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Sample records for activity restriction model

  1. Poor Vision, Functioning, and Depressive Symptoms: A Test of the Activity Restriction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookwala, Jamila; Lawson, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested the applicability of the activity restriction model of depressed affect to the context of poor vision in late life. This model hypothesizes that late-life stressors contribute to poorer mental health not only directly but also indirectly by restricting routine everyday functioning. Method: We used data from a national…

  2. Physical activity: benefit or weakness in metabolic adaptations in a mouse model of chronic food restriction?

    PubMed

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Caron, Emilie; Zgheib, Sara; Stievenard, Aliçia; Zizzari, Philippe; Tolle, Virginie; Cortet, Bernard; Lucas, Stéphanie; Prévot, Vincent; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2015-02-01

    In restrictive-type anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, physical activity is usually associated with food restriction, but its physiological consequences remain poorly characterized. In female mice, we evaluated the impact of voluntary physical activity with/without chronic food restriction on metabolic and endocrine parameters that might contribute to AN. In this protocol, FRW mice (i.e., food restriction with running wheel) reached a crucial point of body weight loss (especially fat mass) faster than FR mice (i.e., food restriction only). However, in contrast to FR mice, their body weight stabilized, demonstrating a protective effect of a moderate, regular physical activity. Exercise delayed meal initiation and duration. FRW mice displayed food anticipatory activity compared with FR mice, which was strongly diminished with the prolongation of the protocol. The long-term nature of the protocol enabled assessment of bone parameters similar to those observed in AN patients. Both restricted groups adapted their energy metabolism differentially in the short and long term, with less fat oxidation in FRW mice and a preferential use of glucose to compensate for the chronic energy imbalance. Finally, like restrictive AN patients, FRW mice exhibited low leptin levels, high plasma concentrations of corticosterone and ghrelin, and a disruption of the estrous cycle. In conclusion, our model suggests that physical activity has beneficial effects on the adaptation to the severe condition of food restriction despite the absence of any protective effect on lean and bone mass. PMID:25465889

  3. Investigation of restricted baby Skyrme models

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, C.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Wereszczynski, A.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.

    2010-04-15

    A restriction of the baby Skyrme model consisting of the quartic and potential terms only is investigated in detail for a wide range of potentials. Further, its properties are compared with those of the corresponding full baby Skyrme models. We find that topological (charge) as well as geometrical (nucleus/shell shape) features of baby Skyrmions are captured already by the soliton solutions of the restricted model. Further, we find a coincidence between the compact or noncompact nature of solitons in the restricted model, on the one hand, and the existence or nonexistence of multi-Skyrmions in the full baby Skyrme model, on the other hand.

  4. 45 CFR 3.42 - Restricted activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restricted activities. 3.42 Section 3.42 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON... contrary to security regulations or Department of Health and Human Services policies, or where...

  5. 45 CFR 3.42 - Restricted activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restricted activities. 3.42 Section 3.42 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON... contrary to security regulations or Department of Health and Human Services policies, or where...

  6. 45 CFR 3.42 - Restricted activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restricted activities. 3.42 Section 3.42 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON... contrary to security regulations or Department of Health and Human Services policies, or where...

  7. 45 CFR 3.42 - Restricted activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Restricted activities. 3.42 Section 3.42 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON... contrary to security regulations or Department of Health and Human Services policies, or where...

  8. 45 CFR 3.42 - Restricted activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Restricted activities. 3.42 Section 3.42 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON... contrary to security regulations or Department of Health and Human Services policies, or where...

  9. The "occlusis" model of cell fate restriction.

    PubMed

    Lahn, Bruce T

    2011-01-01

    A simple model, termed "occlusis", is presented here to account for both cell fate restriction during somatic development and reestablishment of pluripotency during reproduction. The model makes three assertions: (1) A gene's transcriptional potential can assume one of two states: the "competent" state, wherein the gene is responsive to, and can be activated by, trans-acting factors in the cellular milieu, and the "occluded" state, wherein the gene is blocked by cis-acting, chromatin-based mechanisms from responding to trans-acting factors such that it remains silent irrespective of whether transcriptional activators are present in the milieu. (2) As differentiation proceeds in somatic lineages, lineage-inappropriate genes shift progressively and irreversibly from competent to occluded state, thereby leading to the restriction of cell fate. (3) During reproduction, global deocclusion takes place in the germline and/or early zygotic cells to reset the genome to the competent state in order to facilitate a new round of organismal development. PMID:20954221

  10. Time-dependent multiconfiguration self-consistent-field method based on the occupation-restricted multiple-active-space model for multielectron dynamics in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.

    2015-02-01

    The time-dependent multiconfiguration self-consistent-field method based on the occupation-restricted multiple-active-space model is proposed (TD-ORMAS) for multielectron dynamics in intense laser fields. Extending the previously proposed time-dependent complete-active-space self-consistent-field method [TD-CASSCF; Phys. Rev. A 88, 023402 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.023402], which divides the occupied orbitals into core and active orbitals, the TD-ORMAS method further subdivides the active orbitals into an arbitrary number of subgroups and poses the occupation restriction by giving the minimum and maximum number of electrons distributed in each subgroup. This enables highly flexible construction of the configuration-interaction (CI) space, allowing a large-active-space simulation of dynamics, e.g., the core excitation or ionization. The equations of motion for both CI coefficients and spatial orbitals are derived based on the time-dependent variational principle, and an efficient algorithm is proposed to solve for the orbital time derivatives. In-depth descriptions of the computational implementation are given in a readily programmable manner. The numerical application to the one-dimensional lithium hydride cluster models demonstrates that the high flexibility of the TD-ORMAS framework allows for the cost-effective simulations of multielectron dynamics by exploiting systematic series of approximations to the TD-CASSCF method.

  11. Prolonged Activity Restriction After Concussion: Are We Worsening Outcomes?

    PubMed

    DiFazio, Marc; Silverberg, Noah D; Kirkwood, Michael W; Bernier, Raquel; Iverson, Grant L

    2016-05-01

    The current treatment of concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is primarily based on expert consensus. Most clinical practice guidelines advise cognitive and physical rest after injury including withdrawal from normal life activities such as school attendance, sports participation, and technology use until symptoms resolve. Some individuals who sustain an mTBI experience persistent physical, cognitive, and mental health problems. Activity restriction itself may contribute to protracted recovery and other complications. Williamson's Activity Restriction Model of Depression, formulated more than 20 years ago, is central to this hypothesis. We review research evidence for potential harms of prolonged activity restriction and report an mTBI case as an example of how an "activity restriction cascade" can unfold. According to this model, psychological consequences of removal from validating life activities, combined with physical deconditioning, contribute to the development and persistence of postconcussive symptoms after mTBI in some youth. A modification to mTBI guidelines that emphasizes prompt reengagement in life activities as tolerated is encouraged. PMID:26130391

  12. A model of EcoRII restriction endonuclease action: the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpova, E. A.; Kubareva, E. A.; Shabarova, Z. A.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of interaction of restriction endonuclease EcoRII with DNA, we studied by native gel electrophoresis the binding of this endonuclease to a set of synthetic DNA-duplexes containing the modified or canonical recognition sequence 5'-d(CCA/TGG)-3'. All binding substrate or substrate analogues tested could be divided into two major groups: (i) duplexes that, at the interaction with endonuclease EcoRII, form two types of stable complexes on native gel in the absence of Mg2+ cofactor; (ii) duplexes that form only one type of complex, observed both in the presence and absence of Mg2+. Unlike the latter, duplexes under the first group can be hydrolyzed by endonuclease. Data obtained suggest that the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition sequence. A model of EcoRII endonuclease action is presented.

  13. 5 CFR 734.104 - Restriction of political activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... service members; (d) Schedule C employees, 5 CFR 213.3301, 213.3302; and (e) Any other employees who serve... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restriction of political activity. 734... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES General Provisions § 734.104 Restriction...

  14. 5 CFR 734.104 - Restriction of political activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... service members; (d) Schedule C employees, 5 CFR 213.3301, 213.3302; and (e) Any other employees who serve... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Restriction of political activity. 734... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES General Provisions § 734.104 Restriction...

  15. 5 CFR 734.104 - Restriction of political activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... service members; (d) Schedule C employees, 5 CFR 213.3301, 213.3302; and (e) Any other employees who serve... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restriction of political activity. 734... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES General Provisions § 734.104 Restriction...

  16. 5 CFR 734.104 - Restriction of political activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... service members; (d) Schedule C employees, 5 CFR 213.3301, 213.3302; and (e) Any other employees who serve... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restriction of political activity. 734... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES General Provisions § 734.104 Restriction...

  17. 5 CFR 734.104 - Restriction of political activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... service members; (d) Schedule C employees, 5 CFR 213.3301, 213.3302; and (e) Any other employees who serve... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Restriction of political activity. 734... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES General Provisions § 734.104 Restriction...

  18. Using shotgun sequence data to find active restriction enzyme genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Posfai, Janos; Morgan, Richard D; Vincze, Tamas; Roberts, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequence analysis has become the standard method for beginning to determine a genome sequence. The preparation of the shotgun sequence clones is, in fact, a biological experiment. It determines which segments of the genome can be cloned into Escherichia coli and which cannot. By analyzing the complete set of sequences from such an experiment, it is possible to identify genes lethal to E. coli. Among this set are genes encoding restriction enzymes which, when active in E. coli, lead to cell death by cleaving the E. coli genome at the restriction enzyme recognition sites. By analyzing shotgun sequence data sets we show that this is a reliable method to detect active restriction enzyme genes in newly sequenced genomes, thereby facilitating functional annotation. Active restriction enzyme genes have been identified, and their activity demonstrated biochemically, in the sequenced genomes of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 and Methylococcus capsulatus. PMID:18988632

  19. Activity Restrictions after Gynecologic Surgery: Is There Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Ingrid E.; Hamad, Nadia M.; Shaw, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many surgeons recommend rest and restricting activities to their patients after surgery. The aim of this review is to summarize the literature regarding types of activities gynecologic surgeons restrict and intra-abdominal pressure during specific activities and to provide an overview of negative effects of sedentary behavior (rest). Methods We searched Pubmed and Scopus for years 1970 until present and excluded studies that described recovery of activities of daily living after surgery as well as those that assessed intra-abdominal pressure for other reasons such as abdominal compartment syndrome and hypertension. For our review of intra-abdominal pressure, we excluded studies that did not include a generally healthy population, or did not report maximal intra-abdominal pressures. Results We identified no randomized trial or prospective cohort study that studied the association between post-operative activity and surgical success after pelvic floor repair. The ranges of intra-abdominal pressures during specific activities are large and such pressures during activities commonly restricted and not restricted after surgery overlap considerably. There is little concordance in mean peak intra-abdominal pressures across studies. Intra-abdominal pressure depends on many factors, but not least the manner in which it is measured and reported. Conclusions Given trends towards shorter hospital stays and off work intervals, which both predispose women to higher levels of physical activity, we urge research efforts towards understanding the role of physical activity on recurrence of pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence after surgery. PMID:23340879

  20. Measurement of Daily Activity in Restrictive Type Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Ann M.; McAlpine, Donald E.; Shirbhate, Rashmi; Manohar, Chinmay U.; Levine, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The assessment of daily activity in patients with restrictive type anorexia nervosa is limited by an absence of accurate and precise technology. We wanted to test a daily activity detecting device named, the Physical Activity Monitoring System (PAMS). Method Women participants with restrictive type anorexia nervosa (n = 8, 36 ± 11 years, 17 ± 2 kg/m2) and healthy women participants (n = 8, 30 ± 11 years, 27 ± 7 kg/m2) were asked to lie, sit and stand motionless, and walk at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 mph whilst wearing PAMS. Results For all restrictive type anorexia nervosa and healthy participants, body posture was correctly detected for all measurements (300/300). There was excellent correlation of an individual’s body acceleration with walking velocity and walking energy expenditure (r2> 0.99). Conclusions The PAMS technology could serve as a tool for lending insight into the pathophysiology of restrictive type anorexia nervosa; and potentially measuring compliance with activity recommendations for medical professionals treating individuals with restrictive type anorexia nervosa. PMID:18004719

  1. 24 CFR 570.309 - Restriction on location of activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Restriction on location of activities. 570.309 Section 570.309 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS Entitlement...

  2. Controlling the enzymatic activity of a restriction enzyme by light

    PubMed Central

    Schierling, Benno; Noël, Ann-Josée; Wende, Wolfgang; Hien, Le Thi; Volkov, Eugeny; Kubareva, Elena; Oretskaya, Tatiana; Kokkinidis, Michael; Römpp, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard; Pingoud, Alfred

    2010-01-01

    For many applications it would be desirable to be able to control the activity of proteins by using an external signal. In the present study, we have explored the possibility of modulating the activity of a restriction enzyme with light. By cross-linking two suitably located cysteine residues with a bifunctional azobenzene derivative, which can adopt a cis- or trans-configuration when illuminated by UV or blue light, respectively, enzymatic activity can be controlled in a reversible manner. To determine which residues when cross-linked show the largest “photoswitch effect,” i.e., difference in activity when illuminated with UV vs. blue light, > 30 variants of a single-chain version of the restriction endonuclease PvuII were produced, modified with azobenzene, and tested for DNA cleavage activity. In general, introducing single cross-links in the enzyme leads to only small effects, whereas with multiple cross-links and additional mutations larger effects are observed. Some of the modified variants, which carry the cross-links close to the catalytic center, can be modulated in their DNA cleavage activity by a factor of up to 16 by illumination with UV (azobenzene in cis) and blue light (azobenzene in trans), respectively. The change in activity is achieved in seconds, is fully reversible, and, in the case analyzed, is due to a change in V max rather than K m. PMID:20080559

  3. Estimating restricted mean treatment effects with stacked survival models.

    PubMed

    Wey, Andrew; Vock, David M; Connett, John; Rudser, Kyle

    2016-08-30

    The difference in restricted mean survival times between two groups is a clinically relevant summary measure. With observational data, there may be imbalances in confounding variables between the two groups. One approach to account for such imbalances is estimating a covariate-adjusted restricted mean difference by modeling the covariate-adjusted survival distribution and then marginalizing over the covariate distribution. Because the estimator for the restricted mean difference is defined by the estimator for the covariate-adjusted survival distribution, it is natural to expect that a better estimator of the covariate-adjusted survival distribution is associated with a better estimator of the restricted mean difference. We therefore propose estimating restricted mean differences with stacked survival models. Stacked survival models estimate a weighted average of several survival models by minimizing predicted error. By including a range of parametric, semi-parametric, and non-parametric models, stacked survival models can robustly estimate a covariate-adjusted survival distribution and, therefore, the restricted mean treatment effect in a wide range of scenarios. We demonstrate through a simulation study that better performance of the covariate-adjusted survival distribution often leads to better mean squared error of the restricted mean difference although there are notable exceptions. In addition, we demonstrate that the proposed estimator can perform nearly as well as Cox regression when the proportional hazards assumption is satisfied and significantly better when proportional hazards is violated. Finally, the proposed estimator is illustrated with data from the United Network for Organ Sharing to evaluate post-lung transplant survival between large-volume and small-volume centers. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26934835

  4. Physically Active Rats Lose More Weight during Calorie Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Smyers, Mark E.; Bachir, Kailey Z.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Novak, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Daily physical activity shows substantial inter-individual variation, and low physical activity is associated with obesity and weight gain. Elevated physical activity is also associated with high intrinsic aerobic capacity, which confers considerable metabolic health benefits. Rats artificially selected for high intrinsic aerobic capacity (high-capacity runners, HCR) are more physically active than their low-capacity counterparts (low-capacity runners, LCR). To test the hypothesis that physical activity counters metabolic thriftiness, we measured physical activity and weight loss during three weeks of 50% calorie restriction (CR) in the HCR and LCR rat lines. At baseline, HCR ate more and were more active than LCR; this was seen in male rats, where LCR are considerably heavier than HCR, as well as in a set of female rats where body weight did not differ between the lines, demonstrating that this effect is consistent across sex and not secondary to body weight. We show for the first time that HCR lose more weight than LCR relative to baseline. Physical activity levels declined throughout CR, and this was more pronounced in HCR than in LCR, yet some aspects of activity remained elevated in HCR relative to LCR even during CR. This is consistent with the idea that low physical activity contributes to metabolic thriftiness during food restriction, allowing LCR to defend body mass, particularly lean mass. This has implications for physical activity during diet-induced weight loss, the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in weight loss during a diet, and the potential evolutionary opposition between metabolic thriftiness and aerobic capacity. PMID:25449411

  5. Physically active rats lose more weight during calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Smyers, Mark E; Bachir, Kailey Z; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Novak, Colleen M

    2015-02-01

    Daily physical activity shows substantial inter-individual variation, and low physical activity is associated with obesity and weight gain. Elevated physical activity is also associated with high intrinsic aerobic capacity, which confers considerable metabolic health benefits. Rats artificially selected for high intrinsic aerobic capacity (high-capacity runners, HCR) are more physically active than their low-capacity counterparts (low-capacity runners, LCR). To test the hypothesis that physical activity counters metabolic thriftiness, we measured physical activity and weight loss during three weeks of 50% calorie restriction (CR) in the HCR and LCR rat lines. At baseline, HCR ate more and were more active than LCR; this was seen in male rats, where LCR are considerably heavier than HCR, as well as in a set of female rats where body weight did not differ between the lines, demonstrating that this effect is consistent across sex and not secondary to body weight. We show for the first time that HCR lose more weight than LCR relative to baseline. Physical activity levels declined throughout CR, and this was more pronounced in HCR than in LCR, yet some aspects of activity remained elevated in HCR relative to LCR even during CR. This is consistent with the idea that low physical activity contributes to metabolic thriftiness during food restriction, allowing LCR to defend body mass, particularly lean mass. This has implications for physical activity during diet-induced weight loss, the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in weight loss during a diet, and the potential evolutionary opposition between metabolic thriftiness and aerobic capacity. PMID:25449411

  6. Animal models of restricted repetitive behavior in autism

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mark H.; Tanimura, Yoko; Lee, Linda W.; Bodfish, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Restricted, repetitive behavior, along with deficits in social reciprocity and communication, is diagnostic of autism. Animal models relevant to this domain generally fall into three classes: repetitive behavior associated with targeted insults to the CNS; repetitive behavior induced by pharmacological agents; and repetitive behavior associated with restricted environments and experience. The extant literature provides potential models of the repetitive behavioral phenotype in autism rather than attempts to model the etiology or pathophysiology of restricted, repetitive behavior, as these are poorly understood. This review focuses on our work with deer mice which exhibit repetitive behaviors associated with environmental restriction. Repetitive behaviors are the most common category of abnormal behavior observed in confined animals and larger, more complex environments substantially reduce the development and expression of such behavior. Studies with this model, including environmental enrichment effects, suggest alterations in cortical-basal ganglia circuitry in the development and expression of repetitive behavior. Considerably more work needs to be done in this area, particularly in modeling the development of aberrant repetitive behavior. As mutant mouse models continue to proliferate, there should be a number of promising genetic models to pursue. PMID:16997392

  7. A Novel Restricted Diffusion Model of Evoked Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry provides high-fidelity recordings of electrically evoked dopamine release in the rat striatum. The evoked responses are suitable targets for numerical modeling because the frequency and duration of the stimulus are exactly known. Responses recorded in the dorsal and ventral striatum of the rat do not bear out the predictions of a numerical model that assumes the presence of a diffusion gap interposed between the recording electrode and nearby dopamine terminals. Recent findings, however, suggest that dopamine may be subject to restricted diffusion processes in brain extracellular space. A numerical model cast to account for restricted diffusion produces excellent agreement between simulated and observed responses recorded under a broad range of anatomical, stimulus, and pharmacological conditions. The numerical model requires four, and in some cases only three, adjustable parameters and produces meaningful kinetic parameter values. PMID:24983330

  8. Both Food Restriction and High-Fat Diet during Gestation Induce Low Birth Weight and Altered Physical Activity in Adult Rat Offspring: The “Similarities in the Inequalities” Model

    PubMed Central

    Portella, André Krumel; Benetti, Carla da Silva; Noschang, Cristie; Goldani, Marcelo Zubaran; Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo

    2015-01-01

    We have previously described a theoretical model in humans, called “Similarities in the Inequalities”, in which extremely unequal social backgrounds coexist in a complex scenario promoting similar health outcomes in adulthood. Based on the potential applicability of and to further explore the “similarities in the inequalities” phenomenon, this study used a rat model to investigate the effect of different nutritional backgrounds during gestation on the willingness of offspring to engage in physical activity in adulthood. Sprague-Dawley rats were time mated and randomly allocated to one of three dietary groups: Control (Adlib), receiving standard laboratory chow ad libitum; 50% food restricted (FR), receiving 50% of the ad libitum-fed dam’s habitual intake; or high-fat diet (HF), receiving a diet containing 23% fat. The diets were provided from day 10 of pregnancy until weaning. Within 24 hours of birth, pups were cross-fostered to other dams, forming the following groups: Adlib_Adlib, FR_Adlib, and HF_Adlib. Maternal chow consumption and weight gain, and offspring birth weight, growth, physical activity (one week of free exercise in running wheels), abdominal adiposity and biochemical data were evaluated. Western blot was performed to assess D2 receptors in the dorsal striatum. The “similarities in the inequalities” effect was observed on birth weight (both FR and HF groups were smaller than the Adlib group at birth) and physical activity (both FR_Adlib and HF_Adlib groups were different from the Adlib_Adlib group, with less active males and more active females). Our findings contribute to the view that health inequalities in fetal life may program the health outcomes manifested in offspring adult life (such as altered physical activity and metabolic parameters), probably through different biological mechanisms. PMID:25738800

  9. Activity restriction in mild COPD: a challenging clinical problem.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Denis E; Gebke, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    Dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and activity restriction are already apparent in mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, patients may not seek medical help until their symptoms become troublesome and persistent and significant respiratory impairment is already present; as a consequence, further sustained physical inactivity may contribute to disease progression. Ventilatory and gas exchange impairment, cardiac dysfunction, and skeletal muscle dysfunction are present to a variable degree in patients with mild COPD, and collectively may contribute to exercise intolerance. As such, there is increasing interest in evaluating exercise tolerance and physical activity in symptomatic patients with COPD who have mild airway obstruction, as defined by spirometry. Simple questionnaires, eg, the modified British Medical Research Council dyspnea scale and the COPD Assessment Test, or exercise tests, eg, the 6-minute or incremental and endurance exercise tests can be used to assess exercise performance and functional status. Pedometers and accelerometers are used to evaluate physical activity, and endurance tests (cycle or treadmill) using constant work rate protocols are used to assess the effects of interventions such as pulmonary rehabilitation. In addition, alternative outcome measurements, such as tests of small airway dysfunction and laboratory-based exercise tests, are used to measure the extent of physiological impairment in individuals with persistent dyspnea. This review describes the mechanisms of exercise limitation in patients with mild COPD and the interventions that can potentially improve exercise tolerance. Also discussed are the benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation and the potential role of pharmacologic treatment in symptomatic patients with mild COPD. PMID:24940054

  10. Activity restriction in mild COPD: a challenging clinical problem

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Denis E; Gebke, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    Dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and activity restriction are already apparent in mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, patients may not seek medical help until their symptoms become troublesome and persistent and significant respiratory impairment is already present; as a consequence, further sustained physical inactivity may contribute to disease progression. Ventilatory and gas exchange impairment, cardiac dysfunction, and skeletal muscle dysfunction are present to a variable degree in patients with mild COPD, and collectively may contribute to exercise intolerance. As such, there is increasing interest in evaluating exercise tolerance and physical activity in symptomatic patients with COPD who have mild airway obstruction, as defined by spirometry. Simple questionnaires, eg, the modified British Medical Research Council dyspnea scale and the COPD Assessment Test, or exercise tests, eg, the 6-minute or incremental and endurance exercise tests can be used to assess exercise performance and functional status. Pedometers and accelerometers are used to evaluate physical activity, and endurance tests (cycle or treadmill) using constant work rate protocols are used to assess the effects of interventions such as pulmonary rehabilitation. In addition, alternative outcome measurements, such as tests of small airway dysfunction and laboratory-based exercise tests, are used to measure the extent of physiological impairment in individuals with persistent dyspnea. This review describes the mechanisms of exercise limitation in patients with mild COPD and the interventions that can potentially improve exercise tolerance. Also discussed are the benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation and the potential role of pharmacologic treatment in symptomatic patients with mild COPD. PMID:24940054

  11. Aging, Neurogenesis, and Caloric Restriction in Different Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Arslan-Ergul, Ayca; Ozdemir, A Tugrul; Adams, Michelle M

    2013-01-01

    Brain aging is a multifactorial process that is occurring across multiple cognitive domains. A significant complaint that occurs in the elderly is a decrement in learning and memory ability. Both rodents and zebrafish exhibit a similar problem with memory during aging. The neurobiological changes that underlie this cognitive decline are complex and undoubtedly influenced by many factors. Alterations in the birth of new neurons and neuron turnover may contribute to age-related cognitive problems. Caloric restriction is the only non-genetic intervention that reliably increases life span and healthspan across multiple organisms although the molecular mechanisms are not well-understood. Recently the zebrafish has become a popular model organism for understanding the neurobiological consequences but to date very little work has been performed. Similarly, few studies have examined the effects of dietary restriction in zebrafish. Here we review the literature related to memory decline, neurogenesis, and caloric restriction across model organisms and suggest that zebrafish has the potential to be an important animal model for understanding the complex interactions between age, neurobiological changes in the brain, and dietary regimens or their mimetics as interventions. PMID:23936746

  12. Model of adipose tissue cellularity dynamics during food restriction.

    PubMed

    Soula, H A; Géloën, A; Soulage, C O

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue and adipocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases related to obesity. Size of fat cells depends on the balance of synthesis and mobilization of lipids and can undergo important variations throughout the life of the organism. These variations usually occur when storing and releasing lipids according to energy demand. In particular when confronted to severe food restriction, adipocyte releases its lipid content via a process called lipolysis. We propose a mathematical model that combines cell diameter distribution and lipolytic response to show that lipid release is a surface (radius squared) limited mechanism. Since this size-dependent rate affects the cell׳s shrinkage speed, we are able to predict the cell size distribution evolution when lipolysis is the only factor at work: such as during an important food restriction. Performing recurrent surgical biopsies on rats, we measured the evolution of adipose cell size distribution for the same individual throughout the duration of the food restriction protocol. We show that our microscopic model of size dependent lipid release can predict macroscopic size distribution evolution. PMID:25196549

  13. Calorie Restriction in Mammals and Simple Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mirisola, Mario G.

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR), which usually refers to a 20–40% reduction in calorie intake, can effectively prolong lifespan preventing most age-associated diseases in several species. However, recent data from both human and nonhumans point to the ratio of macronutrients rather than the caloric intake as a major regulator of both lifespan and health-span. In addition, specific components of the diet have recently been identified as regulators of some age-associated intracellular signaling pathways in simple model systems. The comprehension of the mechanisms underpinning these findings is crucial since it may increase the beneficial effects of calorie restriction making it accessible to a broader population as well. PMID:24883306

  14. Calorie restriction in mammals and simple model organisms.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Giusi; Mirisola, Mario G

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR), which usually refers to a 20-40% reduction in calorie intake, can effectively prolong lifespan preventing most age-associated diseases in several species. However, recent data from both human and nonhumans point to the ratio of macronutrients rather than the caloric intake as a major regulator of both lifespan and health-span. In addition, specific components of the diet have recently been identified as regulators of some age-associated intracellular signaling pathways in simple model systems. The comprehension of the mechanisms underpinning these findings is crucial since it may increase the beneficial effects of calorie restriction making it accessible to a broader population as well. PMID:24883306

  15. 33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. 334.763 Section 334.763 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. (a) The area. The area...

  16. 33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. 334.763 Section 334.763 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. (a) The area. The area...

  17. 33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. 334.763 Section 334.763 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. (a) The area. The area...

  18. Characteristics Associated with Fear of Falling and Activity Restriction in Community-Living Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Susan L.; Williams, Christianna S.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To identify the characteristics associated with restricting activity because of fear of falling (activity restriction) and to determine which characteristics distinguish older persons who restrict activity from those who have fear of falling but do not restrict their activities (fear of falling alone). DESIGN Population-based cross-sectional study. SETTING General community. PARTICIPANTS One thousand sixty-four community-living persons aged 72 and older. MEASUREMENTS Candidate predictors were identified from the following domains: demographic, health status, physical, psychosocial, and fall-related. The outcome measure was the report of no fear of falling, fear of falling alone, or activity restriction. RESULTS Fifty-seven percent of the cohort reported no fear of falling, 24% reported fear of falling alone, and 19% reported restricting activity. The proportion of participants with poor health status, slow timed physical performance, activities of daily living disability, and poor psychosocial function was highest in those with activity restriction, intermediate in those with fear of falling alone, and lowest in those with no fear of falling. Of participants with fear of falling, characteristics independently associated with activity restriction were history of an injurious fall, slow timed physical performance, two or more chronic conditions, and depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION Older persons who restrict activity are more physically frail and have a greater burden of chronic conditions and depressive symptoms than those who have fear of falling alone. These differences between persons with fear of falling may guide the refinement of clinical interventions and preventative programs. PMID:11943049

  19. 15 CFR 400.33 - Restrictions on manufacturing and processing activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restrictions on manufacturing and...-TRADE ZONES BOARD Manufacturing and Processing Activity-Reviews § 400.33 Restrictions on manufacturing and processing activity. (a) In general. In approving manufacturing or processing activity for a...

  20. 15 CFR 400.33 - Restrictions on manufacturing and processing activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on manufacturing and...-TRADE ZONES BOARD Manufacturing and Processing Activity-Reviews § 400.33 Restrictions on manufacturing and processing activity. (a) In general. In approving manufacturing or processing activity for a...

  1. 15 CFR 400.33 - Restrictions on manufacturing and processing activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restrictions on manufacturing and...-TRADE ZONES BOARD Manufacturing and Processing Activity-Reviews § 400.33 Restrictions on manufacturing and processing activity. (a) In general. In approving manufacturing or processing activity for a...

  2. Bayesian Model Comparison for the Order Restricted RC Association Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iliopoulos, G.; Kateri, M.; Ntzoufras, I.

    2009-01-01

    Association models constitute an attractive alternative to the usual log-linear models for modeling the dependence between classification variables. They impose special structure on the underlying association by assigning scores on the levels of each classification variable, which can be fixed or parametric. Under the general row-column (RC)…

  3. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1. PMID:26738439

  4. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1.

  5. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1. PMID:26738439

  6. Extended model of restricted beam for FSO links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliak, Juraj; Wilfert, Otakar

    2012-10-01

    Modern wireless optical communication systems in many aspects overcome wire or radio communications. Their advantages are license-free operation and broad bandwidth that they offer. The medium in free-space optical (FSO) links is the atmosphere. Operation of outdoor FSO links struggles with many atmospheric phenomena that deteriorate phase and amplitude of the transmitted optical beam. This beam originates in the transmitter and is affected by its individual parts, especially by the lens socket and the transmitter aperture, where attenuation and diffraction effects take place. Both of these phenomena unfavourable influence the beam and cause degradation of link availability, or its total malfunction. Therefore, both of these phenomena should be modelled and simulated, so that one can judge the link function prior to the realization of the system. Not only the link availability and reliability are concerned, but also economic aspects. In addition, the transmitted beam is not, generally speaking, circularly symmetrical, what makes the link simulation more difficult. In a comprehensive model, it is necessary to take into account the ellipticity of the beam that is restricted by circularly symmetrical aperture where then the attenuation and diffraction occur. General model is too computationally extensive; therefore simplification of the calculations by means of analytical and numerical approaches will be discussed. Presented model is not only simulated using computer, but also experimentally proven. One can then deduce the ability of the model to describe the reality and to estimate how far can one go with approximations, i.e. limitations of the model are discussed.

  7. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. 334.761 Section 334.761 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.761 Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1... in this section shall be enforced by the Commanding Officer, Naval Support Activity, Panama...

  8. 15 CFR 744.6 - Restrictions on certain activities of U.S. persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restrictions on certain activities of... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.6 Restrictions on certain activities of U.S...). (b) Additional prohibitions on U.S. persons informed by BIS. BIS may inform U.S. persons,...

  9. 15 CFR 744.6 - Restrictions on certain activities of U.S. persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Restrictions on certain activities of... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.6 Restrictions on certain activities of U.S...). (b) Additional prohibitions on U.S. persons informed by BIS. BIS may inform U.S. persons,...

  10. 15 CFR 744.6 - Restrictions on certain activities of U.S. persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Restrictions on certain activities of... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.6 Restrictions on certain activities of U.S...). (b) Additional prohibitions on U.S. persons informed by BIS. BIS may inform U.S. persons,...

  11. 15 CFR 744.6 - Restrictions on certain activities of U.S. persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restrictions on certain activities of... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.6 Restrictions on certain activities of U.S...). (b) Additional prohibitions on U.S. persons informed by BIS. BIS may inform U.S. persons,...

  12. 33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. 334.763 Section 334.763 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. (a) The area. The area...

  13. Analysis of the restricting factors of laser countermeasure active detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufa; Sun, Xiaoquan

    2016-07-01

    The detection effect of laser active detection system is affected by various kinds of factors. In view of the application requirement of laser active detection, the influence factors for laser active detection are analyzed. The mathematical model of cat eye target detection distance has been built, influence of the parameters of laser detection system and the environment on detection range and the detection efficiency are analyzed. Various parameters constraint detection performance is simulated. The results show that the discovery distance of laser active detection is affected by the laser divergence angle, the incident angle and the visibility of the atmosphere. For a given detection range, the laser divergence angle and the detection efficiency are mutually restricted. Therefore, in view of specific application environment, it is necessary to select appropriate laser detection parameters to achieve optimal detection effect.

  14. Estimation of spatially restricted LET using track structure models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    The spatial distribution of energy deposition is an important determinant in the formation of biologically significant lesions. It has been widely realized that Linear Energy Transfer (LET) being an average quantity is not sufficient to describe the situation at a submicroscopic scale. To remedy this to some extent 'energy-cut-off' values are sometimes used but since they are related to secondary electron energy and only indirectly to their range they are also not adequate although they may be easily calculated. 'Range-restricted LET' appears to be better but its determination is usually quite involved. Xapsos (1992) suggested a semi-empirical approximation based on a modified Bethe-formula which contains a number of assumption which are difficult to verify. A simpler and easier way is to use existing beam-models which describe energy deposition around an ion's path. They all agree that the energy density (i. e., energy deposited per unit mass) decreases with the inverse square of the distance from the track center. This simple dependence can be used to determine the fraction of total LET which is deposited in a cylinder of a given radius. As an example our own beam model. Energy density depends on distance x (measured in m) from the track center according to the presented formula.

  15. 5 CFR 7001.102 - Restrictions on outside employment and business activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on outside employment and business activities. 7001.102 Section 7001.102 Administrative Personnel UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE SUPPLEMENTAL STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE § 7001.102 Restrictions on outside employment and...

  16. Conformationally restricted elongation factor G retains GTPase activity but is inactive in translocation on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Peske, F; Matassova, N B; Savelsbergh, A; Rodnina, M V; Wintermeyer, W

    2000-08-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) from Escherichia coli is a large, five-domain GTPase that promotes tRNA translocation on the ribosome. Full activity requires GTP hydrolysis, suggesting that a conformational change of the factor is important for function. To restrict the intramolecular mobility, two cysteine residues were engineered into domains 1 and 5 of EF-G that spontaneously formed a disulfide cross-link. Cross-linked EF-G retained GTPase activity on the ribosome, whereas it was inactive in translocation as well as in turnover. Both activities were restored when the cross-link was reversed by reduction. These results strongly argue against a GTPase switch-type model of EF-G function and demonstrate that conformational mobility is an absolute requirement for EF-G function on the ribosome. PMID:10983996

  17. BDNF restricted knockout mice as an animal model for aggression

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Wataru; Chehab, Mahmoud; Thakur, Siddarth; Li, Jiayang; Morozov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Mice with global deletion of one BDNF allele, or with forebrain-restricted deletion of both alleles show elevated aggression, but this phenotype is accompanied by other behavioral changes, including increases in anxiety and deficits in cognition. Here, we performed behavioral characterization of conditional BDNF knockout mice generated using a Cre recombinase driver line, KA1-Cre, which expresses Cre in few areas of brain: highly at hippocampal area CA3, moderately in dentate gyrus, cerebellum and facial nerve nucleus. The mutant animals exhibited elevated conspecific aggression and social dominance, but did not show changes in anxiety-like behaviors assessed using the elevated plus maze and open field test. There were no changes in depression like behaviors tested in the forced swim test, but small increase in immobility in the tail suspension test. In cognitive tasks, mutants showed normal social recognition and normal spatial and fear memory, but exhibited a deficit in object recognition. Thus, this knockout can serve as a robust model of BDNF-dependent aggression and object recognition deficiency. PMID:21255268

  18. TRIM5 Retroviral Restriction Activity Correlates with the Ability To Induce Innate Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lascano, Josefina; Uchil, Pradeep D.; Mothes, Walther

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Host restriction factor TRIM5 inhibits retroviral transduction in a species-specific manner by binding to and destabilizing the retroviral capsid lattice before reverse transcription is completed. However, the restriction mechanism may not be that simple since TRIM5 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, the proteasome, autophagy, and TAK1-dependent AP-1 signaling have been suggested to contribute to restriction. Here, we show that, among a panel of seven primate and Carnivora TRIM5 orthologues, each of which has potential for potent retroviral restriction activity, all activated AP-1 signaling. In contrast, TRIM family paralogues most closely related to TRIM5 did not. While each primate species has a single TRIM5 gene, mice have at least seven TRIM5 homologues that cluster into two groups, Trim12a, -b, and -c and Trim30a, -b, -c, and -d. The three Trim12 proteins activated innate immune signaling, while the Trim30 proteins did not, though none of the murine Trim5 homologues restricted any of a panel of cloned retroviruses. To determine if any mouse TRIM5 homologues had potential for restriction activity, each was fused to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CA binding protein cyclophilin A (CypA). The three Trim12-CypA fusions all activated AP-1 and restricted HIV-1 transduction, whereas the Trim30-CypA fusions did neither. AP-1 activation and HIV-1 restriction by the Trim12-CypA fusions were inhibited by disruption of TAK1. Overall then, these experiments demonstrate that there is a strong correlation between TRIM5 retroviral restriction activity and the ability to activate TAK1-dependent innate immune signaling. IMPORTANCE The importance of retroviruses for the evolution of susceptible host organisms cannot be overestimated. Eight percent of the human genome is retrovirus sequence, fixed in the germ line during past infection. Understanding how metazoa protect their genomes from mutagenic retrovirus infection is therefore of fundamental importance to

  19. Human Intestinal Enteroids: a New Model To Study Human Rotavirus Infection, Host Restriction, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Kapil; Blutt, Sarah E.; Ettayebi, Khalil; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Broughman, James R.; Crawford, Sue E.; Karandikar, Umesh C.; Sastri, Narayan P.; Conner, Margaret E.; Opekun, Antone R.; Graham, David Y.; Qureshi, Waqar; Sherman, Vadim; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human gastrointestinal tract research is limited by the paucity of in vitro intestinal cell models that recapitulate the cellular diversity and complex functions of human physiology and disease pathology. Human intestinal enteroid (HIE) cultures contain multiple intestinal epithelial cell types that comprise the intestinal epithelium (enterocytes and goblet, enteroendocrine, and Paneth cells) and are physiologically active based on responses to agonists. We evaluated these nontransformed, three-dimensional HIE cultures as models for pathogenic infections in the small intestine by examining whether HIEs from different regions of the small intestine from different patients are susceptible to human rotavirus (HRV) infection. Little is known about HRVs, as they generally replicate poorly in transformed cell lines, and host range restriction prevents their replication in many animal models, whereas many animal rotaviruses (ARVs) exhibit a broader host range and replicate in mice. Using HRVs, including the Rotarix RV1 vaccine strain, and ARVs, we evaluated host susceptibility, virus production, and cellular responses of HIEs. HRVs infect at higher rates and grow to higher titers than do ARVs. HRVs infect differentiated enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells, and viroplasms and lipid droplets are induced. Heterogeneity in replication was seen in HIEs from different patients. HRV infection and RV enterotoxin treatment of HIEs caused physiological lumenal expansion detected by time-lapse microscopy, recapitulating one of the hallmarks of rotavirus-induced diarrhea. These results demonstrate that HIEs are a novel pathophysiological model that will allow the study of HRV biology, including host restriction, cell type restriction, and virus-induced fluid secretion. IMPORTANCE Our research establishes HIEs as nontransformed cell culture models to understand human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology and the epithelial response, including host restriction of

  20. 15 CFR 970.103 - Prohibited activities and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES General § 970... United States or any other nation; and any other activity designed to harass deep seabed...

  1. 15 CFR 970.103 - Prohibited activities and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES General § 970... United States or any other nation; and any other activity designed to harass deep seabed...

  2. 15 CFR 970.103 - Prohibited activities and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES General § 970... United States or any other nation; and any other activity designed to harass deep seabed...

  3. A restricted population of CB1 cannabinoid receptors with neuroprotective activity

    PubMed Central

    Chiarlone, Anna; Bellocchio, Luigi; Blázquez, Cristina; Resel, Eva; Soria-Gómez, Edgar; Cannich, Astrid; Ferrero, José J.; Sagredo, Onintza; Benito, Cristina; Romero, Julián; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Lutz, Beat; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Guzmán, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor, the main molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is the most abundant G protein-coupled receptor in the mammalian brain. Of note, CB1 receptors are expressed at the synapses of two opposing (i.e., GABAergic/inhibitory and glutamatergic/excitatory) neuronal populations, so the activation of one and/or another receptor population may conceivably evoke different effects. Despite the widely reported neuroprotective activity of the CB1 receptor in animal models, the precise pathophysiological relevance of those two CB1 receptor pools in neurodegenerative processes is unknown. Here, we first induced excitotoxic damage in the mouse brain by (i) administering quinolinic acid to conditional mutant animals lacking CB1 receptors selectively in GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, and (ii) manipulating corticostriatal glutamatergic projections remotely with a designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug pharmacogenetic approach. We next examined the alterations that occur in the R6/2 mouse, a well-established model of Huntington disease, upon (i) fully knocking out CB1 receptors, and (ii) deleting CB1 receptors selectively in corticostriatal glutamatergic or striatal GABAergic neurons. The data unequivocally identify the restricted population of CB1 receptors located on glutamatergic terminals as an indispensable player in the neuroprotective activity of (endo)cannabinoids, therefore suggesting that this precise receptor pool constitutes a promising target for neuroprotective therapeutic strategies. PMID:24843137

  4. Reduced Activity Restriction Buffers the Relations Between Chronic Stress and Sympathetic Nervous System Activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Caregivers of dementia patients are at risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), and this risk increases the longer they provide care. Greater perceptions that caregiving restricts social/recreational activities (i.e., activity restriction [AR]) has been associated with poorer health, and AR may exacerbate the relations between stress and health outcomes. The current study examined the interactive role of greater exposure to stress and increased AR on plasma catecholamine (CAT) levels: norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Method. A total of 84 dementia caregivers completed a standard assessment battery, and a nurse collected blood, which was assayed for NE and EPI. Separate regressions for NE and EPI were used to determine whether the relations between years caregiving and CATs were greater in those with high versus low AR. Results. A significant interaction was found between years caregiving and AR in predicting resting EPI (p = .032) but not resting NE (p = .103). Post hoc analyses indicated that years caregiving was significantly associated with EPI when AR was high (p = .008) but not when AR was low (p = .799). Additionally, years caregiving was not significantly associated with NE when AR was high or low. Discussion. The subjective experience of AR can play an important role in determining risk for detrimental physical health outcomes, particularly CVD risk. PMID:23685924

  5. 15 CFR 971.103 - Prohibited activities and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... any pending application to which priority of right for issuance applies under 15 CFR part 970 or this... THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS General... the effect of harassing, persons conducting deep seabed mining activities authorized by...

  6. 15 CFR 971.103 - Prohibited activities and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... any pending application to which priority of right for issuance applies under 15 CFR part 970 or this... THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS General... the effect of harassing, persons conducting deep seabed mining activities authorized by...

  7. 15 CFR 971.103 - Prohibited activities and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... any pending application to which priority of right for issuance applies under 15 CFR part 970 or this... THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS General... the effect of harassing, persons conducting deep seabed mining activities authorized by...

  8. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Naval Support Activity Panama... REGULATIONS § 334.761 Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1... in this section shall be enforced by the Commanding Officer, Naval Support Activity, Panama...

  9. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naval Support Activity Panama... REGULATIONS § 334.761 Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1... in this section shall be enforced by the Commanding Officer, Naval Support Activity, Panama...

  10. 33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Naval Support Activity Panama....763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. (a) The area. The area is... enforced by the Commanding Officer, Naval Support Activity, Panama City Florida, and such agencies as...

  11. Restricted dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in activated carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Saha, Dipendu; Gallego, Nidia C; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bhat, Vinay V

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was used for characterization of dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in narrow nanopores of two activated carbon materials: PFAC (derived from polyfurfuryl alcohol) and UMC (ultramicroporous carbon). Fast, but incomplete ortho-para conversion was observed at 10 K, suggesting that scattering originates from the fraction of unconverted ortho isomer which is rotation-hindered because of confinement in nanopores. Hydrogen molecules entrapped in narrow nanopores (<7 ) were immobile below 22-25 K. Mobility increased rapidly with temperature above this threshold, which is 8 K higher than the melting point of bulk hydrogen. Diffusion obeyed fixed-jump length mechanism, indistinguishable between 2D and 3D processes. Thermal activation of diffusion was characterized between ~22 and 37 K, and structure-dependent differences were found between the two carbons. Activation energy of diffusion was higher than that of bulk solid hydrogen. Classical notions of liquid and solid do not longer apply for H2 confined in narrow nanopores.

  12. Stringly restrictions on the backgrounds in the heterotic sigma model

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S. ); Majumdar, P. )

    1992-03-21

    This paper shows that for the heterotic string theory in the presence of arbitrary background gauge, gravitational and antisymmetric tensor fields, truncated by a general coordinate dependent compactification a la Scherk-Schwarz, the requirement of 2D conformal invariance is as restrictive as to inhibit supersymmetry breaking with vanishing cosmological constant.

  13. 40 CFR 90.615 - Model year restrictions related to imported engines and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Importation of Nonconforming Engines § 90.615 Model year restrictions related to imported engines and equipment. The provisions of 40 CFR 1068.360 apply starting January 1, 2009... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Model year restrictions related...

  14. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. 334.761 Section 334.761 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.761 Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1... waterline to 30°09′57.5″ N, 085°44′37″ W; then northerly to point of origin. (2) Area BA-1. The area...

  15. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. 334.761 Section 334.761 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.761 Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1... waterline to 30°09′57.5″ N, 085°44′37″ W; then northerly to point of origin. (2) Area BA-1. The area...

  16. Modeling and Evaluation of Miles-in-Trail Restrictions in the National Air Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Shon; Sridhar, Banavar

    2003-01-01

    Miles-in-trail restrictions impact flights in the national air space on a daily basis and these restrictions routinely propagate between adjacent Air Route Traffic Control Centers. Since overly restrictive or ineffective miles-in-trail restrictions can reduce the overall efficiency of the national air space, decision support capabilities that model miles-in-trail restrictions should prove to be very beneficial. This paper presents both an analytical formulation and a linear programming approach for modeling the effects of miles-in-trail restrictions. A methodology for monitoring the conformance of an existing miles-in-trail restriction is also presented. These capabilities have been implemented in the Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool for testing purposes. To allow alternative restrictions to be evaluated in post-operations, a new mode of operation, which is referred to as the hybrid-playback mode, has been implemented in the simulation environment. To demonstrate the capabilities of these new algorithms, the miles-in-trail restrictions, which were in effect on June 27, 2002 in the New York Terminal Radar Approach Control, are examined. Results from the miles-in-trail conformance monitoring functionality are presented for the ELIOT, PARKE and WHITE departure fixes. In addition, the miles-in-trail algorithms are used to assess the impact of alternative restrictions at the PARKE departure fix.

  17. [Is restriction of physical activity indicated in the prevention of retinal detachment?].

    PubMed

    Karel, I

    1993-06-01

    The author evaluates the importance of different vitreoretinal factors and the role of indirect injury in the pathogenesis of detachment of the retina/DR/and holds the following view as regards subjects inclined to pursue physical activity. Numerous and frequent vitreoretinal risk factors are a forecast of DR only in a small fraction of patients. Indirect injury is not recognized as a cause of DR. Risk factors incl. medium-grade and high-grade myopia are not an indication for restriction of physical activity nor for Caesarean section in pregnant women. Restriction of physical activity acts as a psychic trauma and does not prevent the development of DR. PMID:8348645

  18. 5 CFR 7001.102 - Restrictions on outside employment and business activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., including 5 CFR part 2635, which includes, among other provisions, the principle stated at 5 CFR 2635.101(b... business activities. 7001.102 Section 7001.102 Administrative Personnel UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE... Restrictions on outside employment and business activities. (a) Prohibited outside employment and...

  19. 5 CFR 7001.102 - Restrictions on outside employment and business activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., including 5 CFR part 2635, which includes, among other provisions, the principle stated at 5 CFR 2635.101(b... business activities. 7001.102 Section 7001.102 Administrative Personnel UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE... Restrictions on outside employment and business activities. (a) Prohibited outside employment and...

  20. 5 CFR 7001.102 - Restrictions on outside employment and business activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., including 5 CFR part 2635, which includes, among other provisions, the principle stated at 5 CFR 2635.101(b... business activities. 7001.102 Section 7001.102 Administrative Personnel UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE... Restrictions on outside employment and business activities. (a) Prohibited outside employment and...

  1. 5 CFR 7001.102 - Restrictions on outside employment and business activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., including 5 CFR part 2635, which includes, among other provisions, the principle stated at 5 CFR 2635.101(b... business activities. 7001.102 Section 7001.102 Administrative Personnel UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE... Restrictions on outside employment and business activities. (a) Prohibited outside employment and...

  2. Initial test of an emotional avoidance model of restriction in anorexia nervosa using ecological momentary assessment.

    PubMed

    Haynos, Ann F; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Mitchell, James E; Peterson, Carol B; Crow, Scott J; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    It has been hypothesized that restrictive eating allows individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) to avoid contact with negative emotions; however, this presumption has not been directly tested. In this study, we conducted an initial investigation examining whether restrictive eating serves an emotional avoidance function among individuals with AN. Females with AN (n = 118) reported on negative and positive affect, anxiety/tension, and eating behaviors at multiple time points daily over a 2-week period using ecological momentary assessment methodology. Affective patterns were compared using generalized estimating equation models between days in which participants reported either: (1) relatively high restriction (without binge eating); (2) relatively low restriction (without binge eating); (3) binge eating; or (4) no restriction or binge eating. We hypothesized that, if restriction were functioning to avoid negative affect, average negative affect and anxiety/tension, as well as average negative and positive affect lability, would be lower and average positive affect would be higher on days characterized by high levels of restriction compared to other eating patterns. Contrary to hypotheses: (1) average negative affect, anxiety/tension, and positive affect were not significantly different between days characterized by high restriction and those characterized by low or no restriction; (2) Negative affect and anxiety/tension lability were higher on days characterized by high restriction compared to no restriction or binge eating days; (3) Anxiety/tension lability was higher on days characterized by high versus low levels of restriction. This patterns of findings does not support an avoidance model of restrictive eating for individuals with AN. PMID:26228412

  3. The ribonuclease activity of SAMHD1 is required for HIV-1 restriction

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Jeongmin; Choi, Jongsu; Oh, Changhoon; Kim, Sungchul; Seo, Minji; Kim, Seokyoung; Seo, Daekwan; Kim, Jongkyu; White, Tommy E.; Brandariz-Nunez, Alberto; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A.; Kim, Baek; Baek, Daehyun

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 restriction factor SAMHD11,2 is proposed to inhibit HIV-1 replication by depleting the intracellular dNTP pool3-5. However, the phosphorylation of SAMHD1 regulates its ability to restrict HIV-1 without decreasing cellular dNTP levels6-8, which is not consistent with a role for SAMHD1 dNTPase activity in HIV-1 restriction. Here, we show that SAMHD1 possesses RNase activity and that the RNase but not the dNTPase function is essential for HIV-1 restriction. By enzymatically characterizing Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS)-associated SAMHD1 mutations and mutations in the allosteric dGTP-binding site of SAMHD1, we identify SAMHD1 mutants that are RNase-positive but dNTPase-negative (SAMHD1D137N) or RNase-negative but dNTPase-positive (SAMHD1Q548A). The allosteric mutant SAMHD1D137N is able to restrict HIV-1 infection, whereas the AGS mutant SAMHD1Q548A is defective for HIV-1 restriction. SAMHD1 associates with HIV-1 RNA and degrades it during the early phases of infection. SAMHD1 silencing in macrophages and CD4+ T cells from healthy donors increases HIV-1 RNA stability, rendering the cells permissive for HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of SAMHD1 at T592 negatively regulates its RNase activity in vivo and impedes HIV-1 restriction. Our results reveal that the RNase activity of SAMHD1 is responsible for preventing HIV-1 infection by directly degrading the HIV-1 RNA. PMID:25038827

  4. Effects of Experimental Sleep Restriction on Caloric Intake and Activity Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Calvin, Andrew D.; Carter, Rickey E.; Adachi, Taro; G. Macedo, Paula; Albuquerque, Felipe N.; van der Walt, Christelle; Bukartyk, Jan; Davison, Diane E.; Levine, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic studies link short sleep duration to obesity and weight gain. Insufficient sleep appears to alter circulating levels of the hormones leptin and ghrelin, which may promote appetite, although the effects of sleep restriction on caloric intake and energy expenditure are unclear. We sought to determine the effect of 8 days/8 nights of sleep restriction on caloric intake, activity energy expenditure, and circulating levels of leptin and ghrelin. Methods: We conducted a randomized study of usual sleep vs a sleep restriction of two-thirds of normal sleep time for 8 days/8 nights in a hospital-based clinical research unit. The main outcomes were caloric intake, activity energy expenditure, and circulating levels of leptin and ghrelin. Results: Caloric intake in the sleep-restricted group increased by +559 kcal/d (SD, 706 kcal/d, P = .006) and decreased in the control group by −118 kcal/d (SD, 386 kcal/d, P = .51) for a net change of +677 kcal/d (95% CI, 148-1,206 kcal/d; P = .014). Sleep restriction was not associated with changes in activity energy expenditure (P = .62). No change was seen in levels of leptin (P = .27) or ghrelin (P = .21). Conclusions: Sleep restriction was associated with an increase in caloric consumption with no change in activity energy expenditure or leptin and ghrelin concentrations. Increased caloric intake without any accompanying increase in energy expenditure may contribute to obesity in people who are exposed to long-term sleep restriction. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01334788; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:23392199

  5. A dual active-restrictive approach to incorporating environmental flow targets into existing reservoir operation rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Jenq-Tzong; Wu, Fu-Chun

    2010-08-01

    Environmental flow schemes may be implemented through active or restrictive strategies. The former may be applied via reservoir releases, and the latter can be executed by reducing water demands. We present a dual active-restrictive approach to devising the optimal reservoir operation rules that aim to secure off-stream water supplies while maximizing environmental benefits. For the active part, a multicomponent environmental flow target (including the minimum and monthly flows) is incorporated in the operation rules. For the restrictive counterpart, we use a novel demands partitioning and prioritizing (DPP) approach to reallocating the demands of various sectors. The DPP approach partitions the existing off-stream demand and newly incorporated environmental demand and reassembles the two as the first- and second-priority demands. Water is reallocated to each demand according to the ratios derived from the prioritized demands. The proposed approach is coupled with a multicriteria optimization framework to seek the optimal operation rules for the existing Feitsui Reservoir system (Taiwan) under various scenarios. The best overall performance is achieved by an optimal dual strategy whose operational parameters are all determined by optimization. The optimal environmental flow target may well be a top-priority constant base flow rather than the variable quantities. The active strategy would outperform the restrictive one. For the former, a top-priority base flow target is essential; for the latter, the off-stream demand can become vanishingly small in compensation for the eliminated base flow target, thus promoting the monthly flow target as nearly the top-priority demand. For either the active or restrictive strategy, a prioritized environmental flow demand would provide a path toward the optimal overall performance. A significantly improved overall performance over the existing operation rules is unlikely if the active and restrictive parameters are both favorable

  6. Efficacy of physical activity counseling plus sleep restriction therapy on the patients with chronic insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jihui; Yin, Guangxia; Li, Guanying; Liang, Wenjing; Wei, Qinling

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lack of physical activity (PA) is common in patients with chronic insomnia. Studies to increase PA and decrease sedentary behavior in those patients are limited. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of “PA counseling combined with sleep restriction (SR) therapy (PASR)” vs only SR in the patients with chronic insomnia. Methods Seventy-one outpatients were assigned to either PASR (n=35), consisting of four weekly PA counseling sessions based on 5A model (assess, advise, agree, assist, and arrange) + SR, or SR (n=36), consisting of four weekly SR. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (Chinese version) and pedometer-based daily steps were evaluated as the primary endpoints. Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Scale-14, and Sleep Diary were evaluated as the secondary endpoints. Results The results showed that the patients in the PASR group gained more benefits than the SR group in terms of PA level and pedometer-based daily steps (all P<0.05). Better improvements of the study group were also shown in Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Scale-14, and Sleep efficiency (all P<0.05). Conclusion We conclude that PA counseling based on 5A model combined with SR cannot only effectively increase the PA levels but also improve the sleep quality for patients with chronic insomnia. PMID:26566369

  7. Activation of individual L1 retrotransposon instances is restricted to cell-type dependent permissive loci

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, Claude; Vargas-Landin, Dulce B; Doucet, Aurélien J; van Essen, Dominic; Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Kuciak, Monika; Corbin, Antoine; Nigumann, Pilvi; Cristofari, Gaël

    2016-01-01

    LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons represent approximately one sixth of the human genome, but only the human-specific L1HS-Ta subfamily acts as an endogenous mutagen in modern humans, reshaping both somatic and germline genomes. Due to their high levels of sequence identity and the existence of many polymorphic insertions absent from the reference genome, the transcriptional activation of individual genomic L1HS-Ta copies remains poorly understood. Here we comprehensively mapped fixed and polymorphic L1HS-Ta copies in 12 commonly-used somatic cell lines, and identified transcriptional and epigenetic signatures allowing the unambiguous identification of active L1HS-Ta copies in their genomic context. Strikingly, only a very restricted subset of L1HS-Ta loci - some being polymorphic among individuals - significantly contributes to the bulk of L1 expression, and these loci are differentially regulated among distinct cell lines. Thus, our data support a local model of L1 transcriptional activation in somatic cells, governed by individual-, locus-, and cell-type-specific determinants. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13926.001 PMID:27016617

  8. Implementing Restricted Maximum Likelihood Estimation in Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Mike W.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) is now a generic modeling framework for many multivariate techniques applied in the social and behavioral sciences. Many statistical models can be considered either as special cases of SEM or as part of the latent variable modeling framework. One popular extension is the use of SEM to conduct linear mixed-effects…

  9. 13 CFR 120.828 - Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations. 120.828 Section 120.828 Business Credit and Assistance... concentrations. (a) A CDC is required to receive SBA approval of at least four 504 loan approvals during...

  10. 13 CFR 120.828 - Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations. 120.828 Section 120.828 Business Credit and Assistance... concentrations. (a) A CDC is required to receive SBA approval of at least four 504 loan approvals during...

  11. 13 CFR 120.828 - Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations. 120.828 Section 120.828 Business Credit and Assistance... concentrations. (a) A CDC is required to receive SBA approval of at least four 504 loan approvals during...

  12. 13 CFR 120.828 - Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations. 120.828 Section 120.828 Business Credit and Assistance... concentrations. (a) A CDC is required to receive SBA approval of at least four 504 loan approvals during...

  13. 13 CFR 120.828 - Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations. 120.828 Section 120.828 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development Company Loan Program (504) Requirements for Cdc Certification and Operation §...

