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Sample records for activity score cas

  1. Dual nuclease activity of a Cas2 protein in CRISPR-Cas subtype I-B of Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Bhuvan; Ghosh, Karukriti Kaushik; Fernandes, Gary; Kumar, Pankaj; Gogoi, Prerana; Kumar, Manish

    2016-04-01

    Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 carries a set of cas genes associated with CRISPR-Cas subtype I-B. Herein, we report for the first time active transcription of a set of cas genes (cas1 to cas8) of L. interrogans where cas4, cas1, cas2 and cas6, cas3, cas8, cas7, cas5 are clustered together in two independent operons. As an initial step toward comprehensive understanding of CRISPR-Cas system in spirochete, the biochemical study of one of the core Leptospira Cas2 proteins (Lep_Cas2) showed nuclease activity on both DNA and RNA in a nonspecific manner. Additionally, unlike other known Cas2 proteins, Lep_Cas2 showed metal-independent RNase activity and preferential activity on RNA over DNA. These results provide insight for understanding Cas2 diversity existing in the prokaryotic adaptive immune system. PMID:26950513

  2. Comparison of Cas9 activators in multiple species.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Alejandro; Tuttle, Marcelle; Pruitt, Benjamin W; Ewen-Campen, Ben; Chari, Raj; Ter-Ovanesyan, Dmitry; Haque, Sabina J; Cecchi, Ryan J; Kowal, Emma J K; Buchthal, Joanna; Housden, Benjamin E; Perrimon, Norbert; Collins, James J; Church, George

    2016-07-01

    Several programmable transcription factors exist based on the versatile Cas9 protein, yet their relative potency and effectiveness across various cell types and species remain unexplored. Here, we compare Cas9 activator systems and examine their ability to induce robust gene expression in several human, mouse, and fly cell lines. We also explore the potential for improved activation through the combination of the most potent activator systems, and we assess the role of cooperativity in maximizing gene expression. PMID:27214048

  3. Structural plasticity and in vivo activity of Cas1 from the type I-F CRISPR-Cas system.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Max E; Nakatani, Yoshio; Staals, Raymond H J; Kieper, Sebastian N; Opel-Reading, Helen K; McKenzie, Rebecca E; Fineran, Peter C; Krause, Kurt L

    2016-04-15

    CRISPR-Cas systems are adaptive immune systems in prokaryotes that provide protection against viruses and other foreign DNA. In the adaptation stage, foreign DNA is integrated into CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) arrays as new spacers. These spacers are used in the interference stage to guide effector CRISPR associated (Cas) protein(s) to target complementary foreign invading DNA. Cas1 is the integrase enzyme that is central to the catalysis of spacer integration. There are many diverse types of CRISPR-Cas systems, including type I-F systems, which are typified by a unique Cas1-Cas2-3 adaptation complex. In the present study we characterize the Cas1 protein of the potato phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum, an important model organism for understanding spacer acquisition in type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems. We demonstrate by mutagenesis that Cas1 is essential for adaptation in vivo and requires a conserved aspartic acid residue. By X-ray crystallography, we show that although P. atrosepticum Cas1 adopts a fold conserved among other Cas1 proteins, it possesses remarkable asymmetry as a result of structural plasticity. In particular, we resolve for the first time a flexible, asymmetric loop that may be unique to type I-F Cas1 proteins, and we discuss the implications of these structural features for DNA binding and enzymatic activity. PMID:26929403

  4. Interference activity of a minimal Type I CRISPR–Cas system from Shewanella putrefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Brenzinger, Susanne; Gleditzsch, Daniel; Plagens, André; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai; Randau, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Type I CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)–Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems exist in bacterial and archaeal organisms and provide immunity against foreign DNA. The Cas protein content of the DNA interference complexes (termed Cascade) varies between different CRISPR-Cas subtypes. A minimal variant of the Type I-F system was identified in proteobacterial species including Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32. This variant lacks a large subunit (Csy1), Csy2 and Csy3 and contains two unclassified cas genes. The genome of S. putrefaciens CN-32 contains only five Cas proteins (Cas1, Cas3, Cas6f, Cas1821 and Cas1822) and a single CRISPR array with 81 spacers. RNA-Seq analyses revealed the transcription of this array and the maturation of crRNAs (CRISPR RNAs). Interference assays based on plasmid conjugation demonstrated that this CRISPR-Cas system is active in vivo and that activity is dependent on the recognition of the dinucleotide GG PAM (Protospacer Adjacent Motif) sequence and crRNA abundance. The deletion of cas1821 and cas1822 reduced the cellular crRNA pool. Recombinant Cas1821 was shown to form helical filaments bound to RNA molecules, which suggests its role as the Cascade backbone protein. A Cascade complex was isolated which contained multiple Cas1821 copies, Cas1822, Cas6f and mature crRNAs. PMID:26350210

  5. Cas9 gRNA engineering for genome editing, activation and repression

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Samira; Chavez, Alejandro; Tuttle, Marcelle; Hall, Richard N; Chari, Raj; Ter-Ovanesyan, Dmitry; Qian, Jason; Pruitt, Benjamin W; Beal, Jacob; Vora, Suhani; Buchthal, Joanna; Kowal, Emma J K; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Collins, James J; Weiss, Ron; Church, George

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that by altering the length of Cas9-associated guide RNA(gRNA) we were able to control Cas9 nuclease activity and simultaneously perform genome editing and transcriptional regulation with a single Cas9 protein. We exploited these principles to engineer mammalian synthetic circuits with combined transcriptional regulation and kill functions governed by a single multifunctional Cas9 protein. PMID:26344044

  6. Cas9 gRNA engineering for genome editing, activation and repression.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Samira; Chavez, Alejandro; Tuttle, Marcelle; Hall, Richard N; Chari, Raj; Ter-Ovanesyan, Dmitry; Qian, Jason; Pruitt, Benjamin W; Beal, Jacob; Vora, Suhani; Buchthal, Joanna; Kowal, Emma J K; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Collins, James J; Weiss, Ron; Church, George

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that by altering the length of Cas9-associated guide RNA (gRNA) we were able to control Cas9 nuclease activity and simultaneously perform genome editing and transcriptional regulation with a single Cas9 protein. We exploited these principles to engineer mammalian synthetic circuits with combined transcriptional regulation and kill functions governed by a single multifunctional Cas9 protein. PMID:26344044

  7. Nuclease Activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 Promotes Intracellular Infection of Amoebal Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Felizza F.; Mallama, Celeste A.; Fairbairn, Stephanie G.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts. PMID:25547789

  8. Engineering Translational Activators with CRISPR-Cas System.

    PubMed

    Du, Pei; Miao, Chensi; Lou, Qiuli; Wang, Zefeng; Lou, Chunbo

    2016-01-15

    RNA parts often serve as critical components in genetic engineering. Here we report a design of translational activators which is composed of an RNA endoribonuclease (Csy4) and two exchangeable RNA modules. Csy4, a member of Cas endoribonuclease, cleaves at a specific recognition site; this cleavage releases a cis-repressive RNA module (crRNA) from the masked ribosome binding site (RBS), which subsequently allows the downstream translation initiation. Unlike small RNA as a translational activator, the endoribonuclease-based activator is able to efficiently unfold the perfect RBS-crRNA pairing. As an exchangeable module, the crRNA-RBS duplex was forwardly and reversely engineered to modulate the dynamic range of translational activity. We further showed that Csy4 and its recognition site, together as a module, can also be replaced by orthogonal endoribonuclease-recognition site homologues. These modularly structured, high-performance translational activators would endow the programming of gene expression in the translation level with higher feasibility. PMID:26414660

  9. A newly discovered Bordetella species carries a transcriptionally active CRISPR-Cas with a small Cas9 endonuclease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cas9 endonuclease of the Type II-a clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), of Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) has been adapted as a widely used tool for genome editing and genome engineering. Herein, we describe a gene encoding a novel Cas9 ortholog (BpsuCas9) and th...

  10. A Powerful CRISPR/Cas9-Based Method for Targeted Transcriptional Activation.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Shota; Moriguchi, Tetsuo; Ohtsu, Naoki; Kondo, Toru

    2016-05-23

    Targeted transcriptional activation of endogenous genes is important for understanding physiological transcriptional networks, synthesizing genetic circuits, and inducing cellular phenotype changes. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has great potential to achieve this purpose, however, it has not yet been successfully used to efficiently activate endogenous genes and induce changes in cellular phenotype. A powerful method for transcriptional activation by using CRISPR/Cas9 was developed. Replacement of a methylated promoter with an unmethylated one by CRISPR/Cas9 was sufficient to activate the expression of the neural cell gene OLIG2 and the embryonic stem cell gene NANOG in HEK293T cells. Moreover, CRISPR/Cas9-based OLIG2 activation induced the embryonic carcinoma cell line NTERA-2 to express the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin. PMID:27079176

  11. Structures of CRISPR Cas3 offer mechanistic insights into Cascade-activated DNA unwinding and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yanwu; Nam, Ki Hyun; Ding, Fang; Lee, Heejin; Wu, Lijie; Xiao, Yibei; Farchione, F. Daniel; Zhou, Sharleen; Rajashankar, Raj; Kurinov, Igor; Zhang, Rongguang; Ke, Ailong

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR drives prokaryotic adaptation to invasive nucleic acids such as phages and plasmids using an RNA-mediated interference mechanism. Interference in Type I CRISPR-Cas systems requires a targeting Cascade complex and a degradation machine Cas3, which contains both nuclease and helicase activities. Here we report the crystal structures of Cas3 bound to ss-DNA substrate and show that it is an obligated 3′-to-5′ ss-DNase preferentially accepting substrate directly from the helicase moiety. Conserved residues in the HD-type nuclease coordinate two irons for ss-DNA cleavage. ATP coordination and conformational flexibility are revealed for the SF2-type helicase moiety. Cas3 is specifically guided towards Cascade-bound target DNA with a correct PAM sequence, through physical interactions to both the non-target substrate strand and the CasA protein. The cascade of recognition events ensures a well-controlled DNA targeting and degradation of alien DNA by Cascade and Cas3. PMID:25132177

  12. A Biophysical Model of CRISPR/Cas9 Activity for Rational Design of Genome Editing and Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Farasat, Iman; Salis, Howard M

    2016-01-01

    The ability to precisely modify genomes and regulate specific genes will greatly accelerate several medical and engineering applications. The CRISPR/Cas9 (Type II) system binds and cuts DNA using guide RNAs, though the variables that control its on-target and off-target activity remain poorly characterized. Here, we develop and parameterize a system-wide biophysical model of Cas9-based genome editing and gene regulation to predict how changing guide RNA sequences, DNA superhelical densities, Cas9 and crRNA expression levels, organisms and growth conditions, and experimental conditions collectively control the dynamics of dCas9-based binding and Cas9-based cleavage at all DNA sites with both canonical and non-canonical PAMs. We combine statistical thermodynamics and kinetics to model Cas9:crRNA complex formation, diffusion, site selection, reversible R-loop formation, and cleavage, using large amounts of structural, biochemical, expression, and next-generation sequencing data to determine kinetic parameters and develop free energy models. Our results identify DNA supercoiling as a novel mechanism controlling Cas9 binding. Using the model, we predict Cas9 off-target binding frequencies across the lambdaphage and human genomes, and explain why Cas9's off-target activity can be so high. With this improved understanding, we propose several rules for designing experiments for minimizing off-target activity. We also discuss the implications for engineering dCas9-based genetic circuits. PMID:26824432

  13. A Biophysical Model of CRISPR/Cas9 Activity for Rational Design of Genome Editing and Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Farasat, Iman; Salis, Howard M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to precisely modify genomes and regulate specific genes will greatly accelerate several medical and engineering applications. The CRISPR/Cas9 (Type II) system binds and cuts DNA using guide RNAs, though the variables that control its on-target and off-target activity remain poorly characterized. Here, we develop and parameterize a system-wide biophysical model of Cas9-based genome editing and gene regulation to predict how changing guide RNA sequences, DNA superhelical densities, Cas9 and crRNA expression levels, organisms and growth conditions, and experimental conditions collectively control the dynamics of dCas9-based binding and Cas9-based cleavage at all DNA sites with both canonical and non-canonical PAMs. We combine statistical thermodynamics and kinetics to model Cas9:crRNA complex formation, diffusion, site selection, reversible R-loop formation, and cleavage, using large amounts of structural, biochemical, expression, and next-generation sequencing data to determine kinetic parameters and develop free energy models. Our results identify DNA supercoiling as a novel mechanism controlling Cas9 binding. Using the model, we predict Cas9 off-target binding frequencies across the lambdaphage and human genomes, and explain why Cas9’s off-target activity can be so high. With this improved understanding, we propose several rules for designing experiments for minimizing off-target activity. We also discuss the implications for engineering dCas9-based genetic circuits. PMID:26824432

  14. Structure and activity of the Cas3 HD nuclease MJ0384, an effector enzyme of the CRISPR interference

    SciTech Connect

    Beloglazova, Natalia; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Brown, Greg; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2012-03-15

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and Cas proteins represent an adaptive microbial immunity system against viruses and plasmids. Cas3 proteins have been proposed to play a key role in the CRISPR mechanism through the direct cleavage of invasive DNA. Here, we show that the Cas3 HD domain protein MJ0384 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii cleaves endonucleolytically and exonucleolytically (3'-5') single-stranded DNAs and RNAs, as well as 3'-flaps, splayed arms, and R-loops. The degradation of branched DNA substrates by MJ0384 is stimulated by the Cas3 helicase MJ0383 and ATP. The crystal structure of MJ0384 revealed the active site with two bound metal cations and together with site-directed mutagenesis suggested a catalytic mechanism. Our studies suggest that the Cas3 HD nucleases working together with the Cas3 helicases can completely degrade invasive DNAs through the combination of endo- and exonuclease activities.

  15. A light-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system for control of endogenous gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic systems enable precise spatial and temporal control of cell behavior. We engineered a light-activated CRISPR/Cas9 effector (LACE) system that induces transcription of endogenous genes in the presence of blue light. This was accomplished by fusing the light-inducible heterodimerizing proteins CRY2 and CIB1 to a transactivation domain and the catalytically inactive dCas9, respectively. The versatile LACE system can be easily directed to new DNA sequences for the dynamic regulation of endogenous genes. PMID:25664691

  16. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Julia K.; Dunay, Gábor A.; Voges, Maike; Schäfer, Carola; Spohn, Michael; Stucka, Rolf; Hauber, Joachim; Lange, Ulrike C.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs), act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5’ long terminal repeat (LTR), for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination. PMID:27341108

  17. Programmed Self-Assembly of an Active P22-Cas9 Nanocarrier System.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Shefah; Miettinen, Heini M; Wilkinson, Royce A; McCoy, Kimberly; Douglas, Trevor; Wiedenheft, Blake

    2016-03-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) RNA-guided endonucleases are powerful new tools for targeted genome engineering. These nucleases provide an efficient and precise method for manipulating eukaryotic genomes; however, delivery of these reagents to specific cell-types remains challenging. Virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from bacteriophage P22, are robust supramolecular protein cage structures with demonstrated utility for cell type-specific delivery of encapsulated cargos. Here, we genetically fuse Cas9 to a truncated form of the P22 scaffold protein, which acts as a template for capsid assembly as well as a specific encapsulation signal for Cas9. Our results indicate that Cas9 and a single-guide RNA are packaged inside the P22 VLP, and activity assays indicate that this RNA-guided endonuclease is functional for sequence-specific cleavage of dsDNA targets. This work demonstrates the potential for developing P22 as a delivery vehicle for cell specific targeting of Cas9. PMID:26894836

  18. Genome-scale transcriptional activation by an engineered CRISPR-Cas9 complex

    PubMed Central

    Konermann, Silvana; Brigham, Mark D.; Trevino, Alexandro E.; Joung, Julia; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Barcena, Clea; Hsu, Patrick D.; Habib, Naomi; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Nureki, Osamu; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Systematic interrogation of gene function requires the ability to perturb gene expression in a robust and generalizable manner. We describe structure-guided engineering of a CRISPR-Cas9 complex to mediate efficient transcriptional activation at endogenous genomic loci. We use these engineered Cas9 activation complexes to investigate sgRNA targeting rules for effective transcriptional activation, demonstrate multiplexed activation of 10 genes simultaneously, and upregulate long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) transcripts. We also synthesize a library consisting of 70,290 guides targeting all human RefSeq coding isoforms to screen for genes which, upon activation, confer resistance to a BRAF inhibitor. Expected and potentially novel resistance genes are enriched in the top hits and are validated using individual sgRNA as well as cDNA overexpression. The signature of our top screening hits is significantly correlated with gene expression data from clinical melanoma samples. These results collectively demonstrate the potential of Cas9-based activators as a powerful genetic perturbation technology. PMID:25494202

  19. Anti-cas spacers in orphan CRISPR4 arrays prevent uptake of active CRISPR-Cas I-F systems.

    PubMed

    Almendros, Cristóbal; Guzmán, Noemí M; García-Martínez, Jesús; Mojica, Francisco J M

    2016-01-01

    Archaea and bacteria harbour clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci. These arrays encode RNA molecules (crRNA), each containing a sequence of a single repeat-intervening spacer. The crRNAs guide CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to cleave nucleic acids complementary to the crRNA spacer, thus interfering with targeted foreign elements. Notably, pre-existing spacers may trigger the acquisition of new spacers from the target molecule by means of a primed adaptation mechanism. Here, we show that naturally occurring orphan CRISPR arrays that contain spacers matching sequences of the cognate (absent) cas genes are able to elicit both primed adaptation and direct interference against genetic elements carrying those genes. Our findings show the existence of an anti-cas mechanism that prevents the transfer of a fully equipped CRISPR-Cas system. Hence, they suggest that CRISPR immunity may be undesired by particular prokaryotes, potentially because they could limit possibilities for gaining favourable sequences by lateral transfer. PMID:27573106

  20. Conditionally Stabilized dCas9 Activator for Controlling Gene Expression in Human Cell Reprogramming and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Balboa, Diego; Weltner, Jere; Eurola, Solja; Trokovic, Ras; Wartiovaara, Kirmo; Otonkoski, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Summary CRISPR/Cas9 protein fused to transactivation domains can be used to control gene expression in human cells. In this study, we demonstrate that a dCas9 fusion with repeats of VP16 activator domains can efficiently activate human genes involved in pluripotency in various cell types. This activator in combination with guide RNAs targeted to the OCT4 promoter can be used to completely replace transgenic OCT4 in human cell reprogramming. Furthermore, we generated a chemically controllable dCas9 activator version by fusion with the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) destabilization domain. Finally, we show that the destabilized dCas9 activator can be used to control human pluripotent stem cell differentiation into endodermal lineages. PMID:26352799

  1. Potent and Targeted Activation of Latent HIV-1 Using the CRISPR/dCas9 Activator Complex

    PubMed Central

    Saayman, Sheena M; Lazar, Daniel C; Scott, Tristan A; Hart, Jonathan R; Takahashi, Mayumi; Burnett, John C; Planelles, Vicente; Morris, Kevin V; Weinberg, Marc S

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 provirus integration results in a persistent latently infected reservoir that is recalcitrant to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) with lifelong treatment being the only option. The “shock and kill” strategy aims to eradicate latent HIV by reactivating proviral gene expression in the context of cART treatment. Gene-specific transcriptional activation can be achieved using the RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system comprising single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) with a nuclease-deficient Cas9 mutant (dCas9) fused to the VP64 transactivation domain (dCas9-VP64). We engineered this system to target 23 sites within the long terminal repeat promoter of HIV-1 and identified a “hotspot” for activation within the viral enhancer sequence. Activating sgRNAs transcriptionally modulated the latent proviral genome across multiple different in vitro latency cell models including T cells comprising a clonally integrated mCherry-IRES-Tat (LChIT) latency system. We detected consistent and effective activation of latent virus mediated by activator sgRNAs, whereas latency reversal agents produced variable activation responses. Transcriptomic analysis revealed dCas9-VP64/sgRNAs to be highly specific, while the well-characterized chemical activator TNFα induced widespread gene dysregulation. CRISPR-mediated gene activation represents a novel system which provides enhanced efficiency and specificity in a targeted latency reactivation strategy and represents a promising approach to a “functional cure” of HIV/AIDS. PMID:26581162

  2. An Active Type I-E CRISPR-Cas System Identified in Streptomyces avermitilis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Shiwei; Chen, Zhi; Guo, Yajie; Song, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems, the small RNA-dependent immune systems, are widely distributed in prokaryotes. However, only a small proportion of CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified to be active in bacteria. In this work, a naturally active type I-E CRISPR-Cas system was found in Streptomyces avermitilis. The system shares many common genetic features with the type I-E system of Escherichia coli, and meanwhile shows unique characteristics. It not only degrades plasmid DNA with target protospacers, but also acquires new spacers from the target plasmid DNA. The naive features of spacer acquisition in the type I-E system of S. avermitilis were investigated and a completely conserved PAM 5’-AAG-3’ was identified. Spacer acquisition displayed differential strand bias upstream and downstream of the priming spacer, and irregular integrations of new spacers were observed. In addition, introduction of this system into host conferred phage resistance to some extent. This study will give new insights into adaptation mechanism of the type I-E systems in vivo, and meanwhile provide theoretical foundation for applying this system on the genetic modification of S. avermitilis. PMID:26901661

  3. The Caspian Sea-Hindu Kush Index (CasHKI): A regulatory factor for dust activity over southwest Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Houssos, E. E.; Rashki, A.; Francois, P.; Legrand, M.; Goto, D.; Bartzokas, A.; Kambezidis, H. D.; Takemura, T.

    2016-02-01

    This work investigates the modulation in dust activity over southwest (SW) Asia attributed to changes in the mean sea level pressure (MSLP) between the Caspian Sea (CS) and Hindu Kush (HK) during the summer months (June-July-August-September, JJAS) of the period 2000-2014. The MSLP anomalies obtained via NCEP/NCAR re-analysis are evaluated via a new climatology index, the Caspian Sea-Hindu Kush Index (CasHKI), which is defined as CasHKI = MSLPanom.CS - MSLPanom.HK, over specific domains taken over the CS and HK. The changes in CasHKI intensity are examined against dust activity and rainfall distributions over south Asia. The satellite remote sensing (Meteosat, OMI, MODIS) analyses show that high CasHKI values corresponding to enhanced pressure gradient between the CS and the HK, are associated with intensification of northerly winds, increased dust emissions and transportation over SW Asia and north Arabian Sea. In contrast, variations in CasHKI intensity do not seem to have a significant effect on the Indian summer monsoon. Only a slight decrease of precipitation over the southern Indian peninsula and the neighboring oceanic areas and an increase of precipitation along the Ganges Basin and Himalayan range are found to be related to high CasHKI values. Model (MIROC-SPRINTARS) simulations of dust concentration and dust AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) over SW Asia are consistent with the satellite observations, highlighting for the first time the modulation of the SW Asian dust activity by CasHKI.

  4. Specific induction of endogenous viral restriction factors using CRISPR/Cas-derived transcriptional activators

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Kornepati, Anand V. R.; Marshall, Joy B.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas several mammalian proteins can restrict the replication of HIV-1 and other viruses, these are often not expressed in relevant target cells. A potential method to inhibit viral replication might therefore be to use synthetic transcription factors to induce restriction factor expression. In particular, mutants of the RNA-guided DNA binding protein Cas9 that have lost their DNA cleavage activity could be used to recruit transcription activation domains to specific promoters. However, initial experiments revealed only weak activation unless multiple promoter-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were used. Recently, the recruitment of multiple transcription activation domains by a single sgRNA, modified to contain MS2-derived stem loops that recruit fusion proteins consisting of the MS2 coat protein linked to transcription activation domains, was reported to induce otherwise silent cellular genes. Here, we demonstrate that such “synergistic activation mediators” can induce the expression of two restriction factors, APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3B (A3B), in human cells that normally lack these proteins. We observed modest activation of endogenous A3G or A3B expression using single sgRNAs but high expression when two sgRNAs were used. Whereas the induced A3G and A3B proteins both blocked infection by an HIV-1 variant lacking a functional vif gene by inducing extensive dC-to-dU editing, only the induced A3B protein inhibited wild-type HIV-1. These data demonstrate that Cas9-derived transcriptional activators have the potential to be used for screens for endogenous genes that affect virus replication and raise the possibility that synthetic transcription factors might prove clinically useful if efficient delivery mechanisms could be developed. PMID:26668372

  5. Specific induction of endogenous viral restriction factors using CRISPR/Cas-derived transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Kornepati, Anand V R; Marshall, Joy B; Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-12-29

    Whereas several mammalian proteins can restrict the replication of HIV-1 and other viruses, these are often not expressed in relevant target cells. A potential method to inhibit viral replication might therefore be to use synthetic transcription factors to induce restriction factor expression. In particular, mutants of the RNA-guided DNA binding protein Cas9 that have lost their DNA cleavage activity could be used to recruit transcription activation domains to specific promoters. However, initial experiments revealed only weak activation unless multiple promoter-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were used. Recently, the recruitment of multiple transcription activation domains by a single sgRNA, modified to contain MS2-derived stem loops that recruit fusion proteins consisting of the MS2 coat protein linked to transcription activation domains, was reported to induce otherwise silent cellular genes. Here, we demonstrate that such "synergistic activation mediators" can induce the expression of two restriction factors, APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3B (A3B), in human cells that normally lack these proteins. We observed modest activation of endogenous A3G or A3B expression using single sgRNAs but high expression when two sgRNAs were used. Whereas the induced A3G and A3B proteins both blocked infection by an HIV-1 variant lacking a functional vif gene by inducing extensive dC-to-dU editing, only the induced A3B protein inhibited wild-type HIV-1. These data demonstrate that Cas9-derived transcriptional activators have the potential to be used for screens for endogenous genes that affect virus replication and raise the possibility that synthetic transcription factors might prove clinically useful if efficient delivery mechanisms could be developed. PMID:26668372

  6. Fluctuation of the CaS -sequestering activity of permeabilized sea urchin embryos during the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Suprynowicz, F.A.; Mazia, D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors have followed the sequestration of CaS by intracellular compartments in sea urchin embryos through the first cell cycles. To gain biochemical access to these compartments, the embryos were permeabilized by brief exposure to an intense electric field. Sequestration was determined as the retention of tracer, UVCa, after filtration of aliquots on Millipore filters. The permeabilized cells sequester CaS at a constant rate for at least 20 min. The CaS -sequestering activities of embryos that are permeabilized at successive stages of the first cell cycle (one-cell stage) progressively increase to 5 times the initial level. The rate of sequestration is maximal during telophase and, in some populations of zygotes, is nearly as great throughout prophase. Over the course of the second cell cycle (two-cell stage), the activity undergoes a 2-fold oscillation that bears the same temporal relationship to mitosis as the previous fluctuation.

  7. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Barkal, Amira A; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K; Sherwood, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding. PMID:27031353

  8. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding. PMID:27031353

  9. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations. PMID:25985872

  10. [The NAS system: Nursing Activities Score in mobile technology].

