, followed by subsequent collections both during and after supplementation. Induced "respiratory burst" ROS production was measured at each visit in addition to fasting blood glucose, lipid profile, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and lipid/protein peroxidation. Oral FPP supplementation induced "respiratory burst" in peripheral blood mononuclear cells while not influencing other blood parameters studied. When human monocytic THP-1 cells were supplemented with sugar-based FPP, cellular ATP and NADPH concentrations were increased while matched glucose alone did not produce similar effects, suggesting a glucose-independent component of FPP to be responsible for increasing cellular energetics. THP-1 cells supplemented with FPP also exhibited higher mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and oxygen consumption as compared with cells treated with glucose alone. Taken together, our observations lead to the hypothesis that FPP corrects inducible "respiratory burst" function in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:25268638

  10. Antimicrobial peptides and endotoxin inhibit cytokine and nitric oxide release but amplify respiratory burst response in human and murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zughaier, Susu M.; Shafer, William M.; Stephens, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), in addition to their antibacterial properties, are also chemotactic and signalling molecules that connect the innate and adaptive immune responses. The role of AMP [α defensins, LL-37, a cathepsin G-derived peptide (CG117-136), protegrins (PG-1), polymyxin B (PMX) and LLP1] in modulating the respiratory burst response in human and murine macrophages in the presence of bacterial endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipooligosaccharide (LOS)] was investigated. AMP were found to neutralize endotoxin induction of nitric oxide and TNFα release in macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, macrophages primed overnight with AMP and LOS or LPS significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) release compared with cells primed with endotoxin or AMP alone, while no responses were seen in unprimed cells. This enhanced ROS release by macrophages was seen in all cell lines including those obtained from C3H/HeJ (TLR4−/−) mice. Similar effects were also seen when AMP and endotoxin were added directly with zymosan to trigger phagocytosis and the respiratory burst in unprimed RAW 264.7 and C3H/HeJ macrophages. Amplification of ROS release was also demonstrated in a cell-free system of xanthine and xanthine oxidase. Although AMP inhibited cytokine and nitric oxide induction by endotoxin in a TLR4-dependent manner, AMP and endotoxin amplified ROS release in a TLR4-independent manner possibly by exerting a prolonged catalytic effect on the ROS generating enzymes such as the NADPH-oxidase complex. PMID:16098213

  11. Dual stimulus-dependent effect of Oenothera paradoxa extract on the respiratory burst in human leukocytes: suppressing for Escherichia coli and phorbol myristate acetate and stimulating for formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Burzynska-Pedziwiatr, Izabela; Bukowiecka-Matusiak, Malgorzata; Wojcik, Marzena; Machala, Waldemar; Bienkiewicz, Malgorzata; Spolnik, Grzegorz; Danikiewicz, Witold; Wozniak, Lucyna Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Although a growing body of evidence suggests that plant polyphenols can modulate human immune responses, their simultaneous action on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst is currently poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that various polyphenols contained in plant extracts might affect the oxidative burst of phagocytes, we evaluated the effects of ethanolic O. paradoxa extract polyphenols on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst in vitro activated by different stimuli, including opsonized bacteria E. coli, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Samples were analyzed by the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Our results showed that the extract repressed significantly and dose-dependently reactive oxygen species production in both cell types stimulated with E. coli and PMA (P < 0.05) and its inhibitory efficiency was stimulus- and cell-type-dependent. Interestingly, there was significant stimulatory effect of the extract on bursting phagocytes induced by fMLP (P < 0.05). Additionally, several flavonoids and phenolic compounds as well as penta-galloyl-β-(D)-glucose (PGG), the representative of hydrolyzable tannins, were identified in the 60% extract by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. In summary, the ethanolic O. paradoxa extract, rich in flavonoids and phenolic compounds, exhibits dual stimulus-dependent effect on the respiratory burst in human leukocytes; hence, it might affect immune responses in humans. PMID:25298860

  12. Dual Stimulus-Dependent Effect of Oenothera paradoxa Extract on the Respiratory Burst in Human Leukocytes: Suppressing for Escherichia coli and Phorbol Myristate Acetate and Stimulating for Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine

    PubMed Central

    Burzynska-Pedziwiatr, Izabela; Bukowiecka-Matusiak, Malgorzata; Wojcik, Marzena; Machala, Waldemar; Bienkiewicz, Malgorzata; Spolnik, Grzegorz; Danikiewicz, Witold; Wozniak, Lucyna Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Although a growing body of evidence suggests that plant polyphenols can modulate human immune responses, their simultaneous action on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst is currently poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that various polyphenols contained in plant extracts might affect the oxidative burst of phagocytes, we evaluated the effects of ethanolic O. paradoxa extract polyphenols on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst in vitro activated by different stimuli, including opsonized bacteria E. coli, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Samples were analyzed by the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Our results showed that the extract repressed significantly and dose-dependently reactive oxygen species production in both cell types stimulated with E. coli and PMA (P < 0.05) and its inhibitory efficiency was stimulus- and cell-type-dependent. Interestingly, there was significant stimulatory effect of the extract on bursting phagocytes induced by fMLP (P < 0.05). Additionally, several flavonoids and phenolic compounds as well as penta-galloyl-β-(D)-glucose (PGG), the representative of hydrolyzable tannins, were identified in the 60% extract by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. In summary, the ethanolic O. paradoxa extract, rich in flavonoids and phenolic compounds, exhibits dual stimulus-dependent effect on the respiratory burst in human leukocytes; hence, it might affect immune responses in humans. PMID:25298860

  13. Network burst activity in hippocampal neuronal cultures: the role of synaptic and intrinsic currents.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Jyothsna; Radojicic, Mihailo; Pesce, Lorenzo L; Bhansali, Anita; Wang, Janice; Tryba, Andrew K; Marks, Jeremy D; van Drongelen, Wim

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this work was to define the contributions of intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms toward spontaneous network-wide bursting activity, observed in dissociated rat hippocampal cell cultures. This network behavior is typically characterized by short-duration bursts, separated by order of magnitude longer interburst intervals. We hypothesize that while short-timescale synaptic processes modulate spectro-temporal intraburst properties and network-wide burst propagation, much longer timescales of intrinsic membrane properties such as persistent sodium (Nap) currents govern burst onset during interburst intervals. To test this, we used synaptic receptor antagonists picrotoxin, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), and 3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonate (CPP) to selectively block GABAA, AMPA, and NMDA receptors and riluzole to selectively block Nap channels. We systematically compared intracellular activity (recorded with patch clamp) and network activity (recorded with multielectrode arrays) in eight different synaptic connectivity conditions: GABAA + NMDA + AMPA, NMDA + AMPA, GABAA + AMPA, GABAA + NMDA, AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and all receptors blocked. Furthermore, we used mixed-effects modeling to quantify the aforementioned independent and interactive synaptic receptor contributions toward spectro-temporal burst properties including intraburst spike rate, burst activity index, burst duration, power in the local field potential, network connectivity, and transmission delays. We found that blocking intrinsic Nap currents completely abolished bursting activity, demonstrating their critical role in burst onset within the network. On the other hand, blocking different combinations of synaptic receptors revealed that spectro-temporal burst properties are uniquely associated with synaptic functionality and that excitatory connectivity is necessary for the presence of network-wide bursting. In addition to confirming the critical contribution of direct

  14. Magnetar Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  15. Hypoglossal Neuropathology and Respiratory Activity in Pompe Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Milapjit S.; Elmallah, Mai K.; Falk, Darin J.; Lane, Michael A.; Reier, Paul J.; Byrne, Barry J.; Fuller, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Pompe disease is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with systemic deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Respiratory-related problems in Pompe disease include hypoventilation and upper airway dysfunction. Although these problems have generally been attributed to muscular pathology, recent work has highlighted the potential role of central nervous system (CNS) neuropathology in Pompe motor deficiencies. We used a murine model of Pompe disease to test the hypothesis that systemic GAA deficiency is associated with hypoglossal (XII) motoneuron pathology and altered XII motor output during breathing. Brainstem tissue was harvested from adult Gaa−/− mice and the periodic acid Schiff method was used to examine neuronal glycogen accumulation. Semi-thin (2 μm) plastic sections showed widespread medullary neuropathology with extensive cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron soma. We next recorded efferent XII bursting in anesthetized and ventilated Gaa−/− and B6/129 mice both before and after bilateral vagotomy. The coefficient of variation of respiratory cycle duration was greater in Gaa−/− compared to B6/129 mice (p < 0.01). Vagotomy caused a robust increase in XII inspiratory burst amplitude in B6/129 mice (239 ± 44% baseline; p < 0.01) but had little impact on burst amplitude in Gaa−/− mice (130 ± 23% baseline; p > 0.05). We conclude that CNS GAA deficiency results in substantial glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron cell bodies and altered XII motor output. Therapeutic strategies targeting the CNS may be required to fully correct respiratory-related deficits in Pompe disease. PMID:21747768

  16. Diet supplementation of Pediococcus pentosaceus in cobia (Rachycentron canadum) enhances growth rate, respiratory burst and resistance against photobacteriosis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Chen-Fu; Hu, Hung-Hsi; Huang, Jian-Bin; Fang, Han-Chun; Kai, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Yu-Chi; Chi, Shau-Chi

    2013-10-01

    Cobia (Rachycentron canadum) is an economically important fish species for aquaculture in tropical and sub-tropical areas. Cobia aquaculture industry has severely damaged due to photobacteriosis caused by Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida (Pdp), especially in Taiwan. Antibiotics and vaccines have been applied to control Pdp infection, but the efficacy has been inconsistent. One species of lactic acid bacteria, Pediococcus pentosaceus strain 4012 (LAB 4012), was isolated from the intestine of adult cobia, and its culture supernatant can effectively inhibit Pdp growth in vitro. The acidic pH derived from metabolic acids in LAB culture supernatant was demonstrated to be an important factor for the suppression. After a 2-week feeding of LAB 4012, the growth rate of the fed cobia was 12% higher than that of the non-fed group, and the relative percentage of survival (RPS) of the fed cobia was found to be 74.4 in Pdp immersion challenge. In addition, the respiratory burst (RB) of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) in the LAB 4012-fed group was significantly higher than that of the non-fed group. Although feeding LAB 4012 did not improve specific antibody response in cobia after immunization with Pdp vaccine, it still significantly raised the survival rate by 22% over that of the non-fed group after Pdp immersion challenge. Judging by the quick induction of high protection against Pdp infection and promotion of growth in larvae, LAB 4012 was considered to be a viable probiotic for cobia aquaculture. PMID:23916590

  17. Origin of the phagocytic respiratory burst and its role in gut epithelial phagocytosis in a basal chordate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Huang, Shengfeng; Yan, Xinyu; Huang, Guangrui; Dong, Xiangru; Zheng, Tingting; Yuan, Dongjuan; Wang, Ruihua; Li, Rui; Tan, Ying; Xu, Anlong

    2014-05-01

    The vertebrate phagocytic respiratory burst (PRB) is a highly specific and efficient mechanism for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This mechanism is mediated by NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and used by vertebrate phagocytic leukocytes to destroy internalized microbes. Here we demonstrate the presence of the PRB in a basal chordate, the amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt). We show that using the antioxidant NAC to scavenge the production of ROS significantly decreased the survival rates of infected amphioxus, indicating that ROS are indispensable for efficient antibacterial responses. Amphioxus NOX enzymes and cytosolic factors were found to colocalize in the epithelial cells of the gill, intestine, and hepatic cecum and could be upregulated after exposure to microbial pathogens. The ROS production in epithelial cell lysates could be reconstructed by supplementing recombinant cytosolic factors, including bbt-p47phox, bbt-p67phox, bbt-p47phox, and bbt-Rac; the restored ROS production could be inhibited by anti-bbt-NOX2 and anti-bbt-p67phox antibodies. We also reveal that the gut epithelial lining cells of the amphioxus are competent at bacterial phagocytosis, and there is evidence that the PRB machinery could participate in the initiation of this phagocytic process. In conclusion, we report the presence of the classical PRB machinery in nonvertebrates and provide the first evidence for the possible role of PRB in epithelial cell immunity and phagocytosis. PMID:24560860

  18. A geometric understanding of how fast activating potassium channels promote bursting in pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Vo, Theodore; Tabak, Joël; Bertram, Richard; Wechselberger, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The electrical activity of endocrine pituitary cells is mediated by a plethora of ionic currents and establishing the role of a single channel type is difficult. Experimental observations have shown however that fast-activating voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium (BK) current tends to promote bursting in pituitary cells. This burst promoting effect requires fast activation of the BK current, otherwise it is inhibitory to bursting. In this work, we analyze a pituitary cell model in order to answer the question of why the BK activation must be fast to promote bursting. We also examine how the interplay between the activation rate and conductance of the BK current shapes the bursting activity. We use the multiple timescale structure of the model to our advantage and employ geometric singular perturbation theory to demonstrate the origin of the bursting behaviour. In particular, we show that the bursting can arise from either canard dynamics or slow passage through a dynamic Hopf bifurcation. We then compare our theoretical predictions with experimental data using the dynamic clamp technique and find that the data is consistent with a burst mechanism due to a slow passage through a Hopf. PMID:23820858

  19. A chemical genetic approach demonstrates that MPK3/MPK6 activation and NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative burst are two independent signaling events in plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Juan; Xie, Jie; Yan, Chengfei; Zou, Xiaoqin; Ren, Dongtao; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-01-01

    Summary Plant recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 triggers rapid activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis has at least four PAMP/pathogen-responsive MAPKs: MPK3, MPK6, MPK4, and MPK11. It was speculated that these MAPKs may function downstream of ROS in plant immunity because of their activation by exogenously added H2O2. MPK3/MPK6 or their orthologs in other plant species were also reported to be involved in ROS burst from the plant respiratory burst oxidase homologue (Rboh) of human neutrophil gp91phox. However, detailed genetic analysis is lacking. Using a chemical genetic approach, we generated another conditional loss-of-function mpk3 mpk6 double mutant. Together with the conditionally rescued mpk3 mpk6 double mutant reported previously, we demonstrate that flg22-triggered ROS burst is independent of MPK3/MPK6. In Arabidopsis mutant lacking a functional AtRbohD, flg22-induced ROS burst was completely blocked. However, the activation of MPK3/MPK6 was not affected. Based on these results, we conclude that the rapid ROS burst and MPK3/MPK6 activation are two independent early signaling events downstream of FLS2 in plant immunity. We also found that MPK4 negatively impacts the flg22-induced ROS burst. In addition, salicylic acid-pretreatment enhances AtRbohD-mediated ROS burst, which is again independent of MPK3/MPK6 based on the analysis of mpk3 mpk6 double mutant. The establishment of a mpk3 mpk6 double mutant system using the chemical genetic approach offers us a powerful tool to investigate the function of MPK3/MPK6 in plant defense signaling pathway. PMID:24245741

  20. Isoprenoid metabolism is required for stimulation of the respiratory burst oxidase of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bokoch, G M; Prossnitz, V

    1992-01-01

    The formation of oxygen radicals by phagocytic cells occurs through the activation of a multiple-component NADPH oxidase system. An unidentified low molecular weight GTP-binding protein has been proposed to modulate the activity of the NADPH oxidase. The low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins undergo posttranslational processing, including an initial covalent incorporation of an isoprenyl group. To test whether such an isoprenylation reaction might be required for the activity of the oxidase, we utilized compactin and lovastatin as inhibitors of the isoprenylation pathway. Treatment of DMSO-differentiated HL-60 cells with compactin produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of O2- formation in response to FMLP or phorbol myristate acetate. Cell viability was not affected nor was normal differentiation of the HL-60 cells into a neutrophil-like cell. The inhibitory effect of compactin was specifically prevented by addition of exogenous mevalonic acid to the HL-60 cells, indicating that the inhibitory effects of the drug were due to blockade of the pathway leading to isoprenoid synthesis. Addition of cholesterol, ubiquinone, or dolichol, which are also downstream products of the isoprenoid pathway, did not override the inhibitory effects of the drug. Subcellular fractions were prepared from compactin-treated cells, and the location of the compactin-sensitive factor was determined by complementation analysis in a cell-free NADPH oxidase system. The inhibited factor was localized to the HL-60 cytosol. These data suggest that an isoprenoid pathway intermediate is necessary for activation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This is likely to represent the requirement for an isoprenoid moiety in the posttranslational modification of a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein. Our studies provide support for the involvement of such a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein in NADPH oxidase activation. Images PMID:1310693

  1. Effects of raspberry fruit extracts and ellagic acid on respiratory burst in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Raudone, Lina; Bobinaite, Ramune; Janulis, Valdimaras; Viskelis, Pranas; Trumbeckaite, Sonata

    2014-06-01

    The mechanism of action of polyphenolic compounds is attributed to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-proliferative properties and their effects on subcellular signal transduction, cell cycle impairment and apoptosis. A raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) fruit extract contains various antioxidant active compounds, particularly ellagic acid (EA); however the exact intracellular mechanism of their action is not fully understood. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antioxidant effect of raspberry extracts, and that of ellagic acid by assessment of the production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) by murine macrophage J774 cells. Raspberry extracts and their active compound EA did not affect or had very minor effects on cell viability. No significant difference in the ROS generation in arachidonic acid stimulated macrophages was determined for raspberry extracts and EA whereas in the phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate model ROS generation was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced. Our observation that raspberry pomace extracts in vitro reduce ROS production in a J774 macrophage culture suggests that raspberry extract and ellagic acid mediated antioxidant effects may be due to the regulation of NADPH oxidase activity. PMID:24699912

  2. Activity of respiratory system during laser irradiation of brain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, N. A.; Sergeyeva, L. I.

    1984-06-01

    The performance of one of the principal links of the respiratory system, the respiratory center, was studied as a function of the exposure of the medulla oblongata and the sensomotor zone of the cerebral hemisphere cortex to low level laser irradiation in the red wavelength of the spectrum. Experiments were done on white rats under barbital anesthesia. Under such conditions a substantial effect was observed on the activity of the respiratory center. Laser light may display activating or inhibitory influences, in some cases the bilateral symmetry of the activity of the respiratory center is affected indicating deep changes in the integrative mechanism of the functioning of the right and left sides of the hemispheres. The laser beam effect depends on many factors: specific light properties, duration of the exposure, repetition of exposures, initial functional state of the CNS, etc.

  3. Emergence of spatially heterogeneous burst suppression in a neural field model of electrocortical activity

    PubMed Central

    Bojak, Ingo; Stoyanov, Zhivko V.; Liley, David T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Burst suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is a well-described phenomenon that occurs during deep anesthesia, as well as in a variety of congenital and acquired brain insults. Classically it is thought of as spatially synchronous, quasi-periodic bursts of high amplitude EEG separated by low amplitude activity. However, its characterization as a “global brain state” has been challenged by recent results obtained with intracranial electrocortigraphy. Not only does it appear that burst suppression activity is highly asynchronous across cortex, but also that it may occur in isolated regions of circumscribed spatial extent. Here we outline a realistic neural field model for burst suppression by adding a slow process of synaptic resource depletion and recovery, which is able to reproduce qualitatively the empirically observed features during general anesthesia at the whole cortex level. Simulations reveal heterogeneous bursting over the model cortex and complex spatiotemporal dynamics during simulated anesthetic action, and provide forward predictions of neuroimaging signals for subsequent empirical comparisons and more detailed characterization. Because burst suppression corresponds to a dynamical end-point of brain activity, theoretically accounting for its spatiotemporal emergence will vitally contribute to efforts aimed at clarifying whether a common physiological trajectory is induced by the actions of general anesthetic agents. We have taken a first step in this direction by showing that a neural field model can qualitatively match recent experimental data that indicate spatial differentiation of burst suppression activity across cortex. PMID:25767438

  4. The effect of leptin on the respiratory burst of human neutrophils cultured in synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    Rzodkiewicz, Przemysław; Gajewska, Joanna; Wojtecka-Łukasik, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Leptin is a hormone responsible for nutritional status and immune competence coordination. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) increased leptin levels were observed in both serum and synovial fluid. Its influence on development of the disease still remains unclear. So far, research on leptin's influence on the emission of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) measured with chemiluminescence (CL) has provided unclear and contradictory results. In this study, we evaluated the influence of leptin on oxidative activity of neutrophils isolated from blood of healthy volunteers and cultured in different amounts of synovial fluid (SF) from patients with RA. Material and methods Neutrophils’ oxidative metabolism was measured by two types of CL. The first one, luminol-dependent CL (CL-lum), allows one to determine phagocytic activity and the level of ROI generated in a myeloperoxidase-dependent manner. The second method used was lucigenin-dependent CL (CL-luc), which monitors ROI production dependent on the NADPH oxidase enzyme complex located in the cell membranes of neutrophils and enables one to determine the scope of extracellular ROI emission. Results Neutrophils stimulated by opsonized zymosan show a decrease in the level of CL-lum, proportional to the increasing concentration of both SF and serum collected from healthy donors. The observed effect of decreased CL-lum may, therefore, be dependent on the physical conditions (viscosity of fluids used). None of these experiments showed any effect of leptin on the level of CL-lum. Conclusions The present study showed that leptin does not affect the level of any of the CL types in inactive neutrophils incubated in normal serum, and it does not affect the level of oxidative activity in resting neutrophils incubated with SF. However, leptin influences extracellular ROI emission (measured by CL-luc). Leptin reduces extracellular emission of ROI, and this effect is dependent on concentration and duration of exposure to

  5. Gamma-ray bursts, QSOs and active galaxies.

    PubMed

    Burbidge, Geoffrey

    2007-05-15

    The similarity of the absorption spectra of gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources or afterglows with the absorption spectra of quasars (QSOs) suggests that QSOs and GRB sources are very closely related. Since most people believe that the redshifts of QSOs are of cosmological origin, it is natural to assume that GRBs or their afterglows also have cosmological redshifts. For some years a few of us have argued that there is much optical evidence suggesting a very different model for QSOs, in which their redshifts have a non-cosmological origin, and are ejected from low-redshift active galaxies. In this paper I extend these ideas to GRBs. In 2003, Burbidge (Burbidge 2003 Astrophys. J. 183, 112-120) showed that the redshift periodicity in the spectra of QSOs appears in the redshift of GRBs. This in turn means that both the QSOs and the GRB sources are similar objects ejected from comparatively low-redshift active galaxies. It is now clear that many of the GRBs of low redshift do appear in, or very near, active galaxies.A new and powerful result supporting this hypothesis has been produced by Prochter et al. (Prochter et al. 2006 Astrophys. J. Lett. 648, L93-L96). They show that in a survey for strong MgII absorption systems along the sightlines to long-duration GRBs, nearly every sightline shows at least one absorber. If the absorbers are intervening clouds or galaxies, only a small fraction should show absorption of this kind. The number found by Prochter et al. is four times higher than that normally found for the MgII absorption spectra of QSOs. They believe that this result is inconsistent with the intervening hypothesis and would require a statistical fluctuation greater than 99.1% probability. This is what we expect if the absorption is intrinsic to the GRBs and the redshifts are not associated with their distances. In this case, the absorption must be associated with gas ejected from the QSO. This in turn implies that the GRBs actually originate in comparatively low

  6. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Göǧüş, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, James Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-10-01

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in 2010 May with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least 2011 July. Here we present Swift and Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T 90 durations of the bursts range between 18 and 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) × 1038 erg, which is on the low side of soft gamma repeater bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large-scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  7. BURST AND PERSISTENT EMISSION PROPERTIES DURING THE RECENT ACTIVE EPISODE OF THE ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSAR 1E 1841-045

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Van der Klis, Michiel; Baring, Matthew G.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Mcenery, Julie; Michael Burgess, James; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain; Preece, Robert D.; Granot, Jonathan; Tierney, David

    2011-10-10

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in 2010 May with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least 2011 July. Here we present Swift and Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T {sub 90} durations of the bursts range between 18 and 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 10{sup 38} erg, which is on the low side of soft gamma repeater bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large-scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  8. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize the brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit saccular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) (Colebatch & Halmagyi 1992; Colebatch et al. 1994). Some researchers have reported that airconducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects (Curthoys et al. 2009, Wackym et al., 2012). However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying the vestibular disorders related to otolith deficits. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, pre and post central gyri, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation (Bottini et al., 1994; Dieterich et al., 2003; Emri et al., 2003; Schlindwein et al., 2008; Janzen et al., 2008). Here we hypothesized that the skull tap elicits the similar pattern of cortical activity as the auditory tone burst. Subjects put on a set of MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in supine position, with eyes closed. All subjects received both forms of the stimulation, however, the order of stimulation with auditory tone burst and air-conducted skull tap was counterbalanced across subjects. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular cortex, resulting in vestibular response (Halmagyi et al., 1995). Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate

  9. Pontine respiratory activity involved in inspiratory/expiratory phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Mörschel, Michael; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Control of the timing of the inspiratory/expiratory (IE) phase transition is a hallmark of respiratory pattern formation. In principle, sensory feedback from pulmonary stretch receptors (Breuer–Hering reflex, BHR) is seen as the major controller for the IE phase transition, while pontine-based control of IE phase transition by both the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF) and parabrachial complex is seen as a secondary or backup mechanism. However, previous studies have shown that the BHR can habituate in vivo. Thus, habituation reduces sensory feedback, so the role of the pons, and specifically the KF, for IE phase transition may increase dramatically. Pontine-mediated control of the IE phase transition is not completely understood. In the present review, we discuss existing models for ponto-medullary interaction that may be involved in the control of inspiratory duration and IE transition. We also present intracellular recordings of pontine respiratory units derived from an in situ intra-arterially perfused brainstem preparation of rats. With the absence of lung inflation, this preparation generates a normal respiratory pattern and many of the recorded pontine units demonstrated phasic respiratory-related activity. The analysis of changes in membrane potentials of pontine respiratory neurons has allowed us to propose a number of pontine-medullary interactions not considered before. The involvement of these putative interactions in pontine-mediated control of IE phase transitions is discussed. PMID:19651653

  10. The 2006-2007 Active Phase Of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts, and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavril, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2009-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in >11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 8-3x10(exp 3)s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx. 2 - 6 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus three emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4)x10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. We discuss these events in the context of the magnetar model.

  11. Hemodynamic response to burst-suppressed and discontinuous electroencephalography activity in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chalia, Maria; Lee, Chuen Wai; Dempsey, Laura A; Edwards, Andrea D; Singh, Harsimrat; Michell, Andrew W; Everdell, Nicholas L; Hill, Reuben W; Hebden, Jeremy C; Austin, Topun; Cooper, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Burst suppression (BS) is an electroencephalographic state associated with a profound inactivation of the brain. BS and pathological discontinuous electroencephalography (EEG) are often observed in term-age infants with neurological injury and can be indicative of a poor outcome and lifelong disability. Little is known about the neurophysiological mechanisms of BS or how the condition relates to the functional state of the neonatal brain. We used simultaneous EEG and diffuse optical tomography (DOT) to investigate whether bursts of EEG activity in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy are associated with an observable cerebral hemodynamic response. We were able to identify significant changes in concentration of both oxy and deoxyhemoglobin that are temporally correlated with EEG bursts and present a relatively consistent morphology across six infants. Furthermore, DOT reveals patient-specific spatial distributions of this hemodynamic response that may be indicative of a complex pattern of cortical activation underlying discontinuous EEG activity that is not readily apparent in scalp EEG. PMID:27446969

  12. Strategies to Maximize Burst Lengths in Rhythmic Anti-Phase Activity of Networks with Reciprocal Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Amitabha; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2015-06-01

    We consider repetitive activity patterns in which a pair of oscillators take turns becoming active, motivated by anti-phase bursting activity in neuronal networks. In our framework, when one unit is active, it inhibits the other, as occurs with inhibitory synaptic coupling of neurons; when the inhibition is strong enough, the inhibited unit is prevented from activating. We assume that the coupling resources available to each oscillator are constrained and allow each unit to select the amount of input that it provides to the other each time that it activates. In this setting, we investigate the strategies that each oscillator should utilize in order to maximize the number of spikes it can fire (or equivalently the amount of time it is active), corresponding to a burst of spikes in a neuron, before the other unit takes over. We derive a one-dimensional map whose fixed points correspond to periodic anti-phase bursting solutions. We introduce a novel numerical method to obtain the graph of this map and we extend the analysis to select solutions that achieve consistency between coupling resource use and recovery. Our analysis shows that corresponding to each fixed point of the map, there is actually an infinite number of related strategies that yield the same number of spikes per burst.

  13. Effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in sedentary elderly adults with mobility limitations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in community dwelling elderly adults with mobility limitations. DESIGN: Multicenter, randomized trial of physical activity vs health education, with respiratory variables prespecified as tertiary outcomes over...

  14. Axonal conduction slowing induced by spontaneous bursting activity in cortical neurons cultured in a microtunnel device.

    PubMed

    Shimba, Kenta; Sakai, Koji; Isomura, Takuya; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Recently, axons have been recognized as computational units in neuronal networks that can change their conduction properties along with their firing. However, little is known about the relationship between spontaneous activity and changes in the conduction velocity due to lack of a suitable method. Here, we studied changes in the conduction velocity during bursting activity using a new microfabricated device and the spike sorting method. The propagating action potentials were recorded from axons, which extended through a microtunnel in our device, comprised of a microfabricated chamber and a microelectrode array. By using waveforms recorded from a series of three electrodes along the bottom of a microtunnel, we achieved a sorting accuracy approximately 8.0% higher than that of the conventional one-electrode waveform method. We then demonstrated for the first time that conduction delays increased by 8.0% in action potentials of a mathematically isolated axon during one burst recorded at 10 days in vitro (DIV). Moreover, 79.4% of all clusters showed this conduction slowing during bursting activity at 10 DIV. Finally, we evaluated the days-in-culture dependence of the properties of bursting activity. These results suggest that our method is suitable for evaluating changes in conduction properties induced by spontaneous activity. PMID:25418582

  15. Influence of age on respiratory modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure and baroreflex function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Shantsila, Alena; McIntyre, David B.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Fadel, Paul J.; Paton, Julian F. R.; Pickering, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? Does ageing influence the respiratory‐related bursting of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the association between the rhythmic fluctuations in MSNA and blood pressure (Traube–Hering waves) that occur with respiration? What is the main finding and its importance? Despite the age‐related elevation in MSNA, the cyclical inhibition of MSNA during respiration is similar between young and older individuals. Furthermore, central respiratory–sympathetic coupling plays a role in the generation of Traube–Hering waves in both young and older humans. Healthy ageing and alterations in respiratory–sympathetic coupling have been independently linked with heightened sympathetic neural vasoconstrictor activity. We investigated how age influences the respiratory‐related modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the association between the rhythmic fluctuations in MSNA and blood pressure that occur with respiration (Traube–Hering waves; THW). Ten young (22 ± 2 years; mean ± SD) and 10 older healthy men (58 ± 6 years) were studied while resting supine and breathing spontaneously. MSNA, blood pressure and respiration were recorded simultaneously. Resting values were ascertained and respiratory cycle‐triggered averaging of MSNA and blood pressure measurements performed. The MSNA burst incidence was higher in older individuals [22.7 ± 9.2 versus 42.2 ± 13.7 bursts (100 heart beats)−1, P < 0.05], and was reduced to a similar extent in the inspiratory to postinspiratory period in young and older subjects (by ∼25% compared with mid‐ to late expiration). A similar attenuation of MSNA burst frequency (in bursts per minute), amplitude and total activity (burst frequency × mean burst amplitude) was also observed in the inspiratory to postinspiratory period in both groups. A significant positive correlation between respiratory‐related MSNA and the magnitude of

  16. The 2006-2007 Active Phase of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts,and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in > 11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 0.4 - 1.8 x 10(exp 3) s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx 2 - 9 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus two emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4) x 10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. Within the framework of the magnetar model, the net spin-down of the star could be explained by regions of the superfluid that rotate. slower than the rest. The bursts, flux enhancements, and pulse morphology changes can be explained as arising from crustal deformations due to stresses imposed by the highly twisted internal magnetic field. However, unlike other AXP outbursts, we cannot account for a major twist being implanted in the magnetosphere.

  17. Detection of Spectral Evolution in the Bursts Emitted During the 2008-2009 Active Episode of SGR J1550 - 5418

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Gruber, David; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, Jonathan; Baring, Matthew G.; Gogus, Ersin; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Kaneko, Yuki; Lin, Lin; Watts, Anna L.; Bhat, Narayana; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Greiner, Jochen; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.; Rau, Arne

    2012-01-01

    In early October 2008, the Soft Gamma Repeater SGRJ1550 - 5418 (1E1547.0 - 5408, AXJ155052 - 5418, PSR J1550 - 5418) became active, emitting a series of bursts which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) after which a second especially intense activity period commenced in 2009 January and a third, less active period was detected in 2009 March-April. Here we analyze the GBM data of all the bursts from the first and last active episodes. We performed temporal and spectral analysis for all events and found that their temporal characteristics are very similar to the ones of other SGR bursts, as well the ones reported for the bursts of the main episode (average burst durations 170ms). In addition, we used our sample of bursts to quantify the systematic uncertainties of the GBM location algorithm for soft gamma-ray transients to less than or equal to 8 degrees. Our spectral analysis indicates significant spectral evolution between the first and last set of events. Although the 2008 October events are best fit with a single blackbody function, for the 2009 bursts an Optically Thin Thermal Bremsstrahlung (OTTB) is clearly preferred. We attribute this evolution to changes in the magnetic field topology of the source, possibly due to effects following the very energetic main bursting episode.

  18. Methylxanthines do not affect rhythmogenic preBötC inspiratory network activity but impair bursting of preBötC-driven motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Panaitescu, B; Kuribayashi, J; Ruangkittisakul, A; Leung, V; Iizuka, M; Ballanyi, K

    2013-01-01

    Clinical stimulation of preterm infant breathing with methylxanthines like caffeine and theophylline can evoke seizures. It is unknown whether underlying neuronal hyperexcitability involves the rhythmogenic inspiratory active pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC) in the brainstem or preBötC-driven motor networks. Inspiratory-related preBötC interneuronal plus spinal (cervical/phrenic) or cranial hypoglossal (XII) motoneuronal bursting was studied in newborn rat en bloc brainstem-spinal cords and brainstem slices, respectively. Non-respiratory bursting perturbed inspiratory cervical nerve activity in en bloc models at >0.25mM theophylline or caffeine. Rhythm in the exposed preBötC of transected en bloc preparations was less perturbed by 10mM theophylline than cervical root bursting which was more affected than phrenic nerve activity. In the preBötC of slices, even 10mM methylxanthine did not evoke seizure-like bursting whereas >1mM masked XII rhythm via large amplitude 1-10Hz oscillations. Blocking A-type γ-aminobutyric (GABAA) receptors evoked seizure-like cervical activity whereas in slices neither XII nor preBötC rhythm was disrupted. Methylxanthines (2.5-10mM), but not blockade of adenosine receptors, phosphodiesterase-4 or the sarcoplasmatic/endoplasmatic reticulum ATPase countered inspiratory depression by muscimol-evoked GABAA receptor activation that was associated with a hyperpolarization and input resistance decrease silencing preBötC neurons in slices. The latter blockers did neither affect preBötC or cranial/spinal motor network bursting nor evoke seizure-like activity or mask corresponding methylxanthine-evoked discharges. Our findings show that methylxanthine-evoked hyperexcitability originates from motor networks, leaving preBötC activity largely unaffected, and suggest that GABAA receptors contribute to methylxanthine-evoked seizure-like perturbation of spinal motoneurons whereas non-respiratory XII motoneuron oscillations are of different

  19. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either the vestibulo-spinal reflex (saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)), or the ocular muscle response (utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)). Some researchers have reported that air-conducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying otolith-specific deficits, including gait and balance problems that astronauts experience upon returning to earth. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that skull taps elicit similar patterns of cortical activity as the auditory tone bursts, and previous vestibular imaging studies. Subjects wore bilateral MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in the supine position, with eyes closed. Subjects received both forms of the stimulation in a counterbalanced fashion. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular system, resulting in the vestibular cortical response. Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory

  20. SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF THE OCCURRENCE OF CORONAL TYPE III RADIO BURSTS AND A NEW SOLAR ACTIVITY INDEX

    SciTech Connect

    Lobzin, Vasili; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, Peter A.

    2011-07-20

    This Letter presents the results of studies of solar cycle variations of the occurrence rate of coronal type III radio bursts. The radio spectra are provided by the Learmonth Solar Radio Observatory (Western Australia), part of the USAF Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN). It is found that the occurrence rate of type III bursts strongly correlates with solar activity. However, the profiles for the smoothed type III burst occurrence rate differ considerably from those for the sunspot number, 10.7 cm solar radio flux, and solar flare index. The type III burst occurrence rate (T3BOR) is proposed as a new index of solar activity. T3BOR provides complementary information about solar activity and should be useful in different studies including solar cycle predictions and searches for different periodicities in solar activity. This index can be estimated from daily results of the Automated Radio Burst Identification System. Access to data from other RSTN sites will allow processing 24 hr radio spectra in near-real time and estimating true daily values of this index. It is also shown that coronal type III bursts can even occur when there are no visible sunspots on the Sun. However, no evidence is found that the bursts are not associated with active regions. It is also concluded that the type III burst productivity of active regions exhibits solar cycle variations.

  1. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-01-01

    SWift/BAT detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in May 2010 with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least July 2011. Here we present Swift and Fermi/GBM observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T90 durations of the bursts range between 18 - 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 1038 erg, which is in the low side of SGR bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in IE 1841-045 might not involve large scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  2. Glucocorticoids Inhibit CRH/AVP-Evoked Bursting Activity of Male Murine Anterior Pituitary Corticotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Peter J.; Tabak, Joël; Ruth, Peter; Bertram, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Corticotroph cells from the anterior pituitary are an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which governs the neuroendocrine response to stress. Corticotrophs are electrically excitable and fire spontaneous single-spike action potentials and also display secretagogue-induced bursting behavior. The HPA axis function is dependent on effective negative feedback in which elevated plasma glucocorticoids result in inhibition at the level of both the pituitary and the hypothalamus. In this study, we have used an electrophysiological approach coupled with mathematical modeling to investigate the regulation of spontaneous and CRH/arginine vasopressin-induced activity of corticotrophs by glucocorticoids. We reveal that pretreatment of corticotrophs with 100 nM corticosterone (CORT; 90 and 150 min) reduces spontaneous activity and prevents a transition from spiking to bursting after CRH/arginine vasopressin stimulation. In addition, previous studies have identified a role for large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels in the generation of secretagogue-induced bursting in corticotrophs. Using the dynamic clamp technique, we demonstrated that CRH-induced bursting can be switched to spiking by subtracting a fast BK current, whereas the addition of a fast BK current can induce bursting in CORT-treated cells. In addition, recordings from BK knockout mice (BK−/−) revealed that CORT can also inhibit excitability through BK-independent mechanisms to control spike frequency. Thus, we have established that glucocorticoids can modulate multiple properties of corticotroph electrical excitability through both BK-dependent and BK-independent mechanisms. PMID:27254001

  3. Glucocorticoids Inhibit CRH/AVP-Evoked Bursting Activity of Male Murine Anterior Pituitary Corticotrophs.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Peter J; Tabak, Joël; Ruth, Peter; Bertram, Richard; Shipston, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Corticotroph cells from the anterior pituitary are an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which governs the neuroendocrine response to stress. Corticotrophs are electrically excitable and fire spontaneous single-spike action potentials and also display secretagogue-induced bursting behavior. The HPA axis function is dependent on effective negative feedback in which elevated plasma glucocorticoids result in inhibition at the level of both the pituitary and the hypothalamus. In this study, we have used an electrophysiological approach coupled with mathematical modeling to investigate the regulation of spontaneous and CRH/arginine vasopressin-induced activity of corticotrophs by glucocorticoids. We reveal that pretreatment of corticotrophs with 100 nM corticosterone (CORT; 90 and 150 min) reduces spontaneous activity and prevents a transition from spiking to bursting after CRH/arginine vasopressin stimulation. In addition, previous studies have identified a role for large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels in the generation of secretagogue-induced bursting in corticotrophs. Using the dynamic clamp technique, we demonstrated that CRH-induced bursting can be switched to spiking by subtracting a fast BK current, whereas the addition of a fast BK current can induce bursting in CORT-treated cells. In addition, recordings from BK knockout mice (BK(-/-)) revealed that CORT can also inhibit excitability through BK-independent mechanisms to control spike frequency. Thus, we have established that glucocorticoids can modulate multiple properties of corticotroph electrical excitability through both BK-dependent and BK-independent mechanisms. PMID:27254001

  4. Interactions between cardiac, respiratory, and brain activity in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musizza, Bojan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2005-05-01

    The electrical activity of the heart (ECG), respiratory function and electric activity of the brain (EEG) were simultaneously recorded in conscious, healthy humans. Instantaneous frequencies of the heart beat, respiration and α-waves were then determined from 30-minutes recordings. The instantaneous cardiac frequency was defined as the inverse value of the time interval between two consecutive R-peaks. The instantaneous respiratory frequency was obtained from recordings of the excursions of thorax by application of the Hilbert transform. To obtain the instantaneous frequency of α-waves, the EEG signal recorded from the forehead was first analysed using the wavelet transform. Then the frequency band corresponding to α-waves was extracted and the Hilbert transform applied. Synchronization analysis was performed and the direction of coupling was ascertained, using pairs of instantaneous frequencies in each case. It is shown that the systems are weakly bidirectionally coupled. It was confirmed that, in conscious healthy humans, respiration drives cardiac activity. We also demonstrate from these analyses that α-activity drives both respiration and cardiac activity.

  5. Use of polyurethane foam deformation sensor to record respiratory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredov, V. I.; Baranov, V. S.

    1980-05-01

    The sensor developed has some substantial advantages over other known types. It is highly sensitive over a wide range of strain loads. The level of the output signal is linearly related to the force exerted on it, and it is sufficient for direct recording without using amplifiers of electric signals. The sensor is based on elastic, spongy material, polyurethane foam (porolon) with current-conducting material on the pore surface, current-conducting carbon black or electrode paste. The elastic properties of the sensor are built in the actual base of the strain-sensitive element, which simplifies the construction substantially and increases the reliability of the unit. In order to test the possibility of using this sensor to examine respiratory function, human pneumograms were recorded with the subject in a calm state along with the respiratory activity of experimental animals (dogs). Samples of the respiratory curve are shown. The simplicity of design of the sensor makes it possible to use it in various physiological experiments.

  6. Rapid toxicity testing based on mitochondrial respiratory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenstricker, M.E. ); Holodnick, S.E.; Mancy, K.H. ); Brabec, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The need exists for rapid and inexpensive methods to determine the health effects of environmental contaminants on biological systems. One of the current research approaches for assessing cytotoxicity is to monitor the respiratory activity of the mitochondrion, a sensitive, nonspecific subcellular target site. Detected changes in mitochondrial function after the addition of a test chemical could be correlated to toxic effects. Mitochondrial respiration can be characterized by three indices: state 3 and state 4 respiratory rates, and the respiratory control ratio (RCR). State 4, the idle or resting state, results when coupled mitochondrial respire in a medium containing inorganic phosphate and a Kreb's cycle substrate in the absence of a phosphate acceptor such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP). In the presence of ADP the respiration rate increases to a maximum (state 3), accompanied by phosphorylation of ADP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The ratio of state 3 to state 4, or RCR, indicates how tightly the oxidative phosphorylation process is coupled. The synthesis of ATP by mitochondria is influenced by a number of compounds, most of which are either uncouplers or inhibitors.

  7. Calcium-activated afterhyperpolarizations regulate synchronization and timing of epileptiform bursts in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Sevilla, David; Garduño, Julieta; Galván, Emilio; Buño, Washington

    2006-12-01

    Calcium-activated potassium conductances regulate neuronal excitability, but their role in epileptogenesis remains elusive. We investigated in rat CA3 pyramidal neurons the contribution of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-mediated afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) in the genesis and regulation of epileptiform activity induced in vitro by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in Mg(2+)-free Ringer. Recurring spike bursts terminated by prolonged AHPs were generated. Burst synchronization between CA3 pyramidal neurons in paired recordings typified this interictal-like activity. A downregulation of the medium afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) paralleled the emergence of the interictal-like activity. When the mAHP was reduced or enhanced by apamin and EBIO bursts induced by 4-AP were increased or blocked, respectively. Inhibition of the slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) with carbachol, t-ACPD, or isoproterenol increased bursting frequency and disrupted burst regularity and synchronization between pyramidal neuron pairs. In contrast, enhancing the sAHP by intracellular dialysis with KMeSO(4) reduced burst frequency. Block of GABA(A-B) inhibitions did not modify the abnormal activity. We describe novel cellular mechanisms where 1) the inhibition of the mAHP plays an essential role in the genesis and regulation of the bursting activity by reducing negative feedback, 2) the sAHP sets the interburst interval by decreasing excitability, and 3) bursting was synchronized by excitatory synaptic interactions that increased in advance and during bursts and decreased throughout the subsequent sAHP. These cellular mechanisms are active in the CA3 region, where epileptiform activity is initiated, and cooperatively regulate the timing of the synchronized rhythmic interictal-like network activity. PMID:16971683

  8. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-01-01

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  9. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-11-30

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  10. The pattern of catecholamine response to burst activity in leopard frogs, Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P A; Nadeau, A; Guderley, H

    1994-07-01

    It is well known that burst activity causes a rapid breakdown of muscle glycogen and extensive accumulation of lactate in frogs. During recovery, it has been shown that lactate is nearly totally recycled into muscle glycogen. Since catecholamines are likely to play some role in the regulation of postexercise repletion of muscle glycogen, the pattern of catecholamine response was assessed in frogs during intense physical activity and the ensuing recovery period. Chronically cannulated frogs were forced to swim until exhaustion, and serial blood samples were taken at regular time intervals for the measurements of catecholamines. The pattern of changes in plasma and muscle lactate and glucose and muscle glycogen during and after burst activity is similar to that reported in previous studies using noncannulated frogs, a result which indicates that the animals recover well from the surgical trauma associated with cannulation. The concentrations of plasma catecholamines in frogs at rest are comparable to those measured in other amphibians, and the levels of plasma epinephrine in resting frogs are much higher than those of norepinephrine. Burst activity causes a marked increase in plasma catecholamines, with higher levels reached by epinephrine. During recovery, the concentration of plasma catecholamines returns to normal within 30 min. Although this pattern of catecholamine response to intense physical activity may be favorable to the repletion of muscle glycogen postexercise, it remains to be clarified how critical the low levels and fast reduction in plasma catecholamines are for optimum glycogen resynthesis. PMID:7926648

  11. Bursting Activity of Substantia Nigra pars Reticulata Neurons in Mouse Parkinsonism in Awake and Anesthetized States

    PubMed Central

    Lobb, CJ; Jaeger, D

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological changes in basal ganglia neurons are hypothesized to underlie motor dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Previous results in head-restrained MPTP-treated non-human primates have suggested that increased bursting within the basal ganglia and related thalamic and cortical areas may be a hallmark of pathophysiological activity. In this study, we investigated whether there is increased bursting in substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) output neurons in anesthetized and awake, head-restrained unilaterally lesioned 6-OHDA mice when compared to control mice. Confirming previous studies, we show that there are significant changes in the firing rate and pattern in SNpr neuron activity under urethane anesthesia. The regular firing pattern of control urethane-anesthetized SNpr neurons was not present in the 6-OHDA-lesioned group, as the latter neurons instead became phase locked with cortical slow wave activity (SWA). Next, we examined whether such robust electrophysiological changes between groups carried over to the awake state. SNpr neurons from both groups fired at much higher frequencies in the awake state than in the anesthetized state and surprisingly showed only modest changes between awake control and 6-OHDA groups. While there were no differences in firing rate between groups in the awake state, an increase in the coefficient of variation (CV) was observed in the 6-OHDA group. Contrary to the bursting hypothesis, this increased CV was not due to changes in bursting but was instead due to a mild increase in pausing. Together, these results suggest that differences in SNpr activity between control and 6-OHDA lesioned mice may be strongly influenced by changes in network activity during different arousal and behavioral states. PMID:25576395

  12. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Ochkur, Sergei I.; Luo, Janice L.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Lee, James J.; Lee, Nancy A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine–driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense. PMID:24297871

  13. The 2001 April Burst Activation of SGR 1900-14: Pulse Properties and Torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, P. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Goegues, E.; Finger, M. H.; Feroci, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Swank, J. H.; Hurley, K.; Heise, J.; Smith D.

    2003-01-01

    We report on observations of SGR 1900+14 made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and BeppoSAXduring the 2001 April burst activation of the source. Using these data, we measure the spin-down torque on the star and confirm earlier findings that the torque and burst activity are not directly correlated. We compare the X-ray pulse profile to the gamma-ray profile during the April 18 intermediate flare and show that (1) their shapes are similar and (1) the gamma-ray profile aligns closely in phase with the X-ray pulsations. The good phase alignment of the gamma-ray and X-ray profiles suggests that there was no rapid spin-down following this flare of the magnitude inferred for the August 27 giant flare. We discuss how these observations further constrain magnetic field reconfiguration models for the large flares of SGRs.

  14. Effect of cimetidine on burst-promoting activity of normal T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Morra, L; Moccia, F; Casti, P; Bessone, G; Ponassi, G A

    1992-05-01

    The effect of cimetidine, an inhibitor of suppressor T lymphocytes, on the burst-promoting activity (BPA) of normal T lymphocytes has been studied. Cimetidine has been shown to increase the BPA of normal T lymphocytes, both when added to the culture and when T lymphocytes were preincubated for 1 h with it. Cimetidine had no direct effect on the in vitro growth of burst-forming units (BFU-E). Our results show that CD8 suppressor T lymphocytes inhibit the in vitro growth of BFU-E in normal conditions, either directly or through inhibition of BPA of CD4 helper T lymphocytes. Cimetidine has proved to be a useful tool for investigating the hematological role of T-lymphocyte subsets in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:1623056

  15. Cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity are absent in familial dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (Riley–Day syndrome) is an hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN type III), expressed at birth, that is associated with reduced pain and temperature sensibilities and absent baroreflexes, causing orthostatic hypotension as well as labile blood pressure that increases markedly during emotional excitement. Given the apparent absence of functional baroreceptor afferents, we tested the hypothesis that the normal cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) are absent in patients with familial dysautonomia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into muscle or cutaneous fascicles of the common peroneal nerve in 12 patients with familial dysautonomia. Spontaneous bursts of MSNA were absent in all patients, but in five patients we found evidence of tonically firing sympathetic neurones, with no cardiac rhythmicity, that increased their spontaneous discharge during emotional arousal but not during a manoeuvre that unloads the baroreceptors. Conversely, skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), recorded in four patients, appeared normal. We conclude that the loss of phasic bursts of MSNA and the loss of baroreflex modulation of muscle vasoconstrictor drive contributes to the poor control of blood pressure in familial dysautonomia, and that the increase in tonic firing of muscle vasoconstrictor neurones contributes to the increase in blood pressure during emotional excitement. PMID:23165765

  16. Respiratory Activity of the Mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii.

    PubMed

    Fraile, E R; Zurita, V E

    1967-11-01

    The respiratory activity of the mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii from submerged cultures was manometrically determined at different stages of its development and the results were statistically analyzed. The experiments were performed in a manner designed to diminish the endogenous respiration without affecting the response to the addition of an exogenous substrate. Lactose was the carbohydrate tested that produced the lowest oxygen consumption. The oxidation of maltose, which was high at 24 hr, decreased by more than 50% at 48 and 55 hr. Glucose and sucrose were actively oxidized by mycelium of three ages. From the intermediates of carbohydrate metabolism, 24-hr mycelium did not produce oxygen consumption with malate, lactate, citrate, fumarate, and alpha-ketoglutarate. At 48 hr, mycelium did not oxidize either lactate or citrate; 55-hr mycelium showed oxygen consumption with all intermediates tested. Acetate and pyruvate always produced high oxygen consumption. Ethyl alcohol produced high oxygen consumption with mycelium of all tested ages. PMID:16349733

  17. Respiratory Activity of the Mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii

    PubMed Central

    Fraile, Elda R.; Zurita, Victoria E.