  14. Korean Children's Evaluation of Parental Restrictions Regarding Gender-Stereotypic Peer Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Yoonjung; Lee-Kim, Jennie; Killen, Melanie; Park, Kyoungja; Kim, Jihyun

    2012-01-01

    Korean children's evaluations of parental restrictions of children's activities based on gender stereotypic expectations were investigated. Third and sixth grade Korean (N = 128) children evaluated scenarios in which a boy or girl desired to play ballet or soccer. Participants used stereotypes to support children's desires to play…

  15. AMP Activated Protein Kinase Is Indispensable for Myocardial Adaptation to Caloric Restriction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Kobayashi, Satoru; Xu, Xianmin; Viollet, Benoit; Liang, Qiangrong

    2013-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is a robust dietary intervention known to enhance cardiovascular health. AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been suggested to mediate the cardioprotective effects of CR. However, this hypothesis remains to be tested by using definitive loss-of-function animal models. In the present study, we subjected AMPKα2 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates to a CR regimen that reduces caloric intake by 20%–40% for 4 weeks. CR decreased body weight, heart weight and serum levels of insulin in both WT and KO mice to the same degree, indicating the effectiveness of the CR protocol. CR activated cardiac AMPK signaling in WT mice, but not in AMPKα2 KO mice. Correspondingly, AMPKα2 KO mice had markedly reduced cardiac function during CR as determined by echocardiography and hemodynamic measurements. The compromised cardiac function was associated with increased markers of oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and myocyte apoptosis. Mechanistically, CR down-regulated the expression of ATP5g2, a subunit of mitochondrial ATP synthase, and reduced ATP content in AMPKα2 KO hearts, but not in WT hearts. In addition, CR accelerated cardiac autophagic flux in WT mice, but failed to do so in AMPKα2 KO mice. These results demonstrated that without AMPK, CR triggers adverse effects that can lead to cardiac dysfunction, suggesting that AMPK signaling pathway is indispensible for energy homeostasis and myocardial adaptation to CR, a dietary intervention that normally produces beneficial cardiac effects. PMID:23527250

  16. Restrictive pattern on spirometry: association with cardiovascular risk and level of physical activity in asymptomatic adults

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Arantes, Rodolfo Leite; Matheus, Agatha Caveda; da Silva, Rodrigo Pereira; Lauria, Vinícius Tonon; Romiti, Marcello; Gagliardi, Antônio Ricardo de Toledo; Dourado, Victor Zuniga

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To determine whether a restrictive pattern on spirometry is associated with the level of physical activity in daily life (PADL), as well as with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in asymptomatic adults. Methods : A total of 374 participants (mean age, 41 ± 14 years) underwent spirometry, which included the determination of FVC and FEV1. A restrictive pattern on spirometry was defined as an FEV1/FVC ratio > 0.7 and an FVC < 80% of the predicted value. After conducting demographic, anthropometric, and CVD risk assessments, we evaluated body composition, muscle function, and postural balance, as well as performing cardiopulmonary exercise testing and administering the six-minute walk test. The PADL was quantified with a triaxial accelerometer. Results : A restrictive pattern on spirometry was found in 10% of the subjects. After multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for confounders (PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness), the following variables retained significance (OR; 95% CI) as predictors of a restrictive pattern: systemic arterial hypertension (17.5; 1.65-184.8), smoking (11.6; 1.56-87.5), physical inactivity (8.1; 1.43-46.4), larger center-of-pressure area while standing on a force platform (1.34; 1.05-1.71); and dyslipidemia (1.89; 1.12-1.98). Conclusions : A restrictive pattern on spirometry appears to be common in asymptomatic adults. We found that CVD risk factors, especially systemic arterial hypertension, smoking, and physical inactivity, were directly associated with a restrictive pattern, even when the analysis was adjusted for PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness. Longitudinal studies are needed in order to improve understanding of the etiology of a restrictive pattern as well as to aid in the design of preventive strategies. PMID:26982037

  17. Activity restriction and the mechanistic basis for extinctions under climate warming.

    PubMed

    R Kearney, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Correlative analyses predict that anthropogenic climate warming will cause widespread extinction but the nature and generality of the underlying mechanisms is unclear. Warming-induced activity restriction has been proposed as a general explanatory mechanism for recent population extinctions in lizards, and has been used to forecast future extinction. Here, I test this hypothesis using globally applied biophysical calculations of the effects of warming and shade reduction on potential activity time and whole-life-cycle energy budgets. These 'thermodynamic niche' analyses show that activity restriction from climate warming is unlikely to provide a general explanation of recent extinctions, and that loss of shade is viable alternative explanation. Climate warming could cause population declines, even under increased activity potential, through joint impacts on fecundity and mortality rates. However, such responses depend strongly on behaviour, habitat (shade, food) and life history, all of which should be explicitly incorporated in mechanistic forecasts of extinction risk under climate change. PMID:24118740

  18. Interactive Effects of Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Nucleus and Time-Restricted Feeding on Fractal Motor Activity Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lo, Men-Tzung; Chiang, Wei-Yin; Hsieh, Wan-Hsin; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M; Hu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    One evolutionary adaptation in motor activity control of animals is the anticipation of food that drives foraging under natural conditions and is mimicked in laboratory with daily scheduled food availability. Food anticipation is characterized by increased activity a few hours before the feeding period. Here we report that 2-h food availability during the normal inactive phase of rats not only increases activity levels before the feeding period but also alters the temporal organization of motor activity fluctuations over a wide range of time scales from minutes up to 24 h. We demonstrate this multiscale alteration by assessing fractal patterns in motor activity fluctuations-similar fluctuation structure at different time scales-that are robust in intact animals with ad libitum food access but are disrupted under food restriction. In addition, we show that fractal activity patterns in rats with ad libitum food access are also perturbed by lesion of the dorsomedial hypothalamic (DMH)-a neural node that is involved in food anticipatory behavior. Instead of further disrupting fractal regulation, food restriction restores the disrupted fractal patterns in these animals after the DMH lesion despite the persistence of the 24-h rhythms. This compensatory effect of food restriction is more clearly pronounced in the same animals after the additional lesion of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN)-the central master clock in the circadian system that generates and orchestrates circadian rhythms in behavior and physiological functions in synchrony with day-night cycles. Moreover, all observed influences of food restriction persist even when data during the food anticipatory and feeding period are excluded. These results indicate that food restriction impacts dynamics of motor activity at different time scales across the entire circadian/daily cycle, which is likely caused by the competition between the food-induced time cue and the light-entrained circadian rhythm of the SCN. The

  19. Interactive Effects of Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Nucleus and Time-Restricted Feeding on Fractal Motor Activity Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Men-Tzung; Chiang, Wei-Yin; Hsieh, Wan-Hsin; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M.; Hu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    One evolutionary adaptation in motor activity control of animals is the anticipation of food that drives foraging under natural conditions and is mimicked in laboratory with daily scheduled food availability. Food anticipation is characterized by increased activity a few hours before the feeding period. Here we report that 2-h food availability during the normal inactive phase of rats not only increases activity levels before the feeding period but also alters the temporal organization of motor activity fluctuations over a wide range of time scales from minutes up to 24 h. We demonstrate this multiscale alteration by assessing fractal patterns in motor activity fluctuations—similar fluctuation structure at different time scales—that are robust in intact animals with ad libitum food access but are disrupted under food restriction. In addition, we show that fractal activity patterns in rats with ad libitum food access are also perturbed by lesion of the dorsomedial hypothalamic (DMH)—a neural node that is involved in food anticipatory behavior. Instead of further disrupting fractal regulation, food restriction restores the disrupted fractal patterns in these animals after the DMH lesion despite the persistence of the 24-h rhythms. This compensatory effect of food restriction is more clearly pronounced in the same animals after the additional lesion of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN)—the central master clock in the circadian system that generates and orchestrates circadian rhythms in behavior and physiological functions in synchrony with day-night cycles. Moreover, all observed influences of food restriction persist even when data during the food anticipatory and feeding period are excluded. These results indicate that food restriction impacts dynamics of motor activity at different time scales across the entire circadian/daily cycle, which is likely caused by the competition between the food-induced time cue and the light-entrained circadian rhythm of the

  20. The effects of graded levels of calorie restriction: V. Impact of short term calorie and protein restriction on physical activity in the C57BL/6 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sharon E.; Delville, Camille; Konstantopedos, Penelope; Derous, Davina; Green, Cara L.; Wang, Yingchun; Han, Jing-Dong J.; Promislow, Daniel E.L.; Douglas, Alex; Chen, Luonan; Lusseau, David; Speakman, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) delays the onset of age-related disease and extends lifespan in a number of species. When faced with reduced energy supply animals need to lower energy demands, which may be achieved in part by reducing physical activity (PA). We monitored changes in PA using implanted transmitters in male C57BL/6 mice in response to graded levels of CR (10 to 40%) or matched levels of graded protein restriction (PR) for 3 months. Mice were fed at lights out and ad libitum controls were limited to dark-phase feeding (12AL) or 24hr/day. Total daily PA declined in a non-linear manner over the first 30 days of CR or PR, remaining stable thereafter. Total daily PA was not related to the level of CR or PR. Total daily PA over the last 20 days of restriction was related to circulating leptin, insulin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 levels, measured after 3 months. Mice under restriction showed a high level of activity in the 2hrs before feeding (food anticipatory activity: FAA). FAA followed a complex pattern, peaking around day 20, falling on ∼day 37 then increasing again. FAA was also positively related to the level of restriction and inversely to leptin, insulin, TNF-α and IGF-1. Non-FAA, in contrast, declined over the period of restriction, generally more so in mice under greater restriction, thereby offsetting to some extent the increase in FAA. Mice under PR displayed no changes in PA over time or in comparison to 12AL, and showed no increase in FAA. PMID:27007156

  1. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Marques, Marisa; Aveleira, Célia A; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-07-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  2. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation

    PubMed Central

    Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; de Almeida, Luís Pereira; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  3. Interplay of Notch and FGF signaling restricts cell fate and MAPK activation in the Drosophila trachea.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, T; Hayashi, S

    1999-10-01

    The patterned branching in the Drosophila tracheal system is triggered by the FGF-like ligand Branchless that activates a receptor tyrosine kinase Breathless and the MAP kinase pathway. A single fusion cell at the tip of each fusion branch expresses the zinc-finger gene escargot, leads branch migration in a stereotypical pattern and contacts with another fusion cell to mediate fusion of the branches. A high level of MAP kinase activation is also limited to the tip of the branches. Restriction of such cell specialization events to the tip is essential for tracheal tubulogenesis. Here we show that Notch signaling plays crucial roles in the singling out process of the fusion cell. We found that Notch is activated in tracheal cells by Branchless signaling through stimulation of &Dgr; expression at the tip of tracheal branches and that activated Notch represses the fate of the fusion cell. In addition, Notch is required to restrict activation of MAP kinase to the tip of the branches, in part through the negative regulation of Branchless expression. Notch-mediated lateral inhibition in sending and receiving cells is thus essential to restrict the inductive influence of Branchless on the tracheal tubulogenesis. PMID:10498681

  4. Modeling mechanical restriction differences between car and heavy truck in two-lane cellular automata traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Li, Xingang; Xiao, Yao; Jia, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Real traffic is heterogeneous with car and truck. Due to mechanical restrictions, the car and the truck have different limited deceleration capabilities, which are important factors in safety driving. This paper extends the single lane safety driving (SD) model with limited deceleration capability to two-lane SD model, in which car-truck heterogeneous traffic is considered. A car has a larger limited deceleration capability while a heavy truck has a smaller limited deceleration capability as a result of loaded goods. Then the safety driving conditions are different as the types of the following and the leading vehicles vary. In order to eliminate the well-known plug in heterogeneous two-lane traffic, it is assumed that heavy truck has active deceleration behavior when the heavy truck perceives the forming plug. The lane-changing decisions are also determined by the safety driving conditions. The fundamental diagram, spatiotemporal diagram, and lane-changing frequency were investigated to show the effect of mechanical restriction on heterogeneous traffic flow. It was shown that there would be still three traffic phases in heterogeneous traffic condition; the active deceleration of the heavy truck could well eliminate the plug; the lane-changing frequency was low in synchronized flow; the flow and velocity would decrease as the proportion of heavy truck grows or the limited deceleration capability of heavy truck drops; and the flow could be improved with lane control measures.

  5. A Generalized Model with Internal Restrictions on Item Difficulty for Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Jin, Kuan-Yu

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors extend the standard item response model with internal restrictions on item difficulty (MIRID) to fit polytomous items using cumulative logits and adjacent-category logits. Moreover, the new model incorporates discrimination parameters and is rooted in a multilevel framework. It is a nonlinear mixed model so that existing…

  6. Inverse problem for the current loop model: Possibilities and restrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, I. M.; Farafonova, Yu. G.

    2016-07-01

    The possibilities of determining arbitrary current loop parameters based on the spatial structures of the magnetic field components generated by this loop on a sphere with a specified radius have been considered with the use of models. The model parameters were selected such that anomalies created by current loops on a sphere with a radius of 6378 km would be comparable in value with the different-scale anomalies of the observed main geomagnetic field (MGF). The least squares method was used to solve the inverse problem. Estimates close to the specified values were obtained for all current loop parameters except the current strength and radius. The radius determination error can reach ±120 km; at the same time, the magnetic moment value is determined with an accuracy of ±1%. The resolvability of the current force and radius can to a certain degree be improved by decreasing the observation sphere radius such that the ratio of the source distance to the current loop radius would be at least smaller than eight, which can be difficult to reach when modeling MGF.

  7. Defining the Range of Pathogens Susceptible to Ifitm3 Restriction Using a Knockout Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Everitt, Aaron R.; Clare, Simon; McDonald, Jacqueline U.; Kane, Leanne; Harcourt, Katherine; Ahras, Malika; Lall, Amar; Hale, Christine; Rodgers, Angela; Young, Douglas B.; Haque, Ashraful; Billker, Oliver; Tregoning, John S.; Dougan, Gordon; Kellam, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) family of proteins has been shown to restrict a broad range of viruses in vitro and in vivo by halting progress through the late endosomal pathway. Further, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in its sequence have been linked with risk of developing severe influenza virus infections in humans. The number of viruses restricted by this host protein has continued to grow since it was first demonstrated as playing an antiviral role; all of which enter cells via the endosomal pathway. We therefore sought to test the limits of antimicrobial restriction by Ifitm3 using a knockout mouse model. We showed that Ifitm3 does not impact on the restriction or pathogenesis of bacterial (Salmonella typhimurium, Citrobacter rodentium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis) or protozoan (Plasmodium berghei) pathogens, despite in vitro evidence. However, Ifitm3 is capable of restricting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in vivo either through directly restricting RSV cell infection, or by exerting a previously uncharacterised function controlling disease pathogenesis. This represents the first demonstration of a virus that enters directly through the plasma membrane, without the need for the endosomal pathway, being restricted by the IFITM family; therefore further defining the role of these antiviral proteins. PMID:24278312

  8. 33 CFR 334.762 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. 334.762 Section 334.762 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.762 Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. (a) The..., Naval Support Activity, Panama City Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  9. 33 CFR 334.762 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. 334.762 Section 334.762 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.762 Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. (a) The..., Naval Support Activity, Panama City Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  10. 33 CFR 334.762 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. 334.762 Section 334.762 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.762 Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. (a) The..., Naval Support Activity, Panama City Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  11. 33 CFR 334.762 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. 334.762 Section 334.762 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.762 Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. (a) The..., Naval Support Activity, Panama City Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  12. 33 CFR 334.762 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. 334.762 Section 334.762 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.762 Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. (a) The..., Naval Support Activity, Panama City Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  13. Caloric restriction blocks neuropathology and motor deficits in Machado–Joseph disease mouse models through SIRT1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Santos, Janete; Duarte-Neves, Joana; Carmona, Vitor; Guarente, Leonard; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Machado–Joseph disease (MJD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by an abnormal expansion of the CAG triplet in the ATXN3 gene, translating into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein. The available treatments only ameliorate symptomatology and do not block disease progression. In this study we find that caloric restriction dramatically rescues the motor incoordination, imbalance and the associated neuropathology in transgenic MJD mice. We further show that caloric restriction rescues SIRT1 levels in transgenic MJD mice, whereas silencing SIRT1 is sufficient to prevent the beneficial effects on MJD pathology. In addition, the re-establishment of SIRT1 levels in MJD mouse model, through the gene delivery approach, significantly ameliorates neuropathology, reducing neuroinflammation and activating autophagy. Furthermore, the pharmacological activation of SIRT1 with resveratrol significantly reduces motor incoordination of MJD mice. The pharmacological SIRT1 activation could provide important benefits to treat MJD patients. PMID:27165717

  14. Specific induction of endogenous viral restriction factors using CRISPR/Cas-derived transcriptional activators

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Kornepati, Anand V. R.; Marshall, Joy B.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas several mammalian proteins can restrict the replication of HIV-1 and other viruses, these are often not expressed in relevant target cells. A potential method to inhibit viral replication might therefore be to use synthetic transcription factors to induce restriction factor expression. In particular, mutants of the RNA-guided DNA binding protein Cas9 that have lost their DNA cleavage activity could be used to recruit transcription activation domains to specific promoters. However, initial experiments revealed only weak activation unless multiple promoter-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were used. Recently, the recruitment of multiple transcription activation domains by a single sgRNA, modified to contain MS2-derived stem loops that recruit fusion proteins consisting of the MS2 coat protein linked to transcription activation domains, was reported to induce otherwise silent cellular genes. Here, we demonstrate that such “synergistic activation mediators” can induce the expression of two restriction factors, APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3B (A3B), in human cells that normally lack these proteins. We observed modest activation of endogenous A3G or A3B expression using single sgRNAs but high expression when two sgRNAs were used. Whereas the induced A3G and A3B proteins both blocked infection by an HIV-1 variant lacking a functional vif gene by inducing extensive dC-to-dU editing, only the induced A3B protein inhibited wild-type HIV-1. These data demonstrate that Cas9-derived transcriptional activators have the potential to be used for screens for endogenous genes that affect virus replication and raise the possibility that synthetic transcription factors might prove clinically useful if efficient delivery mechanisms could be developed. PMID:26668372

  15. Specific induction of endogenous viral restriction factors using CRISPR/Cas-derived transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Kornepati, Anand V R; Marshall, Joy B; Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-12-29

    Whereas several mammalian proteins can restrict the replication of HIV-1 and other viruses, these are often not expressed in relevant target cells. A potential method to inhibit viral replication might therefore be to use synthetic transcription factors to induce restriction factor expression. In particular, mutants of the RNA-guided DNA binding protein Cas9 that have lost their DNA cleavage activity could be used to recruit transcription activation domains to specific promoters. However, initial experiments revealed only weak activation unless multiple promoter-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were used. Recently, the recruitment of multiple transcription activation domains by a single sgRNA, modified to contain MS2-derived stem loops that recruit fusion proteins consisting of the MS2 coat protein linked to transcription activation domains, was reported to induce otherwise silent cellular genes. Here, we demonstrate that such "synergistic activation mediators" can induce the expression of two restriction factors, APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3B (A3B), in human cells that normally lack these proteins. We observed modest activation of endogenous A3G or A3B expression using single sgRNAs but high expression when two sgRNAs were used. Whereas the induced A3G and A3B proteins both blocked infection by an HIV-1 variant lacking a functional vif gene by inducing extensive dC-to-dU editing, only the induced A3B protein inhibited wild-type HIV-1. These data demonstrate that Cas9-derived transcriptional activators have the potential to be used for screens for endogenous genes that affect virus replication and raise the possibility that synthetic transcription factors might prove clinically useful if efficient delivery mechanisms could be developed. PMID:26668372

  16. Restricted psychological horizon in active methamphetamine users: future, past, probability, and social discounting

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Richard; Carter, Anne E.; Landes, Reid D.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine users (MAU) exhibit an exaggerated bias for immediate rewards that reflects a restricted time horizon, where outcomes in the future are excessively discounted. An accumulating literature indicates that time in the future shares features with other dimensions of psychological distances including time in the past probability, and social distance, suggesting that bias for immediacy may be reducible to a more general restriction of psychological horizon. The purpose of the present study was to explore generalized restricted psychological horizon in active MAU by assessing future, past, probability, and social discounting. Compared with nonusing controls, MAU preferred psychologically proximal outcomes, resulting in higher rates for all types of discounting, which supports the conceptualization that MAU insufficiently integrate outcomes of psychological distance (i.e. in the future, the past, probabilistic, for others) into the valuation of current behavioral alternatives. The present results are suggestive of a more fundamental process of problematic decision-making associated with methamphetamine use, indicating the necessity of more comprehensive approaches to address the generalized limitations of restricted psychological horizon. PMID:22743602

  17. Exercise performance, core temperature, and metabolism after prolonged restricted activity and retraining in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Pohoska, E.; Turlejska, E.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Kozlowski, S.

    1992-01-01

    Physiological effects of restricted activity (RA) and subsequent retraining have been studied. Ten male mongrel dogs performed a submaximal exercise endurance test on a treadmill during kennel control, after 8 weeks of cage confinement and after eight weeks of retraining using the same treadmill protocol 1 h/d for 6 d/week. Data obtained show that RA reduces exercise endurance, the effectiveness of exercise thermoregulation, muscle glycogen stores, and the lipolytic response to exercise and to noradrenaline stimulation.

  18. A ranking efficiency unit by restrictions using DEA models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsad, Roslah; Abdullah, Mohammad Nasir; Alias, Suriana

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a comparison regarding the efficiency shares of listed companies in Bursa Malaysia was made, through the application of estimation method of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). In this study, DEA is used to measure efficiency shares of listed companies in Bursa Malaysia in terms of the financial performance. It is believed that only good financial performer will give a good return to the investors in the long run. The main objectives were to compute the relative efficiency scores of the shares in Bursa Malaysia and rank the shares based on Balance Index with regard to relative efficiency. The methods of analysis using Alirezaee and Afsharian's model were employed to this study; where the originality of Charnes, Cooper and Rhode model (CCR) with assumption of constant return to scale (CRS) still holds. This method of ranking relative efficiency of decision making units (DMUs) was value-added by using Balance Index. From the result, the companies that were recommended for investors based on ranking were NATWIDE, YTL and MUDA. These companies were the top three efficient companies with good performance in 2011 whereas in 2012 the top three companies were NATWIDE, MUDA and BERNAS.

  19. Modeling and Control of Airport Queueing Dynamics under Severe Flow Restrictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Francis; Evans, Antony; Clarke, John-Paul; Deron, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Based on field observations and interviews with controllers at BOS and EWR, we identify the closure of local departure fixes as the most severe class of airport departure restrictions. A set of simple queueing dynamics and traffic rules are developed to model departure traffic under such restrictions. The validity of the proposed model is tested via Monte Carlo simulation against 10 hours of actual operations data collected during a case-study at EWR on June 29,2000. In general, the model successfully reproduces the aggregate departure congestion. An analysis of the average error over 40 simulation runs indicates that flow-rate restrictions also significantly impact departure traffic; work is underway to capture these effects. Several applications and what-if scenarios are discussed for future evaluation using the calibrated model.

  20. Inhibition of Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth by Ketogenic Diet and/or Calorie Restriction in a CD1-Nu Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Morscher, Raphael Johannes; Aminzadeh-Gohari, Sepideh; Feichtinger, René Gunther; Mayr, Johannes Adalbert; Lang, Roland; Neureiter, Daniel; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neuroblastoma is a malignant pediatric cancer derived from neural crest cells. It is characterized by a generalized reduction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet on neuroblastoma tumor growth and monitor potential adaptive mechanisms of the cancer’s oxidative phosphorylation system. Methods Xenografts were established in CD-1 nude mice by subcutaneous injection of two neuroblastoma cell lines having distinct genetic characteristics and therapeutic sensitivity [SH-SY5Y and SK-N-BE(2)]. Mice were randomized to four treatment groups receiving standard diet, calorie-restricted standard diet, long chain fatty acid based ketogenic diet or calorie-restricted ketogenic diet. Tumor growth, survival, metabolic parameters and weight of the mice were monitored. Cancer tissue was evaluated for diet-induced changes of proliferation indices and multiple oxidative phosphorylation system parameters (respiratory chain enzyme activities, western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and mitochondrial DNA content). Results Ketogenic diet and/or calorie restriction significantly reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival in the xenograft model. Neuroblastoma growth reduction correlated with decreased blood glucose concentrations and was characterized by a significant decrease in Ki-67 and phospho-histone H3 levels in the diet groups with low tumor growth. As in human tumor tissue, neuroblastoma xenografts showed distinctly low mitochondrial complex II activity in combination with a generalized low level of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, validating the tumor model. Neuroblastoma showed no ability to adapt its mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity to the change in nutrient supply induced by dietary intervention. Conclusions Our data suggest that targeting the metabolic characteristics of neuroblastoma could open a new front in supporting

  1. Chronic hyperhydration and hematological changes in trained subjects during prolonged restriction of motor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Yaroshenko, Michael N.; Federenko, Youri F.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of a daily intake of fluid and salt supplementation (FSS) on the hemoglobin content of endurance trained athletes during hypokinesia (decreased number of steps from 10,000 to 3000 steps per day). The studies were performed on 30 long-distance runners who had a VO 2max average of 66 ml kg -1 min -1 and were in the age range of 19-24 years. Prior to their exposure to hypokinesia (HK) of 364 days, all volunteers were on an average of 10,000 steps per day. All volunteers were divided into three equal groups: the first group underwent normal ambulatory life (control subjects), the second group was kept under continuous restriction of motor activity (hypokinetic subjects) and the third group was placed under continuous restriction of motor activity and consumed 26 ml water kg -1 body weight daily and 0.1 g sodium chloride kg -1 body weight in the form of supplementation (hyperhydrated subjects). For simulation of the hypokinetic effect, the number of steps taken per day by the second and third groups of volunteers was restricted to an average of 3000. During the hypokinetic period we determined reticulocytes (Rt), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), plasma volume (PV), red blood cell (RBC) mass and VO 2max. In hyperhydrated volunteers the content of Hb and Hct decreased significantly, while PV, RBC mass and Rt count increased significantly. In hypokinetic volunteers Hb and Hct increased, while PV, RBC and Rt decreased significantly. It was concluded that chronic hyperhydration may be used to attentuate an increase in the Hb content of physically conditioned subjects during prolonged restriction of motor activity.

  2. Restricted spatial regression in practice: Geostatistical models, confounding, and robustness under model misspecification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanks, Ephraim M.; Schliep, Erin M.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Hoeting, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    In spatial generalized linear mixed models (SGLMMs), covariates that are spatially smooth are often collinear with spatially smooth random effects. This phenomenon is known as spatial confounding and has been studied primarily in the case where the spatial support of the process being studied is discrete (e.g., areal spatial data). In this case, the most common approach suggested is restricted spatial regression (RSR) in which the spatial random effects are constrained to be orthogonal to the fixed effects. We consider spatial confounding and RSR in the geostatistical (continuous spatial support) setting. We show that RSR provides computational benefits relative to the confounded SGLMM, but that Bayesian credible intervals under RSR can be inappropriately narrow under model misspecification. We propose a posterior predictive approach to alleviating this potential problem and discuss the appropriateness of RSR in a variety of situations. We illustrate RSR and SGLMM approaches through simulation studies and an analysis of malaria frequencies in The Gambia, Africa.

  3. Restricted DCJ-indel model: sorting linear genomes with DCJ and indels

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The double-cut-and-join (DCJ) is a model that is able to efficiently sort a genome into another, generalizing the typical mutations (inversions, fusions, fissions, translocations) to which genomes are subject, but allowing the existence of circular chromosomes at the intermediate steps. In the general model many circular chromosomes can coexist in some intermediate step. However, when the compared genomes are linear, it is more plausible to use the so-called restricted DCJ model, in which we proceed the reincorporation of a circular chromosome immediately after its creation. These two consecutive DCJ operations, which create and reincorporate a circular chromosome, mimic a transposition or a block-interchange. When the compared genomes have the same content, it is known that the genomic distance for the restricted DCJ model is the same as the distance for the general model. If the genomes have unequal contents, in addition to DCJ it is necessary to consider indels, which are insertions and deletions of DNA segments. Linear time algorithms were proposed to compute the distance and to find a sorting scenario in a general, unrestricted DCJ-indel model that considers DCJ and indels. Results In the present work we consider the restricted DCJ-indel model for sorting linear genomes with unequal contents. We allow DCJ operations and indels with the following constraint: if a circular chromosome is created by a DCJ, it has to be reincorporated in the next step (no other DCJ or indel can be applied between the creation and the reincorporation of a circular chromosome). We then develop a sorting algorithm and give a tight upper bound for the restricted DCJ-indel distance. Conclusions We have given a tight upper bound for the restricted DCJ-indel distance. The question whether this bound can be reduced so that both the general and the restricted DCJ-indel distances are equal remains open. PMID:23281630

  4. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism.

    PubMed

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  5. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  6. Calorigenic effect of adrenaline in rats under conditions of restricted motor activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaszewska, L.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Kozlowski, S.

    1980-01-01

    In previous studies, it was demonstrated that long term restricted motor activity in rats induces a decrease in body weight, an increase in release of adrenaline, and a decrease in the release of noradrenaline with the urine, as well as a reduction in activity of the thymus gland and level of thyroxin in the blood. At the same time, a decrease was found in the internal body temperature that was accompanied by an increase in the rate of metabolism in the state of rest. An investigation is presented which attempts to clarify whether the calorigenic effect of adrenaline under conditions of increased metabolism in the period of immobility is exposed to changes.

  7. WRKY6 Transcription Factor Restricts Arsenate Uptake and Transposon Activation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Castrillo, Gabriel; Sánchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; de Lorenzo, Laura; Crevillén, Pedro; Fraile-Escanciano, Ana; TC, Mohan; Mouriz, Alfonso; Catarecha, Pablo; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Olsson, Sanna; Leo del Puerto, Yolanda; Mateos, Isabel; Rojo, Enrique; Hernández, Luis E.; Jarillo, Jose A.; Piñeiro, Manuel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Leyva, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Stress constantly challenges plant adaptation to the environment. Of all stress types, arsenic was a major threat during the early evolution of plants. The most prevalent chemical form of arsenic is arsenate, whose similarity to phosphate renders it easily incorporated into cells via the phosphate transporters. Here, we found that arsenate stress provokes a notable transposon burst in plants, in coordination with arsenate/phosphate transporter repression, which immediately restricts arsenate uptake. This repression was accompanied by delocalization of the phosphate transporter from the plasma membrane. When arsenate was removed, the system rapidly restored transcriptional expression and membrane localization of the transporter. We identify WRKY6 as an arsenate-responsive transcription factor that mediates arsenate/phosphate transporter gene expression and restricts arsenate-induced transposon activation. Plants therefore have a dual WRKY-dependent signaling mechanism that modulates arsenate uptake and transposon expression, providing a coordinated strategy for arsenate tolerance and transposon gene silencing. PMID:23922208

  8. The subtle danger of symmetry restrictions in time series regressions, with application to fertility models.

    PubMed

    Haynes, S E

    1983-10-01

    It is widely known that linear restrictions involve bias. What is not known is that some linear restrictions are especially dangerous for hypothesis testing. For some, the expected value of the restricted coefficient does not lie between (among) the true unconstrained coefficients, which implies that the estimate is not a simple average of these coefficients. In this paper, the danger is examined regarding the additive linear restriction almost universally imposed in statistical research--the restriction of symmetry. Symmetry implies that the response of the dependent variable to a unit decrease in an expanatory variable is identical, but of opposite sign, to the response to a unit increase. The 1st section of the paper demonstrates theoretically that a coefficient restricted by symmetry (unlike coefficients embodying other additive restrictions) is not a simple average of the unconstrained coefficients because the relevant interacted variables are inversly correlated by definition. The next section shows that, under the restriction of symmetry, fertility in Finland from 1885-1925 appears to respond in a prolonged manner to infant mortality (significant and positive with a lag of 4-6 years), suggesting a response to expected deaths. However, unscontrained estimates indicate that this finding is spurious. When the restriction is relaxed, the dominant response is rapid (significant and positive with a lag of 1-2 years) and stronger for declines in mortality, supporting an aymmetric response to actual deaths. For 2 reasons, the danger of the symmetry restriction may be especially pervasive. 1st, unlike most other linear constraints, symmetry is passively imposed merely by ignoring the possibility of asymmetry. 2nd, modles in a wide range of fields--including macroeconomics (e.g., demand for money, consumption, and investment models, and the Phillips curve), international economics (e.g., intervention models of central banks), and labor economics (e.g., sticky wage

  9. Synergic chemoprevention with dietary carbohydrate restriction and supplementation of AMPK-activating phytochemicals: the role of SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min-Ah; Ro, Simon Weonsang; Yang, Woo Ick; Cho, Arthur E.H.; Ju, Hye-Lim; Baek, Sinhwa; Chung, Sook In; Kang, Won Jun; Yun, Mijin; Park, Jeon Han

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction or a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) can increase life span in normal cells while inhibiting carcinogenesis. Various phytochemicals also have calorie restriction-mimetic anticancer properties. We investigated whether an isocaloric carbohydrate-restriction diet and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-activating phytochemicals induce synergic tumor suppression. We used a mixture of AMPK-activating phytochemical extracts including curcumin, quercetin, catechins, and resveratrol. Survival analysis was carried out in a B16F10 melanoma model fed a control diet (62.14% kcal carbohydrate, 24.65% kcal protein and 13.2% kcal fat), a control diet with multiple phytochemicals (MP), LCD (16.5, 55.2, and 28.3% kcal, respectively), LCD with multiple phytochemicals (LCDmp), a moderate-carbohydrate diet (MCD, 31.9, 62.4, and 5.7% kcal, respectively), or MCD with phytochemicals (MCDmp). Compared with the control group, MP, LCD, or MCD intervention did not produce survival benefit, but LCDmp (22.80±1.58 vs. 28.00±1.64 days, P=0.040) and MCDmp (23.80±1.08 vs. 30.13±2.29 days, P=0.008) increased the median survival time significantly. Suppression of the IGF-1R/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, activation of the AMPK/SIRT1/LKB1pathway, and NF-κB suppression were the critical tumor-suppression mechanisms. In addition, SIRT1 suppressed proliferation of the B16F10 and A375SM cells under a low-glucose condition. Alterations in histone methylation within Pten and FoxO3a were observed after the MCDmp intervention. In the transgenic liver cancer model developed by hydrodynamic transfection of the HrasG12V and shp53, MCDmp and LCDmp interventions induced significant cancer-prevention effects. Microarray analysis showed that PPARα increased with decreased IL-6 and NF-κB within the hepatocytes after an MCDmp intervention. In conclusion, an isocaloric carbohydrate-restriction diet and natural AMPK-activating agents induce synergistic anticancer effects. SIRT1 acts as a

  10. Modeling Weather Impact on Airport Arrival Miles-in-Trail Restrictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yao; Grabbe, Shon

    2013-01-01

    When the demand for either a region of airspace or an airport approaches or exceeds the available capacity, miles-in-trail (MIT) restrictions are the most frequently issued traffic management initiatives (TMIs) that are used to mitigate these imbalances. Miles-intrail operations require aircraft in a traffic stream to meet a specific inter-aircraft separation in exchange for maintaining a safe and orderly flow within the stream. This stream of aircraft can be departing an airport, over a common fix, through a sector, on a specific route or arriving at an airport. This study begins by providing a high-level overview of the distribution and causes of arrival MIT restrictions for the top ten airports in the United States. This is followed by an in-depth analysis of the frequency, duration and cause of MIT restrictions impacting the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL) from 2009 through 2011. Then, machine-learning methods for predicting (1) situations in which MIT restrictions for ATL arrivals are implemented under low demand scenarios, and (2) days in which a large number of MIT restrictions are required to properly manage and control ATL arrivals are presented. More specifically, these predictions were accomplished by using an ensemble of decision trees with Bootstrap aggregation (BDT) and supervised machine learning was used to train the BDT binary classification models. The models were subsequently validated using data cross validation methods. When predicting the occurrence of arrival MIT restrictions under low demand situations, the model was able to achieve over all accuracy rates ranging from 84% to 90%, with false alarm ratios ranging from 10% to 15%. In the second set of studies designed to predict days on which a high number of MIT restrictions were required, overall accuracy rates of 80% were achieved with false alarm ratios of 20%. Overall, the predictions proposed by the model give better MIT usage information than what has been

  11. Electrochemical biosensor modified with dsDNA monolayer for restriction enzyme activity determination.

    PubMed

    Zajda, Joanna; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    A simple and cost effective method for the determination of restriction endonuclease activity is presented. dsDNA immobilized at a gold electrode surface is used as the enzymatic substrate, and an external cationic redox probe is employed in voltammetric measurements for analytical signal generation. The assessment of enzyme activity is based on a decrease of a current signal derived from reduction of methylene blue which is present in the sample solution. For this reason, the covalent attachment of the label molecule is not required which significantly reduces costs of the analysis and simplifies the entire determination procedure. The influence of buffer components on utilized dsDNA/MCH monolayer stability and integrity is also verified. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that due to pinhole formation during enzyme activity measurement the presence of any surfactants should be avoided. Additionally, it is shown that the sensitivity of the electrochemical biosensor can be tuned by changing the restriction site location along the DNA length. Under optimal conditions the proposed biosensor exhibits a linear response toward PvuII activity within a range from 0.25 to 1.50 U/μL. PMID:26859430

  12. Restricting activation-induced cytidine deaminase tumorigenic activity in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Casellas, Rafael; Yamane, Arito; Kovalchuk, Alexander L; Potter, Michael

    2009-03-01

    DNA breaks play an essential role in germinal centre B cells as intermediates to immunoglobulin class switching, a recombination process initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Immunoglobulin gene hypermutation is likewise catalysed by AID but is believed to occur via single-strand DNA breaks. When improperly repaired, AID-mediated lesions can promote chromosomal translocations (CTs) that juxtapose the immunoglobulin loci to heterologous genomic sites, including oncogenes. Two of the most studied translocations are the t(8;14) and T(12;15), which deregulate cMyc in human Burkitt's lymphomas and mouse plasmacytomas, respectively. While a complete understanding of the aetiology of such translocations is lacking, recent studies using diverse mouse models have shed light on two important issues: (1) the extent to which non-specific or AID-mediated DNA lesions promote CTs, and (2) the safeguard mechanisms that B cells employ to prevent AID tumorigenic activity. Here we review these advances and discuss the usage of pristane-induced mouse plasmacytomas as a tool to investigate the origin of Igh-cMyc translocations and B-cell tumorigenesis. PMID:19302140

  13. Universality of (2+1)-dimensional restricted solid-on-solid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelling, Jeffrey; Ódor, Géza; Gemming, Sibylle

    2016-08-01

    Extensive dynamical simulations of restricted solid-on-solid models in D =2 +1 dimensions have been done using parallel multisurface algorithms implemented on graphics cards. Numerical evidence is presented that these models exhibit Kardar-Parisi-Zhang surface growth scaling, irrespective of the step heights N . We show that by increasing N the corrections to scaling increase, thus smaller step-sized models describe better the asymptotic, long-wave-scaling behavior.

  14. Constitutively Active MAVS Inhibits HIV-1 Replication via Type I Interferon Secretion and Induction of HIV-1 Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M.; Issac, Biju; Guirado, Elizabeth; Stone, Geoffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon is known to inhibit HIV-1 replication through the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISG), including a number of HIV-1 restriction factors. To better understand interferon-mediated HIV-1 restriction, we constructed a constitutively active form of the RIG-I adapter protein MAVS. Constitutive MAVS was generated by fusion of full length MAVS to a truncated form of the Epstein Barr virus protein LMP1 (ΔLMP1). Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells contained high levels of type I interferons and inhibited HIV replication in both TZM-bl and primary human CD4+ T cells. Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells also inhibited replication of VSV-G pseudotyped single cycle SIV in TZM-bl cells, suggesting restriction was post-entry and common to both HIV and SIV. Gene array analysis of ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells and trans-activated CD4+ T cells showed significant upregulation of ISG, including previously characterized HIV restriction factors Viperin, Tetherin, MxB, and ISG56. Interferon blockade studies implicated interferon-beta in this response. In addition to direct viral inhibition, ΔLMP1-MAVS markedly enhanced secretion of IFN-β and IL-12p70 by dendritic cells and the activation and maturation of dendritic cells. Based on this immunostimulatory activity, an adenoviral vector (Ad5) expressing ΔLMP1-MAVS was tested as a molecular adjuvant in an HIV vaccine mouse model. Ad5-Gag antigen combined with Ad5-ΔLMP1-MAVS enhanced control of vaccinia-gag replication in a mouse challenge model, with 4/5 animals showing undetectable virus following challenge. Overall, ΔLMP1-MAVS is a promising reagent to inhibit HIV-1 replication in infected tissues and enhance vaccine-mediated immune responses, while avoiding toxicity associated with systemic type I interferon administration. PMID:26849062

  15. The Order-Restricted Association Model: Two Estimation Algorithms and Issues in Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Vermunt, Jeroen K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a row-column (RC) association model in which the estimated row and column scores are forced to be in agreement with a priori specified ordering. Two efficient algorithms for finding the order-restricted maximum likelihood (ML) estimates are proposed and their reliability under different degrees of association is investigated by…

  16. 40 CFR 90.615 - Model year restrictions related to imported engines and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Model year restrictions related to imported engines and equipment. 90.615 Section 90.615 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Importation...

  17. Increasing cleavage specificity and activity of restriction endonuclease KpnI

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Kommireddy; Nagamalleswari, Easa; Zahran, Mai; Imhof, Petra; Xu, Shuang-yong; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chan, Siu-Hong; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2013-01-01

    Restriction enzyme KpnI is a HNH superfamily endonuclease requiring divalent metal ions for DNA cleavage but not for binding. The active site of KpnI can accommodate metal ions of different atomic radii for DNA cleavage. Although Mg2+ ion higher than 500 μM mediates promiscuous activity, Ca2+ suppresses the promiscuity and induces high cleavage fidelity. Here, we report that a conservative mutation of the metal-coordinating residue D148 to Glu results in the elimination of the Ca2+-mediated cleavage but imparting high cleavage fidelity with Mg2+. High cleavage fidelity of the mutant D148E is achieved through better discrimination of the target site at the binding and cleavage steps. Biochemical experiments and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the mutation inhibits Ca2+-mediated cleavage activity by altering the geometry of the Ca2+-bound HNH active site. Although the D148E mutant reduces the specific activity of the enzyme, we identified a suppressor mutation that increases the turnover rate to restore the specific activity of the high fidelity mutant to the wild-type level. Our results show that active site plasticity in coordinating different metal ions is related to KpnI promiscuous activity, and tinkering the metal ion coordination is a plausible way to reduce promiscuous activity of metalloenzymes. PMID:23963701

  18. Constitutive activation of casein kinase 2 in glioblastomas: Absence of class restriction and broad therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Nadege; Willems, Marie; Nguyen-Khac, Minh-Tuan; Kroonen, Jerome; Goffart, Nicolas; Deprez, Manuel; Bours, Vincent; Robe, Pierre A

    2016-06-01

    Casein kinase II contributes to the growth and survival of malignant gliomas and attracts increasing attention as a therapeutic target in these tumors. Several reports have suggested that this strategy might be most relevant for specific subgroups of patients, namely Verhaak's classical and TP53 wild-type tumors. Using kinase assays and microarray genetic profiling in a series of 27 proprietary fresh frozen surgical glioma samples, we showed that constitutive CK2 kinase activation is not restricted to tumors that present increased copy numbers or mRNA expression of its catalytic or regulatory subunits, and can result from a functional activation by various cytokines from the glioma microenvironment. Using corresponding primary tumor and human astrocyte cell cultures as well as glioma cell lines, we confirmed that CK2 inhibition is selectively toxic to malignant glial tumors, without any restriction to tumor class or to TP53 status. We finally showed that while the contribution of CK2 to the constitutive NF-κB hyperactivation in malignant gliomas is at best moderate, a delayed activation of NF-κB may associate with the therapeutic resistance of glioma cells to CK2 inhibition. PMID:27098015

  19. Muscle mitochondrial density after exhaustive exercise in dogs - Prolonged restricted activity and retraining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Philpott, D.; Pohoska, E.; Olszewska, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of exhaustive treadmill exercise on mitochondrial density (MD) and ultrastructural changes in quadriceps femoris muscle was studied in 7 normal, healthy, male mongrel dogs before and after restricted activity (RA) and following a subsequent 2-month exercise retraining period. Mean time to exhaustion in the 2-month group decreased from 177 +/- 11 min before to 90 +/- 16 min after RA; retraining increased tolerance to 219 +/- 36 min above the pre-RA and 143 percent above the post-RA time. Post-RA exhaustion time in the 5-months group was 25 and 45 min. Muscle samples taken after RA showed abnormalities indicative of degeneration, which were reversed by retraining. Resting MD decreased from a control level of 27.8 percent to 14.7 percent and 16.3 percent, and was restored to 27.1 percent after retraining. Exhaustive exercise caused an increase in MD under control conditions and after RA, but not following retraining. Disruption of mitochondria after exercise was evident after 5-month confinement. Factors causing mitochondrial changes and eventually their disruption during exercise after restricted activity are not related as much to the state of fatigue as to the pre-exercise quality of the muscle modified by disease or training.

  20. Relationship between activity limitations and participation restriction in school-aged children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the relationship between activity limitation and participation restriction in school-aged children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Data were collected from 109 children with cerebral palsy aged 6–12 years. Activity limitations were assessed by using functional classification systems including the Korean-Gross Motor Function Classification System, the Korean-Manual Ability Classification System, and the Korean-Communication Function Classification System. Participation restriction was measured using the Korean-Frequency of Participation Questionnaire. Physical or occupational therapists and parents collected the data. [Results] All levels of the functional classification systems were significantly negatively correlated with Korean-Frequency of Participation Questionnaire ratings (r= −0.382 to −0.477). The Korean-Frequency of Participation Questionnaire ratings differed significantly with respect to the functional classification systems; in particular, the differences in the ratings of levels I and V were significant. The Korean-Communication Function Classification System and Korean-Gross Motor Function Classification System were significant predictors of participation, explaining 26.5% of the variance. [Conclusion] Intervention programs are required to promote communication skills and gross motor ability in order to improve the participation of children with cerebral palsy. PMID:26357445

  1. A restricted dimer model on a two-dimensional random causal triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Durhuus, B.; Wheater, J. F.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a restricted hard dimer model on a random causal triangulation that is exactly solvable and generalizes a model recently proposed by Atkin and Zohren (2012 Phys. Lett. B 712 445-50). We show that the latter model exhibits unusual behaviour at its multicritical point; in particular, its Hausdorff dimension equals 3 and not 3/2 as would be expected from general scaling arguments. When viewed as a special case of the generalized model introduced here we show that this behaviour is not generic and therefore is not likely to represent the true behaviour of the full dimer model on a random causal triangulation.

  2. A Natural Polymorphism in rDNA Replication Origins Links Origin Activation with Calorie Restriction and Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Elizabeth X.; Foss, Eric J.; Tsuchiyama, Scott; Alvino, Gina M.; Kruglyak, Leonid; Kaeberlein, Matt; Raghuraman, M. K.; Brewer, Bonita J.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Bedalov, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Aging and longevity are complex traits influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control replicative lifespan, we employed an outbred Saccharomyces cerevisiae model, generated by crossing a vineyard and a laboratory strain. The predominant QTL mapped to the rDNA, with the vineyard rDNA conferring a lifespan increase of 41%. The lifespan extension was independent of Sir2 and Fob1, but depended on a polymorphism in the rDNA origin of replication from the vineyard strain that reduced origin activation relative to the laboratory origin. Strains carrying vineyard rDNA origins have increased capacity for replication initiation at weak plasmid and genomic origins, suggesting that inability to complete genome replication presents a major impediment to replicative lifespan. Calorie restriction, a conserved mediator of lifespan extension that is also independent of Sir2 and Fob1, reduces rDNA origin firing in both laboratory and vineyard rDNA. Our results are consistent with the possibility that calorie restriction, similarly to the vineyard rDNA polymorphism, modulates replicative lifespan through control of rDNA origin activation, which in turn affects genome replication dynamics. PMID:23505383

  3. Sleep active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase are active after both acute sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, M R; Kim, Y; Karpova, S A; Winston, S; McCarley, R W; Strecker, R E; Gerashchenko, D

    2013-09-01

    Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) delta power (~0.5-4 Hz), also known as slow wave activity (SWA), is typically enhanced after acute sleep deprivation (SD) but not after chronic sleep restriction (CSR). Recently, sleep-active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were identified and associated with enhanced SWA after short acute bouts of SD (i.e., 6h). However, the relationship between cortical nNOS neuronal activity and SWA during CSR is unknown. We compared the activity of cortical neurons expressing nNOS (via c-Fos and nNOS immuno-reactivity, respectively) and sleep in rats in three conditions: (1) after 18-h of acute SD; (2) after five consecutive days of sleep restriction (SR) (18-h SD per day with 6h ad libitum sleep opportunity per day); (3) and time-of-day matched ad libitum sleep controls. Cortical nNOS neuronal activity was enhanced during sleep after both 18-h SD and 5 days of SR treatments compared to control treatments. SWA and NREM sleep delta energy (the product of NREM sleep duration and SWA) were positively correlated with enhanced cortical nNOS neuronal activity after 18-h SD but not 5days of SR. That neurons expressing nNOS were active after longer amounts of acute SD (18h vs. 6h reported in the literature) and were correlated with SWA further suggest that these cells might regulate SWA. However, since these neurons were active after CSR when SWA was not enhanced, these findings suggest that mechanisms downstream of their activation are altered during CSR. PMID:23685166

  4. A Minimax Network Flow Model for Characterizing the Impact of Slot Restrictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Douglas W.; Patek, Stephen D.; Alexandrov, Natalia; Bass, Ellen J.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for evaluating long-term measures to reduce congestion at airports in the National Airspace System (NAS). This model is constructed with the goal of assessing the global impacts of congestion management strategies, specifically slot restrictions. We develop the Minimax Node Throughput Problem (MINNTHRU), a multicommodity network flow model that provides insight into air traffic patterns when one minimizes the worst-case operation across all airports in a given network. MINNTHRU is thus formulated as a model where congestion arises from network topology. It reflects not market-driven airline objectives, but those of a regulatory authority seeking a distribution of air traffic beneficial to all airports, in response to congestion management measures. After discussing an algorithm for solving MINNTHRU for moderate-sized (30 nodes) and larger networks, we use this model to study the impacts of slot restrictions on the operation of an entire hub-spoke airport network. For both a small example network and a medium-sized network based on 30 airports in the NAS, we use MINNTHRU to demonstrate that increasing the severity of slot restrictions increases the traffic around unconstrained hub airports as well as the worst-case level of operation over all airports.

  5. GTP activator and dNTP substrates of HIV-1 restriction factor SAMHD1 generate a long-lived activated state

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Erik C.; Seamon, Kyle J.; Cravens, Shannen L.; Stivers, James T.

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 restriction factor sterile α-motif/histidine-aspartate domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) is a tetrameric protein that catalyzes the hydrolysis of all dNTPs to the deoxynucleoside and tripolyphosphate, which effectively depletes the dNTP substrates of HIV reverse transcriptase. Here, we establish that SAMHD1 is activated by GTP binding to guanine-specific activator sites (A1) as well as coactivation by substrate dNTP binding to a distinct set of nonspecific activator sites (A2). Combined activation by GTP and dNTPs results in a long-lived tetrameric form of SAMHD1 that persists for hours, even after activating nucleotides are withdrawn from the solution. These results reveal an ordered model for assembly of SAMHD1 tetramer from its inactive monomer and dimer forms, where GTP binding to the A1 sites generates dimer and dNTP binding to the A2 and catalytic sites generates active tetramer. Thus, cellular regulation of active SAMHD1 is not determined by GTP alone but instead, the levels of all dNTPs and the generation of a persistent tetramer that is not in equilibrium with free activators. The significance of the long-lived activated state is that SAMHD1 can remain active long after dNTP pools have been reduced to a level that would lead to inactivation. This property would be important in resting CD4+ T cells, where dNTP pools are reduced to nanomolar levels to restrict infection by HIV-1. PMID:24753578

  6. Rapid restriction enzyme free detection of DNA methyltransferase activity based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Kermani, Hanie Ahmadzade; Hosseini, Morteza; Dadmehr, Mehdi; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    DNA methylation has significant roles in gene regulation. DNA methyltransferase (MTase) enzyme characterizes DNA methylation and also induces an aberrant methylation pattern that is related to many diseases, especially cancers. Thus, it is required to develop a method to detect the DNA MTase activity. In this study, we developed a new sensitive and reliable method for methyltransferase activity assay by employing DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA/Ag NCs) without using restriction enzymes. The Ag NCs have been utilized for the determination of M.SssI MTase activity and its inhibition. We designed an oligonucleotide probe which contained an inserted six-cytosine loop as Ag NCs formation template. The changes in fluorescence intensity were monitored to quantify the M.SssI activity. The fluorescence spectra showed a linear decrease in the range of 0.4 to 20 U/ml with a detection limit of 0.1 U/ml, which was significant compared with previous reports. The proposed method was applied successfully for demonstrating the Gentamicin effect as MTase inhibitor. The proposed method showed convenient reproducibility and sensitivity indicating its potential for the determination of methyltransferase activity. PMID:27052776

  7. A Krebs Cycle Component Limits Caspase Activation Rate through Mitochondrial Surface Restriction of CRL Activation.

    PubMed

    Aram, Lior; Braun, Tslil; Braverman, Carmel; Kaplan, Yosef; Ravid, Liat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Arama, Eli

    2016-04-01

    How cells avoid excessive caspase activity and unwanted cell death during apoptotic caspase-mediated removal of large cellular structures is poorly understood. We investigate caspase-mediated extrusion of spermatid cytoplasmic contents in Drosophila during spermatid individualization. We show that a Krebs cycle component, the ATP-specific form of the succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (A-Sβ), binds to and activates the Cullin-3-based ubiquitin ligase (CRL3) complex required for caspase activation in spermatids. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that this interaction occurs on the mitochondrial surface, thereby limiting the source of CRL3 complex activation to the vicinity of this organelle and reducing the potential rate of caspase activation by at least 60%. Domain swapping between A-Sβ and the GTP-specific SCSβ (G-Sβ), which functions redundantly in the Krebs cycle, show that the metabolic and structural roles of A-Sβ in spermatids can be uncoupled, highlighting a moonlighting function of this Krebs cycle component in CRL activation. PMID:27052834

  8. Optimization model for UDWDM-PON deployment based on physical restrictions and asymmetric user's clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, Germán. V.; Hincapié, Roberto C.; Sierra, Javier E.

    2015-09-01

    UDWDM PON is a leading technology oriented to provide ultra-high bandwidth to final users while profiting the physical channels' capability. One of the main drawbacks of UDWDM technique is the fact that the nonlinear effects, like FWM, become stronger due to the close spectral proximity among channels. This work proposes a model for the optimal deployment of this type of networks taking into account the fiber length limitations imposed by physical restrictions related with the fiber's data transmission as well as the users' asymmetric distribution in a provided region. The proposed model employs the data transmission related effects in UDWDM PON as restrictions in the optimization problem and also considers the user's asymmetric clustering and the subdivision of the users region though a Voronoi geometric partition technique. Here it is considered de Voronoi dual graph, it is the Delaunay Triangulation, as the planar graph for resolving the problem related with the minimum weight of the fiber links.

  9. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression Is Restricted to Subsets of Excitatory Pyramidal Glutamatergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Louessard, Morgane; Lacroix, Alexandre; Martineau, Magalie; Mondielli, Gregoire; Montagne, Axel; Lesept, Flavie; Lambolez, Bertrand; Cauli, Bruno; Mothet, Jean-Pierre; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Although the extracellular serine protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is involved in pathophysiological processes such as learning and memory, anxiety, epilepsy, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease, information about its regional, cellular, and subcellular distribution in vivo is lacking. In the present study, we observed, in healthy mice and rats, the presence of tPA in endothelial cells, oligodendrocytes, mastocytes, and ependymocytes, but not in pericytes, microglial cells, and astrocytes. Moreover, blockage of the axo-dendritic transport unmasked tPA expression in neurons of cortical and hippocampal areas. Interestingly, combined electrophysiological recordings, single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunohistological analyses revealed that the presence of tPA is restricted to subsets of excitatory pyramidal glutamatergic neurons. We further evidenced that tPA is stored in synaptobrevin-2-positive glutamatergic synaptic vesicles. Based on all these data, we propose the existence of tPA-ergic neurons in the mature brain. PMID:26377106

  10. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-02

    Here, the most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigatemore » the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. In conclusion, from these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.« less

  11. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells. PMID:26932808

  12. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.

  13. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Murillo L; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J; Bordallo, Heloisa N

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells. PMID:26932808

  14. Amplicon restriction patterns associated with nitrogenase activity of root nodules for selection of superior Myrica seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yanthan, Mhathung; Misra, Arvind K

    2013-11-01

    Trees of Myrica sp. grow abundantly in the forests of Meghalaya, India. These trees are actinorhizal and harbour nitrogen-fixing Frankia in their root nodules and contribute positively towards the enhancement of nitrogen status of forest areas. They can be used in rejuvenation of mine spoils and nitrogen-depleted fallow lands generated due to slash and burn agriculture practiced in the area. We have studied the association of amplicon restriction patterns (ARPs) of Myrica ribosomal RNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and nitrogenase activity of its root nodules. We found that ARPs thus obtained could be used as markers for early screening of seedlings that could support strains of Frankia that fix atmospheric nitrogen more efficiently. PMID:24287658

  15. Influence of age and caloric restriction on liver glycolytic enzyme activities and metabolite concentrations in mice.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, Kevork; Ramsey, Jon J; Weindruch, Richard

    2003-03-01

    The influence of caloric restriction (CR) from 2 months of age on the activities of liver glycolytic enzymes and metabolite levels was studied in young and old mice. Livers were sampled 48 h after the last scheduled feeding time. Old mice on CR showed significant decreases in the activities of all the enzymes studied, except for aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase and phosphoglycerate mutase, which were unchanged. The metabolites glucose, glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, pyruvate and lactate were lower while fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate, 3-phosphoglycerate and phosphoenolpyruvate were increased in old CR. Young mice on CR also showed reduced enzyme activities, except for aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase and enolase which were unchanged when compared with young controls. The metabolites glucose, glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate and pyruvate were decreased when compared with young controls, while phosphoenolpyruvate was increased. Ketone bodies increased (65%) in old, but not young, CR mice while fructose-2,6-bisphosphate decreased in both young (22%) and old CR (28%) mice. The results indicate that decreased hepatic glucose levels in CR mice are associated with decreased enzyme activities but not a uniform decrease in metabolite levels. Increased ketone body levels indicate increased utilization of non-carbohydrate fuels while decreased fructose-2,6-bisphosphate level suggests its importance in the control of glycolysis in CR. PMID:12581789

  16. Synthesis and antioxidant activity of polyhydroxylated trans-restricted 2-arylcinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    Miliovsky, Mitko; Svinyarov, Ivan; Prokopova, Elena; Batovska, Daniela; Stoyanov, Simeon; Bogdanov, Milen G

    2015-01-01

    A series of sixteen polyhydroxylated trans-restricted 2-arylcinnamic acid analogues 3a-p were synthesized through a one-pot reaction between homophthalic anhydrides and various aromatic aldehydes, followed by treatment with BBr3. The structure of the newly synthesized compounds was confirmed by spectroscopic methods and the configuration around the double bond was unequivocally estimated by means of gated decoupling 13C-NMR spectra. It was shown that the trans-cinnamic acid fragment incorporated into the target compounds' structure ensures the cis-configuration of the stilbene backbone and prevents further isomerization along the carbon-carbon double bond. The antioxidant activity of compounds 3a-p was measured against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH●), hydroxyl (OH●) and superoxide (O2●▬) radicals. The results obtained showed that the tested compounds possess higher activities than natural antioxidants such as protocatechuic acid, caffeic acid and gallic acid. Moreover, it was shown that a combination of two different and independently acting fragments of well-known pharmacological profiles into one covalently bonded hybrid molecule evoke a synergistic effect resulting in higher than expected activity. To rationalize the apparent antioxidant activity and to establish the mechanism of action, a SAR analysis and DFT quantum chemical computations were also performed. PMID:25648597

  17. Kremen1 restricts Dkk activity during posterior lateral line development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Hillary F.; Culbertson, Maya D.; Nechiporuk, Alex V.

    2014-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays crucial roles during development and disease. How Wnt signaling is modulated in different in vivo contexts is currently not well understood. Here, we investigate the modulation of Wnt signaling in the posterior lateral line primordium (pLLP), a cohort of ∼100 cells that collectively migrate along the trunk of the zebrafish embryo. The pLLP comprises proliferative progenitor cells and organized epithelial cells that will form the mechanosensory organs of the posterior lateral line. Wnt signaling is active in the leading progenitor zone of the pLLP and restricted from the trailing zone through expression of the secreted Wnt inhibitors dkk1b and dkk2. We have identified a zebrafish strain, krm1nl10, which carries a mutation in the kremen1 gene, a non-obligate co-receptor for the Dkk family of proteins. Previous studies have shown that Kremen1 inhibits Wnt signaling by facilitating internalization of the Kremen1-Dkk-Lrp5/6 complex. Surprisingly, we found that disruption of Kremen1 in the pLLP exhibited molecular and cellular phenotypes associated with a decrease rather than overactivation of Wnt signaling. Transplantation of wild-type cells into the mutant primordia failed to rescue the krm1nl10 phenotype, thus revealing that the effects of Kremen1 loss are non-cell-autonomous. Finally, ectopic expression of Dkk1b-mTangerine protein revealed larger spread of the fusion protein in the mutant primordia compared with the wild type. Based on our data, we propose a novel mechanism in which Kremen1 modulates Wnt activity by restricting the range of secreted Dkk proteins during collective cell migration in the pLLP. PMID:25038040

  18. Kremen1 restricts Dkk activity during posterior lateral line development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Hillary F; Culbertson, Maya D; Nechiporuk, Alex V

    2014-08-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays crucial roles during development and disease. How Wnt signaling is modulated in different in vivo contexts is currently not well understood. Here, we investigate the modulation of Wnt signaling in the posterior lateral line primordium (pLLP), a cohort of ~100 cells that collectively migrate along the trunk of the zebrafish embryo. The pLLP comprises proliferative progenitor cells and organized epithelial cells that will form the mechanosensory organs of the posterior lateral line. Wnt signaling is active in the leading progenitor zone of the pLLP and restricted from the trailing zone through expression of the secreted Wnt inhibitors dkk1b and dkk2. We have identified a zebrafish strain, krm1(nl10), which carries a mutation in the kremen1 gene, a non-obligate co-receptor for the Dkk family of proteins. Previous studies have shown that Kremen1 inhibits Wnt signaling by facilitating internalization of the Kremen1-Dkk-Lrp5/6 complex. Surprisingly, we found that disruption of Kremen1 in the pLLP exhibited molecular and cellular phenotypes associated with a decrease rather than overactivation of Wnt signaling. Transplantation of wild-type cells into the mutant primordia failed to rescue the krm1(nl10) phenotype, thus revealing that the effects of Kremen1 loss are non-cell-autonomous. Finally, ectopic expression of Dkk1b-mTangerine protein revealed larger spread of the fusion protein in the mutant primordia compared with the wild type. Based on our data, we propose a novel mechanism in which Kremen1 modulates Wnt activity by restricting the range of secreted Dkk proteins during collective cell migration in the pLLP. PMID:25038040

  19. Deterministic Modelling of BAK Activation Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grills, C.; Chacko, A.; Crawford, N.; Johnston, P. G.; Fennell, D. A.; O'Rourke, S. F. C.

    2009-08-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying mitochondrial BAK activation during apoptosis remains highly controversial. Two seemingly conflicting models have been proposed. In the activation model, BAK requires so-called activating BH3 only proteins (aBH3) to initiate its conformation change. In the other, displacement from inhibitory pro-survival BCL-2 proteins (PBPs) and monomerization of BAK by PBP restricted dissociator BH3-only proteins (dBH3) is sufficient. To better understand the kinetic implications of these models and reconcile these conflicting but highly evidence-based models, we have employed dynamical systems analysis to explore the kinetics underlying BAK activation as a non-linear reaction system. Our findings accommodate both pure agonism and dissociation as mutually exclusive mechanisms capable of initiating BAK activation. In addition we find our work supports a modelling based approach for predicting resistance to therapeutically relevant small molecules BH3 mimetics.

  20. A spectroscopic method to determine the activity of the restriction endonuclease EcoRV that involves a single reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Quiñones, Edwin

    2016-03-15

    A one-step protocol is presented to determine the activity of EcoRV as a model of restriction enzymes. The protocol involved a molecular beacon as DNA substrate, with the target sequence recognized by EcoRV in the stem. EcoRV cleaved the stem forming two fragments, one of which contained the fluorophore and quencher, initially bound by 3 bp. This shorter fragment rapidly dissociated at 37 °C, causing an increase of fluorescence intensity that was used to gauge the reaction kinetics. The reaction can be described using the Michaelis-Menten mechanism, and the kinetic parameters obtained were compared with literature values involving other protocols. PMID:18489897

  1. Setdb1 maintains hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells by restricting the ectopic activation of nonhematopoietic genes.

    PubMed

    Koide, Shuhei; Oshima, Motohiko; Takubo, Keiyo; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Nitta, Eriko; Saraya, Atsunori; Aoyama, Kazumasa; Kato, Yuko; Miyagi, Satoru; Nakajima-Takagi, Yaeko; Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Matsui, Hirotaka; Arai, Fumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Suda, Toshio; Shinkai, Yoichi; Iwama, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Setdb1, also known as Eset, is a methyltransferase that catalyzes trimethylation of H3K9 (H3K9me3) and plays an essential role in the silencing of endogenous retroviral elements (ERVs) in the developing embryo and embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Its role in somatic stem cells, however, remains unclear because of the early death of Setdb1-deficient embryos. We demonstrate here that Setdb1 is the first H3K9 methyltransferase shown to be essential for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in mice. The deletion of Setdb1 caused the rapid depletion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), as well as leukemic stem cells. In contrast to ESCs, ERVs were largely repressed in Setdb1-deficient HSPCs. A list of nonhematopoietic genes was instead ectopically activated in HSPCs after reductions in H3K9me3 levels, including key gluconeogenic enzyme genes fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase 1 (Fbp1) and Fbp2 The ectopic activation of gluconeogenic enzymes antagonized glycolysis and impaired ATP production, resulting in a compromised repopulating capacity of HSPCs. Our results demonstrate that Setdb1 maintains HSPCs by restricting the ectopic activation of nonhematopoietic genes detrimental to their function and uncover that the gluconeogenic pathway is one of the critical targets of Setdb1 in HSPCs. PMID:27301860

  2. Effect of restricted motion in high temperature on enzymatic activity of the pancreas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdusattarov, A.; Smirnova, G. I.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of 30 day hypodynamia coupled with high temperature (35-36 C) on enzymatic activity of the pancreas of male adult rats were studied. The test animals were divided into four groups. Group one served as controls (freedom of movement and a temperature of 25-26 C, considered optimal). The remaining animals were divided into three additional groups: Group two freedom of movement but high temperature (35-36 C); group three hypodynamia but an optimal temperature; group four hypodynamia and 35-36 C. Considerable change in the enzymatic activity in the pancreas of the four groups is observed in three experimental groups (two, three, and four) as compared to the control (group one). The results indicate that adaption of the organism to the thermal factor and restricted movement is accompanied by a change in the enzymatic spectrum of the pancreas. With the combined effect of these two stresses under conditions of the adaption of the organism especially sharp shifts occur in the enzymatic activity.