    PubMed

    Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Silveira, Denise Tolfo; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado; Borges, Gilberto Cabral de Mello

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to present the computerized structure that enables the use of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) in mobile technology. It is a project for the development of technology production based on software engineering, founded on the theory of systems development life cycle. The NAS system was built in two modules: the search module, which is accessed using a personal computer (PC), and Data Collection module, which is accessed through a mobile device (Smartphone). The NAS system was constructed to allow other forms, in addition to the NAS tool, to be included in the future. Thus, it is understood that the development of the NAS will bring nurses closer to mobile technology and facilitate their accessibility to the data of the instrument relating to patients, thus assisting in decision-making and in staffing to provide nursing care. PMID:22241201

  11. An active immune defense with a minimal CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) RNA and without the Cas6 protein.

    PubMed

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stachler, Aris-Edda; Saunders, Sita J; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-02-13

    The prokaryotic immune system CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) is a defense system that protects prokaryotes against foreign DNA. The short CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are central components of this immune system. In CRISPR-Cas systems type I and III, crRNAs are generated by the endonuclease Cas6. We developed a Cas6b-independent crRNA maturation pathway for the Haloferax type I-B system in vivo that expresses a functional crRNA, which we termed independently generated crRNA (icrRNA). The icrRNA is effective in triggering degradation of an invader plasmid carrying the matching protospacer sequence. The Cas6b-independent maturation of the icrRNA allowed mutation of the repeat sequence without interfering with signals important for Cas6b processing. We generated 23 variants of the icrRNA and analyzed them for activity in the interference reaction. icrRNAs with deletions or mutations of the 3' handle are still active in triggering an interference reaction. The complete 3' handle could be removed without loss of activity. However, manipulations of the 5' handle mostly led to loss of interference activity. Furthermore, we could show that in the presence of an icrRNA a strain without Cas6b (Δcas6b) is still active in interference. PMID:25512373

  12. An Active Immune Defense with a Minimal CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) RNA and without the Cas6 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stachler, Aris-Edda; Saunders, Sita J.; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic immune system CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) is a defense system that protects prokaryotes against foreign DNA. The short CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are central components of this immune system. In CRISPR-Cas systems type I and III, crRNAs are generated by the endonuclease Cas6. We developed a Cas6b-independent crRNA maturation pathway for the Haloferax type I-B system in vivo that expresses a functional crRNA, which we termed independently generated crRNA (icrRNA). The icrRNA is effective in triggering degradation of an invader plasmid carrying the matching protospacer sequence. The Cas6b-independent maturation of the icrRNA allowed mutation of the repeat sequence without interfering with signals important for Cas6b processing. We generated 23 variants of the icrRNA and analyzed them for activity in the interference reaction. icrRNAs with deletions or mutations of the 3′ handle are still active in triggering an interference reaction. The complete 3′ handle could be removed without loss of activity. However, manipulations of the 5′ handle mostly led to loss of interference activity. Furthermore, we could show that in the presence of an icrRNA a strain without Cas6b (Δcas6b) is still active in interference. PMID:25512373

  13. Occurrence and activity of a type II CRISPR-Cas system in Lactobacillus gasseri.

    PubMed

    Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Selle, Kurt; O'Flaherty, Sarah; Klaenhammer, Todd; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2015-09-01

    Bacteria encode clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas), which collectively form an RNA-guided adaptive immune system against invasive genetic elements. In silico surveys have revealed that lactic acid bacteria harbour a prolific and diverse set of CRISPR-Cas systems. Thus, the natural evolutionary role of CRISPR-Cas systems may be investigated in these ecologically, industrially, scientifically and medically important microbes. In this study, 17 Lactobacillus gasseri strains were investigated and 6 harboured a type II-A CRISPR-Cas system, with considerable diversity in array size and spacer content. Several of the spacers showed similarity to phage and plasmid sequences, which are typical targets of CRISPR-Cas immune systems. Aligning the protospacers facilitated inference of the protospacer adjacent motif sequence, determined to be 5'-NTAA-3' flanking the 3' end of the protospacer. The system in L. gasseri JV-V03 and NCK 1342 interfered with transforming plasmids containing sequences matching the most recently acquired CRISPR spacers in each strain. We report the distribution and function of a native type II-A CRISPR-Cas system in the commensal species L. gasseri. Collectively, these results open avenues for applications for bacteriophage protection and genome modification in L. gasseri, and contribute to the fundamental understanding of CRISPR-Cas systems in bacteria. PMID:26297561

  14. Implementation of the Simple Endoscopic Activity Score in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koutroumpakis, Efstratios; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD) was developed as an attempt to simplify Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS). Since it was constructed from CDEIS, SES-CD performs comparably but also carries similar limitations. Several studies have utilized SES-CD scoring to describe disease severity or response to therapy. Some of them used SES-CD score as a continuous variable while others utilized certain cutoff values to define severity grades. All SES-CD cutoff values reported in published clinical trials were empirically selected by experts. Although in most of the studies that used SEC-CD scoring to define disease severity, a score <3 reflected inactive disease, no study is using score 0 to predefine inactivity. Studies applying SES-CD to define response to treatment used score 0. There is no optimal SES-CD cut-off for endoscopic remission. The quantification of mucosal healing using SES-CD scoring has not been standardized yet. As the definition of mucosal healing by SES-CD is unset, the concept of deep remission is also still evolving. Serum and fecal biomarkers as well as new radiologic imaging techniques are complementary to SES-CD. Current practice as well as important changes in endoscopy should be taken into consideration when defining SES-CD cutoffs. The optimal timing of SES-CD scoring to assess mucosal healing is not defined yet. To conclude, SES-CD represents a valuable tool. However, a consensus agreement on its optimal use is required. PMID:27184635

  15. Auditory Short-Term Memory Activation during Score Reading

    PubMed Central

    Simoens, Veerle L.; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Performing music on the basis of reading a score requires reading ahead of what is being played in order to anticipate the necessary actions to produce the notes. Score reading thus not only involves the decoding of a visual score and the comparison to the auditory feedback, but also short-term storage of the musical information due to the delay of the auditory feedback during reading ahead. This study investigates the mechanisms of encoding of musical information in short-term memory during such a complicated procedure. There were three parts in this study. First, professional musicians participated in an electroencephalographic (EEG) experiment to study the slow wave potentials during a time interval of short-term memory storage in a situation that requires cross-modal translation and short-term storage of visual material to be compared with delayed auditory material, as it is the case in music score reading. This delayed visual-to-auditory matching task was compared with delayed visual-visual and auditory-auditory matching tasks in terms of EEG topography and voltage amplitudes. Second, an additional behavioural experiment was performed to determine which type of distractor would be the most interfering with the score reading-like task. Third, the self-reported strategies of the participants were also analyzed. All three parts of this study point towards the same conclusion according to which during music score reading, the musician most likely first translates the visual score into an auditory cue, probably starting around 700 or 1300 ms, ready for storage and delayed comparison with the auditory feedback. PMID:23326487

  16. Auditory short-term memory activation during score reading.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Veerle L; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Performing music on the basis of reading a score requires reading ahead of what is being played in order to anticipate the necessary actions to produce the notes. Score reading thus not only involves the decoding of a visual score and the comparison to the auditory feedback, but also short-term storage of the musical information due to the delay of the auditory feedback during reading ahead. This study investigates the mechanisms of encoding of musical information in short-term memory during such a complicated procedure. There were three parts in this study. First, professional musicians participated in an electroencephalographic (EEG) experiment to study the slow wave potentials during a time interval of short-term memory storage in a situation that requires cross-modal translation and short-term storage of visual material to be compared with delayed auditory material, as it is the case in music score reading. This delayed visual-to-auditory matching task was compared with delayed visual-visual and auditory-auditory matching tasks in terms of EEG topography and voltage amplitudes. Second, an additional behavioural experiment was performed to determine which type of distractor would be the most interfering with the score reading-like task. Third, the self-reported strategies of the participants were also analyzed. All three parts of this study point towards the same conclusion according to which during music score reading, the musician most likely first translates the visual score into an auditory cue, probably starting around 700 or 1300 ms, ready for storage and delayed comparison with the auditory feedback. PMID:23326487

  17. Regulation of Gene Editing Activity Directed by Single-Stranded Oligonucleotides and CRISPR/Cas9 Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bialk, Pawel; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Strouse, Bryan; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. While the regulation of this gene editing reaction has been partially elucidated, the low frequency with which repair occurs has hampered development toward clinical application. In this work a CRISPR/Cas9 complex is employed to induce double strand DNA breakage at specific sites surrounding the nucleotide designated for exchange. The result is a significant elevation in ssODN-directed gene repair, validated by a phenotypic readout. By analysing reaction parameters, we have uncovered restrictions on gene editing activity involving CRISPR/Cas9 complexes. First, ssODNs that hybridize to the non-transcribed strand direct a higher level of gene repair than those that hybridize to the transcribed strand. Second, cleavage must be proximal to the targeted mutant base to enable higher levels of gene editing. Third, DNA cleavage enables a higher level of gene editing activity as compared to single-stranded DNA nicks, created by modified Cas9 (Nickases). Fourth, we calculated the hybridization potential and free energy levels of ssODNs that are complementary to the guide RNA sequences of CRISPRs used in this study. We find a correlation between free energy potential and the capacity of single-stranded oligonucleotides to inhibit specific DNA cleavage activity, thereby indirectly reducing gene editing activity. Our data provide novel information that might be taken into consideration in the design and usage of CRISPR/Cas9 systems with ssODNs for gene editing. PMID:26053390

  18. Monitoring Progress in Algebra in a CAS Active Context: Symbol Sense, Algebraic Insight and Algebraic Expectation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Robyn; Stacey, Kaye

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide researchers with a shared framework, terminology and tool to improve the coherence of research into learning mathematics with CAS and to assist its findings to accumulate into a significant body of knowledge. Experience with calculators in arithmetic led to a framework for number sense. There is an obvious…

  19. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24500196

  20. CasExpress reveals widespread and diverse patterns of cell survival of caspase-3 activation during development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ding, Austin Xun; Sun, Gongping; Argaw, Yewubdar G; Wong, Jessica O; Easwaran, Sreesankar; Montell, Denise J

    2016-01-01

    Caspase-3 carries out the executioner phase of apoptosis, however under special circumstances, cells can survive its activity. To document systematically where and when cells survive caspase-3 activation in vivo, we designed a system, CasExpress, which drives fluorescent protein expression, transiently or permanently, in cells that survive caspase-3 activation in Drosophila. We discovered widespread survival of caspase-3 activity. Distinct spatial and temporal patterns emerged in different tissues. Some cells activated caspase-3 during their normal development in every cell and in every animal without evidence of apoptosis. In other tissues, such as the brain, expression was sporadic both temporally and spatially and overlapped with periods of apoptosis. In adults, reporter expression was evident in a large fraction of cells in most tissues of every animal; however the precise patterns varied. Inhibition of caspase activity in wing discs reduced wing size demonstrating functional significance. The implications of these patterns are discussed. PMID:27058168

  1. CRISPRscan: designing highly efficient sgRNAs for CRISPR/Cas9 targeting in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Mateos, Miguel A.; Vejnar, Charles E.; Beaudoin, Jean-Denis; Fernandez, Juan P.; Mis, Emily K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Giraldez, Antonio J.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology provides a powerful system for genome engineering. However, variable activity across different single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) remains a significant limitation. We have analyzed the molecular features that influence sgRNA stability, activity and loading into Cas9 in vivo. We observe that guanine enrichment and adenine depletion increase sgRNA stability and activity, while loading, nucleosome positioning and Cas9 off-target binding are not major determinants. We additionally identified truncated and 5′ mismatch-containing sgRNAs as efficient alternatives to canonical sgRNAs. Based on these results, we created a predictive sgRNA-scoring algorithm (CRISPRscan.org) that effectively captures the sequence features affecting Cas9/sgRNA activity in vivo. Finally, we show that targeting Cas9 to the germ line using a Cas9-nanos-3′-UTR fusion can generate maternal-zygotic mutants, increase viability and reduce somatic mutations. Together, these results provide novel insights into the determinants that influence Cas9 activity and a framework to identify highly efficient sgRNAs for genome targeting in vivo. PMID:26322839

  2. Photospheric Activity in Selected Be STARS: lambda Eri and gamma Cas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations of rapid variations in optical He I lines, X-rays, and FUV wavelengths in the prototypical classical Be stars lambda Eri and star gamma Cas hint that the violent processes occur on the surfaces of these stars almost all the time. We suggest that of these phenomena show greater similarities with magnetic flaring than any other process through to occur on stars.

  3. Nursing Activities Score: nursing work load in a burns Intensive Care Unit1

    PubMed Central

    Camuci, Marcia Bernadete; Martins, Júlia Trevisan; Cardeli, Alexandrina Aparecida Maciel; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the nursing work load in a Burns Intensive Care Unit according to the Nursing Activities Score. Method an exploratory, descriptive cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. The Nursing Activities Score was used for data collection between October 2011 and May 2012, totalling 1,221 measurements, obtained from 50 patients' hospital records. Data for qualitative variables was described in tables; for the quantitative variables, calculations using statistical measurements were used. Results the mean score for the Nursing Activities Score was 70.4% and the median was 70.3%, corresponding to the percentage of the time spent on direct care to the patient in 24 hours. Conclusion the Nursing Activities Score provided information which involves the process of caring for patients hospitalized in a Burns Intensive Care Unit, and indicated that there is a high work load for the nursing team of the sector studied. PMID:26107842

  4. Optimized sgRNA design to maximize activity and minimize off-target effects of CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Katherine F.; Smith, Ian; Tothova, Zuzana; Wilen, Craig; Orchard, Robert; Virgin, Herbert W.; Root, David E.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9-based genetic screens are a powerful new tool in biology. By simply altering the sequence of the single-guide RNA (sgRNA), Cas9 can be reprogrammed to target different sites in the genome with relative ease, but the on-target activity and off-target effects of individual sgRNAs can vary widely. Here, we use recently-devised sgRNA design rules to create human and mouse genome-wide libraries, perform positive and negative selection screens and observe that the use of these rules produced improved results. Additionally, we profile the off-target activity of thousands of sgRNAs and develop a metric to predict off-target sites. We incorporate these findings from large-scale, empirical data to improve our computational design rules and create optimized sgRNA libraries that maximize on-target activity and minimize off-target effects to enable more effective and efficient genetic screens and genome engineering. PMID:26780180

  5. Genetic Parameter Estimates Among Scale Activity Score and Farrowing Disposition with Reproductive Traits in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scale activity score (SA) at 5 months of age ranged from 1 to 5. Farrowing disposition score (FD) ranged from 1 to 3. Reproductive traits included age at puberty (AP), number born alive (NBA), number born dead (NBD), litter birth weight (LBW), average birth weight (ABW), number weaned adjusted for c...

  6. SCORE/ACE Counselor Handbook. Service Corps of Retired Executives. Active Corps of Executives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsverk, Arvel; And Others

    This counselor handbook is intended to help Service Corps of Retired Executives/Active Corps of Executives (SCORE/ACE) counselors to plan and conduct counseling services more effectively. Included in the introductory section are an overview of the SCORE/ACE counseling program, a discussion of what the counselor does, directions for completing…

  7. Cross-cultural validation of the Italian version of the Cumulated Ambulation Score.

    PubMed

    Grana, Elisa; Verzellotti, Simone; Grassi, Federico A; Ferriero, Giorgio; Kristensen, Morten T; Cisari, Carlo; Invernizzi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Hip fractures are common in elderly patients, and walking impairment is a frequent complication. The Cumulated Ambulation Score (CAS) is a validated functional scale used to monitor easily three basic mobility activities in patients with hip fracture. The aim of this study was to translate, cross-cultural adapt, and validate the CAS in the Italian language (CAS-I). The translation was carried out according to recommended guidelines. The final version of the CAS-I was administered to 80 geriatric patients with hip fracture admitted to a Traumatology Unit, and allowed full weight-bearing after treatment with hemiarthroplasty. Two raters evaluated each patient 2 days after surgery and then after 3 months. Statistical methods included Cronbach's α coefficient for the scale's internal consistency; the total agreement; and the κ coefficient for the inter-rater reliability. The concurrent validity of the scale was determined by comparing the total CAS-I (0-6 points) with the Index of Independence in Activities of Daily Living score (0-4 points). Internal consistency and inter-rater reliability of the CAS, evaluated with Cronbach's α and κ, respectively, were above 0.84 and 0.94. The SE of measurement for the total CAS-I (0-6 points) 2 days and 3 months after surgery were 0.03 and 0.13 points, respectively. The CAS-I showed a significant correlation with the first four items of the Activities of Daily Living score scale (r≥0.85, P<0.001). This study confirms the validity of the CAS-I for patients with a hemiarthroplasty after hip fracture and provides additional evidence of the psychometric properties of the scale. We suggest that the official CAS-I version be used in other settings to evaluate the basic mobility in patients with hip fracture. PMID:27028288

  8. Exploiting CRISPR/Cas systems for biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Timothy R.; Weiss, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease is the central component of the Type II CRISPR/Cas system, a prokaryotic adaptive restriction system against invading nucleic acids, such as those originating from bacteriophages and plasmids. Recently, this RNA-directed DNA endonuclease has been harnessed to target DNA sequences of interest. Here, we review the development of Cas9 as an important tool to not only edit the genomes of a number of different prokaryotic and eukaryotic species, but also as an efficient system for site-specific transcriptional repression or activation. Additionally, a specific Cas9 protein has been observed to target an RNA substrate, suggesting that Cas9 may have the ability to be programmed to target RNA as well. Cas proteins from other CRISPR/Cas subtypes may also be exploited in this regard. Thus, CRISPR/Cas systems represent an effective and versatile biotechnological tool, which will have significant impact on future advancements in genome engineering. PMID:24323919

  9. Systematic analysis of CRISPR-Cas9 mismatch tolerance reveals low levels of off-target activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Emily M; Haupt, Amanda; Schiel, John A; Chou, Eldon; Machado, Hidevaldo B; Strezoska, Žaklina; Lenger, Steve; McClelland, Shawn; Birmingham, Amanda; Vermeulen, Annaleen; Smith, Anja van Brabant

    2015-10-10

    The discovery that the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) acquired immune system can be utilized to create double-strand breaks (DSBs) in eukaryotic genomes has resulted in the ability to create genomic changes more easily than with other genome engineering techniques. While there is significant potential for the CRISPR-Cas9 system to advance basic and applied research, several unknowns remain, including the specificity of the RNA-directed DNA cleavage by the small targeting RNA, the CRISPR RNA (crRNA). Here we describe a novel synthetic RNA approach that allows for high-throughput gene editing experiments. This was used with a functional assay for protein disruption to perform high-throughput analysis of crRNA activity and specificity. We performed a comprehensive test of target cleavage using crRNAs that contain one and two nucleotide mismatches to the DNA target in the 20mer targeting region of the crRNA, allowing for the evaluation of hundreds of potential mismatched target sites without the requirement for the off-target sequences and their adjacent PAMs to be present in the genome. Our results demonstrate that while many crRNAs are functional, less than 5% of crRNAs with two mismatches to their target are effective in gene editing; this suggests an overall high level of functionality but low level of off-targeting. PMID:26189696

  10. p130Cas Is Required for Mammary Tumor Growth and Transforming Growth Factor-β-mediated Metastasis through Regulation of Smad2/3 Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Michael K.; Smith, Jason A.; Schiemann, William P.

    2009-01-01

    During breast cancer progression, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) switches from a tumor suppressor to a pro-metastatic molecule. Several recent studies suggest that this conversion in TGF-β function depends upon fundamental changes in the TGF-β signaling system. We show here that these changes in TGF-β signaling are concomitant with aberrant expression of the focal adhesion protein, p130Cas. Indeed, elevating expression of either the full-length (FL) or just the carboxyl terminus (CT) of p130Cas in mammary epithelial cells (MECs) diminished the ability of TGF-β1 to activate Smad2/3, but increased its coupling to p38 MAPK. This shift in TGF-β signaling evoked (i) resistance to TGF-β-induced growth arrest, and (ii) acinar filling upon three-dimensional organotypic cultures of p130Cas-FL or -CT expressing MECs. Furthermore, rendering metastatic MECs deficient in p130Cas enhanced TGF-β-stimulated Smad2/3 activity, which restored TGF-β-induced growth inhibition both in vitro and in mammary tumors produced in mice. Additionally, whereas elevating TβR-II expression in metastatic MECs had no affect on their phosphorylation of Smad2/3, this event markedly enhanced their activation of p38 MAPK, leading to increased MEC invasion and metastasis. Importantly, depleting p130Cas expression in TβR-II-expressing metastatic MECs significantly increased their activation of Smad2/3, which (i) reestablished the physiologic balance between canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling, and (ii) reversed cellular invasion and early mammary tumor cell dissemination stimulated by TGF-β. Collectively, our findings identify p130Cas as a molecular rheostat that regulates the delicate balance between canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling, a balance that is critical to maintaining the tumor suppressor function of TGF-β during breast cancer progression. PMID:19822523

  11. Why mental arithmetic counts: brain activation during single digit arithmetic predicts high school math scores.

    PubMed

    Price, Gavin R; Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Ansari, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Do individual differences in the brain mechanisms for arithmetic underlie variability in high school mathematical competence? Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we correlated brain responses to single digit calculation with standard scores on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) math subtest in high school seniors. PSAT math scores, while controlling for PSAT Critical Reading scores, correlated positively with calculation activation in the left supramarginal gyrus and bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, brain regions known to be engaged during arithmetic fact retrieval. At the same time, greater activation in the right intraparietal sulcus during calculation, a region established to be involved in numerical quantity processing, was related to lower PSAT math scores. These data reveal that the relative engagement of brain mechanisms associated with procedural versus memory-based calculation of single-digit arithmetic problems is related to high school level mathematical competence, highlighting the fundamental role that mental arithmetic fluency plays in the acquisition of higher-level mathematical competence. PMID:23283330

  12. CasExpress reveals widespread and diverse patterns of cell survival of caspase-3 activation during development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Austin Xun; Sun, Gongping; Argaw, Yewubdar G; Wong, Jessica O; Easwaran, Sreesankar; Montell, Denise J

    2016-01-01

    Caspase-3 carries out the executioner phase of apoptosis, however under special circumstances, cells can survive its activity. To document systematically where and when cells survive caspase-3 activation in vivo, we designed a system, CasExpress, which drives fluorescent protein expression, transiently or permanently, in cells that survive caspase-3 activation in Drosophila. We discovered widespread survival of caspase-3 activity. Distinct spatial and temporal patterns emerged in different tissues. Some cells activated caspase-3 during their normal development in every cell and in every animal without evidence of apoptosis. In other tissues, such as the brain, expression was sporadic both temporally and spatially and overlapped with periods of apoptosis. In adults, reporter expression was evident in a large fraction of cells in most tissues of every animal; however the precise patterns varied. Inhibition of caspase activity in wing discs reduced wing size demonstrating functional significance. The implications of these patterns are discussed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10936.001 PMID:27058168

  13. Enhancing homology-directed genome editing by catalytically active and inactive CRISPR-Cas9 using asymmetric donor DNA.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Christopher D; Ray, Graham J; DeWitt, Mark A; Curie, Gemma L; Corn, Jacob E

    2016-03-01

    Targeted genomic manipulation by Cas9 can efficiently generate knockout cells and organisms via error-prone nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), but the efficiency of precise sequence replacement by homology-directed repair (HDR) is substantially lower. Here we investigate the interaction of Cas9 with target DNA and use our findings to improve HDR efficiency. We show that dissociation of Cas9 from double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) substrates is slow (lifetime ∼6 h) but that, before complete dissociation, Cas9 asymmetrically releases the 3' end of the cleaved DNA strand that is not complementary to the sgRNA (nontarget strand). By rationally designing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) donors of the optimal length complementary to the strand that is released first, we increase the rate of HDR in human cells when using Cas9 or nickase variants to up to 60%. We also demonstrate HDR rates of up to 0.7% using a catalytically inactive Cas9 mutant (dCas9), which binds DNA without cleaving it. PMID:26789497

  14. Estimates of genetic parameters among scale activity scores, growth, and fatness in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic parameters for scale activity score were estimated from generations 5, 6, and 7 of a randomly selected, composite population composed of Duroc, Large White, and two sources of Landrace (n = 2,186). At approximately 156 d of age, pigs were weighed (WT) and ultrasound backfat measurements (BF1...