    1967-01-01

    The respiratory activity of the mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii from submerged cultures was manometrically determined at different stages of its development and the results were statistically analyzed. The experiments were performed in a manner designed to diminish the endogenous respiration without affecting the response to the addition of an exogenous substrate. Lactose was the carbohydrate tested that produced the lowest oxygen consumption. The oxidation of maltose, which was high at 24 hr, decreased by more than 50% at 48 and 55 hr. Glucose and sucrose were actively oxidized by mycelium of three ages. From the intermediates of carbohydrate metabolism, 24-hr mycelium did not produce oxygen consumption with malate, lactate, citrate, fumarate, and α-ketoglutarate. At 48 hr, mycelium did not oxidize either lactate or citrate; 55-hr mycelium showed oxygen consumption with all intermediates tested. Acetate and pyruvate always produced high oxygen consumption. Ethyl alcohol produced high oxygen consumption with mycelium of all tested ages. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16349733

  18. Antitussive activity and respiratory system effects of levodropropizine in man.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Braga, P C; Centanni, S; Legnani, D; Moavero, N E; Allegra, L

    1988-08-01

    Antitussive activity of the new antitussive drug, levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526), was evaluated in healthy volunteers by the classical method of citric acid-induced coughing. Levodropropizine dose-dependently reduced cough frequency. Maximal inhibition was observed at 6 h after administration. Cough intensity was also reduced, as shown by the analysis of cough noise. Levodropropizine, at the dosage of 60 mg t.i.d., had no adverse effects on respiratory function nor on airway clearance mechanisms: in fact, it did not affect spirometric parameters. Levodropropizine had no effects on the rheological properties of mucus nor on ciliary activity of airway epithelium. PMID:3196411

  19. Burst pacemaker activity of the sinoatrial node in sodium–calcium exchanger knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Angelo G.; Zhang, Rui; Zaini, Audrey; Giani, Jorge F.; Kang, Jeanney; Lamp, Scott T.; Philipson, Kenneth D.; Goldhaber, Joshua I.

    2015-01-01

    In sinoatrial node (SAN) cells, electrogenic sodium–calcium exchange (NCX) is the dominant calcium (Ca) efflux mechanism. However, the role of NCX in the generation of SAN automaticity is controversial. To investigate the contribution of NCX to pacemaking in the SAN, we performed optical voltage mapping and high-speed 2D laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) of Ca dynamics in an ex vivo intact SAN/atrial tissue preparation from atrial-specific NCX knockout (KO) mice. These mice lack P waves on electrocardiograms, and isolated NCX KO SAN cells are quiescent. Voltage mapping revealed disorganized and arrhythmic depolarizations within the NCX KO SAN that failed to propagate into the atria. LSCM revealed intermittent bursts of Ca transients. Bursts were accompanied by rising diastolic Ca, culminating in long pauses dominated by Ca waves. The L-type Ca channel agonist BayK8644 reduced the rate of Ca transients and inhibited burst generation in the NCX KO SAN whereas the Ca buffer 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA AM) did the opposite. These results suggest that cellular Ca accumulation hinders spontaneous depolarization in the NCX KO SAN, possibly by inhibiting L-type Ca currents. The funny current (If) blocker ivabradine also suppressed NCX KO SAN automaticity. We conclude that pacemaker activity is present in the NCX KO SAN, generated by a mechanism that depends upon If. However, the absence of NCX-mediated depolarization in combination with impaired Ca efflux results in intermittent bursts of pacemaker activity, reminiscent of human sinus node dysfunction and “tachy-brady” syndrome. PMID:26195795

  20. Spectral Analysis of the SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with Fermi/GBM During its January 2009 Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Horst, Alexander Jonathan; Kouveliotou, C.; Kaneko, Y.; Gogus, E.; GBM Magnetar Team

    2010-03-01

    In 2008 October, the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR J1550-5418 entered an active period that lasted one week. On 2009 January 22, the source entered a second, extremely active period, which lasted for one month, and was followed by a third, small episode in 2009 March. The highest number of bursts ( 450) was observed on January 22 with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The combination of the unique GBM temporal and spectral capabilities has enabled us to study integrated and time-resolved spectra of most of these SGR bursts in great detail. We present here the results of our analysis of all the bursts observed with GBM during the source's active period in January 2009.

  1. Origin of Initial Burst in Activity for Trichoderma reesei endo-Glucanases Hydrolyzing Insoluble Cellulose*

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Leigh; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Damgaard, Heidi Delcomyn; Baumann, Martin J.; Olsen, Søren Nymand; Borch, Kim; Lassen, Søren Flensted; Sweeney, Matt; Tatsumi, Hirosuke; Westh, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis have longbeen described by an initial fast hydrolysis rate, tapering rapidly off, leading to a process that takes days rather than hours to complete. This behavior has been mainly attributed to the action of cellobiohydrolases and often linked to the processive mechanism of this exo-acting group of enzymes. The initial kinetics of endo-glucanases (EGs) is far less investigated, partly due to a limited availability of quantitative assay technologies. We have used isothermal calorimetry to monitor the early time course of the hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose by the three main EGs from Trichoderma reesei (Tr): TrCel7B (formerly EG I), TrCel5A (EG II), and TrCel12A (EG III). These endo-glucanases show a distinctive initial burst with a maximal rate that is about 5-fold higher than the rate after 5 min of hydrolysis. The burst is particularly conspicuous for TrCel7B, which reaches a maximal turnover of about 20 s−1 at 30 °C and conducts about 1200 catalytic cycles per enzyme molecule in the initial fast phase. For TrCel5A and TrCel12A the extent of the burst is 2–300 cycles per enzyme molecule. The availability of continuous data on EG activity allows an analysis of the mechanisms underlying the initial kinetics, and it is suggested that the slowdown is linked to transient inactivation of enzyme on the cellulose surface. We propose, therefore, that the frequency of structures on the substrate surface that cause transient inactivation determine the extent of the burst phase. PMID:22110134

  2. Antiviral activity of carnosic acid against respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory infection and a major public health threat worldwide. To date, no vaccine or effective therapeutic agent has been developed. In a screen for potential therapeutic agents against hRSV, we discovered that an extract of Rosmarinus officinalis exerted a strong inhibitory effect against hRSV infection. Subsequent studies identified carnosic acid as a bioactive constituent responsible for anti-hRSV activity. Carnosic acid has been shown to exhibit potent antioxidant and anti-cancer activities. Anti-RSV activity of carnosic acid was further investigated in this study. Methods Effects of extracts from various plants and subfractions from R. officinalis on hRSV replication were determined by microneutralization assay and plaque assay. Several constituents were isolated from ethyl acetate fraction of R. officinalis and their anti-RSV activities were assessed by plaque assay as well as reverse-transcription quantitative PCR to determine the synthesis of viral RNAs. Results Among the tested bioactive constituents of R. officinalis, carnosic acid displayed the most potent anti-hRSV activity and was effective against both A- and B-type viruses. Carnosic acid efficiently suppressed the replication of hRSV in a concentration-dependent manner. Carnosic acid effectively suppressed viral gene expression without inducing type-I interferon production or affecting cell viability, suggesting that it may directly affect viral factors. A time course analysis showed that addition of carnosic acid 8 hours after infection still effectively blocked the expression of hRSV genes, further suggesting that carnosic acid directly inhibited the replication of hRSV. Conclusions The current study demonstrates that carnosic acid, a natural compound that has already been shown to be safe for human consumption, has anti-viral activity against hRSV, efficiently blocking the replication of this virus. Carnosic

  3. Active and passive immunisation against respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Zambon, M

    1999-01-01

    RSV is a major cause of respiratory illness in infants under 2 years of age. Evidence is accumulating that it is also underestimated as a cause of respiratory infection in adults, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Active interventions to control the impact of RSV infection have been hampered by a lack of understanding of the immune response to RSV in different age groups. A number of different strategies for developing RSV vaccines have been pursued, including live attenuated vaccines, genetically engineered live and subunit vaccines and peptide vaccines with varying degrees of success. The target populations for RSV vaccines include infants, the elderly and women of childbearing age, but the efficacy of different vaccines may differ according to age. Desirable immune responses and immune correlates of protection to RSV in humans remain uncertain and determining these is critical for introduction of any vaccines. Prophylaxis and treatment of RSV in infants using human immunoglobulin containing high titres of RSV specific neutralising antibody (RSV-Ig) has shown limited success in different infant populations. Prophylaxis of premature infants with RSV-Ig, particularly those with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, has demonstrated limited clinical efficacy against RSV. In contrast, there are significant safety concerns for use of this preparation for prophylaxis in infants with congenital heart disease and no demonstrable efficacy in treatment of RSV disease in healthy infants. The cost of the preparation will limit use to highly selected infant groups. Production of humanized monoclonal antibodies to RSV offers another potential passive immunotherapy intervention for RSV, with increased specific activity and reduced side effects, although its use remains experimental. PMID:10578118

  4. Induction of neutrophil respiratory burst by tumour necrosis factor-alpha; priming effect of solid-phase fibronectin and intervention of CD11b-CD18 integrins.

    PubMed Central

    Dapino, P; Dallegri, F; Ottonello, L; Sacchetti, C

    1993-01-01

    Human neutrophils, added to fibronectin (FN)-coated polystyrene wells and exposed to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), were found to exhibit a prolonged production of superoxide anion (O2-) after a lag period of approx 30 min. The O2- production, but not the cell adherence to FN, was completely inhibited by two MoAbs against CD18 and by a MoAb against CD11b, suggesting the involvement of CD11b-CD18 integrins in the neutrophil oxidative response. When neutrophils were induced to adhere to FN by incubation for 30 min on FN-coated surfaces and then washed to remove non-adherent cells, FN-anchored cells exhibited a rapid onset of O2- production in response to TNF-alpha. This suggests that FN primes neutrophils for the TNF-alpha-mediated respiratory burst. The O2- production by adherent neutrophils could be inhibited by anti-CD11b and anti-CD18 MoAbs only when the MoAbs were present both during the induction of adherence and during the subsequent exposure of FN-bound cells to TNF-alpha. The incapacity of MoAbs, added to neutrophils during the induction of adherence, to modify the characteristics of the subsequent neutrophil response to TNF-alpha suggests that the FN-mediated cell priming is independent of the interaction of CD11b-CD18 integrins with the FN substrate. The results are consistent with the intervention of three classes of cell receptors in the TNF-alpha-induced oxidative burst of neutrophils plated on FN: (i) neutrophil FN-binding sites, distinct from CD11b-CD18 and responsible for the cell priming; (ii) CD11b-CD18 integrins, absolutely required for permitting the cell triggering; and (iii) TNF-alpha receptors, responsible for switching on a rapid cell response in primed cells. The requirement of multiple classes of receptors for the full expression of the cell function can be envisaged as a natural precautionary measure to control the neutrophil responsiveness to TNF-alpha and, in turn, the TNF-alpha-dependent neutrophil-mediated oxidative injury

  5. Induction of neutrophil respiratory burst by tumour necrosis factor-alpha; priming effect of solid-phase fibronectin and intervention of CD11b-CD18 integrins.

    PubMed

    Dapino, P; Dallegri, F; Ottonello, L; Sacchetti, C

    1993-12-01

    Human neutrophils, added to fibronectin (FN)-coated polystyrene wells and exposed to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), were found to exhibit a prolonged production of superoxide anion (O2-) after a lag period of approx 30 min. The O2- production, but not the cell adherence to FN, was completely inhibited by two MoAbs against CD18 and by a MoAb against CD11b, suggesting the involvement of CD11b-CD18 integrins in the neutrophil oxidative response. When neutrophils were induced to adhere to FN by incubation for 30 min on FN-coated surfaces and then washed to remove non-adherent cells, FN-anchored cells exhibited a rapid onset of O2- production in response to TNF-alpha. This suggests that FN primes neutrophils for the TNF-alpha-mediated respiratory burst. The O2- production by adherent neutrophils could be inhibited by anti-CD11b and anti-CD18 MoAbs only when the MoAbs were present both during the induction of adherence and during the subsequent exposure of FN-bound cells to TNF-alpha. The incapacity of MoAbs, added to neutrophils during the induction of adherence, to modify the characteristics of the subsequent neutrophil response to TNF-alpha suggests that the FN-mediated cell priming is independent of the interaction of CD11b-CD18 integrins with the FN substrate. The results are consistent with the intervention of three classes of cell receptors in the TNF-alpha-induced oxidative burst of neutrophils plated on FN: (i) neutrophil FN-binding sites, distinct from CD11b-CD18 and responsible for the cell priming; (ii) CD11b-CD18 integrins, absolutely required for permitting the cell triggering; and (iii) TNF-alpha receptors, responsible for switching on a rapid cell response in primed cells. The requirement of multiple classes of receptors for the full expression of the cell function can be envisaged as a natural precautionary measure to control the neutrophil responsiveness to TNF-alpha and, in turn, the TNF-alpha-dependent neutrophil-mediated oxidative injury

  6. Orange Peel Extracts: Chemical Characterization, Antioxidant, Antioxidative Burst, and Phytotoxic Activities.

    PubMed

    Erukainure, Ochuko L; Ebuehi, Osaretin A T; Iqbal Chaudhary, M; Mesaik, M Ahmed; Shukralla, Ahmed; Muhammad, Aliyu; Zaruwa, Moses Z; Elemo, Gloria N

    2016-01-01

    The search for novel drugs and alternative medicine has led to increased research in medicinal plants. Among such plants is the orange fruit. Its peels have been utilized for long as an active ingredient in most traditional medicines. This study aims at investigating the chemical properties of the hexane and dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of orange peel as well as their biological potentials. Blended peels were extracted with n-hexane and n-dichloromethane, respectively. The resulting extracts were subjected to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) characterization. The extracts were also assayed for free radical scavenging ability against 1,1 -diphenyl -2 picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), antioxidative burst via measuring luminol -amplified chemiluminescence response in human blood, and phytotoxicity against lemna minor. GCMS analysis revealed a predominance of fatty acid methyl esters in the hexane extract, while the DCM extract had more ketone metabolites. The DCM extract had significant (p < .05) higher free radical scavenging and antioxidative burst activities compared to the hexane. Both extracts revealed a significantly (p < .05) high phytotoxicity activity. Results from this study indicated that solvent type played a vital a role in the extraction of secondary metabolites, which are responsible for the observed biological activities. The higher activities by the DCM extract can be attributed to its constituents as revealed by GCMS analysis. There is great need to explore the phytotoxicity potentials of both extracts as natural herbicides. PMID:26930349

  7. Cyclothiazide-induced persistent increase in respiratory-related activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Babiec, Walter E; Faull, Kym F; Feldman, Jack L

    2012-01-01

    Hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons (MNs) innervate the genioglossus muscle of the tongue, which plays an important role in maintaining upper airway patency, particularly during sleep, and modulating upper airway resistance. Discovering methods for inducing long-term increases in genioglossal motoneuronal excitability to AMPA-mediated drive may help in the development of therapeutics for upper airway motor disorders such as obstructive sleep apnoea. We show that the diuretic, anti-hypertensive, AMPA receptor modulator cyclothiazide (CTZ) induces a profound and long-lasting increase in the amplitude of respiratory-related XII nerve activity in rhythmically active neonatal rat medullary slices. Treatment of the slice with CTZ (90 μm) for 1 h increased the integrated XII (∫XII) nerve burst amplitude to 262 ± 23% of pre-treatment control at 1 h post-treatment; much of this increase lasted at least 12 h. The amount of CTZ-induced facilitation (CIF) was dependent upon both CTZ dose and exposure time and was accompanied by a long-lasting increase in endogenous AMPA-mediated drive currents to XII MNs. CIF, however, is not a form of plasticity and does not depend on AMPA or NMDA receptor activation for its induction. Nor does it depend on coincident protein kinase A or C activity. Rather, measurement of mEPSCs along with mass spectrometric analysis of CTZ-treated slices indicates that the cause is prolonged bioavailability of CTZ. These results illustrate a latent residual capacity for potentiating AMPA-mediated inspiratory drive to XII MNs that might be applied to the treatment of upper airway motor deficits. PMID:22753547

  8. NMDA receptor hypofunction produces concomitant firing rate potentiation and burst activity reduction in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Mark E.; Homayoun, Houman; Moghaddam, Bita

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive deficits associated with frontal lobe dysfunction are a determinant of long-term disability in schizophrenia and are not effectively treated with available medications. Clinical studies show that many aspects of these deficits are transiently induced in healthy individuals treated with N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists. These findings and recent genetic linkage studies strongly implicate NMDA receptor deficiency in schizophrenia and suggest that reversing this deficiency is pertinent to treating the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Despite the wealth of behavioral data on the effects of NMDA antagonist treatment in humans and laboratory animals, there is a fundamental lack of understanding about the mechanisms by which a general state of NMDA deficiency influences the function of cortical neurons. Using ensemble recording in freely moving rats, we found that NMDA antagonist treatment, at doses that impaired working memory, potentiated the firing rate of most prefrontal cortex neurons. This potentiation, which correlated with expression of behavioral stereotypy, resulted from an increased number of irregularly discharged single spikes. Concurrent with the increase in spike activity, there was a significant reduction in organized bursting activity. These results identify two distinct mechanisms by which NMDA receptor deficiency may disrupt frontal lobe function: an increase in disorganized spike activity, which may enhance cortical noise and transmission of disinformation; and a decrease in burst activity, which reduces transmission efficacy of cortical neurons. These findings provide a physiological basis for the NMDA receptor deficiency model of schizophrenia and may clarify the nature of cortical dysfunction in this disease. PMID:15159546

  9. Reconstruction of burst activity from calcium imaging of neuronal population via Lq minimization and interval screening

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Tingwei; Lv, Xiaohua; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Calcium imaging is becoming an increasingly popular technology to indirectly measure activity patterns in local neuronal networks. Based on the dependence of calcium fluorescence on neuronal spiking, two-photon calcium imaging affords single-cell resolution of neuronal population activity. However, it is still difficult to reconstruct neuronal activity from complex calcium fluorescence traces, particularly for traces contaminated by noise. Here, we describe a robust and efficient neuronal-activity reconstruction method that utilizes Lq minimization and interval screening (IS), which we refer to as LqIS. The simulation results show that LqIS performs satisfactorily in terms of both accuracy and speed of reconstruction. Reconstruction of simulation and experimental data also shows that LqIS has advantages in terms of the recall rate, precision rate, and timing error. Finally, LqIS is demonstrated to effectively reconstruct neuronal burst activity from calcium fluorescence traces recorded from large-size neuronal population. PMID:27375930

  10. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts.

    PubMed

    Dranias, Mark R; Westover, M Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI. PMID:25755638

  11. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts

    PubMed Central

    Dranias, Mark R.; Westover, M. Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M. J.

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI. PMID:25755638

  12. Neutrophil oxidative burst activates ATM to regulate cytokine production and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Harbort, C J; Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vitor; von Bernuth, Horst; Kaindl, Angela M; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Reichenbach, Janine; Roesler, Joachim; Zychlinsky, Arturo; Amulic, Borko

    2015-12-24

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the initial stages of inflammation by balancing pro- and antiinflammatory signals. Among these signals are the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the timely initiation of antiinflammatory cell death via constitutive apoptosis. Here we identify ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase as a modulator of these neutrophil functions. Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a pleiotropic multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene-encoding ATM, a master regulator of the DNA damage response. In addition to progressive neurodegeneration and high rates of cancer, AT patients have numerous symptoms that can be linked to chronic inflammation. We report that neutrophils isolated from patients with AT overproduce proinflammatory cytokines and have a prolonged lifespan compared with healthy controls. This effect is partly mediated by increases in activation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, we show that the oxidative burst, catalyzed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, can activate ATM in neutrophils. Finally, activation of ATM and DNA damage signaling suppress cytokine production and can abrogate the overproduction of IL-8 in ROS-deficient cells. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of cytokine production and apoptosis, establishing DNA damage as a downstream mediator of immune regulation by reactive oxygen species. We propose that deficiencies in the DNA damage response, like deficiencies in the oxidative burst seen in chronic granulomatous disease, could lead to pathologic inflammation. PMID:26491069

  13. Neutrophil oxidative burst activates ATM to regulate cytokine production and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Harbort, C. J.; Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vitor; von Bernuth, Horst; Kaindl, Angela M.; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Reichenbach, Janine; Roesler, Joachim; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the initial stages of inflammation by balancing pro- and antiinflammatory signals. Among these signals are the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the timely initiation of antiinflammatory cell death via constitutive apoptosis. Here we identify ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase as a modulator of these neutrophil functions. Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a pleiotropic multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene-encoding ATM, a master regulator of the DNA damage response. In addition to progressive neurodegeneration and high rates of cancer, AT patients have numerous symptoms that can be linked to chronic inflammation. We report that neutrophils isolated from patients with AT overproduce proinflammatory cytokines and have a prolonged lifespan compared with healthy controls. This effect is partly mediated by increases in activation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, we show that the oxidative burst, catalyzed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, can activate ATM in neutrophils. Finally, activation of ATM and DNA damage signaling suppress cytokine production and can abrogate the overproduction of IL-8 in ROS-deficient cells. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of cytokine production and apoptosis, establishing DNA damage as a downstream mediator of immune regulation by reactive oxygen species. We propose that deficiencies in the DNA damage response, like deficiencies in the oxidative burst seen in chronic granulomatous disease, could lead to pathologic inflammation. PMID:26491069

  14. Detailed correlation of type III radio bursts with H alpha activity. I - Active region of 22 May 1970.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Pasachoff, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Comparison of observations of type III impulsive radio bursts made at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory with high-spatial-resolution cinematographic observations taken at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. Use of the log-periodic radio interferometer makes it possible to localize the radio emission uniquely. This study concentrates on the particularly active region close to the limb on May 22, 1970. Sixteen of the 17 groups were associated with some H alpha activity, 11 of them with the start of such activity.

  15. A codimension-2 bifurcation controlling endogenous bursting activity and pulse-triggered responses of a neuron model.

    PubMed

    Barnett, William H; Cymbalyuk, Gennady S

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of individual neurons are crucial for producing functional activity in neuronal networks. An open question is how temporal characteristics can be controlled in bursting activity and in transient neuronal responses to synaptic input. Bifurcation theory provides a framework to discover generic mechanisms addressing this question. We present a family of mechanisms organized around a global codimension-2 bifurcation. The cornerstone bifurcation is located at the intersection of the border between bursting and spiking and the border between bursting and silence. These borders correspond to the blue sky catastrophe bifurcation and the saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle (SNIC) curves, respectively. The cornerstone bifurcation satisfies the conditions for both the blue sky catastrophe and SNIC. The burst duration and interburst interval increase as the inverse of the square root of the difference between the corresponding bifurcation parameter and its bifurcation value. For a given set of burst duration and interburst interval, one can find the parameter values supporting these temporal characteristics. The cornerstone bifurcation also determines the responses of silent and spiking neurons. In a silent neuron with parameters close to the SNIC, a pulse of current triggers a single burst. In a spiking neuron with parameters close to the blue sky catastrophe, a pulse of current temporarily silences the neuron. These responses are stereotypical: the durations of the transient intervals-the duration of the burst and the duration of latency to spiking-are governed by the inverse-square-root laws. The mechanisms described here could be used to coordinate neuromuscular control in central pattern generators. As proof of principle, we construct small networks that control metachronal-wave motor pattern exhibited in locomotion. This pattern is determined by the phase relations of bursting neurons in a simple central pattern generator modeled by a chain of

  16. Active impedance of respiratory system in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Zin, W A; Pengelly, L D; Milic-Emili, J

    1982-07-01

    We have assessed the validity of the method of Siafakas et al. (J. Appl. Physiol.: Respirat. Environ. Exercise Physiol. 51: 109-121, 1981) for determining active elastance (E'rs) and flow resistance (R'rs) of the respiratory system. In six cats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium we have measured flow, volume, and tracheal occlusion pressure during spontaneous breathing. This allowed us to compute E'rs and R'rs. From these data and the occlusion pressure wave we predicted the time course of volume during inspirations with added linear flow resistances (delta R). These were compared to the actual loaded inspirograms. The agreement was generally good, except for small predictable discrepancies with the highest delta R values, which could be attributed to decompression of thoracic gas. These results indicate that the approach of Siakafas et al. to determine E'rs and R'rs is valid. In addition, we have quantified the "terminal inhibition" of inspiratory activity, which occurs toward the end of unoccluded breaths (both loaded and unloaded). PMID:7118628

  17. The 2001 April Burst Activation of SGR 1900+14: Pulse Properties and Torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, P. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Goegues, E.; Finger, M. H.; Feroci, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Swank, J. H.; Hurley, K.; Heise, J.; Smith, D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report on observations of SGR 1900+14 made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and BeppoSAX during the April 2001 burst activation of the source. Using these data, we measure the spindown torque on the star and confirm earlier findings that the torque and burst activity are not directly correlated. We compare the X-ray pulse profile to the gamma-ray profile during the April 18 intermediate flare and show that (i) their shapes are similar and (ii) the gamma-ray profile aligns closely in phase with the X-ray pulsations. The good phase alignment of the gamma-ray and X-ray profiles suggests that there was no rapid spindown following this flare, in contrast to the August 27 giant flare. The absence of rapid spindown in the hours following the April 18 flare suggests that there was no significant outflow of material as was believed to be present following the August 27 flare. Finally, we discuss how these observations further constrain magnetic field reconfiguration models for the large flares of SGRs.

  18. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Exerts Antiviral Activity against Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Cummins, Neville; Eden, Edward; Geraghty, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Increased lung levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) are frequently observed during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and elevated MMP9 concentrations are associated with severe disease. However little is known of the functional role of MMP9 during lung infection with RSV. To determine whether MMP9 exerted direct antiviral potential, active MMP9 was incubated with RSV, which showed that MMP9 directly prevented RSV infectivity to airway epithelial cells. Using knockout mice the effect of the loss of Mmp9 expression was examined during RSV infection to demonstrate MMP9’s role in viral clearance and disease progression. Seven days following RSV infection, Mmp9-/- mice displayed substantial weight loss, increased RSV-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and reduced clearance of RSV from the lungs compared to wild type mice. Although total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell counts were similar in both groups, neutrophil recruitment to the lungs during RSV infection was significantly reduced in Mmp9-/- mice. Reduced neutrophil recruitment coincided with diminished RANTES, IL-1β, SCF, G-CSF expression and p38 phosphorylation. Induction of p38 signaling was required for RANTES and G-CSF expression during RSV infection in airway epithelial cells. Therefore, MMP9 in RSV lung infection significantly enhances neutrophil recruitment, cytokine production and viral clearance while reducing AHR. PMID:26284919

  19. Emergency department syndromic surveillance providing early warning of seasonal respiratory activity in England.

    PubMed

    Hughes, H E; Morbey, R; Hughes, T C; Locker, T E; Pebody, R; Green, H K; Ellis, J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal respiratory infections place an increased burden on health services annually. We used a sentinel emergency department syndromic surveillance system to understand the factors driving respiratory attendances at emergency departments (EDs) in England. Trends in different respiratory indicators were observed to peak at different points during winter, with further variation observed in the distribution of attendances by age. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed acute respiratory infection and bronchitis/bronchiolitis ED attendances in patients aged 1-4 years were particularly sensitive indicators for increasing respiratory syncytial virus activity. Using near real-time surveillance of respiratory ED attendances may provide early warning of increased winter pressures in EDs, particularly driven by seasonal pathogens. This surveillance may provide additional intelligence about different categories of attendance, highlighting pressures in particular age groups, thereby aiding planning and preparation to respond to acute changes in EDs, and thus the health service in general. PMID:26415918

  20. Do changes in the coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities contribute to neurogenic hypertension?

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Daniel B; Paton, Julian F R; Machado, Benedito H

    2009-12-01

    1. It is well known that respiration markedly modulates the sympathetic nervous system. Interactions between pontine and medullary neurons involved in the control of sympathetic and respiratory functions are the main mechanism underlying the respiratory related oscillations in sympathetic nerve activity. 2. Recently, in rats treated with chronic intermittent hypoxia, we demonstrated that alterations in respiratory pattern may drive increased sympathetic outflow and hence the development of systemic hypertension. These experiments, performed in the in situ working heart-brain stem preparation, raise the possibility that enhanced central coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities could be a potential mechanism underpinning the development and/or the maintenance of neurogenic hypertension. 3. In the present review, we discuss the neural basis of the enhanced entrainment between respiratory and sympathetic neurons in the brain stem that can be induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia and the possible implications of these mechanisms in the genesis of sympathetic overactivity and, consequently, hypertension. PMID:19413588

  1. Diclofenac-Choline Antioxidant Activity Investigated by means of Luminol Amplified Chemiluminescence of Human Neutrophil Bursts and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Braga, P C; Lattuada, N; Greco, V; Sibilia, V; Falchi, M; Bianchi, T; Dal Sasso, M

    2015-05-01

    A new diclofenac salt called diclofenac-choline (DC) has recently been proposed for the symptomatic treatment of oropharyngeal inflammatory processes and pain because its greater water solubility allows the use of high concentrations, which are useful when the contact time between the drug and the oropharyngeal mucosa is brief, as in the case of mouthwashes or spray formulations. The antioxidant activity of DC has not yet been investigated, and so the aim was to use luminol-amplified-chemiluminescence (LACL) to verify whether various concentrations of DC (1.48, 0.74 and 0.37 mg/mL for incubation times of 2, 4 and 8 min) interfere with oxygen and nitrogen radicals during the course of human neutrophils respiratory bursts; electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to investigate its direct antiradical (scavenger) activity. The EPR findings showed that DC has concentration-dependent scavenging activity against the ABTS, the DPPH, and the hydroxyl radicals, but no activity on superoxide anion, as has been previously reported in the case of other NSAIDs. LACL revealed an inhibitory effect that was statistically significant after only 2 min of incubation, and similar after 4 and 8 min. The effects on the peroxynitrite radical paralleled those observed in the previous test. High concentrations and short incubation times showed that there is no interference on PMN viability, and so the inhibitory findings must be attributed to the effect of the drug. The anti-inflammatory effects of DC cannot be attributed solely to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, but its effects on free radicals and neutrophil bursts suggest that they may contribute to its final therapeutic effect. PMID:24918344

  2. Detection of Spectral Evolution in the Bursts Emitted during the 2008-2009 Active Episode of SGR J1550-5418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Gruber, David; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, Jonathan; Baring, Matthew G.; Göǧüş, Ersin; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Kaneko, Yuki; Lin, Lin; Watts, Anna L.; Bhat, Narayana P.; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Greiner, Jochen; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.; Rau, Arne

    2012-08-01

    In early 2008 October, the soft gamma repeater SGR J1550-5418 (1E 1547.0-5408, AX J155052-5418, PSR J1550-5418) became active, emitting a series of bursts which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) after which a second especially intense activity period commenced in 2009 January and a third, less active period was detected in 2009 March-April. Here, we analyze the GBM data for all the bursts from the first and last active episodes. We performed temporal and spectral analysis for all events and found that their temporal characteristics are very similar to the ones of other SGR bursts, as well the ones reported for the bursts of the main episode (average burst durations ~170 ms). In addition, we used our sample of bursts to quantify the systematic uncertainties of the GBM location algorithm for soft gamma-ray transients to lsim8°. Our spectral analysis indicates significant spectral evolution between the first and last set of events. Although the 2008 October events are best fitted with a single blackbody function, for the 2009 bursts an optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung is clearly preferred. We attribute this evolution to changes in the magnetic field topology of the source, possibly due to effects following the very energetic main bursting episode.

  3. The Sherman-Rinzel-Keizer model for bursting electrical activity in the pancreatic. beta. -cell

    SciTech Connect

    Pernarowski, M.; Kevorkian, J. . Dept. of Applied Mathematics); Miura, R.M. )

    1990-03-01

    Pancreatic {beta}-cells exhibit periodic bursting electrical activity (BEA) consisting of active and silent phases. The Sherman-Rinzel-Keizer (SRK) model of this phenomenon consists of three coupled first-order nonlinear differential equations which describe the dynamics of the membrane potential, the activation parameter for the voltage-gated potassium channel, and the intracellular calcium concentration. These equations are nondimensionalized and transformed into a Lienard differential equation coupled to a single first-order differential equation for the slowly changing nondimensional calcium concentration. Leading-order perturbation problems are derived for the silent and active phases of the BEA on slow and fast time scales. Numerical solutions of these leading-order problems are compared with those for the exact equation in their respective regions. The leading-order solution in the active phase has a limit cycle behavior with a slowly varying frequency. It is observed that the damping term'' in the Lienard equation is small numerically. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Bursts of calving activity and controls on the terminus position of Yahtse Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Larsen, C. F.; West, M. E.; Oneel, S.

    2011-12-01

    The tidewater glacier terminus is the interface that links oceanic and glaciological processes. Tidewater glaciers contribute large amounts of cold, fresh water to their fjords. Ocean heat exerts a significant control on glacier mass balance. On the Gulf of Alaska, the terminus of tidewater Yahtse Glacier has advanced slowly since its 1990 post-Little Ice Age minimum. At Yahtse's terminus, ice flowing at 18 m/d encounters water with temperatures of up to 10.5°C (measured 1.5 km from the terminus). Profiles of temperature and salinity in Icy Bay, in which Yahtse Glacier terminates, have revealed a strongly stratified, single-cell circulation pattern. Fresh, glacier outflow exits the bay atop warm, saline Gulf of Alaska water. The Alaska Coastal Current, a major source of Icy Bay water, has warmed by 1°C over the last 40 years. These observations prompt the question of how a tidewater advance may be sustained in spite of warming ocean and atmosphere temperatures. Superimposed on Yahtse Glacier's longer-term advance have been smaller-scale summer retreats and winter-spring re-advances. These smaller fluctuations indicate that factors that change on short timescales, such as ocean conditions and weather, also have an important control on terminus position. Observed bursts in calving frequency are a further reflection of the unsteady conditions at the glacier terminus. In the present study, we use seismograms recorded on bedrock within 500 m of the glacier terminus as a calving counter. The epicenters of a significant majority of glacier-generated seismic events within the St. Elias Mountains have been located to within 15 km of the terminus of Yahtse Glacier. Previous study at Yahtse Glacier has revealed that at least 75% of these seismic events originate from calving processes, most notably through the interactions between iceberg and water. Calving frequency is characterized by a relatively steady rate of background events, punctuated by bursts of calving activity

  5. Na(+)/K(+) pump interacts with the h-current to control bursting activity in central pattern generator neurons of leeches.

    PubMed

    Kueh, Daniel; Barnett, William H; Cymbalyuk, Gennady S; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of different ionic currents shape the bursting activity of neurons and networks that control motor output. Despite being ubiquitous in all animal cells, the contribution of the Na(+)/K(+) pump current to such bursting activity has not been well studied. We used monensin, a Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, to examine the role of the pump on the bursting activity of oscillator heart interneurons in leeches. When we stimulated the pump with monensin, the period of these neurons decreased significantly, an effect that was prevented or reversed when the h-current was blocked by Cs(+). The decreased period could also occur if the pump was inhibited with strophanthidin or K(+)-free saline. Our monensin results were reproduced in model, which explains the pump's contributions to bursting activity based on Na(+) dynamics. Our results indicate that a dynamically oscillating pump current that interacts with the h-current can regulate the bursting activity of neurons and networks. PMID:27588351

  6. 76 FR 28460 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Rock Burst...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... additional information, see the related notice published in the Federal Register on January 19, 2011 (76 FR...; Rock Burst Control Plan--Pertains to Underground Metal and Nonmetal Mines ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... information collection request (ICR) titled, ``Burst Control Plan--Pertains to Underground Metal and...

  7. Calcium-activated non-selective cation currents are involved in generation of tonic and bursting activity in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta.

    PubMed

    Mrejeru, Ana; Wei, Aguan; Ramirez, Jan Marino

    2011-05-15

    Nigral dopamine neurons are transiently activated by high frequency glutamatergic inputs relaying reward-predicting sensory information. The tonic firing pattern of dopamine cells responds to these inputs with a transient burst of spikes that requires NMDA receptors. Here, we show that NMDA receptor activation further excites the cell by recruiting a calcium-activated non-selective cation current (ICAN) capable of generating a plateau potential. Burst firing in vitro is eliminated after blockade of ICAN with flufenamic acid, 9-phenanthrol, or intracellular BAPTA. ICAN is likely to be mediated by a transient receptor potential (TRP) channel, and RT-PCR was used to confirm expression of TRPM2 and TRPM4mRNA in substantia nigra pars compacta.We propose that ICAN is selectively activated during burst firing to boost NMDA currents and allow plateau potentials. This boost mechanism may render DA cells vulnerable to excitotoxicity. PMID:21486760

  8. UNUSUAL CENTRAL ENGINE ACTIVITY IN THE DOUBLE BURST GRB 110709B

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Binbin; Burrows, David N.; Meszaros, Peter; Falcone, Abraham D.; Zhang Bing; Wang Xiangyu; Stratta, Giulia; D'Elia, Valerio; Frederiks, Dmitry; Golenetskii, Sergey; Cummings, Jay R.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil; Norris, Jay P.

    2012-04-01

    The double burst, GRB 110709B, triggered the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) twice at 21:32:39 UT and 21:43:45 UT, respectively, on 2011 July 9. This is the first time we observed a gamma-ray burst (GRB) with two BAT triggers. In this paper, we present simultaneous Swift and Konus-WIND observations of this unusual GRB and its afterglow. If the two events originated from the same physical progenitor, their different time-dependent spectral evolution suggests they must belong to different episodes of the central engine, which may be a magnetar-to-BH accretion system.

  9. Simulation of the bursting activity of neuron R15 in Aplysia: role of ionic currents, calcium balance, and modulatory transmitters.

    PubMed

    Canavier, C C; Clark, J W; Byrne, J H

    1991-12-01

    1. An equivalent circuit model of the R15 bursting neuron in Aplysia has been combined with a fluid compartment model, resulting in a model that incorporates descriptions of most of the membrane ion channels that are known to exist in the somata of R15, as well as providing a Ca2+ balance on the cell. 2. A voltage-activated, calcium-inactivated Ca2+ current (denoted the slow inward current ISI) was sufficient to produce bursting activity without invoking any other calcium-dependent currents (such as a nonspecific cation current, INS, or a calcium-activated K+ current, IK,Ca). Furthermore, many characteristics of a typical R15 burst could be simulated, such as a parabolic variation in interspike interval, the depolarizing afterpotential (DAP), and the progressive decrease in the undershoots of spikes during a burst. 3. The dynamic activity of R15 was analyzed by separately characterizing two different temporal domains; the fast dynamics associated with action potentials and the slow dynamics associated with low-amplitude oscillations lasting tens of seconds ("slow waves"). The slow dynamics were isolated by setting the Na+ conductance (gNa) to zero and then studied by the use of a system of equations reduced to two variables: intracellular concentration of Ca2+ and membrane potential. The fixed point of the system was located at the intersection of the nullclines for these two variables. A stability analysis of the fixed point was then used to determine whether a given set of parameters would produce slow-wave activity. 4. If the reduced model predicted slow-wave oscillations for a given set of parameters with gNa set to zero, then bursting activity was observed for the same set of parameters in the full model with gNa reset to its control value. However, for certain sets of parameters with gNa at its usual value, the full model exhibited bursting activity because of a slow oscillation produced by the activation of INS by action potentials. This oscillation resulted

  10. Radio afterglow rebrightening: evidence for multiple active phases in gamma-ray burst central engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long-Biao; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Rice, Jared

    2015-09-01

    The rebrightening phenomenon is an interesting feature in some X-ray, optical, and radio afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here, we propose a possible energy-supply assumption to explain the rebrightenings of radio afterglows, in which the central engine with multiple active phases can supply at least two GRB pulses in a typical GRB duration time. Considering the case of double pulses supplied by the central engine, the double pulses have separate physical parameters, except for the number density of the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). Their independent radio afterglows are integrated by the ground detectors to form the rebrightening phenomenon. In this Letter, we firstly simulate diverse rebrightening light curves under consideration of different and independent physical parameters. Using this assumption, we also give our best fit to the radio afterglow of GRB 970508 at three frequencies of 1.43, 4.86, and 8.46 GHz. We suggest that the central engine may be active continuously at a timescale longer than that of a typical GRB duration time as many authors have suggested (e.g., Zhang et al., Astrophys. J. 787:66, 2014; Gao and Mészáros, Astrophys. J. 802:90, 2015), and that it may supply enough energy to cause the long-lasting rebrightenings observed in some GRB afterglows.

  11. Concealed expansion of immature precursors underpins acute burst of adult HSC activity in foetal liver.

    PubMed

    Rybtsov, Stanislav; Ivanovs, Andrejs; Zhao, Suling; Medvinsky, Alexander

    2016-04-15

    One day prior to mass emergence of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the foetal liver at E12.5, the embryo contains only a few definitive HSCs. It is thought that the burst of HSC activity in the foetal liver is underpinned by rapid maturation of immature embryonic precursors of definitive HSCs, termed pre-HSCs. However, because pre-HSCs are not detectable by direct transplantations into adult irradiated recipients, the size and growth of this population, which represents the embryonic rudiment of the adult haematopoietic system, remains uncertain. Using a novel quantitative assay, we demonstrate that from E9.5 the pre-HSC pool undergoes dramatic growth in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region and by E11.5 reaches the size that matches the number of definitive HSCs in the E12.5 foetal liver. Thus, this study provides for the first time a quantitative basis for our understanding of how the large population of definitive HSCs emerges in the foetal liver. PMID:27095492

  12. Concealed expansion of immature precursors underpins acute burst of adult HSC activity in foetal liver

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovs, Andrejs; Zhao, Suling; Medvinsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    One day prior to mass emergence of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the foetal liver at E12.5, the embryo contains only a few definitive HSCs. It is thought that the burst of HSC activity in the foetal liver is underpinned by rapid maturation of immature embryonic precursors of definitive HSCs, termed pre-HSCs. However, because pre-HSCs are not detectable by direct transplantations into adult irradiated recipients, the size and growth of this population, which represents the embryonic rudiment of the adult haematopoietic system, remains uncertain. Using a novel quantitative assay, we demonstrate that from E9.5 the pre-HSC pool undergoes dramatic growth in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region and by E11.5 reaches the size that matches the number of definitive HSCs in the E12.5 foetal liver. Thus, this study provides for the first time a quantitative basis for our understanding of how the large population of definitive HSCs emerges in the foetal liver. PMID:27095492

  13. Mechanisms Underlying Adaptation of Respiratory Network Activity to Modulatory Stimuli in the Mouse Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Marc; De Sa, Rafaël; Cardoit, Laura; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Breathing is a rhythmic behavior that requires organized contractions of respiratory effector muscles. This behavior must adapt to constantly changing conditions in order to ensure homeostasis, proper body oxygenation, and CO2/pH regulation. Respiratory rhythmogenesis is controlled by neural networks located in the brainstem. One area considered to be essential for generating the inspiratory phase of the respiratory rhythm is the preBötzinger complex (preBötC). Rhythmogenesis emerges from this network through the interplay between the activation of intrinsic cellular properties (pacemaker properties) and intercellular synaptic connections. Respiratory activity continuously changes under the impact of numerous modulatory substances depending on organismal needs and environmental conditions. The preBötC network has been shown to become active during the last third of gestation. But only little is known regarding the modulation of inspiratory rhythmicity at embryonic stages and even less on a possible role of pacemaker neurons in this functional flexibility during the prenatal period. By combining electrophysiology and calcium imaging performed on embryonic brainstem slice preparations, we provide evidence showing that embryonic inspiratory pacemaker neurons are already intrinsically sensitive to neuromodulation and external conditions (i.e., temperature) affecting respiratory network activity, suggesting a potential role of pacemaker neurons in mediating rhythm adaptation to modulatory stimuli in the embryo. PMID:27239348

  14. Inhibition of protein kinase G activity protects neonatal mouse respiratory network from hyperthermic and hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gary A B; López-Guerrero, Juan J; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Peña, Fernando; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2010-01-22

    In spite of considerable research attention focused on clarifying the mechanisms by which the mammalian respiratory rhythm is generated, little attention has been given to examining how this neuronal circuit can be protected from heat stress. Hyperthermia has a profound effect on neuronal circuits including the circuit that generates breathing in mammals. As temperature of the brainstem increases, respiratory frequency concomitantly rises. If temperature continues to increase respiratory arrest (apnea) and death can occur. Previous research has implicated protein kinase G (PKG) activity in regulating neuronal thermosensitivity of neuronal circuits in invertebrates. Here we examine if pharmacological manipulation of PKG activity in a brainstem slice preparation could alter the thermosensitivity of the fictive neonatal mouse respiratory rhythm. We report a striking effect following alteration of PKG activity in the brainstem such that slices treated with the PKG inhibitor KT5823 recovered fictive respiratory rhythm generation significantly faster than control slices and slices treated with a PKG activator (8-Br-cGMP). Furthermore, slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP arrested fictive respiration at a significantly lower temperature than all other treatment groups. In a separate set of experiments we examined if altered PKG activity could regulate the response of slices to hypoxia by altering the protective switch to fictive gasping. Slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP did not switch to the fictive gasp-like pattern following exposure to hypoxia whereas slices treated with KT5823 did display fictive gasping. We propose that PKG activity inversely regulates the amount of stress the neonatal mammalian respiratory rhythm can endure. PMID:19945442

  15. Bursts of beta oscillation differentiate postperformance activity in the striatum and motor cortex of monkeys performing movement tasks

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Joseph; Gibson, Daniel J.; DePasquale, Brian; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of neural oscillations in the beta band (13–30 Hz) have demonstrated modulations in beta-band power associated with sensory and motor events on time scales of 1 s or more, and have shown that these are exaggerated in Parkinson’s disease. However, even early reports of beta activity noted extremely fleeting episodes of beta-band oscillation lasting <150 ms. Because the interpretation of possible functions for beta-band oscillations depends strongly on the time scale over which they occur, and because of these oscillations’ potential importance in Parkinson’s disease and related disorders, we analyzed in detail the distributions of duration and power for beta-band activity in a large dataset recorded in the striatum and motor-premotor cortex of macaque monkeys performing reaching tasks. Both regions exhibited typical beta-band suppression during movement and postmovement rebounds of up to 3 s as viewed in data averaged across trials, but single-trial analysis showed that most beta oscillations occurred in brief bursts, commonly 90–115 ms long. In the motor cortex, the burst probabilities peaked following the last movement, but in the striatum, the burst probabilities peaked at task end, after reward, and continued through the postperformance period. Thus, what appear to be extended periods of postperformance beta-band synchronization reflect primarily the modulated densities of short bursts of synchrony occurring in region-specific and task-time-specific patterns. We suggest that these short-time-scale events likely underlie the functions of most beta-band activity, so that prolongation of these beta episodes, as observed in Parkinson’s disease, could produce deleterious network-level signaling. PMID:26460033

  16. How long does a burst burst?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S.; Zhang, Bing; Murase, Kohta

    2014-05-20

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (∼hours) in γ-rays than typical long GRBs (∼minutes), and it has recently been proposed that these 'ultra-long GRBs' may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g., blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations suggest that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with X-Ray Telescope observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to determine whether ultra-long GRBs are unusual events. We define burst duration t {sub burst} based on both γ-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using γ-ray observations alone. We find that t {sub burst} can be reliably measured in 343 GRBs. Within this 'good' sample, 21.9% GRBs have t {sub burst} ≳ 10{sup 3} s and 11.5% GRBs have t {sub burst} ≳ 10{sup 4} s. There is an apparent bimodal distribution of t {sub burst} in this sample. However, when we consider an 'undetermined' sample (304 GRBs) with t {sub burst} possibly falling in the gap between GRB duration T {sub 90} and the first X-ray observational time, as well as a selection effect against t {sub burst} falling into the first Swift orbital 'dead zone' due to observation constraints, the intrinsic underlying t {sub burst} distribution is consistent with being a single component distribution. We found that the existing evidence for a separate ultra-long GRB population is inconclusive, and further multi-wavelength observations are needed to draw a firmer conclusion. We also discuss the theoretical implications of our results. In particular, the central engine activity duration of GRBs is generally much longer than the γ-ray T {sub 90} duration and it does not even correlate with T {sub 90}. It would be premature to make a direct connection between T {sub 90} and the size of the progenitor star.

  17. Ulysses observations of wave activity at interplanetary shocks and implications for type II radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel-Frey, D. |; Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.J.; Stone, R.G.; Phillips, J.L. |

    1997-02-01

    We present the first quantitative investigation of interplanetary type II radio emission in which in situ waves measured at interplanetary shocks are used to compute radio wave intensities for comparison with type II observations. This study is based on in situ measurements of 42 in-ecliptic forward shocks as well as 10 intervals of type II emission observed by the Ulysses spacecraft between 1 AU and 5 AU. The analysis involves comparisons of statistical properties of type II bursts and in situ waves. Most of the 42 shocks are associated with the occurrence of electrostatic waves near the time of shock passage at Ulysses. These waves, which are identified as electron plasma waves and ion acoustic-like waves, are typically most intense several minutes before shock passage. This suggests that wave-wave interactions might be of importance in electromagnetic wave generation and that type II source regions are located immediately upstream of the shocks. We use the in situ wave measurements to compute type II brightness temperatures, assuming that emission at the fundamental of the electron plasma frequency is generated by the merging of electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves or the decay of electron plasma waves into ion acoustic and transverse waves. Second harmonic emission is assumed to be produced by the merging of electron plasma waves. The latter mechanism requires that a portion of the electron plasma wave distribution is backscattered, presumably by density inhomogeneities in regions of observed ion acoustic wave activity. The computed type II brightness temperatures are found to be consistent with observed values for both fundamental and second harmonic emission, assuming that strong ({approx_equal}10{sup {minus}4}V/m) electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves are coincident and that the electron plasma waves have phase velocities less than about 10 times the electron thermal velocity. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. FAST OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF A NAKED-EYE BURST-MANIFESTATION OF THE PERIODIC ACTIVITY OF AN INTERNAL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Bondar, S.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Piccioni, A.