  3. Dietary salt restriction activates mineralocorticoid receptor signaling in volume-overloaded heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tatsuhiko; Kurumazuka, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Chika; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Kimura, Sayaka; Kitada, Kento; Kobayashi, Kana; Matsuda, Hirohisa; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kitaura, Yasushi; Matsumura, Yasuo

    2009-11-25

    Whether a high plasma aldosterone concentration induced by strict salt restriction promotes cardiac remodeling remains controversial. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at 10weeks of age were given normal salt (NS) (1.5% NaCl) or low salt (LS) (0.05% NaCl) diets. Each animal underwent aortocaval fistula creation for volume-overloaded heart failure or sham surgery. All rats with a fistula received either vehicle or a non-hypotensive dose of spironolactone (200mg/kg/day) by gavage. Two weeks later, the LS diet significantly increased the plasma aldosterone level in the sham-operated and fistula-created rats (2677+/-662pg/ml and 2406+/-422pg/ml) compared with that in rats given the NS diet (518+/-18pg/ml and 362+/-45pg/ml, respectively). In sham-operated rats, the difference in plasma aldosterone level did not affect the extent of myocardial fibrosis (1.8+/-0.1% with LS diet vs. 1.5+/-0.3% with NS diet). However, the increase in myocardial fibrosis in fistula-created rats was more prominent with the LS diet than with the NS diet (4.7+/-0.3% vs. 3.4+/-0.1%). In addition, the fistula-created rats on the LS diet expressed significantly increased oxidative stress and transforming growth factor-beta compared with those on the NS diets (P<0.05). These increases in the fistula-created rats on the LS diet were significantly suppressed by the non-hypotensive dose of spironolactone (P<0.05). These results suggest that increased plasma aldosterone level with strict salt restriction activated the mineralocorticoid receptor signaling in volume-overloaded condition, resulting in increased myocardial fibrosis. PMID:19766104

  4. Projected Impact of Salt Restriction on Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in China: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Coxson, Pamela G.; Penko, Joanne; Goldman, Lee; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Zhao, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the effects of achieving China’s national goals for dietary salt (NaCl) reduction or implementing culturally-tailored dietary salt restriction strategies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. Methods The CVD Policy Model was used to project blood pressure lowering and subsequent downstream prevented CVD that could be achieved by population-wide salt restriction in China. Outcomes were annual CVD events prevented, relative reductions in rates of CVD incidence and mortality, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained, and CVD treatment costs saved. Results Reducing mean dietary salt intake to 9.0 g/day gradually over 10 years could prevent approximately 197 000 incident annual CVD events [95% uncertainty interval (UI): 173 000–219 000], reduce annual CVD mortality by approximately 2.5% (2.2–2.8%), gain 303 000 annual QALYs (278 000–329 000), and save approximately 1.4 billion international dollars (Int$) in annual CVD costs (Int$; 1.2–1.6 billion). Reducing mean salt intake to 6.0 g/day could approximately double these benefits. Implementing cooking salt-restriction spoons could prevent 183 000 fewer incident CVD cases (153 000–215 000) and avoid Int$1.4 billion in CVD treatment costs annually (1.2–1.7 billion). Implementing a cooking salt substitute strategy could lead to approximately three times the health benefits of the salt-restriction spoon program. More than three-quarters of benefits from any dietary salt reduction strategy would be realized in hypertensive adults. Conclusion China could derive substantial health gains from implementation of population-wide dietary salt reduction policies. Most health benefits from any dietary salt reduction program would be realized in adults with hypertension. PMID:26840409

  5. Common mechanisms for calorie restriction and adenylyl cyclase type 5 knockout models of longevity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Park, Ji Yeon; Dillinger, Jean-Guillaume; De Lorenzo, Mariana S; Yuan, Chujun; Lai, Lo; Wang, Chunbo; Ho, David; Tian, Bin; Stanley, William C; Auwerx, Johan; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2012-12-01

    Adenylyl cyclase type 5 knockout mice (AC5 KO) live longer and are stress resistant, similar to calorie restriction (CR). AC5 KO mice eat more, but actually weigh less and accumulate less fat compared with WT mice. CR applied to AC5 KO results in rapid decrease in body weight, metabolic deterioration, and death. These data suggest that despite restricted food intake in CR, but augmented food intake in AC5 KO, the two models affect longevity and metabolism similarly. To determine shared molecular mechanisms, mRNA expression was examined genome-wide for brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and liver. Significantly more genes were regulated commonly rather than oppositely in all the tissues in both models, indicating commonality between AC5 KO and CR. Gene ontology analysis identified many significantly regulated, tissue-specific pathways shared by the two models, including sensory perception in heart and brain, muscle function in skeletal muscle, and lipid metabolism in liver. Moreover, when comparing gene expression changes in the heart under stress, the glutathione regulatory pathway was consistently upregulated in the longevity models but downregulated with stress. In addition, AC5 and CR shared changes in genes and proteins involved in the regulation of longevity and stress resistance, including Sirt1, ApoD, and olfactory receptors in both young- and intermediate-age mice. Thus, the similarly regulated genes and pathways in AC5 KO and CR mice, particularly related to the metabolic phenotype, suggest a unified theory for longevity and stress resistance. PMID:23020244

  6. Self-sustaining turbulence in a restricted nonlinear model of plane Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Vaughan L.; Gayme, Dennice F.; Lieu, Binh K.; Jovanović, Mihailo R.; Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.

    2014-10-15

    This paper demonstrates the maintenance of self-sustaining turbulence in a restricted nonlinear (RNL) model of plane Couette flow. The RNL system is derived directly from the Navier-Stokes equations and permits higher resolution studies of the dynamical system associated with the stochastic structural stability theory (S3T) model, which is a second order approximation of the statistical state dynamics of the flow. The RNL model shares the dynamical restrictions of the S3T model but can be easily implemented by reducing a DNS code so that it retains only the RNL dynamics. Comparisons of turbulence arising from DNS and RNL simulations demonstrate that the RNL system supports self-sustaining turbulence with a mean flow as well as structural and dynamical features that are consistent with DNS. These results demonstrate that the simplified RNL system captures fundamental aspects of fully developed turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows and motivate use of the RNL/S3T framework for further study of wall-turbulence.

  7. Cost and sensitivity of restricted active-space calculations of metal L-edge X-ray absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Pinjari, Rahul V; Delcey, Mickaël G; Guo, Meiyuan; Odelius, Michael; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-02-15

    The restricted active-space (RAS) approach can accurately simulate metal L-edge X-ray absorption spectra of first-row transition metal complexes without the use of any fitting parameters. These characteristics provide a unique capability to identify unknown chemical species and to analyze their electronic structure. To find the best balance between cost and accuracy, the sensitivity of the simulated spectra with respect to the method variables has been tested for two models, [FeCl6 ](3-) and [Fe(CN)6 ](3-) . For these systems, the reference calculations give deviations, when compared with experiment, of ≤1 eV in peak positions, ≤30% for the relative intensity of major peaks, and ≤50% for minor peaks. When compared with these deviations, the simulated spectra are sensitive to the number of final states, the inclusion of dynamical correlation, and the ionization potential electron affinity shift, in addition to the selection of the active space. The spectra are less sensitive to the quality of the basis set and even a double-ζ basis gives reasonable results. The inclusion of dynamical correlation through second-order perturbation theory can be done efficiently using the state-specific formalism without correlating the core orbitals. Although these observations are not directly transferable to other systems, they can, together with a cost analysis, aid in the design of RAS models and help to extend the use of this powerful approach to a wider range of transition metal systems. PMID:26502979

  8. Restricted active space calculations of L-edge X-ray absorption spectra: From molecular orbitals to multiplet states

    SciTech Connect

    Pinjari, Rahul V.; Delcey, Mickaël G.; Guo, Meiyuan; Lundberg, Marcus; Odelius, Michael

    2014-09-28

    The metal L-edge (2p → 3d) X-ray absorption spectra are affected by a number of different interactions: electron-electron repulsion, spin-orbit coupling, and charge transfer between metal and ligands, which makes the simulation of spectra challenging. The core restricted active space (RAS) method is an accurate and flexible approach that can be used to calculate X-ray spectra of a wide range of medium-sized systems without any symmetry constraints. Here, the applicability of the method is tested in detail by simulating three ferric (3d{sup 5}) model systems with well-known electronic structure, viz., atomic Fe{sup 3+}, high-spin [FeCl{sub 6}]{sup 3−} with ligand donor bonding, and low-spin [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} that also has metal backbonding. For these systems, the performance of the core RAS method, which does not require any system-dependent parameters, is comparable to that of the commonly used semi-empirical charge-transfer multiplet model. It handles orbitally degenerate ground states, accurately describes metal-ligand interactions, and includes both single and multiple excitations. The results are sensitive to the choice of orbitals in the active space and this sensitivity can be used to assign spectral features. A method has also been developed to analyze the calculated X-ray spectra using a chemically intuitive molecular orbital picture.

  9. Surface structures of equilibrium restricted curvature model on two fractal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li-Jian; Tang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Han, Kui; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Xia, Hui; Hao, Da-Peng; Li, Yan

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to probe the effects of the microscopic details of fractal substrates on the scaling of discrete growth models, the surface structures of the equilibrium restricted curvature (ERC) model on Sierpinski arrowhead and crab substrates are analyzed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. These two fractal substrates have the same fractal dimension df, but possess different dynamic exponents of random walk zrw. The results show that the surface structure of the ERC model on fractal substrates are related to not only the fractal dimension df, but also to the microscopic structures of the substrates expressed by the dynamic exponent of random walk zrw. The ERC model growing on the two substrates follows the well-known Family—Vicsek scaling law and satisfies the scaling relations 2α + df asymp z asymp 2zrw. In addition, the values of the scaling exponents are in good agreement with the analytical prediction of the fractional Mullins—Herring equation.

  10. Regulatory models for human embryo cloning: the free market, professional guidelines, and government restrictions.

    PubMed

    Annas, George J

    1994-09-01

    Both experimental and therapeutic uses of the new reproductive technologies have been governed not by the medical ideology of the best interests of patients and their children, but by the market ideology of profit maximization under the guise of "reproductive liberty." Government in our constitutional, democratic society has the authority and obligation to make and enforce reasonable regulations to manage the new reproductive market in order to protect the interests of the public, prospective parents, and their future children. The "cloning" debate provides a useful opportunity to compare and contrast the competing regulatory models of the free market, professional guidelines, and government restrictions. PMID:11645280

  11. Equilibrium-restricted solid-on-solid growth model on fractal substrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bub; Kim, Jin Min

    2009-08-01

    The equilibrium-restricted solid-on-solid growth model on fractal substrates is studied by introducing a fractional Langevin equation. The growth exponent beta and the roughness exponent alpha defined, respectively, by the surface width via W approximately t(beta) and the saturated width via W(sat) approximately L(alpha), L being the system size, were obtained by a power-counting analysis, and the scaling relation 2alpha+d(f)=z(RW) was found to hold. The numerical simulation data on Sierpinski gasket, checkerboard fractal, and critical percolation cluster were found to agree well with the analytical predictions of the fractional Langevin equation. PMID:19792071

  12. Curcumin Mimics the Neurocognitive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Caloric Restriction in a Mouse Model of Midlife Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Susan; Sumien, Nathalie; Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Filipetto, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Dietary curcumin was studied for its potential to decrease adiposity and reverse obesity- associated cognitive impairment in a mouse model of midlife sedentary obesity. We hypothesized that curcumin intake, by decreasing adiposity, would improve cognitive function in a manner comparable to caloric restriction (CR), a weight loss regimen. 15-month-old male C57BL/6 mice were assigned in groups to receive the following dietary regimens for 12 weeks: (i) a base diet (Ain93M) fed ad libitum (AL), (ii) the base diet restricted to 70% of ad libitum (CR) or (iii) the base diet containing curcumin fed AL (1000 mg/kg diet, CURAL). Blood markers of inflammation, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as an indicator of redox stress (GSH: GSSG ratio), were determined at different time points during the treatments, and visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue were measured upon completion of the experiment. After 8 weeks of dietary treatment, the mice were tested for spatial cognition (Morris water maze) and cognitive flexibility (discriminated active avoidance). The CR group showed significant weight loss and reduced adiposity, whereas CURAL mice had stable weight throughout the experiment, consumed more food than the AL group, with no reduction of adiposity. However, both CR and CURAL groups took fewer trials than AL to reach criterion during the reversal sessions of the active avoidance task, suggesting an improvement in cognitive flexibility. The AL mice had higher levels of CRP compared to CURAL and CR, and GSH as well as the GSH: GSSG ratio were increased during curcumin intake, suggesting a reducing shift in the redox state. The results suggest that, independent of their effects on adiposity; dietary curcumin and caloric restriction have positive effects on frontal cortical functions that could be linked to anti-inflammatory or antioxidant actions. PMID:26473740

  13. Tracking the activity-dependent diffusion of synaptic proteins using restricted photoconversion of Dendra2

    PubMed Central

    Cassé, Frédéric; Martin, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Spines are small protrusions on dendritic membranes receiving inputs from axonal termini. They consist in a head connected to the dendritic shaft by a narrow neck and contain multiple synaptic proteins that interact in a coordinated manner to allow for synaptic communication. This process involves many proteins that are moving in and out spines. However, comparing this synaptodendritic movement in basal and stimulated conditions is very challenging. Here we describe an elegant method to measure the activity-dependent diffusion of synaptic proteins using Dendra2 photoconversion. We provide a successful method to obtain Dendra2-photoconverted images and a step-by-step procedure to analyze the data. This live-imaging approach may also apply to investigate the diffusion of proteins across other subcellular compartments or organelles including but not restricted to, nucleus, nucleolus, ER, or vesicular structures. Once the imaging system is set up, data can be acquired in 1–30 min and analyzed in approximately 1–4 h. PMID:26441538

  14. Activation of Nod1 Signaling Induces Fetal Growth Restriction and Death through Fetal and Maternal Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Hisanori; Takada, Hidetoshi; Sakai, Yasunari; Nanishi, Etsuro; Ochiai, Masayuki; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Chen, Si Jing; Matsui, Toshiro; Hara, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR) and death (IUFD) are both serious problems in the perinatal medicine. Fetal vasculopathy is currently considered to account for a pathogenic mechanism of IUGR and IUFD. We previously demonstrated that an innate immune receptor, the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-1 (Nod1), contributed to the development of vascular inflammations in mice at postnatal stages. However, little is known about the deleterious effects of activated Nod1 signaling on embryonic growth and development. We report that administration of FK565, one of the Nod1 ligands, to pregnant C57BL/6 mice induced IUGR and IUFD. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that maternally injected FK565 was distributed to the fetal tissues across placenta. In addition, maternal injection of FK565 induced robust increases in the amounts of CCL2, IL-6, and TNF proteins as well as NO in maternal, placental and fetal tissues. Nod1 was highly expressed in fetal vascular tissues, where significantly higher levels of CCL2 and IL-6 mRNAs were induced with maternal injection of FK565 than those in other tissues. Using Nod1-knockout mice, we verified that both maternal and fetal tissues were involved in the development of IUGR and IUFD. Furthermore, FK565 induced upregulation of genes associated with immune response, inflammation, and apoptosis in fetal vascular tissues. Our data thus provided new evidence for the pathogenic role of Nod1 in the development of IUGR and IUFD at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26880761

  15. p21-activated kinase 1 restricts tonic endocannabinoid signaling in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shuting; Zhou, Zikai; Leung, Celeste; Zhu, Yuehua; Pan, Xingxiu; Qi, Junxia; Morena, Maria; Hill, Matthew N; Xie, Wei; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    PAK1 inhibitors are known to markedly improve social and cognitive function in several animal models of brain disorders, including autism, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We show here that disruption of PAK1 in mice suppresses inhibitory neurotransmission through an increase in tonic, but not phasic, secretion of endocannabinoids (eCB). Consistently, we found elevated levels of anandamide (AEA), but not 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) following PAK1 disruption. This increased tonic AEA signaling is mediated by reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and COX-2 inhibitors recapitulate the effect of PAK1 deletion on GABAergic transmission in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner. These results establish a novel signaling process whereby PAK1 upregulates COX-2, reduces AEA and restricts tonic eCB-mediated processes. Because PAK1 and eCB are both critically involved in many other organ systems in addition to the brain, our findings may provide a unified mechanism by which PAK1 regulates these systems and their dysfunctions including cancers, inflammations and allergies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14653.001 PMID:27296803

  16. p21-activated kinase 1 restricts tonic endocannabinoid signaling in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shuting; Zhou, Zikai; Leung, Celeste; Zhu, Yuehua; Pan, Xingxiu; Qi, Junxia; Morena, Maria; Hill, Matthew N; Xie, Wei; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    PAK1 inhibitors are known to markedly improve social and cognitive function in several animal models of brain disorders, including autism, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We show here that disruption of PAK1 in mice suppresses inhibitory neurotransmission through an increase in tonic, but not phasic, secretion of endocannabinoids (eCB). Consistently, we found elevated levels of anandamide (AEA), but not 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) following PAK1 disruption. This increased tonic AEA signaling is mediated by reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and COX-2 inhibitors recapitulate the effect of PAK1 deletion on GABAergic transmission in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner. These results establish a novel signaling process whereby PAK1 upregulates COX-2, reduces AEA and restricts tonic eCB-mediated processes. Because PAK1 and eCB are both critically involved in many other organ systems in addition to the brain, our findings may provide a unified mechanism by which PAK1 regulates these systems and their dysfunctions including cancers, inflammations and allergies. PMID:27296803

  17. Muscle ultrastructural changes from exhaustive exercise performed after prolonged restricted activity and retraining in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Philpott, D.; Pohoska, E.; Olszewska, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of exhaustive treadmill exercise on ultrastructural changes in the quadriceps femoris muscle was studied in 7 normal, healthy dogs, before and after restricted activity (RA), and following a subsequent 2 month treadmill exercise retraining period for the 5 mo group. Mean time to exhaustion in the 2 mo group decreased from 177 + or - 22 min before to 90 + or - 32 min after RA. Retraining increased tolerance to 219 + or - 73 min; 24 pct. above the before RA and 143 pct. above the after RA time. After RA exhaustion time in the 5 mo group was 25 and 45 min. Before RA, pre-exercise muscle structure was normal and post exercise there was only slight swelling of mitochondria. After RA, pre-exercise, numerous glycogen granules and lipid droplets appeared in the muscle fibers, mitochondria were smaller, and sarcoplasmic reticulum channels widened; post exercise these changes were accentuated and some areas were devoid of glycogen, and there was fiber degradation. After 5 mo RA pre-exercise there were more pronounced changes; mitochondria were very small and dense, there were many lipid droplets, myofibrils were often separated, and the fibers appeared edematous and degenerating; post exercise the sarcoplasmic reticulum was swollen, no glycogen was present, and there was marked swelling and deformation of mitochondria. After retraining, both pre-exercise and post exercise there was still evidence of fiber degeneration. Thus, susceptibility of active skeletal muscle structures and subcellular elements, e.g., mitochondria, to the action of damaging factors occurring during exhaustive exercise is enhanced considerably by prolonged disuse.

  18. An overview of the issues: physiological effects of bed rest and restricted physical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Bloomfield, S. A.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Reduction of exercise capacity with confinement to bed rest is well recognized. Underlying physiological mechanisms include dramatic reductions in maximal stroke volume, cardiac output, and oxygen uptake. However, bed rest by itself does not appear to contribute to cardiac dysfunction. Increased muscle fatigue is associated with reduced muscle blood flow, red cell volume, capillarization and oxidative enzymes. Loss of muscle mass and bone density may be reflected by reduced muscle strength and higher risk for injury to bones and joints. The resultant deconditioning caused by bed rest can be independent of the primary disease and physically debilitating in patients who attempt to reambulate to normal active living and working. A challenge to clinicians and health care specialists has been the identification of appropriate and effective methods to restore physical capacity of patients during or after restricted physical activity associated with prolonged bed rest. The examination of physiological responses to bed rest deconditioning and exercise training in healthy subjects has provided significant information to develop effective rehabilitation treatments. The successful application of acute exercise to enhance orthostatic stability, daily endurance exercise to maintain aerobic capacity, or specific resistance exercises to maintain musculoskeletal integrity rather than the use of surgical, pharmacological, and other medical treatments for clinical conditions has been enhanced by investigation and understanding of underlying mechanisms that distinguish physical deconditioning from the disease. This symposium presents an overview of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning associated with reduced physical work capacity following prolonged bed rest and exercise training regimens that have proven successful in ameliorating or reversing these adverse effects.

  19. Impulsive vaccination and dispersal on dynamics of an SIR epidemic model with restricting infected individuals boarding transports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jianjun; Cai, Shaohong; Li, Limei

    2016-05-01

    To understand the effect of impulsive vaccination and restricting infected individuals boarding transports on disease spread, we establish an SIR model with impulsive vaccination, impulsive dispersal and restricting infected individuals boarding transports. This SIR epidemic model for two regions, which are connected by transportation of non-infected individuals, portrays the evolvement of diseases. We prove that all solutions of the investigated system are uniformly ultimately bounded. We also prove that there exists globally asymptotically stable infection-free boundary periodic solution. The condition for permanence is discussed. It is concluded that the approach of impulsive vaccination and restricting infected individuals boarding transports provides reliable tactic basis for preventing disease spread.

  20. Manufacturing and design of the offshore structure Froude scale model related to basin restrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scurtu, I. C.

    2015-11-01

    Manufacturing steps for a modern three - column semi-submersible structure are delivered using CFD/CAE software and actual Froude scaled model testing. The three- column offshore is part of the Wind Float Project already realized as prototype for wind energy extraction in water depths more than 40 meters, and the actual model will not consider the wind turbine. The model will have heave plates for a smaller heave motion in order to compare it with the case without heave plates. The heave plates will be part of the Froude scale model.. Using a smaller model will determine a smaller heave motion and this will affect predictions of the vertical movement of the three- column offshore structure in real sea. The Froude criterion is used for the time, speed and acceleration scale. The scale model is manufactured from steel and fiberglass and all parts are subjected to software analysis in order to get the smallest stress in connections inside the model. The model mass was restricted by scale dimensions and also the vertical position of centre gravity will be considered during the manufacturing and design process of the Froude scale offshore structure. All conditions must converge in model manufacturing and design in order to get the best results to compare with real sea states and heave motion data.

  1. Restricted feeding-induced sleep, activity, and body temperature changes in normal and preproghrelin-deficient mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Behavioral and physiological rhythms can be entrained by daily restricted feeding (RF), indicating the existence of a food-entrainable oscillator (FEO). One manifestation of the presence of FEO is anticipatory activity to regularly scheduled feeding. In the present study, we tested if intact ghrelin...

  2. MHC-I non-restricted cytotoxic activity in Macaca sylvana experimentally inoculated with HIV2 and SIV/mac.

    PubMed

    Charaf, B; Sanhadji, K; Sekkat, S; Farouqui, B; Touraine, J L; Benslimane, A

    1993-08-01

    The anti-retrovirus cell-mediated immunity was repeatedly investigated in seven monkeys (Macaca sylvana). Four of these animals were injected with cell-free supernatants containing human immunodeficiency viruses: two monkeys received HIV1 Bru (2.5 x 10(6) cpm), two received HIV2 Rod (1.5 x 10(6) cpm). Two additional animals were injected with a cell-free supernatant containing simian immunodeficiency virus SIV/mac 251 (1.5 x 10(6) cpm) and the last animal served as control. The four macaques infected with HIV2 Rod and SIV/mac 251 seroconverted. Freshly isolated and non stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these infected macaques and from the uninfected control were repeatedly assessed for cytolytic activity. Target cells consisted of heterologous human cell lines expressing HIV1 Bru, HIV2 Rod or SIV/mac proteins. A significant cytotoxic activity, non-restricted at the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), was demonstrated in one HIV2 Rod-infected animal (F8) and in one SIV/mac 251-infected animal (M1). This last animal showed progressively diminishing cytolytic activity that was correlated with a pronounced decrease in CD4+ lymphocytes. An AIDS-like disease developed in M1, with presence of lymphadenopathy, weight loss, diarrhea and opportunistic infections. Cytotoxic activity was active against SIV and HIV2-infected target cells in an MHC-unrestricted manner; it was specific to virus-infected cells and there was cross-reactivity between HIV2 and SIV. Cytotoxic effectors appeared to be mainly CD8+ cells. This model may prove to be very useful in evaluating the capacity of candidate AIDS vaccines to elicit effective cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:7905683

  3. a Generic Probabilistic Model and a Hierarchical Solution for Sensor Localization in Noisy and Restricted Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, S.; Yuan, X.

    2016-06-01

    A generic probabilistic model, under fundamental Bayes' rule and Markov assumption, is introduced to integrate the process of mobile platform localization with optical sensors. And based on it, three relative independent solutions, bundle adjustment, Kalman filtering and particle filtering are deduced under different and additional restrictions. We want to prove that first, Kalman filtering, may be a better initial-value supplier for bundle adjustment than traditional relative orientation in irregular strips and networks or failed tie-point extraction. Second, in high noisy conditions, particle filtering can act as a bridge for gap binding when a large number of gross errors fail a Kalman filtering or a bundle adjustment. Third, both filtering methods, which help reduce the error propagation and eliminate gross errors, guarantee a global and static bundle adjustment, who requires the strictest initial values and control conditions. The main innovation is about the integrated processing of stochastic errors and gross errors in sensor observations, and the integration of the three most used solutions, bundle adjustment, Kalman filtering and particle filtering into a generic probabilistic localization model. The tests in noisy and restricted situations are designed and examined to prove them.

  4. Convergence to the Island-Model Coalescent Process in Populations With Restricted Migration

    PubMed Central

    Matsen, Frederick A.; Wakeley, John

    2006-01-01

    In this article we apply some graph-theoretic results to the study of coalescence in a structured population with migration. The graph is the pattern of migration among subpopulations, or demes, and we use the theory of random walks on graphs to characterize the ease with which ancestral lineages can traverse the habitat in a series of migration events. We identify conditions under which the coalescent process in populations with restricted migration, such that individuals cannot traverse the habitat freely in a single migration event, nonetheless becomes identical to the coalescent process in the island migration model in the limit as the number of demes tends to infinity. Specifically, we first note that a sequence of symmetric graphs with Diaconis–Stroock constant bounded above has an unstructured Kingman-type coalescent in the limit for a sample of size two from two different demes. We then show that circular and toroidal models with long-range but restricted migration have an upper bound on this constant and so have an unstructured-migration coalescent in the limit. We investigate the rate of convergence to this limit using simulations. PMID:16219775

  5. Partial Sleep Restriction Activates Immune Response-Related Gene Expression Pathways: Experimental and Epidemiological Studies in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rantanen, Ville; Kronholm, Erkki; Surakka, Ida; van Leeuwen, Wessel M. A.; Lehto, Maili; Matikainen, Sampsa; Ripatti, Samuli; Härmä, Mikko; Sallinen, Mikael; Salomaa, Veikko; Jauhiainen, Matti; Alenius, Harri; Paunio, Tiina; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that short or insufficient sleep is associated with increased risk for metabolic diseases and mortality. To elucidate mechanisms behind this connection, we aimed to identify genes and pathways affected by experimentally induced, partial sleep restriction and to verify their connection to insufficient sleep at population level. The experimental design simulated sleep restriction during a working week: sleep of healthy men (N = 9) was restricted to 4 h/night for five nights. The control subjects (N = 4) spent 8 h/night in bed. Leukocyte RNA expression was analyzed at baseline, after sleep restriction, and after recovery using whole genome microarrays complemented with pathway and transcription factor analysis. Expression levels of the ten most up-regulated and ten most down-regulated transcripts were correlated with subjective assessment of insufficient sleep in a population cohort (N = 472). Experimental sleep restriction altered the expression of 117 genes. Eight of the 25 most up-regulated transcripts were related to immune function. Accordingly, fifteen of the 25 most up-regulated Gene Ontology pathways were also related to immune function, including those for B cell activation, interleukin 8 production, and NF-κB signaling (P<0.005). Of the ten most up-regulated genes, expression of STX16 correlated negatively with self-reported insufficient sleep in a population sample, while three other genes showed tendency for positive correlation. Of the ten most down-regulated genes, TBX21 and LGR6 correlated negatively and TGFBR3 positively with insufficient sleep. Partial sleep restriction affects the regulation of signaling pathways related to the immune system. Some of these changes appear to be long-lasting and may at least partly explain how prolonged sleep restriction can contribute to inflammation-associated pathological states, such as cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24194869

  6. Improving prediction of binge episodes by modelling chronicity of dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Millicent; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Skouteris, Helen; Broadbent, Jaclyn

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates the influences of chronicity of, and time lag between, dietary restriction and binge outcome for predicting binge episode onset. Sixty-two women aged 18 to 40 years old completed an online survey at random intervals seven times daily for a 7-day period. Participants self-reported engagement in dietary restriction and/or binging, and temptation to binge. Consecutive instances of reported dietary restriction better predicted subsequent binges than single instances. As the time lag between the first report of dietary restriction and binge onset increased, a clear linear trend emerged, such that the value of restriction for predicting binges increased with the number of consecutive assessments in which they reported dietary restriction. A similar pattern was found when predicting temptation to binge. Present findings suggest that duration of restriction is a crucial determinant of binge onset. These findings have implications for clinical practice by highlighting the time course from dietary restriction to binging. PMID:25113897

  7. Probabilistic multi-item inventory model with varying mixture shortage cost under restrictions.

    PubMed

    Fergany, Hala A

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed a new general probabilistic multi-item, single-source inventory model with varying mixture shortage cost under two restrictions. One of them is on the expected varying backorder cost and the other is on the expected varying lost sales cost. This model is formulated to analyze how the firm can deduce the optimal order quantity and the optimal reorder point for each item to reach the main goal of minimizing the expected total cost. The demand is a random variable and the lead time is a constant. The demand during the lead time is a random variable that follows any continuous distribution, for example; the normal distribution, the exponential distribution and the Chi square distribution. An application with real data is analyzed and the goal of minimization the expected total cost is achieved. Two special cases are deduced. PMID:27588244

  8. Effect of hyperhydration on bone mineralization in physically healthy subjects after prolonged restriction of motor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Federenko, Youri F.; Naexu, Konstantin A.

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of a daily intake of fluid and salt supplementation (FSS) on bone mineralization in physically healthy male volunteers after exposure to hypokinesia (decreased number of steps taken/day) over a period of 364 days. The studies were performed after exposure to 364 days of hypokinesia (HK) on 18 physically healthy male volunteers who had an average VO2max of 65 ml/kg/min and were aged between 19 and 24 years. For the simulation of the hypokinetic effect the volunteers were kept under an average of 1000 steps/day. The subjects were divided into three equal groups of 6: 6 underwent a normal ambulatory life (control group), 6 were placed under HK (hypokinetic group) and the remaining 6 were subjected to HK and consumed a daily FSS (water 26 ml/kg body wt and NaCl 0.10 mg/kg body wt) (hyperhydrated group). The density of the ulnar, radius, tibia, fibular, lumbar vertebrae and calcenous was measured. Calcium and phosphorus changes, plasma volume, blood pressure and body weight were determined. Calcium content in the examined skeletal bones decreased more in the hypokinetic subjects than in the hyperhydrated subjects. Urinary calcium and phosphorus losses were more pronounced in hypokinetic than hyperhydrated subjects. Plasma volume and body weight increased in hyperhydrated subjects, while it decreased in hypokinetic subjects. It was concluded that a daily intake of FSS may be used to neutralize bone demineralization in physically healthy subjects during prolonged restriction of motor activity.

  9. Coal thermolysis modeling: The effects of restricted diffusion on thermal reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Biggs, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of model compound immobilization by covalent surface attachment is being employed to investigate the potential impact of restricted diffusional mobility on the thermal reactivity of coal. This restricted mobility may be imposed in coal as a consequence of its cross-linked, macromolecular structure. A detailed study of the thermolysis of surface-immobilized bibenzyl showed that the rate of unimolecular C-C homolysis is similar to that in fluid phases. Recent studies have foucused on the thermally induced, free radical chain decomposition reactions for surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane and 1,4-diphenylbutane. For 1,4-diphenylbutane both the reaction rate and product composition are strongly dependent on surface coverage and, hence, the proximity of 1.4-diphenylbutane molecules and hydrogen abstracting radicals on the surface. The rates and selectivities of these key bimolecular reaction steps on the surface might also be affected by the structure of neighboring molecules. In the current study, we are beginning to probe this feature by examining the influence of the structure of co-attached aromatic molecules such as biphenyl and diphenylmethane on the reaction rate and regioselectivity in the thermolysis of 1,4-diphenylbutane. 7 refs. , 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. 40 CFR 1068.360 - What restrictions apply to assigning a model year to imported engines and equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... model year as defined in the applicable standard-setting part and the provisions of 40 CFR 1068.105(a... model year to imported engines and equipment? 1068.360 Section 1068.360 Protection of Environment..., STATIONARY, AND NONROAD PROGRAMS Imports § 1068.360 What restrictions apply to assigning a model year...

  11. 40 CFR 1068.360 - What restrictions apply to assigning a model year to imported engines and equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... model year as defined in the applicable standard-setting part and the provisions of 40 CFR 1068.105(a... model year to imported engines and equipment? 1068.360 Section 1068.360 Protection of Environment..., STATIONARY, AND NONROAD PROGRAMS Imports § 1068.360 What restrictions apply to assigning a model year...

  12. 40 CFR 1068.360 - What restrictions apply to assigning a model year to imported engines and equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... model year as defined in the applicable standard-setting part and the provisions of 40 CFR 1068.105(a... model year to imported engines and equipment? 1068.360 Section 1068.360 Protection of Environment..., STATIONARY, AND NONROAD PROGRAMS Imports § 1068.360 What restrictions apply to assigning a model year...

  13. Developing a model law restricting the transporting of passengers in the cargo areas of pickup trucks.

    PubMed

    Christoffel, T; Agran, P; Winn, D; Anderson, C; Del Valle, C

    2000-01-01

    Pickup trucks have become increasingly popular in the United States, accounting for about one in five vehicles involved in fatal motor-vehicle crashes. A critical factor in these deaths is the practice of carrying passengers in truck cargo areas, which are not designed for this purpose. Each year approximately 200 deaths occur to occupants riding in the back of pickup trucks. Over half the states have laws dealing with preventable injury problem, but these laws vary widely and most are too limited to be effective. We have reviewed existing laws, as well as crash injury data, and we have developed and recommend a model bill. The bill focuses on intended use, restricting passengers to only those portions of a vehicle designed for human transport. We have also conducted and report on a survey of legislative sponsors of pickup truck legislation. PMID:10754798

  14. Computer simulations of the restricted primitive model at very low temperature and density.

    PubMed

    Valeriani, Chantal; Camp, Philip J; Zwanikken, Jos W; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2010-03-17

    The problem of successfully simulating ionic fluids at low temperature and low density states is well known in the simulation literature: using conventional methods, the system is not able to equilibrate rapidly due to the presence of strongly associated cation-anion pairs. In this paper we present a numerical method for speeding up computer simulations of the restricted primitive model (RPM) at low temperatures (around the critical temperature) and at very low densities (down to 10(-10)σ(-3), where σ is the ion diameter). Experimentally, this regime corresponds to typical concentrations of electrolytes in nonaqueous solvents. As far as we are aware, this is the first time that the RPM has been equilibrated at such extremely low concentrations. More generally, this method could be used to equilibrate other systems that form aggregates at low concentrations. PMID:21389456

  15. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field singles method for many-electron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Bojer Madsen, Lars

    2014-04-28

    The time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field singles (TD-RASSCF-S) method is presented for investigating TD many-electron dynamics in atoms and molecules. Adopting the SCF notion from the muticonfigurational TD Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method and the RAS scheme (single-orbital excitation concept) from the TD configuration-interaction singles (TDCIS) method, the TD-RASSCF-S method can be regarded as a hybrid of them. We prove that, for closed-shell N{sub e}-electron systems, the TD-RASSCF-S wave function can be fully converged using only N{sub e}/2 + 1 ⩽ M ⩽ N{sub e} spatial orbitals. Importantly, based on the TD variational principle, the converged TD-RASSCF-S wave function with M = N{sub e} is more accurate than the TDCIS wave function. The accuracy of the TD-RASSCF-S approach over the TDCIS is illustrated by the calculation of high-order harmonic generation spectra for one-dimensional models of atomic helium, beryllium, and carbon in an intense laser pulse. The electronic dynamics during the process is investigated by analyzing the behavior of electron density and orbitals. The TD-RASSCF-S method is accurate, numerically tractable, and applicable for large systems beyond the capability of the MCTDHF method.

  16. Ovine maternal nutrient restriction from mid to late gestation decreases heptic progesterone inactivating enzyme activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we have shown increased concentrations of progesterone and decreased liver weight in mid to late pregnant ewes provided a nutrient restricted vs. adequate diet. This alteration in peripheral progesterone could be due to increased synthesis and/or decreased clearance of progesterone. There...

  17. Modeling flexible active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Michael; Selinger, Robin

    We study active nematic phases of self-propelled flexible chains in two dimensions using computer simulation, to investigate effects of chain flexibility. In a ``dry'' phase of self-propelled flexible chains, we find that increasing chain stiffness enhances orientational order and correlation length, narrows the distribution of turning angles, increases persistence length, and increases the magnitude of giant density fluctuations. We further adapt the simulation model to describe behavior of microtubules driven by kinesin molecular motors in two different environments: on a rigid substrate with kinesin immobilized on the surface; and on a lipid membrane where kinesin is bonded to lipid head groups and can diffuse. Results are compared to experiments by L. Hirst and J. Xu. Lastly, we consider active nematics of flexible particles enclosed in soft, deformable encapsulation in two dimensions, and demonstrate novel mechanisms of pattern formation that are fundamentally different from those observed in bulk. Supported by NSF-DMR 1409658.

  18. Amarogentin regulates self renewal pathways to restrict liver carcinogenesis in experimental mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sur, Subhayan; Pal, Debolina; Banerjee, Kaustav; Mandal, Suvra; Das, Ashes; Roy, Anup; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Amarogentin, a secoiridoid glycoside isolated from medicinal plant Swertia chirata, was found to restrict CCl4 /N-nitrosodiethyl amine (NDEA) induced mouse liver carcinogenesis by modulating G1/S cell cycle check point and inducing apoptosis. To understand its therapeutic efficacy on stem cell self renewal pathways, prevalence of CD44 positive cancer stem cell (CSC) population, expressions (mRNA/protein) of some key regulatory genes of self renewal Wnt and Hedgehog pathways along with expressions of E-cadherin and EGFR were analyzed during the liver carcinogenesis and in liver cancer cell line HepG2. It was observed that amarogentin could significantly reduce CD44 positive CSCs in both pre and post initiation stages of carcinogenesis than carcinogen control mice. In Wnt pathway, amarogentin could inhibit expressions of β-catenin, phospho β-catenin (Y-654) and activate expressions of antagonists sFRP1/2 and APC in the liver lesions. In Hedgehog pathway, decreased expressions of Gli1, sonic hedgehog ligand, and SMO along with up-regulation of PTCH1 were seen in the liver lesions due to amarogentin treatment. Moreover, amarogentin could up-regulate E-cadherin expression and down-regulate expression of EGFR in the liver lesions. Similarly, amarogentin could inhibit HepG2 cell growth along with expression and prevalence of CD44 positive CSCs. Similar to in vivo analysis, amarogentin could modulate the expressions of the key regulatory genes of the Wnt and hedgehog pathways and EGFR in HepG2 cells. Thus, our data suggests that the restriction of liver carcinogenesis by amarogentin might be due to reduction of CD44 positive CSCs and modulation of the self renewal pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26154024

  19. Caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R; Mitchell, Sharon E

    2011-06-01

    Restricting the intake of calories has been practiced as a method for increasing both the length and quality of life for over 500 years. Experimental work confirming the success of this approach in animals has accumulated over the last 100 years. Lifelong caloric restriction (CR) may extend life by up to 50% in rodents, with progressively less impact the later in life it is started. This effect is matched by profound impacts on age related diseases including reduced risk of cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, autoimmune disease, cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. The disposable soma theory of ageing suggests that CR evolved as a somatic protection response to enable animals to survive periods of food shortage. The shutdown of reproductive function during CR is consistent with this suggestion, but other features of the phenomenon are less consistent with this theory, and some have suggested that in rodents it may be mostly an artifact of domestication. CR induces profound effects on animals at all levels from the transcriptome to whole animal physiology and behavior. Animals under CR lose weight which is disproportionately contributed to by white adipose tissue. Generally animals on CR change their activity patterns so that they are more active prior to food delivery each day but total activity may be unchanged or reduced. Considerable debate has occurred over the effects of CR on resting metabolic rate (RMR). Total RMR declines, but as body mass and body composition also change it is unclear whether metabolism at the tissue level also declines, is unchanged or even increases. Body temperature universally decreases. Hunger is increased and does not seem to abate even with very long term restriction. Circulating adipokines are reduced reflecting the reduction in white adipose tissue (WAT) mass under restriction and there is a large reduction in circulating insulin and glucose levels. There are profound tissue level changes in metabolism with a

  20. Cardiometabolic and reproductive benefits of early dietary energy restriction and voluntary exercise in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model.

    PubMed

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Kupreeva, Maria; Borthwick, Faye; Proctor, Spencer D; Pierce, W David; Vine, Donna F

    2015-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine-metabolic disorders in women of reproductive age characterized by ovulatory dysfunction, hyperandrogenism and cardiometabolic risk. The overweight-obese PCOS phenotype appears to have exacerbated reproductive dysfunction and cardiometabolic risk. In overweight-obese adult women with PCOS, exercise and energy restricted diets have shown limited and inconsistent effects on both cardiometabolic indices and reproductive outcomes. We hypothesized that an early lifestyle intervention involving exercise and dietary energy restriction to prevent or reduce the propensity for adiposity would modulate reproductive indices and cardiometabolic risk in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model. Weanling obese PCOS-prone and Lean-Control JCR:LA-cp rodents were given a chow diet ad libitum or an energy-restricted diet combined with or without voluntary exercise (4  h/day) for 8 weeks. Dietary energy restriction and exercise lowered total body weight gain and body fat mass by 30% compared to free-fed sedentary or exercising obese PCOS-prone animals (P<0.01). Energy restriction induced an increase in exercise intensity compared to free-feeding plus exercise conditions. Energy restriction and exercise decreased fasting plasma triglycerides and apoB48 concentrations in obese PCOS-prone animals compared to free-fed and exercise or sedentary groups. The energy restriction and exercise combination in obese PCOS-prone animals significantly increased plasma sex-hormone binding globulin, hypothalamic cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and Kisspeptin mRNA expression to levels of the Lean-Control group, and this was further associated with improvements in estrous cyclicity. The combination of exercise and dietary energy restriction when initiated in early life exerts beneficial effects on cardiometabolic and reproductive indices in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model, and this may be associated with normalization of

  1. Activation of Nucleotide Oligomerization Domain 2 (NOD2) by Human Cytomegalovirus Initiates Innate Immune Responses and Restricts Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Arun; Forman, Michael; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) is an important innate immune sensor of bacterial pathogens. Its induction results in activation of the classic NF-κB pathway and alternative pathways including type I IFN and autophagy. Although the importance of NOD2 in recognizing RNA viruses has recently been identified, its role in sensing DNA viruses has not been studied. We report that infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in significant induction of NOD2 expression, beginning as early as 2 hours post infection and increasing steadily 24 hours post infection and afterwards. Infection with human herpesvirus 1 and 2 does not induce NOD2 expression. While the HCMV-encoded glycoprotein B is not required for NOD2 induction, a replication competent virion is necessary. Lentivirus-based NOD2 knockdown in human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) and U373 glioma cells leads to enhanced HCMV replication along with decreased levels of interferon beta (IFN-β) and the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL8. NOD2 induction in HCMV-infected cells activates downstream NF-κB and interferon pathways supported by reduced nuclear localization of NF-κB and pIRF3 in NOD2 knockdown HFFs. Stable overexpression of NOD2 in HFFs restricts HCMV replication in association with increased levels of IFN-β and IL8. Similarly, transient overexpression of NOD2 in U373 cells or its downstream kinase, RIPK2, results in decreased HCMV replication and enhanced cytokine responses. However, overexpression of a mutant NOD2, 3020insC, associated with severe Crohn's disease, results in enhanced HCMV replication and decreased levels of IFN-β in U373 cells. These results show for the first time that NOD2 plays a significant role in HCMV replication and may provide a model for studies of HCMV recognition by the host cell and HCMV colitis in Crohn's disease. PMID:24671169

  2. Multilevel, Two-Parameter, and Random-Weights Generalizations of a Model with Internal Restrictions on Item Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Jin, Kuan-Yu

    2010-01-01

    In this study, all the advantages of slope parameters, random weights, and latent regression are acknowledged when dealing with component and composite items by adding slope parameters and random weights into the standard item response model with internal restrictions on item difficulty and formulating this new model within a multilevel framework…

  3. Beneficial Effects of Caloric Restriction on Chronic Kidney Disease in Rodent Models: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-meng; Cai, Guang-yan; Bu, Ru; Wang, Wen-juan; Bai, Xue-yuan; Sun, Xue-feng; Chen, Xiang-mei

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have demonstrated the life-extending effect of caloric restriction. It is generally accepted that caloric restriction has health benefits, such as prolonging lifespan and delaying the onset and progression of CKD in various species, especially in rodent models. Although many studies have tested the efficacy of caloric restriction, no complete quantitative analysis of the potential beneficial effects of reducing caloric intake on the development and progression of CKD has been published. Methods All studies regarding the relationship between caloric restriction and chronic kidney diseases were searched in electronic databases, including PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index (SCI), OVID evidence-based medicine, Chinese Bio-medical Literature and Chinese science and technology periodicals (CNKI, VIP, and Wan Fang). The pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated by using fixed- or random-effects models. Results The data from 27 of all the studies mentioned above was used in the Meta analysis. Through the meta-analysis, we found that the parameter of blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine and urinary protein levels of the AL group was significant higher than that of the CR group, which are 4.11 mg/dl, 0.08mg/dl and 33.20mg/kg/24h, respectively. The incidence of the nephropathy in the caloric restriction (CR) group was significantly lower than that in the ad libitum—fed (AL) group. We further introduced the subgroup analysis and found that the effect of caloric restriction on the occurrence of kidney disease was only significant with prolonged intervention; the beneficial effects of CR on the 60%-caloric-restriction group were greater than on the less-than-60%-caloric-restriction group, and caloric restriction did not show obvious protective effects in genetically modified strains. Moreover, survival rate of the caloric restriction group is much higher than that of the ad libitum—fed (AL) group

  4. Anticonvulsant Effect of Time-Restricted Feeding in a Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure Model: Metabolic and Epigenetic Implications.

    PubMed

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio Fabián; Vázquez-García, Mario; Rodríguez-Molina, Víctor; Córdova-Dávalos, Laura; Arriaga-Ávila, Virginia; Miranda-Martínez, Alfredo; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2016-01-01

    A new generation of antiepileptic drugs has emerged; however, one-third of epilepsy patients do not properly respond to pharmacological treatments. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether time-restricted feeding (TRF) has an anticonvulsant effect and whether this restrictive diet promotes changes in energy metabolism and epigenetic modifications in a pilocarpine-induced seizure model. To resolve our hypothesis, one group of rats had free access to food and water ad libitum (AL) and a second group underwent a TRF schedule. We used the lithium-pilocarpine model to induce status epilepticus (SE), and behavioral seizure monitoring was analyzed. Additionally, an electroencephalography (EEG) recording was performed to verify the effect of TRF on cortical electrical activity after a pilocarpine injection. For biochemical analysis, animals were sacrificed 24 h after SE and hippocampal homogenates were used to evaluate the proteins related to metabolism and chromatin structure. Our results showed that TRF had an anticonvulsant effect as measured by the prolonged latency of forelimb clonus seizure, a decrease in the seizure severity score and fewer animals reaching SE. Additionally, the power of the late phase EEG recordings in the AL group was significantly higher than the TRF group. Moreover, we found that TRF is capable of inducing alterations in signaling pathways that regulate energy metabolism, including an increase in the phosphorylation of AMP dependent kinase (AMPK) and a decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt kinase. Furthermore, we found that TRF was able to significantly increase the beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB) concentration, an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Finally, we found a significant decrease in HDAC activity as well as an increase in acetylation on histone 3 (H3) in hippocampal homogenates from the TRF group. These findings suggest that alterations in energy metabolism and the increase in β-HB mediated by TRF

  5. Anticonvulsant Effect of Time-Restricted Feeding in a Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure Model: Metabolic and Epigenetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio Fabián; Vázquez-García, Mario; Rodríguez-Molina, Víctor; Córdova-Dávalos, Laura; Arriaga-Ávila, Virginia; Miranda-Martínez, Alfredo; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2016-01-01

    A new generation of antiepileptic drugs has emerged; however, one-third of epilepsy patients do not properly respond to pharmacological treatments. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether time-restricted feeding (TRF) has an anticonvulsant effect and whether this restrictive diet promotes changes in energy metabolism and epigenetic modifications in a pilocarpine-induced seizure model. To resolve our hypothesis, one group of rats had free access to food and water ad libitum (AL) and a second group underwent a TRF schedule. We used the lithium-pilocarpine model to induce status epilepticus (SE), and behavioral seizure monitoring was analyzed. Additionally, an electroencephalography (EEG) recording was performed to verify the effect of TRF on cortical electrical activity after a pilocarpine injection. For biochemical analysis, animals were sacrificed 24 h after SE and hippocampal homogenates were used to evaluate the proteins related to metabolism and chromatin structure. Our results showed that TRF had an anticonvulsant effect as measured by the prolonged latency of forelimb clonus seizure, a decrease in the seizure severity score and fewer animals reaching SE. Additionally, the power of the late phase EEG recordings in the AL group was significantly higher than the TRF group. Moreover, we found that TRF is capable of inducing alterations in signaling pathways that regulate energy metabolism, including an increase in the phosphorylation of AMP dependent kinase (AMPK) and a decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt kinase. Furthermore, we found that TRF was able to significantly increase the beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB) concentration, an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Finally, we found a significant decrease in HDAC activity as well as an increase in acetylation on histone 3 (H3) in hippocampal homogenates from the TRF group. These findings suggest that alterations in energy metabolism and the increase in β-HB mediated by TRF

  6. A Multi-stage Carcinogenesis Model to Investigate Caloric Restriction as a Potential Tool for Post-irradiation Mitigation of Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Shusuke; Blyth, Benjamin John; Shang, Yi; Morioka, Takamitsu; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    The risk of radiation-induced cancer adds to anxiety in low-dose exposed populations. Safe and effective lifestyle changes which can help mitigate excess cancer risk might provide exposed individuals the opportunity to pro-actively reduce their cancer risk, and improve mental health and well-being. Here, we applied a mathematical multi-stage carcinogenesis model to the mouse lifespan data using adult-onset caloric restriction following irradiation in early life. We re-evaluated autopsy records with a veterinary pathologist to determine which tumors were the probable causes of death in order to calculate age-specific mortality. The model revealed that in both irradiated and unirradiated mice, caloric restriction reduced the age-specific mortality of all solid tumors and hepatocellular carcinomas across most of the lifespan, with the mortality rate dependent more on age owing to an increase in the number of predicted rate-limiting steps. Conversely, irradiation did not significantly alter the number of steps, but did increase the overall transition rate between the steps. We show that the extent of the protective effect of caloric restriction is independent of the induction of cancer from radiation exposure, and discuss future avenues of research to explore the utility of caloric restriction as an example of a potential post-irradiation mitigation strategy. PMID:27390741

  7. Restricted diffusion in a model acinar labyrinth by NMR: Theoretical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, D. S.; Guillot, G.; Sapoval, B.

    2007-01-01

    A branched geometrical structure of the mammal lungs is known to be crucial for rapid access of oxygen to blood. But an important pulmonary disease like emphysema results in partial destruction of the alveolar tissue and enlargement of the distal airspaces, which may reduce the total oxygen transfer. This effect has been intensively studied during the last decade by MRI of hyperpolarized gases like helium-3. The relation between geometry and signal attenuation remained obscure due to a lack of realistic geometrical model of the acinar morphology. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations of restricted diffusion in a realistic model acinus to compute the signal attenuation in a diffusion-weighted NMR experiment. We demonstrate that this technique should be sensitive to destruction of the branched structure: partial removal of the interalveolar tissue creates loops in the tree-like acinar architecture that enhance diffusive motion and the consequent signal attenuation. The role of the local geometry and related practical applications are discussed.

  8. Basic Restriction and Reference Level in Anatomically-based Japanese Models for Low-Frequency Electric and Magnetic Field Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yukinori; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    Human exposed to electric and/or magnetic fields at low frequencies may cause direct effect such as nerve stimulation and excitation. Therefore, basic restriction is regulated in terms of induced current density in the ICNIRP guidelines and in-situ electric field in the IEEE standard. External electric or magnetic field which does not produce induced quantities exceeding the basic restriction is used as a reference level. The relationship between the basic restriction and reference level for low-frequency electric and magnetic fields has been investigated using European anatomic models, while limited for Japanese model, especially for electric field exposures. In addition, that relationship has not well been discussed. In the present study, we calculated the induced quantities in anatomic Japanese male and female models exposed to electric and magnetic fields at reference level. A quasi static finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method was applied to analyze this problem. As a result, spatially averaged induced current density was found to be more sensitive to averaging algorithms than that of in-situ electric field. For electric and magnetic field exposure at the ICNIRP reference level, the maximum values of the induced current density for different averaging algorithm were smaller than the basic restriction for most cases. For exposures at the reference level in the IEEE standard, the maximum electric fields in the brain were larger than the basic restriction in the brain while smaller for the spinal cord and heart.

  9. Cauterization of meso-ovarian vessels, a new model of intrauterine growth restriction in rats.

    PubMed

    Camprubí, M; Ortega, A; Balaguer, A; Iglesias, I; Girabent, M; Callejo, J; Figueras, J; Krauel, X

    2009-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) remains an important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Both IUGR and low birth weight have been identified as risk factors for increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, dyslipemia, and other diseases in the adulthood. Several animal models have been developed to study the underlying mechanisms of IUGR and its later consequences, with utero-placental ischemia by uterine artery ligation (UAL) being the most frequently used in rats. The relevance of this model lies in the fact that it induces altered placental perfusion, the main cause of IUGR in humans in Western countries. However, there is also controversy over the grade and homogeneity of IUGR obtained. In this study, we propose a new animal model of IUGR related to placental ischemia through the cauterization of meso-ovarian vessels. We aimed to test the feasibility of meso-ovarian vessel cauterization (CMO), and to compare it with uterine artery ligation (UAL). The CMO group had similar incidence of perinatal mortality, percentage of IUGR, and evolution of body weight during early extrauterine life to the UAL group, indicating that both methods are similarly efficient for inducing IUGR. Moreover, both of them affect the ratio of fetal to placental weight, and the weight of vital organs, supporting the hypothesis of a fetal compensatory response or "brain- and heart-sparing effect". Both operative models suffer approximately 50% perinatal mortality, implying that they are both more efficient in the production of IUGR when C-section is performed. On the other hand, CMO was significantly faster to perform than UAL and seemed to produce a more uniform ischemia throughout the uterus than the UAL method, resulting in a more homogeneous group of IUGR pups. PMID:19631378

  10. Activities of microorganisms and enzymes in water-restricted environments: biological activities in aqueous compartments at micron scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppert, Michael; Mlejnek, Klaus; Seiffert, Beatrix; Mayer, Frank

    1997-07-01

    In water-in-oil microemulsions, microdroplets of water, surrounded by a layer of surfactant molecules (reversed micelles), are dispersed in an organic solvent. Various microorganisms (unicellular algae and cyanobacteria) and isolated enzymes were dispersed in microemulsions without loss of biological activity. Each biological system needed a defined quantity of water in the microemulsion for maximum activity. Under optimum conditions, microbial enzymes for various sources (hydrogenases, dehydrogenases) exhibited, besides ten-fold increase in specific activity, a temperature optimum up to 16 degree(s)C higher as compared to aqueous solutions. These experimental findings, together with theoretical considerations, imply that water structure inside reversed micelles is very different from free water, but similar to water in narrow compartments with polar or ionic surfaces. These compartments may represent a model system for environments, where (liquid) water is not available in bulk amounts, but embedded in an anhydrous matrix.

  11. Oriented active shape models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiamin; Udupa, Jayaram K

    2009-04-01

    Active shape models (ASM) are widely employed for recognizing anatomic structures and for delineating them in medical images. In this paper, a novel strategy called oriented active shape models (OASM) is presented in an attempt to overcome the following five limitations of ASM: 1) lower delineation accuracy, 2) the requirement of a large number of landmarks, 3) sensitivity to search range, 4) sensitivity to initialization, and 5) inability to fully exploit the specific information present in the given image to be segmented. OASM effectively combines the rich statistical shape information embodied in ASM with the boundary orientedness property and the globally optimal delineation capability of the live wire methodology of boundary segmentation. The latter characteristics allow live wire to effectively separate an object boundary from other nonobject boundaries with similar properties especially when they come very close in the image domain. The approach leads to a two-level dynamic programming method, wherein the first level corresponds to boundary recognition and the second level corresponds to boundary delineation, and to an effective automatic initialization method. The method outputs a globally optimal boundary that agrees with the shape model if the recognition step is successful in bringing the model close to the boundary in the image. Extensive evaluation experiments have been conducted by utilizing 40 image (magnetic resonance and computed tomography) data sets in each of five different application areas for segmenting breast, liver, bones of the foot, and cervical vertebrae of the spine. Comparisons are made between OASM and ASM based on precision, accuracy, and efficiency of segmentation. Accuracy is assessed using both region-based false positive and false negative measures and boundary-based distance measures. The results indicate the following: 1) The accuracy of segmentation via OASM is considerably better than that of ASM; 2) The number of landmarks

  12. A unified mathematical model to quantify performance impairment for both chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Rajdev, Pooja; Thorsley, David; Rajaraman, Srinivasan; Rupp, Tracy L; Wesensten, Nancy J; Balkin, Thomas J; Reifman, Jaques

    2013-08-21

    Performance prediction models based on the classical two-process model of sleep regulation are reasonably effective at predicting alertness and neurocognitive performance during total sleep deprivation (TSD). However, during sleep restriction (partial sleep loss) performance predictions based on such models have been found to be less accurate. Because most modern operational environments are predominantly characterized by chronic sleep restriction (CSR) rather than by episodic TSD, the practical utility of this class of models has been limited. To better quantify performance during both CSR and TSD, we developed a unified mathematical model that incorporates extant sleep debt as a function of a known sleep/wake history, with recent history exerting greater influence. This incorporation of sleep/wake history into the classical two-process model captures an individual's capacity to recover during sleep as a function of sleep debt and naturally bridges the continuum from CSR to TSD by reducing to the classical two-process model in the case of TSD. We validated the proposed unified model using psychomotor vigilance task data from three prior studies involving TSD, CSR, and sleep extension. We compared and contrasted the fits, within-study predictions, and across-study predictions from the unified model against predictions generated by two previously published models, and found that the unified model more accurately represented multiple experimental studies and consistently predicted sleep restriction scenarios better than the existing models. In addition, we found that the model parameters obtained by fitting TSD data could be used to predict performance in other sleep restriction scenarios for the same study populations, and vice versa. Furthermore, this model better accounted for the relatively slow recovery process that is known to characterize CSR, as well as the enhanced performance that has been shown to result from sleep banking. PMID:23623949

  13. Caloric restriction impedes age-related decline of mitochondrial function and neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Coman, Daniel; Jiang, Lihong; Rothman, Douglas L; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2014-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) prolongs lifespan and retards many detrimental effects of aging, but its effect on brain mitochondrial function and neuronal activity—especially in healthy aging—remains unexplored. Here we measured rates of neuronal glucose oxidation and glutamate–glutamine neurotransmitter cycling in young control, old control (i.e., healthy aging), and old CR rats using in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found that, compared with the young control, neuronal energy production and neurotransmission rates were significantly reduced in healthy aging, but were preserved in old CR rats. The results suggest that CR mitigated the age-related deceleration of brain physiology. PMID:24984898

  14. Long-term reorganization of structural brain networks in a rabbit model of intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Batalle, Dafnis; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; Illa, Miriam; Figueras, Francesc; Eixarch, Elisenda; Gratacos, Eduard

    2014-10-15

    Characterization of brain changes produced by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is among the main challenges of modern fetal medicine and pediatrics. This condition affects 5-10% of all pregnancies and is associated with a wide range of neurodevelopmental disorders. Better understanding of the brain reorganization produced by IUGR opens a window of opportunity to find potential imaging biomarkers in order to identify the infants with a high risk of having neurodevelopmental problems and apply therapies to improve their outcomes. Structural brain networks obtained from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising tool to study brain reorganization and to be used as a biomarker of neurodevelopmental alterations. In the present study this technique is applied to a rabbit animal model of IUGR, which presents some advantages including a controlled environment and the possibility to obtain high quality MRI with long acquisition times. Using a Q-Ball diffusion model, and a previously published rabbit brain MRI atlas, structural brain networks of 15 IUGR and 14 control rabbits at 70 days of age (equivalent to pre-adolescence human age) were obtained. The analysis of graph theory features showed a decreased network infrastructure (degree and binary global efficiency) associated with IUGR condition and a set of generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA) weighted measures associated with abnormal neurobehavior. Interestingly, when assessing the brain network organization independently of network infrastructure by means of normalized networks, IUGR showed increased global and local efficiencies. We hypothesize that this effect could reflect a compensatory response to reduced infrastructure in IUGR. These results present new evidence on the long-term persistence of the brain reorganization produced by IUGR that could underlie behavioral and developmental alterations previously described. The described changes in network organization have the potential to be used

  15. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Thoracolumbar Fascia Injury and Movement Restriction in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, James H.; Fox, James R.; Maple, Rhonda; Loretan, Caitlin; Badger, Gary J.; Henry, Sharon M.; Vizzard, Margaret A.; Langevin, Helene M.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of back pain following acute back “sprains” is a serious public health problem with poorly understood pathophysiology. The recent finding that human subjects with chronic low back pain (LBP) have increased thickness and decreased mobility of the thoracolumbar fascia measured with ultrasound suggest that the fasciae of the back may be involved in LBP pathophysiology. This study used a porcine model to test the hypothesis that similar ultrasound findings can be produced experimentally in a porcine model by combining a local injury of fascia with movement restriction using a “hobble” device linking one foot to a chest harness for 8 weeks. Ultrasound measurements of thoracolumbar fascia thickness and shear plane mobility (shear strain) during passive hip flexion were made at the 8 week time point on the non-intervention side (injury and/or hobble). Injury alone caused both an increase in fascia thickness (p = .007) and a decrease in fascia shear strain on the non-injured side (p = .027). Movement restriction alone did not change fascia thickness but did decrease shear strain on the non-hobble side (p = .024). The combination of injury plus movement restriction had additive effects on reducing fascia mobility with a 52% reduction in shear strain compared with controls and a 28% reduction compared to movement restriction alone. These results suggest that a back injury involving fascia, even when healed, can affect the relative mobility of fascia layers away from the injured area, especially when movement is also restricted. PMID:26820883

  16. Genetic Dissection of Dietary Restriction in Mice Supports the Metabolic Efficiency Model of Life Extension

    PubMed Central

    Rikke, Brad A.; Liao, Chen-Yu; McQueen, Matthew B.; Nelson, James F.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) has been used for decades to retard aging in rodents, but its mechanism of action remains an enigma. A principal roadblock has been that DR affects many different processes, making it difficult to distinguish cause and effect. To address this problem, we applied a quantitative genetics approach utilizing the ILSXISS series of mouse recombinant inbred strains. Across 42 strains, mean female lifespan ranged from 380 to 1070 days on DR (fed 60% of ad libitum [AL]) and from 490 to 1020 days on an AL diet. Longevity under DR and AL is under genetic control, showing 34% and 36% heritability, respectively. There was no correlation between lifespans on DR and AL; thus different genes modulate longevity under the two regimens. DR lifespans are significantly correlated with female fertility after return to an AL diet after various periods of DR (R = 0.44, P = 0.006). We assessed fuel efficiency (FE, ability to maintain growth and body weight independent of absolute food intake) using a multivariate approach and found it to be correlated with longevity and female fertility, suggesting possible causality. We found several quantitative trait loci responsible for these traits, mapping to chromosomes 7, 9, and 15. We present a metabolic model in which the anti-aging effects of DR are consistent with the ability to efficiently utilize dietary resources. PMID:20452416

  17. Surface growth on diluted lattices by a restricted solid-on-solid model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Lee, Sang Bub

    2009-08-01

    An influence of diluted sites on surface growth has been investigated, using the restricted solid-on-solid model. It was found that, with respect to equilibrium growth, the surface width and the saturated width exhibited universal power-law behaviors, i.e., W approximately t(beta) and W(sat) approximately L(zeta), regarding all cases with respect to the concentration of diluted sites x=1-p , with p being the occupation probability on each lattice site. For x < x(c) (=1-p(c), p(c) being the percolation threshold), the growth appeared to be similar to that of a regular lattice, both in two and three dimensions. For x=x(c), the growth yielded nontrivial exponents which were different from those on a regular lattice. In nonequilibrium growth, a considerable amount of diluted sites (x < or = x(c)) appeared to yield nonuniversal growth, unlike the case of a regular lattice. The cause of nonuniversal growth dynamics has been investigated, considering the growth on a backbone cluster and on lattices constructed with periodically and randomly diluted subcells. PMID:19792104

  18. The activity-based anorexia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Klenotich, Stephanie J; Dulawa, Stephanie C

    2012-01-01

    Animals housed with running wheels and subjected to daily food restriction show paradoxical reductions in food intake and increases in running wheel activity. This phenomenon, known as activity-based anorexia (ABA), leads to marked reductions in body weight that can ultimately lead to death. Recently, ABA has been proposed as a model of anorexia nervosa (AN). AN affects about 8 per 100,000 females and has the highest mortality rate among all psychiatric illnesses. Given the reductions in quality of life, high mortality rate, and the lack of pharmacological treatments for AN, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying AN-like behavior is greatly needed. This chapter provides basic guidelines for conducting ABA experiments using mice. The ABA mouse model provides an important tool for investigating the neurobiological underpinnings of AN-like behavior and identifying novel treatments. PMID:22231828

  19. Retinoic Acid Activity in Undifferentiated Neural Progenitors Is Sufficient to Fulfill Its Role in Restricting Fgf8 Expression for Somitogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Brade, Thomas; Sandell, Lisa L.; Lewandoski, Mark; Trainor, Paul A.; Colas, Alexandre; Mercola, Mark; Duester, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Bipotent axial stem cells residing in the caudal epiblast during late gastrulation generate neuroectodermal and presomitic mesodermal progeny that coordinate somitogenesis with neural tube formation, but the mechanism that controls these two fates is not fully understood. Retinoic acid (RA) restricts the anterior extent of caudal fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) expression in both mesoderm and neural plate to control somitogenesis and neurogenesis, however it remains unclear where RA acts to control the spatial expression of caudal Fgf8. Here, we found that mouse Raldh2-/- embryos, lacking RA synthesis and displaying a consistent small somite defect, exhibited abnormal expression of key markers of axial stem cell progeny, with decreased Sox2+ and Sox1+ neuroectodermal progeny and increased Tbx6+ presomitic mesodermal progeny. The Raldh2-/- small somite defect was rescued by treatment with an FGF receptor antagonist. Rdh10 mutants, with a less severe RA synthesis defect, were found to exhibit a small somite defect and anterior expansion of caudal Fgf8 expression only for somites 1–6, with normal somite size and Fgf8 expression thereafter. Rdh10 mutants were found to lack RA activity during the early phase when somites are small, but at the 6-somite stage RA activity was detected in neural plate although not in presomitic mesoderm. Expression of a dominant-negative RA receptor in mesoderm eliminated RA activity in presomitic mesoderm but did not affect somitogenesis. Thus, RA activity in the neural plate is sufficient to prevent anterior expansion of caudal Fgf8 expression associated with a small somite defect. Our studies provide evidence that RA restriction of Fgf8 expression in undifferentiated neural progenitors stimulates neurogenesis while also restricting the anterior extent of the mesodermal Fgf8 mRNA gradient that controls somite size, providing new insight into the mechanism that coordinates somitogenesis with neurogenesis. PMID:26368825