  15. Correlation between clinical and MRI disease activity scores in axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    MacKay, James W; Aboelmagd, Sharief; Gaffney, J Karl

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-based disease activity scores (DAS) in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) are rarely employed in the normal clinical setting, whereas clinical DAS are used routinely to monitor disease activity and set thresholds for biologic treatment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the correlation between MR and clinical DAS in a general axSpA outpatient population and to assess the difference in MR DAS in individuals with high and low clinical DAS. This was a prospective, cross-sectional observational study. Forty participants with axSpA who presented for MR of the whole spine and sacroiliac joints as part of ongoing management were included. Completion of Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) was performed at the time of MR examination. MR images were scored by two independent observers using the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) MR DAS. There were weak, non-significant correlations between total SPARCC score and BASDAI (r = 0.18, p = 0.26), ASDAS using erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ASDAS-ESR) (r = 0.31, p = 0.07) and ASDAS using C-reactive protein level (ASDAS-CRP) (r = 0.31, p = 0.05). There was no significant difference in the SPARCC score of participants with high and low clinical DAS. MR DAS may provide information about disease activity not provided by the current standard of clinical DAS and may be considered as a useful adjunct in clinical practice. PMID:25894437

  16. Toward Development of a Fibromyalgia Responder Index and Disease Activity Score: OMERACT Module Update

    PubMed Central

    Mease, PJ; Clauw, DJ; Christensen, R; Crofford, L; Gendreau, M; Martin, SA; Simon, L; Strand, V; Williams, DA; Arnold, LM

    2012-01-01

    Following development of the core domain set for fibromyalgia (FM) in OMERACT 7–9, the FM working group has progressed toward the development of an FM responder index and a disease activity score based on these domains, utilizing outcome indices of these domains from archived randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in FM. Possible clinical domains that could be included in a responder index and disease activity score include: pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, cognitive dysfunction, mood disturbance, tenderness, stiffness, and functional impairment. Outcome measures for these domains demonstrate good to adequate psychometric properties, although measures of cognitive dysfunction need to be further developed. The approach used in the development of responder indices and disease activity scores for rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis represent heuristic models for our work, but FM is challenging in that there is no clear algorithm of treatment that defines disease activity based on treatment decisions, nor are there objective markers that define thresholds of severity or response to treatment. The process of developing candidate dichotomous responder definitions and continuous quantitative disease activity measures is described, as is participant discussion that transpired at OMERACT 10. Final results of this work will be published in a separate manuscript pending completion of analyses. PMID:21724721

  17. Reliability of Accelerometer Scores for Measuring Sedentary and Physical Activity Behaviors in Persons With Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Klaren, Rachel E; Hubbard, Elizabeth A; Zhu, Weimo; Motl, Robert W

    2016-04-01

    This brief research note examined the reliability of scores from an accelerometer as measures of sedentary and physical activity behaviors in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). The analysis was performed on a combined data set from 2 previous longitudinal investigations of physical activity in MS. We focused on the number of days required to reliably estimate sedentary behavior, based on time spent in sedentary behavior per day and number of sedentary breaks, number of long sedentary bouts, and average length of sedentary bouts per day. We further examined the number of days required to reliably estimate physical activity behavior, based on time spent in light and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and average length of activity bouts per day. Between 4-6 days of monitoring and 3-7 days of monitoring were necessary for good reliability of scores from all sedentary outcomes and physical activity outcomes, respectively. These results should guide research and practice examining sedentary and physical activity behaviors using accelerometry in persons with MS. PMID:27078272

  18. RNA-activated DNA cleavage by the Type III-B CRISPR-Cas effector complex.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Michael A; Kuo, Fang-Ting; Bailey, Scott

    2016-02-15

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) system is an RNA-guided immune system that protects prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. This system represents an inheritable and adaptable immune system that is mediated by multisubunit effector complexes. In the Type III-B system, the Cmr effector complex has been found to cleave ssRNA in vitro. However, in vivo, it has been implicated in transcription-dependent DNA targeting. We show here that the Cmr complex from Thermotoga maritima can cleave an ssRNA target that is complementary to the CRISPR RNA. We also show that binding of a complementary ssRNA target activates an ssDNA-specific nuclease activity in the histidine-aspartate (HD) domain of the Cmr2 subunit of the complex. These data suggest a mechanism for transcription-coupled DNA targeting by the Cmr complex and provide a unifying mechanism for all Type III systems. PMID:26848046

  19. Using the EZ-Diffusion Model to Score a Single-Category Implicit Association Test of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rebar, Amanda L.; Ram, Nilam; Conroy, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Single-Category Implicit Association Test (SC-IAT) has been used as a method for assessing automatic evaluations of physical activity, but measurement artifact or consciously-held attitudes could be confounding the outcome scores of these measures. The objective of these two studies was to address these measurement concerns by testing the validity of a novel SC-IAT scoring technique. Design Study 1 was a cross-sectional study, and study 2 was a prospective study. Method In study 1, undergraduate students (N = 104) completed SC-IATs for physical activity, flowers, and sedentary behavior. In study 2, undergraduate students (N = 91) completed a SC-IAT for physical activity, self-reported affective and instrumental attitudes toward physical activity, physical activity intentions, and wore an accelerometer for two weeks. The EZ-diffusion model was used to decompose the SC-IAT into three process component scores including the information processing efficiency score. Results In study 1, a series of structural equation model comparisons revealed that the information processing score did not share variability across distinct SC-IATs, suggesting it does not represent systematic measurement artifact. In study 2, the information processing efficiency score was shown to be unrelated to self-reported affective and instrumental attitudes toward physical activity, and positively related to physical activity behavior, above and beyond the traditional D-score of the SC-IAT. Conclusions The information processing efficiency score is a valid measure of automatic evaluations of physical activity. PMID:25484621

  20. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated biallelic gene disruption and site-specific knockin after rapid selection of highly active sgRNAs in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianlong; Zhou, Jinwei; Cao, Chunwei; Huang, Jiaojiao; Hai, Tang; Wang, Yanfang; Zheng, Qiantao; Zhang, Hongyong; Qin, Guosong; Miao, Xiangnan; Wang, Hongmei; Cao, Suizhong; Zhou, Qi; Zhao, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Genetic engineering in livestock was greatly enhanced by the emergence of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9), which can be programmed with a single-guide RNA (sgRNA) to generate site-specific DNA breaks. However, the uncertainties caused by wide variations in sgRNA activity impede the utility of this system in generating genetically modified pigs. Here, we described a single blastocyst genotyping system to provide a simple and rapid solution to evaluate and compare the sgRNA efficiency at inducing indel mutations for a given gene locus. Assessment of sgRNA mutagenesis efficiencies can be achieved within 10 days from the design of the sgRNA. The most effective sgRNA selected by this system was successfully used to induce site-specific insertion through homology-directed repair at a frequency exceeding 13%. Additionally, the highly efficient gene deletion via the selected sgRNA was confirmed in pig fibroblast cells, which could serve as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer. We further showed that direct cytoplasmic injection of Cas9 mRNA and the favorable sgRNA into zygotes could generate biallelic knockout piglets with an efficiency of up to 100%. Thus, our method considerably reduces the uncertainties and expands the practical possibilities of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering in pigs. PMID:26293209

  1. Direct and indirect costs associated with ankylosing spondylitis and related disease activity scores in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Akkoç, Nurullah; Direskeneli, Haner; Erdem, Hakan; Gül, Ahmet; Kabasakal, Yasemin; Kiraz, Sedat; Balkan Tezer, Dilara; Hacıbedel, Başak; Hamuryudan, Vedat

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed quality of life, direct and indirect healthcare costs related to ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This study included 650 prevalent AS patients visiting seven centers at tertiary healthcare institutions in Turkey who were interviewed using a standard questionnaire to determine annual direct and indirect healthcare costs. Eligible patients were age ≥18 years with AS for at least 12 months. Direct costs were categorized as inpatient, outpatient and pharmacy, and AS-related consultation. Indirect costs were categorized as workday loss, additional AS-related costs, and caregiver costs. Clinical outcome measures were obtained, including Patients' Global Disease Activity (Pt-GDA); visual analog scale (Pain-VAS) for pain; Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Functional Index (BASFI), and Metrology Index (BASMI) scores, and EuroQoL 5 dimension (EQ-5D) health status survey scores. Mean (€,335.20) and median (€5,671.00) annual costs per patient were calculated. Pharmacy costs (€4,032.73) were highest among overall expenditures, followed by additional AS-related consultation (€2,480.38), outpatient (€225.02), and inpatient costs (€29.98). Over half of AS patients (54.8 %) experienced work loss. Related average annual costs were €414.16, based on income level. 10.3 % of AS patients incurred an additional €2,008.07 in 1 year. 6.8 % of patients required caregivers and incurred €778.70 in average annual patient paid costs. Mean Pt-GDA, Pain-VAS, EQ-5D, BASDAI, BASFI, and BASMI scores were 4.4, 40.5, 62.7, 3.6, 3.1, and 2.9, respectively. Direct and indirect AS-related costs are high and represent a considerable economic burden on Turkish AS patients. PMID:25749712

  2. Comparison of chiropractic student scores before and after utilizing active learning techniques in a classroom setting

    PubMed Central

    Guagliardo, Joseph G.; Hoiriis, Kathryn T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We report the differences in final examination scores achieved by students at the culmination of two different teaching strategies in an introductory skills course. Methods Multiple choice examination scores from six consecutive academic calendar sessions over 18 months (n = 503) were compared. Two groups were used: Cohort A (n = 290) represented students who were enrolled in the course 3 consecutive academic sessions before an instructional change and Cohort B (n = 213) included students who were enrolled in 3 consecutive academic sessions following the instructional change, which included a more active learning format. Statistical analyses used were 2-tailed independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD), and effect size. Results The 2-tailed independent t-test revealed a significant difference between the two groups (t = −3.71, p < .001; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29–4.20). Significant difference was found in the highest performing subgroup compared to the lowest performing subgroup in Cohort A (F = 3.343, p = .037). For Cohort A subgroups 1 and 2, Tukey's HSD was p < .028. In Cohort B, no difference was found among subgroups (F = 1.912, p = .150, HSD p > .105). Conclusion Compared to previous versions of the same course taught by the same instructor, the students in the new course design performed better, suggesting that using active learning techniques helps improve student achievement. PMID:23964739

  3. Performance characteristics of the simplified version of ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score (SASDAS).

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Dilek; Yildirim, Tulay; Avci, Okan; Tomas, Nazmiye; Akar, Servet

    2016-07-01

    Various types of disease activity measures are available for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), and there is no gold standard for all individual patients. The ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score (ASDAS) is highly discriminatory, sensitive to change, and associated with structural progression. A simplified version of the ASDAS (SASDAS) was proposed and found to be a simple and practical tool to assess disease activity. Our aim was to test the performance characteristics of the SASDAS and compare it with validated tools. In total, 97 consecutive ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients were included in the study. Disease activity was assessed by the ASDAS-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), ASDAS-C-reactive protein (CRP), bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), and SASDAS. The relationship among these activity indices and the level of agreement of various activity categories were tested. There was a strong correlation between the SASDAS and other activity indices, including the BASDAI (r = 0.916, p < 0.001), ASDAS-CRP (r = 0.847, p < 0.001), and ASDAS-ESR (r = 0.942, p < 0.001). Although the agreement between the ASDAS-ESR and SASDAS was good (weighted kappa of 0.744 and total agreement of 77 %), there was moderate agreement between the ASDAS-CRP and SASDAS (weighted kappa of 0.579 and total agreement of 66 %). The disagreement was particularly striking in "moderate" and "high disease activity" states. Approximately 40 % of patients classified as moderate activity according to the ASDAS-ESR and 45 % according to the ASDAS-CRP were differentially categorized by the SASDAS. The results of the present analysis suggest that the simplified version of the ASDAS-ESR should be further validated in various settings and populations due to a questionable level of agreement between the ASDAS-CRP and SASDAS. PMID:26670454

  4. Photoactivatable CRISPR-Cas9 for optogenetic genome editing.

    PubMed

    Nihongaki, Yuta; Kawano, Fuun; Nakajima, Takahiro; Sato, Moritoshi

    2015-07-01

    We describe an engineered photoactivatable Cas9 (paCas9) that enables optogenetic control of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing in human cells. paCas9 consists of split Cas9 fragments and photoinducible dimerization domains named Magnets. In response to blue light irradiation, paCas9 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293T cells induces targeted genome sequence modifications through both nonhomologous end joining and homology-directed repair pathways. Genome editing activity can be switched off simply by extinguishing the light. We also demonstrate activation of paCas9 in spatial patterns determined by the sites of irradiation. Optogenetic control of targeted genome editing should facilitate improved understanding of complex gene networks and could prove useful in biomedical applications. PMID:26076431

  5. Direct Injection of CRISPR/Cas9-Related mRNA into Cytoplasm of Parthenogenetically Activated Porcine Oocytes Causes Frequent Mosaicism for Indel Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masahiro; Koriyama, Miyu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ohtsuka, Masato; Sakurai, Takayuki; Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Nakamura, Shingo; Miyoshi, Kazuchika

    2015-01-01

    Some reports demonstrated successful genome editing in pigs by one-step zygote microinjection of mRNA of CRISPR/Cas9-related components. Given the relatively long gestation periods and the high cost of housing, the establishment of a single blastocyst-based assay for rapid optimization of the above system is required. As a proof-of-concept, we attempted to disrupt a gene (GGTA1) encoding the α-1,3-galactosyltransferase that synthesizes the α-Gal epitope using parthenogenetically activated porcine oocytes. The lack of α-Gal epitope expression can be monitored by staining with fluorescently labeled isolectin BS-I-B4 (IB4), which binds specifically to the α-Gal epitope. When oocytes were injected with guide RNA specific to GGTA1 together with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and human Cas9 mRNAs, 65% (24/37) of the developing blastocysts exhibited green fluorescence, although almost all (96%, 23/24) showed a mosaic fluorescent pattern. Staining with IB4 revealed that the green fluorescent area often had a reduced binding activity to IB4. Of the 16 samples tested, six (five fluorescent and one non-fluorescent blastocysts) had indel mutations, suggesting a correlation between EGFP expression and mutation induction. Furthermore, it is suggested that zygote microinjection of mRNAs might lead to the production of piglets with cells harboring various mutation types. PMID:26247938

  6. Direct Injection of CRISPR/Cas9-Related mRNA into Cytoplasm of Parthenogenetically Activated Porcine Oocytes Causes Frequent Mosaicism for Indel Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masahiro; Koriyama, Miyu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ohtsuka, Masato; Sakurai, Takayuki; Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Nakamura, Shingo; Miyoshi, Kazuchika

    2015-01-01

    Some reports demonstrated successful genome editing in pigs by one-step zygote microinjection of mRNA of CRISPR/Cas9-related components. Given the relatively long gestation periods and the high cost of housing, the establishment of a single blastocyst-based assay for rapid optimization of the above system is required. As a proof-of-concept, we attempted to disrupt a gene (GGTA1) encoding the α-1,3-galactosyltransferase that synthesizes the α-Gal epitope using parthenogenetically activated porcine oocytes. The lack of α-Gal epitope expression can be monitored by staining with fluorescently labeled isolectin BS-I-B4 (IB4), which binds specifically to the α-Gal epitope. When oocytes were injected with guide RNA specific to GGTA1 together with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and human Cas9 mRNAs, 65% (24/37) of the developing blastocysts exhibited green fluorescence, although almost all (96%, 23/24) showed a mosaic fluorescent pattern. Staining with IB4 revealed that the green fluorescent area often had a reduced binding activity to IB4. Of the 16 samples tested, six (five fluorescent and one non-fluorescent blastocysts) had indel mutations, suggesting a correlation between EGFP expression and mutation induction. Furthermore, it is suggested that zygote microinjection of mRNAs might lead to the production of piglets with cells harboring various mutation types. PMID:26247938

  7. Correlation of Paraoxonase Status with Disease Activity Score and Systemic Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Usha Dudeja; Siddiqui, Merajul Haque; Sharma, Dilutpal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite, various preventive efforts on conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, the incidence of CVD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients increases continuously. To solve this conundrum one needs more investigations. Aim The present study was conducted to evaluate the plasma paraoxonase (PON) activity along with the markers of systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and disease activity score-28 (DAS28) in RA patients and clarify their role in determining the probability of RA patients to develop future CVD risk. Materials and Methods Plasma PON, total antioxidant activity (TAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), synovial interleukin-6 (IL-6) and erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in 40 RA patients aged 40-55 years aged and 40 age-matched healthy controls. The data obtained were compared statistically by using Student’s t-test and Pearson correlation test. Results Besides dyslipidaemia, marked reduction in plasma PON and TAA (p< 0.05) were observed in RA patients as compared with that of healthy controls. Erythrocyte MDA, plasma CRP and synovial IL-6 levels were increased significantly (p<0.05) in RA patients. PON was negatively correlated with MDA (r = - 0.672; p < 0.001), CRP (r = -0.458; p<0.05), IL-6 (r = -0.426; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r = -0.598; p < 0.001), and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol (r = 0.648; p<0.001) and TAA (r = 0.608; p< 0.001) levels in RA patients. Conclusion Alteration in PON activity might contribute to the progression of future CVD risk in RA patients, which may result from interplay of several confounding factors, such as inflammation, oxidative stress and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, plasma PON activity, CRP and TAA levels could be considered as non-traditional factors to predict CVD risk. Thus, it is suggested that future drugs could be developed to target the non-traditional risk factors in RA patients. PMID:27134854

  8. Structure and activity of the RNA-targeting Type III-B CRISPR-Cas complex of Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yifan; Taylor, David W.; van Duijn, Esther; Barendregt, Arjan; Vlot, Marnix; Koehorst, Jasper J.; Sakamoto, Keiko; Masuda, Akiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Schaap, Peter J.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Heck, Albert J.R.; Yonekura, Koji; van der Oost, John; Shinkai, Akeo

    2014-01-01

    Summary The CRISPR-Cas system is a prokaryotic host defense system against genetic elements. The Type III-B CRISPR-Cas system of the bacterium Thermus thermophilus, the TtCmr complex, is composed of six different protein subunits (Cmr1-6) and one crRNA with a stoichiometry of Cmr112131445361:crRNA1. The TtCmr complex co-purifies with crRNA species of 40 and 46 nt, originating from a distinct subset of CRISPR loci and spacers. The TtCmr complex cleaves the target RNA at multiple sites with 6 nt intervals via a 5’ ruler mechanism. Electron microscopy revealed that the structure of TtCmr resembles a ‘sea worm’ and is composed of a Cmr2-3 heterodimer ‘tail’, a helical backbone of Cmr4 subunits capped by Cmr5 subunits, and a curled ‘head’ containing Cmr1 and Cmr6. Despite having a backbone of only four Cmr4 subunits and being both longer and narrower, the overall architecture of TtCmr resembles that of Type I Cascade complexes. PMID:24119403

  9. [CAS General Standards 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) is to promote the improvement of programs and services to enhance the quality of student learning and development. CAS is a consortium of professional associations who work collaboratively to develop and promulgate standards and guidelines and to encourage…

  10. Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) serum levels in rheumatoid arthritis: correlations with insulin resistance and disease activity scores.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulas, Theodoros; Hodson, James; Sandoo, Aamer; Smith, Jacqueline; Kitas, George D

    2015-09-01

    Vascular abnormalities predisposing to atherosclerosis are present in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and associate with excess cardiovascular risk. Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity, has been recognised as novel risk factor for endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We aimed to compare SDMA levels in RA patients and controls and to investigate whether they are influenced by demographic, inflammatory or metabolic factors. Serum SDMA levels were measured in 197 RA individuals [median age: 67 years (quartiles: 59-3), 153 (78 %) females] and 82 controls [median age: 44 years [quartiles: 33-55, 50 (61 %) females]. Routine biochemistry tests, lipid profile, glycemic profile [glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI)], as well as inflammatory markers were measured in all patients. Paired analysis was employed for the comparison of SDMA in two groups and multivariable regression models were performed to identify predictors of SDMA in the RA cohort. SDMA was significantly lower in RA than control patients in both unpaired and paired analyses (P < 0.001 and P = 0.005, respectively), with the magnitude of the difference being similar in both models. QUICKI (P = 0.005) and disease activity score-28 (P = 0.007) were positively related to SDMA in the RA cohort, whilst a negative correlation with renal function (eGFR) was detected (P = 0.005). The molecular explanation of lower serum SDMA is unclear, but the established relationships with indices of disease activity and insulin resistance, may underline the pathogenetic role of the L-arginine/NO pathway dysregulation in the development of atherosclerosis in RA. The biological and clinical importance of SDMA in RA remains to be evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. PMID:25772817

  11. Does body mass index (BMI) influence the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score in axial spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Rubio Vargas, Roxana; van den Berg, Rosaline; van Lunteren, Miranda; Ez-Zaitouni, Zineb; Bakker, Pauline A C; Dagfinrud, Hanne; Ramonda, Roberta; Landewé, Robert; Molenaar, Esmeralda; van Gaalen, Floris A; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with elevated C reactive protein (CRP) levels. The Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) combines patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and CRP. We evaluated the effect of body mass index (BMI) on CRP and on ASDAS, and studied if ASDAS can be used in obese axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) patients to assess disease activity. Methods Baseline data of patients with chronic back pain of short duration included in the SPondyloArthritis Caught Early (SPACE) cohort were used. Collected data included BMI and ASDAS. Patients were classified according to the ASAS axSpA classification criteria and BMI (overweight ≥25 and obese ≥30). Correlation and linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relation between BMI and ASDAS. Linear regression models were performed to assess if age or gender were effect modifiers in the relation between BMI and CRP, and between BMI and ASDAS. Results In total, 428 patients were analysed (n=168 axSpA; n=260 no-axSpA). The mean age was 31.1 years, 36.9% were male, 26.4% were overweight and 13.3% obese, median CRP was 3 mg/L and the mean ASDAS was 2.6. Gender was the only factor modifying the relationship between BMI and CRP as BMI had an influence on CRP only in females (β=0.35; p<0.001). Correlations between BMI and CRP or PROs were generally weak, and only significant for CRP in female patients. BMI was not related to ASDAS in axSpA patients. Conclusions ASDAS is not affected by BMI in axSpA patients. Therefore, based on our data it is not necessary to take BMI in consideration when assessing disease activity using ASDAS in axSpA patients. PMID:27403336

  12. Unification of Cas protein families and a simple scenario for the origin and evolution of CRISPR-Cas systems

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity systems that are present in most Archaea and many Bacteria function by incorporating fragments of alien genomes into specific genomic loci, transcribing the inserts and using the transcripts as guide RNAs to destroy the genome of the cognate virus or plasmid. This RNA interference-like immune response is mediated by numerous, diverse and rapidly evolving Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins, several of which form the Cascade complex involved in the processing of CRISPR transcripts and cleavage of the target DNA. Comparative analysis of the Cas protein sequences and structures led to the classification of the CRISPR-Cas systems into three Types (I, II and III). Results A detailed comparison of the available sequences and structures of Cas proteins revealed several unnoticed homologous relationships. The Repeat-Associated Mysterious Proteins (RAMPs) containing a distinct form of the RNA Recognition Motif (RRM) domain, which are major components of the CRISPR-Cas systems, were classified into three large groups, Cas5, Cas6 and Cas7. Each of these groups includes many previously uncharacterized proteins now shown to adopt the RAMP structure. Evidence is presented that large subunits contained in most of the CRISPR-Cas systems could be homologous to Cas10 proteins which contain a polymerase-like Palm domain and are predicted to be enzymatically active in Type III CRISPR-Cas systems but inactivated in Type I systems. These findings, the fact that the CRISPR polymerases, RAMPs and Cas2 all contain core RRM domains, and distinct gene arrangements in the three types of CRISPR-Cas systems together provide for a simple scenario for origin and evolution of the CRISPR-Cas machinery. Under this scenario, the CRISPR-Cas system originated in thermophilic Archaea and subsequently spread horizontally among prokaryotes. Conclusions Because of the extreme diversity of CRISPR-Cas systems, in-depth sequence and structure comparison continue to

  13. Predicting Disease-Related Subnetworks for Type 1 Diabetes Using a New Network Activity Score

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shouguo; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this study we investigated the advantage of including network information in prioritizing disease genes of type 1 diabetes (T1D). First, a naïve Bayesian network (NBN) model was developed to integrate information from multiple data sources and to define a T1D-involvement probability score (PS) for each individual gene. The algorithm was validated using known functional candidate genes as a benchmark. Genes with higher PS were found to be more likely to appear in T1D-related publications. Next a new network activity metric was proposed to evaluate the T1D relevance of protein-protein interaction (PPI) subnetworks. The metric considered the contribution both from individual genes and from network topological characteristics. The predictions were confirmed by several independent datasets, including a genome wide association study (GWAS), and two large-scale human gene expression studies. We found that novel candidate genes in the T1D subnetworks showed more significant associations with T1D than genes predicted using PS alone. Interestingly, most novel candidates were not encoded within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, and their expression levels showed correlation with disease only in cohorts with low-risk HLA genotypes. The results suggested the importance of mapping disease gene networks in dissecting the genetics of complex diseases, and offered a general approach to network-based disease gene prioritization from multiple data sources. PMID:22917479

  14. Cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CAS) is overexpressed in thyroid carcinoma and maintains tumor cell growth: A potential link to the BRAFV600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Kerstin; Drucker, Elisabeth; Oliver, Scott; Winkler, Juliane; Eiteneuer, Eva; Herpel, Esther; Breuhahn, Kai; Singer, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is among the most common malignant endocrine neoplasms with a rising incidence. Genetic alterations occurring in thyroid cancer frequently affect the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK-pathway such as the oncogenic, kinase-activating BRAF(V600E) mutation. Nuclear transport receptors including importins and exportins represent an important part of the nuclear transport machinery providing nucleo-cytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules. The role of nuclear transport receptors in the development and progression of thyroid carcinomas is largely unknown. Here, we studied the expression and function of the exportin cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CAS) in thyroid carcinogenesis and its link to the BRAF(V600E) mutation. By using immunohistochemistry (IHC) we found significantly increased IHC scores of CAS in primary papillary (PTC) and medullary (MTC), but not in follicular (FTC) thyroid carcinoma compared to non-tumorous (NT) thyroid tissue. Interestingly, metastases of the aforementioned subtypes including FTC showed a strong CAS positivity. Among PTCs we observed that CAS immunoreactivity was significantly higher in the tumors harboring the BRAF(V600E) mutation. Furthermore, depletion of CAS by RNAi in the BRAF(V600E)-positive PTC cell line B-CPAP led to reduced tumor cell growth measured by crystal violet assays. This phenotype could be attributed to reduced proliferation and increased cell death as assayed by BrdU ELISAs and immunoblotting for PARP-cleavage, respectively. Finally, we found additive effects of CAS siRNA and vemurafenib treatment in B-CPAP cells. Collectively, these data suggest that CAS overexpression in thyroid carcinoma depends on the subtype and the disease stage. Our findings also indicate that CAS maintains PTC cell proliferation and survival. Targeting CAS could represent a potential therapeutic approach particularly in combination with BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib in BRAF(V600E)-positive tumors. PMID:26892809

  15. Is anterior cruciate ligament surgery technique important in rehabilitation and activity scores?

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Celik, Haluk; Oc, Yunus; Camur, Savas

    2016-01-01

    To compare the two different anterior cruciate ligament surgery techniques’ effect in rehabilitation and activity performance. Fifty-five patients were evaluated. Twenty-seven patients with transtibial technique (TT), 28 with anatomic single-bundle technique (AT) included. Tegner Activity Scale (TAS) was performed at preoperation and follow-up. The returning time of the sport and work was evaluated at follow-up. Single-leg hop test was performed at follow-up. Outcomes were compared between the two groups. The determined length difference between the operated knee and the intact knee was compared between the two groups. Average age of TT and AT was 27.9±6.4 yr, 28.3±6 yr, respectively. There was a significant difference between the two groups in duration of returning to sport. TT group had higher duration to return to sport (P<0.01). No difference between the two groups in duration of returning to work (P>0.05). There was a significant difference between the two groups. TT group had significantly higher values than AT group (P<0.01). No difference in TAS between the two techniques at preoperation and at last follow-up (P>0.05). The increase of TAS in patients who had AT was higher than the patients who had TT (P>0.05). No difference in single-leg hop test at 55%–65%, 65%–75%, and 85%–95% level (P>0.05). In this test at 75%–85% TT group had higher values than AT group (P<0.05), AT group had higher values at 95%–105% level (P<0.05). Good short and long-term knee outcome scores depend on rehabilitation protocol after surgery. Surgery technique should provide the adequate stability in rehabilitation period. AT obtains better outcomes in rehabilitation. PMID:27419120

  16. Characterization of Cas9-Guide RNA Orthologs.

    PubMed

    Braff, Jonathan L; Yaung, Stephanie J; Esvelt, Kevin M; Church, George M

    2016-01-01

    In light of the multitude of new Cas9-mediated functionalities, the ability to carry out multiple Cas9-enabled processes simultaneously and in a single cell is becoming increasingly valuable. Accomplishing this aim requires a set of Cas9-guide RNA (gRNA) pairings that are functionally independent and insulated from one another. For instance, two such protein-gRNA complexes would allow for concurrent activation and editing at independent target sites in the same cell. The problem of establishing orthogonal CRISPR systems can be decomposed into three stages. First, putatively orthogonal systems must be identified with an emphasis on minimizing sequence similarity of the Cas9 protein and its associated RNAs. Second, the systems must be characterized well enough to effectively express and target the systems using gRNAs. Third, the systems should be established as orthogonal to one another by testing for activity and cross talk. Here, we describe the value of these orthogonal CRISPR systems, outline steps for selecting and characterizing potentially orthogonal Cas9-gRNA pairs, and discuss considerations for the desired specificity in Cas9-coupled functions. PMID:27140923