    2010-08-10

    We imaged the position of the naked-eye burst, GRB080319B, before, during, and after its gamma-ray activity with sub-second temporal resolution using the TORTORA wide-field camera. The burst optical prompt emission, which reached 5.3 mag, has been detected, and its periodic optical variability has been discovered in the form of four equidistant flashes with a duration of several seconds. We also detected a strong correlation (r {approx} 0.82) between optical and gamma-ray light curves with a 2 s delay of the optical emission with respect to the gamma-ray emission. The revealed temporal structure of the optical light curve in comparison with the gamma-ray light curve can be interpreted in the framework of the model of shell collisions in the ejecta containing a significant neutron component. All observed emission features reflect the non-stationary behavior of the burst internal engine-supposedly, a hyperaccreting solar-mass black hole formed in the collapse of a massive stellar core.

  19. Effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and respiratory muscles activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Jintae; Park, Soojin; Kim, Youngju; Choi, Yeonsung; Lyu, Hyeonnam

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and deep breathing. [Subjects] Twenty-six subjects, divided into the two groups (normal and forward head posture groups), participated in this study. [Methods] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were measured using respiratory function instrumentation that met the American Thoracic Society's recommendation for diagnostic spirometry. Accessory respiratory muscle activity during deep breathing was measured by electromyography. A Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the measure variables between the normal and forward head posture group. [Results] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were significantly lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. Accessory respiratory muscle activity was also lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. In particular, the sternocleidomastoid and pectoralis major activity of the forward head posture group was significantly lower than that of normal group. Activities of the other muscles were generally decreased with forward head posture, but were not significantly different between the two groups. [Conclusion] These results indicate that forward head posture could reduce vital capacity, possibly because of weakness or disharmony of the accessory respiratory muscles. PMID:26957743

  20. A longitudinal study of poor performance and subclinical respiratory viral activity in Standardbred trotters

    PubMed Central

    Back, Helena; Penell, Johanna; Pringle, John; Isaksson, Mats; Ronéus, Nils; Treiberg Berndtsson, Louise; Ståhl, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While clinical respiratory disease is considered a main cause of poor performance in horses, the role of subclinical respiratory virus infections is less clear and needs further investigation. Aims and objectives In this descriptive longitudinal study the relationship of markers of subclinical respiratory viral activity to occurrence of poor performance in racing Standardbred trotters was investigated. Material and methods 66 elite Standardbred trotters were followed for 13 months by nasal swabs analysed with qPCR for equine influenza virus, equine arteritis virus, equine rhinitis B virus (ERBV), equine herpesvirus type 1(EHV-1) and equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) and serology to equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV), ERBV, EHV-1 and EHV-4, as well as the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA). Findings on lab analyses were subsequently assessed for possible correlations to workload performance and trainer opinion measures of poor performance. Results Despite occurrence of poor performance and subclinical viral activity the authors were unable to detect association neither between subclinical viral activity and poor performance, nor between SAA elevations and either viral activity or poor performance. Conclusions Consistent with earlier study results, antibody titres to ERBV remained high for at least a year and few horses two years or older were seronegative to either ERAV or ERBV. In absence of clinical signs, serology to common respiratory viruses appears to have little diagnostic benefit in evaluation of poor performance in young athletic horses. PMID:26392904

  1. Altered intrinsic properties and bursting activities of neurons in layer IV of somatosensory cortex from Fmr-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linming; Liang, Zhanrong; Zhu, Pingping; Li, Meng; Yi, Yong-Hong; Liao, Wei-Ping; Su, Tao

    2016-06-01

    Neuroadaptations and alterations in neuronal excitability are critical in brain maturation and many neurological diseases. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by extensive synaptic and circuit dysfunction. It is still unclear about the alterations in intrinsic excitability of individual neurons and their link to hyperexcitable circuitry. In this study, whole cell patch-clamp recordings were employed to characterize the membrane and firing properties of layer IV cells in slices of the somatosensory cortex of Fmr-1 knockout (KO) mice. These cells generally exhibited a regular spiking (RS) pattern, while there were significant increases in the number of cells that adopted intrinsic bursting (IB) compared with age-matched wild type (WT) cells. The cells subgrouped according to their firing patterns and maturation differed significantly in membrane and discharge properties between KO and WT. The changes in the intrinsic properties were consistent with highly facilitated discharges in KO cells induced by current injection. Spontaneous activities of RS neurons driven by local network were also increased in the KO cells, especially in neonate groups. Under an epileptiform condition mimicked by omission of Mg(2+) in extracellular solution, these RS neurons from KO mice were more likely to switch to burst discharges. Analysis on bursts revealed that the KO cells tended to form burst discharges and even severe events manifested as seizure-like ictal discharges. These results suggest that alterations in intrinsic properties in individual neurons are involved in the abnormal excitability of cortical circuitry and possibly account for the pathogenesis of epilepsy in FXS. PMID:27048919

  2. Number of transients/Q-bursts in ELF-band as possible criterion for global thunderstorm activity estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondraskova, Adriena; Sevcik, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Schumann resonances (SR) are resonant electromagnetic oscillations in extremely low frequency band (ELF, 3 Hz - 3 kHz), which arise in the Earth-ionosphere cavity due to lightning activity in planetary range. The time records in the ELF-band consist of background signals and ELF transients/Q-bursts superimposed on the background exceeding it by a factor of 5 - 10. The former are produced by the common worldwide thunderstorm activity (100 - 150 events per second), the latter origin from individual intense distant lightning discharges (100 - 120 powerful strokes per hour). A Q-burst is produced by a combination of direct and antipodal pulses and the decisive factor for its shape follows from the source-to-observer distance (SOD). Diurnal/seasonal variations of global thunderstorm activity can be deduced from spectral amplitudes of SR modes. Here we focus on diurnal/seasonal variations of the number of ELF-transients assuming that it is another way of lightning activity estimation. To search for transients, our own code was applied to the SR vertical electric component measured in October 2004 - December 2008 at the Astronomical and Geophysical Observatory of FMPI CU, Slovakia. Limits (min-max) for the width of primary spike, time difference between primary and secondary spike and the amplitude of the spike were chosen as criteria for the identification of the burst. Cumulative spectral amplitude of the first three SR modes compared with number of ELF-transients in monthly averaged diurnal variations quite successfully confirmed, that the number of transients can be a suitable criterion for the quantification of global lightning activity.

  3. [Respiratory behavior].

    PubMed

    Gallego, J; Gaultier, C

    2000-02-01

    The notion of respiratory behaviour is grounded, among other approaches, on studies of neuronal mechanisms of voluntary breathing, clinical data, conditioning experiments and respiratory sensations. The interactions between cortical centres of voluntary breathing and respiratory neurones in the brain stem are poorly understood: voluntary control operates through the direct action of corticomotor centres on respiratory motoneurones; however these cortical structures may directly act on bulbopontine centres, and therefore indirectly on respiratory motoneurones. Recordings in animals of brain stem neuronal activity, brain imaging in humans, and transcortical stimulation of the diaphragm in humans and in animal models support either one or the other hypothesis. The mutual independence of the automatic and the voluntary controls of breathing appears in patients with impaired bulbopontine automatism and operational voluntary control (Central Congenital Hypoventilation Syndrome), and in patients with the reverse impairment (locked-in syndrome). Finally, recent studies in humans and animals show that classical conditioning affects respiratory control and sensations. PMID:10756555

  4. Selectivity Across the Interface: A Test of Surface Activity in the Composition of Organic-Enriched Aerosols from Bubble Bursting.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Richard E; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stone, Elizabeth A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-05-01

    Although theories have been developed that describe surface activity of organic molecules at the air-water interface, few studies have tested how surface activity impacts the selective transfer of molecules from solution phase into the aerosol phase during bubble bursting. The selective transfer of a series of organic compounds that differ in their solubility and surface activity from solution into the aerosol phase is quantified experimentally for the first time. Aerosol was produced from solutions containing salts and a series of linear carboxlyates (LCs) and dicarboxylates (LDCs) using a bubble bursting process. Surface activity of these molecules dominated the transport across the interface, with enrichment factors of the more surface-active C4-C8 LCs (55 ± 8) being greater than those of C4-C8 LDCs (5 ± 1). Trends in the estimated surface concentrations of LCs at the liquid-air interface agreed well with their relative concentrations in the aerosol phase. In addition, enrichment of LCs was followed by enrichment of calcium with respect to other inorganic cations and depletion of chloride and sulfate. PMID:27093579

  5. Noninvasively measuring respiratory activity of rat primary hepatocyte spheroids by scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Zhou, Yuanshu; Horiguchi, Yoshiko; Shiku, Hitoshi; Sonoda, Hiroshi; Itabashi, Naoshi; Yamamoto, Jiro; Saito, Taku; Matsue, Tomokazu; Hisada, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    Construction of an in vitro drug screening method for evaluating drug metabolism and toxicity by using cells is required instead of the conventional in vivo one that uses animals. In order to realize the in vitro study, analyzing the cellular activity or viability noninvasively in advance of the screening is essential. The aim of the current study is to establish a method that can evaluate the cellular activity depending on spheroid sizes by means of oxygen consumption and to determine the valid diameter of hepatocyte spheroids. To measure the respiratory activity of the spheroids, which were formed on a nanopillar sheet, we applied scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). From the viewpoint of high respiratory activity and its small variation, we determined that spheroids with 70 μm in diameter were adequate. We then performed a gene expression analysis by using a real-time PCR to evaluate the correlation with respiratory activity. As a result, a higher expression level of Hnf4α, which is essential for hepatocytes to fulfill many liver functions and is the indicator of well-differentiated hepatocytes, showed relatively higher respiratory activity. We concluded that the noninvasive SECM technique could evaluate the cellular activity of a single spheroid. Noninvasively measuring cellular activity by SECM makes it possible to evaluate the cellular activity prior to a nonclinical test and enables the continued monitoring of the drug response by using single spheroid. SECM becomes a powerful tool to satisfying the increasing demand for an in vitro system in the course of new drug development. PMID:23890543

  6. Comprehensive measurement of respiratory activity in permeabilized cells using extracellular flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salabei, Joshua K.; Gibb, Andrew A.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular flux (XF) analysis has become a mainstream method to measure bioenergetic function in cells and tissues. While this technique is commonly used to measure energetics in intact cells, we outline here a detailed XF protocol for measuring respiration in permeabilized cells. Cells are permeabilized using saponin, digitonin, or recombinant perfringolysin O (XF PMP reagent) and provided with specific substrates to measure complex I- or II-mediated respiratory activity, Complex III+IV respiratory activity, or Complex IV activity. Medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines or glutamine may also be provided for measuring fatty acid oxidation or glutamine oxidation, respectively. This protocol allows for such measurements using a minimal number of cells compared with other protocols, without the need for mitochondrial isolation. The results are highly reproducible, and mitochondria remain well coupled. Collectively, this protocol provides comprehensive and detailed information regarding mitochondrial activity and efficiency, and, following preparative steps, takes approximately 6 hours to complete. PMID:24457333

  7. Reductive activation of E. coli respiratory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Pierre; Rendon, Julia; Léger, Christophe; Toci, René; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Magalon, Axel; Grimaldi, Stéphane; Fourmond, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Over the past decades, a number of authors have reported the presence of inactive species in as-prepared samples of members of the Mo/W-bisPGD enzyme family. This greatly complicated the spectroscopic studies of these enzymes, since it is impossible to discriminate between active and inactive species on the basis of the spectroscopic signatures alone. Escherichia coli nitrate reductase A (NarGHI) is a member of the Mo/W-bisPGD family that allows anaerobic respiration using nitrate as terminal electron acceptor. Here, using protein film voltammetry on NarGH films, we show that the enzyme is purified in a functionally heterogeneous form that contains between 20 and 40% of inactive species that activate the first time they are reduced. This activation proceeds in two steps: a non-redox reversible reaction followed by an irreversible reduction. By carefully correlating electrochemical and EPR spectroscopic data, we show that neither the two major Mo(V) signals nor those of the two FeS clusters that are the closest to the Mo center are associated with the two inactive species. We also conclusively exclude the possibility that the major "low-pH" and "high-pH" Mo(V) EPR signatures correspond to species in acid-base equilibrium. PMID:26073890

  8. Respiratory responses to passive and active recovery from exercise.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Niizeki, K; Miyamoto, Y

    1997-02-01

    To investigate the effect of the neural components associated with leg movements on the control of ventilation during recovery from exercise, we recorded the minute ventilation (VE), oxygen uptake (VO2), and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) of eight normal volunteers during recovery from moderate, steady-state cycle exercise (170 W). The recovery phases were undergone separately under two different conditions: 5 min of rest (passive recovery) on a bicycle ergometer and 3 min of pedaling at a work rate of 0W (active recovery) followed by 2 min of rest. The phase-1 responses were observed in all the variables studied at the transition of passive recovery but not in the active recovery phase. The kinetics of VCO2, during the off-transition were significantly faster than those of VE in both recoveries, indicating that the decreases in VCO2 could precede the decreases in VE. Although the levels of VE and VCO2 during active recovery were significantly higher than those during passive recovery, the decline in VE was closely proportional to that of VCO2 under both recovery conditions, with resultant indications of similar VE-VCO2 regression lines. These findings suggest that the flux of CO2 to the lungs is an important determinant of ventilatory drive during recovery, and that neither central command nor neural afferents from contracting muscles are requisite for the control of ventilation during recovery from exercise. PMID:9159643

  9. Calcium-activated inward spike after-currents in bursting neurone R15 of Aplysia.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D V

    1988-01-01

    1. Slow inward and outward after-currents follow action potentials in the bursting pacemaker neurone, R 15, of Aplysia californica. These experiments were performed to examine the role of axo-dendritic calcium influx in activating these after currents. 2. Depolarizing voltage-clamp commands issued at the soma were used to elicit the after-currents. The earlier inward depolarizing after-current of DAC was followed by the hyperpolarizing after-current or HAC. The DAC and HAC appeared at a threshold following depolarizing commands in normal sea water, presumably due to triggering of action potentials in inadequately space-clamped axon. In 100 microM-tetrodotoxin (TTX), the after-currents were graded, increasing gradually in amplitude with increasing voltage or duration of the command. 3. After-current amplitudes varied with the holding potential through the range tested, -40 to -80 mV. DACs were maximum at -40 to -50 mV and decreased in amplitude with hyperpolarization. HACs were maximum at -40 mV and decreased with hyperpolarization to disappear between -70 and -80 mV. 4. The dependence of after-currents upon intracellular calcium accumulation during the depolarizing command was tested in several ways. Bathing R15 in 0 Ca2+-2 mM-EGTA (ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid) sea water eliminated the after-currents. Bathing in 1 mM-Ca2+ sea water reduced the DAC by 76% and the HAC by 87% following 10 ms long depolarizations to +40 mV. Application of Mn2+ (25 mM) or La3+ (5 mM) blocked the after-currents. Injection of EGTA intracellularly practically eliminated after-currents. Greatly prolonged depolarizations were required to elicit them after EGTA injection. Substitution of Ba2+ for Ca2+ also eliminated after-currents. 5. Sodium-free sea water eliminated the DAC. The HAC following brief (less than 30 ms) depolarizing commands was also eliminated in zero sodium, although longer commands were followed by an outward tail current. 6. Although the

  10. Respiratory muscle activity and oxygenation during sleep in patients with muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    White, J E; Drinnan, M J; Smithson, A J; Griffiths, C J; Gibson, G J

    1995-05-01

    Patients with respiratory muscle weakness show nocturnal hypoventilation, with oxygen desaturation particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but evidence in individuals with isolated bilateral diaphragmatic paresis (BDP) is conflicting. The effect of sleep on relative activity of the different respiratory muscles of such patients and, consequently, the precise mechanisms causing desaturation have not been clarified. We have studied eight patients, four with generalized muscle weakness and four with isolated BDP during nocturnal sleep with measurements including oxygen saturation and surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of various respiratory muscle groups. Nocturnal oxygenation correlated inversely with postural fall in vital capacity, an index of diaphragmatic strength. During REM sleep, hypopnoea and desaturation occurred particularly during periods of rapid eye movements (phasic REM sleep). In most subjects, such events were "central" in type and associated with marked suppression of intercostal muscle activity, but two subjects had recurrent desaturation due to "obstructive" hypopnoea and/or apnoea. Expiratory activity of the external oblique muscle was present whilst awake and during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in seven of the eight subjects in the semirecumbent posture. This probably represents an "accessory inspiratory" effect, which aids passive caudal diaphragmatic motion as the abdominal muscles relax at the onset of inspiration. Expiratory abdominal muscle activity was suppressed in phasic REM sleep, suggesting that loss of this "accessory inspiratory" effect may contribute to "central" hypopnoea. We conclude that, in patients with muscle weakness, nocturnal oxygenation correlates with diaphragmatic strength.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7656954

  11. Fluctuation analysis-based risk assessment for respiratory virus activity and air pollution associated asthma incidence.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chung-Min; Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Chio, Chia-Pin

    2011-08-15

    Asthma is a growing epidemic worldwide. Exacerbations of asthma have been associated with bacterial and viral respiratory tract infections and air pollution. We correlated the asthma admission rates with fluctuations in respiratory virus activity and traffic-related air pollution, namely particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM₁₀), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO₂), and ozone (O₃). A probabilistic risk assessment framework was developed based on a detrended fluctuation analysis to predict future respiratory virus and air pollutant associated asthma incidence. Results indicated a strong association between asthma admission rate and influenza (r=0.80, p<0.05) and SO₂ level (r=0.73, p<0.05) in Taiwan in the period 2001-2008. No significant correlation was found for asthma admission and PM₁₀, O₃, NO₂, and CO. The proposed fluctuation analysis provides a simple correlation exponent describing the complex interactions of respiratory viruses and air pollutants with asthma. This study revealed that there was a 95% probability of having exceeded 2987 asthma admissions per 100,000 population. It was unlikely (30% probability) that the asthma admission rate exceeded 3492 per 100,000 population. The probability of asthma admission risk can be limited to below 50% by keeping the correlation exponent of influenza to below 0.9. We concluded that fluctuation analysis based risk assessment provides a novel predictor of asthma incidence. PMID:21663946

  12. Unusual Central Engine Activity in the Double Burst GRB 110709B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Burrows, David N.; Zhang, Bing; Meszaros, Peter; Stratta, Giulia; D'Elia, Valerio; Frederiks, Dmitry; Golenetskii, S.; Cummings, Jay R.; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Falcone, Abraham D.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The double burst, GRB 110709B, triggered Swift/BAT twice at 21:32:39 UT and 21:43:45 UT, respectively, on 9 July 2011. This is the first time we observed a GRB with two BAT triggers. In this paper, we present simultaneous Swift and Konus-WIND observations of this unusual GRB and its afterglow. If the two events are from the same physical origin, their different time-dependent spectral evolution suggest they must belong to different episodes of the central engine, which may be a magnetar-to-BH accretion system.

  13. Na+/K+ pump interacts with the h-current to control bursting activity in central pattern generator neurons of leeches

    PubMed Central

    Kueh, Daniel; Barnett, William H; Cymbalyuk, Gennady S; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of different ionic currents shape the bursting activity of neurons and networks that control motor output. Despite being ubiquitous in all animal cells, the contribution of the Na+/K+ pump current to such bursting activity has not been well studied. We used monensin, a Na+/H+ antiporter, to examine the role of the pump on the bursting activity of oscillator heart interneurons in leeches. When we stimulated the pump with monensin, the period of these neurons decreased significantly, an effect that was prevented or reversed when the h-current was blocked by Cs+. The decreased period could also occur if the pump was inhibited with strophanthidin or K+-free saline. Our monensin results were reproduced in model, which explains the pump’s contributions to bursting activity based on Na+ dynamics. Our results indicate that a dynamically oscillating pump current that interacts with the h-current can regulate the bursting activity of neurons and networks. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19322.001 PMID:27588351

  14. Relationship between respiratory mechanics and postinspiratory muscle activity during muscarinic challenge in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Romero, P V; Lopez-Aguilar, J; Zin, W A

    1996-12-01

    In six spontaneously breathing New Zealand rabbits (weight 2.36 +/- 0.29 kg) anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (35 mg/kg i.v.) airflow, tidal volume, and tracheal and esophageal pressures were measured. These allowed the determination of breathing pattern parameters, respiratory system and lung resistances, elastances, and time constants, total postinspiratory muscle pressure and its timing parameters. The measurements were performed: (a) under control conditions; (b) after increasing concentrations of aerosolized methacholine (8, 16, 32, and 64 mg/ml); and (c) after aerosolized atropine (1 mg/ml). Methacholine progressively increased intrinsic mechanical load (resistance and elastance) of the respiratory system. Total postinspiratory muscle pressure (Pmus,0) increased in relation to the increase in elastic load. The duration of postinspiratory activity increased mainly because of the decrease in expiratory time. In conclusion, increase in inspiratory activity during expiration is due to two independent mechanisms controlling the amplitude and the relative duration. PMID:9017847

  15. The Type III Radio Burst Occurrence Rate as a New Solar Activity Index: Rieger-Type periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobzin, V. V.; Cairns, I. H.

    2012-12-01

    The type III radio burst occurrence rate (T3BOR) strongly correlates with solar activity and was recently proposed as a new index of solar activity. This index can provide complementary information and may be useful in different studies including solar cycle predictions and searches for different periodicities in solar activity. The first observations of a Rieger-type periodicity with the period of 156 days in the daily T3BOR are presented. This periodicity was detected during the time interval from 22 June 2000 to 31 December 2003. This interval partially contains maximum and the declining phase of solar cycle 23. The radio spectra were provided by the Learmonth Solar Radio Observatory in Western Australia, part of the USAF Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN).

  16. Pharmacologic Activation of the Innate Immune System to Prevent Respiratory Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guanjun; Fridlender, Zvi G.; Cheng, Guang-Shing; Chen, Bei; Mangalmurti, Nilam S.; Saloura, Vassiliki; Yu, Zaifang; Kapoor, Veena; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Moon, Edmund; Sun, Jing; Kreindler, James L.; Cohen, Noam A.; Caton, Andrew J.; Erikson, Jan; Albelda, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Drugs that can rapidly inhibit respiratory infection from influenza or other respiratory pathogens are needed. One approach is to engage primary innate immune defenses against viral infection, such as activating the IFN pathway. In this study, we report that a small, cell-permeable compound called 5,6-di-methylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) can induce protection against vesicular stomatitis virus in vitro and H1N1 influenza A virus in vitro and in vivo through innate immune activation. Using the mouse C10 bronchial epithelial cell line and primary cultures of nasal epithelial cells, we demonstrate DMXAA activates the IFN regulatory factor-3 pathway leading to production of IFN-β and subsequent high-level induction of IFN-β–dependent proteins, such as myxovirus resistance 1 (Mx1) and 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1). Mice treated with DMXAA intranasally elevate mRNA/protein expression of Mx1 and OAS1 in the nasal mucosa, trachea, and lung. When challenged intranasally with a lethal dose of H1N1 influenza A virus, DMXAA reduced viral titers in the lungs and protected 80% of mice from death, even when given at 24 hours before infection. These data show that agents, like DMXAA, that can directly activate innate immune pathways, such as the IFN regulatory factor-3/IFN-β system, in respiratory epithelial cells can be used to protect from influenza pneumonia and potentially in other respiratory viral infections. Development of this approach in humans could be valuable for protecting health care professionals and “first responders” in the early stages of viral pandemics or bioterror attacks. PMID:21148741

  17. High atmospheric carbon dioxide-dependent alleviation of salt stress is linked to RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE 1 (RBOH1)-dependent H2O2 production in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Changyu; Yao, Kaiqian; Cai, Shuyu; Li, Huizi; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiaojian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan; Foyer, Christine Helen; Zhou, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    Plants acclimate rapidly to stressful environmental conditions. Increasing atmospheric CO2 levels are predicted to influence tolerance to stresses such as soil salinity but the mechanisms are poorly understood. To resolve this issue, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were grown under ambient (380 μmol mol–1) or high (760 μmol mol–1) CO2 in the absence or presence of sodium chloride (100mM). The higher atmospheric CO2 level induced the expression of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE 1 (SlRBOH1) and enhanced H2O2 accumulation in the vascular cells of roots, stems, leaf petioles, and the leaf apoplast. Plants grown with higher CO2 levels showed improved salt tolerance, together with decreased leaf transpiration rates and lower sodium concentrations in the xylem sap, vascular tissues, and leaves. Silencing SlRBOH1 abolished high CO2 -induced salt tolerance and increased leaf transpiration rates, as well as enhancing Na+ accumulation in the plants. The higher atmospheric CO2 level increased the abundance of a subset of transcripts involved in Na+ homeostasis in the controls but not in the SlRBOH1-silenced plants. It is concluded that high atmospheric CO2 concentrations increase salt stress tolerance in an apoplastic H2O2 dependent manner, by suppressing transpiration and hence Na+ delivery from the roots to the shoots, leading to decreased leaf Na+ accumulation. PMID:26417022

  18. Hypoxia-Mediated Impairment of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Inhibits the Bactericidal Activity of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Melanie; Gerlach, Roman G.; Popp, Isabel; Matuszak, Jasmin; Mahapatro, Mousumi; Castiglione, Kirstin; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Willam, Carsten; Hensel, Michael; Bogdan, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In infected tissues oxygen tensions are low. As innate immune cells have to operate under these conditions, we analyzed the ability of macrophages (Mϕ) to kill Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus in a hypoxic microenvironment. Oxygen restriction did not promote intracellular bacterial growth but did impair the bactericidal activity of the host cells against both pathogens. This correlated with a decreased production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and reactive nitrogen intermediates. Experiments with phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX) and inducible NO synthase (NOS2) double-deficient Mϕ revealed that in E. coli- or S. aureus-infected cells the reduced antibacterial activity during hypoxia was either entirely or partially independent of the diminished PHOX and NOS2 activity. Hypoxia impaired the mitochondrial activity of infected Mϕ. Inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity during normoxia (using rotenone or antimycin A) completely or partially mimicked the defective antibacterial activity observed in hypoxic E. coli- or S. aureus-infected wild-type Mϕ, respectively. Accordingly, inhibition of the respiratory chain of S. aureus-infected, normoxic PHOX−/− NOS2−/− Mϕ further raised the bacterial burden of the cells, which reached the level measured in hypoxic PHOX−/− NOS2−/− Mϕ cultures. Our data demonstrate that the reduced killing of S. aureus or E. coli during hypoxia is not simply due to a lack of PHOX and NOS2 activity but partially or completely results from an impaired mitochondrial antibacterial effector function. Since pharmacological inhibition of the respiratory chain raised the generation of ROI but nevertheless phenocopied the effect of hypoxia, ROI can be excluded as the mechanism underlying the antimicrobial activity of mitochondria. PMID:22252868

  19. Relation Between Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Respiratory Rate During Mental Stress Tasks: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuta; Hu, Lizhen; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    In order to clarify the central mechanism controlling respiratory rate during mental stress, we examined the relation between prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity and respiratory rate during mental arithmetic (MA) tasks. Employing two-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), we measured hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes in the bilateral PFC during MA tasks in normal adults. To evaluate asymmetry of the PFC activity, we calculated the laterality index (LI); (R-L)/(R + L) of oxy-Hb concentration changes (R = right, L = left); positive LI scores indicate right-dominant activity, while negative scores indicate left-dominant activity. For measurements of respiratory rate, we employed a Kinect motion sensor (Microsoft). The MA tasks increased both oxy-Hb in the bilateral PFC and respiratory rate (p < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between LI and respiratory rate (r = 0.582, p < 0.02). These results indicate that the MA-induced activity in the right PFC was greater than that in the left PFC in subjects with large increases of respiratory rate, suggesting that the right PFC has a greater role in cerebral regulation of respiratory rate during mental stress. PMID:27526145

  20. Alterations in enterocyte mitochondrial respiratory function and enzyme activities in gastrointestinal dysfunction following brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ke-Jun; Huang, Hong; Chu, Hui; Yu, Hang; Zhang, Shi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the alterations in rat enterocyte mitochondrial respiratory function and enzyme activities following traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHODS: Fifty-six male SD rats were randomly divided into seven groups (8 rats in each group): a control group (rats with sham operation) and traumatic brain injury groups at 6, 12, 24 h, days 2, 3, and 7 after operation. TBI models were induced by Feendy’s free-falling method. Mitochondrial respiratory function (respiratory control ratio and ADP/O ratio) was measured with a Clark oxygen electrode. The activities of respiratory chain complex I-IV and related enzymes were determined by spectrophotometry. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio (RCR) declined at 6 h and remained at a low level until day 7 after TBI (control, 5.42 ± 0.46; 6 h, 5.20 ± 0.18; 12 h, 4.55 ± 0.35; 24 h, 3.75 ± 0.22; 2 d, 4.12 ± 0.53; 3 d, 3.45 ± 0.41; 7 d, 5.23 ± 0.24, P < 0.01). The value of phosphate-to-oxygen (P/O) significantly decreased at 12, 24 h, day 2 and day 3, respectively (12 h, 3.30 ± 0.10; 24 h, 2.61 ± 0.21; 2 d, 2.95 ± 0.18; 3 d, 2.76 ± 0.09, P < 0.01) compared with the control group (3.46 ± 0.12). Two troughs of mitochondrial respiratory function were seen at 24 h and day 3 after TBI. The activities of mitochondrial complex I (6 h: 110 ± 10, 12 h: 115 ± 12, 24 h: 85 ± 9, day 2: 80 ± 15, day 3: 65 ± 16, P < 0.01) and complex II (6 h: 105 ± 8, 12 h: 110 ± 92, 24 h: 80 ± 10, day 2: 76 ± 8, day 3: 68 ± 12, P < 0.01) were increased at 6 h and 12 h following TBI, and then significantly decreased at 24 h, day 2 and day 3, respectively. However, there were no differences in complex I and II activities between the control and TBI groups. Furthermore, pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity was significantly decreased at 6 h and continued up to 7 d after TBI compared with the control group (6 h: 90 ± 8, 12 h: 85 ± 10, 24 h: 65 ± 12, day 2: 60 ± 9, day 3: 55

  1. Change and Stability in Active and Passive Social Influence Dynamics during Natural Drinking Events: A Longitudinal Measurement-Burst Study

    PubMed Central

    Cullum, Jerry; O’Grady, Megan; Armeli, Stephen; Tennen, Howard

    2011-01-01

    We examined the link between social norms and active social influences occurring during natural social drinking contexts. Across 4 yearly measurement-bursts, college students (N = 523) reported daily for 30-day periods on drinking norms, drinking offers, how many drinks they accepted, and personal drinking levels during social drinking events. In contexts where drinking norms were higher, students were more likely to both receive and comply with drinking offers. These acute social influences were highly stable throughout college, but affected men and women differently across time: Women received more drinking offers than men, especially at the beginning of college and when norms were higher, but men complied with more drinking offers per occasion. These effects were not attributable to between-person differences in social drinking motives or drinking levels, nor to within-person patterns of situation-selection. The present work suggests that context-specific drinking norms catalyze active social influence attempts, and further promote compliance drinking. PMID:22661826

  2. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect. PMID:26584054

  3. Preventing severe respiratory syncytial virus disease: passive, active immunisation and new antivirals.

    PubMed

    Murray, Joanna; Saxena, Sonia; Sharland, Mike

    2014-05-01

    In most high-income countries palivizumab prophylaxis is considered safe, efficacious and cost-effective for preventing respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospital admissions among specific subgroups of infants born preterm, with chronic lung disease or with congenital heart disease. Virtually all babies acquire RSV during infancy and previously healthy babies are not eligible to receive palivizumab. Emerging evidence suggests some benefit of palivizumab use in reducing recurrent wheeze among infants born preterm. Better longitudinal studies are needed to examine its clinical and cost-effectiveness on recurrent and chronic respiratory illness and associated healthcare burden on resources in the community and hospitals. Since 99% of child deaths attributed to RSV occur in resource poor countries where expensive prophylaxis is not available or affordable, palivizumab has limited potential to impact on the current global burden of RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). A range of candidate vaccines for active immunisation against RSV are now in clinical trials. Two promising new antivirals are also currently in phase I/II trials to test their effectiveness in preventing severe RSV LRTI. These agents may be effective in preventing severe disease and phase III studies are in development. In the absence of effective active immunisation against RSV infection, population level approaches to prevent severe RSV LRTI should continue to focus on reducing prenatal and environmental risk factors including prematurity, smoking and improving hygiene practices. PMID:24464977

  4. Sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract in patients with active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smiéjan, J M; Cosnes, J; Chollet-Martin, S; Soler, P; Basset, F M; Le Quintrec, Y; Hance, A J

    1986-01-01

    To re-evaluate the relationship between Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis, we compared the numbers and types of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from normal volunteers and patients with Crohn's disease, with other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, and with sarcoidosis. Patients with Crohn's disease, but not patients with other inflammatory bowel disorders, had an increase in the number of T lymphocytes on the surface of the lower respiratory tract similar to that seen in patients with sarcoidosis. As in sarcoidosis, this lymphocytosis results from an expansion of the T4+ T-lymphocyte subset, is characteristic of patients with active disease only, and is not associated with similar abnormalities in the peripheral blood. Thus, patients with apparently localized Crohn's disease have sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract, a finding that emphasizes the systemic nature of Crohn's disease and the disorder's close relationship to sarcoidosis. PMID:3940500

  5. The corpus callosum modulates spindle-burst activity within homotopic regions of somatosensory cortex in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Marcano-Reik, Amy Jo; Blumberg, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The corpus callosum, a major interhemispheric fiber tract, mediates communication between homotopic regions within the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Recently, in 1- to 6-day-old rats, brief bursts of oscillatory activity - called spindle-bursts (SBs) - were described in cortical somatosensory areas following sensory feedback from sleep-related myoclonic twitches or specific peripheral stimulation. To determine whether interhemispheric communication via the corpus callosum modulates the expression of SBs during this early period of development, we investigated the spontaneous expression of SBs in unanesthetized 1- to 6-day-old rats as well as SBs evoked by plantar surface stimulation of the forepaw. We hypothesized that surgically disrupting transcallosal communication (i.e. with callosotomy) or unilateral pharmacological manipulation of S1 activity (e.g. by blocking muscarinic receptors) would alter S1 activity in one or both hemispheres. First, callosotomy doubled the rate of spontaneous, twitch-related SBs in left and right S1s by reducing the interval between successive SBs. Second, unilateral infusion into the left S1 of the muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine, inhibited SBs in response to right forepaw stimulation; importantly, SBs were now disinhibited in the right S1 to right forepaw stimulation, thus 'unmasking' an ipsilateral representation. Subsequent callosotomy reinstated contralateral SB responses in the left S1. Finally, tactile and proprioceptive stimulation produced dissociable neurophysiological S1 responses; specifically, SBs were produced in response to proprioceptive, but not tactile, stimulation. We conclude that the corpus callosum modulates functionally inhibitory interactions between homotopic regions in left and right S1s during the early developmental period when organized neurophysiological activity is first detected in the neocortex. PMID:18973571

  6. The Stored Energy of Gravitational Collapse Powers Gamma Ray Bursts, Active Galactic Nuclei and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greyber, Howard

    2004-05-01

    The recent discovery of almost 100% polarization of the prompt gamma ray emission from GRB021206 (1) confirms my ````Strong'' Magnetic Field'' model (SMF). In SMF, Storage Ring (SR) particles were accelerated during the gravitational collapse of the pregalactic/prequasar plasma that is permeated by a large-scale primordial magnetic field (2.3). The enormous, intense, slender, relativistic, stable, coherent Astrophysical Storage Ring stores a small fraction of the gravitational collapse energy in an almost radiationless state, unless disturbed. Galactic morphology varies as the ratio of magnetic energy to rotational energy in each object. GRB are due to a ``rock'' i.e. white dwarf,ordinary star,neutron star,planet,etc. falling through the SR and being rapidly vaporized into a hot plasma fireball. The fireball speeds on into the huge organized magnetic field surrounding the current ring, thus generating very highly polarized prompt gamma ray emission from the synchrotron radiation process. The timing fits the GRB observations. A ``rock'' racing at 1000 km/sec across a 20,000 km path in the beam produces a twenty second burst. Tracking across a short chord yields a short burst. Typical currents in space are sometimes made of many slender filaments. Thus the puzzling less than one millisecond spikes observed in some GRB are simply describing the structure of that particular SR at that time. 1. W. Coburn & S. E. Boggs, Nature 423, 425 (2003) 2. H. D. Greyber in After the Dark Ages:When Galaxies Were Young, AIP Conf. Proc. 470, eds. S. Holt & E. Smith, (1998) 3. H. D. Greyber in a Space Telescope Science Institute Report from their 2001 Spring Symposium, ``The Dark Universe: Matter, Energy and Gravity'', ed. Mario Livio, published March 2003.

  7. Cardio-respiratory and daily activity monitor based on FMCW Doppler radar embedded in a wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Postolache, Octavian; Girão, Pedro Silva; Postolache, Gabriela; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Unobtrusive monitoring of the cardio-respiratory and daily activity for wheelchair users became nowadays an important challenge, considering population aging phenomena and the increasing of the elderly with chronic diseases that affect their motion capabilities. This work reports the utilization of FMCW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar sensors embedded in a manual wheelchair to measure the cardiac and respiratory activities and the physical activity of the wheelchair user. Another radar sensor is included in the system in order to quantify the motor activity through the wheelchair traveled distance, when the user performs the manual operation of the wheelchair. A conditioning circuit including active filters and a microcontroller based primary processing module was designed and implemented to deliver the information through Bluetooth communication protocol to an Android OS tablet computer. The main capabilities of the software developed using Android SDK and Java were the signal processing of Doppler radar measurement channel signals, graphical user interface, data storage and Wi-Fi data synchronization with remote physiological and physical activity database. PMID:22254706

  8. TMPRSS2 Isoform 1 Activates Respiratory Viruses and Is Expressed in Viral Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zmora, Pawel; Moldenhauer, Anna-Sophie; Hofmann-Winkler, Heike; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The cellular protease TMPRSS2 cleaves and activates the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and TMPRSS2 expression is essential for viral spread and pathogenesis in mice. Moreover, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and other respiratory viruses are activated by TMPRSS2. However, previous studies on viral activation by TMPRSS2 focused on a 492 amino acids comprising form of the protein (isoform 2) while other TMPRSS2 isoforms, generated upon alternative splicing of the tmprss2 mRNA, have not been characterized. Here, we show that the mRNA encoding a TMPRSS2 isoform with an extended N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (isoform 1) is expressed in lung-derived cell lines and tissues. Moreover, we demonstrate that TMPRSS2 isoform 1 colocalizes with HA and cleaves and activates HA. Finally, we show that isoform 1 activates the SARS-CoV spike protein for cathepsin L-independent entry into target cells. Our results indicate that TMPRSS2 isoform 1 is expressed in viral target cells and might contribute to viral activation in the host. PMID:26379044

  9. Participation of a persistent sodium current and calcium-activated nonspecific cationic current to burst generation in trigeminal principal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Tsuruyama, Kentaro; Hsiao, Chie-Fang; Chandler, Scott H

    2013-10-01

    The properties of neurons participating in masticatory rhythmogenesis are not clearly understood. Neurons within the dorsal trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (dPrV) are potential candidates as components of the masticatory central pattern generator (CPG). The present study examines in detail the ionic mechanisms controlling burst generation in dPrV neurons in rat (postnatal day 8-12) brain stem slices using whole cell and perforated patch-clamp methods. Nominal extracellular Ca(2+) concentration transformed tonic discharge in response to a maintained step pulse of current into rhythmical bursting in 38% of nonbursting neurons. This change in discharge mode was suppressed by riluzole, a persistent Na(+) current (INaP) antagonist. Veratridine, which suppresses the Na(+) channel inactivation mechanism, induced rhythmical bursting in nonbursting neurons in normal artificial cerebrospinal fluid, suggesting that INaP contributes to burst generation. Nominal extracellular Ca(2+) exposed a prominent afterdepolarizing potential (ADP) following a single spike induced by a 3-ms current pulse, which was suppressed, but not completely blocked, by riluzole. Application of BAPTA, a Ca(2+) chelator, intracellularly, or flufenamic acid, a Ca(2+)-activated nonspecific cationic channel (ICAN) antagonist, extracellularly to the bath, suppressed rhythmical bursting and the postspike ADP. Application of drugs to alter Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum also suppressed bursting. Finally, voltage-clamp methods demonstrated that nominal Ca(2+) facilitated INaP and induced ICAN. These data demonstrate for the first time that the previously observed induction in dPrV neurons of rhythmical bursting in nominal Ca(2+) is mediated by enhancement of INaP and onset of ICAN, which are dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). PMID:23883859

  10. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein ion channel activity promotes virus fitness and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; DeDiego, Marta L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  11. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Ion Channel Activity Promotes Virus Fitness and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M.; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  12. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Possesses an Antiviral Activity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools. PMID:24878741

  13. Mitochondrial Respiratory Pathways Inhibition in Rhizopus oryzae Potentiates Activity of Posaconazole and Itraconazole via Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has increased drastically in immunocompromised patients. Also the array of targets whose inhibition results in Mucorales death is limited. Recently, researchers identified mitochondria as important regulators of detoxification and virulence mechanisms in fungi. In this context, targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain may provide a new platform for antifungal development. We hypothesized that targeting respiratory pathways potentiates triazoles activity via apoptosis. We found that simultaneous administration of antimycin A (AA) and benzohydroxamate (BHAM), inhibitors of classical and alternative mitochondrial pathways respectively, resulted in potent activity of posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) against Rhizopus oryzae. We observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in R. oryzae cells treated with PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM. The fungicidal activity of this combination against R. oryzae was correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and increased caspase like activity. DNA fragmentation and condensation assays also revealed apoptosis of R. oryzae cells. These apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM makes R. oryzae exquisitely sensitive to treatment with triazoles via apoptosis. This strategy may serve as a new model for the development of improved or novel antifungal agents. PMID:23696824

  14. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  15. Comprehensive measurement of respiratory activity in permeabilized cells using extracellular flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Salabei, Joshua K; Gibb, Andrew A; Hill, Bradford G

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular flux (XF) analysis has become a mainstream method for measuring mitochondrial function in cells and tissues. Although this technique is commonly used to measure bioenergetics in intact cells, we outline here a detailed XF protocol for measuring respiration in permeabilized cells. Cells are permeabilized using saponin (SAP), digitonin (DIG) or recombinant perfringolysin O (rPFO) (XF-plasma membrane permeabilizer (PMP) reagent), and they are provided with specific substrates to measure complex I- or complex II-mediated respiratory activity, complex III+IV respiratory activity or complex IV activity. Medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines or glutamine may also be provided for measuring fatty acid (FA) oxidation or glutamine oxidation, respectively. This protocol uses a minimal number of cells compared with other protocols and does not require isolation of mitochondria. The results are highly reproducible, and mitochondria remain well coupled. Collectively, this protocol provides comprehensive and detailed information regarding mitochondrial activity and efficiency, and, after preparative steps, it takes 6-8 h to complete. PMID:24457333

  16. Mitochondrial respiratory pathways inhibition in Rhizopus oryzae potentiates activity of posaconazole and itraconazole via apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has increased drastically in immunocompromised patients. Also the array of targets whose inhibition results in Mucorales death is limited. Recently, researchers identified mitochondria as important regulators of detoxification and virulence mechanisms in fungi. In this context, targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain may provide a new platform for antifungal development. We hypothesized that targeting respiratory pathways potentiates triazoles activity via apoptosis. We found that simultaneous administration of antimycin A (AA) and benzohydroxamate (BHAM), inhibitors of classical and alternative mitochondrial pathways respectively, resulted in potent activity of posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) against Rhizopus oryzae. We observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in R. oryzae cells treated with PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM. The fungicidal activity of this combination against R. oryzae was correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and increased caspase like activity. DNA fragmentation and condensation assays also revealed apoptosis of R. oryzae cells. These apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM makes R. oryzae exquisitely sensitive to treatment with triazoles via apoptosis. This strategy may serve as a new model for the development of improved or novel antifungal agents. PMID:23696824

  17. Muscle Transcriptional Profile Based on Muscle Fiber, Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity, and Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Du, Yang; Trakooljul, Nares; Brand, Bodo; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly metabolically active tissue that both stores and consumes energy. Important biological pathways that affect energy metabolism and metabolic fiber type in muscle cells may be identified through transcriptomic profiling of the muscle, especially ante mortem. Here, gene expression was investigated in malignant hyperthermia syndrome (MHS)-negative Duroc and Pietrian (PiNN) pigs significantly differing for the muscle fiber types slow-twitch-oxidative fiber (STO) and fast-twitch-oxidative fiber (FTO) as well as mitochondrial activity (succinate-dependent state 3 respiration rate). Longissimus muscle samples were obtained 24 h before slaughter and profiled using cDNA microarrays. Differential gene expression between Duroc and PiNN muscle samples were associated with protein ubiquitination, stem cell pluripotency, amyloid processing, and 3-phosphoinositide biosynthesis and degradation pathways. In addition, weighted gene co-expression network analysis within both breeds identified several co-expression modules that were associated with the proportion of different fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and ATP metabolism. In particular, Duroc results revealed strong correlations between mitochondrion-associated co-expression modules and STO (r = 0.78), fast-twitch glycolytic fiber (r = -0.98), complex I (r=0.72) and COX activity (r = 0.86). Other pathways in the protein-kinase-activity enriched module were positively correlated with STO (r=0.93), while negatively correlated with FTO (r = -0.72). In contrast to PiNN, co-expression modules enriched in macromolecule catabolic process, actin cytoskeleton, and transcription activator activity were associated with fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and metabolic enzyme activities. Our results highlight the importance of mitochondria for the oxidative capacity of porcine muscle and for breed-dependent molecular pathways in muscle cell fibers. PMID:26681915

  18. Influence of morphine on respiratory activities of phrenic and hypoglossal nerves in cats.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D; St John, W M

    1986-06-01

    Anesthetic and sedative drugs have been found to diminish the respiratory motor activity of the hypoglossal nerve more than that of the phrenic nerve. This differential depression of motor activity to the upper airway may contribute to the exacerbation of obstructive sleep apnea by sedative drugs. To determine whether morphine has a similar selective action, we recorded phrenic and hypoglossal nerve activities before and after morphine administration in decerebrate, vagotomized cats, paralyzed with gallamine. Morphine diminished the activities of both nerves in most animals, but the responses were highly variable, and no consistent pattern of differential depression was apparent. The variability of the results may reflect the complex nature of opiate actions on the control of breathing. PMID:3738255

  19. Burst activity and ultrafast activation kinetics of CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels support presynaptic activity in adult gerbil hair cell ribbon synapses

    PubMed Central

    Zampini, Valeria; Johnson, Stuart L; Franz, Christoph; Knipper, Marlies; Holley, Matthew C; Magistretti, Jacopo; Masetto, Sergio; Marcotti, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Auditory information transfer to afferent neurons relies on precise triggering of neurotransmitter release at the inner hair cell (IHC) ribbon synapses by Ca2+ entry through CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels. Despite the crucial role of CaV1.3 Ca2+ channels in governing synaptic vesicle fusion, their elementary properties in adult mammals remain unknown. Using near-physiological recording conditions we investigated Ca2+ channel activity in adult gerbil IHCs. We found that Ca2+ channels are partially active at the IHC resting membrane potential (−60 mV). At −20 mV, the large majority (>70%) of Ca2+ channel first openings occurred with an estimated delay of about 50 μs in physiological conditions, with a mean open time of 0.5 ms. Similar to other ribbon synapses, Ca2+ channels in IHCs showed a low mean open probability (0.21 at −20 mV), but this increased significantly (up to 0.91) when Ca2+ channel activity switched to a bursting modality. We propose that IHC Ca2+ channels are sufficiently rapid to transmit fast signals of sound onset and support phase-locking. Short-latency Ca2+ channel opening coupled to multivesicular release would ensure precise and reliable signal transmission at the IHC ribbon synapse. PMID:23713031

  20. Distribution and Respiratory Activity of Mycobacteria in Household Water System of Healthy Volunteers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Tomoaki; Izumi, Yoko; Nakamoto, Sayuri; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The primary infectious source of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), which are known as opportunistic pathogens, appears to be environmental exposure, and it is important to reduce the frequency of exposure from environmental sources for preventing NTM infections. In order to achieve this, the distribution and respiratory activity of NTM in the environments must be clarified. In this study, we determined the abundance of mycobacteria and respiratory active mycobacteria in the household water system of healthy volunteers using quantitative PCR and a fluorescent staining method, because household water has been considered as one of the possible infectious sources. We chose healthy volunteer households in order to lessen the effect of possible residential contamination from an infected patient. We evaluated whether each sampling site (bathroom drain, kitchen drain, bath heater pipe and showerhead) have the potential to be the sources of NTM infections. Our results indicated that drains in the bathroom and kitchen sink are the niche for Mycobacterium spp. and M. avium cells were only detected in the bathtub inlet. Both physicochemical and biologic selective pressures may affect the preferred habitat of Mycobacterium spp. Regional differences also appear to exist as demonstrated by the presence (US) or absence (Japan) of Mycobacterium spp. on showerheads. Understanding of the country specific human activities and water usage will help to elucidate the infectious source and route of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. PMID:25350137

  1. Control of pathogenic effector T-cell activities in situ by PD-L1 expression on respiratory inflammatory dendritic cells during respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, S; Jiang, L; Moser, EK; Jewett, LB; Wright, J; Du, J; Zhou, B; Davis, SD; Krupp, NL; Braciale, TJ; Sun, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in young infants, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. We demonstrate here that the co-inhibitory molecule programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is selectively upregulated on T cells within the respiratory tract during both murine and human RSV infection. Importantly, the interaction of PD-1 with its ligand PD-L1 is vital to restrict the pro-inflammatory activities of lung effector T cells in situ, thereby inhibiting the development of excessive pulmonary inflammation and injury during RSV infection. We further identify that PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells is critical to suppress inflammatory T-cell activities, and an interferon–STAT1–IRF1 axis is responsible for increased PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells. Our findings suggest a potentially critical role of PD-L1 and PD-1 interactions in the lung for controlling host inflammatory responses and disease progression in clinical RSV infection. PMID:25465101

  2. Does breathing type influence electromyographic activity of obligatory and accessory respiratory muscles?

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M F; Valenzuela, S; Miralles, R; Portus, C; Santander, H; Fuentes, A D; Celhay, I

    2014-11-01

    Craniomandibular electromyographic (EMG) studies frequently include several parameters, e.g. resting, chewing and tooth-clenching. EMG activity during these parameters has been recorded in the elevator muscles, but little is known about the respiratory muscles. The aim of this study was to compare EMG activity in obligatory and accessory respiratory muscles between subjects with different breathing types. Forty male subjects were classified according to their breathing type into two groups of 20 each: costo-diaphragmatic breathing type and upper costal breathing type. Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on the sternocleidomastoid, diaphragm, external intercostal and latissimus dorsi muscles. EMG activity was recorded during the following tasks: (i) normal quiet breathing, (ii) maximal voluntary clenching in intercuspal position, (iii) natural rate chewing until swallowing threshold, (iv) short-time chewing. Diaphragm EMG activity was significantly higher in the upper costal breathing type than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type in all tasks (P < 0·05). External intercostal EMG activity was significantly higher in the upper costal breathing type than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type in tasks 3 and 4 (P < 0·05). Sternocleidomastoid and latissimus dorsi EMG activity did not show significant differences between breathing types in the tasks studied (P > 0·05). The significantly higher EMG activity observed in subjects with upper costal breathing than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type suggests that there could be differences in motor unit recruitment strategies depending on the breathing type. This may be an expression of the adaptive capability of muscle chains in subjects who clinically have a different thoraco-abdominal expansion during inspiration at rest. PMID:25040551

  3. Serotonergic raphe magnus cell discharge reflects on-going autonomic and respiratory activities

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Peggy; Gao, Keming; Genzen, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonergic cells are located in a restricted number of brainstem nuclei, send projections to virtually all parts of the central nervous system, and are critical to normal brain function. They discharge tonically at a rate modulated by sleep/wake cycle and, in the case of medullary serotonergic cells in raphe magnus and the adjacent reticular formation (RM), are excited by cold challenge. Yet, beyond behavioral state and cold, endogenous factors that influence serotonergic cell discharge remain largely mysterious. The present study in the anesthetized rat investigated predictors of serotonergic RM cell discharge by testing whether cell discharge correlated to three rhythms observed in blood pressure recordings that averaged >30 minutes in length. A very slow frequency rhythm with a period of minutes, a respiratory rhythm, and a cardiac rhythm were derived from the blood pressure recording. Cross correlations between each of the derived rhythms and cell activity revealed that the discharge of 38 of the 40 serotonergic cells studied was significantly correlated to the very slow and/or respiratory rhythms. Very few serotonergic cells discharged in relation to the cardiac cycle and those that did, did so weakly. The correlations between serotonergic cell discharge and the slow and respiratory rhythms cannot arise from baroreceptive input. Instead we hypothesize that they are by-products of on-going adjustments to homeostatic functions that happen to alter blood pressure. Thus, serotonergic RM cells integrate information about multiple homeostatic activities and challenges and can consequently modulate spinal processes according to the most pressing need of the organism. PMID:17715191

  4. In vitro activity and rodent efficacy of clinafloxacin for bovine and swine respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Michael T.; Quesnell, Rebecca; Tiwari, Raksha; LeMay, Mary; Watts, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinafloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone that was originally developed and subsequently abandoned in the late 1990s as a human health antibiotic for respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of clinafloxacin as a possible treatment for respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended procedures with recent strains from the Zoetis culture collection. Rodent efficacy was determined in CD-1 mice infected systemically or intranasally with bovine Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, or swine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and administered clinafloxacin for determination of ED50 (efficacious dose-50%) values. The MIC90 values for clinafloxacin against bovine P. multocida, M. haemolytica, Histophilus somni, and M. bovis were 0.125, 0.5, 0.125, and 1 μg/ml, respectively, and the MIC90 values against swine P. multocida, A. pleuropneumoniae, S. suis, and M. hyopneumoniae were í0.03, í0.03, 0.125, and í0.008 μg/ml, respectively. Efficacy in mouse models showed average ED50 values of 0.019 mg/kg/dose in the bovine M. haemolytica systemic infection model, 0.55 mg/kg in the bovine P. multocida intranasal lung challenge model, 0.08 mg/kg/dose in the bovine P. multocida systemic infection model, and 0.7 mg/kg/dose in the swine A. pleuropneumoniae systemic infection model. Clinafloxacin shows good in vitro activity and efficacy in mouse models and may be a novel treatment alternative for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. PMID:23785362

  5. Modulating antibiotic activity towards respiratory bacterial pathogens by co-medications: a multi-target approach.

    PubMed

    Vandevelde, Nathalie M; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2016-07-01

    Non-antibiotic drugs can modulate bacterial physiology and/or antibiotic activity, opening perspectives for innovative therapeutic strategies. Focusing on respiratory pathogens and considering in vitro, in vivo, and clinical data, here we examine the effect of these drugs on the expression of resistance mechanisms, biofilm formation, and intracellular survival, as well as their influence on the activity of antibiotics on bacteria. Beyond the description of the effects observed, we also comment on concentrations that are active and discuss the mechanisms of drug-drug or drug-target interactions. This discussion should be helpful in defining useful targets for adjuvant therapy and establishing the corresponding pharmacophores for further drug fine-tuning. PMID:27094105

  6. Dependence of synchronized bursting activity on medium stirring and the perfusion rate in a cultured network of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Ryoun; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2016-05-01

    A cultured network of neurons coupled with a multi-electrode-array (MEA) recording system has been a useful platform for investigating various issues in neuroscience and engineering. The neural activity supported by the system can be sensitive to environmental fluctuations, for example, in the medium's nutrient composition, ph, and temperature, and to mechanical disturbances, yet this issue has not been the subject. Especially, a normal practice in maintaining neuronal cell cultures involves an intermittent sequence of medium exchanges, typically at a time interval of a few days, and one such sudden medium exchange is unavoidably accompanied by many unintended disturbances. Here, based on a quantitative time-series analysis of synchronized bursting events, we explicitly demonstrate that such a medium exchange can, indeed, bring a huge change in the existing neural activity. Subsequently, we develop a medium perfusion-stirring system and an ideal protocol that can be used in conjunction with a MEA recording system, providing long-term stability. Specifically, we systematically evaluate the effects of medium stirring and perfusion rates. Unexpectedly, even some vigorous mechanical agitations do not have any impacts on neural activity. On the other hand, too much replenishment ( e.g., 1.8 ml/day for a 1.8-ml dish) of neurobasal medium results in an excitotoxicity.