  20. Functional characterization of neural-restrictive silencer element in mouse pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hideki; Tominaga, Aiko; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamada, Katsushi; Miyata, Atsuro

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is predominantly localized in the nervous system, but the underlying mechanism in its neuron-specific expression remains unclear. In addition to two neural-restrictive silencer-like element (NRSLE1 and 2), as reported previously, we have identified the third element in -1,601 to -1,581 bp from the translational initiation site of mouse PACAP gene and termed it as NRSLE3, of which, the sequence and location were highly conserved among mouse, rat, and human PACAP genes. In luciferase reporter assay, the deletion or site-directed mutagenesis of NRSLE3 in the reporter gene construct, driven by heterologous SV40 promoter, cancelled the repression of luciferase activity in non-neuronal Swiss-3T3 cells. Furthermore, its promoter activity was significantly repressed in Swiss-3T3 cells, but not in neuronal-differentiated PC12 cells. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) with nuclear extracts of Swiss-3T3 cells demonstrated a specific complex with NRSLE3 probe that exhibited the same migration with the neural-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) probe of rat type II sodium channel gene. During neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells, the increment of PACAP mRNA exhibited the correlation with that of REST4 mRNA, which is a neuron-specific variant form of neural-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF). In undifferentiated PC12 cells, trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which indirectly inhibits NRSF-mediated gene silencing, increased PACAP mRNA level and attenuated the repression of promoter activity of 5' flanking region of mouse PACAP gene containing NRSLEs. These suggest that the NRSE-NRSF system implicates in the regulatory mechanism of neuron-specific expression of PACAP gene. PMID:24939248

  1. Amelioration of neuronal cell death in a spontaneous obese rat model by dietary restriction through modulation of ubiquitin proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Shruthi, Karnam; Reddy, S Sreenivasa; Reddy, P Yadagiri; Shivalingam, Potula; Harishankar, Nemani; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2016-07-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) has been shown to increase longevity, delay onset of aging, reduce DNA damage and oxidative stress and prevent age-related decline of neuronal activity. We previously reported the role of altered ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) in the neuronal cell death in a spontaneous obese rat model (WNIN/Ob rat). In this study, we investigated the effect of DR on obesity-induced neuronal cell death in a rat model. Two groups of 40-day-old WNIN/Ob rats were either fed ad libitum (Ob) or pair-fed with lean. The lean phenotype of WNIN/Ob rats served as ad libitum control. These animals were maintained for 6.5months on their respective diet regime. At the end of the study, cerebral cortex was collected and markers of UPS, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Chymotrypsin-like activity of proteasome was assayed by the fluorimetric method. Apoptotic cells were analyzed by TUNEL assay. DR improved metabolic abnormalities in obese rats. Alterations in UPS (up-regulation of UCHL1, down-regulation of UCHL5, declined proteasomal activity), increased ER stress, declined autophagy and increased expression of α-synuclein, p53 and BAX were observed in obese rats and DR alleviated these changes in obese rats. Further, DR decreased TUNEL-positive cells. In conclusion, DR in obese rats could not only restore the metabolic abnormalities but also preserved neuronal health in the cerebral cortex by preventing alterations in the UPS. PMID:27260470

  2. Restricted Heterochromatin Formation Links NFATc2 Repressor Activity With Growth Promotion in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    BAUMGART, SANDRA; GLESEL, ELISABETH; SINGH, GARIMA; CHEN, NAI-MING; REUTLINGER, KRISTINA; ZHANG, JINSAN; BILLADEAU, DANIEL D.; FERNANDEZ-ZAPICO, MARTIN E.; GRESS, THOMAS M.; SINGH, SHIV K.; ELLENRIEDER, VOLKER

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Transcriptional silencing of the p15INK4b tumor suppressor pathway overcomes cellular protection against unrestrained proliferation in cancer. Here we show a novel pathway involving the oncogenic transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c2 targeting a p15INK4b-mediated failsafe mechanism to promote pancreatic cancer tumor growth. METHODS Immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy were used for expression studies. Cancer growth was assessed in vitro by [3H]thymidine incorporation, colony formation assays, and in vivo using xenograft tumor models. Protein-protein interactions, promoter regulation, and local histone modifications were analyzed by immunoprecipitation, DNA pull-down, reporter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. RESULTS Our study uncovered induction of NFATc2 in late-stage pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions with increased expression in tumor cell nuclei of advanced cancers. In the nucleus, NFATc2 targets the p15INK4b promoter for inducible heterochromatin formation and silencing. NFATc2 binding to its cognate promoter site induces stepwise recruitment of the histone methyltransferase Suv39H1, causes local H3K9 trimethylation, and allows docking of heterochromatin protein HP1γ to the repressor complex. Conversely, inactivation of NFATc2 disrupts this repressor complex assembly and local heterochromatin formation, resulting in restoration of p15INK4b expression and inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Here we describe a novel mechanism for NFATc2-mediated gene regulation and identify a functional link among its repressor activity, the silencing of the suppressor pathway p15INK4b, and its pancreatic cancer growth regulatory functions. Thus, we provide evidence that inactivation of oncogenic NFATc2 might be an attractive strategy in treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22079596

  3. Prolactin prevents hepatocellular carcinoma by restricting innate immune activation of c-Myc in mice.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Hadley J; Petrosky, Keiko Y; Fox, James G; Horseman, Nelson D; Rogers, Arlin B

    2014-08-01

    Women are more resistant to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) than men despite equal exposure to major risk factors, such as hepatitis B or C virus infection. Female resistance is hormone-dependent, as evidenced by the sharp increase in HCC incidence in postmenopausal women who do not take hormone replacement therapy. In rodent models sex-dimorphic HCC phenotypes are pituitary-dependent, suggesting that sex hormones act via the gonadal-hypophyseal axis. We found that the estrogen-responsive pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL), signaling through hepatocyte-predominant short-form prolactin receptors (PRLR-S), constrained TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-dependent innate immune responses invoked by IL-1β, TNF-α, and LPS/Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), but not TRIF-dependent poly(I:C)/TLR3. PRL ubiquitinated and accelerated poststimulatory decay of a "trafasome" comprised of IRAK1, TRAF6, and MAP3K proteins, abrogating downstream activation of c-Myc-interacting pathways, including PI3K/AKT, mTORC1, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB. Consistent with this finding, we documented exaggerated male liver responses to immune stimuli in mice and humans. Tumor promotion through, but regulation above, the level of c-Myc was demonstrated by sex-independent HCC eruption in Alb-Myc transgenic mice. PRL deficiency accelerated liver carcinogenesis in Prl(-/-) mice of both sexes. Conversely, pharmacologic PRL mobilization using the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist domperidone prevented HCC in tumor-prone C3H/HeN males. Viewed together, our results demonstrate that PRL constrains tumor-promoting liver inflammation by inhibiting MAP3K-dependent activation of c-Myc at the level of the trafasome. PRL-targeted therapy may hold promise for reducing the burden of liver cancer in high-risk men and women. PMID:25049387

  4. Reconsidering Physical Activity Restrictions for Mononephric Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Okada, Maki; Hockenberry, Marilyn J; Koh, Chester J; Meeske, Kathleen A; Rangan, Kasey E; Rodgers, Cheryl; Rosenthal, Yael; Ruccione, Kathleen S; Freyer, David R

    2016-07-01

    Although traditional recommendations for mononephric childhood cancer survivors are to avoid contact sports in order to protect the remaining kidney, review of available evidence suggests that the majority of renal loss is caused by accidents not involving sports. An interdisciplinary team performed a review of the English literature published from 1999 to 2012 within the PubMed, Cochrane, Google Scholar, and National Guidelines Clearinghouse databases. The level of evidence and proposed recommendations were graded according to an established rubric and GRADE criteria. Our review found that kidney loss is most commonly caused by nonsports activities such as motor vehicle accidents and falls, implying that restrictions on sports-related activity in mononephric pediatric survivors are not well supported. This favors encouraging ordinary sports and related activities without restriction in mononephric childhood cancer survivors because the known benefits of exercise outweigh the exceedingly low risk of renal loss. Accordingly, activity recommendations for mononephric patients have been revised in the most current version of the Children's Oncology Group Long-term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Cancers. This has important implications for this and similar populations who may now undertake individual and organized sports without undue regard for their mononephric status. PMID:26589357

  5. The inner nuclear membrane protein Emerin regulates β-catenin activity by restricting its accumulation in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz, Ewa; Tilgner, Katarzyna; Barker, Nick; van de Wetering, Mark; Clevers, Hans; Dorobek, Margareth; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Broers, Jos L V; Blankesteijn, W Matthijs; Salpingidou, Georgia; Wilson, Robert G; Ellis, Juliet A; Hutchison, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Emerin is a type II inner nuclear membrane (INM) protein of unknown function. Emerin function is likely to be important because, when it is mutated, emerin promotes both skeletal muscle and heart defects. Here we show that one function of Emerin is to regulate the flux of β-catenin, an important transcription coactivator, into the nucleus. Emerin interacts with β-catenin through a conserved adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-like domain. When GFP-emerin is expressed in HEK293 cells, β-catenin is restricted to the cytoplasm and β-catenin activity is inhibited. In contrast, expression of an emerin mutant, lacking its APC-like domain (GFP-emerinΔ), dominantly stimulates β-catenin activity and increases nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. Human fibroblasts that are null for emerin have an autostimulatory growth phenotype. This unusual growth phenotype arises through enhanced nuclear accumulation and activity of β-catenin and can be replicated in wild-type fibroblasts by transfection with constitutively active β-catenin. Our results support recent findings that suggest that INM proteins can influence signalling pathways by restricting access of transcription coactivators to the nucleus. PMID:16858403

  6. Sutural growth restriction and modern human facial evolution: an experimental study in a pig model

    PubMed Central

    Holton, Nathan E; Franciscus, Robert G; Nieves, Mary Ann; Marshall, Steven D; Reimer, Steven B; Southard, Thomas E; Keller, John C; Maddux, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    Facial size reduction and facial retraction are key features that distinguish modern humans from archaic Homo. In order to more fully understand the emergence of modern human craniofacial form, it is necessary to understand the underlying evolutionary basis for these defining characteristics. Although it is well established that the cranial base exerts considerable influence on the evolutionary and ontogenetic development of facial form, less emphasis has been placed on developmental factors intrinsic to the facial skeleton proper. The present analysis was designed to assess anteroposterior facial reduction in a pig model and to examine the potential role that this dynamic has played in the evolution of modern human facial form. Ten female sibship cohorts, each consisting of three individuals, were allocated to one of three groups. In the experimental group (n = 10), microplates were affixed bilaterally across the zygomaticomaxillary and frontonasomaxillary sutures at 2 months of age. The sham group (n = 10) received only screw implantation and the controls (n = 10) underwent no surgery. Following 4 months of post-surgical growth, we assessed variation in facial form using linear measurements and principal components analysis of Procrustes scaled landmarks. There were no differences between the control and sham groups; however, the experimental group exhibited a highly significant reduction in facial projection and overall size. These changes were associated with significant differences in the infraorbital region of the experimental group including the presence of an infraorbital depression and an inferiorly and coronally oriented infraorbital plane in contrast to a flat, superiorly and sagittally infraorbital plane in the control and sham groups. These altered configurations are markedly similar to important additional facial features that differentiate modern humans from archaic Homo, and suggest that facial length restriction via rigid plate fixation is a

  7. Placental TonEBP/NFAT5 osmolyte regulation in an ovine model of intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Juan A; Garcia-Jones, Pastora; Graham, Amanda; Teng, Cecilia C; Battaglia, Frederick C; Galan, Henry L

    2012-03-01

    TonEBP/NFAT5 (the tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/nuclear factor of activated T cells) modulates cellular response to osmotic changes by accumulating inositol and sorbitol inside the cells. Our objective was to assess placental osmolytes, TonEBP/NFAT5 RNA and protein expression, and signaling molecules across gestation between control and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) ovine pregnancies. Pregnant sheep were placed in hyperthermic conditions to induce IUGR. Placental tissues were collected at 55, 95, and 130 days gestational age (dGA) to measure inositol, sorbitol, TonEBP/NFAT5 (NFAT5), sodium-dependent myo-inositol transporter (SMIT; official symbol SLC5A3), aldose reductase (AR), and NADPH (official symbol DE-CR1). Placental weight was reduced in IUGR compared to controls at 95 and 130 dGA. Osmolyte concentrations were similar between control and IUGR placentas, but both groups demonstrated a significant decrease in inositol concentration and an increase in sorbitol concentration with advancing gestation. Cytosolic NFAT5 protein decreased significantly from 55 to 95 dGA in both groups, and nuclear NFAT5 protein increased only at 130 dGA in the IUGR group, but no differences were seen between groups for either cytosolic or nuclear NFAT5 protein concentrations. DE-CR1 concentrations were similar between groups and increased significantly with advancing gestational age. AR was lowest at 55dGA, and SLC5A3 increased with advancing gestational age. We conclude that both placental osmolytes inositol and sorbitol (and their corresponding proteins SLC5A3 and AR) change with gestational age and are regulated, at least in part, by NFAT5 and DE-CR1 (NADPH). The inverse relationship between each osmolyte across gestation (e.g., inositol higher in early gestation and sorbitol higher in late gestation) may reflect nutritional needs that change across gestation. PMID:22190709

  8. Poultry enteric inflammation model with dextran sodium sulfate mediated chemical induction and feed restriction in broilers.

    PubMed

    Kuttappan, V A; Berghman, L R; Vicuña, E A; Latorre, J D; Menconi, A; Wolchok, J D; Wolfenden, A D; Faulkner, O B; Tellez, G I; Hargis, B M; Bielke, L R

    2015-06-01

    Gut inflammation is a cardinal event occurring in various gastrointestinal diseases regardless of etiology. A potential mechanism of action for antibiotic growth promoters and probiotics is alleviation or attenuation of such inflammation. In vivo inflammation models and markers to quantify changes in inflammation, such as paracellular leakage and tight junction function, are necessary tools in the search for methods to reduce enteric inflammation. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) and feed restriction (FRS), and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d; 3 to 5 kDa) marker were evaluated for induction and assessment of enteric inflammation in broilers. Three independent experiments were conducted where birds received an inflammation inducer treatment and an oral gavage of FITC-d (2.2 mg/bird) 2.5 h before killing on d 4, followed by measurement of serum FITC-d levels and release of FITC-d from different regions of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) to evaluate tight junction function. Experiment 1 tested control (CON) and DSS; Experiments 2 and 3 evaluated CON, DSS, and FRS. In all experiments DSS, as well as FRS in Experiments 2 and 3, showed higher (P<0.05) leakage of FITC-d into serum than CON, but FRS was not different from DSS. The amount of FITC-d retained in duodenal and cecal tissue was affected (P<0.05) by FRS in Experiments 2 and 3, and DSS affected FITC-d retention in duodenum only, suggesting differences in gut passage or absorption/adsorption. In conclusion, DSS oral gavage and FRS could induce leaky gut, with changes in serum FITC-d and migration of FITC-d from GIT. PMID:25877409

  9. Characterisation and modelling of conduit restricted karst aquifers - Example of the Auja spring, Jordan Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Geyer, Tobias; Guttman, Joseph; Marei, Amer; Ries, Fabian; Sauter, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The conduit system of mature karstified carbonate aquifers is typically characterised by a high hydraulic conductivity and does not impose a major flow constriction on catchment discharge. As a result, discharge at karst springs is usually flashy and displays pronounced peaks following recharge events. In contrast, some karst springs reported in literature display a discharge maximum, attributed to reaching the finite discharge capacity of the conduit system (flow threshold). This phenomenon also often leads to a non-standard recession behaviour, a so called “convex recession”, i.e. an increase in the recession coefficient during flow recession, which in turn might be used as an indicator for conduit restricted aquifers. The main objective of the study is the characterisation and modelling of those hydrogeologically challenging aquifers. The applied approach consists of a combination of hydrometric monitoring, a spring hydrograph recession and event analysis, as well as the setup and calibration of a non-linear reservoir model. It is demonstrated for the Auja spring, the largest freshwater spring in the Lower Jordan Valley. The semi-arid environment with its short but intensive precipitation events and an extended dry season leads to sharp input signals and undisturbed recession periods. The spring displays complex recession behaviour, exhibiting exponential (coefficient α) and linear (coefficient β) recession periods. Numerous different recession coefficients α were observed: ∼0.2 to 0.8 d-1 (presumably main conduit system), 0.004 d-1 (fractured matrix), 0.0009 d-1 (plateau caused by flow threshold being exceeded), plus many intermediate values. The reasons for this observed behaviour are the outflow threshold at 0.47 m3 s-1 and a variable conduit-matrix cross-flow in the aquifer. Despite system complexity, and hence the necessity of incorporating features such as a flow threshold, conduit-matrix cross-flow, and a spatially variable soil/epikarst field

  10. Effects of T592 phosphomimetic mutations on tetramer stability and dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 can not explain the retroviral restriction defect.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Akash; Wang, Zhonghua; White, Tommy; Buffone, Cindy; Nguyen, Laura A; Shepard, Caitlin N; Kim, Baek; Demeler, Borries; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Ivanov, Dmitri N

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1, a dNTP triphosphohydrolase, contributes to interferon signaling and restriction of retroviral replication. SAMHD1-mediated retroviral restriction is thought to result from the depletion of cellular dNTP pools, but it remains controversial whether the dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 is sufficient for restriction. The restriction ability of SAMHD1 is regulated in cells by phosphorylation on T592. Phosphomimetic mutations of T592 are not restriction competent, but appear intact in their ability to deplete cellular dNTPs. Here we use analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence polarization and NMR-based enzymatic assays to investigate the impact of phosphomimetic mutations on SAMHD1 tetramerization and dNTPase activity in vitro. We find that phosphomimetic mutations affect kinetics of tetramer assembly and disassembly, but their effects on tetramerization equilibrium and dNTPase activity are insignificant. In contrast, the Y146S/Y154S dimerization-defective mutant displays a severe dNTPase defect in vitro, but is indistinguishable from WT in its ability to deplete cellular dNTP pools and to restrict HIV replication. Our data suggest that the effect of T592 phosphorylation on SAMHD1 tetramerization is not likely to explain the retroviral restriction defect, and we hypothesize that enzymatic activity of SAMHD1 is subject to additional cellular regulatory mechanisms that have not yet been recapitulated in vitro. PMID:27511536

  11. Effects of T592 phosphomimetic mutations on tetramer stability and dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 can not explain the retroviral restriction defect

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Akash; Wang, Zhonghua; White, Tommy; Buffone, Cindy; Nguyen, Laura A.; Shepard, Caitlin N.; Kim, Baek; Demeler, Borries; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Ivanov, Dmitri N.

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1, a dNTP triphosphohydrolase, contributes to interferon signaling and restriction of retroviral replication. SAMHD1-mediated retroviral restriction is thought to result from the depletion of cellular dNTP pools, but it remains controversial whether the dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 is sufficient for restriction. The restriction ability of SAMHD1 is regulated in cells by phosphorylation on T592. Phosphomimetic mutations of T592 are not restriction competent, but appear intact in their ability to deplete cellular dNTPs. Here we use analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence polarization and NMR-based enzymatic assays to investigate the impact of phosphomimetic mutations on SAMHD1 tetramerization and dNTPase activity in vitro. We find that phosphomimetic mutations affect kinetics of tetramer assembly and disassembly, but their effects on tetramerization equilibrium and dNTPase activity are insignificant. In contrast, the Y146S/Y154S dimerization-defective mutant displays a severe dNTPase defect in vitro, but is indistinguishable from WT in its ability to deplete cellular dNTP pools and to restrict HIV replication. Our data suggest that the effect of T592 phosphorylation on SAMHD1 tetramerization is not likely to explain the retroviral restriction defect, and we hypothesize that enzymatic activity of SAMHD1 is subject to additional cellular regulatory mechanisms that have not yet been recapitulated in vitro. PMID:27511536

  12. Plasma membrane restricted RhoGEF activity is sufficient for RhoA-mediated actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    van Unen, Jakobus; Reinhard, Nathalie R.; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I.; Postma, Marten; Gadella, Theodorus W.J.; Goedhart, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoA is involved in cell morphology and migration. RhoA activity is tightly regulated in time and space and depends on guanine exchange factors (GEFs). However, the kinetics and subcellular localization of GEF activity towards RhoA are poorly defined. To study the mechanism underlying the spatiotemporal control of RhoA activity by GEFs, we performed single cell imaging with an improved FRET sensor reporting on the nucleotide loading state of RhoA. By employing the FRET sensor we show that a plasma membrane located RhoGEF, p63RhoGEF, can rapidly activate RhoA through endogenous GPCRs and that localized RhoA activity at the cell periphery correlates with actin polymerization. Moreover, synthetic recruitment of the catalytic domain derived from p63RhoGEF to the plasma membrane, but not to the Golgi apparatus, is sufficient to activate RhoA. The synthetic system enables local activation of endogenous RhoA and effectively induces actin polymerization and changes in cellular morphology. Together, our data demonstrate that GEF activity at the plasma membrane is sufficient for actin polymerization via local RhoA signaling. PMID:26435194

  13. CD252 regulates mast cell mediated, CD1d-restricted NKT-cell activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Roldan, Nestor; Orinska, Zane; Ewers, Hanno; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between tissue-resident mast cells (MCs) and recruited immune cells contributes to tissue immunosurveillance. However, the cells, mechanisms, and receptors involved in this crosstalk remain ill defined. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are CD1d-restricted innate lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens and have emerged as critical players in immunity. Here, we show that primary mouse peritoneal MCs express surface CD1d, which is upregulated in vivo following administration of alpha-galactosylceramide. In contrast, in BM-derived MCs CD1d was found to be stored intracellularly and to relocate at the cell surface upon IgE-mediated degranulation. Activated BM-derived MCs expressing surface CD1d and loaded with alpha-galactosylceramide were found to induce iNKT-cell proliferation and the release of IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-4 in a CD1d-restricted manner. Moreover, the costimulatory molecules CD48, CD137L, CD252, CD274, and CD275 affected MC-induced IFN-γ release and iNKT-cell proliferation. Interestingly, among the costimulatory molecules, CD48 and CD252 exhibited a distinctly regulatory activity on iNKT-cell release of both IFN-γ and IL-13. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the crosstalk between MCs and iNKT cells may regulate inflammatory immune responses. PMID:26564814

  14. Regulated CRISPR Modules Exploit a Dual Defense Strategy of Restriction and Abortive Infection in a Model of Prokaryote-Phage Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. Senthil; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    CRISPRs offer adaptive immunity in prokaryotes by acquiring genomic fragments from infecting phage and subsequently exploiting them for phage restriction via an RNAi-like mechanism. Here, we develop and analyze a dynamical model of CRISPR-mediated prokaryote-phage coevolution that incorporates classical CRISPR kinetics along with the recently discovered infection-induced activation and autoimmunity side effects. Our analyses reveal two striking characteristics of the CRISPR defense strategy: that both restriction and abortive infections operate during coevolution with phages, driving phages to much lower densities than possible with restriction alone, and that CRISPR maintenance is determined by a key dimensionless combination of parameters, which upper bounds the activation level of CRISPRs in uninfected populations. We contrast these qualitative observations with experimental data on CRISPR kinetics, which offer insight into the spacer deletion mechanism and the observed low CRISPR prevalence in clinical isolates. More generally, we exploit numerical simulations to delineate four regimes of CRISPR dynamics in terms of its host, kinetic, and regulatory parameters. PMID:26544847

  15. Junctionally restricted RhoA activity is necessary for apical constriction during phase 2 inner ear placode invagination.

    PubMed

    Sai, Xiaorei; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Ladher, Raj K

    2014-10-15

    After induction, the inner ear is transformed from a superficially located otic placode into an epithelial vesicle embedded in the mesenchyme of the head. Invagination of this epithelium is biphasic: phase 1 involves the expansion of the basal aspect of the otic cells, and phase 2, the constriction of their apices. Apical constriction is important not only for otic invagination, but also the invagination of many other epithelia; however, its molecular basis is still poorly understood. Here we show that phase 2 otic morphogenesis, like phase 1 morphogenesis, results from the activation of myosin-II. However unlike the actin depolymerising activity observed basally, active myosin-II results in actomyosin contractility. Myosin-II activation is triggered by the accumulation of the planar cell polarity (PCP) core protein, Celsr1 in apical junctions (AJ). Apically polarized Celsr1 orients and recruits the Rho Guanine exchange factor (GEF) ArhGEF11 to apical junctions, thus restricting RhoA activity to the junctional membrane where it activates the Rho kinase ROCK. We suggest that myosin-II and RhoA activation results in actomyosin dependent constriction in an apically polarised manner driving otic epithelium invagination. PMID:25173873

  16. Serotonin suppresses food anticipatory activity and synchronizes the food-entrainable oscillator during time-restricted feeding.

    PubMed

    Rozenblit-Susan, Sigal; Chapnik, Nava; Genzer, Yoni; Froy, Oren

    2016-01-15

    The serotonergic and circadian systems are intertwined as serotonin modulates the response of the central brain suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) clock to light. Time-restricted feeding (RF) is characterized by increased food anticipatory activity (FAA) and controlled by the food-entrainable oscillator (FEO) rather than the SCN. Our objective was to test whether serotonin affects the FEO. Mice were treated with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine (FLX) or the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA) and locomotor activity under ad libitum feeding, RF and different lighting conditions was monitored. Under AL, FLX administration did not affect 24-h locomotor activity, while mice treated with PCPA exhibited increased activity. RF-FLX-treated mice showed less FAA 2h before food availability (ZT2-ZT4) compared to RF- or RF-PCPA-fed mice. Under DD, RF-PCPA-treated mice displayed increased activity, as was seen under LD conditions. Surprisingly, RF-PCPA-treated mice showed free running in the FAA component. These results emphasize the role of serotonin in SCN-mediated activity inhibition and FEO entrainment and activity. PMID:26467604

  17. Francisella tularensis Catalase Restricts Immune Function by Impairing TRPM2 Channel Activity.

    PubMed

    Shakerley, Nicole L; Chandrasekaran, Akshaya; Trebak, Mohamed; Miller, Barbara A; Melendez, J Andrés

    2016-02-19

    As an innate defense mechanism, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species that weaken pathogens and serve as secondary messengers involved in immune function. The Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis utilizes its antioxidant armature to limit the host immune response, but the mechanism behind this suppression is not defined. Here we establish that F. tularensis limits Ca(2+) entry in macrophages, thereby limiting actin reorganization and IL-6 production in a redox-dependent fashion. Wild type (live vaccine strain) or catalase-deficient F. tularensis (ΔkatG) show distinct profiles in their H2O2 scavenging rates, 1 and 0.015 pm/s, respectively. Murine alveolar macrophages infected with ΔkatG display abnormally high basal intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that did not increase further in response to H2O2. Additionally, ΔkatG-infected macrophages displayed limited Ca(2+) influx in response to ionomycin, as a result of ionophore H2O2 sensitivity. Exogenously added H2O2 or H2O2 generated by ΔkatG likely oxidizes ionomycin and alters its ability to transport Ca(2+). Basal increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) and insensitivity to H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry in ΔkatG-infected cells are reversed by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitors 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and SKF-96365. 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate but not SKF-96365 abrogated ΔkatG-dependent increases in macrophage actin remodeling and IL-6 secretion, suggesting a role for H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry through the transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channel in macrophages. Indeed, increases in basal Ca(2+), actin polymerization, and IL-6 production are reversed in TRPM2-null macrophages infected with ΔkatG. Together, our findings provide compelling evidence that F. tularensis catalase restricts reactive oxygen species to temper macrophage TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and limit host immune function. PMID:26679996

  18. Psychological, Physical and Sensory Correlates of Fear of Falling and Consequent Activity Restriction in the Elderly: The InCHIANTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Nandini; Metter, E. Jeffery; Bandinelli, Stefania; Lauretani, Fulvio; Windham, B. Gwen; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify psychological, physical and sensory function parameters that are specifically associated with fear of falling (FF) and fear-induced activity restriction in a population-based sample of older adults. DESIGN FF, fear-induced activity restriction, cognition, depression, personal mastery, chair stand performance, standing balance, lower limb and grip strength, visual acuity and contrast sensitivity and vibrotactile sensitivity were evaluated in the population-based older cohort (n=926, age ≥ 65) enrolled in the InCHIANTI study. RESULTS Nearly 50% participants reported FF. Of these, 65% reported some activity restriction. Personal mastery (p< .001) and chair standing performance (p= .001) were independently associated with FF. In those who did not have depression, personal mastery, standing balance, lower limb strength and visual contrast sensitivity were associated with activity restriction (p<.001 to .011). In those who were depressed, Total FF was the major factor strongly associated with activity restriction (p< .001) with marginal but significant association for cognition (p= .027) and standing balance (p= .015). CONCLUSION Psychological and physical factors are independently associated with FF. Presence of depression possibly modulates what factors in addition to fear of falling affect fear-induced activity restriction. A longitudinal study is warranted to substantiate causal relationships. PMID:18174852

  19. The effects of lighting conditions and food restriction paradigms on locomotor activity of common spiny mice, Acomys cahirinus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An endogenous circadian clock controls locomotor activity in common spiny mice (Acomys cahirinus). However, little is known about the effects of constant light (LL) on this activity or about the existence of an additional food entrainable clock. A series of experiments were performed to investigate the effects of LL and DD on tau and activity levels. Methods Spiny mice were housed individually and their running wheel activity monitored. One group of mice was exposed to LD, DD and several intensities of LL. Another group was exposed to a restricted feeding (RF) paradigm in light: dark (LD) during one hour before the L to D transition. Significance of rhythmicity was assessed using Lomb-Scargle periodograms. Results In LD all animals exhibited nocturnal activity rhythms that persisted in DD. When animals were exposed to RF (during L), all of these animals (n = 11) demonstrated significant food anticipatory activity as well as an increase in diurnal activity. This increase in diurnal activity persisted in 4/11 animals during subsequent ad libitum conditions. Under LL conditions, the locomotor rhythms of 2/11 animals appeared to entrain to RF. When animals were exposed to sequentially increasing LL intensities, rhythmicity persisted and, while activity decreased significantly, the free-running period was relatively unaffected. In addition, the period in LL was significantly longer than the period in DD. Exposure to LL also induced long-term changes (after-effects) on period and activity when animals were again exposed to DD. Conclusions Overall these studies demonstrate clear and robust circadian rhythms of wheel-running in A. cahirinus. In addition, LL clearly inhibited activity in this species and induced after-effects. The results also confirm the presence of a food entrainable oscillator in this species. PMID:22958374

  20. Repetitive and Retinotopically Restricted Activation of the Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus with Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Castonguay, Alexandre; Thomas, Sébastien; Lesage, Frédéric; Casanova, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetics allows the control of cellular activity using focused delivery of light pulses. In neuroscience, optogenetic protocols have been shown to efficiently inhibit or stimulate neuronal activity with a high temporal resolution. Among the technical challenges associated with the use of optogenetics, one is the ability to target a spatially specific population of neurons in a given brain structure. To address this issue, we developed a side-illuminating optical fiber capable of delivering light to specific sites in a target nucleus with added flexibility through rotation and translation of the fiber and by varying the output light power. The designed optical fiber was tested in vivo in visual structures of ChR2-expressing transgenic mice. To assess the spatial extent of neuronal activity modulation, we took advantage of the hallmark of the visual system: its retinotopic organization. Indeed, the relative position of ganglion cells in the retina is transposed in the cellular topography of both the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in the thalamus and the primary visual cortex (V1). The optical fiber was inserted in the LGN and by rotating it with a motor, it was possible to sequentially activate different neuronal populations within this structure. The activation of V1 neurons by LGN projections was recorded using intrinsic optical imaging. Increasing light intensity (from 1.4 to 8.9 mW/mm2) led to increasing activation surfaces in V1. Optogenetic stimulation of the LGN at different translational and rotational positions was associated with different activation maps in V1. The position and/or orientation of the fiber inevitably varied across experiments, thus limiting the capacity to pool data. With the optogenetic design presented here, we demonstrate for the first time a transitory and spatially-concise activation of a deep neuronal structure. The optogenetic design presented here thus opens a promising avenue for studying the function of deep brain

  1. Repetitive and retinotopically restricted activation of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus with optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Castonguay, Alexandre; Thomas, Sébastien; Lesage, Frédéric; Casanova, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetics allows the control of cellular activity using focused delivery of light pulses. In neuroscience, optogenetic protocols have been shown to efficiently inhibit or stimulate neuronal activity with a high temporal resolution. Among the technical challenges associated with the use of optogenetics, one is the ability to target a spatially specific population of neurons in a given brain structure. To address this issue, we developed a side-illuminating optical fiber capable of delivering light to specific sites in a target nucleus with added flexibility through rotation and translation of the fiber and by varying the output light power. The designed optical fiber was tested in vivo in visual structures of ChR2-expressing transgenic mice. To assess the spatial extent of neuronal activity modulation, we took advantage of the hallmark of the visual system: its retinotopic organization. Indeed, the relative position of ganglion cells in the retina is transposed in the cellular topography of both the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in the thalamus and the primary visual cortex (V1). The optical fiber was inserted in the LGN and by rotating it with a motor, it was possible to sequentially activate different neuronal populations within this structure. The activation of V1 neurons by LGN projections was recorded using intrinsic optical imaging. Increasing light intensity (from 1.4 to 8.9 mW/mm²) led to increasing activation surfaces in V1. Optogenetic stimulation of the LGN at different translational and rotational positions was associated with different activation maps in V1. The position and/or orientation of the fiber inevitably varied across experiments, thus limiting the capacity to pool data. With the optogenetic design presented here, we demonstrate for the first time a transitory and spatially-concise activation of a deep neuronal structure. The optogenetic design presented here thus opens a promising avenue for studying the function of deep brain

  2. Modulation of body fluids and angiotensin II receptors in a rat model of intra-uterine growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Sophie; Sicotte, Benoit; St-Louis, Jean; Brochu, Michèle

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that sodium restriction during pregnancy reduces plasma volume expansion and promotes intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) in rats while it activates the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS). In the present study, we proceeded to determine whether expression of the two angiotensin II (ANGII) receptor subtypes (AT1 and AT2) change in relation to maternal water–electrolyte homeostasis and fetal growth. To this end, pregnant (gestation day 15) and non-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups fed either normal, or Na+-restricted diets for 7 days. At the end of the treatment period, plasma aldosterone and renin activity as well as plasma and urine electrolytes were measured. Determinations for AT1 and AT2 mRNA and protein were made by RNase protection assay and photoaffinity labelling, respectively, using a number of tissues implicated in volume regulation and fetal growth. In non-pregnant rats, Na+ restriction decreases Na+ excretion without altering plasma volume, plasma Na+ concentration or the expression of AT1 and AT2 mRNA or protein in the tissues examined. In normally fed pregnant rats when compared to non-pregnant controls, AT1 mRNA increases in the hypothalamus as well as pituitary and declines in uterine arteries, while AT1 protein decreases in the kidney and AT2 mRNA declines in the adrenal cortex. In pregnant rats, Na+ restriction induces a decrease in plasma Na+, an increase in plasma urea, as well as a decline in renal urea and creatinine clearance rates. Protein levels for both AT1 and AT2 in the pituitary and AT2 mRNA in the adrenal cortex are lower in the Na+-restricted pregnant group when compared to normally fed pregnant animals. Na+ restriction also induces a decrease in AT1 protein in the placenta. In conclusion, these results suggest that pregnancy may increase sensitivity to Na+ depletion by the tissue-specific modulation of ANGII receptors. Finally, these receptors may be implicated

  3. Activation of different Stat5 isoforms contributes to cell-type-restricted signaling in response to interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, A; Barahmand-Pour, F; Wöhrl, S; Stoiber, D; Decker, T

    1996-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the transcription factor Stat5 occur in response to stimuli like granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3, or erythropoietin that stimulate both proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. It is unclear whether Stat5 is part of a proliferative response or part of the events leading to cellular differentiation. Here we report that agents promoting differentiation but not proliferation of hematopoietic cells, like phorbol ester or both types of interferons (IFNs), activate Stat5 in promonocytic U937 cells. Both IFN types caused tyrosine phosphorylation and DNA binding of predominantly one Stat5 isoform (Stat5a) despite expression of both Stat5a and Stat5b proteins. Monocytic differentiation of U937 cells led to a strong decrease in IFN-gamma-mediated activation of Stat5 but not of Stat1. Transactivation of Stat5-target genes occurred in response to IFN-gamma, which activates both Stat5 and Stat1, but not in response to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, which activates only Stat5. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat5 is not generally part of the IFN response. IFN-gamma did not cause Stat5 activation in HeLa cells, despite the expression of both Stat5 isoforms at similar levels. By contrast, IFN-alpha caused tyrosine phosphorylation and DNA binding of exclusively the b isoform of Stat5, and activated Stat5b formed a DNA binding activity previously found in HeLa cells and designated IFN-alpha activation factor 2. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ligand binding of IFN receptors leads to an isoform-specific activation of Stat5 in a restricted number of cell lineages. Moreover, they suggest that Stat5 might be part of the differentiation response of myeloid cells. PMID:8943349

  4. Apigenin Restricts FMDV Infection and Inhibits Viral IRES Driven Translational Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Suhong; Fan, Wenchun; Qian, Ping; Zhang, Dong; Wei, Yurong; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of domestic and wild ruminants that is caused by FMD virus (FMDV). FMD outbreaks have occurred in livestock-containing regions worldwide. Apigenin, which is a flavonoid naturally existing in plant, possesses various pharmacological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antioxidant and antiviral activities. Results show that apigenin can inhibit FMDV-mediated cytopathogenic effect and FMDV replication in vitro. Further studies demonstrate the following: (i) apigenin inhibits FMDV infection at the viral post-entry stage; (ii) apigenin does not exhibit direct extracellular virucidal activity; and (iii) apigenin interferes with the translational activity of FMDV driven by internal ribosome entry site. Studies on applying apigein in vivo are required for drug development and further identification of potential drug targets against FDMV infection. PMID:25835532

  5. A continuous enzyme-coupled assay for triphosphohydrolase activity of HIV-1 restriction factor SAMHD1.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Laurence H; Kunzelmann, Simone; Webb, Martin R; Taylor, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    The development of deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP)-based drugs requires a quantitative understanding of any inhibition, activation, or hydrolysis by off-target cellular enzymes. SAMHD1 is a regulatory dNTP-triphosphohydrolase that inhibits HIV-1 replication in human myeloid cells. We describe here an enzyme-coupled assay for quantifying the activation, inhibition, and hydrolysis of dNTPs, nucleotide analogues, and nucleotide analogue inhibitors by triphosphohydrolase enzymes. The assay facilitates mechanistic studies of triphosphohydrolase enzymes and the quantification of off-target effects of nucleotide-based antiviral and chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25331707

  6. 15 CFR 744.6 - Restrictions on certain activities of U.S. persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... activities unrelated to exports. No U.S. person shall, without a license from BIS: (i) Perform any contract... 740 of the EAR); or (ii) Perform any contract, service, or employment that the U.S. person knows will... apply to the prohibitions described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section. (e) License...

  7. 20 CFR 668.350 - Are there any restrictions on allowable activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT..., as described in WIA section 181(d) and 20 CFR 667.268. (e) INA grantees must only use WIA funds for activities which are in addition to those that would otherwise be available to the Native American...

  8. 20 CFR 668.350 - Are there any restrictions on allowable activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT..., as described in WIA section 181(d) and 20 CFR 667.268. (e) INA grantees must only use WIA funds for activities which are in addition to those that would otherwise be available to the Native American...

  9. 20 CFR 668.350 - Are there any restrictions on allowable activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT..., as described in WIA section 181(d) and 20 CFR 667.268. (e) INA grantees must only use WIA funds for activities which are in addition to those that would otherwise be available to the Native American...

  10. 20 CFR 668.350 - Are there any restrictions on allowable activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... 195(4).) (d) INA grantees are prohibited from using funds to encourage the relocation of a business, as described in WIA section 181(d) and 20 CFR 667.268. (e) INA grantees must only use WIA funds for... way affect union organizing. (g) Under 20 CFR 667.266, sectarian activities involving WIA...

  11. The Geriatric Hand: Correlation of Hand-Muscle Function and Activity Restriction in Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Incel, Nurgul Arinci; Sezgin, Melek; As, Ismet; Cimen, Ozlem Bolgen; Sahin, Gunsah

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the importance of hand manipulation in activities of daily living (ADL), deterioration of hand function because of various factors reduces quality and independence of life of the geriatric population. The aim of this study was to identify age-induced changes in manual function and to quantify the correlations between hand-muscle…

  12. Calcium metabolism in bone and teeth of rats during exposure to restriction of motor activity and to swimming exercise.

    PubMed

    Zorbas, Y G; Charapakhin, K P; Kuznetsov, N A; Kakurin, V J

    1999-06-01

    The effects of motor activity restriction for 90 days (hypokinesia, HK) and swimming training (T) on calcium metabolism in rat bones and teeth were evaluated. Male Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: untrained vivarium control rats (UVCR), untrained hypokinetic rats (UHKR), trained hypokinetic rats (THKR) and trained vivarium control rats (TVCR). Hypokinesia was obtained keeping the animals for 90 days in small individual cages which restricted their movements in all directions without hindering food and water intakes. Rats of THKR and TVCR were forced to swim for 15 to 90 minutes everyday. On the 1st, 7th, 15th day of a prehypokinetic period and on the 5th, 10th, 20th, 40th, 60th and 90th day of the hypokinetic period, six rats of each group were decapitated. Radioactive calcium was injected to the animals 70 days before autopsy. Calcium and phosphorus in serum, bones (molars, incisors, upper and lower jaws, parietal, scapular, clavicle, pelvic and tibial bones) and in the respective ash residues were measured. Body and bone weights, and radioactive calcium were also determined. Under prolonged exposure to HK (THKR and UHKR groups), bone weights and bone and ash Ca and P concentrations decreased, whereas serum Ca and P and 45Ca resorption increased, in comparison to the respective values in the UVCR and TVCR groups. Swimming exercise apparently did not modify calcium metabolism in the hypokinetic or control rats. PMID:10517263

  13. Synthesis and Antitumor Activity of 1,5-Disubstituted 1,2,4-Triazoles as Cis-Restricted Combretastatin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Romeo; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Cruz-Lopez, Olga; Lopez Cara, Carlota; Carrion, Maria Dora; Brancale, Andrea; Hamel, Ernest; Chen, Longchuan; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2010-01-01

    A series of 1-aryl-5-(3′,4′,5′-trimethoxyphenyl) derivatives and their related 1-(3′,4′,5′-trimethoxyphenyl)-5-aryl-1,2,4-triazoles, designed as cis-restricted combretastatin analogues, were synthesized and evaluated for antiproliferative activity, inhibitory effects on tubulin polymerization, cell cycle effects, and apoptosis induction. Their activity was greater than, or comparable with, that of the reference compound CA-4. Flow cytometry studies showed that HeLa and Jurkat cells treated with the most active compounds 4l and 4o were arrested in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle in a concentration dependent manner. This effect was accompanied by apoptosis of the cells, mitochondrial depolarization, generation of reactive oxygen species, activation of caspase-3, and PARP cleavage. Compound 4l was also shown to have potential antivascular activity, since it induced endothelial cell shape change in vitro and disrupted the sprouting of endothelial cells in the chick aortic ring assay. PMID:20420439

  14. Enzymes of Glycerol and Glyceraldehyde Metabolism in Mouse Liver: Effects of Caloric Restriction and Age on Activities

    PubMed Central

    Hagopian, Kevork; Ramsey, Jon J.; Weindruch, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis The influence of caloric restriction on hepatic glyceraldehyde and glycerol metabolizing enzyme activities of young and old mice were studied. Glycerol kinase and cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activities were increased in both young and old CR mice when compared to controls, while triokinase increased only in old CR mice. Aldehyde dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase activities in both young and old CR were unchanged by CR. Mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed a trend towards an increased activity in old CR mice, while a trend towards a decreased activity in alcohol dehydrogenase was observed in both young and old CR mice. Serum glycerol levels decreased in young and old CR mice. Therefore, increases in glycerol kinase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were associated with a decrease in fasting blood glycerol levels in CR animals. A prominent role for triokinase in glyceraldehyde metabolism with CR was also observed. The results indicate that long-term CR induces sustained increases in the capacity for gluconeogenesis from glycerol. PMID:18429748

  15. Calorie restriction does not restore brain mitochondrial function in P301L tau mice, but it does decrease mitochondrial F0F1-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Delic, Vedad; Brownlow, Milene; Joly-Amado, Aurelie; Zivkovic, Sandra; Noble, Kenyaria; Phan, Tam-Anh; Ta, Yen; Zhang, Yumeng; Bell, Stephen D; Kurien, Crupa; Reynes, Christian; Morgan, Dave; Bradshaw, Patrick C

    2015-07-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) has been shown to increase lifespan and delay aging phenotypes in many diverse eukaryotic species. In mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), CR has been shown to decrease amyloid-beta and hyperphosphorylated tau levels and preserve cognitive function. Overexpression of human mutant tau protein has been shown to induce deficits in mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I activity. Therefore, experiments were performed to determine the effects of 4-month CR on brain mitochondrial function in Tg4510 mice, which express human P301L tau. Expression of mutant tau led to decreased ADP-stimulated respiratory rates, but not uncoupler-stimulated respiratory rates. The membrane potential was also slightly higher in mitochondria from the P301L tau mice. As shown previously, tau expression decreased mitochondrial complex I activity. The decreased complex I activity, decreased ADP-stimulated respiratory rate, and increased mitochondrial membrane potential occurring in mitochondria from Tg4510 mice were not restored by CR. However, the CR diet did result in a genotype independent decrease in mitochondrial F0F1-ATPase activity. This decrease in F0F1-ATPase activity was not due to lowered levels of the alpha or beta subunits of F0F1-ATPase. The possible mechanisms through which CR reduces the F0F1-ATPase activity in brain mitochondria are discussed. PMID:26048366

  16. Restoration of physical performance capacity of athletes after prolonged restriction of their motor activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soldatov, A. D.; Finogeyev, V. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of different regimens of treatment following prolonged hypokinesia were studied in order to determine the most effective program. The types of programs considered were passive means, consisting of physical therapy; active means, consisting of athletic training; and a combined program. In the first stage of the experiment, the effects of a 10 day period of hypokinesia were studied. It was determined that the restoration programs must address the problems of: (1) increasing defense function and general tone of the body; (2) restore orthostatic stability; and (3) increase general endurance. In later stages, groups of athletes and nonathletes underwent 30 day periods of hypokinesia. Restoration was carefully monitored for groups treated with the various regimens. It was determined that the most effective treatment was a comprehensive program of passive and active therapy.

  17. Cardiac Glycosides Activate the Tumor Suppressor and Viral Restriction Factor Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein (PML)

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Chao, Elizabeth; Dewing, Antimone; Solano, Ricardo; Milan, Loribelle; Barron, Nikki; He, Min; Diaz, Paul W.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Reed, John C.; Hassig, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides (CGs), inhibitors of Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), used clinically to treat heart failure, have garnered recent attention as potential anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. A high-throughput phenotypic screen designed to identify modulators of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear body (NB) formation revealed the CG gitoxigenin as a potent activator of PML. We demonstrate that multiple structurally distinct CGs activate the formation of PML NBs and induce PML protein SUMOylation in an NKA-dependent fashion. CG effects on PML occur at the post-transcriptional level, mechanistically distinct from previously described PML activators and are mediated through signaling events downstream of NKA. Curiously, genomic deletion of PML in human cancer cells failed to abrogate the cytotoxic effects of CGs and other apoptotic stimuli such as ceramide and arsenic trioxide that were previously shown to function through PML in mice. These findings suggest that alternative pathways can compensate for PML loss to mediate apoptosis in response to CGs and other apoptotic stimuli. PMID:27031987

  18. Cardiac Glycosides Activate the Tumor Suppressor and Viral Restriction Factor Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein (PML).

    PubMed

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Chao, Elizabeth; Dewing, Antimone; Solano, Ricardo; Milan, Loribelle; Barron, Nikki; He, Min; Diaz, Paul W; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Reed, John C; Hassig, Christian A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides (CGs), inhibitors of Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), used clinically to treat heart failure, have garnered recent attention as potential anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. A high-throughput phenotypic screen designed to identify modulators of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear body (NB) formation revealed the CG gitoxigenin as a potent activator of PML. We demonstrate that multiple structurally distinct CGs activate the formation of PML NBs and induce PML protein SUMOylation in an NKA-dependent fashion. CG effects on PML occur at the post-transcriptional level, mechanistically distinct from previously described PML activators and are mediated through signaling events downstream of NKA. Curiously, genomic deletion of PML in human cancer cells failed to abrogate the cytotoxic effects of CGs and other apoptotic stimuli such as ceramide and arsenic trioxide that were previously shown to function through PML in mice. These findings suggest that alternative pathways can compensate for PML loss to mediate apoptosis in response to CGs and other apoptotic stimuli. PMID:27031987

  19. Restriction of Replication Fork Regression Activities by a Conserved SMC Complex

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Choi, Koyi; Bonner, Jaclyn; Chiba, Tamara; Kwon, Youngho; Xu, Yuanyuan; Sanchez, Humberto; Wyman, Claire; Niu, Hengyao; Zhao, Xiaolan; Sung, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Conserved, multi-tasking DNA helicases mediate diverse DNA transactions and are relevant for human disease pathogenesis. These helicases and their regulation help maintain genome stability during DNA replication and repair. We show that the structural maintenance of chromosome complex Smc5-Smc6 restrains the replication fork regression activity of Mph1 helicase, but not its D-loop disruptive activity. This regulatory mechanism enables flexibility in replication fork repair without interfering with DNA break repair. In vitro studies find that Smc5-Smc6 binds to a Mph1 region required for efficient fork regression, preventing assembly of Mph1 oligomers at the junction of DNA forks. In vivo impairment of this regulatory mechanism compensates for the inactivation of another fork regression helicase and increases reliance on joint DNA structure removal or avoidance. Our findings provide molecular insights into replication fork repair regulation and uncover a role of Smc5-Smc6 in directing Mph1 activity towards a specific biochemical outcome. PMID:25439736

  20. Restricted three-body problem in effective-field-theory models of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Emmanuele; Esposito, Giampiero

    2014-04-01

    One of the outstanding problems of classical celestial mechanics was the restricted three-body problem, in which a planetoid of small mass is subject to the Newtonian attraction of two celestial bodies of large mass, as it occurs, for example, in the Sun-Earth-Moon system. On the other hand, over the last decades, a systematic investigation of quantum corrections to the Newtonian potential has been carried out in the literature on quantum gravity. The present paper studies the effect of these tiny quantum corrections on the evaluation of equilibrium points. It is shown that, despite the extreme smallness of the corrections, there exists no choice of sign of these corrections for which all qualitative features of the restricted three-body problem in Newtonian theory remain unaffected. Moreover, first-order stability of equilibrium points is characterized by solving a pair of algebraic equations of fifth degree, where some coefficients depend on the Planck length. The coordinates of stable equilibrium points are slightly changed with respect to Newtonian theory, because the planetoid is no longer at equal distance from the two bodies of large mass. The effect is conceptually interesting but too small to be observed, at least for the restricted three-body problems available in the solar system.

  1. A restricted parabrachial pontine region is active during non-REM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Torterolo, Pablo; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    The principal site that generates both REM sleep and wakefulness is located in the mesopontine reticular formation, whereas non-REM sleep (NREM) is primarily dependent upon the functioning of neurons that are located in the preoptic region of the hypothalamus. In the present study, we were interested in determining whether the occurrence of NREM might also depend on the activity of mesopontine structures, as has been shown for wakefulness and REM sleep. Adult cats were maintained in one of the following states: quiet wakefulness (QW), alert wakefulness (AW), NREM, or REM sleep induced by microinjections of carbachol into the nucleus pontis oralis (REM-carbachol). Subsequently, they were euthanized and single labeling immunohistochemical studies were undertaken to determine state-dependent patterns of neuronal activity in the brainstem based upon the expression of the protein Fos. In addition, double labeling immunohistochemical studies were carried out to detect neurons that expressed Fos as well as choline acetyltransferase, tyrosine hydroxylase or GABA. During NREM, only a few Fos immunoreactive cells were present in different regions of the brainstem; however, a discrete cluster of Fos+ neurons was observed in the caudolateral peribrachial region (CLPB). The number of the Fos+ neurons in the CLPB during NREM was significantly greater (67.9 ± 10.9, P < 0.0001) compared to QW (8.0 ± 6.7), AW (5.2 ± 4.2) or REM-carbachol (8.0 ± 4.7). In addition, there was a positive correlation (R = 0.93) between the time the animals spent in NREM and the number of Fos+ neurons in the CLPB. Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the CLPB were neither cholinergic nor catecholaminergic; however about 50% of these neurons were GABAergic. We conclude that a group of GABAergic and unidentified neurons in the CLPB are active during NREM and likely involved in the control of this behavioral state. These data open new avenues for the study of NREM, as well as for the explorations of

  2. Second-order perturbative corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction with the hole and particle approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, David

    2014-04-01

    Second-order corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction (RASCI) with the hole and particle truncation of the excitation operator are developed. Theoretically, the computational cost of the implemented perturbative approach, abbreviated as RASCI(2), grows like its single reference counterpart in MP2. Two different forms of RASCI(2) have been explored, that is the generalized Davidson-Kapuy and the Epstein-Nesbet partitions of the Hamiltonian. The preliminary results indicate that the use of energy level shift of a few tenths of a Hartree might systematically improve the accuracy of the RASCI(2) energies. The method has been tested in the computation of the ground state energy profiles along the dissociation of the hydrogen fluoride and N2 molecules, the computation of correlation energy in the G2/97 molecular test set, and in the computation of excitation energies to low-lying states in small organic molecules.

  3. Second-order perturbative corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction with the hole and particle approach

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, David

    2014-04-14

    Second-order corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction (RASCI) with the hole and particle truncation of the excitation operator are developed. Theoretically, the computational cost of the implemented perturbative approach, abbreviated as RASCI(2), grows like its single reference counterpart in MP2. Two different forms of RASCI(2) have been explored, that is the generalized Davidson-Kapuy and the Epstein-Nesbet partitions of the Hamiltonian. The preliminary results indicate that the use of energy level shift of a few tenths of a Hartree might systematically improve the accuracy of the RASCI(2) energies. The method has been tested in the computation of the ground state energy profiles along the dissociation of the hydrogen fluoride and N{sub 2} molecules, the computation of correlation energy in the G2/97 molecular test set, and in the computation of excitation energies to low-lying states in small organic molecules.

  4. Conserved Overlapping Gene Arrangement, Restricted Expression, and Biochemical Activities of DNA Polymerase ν (POLN)*

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Kei-ichi; Tomida, Junya; Reh, Shelley; Swanhart, Lisa M.; Takata, Minoru; Hukriede, Neil A.; Wood, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase ν (POLN) is one of 16 DNA polymerases encoded in vertebrate genomes. It is important to determine its gene expression patterns, biological roles, and biochemical activities. By quantitative analysis of mRNA expression, we found that POLN from the zebrafish Danio rerio is expressed predominantly in testis. POLN is not detectably expressed in zebrafish embryos or in mouse embryonic stem cells. Consistent with this, injection of POLN-specific morpholino antisense oligonucleotides did not interfere with zebrafish embryonic development. Analysis of transcripts revealed that vertebrate POLN has an unusual gene expression arrangement, sharing a first exon with HAUS3, the gene encoding augmin-like complex subunit 3. HAUS3 is broadly expressed in embryonic and adult tissues, in contrast to POLN. Differential expression of POLN and HAUS3 appears to arise by alternate splicing of transcripts in mammalian cells and zebrafish. When POLN was ectopically overexpressed in human cells, it specifically coimmunoprecipitated with the homologous recombination factors BRCA1 and FANCJ, but not with previously suggested interaction partners (HELQ and members of the Fanconi anemia core complex). Purified zebrafish POLN protein is capable of thymine glycol bypass and strand displacement, with activity dependent on a basic amino acid residue known to stabilize the primer-template. These properties are conserved with the human enzyme. Although the physiological function of pol ν remains to be clarified, this study uncovers distinctive aspects of its expression control and evolutionarily conserved properties of this DNA polymerase. PMID:26269593

  5. Adipose tissue and vascular phenotypic modulation by voluntary physical activity and dietary restriction in obese insulin-resistant OLETF rats

    PubMed Central

    Crissey, Jacqueline M.; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Lansford, Kasey A.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Bayless, David S.; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.; Rector, R. Scott; Thyfault, John P.; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT)-derived cytokines are proposed to contribute to obesity-associated vascular insulin resistance. We tested the hypothesis that voluntary physical activity and diet restriction-induced maintenance of body weight would both result in decreased AT inflammation and concomitant improvements in insulin-stimulated vascular relaxation in the hyperphagic, obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rat. Rats (aged 12 wk) were randomly assigned to sedentary (SED; n = 10), wheel running (WR; n = 10), or diet restriction (DR; n = 10; fed 70% of SED) for 8 wk. WR and DR rats exhibited markedly lower adiposity (7.1 ± 0.4 and 15.7 ± 1.1% body fat, respectively) relative to SED (27 ± 1.2% body fat), as well as improved blood lipid profiles and systemic markers of insulin resistance. Reduced adiposity in both WR and DR was associated with decreased AT mRNA expression of inflammatory genes (e.g., MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6) and markers of immune cell infiltration (e.g., CD8, CD11c, and F4/80). The extent of these effects were most pronounced in visceral AT compared with subcutaneous and periaortic AT. Markers of inflammation in brown AT were upregulated with WR but not DR. In periaortic AT, WR- and DR-induced reductions in expression and secretion of cytokines were accompanied with a more atheroprotective gene expression profile in the adjacent aortic wall. WR, but not DR, resulted in greater insulin-stimulated relaxation in the aorta; an effect that was, in part, mediated by a decrease in insulin-induced endothelin-1 activation in WR aorta. Collectively, we show in OLETF rats that lower adiposity leads to less AT and aortic inflammation, as well as an exercise-specific improvement in insulin-stimulated vasorelaxation. PMID:24523340

  6. Conformational Restriction Leading to a Selective CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist Orally Active Against Colitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The CB2 cannabinoid receptor has been implicated in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Following on from the promising activity of a series of 4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide, we developed constrained analogues based on a 2H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3(5H)-one scaffold, with improved affinity for the hCB2 receptor and had very high selectivity over the hCB1 receptor. Importantly, the lead of this series (26, hCB2: Ki = 0.39 nM, hCB1: Ki > 3000 nM) was found to protect mice against experimental colitis after oral administration. PMID:25699149

  7. Human-restricted bacterial pathogens block shedding of epithelial cells by stimulating integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Petra; Bachmann, Verena; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Hentschel, Jochen; Hauck, Christof R

    2010-09-01

    Colonization of mucosal surfaces is the key initial step in most bacterial infections. One mechanism protecting the mucosa is the rapid shedding of epithelial cells, also termed exfoliation, but it is unclear how pathogens counteract this process. We found that carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-binding bacteria colonized the urogenital tract of CEA transgenic mice, but not of wild-type mice, by suppressing exfoliation of mucosal cells. CEA binding triggered de novo expression of the transforming growth factor receptor CD105, changing focal adhesion composition and activating beta1 integrins. This manipulation of integrin inside-out signaling promotes efficient mucosal colonization and represents a potential target to prevent or cure bacterial infections. PMID:20813953

  8. Basic properties of magnetic flux tubes and restrictions on theories of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the mean longitudinal field in a magnetic flux tube is reduced, rather than enhanced, by twisting the tube to form a rope. It is shown that there is no magnetohydrostatic equilibrium when one twisted rope is wound around another. Instead there is rapid line cutting (neutral point annihilation). It is shown that the twisting increases, and the field strength decreases, along a flux tube extending upward through a stratified atmosphere. These facts are at variance with Piddington's (1975) recent suggestion that solar activity is to be understood as the result of flux tubes which are enormously concentrated by twisting, which consist of several twisted ropes wound around each other, and which came untwisted where they emerge through the photosphere.

  9. Food restriction and spontaneous motor activity in male mice: effects of feeding pattern, far-infrared ray and bamboo grass leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, H; Murayama, Y; Ishigame, H

    2001-01-01

    The effects on spontaneous motor activity of the pattern of restricted feeding, far-infrared ray (FIR) irradiation or free access in drinking water containing Sasa Health, a bamboo grass leafextract, were examined in SHN male mice at 2-3 months of age. In mice whose diet was restricted to 60% of the control, fed at 9:00 or 17:00 hours, the level of spontaneous behaviour was elevated 1 hour before the respective feeding time (8:00 or 16:00 hours). The activity was stimulated by FIR in both the control and food-restricted mice, but to a much higher degree in the latter. Treatment with Sasa Health in drinking water lowered the elevated activity level in food-restricted mice. Plasma component levels and organ weights were modulated by FIR or Sasa Health. The findings revealed that, not only the restricted feeding itsel, but also its pattern, significantly affected behaviour and that FIR and Sasa Health modified the deleterious effects of restricted feeding. PMID:11695223

  10. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood returns from the body (diastole). When the disease progresses, the heart may not pump blood strongly. The abnormal heart function can affect the lungs, liver, and other body systems. Restrictive cardiomyopathy may affect either or both of the ...

  11. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood returns from the body (diastole). When the disease progresses, the heart may not pump blood strongly. The abnormal heart function can affect the lungs, liver, and other body systems. Restrictive cardiomyopathy may affect ...

  12. Anatomically restricted synergistic anti-viral activities of innate and adaptive immune cells in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Heather D.; Reynoso, Glennys V.; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Rubin, Erica J.; Magadán, Javier G.; Cush, Stephanie S.; Gibbs, James; Molon, Barbara; Bronte, Vincenzo; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite extensive ex vivo investigation, the spatiotemporal organization of immune cells interacting with virus-infected cells in tissues remains uncertain. To address this, we used intravital multiphoton microscopy to visualize immune cell interactions with virus-infected cells following epicutaneous vaccinia virus (VV) infection of mice. VV infects keratinocytes in epidermal foci, and numerous migratory dermal inflammatory monocytes outlying the foci. We observed Ly6G+ innate immune cells infiltrating and controlling foci, while CD8+ T cells remained on the periphery killing infected monocytes. Most antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the skin did not interact with virus-infected cells. Blocking the generation of reactive nitrogen species relocated CD8+ T cells into foci, modestly reducing viral titers. Depletion of Ly6G+ and CD8+ cells dramatically increased viral titers, consistent with their synergistic but spatially segregated viral clearance activities. These findings highlight previously unappreciated differences in the anatomic specialization of antiviral immune cell subsets. PMID:23414756

  13. Calorie restriction leads to greater Akt2 activity and glucose uptake by insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle from old rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Arias, Edward B; Cartee, Gregory D

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is associated with many common age-related diseases, but moderate calorie restriction (CR) can substantially elevate glucose uptake by insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle from both young and old rats. The current study evaluated the isolated epitrochlearis muscle from ∼24.5-mo-old rats that were either fed ad libitum (AL) or subjected to CR (consuming ∼65% of ad libitum, AL, intake beginning at ∼22.5 mo old). Some muscles were also incubated with MK-2206, a potent and selective Akt inhibitor. The most important results were that in isolated muscles, CR vs. AL resulted in 1) greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake 2) that was accompanied by significantly increased insulin-mediated activation of Akt2, as indicated by greater phosphorylation on both Thr(309) and Ser(474) along with greater Akt2 activity, 3) concomitant with enhanced phosphorylation of several Akt substrates, including an Akt substrate of 160 kDa on Thr(642) and Ser(588), filamin C on Ser(2213) and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa on Thr(246), but not TBC1D1 on Thr(596); and 4) each of the CR effects was eliminated by MK-2206. These data provide compelling new evidence linking greater Akt2 activation to the CR-induced elevation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by muscle from old animals. PMID:26739650

  14. Global Modeling Activities and NAME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this talk I will review global modeling activities in the United States that could contribute to and benefit from NAME activities. I will present some preliminary results from several global atmospheric general circulation model simulation experiments for the initial NAME model intercomparison project period of May-Oct 1990. These include an ensemble of medium resolution simulations, and a high resolution (one half degree) simulation. I will also discuss possible high resolution global data assimilation experiments that could be used to help validate the model simulations and assimilate planned NAME observations.