  17. The effect of routine hoof trimming on locomotion score, ruminating time, activity, and milk yield of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Van Hertem, T; Parmet, Y; Steensels, M; Maltz, E; Antler, A; Schlageter-Tello, A A; Lokhorst, C; Romanini, C E B; Viazzi, S; Bahr, C; Berckmans, D; Halachmi, I

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of hoof trimming on cow behavior (ruminating time, activity, and locomotion score) and performance (milk yield) over time. Data were gathered from a commercial dairy farm in Israel where routine hoof trimming is done by a trained hoof trimmer twice per year on the entire herd. In total, 288 cows spread over 6 groups with varying production levels were used for the analysis. Cow behavior was measured continuously with a commercial neck activity logger and a ruminating time logger (HR-Tag, SCR Engineers Ltd., Netanya, Israel). Milk yield was recorded during each milking session with a commercial milk flow sensor (Free Flow, SCR Engineers Ltd.). A trained observer assigned on the spot 5-point locomotion scores during 19 nighttime milking occasions between 22 October 2012 and 4 February 2013. Behavioral and performance data were gathered from 1wk before hoof trimming until 1wk after hoof trimming. A generalized linear mixed model was used to statistically test all main and interactive effects of hoof trimming, parity, lactation stage, and hoof lesion presence on ruminating time, neck activity, milk yield, and locomotion score. The results on locomotion scores show that the proportional distribution of cows in the different locomotion score classes changes significantly after trimming. The proportion of cows with a locomotion score ≥3 increases from 14% before to 34% directly after the hoof trimming. Two months after the trimming, the number of cows with a locomotion score ≥3 reduced to 20%, which was still higher than the baseline values 2wk before the trimming. The neck activity level was significantly reduced 1d after trimming (380±6 bits/d) compared with before trimming (389±6 bits/d). Each one-unit increase in locomotion score reduced cow activity level by 4.488 bits/d. The effect of hoof trimming on ruminating time was affected by an interaction effect with parity. The effect of hoof trimming on

  18. Optical Control of CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing

    PubMed Central

    Hemphill, James; Borchardt, Erin K.; Brown, Kalyn; Asokan, Aravind; Deiters, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has emerged as an important tool in biomedical research for a wide range of applications, with significant potential for genome engineering and gene therapy. In order to achieve conditional control of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, a genetically encoded light-activated Cas9 was engineered through the site-specific installation of a caged lysine amino acid. Several potential lysine residues were identified as viable caging sites that can be modified to optically control Cas9 function, as demonstrated through optical activation and deactivation of both exogenous and endogenous gene function. PMID:25905628

  19. Substrate generation for endonucleases of CRISPR/cas systems.

    PubMed

    Zoephel, Judith; Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Richter, Hagen; Plagens, André; Randau, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of viruses and their prokaryotic hosts shaped the evolution of bacterial and archaeal life. Prokaryotes developed several strategies to evade viral attacks that include restriction modification, abortive infection and CRISPR/Cas systems. These adaptive immune systems found in many Bacteria and most Archaea consist of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) sequences and a number of CRISPR associated (Cas) genes (Fig. 1) (1-3). Different sets of Cas proteins and repeats define at least three major divergent types of CRISPR/Cas systems (4). The universal proteins Cas1 and Cas2 are proposed to be involved in the uptake of viral DNA that will generate a new spacer element between two repeats at the 5' terminus of an extending CRISPR cluster (5). The entire cluster is transcribed into a precursor-crRNA containing all spacer and repeat sequences and is subsequently processed by an enzyme of the diverse Cas6 family into smaller crRNAs (6-8). These crRNAs consist of the spacer sequence flanked by a 5' terminal (8 nucleotides) and a 3' terminal tag derived from the repeat sequence (9). A repeated infection of the virus can now be blocked as the new crRNA will be directed by a Cas protein complex (Cascade) to the viral DNA and identify it as such via base complementarity(10). Finally, for CRISPR/Cas type 1 systems, the nuclease Cas3 will destroy the detected invader DNA (11,12) . These processes define CRISPR/Cas as an adaptive immune system of prokaryotes and opened a fascinating research field for the study of the involved Cas proteins. The function of many Cas proteins is still elusive and the causes for the apparent diversity of the CRISPR/Cas systems remain to be illuminated. Potential activities of most Cas proteins were predicted via detailed computational analyses. A major fraction of Cas proteins are either shown or proposed to function as endonucleases (4). Here, we present methods to generate crRNAs and precursor-cRNAs for

  20. Protein engineering of Cas9 for enhanced function

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Benjamin L.; Nadler, Dana C.; Savage, David F.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas systems act to protect the cell from invading nucleic acids in many bacteria and archaea. The bacterial immune protein Cas9 is a component of one of these CRISPR/Cas systems and has recently been adapted as a tool for genome editing. Cas9 is easily targeted to bind and cleave a DNA sequence via a complimentary RNA; this straightforward programmability has gained Cas9 rapid acceptance in the field of genetic engineering. While this technology has developed quickly, a number of challenges regarding Cas9 specificity, efficiency, fusion protein function, and spatiotemporal control within the cell remain. In this work, we develop a platform for constructing novel proteins to address these open questions. We demonstrate methods to either screen or select active Cas9 mutants and use the screening technique to isolate functional Cas9 variants with a heterologous PDZ domain inserted directly into the protein. As a proof of concept, these methods lay the groundwork for the future construction of diverse Cas9 proteins. Straightforward and accessible techniques for genetic editing are helping to elucidate biology in new and exciting ways; a platform to engineer new functionalities into Cas9 will help forge the next generation of genome modifying tools. PMID:25398355

  1. Costs of CRISPR-Cas-mediated resistance in Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Pedro F.; Lafforgue, Guillaume; Gatchitch, Francois; Gardan, Rozenn; Moineau, Sylvain; Gandon, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is a form of adaptive sequence-specific immunity in microbes. This system offers unique opportunities for the study of coevolution between bacteria and their viral pathogens, bacteriophages. A full understanding of the coevolutionary dynamics of CRISPR-Cas requires knowing the magnitude of the cost of resisting infection. Here, using the gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus and its associated virulent phage 2972, a well-established model system harbouring at least two type II functional CRISPR-Cas systems, we obtained different fitness measures based on growth assays in isolation or in pairwise competition. We measured the fitness cost associated with different components of this adaptive immune system: the cost of Cas protein expression, the constitutive cost of increasing immune memory through additional spacers, and the conditional costs of immunity during phage exposure. We found that Cas protein expression is particularly costly, as Cas-deficient mutants achieved higher competitive abilities than the wild-type strain with functional Cas proteins. Increasing immune memory by acquiring up to four phage-derived spacers was not associated with fitness costs. In addition, the activation of the CRISPR-Cas system during phage exposure induces significant but small fitness costs. Together these results suggest that the costs of the CRISPR-Cas system arise mainly due to the maintenance of the defence system. We discuss the implications of these results for the evolution of CRISPR-Cas-mediated immunity. PMID:26224708

  2. Everyone Gains: Extracurricular Activities in High School and Higher SAT® Scores. Research Report No. 2005-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everson, Howard T.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents evidence that links participation in extracurricular activities (ECAs) in high school with higher SAT Reasoning Test™ (SAT®) scores. Using structural equation models (SEMs) with latent means, we analyzed data from a national sample of college-bound high school students. A series of structural equation models--isolating the…

  3. Inducible in vivo genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Kevin P; Muley, Ashlesha; Kastenhuber, Edward R; Livshits, Geulah; Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; Socci, Nicholas D; Lowe, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing enables the rapid genetic manipulation of any genomic locus without the need for gene targeting by homologous recombination. Here we describe a conditional transgenic approach that allows temporal control of CRISPR/Cas9 activity for inducible genome editing in adult mice. We show that doxycycline-regulated Cas9 induction enables widespread gene disruption in multiple tissues and that limiting the duration of Cas9 expression or using a Cas9D10A (Cas9n) variant, can regulate the frequency and size of target gene modifications, respectively. Further, we show that the inducible CRISPR (iCRISPR) system can be used effectively to create biallelic mutation in multiple target loci and thus, provides a flexible and fast platform to study loss of function phenotypes in vivo. PMID:25690852

  4. Objective Functional Assessment After a Head Injury Using Movement and Activity in Physical Space Scores: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, James L.; McElhiney, Danielle; David, Shannon; Sinha, Gaurav; Ragan, Brian G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the potential benefit of using a global positioning system (GPS) and accelerometry as an objective functional-activity measure after concussion by creating Movement and Activity in Physical Space (MAPS) scores. Background: A 21-year-old female soccer player suffered a blow to the back of the head from an opponent's shoulder during an away match. No athletic trainer was present. She played the remainder of the match and reported to the athletic training facility the next day for evaluation. Differential Diagnosis: Concussion. Treatment: The athlete was removed from all athletic activities. Her symptoms were monitored based on the Zurich guidelines. She was also instructed to wear an accelerometer on her hip and to carry an on-person GPS receiver at all times for 10 days. Her total symptom scores for the 4 symptomatic days were 82, 39, 49, and 36. Her mean MAPS functional score for symptomatic days 3 through 5 was 900.9 and for asymptomatic days 6 through 11 was 2734.9. Uniqueness: We monitored the patient's function during the concussion-recovery process using an on-person GPS receiver and accelerometer to calculate personalized MAPS scores. This novel approach to measuring function after injury may provide a useful complementary tool to help with return-to-play decisions. Conclusions: An on-person GPS receiver and accelerometer were used to observe the patient's physical activity in a free-living environment, allowing for an objective measure of function during recovery. Her MAPS scores were low while she was symptomatic and increased as she became asymptomatic. We saw the expected inverse relationship between symptoms and function. In situations where accuracy of reported symptoms may be a concern, this measure may provide a way to verify the validity of, or raise doubts about, self-reported symptoms. PMID:24840582

  5. Thioredoxin 1 in Prostate Tissue Is Associated with Gleason Score, Erythrocyte Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Dietary Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Terrence M.; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Pop, Elena A.; Lee, Sang Gil; Su, L. Joseph; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Steck, Susan E.; Arab, Lenore; Mohler, James L.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Koo, Sung I.; Chun, Ock K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in men in the US. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress is involved in prostate cancer. Methods. In this study, thioredoxin 1 (Trx 1), an enzyme and subcellular indicator of redox status, was measured in prostate biopsy tissue from 55 men from the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project. A pathologist blindly scored levels of Trx 1. The association between Trx 1 and the Gleason score, erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity, and dietary antioxidant intake was determined using Fisher's exact test. Results. Trx 1 levels in benign prostate tissue in men with incident prostate cancer were positively associated with the Gleason score (P = 0.01) and inversely associated with dietary antioxidant intake (P = 0.03). In prostate cancer tissue, Trx 1 levels were associated with erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity (P = 0.01). No association was found for other erythrocyte enzymes. Greater Gleason score of malignant tissue corresponds to a greater difference in Trx 1 levels between malignant and benign tissue (P = 0.04). Conclusion. These results suggest that the redox status of prostate tissue is associated with prostate cancer grade and both endogenous and exogenous antioxidants. PMID:26357575

  6. Thioredoxin 1 in Prostate Tissue Is Associated with Gleason Score, Erythrocyte Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Dietary Antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Vance, Terrence M; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Pop, Elena A; Lee, Sang Gil; Su, L Joseph; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Bensen, Jeannette T; Steck, Susan E; Arab, Lenore; Mohler, James L; Chen, Ming-Hui; Koo, Sung I; Chun, Ock K

    2015-01-01

    Background. Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in men in the US. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress is involved in prostate cancer. Methods. In this study, thioredoxin 1 (Trx 1), an enzyme and subcellular indicator of redox status, was measured in prostate biopsy tissue from 55 men from the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project. A pathologist blindly scored levels of Trx 1. The association between Trx 1 and the Gleason score, erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity, and dietary antioxidant intake was determined using Fisher's exact test. Results. Trx 1 levels in benign prostate tissue in men with incident prostate cancer were positively associated with the Gleason score (P = 0.01) and inversely associated with dietary antioxidant intake (P = 0.03). In prostate cancer tissue, Trx 1 levels were associated with erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity (P = 0.01). No association was found for other erythrocyte enzymes. Greater Gleason score of malignant tissue corresponds to a greater difference in Trx 1 levels between malignant and benign tissue (P = 0.04). Conclusion. These results suggest that the redox status of prostate tissue is associated with prostate cancer grade and both endogenous and exogenous antioxidants. PMID:26357575

  7. Breaking-Cas-interactive design of guide RNAs for CRISPR-Cas experiments for ENSEMBL genomes.

    PubMed

    Oliveros, Juan C; Franch, Mònica; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; San-León, David; Montoliu, Lluis; Cubas, Pilar; Pazos, Florencio

    2016-07-01

    The CRISPR/Cas technology is enabling targeted genome editing in multiple organisms with unprecedented accuracy and specificity by using RNA-guided nucleases. A critical point when planning a CRISPR/Cas experiment is the design of the guide RNA (gRNA), which directs the nuclease and associated machinery to the desired genomic location. This gRNA has to fulfil the requirements of the nuclease and lack homology with other genome sites that could lead to off-target effects. Here we introduce the Breaking-Cas system for the design of gRNAs for CRISPR/Cas experiments, including those based in the Cas9 nuclease as well as others recently introduced. The server has unique features not available in other tools, including the possibility of using all eukaryotic genomes available in ENSEMBL (currently around 700), placing variable PAM sequences at 5' or 3' and setting the guide RNA length and the scores per nucleotides. It can be freely accessed at: http://bioinfogp.cnb.csic.es/tools/breakingcas, and the code is available upon request. PMID:27166368

  8. Semiotic and Discursive Variables in CAS-Based Didactical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winslow, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Presents a semiotic analysis of the potential of computer algebra systems (CAS) for enabling mathematical activity on a conceptual level higher than usual. Illustrates examples of theoretical points from a development project in the context of a first year university course in calculus. Discusses how CAS may be used in a didactical analysis and in…

  9. Foreign DNA capture during CRISPR–Cas adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, James K.; Harrington, Lucas B.; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Engelman, Alan N.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea generate adaptive immunity against phages and plasmids by integrating foreign DNA of specific 30–40 base pair (bp) lengths into clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci as spacer segments1–6. The universally conserved Cas1–Cas2 integrase complex catalyzes spacer acquisition using a direct nucleophilic integration mechanism similar to retroviral integrases and transposases7–13. How the Cas1–Cas2 complex selects foreign DNA substrates for integration remains unknown. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of the Escherichia coli Cas1–Cas2 complex bound to cognate 33 nucleotide (nt) protospacer DNA substrates. The protein complex creates a curved binding surface spanning the length of the DNA and splays the ends of the protospacer to allow each terminal nucleophilic 3′–OH to enter a channel leading into the Cas1 active sites. Phosphodiester backbone interactions between the protospacer and the proteins explain the sequence-nonspecific substrate selection observed in vivo2–4. Our results uncover the structural basis for foreign DNA capture and the mechanism by which Cas1–Cas2 functions as a molecular ruler to dictate the sequence architecture of CRISPR loci. PMID:26503043

  10. Foreign DNA capture during CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, James K; Harrington, Lucas B; Kranzusch, Philip J; Engelman, Alan N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2015-11-26

    Bacteria and archaea generate adaptive immunity against phages and plasmids by integrating foreign DNA of specific 30-40-base-pair lengths into clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci as spacer segments. The universally conserved Cas1-Cas2 integrase complex catalyses spacer acquisition using a direct nucleophilic integration mechanism similar to retroviral integrases and transposases. How the Cas1-Cas2 complex selects foreign DNA substrates for integration remains unknown. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of the Escherichia coli Cas1-Cas2 complex bound to cognate 33-nucleotide protospacer DNA substrates. The protein complex creates a curved binding surface spanning the length of the DNA and splays the ends of the protospacer to allow each terminal nucleophilic 3'-OH to enter a channel leading into the Cas1 active sites. Phosphodiester backbone interactions between the protospacer and the proteins explain the sequence-nonspecific substrate selection observed in vivo. Our results uncover the structural basis for foreign DNA capture and the mechanism by which Cas1-Cas2 functions as a molecular ruler to dictate the sequence architecture of CRISPR loci. PMID:26503043

  11. Genome-wide specificity of DNA binding, gene regulation, and chromatin remodeling by TALE- and CRISPR/Cas9-based transcriptional activators

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Kocak, D. Dewran; Vockley, Christopher M.; Bledsoe, Peggy; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E.; Reddy, Timothy E.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome engineering technologies based on the CRISPR/Cas9 and TALE systems are enabling new approaches in science and biotechnology. However, the specificity of these tools in complex genomes and the role of chromatin structure in determining DNA binding are not well understood. We analyzed the genome-wide effects of TALE- and CRISPR-based transcriptional activators in human cells using ChIP-seq to assess DNA-binding specificity and RNA-seq to measure the specificity of perturbing the transcriptome. Additionally, DNase-seq was used to assess genome-wide chromatin remodeling that occurs as a result of their action. Our results show that these transcription factors are highly specific in both DNA binding and gene regulation and are able to open targeted regions of closed chromatin independent of gene activation. Collectively, these results underscore the potential for these technologies to make precise changes to gene expression for gene and cell therapies or fundamental studies of gene function. PMID:26025803

  12. Physical Activity Level Improves the Predictive Accuracy of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score: The ATTICA Study (2002–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N.; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Bougatsas, Dimitrios; Chatzigeorgiou, Michael; Kavouras, Stavros A.; Chrysohoou, Christina; Skoumas, Ioannis; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although physical activity (PA) has long been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), assessment of PA status has never been used as a part of CVD risk prediction tools. The aim of the present work was to examine whether the inclusion of PA status in a CVD risk model improves its predictive accuracy. Methods: Data from the 10-year follow-up (2002–2012) of the n = 2020 participants (aged 18–89 years) of the ATTICA prospective study were used to test the research hypothesis. The HellenicSCORE (that incorporates age, sex, smoking, total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure levels) was calculated to estimate the baseline 10-year CVD risk; assessment of PA status was based on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The estimated CVD risk was tested against the observed 10-year incidence (i.e., development of acute coronary syndromes, stroke, or other CVD according to the World Health Organization [WHO]-International Classification of Diseases [ICD]-10 criteria). Changes in the predictive ability of the nested CVD risk model that contained the HellenicSCORE plus PA assessment were evaluated using Harrell's C and net reclassification index. Results: Both HellenicSCORE and PA status were predictors of future CVD events (P < 0.05). However, the estimating classification bias of the model that included only the HellenicSCORE was significantly reduced when PA assessment was included (Harrel's C = 0.012, P = 0.032); this reduction remained significant even when adjusted for diabetes mellitus and dietary habits (P < 0.05). Conclusions: CVD risk scores seem to be more accurate by incorporating individuals’ PA status; thus, may be more effective tools in primary prevention by efficiently allocating CVD candidates. PMID:27076890

  13. Apgar score

    MedlinePlus

    ... the baby's: Breathing effort Heart rate Muscle tone Reflexes Skin color Each category is scored with 0, ... scores 2 for muscle tone. Grimace response or reflex irritability is a term describing response to stimulation, ...

  14. The Effects of Activating Prior Topic and Metacognitive Knowledge on Text Comprehension Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostons, Danny; van der Werf, Greetje

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on prior knowledge activation has consistently shown that activating learners' prior knowledge has beneficial effects on learning. If learners activate their prior knowledge, this activated knowledge serves as a framework for establishing relationships between the knowledge they already possess and new information provided to…

  15. Conditional Control of CRISPR/Cas9 Function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenyuan; Deiters, Alexander

    2016-04-25

    The recently discovered CRISPR/Cas9 endonuclease system, comprised of a guide RNA for the recognition of a DNA target and the Cas9 nuclease protein for binding and processing the target, has been extensively studied and has been widely applied in genome editing, synthetic biology, and transcriptional modulation in cells and animals. Toward more precise genomic modification and further expansion of the CRISPR/Cas9 system as a spatiotemporally controlled gene regulatory system, several approaches of conditional activation of Cas9 function using small molecules and light have recently been developed. These methods have led to improvements in the genome editing specificity of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and enabled its activation with temporal and spatial precision. PMID:26996256

  16. A therapeutic trial of human melanomas with combined small interfering RNAs targeting adaptor molecules p130Cas and paxillin activated under expression of ganglioside GD3.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yusuke; Hamamura, Kazunori; Takei, Yoshifumi; Bhuiyan, Robiul Hasan; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that focal adhesion kinase (FAK), p130Cas and paxillin are crucially involved in the enhanced malignant properties under expression of ganglioside GD3 in melanoma cells. Therefore, molecules existing in the GD3-mediated signaling pathway could be considered as suitable targets for therapeutic intervention in malignant melanoma. The aim of this study was to determine whether blockade of p130Cas and/or paxillin by RNAi suppresses melanoma growth. We found a suitable dose (40 μM siRNA, 25 μl/tumor) of the siRNA to suppress p130Cas in the xenografts generated in nu/nu mice. Based on these results, we performed intratumoral (i.t.) treatment with anti-p130Cas and/or anti-paxillin siRNAs mixed with atelocollagen as a drug delivery system in a xenograft tumor of a human melanoma cell line, SK-MEL-28. Mixture of atelocollagen (1.75%) and an siRNA (500 or 1000 pmol/tumor) was injected into the tumors every 3 days after the first injection. An siRNA against human p130Cas markedly suppressed tumor growth of the xenograft in a dose-dependent manner, whereas siRNA against human paxillin slightly inhibited the tumor growth. A control siRNA against firefly luciferase showed no effect. To our surprise, siRNA against human p130Cas (500 or 1000 pmol/tumor) combined with siRNA against human paxillin dramatically suppressed tumor growth. In agreement with the tumor suppression effects of the anti-p130Cas siRNA, reduction in Ki-67 positive cell number as well as in p130Cas expression was demonstrated by immunohistostaining. These results suggested that blockade of GD3-mediated growth signaling pathways by siRNAs might be a novel and promising therapeutic strategy against malignant melanomas, provided signaling molecules such as p130Cas and paxillin are significantly expressed in individual cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Glycans in personalised medicine" Guest Editor: Professor Gordan Lauc. PMID:27068854

  17. AADS--an automated active site identification, docking, and scoring protocol for protein targets based on physicochemical descriptors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tanya; Biswas, D; Jayaram, B

    2011-10-24

    We report here a robust automated active site detection, docking, and scoring (AADS) protocol for proteins with known structures. The active site finder identifies all cavities in a protein and scores them based on the physicochemical properties of functional groups lining the cavities in the protein. The accuracy realized on 620 proteins with sizes ranging from 100 to 600 amino acids with known drug active sites is 100% when the top ten cavity points are considered. These top ten cavity points identified are then submitted for an automated docking of an input ligand/candidate molecule. The docking protocol uses an all atom energy based Monte Carlo method. Eight low energy docked structures corresponding to different locations and orientations of the candidate molecule are stored at each cavity point giving 80 docked structures overall which are then ranked using an effective free energy function and top five structures are selected. The predicted structure and energetics of the complexes agree quite well with experiment when tested on a data set of 170 protein-ligand complexes with known structures and binding affinities. The AADS methodology is implemented on an 80 processor cluster and presented as a freely accessible, easy to use tool at http://www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/dock/ActiveSite_new.jsp . PMID:21877713

  18. Aggregate entropy scoring for quantifying activity across endpoints with irregular correlation structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guozhu; Marvel, Skylar; Truong, Lisa; Tanguay, Robert L; Reif, David M

    2016-07-01

    Robust computational approaches are needed to characterize systems-level responses to chemical perturbations in environmental and clinical toxicology applications. Appropriate characterization of response presents a methodological challenge when dealing with diverse phenotypic endpoints measured using in vivo systems. In this article, we propose an information-theoretic method named Aggregate Entropy (AggE) and apply it to scoring multiplexed, phenotypic endpoints measured in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) across a broad concentration-response profile for a diverse set of 1060 chemicals. AggE accurately identified chemicals with significant morphological effects, including single-endpoint effects and multi-endpoint responses that would have been missed by univariate methods, while avoiding putative false-positives that confound traditional methods due to irregular correlation structure. By testing AggE in a variety of high-dimensional real and simulated datasets, we have characterized its performance and suggested implementation parameters that can guide its application across a wide range of experimental scenarios. PMID:27132190

  19. Optimization of genome editing through CRISPR-Cas9 engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Adikaram, Poorni; Pandey, Mritunjay; Genis, Allison; Simonds, William F

    2016-04-01

    CRISPR (Clustered Regularly-Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein 9) has rapidly become the most promising genome editing tool with great potential to revolutionize medicine. Through guidance of a 20 nucleotide RNA (gRNA), CRISPR-Cas9 finds and cuts target protospacer DNA precisely 3 base pairs upstream of a PAM (Protospacer Adjacent Motif). The broken DNA ends are repaired by either NHEJ (Non-Homologous End Joining) resulting in small indels, or by HDR (Homology Directed Repair) for precise gene or nucleotide replacement. Theoretically, CRISPR-Cas9 could be used to modify any genomic sequences, thereby providing a simple, easy, and cost effective means of genome wide gene editing. However, the off-target activity of CRISPR-Cas9 that cuts DNA sites with imperfect matches with gRNA have been of significant concern because clinical applications require 100% accuracy. Additionally, CRISPR-Cas9 has unpredictable efficiency among different DNA target sites and the PAM requirements greatly restrict its genome editing frequency. A large number of efforts have been made to address these impeding issues, but much more is needed to fully realize the medical potential of CRISPR-Cas9. In this article, we summarize the existing problems and current advances of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology and provide perspectives for the ultimate perfection of Cas9-mediated genome editing. PMID:27340770

  20. Clinical performance of two visual scoring systems in detecting and assessing activity status of occlusal caries in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Braga, M M; Ekstrand, K R; Martignon, S; Imparato, J C P; Ricketts, D N J; Mendes, F M

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the clinical performance of two sets of visual scoring criteria for detecting caries severity and assessing caries activity status in occlusal surfaces. Two visual scoring systems--the Nyvad criteria (NY) and the ICDAS-II including an adjunct system for lesion activity assessment (ICDAS-LAA)--were compared using 763 primary molars of 139 children aged 3-12 years. The examinations were performed by 2 calibrated examiners. A subsample (n = 50) was collected after extraction and histology with 0.1% red methyl dye was performed to validate lesion depth and activity. The reproducibility of the indices was calculated (kappa test) and ROC analysis was performed to assess their validity and related parameters were compared using McNemar's test. The association between the indices and with the histological examination was evaluated using Spearman's correlation coefficient (r(s)). Visual criteria showed excellent reproducibility both regarding severity (NY: 0.94; ICDAS-II: 0.91) and activity (NY: 0.90; LAA: 0.91). The NY and LAA showed good association in caries activity assessment (r(s) = 0.88; 95% CI = 0.86-0.89; p < 0.001). Nevertheless, considering only cavitated lesions, this association was not significant (p > 0.05). Concerning the severity, both indices presented similar validity parameters. At D2 threshold, the sensitivity was higher for NY (NY = 0.87; ICDAS = 0.61, p < 0.05). Regarding activity status, NY showed higher specificities and accuracies. In conclusion, NY and ICDAS-II criteria are comparable and present good reproducibility and validity to detect caries lesions and estimate their severities, but the LAA seems to overestimate the caries activity assessment of cavitated lesions compared to NY. PMID:20530964

  1. Scored Discussions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zola, John

    1992-01-01

    Suggests a classroom strategy to help students learn to analyze and discuss significant issues from history and current policy debates. Describes scored discussions in which small groups of students receive points for participation. Provides an example of a discussion on gold mining. Includes an agenda. Explores uses of scored discussions and…

  2. Scoring Package

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Scoring Package (PC database for purchase)   The NIST Scoring Package (Special Database 1) is a reference implementation of the draft Standard Method for Evaluating the Performance of Systems Intended to Recognize Hand-printed Characters from Image Data Scanned from Forms.