  7. Effect of selenite on the morphology and respiratory activity of Phanerochaete chrysosporium biofilms.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Ortiz, Erika J; Pechaud, Yoan; Lauchnor, Ellen; Rene, Eldon R; Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-06-01

    The temporal and spatial effects of selenite (SeO3(2-)) on the physical properties and respiratory activity of Phanerochaete chrysosporium biofilms, grown in flow-cell reactors, were investigated using oxygen microsensors and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging. Exposure of the biofilm to a SeO3(2-) load of 1.67mgSeL(-1)h(-1) (10mgSeL(-1) influent concentration), for 24h, resulted in a 20% reduction of the O2 flux, followed by a ∼10% decrease in the glucose consumption rate. Long-term exposure (4days) to SeO3(2-) influenced the architecture of the biofilm by creating a more compact and dense hyphal arrangement resulting in a decrease of biofilm thickness compared to fungal biofilms grown without SeO3(2-). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the effect of SeO3(2-) on the aerobic respiratory activity on fungal biofilms is described. PMID:26935326

  8. Propofol and sevoflurane induce distinct burst suppression patterns in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Jonathan D.; Westover, M. Brandon; Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is an EEG pattern characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude activity (bursts) and relatively low amplitude activity (suppressions). Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ among general anesthetics. PMID:25565990

  9. The effects of breathing exercise types on respiratory muscle activity and body function in patients with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong-il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Fragmentary studies on characteristics of respiratory muscles are being done to increase respiratory capacity by classifying exercises into voluntary respiratory exercise which relieves symptoms and prevents COPD and exercise using breathing exercise equipment. But this study found changes on respiratory pattern through changes on the activity pattern of agonist and synergist respiratory muscles and studied what effect they can have on body function improvement. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects in experimental group I that respiratory exercise of diaphragm and 15 subjects in experimental group II that feedback respiratory exercise were randomly selected among COPD patients to find the effective intervention method for COPD patients. And intervention program was conducted for 5 weeks, three times a week, once a day and 30 minutes a session. They were measured with BODE index using respiratory muscle activity, pulmonary function, the six-minute walking test, dyspnea criteria and BMI Then the results obtained were compared and analyzed. [Results] There was a significant difference in sternocleidomastoid muscle and scalene muscle and in 6-minute walk and BODE index for body function. Thus the group performing feedback respiratory had more effective results for mild COPD patients. [Conclusion] Therefore, the improvement was significant regarding the activity of respiratory muscles synergists when breathing before doing breathing exercise. Although, it is valuable to reduce too much mobilization of respiratory muscles synergists through the proper intervention it is necessary to study body function regarding improvement of respiratory function for patients with COPD. PMID:27064889

  10. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  11. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  12. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus NS4b Protein Inhibits Host RNase L Activation

    PubMed Central

    Thornbrough, Joshua M.; Jha, Babal K.; Yount, Boyd; Goldstein, Stephen A.; Li, Yize; Elliott, Ruth; Sims, Amy C.; Baric, Ralph S.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is the first highly pathogenic human coronavirus to emerge since severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2002. Like many coronaviruses, MERS-CoV carries genes that encode multiple accessory proteins that are not required for replication of the genome but are likely involved in pathogenesis. Evasion of host innate immunity through interferon (IFN) antagonism is a critical component of viral pathogenesis. The IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS)-RNase L pathway activates upon sensing of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Activated RNase L cleaves viral and host single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), which leads to translational arrest and subsequent cell death, preventing viral replication and spread. Here we report that MERS-CoV, a lineage C Betacoronavirus, and related bat CoV NS4b accessory proteins have phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity and antagonize OAS-RNase L by enzymatically degrading 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A), activators of RNase L. This is a novel function for NS4b, which has previously been reported to antagonize IFN signaling. NS4b proteins are distinct from lineage A Betacoronavirus PDEs and rotavirus gene-encoded PDEs, in having an amino-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) and are localized mostly to the nucleus. However, the expression level of cytoplasmic MERS-CoV NS4b protein is sufficient to prevent activation of RNase L. Finally, this is the first report of an RNase L antagonist expressed by a human or bat coronavirus and provides a specific mechanism by which this occurs. Our findings provide a potential mechanism for evasion of innate immunity by MERS-CoV while also identifying a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27025250

  13. Inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity: Protecting the drive to breathe in disorders that reduce respiratory neural activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Strey, K.A.; Baertsch, N.A.; Baker-Herman, T.L.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple forms of plasticity are activated following reduced respiratory neural activity. For example, in ventilated rats, a central neural apnea elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal burst amplitude upon resumption of respiratory neural activity, forms of plasticity called inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF), respectively. Here, we provide a conceptual framework for plasticity following reduced respiratory neural activity to guide future investigations. We review mechanisms giving rise to iPMF and iHMF, present new data suggesting that inactivity-induced plasticity is observed in inspiratory intercostals (iIMF) and point out gaps in our knowledge. We then survey conditions relevant to human health characterized by reduced respiratory neural activity and discuss evidence that inactivity-induced plasticity is elicited during these conditions. Understanding the physiological impact and circumstances in which inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity is elicited may yield novel insights into the treatment of disorders characterized by reductions in respiratory neural activity. PMID:23816599

  14. MSFC Respiratory Protection Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    CoVan, James P.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Marshall Space Flight Center Respiratory Protection program is provided in this poster display. Respiratory protection personnel, building, facilities, equipment, customers, maintenance and operational activities, and Dynatech fit testing details are described and illustrated.

  15. Prevalence and Impact of Active and Passive Cigarette Smoking in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Zhuo, Hanjing; Benowitz, Neal L.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Liu, Kathleen D.; Matthay, Michael A.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cigarette smoke exposure has recently been found to be associated with increased susceptibility to trauma- and transfusion-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We sought to determine 1) the prevalence of cigarette smoke exposure in a diverse multi-center sample of ARDS patients, and 2) whether cigarette smoke exposure is associated with severity of lung injury and mortality in ARDS. Design Analysis of the Albuterol for the Treatment of ALI (ALTA) and Omega ARDS Network studies. Setting Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network hospitals. Patients Three hundred eighty one patients with ARDS. Interventions None. Measurements NNAL (4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol), a validated tobacco-specific marker, was measured in urine samples from subjects enrolled in two NHLBI ARDS Network randomized controlled trials. Main Results Urine NNAL levels were consistent with active smoking in 36% of ARDS patients and with passive smoking in 41% of nonsmokers (vs 20% and 40% in general population, respectively). Patients with NNAL levels in the active smoking range were younger and had a higher prevalence of alcohol misuse, fewer comorbidities, lower severity of illness, and less septic shock at enrollment compared to patients with undetectable NNAL levels. Despite this lower severity of illness, the severity of lung injury did not significantly differ based on biomarker-determined smoking status. Cigarette smoke exposure was not significantly associated with death after adjusting for differences in age, alcohol use, comorbidities, and severity of illness. Conclusions In this first multicenter study of biomarker-determined cigarette smoke exposure in ARDS patients, we found that active cigarette smoke exposure was significantly more prevalent among ARDS patients compared to population averages. Despite their younger age, better overall health, and lower severity of illness, smokers by NNAL had similar severity of lung injury as patients with

  16. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  17. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  18. Respiratory-related activity of cricothyroid muscle in awake normal humans.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, J R; Brancatisano, A; Engel, L A

    1991-05-01

    The role of the cricothyroid muscle (CT) in respiration is unclear. To examine the respiratory-related electrical activity of the CT, we measured its electromyogram (EMG) and compared it with that of the alae nasi (AN) in eight healthy subjects. During quiet breathing the CT EMG phasing was inspiratory in seven subjects. This pattern was similar to the AN with respect to phasing and shape of the integrated EMG. The onset of phasic CT and AN activity related to inspiration preceded flow by 173 +/- 39 and 570 +/- 76 (SE) ms, respectively (P less than 0.01). We measured the duration from onset of phasic activity to peak of the EMG (TA) and the total cycle duration (TT). TA/TT of the CT was 0.29 +/- 0.02, similar to that of the AN (0.28 +/- 0.03). Inspiratory resistive loading, panting, and voluntary hyperventilation increased CT activity above the peak level seen during tidal breathing. Voluntary glottic closure increased CT activity to a level above tonic but below peak tidal activity. The findings suggest that the phasic electrical activity of the CT simulates predominantly that of an upper airway dilator. PMID:1864803

  19. Expanding Voluntary Active-learning Opportunities for Pharmacy Students in a Respiratory Physiology Module

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Hardy; Colthorpe, Kay

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To expand voluntary active-learning opportunities for bachelor of pharmacy students enrolled in a third-year human physiology and pharmacology course and determine whether the additional course components improved learning outcomes. Design Additional voluntary active-learning opportunities including a large-class tutorial, additional formative assessment, and an online discussion were added to the Respiratory Physiology Module of the course. Examination scores were compared with those from previous years. A questionnaire was administered to assess students' perception of the active-learning components. Assessment Mean examination scores increased from 69.3% ± 24.4% in 2003 to 88.9% ± 13.4% in 2004 and 86.9% ± 17.6% in 2005, after the addition of the active-learning components. Students' overall perception of the value of the active-learning activities was positive. Summary The addition of voluntary active-learning course components to a required pharmacy course resulted in improved student examination scores, and decreased failure rate, and were accomplished at low cost and with little additional staff time. PMID:18483596

  20. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease ) Diseases of the chest ( ...

  1. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for weak acid respiratory uncouplers to Vibrio fisheri

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Cronin, M.T.D.

    1997-02-01

    Acute toxicity values of 16 organic compounds thought to elicit their response via the weak acid respiratory uncoupling mechanism of toxic action were secured from the literature. Regression analysis of toxicities revealed that a measured 5-min V. fisheri potency value can be used as a surrogate for the 30-min value. Regression analysis of toxicity versus hydrophobicity, measured as the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient (log K{sub ow}), was used to formulate a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR). The equation log pT{sub 30}{sup {minus}1} = 0.489(log K{sub ow}) + 0.126 was found to be a highly predictive model. This V. fisheri QSAR is statistically similar to QSARs generated from weak acid uncoupler potency data for Pimephales promelas survivability and Tetrahymena pyriformis population growth impairment. This work, therefore, suggests that the weak acid respiratory uncoupling mechanism of toxic action is present in V. fisheri, and as such is not restricted to mitochondria-containing organisms.

  2. Evaluation of respiratory muscle activation in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ovechkin, Alexander; Vitaz, Todd; de Paleville, Daniela Terson; Aslan, Sevda; McKay, William

    2010-09-30

    This study was undertaken to physiologically characterize respiratory muscle control in eighteen individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) through comparison with 14 matched non-injured (NI) subjects. Standard pulmonary function measures (FVC, FEV(1), PI(max) and PE(max)) were obtained along with surface electromyographic (sEMG) recording from respiratory muscles. A vector analysis of sEMG was used to calculate Similarity Index (SI) values relating SCI subject sEMG patterns to those produced by NI subjects. SI values for inspiratory and expiratory tasks were very consistent within the NI group, 0.92±0.03 and 0.93±0.04 (mean±SD), respectively. Altered multi-muscle patterns in the SCI group produced SI values that trended lower 0.84±0.11 for inspiratory tasks and were significantly lower, 0.59±0.22 for expiratory tasks. SI values for expiratory tasks were also significantly correlated with SCI levels and pulmonary function measures. These results suggest that pulmonary function after SCI is dependent upon the degree to which multi-muscle activation patterns are disrupted. PMID:20692382

  3. Sox2 Activates Cell Proliferation and Differentiation in the Respiratory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, David H.; Besnard, Valérie; Lange, Alexander W.; Keiser, Angela R.; Wert, Susan E.; Bruno, Michael D.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Sox2, a transcription factor critical for the maintenance of embryonic stem cells and induction of pluripotent stem cells, is expressed exclusively in the conducting airway epithelium of the lung, where it is required for differentiation of nonciliated, goblet, and ciliated cells. To determine the role of Sox2 in respiratory epithelial cells, Sox2 was selectively and conditionally expressed in nonciliated airway epithelial cells and in alveolar type II cells in the adult mouse. Sox2 induced epithelial cell proliferation within 3 days of expression. Epithelial cell proliferation was associated with increased Ki-67 and cyclin D1 staining. Expression of cell cycle genes, including FoxM1, Ccna2 (Cyclin A2), Ccnb2 (Cyclin B2), and Ccnd1 (Cyclin D1), was increased. Consistent with a role in cell proliferation, Sox2 activated the transcription of FoxM1 in vitro. In alveoli, Sox2 caused hyperplasia and ectopic differentiation of epithelial cells to those with morphologic and molecular characteristics of conducting airway epithelium. Sox2 induced the expression of conducting airway epithelial specific genes, including Scgb1a1, Foxj1, Tubb3, and Cyp2f2. Although prolonged expression of Sox2 caused cell proliferation and epithelial hyperplasia, Sox2 did not induce pulmonary tumors. Sox2 induces proliferation of respiratory epithelial cells and, subsequently, partially reprograms alveolar epithelial cells into cells with characteristics of the conducting airways. PMID:20855650

  4. Influence of respiratory motor neurone activity on human autonomic and haemodynamic rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonschorek, A. S.; Lu, L. L.; Halliwill, J. R.; Beightol, L. A.; Taylor, J. A.; Painter, J. A.; Warzel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Although humans hold great advantages over other species as subjects for biomedical research, they also bring major disadvantages. One is that among the many rhythmic physiological signals that can be recorded, there is no sure way to know which individual change precedes another, or which change represents cause and which represents effect. In an attempt to deal with the inherent complexity of research conducted in intact human subjects, we developed and used a structural equation model to analyse responses of healthy young men to pharmacological changes of arterial pressure and graded inspiratory resistance, before and after vagomimetic atropine. Our model yielded a good fit of the experimental data, with a system weighted R2 of 0.77, and suggested that our treatments exerted both direct and indirect influences on the variables we measured. Thus, infusions of nitroprusside and phenylephrine exerted all of their direct effects by lowering and raising arterial pressure; the changes of R-R intervals, respiratory sinus arrhythmia and arterial pressure fluctuations that these drugs provoked, were indirect consequences of arterial pressure changes. The only direct effect of increased inspiratory resistance was augmentation of arterial pressure fluctuations. These results may provide a new way to disentangle and understand responses of intact human subjects to experimental forcings. The principal new insight we derived from our modelling is that respiratory gating of vagal-cardiac motor neurone firing is nearly maximal at usual levels of arterial pressure and inspiratory motor neurone activity.

  5. Plasminogen activator induction facilitates recovery of respiratory function following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Minor, Kenneth H; Seeds, Nicholas W

    2008-01-01

    The possibility that plasminogen activator (PA) plays a role in synaptic plasticity was explored in the spinal cord during the crossed phrenic phenomenon (CPP), where respiratory functional plasticity develops following spinal cord injury. Synaptic remodeling on phrenic motorneurons occurs during the characteristic delay period following spinal cord injury before CPP recovery of respiratory function. The molecular mechanisms underlying this plasticity are not well-defined. During the critical 1-2 h delay period required for this synaptic plasticity following a C2 hemisection in mice, uPA and tPA mRNAs are rapidly induced in C4-5 ventral spinal cord neurons in the ipsilateral phrenic motor nucleus (PMN), as are uPA and tPA protein levels. A role for uPA in CPP spinal cord plasticity is confirmed by the impaired ability of uPA knockout mice to acquire a good CPP response by 6 h post-hemisection and their lack of structural remodeling of PMN synapses that underlies development of the CPP response. PMID:18042398

  6. Environmental factors, immune changes and respiratory diseases in troops during military activities.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Chciałowski, Andrzej; Korsak, Jolanta

    2013-06-01

    Combat operations in contemporary theaters of war, as well as combat training, are carried out in all parts of the world, typically in a harsh environment. Specific environmental conditions, such as heat, cold, high-altitudes, desert climates, as well as chemical and biological pollution of both the atmosphere and soil, together with over-exertion, food restrictions, sleep deprivation, and psychological stress can all result in changes in the immune system and the occurrence of associated diseases. Respiratory diseases are one of the most common health problems among military personnel participating in combat training or deployed to operations in areas characterized by difficult climatic and sanitary conditions. They are, therefore, one of the main reasons for military personnel requiring ambulant and hospital treatment. The aim of the study was to discuss the influence of environmental factors and the conditions in which active duty is performed on changes in the immune system and the occurrence of respiratory tract diseases in a military environment. PMID:23403385

  7. Anesthetic activation of central respiratory chemoreceptor neurons involves inhibition of a THIK-1-like background K+ current

    PubMed Central

    Lazarenko, Roman M.; Fortuna, Michal G.; Shi, Yingtang; Mulkey, Daniel K.; Takakura, Ana C.; Moreira, Thiago S.; Guyenet, Patrice G.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    At surgical depths of anesthesia, inhalational anesthetics cause a loss of motor response to painful stimuli (i.e., immobilization) that is characterized by profound inhibition of spinal motor circuits. Yet, although clearly depressed, the respiratory motor system continues to provide adequate ventilation under these same conditions. Here, we show that isoflurane causes robust activation of CO2/pH-sensitive, Phox2b-expressing neurons located in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) of the rodent brainstem, in vitro and in vivo. In brainstem slices from Phox2b-eGFP mice, the firing of pH-sensitive RTN neurons was strongly increased by isoflurane, independent of prevailing pH conditions. At least two ionic mechanisms contributed to anesthetic activation of RTN neurons: activation of a Na+-dependent cationic current and inhibition of a background K+ current. Single cell RT-PCR analysis of dissociated GFP-labeled RTN neurons revealed expression of THIK-1 (K2P13.1), a channel that shares key properties with the native RTN current (i.e., suppression by inhalational anesthetics, weak rectification, inhibition by extracellular Na+, and pH-insensitivity). Isoflurane also increased firing rate of RTN chemosensitive neurons in urethane-anesthetized rats, again independent of CO2 levels. In these animals, isoflurane transiently enhanced activity of the respiratory system, an effect that was most prominent at low levels of respiratory drive and mediated largely by an increase in respiratory frequency. These data indicate that inhalational anesthetics cause activation of RTN neurons, which serve an important integrative role in respiratory control; the increased drive provided by enhanced RTN neuronal activity may contribute, in part, to maintaining respiratory motor activity under immobilizing anesthetic conditions. PMID:20610767

  8. Impairment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity in diethylnitrosamine-induced rat hepatomas: possible involvement of oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Boitier, E; Merad-Boudia, M; Guguen-Guillouzo, C; Defer, N; Ceballos-Picot, I; Leroux, J P; Marsac, C

    1995-07-15

    Alterations in the energy metabolism of cancer cells have been reported for many years. However, the deleterious mechanisms involved in these deficiencies have not yet been clearly proved. The main goal of this study was to decipher the harmful mechanisms responsible for the respiratory chain deficiencies in the course of diethylnitrosamine (DENA)-induced rat hepatocarcinogenesis, where mitochondrial DNA abnormalities had been previously reported. The respiratory activity of freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria, assessed by oxygen consumption experiments and enzymatic assays, presented a severe complex I deficiency 19 months after DENA treatment, and later on, in addition, a defective complex III activity. Since respiratory complex subunits are encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, we checked whether the respiratory chain defects were due to impaired synthesis processes. The specific immunodetection of complex I failed to show any alterations in the steady-state levels of both nuclear and mitochondrial encoded subunits in the hepatomas. Moreover, in vitro protein synthesis experiments carried out on freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria did not bring to light any modifications in the synthesis of the mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory complexes, whatever the degree of tumor progression. Finally, Southern blot analysis of mitochondrial DNA did not show any major mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in DENA-induced hepatomas. Because the synthetic processes of respiratory complexes did not seem to be implicated in the respiratory chain impairment, these deficiencies could be partly ascribed to a direct toxic impact of highly reactive molecules on these complexes, thus impairing their function. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is an important generator of noxious, reactive oxygen free radicals such as superoxide and H2O2, which are normally catabolized by powerful antioxidant scavengers. Nineteen months after DENA treatment, a general collapse of

  9. Influence of upper airway sensory receptors on respiratory muscle activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Redline, S; Strohl, K P

    1987-07-01

    We reasoned that neural information from upper airway (UA) sensory receptors could influence the relationship between UA and diaphragmatic neuromuscular responses to hypercapnia. In this study, the electromyographic (EMG) activities of the alae nasi (AN), genioglossus (GG), and chest wall (CW) or diaphragm (Di) to ventilatory loading were assessed in six laryngectomized, tracheostomized human subjects and in six subjects breathing with an intact UA before and after topical UA anesthesia. The EMG activities of the UA and thoracic muscles increased at similar rates with increasing hypercapnia in normal subjects, in subjects whose upper airways were anesthetized, and in laryngectomized subjects breathing with a cervical tracheostomy. Furthermore, in the laryngectomized subjects, respiratory muscle EMG activation increased with resistive inspiratory loading (15 cmH2O X l-1 X s) applied at the level of a cervical tracheostomy. At an average expired CO2 fraction of 7.0%, resistive loading resulted in a 93 +/- 26.3% (SE) increase in peak AN EMG activity, a 39 +/- 2.0% increase in peak GG EMG activity, and a 43.2 +/- 16.5% increase in peak CW (Di) EMG activity compared with control values. We conclude that the ventilatory responses of the UA and thoracic muscles to ventilatory loading are not substantially influenced by laryngectomy or UA anesthesia. PMID:3624139

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus activity and climate parameters during a 12-year period.

    PubMed

    Sirimi, Natalia; Miligkos, Michael; Koutouzi, Foteini; Petridou, Evi; Siahanidou, Tania; Michos, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    The epidemic pattern of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection during long periods and the factors that determine seasonality are not well studied. In order to correlate the RSV epidemic activity with climate parameters, we conducted a retrospective study of children (0-14 year) who were hospitalized because of respiratory tract infection and had an RSV test performed in the major tertiary pediatric hospital of Greece during a 12-year period (2002-2013). Daily data regarding temperature and humidity were obtained from the Hellenic National Meteorological Service. A total of 2030/7516 (27%) children were tested positive for RSV infection. Among RSV positive children 1945/2030 (95.8%) were infants <1 year. A peak of RSV activity was measured in years 2002, 2003, and 2006 (>35% positive). The RSV season in our area spanned from December to April, with higher incidence during January through March. The peak monthly RSV incidence was observed during February with mean temperature 10.34 °C and mean relative humidity 69.16%. Regarding climate conditions, a statistically significant positive correlation was found between monthly RSV activity and mean monthly relative humidity (rho = 0.66, P-value = 0.02), whereas a negative correlation was found with mean monthly temperature (rho = -0.81, P-value = 0.002). However, in the multivariable analysis, only the effect of mean monthly temperature remained statistically significant (IRR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.80). Further understanding of RSV seasonality in different geographic areas would be important in order to timely implement preventing strategies with immunoprophylaxis or future RSV vaccines. PMID:26575521

  11. Epidemic activity of respiratory syncytial virus is related to temperature and rainfall in equatorial tropical countries.

    PubMed

    Gamba-Sanchez, N; Rodriguez-Martinez, C E; Sossa-Briceño, M P

    2016-07-01

    Although viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) are a major public health problem in tropical low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and there is growing evidence showing their relationship with meteorological parameters, studies performed in these countries are scarce. In an analytical cross-sectional study, we determined which of the main meteorological parameters (temperature, absolute humidity, rainfall, wind speed, and solar radiation) predicted respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) activity in a population of hospitalized children with ALRI during a 5-year period, from January 2009 to December 2013. Out of a total of 4559 children included in the study (mean age 9·2 ± 8·5 months), 2953 (64·8%) presented RSV infection during the 3-month period from March to May. In the multivariate analysis, after controlling for absolute humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation, temperature [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2·25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·11-4·53, P = 0·024], and rainfall (IRR 1·01, 95% CI 1·00-1·02, P = 0·044) were independently associated with the monthly number of RSV infections. In conclusion, in Bogota, the capital of a tropical LMIC lying slightly above the equator, RSV activity peaks in the 3-month period from March to May, the main rainy period of the year in the city. In addition, rainfall and temperature are the two most important meteorological parameters that are independently associated with RSV activity in hospitalized children with ALRI in the city. PMID:26888544

  12. Effect of venotropic drugs on the respiratory activity of isolated mitochondria and in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Dominique; Delaive, Edouard; Houbion, Andrée; Eliaers, François; Remacle, José; Michiels, Carine

    2000-01-01

    Several drugs used in the treatment of chronic peripheral ischaemic and venous diseases, i.e. aescine, Cyclo 3, Ginkor Fort, hydroxyethylrutosides, naftidrofuryl, naphthoquinone and procyanidolic oligomers, were tested on the mitochondrial respiratory activity. The results show that all these drugs protected human endothelial cells against the hypoxia-induced decrease in ATP content. In addition, they all induced a concentration-dependent increase in respiratory control ratio (RCR) of liver mitochondria pre-incubated with the drugs for 60 min. The drugs were divided into two groups according to their effects. The first group (A), comprising aescine, Ginkor Fort, naftidrofuryl and naphthoquinone, increased RCR by decreasing state 4 respiration rate. The second group of drugs (B), comprising hydroxyethylrutosides, procyanidolic oligomers and Cyclo 3, increased RCR by increasing state 3 respiration rate. The drugs of group A were able to prevent the inhibition of complexes I and III respectively by amytal and antimycin A while the first two drugs of group B increased adenine nucleotide translocase activity. Cyclo 3 inhibited the carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (mCCP)-induced uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration. None of these seven drugs could protect complexes IV and V, respectively, from inhibition by cyanide and oligomycin. When tested on endothelial cells the drugs of group A, in contrast to group B, prevented the decrease in ATP content induced by amytal or antimycin A. The present results suggest that the protective effects on mitochondrial respiration activity by these venotropic drugs may explain their protective effect on the cellular ATP content in ischaemic conditions and some of their beneficial therapeutic effect in chronic vascular diseases. PMID:10928952

  13. Testing the hypothesis of neurodegeneracy in respiratory network function with a priori transected arterially perfused brain stem preparation of rat.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah E; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    Degeneracy of respiratory network function would imply that anatomically discrete aspects of the brain stem are capable of producing respiratory rhythm. To test this theory we a priori transected brain stem preparations before reperfusion and reoxygenation at 4 rostrocaudal levels: 1.5 mm caudal to obex (n = 5), at obex (n = 5), and 1.5 (n = 7) and 3 mm (n = 6) rostral to obex. The respiratory activity of these preparations was assessed via recordings of phrenic and vagal nerves and lumbar spinal expiratory motor output. Preparations with a priori transection at level of the caudal brain stem did not produce stable rhythmic respiratory bursting, even when the arterial chemoreceptors were stimulated with sodium cyanide (NaCN). Reperfusion of brain stems that preserved the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) showed spontaneous and sustained rhythmic respiratory bursting at low phrenic nerve activity (PNA) amplitude that occurred simultaneously in all respiratory motor outputs. We refer to this rhythm as the pre-BötC burstlet-type rhythm. Conserving circuitry up to the pontomedullary junction consistently produced robust high-amplitude PNA at lower burst rates, whereas sequential motor patterning across the respiratory motor outputs remained absent. Some of the rostrally transected preparations expressed both burstlet-type and regular PNA amplitude rhythms. Further analysis showed that the burstlet-type rhythm and high-amplitude PNA had 1:2 quantal relation, with burstlets appearing to trigger high-amplitude bursts. We conclude that no degenerate rhythmogenic circuits are located in the caudal medulla oblongata and confirm the pre-BötC as the primary rhythmogenic kernel. The absence of sequential motor patterning in a priori transected preparations suggests that pontine circuits govern respiratory pattern formation. PMID:26888109

  14. Inspiratory activation is not required for episodic hypoxia-induced respiratory long-term facilitation in postnatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Tadjalli, Arash; Duffin, James; Li, Yan Mei; Hong, Hyunwook; Peever, John

    2007-01-01

    Episodic hypoxia causes repetitive inspiratory activation that induces a form of respiratory plasticity termed long-term facilitation (LTF). While LTF is a function of the hypoxic exposures and inspiratory activation, their relative importance in evoking LTF is unknown. The aims of this study were to: (1) dissociate the relative roles played by episodic hypoxia and respiratory activation in LTF; and (2) determine whether the magnitude of LTF varies as a function of hypoxic intensity. We did this by examining the effects of episodic hypoxia in postnatal rats (15–25 days old), which unlike adult rats exhibit a prominent hypoxia-induced respiratory depression. We quantified inspiratory phrenic nerve activity generated by the in situ working-heart brainstem before, during and for 60 min after episodic hypoxia. We demonstrate that episodic hypoxia evokes LTF despite the fact that it potently suppresses inspiratory activity during individual hypoxic exposures (P < 0.05). Specifically, we show that after episodic hypoxia (three 5 min periods of 10% O2) respiratory frequency increased to 40 ± 3.3% above baseline values over the next 60 min (P < 0.001). Continuous hypoxia (15 min of 10% O2) had no lasting effects on respiratory frequency (P > 0.05). To determine if LTF magnitude was affected by hypoxic intensity, the episodic hypoxia protocol was repeated under three different O2 tensions. We demonstrate that the magnitude and time course of LTF depend on hypoxic severity, with more intense hypoxia inducing a more potent degree of LTF. We conclude that inspiratory activation is not required for LTF induction, and that hypoxia per se is the physiological stimulus for eliciting hypoxia-induced respiratory LTF. PMID:17932158

  15. RADIAL ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSFER AND MAGNETIC BARRIER FOR SHORT-TYPE GAMMA-RAY-BURST CENTRAL ENGINE ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tong; Gu Weimin; Hou Shujin; Liang Enwei; Lei Weihua; Lin Lin; Zhang Shuangnan; Dai Zigao

    2012-11-20

    Soft extended emission (EE) following initial hard spikes up to 100 s was observed with Swift/BAT for about half of known short-type gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). This challenges the conversional central engine models of SGRBs, i.e., compact star merger models. In the framework of black-hole-neutron-star merger models, we study the roles of radial angular momentum transfer in the disk and the magnetic barrier around the black hole in the activity of SGRB central engines. We show that radial angular momentum transfer may significantly prolong the lifetime of the accretion process, which may be divided into multiple episodes by the magnetic barrier. Our numerical calculations based on models of neutrino-dominated accretion flows suggest that disk mass is critical for producing the observed EE. In the case of the mass being {approx}0.8 M {sub Sun }, our model can reproduce the observed timescale and luminosity of both the main and the EE episodes in a reasonable parameter set. The predicted luminosity of the EE component is lower than the observed EE within about one order of magnitude and the timescale is shorter than 20 s if the disk mass is {approx}0.2 M {sub Sun }. Swift/BAT-like instruments may be not sensitive enough to detect the EE component in this case. We argue that the EE component could be a probe for the merger process and disk formation for compact star mergers.

  16. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Roy D.; Simpson, Michael L; Weinberger, Leor S.; Razooky, B; Cox, Chris D.; McCollum, James M.; Trimeloni, Tom; Singh, A

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts or as a constitutive, Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, building off of theoretical studies that exploit the time-resolved structure of stochastic fluctuations in gene expression, to develop a three-dimensional method for mapping underlying gene-regulatory mechanisms. Over 8,000 individual human genomic loci were analyzed, and at virtually all loci, episodic bursting as opposed to constitutive expression was found to be the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both frequency and size of transcriptional bursts vary equally across the human genome independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, while stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators, such as TNF, generate similar patterns of change in burst frequency and burst size. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus.

  17. Phosphoantigen Burst upon Plasmodium falciparum Schizont Rupture Can Distantly Activate Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guenot, Marianne; Loizon, Séverine; Howard, Jennifer; Costa, Giulia; Baker, David A.; Mohabeer, Shaneel Y.; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Moreau, Jean-François; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Behr, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Malaria induces potent activation and expansion of the Vγ9Vδ2 subpopulation of γδT cells, which inhibit the Plasmodium falciparum blood cycle through soluble cytotoxic mediators, abrogating merozoite invasion capacity. Intraerythrocytic stages efficiently trigger Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell activation and degranulation through poorly understood mechanisms. P. falciparum blood-stage extracts are known to contain phosphoantigens able to stimulate Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, but how these are presented by intact infected red blood cells (iRBCs) remains elusive. Here we show that, unlike activation by phosphoantigen-expressing cells, Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell activation by intact iRBCs is independent of butyrophilin expression by the iRBC, and contact with an intact iRBC is not required. Moreover, blood-stage culture supernatants proved to be as potent activators of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells as iRBCs. Bioactivity in the microenvironment is attributable to phosphoantigens, as it is dependent on the parasite DOXP pathway, on Vγ9Vδ2 TCR signaling, and on butyrophilin expression by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Kinetic studies showed that the phosphoantigens were released at the end of the intraerythrocytic cycle at the time of parasite egress. We document exquisite sensitivity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, which respond to a few thousand parasites. These data unravel a novel framework, whereby release of phosphoantigens into the extracellular milieu by sequestered parasites likely promotes activation of distant Vγ9Vδ2 T cells that in turn exert remote antiparasitic functions. PMID:26169273

  18. Abdominal Muscle Activity during Mechanical Ventilation Increases Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianming; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Du, Juan; Chen, Rongchang

    2016-01-01

    Objective It has proved that muscle paralysis was more protective for injured lung in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the precise mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation increases lung injury in severe ARDS. Methods Eighteen male Beagles were studied under mechanical ventilation with anesthesia. Severe ARDS was induced by repetitive oleic acid infusion. After lung injury, Beagles were randomly assigned into spontaneous breathing group (BIPAPSB) and abdominal muscle paralysis group (BIPAPAP). All groups were ventilated with BIPAP model for 8h, and the high pressure titrated to reached a tidal volume of 6ml/kg, the low pressure was set at 10 cmH2O, with I:E ratio 1:1, and respiratory rate adjusted to a PaCO2 of 35–60 mmHg. Six Beagles without ventilator support comprised the control group. Respiratory variables, end-expiratory volume (EELV) and gas exchange were assessed during mechanical ventilation. The levels of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 in lung tissue and plasma were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Lung injury scores were determined at end of the experiment. Results For the comparable ventilator setting, as compared with BIPAPSB group, the BIPAPAP group presented higher EELV (427±47 vs. 366±38 ml) and oxygenation index (293±36 vs. 226±31 mmHg), lower levels of IL-6(216.6±48.0 vs. 297.5±71.2 pg/ml) and IL-8(246.8±78.2 vs. 357.5±69.3 pg/ml) in plasma, and lower express levels of IL-6 mRNA (15.0±3.8 vs. 21.2±3.7) and IL-8 mRNA (18.9±6.8 vs. 29.5±7.9) in lung tissues. In addition, less lung histopathology injury were revealed in the BIPAPAP group (22.5±2.0 vs. 25.2±2.1). Conclusion Abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation is one of the injurious factors in severe ARDS, so abdominal muscle paralysis might be an effective strategy to minimize ventilator-induce lung injury. PMID:26745868

  19. Comparative evaluation of assays for the measurement of bovine neutrophil oxidative burst activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During mastitis and other bacterial-mediated diseases of cattle, neutrophils play a critical role in the host innate immune response to infection. The bactericidal activity of neutrophils is mediated, in part, through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The objectives of the current stu...

  20. Products of Submarine Fountains and Bubble-burst Eruptive Activity at 1200 m on West Mata Volcano, Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Rubin, K. H.; Keller, N. S.

    2009-12-01

    An eruption was observed and sampled at West Mata Volcano using ROV JASON II for 5 days in May 2009 during the NSF-NOAA eruption response cruise to this region of suspected volcanic activity. Activity was focused near the summit at the Prometheus and Hades vents. Prometheus erupted almost exclusively as low-level fountains. Activity at Hades cycled between vigorous degassing, low fountains, and bubble-bursts, building up and partially collapsing a small spatter/scoria cone and feeding short sheet-like and pillow flows. Fire fountains at Prometheus produced mostly small primary pyroclasts that include Pele's hair and fluidal fragments of highly vesicular volcanic glass. These fragments have mostly shattered and broken surfaces, although smooth spatter-like surfaces also occur. As activity wanes, glow in the vent fades, and denser, sometimes altered volcanic clasts are incorporated into the eruption. The latter are likely from the conduit walls and/or vent-rim ejecta, drawn back into the vent by inrushing seawater that replaces water entrained in the rising volcanic plume. Repeated recycling of previously erupted materials eventually produces rounded clasts resembling beach cobbles and pitted surfaces on broken phenocrysts of pyroxene and olivine. We estimate that roughly 33% of near vent ejecta are recycled. Our best sample of this ejecta type was deposited in the drawer of the JASON II ROV during a particularly large explosion that occurred during plume sampling immediately above the vent. Elemental sulfur spherules up to 5 mm in diameter are common in ejecta from both vents and occur inside some of the lava fragments Hades activity included dramatic bubble-bursts unlike anything previously observed under water. The lava bubbles, sometimes occurring in rapid-fire sequence, collapsed in the water-column, producing fragments that are quenched in less than a second to form Pele's hair, limu o Pele, spatter-like lava blobs, and scoria. All are highly vesicular

  1. Large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels promote secretagogue-induced transition from spiking to bursting in murine anterior pituitary corticotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Peter J; Şengül, Sevgi; Tabak, Joël; Ruth, Peter; Bertram, Richard; Shipston, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Anterior pituitary corticotroph cells are a central component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis essential for the neuroendocrine response to stress. Corticotrophs are excitable cells that receive input from two hypothalamic secretagogues, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) to control the release of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). Although corticotrophs are spontaneously active and increase in excitability in response to CRH and AVP the patterns of electrical excitability and underlying ionic conductances are poorly understood. In this study, we have used electrophysiological, pharmacological and genetic approaches coupled with mathematical modelling to investigate whether CRH and AVP promote distinct patterns of electrical excitability and to interrogate the role of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels in spontaneous and secretagogue-induced activity. We reveal that BK channels do not play a significant role in the generation of spontaneous activity but are critical for the transition to bursting in response to CRH. In contrast, AVP promotes an increase in single spike frequency, a mechanism independent of BK channels but dependent on background non-selective conductances. Co-stimulation with CRH and AVP results in complex patterns of excitability including increases in both single spike frequency and bursting. The ability of corticotroph excitability to be differentially regulated by hypothalamic secretagogues provides a mechanism for differential control of corticotroph excitability in response to different stressors. Key points Corticotroph cells of the anterior pituitary are electrically excitable and are an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which governs the neuroendocrine response to stress. Corticotrophs display predominantly single spike activity under basal conditions that transition to complex bursting behaviours upon stimulation by the

  2. Differential inhibitory effects of methylmalonic acid on respiratory chain complex activities in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Pettenuzzo, Leticia F; Ferreira, Gustavo da C; Schmidt, Anna Laura; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wajner, Moacir

    2006-02-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of methylmalonic acid (MMA) and clinically by progressive neurological deterioration and kidney failure, whose pathophysiology is so far poorly established. Previous studies have shown that MMA inhibits complex II of the respiratory chain in rat cerebral cortex, although no inhibition of complexes I-V was found in bovine heart. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the in vitro effect of 2.5mM MMA on the activity of complexes I-III, II, II-III and IV in striatum, hippocampus, heart, liver and kidney homogenates from young rats. We observed that MMA caused a significant inhibition of complex II activity in striatum and hippocampus (15-20%) at low concentrations of succinate in the medium, but not in the peripheral tissues. We also verified that the inhibitory property of MMA only occurred after exposing brain homogenates for at least 10 min with the acid, suggesting that this inhibition was mediated by indirect mechanisms. Simultaneous preincubation with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and catalase (CAT) plus superoxide dismutase (SOD) did not prevent MMA-induced inhibition of complex II, suggesting that common reactive oxygen (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical) and nitric (nitric oxide) species were not involved in this effect. In addition, complex II-III (20-35%) was also inhibited by MMA in all tissues tested, and complex I-III only in the kidney (53%) and liver (38%). In contrast, complex IV activity was not changed by MMA in all tissues studied. These results indicate that MMA differentially affects the activity of the respiratory chain pending on the tissues studied, being striatum and hippocampus more vulnerable to its effect. In case our in vitro data are confirmed in vivo in tissues from methylmalonic acidemic patients, it is feasible that that the present findings may be

  3. Molecular changes in mitochondrial respiratory activity and metabolic enzyme activity in muscle of four pig breeds with distinct metabolic types.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Trakooljul, Nares; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Schellander, Karl; Wicke, Michael; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscles are metabolically active and have market value in meat-producing farm animals. A better understanding of biological pathways affecting energy metabolism in skeletal muscle could advance the science of skeletal muscle. In this study, comparative pathway-focused gene expression profiling in conjunction with muscle fiber typing were analyzed in skeletal muscles from Duroc, Pietrain, and Duroc-Pietrain crossbred pigs. Each breed type displayed a distinct muscle fiber-type composition. Mitochondrial respiratory activity and glycolytic and oxidative enzyme activities were comparable among genotypes, except for significantly lower complex I activity in Pietrain pigs homozygous-positive for malignant hyperthermia syndrome. At the transcriptional level, lactate dehydrogenase B showed breed specificity, with significantly lower expression in Pietrain pigs homozygous-positive for malignant hyperthermia syndrome. A similar mRNA expression pattern was shown for several subunits of oxidative phosphorylation complexes, including complex I, complex II, complex IV, and ATP synthase. Significant correlations were observed between mRNA expression of genes in focused pathways and enzyme activities in a breed-dependent manner. Moreover, expression patterns of pathway-focused genes were well correlated with muscle fiber-type composition. These results stress the importance of regulation of transcriptional rate of genes related to oxidative and glycolytic pathways in the metabolic capacity of muscle fibers. Overall, the results further the breed-specific understanding of the molecular basis of metabolic enzyme activities, which directly impact meat quality. PMID:26759028

  4. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing. PMID:27134409

  5. Respiratory water loss in relation to activity in fullterm infants on their first day after birth.

    PubMed

    Riesenfeld, T; Hammarlund, K; Sedin, G

    1987-11-01

    Respiratory water loss (RWL), oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured in ten fullterm infants on their first day after birth, using an open flow-through system with a mass spectrometer, specially equipped with a water channel, for analysis of gas concentrations. Measurements were made both with the infant asleep and during different levels of motor activity. The ambient temperature was maintained at approximately 32.5 degrees C and the ambient relative humidity at 50%. RWL increased from 4.2 +/- 0.7 (SD) mg/kg min when the infant was asleep to 6.3 +/- 1.0 mg/kg min when he or she was awake but calm; with increasing activity there was a further increase in RWL. The oxygen consumption increased from 5.4 +/- 0.9 (SD) ml/kg min during sleep to 6.9 +/- 0.8 (SD) ml/kg min when awake, and also increased further with increasing activity. PMID:3425306

  6. Nighttime instabilities of neurophysiological, cardiovascular, and respiratory activity: integrative modeling and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Vladimir; Troy, William C; Abdelmessih, Medhat; Hoffman, Stacy; Nemec, Jan; Strollo, Patrick J; London, Barry; Lampert, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Unstable (cyclical alternating pattern, or CAP) sleep is associated with surges of sympathetic nervous system activity, increased blood pressure and vasoconstriction, heightened baroreflex sensitivity, and unstable heart rhythm and breathing. In susceptible persons, CAP sleep provokes clinically significant events, including hypertensive crises, sleep-disordered breathing, and cardiac arrhythmias. Here we explore the neurophysiology of CAP sleep and its impact on cardiovascular and respiratory functions. We show that: (i) an increase in neurophysiological recovery rate can explain the emergence of slow, self-sustained, hypersynchronized A1 CAP-sleep pattern and its transition to the faster A2-A3 CAP-sleep patterns; (ii) in a two-dimensional, continuous model of cardiac tissue with heterogeneous action potential duration (APD) distribution, heart rate accelerations during CAP sleep may encounter incompletely recovered electrical excitability in cell clusters with longer APD. If the interaction between short cycle length and incomplete, spatially heterogeneous repolarization persists over multiple cycles, irregularities and asymmetry of depolarization front may accumulate and ultimately lead to a conduction block, retrograde conduction, breakup of activation waves, reentrant activity, and arrhythmias; and (iii) these modeling results are consistent with the nighttime data obtained from patients with structural heart disease (N=13) that show clusters of atrial and ventricular premature beats occurring during the periods of unstable heart rhythm and respiration that accompany CAP sleep. In these patients, CAP sleep is also accompanied by delayed adaptation of QT intervals and T-wave alternans. PMID:26341647

  7. THE 60 MONTH ALL-SKY BURST ALERT TELESCOPE SURVEY OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS AND THE ANISOTROPY OF NEARBY AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Madejski, G. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Greiner, J.; Burlon, D.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-04-10

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). In this time frame, BAT-detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGNs, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of {approx}2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGNs. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona fide Compton-thick AGNs and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGNs represent {approx}5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT data set to refine the determination of the log N-log S of AGNs which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, toward assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the log N-log S of AGNs selected above 10 keV is now established to {approx}10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGNs and measure a space density of 7.9{sup +4.1}{sub -2.9} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. As the BAT AGNs are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGNs in the nearby universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGNs that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local ({<=}85 Mpc) universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions.

  8. The 60 Month All-Sky Burst Alert Telescope Survey of Active Galactic Nucleus and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Greiner, J.; Madejeski, G. M.; Gehrels, N.; Burlon, D.