  15. Glutamine synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L; Hock, Andreas K; Barnett, Susan C; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-12-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance the carbon and nitrogen requirements of tissues. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle, and that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect cell proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by glutamine synthetase (GS; cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, (13)C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA-cycle-derived carbons. Finally, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is contributed only marginally by the circulation, and is mainly either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes. PMID:26595383

  16. Glutamine Synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U.; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L.; Hock, Andreas K.; Barnett, Susan C.; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P.; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance tissue requirements of carbon and nitrogen. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle and, that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by Glutamine Synthetase (GS) (cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, 13C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA cycle-derived carbons. Finally, while it is contributed only marginally by the circulation, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes. PMID:26595383

  17. Subfertility and growth restriction in a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) - deficient mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Manshu; Siddiqi, Anwer; Witt, Benjamin; Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Johnson, Britt; Fraser, Nisa; Chen, Wyman; Rascon, Rafael; Yin, Xue; Goli, Harish; Bodamer, Olaf A; Lai, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The first GalT gene knockout (KO) mouse model for Classic Galactosemia (OMIM 230400) accumulated some galactose and its metabolites upon galactose challenge, but was seemingly fertile and symptom free. Here we constructed a new GalT gene-trapped mouse model by injecting GalT gene-trapped mouse embryonic stem cells into blastocysts, which were later implanted into pseudo-pregnant females. High percentage GalT gene-trapped chimera obtained were used to generate heterozygous and subsequently, homozygous GalT gene-trapped mice. Biochemical assays confirmed total absence of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity in the homozygotes. Although the homozygous GalT gene-trapped females could conceive and give birth when fed with normal chow, they had smaller litter size (P=0.02) and longer time-to-pregnancy (P=0.013) than their wild-type littermates. Follicle-stimulating hormone levels of the mutant female mice were not significantly different from the age-matched, wild-type females, but histological examination of the ovaries revealed fewer follicles in the homozygous mutants (P=0.007). Administration of a high-galactose (40% w/w) diet to lactating homozygous GalT gene-trapped females led to lethality in over 70% of the homozygous GalT gene-trapped pups before weaning. Cerebral edema, abnormal changes in the Purkinje and the outer granular cell layers of the cerebellum, as well as lower blood GSH/GSSG ratio were identified in the galactose-intoxicated pups. Finally, reduced growth was observed in GalT gene-trapped pups fed with normal chow and all pups fed with high-galactose (20% w/w) diet. This new mouse model presents several of the complications of Classic Galactosemia and will be useful to investigate pathogenesis and new therapies. PMID:24549051

  18. Subfertility and growth restriction in a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) - deficient mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Manshu; Siddiqi, Anwer; Witt, Benjamin; Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Johnson, Britt; Fraser, Nisa; Chen, Wyman; Rascon, Rafael; Yin, Xue; Goli, Harish; Bodamer, Olaf A; Lai, Kent

    2014-10-01

    The first GalT gene knockout (KO) mouse model for Classic Galactosemia (OMIM 230400) accumulated some galactose and its metabolites upon galactose challenge, but was seemingly fertile and symptom free. Here we constructed a new GalT gene-trapped mouse model by injecting GalT gene-trapped mouse embryonic stem cells into blastocysts, which were later implanted into pseudo-pregnant females. High percentage GalT gene-trapped chimera obtained were used to generate heterozygous and subsequently, homozygous GalT gene-trapped mice. Biochemical assays confirmed total absence of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity in the homozygotes. Although the homozygous GalT gene-trapped females could conceive and give birth when fed with normal chow, they had smaller litter size (P=0.02) and longer time-to-pregnancy (P=0.013) than their wild-type littermates. Follicle-stimulating hormone levels of the mutant female mice were not significantly different from the age-matched, wild-type females, but histological examination of the ovaries revealed fewer follicles in the homozygous mutants (P=0.007). Administration of a high-galactose (40% w/w) diet to lactating homozygous GalT gene-trapped females led to lethality in over 70% of the homozygous GalT gene-trapped pups before weaning. Cerebral edema, abnormal changes in the Purkinje and the outer granular cell layers of the cerebellum, as well as lower blood GSH/GSSG ratio were identified in the galactose-intoxicated pups. Finally, reduced growth was observed in GalT gene-trapped pups fed with normal chow and all pups fed with high-galactose (20% w/w) diet. This new mouse model presents several of the complications of Classic Galactosemia and will be useful to investigate pathogenesis and new therapies. PMID:24549051

  19. Modeling approaches for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Sven; Atzrodt, Heiko; Mayer, Dirk; Thomaier, Martin

    2006-03-01

    To solve a wide range of vibration problems with the active structures technology, different simulation approaches for several models are needed. The selection of an appropriate modeling strategy is depending, amongst others, on the frequency range, the modal density and the control target. An active system consists of several components: the mechanical structure, at least one sensor and actuator, signal conditioning electronics and the controller. For each individual part of the active system the simulation approaches can be different. To integrate the several modeling approaches into an active system simulation and to ensure a highly efficient and accurate calculation, all sub models must harmonize. For this purpose, structural models considered in this article are modal state-space formulations for the lower frequency range and transfer function based models for the higher frequency range. The modal state-space formulations are derived from finite element models and/or experimental modal analyses. Consequently, the structure models which are based on transfer functions are directly derived from measurements. The transfer functions are identified with the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method. To convert them from the z-domain to the s-domain a least squares solution is implemented. An analytical approach is used to derive models of active interfaces. These models are transferred into impedance formulations. To couple mechanical and electrical sub-systems with the active materials, the concept of impedance modeling was successfully tested. The impedance models are enhanced by adapting them to adequate measurements. The controller design strongly depends on the frequency range and the number of modes to be controlled. To control systems with a small number of modes, techniques such as active damping or independent modal space control may be used, whereas in the case of systems with a large number of modes or with modes that are not well separated, other control

  20. Depletion of Ascorbic Acid Restricts Angiogenesis and Retards Tumor Growth in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Telang, Sucheta; Clem, Amy L; Eaton, John W; Chesney, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Angiogenesis requires the deposition of type IV collagen by endothelial cells into the basement membrane of new blood vessels. Stabilization of type IV collagen triple helix depends on the hydroxylation of proline, which is catalyzed by the iron-containing enzyme prolyl hydroxylase. This enzyme, in turn, requires ascorbic acid to maintain the enzyme-bound iron in its reduced state. We hypothesized that dietary ascorbic acid might be required for tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, tumor growth. Here, we show that, not surprisingly, ascorbic acid is necessary for the synthesis of collagen type IV by human endothelial cells and for their effective migration and tube formation on a basement membrane matrix. Furthermore, ascorbic acid depletion in mice incapable of synthesizing ascorbic acid (Gulo-/-) dramatically restricts the in vivo growth of implanted Lewis lung carcinoma tumors. Histopathological analyses of these tumors reveal poorly formed blood vessels, extensive hemorrhagic foci, and decreased collagen and von Willebrand factor expression. Our data indicate that ascorbic acid plays an essential role in tumor angiogenesis and growth, and that restriction of ascorbic acid or pharmacological inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase may prove to be novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment of cancer. PMID:17325743

  1. Effect of calorie restriction on spontaneous physical activity and body mass in mice divergently selected for basal metabolic rate (BMR).

    PubMed

    Brzęk, Paweł; Gębczyński, Andrzej K; Książek, Aneta; Konarzewski, Marek

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous physical activity (SPA) represents an important component of daily energy expenditures in animals and humans. Intra-specific variation in SPA may be related to the susceptibility to metabolic disease or obesity. In particular, reduced SPA under conditions of limited food availability may conserve energy and prevent loss of body and fat mass ('thrifty genotype hypothesis'). However, both SPA and its changes during food restriction show wide inter-individual variations. We studied the effect of 30% caloric restriction (CR) on SPA in laboratory mice divergently selected for high (H-BMR) and low (L-BMR) basal metabolic rate. Selection increased SPA in the H-BMR line but did not change it in the L-BMR mice. This effect reflected changes in SPA intensity but not SPA duration. CR increased SPA intensity more strongly in the L-BMR line than in the H-BMR line and significantly modified the temporal variation of SPA. However, the initial between-line differences in SPA were not affected by CR. Loss of body mass during CR did not differ between both lines. Our results show that the H-BMR mice can maintain their genetically determined high SPA under conditions of reduced food intake without sacrificing their body mass. We hypothesize that this pattern may reflect the higher flexibility in the energy budget in the H-BMR line, as we showed previously that mice from this line reduced their BMR during CR. These energy savings may allow for the maintenance of elevated SPA in spite of reduced food intake. We conclude that the effect of CR on SPA is in large part determined by the initial level of BMR, whose variation may account for the lack of universal pattern of behavioural responses to CR. PMID:27090226

  2. The retinal determination gene Dachshund restricts cell proliferation by limiting the activity of the Homothorax-Yorkie complex.

    PubMed

    Brás-Pereira, Catarina; Casares, Fernando; Janody, Florence

    2015-04-15

    The Drosophila transcriptional co-activator protein Yorkie and its vertebrate orthologs YAP and TAZ are potent oncogenes, whose activity is normally kept in check by the upstream Hippo kinase module. Upon its translocation into the nucleus, Yorkie forms complexes with several tissue-specific DNA-binding partners, which help to define the tissue-specific target genes of Yorkie. In the progenitor cells of the eye imaginal disc, the DNA-binding transcription factor Homothorax is required for Yorkie-promoted proliferation and survival through regulation of the bantam microRNA (miRNA). The transit from proliferating progenitors to cell cycle quiescent precursors is associated with the progressive loss of Homothorax and gain of Dachshund, a nuclear protein related to the Sno/Ski family of co-repressors. We have identified Dachshund as an inhibitor of Homothorax-Yorkie-mediated cell proliferation. Loss of dachshund induces Yorkie-dependent tissue overgrowth. Conversely, overexpressing dachshund inhibits tissue growth, prevents Yorkie or Homothorax-mediated cell proliferation of disc epithelia and restricts the transcriptional activity of the Yorkie-Homothorax complex on the bantam enhancer in Drosophila cells. In addition, Dachshund collaborates with the Decapentaplegic receptor Thickveins to repress Homothorax and Cyclin B expression in quiescent precursors. The antagonistic roles of Homothorax and Dachshund in Yorkie activity, together with their mutual repression, ensure that progenitor and precursor cells are under distinct proliferation regimes. Based on the crucial role of the human dachshund homolog DACH1 in tumorigenesis, our work suggests that DACH1 might prevent cellular transformation by limiting the oncogenic activity of YAP and/or TAZ. PMID:25790852

  3. A Home Production Activity Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Ivan F.; Owen, Alma J.

    1980-01-01

    The family is examined as a focal unit of production and a home production activity model is developed. An interdisciplinary approach is used which puts the broad range of family activities on a continuum from production to consumption. (Author/SK)

  4. A history of caloric restriction induces neurochemical and behavioral changes in rats consistent with models of depression

    PubMed Central

    Chandler-Laney, P.C.; Castaneda, E.; Pritchett, C.E.; Smith, M.L.; Giddings, M.; Artiga, A.I.; Boggiano, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    A history of dieting is common in individuals suffering from eating disorders for which depression and mood disturbances are also comorbid. We investigated the effect of a history of caloric restriction (HCR) in rats that involved cyclic food restriction and refeeding with varying levels of access to palatable food (PF) on: 1) responses to the SSRI, fluoxetine; 2) monoamine levels in brain regions central to the control of feeding, reward, and mood regulation; and 3) behavioral tests of anxiety and depression. HCR coupled with intermittent but not daily access to PF exaggerated rats’ anorectic response to fluoxetine (p<0.05); was associated with a significant 71% and 58% reduction of 5-HT and dopamine, respectively, in the medial prefrontal cortex; and induced behaviors consistent with models of depression. HCR, irrespective of access to PF, abolished the strong association between 5-HT and dopamine turnover in the nucleus accumbens in control rats (r =0.71 vs. -0.06, p<0.01). Access to PF, irrespective of HCR, reduced hypothalamic dopamine. Together, these findings suggest that a history of frequent food restriction-induced weight fluctuation imposes neurochemical changes that negatively impact feeding and mood regulation. PMID:17490740

  5. n-back task performance and corresponding brain-activation patterns in women with restrictive and bulimic eating-disorder variants: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Israel, Mimi; Klein, Michael; Pruessner, Jens; Thaler, Lea; Spilka, Michael; Efanov, Simona; Ouellette, Anne-Sophie; Berlim, Marcelo; Ali, Nida; Beaudry, Thomas; Van den Eynde, Frederique; Walker, Claire-Dominique; Steiger, Howard

    2015-04-30

    Eating disorder (ED) variants characterized by "binge-eating/purging" symptoms differ from "restricting-only" variants along diverse clinical dimensions, but few studies have compared people with these different eating-disorder phenotypes on measures of neurocognitive function and brain activation. We tested the performances of 19 women with "restricting-only" eating syndromes and 27 with "binge-eating/purging" variants on a modified n-back task, and used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine task-induced brain activations in frontal regions of interest. When compared with "binge-eating/purging" participants, "restricting-only" participants showed superior performance. Furthermore, in an intermediate-demand condition, "binge-eating/purging" participants showed significantly less event-related activation than did "restricting-only" participants in a right posterior prefrontal region spanning Brodmann areas 6-8-a region that has been linked to planning of motor responses, working memory for sequential information, and management of uncertainty. Our findings suggest that working memory is poorer in eating-disordered individuals with binge-eating/purging behaviors than in those who solely restrict food intake, and that observed performance differences coincide with interpretable group-based activation differences in a frontal region thought to subserve planning and decision making. PMID:25707581

  6. Analysis of host range restriction determinants in the rabbit model: comparison of homologous and heterologous rotavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Ciarlet, M; Estes, M K; Barone, C; Ramig, R F; Conner, M E

    1998-03-01

    The main limitation of both the rabbit and mouse models of rotavirus infection is that human rotavirus (HRV) strains do not replicate efficiently in either animal. The identification of individual genes necessary for conferring replication competence in a heterologous host is important to an understanding of the host range restriction of rotavirus infections. We recently reported the identification of the P type of the spike protein VP4 of four lapine rotavirus strains as being P[14]. To determine whether VP4 is involved in host range restriction in rabbits, we evaluated infection in rotavirus antibody-free rabbits inoculated orally with two P[14] HRVs, PA169 (G6) and HAL1166 (G8), and with several other HRV strains and animal rotavirus strains of different P and G types. We also evaluated whether the parental rhesus rotavirus (RRV) (P5B[3], G3) and the derived RRV-HRV reassortant candidate vaccine strains RRV x D (G1), RRV x DS-1 (G2), and RRV x ST3 (G4) would productively infect rabbits. Based on virus shedding, limited replication was observed with the P[14] HRV strains and with the SA11 Cl3 (P[2], G3) and SA11 4F (P6[1], G3) animal rotavirus strains, compared to the homologous ALA strain (P[14], G3). However, even limited infection provided complete protection from rotavirus infection when rabbits were challenged orally 28 days postinoculation (DPI) with 10(3) 50% infective doses of ALA rabbit rotavirus. Other HRVs did not productively infect rabbits and provided no significant protection from challenge, in spite of occasional seroconversion. Simian RRV replicated as efficiently as lapine ALA rotavirus in rabbits and provided complete protection from ALA challenge. Live attenuated RRV reassortant vaccine strains resulted in no, limited, or productive infection of rabbits, but all rabbits were completely protected from heterotypic ALA challenge. The altered replication efficiency of the reassortants in rabbits suggests a role for VP7 in host range restriction

  7. Adenosine diphosphate restricts the protein remodeling activity of the Hsp104 chaperone to Hsp70 assisted disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kłosowska, Agnieszka; Chamera, Tomasz; Liberek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Hsp104 disaggregase provides thermotolerance in yeast by recovering proteins from aggregates in cooperation with the Hsp70 chaperone. Protein disaggregation involves polypeptide extraction from aggregates and its translocation through the central channel of the Hsp104 hexamer. This process relies on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. Considering that Hsp104 is characterized by low affinity towards ATP and is strongly inhibited by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), we asked how Hsp104 functions at the physiological levels of adenine nucleotides. We demonstrate that physiological levels of ADP highly limit Hsp104 activity. This inhibition, however, is moderated by the Hsp70 chaperone, which allows efficient disaggregation by supporting Hsp104 binding to aggregates but not to non-aggregated, disordered protein substrates. Our results point to an additional level of Hsp104 regulation by Hsp70, which restricts the potentially toxic protein unfolding activity of Hsp104 to the disaggregation process, providing the yeast protein-recovery system with substrate specificity and efficiency in ATP consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15159.001 PMID:27223323

  8. Nature of the promoter activated by C.PvuII, an unusual regulatory protein conserved among restriction-modification systems.

    PubMed

    Knowle, Dieter; Lintner, Robert E; Touma, Yara M; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    A widely distributed family of small regulators, called C proteins, controls a subset of restriction-modification systems. The C proteins studied to date activate transcription of their own genes and that of downstream endonuclease genes; this arrangement appears to delay endonuclease expression relative to that of the protective methyltransferase when the genes enter a new cell. C proteins bind to conserved sequences called C boxes. In the PvuII system, the C boxes have been reported to extend from -23 to +3 relative to the transcription start for the gene for the C protein, an unexpected starting position relative to a bound activator. This study suggests that transcript initiation within the C boxes represents initial, C-independent transcription of pvuIICR. The major C protein-dependent transcript appears to be a leaderless mRNA starting farther downstream, at the initiation codon for the pvuIIC gene. This conclusion is based on nuclease S1 transcript mapping and the effects of a series of nested deletions in the promoter region. Furthermore, replacing the region upstream of the pvuIIC initiation codon with a library of random oligonucleotides, followed by selection for C-dependent transcription, yielded clones having sequences that resemble -10 promoter hexamers. The -35 hexamer of this promoter would lie within the C boxes. However, the spacing between C boxes/-35 and the apparent -10 hexamer can be varied by +/-4 bp with little effect. This suggests that, like some other activator-dependent promoters, PpvuIICR may not require a -35 hexamer. Features of this transcription activation system suggest explanations for its broad host range. PMID:15629920

  9. Long-term calorie restriction decreases metabolic cost of movement and prevents decrease of physical activity during aging in the rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yosuke; Colman, Ricki J; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Baum, Scott T.; Anderson, Rozalyn M.; Weindruch, Richard; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Short-term (<1 year) calorie restriction (CR) has been reported to decrease physical activity and metabolic rate in humans and non-human primate models; however, studies examining the very long-term (>10 year) effect of CR on these parameters are lacking. Objective The objective of this study was to examine metabolic and behavioral adaptations to long-term CR longitudinally in rhesus macaques. Design Eighteen (10 male, 8 female) control (C) and 24 (14 male, 10 female) age matched CR rhesus monkeys between 19.6 and 31.9 years old were examined after 13 and 18 years of moderate adult-onset CR. Energy expenditure (EE) was examined by doubly labeled water (DLW; TEE) and respiratory chamber (24hrEE). Physical activity was assessed both by metabolic equivalent (MET) in a respiratory chamber and by an accelerometer. Metabolic cost of movements during 24h were also calculated. Age and fat-free mass were included as covariates. Results Adjusted total and 24hr EE were not different between C and CR. Sleeping metabolic rate was significantly lower, and physical activity level was higher in CR than in C independent from the CR-induced changes in body composition. The duration of physical activity above 1.6 METs was significantly higher in CR than in C, and CR had significantly higher accelerometer activity counts than C. Metabolic cost of movements during 24h were significantly lower in CR than in C. The accelerometer activity counts were significantly decreased after seven years in C animals, but not in CR animals. Conclusions The results suggest that long-term CR decreases basal metabolic rate, but maintains higher physical activity with lower metabolic cost of movements compared with C. PMID:23954367

  10. Deubiquitinase USP2a Sustains Interferons Antiviral Activity by Restricting Ubiquitination of Activated STAT1 in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Yuan, Yukang; Cheng, Qiao; Zuo, Yibo; Qian, Liping; Guo, Tingting; Qian, Guanghui; Li, Lemin; Ge, Jun; Dai, Jianfeng; Xiong, Sidong; Zheng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    STAT1 is a critical transcription factor for regulating host antiviral defenses. STAT1 activation is largely dependent on phosphorylation at tyrosine 701 site of STAT1 (pY701-STAT1). Understanding how pY701-STAT1 is regulated by intracellular signaling remains a major challenge. Here we find that pY701-STAT1 is the major form of ubiquitinated-STAT1 induced by interferons (IFNs). While total STAT1 remains relatively stable during the early stages of IFNs signaling, pY701-STAT1 can be rapidly downregulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Moreover, ubiquitinated pY701-STAT1 is located predominantly in the nucleus, and inhibiting nuclear import of pY701-STAT1 significantly blocks ubiquitination and downregulation of pY701-STAT1. Furthermore, we reveal that the deubiquitinase USP2a translocates into the nucleus and binds to pY701-STAT1, and inhibits K48-linked ubiquitination and degradation of pY701-STAT1. Importantly, USP2a sustains IFNs-induced pY701-STAT1 levels, and enhances all three classes of IFNs- mediated signaling and antiviral activity. To our knowledge, this is the first identified deubiquitinase that targets activated pY701-STAT1. These findings uncover a positive mechanism by which IFNs execute efficient antiviral signaling and function, and may provide potential targets for improving IFNs-based antiviral therapy. PMID:27434509

  11. Inhibition of lipolysis in the novel transgenic quail model overexpressing G0/G1 switch gene 2 in the adipose tissue during feed restriction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangsu; Choi, Young Min; Han, Jae Yong; Lee, Kichoon

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the issue of obesity in humans, the production of low-fat meat from domestic animals is important in the agricultural industry to satisfy consumer demand. Understanding the regulation of lipolysis in adipose tissue could advance our knowledge to potentially solve both issues. Although the G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2) was recently identified as an inhibitor of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) in vitro, its role in vivo has not been fully clarified. This study was conducted to investigate the role of G0S2 gene in vivo by using two independent transgenic quail lines during different energy conditions. Unexpectedly, G0S2 overexpression had a negligible effect on plasma NEFA concentration, fat cell size and fat pad weight under ad libitum feeding condition when adipose lipolytic activity is minimal. A two-week feed restriction in non-transgenic quail expectedly caused increased plasma NEFA concentration and dramatically reduced fat cell size and fat pad weight. Contrary, G0S2 overexpression under a feed restriction resulted in a significantly less elevation of plasma NEFA concentration and smaller reductions in fat pad weights and fat cell size compared to non-transgenic quail, demonstrating inhibition of lipolysis and resistance to loss of fat by G0S2. Excessive G0S2 inhibits lipolysis in vivo during active lipolytic conditions, such as food restriction and fasting, suggesting G0S2 as a potential target for treatment of obesity. In addition, transgenic quail are novel models for studying lipid metabolism and mechanisms of obesity. PMID:24964090

  12. Evaluation of a Mathematical Model of Rat Body Weight Regulation in Application to Caloric Restriction and Drug Treatment Studies

    PubMed Central

    Selimkhanov, Jangir; Patterson, Terrell A.; Scott, Dennis O.; Maurer, Tristan S.; Musante, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a mathematical model of energy balance and body weight regulation that can predict species-specific response to common pre-clinical interventions. To this end, we evaluate the ability of a previously published mathematical model of mouse metabolism to describe changes in body weight and body composition in rats in response to two short-term interventions. First, we adapt the model to describe body weight and composition changes in Sprague-Dawley rats by fitting to data previously collected from a 26-day caloric restriction study. The calibrated model is subsequently used to describe changes in rat body weight and composition in a 23-day cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist (CB1Ra) study. While the model describes body weight data well, it fails to replicate body composition changes with CB1Ra treatment. Evaluation of a key model assumption about deposition of fat and fat-free masses shows a limitation of the model in short-term studies due to the constraint placed on the relative change in body composition components. We demonstrate that the model can be modified to overcome this limitation, and propose additional measurements to further test the proposed model predictions. These findings illustrate how mathematical models can be used to support drug discovery and development by identifying key knowledge gaps and aiding in the design of additional experiments to further our understanding of disease-relevant and species-specific physiology. PMID:27227543

  13. Effects of blood flow restriction duration on muscle activation and microvascular oxygenation during low-volume isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Cayot, Trent E; Lauver, Jakob D; Silette, Christopher R; Scheuermann, Barry W

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to observe how varying occlusion durations affected neuromuscular activation and microvascular oxygenation during low-volume isometric knee extension exercise. Healthy, recreationally active males performed isometric knee extension at a variety of submaximal intensities under different blood flow restriction (BFR) occlusion durations. The occlusion pressure (130% SBP) was applied either 5 min prior to exercise (PO), immediately prior to exercise (IO) or not during exercise (CON). Surface electromyography (sEMG) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to record the neuromuscular activation and microvascular oxygenation of the knee extensors during exercise. No difference in sEMG was observed in the vastus lateralis or vastus medialis during any exercise condition or any submaximal intensity. PO elicited greater microvascular deoxygenation (deoxy-[Hb + Mb]) compared to CON (P≤0·05) at all submaximal intensities and also compared to IO at 20% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). IO resulted in a greater deoxy-[Hb + Mb] response during low-intensity exercise (20% and 40% MVC) compared to CON (P≤0·05). These findings suggest that applying BFR 5 min before exercise can enhance the exercise-induced metabolic stress (i.e. deoxy-[Hb + Mb]), measured via NIRS, during low-intensity exercise (20% MVC) compared to applying BFR immediately prior to exercise. Furthermore, the increased metabolic stress observed during IO is attenuated during high-intensity (60% MVC, 80% MVC) exercise when compared to CON conditions. Knowledge of the changes in exercise-induced metabolic stress between the various occlusion durations may assist in developing efficient BFR exercise programmes. PMID:25564998

  14. Computational models of epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Fabrice; Benquet, Pascal; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Jirsa, Viktor

    2016-02-15

    We reviewed computer models that have been developed to reproduce and explain epileptiform activity. Unlike other already-published reviews on computer models of epilepsy, the proposed overview starts from the various types of epileptiform activity encountered during both interictal and ictal periods. Computational models proposed so far in the context of partial and generalized epilepsies are classified according to the following taxonomy: neural mass, neural field, detailed network and formal mathematical models. Insights gained about interictal epileptic spikes and high-frequency oscillations, about fast oscillations at seizure onset, about seizure initiation and propagation, about spike-wave discharges and about status epilepticus are described. This review shows the richness and complementarity of the various modeling approaches as well as the fruitful contribution of the computational neuroscience community in the field of epilepsy research. It shows that models have progressively gained acceptance and are now considered as an efficient way of integrating structural, functional and pathophysiological data about neural systems into "coherent and interpretable views". The advantages, limitations and future of modeling approaches are discussed. Perspectives in epilepsy research and clinical epileptology indicate that very promising directions are foreseen, like model-guided experiments or model-guided therapeutic strategy, among others. PMID:25843066

  15. Phenotypic debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase activity among extensive metabolizers is unrelated to genotype as determined by the Xba-I restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, J; Evans, W E; Relling, M V; Wilkinson, G R; Roden, D M

    1991-01-01

    1. The major pathway for 4-hydroxylation of debrisoquine in man is polymorphic and under genetic control. More than 90% of subjects (extensive metabolizers, EMs) have active debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (cytochrome P450IID6) while in the remainder (poor metabolizers, PMs), cytochrome P450IID6 activity is greatly impaired. 2. Within the EM group, cytochrome P450IID6-mediated metabolism of a range of substrates varies widely. Some of this intra-phenotype non-uniformity may be explained by the presence of two subsets of subjects with different genotypes (heterozygotes and homozygotes). 3. Cytochrome P450IID6 substrates have not differentiated between these two genotypes. However, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) which identifies mutant alleles of cytochrome P450IID6 locus has been described and can definitively assign genotype in some heterozygous EM subjects. 4. In this study, we used RFLP analysis and encainide as a model substrate to determine if non-uniformity in cytochrome P450IID6 activity among EMs is related to genotype. We tested the hypothesis that heterozygotes exhibit intermediate metabolic activity and that homozygous dominants exhibit the highest activity. We proposed encainide as a useful substrate for this purpose since cytochrome P450IID6 catalyzes not only its biotransformation to O-desmethyl encainide (ODE) but also the subsequent metabolism of ODE to 3-methoxy-O-desmethyl encainide (MODE). 5. A single 50 mg oral dose of encainide was administered to 139 normal volunteers and 14 PMs were identified. Urinary ratios among encainide, ODE and MODE in the remaining 125 EM subjects revealed a wide range of cytochrome P450IID6 activity. However, Southern blotting of genomic DNA digested with XbaI identified obligate heterozygotes in both extremes of all ratio distributions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 PMID:1685663

  16. Interstitial Fluid Flow Intensity Modulates Endothelial Sprouting in Restricted Src-Activated Cell Clusters During Capillary Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández Vera, Rodrigo; Genové, Elsa; Alvarez, Lery; Borrós, Salvador; Kamm, Roger; Lauffenburger, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Development of tissues in vitro with dimensions larger than 150 to 200 μm requires the presence of a functional vascular network. Therefore, we have studied capillary morphogenesis under controlled biological and biophysical conditions with the aim of promoting vascular structures in tissue constructs. We and others have previously demonstrated that physiological values of interstitial fluid flow normal to an endothelial monolayer in combination with vascular endothelial growth factor play a critical role during capillary morphogenesis by promoting cell sprouting. In the present work, we studied the effect that a range of interstitial flow velocities (0–50 μm/min) has in promoting the amount, length, and branching of developing sprouts during capillary morphogenesis. The number of capillary-like structures developed from human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers across the interstitial flow values tested was not significantly affected. Instead, the length and branching degree of the sprouts presented a significant maximum at flow velocities of 10 to 20 μm/min. More-over, at these same flow values, the phosphorylation level of Src also showed its peak. We discovered that capillary morphogenesis is restricted to patches of Src-activated cells (phosphorylated Src (pSrc)) at the monolayer, suggesting that the transduction pathway in charge of sensing the mechanical stimulus induced by flow is promoting predetermined mechanically sensitive areas (pSrc) to undergo capillary morphogenesis. PMID:18636940

  17. Effect of Prenatal Hypoxia in Transgenic Mouse Models of Preeclampsia and Fetal Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Clausen, C. F.; Thambiraj, D. F.; Poudel, R.; Davidge, S. T.; Baker, P. N.

    2014-01-01

    Mice lacking endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS− /−) or catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT−/−) exhibit a preeclampsia-like phenotype and fetal growth restriction. We hypothesized that a hypoxic insult would result in a more severe phenotype. Pregnant eNOS−/−, COMT−/− and control (C57BL/6J) mice were randomized to hypoxic (10.5% O2) or normal conditions (20.9% O2) from gestational day 10.5 to 18.5. Hypoxia increased the blood pressure in all genotypes and proteinuria in C57BL/6J and eNOS−/− mice. Fetal survival was significantly reduced following hypoxia, particularly in eNOS−/− mice. Birth weight was decreased in both C57BL/6J and COMT−/− mice. Placentas from COMT−/− mice demonstrated increased peroxynitrite. Despite similar hypoxia-induced effects on maternal blood pressure and proteinuria, eNOS−/− embryos have a decreased tolerance to hypoxia. Compared to C57BL/6J, COMT−/− mice exhibited less severe changes in proteinuria and fetal growth when exposed to prenatal hypoxia. This relative resistance to prenatal hypoxia was associated with a significant increase in placental levels of peroxynitrite. PMID:24084523

  18. Permanent Cardiac Sarcomere Changes in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Torre, Iratxe; González-Tendero, Anna; García-Cañadilla, Patricia; Crispi, Fátima; García-García, Francisco; Bijnens, Bart; Iruretagoyena, Igor; Dopazo, Joaquin; Amat-Roldán, Ivan; Gratacós, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Background Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) induces fetal cardiac remodelling and dysfunction, which persists postnatally and may explain the link between low birth weight and increased cardiovascular mortality in adulthood. However, the cellular and molecular bases for these changes are still not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that IUGR is associated with structural and functional gene expression changes in the fetal sarcomere cytoarchitecture, which remain present in adulthood. Methods and Results IUGR was induced in New Zealand pregnant rabbits by selective ligation of the utero-placental vessels. Fetal echocardiography demonstrated more globular hearts and signs of cardiac dysfunction in IUGR. Second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM) showed shorter sarcomere length and shorter A-band and thick-thin filament interaction lengths, that were already present in utero and persisted at 70 postnatal days (adulthood). Sarcomeric M-band (GO: 0031430) functional term was over-represented in IUGR fetal hearts. Conclusion The results suggest that IUGR induces cardiac dysfunction and permanent changes on the sarcomere. PMID:25402351

  19. Necrotizing myositis causes restrictive hypoventilation in a mouse model for human enterovirus 71 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections are associated with a high prevalence of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children and occasionally cause lethal complications. Most infections are self-limiting. However, resulting complications, including aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, poliomyelitis-like acute flaccid paralysis, and neurological pulmonary edema or hemorrhage, are responsible for the lethal symptoms of EV71 infection, the pathogenesis of which remain to be clarified. Results In the present study, 2-week-old Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were infected with a mouse-adapted EV71 strain. These infected mice demonstrated progressive paralysis and died within 12 days post infection (d.p.i.). EV71, which mainly replicates in skeletal muscle tissues, caused severe necrotizing myositis. Lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) and other tissues were not observed. Conclusions Necrotizing myositis of respiratory-related muscles caused severe restrictive hypoventilation and subsequent hypoxia, which could explain the fatality of EV71-infected mice. This finding suggests that, in addition to CNS injury, necrotic myositis may also be responsible for the paralysis and death observed in EV71-infected mice. PMID:23809248

  20. Cardiac Sirt1 mediates the cardioprotective effect of caloric restriction by suppressing local complement system activation after ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsunehisa; Tamaki, Kayoko; Shirakawa, Kohsuke; Ito, Kentaro; Yan, Xiaoxiang; Katsumata, Yoshinori; Anzai, Atsushi; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Endo, Jin; Inaba, Takaaki; Tsubota, Kazuo; Sano, Motoaki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Shinmura, Ken

    2016-04-15

    Caloric restriction (CR) confers cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. We previously found the essential roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the development of CR-induced cardioprotection and Sirt1 activation during CR (Shinmura K, Tamaki K, Ito K, Yan X, Yamamoto T, Katsumata Y, Matsuhashi T, Sano M, Fukuda K, Suematsu M, Ishii I. Indispensable role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in caloric restriction-induced cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injury.Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol308: H894-H903, 2015). However, the exact mechanism by which Sirt1 in cardiomyocytes mediates the cardioprotective effect of CR remains undetermined. We subjected cardiomyocyte-specificSirt1knockout (CM-Sirt1(-/-)) mice and the corresponding control mice to either 3-mo ad libitum feeding or CR (-40%). Isolated perfused hearts were subjected to 25-min global ischemia, followed by 60-min reperfusion. The recovery of left ventricle function after I/R was improved, and total lactate dehydrogenase release into the perfusate during reperfusion was attenuated in the control mice treated with CR, but a similar cardioprotective effect of CR was not observed in the CM-Sirt1(-/-)mice. The expression levels of cardiac complement component 3 (C3) at baseline and the accumulation of C3 and its fragments in the ischemia-reperfused myocardium were attenuated by CR in the control mice, but not in the CM-Sirt1(-/-)mice. Resveratrol treatment also attenuated the expression levels of C3 protein in cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Moreover, the degree of myocardial I/R injury in conventionalC3knockout (C3(-/-)) mice treated with CR was similar to that in the ad libitum-fedC3(-/-)mice, although the expression levels of Sirt1 were enhanced by CR. These results demonstrate that cardiac Sirt1 plays an essential role in CR-induced cardioprotection against I/R injury by suppressing cardiac C3 expression. This is the first report suggesting that

  1. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  2. Meat Feeding Restricts Rapid Cold Hardening Response and Increases Thermal Activity Thresholds of Adult Blow Flies, Calliphora vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all temperate insects survive the winter by entering a physiological state of reduced metabolic activity termed diapause. However, there is increasing evidence that climate change is disrupting the diapause response resulting in non-diapause life stages encountering periods of winter cold. This is a significant problem for adult life stages in particular, as they must remain mobile, periodically feed, and potentially initiate reproductive development at a time when resources should be diverted to enhance stress tolerance. Here we present the first evidence of protein/meat feeding restricting rapid cold hardening (RCH) ability and increasing low temperature activity thresholds. No RCH response was noted in adult female blow flies (Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy) fed a sugar, water and liver (SWL) diet, while a strong RCH response was seen in females fed a diet of sugar and water (SW) only. The RCH response in SW flies was induced at temperatures as high as 10°C, but was strongest following 3h at 0°C. The CTmin (loss of coordinated movement) and chill coma (final appendage twitch) temperature of SWL females (-0.3 ± 0.5°C and -4.9 ± 0.5°C, respectively) was significantly higher than for SW females (-3.2 ± 0.8°C and -8.5 ± 0.6°C). We confirmed this was not directly the result of altered extracellular K+, as activity thresholds of alanine-fed adults were not significantly different from SW flies. Instead we suggest the loss of cold tolerance is more likely the result of diverting resource allocation to egg development. Between 2009 and 2013 winter air temperatures in Birmingham, UK, fell below the CTmin of SW and SWL flies on 63 and 195 days, respectively, suggesting differential exposure to chill injury depending on whether adults had access to meat or not. We conclude that disruption of diapause could significantly impact on winter survival through loss of synchrony in the timing of active feeding and reproductive development with favourable

  3. Weight-Loss Induced Changes in Physical Activity and Activity Energy Expenditure in Overweight and Obese Subjects before and after Energy Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Alberto G.; Soenen, Stijn; Goris, Annelies H. C.; Westerterp, Klaas R.

    2013-01-01

    Activity energy expenditure (AEE) is the component of daily energy expenditure that is mainly influenced by the amount of physical activity (PA) and by the weight of the body displaced. This study aimed at analyzing the effect of weight loss on PA and AEE. The body weight and PA of 66 overweight and obese subjects were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of 67% energy restriction. PA was measured using a tri-axial accelerometer for movement registration (Tracmor) and quantified in activity counts. Tracmor recordings were also processed using a classification algorithm to recognize 6 common activity types engaged in during the day. A doubly-labeled water validated equation based on Tracmor output was used to estimate AEE. After weight loss, body weight decreased by 13±4%, daily activity counts augmented by 9% (95% CI: +2%, +15%), and this increase was weakly associated with the decrease in body weight (R2 = 7%; P<0.05). After weight loss subjects were significantly (P<0.05) less sedentary (–26 min/d), and increased the time spent walking (+11 min/d) and bicycling (+4 min/d). However, AEE decreased by 0.6±0.4 MJ/d after weight loss. On average, a 2-hour/day reduction of sedentary time by increasing ambulatory and generic activities was required to restore baseline levels of AEE. In conclusion, after weight loss PA increased but the related metabolic demand did not offset the reduction in AEE due to the lower body weight. Promoting physical activity according to the extent of weight loss might increase successfulness of weight maintenance. PMID:23555733

  4. Simulations of iron K pre-edge X-ray absorption spectra using the restricted active space method.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiyuan; Sørensen, Lasse Kragh; Delcey, Mickaël G; Pinjari, Rahul V; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-01-28

    The intensities and relative energies of metal K pre-edge features are sensitive to both geometric and electronic structures. With the possibility to collect high-resolution spectral data it is important to find theoretical methods that include all important spectral effects: ligand-field splitting, multiplet structures, 3d-4p orbital hybridization, and charge-transfer excitations. Here the restricted active space (RAS) method is used for the first time to calculate metal K pre-edge spectra of open-shell systems, and its performance is tested against on six iron complexes: [FeCl6](n-), [FeCl4](n-), and [Fe(CN)6](n-) in ferrous and ferric oxidation states. The method gives good descriptions of the spectral shapes for all six systems. The mean absolute deviation for the relative energies of different peaks is only 0.1 eV. For the two systems that lack centrosymmetry [FeCl4](2-/1-), the ratios between dipole and quadrupole intensity contributions are reproduced with an error of 10%, which leads to good descriptions of the integrated pre-edge intensities. To gain further chemical insight, the origins of the pre-edge features have been analyzed with a chemically intuitive molecular orbital picture that serves as a bridge between the spectra and the electronic structures. The pre-edges contain information about both ligand-field strengths and orbital covalencies, which can be understood by analyzing the RAS wavefunction. The RAS method can thus be used to predict and rationalize the effects of changes in both the oxidation state and ligand environment in a number of hard X-ray studies of small and medium-sized molecular systems. PMID:26742851

  5. Modeling Activities in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Kathy

    2014-05-01

    Students usually find science to be quite abstract. This is especially true of disciplines like Earth Science where it is difficult for the students to conduct and design hands-on experiments in areas such as Plate Tectonics that would allow them to develop predictive models. In the United States the new Next Generation Science Standards explicitly requires students to experience the science disciplines via modeling based activities. This poster presentation will discuss an activity that demonstrates how modeling, plate tectonics and student discourse converge in the earth science classroom. The activities featured on the poster will include using cardboard and shaving cream to demonstrate convergent plate boundaries, a Milky Way candy bar to demonstrate divergent boundaries and silly putty to demonstrate a strike slip boundary. I will discuss how students report back to the group about the findings from the lab and the techniques that can be used to heighten the student discourse. The activities outlined in this poster were originally designed for a middle school Earth Science class by Suzi Shoemaker for a graduate thesis at Arizona State University.

  6. Restriction on an Energy-Dense Diet Improves Markers of Metabolic Health and Cellular Aging in Mice Through Decreasing Hepatic mTOR Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schloesser, Anke; Campbell, Graeme; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dietary restriction (DR) on a normal low-fat diet improves metabolic health and may prolong life span. However, it is still uncertain whether restriction of an energy-dense, high-fat diet would also be beneficial and mitigate age-related processes. In the present study, we determined biomarkers of metabolic health, energy metabolism, and cellular aging in obesity-prone mice subjected to 30% DR on a high-fat diet for 6 months. Dietary-restricted mice had significantly lower body weights, less adipose tissue, lower energy expenditure, and altered substrate oxidation compared to their ad libitum–fed counterparts. Hepatic major urinary proteins (Mup) expression, which is linked to glucose and energy metabolism, and biomarkers of metabolic health, including insulin, glucose, cholesterol, and leptin/adiponectin ratio, were likewise reduced in high-fat, dietary-restricted mice. Hallmarks of cellular senescence such as Lamp2a and Hsc70 that mediate chaperone-mediated autophagy were induced and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling mitigated upon high-fat DR. In contrast to DR applied in low-fat diets, anti-oxidant gene expression, proteasome activity, as well as 5′-adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation were not changed, suggesting that high-fat DR may attenuate some processes associated with cellular aging without the induction of cellular stress response or energy deprivation. PMID:25405871

  7. Derivative-free restricted maximum likelihood estimation in animal models with a sparse matrix solver.

    PubMed

    Boldman, K G; Van Vleck, L D

    1991-12-01

    Estimation of (co)variance components by derivative-free REML requires repeated evaluation of the log-likelihood function of the data. Gaussian elimination of the augmented mixed model coefficient matrix is often used to evaluate the likelihood function, but it can be costly for animal models with large coefficient matrices. This study investigated the use of a direct sparse matrix solver to obtain the log-likelihood function. The sparse matrix package SPARSPAK was used to reorder the mixed model equations once and then repeatedly to solve the equations by Cholesky factorization to generate the terms required to calculate the likelihood. The animal model used for comparison contained 19 fixed levels, 470 maternal permanent environmental effects, and 1586 direct and 1586 maternal genetic effects, resulting in a coefficient matrix of order 3661 with .3% nonzero elements after including numerator relationships. Compared with estimation via Gaussian elimination of the unordered system, utilization of SPARSPAK required 605 and 240 times less central processing unit time on mainframes and personal computers, respectively. The SPARSPAK package also required less memory and provided solutions for all effects in the model. PMID:1787202

  8. Restrictions on two Higgs doublet models and CP violation at the unification scale

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasiu, G.G.

    1987-04-01

    Bounds on charged Higgs masses and couplings in models with two Higgs doublets are examined that came from CP violation in the neutral K system. Bounds on charged Higgs masses and couplings in two Higgs doublet models are also obtained from their effects on neutral-B-meson mixing. The bounds are found to be comparable to those obtained with additional assumptions from the neutral K system. The three generation phase invariant measure of CP violation is shown to satisfy a simple and solvable renormalization group equation. Its value is seen to fall by four to eight orders of magnitude between the weak and grand unification scales in the standard model, as well as in its two Higgs and supersymmetric extensions. (LEW)

  9. Role of TRIM5α RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in capsid disassembly, reverse transcription blockade, and restriction of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghwa; Tipper, Christopher; Sodroski, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    The mammalian tripartite motif protein, TRIM5α, recognizes retroviral capsids entering the cytoplasm and blocks virus infection. Depending on the particular TRIM5α protein and retrovirus, complete disruption of the TRIM5α RING domain decreases virus-restricting activity to various degrees. TRIM5α exhibits RING domain-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, but the specific role of this activity in viral restriction is unknown. We created a panel of African green monkey TRIM5α (TRIM5α(AGM)) mutants, many of which are specifically altered in RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase function, and characterized the phenotypes of these mutants with respect to restriction of simian and human immunodeficiency viruses (SIV(mac) and HIV-1, respectively). TRIM5α(AGM) ubiquitin ligase activity was essential for both the accelerated disassembly of SIV(mac) capsids and the disruption of reverse transcription. The levels of SIV(mac) particulate capsids in the cytosol of target cells expressing the TRIM5α variants strongly correlated with the levels of viral late reverse transcripts. RING-mediated ubiquitylation and B30.2(SPRY) domain-determined capsid binding independently contributed to the potency of SIV(mac) restriction by TRIM5α(AGM). In contrast, TRIM5α proteins attenuated in RING ubiquitin ligase function still accelerated HIV-1 capsid disassembly, inhibited reverse transcription, and blocked infection. Replacement of the helix-4/5 loop in the SIV(mac) capsid with the corresponding region of the HIV-1 capsid diminished the dependence of restriction on TRIM5α RING function. Thus, ubiquitylation mediated by the RING domain of TRIM5α(AGM) is essential for blocking SIV(mac) infection at the stage of capsid uncoating. PMID:21680520

  10. Surface growth on percolation networks by a conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2016-02-01

    Surface growth by the conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid model is investigated on diluted lattices, i.e., on percolation networks that are embedded in two spatial dimensions. The growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α are defined, respectively, by the mean-square surface width via W2(t ) ˜t2 β and the mean-square saturated width via Wsat2(L ) ˜L2 α , where L is the system size. These are measured on both an infinite network and a backbone network and the results are compared with power-counting predictions obtained using the fractional Langevin equation. While the Monte Carlo results on deterministic fractal substrates show excellent agreement with the predictions [D. H. Kim and J. M. Kim, Phys. Rev. E 84, 011105 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.011105], the results on critical percolation networks deviate by 8%-12% from these predictions.

  11. Surface growth on percolation networks by a conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid growth model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2016-02-01

    Surface growth by the conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid model is investigated on diluted lattices, i.e., on percolation networks that are embedded in two spatial dimensions. The growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α are defined, respectively, by the mean-square surface width via W(2)(t)∼t(2β) and the mean-square saturated width via W(sat)(2)(L)∼L(2α), where L is the system size. These are measured on both an infinite network and a backbone network and the results are compared with power-counting predictions obtained using the fractional Langevin equation. While the Monte Carlo results on deterministic fractal substrates show excellent agreement with the predictions [D. H. Kim and J. M. Kim, Phys. Rev. E 84, 011105 (2011)], the results on critical percolation networks deviate by 8%-12% from these predictions. PMID:26986299

  12. A Cognitive Vulnerability Model of Sleep and Mood in Adolescents under Naturalistically Restricted and Extended Sleep Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Bei; Wiley, Joshua F.; Allen, Nicholas B.; Trinder, John

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: School terms and vacations represent naturally occurring periods of restricted and extended sleep opportunities. A cognitive model of the relationships among objective sleep, subjective sleep, and negative mood was tested across these periods, with sleep-specific (i.e., dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep) and global (i.e., dysfunctional attitudes) cognitive vulnerabilities as moderators. Design: Longitudinal study over the last week of a school term (Time-E), the following 2-w vacation (Time-V), and the first week of the next term (Time-S). Setting: General community. Participants: 146 adolescents, 47.3% male, mean age = 16.2 years (standard deviation ± 1 year). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Objective sleep was measured continuously by actigraphy. Sociodemographics and cognitive vulnerabilities were assessed at Time-E; subjective sleep, negative mood (anxiety and depressive symptoms), and academic stress were measured at each time point. Controlling for academic stress and sex, subjective sleep quality mediated the relationship between objective sleep and negative mood at all time points. During extended (Time-V), but not restricted (Time-E and Time-S) sleep opportunity, this mediation was moderated by global cognitive vulnerability, with the indirect effects stronger with higher vulnerability. Further, at Time-E and Time-V, but not Time-S, greater sleep-specific and global cognitive vulnerabilities were associated with poorer subjective sleep quality and mood, respectively. Conclusions: Results highlighted the importance of subjective sleep perception in the development of sleep related mood problems, and supported the role of cognitive vulnerabilities as potential mechanisms in the relationships between objective sleep, subjective sleep, and negative mood. Adolescents with higher cognitive vulnerability are more susceptible to perceived poor sleep and sleep related mood problems. These findings have practical

  13. Dynamics of velocity gradient invariants in turbulence: Restricted Euler and linear diffusion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, Jesús; Dopazo, César; Valiño, Luis

    1998-08-01

    A complete system of dynamical equations for the invariants of the velocity gradient, the strain rate, and the rate-of-rotation tensors is deduced for an incompressible flow. The equations for the velocity gradient invariants R and Q were first deduced by Cantwell [Phys. Fluids A 4, 782 (1992)] in terms of Hij, the tensor containing the anisotropic part of the pressure Hessian and the viscous diffusion term in the velocity gradient equation. These equations are extended here for the strain rate tensor invariants, RS and QS, and for the rate-of-rotation tensor invariant, QW, using HijS and HijW, the symmetric and the skew-symmetric parts of Hij, respectively. In order to obtain a complete system, an equation for the square of the vortex stretching vector, Vi≡Sijωj, is required. The resulting dynamical system of invariants is closed using a simple model for the velocity gradient evolution: an isotropic approximation for the pressure term and a linear model for the viscous diffusion term. The local topology and the resulting statistics implied by this model reproduce a number of trends similar to known results from numerical experiments for the small scales of turbulence.

  14. Modeling the impact of air, sea, and land travel restrictions supplemented by other interventions on the emergence of a new influenza pandemic virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the early stages of a new influenza pandemic, travel restriction is an immediate and non-pharmaceutical means of retarding incidence growth. It extends the time frame of effective mitigation, especially when the characteristics of the emerging virus are unknown. In the present study, we used the 2009 influenza A pandemic as a case study to evaluate the impact of regulating air, sea, and land transport. Other government strategies, namely, antivirals and hospitalizations, were also evaluated. Methods Hong Kong arrivals from 44 countries via air, sea, and land transports were imported into a discrete stochastic Susceptible, Exposed, Infectious and Recovered (SEIR) host-flow model. The model allowed a number of latent and infectious cases to pass the border, which constitutes a source of local disease transmission. We also modeled antiviral and hospitalization prevention strategies to compare the effectiveness of these control measures. Baseline reproduction rate was estimated from routine surveillance data. Results Regarding air travel, the main route connected to the influenza source area should be targeted for travel restrictions; imposing a 99% air travel restriction delayed the epidemic peak by up to two weeks. Once the pandemic was established in China, the strong land connection between Hong Kong and China rendered Hong Kong vulnerable. Antivirals and hospitalization were found to be more effective on attack rate reductions than travel restrictions. Combined strategies (with 99% restriction on all transport modes) deferred the peak for long enough to establish a vaccination program. Conclusion The findings will assist policy-makers with decisions on handling similar future pandemics. We also suggest regulating the extent of restriction and the transport mode, once restriction has been deemed necessary for pandemic control. Although travel restrictions have yet to gain social acceptance, they allow time for mitigation response when a new and

  15. Evidence from Animal Models: Is a Restricted or Conventional Intestinal Microbiota Composition Predisposing to Risk for High-LET Radiation Injury?

    PubMed

    Maier, Irene; Schiestl, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal microbiota affect cell responses to ionizing radiation at the molecular level and can be linked to the development of the immune system, controlled cell death or apoptosis. We have developed a microbiota mouse model and report here that high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induced the repair of chromosomal DNA lesions more efficiently in conventional than in restricted intestinal microbiota mice. Based on different phylotype densities after whole-body irradiation, bacterial indicator phylotypes were found to be more abundant in restricted in microbiota than in conventional microbiota. Genotoxic phenotypes of irradiated restricted and conventional microbiota mice were compared with ataxia telangiectasia-deficient restricted and conventional microbiota mice, respectively. Those indicator phylotypes, including Bacteroides (Gram-negative bacterium cTPY-13), Barnesiella intestinihominis and others, which were identified in nonirradiated restricted microbiota mice, increase in radiation-exposed conventional microbiota along with a reduction of persistent DNA double-strand breaks in blood lymphocytes. The dynamic change of phylotype abundances elucidated a feedback mechanism and effect of intestinal microbiota composition on the adaptive response to high-LET radiation. Several other bacterial phylotypes ( Helicobacter hepaticus , Helicobacter spp and others) were found to be more abundant in conventional than restricted microbiota. In this commentary, mouse models used in cancer research and radiotherapy for the study on the effects of intestinal microbiota composition on normal tissue radiation response are characterized and discussed. Highlights of this commentary: 1. Restricted microbiota phylotypes were correlated with persistent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and were found to orchestrate onco-protective controlled cell death after radiation; 2. Restricted microbiota composition reduced proinflammatory extracellular-stimulated immune responses, but

  16. Modelling Interactions between forest pest invasions and human decisions regarding firewood transport restrictions.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Lee-Ann; Cecile, Jacob; Bauch, Chris T; Anand, Madhur

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of nonnative, wood-boring insects such as the Asian longhorned beetle (A. glabripennis) and the emerald ash borer (A. planipennis) is a serious ecological and economic threat to Canadian deciduous and mixed-wood forests. Humans act as a major vector for the spread of these pests via firewood transport, although existing models do not explicitly capture human decision-making regarding firewood transport. In this paper we present a two-patch coupled human-environment system model that includes social influence and long-distance firewood transport and examines potential strategies for mitigating pest spread. We found that increasing concern regarding infestations (f) significantly reduced infestation. Additionally it resulted in multiple thresholds at which the intensity of infestation in a patch was decreased. It was also found that a decrease in the cost of firewood purchased in the area where it is supposed to be burned (Cl) resulted in an increased proportion of local-firewood strategists, and a 67% decrease in Cl from $6.75 to $4.50 was sufficient to eliminate crosspatch infestation. These effects are synergistic: increasing concern through awareness and education campaigns acts together with reduced firewood costs, thereby reducing the required threshold of both awareness and economic incentives. Our results indicate that the best management strategy includes a combination of public education paired with firewood subsidization. PMID:24736497

  17. Associations between chronic conditions, body functions, activity limitations and participation restrictions: a cross-sectional approach in Spanish non-clinical populations

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Blázquez, Carmen; Damián, Javier; Andrés-Prado, María José; Almazán-Isla, Javier; Alcalde-Cabero, Enrique; Forjaz, Maria João; Castellote, Juan Manuel; González-Enríquez, Jesús; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Comín, Magdalena; de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To analyse the relationships between chronic conditions, body functions, activity limitations and participation restrictions in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting 2 geographical areas in the Autonomous Region of Aragon, Spain, namely, a rural area, Cinco Villas, and an urban area in the city of Zaragoza. Participants 864 individuals selected by simple random sampling from the register of Social Security card holders, aged 50 years and over, positive to disability screening. Main outcome measures ICF Checklist—body function domains, WHO Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0, 36-item (WHODAS-36)) global scores and medical diagnoses (chronic conditions) from primary care records. Results Mild disability (WHODAS-36 level 5–24%) was present in 51.5% of the sample. In the adjusted ordinal regression model with WHODAS-36 as the dependent variable, disability was substantially associated with moderate-to-complete impairment in the following functions: mental, OR 212.8 (95% CI 72 to 628.9); neuromusculoskeletal, OR 44.8 (24.2 to 82.8); and sensory and pain, OR 6.3 (3.5 to 11.2). In the relationship between health conditions and body function impairments, the strongest links were seen for: dementia with mental functions, OR 50.6 (25.1 to 102.1); cerebrovascular disease with neuromusculoskeletal function, OR 5.8 (3.5 to 9.7); and chronic renal failure with sensory function and pain, OR 3.0 (1.49 to 6.4). Dementia, OR 8.1 (4.4 to 14.7) and cerebrovascular disease, OR 4.1 (2.7 to 6.4) were associated with WHODAS-36 scores. Conclusions Body functions are heterogeneously linked to limitations in activities and restrictions on participation, with the highest impact being due to mental and musculoskeletal functions. This may be relevant for disability assessment and intervention design, particularly if defined on a body function basis. Control of specific health

  18. Prenatal programming in an obese swine model: sex-related effects of maternal energy restriction on morphology, metabolism and hypothalamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Óvilo, Cristina; González-Bulnes, Antonio; Benítez, Rita; Ayuso, Miriam; Barbero, Alicia; Pérez-Solana, Maria L; Barragán, Carmen; Astiz, Susana; Fernández, Almudena; López-Bote, Clemente

    2014-02-01

    Maternal energy restriction during pregnancy predisposes to metabolic alterations in the offspring. The present study was designed to evaluate phenotypic and metabolic consequences following maternal undernutrition in an obese pig model and to define the potential role of hypothalamic gene expression in programming effects. Iberian sows were fed a control or a 50 % restricted diet for the last two-thirds of gestation. Newborns were assessed for body and organ weights, hormonal and metabolic status, and hypothalamic expression of genes implicated in energy homeostasis, glucocorticoid function and methylation. Weight and adiposity were measured in adult littermates. Newborns of the restricted sows were lighter (P <0·01), but brain growth was spared. The plasma concentration of TAG was lower in the restricted newborns than in the control newborns of both the sexes (P <0·01), while the concentration of cortisol was higher in females born to the restricted sows (P <0·04), reflecting a situation of metabolic stress by nutrient insufficiency. A lower hypothalamic expression of anorexigenic peptides (LEPR and POMC, P <0·01 and P <0·04, respectively) was observed in females born to the restricted sows, but no effect was observed in the males. The expression of HSD11B1 gene was down-regulated in the restricted animals (P <0·05), suggesting an adaptive mechanism for reducing the harmful effects of elevated concentrations of cortisol. At 4 and 7 months of age, the restricted females were heavier and fatter than the controls (P< 0·01). Maternal feed restriction induces asymmetrical growth retardation and metabolic alterations in the offspring. Differences in gene expression at birth and higher growth and adiposity in adulthood suggest a female-specific programming effect for a positive energy balance, possibly due to overexposure to endogenous stress-induced glucocorticoids. PMID:24528940

  19. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif phosphorylation during engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by the neutrophil-restricted CEACAM3 (CD66d) receptor.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Shannon E; Schneider, Jutta; Liao, Edward H; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2003-08-01

    Gonorrhea is characterized by a purulent urethral or cervical discharge consisting primarily of neutrophils associated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. These interactions are facilitated by gonococcal colony opacity-associated (Opa) protein binding to host cellular CEACAM receptors. Of these, CEACAM3 is restricted to neutrophils and contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) reminiscent of that found within certain phagocytic Fc receptors. CEACAM3 was tyrosine phosphorylated by a Src family kinase-dependent process upon infection by gonococci expressing CEACAM-specific Opa proteins. This phosphorylation was necessary for efficient bacterial uptake; however, a less efficient uptake process became evident when kinase inhibitors or mutagenesis of the ITAM were used to prevent phosphorylation. Ligated CEACAM3 was recruited to a cytoskeleton-containing fraction, intense foci of polymerized actin were evident where bacteria attached to HeLa-CEACAM3, and disruption of polymerized actin by cytochalasin D blocked all bacterial uptake by these cells. These data support a model whereby CEACAM3 can mediate the Opa-dependent uptake of N. gonorrhoeae via either an efficient, ITAM phosphorylation-dependent process that resembles phagocytosis or a less efficient, tyrosine phosphorylation-independent mechanism. PMID:12864848

  20. Nitrogen restrictions buffer modeled interactions of water with the carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Gerber, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon and water cycles are coupled at multiple spatiotemporal scales and are crucial to carbon sequestration. Water related climate extremes, such as drought and intense precipitation, can substantially affect the carbon cycle. Meanwhile, nitrogen is a limiting resource to plant and has therefore the potential to alter the coupling of water and carbon cycles on land. Here we assess the effect of nitrogen limitation on the response of the terrestrial carbon cycle to moisture anomalies using Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's land surface model LM3V-N. We analyzed the response of three central carbon fluxes: net primary productivity (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), and net ecosystem productivity (NEP, the difference between NPP and Rh) and how these fluxes were altered under anomalies of the standardized precipitation and evapotranspiration index (SPEI). We found that globally, the correlations between each of the carbon flux and SPEI depended on the timescale and a strong legacy effect of SPEI anomalies on Rh. Consideration of nitrogen constraints reduced anomalies in carbon fluxes in response to extreme dry/wet events. This nitrogen-induced buffer constrained the growth of plants under wet extremes and allowed for enhanced growth during droughts. Extra gain of soil moisture from the downregulation of canopy transpiration by nitrogen limitation and shifts in the relative importance of water and nitrogen limitation during dry/wet extreme events are possible mechanisms contributing to the buffering of modeled NPP and NEP. Responses of Rh to moisture anomalies were much weaker compared to NPP, and N buffering effects were less evident.

  1. A two-phase restricted equilibrium model for combustion of metalized solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, J. S.; Dejong, F. J.; Gibeling, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    An Eulerian-Lagrangian two-phase approach was adopted to model the multi-phase reacting internal flow in a solid rocket with a metalized propellant. An Eulerian description was used to analyze the motion of the continuous phase which includes the gas as well as the small (micron-sized) particulates, while a Lagrangian description is used for the analysis of the discrete phase which consists of the larger particulates in the motor chamber. The particulates consist of Al and Al2O3 such that the particulate composition is 100 percent Al at injection from the propellant surface with Al2O3 fraction increasing due to combustion along the particle trajectory. An empirical model is used to compute the combustion rate for agglomerates while the continuous phase chemistry is treated using chemical equilibrium. The computer code was used to simulate the reacting flow in a solid rocket motor with an AP/HTPB/Al propellant. The computed results show the existence of an extended combustion zone in the chamber rather than a thin reaction region. The presence of the extended combustion zone results in the chamber flow field and chemical being far from isothermal (as would be predicted by a surface combustion assumption). The temperature in the chamber increases from about 2600 K at the propellant surface to about 3350 K in the core. Similarly the chemical composition and the density of the propellant gas also show spatially non-uniform distribution in the chamber. The analysis developed under the present effort provides a more sophisticated tool for solid rocket internal flow predictions than is presently available, and can be useful in studying apparent anomalies and improving the simple correlations currently in use. The code can be used in the analysis of combustion efficiency, thermal load in the internal insulation, plume radiation, etc.

  2. Habitual physical activity and plasma metabolomic patterns distinguish individuals with low vs. high weight loss during controlled energy restriction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weight loss (WL) induced by energy restriction is highly variable even in controlled clinical trials. An integrative analysis of the plasma metabolome coupled to traditional clinical variables may reveal a WL “responder” phenotype. Therfore, we predicted WL in overweight and obese individuals on a...

  3. Habitual physical activity and plasma metabolomics patterns distinguish individuals with low- versus high-weight loss during controlled energy restriction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weight loss (WL) induced by energy restriction is highly variable even in controlled clinical trials. An integrative analysis of the plasma metabolome coupled to traditional clinical variables may reveal a WL “responder” phenotype. Therfore, we predicted WL in overweight and obese individuals on a...