  3. DAS28 score vs. ultrasound examination for assessment of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity: comparison and discussion of pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Dura, Marta; Blumfield, Einat; Węgierska, Małgorzata; Żuchowski, Pawel; Wilińska-Jankowska, Arnika; Jeka, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease which is characterized by symetrical multiple joints involvement and extra-articular symptoms. Current EULAR diagnostic criteria for RA include disease activity parameters, such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP), which are used to calculate disease activity scores, including DAS and DAS28. Recently attempts have been made to assess disease activity using imaging diagnostic modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US). Due to significant progress in therapy effectiveness and early RA diagnosis possibility, imaging modalities become increasingly meaningful and many clinical trials confirm their usefulness. However, there are no consistent criteria for objective assessment of therapy effectiveness based on US. Moreover, it is not US availability that limits its common use, but rather significant variability between operators. This is why US remains only an additional tool to assess therapy efficacy with regard to DAS/DAS28 index.

  4. Genome Editing with CRISPR-Cas9: Can It Get Any Better?

    PubMed

    Haeussler, Maximilian; Concordet, Jean-Paul

    2016-05-20

    The CRISPR-Cas revolution is taking place in virtually all fields of life sciences. Harnessing DNA cleavage with the CRISPR-Cas9 system of Streptococcus pyogenes has proven to be extraordinarily simple and efficient, relying only on the design of a synthetic single guide RNA (sgRNA) and its co-expression with Cas9. Here, we review the progress in the design of sgRNA from the original dual RNA guide for S. pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SpCas9 and SaCas9). New assays for genome-wide identification of off-targets have provided important insights into the issue of cleavage specificity in vivo. At the same time, the on-target activity of thousands of guides has been determined. These data have led to numerous online tools that facilitate the selection of guide RNAs in target sequences. It appears that for most basic research applications, cleavage activity can be maximized and off-targets minimized by carefully choosing guide RNAs based on computational predictions. Moreover, recent studies of Cas proteins have further improved the flexibility and precision of the CRISPR-Cas toolkit for genome editing. Inspired by the crystal structure of the complex of sgRNA-SpCas9 bound to target DNA, several variants of SpCas9 have recently been engineered, either with novel protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) or with drastically reduced off-targets. Novel Cas9 and Cas9-like proteins called Cpf1 have also been characterized from other bacteria and will benefit from the insights obtained from SpCas9. Genome editing with CRISPR-Cas9 may also progress with better understanding and control of cellular DNA repair pathways activated after Cas9-induced DNA cleavage. PMID:27210042

  5. Introduction of p130cas signaling complex formation upon integrin-mediated cell adhesion: a role for Src family kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Vuori, K; Hirai, H; Aizawa, S; Ruoslahti, E

    1996-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion triggers intracellular signaling cascades, including tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins. Among these are the focal adhesion proteins p130cas (Cas) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Here we identify the kinase(s) mediating integrin-induced Cas phosphorylation and characterize protein-protein interactions mediated by phosphorylated Cas. We found that expression of a constitutively active FAK in fibroblasts results in a consecutive tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas. This effect required the autophosphorylation site of FAK, which is a binding site for Src family kinases. Integrin-mediated phosphorylation of Cas was not, however, compromised in fibroblasts lacking FAK. In contrast, adhesion-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas was reduced in cells lacking Src, whereas enhanced phosphorylation of Cas was observed Csk- cells, in which Src kinases are activated. These results suggest that Src kinases are responsible for the integrin-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas. FAK seems not to be necessary for phosphorylation of Cas, but when autophosphorylated, FAK may recruit Src family kinases to phosphorylate Cas. Cas was found to form complexes with Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing signaling molecules, such as the SH2/SH3 adapter protein Crk, following integrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors C3G and Sos were found in the Cas-Crk complex upon integrin ligand binding. These observations suggest that Cas serves as a docking protein and may transduce signals to downstream signaling pathways following integrin-mediated cell adhesion. PMID:8649368

  6. The role of Cas8 in type I CRISPR interference

    PubMed Central

    Cass, Simon D.B.; Haas, Karina A.; Stoll, Britta; Alkhnbashi, Omer S.; Sharma, Kundan; Urlaub, Henning; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita; Bolt, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) systems provide bacteria and archaea with adaptive immunity to repel invasive genetic elements. Type I systems use ‘cascade’ [CRISPR-associated (Cas) complex for antiviral defence] ribonucleoprotein complexes to target invader DNA, by base pairing CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to protospacers. Cascade identifies PAMs (protospacer adjacent motifs) on invader DNA, triggering R-loop formation and subsequent DNA degradation by Cas3. Cas8 is a candidate PAM recognition factor in some cascades. We analysed Cas8 homologues from type IB CRISPR systems in archaea Haloferax volcanii (Hvo) and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (Mth). Cas8 was essential for CRISPR interference in Hvo and purified Mth Cas8 protein responded to PAM sequence when binding to nucleic acids. Cas8 interacted physically with Cas5–Cas7–crRNA complex, stimulating binding to PAM containing substrates. Mutation of conserved Cas8 amino acid residues abolished interference in vivo and altered catalytic activity of Cas8 protein in vitro. This is experimental evidence that Cas8 is important for targeting Cascade to invader DNA. PMID:26182359

  7. The role of Cas8 in type I CRISPR interference.

    PubMed

    Cass, Simon D B; Haas, Karina A; Stoll, Britta; Alkhnbashi, Omer S; Sharma, Kundan; Urlaub, Henning; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita; Bolt, Edward L

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) systems provide bacteria and archaea with adaptive immunity to repel invasive genetic elements. Type I systems use 'cascade' [CRISPR-associated (Cas) complex for antiviral defence] ribonucleoprotein complexes to target invader DNA, by base pairing CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to protospacers. Cascade identifies PAMs (protospacer adjacent motifs) on invader DNA, triggering R-loop formation and subsequent DNA degradation by Cas3. Cas8 is a candidate PAM recognition factor in some cascades. We analysed Cas8 homologues from type IB CRISPR systems in archaea Haloferax volcanii (Hvo) and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (Mth). Cas8 was essential for CRISPR interference in Hvo and purified Mth Cas8 protein responded to PAM sequence when binding to nucleic acids. Cas8 interacted physically with Cas5-Cas7-crRNA complex, stimulating binding to PAM containing substrates. Mutation of conserved Cas8 amino acid residues abolished interference in vivo and altered catalytic activity of Cas8 protein in vitro. This is experimental evidence that Cas8 is important for targeting Cascade to invader DNA. PMID:26182359

  8. Lack of utility of risk score and gynecological examination for screening for sexually transmitted infections in sexually active adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Eleuse MB; Guimarães, Mark DC; Vieira, Maria Aparecida S; Bontempo, Nádia M; Seixas, Mirian SS; Garcia, Mônica SD; Daud, Lyana ES; Côrtes, Rejane LM; Alves, Maria de Fátima C

    2009-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted infections constitute the main health risk among adolescents. In developing countries the diagnosis and treatment of cervical infections is based on the syndromic approach. In this study we estimated the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae among female adolescents from a Health Sector of the city of Goiânia, Brazil, and validated cervicitis diagnosis using World Health Organization/Ministry of Health risk score and gynecological examination. Methods A cross-sectional community-based sample of 914 15- to 19-year-old female teenagers was randomly selected and referred to the local Family Health Program. Of these, 472 (51.6%) were sexually active and gynecological examinations were carried out for 427. Endocervical samples were collected to perform the polymerase chain reaction for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae. Performance of risk score, the presence of mucopurulent discharge, friability, ectopia and pain during cervical maneuver were compared with the presence of C. trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae or both. Results The prevalence of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae was 14.5% and 2.1%, respectively. The risk score had a specificity of 31.9% (95% confidence interval, 21.2 to 44.2) and a positive predictive value of 20.8% (95% confidence interval, 13.5 to 29.7). Friability was the component of the gynecological examination that presented the best performance with a sensitivity of 43.5%, specificity of 81.0%, and 30.6% of positive predictive value. Conclusion The prevalence of infection by C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae was high among these sexually active adolescents. The syndromic approach is clearly inadequate for screening and treating these infections in this population. Therefore, the implantation of other strategies to control these infections among adolescents is urgently required. PMID:19284575

  9. Modeling complexity in pathologist workload measurement: the Automatable Activity-Based Approach to Complexity Unit Scoring (AABACUS).

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carol C; Torlakovic, Emina E; Chow, Hung; Snover, Dale C; Asa, Sylvia L

    2015-03-01

    Pathologists provide diagnoses relevant to the disease state of the patient and identify specific tissue characteristics relevant to response to therapy and prognosis. As personalized medicine evolves, there is a trend for increased demand of tissue-derived parameters. Pathologists perform increasingly complex analyses on the same 'cases'. Traditional methods of workload assessment and reimbursement, based on number of cases sometimes with a modifier (eg, the relative value unit (RVU) system used in the United States), often grossly underestimate the amount of work needed for complex cases and may overvalue simple, small biopsy cases. We describe a new approach to pathologist workload measurement that aligns with this new practice paradigm. Our multisite institution with geographically diverse partner institutions has developed the Automatable Activity-Based Approach to Complexity Unit Scoring (AABACUS) model that captures pathologists' clinical activities from parameters documented in departmental laboratory information systems (LISs). The model's algorithm includes: 'capture', 'export', 'identify', 'count', 'score', 'attribute', 'filter', and 'assess filtered results'. Captured data include specimen acquisition, handling, analysis, and reporting activities. Activities were counted and complexity units (CUs) generated using a complexity factor for each activity. CUs were compared between institutions, practice groups, and practice types and evaluated over a 5-year period (2008-2012). The annual load of a clinical service pathologist, irrespective of subspecialty, was ∼40,000 CUs using relative benchmarking. The model detected changing practice patterns and was appropriate for monitoring clinical workload for anatomical pathology, neuropathology, and hematopathology in academic and community settings, and encompassing subspecialty and generalist practices. AABACUS is objective, can be integrated with an LIS and automated, is reproducible, backwards compatible

  10. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules. PMID:27385551

  11. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J.; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T.; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules. PMID:27385551

  12. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J.; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T.; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-07-01

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules.

  13. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13450.001 PMID:27130520

  14. Validity of PALMS GPS Scoring of Active and Passive Travel Compared to SenseCam

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jordan A.; Jankowska, Marta M.; Meseck, Kristin; Godbole, Suneeta; Natarajan, Loki; Raab, Fredric; Demchak, Barry; Patrick, Kevin; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess validity of the Personal Activity Location Measurement System (PALMS) for deriving time spent walking/running, bicycling, and in vehicle, using SenseCam as the comparison. Methods 40 adult cyclists wore a Qstarz BT-Q1000XT GPS data logger and SenseCam (camera worn around neck capturing multiple images every minute) for a mean of 4 days. PALMS used distance and speed between GPS points to classify whether each minute was part of a trip (yes/no), and if so, the trip mode (walking/running, bicycling, in vehicle). SenseCam images were annotated to create the same classifications (i.e., trip yes/no and mode). 2×2 contingency tables and confusion matrices were calculated at the minute-level for PALMS vs. SenseCam classifications. Mixed-effects linear regression models estimated agreement (mean differences and intraclass correlations [ICCs]) between PALMS and SenseCam with regards to minutes/day in each mode. Results Minute-level sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value were ≥88%, and positive predictive value was ≥75% for non mode-specific trip detection. 72–80% of outdoor walking/running minutes, 73% of bicycling minutes, and 74–76% of in-vehicle minutes were correctly classified by PALMS. For minutes/day, PALMS had a mean bias (i.e., amount of over or under estimation) of 2.4–3.1 minutes (11–15%) for walking/running, 2.3–2.9 minutes (7–9%) for bicycling, and 4.3–5 minutes (15–17%) for vehicle time. ICCs were ≥.80 for all modes. Conclusions PALMS has validity for processing GPS data to objectively measure time walking/running, bicycling, and in vehicle in population studies. Assessing travel patterns is one of many valuable applications of GPS in physical activity research that can improve our understanding of the determinants and health outcomes of active transportation as well as its impact on physical activity. PMID:25010407

  15. Job level risk assessment using task level ACGIH hand activity level TLV scores: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Drinkaus, Phillip; Sesek, Richard; Bloswick, Donald S; Mann, Clay; Bernard, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Existing upper extremity musculoskeletal disorder analytical tools are primarily intended for single or mono-task jobs. However, many jobs contain more than 1 task and some include job rotation. This case/control study investigates methods of modifying an existing tool, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Hand Activity Level (HAL) Threshold Limit Value (TLV), to assess the upper extremity risk of multi-task jobs. Various methods of combining the task differences and ratios into a job level assessment were explored. Two methods returned significant odds ratios, (p < .05) of 18.0 (95% CI 1.8-172) and 12.0 (95% CI 1.2-120). These results indicate that a modified ACGIH HAL TLV may provide insight into the work-related risk of multi-task jobs. Further research is needed to optimize this process. PMID:16219155

  16. Introducing the TI-Nspire CAS Learning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbourne, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Engage your students! In this hands-on workshop, we will demonstrate how TI's newest graphing technology can be integrated into the physics classroom. Come experience both the TI-NspireT CAS Handheld and the TI- NspireT CAS Computer Software. The new TI-Nspire learning technology has been developed to allow students to explore physics and to better understand concepts through the manipulation of complex formulas,graphing, spreadsheets, data analysis, and simulations. During the workshop you will receive an overview of the technology, sample activities, along with the opportunity to experience how TI-Nspire CAS can be effectively integrated into the physics classroom. Limited to 20 participants.

  17. An affinity-based scoring scheme for predicting DNA-binding activities of modularly assembled zinc-finger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Jeffry D.; Zaback, Peter; Joung, J. Keith; Voytas, Daniel F.; Dobbs, Drena

    2009-01-01

    Zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs) have long been recognized for their potential to manipulate genetic information because they can be engineered to bind novel DNA targets. Individual zinc-finger domains (ZFDs) bind specific DNA triplet sequences; their apparent modularity has led some groups to propose methods that allow virtually any desired DNA motif to be targeted in vitro. In practice, however, ZFPs engineered using this ‘modular assembly’ approach do not always function well in vivo. Here we report a modular assembly scoring strategy that both identifies combinations of modules least likely to function efficiently in vivo and provides accurate estimates of their relative binding affinities in vitro. Predicted binding affinities for 53 ‘three-finger’ ZFPs, computed based on energy contributions of the constituent modules, were highly correlated (r = 0.80) with activity levels measured in bacterial two-hybrid assays. Moreover, Kd values for seven modularly assembled ZFPs and their intended targets, measured using fluorescence anisotropy, were also highly correlated with predictions (r = 0.91). We propose that success rates for ZFP modular assembly can be significantly improved by exploiting the score-based strategy described here. PMID:19056825

  18. Association of a multibiomarker disease activity score at multiple time-points with radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: results from the SWEFOT trial

    PubMed Central

    Hambardzumyan, Karen; Bolce, Rebecca J; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Forslind, Kristina; Wallman, Johan K; Cruickshank, Scott E; Sasso, Eric H; Chernoff, David; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), predictive biomarkers for subsequent radiographic progression (RP) could improve therapeutic choices for individual patients. We previously showed that the multibiomarker disease activity (MBDA) score in patients with newly diagnosed RA identified patients at risk for RP. We evaluated the MBDA score at multiple time-points as a predictor of RP during 2 years of follow-up. Methods A subset of patients with RA (N=220) from the Swedish Farmacotherapy (SWEFOT) trial were analysed for MBDA score, disease activity score of 28 joints (DAS28), C reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) at baseline (BL), month 3 and year 1, for predicting RP based on modified Sharp/van der Heijde scores at BL, year 1 and year 2. Results Patients with persistently low MBDA (<30) scores or those with a decrease from moderate (30–44) to low MBDA scores, did not develop RP during 2 years of follow-up. The highest risk for RP during 2 years of follow-up (42%) was observed among patients with persistently high (>44) MBDA scores. Among methotrexate non-responders with a high MBDA score at BL or month 3, significantly more of those who received triple therapy had RP at year 2 compared with those who received antitumour necrosis factor therapy. Conclusions Measuring the MBDA score both before and during treatment in RA was useful for the assessment of individual patient risk for RP during 2 years of follow-up. In comparison with low CRP, ESR or DAS28, a low MBDA score at any time-point was associated with numerically lower proportions of RP. Trial registration number NCT00764725. PMID:26958364

  19. Internal guide RNA interactions interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage.

    PubMed

    Thyme, Summer B; Akhmetova, Laila; Montague, Tessa G; Valen, Eivind; Schier, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system uses guide RNAs (gRNAs) to direct sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Not every gRNA elicits cleavage and the mechanisms that govern gRNA activity have not been resolved. Low activity could result from either failure to form a functional Cas9-gRNA complex or inability to recognize targets in vivo. Here we show that both phenomena influence Cas9 activity by comparing mutagenesis rates in zebrafish embryos with in vitro cleavage assays. In vivo, our results suggest that genomic factors such as CTCF inhibit mutagenesis. Comparing near-identical gRNA sequences with different in vitro activities reveals that internal gRNA interactions reduce cleavage. Even though gRNAs containing these structures do not yield cleavage-competent complexes, they can compete with active gRNAs for binding to Cas9. These results reveal that both genomic context and internal gRNA interactions can interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage and illuminate previously uncharacterized features of Cas9-gRNA complex formation. PMID:27282953

  20. Internal guide RNA interactions interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Thyme, Summer B.; Akhmetova, Laila; Montague, Tessa G.; Valen, Eivind; Schier, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system uses guide RNAs (gRNAs) to direct sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Not every gRNA elicits cleavage and the mechanisms that govern gRNA activity have not been resolved. Low activity could result from either failure to form a functional Cas9–gRNA complex or inability to recognize targets in vivo. Here we show that both phenomena influence Cas9 activity by comparing mutagenesis rates in zebrafish embryos with in vitro cleavage assays. In vivo, our results suggest that genomic factors such as CTCF inhibit mutagenesis. Comparing near-identical gRNA sequences with different in vitro activities reveals that internal gRNA interactions reduce cleavage. Even though gRNAs containing these structures do not yield cleavage-competent complexes, they can compete with active gRNAs for binding to Cas9. These results reveal that both genomic context and internal gRNA interactions can interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage and illuminate previously uncharacterized features of Cas9–gRNA complex formation. PMID:27282953

  1. Chemical and Biophysical Modulation of Cas9 for Tunable Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, James K; Harrington, Lucas B; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-03-18

    The application of the CRISPR-Cas9 system for genome engineering has revolutionized the ability to interrogate genomes of mammalian cells. Programming the Cas9 endonuclease to induce DNA breaks at specified sites is achieved by simply modifying the sequence of its cognate guide RNA. Although Cas9-mediated genome editing has been shown to be highly specific, cleavage events at off-target sites have also been reported. Minimizing, and eventually abolishing, unwanted off-target cleavage remains a major goal of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology before its implementation for therapeutic use. Recent efforts have turned to chemical biology and biophysical approaches to engineer inducible genome editing systems for controlling Cas9 activity at the transcriptional and protein levels. Here, we review recent advancements to modulate Cas9-mediated genome editing by engineering split-Cas9 constructs, inteins, small molecules, protein-based dimerizing domains, and light-inducible systems. PMID:26857072

  2. Modelling Cost-Effectiveness of Biologic Treatments Based on Disease Activity Scores for the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Beresniak, Ariel; Ariza-Ariza, Rafael; Garcia-Llorente, Jose Francisco; Ramirez-Arellano, Antonio; Dupont, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Background. The objective of this simulation model was to assess the cost-effectiveness of different biological treatment strategies based on levels of disease activity in Spain, in patients with moderate to severe active RA and an insufficient response to at least one anti-TNF agent. Methods. Clinically meaningful effectiveness criteria were defined using DAS28 scores: remission and Low Disease Activity State (LDAS) thresholds. Monte-Carlo simulations were conducted to assess cost-effectiveness over 2 years of four biological sequential strategies composed of anti-TNF agents (adalimumab, infliximab), abatacept or rituximab, in patients with moderate to severe active RA and an insufficient response to etanercept as first biological agent. Results. The sequential strategy including etanercept, abatacept and adalimumab appeared more efficacious over 2 years (102 days in LDAS) compared to the same sequence including rituximab as second biological option (82 days in LDAS). Cost-effectiveness ratios showed lower costs per day in LDAS with abatacept (427 €) compared to rituximab as second biological option (508 €). All comparisons were confirmed when using remission criteria. Conclusion. Model results suggest that in patients with an insufficient response to anti-TNF agents, the biological sequences including abatacept appear more efficacious and cost-effective than similar sequences including rituximab or cycled anti-TNF agents. PMID:21785694

  3. Characterization and evolution of Salmonella CRISPR-Cas systems.

    PubMed

    Shariat, Nikki; Timme, Ruth E; Pettengill, James B; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Dudley, Edward G

    2015-02-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and CRISPR-associated genes) systems provide adaptive immunity from invasive genetic elements and encompass three essential features: (i) cas genes, (ii) a CRISPR array composed of spacers and direct repeats and (iii) an AT-rich leader sequence upstream of the array. We performed in-depth sequence analysis of the CRISPR-Cas systems in >600 Salmonella, representing four clinically prevalent serovars. Each CRISPR-Cas feature is extremely conserved in the Salmonella, and the CRISPR1 locus is more highly conserved than CRISPR2. Array composition is serovar-specific, although no convincing evidence of recent spacer acquisition against exogenous nucleic acids exists. Only 12% of spacers match phage and plasmid sequences and self-targeting spacers are associated with direct repeat variants. High nucleotide identity (>99.9%) exists across the cas operon among isolates of a single serovar and in some cases this conservation extends across divergent serovars. These observations reflect historical CRISPR-Cas immune activity, showing that this locus has ceased undergoing adaptive events. Intriguingly, the high level of conservation across divergent serovars shows that the genetic integrity of these inactive loci is maintained over time, contrasting with the canonical view that inactive CRISPR loci degenerate over time. This thorough characterization of Salmonella CRISPR-Cas systems presents new insights into Salmonella CRISPR evolution, particularly with respect to cas gene conservation, leader sequences, organization of direct repeats and protospacer matches. Collectively, our data suggest that Salmonella CRISPR-Cas systems are no longer immunogenic; rather, their impressive conservation indicates they may have an alternative function in Salmonella. PMID:25479838

  4. Calcium dithionate tetrahydrate, CaS2O6ṡ4H2O, a novel SRS-active crystal for octave-spanning many-phonon Stokes and anti-Stokes combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminskii, A. A.; Haussühl, E.; Haussühl, S.; Lux, O.; Hanuza, J.; Rhee, H.; Kaltenbach, A.; Eichler, H. J.; Yoneda, H.; Shirakawa, A.; Ueda, K.

    2013-09-01

    This paper introduces a novel SRS-active crystal, hexagonal CaS2O6ṡ4H2O, which was found to be an attractive Raman gain material and a suitable subject for the study of numerous nonlinear lasing effects. Under picosecond laser pumping in the UV, visible and near-IR spectral region we observed various manifestations of Raman induced nonlinear interactions. All registered Stokes and anti-Stokes components are identified and attributed to the participating χ(3)-promoting phonon modes. In the appendix, we present new data on the SRS properties of another dithionate, Na2S2O6ṡ2H2O.

  5. Screening and Scoring of Antimicrobial and Biological Activities of Italian Vulnerary Plants against Major Oral Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ferrazzano, Gianmaria F.; Roberto, Lia; Catania, Maria Rosaria; Chiaviello, Angela; De Natale, Antonino; Roscetto, Emanuela; Pinto, Gabriele; Pollio, Antonino; Ingenito, Aniello; Palumbo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the activity of Italian vulnerary plants against the most important oral pathogenic bacteria. This estimate was accomplished through a fivefold process: (a) a review of ethnobotanical and microbiological data concerning the Italian vulnerary plants; (b) the development of a scoring system to rank the plants; (c) the comparative assessment of microbiological properties; (d) the assessment of potential cytotoxic effects on keratinocyte-like cells and gingival fibroblasts in culture by XTT cell viability assay; (e) clinical evaluation of the most suitable plant extract as antibacterial agent in a home-made mouthwash. The study assays hexane (H), ethanol (E), and water (W) extracts from 72 plants. The agar diffusion method was used to evaluate the activity against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, and Actinomyces viscosus. Twenty-two plants showed appreciable activity. The extracts showing the strongest antibacterial power were those from Cotinus coggygria Scop., Equisetum hyemale L., Helichrysum litoreum Guss, Juniperus communis L., and Phyllitis scolopendrium (L.) Newman subsp. scolopendrium. The potential cytotoxic effect of these extracts was assessed. On the basis of these observations, a mouth-rinse containing the ethanolic extract of H. litoreum has been tested in vivo, resulting in reduction of the salivary concentration of S. mutans. PMID:24302963

  6. Screening and Scoring of Antimicrobial and Biological Activities of Italian Vulnerary Plants against Major Oral Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ferrazzano, Gianmaria F; Roberto, Lia; Catania, Maria Rosaria; Chiaviello, Angela; De Natale, Antonino; Roscetto, Emanuela; Pinto, Gabriele; Pollio, Antonino; Ingenito, Aniello; Palumbo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the activity of Italian vulnerary plants against the most important oral pathogenic bacteria. This estimate was accomplished through a fivefold process: (a) a review of ethnobotanical and microbiological data concerning the Italian vulnerary plants; (b) the development of a scoring system to rank the plants; (c) the comparative assessment of microbiological properties; (d) the assessment of potential cytotoxic effects on keratinocyte-like cells and gingival fibroblasts in culture by XTT cell viability assay; (e) clinical evaluation of the most suitable plant extract as antibacterial agent in a home-made mouthwash. The study assays hexane (H), ethanol (E), and water (W) extracts from 72 plants. The agar diffusion method was used to evaluate the activity against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, and Actinomyces viscosus. Twenty-two plants showed appreciable activity. The extracts showing the strongest antibacterial power were those from Cotinus coggygria Scop., Equisetum hyemale L., Helichrysum litoreum Guss, Juniperus communis L., and Phyllitis scolopendrium (L.) Newman subsp. scolopendrium. The potential cytotoxic effect of these extracts was assessed. On the basis of these observations, a mouth-rinse containing the ethanolic extract of H. litoreum has been tested in vivo, resulting in reduction of the salivary concentration of S. mutans. PMID:24302963

  7. 32 CFR 169a.13 - CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian... DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.13 CAs involving forty-five... Appendix C to this part, CAs involving 11 to 45 DoD civilian employees may be competed based on...