    2014-01-01

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). In this time frame, BAT-detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGNs, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of approx. 2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGNs. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona fide Compton-thick AGNs and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGNs represent approx. 5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT data set to refine the determination of the log N-log S of AGNs which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, toward assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the log N-log S of AGNs selected above 10 keV is now established to approx. 10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGNs and measure a space density of 7.9(+4.1/-2.9)× 10(exp -5)/cubic Mpc for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 × 10(exp 42) erg / s. As the BAT AGNs are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGNs in the nearby universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGNs that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local (much < 85 Mpc) universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions..

  9. OPTICAL SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE HARD X-RAY-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Lisa M.; Keeney, Brian; Lewis, Karen T.; Koss, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2010-02-10

    The Swift Burst Alert Telescope survey of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is providing an unprecedented view of local AGNs ((z) {approx} 0.03) and their host galaxy properties. In this paper, we present an analysis of the optical spectra of a sample of 64 AGNs from the nine month survey, detected solely based on their 14-195 keV flux. Our analysis includes both archived spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and our own observations from the 2.1 m Kitt Peak National Observatory telescope. Among our results, we include line ratio classifications utilizing standard emission line diagnostic plots, [O III] 5007 A luminosities, and Hbeta-derived black hole masses. As in our X-ray study, we find the type 2 sources to be less luminous (in [O III] 5007 A and 14-195 keV luminosities) with lower accretion rates than the type 1 sources. We find that the optically classified low-ionization narrow emission line regions, H II/composite galaxies, and ambiguous sources have the lowest luminosities, while both broad-line and narrow-line Seyferts have similar luminosities. From a comparison of the hard X-ray (14-195 keV) and [O III] luminosities, we find that both the observed and extinction-corrected [O III] luminosities are weakly correlated with X-ray luminosity. In a study of the host galaxy properties from both continuum fits and measurements of the stellar absorption indices, we find that the hosts of the narrow-line sources have properties consistent with late-type galaxies.

  10. A novel preterm respiratory mechanics active simulator to test the performances of neonatal pulmonary ventilators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, Paolo; Sciuto, Salvatore Andrea; Silvestri, Sergio

    2002-06-01

    A patient active simulator is proposed which is capable of reproducing values of the parameters of pulmonary mechanics of healthy newborns and preterm pathological infants. The implemented prototype is able to: (a) let the operator choose the respiratory pattern, times of apnea, episodes of cough, sobs, etc., (b) continuously regulate and control the parameters characterizing the pulmonary system; and, finally, (c) reproduce the attempt of breathing of a preterm infant. Taking into account both the limitation due to the chosen application field and the preliminary autocalibration phase automatically carried out by the proposed device, accuracy and reliability on the order of 1% is estimated. The previously indicated value has to be considered satisfactory in light of the field of application and the small values of the simulated parameters. Finally, the achieved metrological characteristics allow the described neonatal simulator to be adopted as a reference device to test performances of neonatal ventilators and, more specifically, to measure the time elapsed between the occurrence of a potentially dangerous condition to the patient and the activation of the corresponding alarm of the tested ventilator.

  11. Purification of Active Respiratory Supercomplex from Bovine Heart Mitochondria Enables Functional Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimomura, Harunobu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Shimada, Satoru; Takahashi, Ryoko; Oosaki, Marika; Ogura, Takashi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2016-01-01

    To understand the roles of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes, methods for consistently separating and preparing supercomplexes must be established. To this end, we solubilized supercomplexes from bovine heart mitochondria with digitonin and then replaced digitonin with amphipol (A8–35), an amphiphilic polymer. Afterward, supercomplexes were separated from other complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Twenty-six grams of bovine myocardium yielded 3.2 mg of amphipol-stabilized supercomplex. The purified supercomplexes were analyzed based on their absorption spectra as well as Q10 (ubiquinone with ten isoprene units) and lipid assays. The supercomplex sample did not contain cytochrome c but did contain complexes I, III, and IV at a ratio of 1:2:1, 6 molecules of Q10, and 623 atoms of phosphorus. When cytochrome c was added, the supercomplex exhibited KCN-sensitive NADH oxidation; thus, the purified supercomplex was active. Reduced complex IV absorbs at 444 nm, so we measured the resonance Raman spectrum of the reduced amphipol-solubilized supercomplex and the mixture of amphipol-solubilized complexes I1, III2, and IV1 using an excitation wavelength of 441.6 nm, allowing measurement precision comparable with that obtained for complex IV alone. Use of the purified active sample provides insights into the effects of supercomplex formation. PMID:26698328

  12. Purification of Active Respiratory Supercomplex from Bovine Heart Mitochondria Enables Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimomura, Harunobu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Shimada, Satoru; Takahashi, Ryoko; Oosaki, Marika; Ogura, Takashi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2016-02-19

    To understand the roles of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes, methods for consistently separating and preparing supercomplexes must be established. To this end, we solubilized supercomplexes from bovine heart mitochondria with digitonin and then replaced digitonin with amphipol (A8-35), an amphiphilic polymer. Afterward, supercomplexes were separated from other complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Twenty-six grams of bovine myocardium yielded 3.2 mg of amphipol-stabilized supercomplex. The purified supercomplexes were analyzed based on their absorption spectra as well as Q10 (ubiquinone with ten isoprene units) and lipid assays. The supercomplex sample did not contain cytochrome c but did contain complexes I, III, and IV at a ratio of 1:2:1, 6 molecules of Q10, and 623 atoms of phosphorus. When cytochrome c was added, the supercomplex exhibited KCN-sensitive NADH oxidation; thus, the purified supercomplex was active. Reduced complex IV absorbs at 444 nm, so we measured the resonance Raman spectrum of the reduced amphipol-solubilized supercomplex and the mixture of amphipol-solubilized complexes I1, III2, and IV1 using an excitation wavelength of 441.6 nm, allowing measurement precision comparable with that obtained for complex IV alone. Use of the purified active sample provides insights into the effects of supercomplex formation. PMID:26698328

  13. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P.; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L.; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions. PMID:26330610

  14. The respiratory molybdo-selenoprotein formate dehydrogenases of Escherichia coli have hydrogen: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli synthesizes three membrane-bound molybdenum- and selenocysteine-containing formate dehydrogenases, as well as up to four membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Two of the formate dehydrogenases (Fdh-N and Fdh-O) and two of the hydrogenases (Hyd-1 and Hyd-2) have their respective catalytic subunits located in the periplasm and these enzymes have been shown previously to oxidize formate and hydrogen, respectively, and thus function in energy metabolism. Mutants unable to synthesize the [NiFe]-hydrogenases retain a H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity. The aim of this study was to identify the enzyme or enzymes responsible for this activity. Results Here we report the identification of a new H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase enzyme activity in E. coli that is independent of the [NiFe]-hydrogenases. This enzyme activity was originally identified after non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualization of hydrogen-oxidizing activity by specific staining. Analysis of a crude extract derived from a variety of E. coli mutants unable to synthesize any [NiFe]-hydrogenase-associated enzyme activity revealed that the mutants retained this specific hydrogen-oxidizing activity. Enrichment of this enzyme activity from solubilised membrane fractions of the hydrogenase-negative mutant FTD147 by ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and size-exclusion chromatographies followed by mass spectrometric analysis identified the enzymes Fdh-N and Fdh-O. Analysis of defined mutants devoid of selenocysteine biosynthetic capacity or carrying deletions in the genes encoding the catalytic subunits of Fdh-N and Fdh-O demonstrated that both enzymes catalyze hydrogen activation. Fdh-N and Fdh-O can also transfer the electrons derived from oxidation of hydrogen to other redox dyes. Conclusions The related respiratory molybdo-selenoproteins Fdh-N and Fdh-O of Escherichia coli have hydrogen-oxidizing activity. These findings demonstrate that the

  15. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Inhibitor AZ-27 Differentially Inhibits Different Polymerase Activities at the Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Noton, Sarah L.; Nagendra, Kartikeya; Dunn, Ewan F.; Mawhorter, Michael E.; Yu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of pediatric respiratory disease. RSV has an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that transcribes and replicates the viral negative-sense RNA genome. The large polymerase subunit (L) has multiple enzymatic activities, having the capability to synthesize RNA and add and methylate a cap on each of the viral mRNAs. Previous studies (H. Xiong et al., Bioorg Med Chem Lett, 23:6789–6793, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2013.10.018; C. L. Tiong-Yip et al., Antimicrob Agents Chemother, 58:3867–3873, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.02540-14) had identified a small-molecule inhibitor, AZ-27, that targets the L protein. In this study, we examined the effect of AZ-27 on different aspects of RSV polymerase activity. AZ-27 was found to inhibit equally both mRNA transcription and genome replication in cell-based minigenome assays, indicating that it inhibits a step common to both of these RNA synthesis processes. Analysis in an in vitro transcription run-on assay, containing RSV nucleocapsids, showed that AZ-27 inhibits synthesis of transcripts from the 3′ end of the genome to a greater extent than those from the 5′ end, indicating that it inhibits transcription initiation. Consistent with this finding, experiments that assayed polymerase activity on the promoter showed that AZ-27 inhibited transcription and replication initiation. The RSV polymerase also can utilize the promoter sequence to perform a back-priming reaction. Interestingly, addition of AZ-27 had no effect on the addition of up to three nucleotides by back-priming but inhibited further extension of the back-primed RNA. These data provide new information regarding the mechanism of inhibition by AZ-27. They also suggest that the RSV polymerase adopts different conformations to perform its different activities at the promoter. IMPORTANCE Currently, there are no effective antiviral drugs to treat RSV infection. The RSV polymerase is an

  16. Clock-genes and mitochondrial respiratory activity: Evidence of a reciprocal interplay.

    PubMed

    Scrima, Rosella; Cela, Olga; Merla, Giuseppe; Augello, Bartolomeo; Rubino, Rosa; Quarato, Giovanni; Fugetto, Sabino; Menga, Marta; Fuhr, Luise; Relógio, Angela; Piccoli, Claudia; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2016-08-01

    In the past few years mounting evidences have highlighted the tight correlation between circadian rhythms and metabolism. Although at the organismal level the central timekeeper is constituted by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei practically all the peripheral tissues are equipped with autonomous oscillators made up by common molecular clockworks represented by circuits of gene expression that are organized in interconnected positive and negative feed-back loops. In this study we exploited a well-established in vitro synchronization model to investigate specifically the linkage between clock gene expression and the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). Here we show that synchronized cells exhibit an autonomous ultradian mitochondrial respiratory activity which is abrogated by silencing the master clock gene ARNTL/BMAL1. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial OxPhos system resulted in dramatic deregulation of the rhythmic clock-gene expression and a similar result was attained with mtDNA depleted cells (Rho0). Our findings provide a novel level of complexity in the interlocked feedback loop controlling the interplay between cellular bioenergetics and the molecular clockwork. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060253

  17. Activity-based cost management. Part II: Applied to a respiratory protection program.

    PubMed

    Brandt, M T; Levine, S P; Smith, D G; Ettinger, H J; Gallimore, B F

    1998-05-01

    To demonstrate the relevance of activity-based cost management (ABCM) for the occupational and environmental health community, the investigators used data generated by an ABCM model of a respiratory protection program (RPP) to develop options for solving a business problem. The RPP manager in this hypothetical but realistic business scenario is faced with a 25% budget cut and a 10% increase in demand for RPP services. The manager's dilemma is to maintain the integrity of the RPP while absorbing a significant budget cut. Various cost savings options are developed, and the assumptions under which these options operate are presented. It is emphasized that the RPP manager's primary responsibility is to assure worker health and safety by first understanding the technical issues, merits, and implications of any cost-cutting option that may be considered. It is argued that only then should the manager consider the financial merits of the possible solutions to this business problem. In this way worker health and safety, and environmental protection goals, can continue to be achieved in an economic climate of cost cutting and downsizing. PMID:9622907

  18. Chlorogenic acid ameliorates intestinal mitochondrial injury by increasing antioxidant effects and activity of respiratory complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Zhou, Lili; Ruan, Zheng; Mi, Shumei; Jiang, Min; Li, Xiaolan; Wu, Xin; Deng, Zeyuan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-05-01

    Dietary polyphenols are thought to be beneficial for human health by acting as antioxidants. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is abundant in plant-based foods as an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid. In this study, we investigated the effects of CGA on mitochondrial protection. Our results demonstrated that pretreatment with CGA ameliorated the intestinal mitochondrial injury induced by H2O2; membrane potential was increased, mitochondrial swelling, levels of reactive oxygen species, contents of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, and cytochrome c released were decreased. The beneficial effects of CGA were accompanied by an increase in antioxidant and respiratory-chain complex I, IV, and V activities. In trinitrobenzene-sulfonic acid-induced colitic rats indicated that CGA supplementation improved mitochondria ultrastructure and decreased mitochondrial injury. Our results suggest a promising role for CGA as a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant in combating intestinal oxidative injury. Daily intake of diets containing CGA, such as coffee and honeysuckle, may be useful for prevention of intestinal diseases. PMID:26824685

  19. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  20. Respiratory alkalosis

    MedlinePlus

    Alkalosis - respiratory ... leads to shortness of breath can also cause respiratory alkalosis (such as pulmonary embolism and asthma). ... Treatment is aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing into a paper bag -- or using ...

  1. Heterogeneity in the properties of burst-forming units of erythroid lineage in sickle cell anemia: DNA synthesis and burst-promoting activity production is related to peripheral hemoglobin F levels

    SciTech Connect

    Croizat, H.; Billett, H.H.; Nagel, R.L. )

    1990-02-15

    Circulating 14-day erythroid progenitors (BFU-E) from 28 sickle cell anemia (SS) patients with hemoglobin F (HbF) levels ranging from 2% to 16% were studied to determine their sensitivity to ({sup 3}H) thymidine kill and burst-promoting activity (BPA)-like factor production. We find that the proportion of BFU-E sensitive to 3H-dT kill, and hence active in DNA synthesis, was inversely correlated with the percent of peripheral HbF when light density (LD) mononuclear cells were used for plating. Regression analysis showed that the correlation between HbF level and BFU-E kill was highly significant (r = .88; P less than .00003). We confirmed the BPA-like factor(s) production by LD mononuclear cells of SS patients, and found, in addition, that this phenomenon is restricted to the population of SS patients with HbF levels lower than 9%. Circulating BFU-E of patients with high HbF levels are not sensitive to 3H-dT, and their mononuclear cells do not release BPA-like factor. In summary, SS patients exhibit differences in the capacity of their mononuclear cells to produce BPA activity according to their peripheral HbF level, as well as to the DNA synthesis-state of their circulating BFU-E. We conclude that erythroid progenitors differ among SS patients in relation to their peripheral HbF level.

  2. Respiration and respiratory enzyme activity in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, T. T.; Garfield, P. C.; Martinez, R.

    1983-03-01

    Oxygen consumption, nitrate reduction, respiratory electron transport activity, and nitrate reductase activity were measured in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus. The respiratory electron transport activity was closely correlated with oxygen consumption ( r = 0.98) in aerobic cultures and nearly as well correlated with nitrate reductase activity ( r = 0.91) and nitrate reduction ( r = 0.85) in anaerobic cultures. It was also well correlated with biomass in both aerobic ( r = 0.99) and anaerobic ( r = 0.94) cultures supporting the use of tetrazolium reduction as an index of living biomass. Time courses of nitrate and nitrate in the anaerobic cultures demonstrated that at nitrate concentrations above 1 mM, denitrification proceeds stepwise. Time courses of pH in anaerobic cultures revealed a rise from 7 to 8.5 during nitrite reduction indicating net proton utilization. This proton utilization is predicted by the stoichiometry of denitrification. Although the experiments were not under 'simulated in situ' conditions, the results are relevant to studies of denitrification, to bacterial ATP production, and to the respiratory activity of marine plankton in the ocean.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of prulifloxacin in comparison with other fluoroquinolones against community-acquired urinary and respiratory pathogens isolated in Greece.

    PubMed

    Karageorgopoulos, D E; Maraki, S; Vatopoulos, A C; Samonis, G; Schito, G C; Falagas, M E

    2013-11-01

    Prulifloxacin, the prodrug of ulifloxacin, is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone rather recently introduced in certain European countries. We compared the antimicrobial potency of ulifloxacin with that of other fluoroquinolones against common urinary and respiratory bacterial pathogens. The microbial isolates were prospectively collected between January 2007 and May 2008 from patients with community-acquired infections in Greece. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin (for respiratory isolates only), and ulifloxacin using the E-test method. The binary logarithms of the MICs [log2(MICs)] were compared by using the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. A total of 409 isolates were studied. Ulifloxacin had the lowest geometric mean MIC for the 161 Escherichia coli, 59 Proteus mirabilis, and 22 Staphylococcus saprophyticus urinary isolates, the second lowest geometric mean MIC for the 38 Streptococcus pyogenes respiratory isolates (after moxifloxacin), and the third lowest geometric mean MIC for the 114 Haemophilus influenzae and the 15 Moraxella catarrhalis respiratory isolates (after ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin). Compared with levofloxacin, ulifloxacin had lower log2(MICs) against E. coli (p < 0.001), P. mirabilis (p < 0.001), S. saprophyticus (p < 0.001), and S. pyogenes (p < 0.001). Compared with ciprofloxacin, ulifloxacin had lower log2(MICs) against P. mirabilis (p < 0.001), S. saprophyticus (p = 0.008), and S. pyogenes (p < 0.001), but higher log2(MICs) against H. influenzae (p < 0.001) and M. catarrhalis (p = 0.001). In comparison with other clinically relevant fluoroquinolones, ulifloxacin had the most potent antimicrobial activity against the community-acquired urinary isolates studied and very good activity against the respiratory isolates. PMID:23686506

  4. Electroencephalographic detection of respiratory-related cortical activity in humans: from event-related approaches to continuous connectivity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Anna L; Navarro-Sune, Xavier; Martinerie, Jacques; Pouget, Pierre; Raux, Mathieu; Chavez, Mario; Similowski, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The presence of a respiratory-related cortical activity during tidal breathing is abnormal and a hallmark of respiratory difficulties, but its detection requires superior discrimination and temporal resolution. The aim of this study was to validate a computational method using EEG covariance (or connectivity) matrices to detect a change in brain activity related to breathing. In 17 healthy subjects, EEG was recorded during resting unloaded breathing (RB), voluntary sniffs, and breathing against an inspiratory threshold load (ITL). EEG were analyzed by the specially developed covariance-based classifier, event-related potentials, and time-frequency (T-F) distributions. Nine subjects repeated the protocol. The classifier could accurately detect ITL and sniffs compared with the reference period of RB. For ITL, EEG-based detection was superior to airflow-based detection (P < 0.05). A coincident improvement in EEG-airflow correlation in ITL compared with RB (P < 0.05) confirmed that EEG detection relates to breathing. Premotor potential incidence was significantly higher before inspiration in sniffs and ITL compared with RB (P < 0.05), but T-F distributions revealed a significant difference between sniffs and RB only (P < 0.05). Intraclass correlation values ranged from poor (-0.2) to excellent (1.0). Thus, as for conventional event-related potential analysis, the covariance-based classifier can accurately predict a change in brain state related to a change in respiratory state, and given its capacity for near "real-time" detection, it is suitable to monitor the respiratory state in respiratory and critically ill patients in the development of a brain-ventilator interface. PMID:26864771

  5. Antiviral activity in vitro of two preparations of the herbal medicinal product Sinupret® against viruses causing respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Glatthaar-Saalmüller, B; Rauchhaus, U; Rode, S; Haunschild, J; Saalmüller, A

    2011-12-15

    Sinupret(®), a herbal medicinal product made from Gentian root, Primula flower, Elder flower, Sorrel herb, and Verbena herb is frequently used in the treatment of acute and chronic rhinosinusitis and respiratory viral infections such as common cold. To date little is known about its potential antiviral activity. Therefore experiments have been performed to measure the antiviral activity of Sinupret(®) oral drops (hereinafter referred to as "oral drops") and Sinupret(®) dry extract (hereinafter referred to as "dry extract"), in vitro against a broad panel of both enveloped and non-enveloped human pathogenic RNA and DNA viruses known to cause infections of the upper respiratory tract: influenza A, Chile 1/83 (H1N1) virus (FluA), Porcine Influenza A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) virus (pFluA), parainfluenza type 3 virus (Para 3), respiratory syncytial virus, strain Long (RSV), human rhinovirus B subtype 14 (HRV 14), coxsackievirus subtype A9 (CA9), and adenovirus C subtype 5 (Adeno 5). Concentration-dependent antiviral activity (EC(50) between 13.8 and 124.8 μg/ml) of Sinupret(®) was observed against RNA as well as DNA viruses independent of a viral envelope. Remarkable antiviral activity was shown against Adeno 5, HRV 14 and RSV in which dry extract was significantly superior to oral drops. This could be ascertained with different assays as plaque-reduction assays in plaque forming units (PFU), the analyses of a cytopathogenic effect (CPE) and with enzyme immunoassays (ELISA) to determine the amount of newly synthesised virus. Our results demonstrate that Sinupret(®) shows a broad spectrum of antiviral activity in vitro against viruses commonly known to cause respiratory infections. PMID:22112724

  6. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders. PMID:26476839

  7. Transition Mechanisms of Bursting in a Two-Cell Network Model of the Pre-Bötzinger Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lixia; Yuan, Dandan; Chen, Xi; Meng, Xiangying

    Persistent sodium and calcium activated nonspecific cationic currents play important roles in the respiratory rhythm generation of the pre-Bötzinger complex. In this paper, we study the bursting patterns and their transition mechanisms in the two-parameter space of a two-cell network model of the pre-Bötzinger complex with synaptic coupling. Using the methods of fast/slow decomposition and two-parameter bifurcation analysis, we divide the two-parameter space into four different regions according to the multiphase oscillations, and reveal the possible transition mechanisms of bursting between these different regions. We also study the dynamics of the system with varying synaptic coupling strength. This work provides insights of how currents and synaptic coupling work on the respiratory rhythm generation.

  8. Enhanced allergic responsiveness after early childhood infection with respiratory viruses: Are long-lived alternatively activated macrophages the missing link?

    PubMed

    Keegan, Achsah D; Shirey, Kari Ann; Bagdure, Dayanand; Blanco, Jorge; Viscardi, Rose M; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2016-07-01

    Early childhood infection with respiratory viruses, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza, is associated with an increased risk of allergic asthma and severe exacerbation of ongoing disease. Despite the long recognition of this relationship, the mechanism linking viral infection and later susceptibility to allergic lung inflammation is still poorly understood. We discuss the literature and provide new evidence demonstrating that these viruses induce the alternative activation of macrophages. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) induced by RSV or influenza infection persisted in the lungs of mice up to 90 days after initial viral infection. Several studies suggest that AAM contribute to allergic inflammatory responses, although their mechanism of action is unclear. In this commentary, we propose that virus-induced AAM provide a link between viral infection and enhanced responses to inhaled allergens. PMID:27178560

  9. Variations of respiratory activity and glutathione in activated sludges exposed to low ozone doses.

    PubMed

    Dziurla, M A; Salhi, M; Leroy, P; Paul, E; Ginestet, Ph; Block, J C

    2005-07-01

    Ozonation is one of the most effective treatments for reducing the production of activated sludges in wastewater treatment plants. However, because microorganisms are present in the form of microcolonies, some bacteria may be exposed to sub-lethal ozone doses that could lead to adaptation and resistance to further exposition to oxidative treatment. This represents a major question as it may limit the effect of the treatment, especially when low ozone doses are applied. The critical ozone dosage, defined as the lowest specific transferred ozone concentration leading to a decrease in the maximum oxygen uptake rate was estimated to range between 0.9 and 13.6mg O(3)g(-1) COD(sludges), according to the sludges tested. The lowest ozone dosage leading to the decrease of GSH and GSHt concentrations could be estimated to be lower than 10mg O(3)g(-1) COD(sludges) for GSH, and close to 10mg O(3)g(-1) COD(sludges) for GSHt. After sludge exposure to low ozone doses, no higher amounts of glutathione were synthesized, suggesting that no development of resistance to ozonation occurred after sludge treatment with low ozone doses. PMID:15972223

  10. Mitochondrial K(ATP) channels in respiratory neurons and their role in the hypoxic facilitation of rhythmic activity.

    PubMed

    Mironov, S L; Hartelt, N; Ivannikov, M V

    2005-02-01

    Hypoxia is damaging in neurons, but it can also produce beneficial effects by consolidating the activity of neural networks such as facilitation of respiratory activity [T.L. Baker-Herman, D.D. Fuller, R.W. Bavis, A.G. Zabka, F.J. Golder, N.J. Doperalski, R.A. Johnson, J.J. Watters, G.S. Mitchell, Nature Neuroscience 7 (2004) 48-55; J.L. Feldman, G.S. Mitchell, E.E. Nattie, Ann. Rev. Neurosci. 26 (2003) 239-266; D.M. Blitz, J.M. Ramirez, J. Neurophysiol. 87 (2002) 2964-2971]. The underlying mechanisms are unknown, and we hypothesized they may be similar to ischemic preconditioning in the heart, involving mitochondrial K(ATP) (mK(ATP)) channels. By measuring the mitochondrial potential (Psi(m)) and Ca2+ ([Ca2+]m) in neurons of pre-Botzinger complex (pBC), we examined the functional expression of mK(ATP) channels in the respiratory network. The opener of mK(ATP) channels diazoxide decreased Psi(m) and [Ca2+]m both in pBC neurons and in isolated immobilized mitochondria. 5-Hydroxydecanoate (5-HD), the blocker of mK(ATP) channels, increased both Psi(m) and [Ca2+]m. Phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) mimicked the effects of diazoxide. Protein kinase C (PKC) was stimulated during hypoxia that occurred mostly at the mitochondria. Brief hypoxia induced facilitation of the respiratory activity, which was prevented after blockade of mK(ATP) channels with 5-HD and PKC with staurosporine. Diazoxide potentiated the motor output and subsequent application of hypoxia was ineffective. We propose that a PKC-induced stimulation of K(ATP) channels in the mitochondria of respiratory neurons is responsible for the hypoxic facilitation of rhythmic activity. PMID:15680335

  11. Gamma and Beta Bursts Underlie Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Mikael; Rose, Jonas; Herman, Pawel; Brincat, Scott L; Buschman, Timothy J; Miller, Earl K

    2016-04-01

    Working memory is thought to result from sustained neuron spiking. However, computational models suggest complex dynamics with discrete oscillatory bursts. We analyzed local field potential (LFP) and spiking from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of monkeys performing a working memory task. There were brief bursts of narrow-band gamma oscillations (45-100 Hz), varied in time and frequency, accompanying encoding and re-activation of sensory information. They appeared at a minority of recording sites associated with spiking reflecting the to-be-remembered items. Beta oscillations (20-35 Hz) also occurred in brief, variable bursts but reflected a default state interrupted by encoding and decoding. Only activity of neurons reflecting encoding/decoding correlated with changes in gamma burst rate. Thus, gamma bursts could gate access to, and prevent sensory interference with, working memory. This supports the hypothesis that working memory is manifested by discrete oscillatory dynamics and spiking, not sustained activity. PMID:26996084

  12. Breakthrough curves for toluene adsorption on different types of activated carbon fibers: application in respiratory protection.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Floyd, Evan L; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2015-05-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACF) are considered viable alternative adsorbent materials in respirators because of their larger surface area, lighter weight, and fabric form. The purpose of this study was to characterize the breakthrough curves of toluene for different types of commercially available ACFs to understand their potential service lives in respirators. Two forms of ACF, cloth (AC) and felt (AF), with three surface areas each were tested. ACFs were challenged with six toluene concentrations (50-500 p.p.m.) at constant air temperature (23°C), relative humidity (50%), and air flow (16 l min-1) at different bed depths. Breakthrough data were obtained using continuous monitoring by gas chromatography using a gas sampling valve. The ACF specific surface areas were measured by an automatic physisorption analyzer. Results showed unique shapes of breakthrough curves for each ACF form: AC demonstrated a gradual increase in breakthrough concentration, whereas AF showed abrupt increase in concentration from the breakpoint, which was attributed to the difference in fiber density between the forms. AF has steeper breakthrough curves compared with AC with similar specific surface area. AC exhibits higher 10% breakthrough times for a given bed depth due to higher mass per bed depth compared with AF, indicating more adsorption per bed depth with AC. ACF in respirators may be appropriate for use as protection in environments with toluene concentration at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limit, or during emergency escape for higher toluene concentrations. ACF has shown great potential for application in respiratory protection against toluene and in the development of thinner, lighter, and more efficient respirators. PMID:25528579

  13. New Respiratory Inductive Plethysmography (RIP) Method for Evaluating Ventilatory Adaptation during Mild Physical Activities.

    PubMed

    Retory, Yann; Niedzialkowski, Pauline; de Picciotto, Carole; Bonay, Marcel; Petitjean, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The pneumotachometer is currently the most accepted device to measure tidal breathing, however, it requires the use of a mouthpiece and thus alteration of spontaneous ventilation is implied. Respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP), which includes two belts, one thoracic and one abdominal, is able to determine spontaneous tidal breathing without the use of a facemask or mouthpiece, however, there are a number of as yet unresolved issues. In this study we aimed to describe and validate a new RIP method, relying on a combination of thoracic RIP and nasal pressure signals taking into account that exercise-induced body movements can easily contaminate RIP thoracic signals by generating tissue motion artifacts. A custom-made time domain algorithm that relies on the elimination of low amplitude artifacts was applied to the raw thoracic RIP signal. Determining this tidal ventilation allowed comparisons between the RIP signal and simultaneously-recorded airflow signals from a calibrated pneumotachometer (PT). We assessed 206 comparisons from 30 volunteers who were asked to breathe spontaneously at rest and during walking on the spot. Comparisons between RIP signals processed by our algorithm and PT showed highly significant correlations for tidal volume (Vt), inspiratory (Ti) and expiratory times (Te). Moreover, bias calculated using the Bland and Altman method were reasonably low for Vt and Ti (0.04 L and 0.02 s, respectively), and acceptable for Te (<0.1 s) and the intercept from regression relationships (0.01 L, 0.06 s, 0.17 s respectively). The Ti/Ttot and Vt/Ti ratios obtained with the two methods were also statistically correlated. We conclude that our methodology (filtering by our algorithm and calibrating with our calibration procedure) for thoracic RIP renders this technique sufficiently accurate to evaluate tidal ventilation variation at rest and during mild to moderate physical activity. PMID:27008313

  14. New Respiratory Inductive Plethysmography (RIP) Method for Evaluating Ventilatory Adaptation during Mild Physical Activities

    PubMed Central

    Retory, Yann; Niedzialkowski, Pauline; de Picciotto, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The pneumotachometer is currently the most accepted device to measure tidal breathing, however, it requires the use of a mouthpiece and thus alteration of spontaneous ventilation is implied. Respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP), which includes two belts, one thoracic and one abdominal, is able to determine spontaneous tidal breathing without the use of a facemask or mouthpiece, however, there are a number of as yet unresolved issues. In this study we aimed to describe and validate a new RIP method, relying on a combination of thoracic RIP and nasal pressure signals taking into account that exercise-induced body movements can easily contaminate RIP thoracic signals by generating tissue motion artifacts. A custom-made time domain algorithm that relies on the elimination of low amplitude artifacts was applied to the raw thoracic RIP signal. Determining this tidal ventilation allowed comparisons between the RIP signal and simultaneously-recorded airflow signals from a calibrated pneumotachometer (PT). We assessed 206 comparisons from 30 volunteers who were asked to breathe spontaneously at rest and during walking on the spot. Comparisons between RIP signals processed by our algorithm and PT showed highly significant correlations for tidal volume (Vt), inspiratory (Ti) and expiratory times (Te). Moreover, bias calculated using the Bland and Altman method were reasonably low for Vt and Ti (0.04 L and 0.02 s, respectively), and acceptable for Te (<0.1 s) and the intercept from regression relationships (0.01 L, 0.06 s, 0.17 s respectively). The Ti/Ttot and Vt/Ti ratios obtained with the two methods were also statistically correlated. We conclude that our methodology (filtering by our algorithm and calibrating with our calibration procedure) for thoracic RIP renders this technique sufficiently accurate to evaluate tidal ventilation variation at rest and during mild to moderate physical activity. PMID:27008313

  15. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  16. Expiratory activation of abdominal muscle is associated with improved respiratory stability and an increase in minute ventilation in REM epochs of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Colin G; Pagliardini, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Breathing is more vulnerable to apneas and irregular breathing patterns during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in both humans and rodents. We previously reported that robust and recurrent recruitment of expiratory abdominal (ABD) muscle activity is present in rats during REM epochs despite ongoing REM-induced muscle atonia in skeletal musculature. To develop a further understanding of the characteristics of ABD recruitment during REM epochs and their relationship with breathing patterns and irregularities, we sought to compare REM epochs that displayed ABD muscle recruitment with those that did not, within the same rats. Specifically, we investigated respiratory characteristics that preceded and followed recruitment. We hypothesized that ABD muscle recruitment would be likely to occur following respiratory irregularities and would subsequently contribute to respiratory stability and the maintenance of good ventilation following recruitment. Our data demonstrate that epochs of REM sleep containing ABD recruitments (REM(ABD+)) were characterized by increased respiratory rate variability and increased presence of spontaneous brief central apneas. Within these epochs, respiratory events that displayed ABD muscle activation were preceded by periods of increased respiratory rate variability. Onset of ABD muscle activity increased tidal volume, amplitude of diaphragmatic contractions, and minute ventilation compared with the periods preceding ABD muscle activation. These results show that expiratory muscle activity is more likely recruited when respiration is irregular and its recruitment is subsequently associated with an increase in minute ventilation and a more regular respiratory rhythm. PMID:26338455

  17. The effect of sugars and free amino acids from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii hemolymph on lectin activity and on oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Soria, Frida; Sierra, Claudia; Bouquelet, Stephane; Brassart, Colette; Agundis, Concepción; Zenteno, Edgar; Vázquez, Lorena

    2006-01-01

    We determined the effect of low molecular weight components (LMWC) from healthy juvenile and adult Macrobrachium rosenbergii hemolymph on lectin activity and oxidative burst (OB) in hemocytes. In an attempt to identify the LMWC that affect the lectin's hemagglutinating activity or oxidative burst, we determined the hemolymph carbohydrates and free amino acids (FAA) concentration. The LMWC (<2000 Da) were obtained after dialysis of the hemolymph. Our results showed that LMWC from juveniles exerted a greater inhibition on lectin than LMWC from adult hemolymph. Production of superoxide radicals by hemocytes was lower in the presence of juvenile (p<0.05) as compared to adult LMWC. FAA composition of the hemolymph and of LMWC from adults showed higher proportion of alanine (which corresponded to 25% of total FAA) and proline (>20%); whereas, in juveniles, the main FAA identified were glycine (>40%) and alanine (26%). N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) was the main sugar residue in the hemolymph and LMWC from juveniles; its concentration was 2.4 times higher than glucose (Glc), whereas, in adults, Glc was the main free sugar residue. Our results suggest that the proportion of FAA and carbohydrates in the hemolymph of M. rosenbergii seems to be correlated with the maturation process; furthermore, the high proportion of free GlcNAc and glycine regulate, in the juvenile stage, lectin activity and cellular oxidative mechanisms, respectively. PMID:16290085

  18. The human respiratory gate

    PubMed Central

    Eckberg, Dwain L

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this ‘respiratory gating’ is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R–R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R–R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms. PMID:12626671

  19. The human respiratory gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this 'respiratory gating' is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R-R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R-R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms.

  20. Analysis of Family Structures Reveals Robustness or Sensitivity of Bursting Activity to Parameter Variations in a Half-Center Oscillator (HCO) Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms that support robustness in neuronal networks are as yet unknown. However, recent studies provide evidence that neuronal networks are robust to natural variations, modulation, and environmental perturbations of parameters, such as maximal conductances of intrinsic membrane and synaptic currents. Here we sought a method for assessing robustness, which might easily be applied to large brute-force databases of model instances. Starting with groups of instances with appropriate activity (e.g., tonic spiking), our method classifies instances into much smaller subgroups, called families, in which all members vary only by the one parameter that defines the family. By analyzing the structures of families, we developed measures of robustness for activity type. Then, we applied these measures to our previously developed model database, HCO-db, of a two-neuron half-center oscillator (HCO), a neuronal microcircuit from the leech heartbeat central pattern generator where the appropriate activity type is alternating bursting. In HCO-db, the maximal conductances of five intrinsic and two synaptic currents were varied over eight values (leak reversal potential also varied, five values). We focused on how variations of particular conductance parameters maintain normal alternating bursting activity while still allowing for functional modulation of period and spike frequency. We explored the trade-off between robustness of activity type and desirable change in activity characteristics when intrinsic conductances are altered and identified the hyperpolarization-activated (h) current as an ideal target for modulation. We also identified ensembles of model instances that closely approximate physiological activity and can be used in future modeling studies. PMID:27595135

  1. Analysis of Family Structures Reveals Robustness or Sensitivity of Bursting Activity to Parameter Variations in a Half-Center Oscillator (HCO) Model.

    PubMed

    Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms that support robustness in neuronal networks are as yet unknown. However, recent studies provide evidence that neuronal networks are robust to natural variations, modulation, and environmental perturbations of parameters, such as maximal conductances of intrinsic membrane and synaptic currents. Here we sought a method for assessing robustness, which might easily be applied to large brute-force databases of model instances. Starting with groups of instances with appropriate activity (e.g., tonic spiking), our method classifies instances into much smaller subgroups, called families, in which all members vary only by the one parameter that defines the family. By analyzing the structures of families, we developed measures of robustness for activity type. Then, we applied these measures to our previously developed model database, HCO-db, of a two-neuron half-center oscillator (HCO), a neuronal microcircuit from the leech heartbeat central pattern generator where the appropriate activity type is alternating bursting. In HCO-db, the maximal conductances of five intrinsic and two synaptic currents were varied over eight values (leak reversal potential also varied, five values). We focused on how variations of particular conductance parameters maintain normal alternating bursting activity while still allowing for functional modulation of period and spike frequency. We explored the trade-off between robustness of activity type and desirable change in activity characteristics when intrinsic conductances are altered and identified the hyperpolarization-activated (h) current as an ideal target for modulation. We also identified ensembles of model instances that closely approximate physiological activity and can be used in future modeling studies. PMID:27595135

  2. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst.

    PubMed

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10-15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches-and their associated spindle bursts-occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  3. Physical Activity, Cardio-Respiratory Fitness, and Metabolic Traits in Rural Mexican Tarahumara

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Dirk Lund; Alcalá-Sánchez, Imelda; Leal-Berumen, Irene; Conchas-Ramirez, Miguel; Brage, Soren

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To study the association between physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) and cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) with key metabolic traits and anthropometric measures in the Tarahumara of Mexico. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in five rural communities in Chihuahua, México including 64 adult Tarahumara, mean (SD) age 40.7 (12.9) years. Using a combined accelerometer and heart rate sensor, PAEE was measured over three consecutive days and nights and a sub-maximal step test was carried out in order to (1) calibrate heart rate at the individual level and (2) to estimate CRF. Random blood glucose level and resting blood pressure (BP) were measured with standard anthropometrics. Results Mean (SD) PAEE was 71.2 (30.3) kJ kg−1 day−1 and CRF was 36.6 (6.5) mlO2 min−1 kg−1. Mean (SD) glucose was 127.9 (32.4) mg/dl, with 3.3% having diabetes. Mean (SD) systolic and diastolic BP was 122 (20.8) and 82 (14.8) mm Hg, respectively, with 28.1% having hypertension. Mean body mass index was 27.5 (4.2) kg m−2, with 71.9% being overweight. Following adjustment for age and sex, weak inverse associations were observed between PAEE and systolic BP (β = −0.20, P = 0.27) and diastolic BP (β = −0.16, P = 0.23); and between CRF and systolic BP (β = −0.51, P = 0.14) and diastolic BP (β = −0.53, P = 0.06). The inverse associations with glucose were also weak and not statistically significant for neither PAEE (β = −0.01, P = 0.63) nor CRF (β = −0.05, P = 0.27). Conclusions This study suggests high levels of overweight and hypertension in the Tarahumara, and points to fitness and physical activity as potential intervention targets although findings should be confirmed in larger samples. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22308165

  4. Mechanism for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, G. E.; del Valle, M. V.; Vieyro, F. L.

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are mysterious transient sources likely located at cosmological distances. The derived brightness temperatures exceed by many orders of magnitude the self-absorption limit of incoherent synchrotron radiation, implying the operation of a coherent emission process. We propose a radiation mechanism for fast radio bursts where the emission arises from collisionless bremsstrahlung in strong plasma turbulence excited by relativistic electron beams. We discuss possible astrophysical scenarios in which this process might operate. The emitting region is a turbulent plasma hit by a relativistic jet, where Langmuir plasma waves produce a concentration of intense electrostatic soliton-like regions (cavitons). The resulting radiation is coherent and, under some physical conditions, can be polarized and have a power-law distribution in energy. We obtain radio luminosities in agreement with the inferred values for fast radio bursts. The time scale of the radio flare in some cases can be extremely fast, of the order of 1 0-3 s . The mechanism we present here can explain the main features of fast radio bursts and is plausible in different astrophysical sources, such as gamma-ray bursts and some active galactic nuclei.

  5. Air contaminants associated with potential respiratory effects from unconventional resource development activities.

    PubMed

    McCawley, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Unconventional natural gas development uses horizontal drilling in conjunction with hydraulic fracturing to gain access to natural gas deposits which may be tightly held in shale deposits and unavailable to conventional vertical drilling operations. The intensive work required to extract this source of energy results in higher than usual numbers of vehicles involved, potential release of emissions from those vehicles in congested zones surrounding the drill site, and release of other contaminants from materials drawn back out of the borehole after fracturing of the shale. Typical contaminants would be diesel exhaust particulate and gases, volatile organic compounds and other hydrocarbons both from diesels and the drilling process, crystalline silica, used as part of the hydraulic fracturing process in kiloton quantities, and methane escaping from the borehole and piping. A rise in respiratory disease with proximity to the process has been reported in nearby communities and both silica and diesel exposures at the worksite are recognized respiratory hazards. Because of the relatively short time this process has been used to the extent it is currently being used, it is not possible to draw detailed conclusions about the respiratory hazards that may be posed. However, based on the traffic volume associated with each drill site and the number of drill sites in any locale, it is possible at least to compare the effects to that of large traffic volume highways which are known to produce some respiratory effects in surrounding areas. PMID:26024346

  6. Learning within the Confines of a Continuing Professional Education Activity: Perspectives from Respiratory Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittnebel, Leonard D.

    2013-01-01

    Continuing professional education (CPE) for respiratory therapists (RTs) represent both a mandate and a desired characteristic of a profession poised to assume a more prominent role in the healthcare landscape. While it is acknowledged that education beyond the professional degree and a lifetime approach to learning is inherent due to the nature…

  7. Comparative analysis of signature genes in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells, e.g. monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these cell...

  8. Bursts in discontinuous Aeolian saltation.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, M V; Rasmussen, K R; Herrmann, H J

    2015-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of discontinuous flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the fluid threshold Shields number θc. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain discontinuous flux even below the fluid threshold. PMID:26073305

  9. Bursts in discontinuous Aeolian saltation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, M. V.; Rasmussen, K. R.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of discontinuous flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the fluid threshold Shields number θc. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain discontinuous flux even below the fluid threshold. PMID:26073305

  10. Critical COPD respiratory illness is linked to increased transcriptomic activity of neutrophil proteases genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene expression profiling (GEP) in cells obtained from peripheral blood has shown that this is a very useful approach for biomarker discovery and for studying molecular pathogenesis of prevalent diseases. While there is limited literature available on gene expression markers associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), the transcriptomic picture associated with critical respiratory illness in this disease is not known at the present moment. Findings By using Agilent microarray chips, we have profiled gene expression signatures in the whole blood of 28 COPD patients hospitalized with different degrees of respiratory compromise.12 of them needed of admission to the ICU, whilst 16 were admitted to the Respiratory Medicine Service. GeneSpring GX 11.0 software was used for performing statistical comparisons of transcript levels between ICU and non-ICU patients. Ingenuity pathway analysis 8.5 (IPA) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) were used to select, annotate and visualize genes by function and pathway (gene ontology). T-test showed evidence of 1501 genes differentially expressed between ICU and non-ICU patients. IPA and KEGG analysis of the most representative biological functions revealed that ICU patients had increased levels of neutrophil gene transcripts, being [cathepsin G (CTSG)], [elastase, neutrophil expressed (ELANE)], [proteinase 3 (PRTN3)], [myeloperoxidase (MPO)], [cathepsin D (CTSD)], [defensin, alpha 3, neutrophil-specific (DEFA3)], azurocidin 1 (AZU1)], and [bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI)] the most representative ones. Proteins codified by these genes form part of the azurophilic granules of neutrophils and are involved in both antimicrobial defence and tissue damage. This “neutrophil signature” was paralleled by the necessity of advanced respiratory and vital support, and the presence of bacterial infection. Conclusion Study of transcriptomic signatures in blood suggests an

  11. Luminescence as a Continuous Real-Time Reporter of Promoter Activity in Yeast Undergoing Respiratory Oscillations or Cell Division Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J. Brian; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes a method for generating yeast respiratory oscillations in continuous culture and monitoring rhythmic promoter activity of the culture by automated real-time recording of luminescence. These techniques chiefly require the use of a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that has been genetically modified to express firefly luciferase under the control of a promoter of interest and a continuous culture bioreactor that incorporates a photomultiplier apparatus for detecting light emission. Additionally, this chapter describes a method for observing rhythmic (cell cycle-related) promoter activity in small batch cultures of yeast through luminescence monitoring. PMID:21468985

  12. Control of abdominal and expiratory intercostal muscle activity during vomiting - Role of ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Tan, L. K.; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The role of ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons in the control of abdominal and internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting was investigated in cats. Two series of experiments were performed: in one, the activity of VRG E neurons was recorded during fictive vomiting in cats that were decerebrated, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated; in the second, the abdominal muscle activity during vomiting was compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons in decerebrate spontaneously breathing cats. The results show that about two-thirds of VRG E neurons that project at least as far caudally as the lower thoracic cord contribute to internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting. The remaining VRG E neurons contribute to abdominal muscle activation. As shown by severing the axons of the VRG E neurons, other, as yet unidenified, inputs (either descending from the brain stem or arising from spinal reflexes) can also produce abdominal muscle activation.

  13. Forecasting SEP Events with Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, J. R.; Winter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events from the Sun occur when particles associated with solar bursts like CMEs and flares are propelled into space. These events can cause substantial damage to objects in their paths, like satellites, by penetrating into them and causing radiation. In a related recent study a method was devised to forecast the occurrence of an SEP event using properties of the type II and type III radio bursts measured from WIND/WAVES (Winter & Ledbetter 2015). This study analyzed 27 SEP events from 2010 to 2013. We now present an analysis of type II and type III bursts in solar cycle 23, associated with the 63 SEP events from 2000-2003. Parameters including the peak flux of type II bursts, integral flux of type II and II bursts, and the duration of type III bursts are used to create a radio index. This index is used to predict whether or not an SEP event will occur. Cycle 23 was more active than cycle 24, with significantly more radio bursts and SEP events. Our results show that the radio index successfully predicts the occurrence of SEPs for the events in the more active solar cycle 23. We also find that, in general, the higher the radio index the higher the peak proton flux will be following the burst.

  14. Activity of Oral ALS-008176 in a Respiratory Syncytial Virus Challenge Study.

    PubMed

    DeVincenzo, John P; McClure, Matthew W; Symons, Julian A; Fathi, Hosnieh; Westland, Christopher; Chanda, Sushmita; Lambkin-Williams, Rob; Smith, Patrick; Zhang, Qingling; Beigelman, Leo; Blatt, Lawrence M; Fry, John

    2015-11-19

    BACKGROUND Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a cause of substantial morbidity and mortality. There is no known effective therapy. METHODS We conducted a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial in healthy adults inoculated with RSV. Participants received the oral nucleoside analogue ALS-008176 or placebo 12 hours after confirmation of RSV infection or 6 days after inoculation. Treatment was administered every 12 hours for 5 days. Viral load, disease severity, resistance, and safety were measured throughout the 28-day study period, with measurement beginning before inoculation. The primary end point was the area under the curve (AUC) for viral load, which was assessed immediately before administration of the first dose through the 12th day after inoculation in participants infected with RSV. RESULTS A total of 62 participants received placebo or one of three ALS-008176 dosing regimens: 1 loading dose of 750 mg followed by 9 maintenance doses of 500 mg (group 1), 1 loading dose of 750 mg followed by 9 maintenance doses of 150 mg (group 2), or 10 doses of 375 mg (group 3). In the 35 infected participants (23 of whom were treated with ALS-008176), the AUCs for viral load for groups 1, 2, and 3 and the placebo group were 59.9, 73.7, 133.4, and 500.9 log10 plaque-forming-unit equivalents × hours per milliliter, respectively (P≤0.001). The time to nondetectability on polymerase-chain-reaction assay (P<0.001), the peak viral load (P≤0.001), the AUC for symptom score (P<0.05), and the AUC for mucus weight were lower in all groups receiving ALS-008176 than in the placebo group. Antiviral activity was greatest in the two groups that received a loading dose--viral clearance was accelerated (P≤0.05), and the AUC for viral load decreased by 85 to 88% as compared with the placebo group. Within this small trial, no viral rebound or resistance was identified. There were no serious adverse events, and there was no need for premature discontinuation of the study

  15. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  16. Chronic serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake transporter inhibition modifies basal respiratory output in adult mouse in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Kelly A.; Solomon, Irene C.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory disturbances are a common feature of panic disorder and present as breathing irregularity, hyperventilation, and increased sensitivity to carbon dioxide. Common therapeutic interventions, such as tricyclic (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants, have been shown to ameliorate not only the psychological components of panic disorder but also the respiratory disturbances. These drugs are also prescribed for generalized anxiety and depressive disorders, neither of which are characterized by respiratory disturbances, and previous studies have demonstrated that TCAs and SSRIs exert effects on basal respiratory activity in animal models without panic disorder symptoms. Whether serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) have similar effects on respiratory activity remains to be determined. Therefore, the current study was designed to investigate the effects of chronic administration of the SNRI antidepressant venlafaxine (VHCL) on basal respiratory output. For these experiments, we recorded phrenic nerve discharge in an in vitro arterially-perfused adult mouse preparation and diaphragm electromyogram (EMG) activity in an in vivo urethane-anesthetized adult mouse preparation. We found that following 28-d VHCL administration, basal respiratory burst frequency was markedly reduced due to an increase in expiratory duration (TE), and the inspiratory duty cycle (TI/Ttot) was significantly shortened. In addition, post-inspiratory and spurious expiratory discharges were seen in vitro. Based on our observations, we suggest that drugs capable of simultaneously blocking both 5-HT and NE reuptake transporters have the potential to influence the respiratory control network in patients using SNRI therapy. PMID:22871263

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is required for normal development of the central respiratory rhythm in mice.