  4. Dietary restriction decreases coenzyme Q and ubiquinol potentially via changes in gene expression in the model organism C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alexandra; Klapper, Maja; Onur, Simone; Menke, Thomas; Niklowitz, Petra; Döring, Frank

    2015-05-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) is a robust intervention that extends both health span and life span in many organisms. Ubiquinol and ubiquinone represent the reduced and oxidized forms of coenzyme Q (CoQ). CoQ plays a central role in energy metabolism and functions in several cellular processes including gene expression. Here we used the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to determine level and redox state of CoQ and expression of genes in response to DR. We found that DR down-regulates the steady-state expression levels of several evolutionary conserved genes (i.e. coq-1) that encode key enzymes of the mevalonate and CoQ-synthesizing pathways. In line with this, DR decreases the levels of total CoQ and ubiquinol. This CoQ-reducing effect of DR is obvious in adult worms but not in L4 larvae and is also evident in the eat-2 mutant, a genetic model of DR. In conclusion, we propose that DR reduces the level of CoQ and ubiquinol via gene expression in the model organism C. elegans. PMID:25939481

  5. On Modelling Minimal Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Christopher H.; Su, Li; Gladman, Dafna D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore methods for statistical modelling of minimal disease activity (MDA) based on data from intermittent clinic visits. Methods The analysis was based on a 2‐state model. Comparisons were made between analyses based on “complete case” data from visits at which MDA status was known, and the use of hidden model methodology that incorporated information from visits at which only some MDA defining criteria could be established. Analyses were based on an observational psoriatic arthritis cohort. Results With data from 856 patients and 7,024 clinic visits, analysis was based on virtually all visits, although only 62.6% provided enough information to determine MDA status. Estimated mean times for an episode of MDA varied from 4.18 years to 3.10 years, with smaller estimates derived from the hidden 2‐state model analysis. Over a 10‐year period, the estimated expected times spent in MDA episodes of longer than 1 year was 3.90 to 4.22, and the probability of having such an MDA episode was estimated to be 0.85 to 0.91, with longer times and greater probabilities seen with the hidden 2‐state model analysis. Conclusion A 2‐state model provides a useful framework for the analysis of MDA. Use of data from visits at which MDA status can not be determined provide more precision, and notable differences are seen in estimated quantities related to MDA episodes based on complete case and hidden 2‐state model analyses. The possibility of bias, as well as loss of precision, should be recognized when complete case analyses are used. PMID:26315478

  6. Using Active Modeling in Counterterrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi-Jen; Jiau, Hewijin C.; Tsai, Shang-Rong

    Terrorist organizations attain their goals by attacking various targets to jeopardize human lives and intimidate governments. As new terrorist attacks almost always aim to break the mold of old plots, tracing the dynamic behaviors of terrorists becomes crucial to national defense. This paper proposes using active modeling in analyzing unconventional attacks in the design of counterterrorism system. The intelligent terrorism detection system not only detects potential threats by monitoring terrorist networks with identified threat patterns, but also continually integrates new threat features in terrorist behaviors and the varying relationships among terrorists.

  7. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  8. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  9. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  10. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  11. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  12. Ovine Surgical Model of Uterine Space Restriction: Interactive Effects of Uterine Anomalies and Multifetal Gestations on Fetal and Placental Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Katie M.; Koch, Jill M.; Ramadoss, Jayanth; Kling, Pamela J.; Magness, Ronald R.

    2010-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is observed in conditions with limitations in uterine space (e.g., uterine anomalies and multifetal gestations). IUGR is associated with reduced fetal weight, organ growth, and a spectrum of adult-onset diseases. To examine the interaction of uterine anomalies and multifetal gestations, we developed a surgical uterine space restriction model with a unilateral uterine horn ligation before breeding (unilateral surgery). Placentas and fetuses were studied on Gestational Day (GD) 120 and GD 130 (term = 147 days). Unilateral surgery decreased placentome numbers in singleton and twin pregnancies (25% and 50%, respectively) but not unilateral triplets. Unilateral surgery decreased total placentome weight in twin pregnancies (decreased 24%). Fetuses categorized as uterine space restricted (unilateral twin and both groups of triplets) had 51% fewer placentomes per fetus and a 31% reduction in placentomal weight per fetus compared to the nonrestricted group (control singleton, unilateral singleton, and control twin). By GD 130, uterine space-restricted fetuses exhibited decreased weight, smaller crown-rump, abdominal girth, and thoracic girth as well as decreased fetal heart, kidney, liver, spleen, and thymus weights. Lung and brain weights were unaffected, demonstrating asymmetric IUGR. At GD 130, placental efficiency (fetal weight per total placentomal weight) was elevated in uterine space-restricted fetuses. However, fetal arterial creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and cholesterol were elevated, suggesting insufficient placental clearance. Maternal-to-fetal glucose and triglycerides ratios were elevated in the uterine space-restricted pregnancies, suggesting placental nutrient transport insufficiency. This model allows for examination of interactive effects of uterine space restriction-induced IUGR on placental adaptation and fetal organ growth. PMID:20574052

  13. The impact of a human IGF-II analog ([Leu27]IGF-II) on fetal growth in a mouse model of fetal growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Charnock, Jayne C.; Dilworth, Mark R.; Aplin, John D.; Sibley, Colin P.; Westwood, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing placental insulin-like growth factor (IGF) availability appears to be an attractive strategy for improving outcomes in fetal growth restriction (FGR). Our approach was the novel use of [Leu27]IGF-II, a human IGF-II analog that binds the IGF-II clearance receptor IGF-IIR in fetal growth-restricted (FGR) mice. We hypothesized that the impact of [Leu27]IGF-II infusion in C57BL/6J (wild-type) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout (eNOS−/−; FGR) mice would be to enhance fetal growth and investigated this from mid- to late gestation; 1 mg·kg−1·day−1 [Leu27]IGF-II was delivered via a subcutaneous miniosmotic pump from E12.5 to E18.5. Fetal and placental weights recorded at E18.5 were used to generate frequency distribution curves; fetuses <5th centile were deemed growth restricted. Placentas were harvested for immunohistochemical analysis of the IGF system, and maternal serum was collected for measurement of exogenously administered IGF-II. In WT pregnancies, [Leu27]IGF-II treatment halved the number of FGR fetuses, reduced fetal(P = 0.028) and placental weight variations (P = 0.0032), and increased the numbers of pups close to the mean fetal weight (131 vs. 112 pups within 1 SD). Mixed-model analysis confirmed litter size to be negatively correlated with fetal and placental weight and showed that [Leu27]IGF-II preferentially improved fetal weight in the largest litters, as defined by number. Unidirectional 14CMeAIB transfer per gram placenta (System A amino acid transporter activity) was inversely correlated with fetal weight in [Leu27]IGF-II-treated WT animals (P < 0.01). In eNOS−/− mice, [Leu27]IGF-II reduced the number of FGR fetuses(1 vs. 5 in the untreated group). The observed reduction in FGR pup numbers in both C57 and eNOS−/− litters suggests the use of this analog as a means of standardizing and rescuing fetal growth, preferentially in the smallest offspring. PMID:26530156

  14. The impact of a human IGF-II analog ([Leu27]IGF-II) on fetal growth in a mouse model of fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Charnock, Jayne C; Dilworth, Mark R; Aplin, John D; Sibley, Colin P; Westwood, Melissa; Crocker, Ian P

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing placental insulin-like growth factor (IGF) availability appears to be an attractive strategy for improving outcomes in fetal growth restriction (FGR). Our approach was the novel use of [Leu(27)]IGF-II, a human IGF-II analog that binds the IGF-II clearance receptor IGF-IIR in fetal growth-restricted (FGR) mice. We hypothesized that the impact of [Leu(27)]IGF-II infusion in C57BL/6J (wild-type) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-); FGR) mice would be to enhance fetal growth and investigated this from mid- to late gestation; 1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) [Leu(27)]IGF-II was delivered via a subcutaneous miniosmotic pump from E12.5 to E18.5. Fetal and placental weights recorded at E18.5 were used to generate frequency distribution curves; fetuses <5th centile were deemed growth restricted. Placentas were harvested for immunohistochemical analysis of the IGF system, and maternal serum was collected for measurement of exogenously administered IGF-II. In WT pregnancies, [Leu(27)]IGF-II treatment halved the number of FGR fetuses, reduced fetal(P = 0.028) and placental weight variations (P = 0.0032), and increased the numbers of pups close to the mean fetal weight (131 vs. 112 pups within 1 SD). Mixed-model analysis confirmed litter size to be negatively correlated with fetal and placental weight and showed that [Leu(27)]IGF-II preferentially improved fetal weight in the largest litters, as defined by number. Unidirectional (14C)MeAIB transfer per gram placenta (System A amino acid transporter activity) was inversely correlated with fetal weight in [Leu(27)]IGF-II-treated WT animals (P < 0.01). In eNOS(-/-) mice, [Leu(27)]IGF-II reduced the number of FGR fetuses(1 vs. 5 in the untreated group). The observed reduction in FGR pup numbers in both C57 and eNOS(-/-) litters suggests the use of this analog as a means of standardizing and rescuing fetal growth, preferentially in the smallest offspring. PMID:26530156

  15. The study of responses to 'model' DNA breaks induced by restriction endonucleases in cells and cell-free systems: achievements and difficulties.

    PubMed

    Thacker, J

    1994-11-01

    The use of restriction endonucleases (RE) as a means of implicating DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) in cellular responses is reviewed. The introduction of RE into cells leads to many of the responses known to be characteristic of radiation damage--cell killing, chromosomal aberration, oncogenic transformation, gene mutation and amplification. Additionally, radiosensitive cell lines are hypersensitive to RE, including those from the human disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. However, quantitation of response and comparisons of the effectiveness of different RE are difficult, partly because of unknown activity and lifetime of RE in the cell. RE-induced dsb have also been used to reveal molecular mechanisms of repair and misrepair at specific sites in DNA. Dsb have been implicated in recombination processes including those leading to illegitimate rejoining (formation of deletions and rearrangements) at short sequence features in DNA. Also model dsb act as a signal to activate other cellular processes, which may influence or indirectly cause some responses, including cell death. In these signalling responses the detailed chemistry at the break site may not be very important, perhaps explaining why there is considerable overlap in responses to RE and to ionizing radiations. PMID:7983451

  16. A modified Vicsek model for self-propelled agents with exponential neighbor weight and restricted visual field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Guang; Zhu, Chen-Ping; Yin, Chuan-Yang; Hu, Dong-Sheng; Yan, Zhi-Jun

    2013-05-01

    Large flocks of wild beings can have coordinated motion with neither leading center nor global information. The Vicsek model and its new versions explained such collective behavior of self-propelled agents with the mechanism of un-weighted influence of neighbors and global visual field (GVF), which may not always fit the reality. In the present work, we take both exponential (λ) neighbor weight (ENW) and restricted visual field (RVF) into account, and investigate the combinatory effect of them. Based on this mechanism, in most cases of our simulation, stationary direction consensus Va exhibits a maximum or decreases with VF, and a minimum convergence time T appears in RVF, which demonstrates that GVF is not necessary for coordinated motion, while RVF matched ENW would be reasonable. Moreover, we simulated various recipes for optimizing Va and T in unfavorable cases, and found critical points separating inverse λ-dependent variations of T. The present work may be useful in improving the efficiency of direction consensus of large flocks of artificial individuals besides the understanding of biological collective motion in nature.

  17. Wanted: Active Role Models for Today's Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Reducing Childhood Obesity Wanted: Active Role Models for Today's Kids Past ... the active role models they can get. "With childhood obesity at an all-time high, we need to ...

  18. Changes in Mediterranean circulation and water characteristics due to restriction of the Atlantic connection: a high-resolution ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topper, R. P. M.; Meijer, P. Th.

    2015-02-01

    A high-resolution parallel ocean model is set up to examine how the sill depth of the Atlantic connection affects circulation and water characteristics in the Mediterranean Basin. An analysis of the model performance, comparing model results with observations of the present-day Mediterranean, demonstrates its ability to reproduce observed water characteristics and circulation (including deep water formation). A series of experiments with different sill depths in the Atlantic-Mediterranean connection is used to assess the sensitivity of Mediterranean circulation and water characteristics to sill depth. Basin-averaged water salinity and, to a lesser degree, temperature rise when the sill depth is shallower and exchange with the Atlantic is lower. Lateral and interbasinal differences in the Mediterranean are, however, largely unchanged. The strength of the upper overturning cell in the western basin is proportional to the magnitude of the exchange with the Atlantic, and hence to sill depth. Overturning in the eastern basin and deep water formation in both basins, on the contrary, are little affected by the sill depth. The model results are used to interpret the sedimentary record of the Late Miocene preceding and during the Messinian Salinity Crisis. In the western basin, a correlation exists between sill depth and rate of refreshment of deep water. On the other hand, because sill depth has little effect on the overturning and deep water formation in the eastern basin, the model results do not support the notion that restriction of the Atlantic-Mediterranean connection may cause lower oxygenation of deep water in the eastern basin. However, this discrepancy may be due to simplifications in the surface forcing and the use of a bathymetry different from that in the Late Miocene. We also tentatively conclude that blocked outflow, as found in experiments with a sill depth ≤10 m, is a plausible scenario for the second stage of the Messinian Salinity Crisis during which

  19. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies of O-biphenyl-3-yl carbamates as peripherally restricted fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Duranti, Andrea; Melzig, Laurin; Fiorelli, Claudio; Ruda, Gian Filippo; Colombano, Giampiero; Mestichelli, Paola; Sanchini, Silvano; Tontini, Andrea; Mor, Marco; Bandiera, Tiziano; Scarpelli, Rita; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele

    2013-07-25

    The peripherally restricted fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB937 (3, cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-6-hydroxybiphenyl-3-yl ester) is extruded from the brain and spinal cord by the Abcg2 efflux transporter. Despite its inability to enter the central nervous system (CNS), 3 exerts profound antinociceptive effects in mice and rats, which result from the inhibition of FAAH in peripheral tissues and the consequent enhancement of anandamide signaling at CB1 cannabinoid receptors localized on sensory nerve endings. In the present study, we examined the structure-activity relationships (SAR) for the biphenyl region of compound 3, focusing on the carbamoyl and hydroxyl groups in the distal and proximal phenyl rings. Our SAR studies generated a new series of peripherally restricted FAAH inhibitors and identified compound 35 (cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-5-hydroxybiphenyl-3-yl ester) as the most potent brain-impermeant FAAH inhibitor disclosed to date. PMID:23822179

  20. Dietary restriction with and without caloric restriction for healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changhan; Longo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention known to regulate aging and increase the healthy lifespan in various model organisms, ranging from the unicellular yeast to worms, flies, rodents, and primates. However, caloric restriction, which in most cases entails a 20–40% reduction of food consumption relative to normal intake, is a severe intervention that results in both beneficial and detrimental effects. Specific types of chronic, intermittent, or periodic dietary restrictions without chronic caloric restriction have instead the potential to provide a significant healthspan increase while minimizing adverse effects. Improved periodic or targeted dietary restriction regimens that uncouple the challenge of food deprivation from the beneficial effects will allow a safe intervention feasible for a major portion of the population. Here we focus on healthspan interventions that are not chronic or do not require calorie restriction. PMID:26918181

  1. Restriction of dietary protein decreases mTORC1 in tumors and somatic tissues of a tumor-bearing mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Nicole E.; Rastelli, Antonella L.; Gao, Feng; Cava, Edda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Spelta, Francesco; Pili, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Reduced dietary protein intake and intermittent fasting (IF) are both linked to healthy longevity in rodents, and are effective in inhibiting cancer growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic protein restriction (PR) and IF are unclear, but may be mediated in part by a down-regulation of the IGF/mTOR pathway. In this study we compared the effects of PR and IF on tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. We also investigated the effects of PR and IF on the mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, inhibition of which extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. The mTOR protein kinase is found in two distinct complexes, of which mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is responsive to acute treatment with amino acids in cell culture and in vivo. We found that both PR and IF inhibit tumor growth and mTORC1 phosphorylation in tumor xenografts. In somatic tissues, we found that PR, but not IF, selectively inhibits the activity of the amino acid sensitive mTORC1, while the activity of the second mTOR complex, mTORC2, was relatively unaffected by PR. In contrast, IF resulted in increased S6 phosphorylation in multiple metabolic tissues. Our work represents the first finding that PR may reduce mTORC1 activity in tumors and multiple somatic tissues, and suggest that PR may represent a highly translatable option for the treatment not only of cancer, but also other age-related diseases. PMID:26378060

  2. Restriction of dietary protein decreases mTORC1 in tumors and somatic tissues of a tumor-bearing mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Lamming, Dudley W; Cummings, Nicole E; Rastelli, Antonella L; Gao, Feng; Cava, Edda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Spelta, Francesco; Pili, Roberto; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-10-13

    Reduced dietary protein intake and intermittent fasting (IF) are both linked to healthy longevity in rodents, and are effective in inhibiting cancer growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic protein restriction (PR) and IF are unclear, but may be mediated in part by a down-regulation of the IGF/mTOR pathway. In this study we compared the effects of PR and IF on tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. We also investigated the effects of PR and IF on the mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, inhibition of which extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. The mTOR protein kinase is found in two distinct complexes, of which mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is responsive to acute treatment with amino acids in cell culture and in vivo. We found that both PR and IF inhibit tumor growth and mTORC1 phosphorylation in tumor xenografts. In somatic tissues, we found that PR, but not IF, selectively inhibits the activity of the amino acid sensitive mTORC1, while the activity of the second mTOR complex, mTORC2, was relatively unaffected by PR. In contrast, IF resulted in increased S6 phosphorylation in multiple metabolic tissues. Our work represents the first finding that PR may reduce mTORC1 activity in tumors and multiple somatic tissues, and suggest that PR may represent a highly translatable option for the treatment not only of cancer, but also other age-related diseases. PMID:26378060

  3. Placental Underperfusion in a Rat Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction Induced by a Reduced Plasma Volume Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Bibeau, Karine; Sicotte, Benoit; Béland, Mélanie; Bhat, Menakshi; Gaboury, Louis; Couture, Réjean; St-Louis, Jean; Brochu, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Lower maternal plasma volume expansion was found in idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but the link remains to be elucidated. An animal model of IUGR was developed by giving a low-sodium diet to rats over the last week of gestation. This treatment prevents full expansion of maternal circulating volume and the increase in uterine artery diameter, leading to reduced placental weight compared to normal gestation. We aimed to verify whether this is associated with reduced remodeling of uteroplacental circulation and placental hypoxia. Dams were divided into two groups: IUGR group and normal-fed controls. Blood velocity waveforms in the main uterine artery were obtained by Doppler sonography on days 14, 18 and 21 of pregnancy. On day 22 (term = 23 days), rats were sacrificed and placentas and uterine radial arteries were collected. Diameter and myogenic response of uterine arteries supplying placentas were determined while expression of hypoxia-modulated genes (HIF-1α, VEGFA and VEGFR2), apoptotic enzyme (Caspase -3 and -9) and glycogen cells clusters were measured in control and IUGR term-placentas. In the IUGR group, impaired blood velocity in the main uterine artery along with increased resistance index was observed without alteration in umbilical artery blood velocity. Radial uterine artery diameter was reduced while myogenic response was increased. IUGR placentas displayed increased expression of hypoxia markers without change in the caspases and increased glycogen cells in the junctional zone. The present data suggest that reduced placental and fetal growth in our IUGR model may be mediated, in part, through reduced maternal uteroplacental blood flow and increased placental hypoxia. PMID:26727492

  4. Sildenafil Therapy Normalizes the Aberrant Metabolomic Profile in the Comt−/− Mouse Model of Preeclampsia/Fetal Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Joanna L.; Sulek, Karolina; Andersson, Irene J.; Davidge, Sandra T.; Kenny, Louise C.; Sibley, Colin P.; Mandal, Rupasri; Wishart, David S.; Broadhurst, David I.; Baker, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) and fetal growth restriction (FGR) are serious complications of pregnancy, associated with greatly increased risk of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. These complications are difficult to diagnose and no curative treatments are available. We hypothesized that the metabolomic signature of two models of disease, catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT−/−) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (Nos3−/−) knockout mice, would be significantly different from control C57BL/6J mice. Further, we hypothesised that any differences in COMT−/− mice would be resolved following treatment with Sildenafil, a treatment which rescues fetal growth. Targeted, quantitative comparisons of serum metabolic profiles of pregnant Nos3−/−, COMT−/− and C57BL/6J mice were made using a kit from BIOCRATES. Significant differences in 4 metabolites were observed between Nos3−/− and C57BL/6J mice (p < 0.05) and in 18 metabolites between C57BL/6J and COMT−/− mice (p < 0.05). Following treatment with Sildenafil, only 5 of the 18 previously identified differences in metabolites (p < 0.05) remained in COMT−/− mice. Metabolomic profiling of mouse models is possible, producing signatures that are clearly different from control animals. A potential new treatment, Sildenafil, is able to normalize the aberrant metabolomic profile in COMT−/− mice; as this treatment moves into clinical trials, this information may assist in assessing possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26667607

  5. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells express a restricted set of functionally active chemokine receptors capable of promoting migration to pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Sordi, Valeria; Malosio, Maria Luisa; Marchesi, Federica; Mercalli, Alessia; Melzi, Raffaella; Giordano, Tiziana; Belmonte, Nathalie; Ferrari, Giuliana; Leone, Biagio Eugenio; Bertuzzi, Federico; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Allavena, Paola; Bonifacio, Ezio; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2005-07-15

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are stromal cells with the ability to proliferate and differentiate into many tissues. Although they represent powerful tools for several therapeutic settings, mechanisms regulating their migration to peripheral tissues are still unknown. Here, we report chemokine receptor expression on human BM-MSCs and their role in mediating migration to tissues. A minority of BM-MSCs (2% to 25%) expressed a restricted set of chemokine receptors (CXC receptor 4 [CXCR4], CX3C receptor 1 [CX3CR1], CXCR6, CC chemokine receptor 1 [CCR1], CCR7) and, accordingly, showed appreciable chemotactic migration in response to the chemokines CXC ligand 12 (CXCL12), CX3CL1, CXCL16, CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), and CCL19. Using human pancreatic islets as an in vitro model of peripheral tissue, we showed that islet supernatants released factors able to attract BM-MSCs in vitro, and this attraction was principally mediated by CX3CL1 and CXCL12. Moreover, cells with features of BM-MSCs were detected within the pancreatic islets of mice injected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive BM. A population of bona fide MSCs that also expressed CXCR4, CXCR6, CCR1, and CCR7 could be isolated from normal adult human pancreas. This study defines the chemokine receptor repertoire of human BM-MSCs that determines their migratory activity. Modulation of homing capacity may be instrumental for harnessing the therapeutic potential of BM-MSCs. PMID:15784733

  6. Regulatory circuit based on autogenous activation-repression: roles of C-boxes and spacer sequences in control of the PvuII restriction-modification system

    PubMed Central

    Mruk, Iwona; Rajesh, Preeti; Blumenthal, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems comprise a restriction endonuclease (REase) and a protective methyltransferase (MTase). After R-M genes enter a new cell, MTase must appear before REase or the chromosome will be cleaved. PvuII and some other R-M systems achieve this delay by cotranscribing the REase gene with the gene for an autogenous transcription activator (the controlling or ‘C’ protein C.PvuII). This study reveals, through in vivo titration, that C.PvuII is not only an activator but also a repressor for its own gene. In other systems, this type of circuit can result in oscillatory behavior. Despite the use of identical, symmetrical C protein-binding sequences (C-boxes) in the left and right operators, C.PvuII showed higher in vitro affinity for OL than for OR, implicating the spacer sequences in this difference. Mutational analysis associated the repression with OR, which overlaps the promoter −35 hexamer but is otherwise dispensable for activation. A nonrepressing mutant exhibited poor establishment in new cells. Comparing promoter-operator regions from PvuII and 29 R-M systems controlled by C proteins revealed that the most-highly conserved sequence is the tetranucleotide spacer separating OL from OR. Any changes in that spacer reduced the stability of C.PvuII-operator complexes and abolished activation. PMID:17933763

  7. Regulatory circuit based on autogenous activation-repression: roles of C-boxes and spacer sequences in control of the PvuII restriction-modification system.

    PubMed

    Mruk, Iwona; Rajesh, Preeti; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems comprise a restriction endonuclease (REase) and a protective methyltransferase (MTase). After R-M genes enter a new cell, MTase must appear before REase or the chromosome will be cleaved. PvuII and some other R-M systems achieve this delay by cotranscribing the REase gene with the gene for an autogenous transcription activator (the controlling or 'C' protein C.PvuII). This study reveals, through in vivo titration, that C.PvuII is not only an activator but also a repressor for its own gene. In other systems, this type of circuit can result in oscillatory behavior. Despite the use of identical, symmetrical C protein-binding sequences (C-boxes) in the left and right operators, C.PvuII showed higher in vitro affinity for O(L) than for O(R), implicating the spacer sequences in this difference. Mutational analysis associated the repression with O(R), which overlaps the promoter -35 hexamer but is otherwise dispensable for activation. A nonrepressing mutant exhibited poor establishment in new cells. Comparing promoter-operator regions from PvuII and 29 R-M systems controlled by C proteins revealed that the most-highly conserved sequence is the tetranucleotide spacer separating O(L) from O(R). Any changes in that spacer reduced the stability of C.PvuII-operator complexes and abolished activation. PMID:17933763

  8. Arylesterase activity is associated with antioxidant intake and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) gene methylation in metabolic syndrome patients following an energy restricted diet

    PubMed Central

    de la Iglesia, Rocio; Mansego, Maria L.; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J.; Zulet, M. Angeles; Martinez, J. Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The arylesterase (ARE) activity linked to the paraoxonase-1 (PON1) gene is known to protect lipoproteins from oxidation and provide defense against metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular diseases. The epigenetic regulation of enzymatic activities is gaining importance nowadays. This research aimed to assess the potential relationships between the ARE activity with the methylation levels of the PON1 gene transcriptional regulatory region, anthropometrics, biochemical markers and antioxidant dietary components. Forty-seven subjects (47 ± 10 y.o; BMI 36.2 ± 3.8 kg/m2; 46.8 % female) with MetS features, who followed a six-month energy-restricted dietary weight-loss intervention, were included in this study (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01087086). Anthropometric, biochemical, enzymatic and dietary data were assessed using validated procedures. PON1 transcriptional regulatory region methylation was analyzed by a microarray technical approach. Volunteers reduced ARE activity in parallel with body weight (p = 0.005), BMI (p = 0.006), total fat mass (p = 0.020), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.018), mean blood pressure (p = 0.022) and triglycerides (p = 0.014). Methylation levels of some CpG sites of the PON1 gene correlated negatively with ARE activity (p < 0.05). Interestingly, dietary vitamin C (p = 0.001), tocopherols (p = 0.009) and lycopene (p = 0.038) were positively associated with ARE activity and showed an inverse correlation (p = 0.004, p = 0.029 and p = 0.021, respectively) with the methylation of some selected CpG sites of the PON1 gene. In conclusion, ARE activity decreased in parallel with MetS-related markers associated to the energy restriction, while dietary antioxidants might enhance the ARE activity by lowering the PON1 gene methylation in patients with MetS features. PMID:26417268

  9. H11/HSPB8 Restricts HIV-2 Vpx to Restore the Anti-Viral Activity of SAMHD1

    PubMed Central

    Kudoh, Ayumi; Miyakawa, Kei; Matsunaga, Satoko; Matsushima, Yuki; Kosugi, Isao; Kimura, Hirokazu; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Virus–host interactions play vital roles in viral replication and virus-induced pathogenesis. Viruses rely entirely upon host cells to reproduce progeny viruses; however, host factors positively or negatively regulate virus replication by interacting with viral proteins. The elucidation of virus–host protein interaction not only provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which host cells combat viral infections, but also facilitates the development of new anti-viral therapeutics. Identification of relevant host factors requires techniques that enable comprehensive characterization of virus–host protein interactions. In this study, we developed a proteomic approach to systematically identify human protein kinases that interact potently with viral proteins. For this purpose, we synthesized 412 full-length human protein kinases using the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, and screened them for their association with a virus protein using the amplified luminescent proximity homogenous assay (AlphaScreen). Using this system, we attempted to discover a robust anti-viral host restriction mechanism targeting virus protein X (Vpx) of HIV-2. The screen identified H11/HSPB8 as a Vpx-binding protein that negatively regulates the stability and function of Vpx. Indeed, overexpression of H11/HSPB8 promoted the degradation of Vpx via the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway and inhibited its interaction with SAMHD1, a host restriction factor responsible for blocking replication of HIV. Conversely, targeted knockdown of H11/HSPB8 in human trophoblast cells, which ordinarily express high levels of this protein, restored the expression and function of Vpx, making the cells highly susceptible to viral replication. These results demonstrate that our proteomic approach represents a powerful tool for revealing virus–host interaction not yet identified by conventional methods. Furthermore, we showed that H11/HSPB8 could be a potential host regulatory

  10. In Vivo Detection of Perinatal Brain Metabolite Changes in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR)

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Rui V.; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Carbajo, Rodrigo J.; González-Tendero, Anna; Illa, Miriam; Sanz-Cortés, Magdalena; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Gratacós, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Background Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. We studied a rabbit model of IUGR by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), to assess in vivo brain structural and metabolic consequences, and identify potential metabolic biomarkers for clinical translation. Methods IUGR was induced in 3 pregnant rabbits at gestational day 25, by 40–50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn; the contralateral horn was used as control. Fetuses were delivered at day 30 and weighted. A total of 6 controls and 5 IUGR pups underwent T2-w MRI and localized proton MRS within the first 8 hours of life, at 7T. Changes in brain tissue volumes and respective contributions to each MRS voxel were estimated by semi-automated registration of MRI images with a digital atlas of the rabbit brain. MRS data were used for: (i) absolute metabolite quantifications, using linear fitting; (ii) local temperature estimations, based on the water chemical shift; and (iii) classification, using spectral pattern analysis. Results Lower birth weight was associated with (i) smaller brain sizes, (ii) slightly lower brain temperatures, and (iii) differential metabolite profile changes in specific regions of the brain parenchyma. Specifically, we found estimated lower levels of aspartate and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus (suggesting neuronal impairment), and higher glycine levels in the striatum (possible marker of brain injury). Our results also suggest that the metabolic changes in cortical regions are more prevalent than those detected in hippocampus and striatum. Conclusions IUGR was associated with brain metabolic changes in vivo, which correlate well with the neurostructural changes and neurodevelopment problems described in IUGR. Metabolic parameters could constitute non invasive biomarkers for the diagnosis and abnormal neurodevelopment of perinatal origin. PMID:26208165

  11. Novel Role for Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) in the Restriction of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 by the Cellular Intrinsic Antiviral Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Kristen L.; Wasson, Peter; McFarlane, Steven; Tong, Lily; Brown, James R.; Grant, Kyle G.; Domingues, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is used by the intrinsic antiviral immune response to restrict viral pathogens, such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Despite characterization of the host factors that rely on SUMOylation to exert their antiviral effects, the enzymes that mediate these SUMOylation events remain to be defined. We show that unconjugated SUMO levels are largely maintained throughout infection regardless of the presence of ICP0, the HSV-1 SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase. Moreover, in the absence of ICP0, high-molecular-weight SUMO-conjugated proteins do not accumulate if HSV-1 DNA does not replicate. These data highlight the continued importance for SUMO signaling throughout infection. We show that the SUMO ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) is upregulated during HSV-1 infection and localizes to nuclear domains that contain viral DNA. PIAS4 is recruited to sites associated with HSV-1 genome entry through SUMO interaction motif (SIM)-dependent mechanisms that are destabilized by ICP0. In contrast, PIAS4 accumulates in replication compartments through SIM-independent mechanisms irrespective of ICP0 expression. Depletion of PIAS4 enhances the replication of ICP0-null mutant HSV-1, which is susceptible to restriction by the intrinsic antiviral immune response. The mechanisms of PIAS4-mediated restriction are synergistic with the restriction mechanisms of a characterized intrinsic antiviral factor, promyelocytic leukemia protein, and are antagonized by ICP0. We provide the first evidence that PIAS4 is an intrinsic antiviral factor. This novel role for PIAS4 in intrinsic antiviral immunity contrasts with the known roles of PIAS proteins as suppressors of innate immunity. IMPORTANCE Posttranslational modifications with small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins regulate multiple aspects of host immunity and viral replication. The protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) family of SUMO ligases is predominantly associated

  12. Exogenous progesterone exacerbates running response of adolescent female mice to repeated food restriction stress by changing α4-GABAA receptor activity of hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Wable, G S; Chen, Y-W; Rashid, S; Aoki, C

    2015-12-01

    Adolescent females are particularly vulnerable to mental illnesses with co-morbidity of anxiety, such as anorexia nervosa (AN). We used an animal model of AN, called activity-based anorexia (ABA), to investigate the neurobiological basis of vulnerability to repeated, food restriction (FR) stress-evoked anxiety. Twenty-one of 23 adolescent female mice responded to the 1st FR with increased wheel-running activity (WRA), even during the limited period of food access, thereby capturing AN's symptoms of voluntary FR and over-exercise. Baseline WRA was an excellent predictor of FR-elicited WRA (severity of ABA, SOA), with high baseline runners responding to FR with minimal SOA (i.e., negative correlation). Nine gained resistance to ABA following the 1st FR. Even though allopregnanolone (3α-OH-5α-pregnan-20-one, THP), the metabolite of progesterone (P4), is a well-recognized anxiolytic agent, subcutaneous P4 to these ABA-resistant animals during the 2nd FR was exacerbative, evoking greater WRA than the counterpart resistant group that received oil vehicle, only. Moreover, P4 had no WRA-reducing effect on animals that remained ABA-vulnerable. To explain the sensitizing effect of P4 upon the resistant mice, we examined the relationship between P4 treatment and levels of the α4 subunit of GABAARs at spines of pyramidal cells of the hippocampal CA1, a parameter previously shown to correlate with resistance to ABA. α4 levels at spine membrane correlated strongly and negatively with SOA during the 1st ABA (prior to P4 injection), confirming previous findings. α4 levels were greater among P4-treated animals that had gained resistance than of vehicle-treated resistant animals or of the vulnerable animals with or without P4. We propose that α4-GABAARs play a protective role by counterbalancing the ABA-induced increase in excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, and although exogenous P4's metabolite, THP, enhances α4 expression, especially among those that can gain resistance

  13. Stage-Specific MicroRNAs and Their Role in the Anticancer Effects of Calorie Restriction in a Rat Model of ER-Positive Luminal Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Kaylyn L; Sanford, Tiffany; Harrison, Lauren M; LeBourgeois, Paul; Lashinger, Laura M; Mambo, Elizabeth; Hursting, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as ubiquitous post-transcriptional regulators that coordinate many fundamental processes within cells, including those commonly linked to cancer when dysregulated. Profiling microRNAs across stages of cancer progression provides focus as to which microRNAs are key players in cancer development and are therefore important to manipulate with interventions to delay cancer onset and progression. Calorie restriction is one of the most effective preventive interventions across many types of cancer, although its effects on microRNAs have not been well characterized. We used the dimethylbenz[a]-anthracene-induced model of luminal mammary cancer in Sprague Dawley rats to elucidate which microRNAs are linked to progression in this type of cancer and, subsequently, to study how calorie restriction affects such microRNAs. We identified eight microRNAs (miR-10a, miR-10b, miR-21, miR-124, miR-125b, miR-126, miR-145 and miR-200a) to be associated with DMBA-induced mammary tumor progression. Calorie restriction, which greatly increased tumor-free survival and decreased the overall size of tumors that did develop, significantly decreased the expression of one microRNA, miR-200a, which was positively associated with tumor progression. We further showed that inhibition of miR-200a function, mimicking the effect of calorie restriction on this microRNA, inhibited proliferation in both rat (LA7) and human (MCF7) luminal mammary cancer cell lines. These findings present, for the first time, a stage-specific profile of microRNAs in a rodent model of luminal mammary cancer. Furthermore, we have identified the regulation of miR-200a, a microRNA that is positively associated with progression in this model, as a possible mechanism contributing to the anticancer effects of calorie restriction. PMID:27433802

  14. Stage-Specific MicroRNAs and Their Role in the Anticancer Effects of Calorie Restriction in a Rat Model of ER-Positive Luminal Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Kaylyn L.; Sanford, Tiffany; Harrison, Lauren M.; LeBourgeois, Paul; Lashinger, Laura M.; Mambo, Elizabeth; Hursting, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as ubiquitous post-transcriptional regulators that coordinate many fundamental processes within cells, including those commonly linked to cancer when dysregulated. Profiling microRNAs across stages of cancer progression provides focus as to which microRNAs are key players in cancer development and are therefore important to manipulate with interventions to delay cancer onset and progression. Calorie restriction is one of the most effective preventive interventions across many types of cancer, although its effects on microRNAs have not been well characterized. We used the dimethylbenz[a]-anthracene-induced model of luminal mammary cancer in Sprague Dawley rats to elucidate which microRNAs are linked to progression in this type of cancer and, subsequently, to study how calorie restriction affects such microRNAs. We identified eight microRNAs (miR-10a, miR-10b, miR-21, miR-124, miR-125b, miR-126, miR-145 and miR-200a) to be associated with DMBA-induced mammary tumor progression. Calorie restriction, which greatly increased tumor-free survival and decreased the overall size of tumors that did develop, significantly decreased the expression of one microRNA, miR-200a, which was positively associated with tumor progression. We further showed that inhibition of miR-200a function, mimicking the effect of calorie restriction on this microRNA, inhibited proliferation in both rat (LA7) and human (MCF7) luminal mammary cancer cell lines. These findings present, for the first time, a stage-specific profile of microRNAs in a rodent model of luminal mammary cancer. Furthermore, we have identified the regulation of miR-200a, a microRNA that is positively associated with progression in this model, as a possible mechanism contributing to the anticancer effects of calorie restriction. PMID:27433802

  15. A Combination of Activation and Repression by a Colinear Hox Code Controls Forelimb-Restricted Expression of Tbx5 and Reveals Hox Protein Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Satoko; Minguillon, Carolina; Wood, Sophie; Logan, Malcolm P. O.

    2014-01-01

    Tight control over gene expression is essential for precision in embryonic development and acquisition of the regulatory elements responsible is the predominant driver for evolution of new structures. Tbx5 and Tbx4, two genes expressed in forelimb and hindlimb-forming regions respectively, play crucial roles in the initiation of limb outgrowth. Evolution of regulatory elements that activate Tbx5 in rostral LPM was essential for the acquisition of forelimbs in vertebrates. We identified such a regulatory element for Tbx5 and demonstrated Hox genes are essential, direct regulators. While the importance of Hox genes in regulating embryonic development is clear, Hox targets and the ways in which each protein executes its specific function are not known. We reveal how nested Hox expression along the rostro-caudal axis restricts Tbx5 expression to forelimb. We demonstrate that Hoxc9, which is expressed in caudal LPM where Tbx5 is not expressed, can form a repressive complex on the Tbx5 forelimb regulatory element. This repressive capacity is limited to Hox proteins expressed in caudal LPM and carried out by two separate protein domains in Hoxc9. Forelimb-restricted expression of Tbx5 and ultimately forelimb formation is therefore achieved through co-option of two characteristics of Hox genes; their colinear expression along the body axis and the functional specificity of different paralogs. Active complexes can be formed by Hox PG proteins present throughout the rostral-caudal LPM while restriction of Tbx5 expression is achieved by superimposing a dominant repressive (Hoxc9) complex that determines the caudal boundary of Tbx5 expression. Our results reveal the regulatory mechanism that ensures emergence of the forelimbs at the correct position along the body. Acquisition of this regulatory element would have been critical for the evolution of limbs in vertebrates and modulation of the factors we have identified can be molecular drivers of the diversity in limb morphology

  16. How Are Child Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors Associated with Caregiver Stress over Time? A Parallel Process Multilevel Growth Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrop, Clare; McBee, Matthew; Boyd, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of raising a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is frequently accompanied by elevated caregiver stress. Examining the variables that predict these elevated rates will help us understand how caregiver stress is impacted by and impacts child behaviors. This study explored how restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) contributed…

  17. Listening to patients: using verbal data in the validation of the Aberdeen Measures of Impairment, Activity Limitation and Participation Restriction (Ab-IAP)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to evaluate the validity of the self-administered Aberdeen Measures of Impairment, Activity Limitation and Participation Restriction (Ab-IAP): by investigating how participants interpret and respond to questions using the cognitive interviewing technique. Methods Twenty patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip participated in a cognitive interview whilst completing the Ab-IAP. Interviews were conducted using the concurrent 'think aloud' design. All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and analysed (i) using a standardised classification scheme to identify four types of response problems and (ii) thematically using the constant comparative technique. Results Participants used various response strategies when answering questions about impairment, activity limitations and participation restriction. Problems were judged to be present in 3.1% of participants' responses for the item Ab-IAP. Thematic analysis provided insight into the type and nature of problems people experienced when completing the Ab-IAP measures. The problems identified were mainly comprehension and response problems. Conclusions Participants had minimal difficulties completing the Ab-IAP; however those difficulties identified have prompted suggestions for improving the measures. The cognitive interviews produced results that were compatible with statistical analysis of the measures.. Cognitive interviewing was beneficial for testing the validity and acceptability of new Ab-IAP measures. The results demonstrates that the Ab-IAP, in addition to being theoretically-based and having good psychometric properties, elicits appropriate responses. PMID:20704724

  18. Differential inhibition of restriction enzyme cleavage by chromophore-modified analogues of the antitumour antibiotics mithramycin and chromomycin reveals structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, Sylvia; Garcia-Ferrer, Irene; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A; Portugal, José

    2010-05-15

    Differential cleavage at three restriction enzyme sites was used to determine the specific binding to DNA of the antitumour antibiotics mithramycin A (MTA), chromomycin A(3) (CRO) and six chromophore-modified analogues bearing shorter side chains attached at C-3, instead of the pentyl chain. All these antibiotics were obtained through combinatorial biosynthesis in the producer organisms. MTA, CRO and their six analogues showed differences in their capacity for inhibiting the rate of cleavage by restriction enzymes that recognize C/G-rich tracts. Changes in DNA melting temperature produced by these molecules were also analyzed, as well as their antiproliferative activities against a panel of colon, ovarian and prostate human carcinoma cell lines. Moreover, the cellular uptake of several analogues was examined to identify whether intracellular retention was related to cytotoxicity. These experimental approaches provided mutually consistent evidence of a seeming correlation between the strength of binding to DNA and the antiproliferative activity of the chromophore-modified molecules. Four of the analogues (mithramycin SK, mithramycin SDK, chromomycin SK and chromomycin SDK) showed promising biological profiles. PMID:20093108

  19. MgcRacGAP restricts active RhoA at the cytokinetic furrow and both RhoA and Rac1 at cell–cell junctions in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Breznau, Elaina B.; Semack, Ansley C.; Higashi, Tomohito; Miller, Ann L.

    2015-01-01

    Localized activation of Rho GTPases is essential for multiple cellular functions, including cytokinesis and formation and maintenance of cell–cell junctions. Although MgcRacGAP (Mgc) is required for spatially confined RhoA-GTP at the equatorial cortex of dividing cells, both the target specificity of Mgc's GAP activity and the involvement of phosphorylation of Mgc at Ser-386 are controversial. In addition, Mgc's function at cell–cell junctions remains unclear. Here, using gastrula-stage Xenopus laevis embryos as a model system, we examine Mgc's role in regulating localized RhoA-GTP and Rac1-GTP in the intact vertebrate epithelium. We show that Mgc's GAP activity spatially restricts accumulation of both RhoA-GTP and Rac1-GTP in epithelial cells—RhoA at the cleavage furrow and RhoA and Rac1 at cell–cell junctions. Phosphorylation at Ser-386 does not switch the specificity of Mgc's GAP activity and is not required for successful cytokinesis. Furthermore, Mgc regulates adherens junction but not tight junction structure, and the ability to regulate adherens junctions is dependent on GAP activity and signaling via the RhoA pathway. Together these results indicate that Mgc's GAP activity down-regulates the active populations of RhoA and Rac1 at localized regions of epithelial cells and is necessary for successful cytokinesis and cell–cell junction structure. PMID:25947135

  20. Ribosomal frameshifting and dual-target antiactivation restrict quorum-sensing–activated transfer of a mobile genetic element

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Joshua P.; Tester, Laura G. L.; Major, Anthony S.; Sullivan, John T.; Edgar, Christina D.; Kleffmann, Torsten; Patterson-House, Jackson R.; Hall, Drew A.; Tate, Warren P.; Hynes, Michael F.; Ronson, Clive W.

    2015-01-01

    Symbiosis islands are integrative and conjugative mobile genetic elements that convert nonsymbiotic rhizobia into nitrogen-fixing symbionts of leguminous plants. Excision of the Mesorhizobium loti symbiosis island ICEMlSymR7A is indirectly activated by quorum sensing through TraR-dependent activation of the excisionase gene rdfS. Here we show that a +1 programmed ribosomal frameshift (PRF) fuses the coding sequences of two TraR-activated genes, msi172 and msi171, producing an activator of rdfS expression named Frameshifted excision activator (FseA). Mass-spectrometry and mutational analyses indicated that the PRF occurred through +1 slippage of the tRNAphe from UUU to UUC within a conserved msi172-encoded motif. FseA activated rdfS expression in the absence of ICEMlSymR7A, suggesting that it directly activated rdfS transcription, despite being unrelated to any characterized DNA-binding proteins. Bacterial two-hybrid and gene-reporter assays demonstrated that FseA was also bound and inhibited by the ICEMlSymR7A-encoded quorum-sensing antiactivator QseM. Thus, activation of ICEMlSymR7A excision is counteracted by TraR antiactivation, ribosomal frameshifting, and FseA antiactivation. This robust suppression likely dampens the inherent biological noise present in the quorum-sensing autoinduction circuit and ensures that ICEMlSymR7A transfer only occurs in a subpopulation of cells in which both qseM expression is repressed and FseA is translated. The architecture of the ICEMlSymR7A transfer regulatory system provides an example of how a set of modular components have assembled through evolution to form a robust genetic toggle that regulates gene transcription and translation at both single-cell and cell-population levels. PMID:25787256

  1. Similar time restriction for intracytoplasmic sperm injection and round spermatid injection into activated oocytes for efficient offspring production.

    PubMed

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nguyen, Van Thuan; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2004-06-01

    The injection of male haploid germ cells, such as spermatozoa and round spermatids, into preactivated mouse oocytes can result in the development of viable embryos and offspring. However, it is not clear how the timing of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and round spermatid injection (ROSI) affects the production of offspring. We carried out ICSI and ROSI every 20 min for up to 4 h after the activation of mouse oocytes by Sr(2+) and compared the late-stage development of ICSI- and ROSI- treated oocytes, including the formation of pronuclei, blastocyst formation, and offspring production. The rate of pronucleus formation (RPF) after carrying out ICSI started to decrease from >95% at 100 min following oocyte activation and declined to <20% by 180 min. In comparison, RPF by ROSI decreased gradually from >70% between 0 and 4 h after activation. The RPFs were closely correlated with blastocyst formation. Offspring production for both ICSI and ROSI decreased significantly when injections were conducted after 100 min, a time at which activated oocytes were in the early G1 stage of the cell cycle. These results suggest that spermatozoa and round spermatids have different potentials for inducing the formation of a male pronucleus in activated oocytes, but ICSI and ROSI are both subject to the same time constraint for the efficient production of offspring, which is determined by the cell cycle of the activated oocyte. PMID:14985245

  2. Spatially restricted electrical activation of retinal ganglion cells in the rabbit retina by hexapolar electrode return configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Amgad G.; Cameron, Morven A.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Morley, John W.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Visual prostheses currently in development aim to restore some form of vision to patients suffering from diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Most rely on electrically stimulating inner retinal cells via electrodes implanted on or near the retina, resulting in percepts of light termed ‘phosphenes’. Activation of spatially distinct populations of cells in the retina is key for pattern vision to be produced. To achieve this, the electrical stimulation must be localized, activating cells only in the direct vicinity of the stimulating electrode(s). With this goal in mind, a hexagonal return (hexapolar) configuration has been proposed as an alternative to the traditional monopolar or bipolar return configurations for electrically stimulating the retina. This study investigated the efficacy of the hexapolar configuration in localizing the activation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), compared to a monopolar configuration. Approach. Patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to measure the activation thresholds of RGCs in whole-mount rabbit retina to monopolar and hexapolar electrical stimulation, applied subretinally. Main results. Hexapolar activation thresholds for RGCs located outside the hex guard were found to be significantly (>2 fold) higher than those located inside the area of tissue bounded by the hex guard. The hexapolar configuration localized the activation of RGCs more effectively than its monopolar counterpart. Furthermore, no difference in hexapolar thresholds or localization was observed when using cathodic-first versus anodic-first stimulation. Significance. The hexapolar configuration may provide an improved method for electrically stimulating spatially distinct populations of cells in retinal tissue.

  3. Discursive Positionings and Emotions in Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daher, Wajeeh

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling is suggested as an activity through which students engage in meaningful mathematics. In the current research, the modelling activity of a group of four seventh-grade students was analysed using the discursive analysis framework. The research findings show that the positionings and emotions of the group members during their…

  4. 12 CFR 347.113 - Restrictions applicable to activities by a foreign organization in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Activities that are permissible for an Edge corporation in the United States under 12 CFR 211.6; or (ii... foreign organization in the United States. 347.113 Section 347.113 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING §...

  5. 12 CFR 347.113 - Restrictions applicable to activities by a foreign organization in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Activities that are permissible for an Edge corporation in the United States under 12 CFR 211.6; or (ii... foreign organization in the United States. 347.113 Section 347.113 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING §...

  6. 12 CFR 347.113 - Restrictions applicable to activities by a foreign organization in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Activities that are permissible for an Edge corporation in the United States under 12 CFR 211.6; or (ii... foreign organization in the United States. 347.113 Section 347.113 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING §...

  7. 12 CFR 347.113 - Restrictions applicable to activities by a foreign organization in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Activities that are permissible for an Edge corporation in the United States under 12 CFR 211.6; or (ii... foreign organization in the United States. 347.113 Section 347.113 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING §...

  8. 12 CFR 347.113 - Restrictions applicable to activities by a foreign organization in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Activities that are permissible for an Edge corporation in the United States under 12 CFR 211.6; or (ii... foreign organization in the United States. 347.113 Section 347.113 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING §...

  9. Glucose restriction decreases telomerase activity and enhances its inhibitor response on breast cancer cells: possible extra-telomerase role of BIBR 1532

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Considerable progress has been made to understand the association between lifestyle and diet in cancer initiation and promotion. Because excessive glucose consumption is a key metabolic hallmark of cancer cells, glucose restriction (GR) decreases the proliferation, and promotes the differentiation and transformation of cancer cells to quiescent cells. The immortality of cancerous cells is largely assured by telomerase, which is an interesting target for inhibition by BIBR 1532. In this study, we investigated the effect of GR on telomerase activity and on the efficacy of its inhibition by BIBR 1532. Methods Breast cancer MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 cells were cultured in DMEM (Dulbecco’s modified eagle’s media) with 0, 1 or 4.5 g/l of glucose. The telomerase activity was measured via quantitative Real-Time PCR, and the two telomerase subunits were semi-quantified by RT-PCR. Proliferation test and mitochondrial metabolism were assessed via tetrazolium salt reduction and cell counts; apoptosis was assessed via caspase-3 quantification and flow cytometry. Results A decrease in the telomerase activity of more than 75% was associated with a significant reduction in the mRNA expression of its catalytic subunit hTERT (Reverse Transcriptase) and a decrease in the mitochondrial metabolism by more than 80% under restricted glucose conditions. In addition, GR increased the effect of BIBR 1532. Glucose deprivation induces apoptosis via BIBR 1532-mediated telomerase inhibition in triple negative breast cancer cells, as assessed by caspase-3 measurements and Annexin analysis. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that the effect of BIBR 1532 is potentiated by GR to induce triple negative breast cancer cell death. PMID:25089119

  10. Salt restriction leads to activation of adult renal mesenchymal stromal cell-like cells via prostaglandin E2 and E-prostanoid receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqiang; Gomez, Jose A; Herrera, Marcela; Perez-Marco, Romelia; Repenning, Peter; Zhang, Zhiping; Payne, Alan; Pratt, Richard E; Koller, Beverly; Beierwaltes, William H; Coffman, Thomas; Mirotsou, Maria; Dzau, Victor J

    2015-05-01

    Despite the importance of juxtaglomerular cell recruitment in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases, the mechanisms that underlie renin production under conditions of chronic stimulation remain elusive. We have previously shown that CD44+ mesenchymal-like cells (CD44+ cells) exist in the adult kidney. Under chronic sodium deprivation, these cells are recruited to the juxtaglomerular area and differentiate to new renin-expressing cells. Given the proximity of macula densa to the juxtaglomerular area and the importance of macula densa released prostanoids in renin synthesis and release, we hypothesized that chronic sodium deprivation induces macula densa release of prostanoids, stimulating renal CD44+ cell activation and differentiation. CD44+ cells were isolated from adult kidneys and cocultured with the macula densa cell line, MMDD1, in normal or low-sodium medium. Low sodium stimulated prostaglandin E2 production by MMDD1 and induced migration of CD44+ cells. These effects were inhibited by addition of a cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor (NS398) or an E-prostanoid receptor 4 antagonist (AH23848) to MMDD1 or CD44+ cells, respectively. Addition of prostaglandin E2 to CD44+ cells increased cell migration and induced renin expression. In vivo activation of renal CD44+ cells during juxtaglomerular recruitment was attenuated in wild-type mice subjected to salt restriction in the presence of cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor rofecoxib. Similar results were observed in E-prostanoid receptor 4 knockout mice subjected to salt restriction. These results show that the prostaglandin E2/E-prostanoid receptor 4 pathway plays a key role in the activation of renal CD44+ mesenchymal stromal cell-like cells during conditions of juxtaglomerular recruitment; highlighting the importance of this pathway as a key regulatory mechanism of juxtaglomerular recruitment. PMID:25776075

  11. Modelling Typical Online Language Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoro, Carlos; Hampel, Regine; Stickler, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the methods and results of a four-year-long research project focusing on the language learning activity of individual learners using online tasks conducted at the University of Guanajuato (Mexico) in 2009-2013. An activity-theoretical model (Blin, 2010; Engeström, 1987) of the typical language learning activity was used to…

  12. Evaluating a Model of Youth Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzler, Carrie D.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Erickson, Darin J.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Sirard, John R.; Story, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between social influences, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and barriers and physical activity. Methods: Structural equation modeling examined relationships between parent and peer support, parent physical activity, individual perceptions, and objectively measured physical activity using accelerometers among a…

  13. Associative memory model with spontaneous neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurikawa, Tomoki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2012-05-01

    We propose a novel associative memory model wherein the neural activity without an input (i.e., spontaneous activity) is modified by an input to generate a target response that is memorized for recall upon the same input. Suitable design of synaptic connections enables the model to memorize input/output (I/O) mappings equaling 70% of the total number of neurons, where the evoked activity distinguishes a target pattern from others. Spontaneous neural activity without an input shows chaotic dynamics but keeps some similarity with evoked activities, as reported in recent experimental studies.

  14. Food restriction alters N'-propyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzothiazole-2,6-diamine dihydrochloride (pramipexole)-induced yawning, hypothermia, and locomotor activity in rats: evidence for sensitization of dopamine D2 receptor-mediated effects.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Calinski, Diane M; Newman, Amy Hauck; Grundt, Peter; Woods, James H

    2008-05-01

    Food restriction enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse including opiates, nicotine, and psychostimulants. Food restriction has also been shown to alter a variety of behavioral and pharmacological responses to dopaminergic agonists, including an increased sensitivity to the locomotor stimulatory effects of direct- and indirect-dopamine agonists, elevated extracellular dopamine levels in responses to psychostimulants, as well as suppression of agonist-induced yawning. Behavioral and molecular studies suggest that augmented dopaminergic responses observed in food-restricted animals result from a sensitization of the dopamine D2 receptor; however, little is known about how food restriction affects dopamine D3 receptor function. The current studies were aimed at better defining the effects of food restriction on D2 and D3 receptor function by assessing the capacity of N'-propyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzothiazole-2,6-diamine dihydrochloride (pramipexole) to induce yawning, penile erection (PE), hypothermia, and locomotor activity in free-fed and food-restricted rats. Food restriction resulted in a suppression of pramipexole-induced yawning, a sensitized hypothermic response, and an enhanced locomotor response to pramipexole, effects that are suggestive of an enhanced D2 receptor activity; no effect on pramipexole-induced PE was observed. Antagonist studies further supported a food restriction-induced enhancement of the D2 receptor activity because the D2 antagonist 3-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-l-yl]methyl-1H-indole (L741,626) recovered pramipexole-induced yawning to free-fed levels, whereas yawning and PE were suppressed following pretreatment with the D3 antagonist N-{4-[4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-trans-but-2-enyl}-4-pyridine-2-yl-benzamide hydrochloride (PG01037). The results of the current studies suggest that food restriction sensitized rats to the D2-mediated effects of pramipexole while having no effect

  15. HDAC6-mediated EGFR stabilization and activation restrict cell response to sorafenib in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihao; Hu, Pengchao; Tang, Fang; Xie, Conghua

    2016-05-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor and has been the subject of extensive clinical research in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, sorafenib fails to improve overall survival of patients with advanced NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms that account for this phenomenon are unclear. Here we show that sorafenib treatment stabilizes epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and activates EGFR pathway. Moreover, this is partly mediated by stabilization of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which has been shown to regulate EGFR endocytic trafficking and degradation. Overexpression of HDAC6 confers resistance to sorafenib in NSCLC cells. Inhibition of HDAC6 with selective inhibitors synergizes with sorafenib to kill NSCLC cells via inhibition of sorafenib-mediated EGFR pathway activation. Taken together, our findings might partly explain the failure of Phase III trial of sorafenib in improving overall survival of advanced NSCLC patients and bear possible implications for the improvement on the efficacy of sorafenib in treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27090797

  16. Using the Activity-based Anorexia Rodent Model to Study the Neurobiological Basis of Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness characterized by excessively restricted caloric intake and abnormally high levels of physical activity. A challenging illness to treat, due to the lack of understanding of the underlying neurobiology, AN has the highest mortality rate among psychiatric illnesses. To address this need, neuroscientists are using an animal model to study how neural circuits may contribute toward vulnerability to AN and may be affected by AN. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a bio-behavioral phenomenon described in rodents that models the key symptoms of anorexia nervosa. When rodents with free access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel experience food restriction, they become hyperactive – running more than animals with free access to food. Here, we describe the procedures by which ABA is induced in adolescent female C57BL/6 mice. On postnatal day 36 (P36), the animal is housed with access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel. After 4 days of acclimation to the running wheel, on P40, all food is removed from the cage. For the next 3 days, food is returned to the cage (allowing animals free food access) for 2 hr daily. After the fourth day of food restriction, free access to food is returned and the running wheel is removed from the cage to allow the animals to recover. Continuous multi-day analysis of running wheel activity shows that mice become hyperactive within 24 hr following the onset of food restriction. The mice run even during the limited time during which they have access to food. Additionally, the circadian pattern of wheel running becomes disrupted by the experience of food restriction. We have been able to correlate neurobiological changes with various aspects of the animals’ wheel running behavior to implicate particular brain regions and neurochemical changes with resilience and vulnerability to food-restriction induced hyperactivity. PMID:26555618

  17. Using the Activity-based Anorexia Rodent Model to Study the Neurobiological Basis of Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness characterized by excessively restricted caloric intake and abnormally high levels of physical activity. A challenging illness to treat, due to the lack of understanding of the underlying neurobiology, AN has the highest mortality rate among psychiatric illnesses. To address this need, neuroscientists are using an animal model to study how neural circuits may contribute toward vulnerability to AN and may be affected by AN. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a bio-behavioral phenomenon described in rodents that models the key symptoms of anorexia nervosa. When rodents with free access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel experience food restriction, they become hyperactive - running more than animals with free access to food. Here, we describe the procedures by which ABA is induced in adolescent female C57BL/6 mice. On postnatal day 36 (P36), the animal is housed with access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel. After 4 days of acclimation to the running wheel, on P40, all food is removed from the cage. For the next 3 days, food is returned to the cage (allowing animals free food access) for 2 hr daily. After the fourth day of food restriction, free access to food is returned and the running wheel is removed from the cage to allow the animals to recover. Continuous multi-day analysis of running wheel activity shows that mice become hyperactive within 24 hr following the onset of food restriction. The mice run even during the limited time during which they have access to food. Additionally, the circadian pattern of wheel running becomes disrupted by the experience of food restriction. We have been able to correlate neurobiological changes with various aspects of the animals' wheel running behavior to implicate particular brain regions and neurochemical changes with resilience and vulnerability to food-restriction induced hyperactivity. PMID:26555618

  18. A human model of restricted upper esophageal sphincter opening and its pharyngeal and UES deglutitive pressure phenomena.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hongmei; Mei, Ling; Sharma, Tarun; Kern, Mark; Sanvanson, Patrick; Shaker, Reza

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia due to upper esophageal sphincter (UES) dysfunction is commonly encountered in the clinical setting. Selective experimental perturbation of various components of the deglutitive apparatus can provide an opportunity to improve our understanding of the swallowing physiology and pathophysiology. The aim is to characterize the pharyngeal and UES deglutitive pressure phenomena in an experimentally induced restriction of UES opening in humans. We studied 14 volunteers without any dysphagic symptoms (7 men, 66 ± 11 yr) but with various supraesophageal reflux symptoms. To induce UES restriction, we used a handmade device that with adjustment could selectively apply 0, 20, 30, or 40 mmHg pressure perpendicularly to the cricoid cartilage. Deglutitive pharyngeal and UES pressure phenomena were determined during dry and 5- and 10-ml water swallows × 3 for each of the UES perturbations. External cricoid pressure against the UES resulted in a significant increase in hypopharyngeal intrabolus pressure and UES nadir deglutitive relaxation pressure for all tested swallowed volumes (P < 0.05). Application of external cricoid pressure increased the length of the UES high pressure zone from 2.5 ± 0.2 to 3.1 ± 0.2, 3.5 ± 0.1, and 3.7 ± 0.1 cm for 20, 30, and 40 mmHg cricoid pressure, respectively (P < 0.05). External cricoid pressure had no significant effect on pharyngeal peristalsis. On the other hand, irrespective of external cricoid pressure deglutitive velopharyngeal contractile integral progressively increased with increased swallowed volumes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, acute experimental restriction of UES opening by external cricoid pressure manifests the pressure characteristics of increased resistance to UES transsphincteric flow observed clinically without affecting the pharyngeal peristaltic contractile function. PMID:27198193

  19. Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 Ameliorates Oxidative and Metabolic Parameters by Increasing Intestinal Feruloyl Esterase Activity and Modulating Microbiota in Caloric-Restricted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Matias; Fabersani, Emanuel; Abeijón-Mukdsi, María C.; Ross, Romina; Fontana, Cecilia; Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Gauffin-Cano, Paola; Medina, Roxana B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the administration of the feruloyl esterase (FE)-producing strain Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 enhances metabolic and oxidative parameters in caloric-restricted (CR) mice. Balb/c male mice were divided into ad libitum fed Group (ALF Group), CR diet Group (CR Group) and CR diet plus L. fermentum Group (CR-Lf Group). CR diet was administered during 45 days and CRL1446 strain was given in the dose of 108 cells/mL/day/mouse. FE activity was determined in intestinal mucosa and content at Day 1, 20 and 45. Triglyceride, total cholesterol, glucose, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels and glutathione reductase activity were determined in plasma. Gut microbiota was evaluated by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. At Day 45, total intestinal FE activity in CR-Lf Group was higher (p = 0.020) than in CR and ALF groups and an improvement in both metabolic (reductions in triglyceride (p = 0.0025), total cholesterol (p = 0.005) and glucose (p < 0.0001) levels) and oxidative (decrease of TBARS levels and increase of plasmatic glutathione reductase activity (p = 0.006)) parameters was observed, compared to ALF Group. CR diet increased abundance of Bacteroidetes and CRL1446 administration increased abundance of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genus. L. fermentun CRL1446 exerted a bifidogenic effect under CR conditions. PMID:27399766

  20. Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 Ameliorates Oxidative and Metabolic Parameters by Increasing Intestinal Feruloyl Esterase Activity and Modulating Microbiota in Caloric-Restricted Mice.