  8. 32 CFR 169a.13 - CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian... DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.13 CAs involving forty-five... Appendix C to this part, CAs involving 11 to 45 DoD civilian employees may be competed based on...

  9. 32 CFR 169a.13 - CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian... DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.13 CAs involving forty-five... Appendix C to this part, CAs involving 11 to 45 DoD civilian employees may be competed based on...

  10. 32 CFR 169a.13 - CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian... DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.13 CAs involving forty-five... Appendix C to this part, CAs involving 11 to 45 DoD civilian employees may be competed based on...

  11. 32 CFR 169a.13 - CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAs involving forty-five or fewer DoD civilian... DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.13 CAs involving forty-five... Appendix C to this part, CAs involving 11 to 45 DoD civilian employees may be competed based on...

  12. Nucleosomes impede Cas9 access to DNA in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Horlbeck, Max A; Witkowsky, Lea B; Guglielmi, Benjamin; Replogle, Joseph M; Gilbert, Luke A; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Torigoe, Sharon E; Tjian, Robert; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    The prokaryotic CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats)-associated protein, Cas9, has been widely adopted as a tool for editing, imaging, and regulating eukaryotic genomes. However, our understanding of how to select single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that mediate efficient Cas9 activity is incomplete, as we lack insight into how chromatin impacts Cas9 targeting. To address this gap, we analyzed large-scale genetic screens performed in human cell lines using either nuclease-active or nuclease-dead Cas9 (dCas9). We observed that highly active sgRNAs for Cas9 and dCas9 were found almost exclusively in regions of low nucleosome occupancy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that nucleosomes in fact directly impede Cas9 binding and cleavage, while chromatin remodeling can restore Cas9 access. Our results reveal a critical role of eukaryotic chromatin in dictating the targeting specificity of this transplanted bacterial enzyme, and provide rules for selecting Cas9 target sites distinct from and complementary to those based on sequence properties. PMID:26987018

  13. Nucleosomes impede Cas9 access to DNA in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Horlbeck, Max A; Witkowsky, Lea B; Guglielmi, Benjamin; Replogle, Joseph M; Gilbert, Luke A; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Torigoe, Sharon E; Tjian, Robert; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    The prokaryotic CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats)-associated protein, Cas9, has been widely adopted as a tool for editing, imaging, and regulating eukaryotic genomes. However, our understanding of how to select single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that mediate efficient Cas9 activity is incomplete, as we lack insight into how chromatin impacts Cas9 targeting. To address this gap, we analyzed large-scale genetic screens performed in human cell lines using either nuclease-active or nuclease-dead Cas9 (dCas9). We observed that highly active sgRNAs for Cas9 and dCas9 were found almost exclusively in regions of low nucleosome occupancy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that nucleosomes in fact directly impede Cas9 binding and cleavage, while chromatin remodeling can restore Cas9 access. Our results reveal a critical role of eukaryotic chromatin in dictating the targeting specificity of this transplanted bacterial enzyme, and provide rules for selecting Cas9 target sites distinct from and complementary to those based on sequence properties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12677.001 PMID:26987018

  14. Differences Between the "Chinese AMS Score" and the Lake Louise Score in the Diagnosis of Acute Mountain Sickness.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jialin; Gu, Haoran; Luo, Yongjun

    2016-05-01

    The Chinese AMS score (CAS) is used in clinical medicine and research to diagnosis acute mountain sickness (AMS). However, the Lake Louise Score (LLS) is the well-accepted standard for diagnosing AMS. The difference between the CAS and LLS questionnaires is that the CAS considers more nonspecific symptoms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate differences in AMS prevalence according to the LLS and CAS criteria. We surveyed 58 males who traveled from Chongqing (300 m) to Lhasa (3658 m) via the Qinghai-Tibet train. Cases of AMS were diagnosed using LLS and CAS questionnaires in a few railway stations at different evaluation areas along the road. We subsequently evaluated discrepancies in values related to the prevalence of AMS determined using the 2 types of questionnaires (CAS and LLS). The prevalence of CAS-diagnosed AMS indicated that the percentage of AMS cases among the 58 young men was 29.3% in Golmud, 60.3% in Tanggula, 63.8% in Lhasa, 22.4% on the first day after arrival in Lhasa, 27.6% on the second day, 24.1% on the third day, and 12.1% on the fourth day. The prevalence of LLS-diagnosed AMS in Golmud was 10.3%, 38% in Lhasa, and 6.9% on day 1, the prevalence in each station was lower than that as assessed by the CAS. Our experimental data indicate that AMS diagnoses ascertained using the CAS indicate a higher AMS prevalence than those ascertained using the LLS. Through statistical analysis, the CAS seems capable of effectively diagnosing AMS as validated by LLS (sensitivity 61.8%, specificity 92.7%). PMID:27227918

  15. Methods for Optimizing CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing Specificity.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Josh; Myer, Vic E; Hsu, Patrick D

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the development of delivery, repair, and specificity strategies for the CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering toolbox are helping researchers understand gene function with unprecedented precision and sensitivity. CRISPR-Cas9 also holds enormous therapeutic potential for the treatment of genetic disorders by directly correcting disease-causing mutations. Although the Cas9 protein has been shown to bind and cleave DNA at off-target sites, the field of Cas9 specificity is rapidly progressing, with marked improvements in guide RNA selection, protein and guide engineering, novel enzymes, and off-target detection methods. We review important challenges and breakthroughs in the field as a comprehensive practical guide to interested users of genome editing technologies, highlighting key tools and strategies for optimizing specificity. The genome editing community should now strive to standardize such methods for measuring and reporting off-target activity, while keeping in mind that the goal for specificity should be continued improvement and vigilance. PMID:27494557

  16. Force Sensing by Extension of the Src Family Kinase Substrate, p130Cas

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Yasuhiro; Tamada, Masako; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin J.; Cherniavskaya, Oksana; Sakai, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Sakae; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Physical force is implicated in many cell functions. However, the molecular mechanisms of force sensing are poorly understood. Here, we show that mechanical extension of p130Cas (Cas) in vitro and in vivo causes phosphorylation by Src family kinases with no apparent change in Src kinase activity and that Cas phosphorylation is involved in stretch-dependent activation of the small GTPase, Rap1. In vitro, we mechanically extended bacterially expressed Cas substrate domain (CasSD) and found a remarkable enhancement of phosphorylation by specific kinases. Using an antibody that recognized extended CasSD in vitro, Cas extension in intact cells was observed in the peripheral regions of spreading cells where higher traction forces are expected and phosphorylated Cas was detected, suggesting that the in vitro extension and phosphorylation of CasSD is relevant to physiological force transduction. Thus, Cas acts as a primary force-sensor through extension of the substrate domain, which primes it for phosphorylation. PMID:17129785

  17. Rational design of a split-Cas9 enzyme complex

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wright, Addison V.; Sternberg, Samuel H.; Taylor, David W.; Staahl, Brett T.; Bardales, Jorge A.; Kornfeld, Jack E.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-02-23

    Cas9, an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease found in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) bacterial immune systems, is a versatile tool for genome editing, transcriptional regulation, and cellular imaging applications. Structures of Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 alone or bound to single-guide RNA (sgRNA) and target DNA revealed a bilobed protein architecture that undergoes major conformational changes upon guide RNA and DNA binding. To investigate the molecular determinants and relevance of the interlobe rearrangement for target recognition and cleavage, we designed a split-Cas9 enzyme in which the nuclease lobe and α-helical lobe are expressed as separate polypeptides. The lobes do not interactmore » on their own, the sgRNA recruits them into a ternary complex that recapitulates the activity of full-length Cas9 and catalyzes site-specific DNA cleavage. The use of a modified sgRNA abrogates split-Cas9 activity by preventing dimerization, allowing for the development of an inducible dimerization system. We propose that split-Cas9 can act as a highly regulatable platform for genome-engineering applications.« less

  18. Rational design of a split-Cas9 enzyme complex

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Addison V.; Sternberg, Samuel H.; Taylor, David W.; Staahl, Brett T.; Bardales, Jorge A.; Kornfeld, Jack E.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Cas9, an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease found in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) bacterial immune systems, is a versatile tool for genome editing, transcriptional regulation, and cellular imaging applications. Structures of Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 alone or bound to single-guide RNA (sgRNA) and target DNA revealed a bilobed protein architecture that undergoes major conformational changes upon guide RNA and DNA binding. To investigate the molecular determinants and relevance of the interlobe rearrangement for target recognition and cleavage, we designed a split-Cas9 enzyme in which the nuclease lobe and α-helical lobe are expressed as separate polypeptides. Although the lobes do not interact on their own, the sgRNA recruits them into a ternary complex that recapitulates the activity of full-length Cas9 and catalyzes site-specific DNA cleavage. The use of a modified sgRNA abrogates split-Cas9 activity by preventing dimerization, allowing for the development of an inducible dimerization system. We propose that split-Cas9 can act as a highly regulatable platform for genome-engineering applications. PMID:25713377

  19. Rational design of a split-Cas9 enzyme complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Addison V.; Sternberg, Samuel H.; Taylor, David W.; Staahl, Brett T.; Bardales, Jorge A.; Kornfeld, Jack E.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-02-23

    Cas9, an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease found in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) bacterial immune systems, is a versatile tool for genome editing, transcriptional regulation, and cellular imaging applications. Structures of Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 alone or bound to single-guide RNA (sgRNA) and target DNA revealed a bilobed protein architecture that undergoes major conformational changes upon guide RNA and DNA binding. To investigate the molecular determinants and relevance of the interlobe rearrangement for target recognition and cleavage, we designed a split-Cas9 enzyme in which the nuclease lobe and α-helical lobe are expressed as separate polypeptides. The lobes do not interact on their own, the sgRNA recruits them into a ternary complex that recapitulates the activity of full-length Cas9 and catalyzes site-specific DNA cleavage. The use of a modified sgRNA abrogates split-Cas9 activity by preventing dimerization, allowing for the development of an inducible dimerization system. We propose that split-Cas9 can act as a highly regulatable platform for genome-engineering applications.

  20. Young Zanzibari Children with Iron Deficiency, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Stunting, or Malaria Have Lower Motor Activity Scores and Spend Less Time in Locomotion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Motor activity improves cognitive and social-emotional development through a child’s exploration of his or her physical and social environment. This study assessed anemia, iron deficiency, hemoglobin (Hb), length-for-age Z-score (LAZ), and malaria infection as predictors of motor activity in 771 chi...

  1. Broadening Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 Targeting Range by Modifying PAM Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P.; Prew, Michelle S.; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Nguyen, Nhu T.; Topkar, Ved V.; Zheng, Zongli; Joung, J. Keith

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are primarily guided by RNA-DNA interactions but also require Cas9-mediated recognition of a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). While potentially advantageous for specificity, extended PAM sequences limit the targeting range of Cas9 orthologues for genome editing. One possible strategy to relieve this restriction is to relax specificities for certain positions within the PAM. Here we used molecular evolution to modify the NNGRRT PAM specificity of Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9). One variant we identified, referred to as KKH SaCas9, shows robust genome editing activities at endogenous human target sites with NNNRRT PAMs. Importantly, using GUIDE-seq, we show that both wild-type and KKH SaCas9 induce comparable numbers of off-target effects in human cells. KKH SaCas9 increased the targeting range of SaCas9 by nearly two- to four-fold. Our molecular evolution strategy does not require structural information and therefore should be applicable to a wide range of Cas9 orthologues. PMID:26524662

  2. Modified RNAs in CRISPR/Cas9: An Old Trick Works Again.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Alfonso; Latorre, Ana; Somoza, Álvaro

    2016-03-01

    Old tricks, new dog: CRISPR/Cas9 is a powerful tool for gene editing that requires an endonuclease (Cas9) and RNA strands. It has been shown that chemical modification of the RNA structures, an approach that has been used to improve the efficiency of RNA interference, can also be applied to enhance the activity of CRISPR/Cas9 and reduce its off-target effects. PMID:26880106

  3. Potential pitfalls of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rongxue; Lin, Guigao; Li, Jinming

    2016-04-01

    Recently, a novel technique named the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas)9 system has been rapidly developed. This genome editing tool has improved our ability tremendously with respect to exploring the pathogenesis of diseases and correcting disease mutations, as well as phenotypes. With a short guide RNA, Cas9 can be precisely directed to target sites, and functions as an endonuclease to efficiently produce breaks in DNA double strands. Over the past 30 years, CRISPR has evolved from the 'curious sequences of unknown biological function' into a promising genome editing tool. As a result of the incessant development in the CRISPR/Cas9 system, Cas9 co-expressed with custom guide RNAs has been successfully used in a variety of cells and organisms. This genome editing technology can also be applied to synthetic biology, functional genomic screening, transcriptional modulation and gene therapy. However, although CRISPR/Cas9 has a broad range of action in science, there are several aspects that affect its efficiency and specificity, including Cas9 activity, target site selection and short guide RNA design, delivery methods, off-target effects and the incidence of homology-directed repair. In the present review, we highlight the factors that affect the utilization of CRISPR/Cas9, as well as possible strategies for handling any problems. Addressing these issues will allow us to take better advantage of this technique. In addition, we also review the history and rapid development of the CRISPR/Cas system from the time of its initial discovery in 2012. PMID:26535798

  4. CRISPR-Cas9 Based Engineering of Actinomycetal Genomes.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yaojun; Charusanti, Pep; Zhang, Lixin; Weber, Tilmann; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-09-18

    Bacteria of the order Actinomycetales are one of the most important sources of pharmacologically active and industrially relevant secondary metabolites. Unfortunately, many of them are still recalcitrant to genetic manipulation, which is a bottleneck for systematic metabolic engineering. To facilitate the genetic manipulation of actinomycetes, we developed a highly efficient CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete gene(s) or gene cluster(s), implement precise gene replacements, and reversibly control gene expression in actinomycetes. We demonstrate our system by targeting two genes, actIORF1 (SCO5087) and actVB (SCO5092), from the actinorhodin biosynthetic gene cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Our CRISPR-Cas9 system successfully inactivated the targeted genes. When no templates for homology-directed repair (HDR) were present, the site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) introduced by Cas9 were repaired through the error-prone nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, resulting in a library of deletions with variable sizes around the targeted sequence. If templates for HDR were provided at the same time, precise deletions of the targeted gene were observed with near 100% frequency. Moreover, we developed a system to efficiently and reversibly control expression of target genes, deemed CRISPRi, based on a catalytically dead variant of Cas9 (dCas9). The CRISPR-Cas9 based system described here comprises a powerful and broadly applicable set of tools to manipulate actinomycetal genomes. PMID:25806970

  5. Multiple mechanisms for CRISPR-Cas inhibition by anti-CRISPR proteins.

    PubMed

    Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Garcia, Bianca; Strum, Scott; Du, Mingjian; Rollins, MaryClare F; Hidalgo-Reyes, Yurima; Wiedenheft, Blake; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2015-10-01

    The battle for survival between bacteria and the viruses that infect them (phages) has led to the evolution of many bacterial defence systems and phage-encoded antagonists of these systems. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR-associated (cas) genes comprise an adaptive immune system that is one of the most widespread means by which bacteria defend themselves against phages. We identified the first examples of proteins produced by phages that inhibit a CRISPR-Cas system. Here we performed biochemical and in vivo investigations of three of these anti-CRISPR proteins, and show that each inhibits CRISPR-Cas activity through a distinct mechanism. Two block the DNA-binding activity of the CRISPR-Cas complex, yet do this by interacting with different protein subunits, and using steric or non-steric modes of inhibition. The third anti-CRISPR protein operates by binding to the Cas3 helicase-nuclease and preventing its recruitment to the DNA-bound CRISPR-Cas complex. In vivo, this anti-CRISPR can convert the CRISPR-Cas system into a transcriptional repressor, providing the first example-to our knowledge-of modulation of CRISPR-Cas activity by a protein interactor. The diverse sequences and mechanisms of action of these anti-CRISPR proteins imply an independent evolution, and foreshadow the existence of other means by which proteins may alter CRISPR-Cas function. PMID:26416740

  6. Development of an intein-mediated split–Cas9 system for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Dong-Jiunn Jeffery; Kühner, Karin; Kühn, Ralf; Werfel, Stanislas; Engelhardt, Stefan; Wurst, Wolfgang; Ortiz, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    Using CRISPR/Cas9, it is possible to target virtually any gene in any organism. A major limitation to its application in gene therapy is the size of Cas9 (>4 kb), impeding its efficient delivery via recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV). Therefore, we developed a split–Cas9 system, bypassing the packaging limit using split-inteins. Each Cas9 half was fused to the corresponding split-intein moiety and, only upon co-expression, the intein-mediated trans-splicing occurs and the full Cas9 protein is reconstituted. We demonstrated that the nuclease activity of our split-intein system is comparable to wild-type Cas9, shown by a genome-integrated surrogate reporter and by targeting three different endogenous genes. An analogously designed split-Cas9D10A nickase version showed similar activity as Cas9D10A. Moreover, we showed that the double nick strategy increased the homologous directed recombination (HDR). In addition, we explored the possibility of delivering the repair template accommodated on the same dual-plasmid system, by transient transfection, showing an efficient HDR. Most importantly, we revealed for the first time that intein-mediated split–Cas9 can be packaged, delivered and its nuclease activity reconstituted efficiently, in cells via rAAV. PMID:26082496

  7. Development of an intein-mediated split-Cas9 system for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Truong, Dong-Jiunn Jeffery; Kühner, Karin; Kühn, Ralf; Werfel, Stanislas; Engelhardt, Stefan; Wurst, Wolfgang; Ortiz, Oskar

    2015-07-27

    Using CRISPR/Cas9, it is possible to target virtually any gene in any organism. A major limitation to its application in gene therapy is the size of Cas9 (>4 kb), impeding its efficient delivery via recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV). Therefore, we developed a split-Cas9 system, bypassing the packaging limit using split-inteins. Each Cas9 half was fused to the corresponding split-intein moiety and, only upon co-expression, the intein-mediated trans-splicing occurs and the full Cas9 protein is reconstituted. We demonstrated that the nuclease activity of our split-intein system is comparable to wild-type Cas9, shown by a genome-integrated surrogate reporter and by targeting three different endogenous genes. An analogously designed split-Cas9D10A nickase version showed similar activity as Cas9D10A. Moreover, we showed that the double nick strategy increased the homologous directed recombination (HDR). In addition, we explored the possibility of delivering the repair template accommodated on the same dual-plasmid system, by transient transfection, showing an efficient HDR. Most importantly, we revealed for the first time that intein-mediated split-Cas9 can be packaged, delivered and its nuclease activity reconstituted efficiently, in cells via rAAV. PMID:26082496

  8. BCAR3/AND-34 can signal independent of complex formation with CAS family members or the presence of p130Cas

    PubMed Central

    Borre, Pierre Vanden; Near, Richard I.; Makkinje, Anthony; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Lerner, Adam

    2011-01-01

    BCAR3 binds to the carboxy-terminus of p130Cas, a focal adhesion adapter protein. Both BCAR3 and p130Cas have been linked to resistance to anti-estrogens in breast cancer, Rac activation and cell motility. Using R743A BCAR3, a point mutant that has lost the ability to bind p130Cas, we find that BCAR3-p130Cas complex formation is not required for BCAR3-mediated anti-estrogen resistance, Rac activation or discohesion of epithelial breast cancer cells. Complex formation was also not required for BCAR3-induced lamellipodia formation in BALB/c-3T3 fibroblasts but was required for optimal BCAR3-induced motility. Although both wildtype and R743A BCAR3 induced phosphorylation of p130Cas and the related adapter protein HEF1/NEDD9, chimeric NSP3:BCAR3 experiments demonstrate that such phosphorylation does not correlate with BCAR3-induced anti-estrogen resistance or lamellipodia formation. Wildtype but not R743A BCAR3 induced lamellipodia formation and augmented cell motility in p130Cas-/- murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), suggesting that while p130Cas itself is not strictly required for these endpoints, complex formation with other CAS family members is, at least in cells lacking p130Cas. Overall, our work suggests that many, but not all, BCAR3-mediated signaling events in epithelial and mesenchymal cells are independent of p130Cas association. These studies also indicate that disruption of the BCAR3-p130Cas complex is unlikely to reverse BCAR3-mediated anti-estrogen resistance. PMID:21262352

  9. Transcriptional Regulation with CRISPR/Cas9 Effectors in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hannah; Kearns, Nicola A; Maehr, René

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-based regulation of gene expression provides the scientific community with a new high-throughput tool to dissect the role of genes in molecular processes and cellular functions. Single-guide RNAs allow for recruitment of a nuclease-dead Cas9 protein and transcriptional Cas9-effector fusion proteins to specific genomic loci, thereby modulating gene expression. We describe the application of a CRISPR-Cas9 effector system from Streptococcus pyogenes for transcriptional regulation in mammalian cells resulting in activation or repression of transcription. We present methods for appropriate target site selection, sgRNA design, and delivery of dCas9 and dCas9-effector system components into cells through lentiviral transgenesis to modulate transcription. PMID:26463376

  10. Trans-spliced Cas9 allows cleavage of HBB and CCR5 genes in human cells using compact expression cassettes.

    PubMed

    Fine, Eli J; Appleton, Caleb M; White, Douglas E; Brown, Matthew T; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Kemp, Melissa L; Bao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 systems have been used in a wide variety of biological studies; however, the large size of CRISPR/Cas9 presents challenges in packaging it within adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) for clinical applications. We identified a two-cassette system expressing pieces of the S. pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) protein which splice together in cellula to form a functional protein capable of site-specific DNA cleavage. With specific CRISPR guide strands, we demonstrated the efficacy of this system in cleaving the HBB and CCR5 genes in human HEK-293T cells as a single Cas9 and as a pair of Cas9 nickases. The trans-spliced SpCas9 (tsSpCas9) displayed ~35% of the nuclease activity compared with the wild-type SpCas9 (wtSpCas9) at standard transfection doses, but had substantially decreased activity at lower dosing levels. The greatly reduced open reading frame length of the tsSpCas9 relative to wtSpCas9 potentially allows for more complex and longer genetic elements to be packaged into an AAV vector including tissue-specific promoters, multiplexed guide RNA expression, and effector domain fusions to SpCas9. For unknown reasons, the tsSpCas9 system did not work in all cell types tested. The use of protein trans-splicing may help facilitate exciting new avenues of research and therapeutic applications through AAV-based delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 systems. PMID:26126518

  11. Highly efficient heritable plant genome engineering using Cas9 orthologues from Streptococcus thermophilus and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Jeannette; Schiml, Simon; Fauser, Friedrich; Puchta, Holger

    2015-12-01

    The application of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system of Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) is currently revolutionizing genome engineering in plants. However, synthetic plant biology will require more complex manipulations of genomes and transcriptomes. The simultaneous addressing of different specific genomic sites with independent enzyme activities within the same cell is a key to this issue. Such approaches can be achieved by the adaptation of additional bacterial orthologues of the CRISPR/Cas system for use in plant cells. Here, we show that codon-optimised Cas9 orthologues from Streptococcus thermophilus (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9) can both be used to induce error-prone non-homologous end-joining-mediated targeted mutagenesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana at frequencies at least comparable to those that have previously been reported for the S. pyogenes CRISPR/Cas system. Stable inheritance of the induced targeted mutations of the ADH1 gene was demonstrated for both St1Cas9- and SaCas9-based systems at high frequencies. We were also able to demonstrate that the SaCas9 and SpCas9 proteins enhance homologous recombination via the induction of double-strand breaks only in the presence of their species-specific single guide (sg) RNAs. These proteins are not prone to inter-species interference with heterologous sgRNA expression constructs. Thus, the CRISPR/Cas systems of S. pyogenes and S. aureus should be appropriate for simultaneously addressing different sequence motifs with different enzyme activities in the same plant cell. PMID:26576927

  12. Complete active space (CAS) SCF study of the dipole polarizability function for the X 1Sigma + state of LiH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Björn O.; Sadlej, Andrzej J.

    1982-06-01

    The CAS SCF method is applied to the calculation of the dipole polarizability function of the X 1Σ+ state of LiH by using the finite-field perturbation approach. The dipole moment function and the potential energy curve are also computed. The vibrational averaging of electric properties has been carried out with different accurate potential energy curves available for the LiH molecule. It has been found that the vibrational contribution to the polarizability components leads to the change of the sign of the polarizability anisotropy between the second and third vibrational state. The dipole polarizability tensor transition matrix elements for some of the lowest energy vibrational transitions have been calculated and can be checked against the Raman intensity data.

  13. D.C. Student Test Scores Show Uneven Progress. Data Snapshot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPre, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Over the past five years, both DC Public Schools (DCPS) and public charter schools (PCS) have seen significant growth in secondary reading and math scores on the state test known as the District of Columbia Comprehensive Assessment System (DC CAS). However, scores have not improved as much at the elementary level. Reading and math scores for DCPS…

  14. Nutritional Quality of Breakfast and Physical Activity Independently Predict the Literacy and Numeracy Scores of Children after Adjusting for Socioeconomic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dea, Jennifer A.; Mugridge, Anna C.

    2012-01-01

    Health-related behaviors [physical activity (PA), nutritional quality of breakfast and sleep]; personal variables (self-esteem, attitudes to PA and gender) and socioeconomic status (SES) (school SES and parental education), were examined in relation to literacy and numeracy scores of 824 grade 3-7 children. Participants completed a questionnaire,…

  15. The Impact of Four-Year Participation in Music and/or Athletic Activities in South Dakota Public High Schools on GPA and ACT Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Patrick S.