    PubMed

    Balkowiec, A; Katz, D M

    1998-07-15

    1. Molecular mechanisms underlying maturation of the central respiratory rhythm are largely unknown. Previously, we found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for expression of normal breathing behaviour in newborn mice, raising the possibility that maturation of central respiratory output is dependent on BDNF. 2. Respiratory activity was recorded in vitro from cervical ventral roots (C1 or C4) using the isolated brainstem-spinal cord preparation from postnatal day (P) 0.5-2.0 and P4.5 wild-type mice and mice lacking functional bdnf alleles. 3. Loss of one or both bdnf alleles resulted in an approximately 50% depression of central respiratory frequency compared with wild-type controls. In addition, respiratory cycle length variability was 214% higher in bdnf null (bdnf-/-) animals compared with controls at P4.5. In contrast, respiratory burst duration was unaffected by bdnf gene mutation. 4. These derangements of central respiratory rhythm paralleled the ventilatory depression and irregular breathing characteristic of bdnf mutants in vivo, indicating that central deficits can largely account for the abnormalities in resting ventilation produced by genetic loss of BDNF. BDNF is thus the first growth factor identified that is required for normal development of the central respiratory rhythm, including the stabilization of central respiratory output that occurs after birth. PMID:9706001

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is required for normal development of the central respiratory rhythm in mice

    PubMed Central

    Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Katz, David M

    1998-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying maturation of the central respiratory rhythm are largely unknown. Previously, we found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for expression of normal breathing behaviour in newborn mice, raising the possibility that maturation of central respiratory output is dependent on BDNF. Respiratory activity was recorded in vitro from cervical ventral roots (C1 or C4) using the isolated brainstem–spinal cord preparation from postnatal day (P) 0.5–2.0 and P4.5 wild-type mice and mice lacking functional bdnf alleles. Loss of one or both bdnf alleles resulted in an approximately 50 % depression of central respiratory frequency compared with wild-type controls. In addition, respiratory cycle length variability was 214 % higher in bdnf null (bdnf−/−) animals compared with controls at P4.5. In contrast, respiratory burst duration was unaffected by bdnf gene mutation. These derangements of central respiratory rhythm paralleled the ventilatory depression and irregular breathing characteristic of bdnf mutants in vivo, indicating that central deficits can largely account for the abnormalities in resting ventilation produced by genetic loss of BDNF. BDNF is thus the first growth factor identified that is required for normal development of the central respiratory rhythm, including the stabilization of central respiratory output that occurs after birth. PMID:9706001

  19. Burst-by-burst laser frequency monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esproles, Carlos (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a system for real-time frequency monitoring and display of an RF burst where the burst frequency is analyzed and displayed on a burst-by-burst basis in order to allow for frequency control. Although the invention was made for monitoring the laser frequency of a LIDAR system, it has other applications where realtime monitoring is required. The novelty of the invention resides in the use of a counter that is reset at the beginning of each unit time of monitoring and then gated for a unit of time. The invention also has an LED bar graph for displaying the measure of frequency at the end of each unit time in either a bar length mode or a moving dot mode. In the latter mode, the operator makes necessary adjustments to maintain the dot at the center of the bar graph.

  20. New Results on the Spectral Evolution of Magnetar Bright Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, George A.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.; GBM Magnetar Team

    2013-04-01

    Magnetars are isolated neutron stars characterized by long spin periods (2-12 s) and large spin down rates, implying a very strong magnetic field, B>10E14 G. Magnetars exhibit short bursts of hard X-/soft gamma-rays with luminosities ranging from 10E37 to 10E41 erg/s. The magnetar SGR J1550-5418 entered an extremely active bursting episode, starting on 2008 October 03 until 2009 April 17, during which Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) observed several hundred bursts from this source. Such wealth of bursts resulted in the largest catalog of detailed temporal and spectral results for SGR J1550-5418. Here, we discuss new results from time-resolved spectral analysis of the brightest bursts from this source. Our analysis, together with the comparison of our results with other magnetar bursts, enabled us to put strong constraints on the theories underlying the magnetar bursts emission mechanism.

  1. Evidence-based risk assessment and recommendations for physical activity clearance: respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Eves, Neil D; Davidson, Warren J

    2011-07-01

    The 2 most common respiratory diseases are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Growing evidence supports the benefits of exercise for all patients with these diseases. Due to the etiology of COPD and the pathophysiology of asthma, there may be some additional risks of exercise for these patients, and hence accurate risk assessment and clearance is needed before patients start exercising. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the available literature regarding the risks of exercise for patients with respiratory disease and provide evidence-based recommendations to guide the screening process. A systematic review of 4 databases was performed. The literature was searched to identify adverse events specific to exercise. For COPD, 102 randomized controlled trials that involved an exercise intervention were included (n = 6938). No study directly assessed the risk of exercise, and only 15 commented on exercise-related adverse events. For asthma, 30 studies of mixed methodologies were included (n = 1278). One study directly assessed the risk of exercise, and 15 commented on exercise-related adverse events. No exercise-related fatalities were reported. The majority of adverse events in COPD patients were musculoskeletal or cardiovascular in nature. In asthma patients, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and (or) asthma symptoms were the primary adverse events. There is no direct evidence regarding the risk of exercise for patients with COPD or asthma. However, based on the available literature, it would appear that with adequate screening and optimal medical therapy, the risk of exercise for these respiratory patients is low. PMID:21800949

  2. Effects of a quaternary lidocaine derivative, QX-314, on the respiratory activity in brainstem-spinal cord preparation from newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Chikara; Onimaru, Hiroshi

    2016-04-21

    In the clinical setting, the use of QX-314 (a quaternary derivative of lidocaine) has been proposed to achieve the selective inhibition of nociceptors that express transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels with fewer motor deficits. However, it has been also reported that QX-314 may produce systemic CNS toxicities with relative potencies that are approximately twice as high as those of lidocaine. There are no reports concerning the effects of extracellular QX-314 on the rhythm-generating neurons in the respiratory center. In the present study, we examined the effects of QX-314 on respiratory rhythm generation in brainstem-spinal cord preparations from newborn rats. The extracellular application of QX-314 (200μM) decreased the C4 burst rate, amplitude and slope during the initial rising phase, and the effects slowly developed with a half-decay time of approximately 20min. The combined application of capsaicin (10 or 100μM) with QX-314 (100μM) showed no additional effect. The intracellular application of QX-314 (100μM) to respiratory neurons depressed the action potentials with a half-decay time of around 5min. Our findings could explain one of the mechanisms underlying the central toxicities that occur after the systemic application of QX-314. PMID:26992939

  3. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  4. Respiratory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  5. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis: correlation with respiratory atopy.

    PubMed

    Sawai, T; Ikai, K; Uehara, M

    1998-05-01

    We determined the cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from 100 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) aged 13-57 years (mean +/- SD, 29.8 +/- 17.7 years). The correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and clinical parameters such as the severity of eczema and a personal or family predisposition to atopic respiratory diseases (ARD) (asthma or allergic rhinitis) was examined. Although the enzymic activity varied from normal to very high in the AD patients, cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.005) elevated in AD patients (42.1 +/- 22.0 units) as compared with the normal controls (12.4 +/- 5.6) and clinical control subjects (13.4 +/- 9.5). In contrast, we found no correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and the severity of eczema when AD patients were classified into four categories (remission, mild, moderate and severe) according to the extent of their skin involvement. Furthermore, we found that systemic corticosteroid therapy in severe AD patients did not alter the cAMP-PDE activity. cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in those AD patients who had a personal history of ARD (47.2 +/- 11.2) than in AD patients with a family history of ARD (37.2 +/- 17.4) and those without a personal or family history ('pure' AD) (34.4 +/- 19.8). Nevertheless, the cAMP-PDE activity was significantly higher even in 'pure' AD patients than in the controls. These results suggest that an elevation of cAMP-PDE activity is closely related to a predisposition to respiratory atopy, and does not follow inflammation in AD patients. PMID:9666832

  6. Contribution of a Cyanide-insensitive Alternate Respiratory System to Increases in Formamide Hydro-lyase Activity and to Growth in Stemphylium loti in Vitro1

    PubMed Central

    Rissler, Jane F.; Millar, Roy L.

    1977-01-01

    Stemphylium loti, a pathogen of a cyanogenic plant, possesses a cyanide-insensitive alternate respiratory pathway. In the absence of cytochrome inhibitors, the alternate system had only a minor role in respiration. When S. loti was grown in medium amended with antimycin to block the cytochrome chain, the alternate system accounted for the total oxygen consumption associated with respiration. The contribution of the alternate respiratory system to increases in formamide hydro-lyase (FHL) activity and to growth in S. loti in vitro was assessed. FHL, induced by cyanide, converts cyanide to nontoxic formamide and is partially responsible for the tolerance of S. loti to high concentrations of cyanide in vitro. When the cytochromes were blocked and the cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway accounted for 100% of the oxygen uptake associated with respiration, FHL activity, but not changes in dry weight, was positively correlated with activity of the alternate pathway. As the alternate pathway activity decreased with increasing concentrations of salicylhydroxamic acid, the level of FHL activity correspondingly decreased. The alternate respiratory system may provide for increases in FHL activity but not for growth. S. loti appears to have two mechanisms for cyanide tolerance in vitro: cyanide-insensitive respiration and FHL activity. The initial activity of FHL for detoxification of cyanide may depend on the alternate respiratory pathway when the cytochromes of the electron transport chain are blocked. PMID:16660201

  7. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    PubMed Central

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  8. The relative importance of respiratory water loss in scorpions is correlated with species habitat type and activity pattern.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Scorpions exhibit some of the lowest recorded water loss rates compared with those of other terrestrial arthropods of similar body size. Evaporative water loss (EWL) includes cuticular transpiration and respiratory water loss (RWL) from gas exchange surfaces, that is, book lung lamellae. Estimated fractions of cuticular and respiratory losses currently available from the literature show considerable variation, at least partly as a result of differences in methodology. This study reports RWL rates and their relative importance in scorpions from two families (Buthidae and Scorpionidae), including both xeric and mesic species (or subspecies). Two of the included Buthidae were surface-dwelling species, and another inhabits empty burrows of other terrestrial arthropods. This experimental design enabled correlating RWL importance with scorpion phylogeny, habitat type, and/or homing behavior. Buthidae species exhibited significantly lower EWL rates compared with those of Scorpionidae, whereas effects of habitat type and homing behavior were not significant. Resting RWL rates were not significantly affected by scorpion phylogeny, but rates for the xeric species (totaling ~10% of EWL rates at 30°C) were significantly lower compared with those of mesic species. These lower RWL values were correlated with significantly lower H(2)O/CO(2) emission rates in xeric species. The experimental setup and ~24-h duration of each individual recording allowed estimating the effect of interspecific variation in activity on RWL proportions. The high respiratory losses in active hydrated Scorpio maurus fuscus, totaling 30% of EWL, suggest that behavioral discretion in this species is a more likely mechanism for body water conservation under stressful conditions when compared with the responses of other studied species. PMID:21133796

  9. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Kienlin, Andreas von; Lichti, Giselher; Steinle, Helmut; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  10. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R. Marc; vonKienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  11. Respiratory muscle activity during REM sleep in patients with diaphragm paralysis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J R; Dunroy, H M A; Corfield, D R; Hart, N; Simonds, A K; Polkey, M I; Morrell, M J

    2004-01-13

    The diaphragm is the main inspiratory muscle during REM sleep. It was hypothesized that patients with isolated bilateral diaphragm paralysis (BDP) might not be able to sustain REM sleep. Polysomnography with EMG recordings was undertaken from accessory respiratory muscles in patients with BDP and normal subjects. Patients with BDP had a normal quantity of REM sleep (mean +/- SD, 18.6 +/- 7.5% of total sleep time) achieved by inspiratory recruitment of extradiaphragmatic muscles in both tonic and phasic REM, suggesting brainstem reorganization. PMID:14718717

  12. A Non-Triggered Burst Supplement to the BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kommers, J.; Lewin, W. H.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanParadijs, J.; Pendleton, G. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detects gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a real-time burst detection (or "trigger") system running onboard the spacecraft. Under some circumstances, however, a GRB may not activate the onboard burst trigger. For example, the burst may be too faint to exceed the onboard detection threshold, or it may occur while the onboard burst trigger is disabled for technical reasons. This paper is a catalog of such "non-triggered" GRBs that were detected in a search of the archival continuous data from BATSE. It lists 873 non-triggered bursts that were recorded between 1991 December 9.0 and 1997 December 17.0. For each burst, the catalog gives an estimated source direction, duration, peak flux, and fluence. Similar data are presented for 50 additional bursts of unknown origin that were detected in the 25-50 keV range; these events may represent the low-energy "tail" of the GRB spectral distribution. This catalog increases the number of GRBs detected with BATSE by 48% during the time period covered by the search.

  13. Modification of the degree of branching of a beta-(1,3)-glucan affects aggregation behavior and activity in an oxidative burst assay.

    PubMed

    Magee, Andrew S; Langeslay, Ryan R; Will, Paul M; Danielson, Michael E; Wurst, Lindsay R; Iiams, Vanessa A

    2015-12-01

    Scleroglucan is a β-(1,3)-glucan which is highly branched at the 6-position with a single glucose residue. Acid hydrolysis of a high molecular weight scleroglucan gave a medium molecular weight, freely soluble material. Linkage analysis by the partially methylated alditol acetate method showed that the solubilized material had 30% branching. When the material was subjected to partial Smith degradations, the percent branching was reduced accordingly to 12% or 17%. After the percent branching was reduced, the average molecular weight of the samples increased considerably, indicating the assembly of higher ordered aggregate structures. An aggregate number distribution analysis was applied to confirm the higher aggregated structures. These aggregated structures gave the material significantly enhanced activity in an in vitro oxidative burst assay compared to the highly branched material. PMID:26015027

  14. Piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the piezophilic Shewanella violacea DSS12 as compared with non-piezophilic Shewanella species.

    PubMed

    Tamegai, Hideyuki; Ota, Yuuya; Haga, Minami; Fujimori, Hiroki; Kato, Chiaki; Nogi, Yuichi; Kawamoto, Jun; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    The facultative piezophile Shewanella violacea DSS12 is known to alter its respiratory components under the influence of hydrostatic pressure during growth, suggesting that it has a respiratory system that functions in adaptation to high pressure. We investigated the pressure- and temperature-dependencies of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the membrane of S. violacea relative to non-piezophilic Shewanella species. We observed that the activity in the membrane of S. violacea was more resistant to high pressure than those of non-piezophilic Shewanella even though DSS12 was cultured under atmospheric pressure. On the other hand, the temperature dependency of this activity was almost the same for all of the tested strain regardless of optimal growth temperature. Both high pressure and low temperature are expected to lower protein flexibility, causing a decrease in enzyme activity, but the results of this study suggest that the mechanism maintaining enzyme activity under high hydrostatic pressure is different from that at low temperature. Additionally, the responses of the activity to the pressure- and temperature-changes were independent of membrane lipid composition. Therefore, the piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidases of S. violacea is perhaps dependent on the properties of the protein itself and not on the lipid composition of the membrane. Our observations suggest that S. violacea constitutively express piezotolerant respiratory terminal oxidases that serve adaptation to the deep-sea environment. PMID:21597190

  15. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O K; Payne, Harold R; Lawhon, Sara D; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F; Womack, James E

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  16. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C.; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O. K.; Payne, Harold R.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Womack, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  17. Defensive activation to (un)predictable interoceptive threat: The NPU respiratory threat test (NPUr).

    PubMed

    Schroijen, Mathias; Fantoni, Simona; Rivera, Carmen; Vervliet, Bram; Schruers, Koen; van den Bergh, Omer; van Diest, Ilse

    2016-06-01

    Potentially life-threatening interoceptive sensations easily engage the behavioral defensive system. Resulting fear and anxiety toward interoceptive threat are functionally distinct states that are hypothesized to play a prominent role in the etiology of panic disorder. The present study aimed to investigate whether fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle responses occur to predictable and unpredictable interoceptive threat, respectively. Therefore, we modified the NPU threat test (Schmitz & Grillon, ) and replaced the aversive electrocutaneous stimulus with an aversive interoceptive stimulus (a breathing occlusion, making it briefly impossible to breathe). Healthy participants (N = 48) underwent three instructed conditions. A visual cue signaled the occlusion in the predictable condition (P), whereas another cue was unrelated to the occurrence of the occlusion in the unpredictable condition (U). The safe condition (N) also had a visual cue, but no occlusion. Both fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle blink responses were observed in response to predictable and unpredictable respiratory threat, respectively. The current study presents and validates the NPU respiratory threat test (NPUr) as an ecologically valid paradigm to study both anxiety and fear in response to a panic-relevant interoceptive threat. The paradigm allows future testing of contextual generalization, investigation of different clinical groups, and more explicit comparisons of defensive responding to interoceptive versus exteroceptive threats. PMID:26879710

  18. Automated determination of wakefulness and sleep in rats based on non-invasively acquired measures of movement and respiratory activity

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Tao; Mott, Christopher; Mollicone, Daniel; Sanford, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    The current standard for monitoring sleep in rats requires labor intensive surgical procedures and the implantation of chronic electrodes which have the potential to impact behavior and sleep. With the goal of developing a non-invasive method to determine sleep and wakefulness, we constructed a non-contact monitoring system to measure movement and respiratory activity using signals acquired with pulse Doppler radar and from digitized video analysis. A set of 23 frequency and time-domain features were derived from these signals and were calculated in 10 s epochs. Based on these features, a classification method for automated scoring of wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) and REM in rats was developed using a support vector machine (SVM). We then assessed the utility of the automated scoring system in discriminating wakefulness and sleep by comparing the results to standard scoring of wakefulness and sleep based on concurrently recorded EEG and EMG. Agreement between SVM automated scoring based on selected features and visual scores based on EEG and EMG were approximately 91% for wakefulness, 84% for NREM and 70% for REM. The results indicate that automated scoring based on non-invasively acquired movement and respiratory activity will be useful for studies requiring discrimination of wakefulness and sleep. However, additional information or signals will be needed to improve discrimination of NREM and REM episodes within sleep. PMID:22178621

  19. Tissue-specific mtDNA abundance from exome data and its correlation with mitochondrial transcription, mass and respiratory activity.

    PubMed

    D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Atlante, Anna; Gadaleta, Gemma; Pavesi, Giulio; Chiara, Matteo; De Virgilio, Caterina; Manzari, Caterina; Mastropasqua, Francesca; Prazzoli, Gian Marco; Picardi, Ernesto; Gissi, Carmela; Horner, David; Reyes, Aurelio; Sbisà, Elisabetta; Tullo, Apollonia; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain a population of mitochondria, variable in number and shape, which in turn contain multiple copies of a tiny compact genome (mtDNA) whose expression and function is strictly coordinated with the nuclear one. mtDNA copy number varies between different cell or tissues types, both in response to overall metabolic and bioenergetics demands and as a consequence or cause of specific pathological conditions. Here we present a novel and reliable methodology to assess the effective mtDNA copy number per diploid genome by investigating off-target reads obtained by whole-exome sequencing (WES) experiments. We also investigate whether and how mtDNA copy number correlates with mitochondrial mass, respiratory activity and expression levels. Analyzing six different tissues from three age- and sex-matched human individuals, we found a highly significant linear correlation between mtDNA copy number estimated by qPCR and the frequency of mtDNA off target WES reads. Furthermore, mtDNA copy number showed highly significant correlation with mitochondrial gene expression levels as measured by RNA-Seq as well as with mitochondrial mass and respiratory activity. Our methodology makes thus feasible, at a large scale, the investigation of mtDNA copy number in diverse cell-types, tissues and pathological conditions or in response to specific treatments. PMID:25446395

  20. Endomorphin analog analgesics with reduced abuse liability, respiratory depression, motor impairment, tolerance, and glial activation relative to morphine.

    PubMed

    Zadina, James E; Nilges, Mark R; Morgenweck, Jenny; Zhang, Xing; Hackler, Laszlo; Fasold, Melita B

    2016-06-01

    Opioids acting at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are the most effective analgesics, however adverse side effects severely limit their use. Of particular importance, abuse liability results in major medical, societal, and economic problems, respiratory depression is the cause of fatal overdoses, and tolerance complicates treatment and increases the risk of side effects. Motor and cognitive impairment are especially problematic for older adults. Despite the host of negative side effects, opioids such as morphine are commonly used for acute and chronic pain conditions. Separation of analgesia from unwanted effects has long been an unmet goal of opioid research. Novel MOR agonist structures may prove critical for greater success. Here we tested metabolically stable analogs of the endomorphins, endogenous opioids highly selective for the MOR. Compared to morphine, the analogs showed dramatically improved analgesia-to-side-effect ratios. At doses providing equal or greater antinociception than morphine in the rat, the analogs showed reduced a) respiratory depression, b) impairment of motor coordination, c) tolerance and hyperalgesia, d) glial p38/CGRP/P2X7 receptor signaling, and e) reward/abuse potential in both conditioned place preference and self-administration tests. Differential effects on glial activation indicate a mechanism for the relative lack of side effects by the analogs compared to morphine. The results suggest that endomorphin analogs described here could provide gold standard pain relief mediated by selective MOR activation, but with remarkably safer side effect profiles compared to opioids like morphine. PMID:26748051

  1. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsay M; Schneider, David A; Frevert, Charles W; Nelson, Danielle D; Morrison, W Ivan; Knowles, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  2. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David A.; Frevert, Charles W.; Nelson, Danielle D.; Morrison, W. Ivan; Knowles, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  3. Prediction of Muscle Energy States at Low Metabolic Rates Requires Feedback Control of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activity by Inorganic Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Joep P. J.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.; van Oorschot, Joep W. M.; Prompers, Jeanine J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; van Riel, Natal A. W.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of the 100-fold dynamic range of mitochondrial ATP synthesis flux in skeletal muscle was investigated. Hypotheses of key control mechanisms were included in a biophysical model of oxidative phosphorylation and tested against metabolite dynamics recorded by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS). Simulations of the initial model featuring only ADP and Pi feedback control of flux failed in reproducing the experimentally sampled relation between myoplasmic free energy of ATP hydrolysis (ΔGp = ΔGpo′+RT ln ([ADP][Pi]/[ATP]) and the rate of mitochondrial ATP synthesis at low fluxes (<0.2 mM/s). Model analyses including Monte Carlo simulation approaches and metabolic control analysis (MCA) showed that this problem could not be amended by model re-parameterization, but instead required reformulation of ADP and Pi feedback control or introduction of additional control mechanisms (feed forward activation), specifically at respiratory Complex III. Both hypotheses were implemented and tested against time course data of phosphocreatine (PCr), Pi and ATP dynamics during post-exercise recovery and validation data obtained by 31P MRS of sedentary subjects and track athletes. The results rejected the hypothesis of regulation by feed forward activation. Instead, it was concluded that feedback control of respiratory chain complexes by inorganic phosphate is essential to explain the regulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis flux in skeletal muscle throughout its full dynamic range. PMID:22470528

  4. Time-dependent changes in membrane excitability during glucose-induced bursting activity in pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chae Young; Santos, Enrique; Amano, Akira; Shimayoshi, Takao

    2011-01-01

    In our companion paper, the physiological functions of pancreatic β cells were analyzed with a new β-cell model by time-based integration of a set of differential equations that describe individual reaction steps or functional components based on experimental studies. In this study, we calculate steady-state solutions of these differential equations to obtain the limit cycles (LCs) as well as the equilibrium points (EPs) to make all of the time derivatives equal to zero. The sequential transitions from quiescence to burst–interburst oscillations and then to continuous firing with an increasing glucose concentration were defined objectively by the EPs or LCs for the whole set of equations. We also demonstrated that membrane excitability changed between the extremes of a single action potential mode and a stable firing mode during one cycle of bursting rhythm. Membrane excitability was determined by the EPs or LCs of the membrane subsystem, with the slow variables fixed at each time point. Details of the mode changes were expressed as functions of slowly changing variables, such as intracellular [ATP], [Ca2+], and [Na+]. In conclusion, using our model, we could suggest quantitatively the mutual interactions among multiple membrane and cytosolic factors occurring in pancreatic β cells. PMID:21708954

  5. Intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity elicit spinal TNF-α-independent, atypical PKC-dependent inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Baertsch, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    In many neural networks, mechanisms of compensatory plasticity respond to prolonged reductions in neural activity by increasing cellular excitability or synaptic strength. In the respiratory control system, a prolonged reduction in synaptic inputs to the phrenic motor pool elicits a TNF-α- and atypical PKC-dependent form of spinal plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). Although iPMF may be elicited by a prolonged reduction in respiratory neural activity, iPMF is more efficiently induced when reduced respiratory neural activity (neural apnea) occurs intermittently. Mechanisms giving rise to iPMF following intermittent neural apnea are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that iPMF following intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity requires spinal TNF-α and aPKC. Phrenic motor output was recorded in anesthetized and ventilated rats exposed to brief intermittent (5, ∼1.25 min), brief sustained (∼6.25 min), or prolonged sustained (30 min) neural apnea. iPMF was elicited following brief intermittent and prolonged sustained neural apnea, but not following brief sustained neural apnea. Unlike iPMF following prolonged neural apnea, spinal TNF-α was not required to initiate iPMF during intermittent neural apnea; however, aPKC was still required for its stabilization. These results suggest that different patterns of respiratory neural activity induce iPMF through distinct cellular mechanisms but ultimately converge on a similar downstream pathway. Understanding the diverse cellular mechanisms that give rise to inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity may lead to development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat devastating respiratory control disorders when endogenous compensatory mechanisms fail. PMID:25673781

  6. Intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity elicit spinal TNF-α-independent, atypical PKC-dependent inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation.

    PubMed

    Baertsch, Nathan A; Baker-Herman, Tracy L

    2015-04-15

    In many neural networks, mechanisms of compensatory plasticity respond to prolonged reductions in neural activity by increasing cellular excitability or synaptic strength. In the respiratory control system, a prolonged reduction in synaptic inputs to the phrenic motor pool elicits a TNF-α- and atypical PKC-dependent form of spinal plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). Although iPMF may be elicited by a prolonged reduction in respiratory neural activity, iPMF is more efficiently induced when reduced respiratory neural activity (neural apnea) occurs intermittently. Mechanisms giving rise to iPMF following intermittent neural apnea are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that iPMF following intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity requires spinal TNF-α and aPKC. Phrenic motor output was recorded in anesthetized and ventilated rats exposed to brief intermittent (5, ∼1.25 min), brief sustained (∼6.25 min), or prolonged sustained (30 min) neural apnea. iPMF was elicited following brief intermittent and prolonged sustained neural apnea, but not following brief sustained neural apnea. Unlike iPMF following prolonged neural apnea, spinal TNF-α was not required to initiate iPMF during intermittent neural apnea; however, aPKC was still required for its stabilization. These results suggest that different patterns of respiratory neural activity induce iPMF through distinct cellular mechanisms but ultimately converge on a similar downstream pathway. Understanding the diverse cellular mechanisms that give rise to inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity may lead to development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat devastating respiratory control disorders when endogenous compensatory mechanisms fail. PMID:25673781

  7. DIFFERENTIAL ACTIVATION OF SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS MEDIATING OXIDATIVE BURST BY CHICKEN HETEROPHILS IN RESPONSE TO STIMULATION WITH SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS LIPOTEICHOIC ACID

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been previously shown to mediate oxidative burst in chicken heterophils. This study was conducted to determine which molecular pathways are involved in TLR mediated oxidative burst. Peripheral blood heterophils from neonatal chicks were isolated and exposed to known...

  8. Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

  9. Effects of ambient ozone on respiratory function in active, normal children

    SciTech Connect

    Spektor, D.M.; Lippmann, M.; Lioy, P.J.; Thurston, G.D.; Citak, K.

    1988-01-01

    Respiratory functions were measured daily by spirometry over four weeks at a summer camp in northwestern New Jersey. Multiple regression analyses indicated that O{sub 3} concentration, cumulative daily O{sub 3} exposure, ambient temperature, and humidity were the most explanatory environmental variables for daily variations in function, and that O{sub 3} concentration had the strongest influence on FVC, PEFR, and MMEf. For FEV1, cumulative daily O{sub 3} exposure and heat stress had greater relative effects. Linear regressions were performed for each child between O{sub 3} concentration and function, and all average slopes were significantly negative (p <0.05) for PVC, FEV1, PEFR and MMEF for all children, and for boys and girls separately. The implications of these short-term effects are unknown. However, the results in these free living children are comparable to those found in chamber studies with comparable exposures.

  10. Multi-channel optical sensor-array for measuring ballistocardiograms and respiratory activity in bed.

    PubMed

    Brüser, Christoph; Kerekes, Anna; Winter, Stefan; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Our work covers improvements in sensors and signal processing for unobtrusive, long-term monitoring of cardiac (and respiratory) rhythms using only non-invasive vibration sensors. We describe a system for the unobtrusive monitoring of vital signs by means of an array of novel optical ballistocardiography (BCG) sensors placed underneath a regular bed mattress. Furthermore, we analyze the systems spatial sensitivity and present proof-of-concept results comparing our system to a more conventional BCG system based on a single electromechanical-film (EMFi) sensor. Our preliminary results suggest that the proposed optical multi-channel system could have the potential to reduce beat-to-beat heart rate estimation errors, as well as enable the analysis of more complex breathing patterns. PMID:23367061

  11. In Vitro Antiviral Activity of Germacrone Against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiaping; Bai, Xiaolei; Cui, Tiantian; Zhou, Han; Chen, Yao; Xie, Jiexiong; Shi, Qingwei; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Guihong

    2016-09-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most serious diseases affecting the swine industry worldwide; however, there is no efficient control strategies against PRRSV at present. Therefore, development of new antiviral treatment strategies is urgently needed. As reported, germacrone can efficiently impair influenza virus replication. In this study, we exploited whether germacrone has the potential to inhibit PRRSV infection. Our results showed that the germacrone significantly inhibited replication of PRRSV in vitro and repressed the synthesis of viral RNA and protein. However, it did not block PRRSV binding and entry. Further studies confirmed that germacrone impaired PRRSV replication at an early stage, and inhibited infection of both classic and highly pathogenic type II PRRSV strains. Collectively, our findings imply that the germacrone has the potential to be used as an anti-PRRSV drug. PMID:27178541

  12. Ribose 5-Phosphate Glycation Reduces Cytochrome c Respiratory Activity and Membrane Affinity‡

    PubMed Central

    Hildick-Smith, Gordon J.; Downey, Michael C.; Gretebeck, Lisa M.; Gersten, Rebecca A.; Sandwick, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous glycation of bovine heart cytochrome c (cyt c) by the sugar ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) decreases the ability of the heme protein to transfer electrons in the respiratory pathway and to bind to membranes. Trypsin fragmentation studies suggest the preferential sites of glycation include Lys72 and Lys87/88 of a cationic patch involved in the association of the protein with its respiratory chain partners and with cardiolipin-containing membranes. Reaction of bovine cyt c with R5P (50 mM) for 8 h modified the protein in a manner that decreased its ability to transfer electrons to cytochrome oxidase by 60%. An 18 hour treatment with R5P decreased bovine cyt c’s binding affinity with cardiolipin-containing liposomes by an estimated eightfold. A similar lower binding of glycated cyt c was observed with mitoplasts. The reversal of the effects of R5P on membrane binding by ATP further supports an A-site modification. A significant decrease in the rate of spin state change for ferro-cyt c, thought to be due to cardiolipin insertion disrupting the Met coordination to heme, was found for the R5P-treated cyt c. This change occurred to a greater extent than explained by the permanent attachment of the protein onto the liposome. Turbidity changes resulting from the multi-lamellar liposome fusion that is readily promoted by cyt c binding were not seen for the R5P-glycated cyt c samples. Collectively, these results demonstrate the negative impact that R5P glycation can have on critical electron transfer and membrane association functions of cyt c. PMID:22091532

  13. Sawtooth bursts: observations and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Bárta, M.; Klassen, A.; Aurass, H.; Mann, G.

    2002-12-01

    An example of the sawtooth burst observed during the November 3, 1997 flare is shown. Basic parameters of the sawtooth bursts are summarized and compared with those of fibers, fiber chains, zebras, EEL bursts and lace bursts. The sawtooth bursts are found to be most similar to the lace bursts, therefore the lace bursts model is proposed also for them. Then using this model the dynamic spectrum with the sawtooth burst is modelled. The model considers accelerated electrons with an unstable distribution function on the double resonance frequency and quasi-periodic variations of the electron plasma density and/or magnetic field in the radio source.

  14. The dynamics underlying pseudo-plateau bursting in a pituitary cell model.

    PubMed

    Teka, Wondimu; Tabak, Joël; Vo, Theodore; Wechselberger, Martin; Bertram, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Pituitary cells of the anterior pituitary gland secrete hormones in response to patterns of electrical activity. Several types of pituitary cells produce short bursts of electrical activity which are more effective than single spikes in evoking hormone release. These bursts, called pseudo-plateau bursts, are unlike bursts studied mathematically in neurons (plateau bursting) and the standard fast-slow analysis used for plateau bursting is of limited use. Using an alternative fast-slow analysis, with one fast and two slow variables, we show that pseudo-plateau bursting is a canard-induced mixed mode oscillation. Using this technique, it is possible to determine the region of parameter space where bursting occurs as well as salient properties of the burst such as the number of spikes in the burst. The information gained from this one-fast/two-slow decomposition complements the information obtained from a two-fast/one-slow decomposition. PMID:22268000

  15. Influence of Transmural Pressure and Cytoskeletal Structure on NF-κB Activation in Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Haas, Caroline; Ghadiali, Samir N.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory epithelial cells are exposed to complex mechanical forces which are often modulated during pathological conditions such as Otitis Media and acute lung injury. The transduction of these mechanical forces into altered inflammatory signaling may play an important role in the persistence of disease conditions and inflammation. In this study, we investigated how static and oscillatory pressures altered the activation of NF-κB inflammatory pathways and how changes in the actin cytoskeleton influenced the mechanotransduction of pressure into NF-κB activation. An in vitro system was used to apply static and oscillatory pressures to alveolar epithelial cells cultured at an air–liquid interface. Latrunculin A and Jasplakinolide were used to alter the cytoskeleton and tight-junction structure and ELISA was used to monitor activation of NF-κB. Results indicate that both static and oscillatory pressures can activate NF-κB and that this activation is magnitude-dependent at low oscillation frequencies only. Jasplakinolide treated cells did not exhibit significant changes in normalized NF-κB activation compared to unloaded controls while Latrunculin treated cells exhibited increases in normalized NF-κB activation only at low frequency or static pressures. These results indicate that altering the actin cytoskeleton may be a useful way to mitigate the mechanotransduction of pressure forces into inflammatory signaling. PMID:22956984

  16. Sirtuin 1 regulates dendritic cell activation and autophagy during Respiratory Syncytial Virus-induced immune responses1

    PubMed Central

    Owczarczyk, Anna B.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Reed, Michelle; Rasky, Andrew J.; Lombard, David B.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD+ dependent deacetylase, has been associated with the induction of autophagy and the regulation of inflammatory mediators. We found that Sirt1 was upregulated in mouse lung after RSV infection. Infected animals that received EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, displayed exacerbated lung pathology, with increased mucus production, elevated viral load, and enhanced Th2 cytokine production. Gene expression analysis of isolated cell populations revealed that Sirt1 was most highly upregulated in RSV-treated dendritic cells (DCs). Upon RSV infection, EX-527-treated DCs, Sirt1 siRNA-treated DCs, or DCs from conditional knockout (Sirt1f/f-CD11c–Cre+) mice showed downregulated inflammatory cytokine gene expression and attenuated autophagy. Finally, RSV infection of Sirt1f/f-CD11c–Cre+ mice resulted in altered lung and lymph node cytokine responses, leading to exacerbated pathology. These data indicate that SIRT1 promotes DC activation associated with autophagy-mediated processes during RSV infection, thereby directing efficient antiviral immune responses. PMID:26157176

  17. Analysis of respiratory activity and carbon usage of a mutant of Azotobacter vinelandii impaired in poly-β-hydroxybutyrate synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Lucero; Castillo, Tania; Flores, Celia; Segura, Daniel; Galindo, Enrique; Peña, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the respiratory activity and carbon usage of the mutant strain of A. vinelandii AT6, impaired in poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production, and their relationship with the synthesis of alginate were evaluated. The alginate yield and the specific oxygen uptake rate were higher (2.5-fold and 62 %, respectively) for the AT6 strain, compared to the control strain (ATCC 9046), both in shake flasks cultures and in bioreactor, under fixed dissolved oxygen tension (1 %). In contrast, the degree of acetylation was similar in both strains. These results, together with the analysis of carbon usage (% C-mol), suggest that in the case of the AT6 strain, the flux of acetyl-CoA (precursor molecule for PHB biosynthesis and alginate acetylation) was diverted to the respiratory chain passing through the tricarboxylic acids cycle, and an important % C-mol was directed through alginate biosynthesis, up to 25.9 % and to a lesser extent, to biomass production (19.7 %). PMID:27154760

  18. Downregulation of protein kinase PKR activation by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus at its early stage infection.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yueqiang; Ma, Zexu; Wang, Rong; Yang, Liping; Nan, Yuchen; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2016-05-01

    The interferon-induced double-strand RNA activated protein kinase (PKR) plays an important role in antiviral response. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) on PKR activation. Here we report that PRRSV inhibited PKR activation during its early stage infection of primary pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). PRRSV infection led to lower level of phosphorylated PKR in comparison with mock-infected cells. The PKR inhibition was sustained until 10h post infection in the presence of polyI:C, a synthetic analog of double-stranded RNA activating PKR. PKR-mediated phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2α was also lower in the PRRSV-infected PAMs during the early stage infection. Interestingly, inactivated PRRSV was capable to inhibit the PKR activation until 6h post infection. This suggests that structural components of PRRSV virions were responsible for the inhibition, although PRRSV replication was needed for longer inhibition. These results indicate that the downregulation of PKR activation during early infection stage should be essential for PRRSV to avoid the antiviral response to initiate replication. This finding contributes to our understanding on PRRSV interaction with host innate immune response and reveal a target for control of PRRSV infection. PMID:27066702

  19. Evaluation of endotoxin (LPS) activity in bovine blood using neutrophil dependent chemiluminescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of a neutrophil chemiluminescence-based assay for the measurement of LPS stimulatory activity in bovine whole blood. The assay is based on the capacity for LPS to trigger the respiratory oxidative burst activity (RBA) of autologous neutroph...

  20. A Nontriggered Burst Supplement to the BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kommers, Jefferson M.; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    2001-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detects gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a real-time burst detection (or "trigger") system running onboard the spacecraft. Under some circumstances, however, a GRB may not activate the on-board burst trigger. For example, the burst may be too faint to exceed the on-board detection threshold, or it may occur while the on-board burst trigger is disabled for technical reasons. This paper describes a catalog of 873 "nontriggered" GRBs that were detected in a search of the archival continuous data from BATSE recorded between 1991 December 9.0 and 1997 December 17.0. For each burst, the catalog gives an estimated source direction, duration, peak flux, and fluence. Similar data are presented for 50 additional bursts of unknown origin that were detected in the 25-50 keV range; these events may represent the low-energy "tail" of the GRB spectral distribution. This catalog increases the number of GRBs detected with BATSE by 48% during the time period covered by the search.

  1. Detection of respiratory enzyme activity in Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts using redox dyes and immunofluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, R; Zhang, S; Sonek, G J; Stibbs, H

    2001-07-30

    The fluorescent redox dye 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC), combined with fluorescein-labeled antibodies, was tested for the simultaneous detection of the respiratory electron transport system (ETS) activity and enumeration of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts by spectral microfluorometry and epifluorescence microscopy. The reduction of CTC and p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet (INT), a non-fluorescent redox dye, was compared with propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescein diacetate (FDA) for the measurements of Giardia cyst viability over time. According to the PI and FDA staining techniques, nearly 60% of the cysts tested viable at the beginning of the observations; after 21 days their viability decreased to 5%. The redox dyes indicated that approximately 4-10% of the cysts were metabolically active 48 h after they were shed, followed by a decline in enzyme activity to near undetectable levels after 4 days. Spectral analysis on individual cysts indicated that the fluorescence emission of the reduced CTC and the fluorescein-labeled antibodies is distinctive for each compound and suitable for their simultaneous determination by microphotometry, flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence signal remained without alteration when the cysts were transferred onto microscope slides coated with an optical embedding medium and stored at -20 degrees C. The fluorescence intensity of the reduced CTC, when properly standardized, can provide quantitative measurements of ETS activity of the cysts. This is the first report of a method to determine enzyme redox activity on intact cysts applicable to water, laboratory and animal samples. PMID:11412910

  2. Synthesis and biological activities of the respiratory chain inhibitor aurachin D and new ring versus chain analogues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu-Wen; Herrmann, Jennifer; Zang, Yi; Grellier, Philippe; Prado, Soizic

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aurachins are myxobacterial 3-farnesyl-4(1H)-quinolone derived compounds initially described as respiratory chain inhibitors, more specifically as inhibitors of various cytochrome complexes. They are also known as potent antibiotic compounds. We describe herein the first synthesis of aurachin D through a key Conrad–Limpach reaction. The same strategy was used to reach some ring as opposed to chain analogues, allowing for the description of structure–activity relationships. Biological screening of the analogues showed antiparasitic, cytotoxic, antibacterial and antifungal activities, and depletion of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The strongest activity was found on Plasmodium falciparum with a selectivity index of 345, compared to Vero cells, for the natural product and its geranyl analogue. The loss of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by aurachins in human U-2 OS osteosarcoma cells was studied, showing the best activity for aurachin D and a naphthalene analogue, yet without totally explaining the observed cytotoxic activity of the compounds. Finally, a synthetic entry is given to the complete carboheterocyclic core of aurachin H through the N-oxidation/epoxidation of aurachin D and a shorter chain analogue, followed by subsequent biomimetic cyclization. PMID:23946854

  3. On vortex bursting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, H.

    1984-01-01

    Vortex bursting is studied by means of visualization. The physical behavior of the phenomenon is emphasized, and its similarity with boundary layer separation or wake bursting becomes apparent. The essential influence of an increasing pressure gradient on the initiation, the position and the type of bursting is clearly confirmed. The evolution of the phenomena as a function of several parameters is analyzed in the case of delta wings, alone or installed on aircraft models, and compared with the results of similar wind tunnel or flight tests.

  4. Complement-mediated neutrophil activation in sepsis- and trauma-related adult respiratory distress syndrome. Clarification with radioaerosol lung scans

    SciTech Connect

    Tennenberg, S.D.; Jacobs, M.P.; Solomkin, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Complement-mediated neutrophil activation (CMNA) has been proposed as an important pathogenic mechanism causing acute microvascular lung injury in the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). To clarify the relationship between CMNA and evolving lung injury, we studied 26 patients with multiple trauma and sepsis within 24 hours of risk establishment for ARDS. Pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability (PACP) was quantified as the clearance rate of a particulate radioaerosol. Seventeen patients (65%) had increased PACP (six developed ARDS) while nine (35%) had normal PACP (none developed ARDS; clearance rates of 3.4%/min and 1.5%/min, respectively). These patients, regardless of evidence of early lung injury, had elevated plasma C3adesArg levels and neutrophil chemotactic desensitization to C5a/C5adesArg. Plasma C3adesArg levels correlated weakly, but significantly, with PACP. Thus, CMNA may be a necessary, but not a sufficient, pathogenic mechanism in the evolution of ARDS.

  5. CMEs and frequency cutoff of solar bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, Al.; Konovalenko, Al.; Koval, Ar.; Volvach, Y.; Zarka, P.

    2016-05-01

    Radio observations of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff by the radio telescope UTR-2 (near Kharkiv, Ukraine) at 8-33 MHz on 17-19 August 2012 are presented. Such cutoff may be attributed to the emergence of the burst sources behind limb of the Sun with respect to an observer on the Earth. The events are strongly associated with solar eruptions occurred in a new active region. Ray tracing simulations show that the CMEs play a constructive role for the behind-limb bursts to be detected in ground-based observations. Likely, due to tunnel-like cavities with low density in CMEs, the radio emission of behind-limb solar bursts can be directed towards the Earth.

  6. Blood or Urine IP-10 Cannot Discriminate between Active Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases Different from Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Linda; Cannas, Angela; Aloi, Francesco; Nsubuga, Martin; Sserumkuma, Joseph; Nazziwa, Ritah Angella; Jugheli, Levan; Lukindo, Tedson; Girardi, Enrico; Reither, Klaus; Goletti, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10), either in blood or in urine, has been proposed as a tuberculosis (TB) biomarker for adults. This study aims to evaluate the potential of IP-10 diagnostics in children from Uganda, a high TB-endemic country. Methods. IP-10 was measured in the blood and urine concomitantly taken from children who were prospectively enrolled with suspected active TB, with or without HIV infection. Clinical/microbiological parameters and commercially available TB-immune assays (tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB-Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT)) were concomitantly evaluated. Results. One hundred twenty-eight children were prospectively enrolled. The analysis was performed on 111 children: 80 (72%) of them were HIV-uninfected and 31 (27.9%) were HIV-infected. Thirty-three healthy adult donors (HAD) were included as controls. The data showed that IP-10 is detectable in the urine and blood of children with active TB, independent of HIV status and age. However, although IP-10 levels were higher in active TB children compared to HAD, the accuracy of identifying “active TB” was low and similar to the TST and QFT-IT. Conclusion. IP-10 levels are higher in children with respiratory illness compared to controls, independent of “TB status” suggesting that the evaluation of this parameter can be used as an inflammatory marker more than a TB test. PMID:26346028

  7. Activation of NF-κB by nucleocapsid protein of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rui; Fang, Liurong; Jiang, Yunbo; Jin, Hui; Wang, Yanwei; Wang, Dang; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2011-02-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a critical transcription factor in innate and adaptive immune response as well as cell proliferation and survival. Previous studies have demonstrated that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection activated NF-κB pathways through IκB degradation in MARC-145 cells and alveolar macrophages. To evaluate the mechanisms behind this, we investigated the role of PRRSV structural proteins in the regulation of NF-κB. In this study, we screened the structural proteins of PRRSV by NF-κB DNA-binding assay and luciferase activity assay and demonstrated that PRRSV nucleocapsid (N) protein could activate NF-κB in MARC-145 cells. Furthermore, we revealed that the region between aa 30 and 73 of N protein was essential for its function in the activation of NF-κB. These results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular mechanism of PRRSV infection and inflammation response. PMID:21063763

  8. Evaluation of neural reflex activation as a mode of action for the acute respiratory effects of ozone.

    PubMed

    Prueitt, Robyn L; Goodman, Julie E

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to elevated levels of ozone has been associated with a variety of respiratory-related health endpoints in both epidemiology and controlled human exposure studies, including lung function decrements and airway inflammation. A mode of action (MoA) for these effects has not been established, but it has been proposed that they may occur through ozone-induced activation of neural reflexes. We critically reviewed experimental studies of ozone exposure and neural reflex activation and applied the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) mode-of-action/human relevance framework to evaluate the biological plausibility and human relevance of this proposed MoA. Based on the currently available experimental data, we found that the proposed MoA of neural reflex activation is biologically plausible for the endpoint of ozone-induced lung function decrements at high ozone exposures, but further studies are needed to fill important data gaps regarding the relevance of this MoA at lower exposures. A role for the proposed MoA in ozone-induced airway inflammation is less plausible, as the evidence is conflicting and is also of unclear relevance given the lack of studies conducted at lower exposures. The evidence suggests a different MoA for ozone-induced inflammation that may still be linked to the key events in the proposed MoA, such that neural reflex activation may have some degree of involvement in modulating ozone-induced neutrophil influx, even if it is not a direct role. PMID:27569521

  9. [Activity of tigecycline against pathogen bacteria isolated in respiratory infectious disease in Europe. TEST study 2004-2007].

    PubMed

    Rio, Y; Okamba, P; Staal, A; Didion, J; Jurin, F

    2009-02-01

    Tigecycline (TGC), a semisynthetic glycylcycline, has a documented activity on Gram+ and Gram- pathogens including oxacillin-resistant (MRSA) and an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (TEST) is an international surveillance study designed to assess the in vitro activity of TGC and 11 comparators against a range of important clinical pathogens from both the community and the hospital. The aim of this study was to assess efficacy of TGC, using this database, against pathogens implicated in community or hospital pneumonia and sinusitis. A total of 4163 isolates were consecutively collected in 21 European countries during three years (2004-2007). In all center, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were determinated with the same Microscan panel (Dade-Behring). Tigecycline exhibited a good activity against respiratory pathogens, with the exception of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Hundred percent of cocci Gram+ (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus sp.) and 100% of Haemophilus sp. are inhibited with 0.5 mg/L, without effect of an associated beta-lactam resistance mechanism. TGC is active in vitro on 89% of Enterobacteriaceae, with MIC 90 less or equal to 2mg/L. Eighty-nine percent of Enterobacter sp. and 77% of Serratia sp. are susceptible with range of MIC 90 from 2 to 4 mg/L. These interesting results obtained in vitro are to be strengthened by clinical studies. PMID:18829182

  10. Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease Involves a Cysteinyl Leukotriene-Driven IL-33-Mediated Mast Cell Activation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Barrett, Nora A; Feng, Chunli; Garofalo, Denise; Lai, Juying; Buchheit, Kathleen; Bhattacharya, Neil; Laidlaw, Tanya M; Katz, Howard R; Boyce, Joshua A

    2015-10-15

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), a severe eosinophilic inflammatory disorder of the airways, involves overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs), activation of airway mast cells (MCs), and bronchoconstriction in response to nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitors that deplete homeostatic PGE2. The mechanistic basis for MC activation in this disorder is unknown. We now demonstrate that patients with AERD have markedly increased epithelial expression of the alarmin-like cytokine IL-33 in nasal polyps, as compared with polyps from aspirin-tolerant control subjects. The murine model of AERD, generated by dust mite priming of mice lacking microsomal PGE2 synthase (ptges(-/-) mice), shows a similar upregulation of IL-33 protein in the airway epithelium, along with marked eosinophilic bronchovascular inflammation. Deletion of leukotriene C4 synthase, the terminal enzyme needed to generate cysLTs, eliminates the increased IL-33 content of the ptges(-/-) lungs and sharply reduces pulmonary eosinophilia and basal secretion of MC products. Challenges of dust mite-primed ptges(-/-) mice with lysine aspirin induce IL-33-dependent MC activation and bronchoconstriction. Thus, IL-33 is a component of a cysLT-driven innate type 2 immune response that drives pathogenic MC activation and contributes substantially to AERD pathogenesis. PMID:26342029

  11. INTEGRAL burst alert service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, H.; Jennings, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Teegarden, B.

    1997-01-01

    The detection, accurate positioning, and spectral analysis of cosmic gamma ray bursts is an objective of the International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission. Due to their unpredictable nature, gamma ray bursts can only be observed in serendipity mode. In order to allow and promote multiwavelength follow-up observations of such events, it is desirable to make the information available to the astrophysics community with a minimum delay through the use of Internet. Ideally, the data dissemination should occur within a few seconds of the start of the burst event so that follow up observations can proceed while gamma rays are still being emitted. The technical feasibility of building such a system to disseminate INTEGRAL burst alerts in real time is currently under consideration, the preliminary results of which are presented. It is concluded that such an alert service is technically feasible.