    PubMed

    Russo, Matias; Fabersani, Emanuel; Abeijón-Mukdsi, María C; Ross, Romina; Fontana, Cecilia; Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Gauffin-Cano, Paola; Medina, Roxana B

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the administration of the feruloyl esterase (FE)-producing strain Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 enhances metabolic and oxidative parameters in caloric-restricted (CR) mice. Balb/c male mice were divided into ad libitum fed Group (ALF Group), CR diet Group (CR Group) and CR diet plus L. fermentum Group (CR-Lf Group). CR diet was administered during 45 days and CRL1446 strain was given in the dose of 10⁸ cells/mL/day/mouse. FE activity was determined in intestinal mucosa and content at Day 1, 20 and 45. Triglyceride, total cholesterol, glucose, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels and glutathione reductase activity were determined in plasma. Gut microbiota was evaluated by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. At Day 45, total intestinal FE activity in CR-Lf Group was higher (p = 0.020) than in CR and ALF groups and an improvement in both metabolic (reductions in triglyceride (p = 0.0025), total cholesterol (p = 0.005) and glucose (p < 0.0001) levels) and oxidative (decrease of TBARS levels and increase of plasmatic glutathione reductase activity (p = 0.006)) parameters was observed, compared to ALF Group. CR diet increased abundance of Bacteroidetes and CRL1446 administration increased abundance of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genus. L. fermentun CRL1446 exerted a bifidogenic effect under CR conditions. PMID:27399766

  1. Dietary Nucleotides Supplementation Improves the Intestinal Development and Immune Function of Neonates with Intra-Uterine Growth Restriction in a Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Che, Lianqiang; Hu, Liang; Liu, Yan; Yan, Chuan; Peng, Xie; Xu, Qin; Wang, Ru; Cheng, Yuanfang; Chen, Hong; Fang, Zhengfeng; Lin, Yan; Xu, Shengyu; Feng, Bin; Chen, Daiwen; Wu, De

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to determine whether dietary nucleotides supplementation could improve growth performance, intestinal development and immune function of intra-uterine growth restricted (IUGR) neonate using pig as animal model. A total of 14 pairs of normal birth weight (NBW) and IUGR piglets (7 days old) were randomly assigned to receive a milk-based control diet (CON diet) or diet supplemented with nucleotides (NT diet) for a period of 21 days. Blood samples, intestinal tissues and digesta were collected at necropsy and analyzed for morphology, digestive enzyme activities, microbial populations, peripheral immune cells, expression of intestinal innate immunity and barrier-related genes and proteins. Compared with NBW piglets, IUGR piglets had significantly lower average daily dry matter intake and body weight gain (P<0.05). Moreover, IUGR markedly decreased the villous height and villi: crypt ratio in duodenum (P<0.05), as well as the maltase activity in jejunum (P<0.05). In addition, IUGR significantly decreased the serum concentrations of IgA, IL-1βand IL-10 (P<0.05), as well as the percentage of peripheral lymphocytes (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the down-regulation of innate immunity-related genes such as TOLLIP (P<0.05), TLR-9 (P = 0.08) and TLR-2 (P = 0.07) was observed in the ileum of IUGR relative to NBW piglets. Regardless of birth weight, however, feeding NT diet markedly decreased (P<0.05) feed conversion ratio, increased the villous height in duodenum (P<0.05), activities of lactase and maltase in jejunum (P<0.05), count of peripheral leukocytes (P<0.05), serum concentrations of IgA and IL-1β as well as gene expressions of TLR-9, TLR-4 and TOLLIP in ileum (P<0.05). In addition, expressions of tight junction proteins (Claudin-1 and ZO-1) in ileum were markedly increased by feeding NT diet relative to CON diet (P<0.05). These results indicated that IUGR impaired growth performance, intestinal and immune function, but dietary nucleotides supplementation

  2. Dietary Nucleotides Supplementation Improves the Intestinal Development and Immune Function of Neonates with Intra-Uterine Growth Restriction in a Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Che, Lianqiang; Hu, Liang; Liu, Yan; Yan, Chuan; Peng, Xie; Xu, Qin; Wang, Ru; Cheng, Yuanfang; Chen, Hong; Fang, Zhengfeng; Lin, Yan; Xu, Shengyu; Feng, Bin; Chen, Daiwen; Wu, De

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to determine whether dietary nucleotides supplementation could improve growth performance, intestinal development and immune function of intra-uterine growth restricted (IUGR) neonate using pig as animal model. A total of 14 pairs of normal birth weight (NBW) and IUGR piglets (7 days old) were randomly assigned to receive a milk-based control diet (CON diet) or diet supplemented with nucleotides (NT diet) for a period of 21 days. Blood samples, intestinal tissues and digesta were collected at necropsy and analyzed for morphology, digestive enzyme activities, microbial populations, peripheral immune cells, expression of intestinal innate immunity and barrier-related genes and proteins. Compared with NBW piglets, IUGR piglets had significantly lower average daily dry matter intake and body weight gain (P<0.05). Moreover, IUGR markedly decreased the villous height and villi: crypt ratio in duodenum (P<0.05), as well as the maltase activity in jejunum (P<0.05). In addition, IUGR significantly decreased the serum concentrations of IgA, IL-1βand IL-10 (P<0.05), as well as the percentage of peripheral lymphocytes (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the down-regulation of innate immunity-related genes such as TOLLIP (P<0.05), TLR-9 (P = 0.08) and TLR-2 (P = 0.07) was observed in the ileum of IUGR relative to NBW piglets. Regardless of birth weight, however, feeding NT diet markedly decreased (P<0.05) feed conversion ratio, increased the villous height in duodenum (P<0.05), activities of lactase and maltase in jejunum (P<0.05), count of peripheral leukocytes (P<0.05), serum concentrations of IgA and IL-1β as well as gene expressions of TLR-9, TLR-4 and TOLLIP in ileum (P<0.05). In addition, expressions of tight junction proteins (Claudin-1 and ZO-1) in ileum were markedly increased by feeding NT diet relative to CON diet (P<0.05). These results indicated that IUGR impaired growth performance, intestinal and immune function, but dietary nucleotides supplementation

  3. Metabolic Benefit of Chronic Caloric Restriction and Activation of Hypothalamic AGRP/NPY Neurons in Male Mice Is Independent of Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicole H; Walsh, Heidi; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Park, Seongjoon; Gaylinn, Bruce; Thorner, Michael O; Smith, Roy G

    2016-04-01

    Aging is associated with attenuated ghrelin signaling. During aging, chronic caloric restriction (CR) produces health benefits accompanied by enhanced ghrelin production. Ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor 1a) agonists administered to aging rodents and humans restore the young adult phenotype; therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the metabolic benefits of CR are mediated by endogenous ghrelin. Three month-old male mice lacking ghrelin (Ghrelin-/-) or ghrelin receptor (Ghsr-/-), and their wild-type (WT) littermates were randomly assigned to 2 groups: ad libitum (AL) fed and CR, where 40% food restriction was introduced gradually to allow Ghrelin-/- and Ghsr-/- mice to metabolically adapt and avoid severe hypoglycemia. Twelve months later, plasma ghrelin, metabolic parameters, ambulatory activity, hypothalamic and liver gene expression, as well as body composition were measured. CR increased plasma ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin concentrations in WT and Ghsr-/- mice. CR of WT, Ghsr-/-, and Ghrelin-/- mice markedly improved metabolic flexibility, enhanced ambulatory activity, and reduced adiposity. Inactivation of Ghrelin or Ghsr had no effect on AL food intake or food anticipatory behavior. In contrast to the widely held belief that endogenous ghrelin regulates food intake, CR increased expression of hypothalamic Agrp and Npy, with reduced expression of Pomc across genotypes. In the AL context, ablation of ghrelin signaling markedly inhibited liver steatosis, which correlated with reduced Pparγ expression and enhanced Irs2 expression. Although CR and administration of GH secretagogue receptor 1a agonists both benefit the aging phenotype, we conclude the benefits of chronic CR are a consequence of enhanced metabolic flexibility independent of endogenous ghrelin or des-acyl ghrelin signaling. PMID:26812158

  4. Insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness from three minimal models: effects of energy restriction and body fat in adult male rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gresl, Theresa A; Colman, Ricki J; Havighurst, Thomas C; Byerley, Lauri O; Allison, David B; Schoeller, Dale A; Kemnitz, Joseph W

    2003-12-01

    The minimal model of glucose disappearance (MINMOD version 3; MM3) and both the one-compartment (1CMM) and the two-compartment (2CMM) minimal models were used to analyze stable isotope-labeled intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) data from year 10 of a study of the effect of dietary restriction (DR) in male rhesus monkeys. Adult monkeys were energy restricted (R; n = 12) on a semipurified diet to approximately 70% of control (C) intake (ad libitum-fed monkeys; n = 12). Under ketamine anesthesia, fasting insulin levels were greater among C monkeys. Insulin sensitivity estimates from all models were greater in R than C monkeys, whereas glucose effectiveness estimates were not consistently greater in R monkeys. Fasting plasma glucose as well as hepatic glucose production and clearance rates did not differ between groups. Body fat, in part, statistically mediated the effect of DR to enhance insulin sensitivity indexes. Precision of estimation and intermodel relationships among insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness estimates were in the ranges of those reported previously for humans and dogs, suggesting that the models may provide valid estimates for rhesus monkeys as well. The observed insulin sensitivity indexes from all models, elevated among R vs. C monkeys, may be explained, at least in part, by the difference in body fat content between these groups after chronic DR. PMID:12842866

  5. Cometary activity and nucleus modelling: a new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhlmann, D.

    1996-06-01

    The phenomena of comet splittings with an average frequency of about one splitting per 100 years and comet (Chen and Jewitt, Icarus108, 265-271, 1994), and the restriction of cometary activity to well-defined small areas at the almost passive and mantle covered surface (Keller et al., ESA SP-250, Vol. II, pp. 363-364, 1986) are at present driving challenges to models of structure and evolution of comet nuclei. Extending the presently discussed models by incorporating lateral subsurface transport of sublimed volatiles, there appears the possibility that the places of sublimation are different from those of activity (the so-called active areas). Then, there is no necessity to distinguish between different surface properties at active and passive areas, assuming, e.g. an uncovered icy surface at active areas. Active areas are simply the very local "source sites" where the accumulated subsurface flows from distant regions reach the surface. The pressure driven subsurface flows of volatiles may not only leave the comet at its surface, they may penetrate via cracks, etc. also deeply into the nucleus. There they can cause a further growth of cracks and also new cracks. This can be a cause for the observed regular splittings. Furthermore, actual models (Kührt and Keller, Icarus109, 121-132, 1994; Skorov and Rickman, Planet. Space Sci.43, 1587-1594, 1995) of the gas transport through porous comet surface crusts can be interpreted as to give first indications for thermodynamical parameters in heat conducting and porous cometary crusts which are appropriate for 1 AU conditions to permit the temporary existence of a layer with fluid subsurface water within these crusts. This exciting result of the possible temporary existence of subsurface warm water in comets which approach the Sun within about 1 AU makes a cometary subsurface chemistry much more efficient than expected hitherto.

  6. Feedback, receptor clustering, and receptor restriction to single cells yield large Turing spaces for ligand-receptor-based Turing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurics, Tamás; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Turing mechanisms can yield a large variety of patterns from noisy, homogenous initial conditions and have been proposed as patterning mechanism for many developmental processes. However, the molecular components that give rise to Turing patterns have remained elusive, and the small size of the parameter space that permits Turing patterns to emerge makes it difficult to explain how Turing patterns could evolve. We have recently shown that Turing patterns can be obtained with a single ligand if the ligand-receptor interaction is taken into account. Here we show that the general properties of ligand-receptor systems result in very large Turing spaces. Thus, the restriction of receptors to single cells, negative feedbacks, regulatory interactions among different ligand-receptor systems, and the clustering of receptors on the cell surface all greatly enlarge the Turing space. We further show that the feedbacks that occur in the FGF10-SHH network that controls lung branching morphogenesis are sufficient to result in large Turing spaces. We conclude that the cellular restriction of receptors provides a mechanism to sufficiently increase the size of the Turing space to make the evolution of Turing patterns likely. Additional feedbacks may then have further enlarged the Turing space. Given their robustness and flexibility, we propose that receptor-ligand-based Turing mechanisms present a general mechanism for patterning in biology.

  7. Feedback, receptor clustering, and receptor restriction to single cells yield large Turing spaces for ligand-receptor-based Turing models.

    PubMed

    Kurics, Tamás; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Turing mechanisms can yield a large variety of patterns from noisy, homogenous initial conditions and have been proposed as patterning mechanism for many developmental processes. However, the molecular components that give rise to Turing patterns have remained elusive, and the small size of the parameter space that permits Turing patterns to emerge makes it difficult to explain how Turing patterns could evolve. We have recently shown that Turing patterns can be obtained with a single ligand if the ligand-receptor interaction is taken into account. Here we show that the general properties of ligand-receptor systems result in very large Turing spaces. Thus, the restriction of receptors to single cells, negative feedbacks, regulatory interactions among different ligand-receptor systems, and the clustering of receptors on the cell surface all greatly enlarge the Turing space. We further show that the feedbacks that occur in the FGF10-SHH network that controls lung branching morphogenesis are sufficient to result in large Turing spaces. We conclude that the cellular restriction of receptors provides a mechanism to sufficiently increase the size of the Turing space to make the evolution of Turing patterns likely. Additional feedbacks may then have further enlarged the Turing space. Given their robustness and flexibility, we propose that receptor-ligand-based Turing mechanisms present a general mechanism for patterning in biology. PMID:25215767

  8. Structural models for nickel electrode active mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornilsen, B. C.; Karjala, P. J.; Loyselle, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic data allow one to distinguish nickel electrode active mass, alpha and beta phase materials. Discharges active mass is not isostructural with beta-Ni(OH)2. This is contrary to the generally accepted model for the discharged beta phase of active mass. It is concluded that charged active mass displays a disordered and nonstoichiometric, nonclose packed structure of the R3 bar m, NiOOH structure type. Raman spectral data and X ray diffraction data are analyzed and shown to be consistent with this structural model.

  9. Structural models for nickel electrode active mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornilsen, Bahne C.; Karjala, P. J.; Loyselle, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic data allow one to distinguish nickel electrode active mass, alpha and beta phase materials. Discharges active mass is not isostructural with beta-Ni(OH)2. This is contrary to the generally accepted model for the discharged beta phase of active mass. It is concluded that charged active mass displays a disordered and nonstoichiometric, nonclose packed structure of the R3 bar m, NiOOH structure type. Raman spectral data and x ray diffraction data are analyzed and shown to be consistent with this structural model.

  10. Discursive positionings and emotions in modelling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daher, Wajeeh

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical modelling is suggested as an activity through which students engage in meaningful mathematics. In the current research, the modelling activity of a group of four seventh-grade students was analysed using the discursive analysis framework. The research findings show that the positionings and emotions of the group members during their participation in the modelling activity changed as the activity proceeded. Overall, it can be said that three of the four group members acted as insiders, while the fourth acted as an outsider, and only, towards the end of the group's work on the activity, he acted as an insider. Moreover, the research findings point at four factors that affected the group members' positionings and emotions during the modelling activity: the member's characteristics, the member's history of learning experiences, the activity characteristics and the modelling phases. Furthermore, the different positionings of the group members in the different modelling phases were accompanied by different emotions experienced by them, where being an insider and a collaborator resulted in positive emotions, while being an outsider resulted in negative emotions.

  11. Methionine restriction and lifespan control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending lifespan. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with/without adequate nutrition (e.g. particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend lifespan in various model organisms. We discuss beneficial effects of methionine-restricted (MR) diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions. PMID:26663138

  12. Fluxon Modeling of Active Region Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, C. E.; Kankelborg, C. C.; Davey, A. R.; Rachmeler, L.

    2006-12-01

    We present current results and status on fluxon modeling of free energy buildup and release in active regions. Our publicly available code, FLUX, has the unique ability to track magnetic energy buildup with a truly constrained topology in evolving, nonlinear force-free conditions. Recent work includes validation of the model against Low &Lou force-free field solutions, initial evolution studies of idealized active regions, and inclusion of locally parameterized reconnection into the model. FLUX is uniquely able to simulate complete active regions in 3-D on a single workstation; we estimate that a parallelized fluxon model, together with computer vision code to ingest solar data, could run faster than real time on a cluster of \\textasciitilde 30 CPUs and hence provide a true predictive space weather model in the style of predictive simulations of terrestrial weather.

  13. Reduction in ultrasonic vocalizations in pups born to rapid eye movement sleep restricted mothers in rat model.

    PubMed

    Gulia, Kamalesh K; Patel, Niraj; Radhakrishnan, Arathi; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of rapid eye movement sleep restriction (REMSR) in rats during late pregnancy were studied on the ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) made by the pups. USVs are distress calls inaudible to human ears. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was restricted in one group of pregnant rats for 22 hours, starting from gestational day 14 to 20, using standard single platform method. The USVs of male pups were recorded after a brief isolation from their mother for two minutes on alternate post-natal days, from day one till weaning. The USVs were recorded using microphones and were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using SASPro software. Control pups produced maximum vocalization on post-natal days 9 to 11. In comparison, the pups born to REMSR mothers showed not only a reduction in vocalization but also a delay in peak call making days. The experimental group showed variations in the types and characteristics of call types, and alteration in temporal profile. The blunting of distress call making response in these pups indicates that maternal sleep plays a role in regulating the neural development involved in vocalizations and possibly in shaping the emotional behaviour in neonates. It is suggested that the reduced ultrasonic vocalizations can be utilized as a reliable early marker for affective state in rat pups. Such impaired vocalization responses could provide an important lead in understanding mother-child bonding for an optimal cognitive development during post-partum life. This is the first report showing a potential link between maternal REM sleep deprivation and the vocalization in neonates and infants. PMID:24454768

  14. Erythroblast apoptosis and microenvironmental iron restriction trigger anemia in the VK*MYC model of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bordini, Jessica; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Fermo, Isabella; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P Leif; Camaschella, Clara; Campanella, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant disorder characterized by bone marrow proliferation of plasma cells and by overproduction of monoclonal immunoglobulin detectable in the sera (M-spike). Anemia is a common complication of multiple myeloma, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. We aimed to identify the different determinants of anemia using the Vk*MYC mouse, which spontaneously develops an indolent bone marrow localized disease with aging. Affected Vk*MYC mice develop a mild normochromic normocytic anemia. We excluded the possibility that anemia results from defective erythropoietin production, inflammation or increased hepcidin expression. Mature erythroid precursors are reduced in Vk*MYC bone marrow compared with wild-type. Malignant plasma cells express the apoptogenic receptor Fas ligand and, accordingly, active caspase 8 is detected in maturing erythroblasts. Systemic iron homeostasis is not compromised in Vk*MYC animals, but high expression of the iron importer CD71 by bone marrow plasma cells and iron accumulation in bone marrow macrophages suggest that iron competition takes place in the local multiple myeloma microenvironment, which might contribute to anemia. In conclusion, the mild anemia of the Vk*MYC model is mainly related to the local effect of the bone marrow malignant clone in the absence of an overt inflammatory status. We suggest that this reproduces the initial events triggering anemia in patients. PMID:25715406

  15. A Highly Intensified ART Regimen Induces Long-Term Viral Suppression and Restriction of the Viral Reservoir in a Simian AIDS Model

    PubMed Central

    Della Corte, Alessandro; Collins, Matt; Yalley-Ogunro, Jake; Greenhouse, Jack; Iraci, Nunzio; Acosta, Edward P.; Barreca, Maria Letizia; Lewis, Mark G.; Savarino, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Stably suppressed viremia during ART is essential for establishing reliable simian models for HIV/AIDS. We tested the efficacy of a multidrug ART (highly intensified ART) in a wide range of viremic conditions (103–107 viral RNA copies/mL) in SIVmac251-infected rhesus macaques, and its impact on the viral reservoir. Eleven macaques in the pre-AIDS stage of the disease were treated with a multidrug combination (highly intensified ART) consisting of two nucleosidic/nucleotidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors (emtricitabine and tenofovir), an integrase inhibitor (raltegravir), a protease inhibitor (ritonavir-boosted darunavir) and the CCR5 blocker maraviroc. All animals stably displayed viral loads below the limit of detection of the assay (i.e. <40 RNA copies/mL) after starting highly intensified ART. By increasing the sensitivity of the assay to 3 RNA copies/mL, viral load was still below the limit of detection in all subjects tested. Importantly, viral DNA resulted below the assay detection limit (<2 copies of DNA/5*105 cells) in PBMCs and rectal biopsies of all animals at the end of the follow-up, and in lymph node biopsies from the majority of the study subjects. Moreover, highly intensified ART decreased central/transitional memory, effector memory and activated (HLA-DR+) effector memory CD4+ T-cells in vivo, in line with the role of these subsets as the main cell subpopulations harbouring the virus. Finally, treatment with highly intensified ART at viral load rebound following suspension of a previous anti-reservoir therapy eventually improved the spontaneous containment of viral load following suspension of the second therapeutic cycle, thus leading to a persistent suppression of viremia in the absence of ART. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, complete suppression of viral load by highly intensified ART and a likely associated restriction of the viral reservoir in the macaque AIDS model, making it a useful platform for testing potential cures for

  16. Investigating Nitrogen Pollution: Activities and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green Teacher, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Introduces activities on nitrogen, nitrogen pollution from school commuters, nitrogen response in native and introduced species, and nutrient loading models. These activities help students determine the nitrogen contribution from their parents' cars, test native plant responses to nitrogen, and experiment with the results of removing water from…

  17. Modeling Sexual Activity among Schoolgirls in Zambia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillai, Vijayan K.; Gupta, Rashmi

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a model of sexual activity among secondary school-going Zambian girls. Identifies the role of dating as an intervening variable in explaining the variation in sexual activity among teenagers. Schools are an important setting for the young to meet and initiate sexual relationships. Theoretical and policy implications are discussed.…

  18. Modelling the Active Hearing Process in Mosquitoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avitabile, Daniele; Homer, Martin; Jackson, Joe; Robert, Daniel; Champneys, Alan

    2011-11-01

    A simple microscopic mechanistic model is described of the active amplification within the Johnston's organ of the mosquito species Toxorhynchites brevipalpis. The model is based on the description of the antenna as a forced-damped oscillator coupled to a set of active threads (ensembles of scolopidia) that provide an impulsive force when they twitch. This twitching is in turn controlled by channels that are opened and closed if the antennal oscillation reaches a critical amplitude. The model matches both qualitatively and quantitatively with recent experiments. New results are presented using mathematical homogenization techniques to derive a mesoscopic model as a simple oscillator with nonlinear force and damping characteristics. It is shown how the results from this new model closely resemble those from the microscopic model as the number of threads approach physiologically correct values.

  19. Nitrogen-doped Ge3Te2 materials with self-restricted active region for low power phase-change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng; Yang, Pingxiong; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang; Rao, Feng; Song, Sannian; Zhou, Dong; Chu, Junhao

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, nitrogen-doped Ge3Te2 materials have been investigated for low power phase-change memory. Nitrogen incorporated in Ge3Te2 increases the crystallization temperature, electrical resistance, and band gap significantly. The introduced GeNx pile up at the grain-boundaries and suppress the crystal growth of Ge3Te2, which further leads to larger crystalline resistance and smaller active region. 10-year data retention of nitrogen-doped Ge3Te2 film reaches a peak value with a N2 flow of 2 sccm, while it decreases sharply as the N2 flow reaches 3 sccm. This is due to the formation of inhomogeneous nucleation sites at the GeNx-GeTe interface. Phase-change memory device based on nitrogen-doped Ge3Te2 film shows much lower RESET power consumption than that of pure Ge3Te2. It's considered that the self-restricted active region and effect of GeNx microheaters play an important role in cutting down the power consumption.

  20. Dietary Restriction and Nutrient Balance in Aging.

    PubMed

    Santos, Júlia; Leitão-Correia, Fernanda; Sousa, Maria João; Leão, Cecília

    2016-01-01

    Dietary regimens that favour reduced calorie intake delay aging and age-associated diseases. New evidences revealed that nutritional balance of dietary components without food restriction increases lifespan. Particular nutrients as several nitrogen sources, proteins, amino acid, and ammonium are implicated in life and healthspan regulation in different model organisms from yeast to mammals. Aging and dietary restriction interact through partially overlapping mechanisms in the activation of the conserved nutrient-signalling pathways, mainly the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IIS) and the Target Of Rapamycin (TOR). The specific nutrients of dietary regimens, their balance, and how they interact with different genes and pathways are currently being uncovered. Taking into account that dietary regimes can largely influence overall human health and changes in risk factors such as cholesterol level and blood pressure, these new findings are of great importance to fully comprehend the interplay between diet and humans health. PMID:26682004

  1. Dietary Restriction and Nutrient Balance in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Leitão-Correia, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Dietary regimens that favour reduced calorie intake delay aging and age-associated diseases. New evidences revealed that nutritional balance of dietary components without food restriction increases lifespan. Particular nutrients as several nitrogen sources, proteins, amino acid, and ammonium are implicated in life and healthspan regulation in different model organisms from yeast to mammals. Aging and dietary restriction interact through partially overlapping mechanisms in the activation of the conserved nutrient-signalling pathways, mainly the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IIS) and the Target Of Rapamycin (TOR). The specific nutrients of dietary regimens, their balance, and how they interact with different genes and pathways are currently being uncovered. Taking into account that dietary regimes can largely influence overall human health and changes in risk factors such as cholesterol level and blood pressure, these new findings are of great importance to fully comprehend the interplay between diet and humans health. PMID:26682004

  2. Decreased systemic IGF-1 in response to calorie restriction modulates murine tumor cell growth, nuclear factor-κB activation, and inflammation-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alison E; Lashinger, Laura M; Otto, Glen; Nunez, Nomeli P; Hursting, Stephen D

    2013-12-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) prevents obesity and has potent anticancer effects associated with altered hormones and cytokines. We tested the hypothesis that CR inhibits MC38 mouse colon tumor cell growth through modulation of hormone-stimulated nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and protumorigenic gene expression. Female C57BL/6 mice were randomized (n = 30/group) to receive control diet or 30% CR diet. At 20 wk, 15 mice/group were killed for body composition analysis. At 21 wk, serum was obtained for hormone analysis. At 22 wk, mice were injected with MC38 cells; tumor growth was monitored for 24 d. Gene expression in excised tumors and MC38 cells was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR. In vitro MC38 NF-κB activation (by p65 ELISA and immunofluorescence) were measured in response to varying IGF-1 concentrations (1-400 ng/mL). Relative to controls, CR mice had decreased tumor volume, body weight, body fat, serum IGF-1, serum leptin, and serum insulin, and increased serum adiponectin (P < 0.05, each). Tumors from CR mice, versus controls, had downregulated inflammation- and/or cancer-related gene expression, including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-2, S100A9, and F4/80, and upregulated 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression. In MC38 cells in vitro, IGF-1 increased NF-κB activation and NF-κB downstream gene expression (P < 0.05, each). We conclude that CR, in association with reduced systemic IGF-1, modulates MC38 tumor growth, NF-κB activation, and inflammation-related gene expression. Thus, IGF-1 and/or NF-κB inhibition may pharmacologically mimic the anticancer effects of CR to break the obesity-colon cancer link. PMID:22778026

  3. A Kinetic Model of Active Extensile Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Daniel; Chakraborty, Bulbul; Baskaran, Aparna

    Recent experiments in active filament networks reveal interesting rheological properties (Dan Chen: APS March Meeting 2015 D49.00001). This system consumes ATP to produce an extensile motion in bundles of microtubules. This extension then leads to self generated stresses and spontaneous flows. We propose a minimal model where the activity is modeled by self-extending bundles that are part of a cross linked network. This network can reorganize itself through buckling of extending filaments and merging events that alter the topology of the network. We numerically simulate this minimal kinetic model and examine the emergent rheological properties and determine how stresses are generated by the extensile activity. We will present results that focus on the effects of confinement and network connectivity of the bundles on stress fluctuations and response of an active gel.

  4. APOBECs and Virus Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Reuben S.; Dudley, Jaquelin P.

    2015-01-01

    The APOBEC family of single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminases comprises a formidable arm of the vertebrate innate immune system. Pre-vertebrates express a single APOBEC, whereas some mammals produce as many as eleven enzymes. The APOBEC3 subfamily displays both copy number variation and polymorphisms, consistent with ongoing pathogenic pressures. These enzymes restrict the replication of many DNA-based parasites, such as exogenous viruses and endogenous transposable elements. APOBEC1 and activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID) have specialized functions in RNA editing and antibody gene diversification, respectively, whereas APOBEC2 and APOBEC4 appear to have different functions. Nevertheless, the APOBEC family protects against both periodic viral zoonoses as well as exogenous and endogenous parasite replication. This review highlights viral pathogens that are restricted by APOBEC enzymes, but manage to escape through unique mechanisms. The sensitivity of viruses that lack counterdefense measures highlights the need to develop APOBEC-enabling small molecules as a new class of anti-viral drugs. PMID:25818029

  5. Constitutive activation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 gene transcription by IRF1 and IRF2 during restricted EBV latency.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, B C; Paulson, E; Strominger, J L; Speck, S H

    1997-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EBNA1 gene promoter active in the type I program of restricted viral latency was recently identified and shown to reside in the viral BamHI Q fragment. This promoter, Qp, is active in a wide variety of cell lines and has an architecture reminiscent of eukaryotic housekeeping gene promoters (B. C. Schaefer, J. L. Strominger, and S. H. Speck, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92:10565-10569, 1995; B. C. Schaefer, J. L. Strominger, and S. H. Speck, Mol. Cell. Biol. 17:364-377, 1997). Here we demonstrate by deletion analysis that the important cis-acting elements regulating Qp are clustered in a relatively small region (ca. 80 bp) surrounding the site of transcription initiation. Immediately upstream of the site of initiation is a region which is protected from DNase I digestion by crude nuclear extracts. Electrophoretic mobility shift analyses (EMSA) employing probes spanning this region demonstrated the presence of two major protein complexes. Deletion analysis of Qp demonstrated that at least one of these complexes plays an important role in Qp activity. Evidence that interferon response factor 2 (IRF2) is a major constituent of the most prominent EMSA complex and that IRF1 may be a minor component of this complex is presented. Transfections into IRF1-/-, IRF2-/-, and IRF1,2-/- fibroblasts demonstrated that absence of both IRF1 and IRF2 reduced Qp activity to approximately the same extent as mutation of the IRF-binding site in Qp, strongly implicating IRF2, and perhaps IRF1, in the regulation of Qp activity. Notably, transcription from Qp was not inducible by either alpha or gamma interferon in EBV-negative B cells but rather was shown to be constitutively activated by IRF1 and IRF2. This observation suggests that IRF1 and IRF2 have a previously unrecognized role as constitutive activators of specific genes. Additionally, data presented indicate that a protein complex containing the nonhistone architectural protein HMG-I(Y) binds to the region

  6. [Can solar/geomagnetic activity restrict the occurrence of some shellfish poisoning outbreaks? The example of PSP caused by Gymnodinium catenatum at the Atlantic Portuguese coast].

    PubMed

    Vale, P

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic outbreaks of accumulation of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins in mussels attributed to Gymnodinium catenatum blooms displayed several of the highest inter-annual maxima coincidental with minima of the 11-year solar sunspot number (SSN) cycle. The monthly distribution of PSP was associated with low levels of the solar radio flux, a more quantitative approach than SSN for fluctuations in solar activity. A comparison between monthly distribution of PSP and other common biotoxins (okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxin-2 (DTX2) and amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP) toxins) demonstrated that only PSP was significantly associated with low levels of radio flux (p < 0.01). PSP occurrence suggests a prior decline in solar activity could be required to act as a trigger, in a similar manner to a photoperiodic signal. The seasonal frequency increased towards autumn during the study period, which might be related to the progressive atmospheric cut-off of deleterious radiation associated with the seasonal change in solar declination, and might play an additional role in seasonal signal-triggering. PSP distribution was also associated with low levels of the geomagnetic index Aa. A comparison between monthly distribution of PSP and other common biotoxins, also demonstrated that only PSP was significantly associated with low levels of the Aa index (p < 0.01). In some years of SSN minima no significant PSP-outbreaks in mussels were detected. This was attributed to a steady rise in geomagnetic activity that could disrupt the triggering signal. Global distribution patterns show that hotspots for G. catenatum blooms are regions with deficient crustal magnetic anomalies. In addition to the variable magnetic field mostly of solar origin, static fields related to magnetized rocks in the crust and upper mantle might play a role in restricting worldwide geographic distribution. PMID:24455892

  7. Postnatal nutritional restriction affects growth and immune function of piglets with intra-uterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang; Liu, Yan; Yan, Chuan; Peng, Xie; Xu, Qin; Xuan, Yue; Han, Fei; Tian, Gang; Fang, Zhengfeng; Lin, Yan; Xu, Shengyu; Zhang, Keying; Chen, Daiwen; Wu, De; Che, Lianqiang

    2015-07-14

    Postnatal rapid growth by excess intake of nutrients has been associated with an increased susceptibility to diseases in neonates with intra-uterine growth restricted (IUGR). The aim of the present study was to determine whether postnatal nutritional restriction could improve intestinal development and immune function of neonates with IUGR using piglets as model. A total of twelve pairs of normal-birth weight (NBW) and IUGR piglets (7 d old) were randomly assigned to receive adequate nutrient intake or restricted nutrient intake (RNI) by artificially liquid feeding for a period of 21 d. Blood samples and intestinal tissues were collected at necropsy and were analysed for morphology, digestive enzyme activities, immune cells and expression of innate immunity-related genes. The results indicated that both IUGR and postnatal nutritional restriction delayed the growth rate during the sucking period. Irrespective of nutrient intake, piglets with IUGR had a significantly lower villous height and crypt depth in the ileum than the NBW piglets. Moreover, IUGR decreased alkaline phosphatase activity while enhanced lactase activity in the jejunum and mRNA expressions of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9) and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) in the ileum of piglets. Irrespective of body weight, RNI significantly decreased the number and/or percentage of peripheral leucocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes of piglets, whereas the percentage of neutrophils and the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ were increased. Furthermore, RNI markedly enhanced the mRNA expression of TLR-9 and DNMT1, but decreased the expression of NOD2 and TRAF-6 in the ileum of piglets. In summary, postnatal nutritional restriction led to abnormal cellular and innate immune response, as well as delayed the growth and intestinal development of IUGR piglets. PMID:26059215

  8. The structure of the KlcA and ArdB proteins reveals a novel fold and antirestriction activity against Type I DNA restriction systems in vivo but not in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Serfiotis-Mitsa, Dimitra; Herbert, Andrew P.; Roberts, Gareth A.; Soares, Dinesh C.; White, John H.; Blakely, Garry W.; Uhrín, Dušan; Dryden, David T. F.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmids, conjugative transposons and phage frequently encode anti-restriction proteins to enhance their chances of entering a new bacterial host that is highly likely to contain a Type I DNA restriction and modification (RM) system. The RM system usually destroys the invading DNA. Some of the anti-restriction proteins are DNA mimics and bind to the RM enzyme to prevent it binding to DNA. In this article, we characterize ArdB anti-restriction proteins and their close homologues, the KlcA proteins from a range of mobile genetic elements; including an ArdB encoded on a pathogenicity island from uropathogenic Escherichia coli and a KlcA from an IncP-1b plasmid, pBP136 isolated from Bordetella pertussis. We show that all the ArdB and KlcA act as anti-restriction proteins and inhibit the four main families of Type I RM systems in vivo, but fail to block the restriction endonuclease activity of the archetypal Type I RM enzyme, EcoKI, in vitro indicating that the action of ArdB is indirect and very different from that of the DNA mimics. We also present the structure determined by NMR spectroscopy of the pBP136 KlcA protein. The structure shows a novel protein fold and it is clearly not a DNA structural mimic. PMID:20007596

  9. Multiharmonic model of seismic activity in Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Valeev, S. G.; Faskhutdinova, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the uniform catalogue of earthquakes of the minimum energy class 8.5 for 1962-2008, multiharmonic models of seismic activity in Kamchatka are developed. The main harmonic components with periods from a few days to 12 years are identified. Both the entire catalogue and its modified versions obtained by the elimination of aftershocks and clusters, as well as nonoverlapping time series were used to study the stability of the models. The forward-prediction testing showed that in the models with weekly averaged initial data, periods of increased and reduced seismic activity lasting for several weeks are predicted with high confidence on an interval of up to 1.8% of the education period. This testifies for the presence of deterministic components in the seismic activity.

  10. Activity of a social dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reia, Sandro M.; Neves, Ubiraci P. C.

    2015-10-01

    Axelrod's model was proposed to study interactions between agents and the formation of cultural domains. It presents a transition from a monocultural to a multicultural steady state which has been studied in the literature by evaluation of the relative size of the largest cluster. In this article, we propose new measurements based on the concept of activity per agent to study the Axelrod's model on the square lattice. We show that the variance of system activity can be used to indicate the critical points of the transition. Furthermore the frequency distribution of the system activity is able to show a coexistence of phases typical of a first order phase transition. Finally, we verify a power law dependence between cluster activity and cluster size for multicultural steady state configurations at the critical point.

  11. Design, synthesis and biological activity of new neurohypophyseal hormones analogues conformationally restricted in the N-terminal part of the molecule. Highly potent OT receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Ptach, Monika; Borovičková, Lenka; Slaninová, Jiřina; Lammek, Bernard; Prahl, Adam

    2012-08-01

    In this study we present the synthesis and some pharmacological properties of fourteen new analogues of neurohypophyseal hormones conformationally restricted in the N-terminal part of the molecule. All new peptides were substituted at position 2 with cis-1-amino-4-phenylcyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid (cis-Apc). Moreover, one of the new analogues: [cis-Apc(2), Val(4)]AVP was also prepared in N-acylated forms with various bulky acyl groups. All the peptides were tested for pressor, antidiuretic, and in vitro uterotonic activities. We also determined the binding affinity of the selected compounds to human OT receptor. Our results showed that introduction of cis -Apc(2) in position 2 of either AVP or OT resulted in analogues with high antioxytocin potency. Two of the new compounds, [Mpa(1),cis-Apc(2)]AVP and [Mpa(1),cis-Apc(2),Val(4)]AVP, were exceptionally potent antiuterotonic agents (pA(2) = 8.46 and 8.40, respectively) and exhibited higher affinities for the human OT receptor than Atosiban (K (i) values 5.4 and 9.1 nM). Moreover, we have demonstrated for the first time that N -terminal acylation of AVP analogue can improve its selectivity. Using this approach, we obtained compound Aba[cis-Apc(2),Val(4)]AVP (XI) which turned out to be a moderately potent and exceptionally selective OT antagonist (pA(2) = 7.26). PMID:22038179

  12. Cloning and characterization of the 2B4 gene encoding a molecule associated with non-MHC-restricted killing mediated by activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, P.A.; Garni-Wagner, B.A.; Land, K.; Takashima, A.; Stoneman, E.; Bennett, M.; Kumar, V. )

    1993-11-15

    The authors have recently described a signal transducing molecule, 2B4, expressed on all NK and T cells that mediate non-MHC-restricted killing. The gene encoding this molecule was cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. The encoded protein of 398 amino acids has a leader peptide of 18 amino acids and a transmembrane region of 24 amino acids. The predicted protein has eight N-linked glycosylation sites, suggesting that it is highly glycosylated. Comparison of 2B4 with sequences in the databanks indicates that 2B4 is a member of the Ig supergene family, and it shows homology to murine and rat CD48 and human LFA-3. Northern blot analysis has shown at least three transcripts for 2B4 in adherent lymphokine-activated killer cells of several mouse strains and TCR-[gamma]/[delta] dendritic epidermal T cell lines but not in allospecific T cell clones. These three mRNA are the products of differential splicing of heterogeneous nuclear RNA. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from several mouse strains revealed that 2B4 belongs to a family of closely related genes. The 2B4 gene has been mapped to mouse chromosome 1 by analysis of 2B4 expression in recombinant inbred mouse strains. 48 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Stringent restriction from the growth of large-scale structure on apparent acceleration in inhomogeneous cosmological models.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Mustapha; Peel, Austin; Troxel, M A

    2013-12-20

    Probes of cosmic expansion constitute the main basis for arguments to support or refute a possible apparent acceleration due to different expansion rates in the Universe as described by inhomogeneous cosmological models. We present in this Letter a separate argument based on results from an analysis of the growth rate of large-scale structure in the Universe as modeled by the inhomogeneous cosmological models of Szekeres. We use the models with no assumptions of spherical or axial symmetries. We find that while the Szekeres models can fit very well the observed expansion history without a Λ, they fail to produce the observed late-time suppression in the growth unless Λ is added to the dynamics. A simultaneous fit to the supernova and growth factor data shows that the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM) provides consistency with the data at a confidence level of 99.65%, while the Szekeres model without Λ achieves only a 60.46% level. When the data sets are considered separately, the Szekeres with no Λ fits the supernova data as well as the ΛCDM does, but provides a very poor fit to the growth data with only 31.31% consistency level compared to 99.99% for the ΛCDM. This absence of late-time growth suppression in inhomogeneous models without a Λ is consolidated by a physical explanation. PMID:24483736

  14. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity and pro-opiomelanocortin mRNA levels in the hypothalamus and pituitary of the rat are differentially modulated by acute intermittent morphine with or without water restriction stress.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Spangler, R; Maggos, C E; Wang, X M; Han, J S; Ho, A; Kreek, M J

    1999-11-01

    Acute administration of morphine stimulates the secretion of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hormones, ACTH, beta-endorphin and corticosterone in the rat. In this study we investigated the effects of repeated multiple-dose morphine on HPA activity under two different conditions: without or with water restriction stress. Rats received six intermittent injections of morphine (6.25 mg/kg per injection, s.c.) every 2 h and were killed 30 min after the last injection. The results were as follows. (1) Morphine significantly elevated plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels; water restriction also significantly increased ACTH secretion, but with no significant increase of plasma corticosterone levels. In contrast, rats treated with morphine under the water restriction condition failed to show any increases of either ACTH or corticosterone levels. (2) Morphine did not change pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels in the anterior pituitary; whereas water restriction significantly increased the POMC mRNA levels. The water restriction-induced increases of POMC mRNA in the anterior pituitary were absent in the rats which received morphine. (3) Morphine significantly increased POMC mRNA levels in the hypothalamus; water restriction had no effect. The morphine-induced increases in POMC mRNA in the hypothalamus were absent in the rat under the water restriction condition. These findings, that the effects of morphine on HPA activation or POMC mRNA expression depend on the presence of stress, suggest a counter-regulatory role of opiates on a stress response and opioid gene expression. PMID:10556776

  15. Leucine supplementation of a chronically restricted protein and energy diet enhances mTOR pathway activation but not muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Manjarín, Rodrigo; Columbus, Daniel A; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Hernandez-García, Adriana D; Hoang, Nguyet-Minh; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal nutrient intake represents a limiting factor for growth and long-term survival of low-birth weight infants. The objective of this study was to determine if in neonates who can consume only 70 % of their protein and energy requirements for 8 days, enteral leucine supplementation will upregulate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in skeletal muscle, leading to an increase in protein synthesis and muscle anabolism. Nineteen 4-day-old piglets were fed by gastric tube 1 of 3 diets, containing (kg body weight(-1) · day(-1)) 16 g protein and 190 kcal (CON), 10.9 g protein and 132 kcal (R), or 10.8 g protein + 0.2 % leucine and 136 kcal (RL) at 4-h intervals for 8 days. On day 8, plasma AA and insulin levels were measured during 6 post-feeding intervals, and muscle protein synthesis rate and mTOR signaling proteins were determined at 120 min post-feeding. At 120 min, leucine was highest in RL (P < 0.001), whereas insulin, isoleucine and valine were lower in RL and R compared to CON (P < 0.001). Compared to RL and R, the CON diet increased (P < 0.01) body weight, protein synthesis, phosphorylation of S6 kinase (p-S6K1) and 4E-binding protein (p-4EBP1), and activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4 complex (eIF4E · eIF4G). RL increased (P ≤ 0.01) p-S6K1, p-4EBP1 and eIF4E · eIF4G compared to R. In conclusion, when protein and energy intakes are restricted for 8 days, leucine supplementation increases muscle mTOR activation, but does not improve body weight gain or enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs. PMID:26334346

  16. Response of a coupled ocean/energy balance model to restricted flow through the Central American Isthmus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Crowley, Thomas J.

    1997-06-01

    Prior ocean modeling work suggested that an open central American isthmus would cause a collapse of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation because of free exchange of low salinity water between the Atlantic and the Pacific. Geological data provide some support for this response, but the data also indicate that some North Atlantic Deep Water formation occurred before final closure of the isthmus. We previously postulated that this "early switch on" could reflect a more limited exchange of Atlantic waters with the Pacific. In this study we discuss model sensitivity experiments testing that hypothesis and interpret the response in terms of shifts between multiple steady states of the model. Two simulations are conducted with a version of the Hamburg large-scale geostrophic ocean model that is coupled to an atmospheric energy balance model. Constrictions of throughflow through the central American isthmus is mimicked by locally changing the frictional drag coefficient in the ocean model. Results indicate that modest levels of throughflow can maintain some level of thermohaline circulation. These results support the conjecture in our earlier study. However, the overturning cell is about 300 m shallower than in the control run, with deep water production nearly eliminated in the Labrador Sea. These latter responses should be testable with marine data.

  17. Synthesis, Protein Levels, Activity and Phosphorylation State of Tyrosine Hydroxylase in Mesoaccumbens and Nigrostriatal Dopamine Pathways of Chronically Food-restricted Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yan; Berman, Yemiliya; Haberny, Sandra; Meller, Emanuel; Carr, Kenneth D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic food restriction (FR) enhances the rewarding and motor-activating effects of abused drugs, and is accompanied by changes in dopamine (DA) dynamics and increased D-1 DA receptor-mediated cell signaling and transcriptional responses in nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, little is known about effects of FR on DA synthetic activity in the mesoaccumbens and nigrostriatal pathways. In Experiment 1 of the present study, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression was measured in ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra, using real time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization; no differences were observed between FR and ad libitum fed (AL) rats. In Experiment 2, TH protein levels, determined by Western blot, were found to be elevated in NAc and caudate-putamen (CPu) of FR relative to AL rats. In the absence of increased transcription, this may reflect a slowing of TH degradation. In Experiments 3 and 4, DA synthetic activity was assessed by Western blot measurement of TH phosphorylation at Ser-40, and HPLC measurement of in vivo tyrosine hydroxylation rate, as reflected by DOPA accumulation following administration of a decarboxylase inhibitor (NSD-1015; 100 mg/kg, i.p.). Basal phospho-Ser(40)-TH levels did not differ between groups but DOPA accumulation was decreased by FR. Decreased DOPA synthesis, despite increased levels of TH protein, may reflect the inhibitory effect of increased DA binding to TH protein or decreased concentrations of cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin. Finally, in response to d-amphetamine (0.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, i.p.), phospho-Ser(40)-TH was selectively decreased in NAc of FR rats. This suggests increased feedback inhibition of DA synthesis - a possible consequence of postsynaptic receptor hypersensitivity, or increased extracellular DA concentration. These results indicate that FR increases TH protein levels, but may decrease the capacity for DA synthesis by decreasing TH activity. According to this scheme, the previously observed upregulation of striatal

  18. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  19. The Seasons Explained by Refutational Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frede, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the principles and investigation of a small-group laboratory activity based on refutational modeling to teach the concept of seasons to preservice elementary teachers. The results show that these teachers improved significantly when they had to refute their initial misconceptions practically. (Contains 8 figures and 1 table.)

  20. Modeling activity rhythms in fiddler crabs.

    PubMed

    Dugaw, Christopher J; Honeyfield, Rebecca; Taylor, Caz M; Verzi, Diana W

    2009-10-01

    Burrowing crabs of the genus Uca inhabit tidal mudflats and beaches. They feed actively during low tide and remain in their burrows when the tide is high. The timing of this activity has been shown to persist in the absence of external light and tidal cues, indicating the presence of an internal timing mechanism. Researchers report the persistence of several variations in locomotor activity under laboratory conditions that cannot be explained by a single circatidal clock. Previous studies supported two alternative hypotheses: the presence of either two circalunidian clocks, or a circadian and circatidal clock to regulate these activity rhythms. In this paper, we formulate mathematical models to describe and test these hypotheses. The models suggested by the literature contain some important differences beyond the frequency of proposed clocks, and these are reflected in the mathematical formulations and simulation results. One hypothesis suggests independent phase oscillators, while the other hypothesis suggests that they are coupled in anti-phase. Neither model is able to recover all of the variations in locomotor acitivity observed under laboratory conditions. However, we propose a new model that incorporates aspects of both existing hypotheses and is able to reproduce all laboratory observations. PMID:19916836

  1. Using Hybrid Modeling to Develop Innovative Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Brenda; Avans, Diana

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a hybrid activities model that physical educators can use with students in grades four and above to create virtually a limitless array of novel games. A brief introduction to the basic theory is followed by descriptions of some hybrid games. Hybrid games are typically the result of merging two traditional sports or other…

  2. Insights into HLA restricted T cell responses in a novel mouse model of dengue virus infection point towards new implications for vaccine design1

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Daniela; Yauch, Lauren E.; Angelo, Michael A.; John, Daisy V.; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Sidney, John; Kolla, Ravi V.; De Silva, Aruna D.; de Silva, Aravinda M.; Grey, Howard; Peters, Bjoern; Shresta, Sujan; Sette, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The frequency of dengue virus (DENV) infection has increased dramatically in the last few decades, and the lack of a vaccine has led to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. To date, a convenient murine system to study human T cell responses to DENV has not been available. Mice transgenic for human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are widely used to model human immune responses and it has been shown that mouse-passaged DENV is able to replicate to significant levels in IFN-α/βR−/− mice. To cover a wide range of HLA phenotypes, we backcrossed IFN-α/βR−/− mice with HLA A*0201, A*0101, A*1101, B*0702 and DRB1*0101 transgenic mice. A DENV proteome-wide screen identified a total of 42 epitopes across all HLA-transgenic IFN-α/βR−/− strains tested. In contrast only 8 of these elicited responses in the corresponding IFN-α/βR+/+ mice. We were able to identify T cell epitopes from 9 out of the 10 DENV proteins. However, the majority of responses were derived from the highly conserved nonstructural proteins NS3 and NS5. The relevance of this model is further demonstrated by the fact that most of the epitopes identified in our murine system are also recognized by PBMC from DENV exposed human donors, and a dominance of HLA B*0702 restricted responses has been detected in both systems. Our results provide new insights into HLA-restricted T cell responses against DENV, and we herein describe a novel murine model, which allows the investigation of T cell-mediated immune mechanisms relevant to vaccine design. PMID:21918184

  3. Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    While telomerase is expressed in ~90% of primary human tumors, most somatic tissue cells except transiently proliferating stem-like cells do not have detectable telomerase activity (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Telomeres progressively shorten with each cell division in normal cells, including proliferating stem-like cells, due to the end replication (lagging strand synthesis) problem and other causes such as oxidative damage, therefore all somatic cells have limited cell proliferation capacity (Hayflick limit) (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The progressive telomere shortening eventually leads to growth arrest in normal cells, which is known as replicative senescence (Shay et al., 1991). Once telomerase is activated in cancer cells, telomere length is stabilized by the addition of TTAGGG repeats to the end of chromosomes, thus enabling the limitless continuation of cell division (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Therefore, the link between aging and cancer can be partially explained by telomere biology. There are many rapid and convenient methods to study telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) (Mender and Shay, 2015b) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this protocol paper we describe Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) analysis to determine average telomeric length of cells. Telomeric length can be indirectly measured by a technique called Telomere Restriction Fragment analysis (TRF). This technique is a modified Southern blot, which measures the heterogeneous range of telomere lengths in a cell population using the length distribution of the terminal restriction fragments (Harley et al., 1990; Ouellette et al., 2000). This method can be used in eukaryotic cells. The description below focuses on the measurement of human cancer cells telomere length. The principle of this method relies on the lack of

  4. Temporal dynamics of methyltransferase and restriction endonuclease accumulation in individual cells after introducing a restriction-modification system

    PubMed Central

    Morozova, Natalia; Sabantsev, Anton; Bogdanova, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Yana; Maikova, Anna; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Rodic, Andjela; Djordjevic, Marko; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems encode a restriction endonuclease that cleaves DNA at specific sites, and a methyltransferase that modifies same sites protecting them from restriction endonuclease cleavage. Type II R-M systems benefit bacteria by protecting them from bacteriophages. Many type II R-M systems are plasmid-based and thus capable of horizontal transfer. Upon the entry of such plasmids into a naïve host with unmodified genomic recognition sites, methyltransferase should be synthesized first and given sufficient time to methylate recognition sites in the bacterial genome before the toxic restriction endonuclease activity appears. Here, we directly demonstrate a delay in restriction endonuclease synthesis after transformation of Escherichia coli cells with a plasmid carrying the Esp1396I type II R-M system, using single-cell microscopy. We further demonstrate that before the appearance of the Esp1396I restriction endonuclease the intracellular concentration of Esp1396I methyltransferase undergoes a sharp peak, which should allow rapid methylation of host genome recognition sites. A mathematical model that satisfactorily describes the observed dynamics of both Esp1396I enzymes is presented. The results reported here were obtained using a functional Esp1396I type II R-M system encoding both enzymes fused to fluorescent proteins. Similar approaches should be applicable to the studies of other R-M systems at single-cell level. PMID:26687717

  5. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  6. Models of Impulsively Heated Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Klimchuk, J.

    2009-05-01

    A number of attempts to model solar active regions with steady coronal heating have been modestly successful at reproducing the observed soft X-ray emission, but they fail dramatically at explaining EUV observations. Since impulsive heating (nanoflare) models can reproduce individual EUV loops, it seems reasonable to consider that entire active regions are impulsively heated. However, nanoflares are characterized by many parameters, such as magnitude, duration, and time delay between successive events, and these parameters may depend on the strength of the magnetic field or the length of field lines, for example, so a wide range of active region models must be examined. We have recently begun such a study. Each model begins with a magnetic "skeleton” obtained by extrapolating an observed photospheric magnetogram into the corona. Field lines are populated with plasma using our highly efficient hydro code called Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL). We then produce synthetic images corresponding to emission line or broad-band observations. By determining which set of nanoflare parameters best reproduces actual observations, we hope to constrain the properties of the heating and ultimately to reveal the physical mechanism. We here report on the initial progress of our study.

  7. Gateway restriction and climatic conditions of the Mediterranean Sea during the Messinian Salinity Crisis; A box model including Sr-isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topper, Robin; Meijer, Paul; Flecker, Rachel; Wortel, Rinus

    2010-05-01

    Under certain conditions the ratio of two stable isotopes of strontium present in the water of a semi-enclosed basin (87Sr/86Sr) is known to be sensitive to the relative size of the inflow of ocean water and river input. Combining Sr-isotope ratios measured in Mediterranean Late Miocene successions with data on past salinity, Flecker et al. (EPSL, 203, 221-233, 2002) and Flecker and Ellam (Sed.Geol., 188-189, 189-203, 2006) were able to derive quantitative information on the Mediterranean hydrological budget at times before and during the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC). The authors obtained this hydrological budget by inverting the salinity and strontium data with steady-state solutions to the conservation equations of salt, strontium and water. In this study, we incorporate strontium concentration, Sr-isotope ratio and a Late Miocene water budget from Gladstone et al. (P3, 251, 254-267, 2007) in the box model from Meijer (EPSL, 248, 486-494, 2006) which quantifies the water and salt budget of the basin under specified conditions of connectivity with the Atlantic Ocean, representing tectonic restrictions of the Rifian and Betic gateways, and atmospheric fluxes, induced by climatic changes. This model will give insight in the coeval behaviour of salt and Sr-isotope ratios under changing contributions of ocean and fresh water. With respect to the model of Flecker et al. (2002) the extended model is a significant advancement as it allows for examination of the temporal evolution of salt and Sr-isotope ratio as a function of the individual hydrologic fluxes (Atlantic inflow and outflow, river input and evaporation, instead of the inflow and outflow parameters used by Flecker et al. (2002)), and the possibility of non-equilibrium states during the Late Miocene. Model evaluation is performed using the Sr-isotope ratio data set compiled by Flecker and Ellam (2006). Results from our model have implications for the timing and extent of Late Miocene Atlantic gateway

  8. 32 CFR 806.24 - Fee restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fee restrictions. 806.24 Section 806.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.24 Fee restrictions. For FOIA purposes, Air Force activities will consider...

  9. 32 CFR 806.24 - Fee restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fee restrictions. 806.24 Section 806.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.24 Fee restrictions. For FOIA purposes, Air Force activities will consider...

  10. 32 CFR 806.24 - Fee restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fee restrictions. 806.24 Section 806.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.24 Fee restrictions. For FOIA purposes, Air Force activities will consider...

  11. 32 CFR 806.24 - Fee restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fee restrictions. 806.24 Section 806.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.24 Fee restrictions. For FOIA purposes, Air Force activities will consider...

  12. 32 CFR 806.24 - Fee restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fee restrictions. 806.24 Section 806.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.24 Fee restrictions. For FOIA purposes, Air Force activities will consider...

  13. Restricted Interests and Teacher Presentation of Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocco, Corey S.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Rodriguez, Nicole M.

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning),…

  14. Modeling neural activity with cumulative damage distributions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Víctor; Tejo, Mauricio; Guiraud, Pierre; Schmachtenberg, Oliver; Orio, Patricio; Marmolejo-Ramos, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    Neurons transmit information as action potentials or spikes. Due to the inherent randomness of the inter-spike intervals (ISIs), probabilistic models are often used for their description. Cumulative damage (CD) distributions are a family of probabilistic models that has been widely considered for describing time-related cumulative processes. This family allows us to consider certain deterministic principles for modeling ISIs from a probabilistic viewpoint and to link its parameters to values with biological interpretation. The CD family includes the Birnbaum-Saunders and inverse Gaussian distributions, which possess distinctive properties and theoretical arguments useful for ISI description. We expand the use of CD distributions to the modeling of neural spiking behavior, mainly by testing the suitability of the Birnbaum-Saunders distribution, which has not been studied in the setting of neural activity. We validate this expansion with original experimental and simulated electrophysiological data. PMID:25998210

  15. System Model Network for Adipose Tissue Signatures Related to Weight Changes in Response to Calorie Restriction and Subsequent Weight Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Montastier, Emilie; Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Hlavaty, Petr; Tvrzicka, Eva; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Saris, Wim H. M.; Langin, Dominique; Kunesova, Marie; Viguerie, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Nutrigenomics investigates relationships between nutrients and all genome-encoded molecular entities. This holistic approach requires systems biology to scrutinize the effects of diet on tissue biology. To decipher the adipose tissue (AT) response to diet induced weight changes we focused on key molecular (lipids and transcripts) AT species during a longitudinal dietary intervention. To obtain a systems model, a network approach was used to combine all sets of variables (bio-clinical, fatty acids and mRNA levels) and get an overview of their interactions. AT fatty acids and mRNA levels were quantified in 135 obese women at baseline, after an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD) and after 6 months of ad libitum weight maintenance diet (WMD). After LCD, individuals were stratified a posteriori according to weight change during WMD. A 3 steps approach was used to infer a global model involving the 3 sets of variables. It consisted in inferring intra-omic networks with sparse partial correlations and inter-omic networks with regularized canonical correlation analysis and finally combining the obtained omic-specific network in a single global model. The resulting networks were analyzed using node clustering, systematic important node extraction and cluster comparisons. Overall, AT showed both constant and phase-specific biological signatures in response to dietary intervention. AT from women regaining weight displayed growth factors, angiogenesis and proliferation signaling signatures, suggesting unfavorable tissue hyperplasia. By contrast, after LCD a strong positive relationship between AT myristoleic acid (a fatty acid with low AT level) content and de novo lipogenesis mRNAs was found. This relationship was also observed, after WMD, in the group of women that continued to lose weight. This original system biology approach provides novel insight in the AT response to weight control by highlighting the central role of myristoleic acid that may account for the beneficial

  16. Enhanced Dopamine Release by Dopamine Transport Inhibitors Described by a Restricted Diffusion Model and Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Alexander F; Spivak, Charles E; Lupica, Carl R

    2016-06-15

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon fiber electrodes is widely used to rapidly monitor changes in dopamine (DA) levels in vitro and in vivo. Current analytical approaches utilize parameters such as peak oxidation current amplitude and decay times to estimate release and uptake processes, respectively. However, peak amplitude changes are often observed with uptake inhibitors, thereby confounding the interpretation of these parameters. To overcome this limitation, we demonstrate that a simple five-parameter, two-compartment model mathematically describes DA signals as a balance of release (r/ke) and uptake (ku), summed with adsorption (kads and kdes) of DA to the carbon electrode surface. Using nonlinear regression, we demonstrate that our model precisely describes measured DA signals obtained in brain slice recordings. The parameters extracted from these curves were then validated using pharmacological manipulations that selectively alter vesicular release or DA transporter (DAT)-mediated uptake. Manipulation of DA release through altering the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio or adding tetrodotoxin reduced the release parameter with no effect on the uptake parameter. DAT inhibitors methylenedioxypyrovalerone, cocaine, and nomifensine significantly reduced uptake and increased vesicular DA release. In contrast, a low concentration of amphetamine reduced uptake but had no effect on DA release. Finally, the kappa opioid receptor agonist U50,488 significantly reduced vesicular DA release but had no effect on uptake. Together, these data demonstrate a novel analytical approach to distinguish the effects of manipulations on DA release or uptake that can be used to interpret FSCV data. PMID:27018734

  17. Active walker models: tracks and landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayser, D. R.; Aberle, L. K.; Pochy, R. D.; Lam, L.

    1992-12-01

    The track patterns from the active walker models (AWMs) are compared with experimental retinal neuron and dielectric breakdown of liquid patterns, respectively. Excellent qualitative and quantitative agreements are obtained. The landscapes from the Boltzmann AWM in 1 + 1 dimensions form rough surfaces, with a first-order phase transition as the height of the landscaping function W0 is varied. Landscapes and statistics of the tracks from the probabilistic AWM in 2 + 1 dimensions are presented.

  18. Graphite to ultrafine nanocrystalline diamond phase transition model and growth restriction mechanism induced by nanosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X. D.; Liu, R.; Zheng, L. M.; Ren, Y. P.; Hu, Z. Z.; He, H.

    2015-10-01

    To have a clear insight into nanocrystal growth from graphite to diamond upon high energy pulsed laser irradiation of graphite suspension, synthesis of ultrafine nanocrystalline diamonds with laser energy set up from 0.3 J to 12 J, repetition rate of 10 Hz has been studied. The method allows synthesizing ultrafine nanocrystalline particles continuously at the ambient temperature and normal pressure. The particle size is shown independent of laser energy, which is ultrafine and ranges in 2-6 nm. The theoretical grown size of nano-diamonds is found in well agreement with the experiment results. Four kinds of production were found: nano-diamond, spherical carbon nano-particles, flocculent amorphous carbon, and graphene nano-ribbon rolls. A solid-vapor-plasma-liquid coexistence model describing phase transition from graphite to diamond induced by nanosecond laser processing was proposed. Graphene nano-ribbon rolls might be the intermediate phase in the conversion from graphite to diamond.

  19. Modeling of an Active Tablet Coating Process.

    PubMed

    Toschkoff, Gregor; Just, Sarah; Knop, Klaus; Kleinebudde, Peter; Funke, Adrian; Djuric, Dejan; Scharrer, Georg; Khinast, Johannes G

    2015-12-01

    Tablet coating is a common unit operation in the pharmaceutical industry, during which a coating layer is applied to tablet cores. The coating uniformity of tablets in a batch is especially critical for active coating, that is, coating that contains an active pharmaceutical ingredient. In recent years, discrete element method (DEM) simulations became increasingly common for investigating tablet coating. In this work, DEM was applied to model an active coating process as closely as possible, using measured model parameters and non-spherical particles. We studied how operational conditions (rotation speed, fill level, number of nozzles, and spray rate) influence the coating uniformity. To this end, simulation runs were planned and interpreted according to a statistical design of (simulation) experiments. Our general goal was to achieve a deeper understanding of the process in terms of residence times and dimensionless scaling laws. With that regard, the results were interpreted in light of analytical models. The results were presented at various detail levels, ranging from an overview of all variations to in-depth considerations. It was determined that the biggest uniformity improvement in a realistic setting was achieved by increasing the number of spray nozzles, followed by increasing the rotation speed and decreasing the fill level. PMID:26344941

  20. Graphite to ultrafine nanocrystalline diamond phase transition model and growth restriction mechanism induced by nanosecond laser processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X. D. Liu, R.; Zheng, L. M.; Ren, Y. P.; Hu, Z. Z.; He, H.

    2015-10-05

    To have a clear insight into nanocrystal growth from graphite to diamond upon high energy pulsed laser irradiation of graphite suspension, synthesis of ultrafine nanocrystalline diamonds with laser energy set up from 0.3 J to 12 J, repetition rate of 10 Hz has been studied. The method allows synthesizing ultrafine nanocrystalline particles continuously at the ambient temperature and normal pressure. The particle size is shown independent of laser energy, which is ultrafine and ranges in 2–6 nm. The theoretical grown size of nano-diamonds is found in well agreement with the experiment results. Four kinds of production were found: nano-diamond, spherical carbon nano-particles, flocculent amorphous carbon, and graphene nano-ribbon rolls. A solid-vapor-plasma-liquid coexistence model describing phase transition from graphite to diamond induced by nanosecond laser processing was proposed. Graphene nano-ribbon rolls might be the intermediate phase in the conversion from graphite to diamond.

  1. Development of injury in a rat model of chronic renal allograft rejection: effect of dietary protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Bombas, A; Stein-Oakley, A N; Baxter, K; Thomson, N M; Jablonski, P

    1999-01-01

    Non-allogeneic factors such as increased nephron "workload" may contribute to chronic renal allograft rejection. Reducing dietary protein from 20% to 8% was tested in a model of chronic rejection: Dark Agouti kidney to Albino Surgery recipient, "tolerised" by previous donor blood transfusions. Survival, weight gain, serum creatinine concentration and creatinine clearance were similar for both groups at all times. Urinary protein was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the low-protein (LP) group 1 month after transplantation. After 3 and 6 months, both groups demonstrated mild chronic rejection. After 6 months, tubular atrophy was significantly (P < 0.05) less in the LP group and interstitial fibrosis was marginally reduced. Glomerular hypertrophy, glomerular sclerosis, tubular dilatation, leucocyte infiltration, adhesion molecule expression and TGF-beta1 mRNA expression were similarly increased in both groups. Thus, reducing dietary protein to 8% lowered urinary protein, but did not significantly affect the development of chronic rejection in renal allografts beyond affording a degree of protection from tubulointerstitial damage. PMID:10080402

  2. On a Quantum Model of Brain Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, K.-H.; Fichtner, L.; Freudenberg, W.; Ohya, M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main activities of the brain is the recognition of signals. A first attempt to explain the process of recognition in terms of quantum statistics was given in [6]. Subsequently, details of the mathematical model were presented in a (still incomplete) series of papers (cf. [7, 2, 5, 10]). In the present note we want to give a general view of the principal ideas of this approach. We will introduce the basic spaces and justify the choice of spaces and operations. Further, we bring the model face to face with basic postulates any statistical model of the recognition process should fulfill. These postulates are in accordance with the opinion widely accepted in psychology and neurology.