    2010-01-01

    Finding the key to success for high school students has long been the goal for both school personnel and parents. This study examined the impact of four-year participation in music and/or athletics activities in South Dakota public high schools on student GPA and ACT scores. The data in this study were collected from five Class A high schools…

  16. Physical, antioxidant and structural characterization of blend films based on hsian-tsao gum (HG) and casein (CAS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Wen, Xiao Long; Guo, Shan Guang; Chen, Ming Tsao; Jiang, Ai Min; Lai, Lih-Shiuh

    2015-12-10

    The effects of hsian-tsao gum (HG) addition on the physical properties, antioxidant activities and structure of casein (CAS) film have been investigated. It has been observed that HG addition provided CAS film with better mechanical properties and resistant to moisture, stronger barrier properties against light and higher antioxidant activities than pure CAS film. Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) data indicated that hydrogen bonding interactions and Maillard reactions occurred between CAS and HG, giving rise to a more compact structure than CAS film. The results of X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) indicated that CAS and HG were compatible, and addition of HG destroyed the original crystalline domains of CAS film, and the blend films exhibited higher glass transition temperatures than CAS film. Moreover, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis showed that HG addition significantly changed the mobility of water molecule in CAS film. Especially, ratio of the high mobility water of CAS/HG films significantly decreased as compared to CAS film. PMID:26428119

  17. Prediction and Validation of Native and Engineered Cas9 Guide Sequences.

    PubMed

    Briner, Alexandra E; Henriksen, Emily D; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    Cas9-based technologies rely on native elements of Type II CRISPR-Cas bacterial immune systems, including the trans-activating CRISPR RNA (tracrRNA), CRISPR RNA (crRNA), Cas9 protein, and protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM). The tracrRNA and crRNA form an RNA duplex that guides the Cas9 endonuclease to complementary nucleic acid sequences. Mechanistically, Cas9 initiates interactions by binding to the target PAM sequence and interrogating the target DNA in a 3'-to-5' manner. Complementarity between the guide RNA and the target DNA is key. In natural systems, precise cleavage occurs when the target DNA sequence contains a PAM flanking a sequence homologous to the crRNA spacer sequence. Currently, the majority of commercial Cas9-based genome-editing tools are derived from the Type II CRISPR-Cas system of Streptococcus pyogenes However, a diverse set of Type II CRISPR-Cas systems exist in nature that are potentially valuable for genome engineering applications. Exploitation of these systems requires prediction and validation of both native and engineered dual and single guide RNAs to drive Cas9 functionality. Here, we discuss how to identify the elements of these immune systems to develop next-generation Cas9-based genome-editing tools. We first discuss how to predict tracrRNA sequences and suggest a method for designing single guide RNAs containing only critical structural modules. We then outline how to predict the PAM sequence, which is crucial for determining potential targets for Cas9. Finally, validation of the system elements through transcriptome analysis and interference assays is essential for developing next-generation Cas9-based genome-editing tools. PMID:27371591

  18. Transgene-free genome editing in Caenorhabditis elegans using CRISPR-Cas.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hui; Schwartz, Hillel T; Antoshechkin, Igor; Sternberg, Paul W

    2013-11-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an efficient method for genome editing in organisms from bacteria to human cells. We describe a transgene-free method for CRISPR-Cas-mediated cleavage in nematodes, enabling RNA-homology-targeted deletions that cause loss of gene function; analysis of whole-genome sequencing indicates that the nuclease activity is highly specific. PMID:23979577

  19. Attitude and CAS Use in Senior Secondary Mathematics: A Case Study of Seven Year 11 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Scott; Ball, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the possible influence of attitude on seven Year 11 students' use of a Computer Algebra System (CAS) during a class activity where students could choose to use CAS or pen-and-paper in solving a range of problems. Investigation of anxiety, confidence, liking and usefulness through a survey and interview revealed that these…

  20. Efficient fdCas9 Synthetic Endonuclease with Improved Specificity for Precise Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Aouida, Mustapha; Eid, Ayman; Ali, Zahir; Cradick, Thomas; Lee, Ciaran; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Atef, Ahmed; AbuSamra, Dina; Gadhoum, Samah Zeineb; Merzaban, Jasmeen; Bao, Gang; Mahfouz, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease is used for genome editing applications in diverse eukaryotic species. A high frequency of off-target activity has been reported in many cell types, limiting its applications to genome engineering, especially in genomic medicine. Here, we generated a synthetic chimeric protein between the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease and the catalytically inactive Cas9 protein (fdCas9). A pair of guide RNAs (gRNAs) that bind to sense and antisense strands with a defined spacer sequence range can be used to form a catalytically active dimeric fdCas9 protein and generate double-strand breaks (DSBs) within the spacer sequence. Our data demonstrate an improved catalytic activity of the fdCas9 endonuclease, with a spacer range of 15–39 nucleotides, on surrogate reporters and genomic targets. Furthermore, we observed no detectable fdCas9 activity at known Cas9 off-target sites. Taken together, our data suggest that the fdCas9 endonuclease variant is a superior platform for genome editing applications in eukaryotic systems including mammalian cells. PMID:26225561

  1. Handedness and behavioural inhibition system/behavioural activation system (BIS/BAS) scores: A replication and extension of Wright, Hardie, and Wilson (2009).

    PubMed

    Beaton, Alan A; Kaack, Imogen H; Corr, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    The Annett Hand Preference Questionnaire (AHPQ) as modified by Briggs and Nebes was administered along with Carver and White's behavioural inhibition system (BIS) and behavioural activation system (BAS) scale and a shortened form of the Big Five personality questionnaire to 92 university students. After eliminating the data from five respondents who reported having changed handedness and one outlier, there was a significant sex difference in mean BIS scores, with females (n = 43) scoring higher than males (n = 43). Replicating the results of Wright, Hardie and Wilson, non-right-handers (n = 36) had significantly higher mean BIS score than right-handers (n = 50). Controlling for sex of participant, neuroticism and BAS sub-scale scores in hierarchical regression analyses left this BIS effect substantially unaffected. There was no handedness or sex difference on any of the three BAS sub-scales. Further analyses revealed no association between strength, as distinct from direction, of handedness and BIS (or BAS) scores. The findings are discussed with reference to recent developments in reinforcement sensitivity theory on which BIS/BAS variables are based. PMID:25697855

  2. Participation in cognitively-stimulating activities is associated with brain structure and cognitive function in preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Stephanie A; Larson, Jordan; Oh, Jennifer; Koscik, Rebecca; Dowling, Maritza N; Gallagher, Catherine L; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Rowley, Howard A; Bendlin, Barbara B; Asthana, Sanjay; Hermann, Bruce P; Johnson, Sterling C; Sager, Mark; LaRue, Asenath; Okonkwo, Ozioma C

    2015-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that frequent participation in cognitively-stimulating activities, specifically those related to playing games and puzzles, is beneficial to brain health and cognition among middle-aged adults at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three hundred twenty-nine cognitively normal, middle-aged adults (age range, 43.2-73.8 years) enrolled in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (WRAP) participated in this study. They reported their current engagement in cognitive activities using a modified version of the Cognitive Activity Scale (CAS), underwent a structural MRI scan, and completed a comprehensive cognitive battery. FreeSurfer was used to derive gray matter (GM) volumes from AD-related regions of interest (ROIs), and composite measures of episodic memory and executive function were obtained from the cognitive tests. Covariate-adjusted least squares analyses were used to examine the association between the Games item on the CAS (CAS-Games) and both GM volumes and cognitive composites. Higher scores on CAS-Games were associated with greater GM volumes in several ROIs including the hippocampus, posterior cingulate, anterior cingulate, and middle frontal gyrus. Similarly, CAS-Games scores were positively associated with scores on the Immediate Memory, Verbal Learning & Memory, and Speed & Flexibility domains. These findings were not modified by known risk factors for AD. In addition, the Total score on the CAS was not as sensitive as CAS-Games to the examined brain and cognitive measures. For some individuals, participation in cognitive activities pertinent to game playing may help prevent AD by preserving brain structures and cognitive functions vulnerable to AD pathophysiology. PMID:25358750

  3. Students Score!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris-Frederick, Cynthia

    2000-01-01

    Describes how one teacher used peer review to help students understand state content standards. Students held one another accountable for the basics, then she assessed the core content of their work. To get students thinking about standards-based learning, she used a pizza activity. Next, students created rubrics for assessing book reports and…

  4. The casposon-encoded Cas1 protein from Aciduliprofundum boonei is a DNA integrase that generates target site duplications.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Alison B; Dyda, Fred

    2015-12-15

    Many archaea and bacteria have an adaptive immune system known as CRISPR which allows them to recognize and destroy foreign nucleic acid that they have previously encountered. Two CRISPR-associated proteins, Cas1 and Cas2, are required for the acquisition step of adaptation, in which fragments of foreign DNA are incorporated into the host CRISPR locus. Cas1 genes have also been found scattered in several archaeal and bacterial genomes, unassociated with CRISPR loci or other cas proteins. Rather, they are flanked by nearly identical inverted repeats and enclosed within direct repeats, suggesting that these genetic regions might be mobile elements ('casposons'). To investigate this possibility, we have characterized the in vitro activities of the putative Cas1 transposase ('casposase') from Aciduliprofundum boonei. The purified Cas1 casposase can integrate both short oligonucleotides with inverted repeat sequences and a 2.8 kb excised mini-casposon into target DNA. Casposon integration occurs without target specificity and generates 14-15 basepair target site duplications, consistent with those found in casposon host genomes. Thus, Cas1 casposases carry out similar biochemical reactions as the CRISPR Cas1-Cas2 complex but with opposite substrate specificities: casposases integrate specific sequences into random target sites, whereas CRISPR Cas1-Cas2 integrates essentially random sequences into a specific site in the CRISPR locus. PMID:26573596

  5. The casposon-encoded Cas1 protein from Aciduliprofundum boonei is a DNA integrase that generates target site duplications

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Alison B.; Dyda, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Many archaea and bacteria have an adaptive immune system known as CRISPR which allows them to recognize and destroy foreign nucleic acid that they have previously encountered. Two CRISPR-associated proteins, Cas1 and Cas2, are required for the acquisition step of adaptation, in which fragments of foreign DNA are incorporated into the host CRISPR locus. Cas1 genes have also been found scattered in several archaeal and bacterial genomes, unassociated with CRISPR loci or other cas proteins. Rather, they are flanked by nearly identical inverted repeats and enclosed within direct repeats, suggesting that these genetic regions might be mobile elements (‘casposons’). To investigate this possibility, we have characterized the in vitro activities of the putative Cas1 transposase (‘casposase’) from Aciduliprofundum boonei. The purified Cas1 casposase can integrate both short oligonucleotides with inverted repeat sequences and a 2.8 kb excised mini-casposon into target DNA. Casposon integration occurs without target specificity and generates 14–15 basepair target site duplications, consistent with those found in casposon host genomes. Thus, Cas1 casposases carry out similar biochemical reactions as the CRISPR Cas1-Cas2 complex but with opposite substrate specificities: casposases integrate specific sequences into random target sites, whereas CRISPR Cas1-Cas2 integrates essentially random sequences into a specific site in the CRISPR locus. PMID:26573596

  6. CAS-Induced Difficulties in Learning Mathematics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankvist, Uffe Thomas; Misfeldt, Morten

    2015-01-01

    In recent years computer algebra systems (CAS) have become an integrated part of the upper secondary school mathematics program. Despite the many positive possibilities of CAS, there also seems to be a flip side of the coin in relation to actual difficulties in learning mathematics, not least because a strong dependence on CAS for mathematical…

  7. "CAS" Statement of Shared Ethical Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) has served as a voice for quality assurance and promulgation of standards in higher education for over 25 years. CAS was established to promote inter-association efforts to address quality assurance, student learning, and professional integrity. CAS includes membership of over…

  8. CRISPR-Cas: evolution of an RNA-based adaptive immunity system in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V; Makarova, Kira S

    2013-05-01

    The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, CRISPR-associated genes) is an adaptive immunity system in bacteria and archaea that functions via a distinct self-non-self recognition mechanism that is partially analogous to the mechanism of eukaryotic RNA interference (RNAi). The CRISPR-Cas system incorporates fragments of virus or plasmid DNA into the CRISPR repeat cassettes and employs the processed transcripts of these spacers as guide RNAs to cleave the cognate foreign DNA or RNA. The Cas proteins, however, are not homologous to the proteins involved in RNAi and comprise numerous, highly diverged families. The majority of the Cas proteins contain diverse variants of the RNA recognition motif (RRM), a widespread RNA-binding domain. Despite the fast evolution that is typical of the cas genes, the presence of diverse versions of the RRM in most Cas proteins provides for a simple scenario for the evolution of the three distinct types of CRISPR-cas systems. In addition to several proteins that are directly implicated in the immune response, the cas genes encode a variety of proteins that are homologous to prokaryotic toxins that typically possess nuclease activity. The predicted toxins associated with CRISPR-Cas systems include the essential Cas2 protein, proteins of COG1517 that, in addition to a ligand-binding domain and a helix-turn-helix domain, typically contain different nuclease domains and several other predicted nucleases. The tight association of the CRISPR-Cas immunity systems with predicted toxins that, upon activation, would induce dormancy or cell death suggests that adaptive immunity and dormancy/suicide response are functionally coupled. Such coupling could manifest in the persistence state being induced and potentially providing conditions for more effective action of the immune system or in cell death being triggered when immunity fails. PMID:23439366

  9. Cas3 is a single-stranded DNA nuclease and ATP-dependent helicase in the CRISPR/Cas immune system.

    PubMed

    Sinkunas, Tomas; Gasiunas, Giedrius; Fremaux, Christophe; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Horvath, Philippe; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2011-04-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) is a recently discovered adaptive prokaryotic immune system that provides acquired immunity against foreign nucleic acids by utilizing small guide crRNAs (CRISPR RNAs) to interfere with invading viruses and plasmids. In Escherichia coli, Cas3 is essential for crRNA-guided interference with virus proliferation. Cas3 contains N-terminal HD phosphohydrolase and C-terminal Superfamily 2 (SF2) helicase domains. Here, we provide the first report of the cloning, expression, purification and in vitro functional analysis of the Cas3 protein of the Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR4 (Ecoli subtype) system. Cas3 possesses a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-stimulated ATPase activity, which is coupled to unwinding of DNA/DNA and RNA/DNA duplexes. Cas3 also shows ATP-independent nuclease activity located in the HD domain with a preference for ssDNA substrates. To dissect the contribution of individual domains, Cas3 separation-of-function mutants (ATPase(+)/nuclease(-) and ATPase(-)/nuclease(+)) were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. We propose that the Cas3 ATPase/helicase domain acts as a motor protein, which assists delivery of the nuclease activity to Cascade-crRNA complex targeting foreign DNA. PMID:21343909

  10. Walk Score®

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Scott C.; Pantin, Hilda; Lombard, Joanna; Toro, Matthew; Huang, Shi; Plater-Zyberk, Elizabeth; Perrino, Tatiana; Perez-Gomez, Gianna; Barrera-Allen, Lloyd; Szapocznik, José

    2013-01-01

    Background Walk Score® is a nationally and publicly available metric of neighborhood walkability based on proximity to amenities (e.g., retail, food, schools). However, few studies have examined the relationship of Walk Score to walking behavior. Purpose To examine the relationship of Walk Score to walking behavior in a sample of recent Cuban immigrants, who overwhelmingly report little choice in their selection of neighborhood built environments when they arrive in the U.S. Methods Participants were 391 recent healthy Cuban immigrants (M age=37.1 years) recruited within 90 days of arrival in the U.S., and assessed within 4 months of arrival (M=41.0 days in the U.S.), who resided throughout Miami-Dade County FL. Data on participants’ addresses, walking and sociodemographics were collected prospectively from 2008 to 2010. Analyses conducted in 2011 examined the relationship of Walk Score for each participant’s residential address in the U.S. to purposive walking, controlling for age, gender, education, BMI, days in the U.S., and habitual physical activity level in Cuba. Results For each 10-point increase in Walk Score, adjusting for covariates, there was a significant 19% increase in the likelihood of purposive walking, a 26% increase in the likelihood of meeting physical activity recommendations by walking, and 27% more minutes walked in the previous week. Conclusions Results suggest that Walk Score is associated with walking in a sample of recent immigrants who initially had little choice in where they lived in the U.S. These results support existing guidelines indicating that mixed land use (such as parks and restaurants near homes) should be included when designing walkable communities. PMID:23867028

  11. GENOME EDITING IN HUMAN CELLS USING CRISPR/CAS NUCLEASES

    PubMed Central

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar; Joung, J. Keith

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), the CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. Here we describe protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 Endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases. PMID:26423589

  12. High-throughput functional genomics using CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Shalem, Ophir; Sanjana, Neville E.; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Forward genetic screens are powerful tools for the discovery and functional annotation of genetic elements. Recently, the RNA-guided CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-associated Cas9 nuclease has been combined with genome-scale guide RNA libraries for unbiased, phenotypic screening. In this Review, we describe recent advances using Cas9 for genome-scale screens, including knockout approaches that inactivate genomic loci and strategies that modulate transcriptional activity. We discuss practical aspects of screen design, provide comparisons with RNA interference (RNAi) screening, and outline future applications and challenges. PMID:25854182

  13. Pyo-pneumothorax tuberculeux: à propos de 18 cas

    PubMed Central

    Hicham, Souhi; Hanane, El Ouazzani; Hicham, Janah; Ismaïl, Rhorfi; Ahmed, Abid

    2016-01-01

    Le pyo-pneumothorax tuberculeux est une complication rare mais grave de la tuberculose pulmonaire évolutive. Nous rapportons une série de 18 cas de pyo-pneumothorax tuberculeux colligés au service de Pneumo-Phtisiologie de l'Hôpital Militaire d'Instruction Mohammed V de Rabat entre janvier 2005 et décembre 2009. Il s'agit de 15 hommes et 3 femmes d’âge moyen de 35 ans ±7 ans. 4 patients étaient diabétiques. Le tabagisme était retrouvé chez 9 cas. Le pyo-pneumothorax était du coté droit dans 13 cas. La radiographie thoracique avait montré des lésions cavitaires chez 15 patients et des lésions étendues et bilatérales chez 8 cas. La recherche de BK dans le liquide de tubage gastrique était positive chez 16 cas. Un drainage thoracique associé à un traitement antituberculeux selon le régime 2SRHZ/7RH et une kinésithérapie respiratoire ont été instaurés chez tous les cas. La durée moyenne de drainage pleural était de 4 semaines. Chez 3 cas on avait noté la persistance de la suppuration pleurale ayant nécessité une toilette pleurale sous thoracoscopie avec pleurectomie et exérèse pulmonaire limitée emportant la lésion parenchymateuse tuberculeuse et la persistance d'une volumineuse poche pleurale avec trouble ventilatoire restrictif ayant nécessité une décortication pleurale chirurgicale chez deux cas. L’évolution était favorable avec pachypleurite séquellaire minime chez le reste des cas. Le pyo-pneumothorax tuberculeux est une forme grave, qui est souvent en rapport avec une tuberculose cavitaire active. L’évolution est généralement trainante malgré le traitement antituberculeux et le drainage thoracique, d'où la nécessité d'un diagnostic et un traitement précoce de toute forme de tuberculose. PMID:27583090

  14. Is the association of continuous metabolic syndrome risk score with body mass index independent of physical activity? The CASPIAN-III study

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Ramin; shafiee, Gita; Kelishadi, Roya; Babaki, Amir Eslami Shahr; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Arefirad, Tahereh; Ardalan, Gelayol; Ataie-Jafari, Asal; Asayesh, Hamid; Mohammadi, Rasool

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Although the association of body mass index (BMI) with metabolic syndrome (MetS) is well documented, there is little knowledge on the independent and joint associations of BMI and physical activity with MetS risk based on a continuous scoring system. This study was designed to explore the effect of physical activity on interactions between excess body weight and continuous metabolic syndrome (cMetS) in a nationwide survey of Iranian children and adolescents. SUBJECTS/METHODS Data on 5,625 school students between 10 and 18 years of age were analyzed. BMI percentiles, screen time activity (STA), leisure time physical activity (LTPA) levels, and components of cMetS risk score were extracted. Standardized residuals (z-scores) were calculated for MetS components. Linear regression models were used to study the interactions between different combinations of cMetS, LTPA, and BMI percentiles. RESULTS Overall, 984 (17.5%) subjects were underweight, whereas 501 (8.9%) and 451 (8%) participants were overweight and obese, respectively. All standardized values for cMetS components, except fasting blood glucose level, were directly correlated with BMI percentiles in all models (P-trend < 0.001); these associations were independent of STA and LTPA levels. Linear associations were also observed among LTPA and standardized residuals for blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein, and waist circumference (P-trend < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that BMI percentiles are associated with cMetS risk score independent of LTPA and STA levels. PMID:26244080

  15. CRISPR/Cas-Mediated Site-Specific Mutagenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Using Cas9 Nucleases and Paired Nickases.

    PubMed

    Schiml, Simon; Fauser, Friedrich; Puchta, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system has recently become the most important tool for genome engineering due to its simple architecture that allows for rapidly changing the target sequence and its applicability to organisms throughout all kingdoms of life. The need for an easy-to-use and reliable nuclease is especially high in plant research, as precise genome modifications are almost impossible to achieve by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and the regeneration of plants from protoplast cultures is very labor intensive. Here, we describe the application of the Cas9 nuclease to Arabidopsis thaliana for the induction of heritable targeted mutations, which may also be used for other plant species. To cover the concern for off-target activity, we also describe the generation of stable mutants using paired Cas9 nickases. PMID:27557689

  16. Surveillance and Processing of Foreign DNA by the Escherichia coli CRISPR-Cas System.

    PubMed

    Redding, Sy; Sternberg, Samuel H; Marshall, Myles; Gibb, Bryan; Bhat, Prashant; Guegler, Chantal K; Wiedenheft, Blake; Doudna, Jennifer A; Greene, Eric C

    2015-11-01

    CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems protect bacteria and archaea against foreign genetic elements. In Escherichia coli, Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense) is an RNA-guided surveillance complex that binds foreign DNA and recruits Cas3, a trans-acting nuclease helicase for target degradation. Here, we use single-molecule imaging to visualize Cascade and Cas3 binding to foreign DNA targets. Our analysis reveals two distinct pathways dictated by the presence or absence of a protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM). Binding to a protospacer flanked by a PAM recruits a nuclease-active Cas3 for degradation of short single-stranded regions of target DNA, whereas PAM mutations elicit an alternative pathway that recruits a nuclease-inactive Cas3 through a mechanism that is dependent on the Cas1 and Cas2 proteins. These findings explain how target recognition by Cascade can elicit distinct outcomes and support a model for acquisition of new spacer sequences through a mechanism involving processive, ATP-dependent Cas3 translocation along foreign DNA. PMID:26522594

  17. Expanding the CRISPR imaging toolset with Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 for simultaneous imaging of multiple genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baohui; Hu, Jeffrey; Almeida, Ricardo; Liu, Harrison; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Covill-Cooke, Christian; Lim, Wendell A.; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In order to elucidate the functional organization of the genome, it is vital to directly visualize the interactions between genomic elements in living cells. For this purpose, we engineered the Cas9 protein from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9) for the imaging of endogenous genomic loci, which showed a similar robustness and efficiency as previously reported for Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9). Imaging readouts allowed us to characterize the DNA-binding activity of SaCas9 and to optimize its sgRNA scaffold. Combining SaCas9 and SpCas9, we demonstrated two-color CRISPR imaging with the capability to resolve genomic loci spaced by <300 kb. Combinatorial color-mixing further enabled us to code multiple genomic elements in the same cell. Our results highlight the potential of combining SpCas9 and SaCas9 for multiplexed CRISPR-Cas9 applications, such as imaging and genome engineering. PMID:26740581

  18. Expanding the CRISPR imaging toolset with Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 for simultaneous imaging of multiple genomic loci.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baohui; Hu, Jeffrey; Almeida, Ricardo; Liu, Harrison; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Covill-Cooke, Christian; Lim, Wendell A; Huang, Bo

    2016-05-01

    In order to elucidate the functional organization of the genome, it is vital to directly visualize the interactions between genomic elements in living cells. For this purpose, we engineered the Cas9 protein from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9) for the imaging of endogenous genomic loci, which showed a similar robustness and efficiency as previously reported for Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9). Imaging readouts allowed us to characterize the DNA-binding activity of SaCas9 and to optimize its sgRNA scaffold. Combining SaCas9 and SpCas9, we demonstrated two-color CRISPR imaging with the capability to resolve genomic loci spaced by <300 kb. Combinatorial color-mixing further enabled us to code multiple genomic elements in the same cell. Our results highlight the potential of combining SpCas9 and SaCas9 for multiplexed CRISPR-Cas9 applications, such as imaging and genome engineering. PMID:26740581

  19. Litter Control Achievement - Ohio 4-H Club Score Sheet [and] Activity Guides 1 through 7. 4-H Pilot Program 918.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Cooperative Extension Service.

    Seven activity guides, evaluation sheet, and club scoresheet have been prepared for Ohio 4-H clubs' litter education program. Topics of the seven activity guides include: (1) general guidelines and types of activities; (2) little known facts about waste/litter; (3) guidelines for a walking tour; (4) fact sheet (questionnaire) related to garbage;…

  20. CAS-1 lunar soil simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yongchun; Wang, Shijie; Ouyang, Ziyuan; Zou, Yongliao; Liu, Jianzhong; Li, Chunlai; Li, Xiongyao; Feng, Junming

    2009-02-01

    Lunar soil simulant is a geochemical reproduction of lunar regolith, and is needed for lunar science and engineering researches. This paper describes a new lunar soil simulant, CAS-1, prepared by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, to support lunar orbiter, soft-landing mission and sample return missions of China’s Lunar Exploration Program, which is scheduled for 2004 2020. Such simulants should match the samples returned from the Moon, all collected from the lunar regolith rather than outcrops. The average mineral and chemical composition of lunar soil sample returned from the Apollo 14 mission, which landed on the Fra Mauro Formation, is chosen as the model for the CAS-1 simulant. Source material for this simulant was a low-Ti basaltic scoria dated at 1600 years from the late Quaternary volcanic area in the Changbai Mountains of northeast China. The main minerals of this rock are pyroxene, olivine, and minor plagioclase, and about 20 40% modal glass. The scoria was analyzed by XRF and found to be chemically similar to Apollo 14 lunar sample 14163. It was crushed in an impact mill with a resulting median particle size 85.9 μm, similar to Apollo soils. Bulk density, shear resistance, complex permittivity, and reflectance spectra were also similar to Apollo 14 soil. We conclude that CAS-1 is an ideal lunar soil simulant for science and engineering research of future lunar exploration program.

  1. Missing gene identification using functional coherence scores

    PubMed Central

    Chitale, Meghana; Khan, Ishita K.; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing metabolic and signaling pathways is an effective way of interpreting a genome sequence. A challenge in a pathway reconstruction is that often genes in a pathway cannot be easily found, reflecting current imperfect information of the target organism. In this work, we developed a new method for finding missing genes, which integrates multiple features, including gene expression, phylogenetic profile, and function association scores. Particularly, for considering function association between candidate genes and neighboring proteins to the target missing gene in the network, we used Co-occurrence Association Score (CAS) and PubMed Association Score (PAS), which are designed for capturing functional coherence of proteins. We showed that adding CAS and PAS substantially improve the accuracy of identifying missing genes in the yeast enzyme-enzyme network compared to the cases when only the conventional features, gene expression, phylogenetic profile, were used. Finally, it was also demonstrated that the accuracy improves by considering indirect neighbors to the target enzyme position in the network using a proper network-topology-based weighting scheme. PMID:27552989

  2. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technique and its application in site-directed genome modification of animals.