  12. Extragalactic Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailes, Matthew; Johnston, Simon; Bhat, Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Barnes, David; van Straten, Willem

    2008-04-01

    We propose a sky monitoring survey that will piggy-back multibeam observations of other scientific programmes; the intent of our search is to intercept and analyse millisecond-duration, single, impulsive bursts from transient events in the extragalactic sky.

  13. Extragalactic Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Johnston, Simon; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Barnes, David; van Straten, Willem

    2008-10-01

    We propose a sky monitoring survey that will piggy-back multibeam observations of other scientific programmes; the intent of our search is to intercept and analyse millisecond-duration, single, impulsive bursts from transient events in the extragalactic sky.

  14. Effects of ambient ozone on respiratory function in active, normal children

    SciTech Connect

    Spektor, D.M.; Lippmann, M.; Lioy, P.J.; Thurston, G.D.; Citak, K.; James, D.J.; Bock, N.; Speizer, F.E.; Hayes, C.

    1988-02-01

    Respiratory functions were measured on a daily basis by spirometry over a period of 4 wk at a summer camp at Fairview Lake in northwestern New Jersey. Fifty-three boys and 38 girls 8 to 15 yr of age participated in the study on at least 7 days; 37 children were in residence for 4 wk, 34 for the first 2 wk only; and 20 for the last 2 wk. There were 72 whites, 15 blacks, 3 Asians, and 1 Hispanic in the study group. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the O/sub 3/ concentration in the previous hour, the cumulative daily O/sub 3/ exposure during the hours between 9 A.M. and the function measurement, ambient temperature, and humidity were the most explanatory environmental variables for daily variations in function, with the 1 - h O/sub 3/ concentration having the strongest influence. Linear regressions were performed for each child between O/sub 3/ concentration and function, and all average slopes were significantly negative (p less than 0.05) for FVC, FEV1, PEFR, and FEF25-75 for all children, and for boys and girls separately. Comparable results were obtained in data subsets (i.e., children studied during the first or second 2 wk only, and for data sets truncated at O/sub 3/ less than 80 and O/sub 3/ less than 60 ppb). The average regression slopes (+/- SE) for FVC and FEV1, respectively, were -1.03 +/- 0.24 and -1.42 +/- 0.17 ml/ppb, whereas for PEFR and FEF25-75 they were -6.78 +/- 0.73 and -2.48 +/- 0.26 ml/s/ppb.

  15. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  16. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.; Kippen, M.

    2004-09-28

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  17. Burst diaphragm sequence valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisneskie, Bradley D.; Hyman, Sheldon; Hallum, Charles E.

    1991-11-01

    A burst diaphragm sequence valve which effectively combines the structure of a burst diaphragm with that of an ordinary swing check valve, the pivot of the ordinary swing check valve being replaced by an integral flexural hinge. The sequence valve provides a way to sequentially burn solid propellant hot gas generators which exit into a common gas manifold, thereby enabling gas-powered devices to operate for a longer time than the duration of one gas generator burn.

  18. Regulation of Respiratory and Vocal Motor Pools in the Isolated Brain of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Zornik, Erik; Kelley, Darcy B.

    2010-01-01

    The aquatic frog Xenopus laevis uses a complex vocal repertoire during mating and male–male interactions. Calls are produced without breathing, allowing the frogs to vocalize for long periods underwater. The Xenopus vocal organ, the larynx, is innervated by neurons in cranial motor nucleus (n.) IX–X, which contains both vocal (laryngeal) and respiratory (glottal) motor neurons. The primary descending input to n.IX–X comes from the pretrigeminal nucleus of the dorsal tegmental area of the medulla (DTAM), located in the rostral hindbrain. We wanted to characterize premotor inputs to respiratory and vocal motor neurons and to determine what mechanisms might be involved in regulating two temporally distinct rhythmic behaviors: breathing and calling. Using isolated brain and larynx preparations, we recorded extracellular activity from the laryngeal nerve and muscles and intracellular activity in laryngeal and glottal motor neurons. Spontaneous nerve activities mimicking respiratory and vocal patterns were observed. DTAM projection neurons (DTAMIX–X neurons) provide direct input to glottal and laryngeal motor neurons. Electrical stimulation produced short-latency coordinated activity in the laryngeal nerve. DTAMIX–X neurons provide excitatory monosynaptic inputs to laryngeal motor neurons and mixed excitatory and inhibitory inputs to glottal motor neurons. DTAM stimulation also produced a delayed burst of glottal motor neuron activity. Together, our data suggest that neurons in DTAM produce vocal motor output by directly activating laryngeal motor neurons and that DTAM may coordinate vocal and respiratory motor activity. PMID:18199762

  19. Parameters for burst detection

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum, Douglas J.; Radivojevic, Milos; Frey, Urs; Franke, Felix; Hierlemann, Andreas; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Bursts of action potentials within neurons and throughout networks are believed to serve roles in how neurons handle and store information, both in vivo and in vitro. Accurate detection of burst occurrences and durations are therefore crucial for many studies. A number of algorithms have been proposed to do so, but a standard method has not been adopted. This is due, in part, to many algorithms requiring the adjustment of multiple ad-hoc parameters and further post-hoc criteria in order to produce satisfactory results. Here, we broadly catalog existing approaches and present a new approach requiring the selection of only a single parameter: the number of spikes N comprising the smallest burst to consider. A burst was identified if N spikes occurred in less than T ms, where the threshold T was automatically determined from observing a probability distribution of inter-spike-intervals. Performance was compared vs. different classes of detectors on data gathered from in vitro neuronal networks grown over microelectrode arrays. Our approach offered a number of useful features including: a simple implementation, no need for ad-hoc or post-hoc criteria, and precise assignment of burst boundary time points. Unlike existing approaches, detection was not biased toward larger bursts, allowing identification and analysis of a greater range of neuronal and network dynamics. PMID:24567714

  20. The thermal tolerance of crayfish could be estimated from respiratory electron transport system activity.

    PubMed

    Simčič, Tatjana; Pajk, Franja; Jaklič, Martina; Brancelj, Anton; Vrezec, Al

    2014-04-01

    Whether electron transport system (ETS) activity could be used as an estimator of crayfish thermal tolerance has been investigated experimentally. Food consumption rate, respiration rates in the air and water, the difference between energy consumption and respiration costs at a given temperature ('potential growth scope', PGS), and ETS activity of Orconectes limosus and Pacifastacus leniusculus were determined over a temperature range of 5-30°C. All concerned parameters were found to be temperature dependent. The significant correlation between ETS activity and PGS indicates that they respond similarly to temperature change. The regression analysis of ETS activity as an estimator of thermal tolerance at the mitochondrial level and PGS as an indicator of thermal tolerance at the organismic level showed the shift of optimum temperature ranges of ETS activity to the right for 2° in O. limosus and for 3° in P. leniusculus. Thus, lower estimated temperature optima and temperatures of optimum ranges of PGS compared to ETS activity could indicate higher thermal sensitivity at the organismic level than at a lower level of complexity (i.e. at the mitochondrial level). The response of ETS activity to temperature change, especially at lower and higher temperatures, indicates differences in the characteristics of the ETSs in O. limosus and P. leniusculus. O. limosus is less sensitive to high temperature. The significant correlation between PGS and ETS activity supports our assumption that ETS activity could be used for the rapid estimation of thermal tolerance in crayfish species. PMID:24679968

  1. Activation of protein phosphatase 2A is responsible for increased content and inactivation of respiratory chain complex i induced by all-trans retinoic acid in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Sardaro, N; Lippolis, R; Panelli, D; Scacco, S

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on cell growth and respiratory chain complex I in human keratinocyte cultures. Keratinocyte treatment results in increased level of GRIM-19 and other subunits of complex I, in particular of their carbonylated forms, associated with inhibition of its enzymatic activity. The results show that in keratinocytes ATRA-promoted phosphatase activity controls the proteostasis and activity of complex I. PMID:27358125

  2. A Single Amino Acid Deletion in the Matrix Protein of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Confers Resistance to a Polyclonal Swine Antibody with Broadly Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Luca N.; Monday, Nicholas; Calvert, Jay G.; Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of virus neutralization (VN) activity in 176 pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) identified one pig with broadly neutralizing activity. A Tyr-10 deletion in the matrix protein provided escape from broad neutralization without affecting homologous neutralizing activity. The role of the Tyr-10 deletion was confirmed through an infectious clone with a Tyr-10 deletion. The results demonstrate differences in the properties and specificities of VN responses elicited during PRRSV infection. PMID:25855739

  3. Elafin (elastase-specific inhibitor) has anti-microbial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Simpson, A J; Maxwell, A I; Govan, J R; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    1999-06-11

    Elafin (elastase-specific inhibitor) is a low molecular weight inhibitor of neutrophil elastase which is secreted in the lung. Using synthetic peptides corresponding to full-length elafin (H2N-1AVT.....95Q-OH), the NH2-terminal domain (H2N-1AVT.....50K-OH) and the COOH-terminal domain (H2N-51PGS.....95Q-OH), we demonstrate that elafin's anti-elastase activity resides exclusively in the COOH-terminus. Several characteristics of elafin suggest potential anti-microbial activity. The anti-microbial activity of elafin, and of its two structural domains, was tested against the respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Elafin killed both bacteria efficiently, with 93% killing of P. aeruginosa by 2.5 microM elafin and 48% killing of S. aureus by 25 microM elafin. For both organisms, full-length elafin was required to optimise bacterial killing. These findings represent the first demonstration of co-existent anti-proteolytic and anti-microbial functions for elafin. PMID:10386612

  4. Respiratory activity and mitochondrial membrane associated with fruit senescence in postharvest peaches in response to UV-C treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenfeng; Cao, Shifeng; Su, Xinguo; Jiang, Yueming

    2014-10-15

    The effect of 3.0kJ/m(2) ultraviolet-C (UV-C) treatment on respiratory activity and mitochondrial membrane associated with fruit senescence in peach fruit stored at 20°C for 8days was investigated. UV-C treatment could reduce senescence development, as evidenced by higher fruit firmness due to inhibition of respiration rate via reducing succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome C oxidase activity. Meanwhile, the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in the UV-C-treated fruit were much higher than those in control fruit, resulting in lower levels of superoxide radicals (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In addition, this treatment maintained a higher level of mitochondrial membrane fluidity and inhibited opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Our results suggest that the induction of antioxidant enzymes to scavenge O2(-) and H2O2 by UV-C treatment was associated with the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity, which also played an important role in senescence retardation in peach fruit. PMID:24837916

  5. An Off-Line Implementation of the Stable Isotope Technique for Measurements of Alternative Respiratory Pathway Activities1

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Oscar W.; Waldron, Susan; Jones, Hamlyn G.

    2001-01-01

    In situ measurements of alternative respiratory pathway activity are needed to provide insight into the energy efficiency of plant metabolism under various conditions in the field. The only reliable method at present to measure alternative oxidase (AOX) activity is through measurement of changes in δ18O(O2), which to date has only been used in laboratory environments. We have developed a cuvette system to measure partitioning of electrons to AOX that is suitable for off-line use and for field experiments. Plant samples are enclosed in airtight cuvettes and O2 consumption is monitored. Gas samples from the cuvette are stored in evacuated gas containers until measurement of δ18O(O2). We have validated this method using differing plant material to assess AOX activity. Fractionation factors were calculated from δ18O(O2) measurements, which could be measured with an accuracy and precision to 0.1‰ and 0.3‰, respectively. Potential sources of error are discussed and quantified. Our method provides results similar to those obtained with laboratory incubations on-line to a mass spectrometer but greatly increases the potential for adoption of the stable isotope method. PMID:11706206

  6. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. PMID:27478588

  7. Organotypic slice cultures containing the preBötzinger complex generate respiratory-like rhythms.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Wiktor S; Herly, Mikkel; Del Negro, Christopher A; Rekling, Jens C

    2016-02-01

    Study of acute brain stem slice preparations in vitro has advanced our understanding of the cellular and synaptic mechanisms of respiratory rhythm generation, but their inherent limitations preclude long-term manipulation and recording experiments. In the current study, we have developed an organotypic slice culture preparation containing the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), the core inspiratory rhythm generator of the ventrolateral brain stem. We measured bilateral synchronous network oscillations, using calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes, in both ventrolateral (presumably the preBötC) and dorsomedial regions of slice cultures at 7-43 days in vitro. These calcium oscillations appear to be driven by periodic bursts of inspiratory neuronal activity, because whole cell recordings from ventrolateral neurons in culture revealed inspiratory-like drive potentials, and no oscillatory activity was detected from glial fibrillary associated protein-expressing astrocytes in cultures. Acute slices showed a burst frequency of 10.9 ± 4.2 bursts/min, which was not different from that of brain stem slice cultures (13.7 ± 10.6 bursts/min). However, slice cocultures that include two cerebellar explants placed along the dorsolateral border of the brainstem displayed up to 193% faster burst frequency (22.4 ± 8.3 bursts/min) and higher signal amplitude (340%) compared with acute slices. We conclude that preBötC-containing slice cultures retain inspiratory-like rhythmic function and therefore may facilitate lines of experimentation that involve extended incubation (e.g., genetic transfection or chronic drug exposure) while simultaneously being amenable to imaging and electrophysiology at cellular, synaptic, and network levels. PMID:26655824

  8. Immunoenhancing effect of trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid on the phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst activity of canine peripheral blood phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min-Haeng; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Mhan-Pyo

    2008-10-01

    The effect of trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (t10c12-CLA) on the phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst activity (OBA) of canine peripheral blood phagocytes was examined. t10c12-CLA did not directly affect the phagocytic capacity and OBA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes or polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). However, the phagocytic capacity of PMN and monocytes was enhanced by the culture supernatant from t10c12-CLA-treated PBMC. This supernatant enhanced the latex bead-induced OBA of PMN and monocytes. t10c12-CLA also increased TNF-alpha production by PBMC. Recombinant canine (rc) TNF-alpha also increased the phagocytic capacity and OBA of PMN and monocytes. The ability of the culture supernatant from t10c12-CLA-treated PBMC to stimulate the phagocytic capacity and OBA of phagocytes was inhibited by anti-rcTNF-alpha pAb. These results suggest that t10c12-CLA has an immunoenhancing effect on the phagocytic capacity and OBA of phagocytes, and this effect may be mediated by TNF-alpha released from t10c12-CLA-treated PBMC. PMID:18234254

  9. Intermittent Theta Burst Over M1 May Increase Peak Power of a Wingate Anaerobic Test and Prevent the Reduction of Voluntary Activation Measured with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Giboin, Louis-Solal; Thumm, Patrick; Bertschinger, Raphael; Gruber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Despite the potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to improve performances in patients suffering from motor neuronal afflictions, its effect on motor performance enhancement in healthy subjects during a specific sport task is still unknown. We hypothesized that after an intermittent theta burst (iTBS) treatment, performance during the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) will increase and supraspinal fatigue following the exercise will be lower in comparison to a control treatment. Ten subjects participated in two randomized experiments consisting of a WAnT 5 min after either an iTBS or a control treatment. We determined voluntary activation (VA) of the right knee extensors with TMS (VATMS) and with peripheral nerve stimulation (VAPNS) of the femoral nerve, before and after the WAnT. T-tests were applied to the WAnT results and a two way within subject ANOVA was applied to VA results. The iTBS treatment increased the peak power and the maximum pedalling cadence and suppressed the reduction of VATMS following the WAnT compared to the control treatment. No behavioral changes related to fatigue (mean power and fatigue index) were observed. These results indicate for the first time that iTBS could be used as a potential intervention to improve anaerobic performance in a sport specific task. PMID:27486391

  10. Multiple cis Regulatory Elements Control RANTES Promoter Activity in Alveolar Epithelial Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Casola, Antonella; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Haeberle, Helene; Elliott, Todd F.; Lin, Rongtuan; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Brasier, Allan R.

    2001-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) produces intense pulmonary inflammation, in part through its ability to induce chemokine synthesis in infected airway epithelial cells. RANTES (regulated upon activation, normally T-cell expressed and presumably secreted) is a CC chemokine which recruits and activates monocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, all cell types present in the lung inflammatory infiltrate induced by RSV infection. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism of RSV-induced RANTES promoter activation in human type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549 cells). Promoter deletion and mutagenesis experiments indicate that RSV requires the presence of five different cis regulatory elements, located in the promoter fragment spanning from −220 to +55 nucleotides, corresponding to NF-κB, C/EBP, Jun/CREB/ATF, and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) binding sites. Although site mutations of the NF-κB, C/EBP, and CREB/AP-1 like sites reduce RSV-induced RANTES gene transcription to 50% or less, only mutations affecting IRF binding completely abolish RANTES inducibility. Supershift and microaffinity isolation assays were used to identify the different transcription factor family members whose DNA binding activity was RSV inducible. Expression of dominant negative mutants of these transcription factors further established their central role in virus-induced RANTES promoter activation. Our finding that the presence of multiple cis regulatory elements is required for full activation of the RANTES promoter in RSV-infected alveolar epithelial cells supports the enhanceosome model for RANTES gene transcription, which is absolutely dependent on binding of IRF transcription factors. The identification of regulatory mechanisms of RANTES gene expression is fundamental for rational design of inhibitors of RSV-induced lung inflammation. PMID:11413310

  11. In vitro effect of manganese chloride exposure on reactive oxygen species generation and respiratory chain complexes activities of mitochondria isolated from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Surong; Fu, Juanling; Zhou, Zongcan

    2004-02-01

    Manganese (Mn) is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in excessive dose; however the mechanisms underlying its action are not elucidated clearly. To determine if Mn2+ can act directly on mitochondria or indirectly by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), isolated mitochondria were exposed to different concentration of Mn2+ (5, 50, 500, 1000 microM). ROS generation, respiratory control ratio (RCR), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and respiratory chain complexes activities were investigated. Dose-dependent inhibition of respiratory chain complexes and induction of ROS were observed; these changes were paralleled by decreasing of respiratory control ratio (RCR) both with succinate or glutamate + malate. Further investigation indicated that the membrane potential determined by Rhodamine123 release decreased after MnCl2 exposure at 1000 microM. In addition, effects of the antioxidants NAC (500 microM), GSH (500 microM) and Vitamin C (500 microM) were studied at 500 microM Mn2+. The results indicate that the effect of Mn2+ exposure on respiratory chain is not site-specific, and antioxidants can protect the mitochondria function by reducing the formation of free radicals. PMID:14630064

  12. Global gene expression profiling in infants with acute respiratory syncytial virus broncholitis demonstrates systemic activation of interferon signaling networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pediatric lower respiratory tract infections and has a high impact on pediatric emergency department utilization. Variation in host response may influence the pathogenesis and disease severity. We evaluated global gene expression profiles to be...

  13. Statistical Properties of SGR 1900+14 Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogus, Ersin; Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Briggs, Michael S.; Duncan, Robert C.; Thompson, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    We study the statistics of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts, using a data base of 187 events detected with BATSE and 837 events detected with RXTE PCA, all from SGR 1900+14 during its 1998-1999 active phase. we find that the fluence or energy distribution of bursts is consistent with a power law of index 1.66, over 4 orders of magnitude. This scale-free distribution resembles the Gutenberg-Richter Law for earthquakes, and gives evidence for self-organized criticality in SGRS. The distribution of time intervals between successive bursts from SGR 1900+14 is consistent with a log-normal distribution. There is no correlation between burst intensity and the waiting times till the next burst, but there is some evidence for a correlation between burst intensity and the time elapsed since the previous burst. We also find a correlation between the duration and the energy of the bursts, but with significant scatter. In all these statistical properties, SGR bursts resemble earthquakes and solar flares more closely than they resemble any known accretion-powered or nuclear-powered phenomena. Thus our analysis lends support to the hypothesis that the energy source for SGR bursts is internal to the neutron star, and plausibly magnetic.

  14. Statistical Properties of SGR 1900+14 Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogus, Ersin; Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; VanParadijs, Jan

    1999-01-01

    We study the statistics of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts using a database of 187 events detected with BATSE and 837 events detected with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array: all events are from SGR 1900+14 during its 1998-1999 active phase. We find that the fluence or energy distribution of bursts is consistent with a power law of index 1.66, over 4 orders of magnitude. This scale-free distribution resembles the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes and gives evidence for self-organized criticality in SGRS. The distribution of time intervals between successive bursts from SGR 1900+14 is consistent with a lognormal distribution. There is no correlation between burst intensity and the waiting times till the next burst, but there is some evidence for a correlation between burst intensity and the time elapsed since the previous burst. We also find a correlation between the duration and the energy of the bursts, but with significant scatter. In all these statistical properties, SGR bursts resemble earthquakes and solar flares more closely than they resemble any known accretion-powered or nuclear-powered phenomena. Thus, our analysis lends support to the hypothesis that the energy source for SGR bursts is internal to the neutron star and plausibly magnetic.

  15. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the lungs cannot remove all of the carbon dioxide the body produces. This causes body fluids, especially ... Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in which carbon dioxide builds up very quickly, before the kidneys can ...

  16. Effects of 3 hours a week of physical activity on body fat and cardio-respiratory parameters in obese boys.

    PubMed

    Vajda, I; Mészáros, J; Mészáros, Z; Prókai, A; Sziva, A; Photiou, A; Zsidegh, P

    2007-09-01

    The prevalence of overweight or fat children and adolescents has markedly increased in Hungary during the past three decades. Among the possible factors insufficient physical activity and a relative or absolute excess of calorie intake associated to it can be regarded as the most important ones. The aim of the study was to analyse the effects of a 20-week aerobic exercise on body composition and on the exercise tested cardio-respiratory functions in 10-year-old obese boys. Obesity was defined by a BMI greater than the cut-off value reported by Cole and co-workers (5) and a relative body fat content above 30% (13). Of the study group 21 volunteer children completed the program; the contrast group contained 28 obese boys. Mean calendar age was 10.03 +/- 0.26 in the study group (S) and 9.88 +/- 0.29 in the control group (C). The members of group S had two curricular physical education (PE) classes a week and three extracurricular aerobic physical activity sessions of 60 min net time in the afternoon, on Mondays (swimming and water games), Wednesdays (folk dance) and Fridays (soccer). Group C had only 2 PE classes a week. Anthropometric and spiroergometric data were collected in the middle of January and June of 2004. Relative body fat content and BMI did not increase during the observation period in contrast to the significant increase of both in the control group. Peak minute ventilation, aerobic power, oxygen pulse, and running distance (performed on a treadmill) increased in group S, and did not change in group C. The program was considered successful despite that the changes in the observed physiological and physical indicators appeared to be slight. However, the 5-month elevated level of physical activity brought about such development in the physical status of the obese subjects that might be an appropriate basis for regular training. Fortunately, the cardio-respiratory functions of the investigated boys were not affected yet by obesity, consequently the really

  17. Effect of organic compounds on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of sea spray aerosol produced by bubble bursting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Meagan J. K.; Furutani, Hiroshi; Roberts, Gregory C.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Palenik, Brian; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2011-12-01

    The ocean comprises over 70% of the surface of the earth and thus sea spray aerosols generated by wave processes represent a critical component of our climate system. The manner in which different complex oceanic mixtures of organic species and inorganic salts are distributed between individual particles in sea spray directly determines which particles will effectively form cloud nuclei. Controlled laboratory experiments were undertaken to better understand the full range of particle properties produced by bubbling solutions composed of simplistic model organic species, oleic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), mixed with NaCl to more complex artificial seawater mixed with complex organic mixtures produced by common oceanic microorganisms. Simple mixtures of NaCl and oleic acid or SDS had a significant effect on CCN activity, even in relatively small amounts. However, an artificial seawater (ASW) solution containing microorganisms, the common cyanobacteria ( Synechococcus) and DMS-producing green algae ( Ostreococcus), produced particles containing ˜34 times more carbon than the particles produced from pure ASW, yet no significant change was observed in the overall CCN activity. We hypothesize that these microorganisms produce diverse mixtures of organic species with a wide range of properties that produced offsetting effects, leading to no net change in the overall average measured hygroscopicity of the collection of sea spray particles. Based on these observations, changes in CCN activity due to "bloom" conditions would be predicted to lead to small changes in the average CCN activity, and thus have a negligible impact on cloud formation. However, each sea spray particle will contain a broad spectrum of different species, and thus further studies are needed of the CCN activity of individual sea spray particles and biological processes under a wide range of controllable conditions.

  18. A specific phospholipase C activity regulates phosphatidylinositol levels in lung surfactant of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spyridakis, Spyros; Leondaritis, George; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2010-03-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a lipid-rich material lining the inside of the lungs. It reduces surface tension at the liquid/air interface and thus, it confers protection of the alveoli from collapsing. The surface-active component of LS is dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, while anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and primarily phosphatidylglycerol are involved in the stabilization of the LS monolayer. The exact role of PtdIns in this system is not well-understood; however, PtdIns levels change dramatically during the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) evolution. In this report we present evidence of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, which may regulate PtdIns levels. Characterization of this extracellular activity showed specificity for PtdIns and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, sharing the typical substrate concentration-, pH-, and calcium-dependencies with mammalian PI-PLCs. Fractionation of BAL fluid showed that PI-PLC did not co-fractionate with large surfactant aggregates, but it was found mainly in the soluble fraction. Importantly, analysis of BAL samples from control subjects and from patients with ARDS showed that the PI-PLC specific activity was decreased by 4-fold in ARDS samples concurrently with the increase in BAL PtdIns levels. Thus, we have identified for the first time an extracellular PI-PLC enzyme activity that may be acutely involved in the regulation of PtdIns levels in LS. PMID:19491339

  19. Characterizing Oscillatory Bursts in Single-Trial EEG Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Oscillatory bursts in numerous bands ranging from low (theta) to high frequencies (e.g., gamma) undoubtedly play an important role in cortical dynamics. Largely because of the inadequacy of existing analytic techniques. however, oscillatory bursts and their role in cortical processing remains poorly understood. To study oscillatory bursts effectively one must be able to isolate them and characterize them in the single trial. We describe a series of straightforward analysis techniques that produce useful indices of burst characteristics. First, stimulus-evoked responses are estimated using Differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA), and are subtracted from the single-trial. The single-trial characteristics of the evoked responses are stored to identify possible correlations with burst activity. Time-frequency (T-F), or wavelet, analyses are then applied to the single trial residuals. While T-F plots have been used in recent studies to identify and isolate bursts, we go further by fitting each burst in the T-F plot with a two-dimensional Gaussian. This provides a set of burst characteristics, such as, center time. burst duration, center frequency. frequency dispersion. and amplitude, all of which contribute to the accurate characterization of the individual burst. The burst phase can also be estimated. Burst characteristics can be quantified with several standard techniques (e.g.. histogramming and clustering), as well as Bayesian techniques (e.g., blocking) to allow a more parametric description analysis of the characteristics of oscillatory bursts, and the relationships of specific parameters to cortical excitability and stimulus integration.

  20. Antiviral activity of recombinant porcine surfactant protein A against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Zheng, Qisheng; Zhang, Yuanpeng; Li, Pengcheng; Fu, Yanfeng; Hou, Jibo; Xiao, Xilong

    2016-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has caused significant economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. However, there is not an ideal vaccine to provide complete protection against PRRSV. Thus, the need for new antiviral strategies to control PRRSV still remains. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) belongs to the family of C-type lectins, which can exert antiviral activities. In this present study, we assessed the antiviral properties of recombinant porcine SP-A (RpSP-A) on PRRSV infection in Marc 145 cells and revealed its antiviral mechanism using a plaque assay, real-time qPCR, western blotting analysis and an attachment and penetration assay. Our results showed that RpSP-A could inhibit the infectivity of PRRSV in Marc 145 cells and could reduce the total RNA and protein level. The attachment assay indicated that RpSP-A in the presence of Ca(2+) could largely inhibit Marc 145 cell attachment; however, in the penetration assay, it was relatively inactive. Furthermore, our study suggested that virus progeny released from infected Marc145 cells were blocked by RpSP-A from infecting other cells. We conclude that RpSP-A has antiviral activity against PRRSV, most probably by blocking viral attachment and the cell-to-cell transmission pathway, and therefore, RpSP-A holds promise as a novel antiviral agent against PRRSV. PMID:27101074

  1. Antimicrobial activity of extracts of local cough mixtures on upper respiratory tract bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, I A; Opiah, L

    2003-09-01

    The punched-hole and the paper disc diffusion methods were used in screening for the antimicrobial activity of six common ingredients used locally in cough mixtures, against the following bacteria: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus. Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp, Salmonella paratyphi, Shigella dysenteria, Shigella sonnei and Candida albicans. The results, evaluated as the diameter of zone of inhibition of microbial growth, showed that lime, garlic onion, onion and honey were active against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp and Shigella dysenteriae. Bitter-kola nut extract and palm kernel oil showed no antimicrobial activities against any of the tested organisms. None of the extracts inhibited the growth of Salmonella paratyphi and Shigella sonnei and the most susceptible organisms were Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. PMID:14649097

  2. Decametric and hectometric Solar Type III bursts at Saturn's orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Sawas, Sami; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Maksimovic, Milan

    2015-04-01

    We report on solar radio bursts observed by RPWS experiment onboard Cassini spacecraft. We consider Type III solar bursts observed in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 16 MHz. Those bursts are probably generated in the solar corona and the interplanetary medium. We show that the Type III burst occurrence is depending on the solar activity. We attempt to localize the regions where the Type III burst is probably emitted. We consider that the electrons at the origin of the Solar Type III bursts follow the interplanetary magnetic field. The trajectory is an Archimedean spiral contained in the ecliptic plane. We discuss our results taking into consideration on the one hand the spacecraft positions with regards to the source location, and on the other hand the temporal and spectral radio beam variation when combining Cassini and Wind observations.

  3. Herschel Far-infrared Photometry of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope Active Galactic Nuclei Sample of the Local Universe. I. PACS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Shimizu, T. T.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-01

    Far-Infrared (FIR) photometry from the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer on the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 313 nearby, hard X-ray selected galaxies from the 58 month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Active Galactic Nuclei catalog. The present data do not distinguish between the FIR luminosity distributions at 70 and 160 μm for Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies. This result suggests that if the FIR emission is from the nuclear obscuring material surrounding the accretion disk, then it emits isotropically, independent of orientation. Alternatively, a significant fraction of the 70 and 160 μm luminosity could be from star formation, independent of active galactic nucleus (AGN) type. Using a non-parametric test for partial correlation with censored data, we find a statistically significant correlation between the AGN intrinsic power (in the 14-195 keV band) and the FIR emission at 70 and 160 μm for Seyfert 1 galaxies. We find no correlation between the 14-195 keV and FIR luminosities in Seyfert 2 galaxies. The observed correlations suggest two possible scenarios: (1) if we assume that the FIR luminosity is a good tracer of star formation, then there is a connection between star formation and the AGN at sub-kiloparsec scales, or (2) dust heated by the AGN has a statistically significant contribution to the FIR emission. Using a Spearman rank-order analysis, the 14-195 keV luminosities for the Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies are weakly statistically correlated with the F 70/F 160 ratios. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  4. Herschel far-infrared photometry of the swift burst alert telescope active galactic nuclei sample of the local universe. I. PACS observations

    SciTech Connect

    Meléndez, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Shimizu, T. T.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-20

    Far-Infrared (FIR) photometry from the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer on the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 313 nearby, hard X-ray selected galaxies from the 58 month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Active Galactic Nuclei catalog. The present data do not distinguish between the FIR luminosity distributions at 70 and 160 μm for Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies. This result suggests that if the FIR emission is from the nuclear obscuring material surrounding the accretion disk, then it emits isotropically, independent of orientation. Alternatively, a significant fraction of the 70 and 160 μm luminosity could be from star formation, independent of active galactic nucleus (AGN) type. Using a non-parametric test for partial correlation with censored data, we find a statistically significant correlation between the AGN intrinsic power (in the 14-195 keV band) and the FIR emission at 70 and 160 μm for Seyfert 1 galaxies. We find no correlation between the 14-195 keV and FIR luminosities in Seyfert 2 galaxies. The observed correlations suggest two possible scenarios: (1) if we assume that the FIR luminosity is a good tracer of star formation, then there is a connection between star formation and the AGN at sub-kiloparsec scales, or (2) dust heated by the AGN has a statistically significant contribution to the FIR emission. Using a Spearman rank-order analysis, the 14-195 keV luminosities for the Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies are weakly statistically correlated with the F {sub 70}/F {sub 160} ratios.

  5. Activation of respiratory epithelial cells by wood smoke particles persists beyond immediate exposure.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biological effect of particles on epithelial cells involves, in part, oxidant generation and a cascade of reactions culminating in inflammatory mediator release. Whether there is an immediate short-lived activation or continued persistent response of the cells to the particle...

  6. Different respiratory activities of mitochondria isolated from the subendocardium and subepicardium of the canine heart.

    PubMed

    Camici, P; Ursini, F; Galiazzo, F; Bellitto, L; Pelosi, G; Marzilli, M; L'Abbate, A; Barsacchi, R

    1984-01-01

    Mitochondria were prepared from the subendocardial and subepicardial layers of the canine left ventricle. The oxidation rates of palmitate, palmitoyl carnitine and pyruvate of the mitochondria obtained from the two cardiac layers were measured. The cytochrome content and the specific activities of different beta oxidation and Krebs cycle enzymes were also measured in the two mitochondrial populations. Mitochondria isolated from the ENDO layer showed significantly higher oxidation rates than mitochondria from the EPI layer for all the three substrates. No statistically significant differences in cytochrome c+c1 and a+a3 content were found in mitochondria isolated from the two regions. No significant transmural differences were found in fatty acyl CoA, L-3-hydroxy fatty acyl CoA, succinic and malic dehydrogenase specific activities, whilst isocitric dehydrogenase (NADP) specific activity was significantly higher in mitochondria isolated from the inner layer. In conclusion, the mitochondria isolated from the inner left ventricular layer of the canine heart show a higher oxidative capacity than subepicardial mitochondria. This difference could partly be explained by the higher specific activity of isocitric dehydrogenase in this layer. These properties of subendocardial mitochondria could represent a metabolic support for the greater contractile performance of this layer. PMID:6487238

  7. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nonstructural protein 1beta modulates host innate immune response by antagonizing IRF3 activation.

    PubMed

    Beura, Lalit K; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Kwon, Byungjoon; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Jones, Clinton; Pattnaik, Asit K; Osorio, Fernando A

    2010-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection of swine leads to a serious disease characterized by a delayed and defective adaptive immune response. It is hypothesized that a suboptimal innate immune response is responsible for the disease pathogenesis. In the study presented here we tested this hypothesis and identified several nonstructural proteins (NSPs) with innate immune evasion properties encoded by the PRRS viral genome. Four of the total ten PRRSV NSPs tested were found to have strong to moderate inhibitory effects on beta interferon (IFN-beta) promoter activation. The strongest inhibitory effect was exhibited by NSP1 followed by, NSP2, NSP11, and NSP4. We focused on NSP1alpha and NSP1beta (self-cleavage products of NSP1 during virus infection) and NSP11, three NSPs with strong inhibitory activity. All of three proteins, when expressed stably in cell lines, strongly inhibited double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) signaling pathways. NSP1beta was found to inhibit both IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)- and NF-kappaB-dependent gene induction by dsRNA and Sendai virus. Mechanistically, the dsRNA-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 were strongly inhibited by NSP1beta. Moreover, when tested in a porcine myelomonocytic cell line, NSP1beta inhibited Sendai virus-mediated activation of porcine IFN-beta promoter activity. We propose that this NSP1beta-mediated subversion of the host innate immune response plays an important role in PRRSV pathogenesis. PMID:19923190

  8. A novel p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitor suppresses respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus replication by inhibiting virus-induced p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Soo; Heo, Jinyuk; Yi, Chae-Min; Ban, Junsu; Lee, Noh-Jin; Lee, Na-Rae; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Nam-Jung; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2016-08-26

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A virus are leading causes of acute lower respiratory infectious disease. Respiratory diseases caused by RSV and influenza A virus result in serious economic burden and life-threatening disease for immunocompromised people. With the revelation that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in host cells is crucial for infection and replication of RSV and influenza A virus, inhibition of p38 MAPK activity has been suggested as a potential antiviral therapeutic strategy. However, the low selectivity and high toxicity of the p38 MAPK inhibitors necessitate the development of better inhibitors. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel p38 MAPK inhibitor, NJK14047, with high kinase selectivity. In this work, it was demonstrated that NJK14047 inhibits RSV- and influenza A-mediated p38 MAPK activation in epithelial cells. Subsequently, NJK14047 treatment resulted in decreased viral replication and viral mRNA synthesis. In addition, secretion of interleukin-6 from infected cells was greatly diminished by NJK14047, suggesting that it can ameliorate immunopathological responses to RSV and influenza A. Collectively, the results suggest that NJK14047 has therapeutic potential to treat respiratory viral infection through the suppression of p38 MAPK activation, which is suggested to be an essential step for respiratory virus infection. PMID:27346133

  9. Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor Analysis of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts During an Extreme Outburst in January 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Horst, Alexander Jonathan; Kouveliotou, C.; Kaneko, Y.; Gogus, E.; Gorgone, N.; GBM Magnetar Team

    2011-05-01

    In 2008 October, the Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) J1550-5418 entered a burst active period that lasted one week. On 2009 January 22, the source entered a second, extremely active period, which lasted for one month, and was followed by a third, small episode in 2009 March. The highest number of bursts from the SGR ( 450) was observed on January 22 with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The combination of the unique GBM temporal and spectral capabilities has enabled us to study spectra of most of these SGR bursts in great detail. We present here the results of our time integrated spectral and temporal analysis of all the bursts observed with GBM during the source's active period in January 2009. Further, we compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations.

  10. A continuum model of transcriptional bursting

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Adam M; Tunnacliffe, Edward; Cannon, Danielle; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Transcription occurs in stochastic bursts. Early models based upon RNA hybridisation studies suggest bursting dynamics arise from alternating inactive and permissive states. Here we investigate bursting mechanism in live cells by quantitative imaging of actin gene transcription, combined with molecular genetics, stochastic simulation and probabilistic modelling. In contrast to early models, our data indicate a continuum of transcriptional states, with a slowly fluctuating initiation rate converting the gene between different levels of activity, interspersed with extended periods of inactivity. We place an upper limit of 40 s on the lifetime of fluctuations in elongation rate, with initiation rate variations persisting an order of magnitude longer. TATA mutations reduce the accessibility of high activity states, leaving the lifetime of on- and off-states unchanged. A continuum or spectrum of gene states potentially enables a wide dynamic range for cell responses to stimuli. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13051.001 PMID:26896676

  11. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  12. Constraining the Lateral Helix of Respiratory Complex I by Cross-linking Does Not Impair Enzyme Activity or Proton Translocation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaotong; Vik, Steven B

    2015-08-21

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a multisubunit, membrane-bound enzyme of the respiratory chain. The energy from NADH oxidation in the peripheral region of the enzyme is used to drive proton translocation across the membrane. One of the integral membrane subunits, nuoL in Escherichia coli, has an unusual lateral helix of ∼75 residues that lies parallel to the membrane surface and has been proposed to play a mechanical role as a piston during proton translocation (Efremov, R. G., Baradaran, R., and Sazanov, L. A. (2010) Nature 465, 441-445). To test this hypothesis we have introduced 11 pairs of cysteine residues into Complex I; in each pair one is in the lateral helix, and the other is in a nearby region of subunit N, M, or L. The double mutants were treated with Cu(2+) ions or with bi-functional methanethiosulfonate reagents to catalyze cross-link formation in membrane vesicles. The yields of cross-linked products were typically 50-90%, as judged by immunoblotting, but in no case did the activity of Complex I decrease by >10-20%, as indicated by deamino-NADH oxidase activity or rates of proton translocation. In contrast, several pairs of cysteine residues introduced at other interfaces of N:M and M:L subunits led to significant loss of activity, in particular, in the region of residue Glu-144 of subunit M. The results do not support the hypothesis that the lateral helix of subunit L functions like a piston, but rather, they suggest that conformational changes might be transmitted more directly through the functional residues of the proton translocation apparatus. PMID:26134569

  13. The role of stretch-activated ion channels in acute respiratory distress syndrome: finally a new target?

    PubMed

    Schwingshackl, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) and oxygen therapy (hyperoxia; HO) comprise the cornerstones of life-saving interventions for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Unfortunately, the side effects of MV and HO include exacerbation of lung injury by barotrauma, volutrauma, and propagation of lung inflammation. Despite significant improvements in ventilator technologies and a heightened awareness of oxygen toxicity, besides low tidal volume ventilation few if any medical interventions have improved ARDS outcomes over the past two decades. We are lacking a comprehensive understanding of mechanotransduction processes in the healthy lung and know little about the interactions between simultaneously activated stretch-, HO-, and cytokine-induced signaling cascades in ARDS. Nevertheless, as we are unraveling these mechanisms we are gathering increasing evidence for the importance of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) in the activation of lung-resident and inflammatory cells. In addition to the discovery of new SAC families in the lung, e.g., two-pore domain potassium channels, we are increasingly assigning mechanosensing properties to already known Na(+), Ca(2+), K(+), and Cl(-) channels. Better insights into the mechanotransduction mechanisms of SACs will improve our understanding of the pathways leading to ventilator-induced lung injury and lead to much needed novel therapeutic approaches against ARDS by specifically targeting SACs. This review 1) summarizes the reasons why the time has come to seriously consider SACs as new therapeutic targets against ARDS, 2) critically analyzes the physiological and experimental factors that currently limit our knowledge about SACs, and 3) outlines the most important questions future research studies need to address. PMID:27521425

  14. Study On Burst Location Technology under Steady-state in Water Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianpin; Li, Shuping; Wang, Shaowei; He, Fang; He, Zhixun; Cao, Guodong

    2010-11-01

    According to the characteristics of hydraulic information under the state of burst in water distribution system, to get the correlation of monitoring values and burst location and locate the position of burst on time by mathematical fitting. This method can effectively make use of the information of SCADA in water distribution system to active locating burst position. A new idea of burst location in water distribution systems to shorten the burst time, reduce the impact on urban water supply, economic losses and waste of water resources.

  15. Comet Bursting Through Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    Comets may be excited and occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation states for a large fraction of their lifetimes. Many comet nuclei have been identified or are suspected to occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation [Belton 2005, etc.] as well as have evolving rotation rates [Belton 2011, etc.]. Comet orbits drive these rotation states through cycles of excitation due to surface jets and relaxation due to time variable internal stresses that dissipate energy in the anelastic comet interior. Furthermore, relaxation from complex rotation can increase the loads along the symmetry axis of prolate comets. These loads stretch the body along the symmetry axis and may be the cause of the characteristic ``bowling pin’’ shape and eventually may lead to failure. This is an alternative model for comet bursting. Each cycle deposits only a small amount of energy and stress along the axis, but this process is repeated every orbit during which jets are activated. Our model for the evolution of comet nuclei includes torques due to a number of discrete jets located on the surface based on Neishtadt et al. [2002]. The model also includes internal dissipation using an approach developed by Sharma et al. [2005] and Vokrouhlicky et al. [2009]. These equations are averaged over the instantaneous spin state and the heliocentric orbit so the long-term evolution of the comet can be determined. We determine that even after the inclusion of internal dissipation there still exist non-principal axis equilibrium states for certain jet geometries. For ranges of dissipation factors and jet geometries, prolate comets are found to occupy states that have time variable internal loads over long time periods. These periodic loadings along the symmetry axis may lead to ``necking’’ as the body extends along the axis to release the stress and eventually disruption.

  16. The origin of spontaneous synchronized burst in cultured neuronal networks based on multi-electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanping; Chen, Lin; Lin, Yunsheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2006-08-01

    Many neural networks in mammalian central nervous system (CNS) fire single spike and complex spike burst. In fact, the conditions for triggering burst are not well understood. In the paper multi-electrode arrays (MEA) are used to record the spontaneous electrophysiological activities of cultured rat hippocampal neuronal network for a long time. After about 3 weeks culture, a transition from single spike to burst is observed in several networks. All of these spikes fire quickly before burst begins. The firing rate during the burst is lower than that just before the burst, but differences of inter-spike intervals (ISIs) between two firing patterns are not clear. Moreover, the electrical activities on neighboring electrodes show strong synchrony during the burst activities. In a word, the generation of the burst requires that network should have a sufficient level of excitation as well as a balance of synaptic inhibition. PMID:16533555

  17. Mitochondrial respiratory activity in porcine longissimus muscle fibers of different pig genetics in relation to their meat quality.

    PubMed

    Werner, C; Natter, R; Schellander, K; Wicke, M

    2010-05-01

    The pig genetics of Duroc, Pietrain (MHS homozygote negative, PiNN), Pietrain (MHS homozygote positive, PiPP) and a F2-Duroc-Pietrain cross-breed were analyzed. The animals had comparable (P>0.05) carcass weights, but the PiPP pigs had higher carcass yield and lean meat values (P<0.05). Considering the meat quality characteristics, the PiPP showed a faster pH drop and higher electrical conductivity, drip loss, shear force as well as lightness and redness values (P<0.05). The PiPP animals had less slow-twitch-oxidative (STO) and more fast-twitch-glycolytic (FTG) muscle fibers, whereas the results of the Duroc animals were converse (P<0.05). The STO and FTG fibers of the PiPP animals were larger than those of the other genetics (P<0.05). The analysis of the mitochondrial respiratory activity (MRA) using permeabilized longissimus muscle fibers resulted in no differences between the pig genetics before and immediately after slaughter. During chilling the MRA decreased in all pigs but to a higher extent in the PiPP pigs (P<0.05). PMID:20374876

  18. Search for optical bursts from the gamma ray burst source GBS 0526-66

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seetha, S.; Sreenivasaiah, K. V.; Marar, T. M. K.; Kasturirangan, K.; Rao, U. R.; Bhattacharyya, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Attempts were made to detect optical bursts from the gamma-ray burst source GBS 0526-66 during Dec. 31, 1984 to Jan. 2, 1985 and Feb. 23 to Feb. 24, 1985, using the one meter reflector of the Kavalur Observatory. Jan. 1, 1985 coincided with the zero phase of the predicted 164 day period of burst activity from the source (Rothschild and Lingenfelter, 1984). A new optical burst photon counting system with adjustable trigger threshold was used in parallel with a high speed photometer for the observations. The best time resolution was 1 ms and maximum count rate capability was 255,000 counts s(-1). Details of the instrumentation and observational results are presented.

  19. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE KINETIC POWER AND BOLOMETRIC LUMINOSITY OF JETS: LIMITATION FROM BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI, AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Renyi; Hou, Shujin; Xie, Fu-Guo E-mail: fgxie@shao.ac.cn

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P {sub jet} and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L {sub jet} of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P {sub jet} and L {sub jet} being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ∼10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1} to ∼10{sup 52} erg s{sup –1}, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P {sub jet}-L {sub jet} correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  20. Herschel far-infrared photometry of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope active galactic nuclei sample of the local universe - II. SPIRE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Meléndez, Marcio; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Koss, Michael J.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2016-03-01

    We present far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory's Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) for 313 nearby (z < 0.05) active galactic nuclei (AGN). We selected AGN from the 58 month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalogue, the result of an all-sky survey in the 14-195 keV energy band, allowing for a reduction in AGN selection effects due to obscuration and host galaxy contamination. We find 46 per cent (143/313) of our sample is detected at all three wavebands and combined with our Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations represents the most complete FIR spectral energy distributions of local, moderate-luminosity AGN. We find no correlation among the 250, 350, and 500 μm luminosities with 14-195 keV luminosity, indicating the bulk of the FIR emission is not related to the AGN. However, Seyfert 1s do show a very weak correlation with X-ray luminosity compared to Seyfert 2s and we discuss possible explanations. We compare the SPIRE colours (F250/F350 and F350/F500) to a sample of normal star-forming galaxies, finding the two samples are statistically similar, especially after matching in stellar mass. But a colour-colour plot reveals a fraction of the Herschel-BAT AGN are displaced from the normal star-forming galaxies due to excess 500 μm emission (E500). Our analysis shows E500 is strongly correlated with the 14-195 keV luminosity and 3.4/4.6 μm flux ratio, evidence the excess is related to the AGN. We speculate these sources are experiencing millimetre excess emission originating in the corona of the accretion disc.

  1. MID-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF THE SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SAMPLE OF THE LOCAL UNIVERSE. I. EMISSION-LINE DIAGNOSTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, K. A.; Melendez, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Kraemer, S.; Engle, K.; Malumuth, E.; Tueller, J.; Markwardt, C.; Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Winter, L. M.; Armus, L.

    2010-06-20

    We compare mid-infrared emission-line properties from high-resolution Spitzer spectra of a hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected sample of nearby (z < 0.05) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) aboard Swift. The luminosity distribution for the mid-infrared emission lines, [O IV] 25.89 {mu}m, [Ne II] 12.81 {mu}m, [Ne III] 15.56 {mu}m, and [Ne V] 14.32/24.32 {mu}m, and hard X-ray continuum show no differences between Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 populations; however, six newly discovered BAT AGNs are under-luminous in [O IV], most likely the result of dust extinction in the host galaxy. The overall tightness of the mid-infrared correlations and BAT fluxes and luminosities suggests that the emission lines primarily arise in gas ionized by the AGNs. We also compare the mid-infrared emission lines in the BAT AGNs with those from published studies of ULIRGs, Palomar-Green quasars, star-forming galaxies, and LINERs. We find that the BAT AGN sample falls into a distinctive region when comparing the [Ne III]/[Ne II] and the [O IV]/[Ne III] ratios. These line ratios are lower in sources that have been previously classified in the mid-infrared/optical as AGNs than those found for the BAT AGNs, suggesting that, in our X-ray selected sample, the AGNs represent the main contribution to the observed line emission. These ratios represent a new emission line diagnostic for distinguishing between AGNs and star-forming galaxies.

  2. Relationship between the Kinetic Power and Bolometric Luminosity of Jets: Limitation from Black Hole X-Ray Binaries, Active Galactic Nuclei, and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Renyi; Xie, Fu-Guo; Hou, Shujin

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P jet and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L jet of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P jet and L jet being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ~1031 erg s-1 to ~1052 erg s-1, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P jet-L jet correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  3. Radiation Mechanism and Jet Composition of Gamma-Ray Bursts and GeV-TeV-selected Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Liang, En-Wei; Sun, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Bing; Lu, Ye; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2013-09-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and GeV-TeV-selected radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are compared based on our systematic modeling of the observed spectral energy distributions of a sample of AGNs with a single-zone leptonic model. We show that the correlation between the jet power (P jet) and the prompt gamma-ray luminosity (L jet) of GRBs is consistent, within the uncertainties, with the correlation between jet power and the synchrotron peak luminosity (L s, jet) of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Their radiation efficiencies (ε) are also comparable (>10% for most sources), which increase with the bolometric jet luminosity (L bol, jet) for FSRQs and with the L jet for GRBs with similar power-law indices. BL Lac objects (BL Lacs) do not follow the P jet-L s, jet relation of FSRQs. They have lower ε and L bol, jet values than FSRQs, and a tentative L bol, jet-ε relation is also found, with a power-law index different from that of the FSRQs. The magnetization parameters (σ) of FSRQs are on average larger than that of BL Lacs. They are anti-correlated with ε for the FSRQs, but positively correlated with ε for the BL Lacs. GeV narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies potentially share similar properties with FSRQs. Based on the analogy between GRBs and FSRQs, we suggest that the prompt gamma-ray emission of GRBs is likely produced by the synchrotron process in a magnetized jet with high radiation efficiency, similar to FSRQs. The jets of BL Lacs, on the other hand, are less efficient and are likely more matter-dominated.