  3. Dietary restrictions and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, R W; Turturro, A

    1997-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) alters a significant environmental factor in carcinogenesis, dietary intake, thus inhibiting both spontaneous and induced tumorigenesis. Potential mechanisms for the inhibition of spontaneous cancer may include the effects of DR to do the following: decrease body weight, which decreases cellular proliferation and increases apoptosis in a number of organs that increase and decrease with body size; decrease body temperature, thereby lowering the amount of endogenous DNA damage temperature generates; decrease oxidative damage, by increasing antioxidant damage defense systems; decrease, generally, cellular proliferation; and protect the fidelity of the genome by decreasing DNA damage, increasing DNA repair, and preventing aberrant gene expression. Potential mechanisms for reducing induced tumor incidence include lowering agent activation, changing agent disposition, decreasing the adducts most associated with agent toxicity, and inhibiting tumor progression through mechanisms similar to those that can effect spontaneous tumorigenesis. As a method to control a major source of environmental cancer, and as the major modulator of the agent induction of this disease, understanding how DR works may significantly contribute to the efforts to explain how diet impacts on development of cancer in the United States, and may suggest methods to reduce the adverse impacts of other environmental agents on the disease. PMID:9255593

  4. Restricting dietary magnesium accelerates ectopic connective tissue mineralization in a mouse model of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (Abcc6(-/-) ).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiujie; Uitto, Jouni

    2012-09-01

    Ectopic mineralization, linked to a number of diseases, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a heritable multisystem disorder characterized by calcium phosphate deposition in various tissues. The mineral content of diet has been suggested to modify the disease severity in PXE. The aim of this study is to explore the role of diet with reduced magnesium in modifying tissue mineralization in a mouse model of PXE. Abcc6(-/-) mice were placed on either standard rodent diet (control) or an experimental diet low in magnesium at weaning (4 weeks) and examined for mineralization in the skin and internal organs at the ages of 1.5, 2 or 6 months by computerized morphometric analysis of histopathological sections and by chemical assay of calcium and phosphate. Abcc6(-/-) mice on experimental diet demonstrated an accelerated, early-onset mineralization of connective tissues, as compared to control mice. Wild-type or heterozygous mice on experimental diet did not show evidence of mineralization up to 6 months of age. All mice on experimental diet showed decreased urinary calcium, increased urinary phosphate and elevated parathyroid serum levels. However, no difference in bone density at 6 months of age was noted. Our findings indicate that the mineral content, particularly magnesium, can modify the extent and the onset of mineralization in Abcc6(-/-) mice and suggest that dietary magnesium levels may contribute to the phenotypic variability of PXE. The control of mineralization by dietary magnesium may have broader implications in general population in the context of vascular mineralization. PMID:22897576

  5. Impact of antibiotic restrictions: the pharmaceutical perspective.

    PubMed

    Power, E

    2006-08-01

    The development of new antibiotics is dependent on their performance in economic models that favour products with large markets, high levels of potential sales and low development risks. There is a trend toward more severe and more widespread market restrictions for the use of antibiotics, ostensibly to control resistance, though they may be enacted through the control of drug budgets. The restrictions reduce the potential earnings of new antibiotics. In addition, more stringent regulatory procedures increase development costs and risk. As a consequence, compared with drugs for other diseases, particularly chronic diseases, antibiotics perform poorly in economic decision models and are therefore less likely to be selected by pharmaceutical companies for continued development. Overall, this creates a conflict between the twin objectives of controlling resistance through antibiotic restriction and addressing resistance clinically through the introduction of new agents. Ultimately, this may lead to the accelerated loss of efficacy for currently available agents, as we become more dependent on them. Moreover, the new agents that we need to maintain our current levels of health will be lacking in pharmaceutical pipelines. Antibiotic resistance is inevitable; the development of new antibiotics is, however, under threat. Unless the market conditions can be economically rebalanced to encourage innovation and investment, or new models of pharmaceutical development can be applied to this area, the number of companies with active antibiotic research programmes will continue to fall. Just as we should not be complacent regarding the development of resistance, we should not be complacent in assuming that the antibiotics of tomorrow will be there when we need them. PMID:16827822

  6. Water flow based geometric active deformable model for road network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leninisha, Shanmugam; Vani, Kaliaperumal

    2015-04-01

    A width and color based geometric active deformable model is proposed for road network extraction from remote sensing images with minimal human interception. Orientation and width of road are computed from a single manual seed point, from which the propagation starts both right and left hand directions of the starting point, which extracts the interconnected road network from the aerial or high spatial resolution satellite image automatically. Here the propagation (like water flow in canal with defined boundary) is restricted with color and width of the road. Road extraction is done for linear, curvilinear (U shape and S shape) roads first, irrespective of width and color. Then, this algorithm is improved to extract road with junctions in a shape of L, T and X along with center line. Roads with small break or disconnected roads are also extracts by a modified version of this same algorithm. This methodology is tested and evaluated with various remote sensing images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is efficient and extracting roads accurately with less computation time. However, in complex urban areas, the identification accuracy declines due to the various sizes of obstacles, over bridges, multilane etc.

  7. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of a mouse model of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy reveals severe muscular atrophy restricted to fast glycolytic fibres.

    PubMed

    Trollet, Capucine; Anvar, Seyed Yahya; Venema, Andrea; Hargreaves, Iain P; Foster, Keith; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Negroni, Elisa; Hourde, Christophe; Baraibar, Martin A; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Davies, Janet E; Rubinsztein, David C; Heales, Simon J; Mouly, Vincent; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Raz, Vered; Dickson, George

    2010-06-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disorder characterized by ptosis, dysphagia and proximal limb weakness. Autosomal-dominant OPMD is caused by a short (GCG)(8-13) expansions within the first exon of the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 gene (PABPN1), leading to an expanded polyalanine tract in the mutated protein. Expanded PABPN1 forms insoluble aggregates in the nuclei of skeletal muscle fibres. In order to gain insight into the different physiological processes affected in OPMD muscles, we have used a transgenic mouse model of OPMD (A17.1) and performed transcriptomic studies combined with a detailed phenotypic characterization of this model at three time points. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a massive gene deregulation in the A17.1 mice, among which we identified a significant deregulation of pathways associated with muscle atrophy. Using a mathematical model for progression, we have identified that one-third of the progressive genes were also associated with muscle atrophy. Functional and histological analysis of the skeletal muscle of this mouse model confirmed a severe and progressive muscular atrophy associated with a reduction in muscle strength. Moreover, muscle atrophy in the A17.1 mice was restricted to fast glycolytic fibres, containing a large number of intranuclear inclusions (INIs). The soleus muscle and, in particular, oxidative fibres were spared, even though they contained INIs albeit to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate a fibre-type specificity of muscle atrophy in this OPMD model. This study improves our understanding of the biological pathways modified in OPMD to identify potential biomarkers and new therapeutic targets. PMID:20207626

  8. Active Transport and Diffusion Barriers Restrict Joubert Syndrome-Associated ARL13B/ARL-13 to an Inv-like Ciliary Membrane Subdomain

    PubMed Central

    Cevik, Sebiha; Clarke, Lara; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Hori, Yuji; Horn, Nicola; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Wdowicz, Anita; Mullins, Andrea; Kida, Katarzyna; Kaplan, Oktay I.; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Man Wu, Ka; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Mans, Dorus A.; Katada, Toshiaki; Kontani, Kenji; Ueffing, Marius; Roepman, Ronald; Kremer, Hannie; Blacque, Oliver E.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based cell appendages, serving motility, chemo-/mechano-/photo- sensation, and developmental signaling functions. Cilia are comprised of distinct structural and functional subregions including the basal body, transition zone (TZ) and inversin (Inv) compartments, and defects in this organelle are associated with an expanding spectrum of inherited disorders including Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), Meckel-Gruber Syndrome (MKS), Joubert Syndrome (JS) and Nephronophthisis (NPHP). Despite major advances in understanding ciliary trafficking pathways such as intraflagellar transport (IFT), how proteins are transported to subciliary membranes remains poorly understood. Using Caenorhabditis elegans and mammalian cells, we investigated the transport mechanisms underlying compartmentalization of JS-associated ARL13B/ARL-13, which we previously found is restricted at proximal ciliary membranes. We now show evolutionary conservation of ARL13B/ARL-13 localisation to an Inv-like subciliary membrane compartment, excluding the TZ, in many C. elegans ciliated neurons and in a subset of mammalian ciliary subtypes. Compartmentalisation of C. elegans ARL-13 requires a C-terminal RVVP motif and membrane anchoring to prevent distal cilium and nuclear targeting, respectively. Quantitative imaging in more than 20 mutants revealed differential contributions for IFT and ciliopathy modules in defining the ARL-13 compartment; IFT-A/B, IFT-dynein and BBS genes prevent ARL-13 accumulation at periciliary membranes, whereas MKS/NPHP modules additionally inhibit ARL-13 association with TZ membranes. Furthermore, in vivo FRAP analyses revealed distinct roles for IFT and MKS/NPHP genes in regulating a TZ barrier to ARL-13 diffusion, and intraciliary ARL-13 diffusion. Finally, C. elegans ARL-13 undergoes IFT-like motility and quantitative protein complex analysis of human ARL13B identified functional associations with IFT-B complexes, mapped to IFT46 and IFT74 interactions. Together

  9. Temperature based Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Xu, Yi; Wen, Changyun; Wang, Wei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs), which apply graphical models to learning probability distribution over a set of inputs, have attracted much attention recently since being proposed as building blocks of multi-layer learning systems called deep belief networks (DBNs). Note that temperature is a key factor of the Boltzmann distribution that RBMs originate from. However, none of existing schemes have considered the impact of temperature in the graphical model of DBNs. In this work, we propose temperature based restricted Boltzmann machines (TRBMs) which reveals that temperature is an essential parameter controlling the selectivity of the firing neurons in the hidden layers. We theoretically prove that the effect of temperature can be adjusted by setting the parameter of the sharpness of the logistic function in the proposed TRBMs. The performance of RBMs can be improved by adjusting the temperature parameter of TRBMs. This work provides a comprehensive insights into the deep belief networks and deep learning architectures from a physical point of view.

  10. Activated Dynamics in Dense Model Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shijie; Schweizer, Kenneth

    The nonlinear Langevin equation approach is applied to investigate the ensemble-averaged activated dynamics of small molecule liquids (or disconnected segments in a polymer melt) in dense nanocomposites under model isobaric conditions where the spherical nanoparticles are dynamically fixed. Fully thermalized and quenched-replica integral equation theory methods are employed to investigate the influence on matrix dynamics of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium nanocomposite structure, respectively. In equilibrium, the miscibility window can be narrow due to depletion and bridging attraction induced phase separation which limits the study of activated dynamics to regimes where the barriers are relatively low. In contrast, by using replica integral equation theory, macroscopic demixing is suppressed, and the addition of nanoparticles can induce much slower activated matrix dynamics which can be studied over a wide range of pure liquid alpha relaxation times, interfacial attraction strengths and ranges, particle sizes and loadings, and mixture microstructures. Numerical results for the mean activated relaxation time, transient localization length, matrix elasticity and kinetic vitrification in the nanocomposite will be presented.

  11. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling and active aeroelastic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic modeling techniques are developed and applied to the study of active control of elastic vehicles. The problem of active control of a supercritical flutter mode poses a definite design goal stability, and is treated in detail. The transfer functions relating the arbitrary airfoil motions to the airloads are derived from the Laplace transforms of the linearized airload expressions for incompressible two dimensional flow. The transfer function relating the motions to the circulatory part of these loads is recognized as the Theodorsen function extended to complex values of reduced frequency, and is termed the generalized Theodorsen function. Inversion of the Laplace transforms yields exact transient airloads and airfoil motions. Exact root loci of aeroelastic modes are calculated, providing quantitative information regarding subcritical and supercritical flutter conditions.

  12. CFD Modeling for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes current work under UEET Active Flow Control CFD Research Tool Development. The goal of this work is to develop computational tools for inlet active flow control design. This year s objectives were to perform CFD simulations of fully gridded vane vortex generators, micro-vortex genera- tors, and synthetic jets, and to compare flowfield results with wind tunnel tests of simple geometries with flow control devices. Comparisons are shown for a single micro-vortex generator on a flat plate, and for flow over an expansion ramp with sidewall effects. Vortex core location, pressure gradient and oil flow patterns are compared between experiment and computation. This work lays the groundwork for evaluating simplified modeling of arrays of devices, and provides the opportunity to test simple flow control device/sensor/ control loop interaction.

  13. Restricting Temptations: Neural Mechanisms of Precommitment

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, Molly J.; Braams, Barbara R.; Clark, Luke; Tobler, Philippe N.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Summary Humans can resist temptations by exerting willpower, the effortful inhibition of impulses. But willpower can be disrupted by emotions and depleted over time. Luckily, humans can deploy alternative self-control strategies like precommitment, the voluntary restriction of access to temptations. Here, we examined the neural mechanisms of willpower and precommitment using fMRI. Behaviorally, precommitment facilitated choices for large delayed rewards, relative to willpower, especially in more impulsive individuals. While willpower was associated with activation in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), posterior parietal cortex (PPC), and inferior frontal gyrus, precommitment engaged lateral frontopolar cortex (LFPC). During precommitment, LFPC showed increased functional connectivity with DLPFC and PPC, especially in more impulsive individuals, and the relationship between impulsivity and LFPC connectivity was mediated by value-related activation in ventromedial PFC. Our findings support a hierarchical model of self-control in which LFPC orchestrates precommitment by controlling action plans in more caudal prefrontal regions as a function of expected value. PMID:23889938

  14. Quantitative modeling of multiscale neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter A.; Rennie, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    The electrical activity of the brain has been observed for over a century and is widely used to probe brain function and disorders, chiefly through the electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded by electrodes on the scalp. However, the connections between physiology and EEGs have been chiefly qualitative until recently, and most uses of the EEG have been based on phenomenological correlations. A quantitative mean-field model of brain electrical activity is described that spans the range of physiological and anatomical scales from microscopic synapses to the whole brain. Its parameters measure quantities such as synaptic strengths, signal delays, cellular time constants, and neural ranges, and are all constrained by independent physiological measurements. Application of standard techniques from wave physics allows successful predictions to be made of a wide range of EEG phenomena, including time series and spectra, evoked responses to stimuli, dependence on arousal state, seizure dynamics, and relationships to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Fitting to experimental data also enables physiological parameters to be infered, giving a new noninvasive window into brain function, especially when referenced to a standardized database of subjects. Modifications of the core model to treat mm-scale patchy interconnections in the visual cortex are also described, and it is shown that resulting waves obey the Schroedinger equation. This opens the possibility of classical cortical analogs of quantum phenomena.

  15. Establishment of an intermittent cold stress model using Tupaia belangeri and evaluation of compound C737 targeting neuron-restrictive silencer factor

    PubMed Central

    Hai-Ying, Chi; Nagano, Kiori; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Yamaguchi, Chiho; Kayesh, Mohammad Enamul Hoque; Rebbani, Khadija; Kitab, Bouchra; Nakano, Hirohumi; Kouji, Hiroyuki; Kohara, Michinori; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that intermittent cold stress (ICS) induces depression-like behaviors in mammals. Tupaia belangeri (the tree shrew) is the only experimental animal other than the chimpanzee that has been shown to be susceptible to infection by hepatitis B and C viruses. Moreover, full genome sequence analysis has revealed strong homology between host proteins in Tupaia and in humans and other primates. Tupaia neuromodulator receptor proteins are also known to have a high degree of homology with their corresponding primate proteins. Based on these similarities, we hypothesized that induction of ICS in Tupaia would provide a useful animal model of stress responses. We exposed young adult Tupaia to ICS and observed decreases in body temperature and body weight in both female and male Tupaia, suggesting that Tupaia are an appropriate animal model for ICS studies. We further examined the efficacy of a new small-molecule compound, C737, against the effects of ICS. C737 mimics the helical structure of neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF/REST), which regulates a wide range of target genes involved in neuronal function and pain modulation. Treatment with C737 significantly reduced stress-induced weight loss in female Tupaia; these effects were stronger than those elicited by the antidepressant agomelatine. These results suggest that Tupaia represents a useful non-rodent ICS model. Our data also provide new insights into the function of NRSF/REST in stress-induced depression and other disorders with epigenetic influences or those with high prevalence in women. PMID:27041457

  16. Establishment of an intermittent cold stress model using Tupaia belangeri and evaluation of compound C737 targeting neuron-restrictive silencer factor.

    PubMed

    Hai-Ying, Chi; Nagano, Kiori; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Yamaguchi, Chiho; Kayesh, Mohammad Enamul Hoque; Rebbani, Khadija; Kitab, Bouchra; Nakano, Hirohumi; Kouji, Hiroyuki; Kohara, Michinori; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-07-29

    Previous studies have shown that intermittent cold stress (ICS) induces depression-like behaviors in mammals. Tupaia belangeri (the tree shrew) is the only experimental animal other than the chimpanzee that has been shown to be susceptible to infection by hepatitis B and C viruses. Moreover, full genome sequence analysis has revealed strong homology between host proteins in Tupaia and in humans and other primates. Tupaia neuromodulator receptor proteins are also known to have a high degree of homology with their corresponding primate proteins. Based on these similarities, we hypothesized that induction of ICS in Tupaia would provide a useful animal model of stress responses. We exposed young adult Tupaia to ICS and observed decreases in body temperature and body weight in both female and male Tupaia, suggesting that Tupaia are an appropriate animal model for ICS studies. We further examined the efficacy of a new small-molecule compound, C737, against the effects of ICS. C737 mimics the helical structure of neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF/REST), which regulates a wide range of target genes involved in neuronal function and pain modulation. Treatment with C737 significantly reduced stress-induced weight loss in female Tupaia; these effects were stronger than those elicited by the antidepressant agomelatine. These results suggest that Tupaia represents a useful non-rodent ICS model. Our data also provide new insights into the function of NRSF/REST in stress-induced depression and other disorders with epigenetic influences or those with high prevalence in women. PMID:27041457

  17. Long-Term Physiological Alterations and Recovery in a Mouse Model of Separation Associated with Time-Restricted Feeding: A Tool to Study Anorexia Nervosa Related Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Stéphanie; Leterme, Damien; Ghali, Olfa; Tolle, Virginie; Zizzari, Philippe; Bellefontaine, Nicole; Legroux-Gérot, Isabelle; Hardouin, Pierre; Broux, Odile; Viltart, Odile; Chauveau, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa is a primary psychiatric disorder, with non-negligible rates of mortality and morbidity. Some of the related alterations could participate in a vicious cycle limiting the recovery. Animal models mimicking various physiological alterations related to anorexia nervosa are necessary to provide better strategies of treatment. Aim To explore physiological alterations and recovery in a long-term mouse model mimicking numerous consequences of severe anorexia nervosa. Methods C57Bl/6 female mice were submitted to a separation-based anorexia protocol combining separation and time-restricted feeding for 10 weeks. Thereafter, mice were housed in standard conditions for 10 weeks. Body weight, food intake, body composition, plasma levels of leptin, adiponectin, IGF-1, blood levels of GH, reproductive function and glucose tolerance were followed. Gene expression of several markers of lipid and energy metabolism was assayed in adipose tissues. Results Mimicking what is observed in anorexia nervosa patients, and despite a food intake close to that of control mice, separation-based anorexia mice displayed marked alterations in body weight, fat mass, lean mass, bone mass acquisition, reproductive function, GH/IGF-1 axis, and leptinemia. mRNA levels of markers of lipogenesis, lipolysis, and the brown-like adipocyte lineage in subcutaneous adipose tissue were also changed. All these alterations were corrected during the recovery phase, except for the hypoleptinemia that persisted despite the full recovery of fat mass. Conclusion This study strongly supports the separation-based anorexia protocol as a valuable model of long-term negative energy balance state that closely mimics various symptoms observed in anorexia nervosa, including metabolic adaptations. Interestingly, during a recovery phase, mice showed a high capacity to normalize these parameters with the exception of plasma leptin levels. It will be interesting therefore to explore further the central

  18. Restriction/modification polypeptides, polynucleotides, and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Westpheling, Janet; Chung, DaeHwan; Huddleston, Jennifer; Farkas, Joel A

    2015-02-24

    The present invention relates to the discovery of a novel restriction/modification system in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii. The discovered restriction enzyme is a HaeIII-like restriction enzyme that possesses a thermophilic activity profile. The restriction/modification system also includes a methyltransferase, M.CbeI, that methylates at least one cytosine residue in the CbeI recognition sequence to m.sup.4C. Thus, the invention provides, in various aspects, isolated CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides, or biologically active fragments thereof; isolated polynucleotides that encode the CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides or biologically active fragments thereof, including expression vectors that include such polynucleotide sequences; methods of digesting DNA using a CbeI polypeptide; methods of treating a DNA molecule using a M.CbeI polypeptide; and methods of transforming a Caldicellulosiruptor cell.

  19. Activation of Nonclassical CD1d-Restricted NK T Cells Induces Airway Hyperreactivity in β2-Microglobulin-Deficient Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Everett H.; Pichavant, Muriel; Akbari, Omid; Yasumi, Takahiro; Savage, Paul B.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Umetsu, Dale T.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-driven eosinophilic airway inflammation and by a central feature called airway hyperreactivity (AHR), development of which requires the presence of classical type I invariant NK T (iNKT) cells. Allergen-induced AHR, however, develops in β2-microglobulin (β2m)−/− mice, which lack classical iNKT cells, suggesting that in some situations iNKT cells may be dispensable for the development of AHR. In contrast, our studies now suggest that a CD1d-restricted, NK1.1+ noninvariant TCR NKT cell population is present in β2m−/− mice and is responsible for the development of AHR but not for Th2 responses. Furthermore, treatment of β2m−/− mice with anti-CD1d mAb or anti-NK1.1 mAb unexpectedly abolished allergen-induced AHR. The CD1-restricted NKT cells in these mice, which failed to respond to α-galactosylceramide and which therefore were not classical type I iNKT cells, appear to represent an NKT cell subset restricted by a β2m-independent form of CD1d. These results indicate that, although classical type I iNKT cells are normally required for the development of AHR, under different circumstances other NKT cell subsets, including nonclassical NKT cells, may substitute for classical iNKT cells and induce AHR. PMID:18802058

  20. Theory and modeling of active brazing.

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank B.; Miller, James Edward; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Givler, Richard C.

    2013-09-01

    Active brazes have been used for many years to produce bonds between metal and ceramic objects. By including a relatively small of a reactive additive to the braze one seeks to improve the wetting and spreading behavior of the braze. The additive modifies the substrate, either by a chemical surface reaction or possibly by alloying. By its nature, the joining process with active brazes is a complex nonequilibrium non-steady state process that couples chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion to the rheology and wetting behavior of the braze. Most of the these subprocesses are taking place in the interfacial region, most are difficult to access by experiment. To improve the control over the brazing process, one requires a better understanding of the melting of the active braze, rate of the chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion rates, nonequilibrium composition-dependent surface tension as well as the viscosity. This report identifies ways in which modeling and theory can assist in improving our understanding.

  1. Active State Model for Autonomous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han; Chien, Steve; Zak, Michail; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Fisher, Forest

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the active state model (ASM) is an architecture for the development of advanced integrated fault-detection-and-isolation (FDI) systems for robotic land vehicles, pilotless aircraft, exploratory spacecraft, or other complex engineering systems that will be capable of autonomous operation. An FDI system based on the ASM concept would not only provide traditional diagnostic capabilities, but also integrate the FDI system under a unified framework and provide mechanism for sharing of information between FDI subsystems to fully assess the overall health of the system. The ASM concept begins with definitions borrowed from psychology, wherein a system is regarded as active when it possesses self-image, self-awareness, and an ability to make decisions itself, such that it is able to perform purposeful motions and other transitions with some degree of autonomy from the environment. For an engineering system, self-image would manifest itself as the ability to determine nominal values of sensor data by use of a mathematical model of itself, and selfawareness would manifest itself as the ability to relate sensor data to their nominal values. The ASM for such a system may start with the closed-loop control dynamics that describe the evolution of state variables. As soon as this model was supplemented with nominal values of sensor data, it would possess self-image. The ability to process the current sensor data and compare them with the nominal values would represent self-awareness. On the basis of self-image and self-awareness, the ASM provides the capability for self-identification, detection of abnormalities, and self-diagnosis.

  2. Modeling the Benchmark Active Control Technology Wind-Tunnel Model for Active Control Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the formulation of a model of the dynamic behavior of the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) wind tunnel model for active control design and analysis applications. The model is formed by combining the equations of motion for the BACT wind tunnel model with actuator models and a model of wind tunnel turbulence. The primary focus of this report is the development of the equations of motion from first principles by using Lagrange's equations and the principle of virtual work. A numerical form of the model is generated by making use of parameters obtained from both experiment and analysis. Comparisons between experimental and analytical data obtained from the numerical model show excellent agreement and suggest that simple coefficient-based aerodynamics are sufficient to accurately characterize the aeroelastic response of the BACT wind tunnel model. The equations of motion developed herein have been used to aid in the design and analysis of a number of flutter suppression controllers that have been successfully implemented.

  3. Changes in Mediterranean circulation and water characteristics due to restriction of the Atlantic connection: a high-resolution parallel ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topper, R. P. M.; Meijer, P. Th.

    2014-07-01

    A high-resolution parallel ocean model is set up to examine how the sill depth of the Atlantic connection affects circulation and water characteristics in the Mediterranean Basin. An analysis of the model performance, comparing model results with observations on the present-day Mediterranean, demonstrates its ability to reproduce observed water characteristics and circulation (including deep water formation). A series of experiments with different sill depths in the Atlantic-Mediterranean connection is used to assess the sensitivity of Mediterranean circulation and water characteristics to sill depth. Basin-averaged water salinity and, to a lesser degree, temperature rise when the sill depth is less and exchange with the Atlantic is lower. Lateral and interbasinal differences in the Mediterranean are, however, largely unchanged. The strength of the upper overturning cell in the western basin is proportional to the magnitude of the exchange with the Atlantic, and hence to sill depth. Overturning in the eastern basin and deep water formation in both basins, on the contrary, are little affected by the sill depth. The model results are used to interpret the sedimentary record of the Late Miocene preceding and during the Messinian Salinity Crisis. In the western basin a correlation exists between sill depth and rate of refreshment of deep water. On the other hand, because sill depth has little effect on the overturning and deep water formation in the eastern basin, the model results do not support the notion that restriction of the Atlantic-Mediterranean connection may cause lower oxygenation of deep water in the eastern basin. However, this discrepancy may be due to simplifications in the surface forcing and the use of a bathymetry different from that in the Late Miocene. We also tentatively conclude that blocked outflow, as found in experiments with a sill depth ≤10 m, is a plausible scenario for the second stage of the Messinian Salinity Crisis during which

  4. Restricting mutualistic partners to enforce trade reliance.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Gregory A K; Kiers, E Toby; Gardner, Andy; West, Stuart A

    2016-01-01

    Mutualisms are cooperative interactions between members of different species, often involving the trade of resources. Here, we suggest that otherwise-cooperative mutualists might be able to gain a benefit from actively restricting their partners' ability to obtain resources directly, hampering the ability of the restricted partner to survive and/or reproduce without the help of the restricting mutualist. We show that (i) restriction can be favoured when it makes the resources of the restricting individual more valuable to their partner, and thus allows them to receive more favourable terms of trade; (ii) restriction maintains cooperation in conditions where cooperative behaviour would otherwise collapse; and (iii) restriction can lead to either an increase or decrease in a restricted individual's fitness. We discuss the applicability of this scenario to mutualisms such as those between plants and mycorrhizal fungi. These results identify a novel conflict in mutualisms as well as several public goods dilemmas, but also demonstrate how conflict can help maintain cooperation. PMID:26813888

  5. Restricting mutualistic partners to enforce trade reliance

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Gregory A. K.; Kiers, E. Toby; Gardner, Andy; West, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutualisms are cooperative interactions between members of different species, often involving the trade of resources. Here, we suggest that otherwise-cooperative mutualists might be able to gain a benefit from actively restricting their partners' ability to obtain resources directly, hampering the ability of the restricted partner to survive and/or reproduce without the help of the restricting mutualist. We show that (i) restriction can be favoured when it makes the resources of the restricting individual more valuable to their partner, and thus allows them to receive more favourable terms of trade; (ii) restriction maintains cooperation in conditions where cooperative behaviour would otherwise collapse; and (iii) restriction can lead to either an increase or decrease in a restricted individual's fitness. We discuss the applicability of this scenario to mutualisms such as those between plants and mycorrhizal fungi. These results identify a novel conflict in mutualisms as well as several public goods dilemmas, but also demonstrate how conflict can help maintain cooperation. PMID:26813888

  6. Modeling active memory: Experiment, theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amit, Daniel J.

    2001-06-01

    Neuro-physiological experiments on cognitively performing primates are described to argue that strong evidence exists for localized, non-ergodic (stimulus specific) attractor dynamics in the cortex. The specific phenomena are delay activity distributions-enhanced spike-rate distributions resulting from training, which we associate with working memory. The anatomy of the relevant cortex region and the physiological characteristics of the participating elements (neural cells) are reviewed to provide a substrate for modeling the observed phenomena. Modeling is based on the properties of the integrate-and-fire neural element in presence of an input current of Gaussian distribution. Theory of stochastic processes provides an expression for the spike emission rate as a function of the mean and the variance of the current distribution. Mean-field theory is then based on the assumption that spike emission processes in different neurons in the network are independent, and hence the input current to a neuron is Gaussian. Consequently, the dynamics of the interacting network is reduced to the computation of the mean and the variance of the current received by a cell of a given population in terms of the constitutive parameters of the network and the emission rates of the neurons in the different populations. Within this logic we analyze the stationary states of an unstructured network, corresponding to spontaneous activity, and show that it can be stable only if locally the net input current of a neuron is inhibitory. This is then tested against simulations and it is found that agreement is excellent down to great detail. A confirmation of the independence hypothesis. On top of stable spontaneous activity, keeping all parameters fixed, training is described by (Hebbian) modification of synapses between neurons responsive to a stimulus and other neurons in the module-synapses are potentiated between two excited neurons and depressed between an excited and a quiescent neuron

  7. Calorie restriction as an intervention in ageing.

    PubMed

    López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido

    2016-04-15

    Ageing causes loss of function in tissues and organs, is accompanied by a chronic inflammatory process and affects life- and healthspan. Calorie restriction (CR) is a non-genetic intervention that prevents age-associated diseases and extends longevity in most of the animal models studied so far. CR produces a pleiotropic effect and improves multiple metabolic pathways, generating benefits to the whole organism. Among the effects of CR, modulation of mitochondrial activity and a decrease in oxidative damage are two of the hallmarks. Oxidative damage is reduced by the induction of endogenous antioxidant systems and modulation of the peroxidability index in cell membranes. Mitochondrial activity changes are regulated by inhibition of IGF-1 and Target of Rapamycin (TOR)-dependent activities and activation of AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) and the sirtuin family of proteins. The activity of PGC-1α and FoxO is regulated by these systems and is involved in mitochondria biogenesis, oxidative metabolism activity and mitochondrial turnover. The use of mimetics and the regulation of common factors have demonstrated that these molecular pathways are essential to explain the effect of CR in the organism. Finally, the anti-inflammatory effect of CR is an interesting emerging factor to be taken into consideration. In the present revision we focus on the general effect of CR and other mimetics in longevity, focusing especially on the cardiovascular system and skeletal muscle. PMID:26607973

  8. Calorie restriction as an intervention in ageing

    PubMed Central

    López‐Lluch, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ageing causes loss of function in tissues and organs, is accompanied by a chronic inflammatory process and affects life‐ and healthspan. Calorie restriction (CR) is a non‐genetic intervention that prevents age‐associated diseases and extends longevity in most of the animal models studied so far. CR produces a pleiotropic effect and improves multiple metabolic pathways, generating benefits to the whole organism. Among the effects of CR, modulation of mitochondrial activity and a decrease in oxidative damage are two of the hallmarks. Oxidative damage is reduced by the induction of endogenous antioxidant systems and modulation of the peroxidability index in cell membranes. Mitochondrial activity changes are regulated by inhibition of IGF‐1 and Target of Rapamycin (TOR)‐dependent activities and activation of AMP‐dependent kinase (AMPK) and the sirtuin family of proteins. The activity of PGC‐1α and FoxO is regulated by these systems and is involved in mitochondria biogenesis, oxidative metabolism activity and mitochondrial turnover. The use of mimetics and the regulation of common factors have demonstrated that these molecular pathways are essential to explain the effect of CR in the organism. Finally, the anti‐inflammatory effect of CR is an interesting emerging factor to be taken into consideration. In the present revision we focus on the general effect of CR and other mimetics in longevity, focusing especially on the cardiovascular system and skeletal muscle. PMID:26607973

  9. The restricted ovulator chicken strain: An oviparous vertebrate model of reproductive dysfunction caused by a gene defect affecting an oocyte-specific receptor

    PubMed Central

    Elkin, R.G.; Bauer, R.; Schneider, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    A unique non-laying strain of chickens with heritable hyperlipidemia and aortic atherosclerosis was first described in 1974. Subsequent work established that the phenotype results from a naturally occurring point mutation in the gene specifying the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor, a 95-kDa membrane protein which normally mediates the massive uptake of the main circulating hepatically-synthesized yolk precursors, VLDL and vitellogenin. As a result, hens of the mutant strain termed “restricted ovulator” (R/O) have approximately 5-fold elevations in circulating cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations compared with normal layers, and hepatic lipogenesis and cholesterogenesis are markedly attenuated due to feedback inhibition. R/O hens also exhibit hyperestrogenemia, hypoprogesteronemia, elevated circulating gonadotropins, and up-regulated pituitary progesterone receptor mRNA and isoforms. The ovaries of R/O hens are abnormal in that they lack a follicular hierarchy and contain many small preovulatory follicles of various colors, shapes, and sizes. However, since R/O hens occasionally lay eggs, it is possible that endocytic receptors other than the VLDL receptor may be able to facilitate oocyte growth and/or that yolk precursor uptake can occur via a nonspecific bulk process. A mammalian model of impaired fecundity with abnormal lipoprotein metabolism also has been described, but different mechanisms are likely responsible for its reproductive dysfunction. Nevertheless, as our understanding of the molecular physiology and biochemistry of avian oocyte growth continues to expand, in part due to studies of the R/O model, new analogies may emerge between avian and mammalian systems, which ultimately could help to answer important questions in reproductive biology. PMID:23123285

  10. Near BPS skyrmions and restricted harmonic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speight, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by a class of near BPS Skyrme models introduced by Adam, Sánchez-Guillén and Wereszczyński, the following variant of the harmonic map problem is introduced: a map φ :(M, g) →(N, h) between Riemannian manifolds is restricted harmonic if it locally extremizes E2 on its SDiff(M) orbit, where SDiff(M) denotes the group of volume preserving diffeomorphisms of (M, g), and E2 denotes the Dirichlet energy. It is conjectured that near BPS skyrmions tend to restricted harmonic maps in the BPS limit. It is shown that φ is restricted harmonic if and only if φ∗ h has exact divergence, and a linear stability theory of restricted harmonic maps is developed, from which it follows that all weakly conformal maps are stable restricted harmonic. Examples of restricted harmonic maps in every degree class R3 → SU(2) and R2 →S2 are constructed. It is shown that the axially symmetric BPS skyrmions on which all previous analytic studies of near BPS Skyrme models have been based, are not restricted harmonic, casting doubt on the phenomenological predictions of such studies. The problem of minimizing E2 for φ :Rk → N over all linear volume preserving diffeomorphisms is solved explicitly, and a deformed axially symmetric family of Skyrme fields constructed which are candidates for approximate near BPS skyrmions at low baryon number. The notion of restricted harmonicity is generalized to restricted F-criticality where F is any functional on maps (M, g) →(N, h) which is, in a precise sense, geometrically natural. The case where F is a linear combination of E2 and E4, the usual Skyrme term, is studied in detail, and it is shown that inverse stereographic projection R3 →S3 ≡ SU(2) is stable restricted F-critical for every such F.

  11. Modeling Criminal Activity in Urban Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantingham, Patricia; Glässer, Uwe; Jackson, Piper; Vajihollahi, Mona

    Computational and mathematical methods arguably have an enormous potential for serving practical needs in crime analysis and prevention by offering novel tools for crime investigations and experimental platforms for evidence-based policy making. We present a comprehensive formal framework and tool support for mathematical and computational modeling of criminal behavior to facilitate systematic experimental studies of a wide range of criminal activities in urban environments. The focus is on spatial and temporal aspects of different forms of crime, including opportunistic and serial violent crimes. However, the proposed framework provides a basis to push beyond conventional empirical research and engage the use of computational thinking and social simulations in the analysis of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

  12. 7 CFR 1710.125 - Restrictions on lobbying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Basic Policies § 1710.125 Restrictions on lobbying. Borrowers are required to comply with certain requirements with respect to restrictions on lobbying activities. See 7 CFR part 3018. ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on lobbying. 1710.125 Section...

  13. 33 CFR 141.15 - Restrictions on employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restrictions on employment. 141.15 Section 141.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES PERSONNEL Restrictions on Employment § 141.15 Restrictions...

  14. 33 CFR 141.15 - Restrictions on employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Restrictions on employment. 141.15 Section 141.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES PERSONNEL Restrictions on Employment § 141.15 Restrictions...

  15. 33 CFR 141.15 - Restrictions on employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Restrictions on employment. 141.15 Section 141.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES PERSONNEL Restrictions on Employment § 141.15 Restrictions on employment. (a) Each employer of personnel...

  16. TLR9 promotes tolerance by restricting survival of anergic anti-DNA B cells, yet is also required for their activation.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Kevin M; Christensen, Sean R; Cullen, Jaime L; Meng, Wenzhao; Luning Prak, Eline T; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2013-02-15

    Nucleic acid-reactive B cells frequently arise in the bone marrow but are tolerized by mechanisms including receptor editing, functional anergy, and/or deletion. TLR9, a sensor of endosomal dsDNA, both promotes and regulates systemic autoimmunity in vivo, but the precise nature of its apparently contradictory roles in autoimmunity remained unclear. In this study, using the 3H9 anti-DNA BCR transgene in the autoimmune-prone MRL.Fas(lpr) mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus, we identify the stages at which TLR9 contributes to establishing and breaking B cell tolerance. Although TLR9 is dispensable for L chain editing during B cell development in the bone marrow, TLR9 limits anti-DNA B cell life span in the periphery and is thus tolerogenic. In the absence of TLR9, anti-DNA B cells have much longer life spans and accumulate in the follicle, neither activated nor deleted. These cells retain some characteristics of anergic cells, in that they have elevated basal BCR signaling but impaired induced responses and downregulate their cell-surface BCR expression. In contrast, whereas TLR9-intact anergic B cells accumulate near the T/B border, TLR9-deficient anti-DNA B cells are somewhat more dispersed throughout the follicle. Nonetheless, in older autoimmune-prone animals, TLR9 expression specifically within the B cell compartment is required for spontaneous peripheral activation of anti-DNA B cells and their differentiation into Ab-forming cells via an extrafollicular pathway. Thus, TLR9 has paradoxical roles in regulating anti-DNA B cells: it helps purge the peripheral repertoire of autoreactive cells, yet is also required for their activation. PMID:23296704

  17. Traffic-related air pollution modeling during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games: the effects of an odd-even day traffic restriction scheme.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hao; Xie, Shaodong

    2011-04-15

    An integrated urban air quality modeling system was applied to assess the effects of a short-term odd-even day traffic restriction scheme (TRS) on traffic-related air pollution in the urban area of Beijing (UAB) before, during and after the 2008 Olympic Games. Using traffic flow data retrieved from an on-line traffic monitoring system, concentration levels of CO, PM(10), NO(2) and O(3) on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th Ring Roads (RR) and Linkage Roads (LRs), the main roads distributed around the UAB, were predicted for the pre- (10th-19th, July), during- (20th July-20th September) and post-TRS (21st-30th, September) periods. A widely used statistical framework for model evaluation was adopted, the dependences of model performance on time-of-the-day and on wind direction were investigated, and the model predictions turned out reasonably satisfactory. Results showed that daily average concentrations on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th RR and LRs decreased significantly during the TRS period, by about 35.8, 38.5, 34.9 and 35.6% for CO, about 38.7, 31.8, 44.0 and 34.7% for PM(10), about 30.3, 31.9, 32.3 and 33.9% for NO(2), and about 36.7, 33.0, 33.4 and 34.7% for O(3), respectively, compared with the pre-TRS period. Hourly average concentrations were also reduced significantly, particularly for the morning and evening peaks for CO and PM(10), for the evening peak for NO(2), and for the afternoon peak for O(3). Consequently, both the daily and hourly concentration level of CO, PM(10), NO(2) and O(3) conformed to the China National Ambient Air Quality Standards Grade II during the Games. In addition, notable reduction of concentration levels was achieved in different regions of Beijing, with the traffic-related air pollution in the downwind northern and western areas relieved most significantly. The TRS policy was therefore effective in alleviating traffic-related air pollution and improving short-term air quality in Beijing during the Games. PMID:21353290

  18. A model of dispenser cathode activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamartine, B. C.; Eyink, K. G.; Czarnecki, J. V.; Lampert, W. V.; Haas, T. W.

    1985-12-01

    A semiquantitative model of dispenser cathode activity based on recent work on the co-adsorption of Ba and O onto W surfaces is presented. The co-adsorption studies have determined the shape of a three-dimensional surface of work function as a function of θO and θBa, the surface coverages of O and Ba, respectively. Compositions of a variety of pedigreed dispenser cathodes were fitted to this surface and their composition changes during lifetime were modeled. Changes of surface composition with temperature and of workfunction, φ, with temperature were also found to fit these curves. The concept of a patchy surface implied by the co-adsorption measurements was used to explain earlier results on the shape of the X-ray excited Ba MNN Auger feature. Finally, SIMS measurements under UHV conditions was found to provide an extremely sensitive measurement of surface composition in the region of surface coverages of interest in the study of cathode phenomena. Extensions of this work to other types of cathodes such as M-types, and rhenium substrate cathodes is also discussed.

  19. Neuroaesthetics: range and restrictions.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2013-04-01

    Bullot & Reber (B&R) should be commended for highlighting tensions between scientific aesthetics and art history. The question of how each tradition can learn from the other is timely. While I am sympathetic to their views, their diagnosis of the problem appears exaggerated and their solution partial. They underestimate the reach of scientific aesthetics while failing to identify its inherent restrictions. PMID:23507092

  20. Affective tone of mothers' statements to restrict their children's eating.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Megan H; Miller, Alison L; Appugliese, Danielle P; Rosenblum, Katherine L; Lumeng, Julie C

    2016-08-01

    Maternal restrictive feeding behaviors have been associated with child weight status. The affective tone of mothers' statements intended to restrict their children's eating has not been examined. The objectives of this study were to describe the affective tone of mothers' restrictive feeding behaviors (positive or negative), and to test the association of child and mother characteristics with rates of Restriction with Positive Affect, Restriction with Negative Affect and Total Restriction. A total of 237 low-income child-mother dyads (mean child age 5.9 years) participated in a videotaped standardized laboratory eating protocol, during which mothers and children were both presented with large servings of cupcakes. A coding scheme was developed to count each restrictive statement with a positive affective tone and each restrictive statement with a negative affective tone. To establish reliability, 20% of videos were double-coded. Demographics and anthropometrics were obtained. Poisson regression models were used to test the association between characteristics of the child and mother with counts of Restriction with Positive Affect, Restriction with Negative Affect, and Total Restriction. Higher rates of Restriction with Positive Affect and Total Restriction were predicted by child obese weight status, and mother non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity. Higher rates of Restriction with Negative Affect were predicted by older child age, child obese weight status, mother non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity, and lower mother education level. In conclusion, in this study mothers of obese (vs. non-obese) children had higher rates of restriction in general, but particularly higher rates of Restriction with Negative Affect. Rather than being told not to restrict, mothers may need guidance on how to sensitively restrict their child's intake. Future studies should consider the contributions of maternal affect to children's responses to maternal restriction. PMID:27090342

  1. Metabolic adjustments to moderate maternal nutrient restriction.

    PubMed

    Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E; Dudley, Christopher J; Gomez, Jeremiah J; Nevill, C Heath; Smith, Bonnie K; Jenkins, Susan L; McDonald, Thomas J; Bartlett, Thad Q; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Nijland, Mark J

    2007-08-01

    Reduced food availability in pregnancy influences fetal growth, obstetric outcomes and offspring health in both developing and developed countries. The objective of the present study was to determine responses to moderate global maternal nutrient restriction (MNR) during pregnancy in baboons (Papio hamadryas) - an established non-human primate model for pregnancy-related research. Starting at 30 d gestation (dG), twelve pregnant baboons received 70 % of food (MNR group) consumed by twenty ad libitum-fed pregnant controls. Maternal body weight, BMI, food intake and physical activity were measured before pregnancy, at 90 dG and at 165 dG (full-term 180 dG). Fetal and placental weights were recorded at the time of Caesarean section (90 and 165 dG). Activity patterns were also evaluated in fourteen non-pregnant female baboons. Behavioural observations were made in five non-pregnant, six control and four MNR animals. Pregnant baboons decreased overall physical activity and energy-expensive behaviours compared with non-pregnant baboons. In the MNR group, maternal weight, weight gain and maternal physical activity were reduced compared with the control animals. MNR decreased placental weight and volume compared with control, while fetal weight and length were unaffected. We conclude that decreased physical activity and increased usage of maternal available body stores play an important role in the maternal response to pregnancy. Also, adaptations in maternal behaviour and energy utilisation protect fetal growth during moderate MNR. PMID:17391566

  2. Modeling injection molding of net-shape active ceramic components.

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Tomas; Cote, Raymond O.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Yang, Pin; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Noble, David R.; Notz, Patrick K.; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Halbleib, Laura L.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Burns, George Robert; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    To reduce costs and hazardous wastes associated with the production of lead-based active ceramic components, an injection molding process is being investigated to replace the current machining process. Here, lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic particles are suspended in a thermoplastic resin and are injected into a mold and allowed to cool. The part is then bisque fired and sintered to complete the densification process. To help design this new process we use a finite element model to describe the injection molding of the ceramic paste. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element based, Newton-Raphson numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. Thermal, rheological, and wetting properties of the PZT paste are measured for use as input to the model. The viscosity of the PZT is highly dependent both on temperature and shear rate. One challenge in modeling the injection process is coming up with appropriate constitutive equations that capture relevant phenomenology without being too computationally complex. For this reason we model the material as a Carreau fluid and a WLF temperature dependence. Two-dimensional (2D) modeling is performed to explore the effects of the shear in isothermal conditions. Results indicate that very low viscosity regions exist near walls and that these results look similar in terms of meniscus shape and fill times to a simple Newtonian constitutive equation at the shear-thinned viscosity for the paste. These results allow us to pick a representative viscosity to use in fully three-dimensional (3D) simulation, which because of numerical complexities are restricted to using a Newtonian constitutive equation. Further 2D modeling at nonisothermal conditions shows that the choice of

  3. A Model for Cell Wall Dissolution in Mating Yeast Cells: Polarized Secretion and Restricted Diffusion of Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Induces Local Dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Huberman, Lori B.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells. PMID:25329559

  4. Comparison of Noninvasive pH and Blood Lactate as Predictors of Mortality in a Swine Hemorrhagic Shock with Restricted Volume Resuscitation Model

    PubMed Central

    Soller, Babs; Zou, Fengmei; Prince, M. Dale; Dubick, Michael A.; Sondeen, Jill L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that high blood lactate in the prehospital setting and poor lactate clearance in the emergency department are predictive of in-hospital mortality. This analysis of data collected from a swine model of hemorrhage and restricted volume resuscitation investigated the hypotheses that noninvasive muscle pH (pHm) and H+ clearance would predict mortality, and the responses would be similar between pHm and lactate. Data from a set of 57 swine were analyzed over the first 2 h after controlled hemorrhage and uncontrolled splenic bleeding. Surviving animals were ones that lived for the full 5-h experimental period. Venous lactate was determined at baseline, shock, and at 30, 60, and 120 min after injury. Spectra were collected continuously from the posterior thigh using a prototype CareGuide 1100 Oximeter and pHm calculated from the spectra; H+ concentration was determined from pHm. Lactate clearance rate was calculated from the difference in lactate concentration at 120 min and shock, and H+ clearance was calculated in a similar manner. Comparison of the area under the receiver operator characteristic curves was used to assess prediction of survival at 5 h after injury. At 120 min after injury, lactate, lactate clearance, noninvasive pHm, and noninvasive H+ clearance were equivalent predictors of mortality each with a receiver operator characteristic area under the curve of 0.87. Thresholds for single lactate (<3.8 mmol/L) or pHm (>7.30) determinations were found to be consistent with a resuscitation goal targeted to reverse acidosis. Continuous, noninvasive pHm monitoring may provide a substitute for lactate measurement in trauma patients, particularly in the prehospital and emergency department settings. PMID:25526374

  5. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    PubMed

    Huberman, Lori B; Murray, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells. PMID:25329559

  6. A modelling study of air quality impact of odd-even day traffic restriction scheme before, during and after the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, H.; Xie, S. D.

    2010-02-01

    Systematic air pollution control measures were designed and implemented to improve air quality for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. This study focuses on the evaluation of the air quality impacts of a short-term odd-even day traffic restriction scheme (TRS) implemented before, during and after the Games, based on modelling simulation by a well validated urban-scale air quality model. Concentration levels of CO, PM10, NO2 and O3 were predicted for the pre- (10-19 July), during- (20 July-20 September) and post-TRS (21-30 September) periods, based on the on-line monitored traffic flows on a total of 334 road segments constituting the 2nd, 3rd, 4th Ring Roads (RR) and the major Linkage Roads (LRs) that were subject to the TRS policy and distributed around the main urban area of Beijing, and on the hourly sequential meteorological data from a representative Observatory. Subsequently, we used the predictions and observations at a roadside air quality monitoring site to evaluate the model, based on a widely used statistical framework for model evaluation, as well as on the dependence of model performance on time-of-the-day and on wind direction, and the model predictions turned out satisfactory. Results showed that daily average concentrations on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th RR and LRs during the TRS period decreased significantly, by about 35.8%, 38.5%, 34.9% and 35.6% for CO, about 38.7%, 31.8%, 44.0% and 34.7% for PM10, about 30.3%, 31.9%, 32.3% and 33.9% for NO2, and about 36.7%, 33.0%, 33.4% and 34.7% for O3, respectively, compared with the pre-TRS period. Besides, hourly average concentrations were also reduced significantly, particularly for the morning and evening peaks for CO and PM10, for the evening peak for NO2, and for the afternoon peak for O3. Consequently, both the daily and hourly concentration level of CO, PM10, NO2 and O3 conformed to the CNAAQS (China National Ambient Air Quality Standards) Grade II during the Games. Besides, a notable ozone weekend effect was revealed

  7. Restricted growth of U-type infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout cells may be linked to casein kinase II activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.-W.; Moon, C.H.; Harmache, A.; Wargo, A.R.; Purcell, M.K.; Bremont, M.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that a representative M genogroup type strain of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from rainbow trout grows well in rainbow trout-derived RTG-2 cells, but a U genogroup type strain from sockeye salmon has restricted growth, associated with reduced genome replication and mRNA transcription. Here, we analysed further the mechanisms for this growth restriction of U-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells, using strategies that assessed differences in viral genes, host immune regulation and phosphorylation. To determine whether the viral glycoprotein (G) or non-virion (NV) protein was responsible for the growth restriction, four recombinant IHNV viruses were generated in which the G gene of an infectious IHNV clone was replaced by the G gene of U- or M-type IHNV and the NV gene was replaced by NV of U- or M-type IHNV. There was no significant difference in the growth of these recombinants in RTG-2 cells, indicating that G and NV proteins are not major factors responsible for the differential growth of the U- and M-type strains. Poly I:C pretreatment of RTG-2 cells suppressed the growth of both U- and M-type IHNV, although the M virus continued to replicate at a reduced level. Both viruses induced type 1 interferon (IFN1) and the IFN1 stimulated gene Mx1, but the expression levels in M-infected cells were significantly higher than in U-infected cells and an inhibitor of the IFN1-inducible protein kinase PKR, 2-aminopurine (2-AP), did not affect the growth of U- or M-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells. These data did not indicate a role for the IFN1 system in the restricted growth of U-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells. Prediction of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites in the viral phosphoprotein (P) using the NetPhosK program revealed differences between U- and M-type P genes at five phosphorylation sites. Pretreatment of RTG-2 cells with a PKC inhibitor or a p38MAPK inhibitor did not affect the growth of the U- and M-type viruses. However, 100 μm of the

  8. MHC-restricted recognition of immunogenic T cell epitopes of pertussis toxin reveals determinants in man distinct from the ADP-ribosylase active site

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The S1 subunit of Pertussis toxin (PT) is responsible for the reactogenicity and in part the immunogenicity of Bordetella pertussis vaccine. The critical residues associated with the immunomodulatory effects of PT were located around Glu140 in the S1 subunit. In man, T cell responses to PT are directed at S1 peptides distinct from Glu140. Two such epitopes, p64-75 and p151-161, are immunogenic in a panel of individuals covering a wide range of HLA genotypes. The response to PT peptides is HLA class II restricted. The response to p64-75 is blocked by an anti-HLA-DQ mAb, while that to p151-161 is blocked by an anti-HLA- DR mAb. These findings may allow for the development of a B. pertussis vaccine free from reactogenicity. PMID:2460578

  9. Toward a model of neuropsychological activity.

    PubMed

    Ardila, A; Galeano, L M; Rosselli, M

    1998-12-01

    The main purpose of this research was to establish the intercorrelations existing among different psychological and neuropsychological test scores in a normal and homogeneous population. A second purpose was to attempt further step in the component analysis of cognitive activity measured by means of neuropsychological tests. A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery was assembled and individually administered to a 300-subject sample, aged 17-25 year-old. All of them were right-handed male university students. The battery included some basic neuropsychological tests directed to assess language, calculation abilities, spatial cognition, praxic abilities, memory, perceptual abilities, and executive functions. In addition, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale was administered. Forty-one different scores were calculated. Correlations among the different test scores were analyzed. It was found that some of the tests presented a quite complex intecorrelation system, whereas other tests presented few or no significant correlations. Mathematical ability tests and orthography knowledge represented the best predictors of Full Scale IQ. A factor analysis with varimax rotation disclosed five factors (verbal, visuoperceptual, executive function, fine movements, and memory) accounting for 63.6% of the total variance. Implications of these results for a neuropsychological model about brain organization of cognition were analyzed. PMID:9951709

  10. Virulent Mycobacterium fortuitum restricts NO production by a gamma interferon-activated J774 cell line and phagosome-lysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Tânia Regina Marques; De Freitas, Juliana Ribeiro; Silva, Queilan Chagas; Figueira, Cláudio Pereira; Roxo, Eliana; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; De Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2002-10-01

    The virulence of different isolates of Mycobacterium has been associated with two morphologically distinguishable colonial variants: opaque (SmOp) and transparent (SmTr). In this report we used an in vitro assay to compare macrophage (Mphi) responses to SmOp and SmTr Mycobacterium fortuitum variants, taking advantage of the fact that these variants were derived from the same isolate. Cells preactivated or not with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) were infected with SmOp or SmTr M. fortuitum. We showed that SmOp and SmTr induced different levels of nitric oxide (NO) production by IFN-gamma-stimulated Mphi. Indeed, the amount of IFN-gamma-induced NO production by J774 cells was 4.8 to 9.0 times higher by SmOp (23.1 to 37.7 micro M) compared to SmTr infection (3.9 to 4.8 micro M) (P = 0.0332), indicating that virulent SmTr bacilli restricted NO production. In addition, IFN-gamma-induced NO production by Mphi was higher when correlated with reduction of only avirulent SmOp bacillus viability. SNAP (S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine)-induced NO production did not modify SmTr viability, indicating its resistance to nitrogen radicals. Electron microscopy studies were performed to evaluate the capacity of phagosomes to fuse with lysosomes labeled with bovine serum albumin-colloidal gold particles. By 24 h postinfection, 69% more phagosome-containing SmOp variant had fused with lysosomes compared to the SmTr-induced phagosomes. In conclusion, these data indicate that virulent SmTr bacilli may escape host defense by restricting IFN-gamma-induced NO production, resisting nitrogen toxic radicals, and limiting phagosome fusion with lysosomes. PMID:12228291

  11. The relationship between transplacental O2 diffusion and placental expression of PlGF, VEGF and their receptors in a placental insufficiency model of fetal growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Regnault, Timothy R H; de Vrijer, Barbra; Galan, Henry L; Davidsen, Meredith L; Trembler, Karen A; Battaglia, Frederick C; Wilkening, Randall B; Anthony, Russell V

    2003-01-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are involved in placental angiogenesis through interactions with the VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 receptors. The placenta of pregnancies whose outcome is fetal growth restriction (FGR) are characterized by abnormal angiogenic development, classically associated with hypoxia. The present study evaluated the near-term expression of this growth factor family in an ovine model of placental insufficiency–FGR, in relationship to uteroplacental oxygenation. Compared to controls, FGR pregnancies demonstrated a 37 % increase in uterine blood flow (FGR vs. control, 610.86 ± 48.48 vs. 443.17 ± 37.39 ml min−1 (kg fetus)−1; P < 0.04), which was associated with an increased maternal uterine venous PO2 (58.13 ± 1.00 vs. 52.89 ± 1.26 mmHg; P < 0.02), increased umbilical artery systolic/diastolic ratio (3.90 ± 0.33 vs. 2.12 ± 0.26, P < 0.05), and fetal hypoxia (arterial PO2; 12.79 ± 0.97 vs. 18.65 ± 1.6 mmHg, P < 0.005). Maternal caruncle PlGF mRNA was increased in FGR (P < 0.02), while fetal cotyledon VEGF mRNA was reduced (P < 0.02). VEGFR-1 mRNA was also reduced in FGR fetal cotyledon (P < 0.001) but was not altered in caruncle tissue. Immunoblot analysis of PlGF and VEGF demonstrated single bands at 19 000 and 18 600 Mr, respectively. Caruncle PlGF concentration was increased (P < 0.04), while cotyledon VEGF was decreased (P < 0.05) in FGR placentae. The data establish that uterine blood flow is not reduced in relationship to metabolic demands in this FGR model and that the transplacental PO2 gradient is increased, maintaining umbilical oxygen uptake per unit of tissue. Furthermore, these data suggest that an increased transplacental gradient of oxygen generates changes in angiogenic growth factors, which may underline the pathophysiology of the post-placental hypoxic FGR. PMID:12740423

  12. Restricted Transport in Small Pores

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John L.; Quinn, John A.

    1974-01-01

    The basic hydrodynamic equations governing transport in submicron pores are reexamined. Conditions necessary for a simplified, one-dimensional treatment of the diffusion/convection process are established. Steric restrictions and Brownian motion are incorporated directly into the resulting model. Currently available fluid mechanical results are used to evaluate an upper limit on hindered diffusion; this limit is valid for small particle-to-pore ratios. Extensions of the analysis are shown to depend on numerical solutions of the related hydrodynamic problem, that of asymmetrical particle motion in a bounded fluid. PMID:4813157

  13. License restrictions at Barnwell

    SciTech Connect

    Autry, V.R.

    1991-12-31

    The State of South Carolina was delegated the authority by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to regulate the receipt, possession, use and disposal of radioactive material as an Agreement State. Since 1970, the state has been the principal regulatory authority for the Barnwell Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility operated by Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. The radioactive material license issued authorizing the receipt and disposal of low-level waste contains numerous restrictions to ensure environmental protection and compliance with shallow land disposal performance criteria. Low-level waste has evolved from minimally contaminated items to complex waste streams containing high concentrations of radionuclides and processing chemicals which necessitated these restrictions. Additionally, some waste with their specific radionuclides and concentration levels, many classified as low-level radioactive waste, are not appropriate for shallow land disposal unless additional precautions are taken. This paper will represent a number of these restrictions, the rationale for them, and how they are being dealt with at the Barnwell disposal facility.

  14. Liberty High School Transition Project: Model Process for Assimilating School, Community, Business, Government and Service Groups of the Least Restrictive Environment for Nondisabled and Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Michael K.

    The panel presentation traces the development of and describes the operation of a Brentwood (California) project to prepare approximately 75 severely disabled individuals, ages 12-22, to function in the least restrictive recreation/leisure, vocational, and general community environments. Transition Steering Committee developed such project…

  15. Methionine restriction and life-span control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending life span. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with or without adequate nutrition (e.g., particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend life span in various model organisms. We discuss the beneficial effects of a methionine-restricted diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions. PMID:26663138

  16. Aligning Learning Activities with Instructional Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurvitch, Rachel; Metzler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Model-based instruction has been increasingly used in physical education for the past two decades. Metzler (2011) identified eight instructional models that are commonly used in physical education today. Each model is designed to promote certain kinds of learning outcomes for students and to address different combinations of the national…

  17. Supporting Students' Knowledge Transfer in Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piksööt, Jaanika; Sarapuu, Tago

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates ways to enhance secondary school students' knowledge transfer in complex science domains by implementing question prompts. Two samples of students applied two web-based models to study molecular genetics--the model of genetic code (n = 258) and translation (n = 245). For each model, the samples were randomly divided into…

  18. Temperature based Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Xu, Yi; Wen, Changyun; Wang, Wei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs), which apply graphical models to learning probability distribution over a set of inputs, have attracted much attention recently since being proposed as building blocks of multi-layer learning systems called deep belief networks (DBNs). Note that temperature is a key factor of the Boltzmann distribution that RBMs originate from. However, none of existing schemes have considered the impact of temperature in the graphical model of DBNs. In this work, we propose temperature based restricted Boltzmann machines (TRBMs) which reveals that temperature is an essential parameter controlling the selectivity of the firing neurons in the hidden layers. We theoretically prove that the effect of temperature can be adjusted by setting the parameter of the sharpness of the logistic function in the proposed TRBMs. The performance of RBMs can be improved by adjusting the temperature parameter of TRBMs. This work provides a comprehensive insights into the deep belief networks and deep learning architectures from a physical point of view. PMID:26758235

  19. In vitro caloric restriction induces protective genes and functional rejuvenation in senescent SAMP8 astrocytes.

    PubMed

    García-Matas, Silvia; Paul, Rajib K; Molina-Martínez, Patricia; Palacios, Hector; Gutierrez, Vincent M; Corpas, Rubén; Pallas, Mercè; Cristòfol, Rosa; de Cabo, Rafael; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2015-06-01

    Astrocytes are key cells in brain aging, helping neurons to undertake healthy aging or otherwise letting them enter into a spiral of neurodegeneration. We aimed to characterize astrocytes cultured from senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a mouse model of brain pathological aging, along with the effects of caloric restriction, the most effective rejuvenating treatment known so far. Analysis of the transcriptomic profiles of SAMP8 astrocytes cultured in control conditions and treated with caloric restriction serum was performed using mRNA microarrays. A decrease in mitochondrial and ribosome mRNA, which was restored by caloric restriction, confirmed the age-related profile of SAMP8 astrocytes and the benefits of caloric restriction. An amelioration of antioxidant and neurodegeneration-related pathways confirmed the brain benefits of caloric restriction. Studies of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function demonstrated a reduction of oxidative damage and partial improvement of mitochondria after caloric restriction. In summary, caloric restriction showed a significant tendency to normalize pathologically aged astrocytes through the activation of pathways that are protective against the age-related deterioration of brain physiology. PMID:25711920

  20. In vitro caloric restriction induces protective genes and functional rejuvenation in senescent SAMP8 astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    García-Matas, Silvia; Paul, Rajib K; Molina-Martínez, Patricia; Palacios, Hector; Gutierrez, Vincent M; Corpas, Rubén; Pallas, Mercè; Cristòfol, Rosa; de Cabo, Rafael; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are key cells in brain aging, helping neurons to undertake healthy aging or otherwise letting them enter into a spiral of neurodegeneration. We aimed to characterize astrocytes cultured from senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a mouse model of brain pathological aging, along with the effects of caloric restriction, the most effective rejuvenating treatment known so far. Analysis of the transcriptomic profiles of SAMP8 astrocytes cultured in control conditions and treated with caloric restriction serum was performed using mRNA microarrays. A decrease in mitochondrial and ribosome mRNA, which was restored by caloric restriction, confirmed the age-related profile of SAMP8 astrocytes and the benefits of caloric restriction. An amelioration of antioxidant and neurodegeneration-related pathways confirmed the brain benefits of caloric restriction. Studies of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function demonstrated a reduction of oxidative damage and partial improvement of mitochondria after caloric restriction. In summary, caloric restriction showed a significant tendency to normalize pathologically aged astrocytes through the activation of pathways that are protective against the age-related deterioration of brain physiology. PMID:25711920