  4. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Sari, R.; Bloom, J. S.; Galama, T. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Price, P. A.; Fox, D.; Reichart, D. E.; Yost, S.; Berger, E.; Diercks, A.; Goodrich, R.; Chaffee, F.

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic γ-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean γ-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 1051 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ( ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host galaxies span a range of luminosities and morphologies, but appear to be broadly typical for the normal, actively star-forming galaxy populations at comparable redshifts and magnitudes. Some of the challenges for the future include: the nature of the short bursts and possibly other types of bursts and transients; use of GRBs to probe the obscured star formation in the universe, and possibly as probes of the very early universe; and their detection as sources of high-energy particles and gravitational waves.

  5. Changes in the Size of the Active Microbial Pool Explain Short-Term Soil Respiratory Responses to Temperature and Moisture

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Villegas, Alejandro; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    abiotic conditions activated soil microorganisms. We conclude that soil respiratory responses to short-term changes in environmental conditions are better explained by changes in AMB than in TMB. These results suggest that decomposition models that explicitly represent microbial carbon pools should take into account the active microbial pool, and researchers should be cautious in comparing modeled microbial pool sizes with measurements of TMB. PMID:27148213

  6. Changes in the Size of the Active Microbial Pool Explain Short-Term Soil Respiratory Responses to Temperature and Moisture.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Villegas, Alejandro; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    abiotic conditions activated soil microorganisms. We conclude that soil respiratory responses to short-term changes in environmental conditions are better explained by changes in AMB than in TMB. These results suggest that decomposition models that explicitly represent microbial carbon pools should take into account the active microbial pool, and researchers should be cautious in comparing modeled microbial pool sizes with measurements of TMB. PMID:27148213

  7. Effects of vocal training on respiratory kinematics during singing tasks.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Ana P; Brown, W S; Sapienza, Christine; Rothman, Howard B

    2006-01-01

    This longitudinal study determined the effects of vocal training (VT) on respiratory kinematics and muscle activity during singing tasks. Four voice students, 3 females and 1 male, were recorded during singing tasks once a semester for 3 consecutive semesters. Respiratory kinematic measures included lung volume, rib cage (RCE) and abdominal excursions (ABE). Surface electromyographic measures included burst duration (BD) and peak amplitude (PA) of the pectoralis major, rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles. Descriptive statistics revealed that RCE and ABE increased from the 1st to the 2nd semester, but decreased from the 2nd to the 3rd semester of VT. Overall, mean BD decreased from the 1st to the 2nd semester and increased from the 2nd to the 3rd semester. Mean PA increased from the 1st to the 2nd semester and decreased from the 2nd to the 3rd semester of VT. RCE and muscle force generation of the above muscles increased as the demand level and the length of the phonatory tasks increased. Interpretation of the results suggests that the respiratory system is highly responsive to VT, after only 3 semesters of training. PMID:16966837

  8. Slow Variable Dominance and Phase Resetting in Phantom Bursting

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Margaret; Tabak, Joel; Zimliki, Charles; Sherman, Arthur; Bertram, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Bursting oscillations are common in neurons and endocrine cells. One type of bursting model with two slow variables has been called ‘phantom bursting’ since the burst period is a blend of the time constants of the slow variables. A phantom bursting model can produce bursting with a wide range of periods: fast (short period), medium, and slow (long period). We describe a measure, which we call the ‘dominance factor’, of the relative contributions of the two slow variables to the bursting produced by a simple phantom bursting model. Using this tool, we demonstrate how the control of different phases of the burst can be shifted from one slow variable to another by changing a model parameter. We then show that the dominance curves obtained as a parameter is varied can be useful in making predictions about the resetting properties of the model cells. Finally, we demonstrate two mechanisms by which phase-independent resetting of a burst can be achieved, as has been shown to occur in the electrical activity of pancreatic islets. PMID:21315733

  9. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) observatory, scheduled for launch in 2007, comprises the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). spectral changes that are known to occur within GRBs. between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. It consists of an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 10 kev to 25 MeV range. The field of view includes the entire unocculted sky when the observatory is pointing close to the zenith. The GBM will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage into the range of current GRB databases, and will provide a trigger for reorienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM is expected to trigger on about 200 bursts per year, and will provide on-board locations of strong bursts accurate to better than 10 degrees.

  10. Antimicrobial characterisation of CEM-101 activity against respiratory tract pathogens, including multidrug-resistant pneumococcal serogroup 19A isolates.

    PubMed

    Farrell, David J; Sader, Helio S; Castanheira, Mariana; Biedenbach, Douglas J; Rhomberg, Paul R; Jones, Ronald N

    2010-06-01

    CEM-101 is a novel fluorinated macrolide-ketolide with potent activity against bacterial pathogens that are susceptible or resistant to other macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B))-ketolide agents. CEM-101 is being developed for oral and parenteral use in moderate to moderately severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. The objective of this study was to assess the activity of CEM-101 and comparators against contemporary respiratory tract infection (RTI) isolates. A worldwide sample of organisms was used, including Streptococcus pneumoniae [n=168; 59.3% erythromycin-resistant and 18 multidrug-resistant (MDR) serogroup 19A strains], Moraxella catarrhalis (n=21; 11 beta-lactamase positive), Haemophilus influenzae (n=100; 48 beta-lactamase positive), Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus (n=12), and Legionella pneumophila (n=30). Testing and interpretation were performed using reference Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods. CEM-101 was very potent against S. pneumoniae [minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of the organisms (MIC90)=0.25 mg/L; highest MIC at 0.5 mg/L] and was 2- and > or =32-fold more active than telithromycin and clindamycin, respectively. CEM-101 also demonstrated potent activity against S. pneumoniae MDR-19A strains (MIC90=0.5 mg/L). CEM-101 was the most potent antimicrobial agent tested against L. pneumophila, with all MIC values at < or = 0.015 mg/L (telithromycin MIC90=0.03 mg/L). CEM-101 was as potent as azithromycin against Haemophilus spp. RTI pathogens (MIC90=2 mg/L), with no variations for beta-lactamase production. CEM-101 MIC values against M. catarrhalis were all at < or =0.5mg/L. Interestingly, CEM-101 potency was ca. 6 log(2) dilutions greater than telithromycin MIC results among 44 beta-haemolytic streptococci having telithromycin MICs > or = 2 mg/L. CEM-101 exhibited the greatest potency and widest spectrum of activity against RTI pathogens among the tested MLS(B)-ketolide agents

  11. Effect of Byrsonima crassa and Phenolic Constituents on Helicobacter pylori-Induced Neutrophils Oxidative Burst

    PubMed Central

    Bonacorsi, Cibele; Raddi, Maria Stella G.; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; Sannomiya, Miriam; Vilegas, Wagner

    2012-01-01

    Byrsonima crassa Niedenzu (Malpighiaceae) is used in Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of diseases related mainly to gastric ulcers. In a previous study, our group described the gastric protective effect of the methanolic extract from the leaves of B. crassa. The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of methanolic extract and its phenolic compounds on the respiratory burst of neutrophils stimulated by H. pylori using a luminol-based chemiluminescence assay as well as their anti-H. pylori activity. The suppressive activity on oxidative burst of H. pylori-stimulated neutrophils was in the order of methyl gallate > (+)-catechin > methanol extract > quercetin 3-O-α-l-arabinopyranoside > quercetin 3-O-β-d-galactopyranoside > amentoflavone. Methyl gallate, compound that induced the highest suppressive activity with IC50 value of 3.4 μg/mL, did not show anti-H. pylori activity. B. crassa could be considered as a potential source of natural antioxidant in gastric ulcers by attenuating the effects on the damage to gastric mucosa caused by neutrophil generated reactive oxygen species, even when H. pylori displays its evasion mechanisms. PMID:22312243

  12. Applicability of tetrazolium salts for the measurement of respiratory activity and viability of groundwater bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatzinger, P.B.; Palmer, P.; Smith, R.L.; Penarrieta, C.T.; Yoshinari, T.

    2003-01-01

    A study was undertaken to measure aerobic respiration by indigenous bacteria in a sand and gravel aquifer on western Cape Cod, MA using tetrazolium salts and by direct oxygen consumption using gas chromatography (GC). In groundwater and aquifer slurries, the rate of aerobic respiration calculated from the direct GC assay was more than 600 times greater than that using the tetrazolium salt 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride (INT). To explain this discrepancy, the toxicity of INT and two additional tetrazolium salts, sodium 3???-[1-(phenylamino)-carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro) benzenesulfonic acid hydrate (XTT) and 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC), to bacterial isolates from the aquifer was investigated. Each of the three tetrazolium salts was observed to be toxic to some of the groundwater isolates at concentrations normally used in electron transport system (ETS) and viability assays. For example, incubation of cells with XTT (3 mM) caused the density of four of the five groundwater strains tested to decline by more than four orders of magnitude. A reasonable percentage (>57%) of cells killed by CTC and INT contained visible formazan crystals (the insoluble, reduced form of the salts) after 4 h of incubation. Thus, many of the cells reduced enough CTC or INT prior to dying to be considered viable by microscopic evaluation. However, one bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens) that remained viable and culturable in the presence of INT and CTC, did not incorporate formazan crystals into more than a few percent of cells, even after 24 h of incubation. This strain would be considered nonviable based on traditional tetrazolium salt reduction assays. The data show that tetrazolium salt assays are likely to dramatically underestimate total ETS activity in groundwater and, although they may provide a reasonable overall estimate of viable cell numbers in a community of groundwater bacteria, some specific strains may

  13. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... from inhaling smoke or harmful fumes Treatment for respiratory failure depends on whether the condition is acute (short-term) or chronic (ongoing) and how severe it is. It also depends on the underlying cause. You may receive oxygen therapy and other treatment to help you breathe. NIH: ...

  14. Statistical Properties of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorgone, Nicholas M.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetars are slowly rotating neutron stars with extreme magnetic fields, over 10(exp 15) Gauss. Only few have been discovered in the last 30 years. These sources are dormant most of their lifetimes and become randomly active emitting multiple soft gamma-ray bursts. We present here our results on the temporal analysis of 300 bursts from Soft Gamma Repeater SGR J1550-5418 recorded with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Observatory during its activation on January 22-29, 2009. We employed an un-triggered burst search in the energy range 8-100keV to collect all events from the source, besides the ones that triggered GBM. For the entire sample of bursts we determined their durations, rise and decay times. We study here the statistical properties of these characteristics and discuss how these may help us better understand the physical characteristics of the magnetar model.

  15. Mitochondrial Respiratory Defect Causes Dysfunctional Lactate Turnover via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Activation in Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Im, Ilkyun; Jang, Mi-Jin; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Sang-Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook; Kim, Seyun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2015-12-01

    A defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (DMRC) causes various metabolic disorders in humans. However, the pathophysiology of DMRC in the liver remains unclear. To understand DMRC pathophysiology in vitro, DMRC-induced pluripotent stem cells were generated from dermal fibroblasts of a DMRC patient who had a homoplasmic mutation (m.3398T→C) in the mitochondrion-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MTND1) gene and that differentiated into hepatocytes (DMRC hepatocytes) in vitro. DMRC hepatocytes showed abnormalities in mitochondrial characteristics, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, the glycogen storage level, the lactate turnover rate, and AMPK activity. Intriguingly, low glycogen storage and transcription of lactate turnover-related genes in DMRC hepatocytes were recovered by inhibition of AMPK activity. Thus, AMPK activation led to metabolic changes in terms of glycogen storage and lactate turnover in DMRC hepatocytes. These data demonstrate for the first time that energy depletion may lead to lactic acidosis in the DMRC patient by reduction of lactate uptake via AMPK in liver. PMID:26491018

  16. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  17. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  18. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  19. Administration of Harmine and Imipramine Alters Creatine Kinase and Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activities in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Réus, Gislaine Z.; Stringari, Roberto B.; Gonçalves, Cinara L.; Scaini, Giselli; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Jeremias, Gabriela C.; Jeremias, Isabela C.; Ferreira, Gabriela K.; Streck, Emílio L.; Hallak, Jaime E.; Zuardi, Antônio W.; Crippa, José A.; Quevedo, João

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase activities after administration of harmine (5, 10, and 15 mg/kg) and imipramine (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg) in rat brain. After acute treatment occurred an increase of creatine kinase in the prefrontal with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine in all doses, in the striatum with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine (5 and 10 mg/kg); harmine (15 mg/kg) decreased creatine kinase. In the chronic treatment occurred an increase of creatine kinase with imipramine (20 mg/kg), harmine (5 mg/kg) in the prefrontal with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine (5 and 10 mg/kg) in the striatum. In the acute treatment, the complex I increased in the prefrontal with harmine (15 mg/kg) and in the striatum with harmine (10 mg/kg); the complex II decreased with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) in the striatum; the complex IV increased with imipramine (30 mg/kg) in the striatum. In the chronic treatment, the complex I increased with harmine (5 mg/kg) in the prefrontal; the complex II increased with imipramine (20 mg/kg) in the prefrontal; the complex IV increased with harmine (5 mg/kg) in the striatum. Finally, these findings further support the hypothesis that harmine and imipramine could be involved in mitochondrial function. PMID:21969912

  20. Repetitive hypoxia rapidly depresses cardio-respiratory responses during active sleep but not quiet sleep in the newborn lamb

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Renea V; Grant, Daniel A; Wilkinson, Malcolm H; Walker, Adrian M

    1999-01-01

    Arousal from sleep is an important protective response to hypoxia that becomes rapidly depressed in active sleep (AS) when hypoxia is repeated. This study questioned whether there might also be selective depression of cardio-respiratory responses to hypoxia during AS. Nine newborn lambs (7-22 days of age) were studied over three successive nights. The first and third nights were baseline studies (inspired oxygen fraction, Fi,O2= 0.21). During the second night, during every epoch of sleep, lambs were exposed to 60 s episodes of isocapnic hypoxia (Fi,O2= 0.10). During quiet sleep (QS), the probability of arousal in hypoxia exceeded the probability of spontaneous arousal (P < 0.001) throughout repeated exposures to hypoxia. Similarly, there were persisting increases in ventilation (135 ± 25 %), blood pressure (3 ± 1 %) and heart rate (3 ± 1 %). By contrast, rapid depression of all responses occurred during repetitive hypoxia in AS. Thus, the probability of arousal in hypoxia exceeded the probability of spontaneous arousal during the first 10 hypoxia exposures (P < 0.001) but not thereafter. Similarly, during the first 10 exposures to hypoxia, the changes in ventilation (88 ± 15 %) and blood pressure (5 ± 1 %) were greater than subsequent responses (P < 0.05). We conclude that, when repeated, hypoxia rapidly becomes ineffective in stimulating protective arousal, ventilatory and blood pressure responses in AS, but not in QS. Selective depression of responses during AS may render the newborn particularly vulnerable to hypoxia in this state. PMID:10457072

  1. Antiviral Activity of TMC353121, a Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Fusion Inhibitor, in a Non-Human Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Ispas, Gabriela; Koul, Anil; Verbeeck, Johan; Sheehan, Jennifer; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte; Roymans, Dirk; Andries, Koen; Rouan, Marie-Claude; De Jonghe, Sandra; Bonfanti, Jean-François; Vanstockem, Marc; Simmen, Kenneth; Verloes, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Background The study assessed the antiviral activity of TMC353121, a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion inhibitor, in a preclinical non-human primate challenge model with a viral shedding pattern similar to that seen in humans, following continuous infusion (CI). Methods African green monkeys were administered TMC353121 through CI, in 2 studies. Study 1 evaluated the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of TMC353121 at a target plasma level of 50 ng/mL (n=15; Group 1: prophylactic arm [Px50], 0.033 mg/mL TMC353121, flow rate 2.5 mL/kg/h from 24 hours pre-infection to 10 days; Group 2: therapeutic arm [Tx50], 0.033mg/mL TMC353121 from 24 hours postinfection to 8 days; Group 3: control [Vh1] vehicle, 24 hours post-infection to 8 days). Study 2 evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of TMC353121 at target plasma levels of 5 and 500 ng/mL (n=12; Group 1: prophylactic 5 arm [Px5], 0.0033 mg/mL TMC353121, flow rate 2.5 mL/kg/h from 72 hours pre-infection to 14 days; Group 2: prophylactic 500 arm [Px500], 0.33 mg/mL TMC353121; Group 3:control [Vh2] vehicle, 14 days). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma were collected every 2 days from day 1 postinfection for pharmacokinetics and safety analysis. Findings TMC353121 showed a dose-dependent antiviral activity, varying from 1log10 reduction of peak viral load to complete inhibition of the RSV replication. Complete inhibition of RSV shedding was observed for a relatively low plasma exposure (0.39 μg/mL) and was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in INFγ, IL6 and MIP1α. TMC353121 administered as CI for 16 days was generally well-tolerated. Conclusion TMC353121 exerted dose-dependent antiviral effect ranging from full inhibition to absence of antiviral activity, in a preclinical model highly permissive for RSV replication. No new safety findings emerged from the study. PMID:26010881

  2. Oligoguluronates Elicit an Oxidative Burst in the Brown Algal Kelp Laminaria digitata1

    PubMed Central

    Küpper, Frithjof Christian; Kloareg, Bernard; Guern, Jean; Potin, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    Oligomeric degradation products of alginate elicited a respiratory and oxidative burst in the sporophytes of the kelp Laminaria digitata. The generation of activated oxygen species (AOS), O2−, and H2O2 was detected at the single cell level, using nitroblue tetrazolium precipitation and a redox-sensitive fluorescent probe, respectively. The oxidative burst involved diphenyleneiodonium-sensitive AOS-generating machinery and its amplitude depended on the type of tissue. After a first elicitation plants were desensitized for about 3 h. The activity of alginate oligosaccharides was dose dependent, saturating around 40 μm. It was also structure-dependent, with homopolymeric blocks of α-1,4-l-guluronic acid, i.e. the functional analogs of oligogalacturonic blocks in pectins, being the most active signals. The perception of oligoguluronate signals resulted in a strong efflux of potassium. Pharmacological dissection of the early events preceding the emission of AOS indicated that the transduction chain of oligoguluronate signals in L. digitata is likely to feature protein kinases, phospholipase A2, as well as K+, Ca2+, and anion channels. PMID:11154336

  3. Mediated effect of ultrasound treated Diclofenac on mussel hemocytes: First evidence for the involvement of respiratory burst enzymes in the induction of DCF-mediated unspecific mode of action.

    PubMed

    Toufexi, Eirini; Dailianis, Stefanos; Vlastos, Dimitris; Manariotis, Ioannis D

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigates the toxic behavior of diclofenac (DCF) before and after its ultrasound (US) treatment, as well as the involvement of intracellular target molecules, such as NADPH oxidase and NO synthase, in the DCF-induced adverse effects on hemocytes of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In this context, appropriate volumes (350 and 500mL) of DCF solutions (at concentrations of 2, 2.5, 5 and 10mgL(-1)) were treated under different ultrasound operating conditions (frequency at 582 and 862kHz, electric power density at 133 and 167W) for assessing US method efficiency. In parallel, DCF and US DCF-mediated cytotoxic (in terms of cell viability measured with the use of neutral red uptake/NRU method), oxidative (in terms of superoxide anions/(.)O2(-), nitric oxides such as NO2(-) and lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde/MDA content) and genotoxic (DNA damage measured by the use of Comet assay method) effects were investigated in hemocytes exposed for 1h to 5, 10 and 100ngL(-1) and 1, 10 and 20μgL(-1) of DCF. The involvement of NADPH oxidase and NO synthase to the DCF-induced toxicity was further investigated by the use of 10μΜ L-NAME, a NO synthase inhibitor and 10μΜ DPI, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor. According to the results, 350mL of 2mgL(-1) DCF showed higher degradation (>50%) under 167W electric power density and frequency at 862kHz for 120min, compared to degradation in all other cases, followed by a significant elimination of its toxicity. Specifically, US DCF-treated hemocytes showed a significant attenuation of DCF-mediated cytotoxic, oxidative and genotoxic effects, which appeared to be caused by NADPH oxidase and NO synthase activation, since their inhibition was followed by a significant elimination of (.)O2(-) and NO2(-) generation and the concomitant oxidative damage within cells. The results of the present study showed for the first time that unspecific mode of action of DCF, associated with the induction of NADPH oxidase

  4. Respiratory Distress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  5. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P.N.; Briggs, M.S.; Connaughton, V.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Meegan, C.A.; Fishman, G.J.; Wilson, R.B.; Lichti, G.G.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Schoenfelder, V.; Kienlin, A. von; Kippen, R.M.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2004-09-28

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission is a followup to the successful EGRET experiment onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It will provide a high-sensitivity survey of the sky in high-energy {gamma}-rays, and will perform detailed observations of persistent and transient sources. There are two experiments onboard the GLAST - the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM).The primary mission of the GBM instrument is to support the LAT in observing {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs) by providing low-energy measurements with high time resolution and rapid burst locations over a large field-of-view ({>=} 8 sr). The GBM will complement the LAT measurements by observing GRBs in the energy range 10 keV to 30 MeV, the region of the spectral turnover in most GRBs. An important objective of the GBM is to compute the locations of GRB sources on-board the spacecraft and quickly communicate them to the LAT and to the ground to allow rapid followup observations. This information may be used to re-point the LAT towards particularly interesting burst sources that occurred outside its field-of-view. The GBM consists of 14 uncollimated scintillation detectors coupled to phototubes to measure {gamma}-ray energies and time profiles. Two types of detectors are used to obtain spectral information over a wide energy range: 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV), and 2 BGO detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV). The detectors are distributed around the GLAST spacecraft to provide a large, unobstructed field of view. The 12 NaI(Tl) detectors are mounted with different orientations for use in locating GRB sources.

  6. High-Frequency Cutoff in Type III Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.; Koval, A. A.

    In this article we report about a group of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff, observed on 19 August of 2012 near 8:23 UT, simultaneously by three different radio telescopes: the Ukrainian decameter radio telescope (8-33 MHz), the French Nancay Decametric Array (10-70 MHz) and the Italian San Vito Solar Observatory of RSTN (25-180 MHz). Morphologically the bursts are very similar to the type III bursts. The solar activity is connected with the emergency of a new group of solar spots on the far side of the Sun with respect to observers on Earth. The solar bursts accompany many moderate flares over eastern limb. The refraction of the behind-limb radio bursts towards the Earth is favorable, if CMEs generate low-density cavities in solar corona.

  7. Influence of nasotrigeminal afferents on medullary respiratory neurones and upper airway patency in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dutschmann, M; Paton, J F R

    2002-05-01

    Noxious stimulation of the nasal mucosa evokes a nasotrigeminal reflex (diving response), consisting of apnoea, bradycardia and vasoconstriction. However, the central mechanisms underlying the respiratory component remain unclear. Here, we describe the influence of nasotrigeminal stimulation (NS) on different types of ventral medullary respiratory neurones and upper airway patency in the rat. In an arterially perfused working heart-brainstem preparation (WHBP), NS was induced by either irrigation of the nasal passage with cold saline (100-200 microl) or electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ethmoidal nerve (EN5, 20 Hz, 10 s, 100 micros, 0.5-2 V). Both stimuli evoked apnoea, bradycardia, a pressor response, persistent discharge in the recurrent laryngeal nerve and marked glottal adduction (P<0.001). NS evoked a distinct pattern of response in respiratory neurones: inspiratory (I) neurones ceased firing and hyperpolarized (n=19), while postinspiratory neurones depolarized (n=10) and discharged persistently. The latency of EN5-evoked synaptic responses (excitatory to postinspiratory neurones 12.3+/-2.8 ms, n=10; inhibitory to inspiratory neurones 11.8+/-1.9 ms; n=19) was comparable. During the NS-evoked apnoea burst discharges were superimposed on a maintained level of tonic activity recorded from both the recurrent laryngeal nerve (n=4) and some postinspiratory neurones (n=7). The physiological significance of these "apnoeic rhythms" is discussed. We conclude that the cardiorespiratory components of the diving response are mediated by activation of distinct sets of postinspiratory respiratory neurones. PMID:11976936

  8. ACTIVATION OF VANILLOID (VR1) RECEPTORS BY PARTICLE'S SURFACE CHARGE STIMULATES INFLAMMATORY CHANGES IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous research from our laboratory indicates that particulate matter air pollutants carry an electronegative surface charge, the degree of which correlates with IL-6 release in human respiratory epithelial cells. This study was designed to test the theory that the positive sur...

  9. Effect of xenobiotics on the respiratory activity of rat heart mitochondria and the concomitant formation of superoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Stolze, K.; Nohl, H. . Inst. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

    1994-03-01

    The effects of the xenobiotics atrazine, benzene, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), lindane, toluene, and xylenol on the respiration of isolated rate heart mitochondria were studied. Bioenergetic parameters such as respiratory control (RC) and ATP/oxygen (P/O) values decreased considerably in the presence of these substances, and a concomitant increase of superoxide radical (O[sub 2][sup [minus

  10. East coast fever caused by Theileria parva is characterized by macrophage activation associated with vasculitis and respiratory failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infect...

  11. Antibacterial activity of carbapenems against clinical isolates of respiratory bacterial pathogens in the northeastern region of Japan in 2007.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Kazunori; Fujimura, Shigeru; Fuse, Katsuhiro; Takane, Hidenari; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Kariya, Yasuko; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Kurokawa, Iku; Tokue, Yutaka; Watanabe, Akira

    2011-04-01

    As the increasing prevalence of resistant strains of respiratory bacterial pathogens has recently been reported, continuous monitoring of the susceptibility of clinical isolates to antibacterial agents is important. We performed a surveillance study focusing on the susceptibility of major respiratory bacterial pathogens in the northeastern region of Japan to carbapenems and control drugs. A total of 168 bacterial strains isolated from patients with respiratory tract infections in 2007 were collected and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined. MIC data were subjected to pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis with Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the probability of achieving the target of time above MIC with each carbapenem. All Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolates were susceptible to carbapenems. Despite the increasing prevalence of β-lactamase-nonproducing ampicillin-resistant strains, all Haemophilus influenzae isolates were susceptible to meropenem. For Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the susceptibility rates for meropenem and biapenem were 76.7%, and the highest probability of achieving pharmacodynamic target (40% of the time above MIC) was obtained with meropenem 0.5 g three times daily as a 4-h infusion (89.4%), followed by meropenem 0.5 g four times daily as a 1-h infusion (88.4%). Carbapenems have retained their position as key drugs for severe respiratory tract infections. PMID:20839026

  12. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, M; Rucker, H O; Farrell, W M

    2013-03-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period [Formula: see text] longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every [Formula: see text] days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696

  13. Periodic Bursts of Jovian Non-Io Decametric Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H O.; Farrell, W. M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have Recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period approx. = 1:5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300 deg. and 60 deg. (via 360 deg.). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every approx. 25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  14. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission

    PubMed Central

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H.O.; Farrell, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000–2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period ≈1.5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every ∼25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696

  15. Low-Frequency Type III Bursts and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Makela, Pertti

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type 11 radio bursts associated with a set of six low frequency (<14 MHz) extended type III bursts from active region 10588. The durations were measured at 1 and 14 MHz using high resolution data from Wind/WAVES and were within the range (>15 min) normally used to define these bursts. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type 11 burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type 11 burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 min) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event.

  16. Temporally structured impulse activity in spontaneously discharging somatosensory cortical neurons in the awake cat: recognition and quantitative description of four different patterns of bursts, post-recording GFAP immunohistology and computer reconstruction of the studied cortical surface.

    PubMed

    Miasnikov, A A; Webster, H H; Dykes, R W

    1999-04-01

    We elaborated two methods used in two previous publications [J. Martinson, H.H. Webster, A.A. Myasnikov, R.W. Dykes, Recognition of temporally structured activity in spontaneously discharging neurons in the somatosensory cortex in waking cats, Brain Res. 750 (1997) 129-140 [16]; H.H. Webster, I. Salimi, A.A. Myasnikov, R.W. Dykes. The effects of peripheral deafferentation on spontaneously bursting neurons in the somatosensory cortex of waking cats, Brain Res. 750 (1997) 109-121 [21

  17. L-carnosine modulates respiratory burst and reactive oxygen species production in neutrophil biochemistry and function: may oral dosage form of non-hydrolized dipeptide L-carnosine complement anti-infective anti-influenza flu treatment, prevention and self-care as an alternative to the conventional vaccination?

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2014-05-01

    Influenza A is a viral disease of global dimension, presenting with high morbidity and mortality in annual epidemics, and in pandemics which are of infrequent occurrence but which have very high attack rates. Influenza vaccines of the future must be directed toward use of conserved group-specific viral antigens, such as are present in transitional proteins which are exposed during the fusion of virus to the host cell. Influenza probes revealed a continuing battle for survival between host and parasite in which the host population updates the specificity of its pool of humoral immunity by contact with and response to infection with the most recent viruses which possess altered antigenic specificity in their hemagglutinin (HA) ligand. It is well known that the HA protein is found on the surface of the influenza virus particle and is responsible for binding to receptors on host cells and initiating infection. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) have been reported to be involved in the initial host response to influenza A virus (IAV). Early after IAV infection, neutrophils infiltrate the airway probably due to release of chemokines that attract PMN. Clearly, severe IAV infection is characterized by increased neutrophil influx into the lung or upper respiratory tract. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) and anserine (N-β-alanyl-1-methyl-L-histidine) are found in skeletal muscle of most vertebrates, including those used for food; for example, 100 g of chicken breast contains 400 mg (17.6 mmol/L) of carnosine and 1020 mg (33.6 mmol/l) of anserine. Carnosine-stimulated respiratory burst in neutrophils is a universal biological mechanism of influenza virus destruction. Our own studies revealed previously unappreciated functional effects of carnosine and related histidine containing compounds as a natural biological prevention and barrier against Influenza virus infection, expand public understanding of the antiviral properties of imidazole-containing dipeptide based

  18. Automatic recognition of type III solar radio bursts: Automated Radio Burst Identification System method and first observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobzin, Vasili V.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, Peter A.; Steward, Graham; Patterson, Garth

    2009-04-01

    Because of the rapidly increasing role of technology, including complicated electronic systems, spacecraft, etc., modern society has become more vulnerable to a set of extraterrestrial influences (space weather) and requires continuous observation and forecasts of space weather. The major space weather events like solar flares and coronal mass ejections are usually accompanied by solar radio bursts, which can be used for a real-time space weather forecast. Coronal type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency and near its harmonic by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. These bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration of the coronal burst being about 1-3 s. This paper presents a new method developed to detect coronal type III bursts automatically and its implementation in a new Automated Radio Burst Identification System. The central idea of the implementation is to use the Radon transform for more objective detection of the bursts as approximately straight lines in dynamic spectra. Preliminary tests of the method with the use of the spectra obtained during 13 days show that the performance of the current implementation is quite high, ˜84%, while no false positives are observed and 23 events not listed previously are found. Prospects for improvements are discussed. The first automatically detected coronal type III radio bursts are presented.

  19. Preventive Activity against Influenza (H1N1) Virus by Intranasally Delivered RNA-Hydrolyzing Antibody in Respiratory Epithelial Cells of Mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seungchan; Youn, Ha-Na; Hoang, Phuong Mai; Cho, Sungrae; Kim, Kee-Eun; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Gunsup; Cho, Mun-Ju; Hong, Juhyun; Byun, Sung-June; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-09-01

    The antiviral effect of a catalytic RNA-hydrolyzing antibody, 3D8 scFv, for intranasal administration against avian influenza virus (H1N1) was described. The recombinant 3D8 scFv protein prevented BALB/c mice against H1N1 influenza virus infection by degradation of the viral RNA genome through its intrinsic RNA-hydrolyzing activity. Intranasal administration of 3D8 scFv (50 μg/day) for five days prior to infection demonstrated an antiviral activity (70% survival) against H1N1 infection. The antiviral ability of 3D8 scFv to penetrate into epithelial cells from bronchial cavity via the respiratory mucosal layer was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, and histopathological examination. The antiviral activity of 3D8 scFv against H1N1 virus infection was not due to host immune cytokines or chemokines, but rather to direct antiviral RNA-hydrolyzing activity of 3D8 scFv against the viral RNA genome. Taken together, our results suggest that the RNase activity of 3D8 scFv, coupled with its ability to penetrate epithelial cells through the respiratory mucosal layer, directly prevents H1N1 virus infection in a mouse model system. PMID:26402693

  20. Preventive Activity against Influenza (H1N1) Virus by Intranasally Delivered RNA-Hydrolyzing Antibody in Respiratory Epithelial Cells of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seungchan; Youn, Ha-Na; Hoang, Phuong Mai; Cho, Sungrae; Kim, Kee-Eun; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Gunsup; Cho, Mun-Ju; Hong, Juhyun; Byun, Sung-June; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-01-01

    The antiviral effect of a catalytic RNA-hydrolyzing antibody, 3D8 scFv, for intranasal administration against avian influenza virus (H1N1) was described. The recombinant 3D8 scFv protein prevented BALB/c mice against H1N1 influenza virus infection by degradation of the viral RNA genome through its intrinsic RNA-hydrolyzing activity. Intranasal administration of 3D8 scFv (50 μg/day) for five days prior to infection demonstrated an antiviral activity (70% survival) against H1N1 infection. The antiviral ability of 3D8 scFv to penetrate into epithelial cells from bronchial cavity via the respiratory mucosal layer was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, and histopathological examination. The antiviral activity of 3D8 scFv against H1N1 virus infection was not due to host immune cytokines or chemokines, but rather to direct antiviral RNA-hydrolyzing activity of 3D8 scFv against the viral RNA genome. Taken together, our results suggest that the RNase activity of 3D8 scFv, coupled with its ability to penetrate epithelial cells through the respiratory mucosal layer, directly prevents H1N1 virus infection in a mouse model system. PMID:26402693

  1. Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor Observations of SGR J0501+4516 Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Woods, Peter M.; Göǧüş, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; Preece, Robert; von Kienlin, Andreas; Chaplin, Vandiver; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Zhang, Shuang Nan; Bhat, Narayan; Finger, Mark H.; Gehrels, Neil; Harding, Alice; Kaper, Lex; Kaspi, Victoria; Mcenery, Julie; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Pe'er, Asaf; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; van der Klis, Michiel; Wachter, Stefanie; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-10-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the gamma-ray burst monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during 13 days of the source's activation in 2008 (August 22- September 3). We find that the T 90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ~123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T 90 values estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ~124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two blackbody functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that E peak decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of ~30 keV at F = 8.7 × 10-6 erg cm-2 s-1, increasing steadily afterward. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550-5418 and 1806-20. The isotropic luminosity, L iso, corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4-1.5 × 1040 erg s-1).

  2. Mycorrhiza-induced lower oxidative burst is related with higher antioxidant enzyme activities, net H2O2 effluxes, and Ca2+ influxes in trifoliate orange roots under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ying-Ning; Huang, Yong-Ming; Wu, Qiang-Sheng; He, Xin-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Mechanisms of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM)-induced lower oxidative burst of host plants under drought stress (DS) are not elucidated. A noninvasive microtest technology (NMT) was used to investigate the effects of Funneliformis mosseae on net fluxes of root hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and calcium ions (Ca2+) in 5-month-old Poncirus trifoliata, in combination with catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities as well as tissue superoxide radical (O2•-) and H2O2 concentrations under DS and well-watered (WW) conditions. A 2-month DS (55% maximum water holding capacity of growth substrates) significantly inhibited AM fungal root colonization, while AM symbiosis significantly increased plant biomass production, irrespective of water status. F. mosseae inoculation generally increased SOD and CAT activity but decreased O2•- and H2O2 concentrations in leaves and roots under WW and DS. Compared with non-AM seedlings, roots of AM seedlings had significantly higher net H2O2 effluxes and net Ca2+ influxes, especially in the meristem zone, but lower net H2O2 efflux in the elongation zone. Net Ca2+ influxes into roots were significantly positively correlated with root net H2O2 effluxes but negatively with root H2O2 concentrations. Results from this study suggest that AM-induced lower oxidative burst is related with higher antioxidant enzyme activities, root net H2O2 effluxes, and Ca2+ influxes under WW and DS. PMID:25085218

  3. Spatiotemporal chaos from bursting dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berenstein, Igal; De Decker, Yannick

    2015-08-14

    In this paper, we study the emergence of spatiotemporal chaos from mixed-mode oscillations, by using an extended Oregonator model. We show that bursting dynamics consisting of fast/slow mixed mode oscillations along a single attractor can lead to spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics, although the spatially homogeneous solution is itself non-chaotic. This behavior is observed far from the Hopf bifurcation and takes the form of a spatiotemporal intermittency where the system locally alternates between the fast and the slow phases of the mixed mode oscillations. We expect this form of spatiotemporal chaos to be generic for models in which one or several slow variables are coupled to activator-inhibitor type of oscillators.

  4. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    SciTech Connect

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Zumstein, James M.; Vigars, Mark L.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  5. X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1986-01-01

    There are about 100 bright X-ray sources in the Galaxy that are accretion-driven systems composed of a neutron star and a low mass companion that fills its critical Roche lobe. Many of these systems generate recurring X-ray bursts that are the result of thermonuclear flashes in the neutron star's surface layers, and are accompanied by a somewhat delayed optical burst due to X-ray heating of accretion disk. The Rapid Burster discovered in 1976 exhibits an interval between bursts that is strongly correlated with the energy in the preceding burst. There is no optical identification for this object.

  6. [Good practice in occupational health services: prophylactic care and occupational activation of people with disabilities due to respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Wiszniewska, Marta; Tymoszuk, Diana; Lipińska-Ojrzanowska, Agnieszka; Wagrowska-Koski, Ewa; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a cause of long-term sickness absence, and even of partial or complete inability to work. This paper presents the first in Poland description of principles of good practice in occupational health service provided for people with respiratory diseases. The issues concerning the certification of the ability to work in this group of patients are discussed. The key-principles of preventive care of workers with obstructive and interstitial lung diseases with particular attention paid to the control of major risk factors are also presented. The importance of possible contraindications for job performance by workers affected by these diseases, as well as the responsibilities of occupational health physicians were highlighted. M PMID:24261254

  7. Respiratory Muscle Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gransee, Heather M.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle’s plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles. PMID:23798306

  8. AMPK activation represses the human gene promoter of the cardiac isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase: Role of nuclear respiratory factor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Tasneem; Opie, Lionel H.; Essop, M. Faadiel

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} AMPK inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta gene promoter activity. {yields} Nuclear respiratory factor-1 inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta promoter activity. {yields} AMPK regulates acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta at transcriptional level. -- Abstract: The cardiac-enriched isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC{beta}) produces malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. AMPK inhibits ACC{beta} activity, lowering malonyl-CoA levels and promoting mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation. Previously, AMPK increased promoter binding of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), a pivotal transcriptional modulator controlling gene expression of mitochondrial proteins. We therefore hypothesized that NRF-1 inhibits myocardial ACC{beta} promoter activity via AMPK activation. A human ACC{beta} promoter-luciferase construct was transiently transfected into neonatal cardiomyocytes {+-} a NRF-1 expression construct. NRF-1 overexpression decreased ACC{beta} gene promoter activity by 71 {+-} 4.6% (p < 0.001 vs. control). Transfections with 5'-end serial promoter deletions revealed that NRF-1-mediated repression of ACC{beta} was abolished with a pPII{beta}-18/+65-Luc deletion construct. AMPK activation dose-dependently reduced ACC{beta} promoter activity, while NRF-1 addition did not further decrease it. We also investigated NRF-1 inhibition in the presence of upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF1), a known transactivator of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter. Here NRF-1 blunted USF1-dependent induction of ACC{beta} promoter activity by 58 {+-} 7.5% (p < 0.001 vs. control), reversed with a dominant negative NRF-1 construct. NRF-1 also suppressed endogenous USF1 transcriptional activity by 55 {+-} 6.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control). This study demonstrates that NRF-1 is a novel transcriptional inhibitor of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter in the mammalian heart. Our data extends AMPK regulation of ACC{beta} to the transcriptional level.

  9. Gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow. PMID:22923573

  10. Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  11. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  12. Respiratory pattern generator model using Ca++-induced Ca++ release in neurons shows both pacemaker and reciprocal network properties.

    PubMed

    Dunin-Barkowski, W L; Escobar, A L; Lovering, A T; Orem, J M

    2003-10-01

    There are two contradictory explanations for central respiratory rhythmogenesis. One suggests that respiratory rhythm emerges from interaction between inspiratory and expiratory neural semicenters that inhibit each other and thereby provide reciprocal rhythmic activity (Brown 1914). The other uses bursting pacemaker activity of individual neurons to produce the rhythm (Feldman and Cleland 1982). Hybrid models have been developed to reconcile these two seemingly conflicting mechanisms (Smith et al. 2000; Rybak et al. 2001). Here we report computer simulations that demonstrate a unified mechanism of the two types of oscillator. In the model, we use the interaction of Ca(++)-dependent K+ channels (Mifflin et al. 1985) with Ca(++)-induced Ca++ release from intracellular stores (McPherson and Campbell 1993), which was recently revealed in neurons (Hernandez-Cruz et al. 1997; Mitra and Slaughter 2002a,b; Scornik et al. 2001). Our computations demonstrate that uncoupled neurons with these intracellular mechanisms show conditional pacemaker properties (Butera et al. 1999) when exposed to steady excitatory inputs. Adding weak inhibitory synapses (based on increased K+ conductivity) between two model neural pools surprisingly synchronizes the activity of both neural pools. As inhibitory synaptic connections between the two pools increase from zero to higher values, the model produces first dissociated pacemaker activity of individual neurons, then periodic synchronous bursts of all neurons (inspiratory and expiratory), and finally reciprocal rhythmic activity of the neural pools. PMID:14605892

  13. Biogenesis of mitochondria in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) curds subjected to temperature stress and recovery involves regulation of the complexome, respiratory chain activity, organellar translation and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Rurek, Michal; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2015-01-01

    The biogenesis of the cauliflower curd mitochondrial proteome was investigated under cold, heat and the recovery. For the first time, two dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis was used to study the plant mitochondrial complexome in heat and heat recovery. Particularly, changes in the complex I and complex III subunits and import proteins, and the partial disintegration of matrix complexes were observed. The presence of unassembled subunits of ATP synthase was accompanied by impairment in mitochondrial translation of its subunit. In cold and heat, the transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes were uncorrelated. The in-gel activities of respiratory complexes were particularly affected after stress recovery. Despite a general stability of respiratory chain complexes in heat, functional studies showed that their activity and the ATP synthesis yield were affected. Contrary to cold stress, heat stress resulted in a reduced efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation likely due to changes in alternative oxidase (AOX) activity. Stress and stress recovery differently modulated the protein level and activity of AOX. Heat stress induced an increase in AOX activity and protein level, and AOX1a and AOX1d transcript level, while heat recovery reversed the AOX protein and activity changes. Conversely, cold stress led to a decrease in AOX activity (and protein level), which was reversed after cold recovery. Thus, cauliflower AOX is only induced by heat stress. In heat, contrary to the AOX activity, the activity of rotenone-insensitive internal NADH dehydrogenase was diminished. The relevance of various steps of plant mitochondrial biogenesis to temperature stress response and recovery is discussed. PMID:25617518

  14. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    Breathing is regulated by a central neural oscillator that produces rhythmic output to the respiratory muscles. Pathological disturbances in rhythm (dysrhythmias) are observed in the breathing pattern of children and adults with neurological and cardiopulmonary diseases. The mechanisms responsible for genesis of respiratory dysrhythmias are poorly understood. The present studies take a novel approach to this problem. The basic postulate is that the rhythm of the respiratory oscillator can be altered by a variety of stimuli. When the oscillator recovers its rhythm after such perturbations, its phase may be reset relative to the original rhythm. The amount of phase resetting is dependent upon stimulus parameters and the level of respiratory drive. The long-range hypothesis is that respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli that impinge upon or arise within the respiratory oscillator with certain combinations of strength and timing relative to the respiratory cycle. Animal studies were performed in anesthetized or decerebrate preparations. Neural respiratory rhythmicity is represented by phrenic nerve activity, allowing use of open-loop experimental conditions which avoid negative chemical feedback associated with changes in ventilation. In animal experiments, respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli having specific combinations of strength and timing. Newborn animals readily exhibit spontaneous dysrhythmias which become more prominent at lower respiratory drives. In human subjects, swallowing was studied as a physiological perturbation of respiratory rhythm, causing a pattern of phase resetting that is characterized topologically as type 0. Computational studies of the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol (BvP) equations, whose qualitative behavior is representative of many excitable systems, supports a unified interpretation of these experimental findings. Rhythmicity is observed when the BvP model exhibits recurrent periods of excitation alternating with

  15. Observational properties of cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazets, E. P.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview of the major observational results obtained in gamma-ray burst studies is presented. Also discussed is to what extent the thermonuclear model, which appears at present to be the most plausible, can account for the observed properties of the bursts. The investigation of gamma-ray bursts should cover observations of the time histories of events, energy spectra, and their variablility, source localization, and inspection of the localization regions during the active and quiescent phases of the source in other wavelengths, as well as, evaluation of the statistical distributions of the data obtained.

  16. An interacting loop model of solar flare bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    As a result of the strong heating produced at chromospheric levels during a solar flare burst, the local gas pressure can transiently attain very large values in certain regions. The effectiveness of the surrounding magnetic field at confining this high pressure plasma is therefore reduced and the flaring loop becomes free to expand laterally. In so doing it may drive magnetic field lines into neighboring, nonflaring, loops in the same active region, causing magnetic reconnection to take place and triggering another flare burst. The features of this interacting loop model are found to be in good agreement with the energetics and time structure of flare associated solar hard X-ray bursts.

  17. Swift's 500th Gamma Ray Burst

    NASA Video Gallery

    On April 13, 2010, NASA's Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer satellite discovered its 500th burst. Swift's main job is to quickly localize each gamma-ray burst (GRB), report its position so that others...

  18. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    Hawking. The newly-discovered radio burst, the researchers said, might be the "last gasp" of a black hole as it finally evaporates completely. "We're actively looking for more of these powerful, short bursts, in other archival pulsar surveys, and hope to resolve the mystery of their origin," said McLaughlin. "In addition, if we can associate these events with galaxies of known distance, the radio dispersion we measure can be used as a powerful new way to determine the amount of material in intergalactic space," she added. The Parkes radio telescope is part of the Australia Telescope, which is funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operation as a National Facility. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  19. Burst propagation in Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, F. A. C.; Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We present investigations of extreme events (bursts) propagating in the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias. In the experiments analyzed, a large grid of Langmuir probes measuring ion saturation current fluctuations is used to study the burst propagation and its dependence on the applied bias voltage. We confirm previous results reported on the turbulence intermittency in the Texas Helimak, extending them to a larger radial interval with a density ranging from a uniform decay to an almost uniform value. For our analysis, we introduce an improved procedure, based on a multiprobe bidimensional conditional averaging method, to assure precise determination of burst statistical properties and their spatial profiles. We verify that intermittent bursts have properties that vary in the radial direction. The number of bursts depends on the radial position and on the applied bias voltage. On the other hand, the burst characteristic time and size do not depend on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage modifies the vertical and radial burst velocity profiles differently. The burst velocity is smaller than the turbulence phase velocity in almost all the analyzed region.

  20. Characterization of serum platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase. Correlation between deficiency of serum PAF acetylhydrolase and respiratory symptoms in asthmatic children.

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, M; Miyake, T; Yamanaka, T; Sugatani, J; Suzuki, Y; Sakata, S; Araki, Y; Matsumoto, M

    1988-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase has been recognized as an enzyme that inactivates PAF. We developed a convenient and reproducible method for determining human serum PAF acetylhydrolase activity. The assay was based on measurement of [14C]acetate produced from 1-O-alkyl-2-[14C]-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine upon precipitation of the complex of radioactive substrate and albumin with TCA. The apparent Km value of PAF acetylhydrolase (near the physiological concentration of serum protein) was 1.5 X 10(-4) M PAF. 32 subjects with serum PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency were found among 816 healthy Japanese adults. The low PAF acetylhydrolase activity in the deficient serum might not be due to the presence of enzyme inhibitor. Both the sensitivity to PAF and the metabolism of PAF in platelets from PAF acetylhydrolase-deficient subjects were almost the same as those of normal subjects. Deficiency in serum PAF acetylhydrolase appeared to be transmitted by autosomal recessive heredity among five Japanese families. Among healthy adults, healthy children, and asthmatic children, who were grouped into five classes on the basis of respiratory symptoms (remission, wheezy, mild, moderate, and severe groups), the probability of PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency was significantly higher in groups with severe symptoms (moderate and severe) (P less than 0.01). These results suggest that deficiency of serum PAF acetylhydrolase might be one of the factors leading to severe respiratory symptoms in asthmatic children. Images PMID:3198761

  1. Burst Firing is a Neural Code in an Insect Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Eyherabide, Hugo G.; Rokem, Ariel; Herz, Andreas V. M.; Samengo, Inés

    2008-01-01

    Various classes of neurons alternate between high-frequency discharges and silent intervals. This phenomenon is called burst firing. To analyze burst activity in an insect system, grasshopper auditory receptor neurons were recorded in vivo for several distinct stimulus types. The experimental data show that both burst probability and burst characteristics are strongly influenced by temporal modulations of the acoustic stimulus. The tendency to burst, hence, is not only determined by cell-intrinsic processes, but also by their interaction with the stimulus time course. We study this interaction quantitatively and observe that bursts containing a certain number of spikes occur shortly after stimulus deflections of specific intensity and duration. Our findings suggest a sparse neural code where information about the stimulus is represented by the number of spikes per burst, irrespective of the detailed interspike-interval structure within a burst. This compact representation cannot be interpreted as a firing-rate code. An information-theoretical analysis reveals that the number of spikes per burst reliably conveys information about the amplitude and duration of sound transients, whereas their time of occurrence is reflected by the burst onset time. The investigated neurons encode almost half of the total transmitted information in burst activity. PMID:18946533

  2. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB Pathway, Reactive Oxygen Species, Potassium Efflux Activates NLRP3/ASC Inflammasome during Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mgbemena, Victoria; Tsai, Su-Yu; Chang, Te-Hung; Berton, Michael T.; Morris, Ian R.; Allen, Irving C.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.; Bose, Santanu

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) constitute highly pathogenic virus that cause severe respiratory diseases in newborn, children, elderly and immuno-compromised individuals. Airway inflammation is a critical regulator of disease outcome in RSV infected hosts. Although “controlled” inflammation is required for virus clearance, aberrant and exa