    PubMed

    Jinwei, Zhou; Qipin, Xu; Jing, Yao; Shumin, Yu; Suizhong, Cao

    2015-10-01

    CRISPR/Cas system, which uses CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) to guide Cas nuclease to silence invading nucleic acids, is self-defense system against exogenous virus or plasmid in bacteria and archaea. Through molecular modification, the typeⅡCRISPR/Cas system has become a highly efficient site-directed genome editing technique, which is simpler than zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) and easier to be designed and applied. In this review, we summarize the evolutionary history of CRISPR/Cas9 system, the working principle and modification process of type Ⅱ CRISPR/Cas and its application in animal genome modification. We also analyze the existing problems and improvement program of the CRISPR/Cas9 system as well as its application prospect combined with successful cases, which may provide innovative perspectives on improving animal traits and establishing animal models of human diseases. PMID:26496753

  3. Expanding CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing Capacity in Zebrafish Using SaCas9

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan; Chen, Cheng; Han, Yuxiang; Chen, Zelin; Lu, Xiaochan; Liang, Fang; Li, Song; Qin, Wei; Lin, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    The type II CRISPR/Cas9 system has been used widely for genome editing in zebrafish. However, the requirement for the 5′-NGG-3′ protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) of Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) limits its targeting sequences. Here, we report that a Cas9 ortholog from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9), and its KKH variant, successfully induced targeted mutagenesis with high frequency in zebrafish. Confirming previous findings, the SpCas9 variant, VQR, can also induce targeted mutations in zebrafish. Bioinformatics analysis of these new Cas targets suggests that the number of available target sites in the zebrafish genome can be greatly expanded. Collectively, the expanded target repertoire of Cas9 in zebrafish should further facilitate the utility of this organism for genetic studies of vertebrate biology. PMID:27317783

  4. Expanding CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing Capacity in Zebrafish Using SaCas9.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Chen, Cheng; Han, Yuxiang; Chen, Zelin; Lu, Xiaochan; Liang, Fang; Li, Song; Qin, Wei; Lin, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    The type II CRISPR/Cas9 system has been used widely for genome editing in zebrafish. However, the requirement for the 5'-NGG-3' protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) of Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) limits its targeting sequences. Here, we report that a Cas9 ortholog from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9), and its KKH variant, successfully induced targeted mutagenesis with high frequency in zebrafish. Confirming previous findings, the SpCas9 variant, VQR, can also induce targeted mutations in zebrafish. Bioinformatics analysis of these new Cas targets suggests that the number of available target sites in the zebrafish genome can be greatly expanded. Collectively, the expanded target repertoire of Cas9 in zebrafish should further facilitate the utility of this organism for genetic studies of vertebrate biology. PMID:27317783

  5. My Favorite American Monument. Kindergarten Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardes, Lupita

    For this kindergarten classroom activity, students are asked to pretend they have just won a trip to four historical sites: (1) Lincoln Memorial; (2) Mount Rushmore; (3) White House; and (4) Statue of Liberty. The activity instructs the students to keep a journal of the trip (taken via the Internet) so that a presentation can be given to the class…

  6. Rocks: A Concrete Activity That Introduces Normal Distribution, Sampling Error, Central Limit Theorem and True Score Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Duzer, Eric

    2011-01-01

    This report introduces a short, hands-on activity that addresses a key challenge in teaching quantitative methods to students who lack confidence or experience with statistical analysis. Used near the beginning of the course, this activity helps students develop an intuitive insight regarding a number of abstract concepts which are key to…

  7. A Propensity Score Matching Study of Participation in Community Activities: A Path to Positive Outcomes for Youth in New Zealand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Seini; Jose, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Extracurricular activities are important in many young people's lives and have been associated with positive academic, psychological, and social outcomes. However, most previous research has been limited to school-based activities in the North American context. This study expands existing literature by analyzing longitudinal data from more than…

  8. Growth of Islam. Seventh Grade Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houson, Judy

    This seventh grade activity asks students to gather data that will help them understand and appreciate the Islamic way of life and to learn to feel comfortable living with a Muslim family in Syria during the second semester of the school year. The activity states each student will be interviewed by a Fulbright official, expected to keep a…

  9. How Much Structuring Is Beneficial with Regard to Examination Scores? A Prospective Study of Three Forms of Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Claus H.; Rosen, Evelyne N.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a superiority of active learning forms compared with traditional lecture. However, there is still debate as to what degree structuring is necessary with regard to high exam outcomes. Seventy-five students from a premedical school were randomly attributed to an active lecture group, a cooperative group, or a…

  10. Let's Go! Kindergarten Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiesner, Eileen

    In this colorfully illustrated kindergarten activity, students read (and re-read) "My Blue Suitcase" (Sharon Katz), as an introduction to traveling. The book uses all of the basic forms of transportation and forms the transportation lesson outline. The activity gives the students the task of learning about each mode of transportation: land, sea,…

  11. Consumption of Low-Calorie Sweeteners among U.S. Adults Is Associated with Higher Healthy Eating Index (HEI 2005) Scores and More Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D.

    2014-01-01

    The possibility that low-calorie sweeteners (LCS) promote lower quality diets and, therefore, weight gain has been noted as a cause for concern. Data from a representative sample of 22,231 adults were obtained from five cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2008 NHANES). A single 24-hour recall was used to identify consumers of LCS beverages, foods and tabletop sweeteners. Diet quality was assessed using the Healthy Eating Index 2005 (HEI 2005) and its multiple subscores. Health behaviors of interest were physical activity, smoking and alcohol use. LCS consumers had higher HEI 2005 scores than did non-consumers, largely explained by better SoFAAS subscores (solid fats, added sugar and alcohol). LCS consumers had better HEI subscores for vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy, but worse subscores for saturated fat and sodium compared to non-consumers. Similar trends were observed for LCS beverages, tabletop LCS and LCS foods. Consumers of LCS were less likely to smoke and were more likely to engage in recreational physical activity. LCS use was associated with higher HEI 2005 scores, lower consumption of empty calories, less smoking and more physical activity. PMID:25329967

  12. Visual scoring of non-cavitated caries lesions and clinical trial efficiency, testing xylitol in caries active adults

    PubMed Central

    Brown, JP; Amaechi, BT; Bader, JD; Gilbert, GH; Makhija, SK; Lozano-Pineda, J; Leo, MC; Chuhe, C; Vollmer, WM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To better understand the effectiveness of xylitol in caries prevention in adults, and to attempt improved clinical trial efficiency. Methods As part of the Xylitol for Adult Caries Trial (X-ACT), non-cavitated and cavitated caries lesions were assessed in subjects who were experiencing the disease. The trial was a test of the effectiveness of 5 grams/day of xylitol, consumed by dissolving in the mouth five 1 gram lozenges spaced across each day, compared with a sucralose placebo. For this analysis, seeking trial efficiency, 538 subjects aged 21–80, with complete data for four dental examinations were selected from the 691 randomized into the three year trial, conducted at three sites. Acceptable inter and intra examiner reliability before and during the trial was quantified using the kappa statistic. Results The mean annualized non-cavitated plus cavitated lesion transition scores in coronal and root surfaces, from sound to carious favoured xylitol over placebo, during the three cumulative periods of 12, 24, and 33 months, but these clinically and statistically non-significant differences declined in magnitude over time. Restricting the present assessment to those subjects with a higher baseline lifetime caries experience showed possible but inconsistent benefit. Conclusions There was no clear and clinically relevant preventive effect of xylitol on caries in adults with adequate fluoride exposure when non-cavitated plus cavitated lesions were assessed. This conformed to the X-ACT trial result assessing cavitated lesions. Including non-cavitated lesion assessment in this full scale, placebo controlled, multi site, randomized, double blinded clinical trial in adults experiencing dental caries, did not achieve added trial efficiency or demonstrate practical benefit of xylitol. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.Gov NCT00393055 PMID:24205951

  13. Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR-Cas9 Systems Enable Specific Editing of the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maximilian; Lee, Ciaran M; Gasiunas, Giedrius; Davis, Timothy H; Cradick, Thomas J; Siksnys, Virginijus; Bao, Gang; Cathomen, Toni; Mussolino, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) based on the type II CRISPR-Cas9 system of Streptococcus pyogenes (Sp) have been widely used for genome editing in experimental models. However, the nontrivial level of off-target activity reported in several human cells may hamper clinical translation. RGN specificity depends on both the guide RNA (gRNA) and the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) recognized by the Cas9 protein. We hypothesized that more stringent PAM requirements reduce the occurrence of off-target mutagenesis. To test this postulation, we generated RGNs based on two Streptococcus thermophilus (St) Cas9 proteins, which recognize longer PAMs, and performed a side-by-side comparison of the three RGN systems targeted to matching sites in two endogenous human loci, PRKDC and CARD11. Our results demonstrate that in samples with comparable on-target cleavage activities, significantly lower off-target mutagenesis was detected using St-based RGNs as compared to the standard Sp-RGNs. Moreover, similarly to SpCas9, the StCas9 proteins accepted truncated gRNAs, suggesting that the specificities of St-based RGNs can be further improved. In conclusion, our results show that Cas9 proteins with longer or more restrictive PAM requirements provide a safe alternative to SpCas9-based RGNs and hence a valuable option for future human gene therapy applications. PMID:26658966

  14. Profiling of engineering hotspots identifies an allosteric CRISPR-Cas9 switch.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Benjamin L; Nadler, Dana C; Flamholz, Avi; Fellmann, Christof; Staahl, Brett T; Doudna, Jennifer A; Savage, David F

    2016-06-01

    The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease with widespread utility for genome modification. However, the structural constraints limiting the engineering of Cas9 have not been determined. Here we experimentally profile Cas9 using randomized insertional mutagenesis and delineate hotspots in the structure capable of tolerating insertions of a PDZ domain without disruption of the enzyme's binding and cleavage functions. Orthogonal domains or combinations of domains can be inserted into the identified sites with minimal functional consequence. To illustrate the utility of the identified sites, we construct an allosterically regulated Cas9 by insertion of the estrogen receptor-α ligand-binding domain. This protein showed robust, ligand-dependent activation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, establishing a versatile one-component system for inducible and reversible Cas9 activation. Thus, domain insertion profiling facilitates the rapid generation of new Cas9 functionalities and provides useful data for future engineering of Cas9. PMID:27136077

  15. Intrinsic sequence specificity of the Cas1 integrase directs new spacer acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Rollie, Clare; Schneider, Stefanie; Brinkmann, Anna Sophie; Bolt, Edward L; White, Malcolm F

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive prokaryotic immune system CRISPR-Cas provides RNA-mediated protection from invading genetic elements. The fundamental basis of the system is the ability to capture small pieces of foreign DNA for incorporation into the genome at the CRISPR locus, a process known as Adaptation, which is dependent on the Cas1 and Cas2 proteins. We demonstrate that Cas1 catalyses an efficient trans-esterification reaction on branched DNA substrates, which represents the reverse- or disintegration reaction. Cas1 from both Escherichia coli and Sulfolobus solfataricus display sequence specific activity, with a clear preference for the nucleotides flanking the integration site at the leader-repeat 1 boundary of the CRISPR locus. Cas2 is not required for this activity and does not influence the specificity. This suggests that the inherent sequence specificity of Cas1 is a major determinant of the adaptation process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08716.001 PMID:26284603

  16. Maximizing mutagenesis with solubilized CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Burger, Alexa; Lindsay, Helen; Felker, Anastasia; Hess, Christopher; Anders, Carolin; Chiavacci, Elena; Zaugg, Jonas; Weber, Lukas M; Catena, Raul; Jinek, Martin; Robinson, Mark D; Mosimann, Christian

    2016-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 enables efficient sequence-specific mutagenesis for creating somatic or germline mutants of model organisms. Key constraints in vivo remain the expression and delivery of active Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) with minimal toxicity, variable mutagenesis efficiencies depending on targeting sequence, and high mutation mosaicism. Here, we apply in vitro assembled, fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs in solubilizing salt solution to achieve maximal mutagenesis efficiency in zebrafish embryos. MiSeq-based sequence analysis of targeted loci in individual embryos using CrispRVariants, a customized software tool for mutagenesis quantification and visualization, reveals efficient bi-allelic mutagenesis that reaches saturation at several tested gene loci. Such virtually complete mutagenesis exposes loss-of-function phenotypes for candidate genes in somatic mutant embryos for subsequent generation of stable germline mutants. We further show that targeting of non-coding elements in gene regulatory regions using saturating mutagenesis uncovers functional control elements in transgenic reporters and endogenous genes in injected embryos. Our results establish that optimally solubilized, in vitro assembled fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs provide a reproducible reagent for direct and scalable loss-of-function studies and applications beyond zebrafish experiments that require maximal DNA cutting efficiency in vivo. PMID:27130213

  17. Campylobacter jejuni acquire new host-derived CRISPR spacers when in association with bacteriophages harboring a CRISPR-like Cas4 protein

    PubMed Central

    Hooton, Steven P. T.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a worldwide cause of human diarrhoeal disease. Clustered Repetitively Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) and associated proteins allow Bacteria and Archaea to evade bacteriophage and plasmid infection. Type II CRISPR systems are found in association with combinations of genes encoding the CRISPR-associated Cas1, Cas2, Cas4 or Csn2, and Cas9 proteins. C. jejuni possesses a minimal subtype II-C CRISPR system containing cas1, cas2, and cas9 genes whilst cas4 is notably absent. Cas4 proteins possess 5′-3′ exonuclease activity to create recombinogenic-ends for spacer acquisition. Here we report a conserved Cas4-like protein in Campylobacter bacteriophages that creates a novel split arrangement between the bacteriophage and host that represents a new twist in the bacteriophage/host co-evolutionary arms race. The continuous association of bacteriophage and host in the carrier state life cycle of C. jejuni provided an opportunity to study spacer acquisition in this species. Remarkably all the spacer sequences observed were of host origin. We hypothesize that Campylobacter bacteriophages can use Cas4-like protein to activate spacer acquisition to use host DNA as an effective decoy to bacteriophage DNA. Bacteria that acquire self-spacers and escape phage infection must overcome CRISPR-mediated autoimmunity either by loss of the interference functions leaving them susceptible to foreign DNA incursion or tolerate changes in gene regulation. PMID:25601859

  18. Utilization of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for the efficient production of mutant mice using crRNA/tracrRNA with Cas9 nickase and FokI-dCas9.

    PubMed

    Terao, Miho; Tamano, Moe; Hara, Satoshi; Kato, Tomoko; Kinoshita, Masato; Takada, Shuji

    2016-07-29

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful genome editing tool for the production of genetically modified animals. To produce mutant mice, chimeric single-guide RNA (sgRNA) is cloned in a plasmid vector and a mixture of sgRNA and Cas9 are microinjected into the fertilized eggs. An issue associated with gene manipulation using the CRISPR/Cas9 system is that there can be off-target effects. To simplify the production of mutant mice with low risks of off-target effects caused by the CRISPR/Cas9 system, we demonstrated that genetically modified mice can be efficiently obtained using chemically synthesized CRISPR RNA (crRNA), trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA), and modified Cas9s, such as the nickase version and FokI-fused catalytically inactive Cas9, by microinjection into fertilized eggs. Using this method, it is no longer necessary to clone sgRNA into a plasmid vector, and this enables high-throughput production of mutant mice. PMID:26972821

  19. Utilization of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for the efficient production of mutant mice using crRNA/tracrRNA with Cas9 nickase and FokI-dCas9

    PubMed Central

    Terao, Miho; Tamano, Moe; Hara, Satoshi; Kato, Tomoko; Kinoshita, Masato; Takada, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful genome editing tool for the production of genetically modified animals. To produce mutant mice, chimeric single-guide RNA (sgRNA) is cloned in a plasmid vector and a mixture of sgRNA and Cas9 are microinjected into the fertilized eggs. An issue associated with gene manipulation using the CRISPR/Cas9 system is that there can be off-target effects. To simplify the production of mutant mice with low risks of off-target effects caused by the CRISPR/Cas9 system, we demonstrated that genetically modified mice can be efficiently obtained using chemically synthesized CRISPR RNA (crRNA), trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA), and modified Cas9s, such as the nickase version and FokI-fused catalytically inactive Cas9, by microinjection into fertilized eggs. Using this method, it is no longer necessary to clone sgRNA into a plasmid vector, and this enables high-throughput production of mutant mice. PMID:26972821

  20. Physical activity assessed with three different methods and the Framingham Risk Score on 10-year coronary heart disease risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity (PA) protects against coronary heart disease (CHD) by favorably altering several CHD risk factors. In order to best understand the true nature of the relationship between PA and CHD, the impact different PA assessment methods have on the relationships must first be clarified. The p...

  1. Optimized CRISPR/Cas tools for efficient germline and somatic genome engineering in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Port, Fillip; Chen, Hui-Min; Lee, Tzumin; Bullock, Simon L

    2014-07-22

    The type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has emerged recently as a powerful method to manipulate the genomes of various organisms. Here, we report a toolbox for high-efficiency genome engineering of Drosophila melanogaster consisting of transgenic Cas9 lines and versatile guide RNA (gRNA) expression plasmids. Systematic evaluation reveals Cas9 lines with ubiquitous or germ-line-restricted patterns of activity. We also demonstrate differential activity of the same gRNA expressed from different U6 snRNA promoters, with the previously untested U6:3 promoter giving the most potent effect. An appropriate combination of Cas9 and gRNA allows targeting of essential and nonessential genes with transmission rates ranging from 25-100%. We also demonstrate that our optimized CRISPR/Cas tools can be used for offset nicking-based mutagenesis. Furthermore, in combination with oligonucleotide or long double-stranded donor templates, our reagents allow precise genome editing by homology-directed repair with rates that make selection markers unnecessary. Last, we demonstrate a novel application of CRISPR/Cas-mediated technology in revealing loss-of-function phenotypes in somatic cells following efficient biallelic targeting by Cas9 expressed in a ubiquitous or tissue-restricted manner. Our CRISPR/Cas tools will facilitate the rapid evaluation of mutant phenotypes of specific genes and the precise modification of the genome with single-nucleotide precision. Our results also pave the way for high-throughput genetic screening with CRISPR/Cas. PMID:25002478

  2. Silencing of p130Cas in Ovarian Carcinoma: A Novel Mechanism for Tumor Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Nick, Alpa M.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo; Ozpolat, Bulent; Tekedereli, Ibrahim; Graybill, Whitney S.; Landen, Charles N.; Villares, Gabriel; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Kim, Hye Sun; Lee, Ju-Seog; Kim, Soo Mi; Baggerly, Keith A.; Ram, Prahlad T.; Deavers, Michael T.; Coleman, Robert L.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigated the clinical and biological significance of p130cas, an important cell signaling molecule, in ovarian carcinoma. Methods Expression of p130cas in ovarian tumors, as assessed by immunohistochemistry, was associated with tumor characteristics and patient survival. The effects of p130cas gene silencing with small interfering RNAs incorporated into neutral nanoliposomes (siRNA-DOPC), alone and in combination with docetaxel, on in vivo tumor growth and on tumor cell proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) and apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling) were examined in mice bearing orthotopic taxane-sensitive (HeyA8 and SKOV3ip1) or taxane-resistant (HeyA8-MDR) ovarian tumors (n = 10 per group). To determine the specific mechanisms by which p130cas gene silencing abrogates tumor growth, we measured cell viability (MTT assay), apoptosis (fluorescence-activated cell sorting), autophagy (immunoblotting, fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy), and cell signaling (immunoblotting) in vitro. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Of 91 ovarian cancer specimens, 70 (76%) had high p130cas expression; and 21 (24%) had low p130cas expression. High p130cas expression was associated with advanced tumor stage (P < .001) and higher residual disease (>1 cm) following primary cytoreduction surgery (P = .007) and inversely associated with overall survival and progression-free survival (median overall survival: high p130cas expression vs low expression, 2.14 vs 9.1 years, difference = 6.96 years, 95% confidence interval = 1.69 to 9.48 years, P < .001; median progression-free survival: high p130cas expression vs low expression, 1.04 vs 2.13 years, difference = 1.09 years, 95% confidence interval = 0.47 to 2.60 years, P = .01). In mice bearing orthotopically implanted HeyA8 or SKOV3ip1 ovarian tumors, treatment with p130cas siRNA-DOPC in combination with docetaxel chemotherapy resulted in the greatest

  3. Layer plate CAS assay for the quantitation of siderophore production and determination of exudation patterns for fungi.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Megan Y; Santelli, Cara M; Duckworth, Owen W

    2016-02-01

    The chrome azurol S (CAS) assay measures the chelating activity of siderophores, but its application (especially to fungi) is limited by toxicity issues. In this note, we describe a modified version of the CAS assay that is suitable for quantifying siderophore exudation for microorganisms, including fungi. PMID:26712125

  4. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA:DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9:guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9:RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9:RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9:RNA. DNA strand separation and RNA:DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 employs PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate dsDNA scission. PMID:24476820

  5. Rapid and efficient analysis of gene function using CRISPR-Cas9 in Xenopus tropicalis founders.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, Mitsuki; Sakane, Yuto; Iida, Midori; Suzuki, Miyuki; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Fujii, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in genome editing using programmable nucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system, have facilitated reverse genetics in Xenopus tropicalis. To establish a practical workflow for analyzing genes of interest using CRISPR-Cas9, we examined various experimental procedures and conditions. We first compared the efficiency of gene disruption between Cas9 protein and mRNA injection by analyzing genotype and phenotype frequency, and toxicity. Injection of X. tropicalis embryos with Cas9 mRNA resulted in high gene-disrupting efficiency comparable with that produced by Cas9 protein injection. To exactly evaluate the somatic mutation rates of on-target sites, amplicon sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using a restriction enzyme or recombinant Cas9 were performed. Mutation rates of two target genes (slc45a2 and ltk) required for pigmentation were estimated to be over 90% by both methods in animals exhibiting severe phenotypes, suggesting that targeted somatic mutations were biallelically introduced in almost all somatic cells of founder animals. Using a heteroduplex mobility assay, we also showed that off-target mutations were induced at a low rate. Based on our results, we propose a CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene disruption workflow for a rapid and efficient analysis of gene function using X. tropicalis founders. PMID:27219625

  6. The Neisseria meningitidis CRISPR-Cas9 System Enables Specific Genome Editing in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Bao, Gang

    2016-03-01

    The clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) system from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) has been successfully adapted for RNA-guided genome editing in a wide range of organisms. However, numerous reports have indicated that Spy CRISPR-Cas9 systems may have significant off-target cleavage of genomic DNA sequences differing from the intended on-target site. Here, we report the performance of the Neisseria meningitidis (Nme) CRISPR-Cas9 system that requires a longer protospacer-adjacent motif for site-specific cleavage, and present a comparison between the Spy and Nme CRISPR-Cas9 systems targeting the same protospacer sequence. The results with the native crRNA and tracrRNA as well as a chimeric single guide RNA for the Nme CRISPR-Cas9 system were also compared. Our results suggest that, compared with the Spy system, the Nme CRISPR-Cas9 system has similar or lower on-target cleavage activity but a reduced overall off-target effect on a genomic level when sites containing three or fewer mismatches are considered. Thus, the Nme CRISPR-Cas9 system may represent a safer alternative for precision genome engineering applications. PMID:26782639

  7. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-03-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  8. Highly Specific Epigenome Editing by CRISPR/Cas9 Repressors for Silencing of Distal Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Thakore, Pratiksha I.; D’Ippolito, Anthony M; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Shivakumar, Nishkala K.; Kabadi, Ami M.; Reddy, Timothy E.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 platform is a promising technology to modulate gene expression to direct cell phenotype and to dissect the causal epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Fusions of the nuclease-inactive dCas9 to the KRAB repressor (dCas9-KRAB) can silence target gene expression, but the genome-wide specificity and the extent of heterochromatin formation catalyzed by dCas9-KRAB is not known. We targeted dCas9-KRAB to the HS2 enhancer, a distal regulatory element that orchestrates expression of multiple globin genes. Genome-wide analyses demonstrated that localization of dCas9-KRAB to HS2 specifically induced H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3) at the enhancer and reduced the chromatin accessibility of both the enhancer and its promoter targets. Targeted epigenetic modification of HS2 silenced the expression of multiple globin genes, with minimal off-target changes in gene expression. These results demonstrate that repression mediated by dCas9-KRAB is sufficiently specific to disrupt the activity of individual enhancers via local modification of the epigenome. PMID:26501517

  9. The Neisseria meningitidis CRISPR-Cas9 System Enables Specific Genome Editing in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)—CRISPR-associated (Cas) system from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) has been successfully adapted for RNA-guided genome editing in a wide range of organisms. However, numerous reports have indicated that Spy CRISPR-Cas9 systems may have significant off-target cleavage of genomic DNA sequences differing from the intended on-target site. Here, we report the performance of the Neisseria meningitidis (Nme) CRISPR-Cas9 system that requires a longer protospacer-adjacent motif for site-specific cleavage, and present a comparison between the Spy and Nme CRISPR-Cas9 systems targeting the same protospacer sequence. The results with the native crRNA and tracrRNA as well as a chimeric single guide RNA for the Nme CRISPR-Cas9 system were also compared. Our results suggest that, compared with the Spy system, the Nme CRISPR-Cas9 system has similar or lower on-target cleavage activity but a reduced overall off-target effect on a genomic level when sites containing three or fewer mismatches are considered. Thus, the Nme CRISPR-Cas9 system may represent a safer alternative for precision genome engineering applications. PMID:26782639

  10. Elevated high-mobility group B1 levels in active adult-onset Still's disease associated with systemic score and skin rash.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Yang; Suh, Chang-Hee; Sohn, Seonghyang; Nam, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyoun-Ah

    2016-08-01

    High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein, and such prototypical damage-associated molecular patterns mediate the immune response in the noninfectious inflammatory response. Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder involved in the dysregulation of innate immunity. We investigated the serum HMGB1 level in patients with AOSD and evaluated its clinical significance. Blood samples were collected from 40 patients with active AOSD and 40 healthy controls (HC). Of the patients with AOSD, follow-up samples were collected from 16 patients after a resolution of AOSD disease activity. Serum HMGB1 levels in patients with AOSD were higher than those of the HC (10.0 ± 5.85 vs. 5.15 ± 1.79 ng/mL, p < 0.001). Serum HMGB1 levels were found to be correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) and the systemic score. The AOSD patient who had a sore throat showed a higher serum HMGB1 level than those patients who did not, and the patient with a skin rash had higher levels than the patients without. In addition, the serum HMGB1 levels were decreased after the resolution of disease activity in the AOSD patients who were followed up. The serum HMGB1 levels were elevated in AOSD patients compared to the HC and were correlated with both CRP and the systemic score. The HMGB1 levels were associated with skin rash and a sore throat in AOSD patients. After the resolution of disease activity, serum HMGB1 levels were found to have decreased. PMID:27225247

  11. CAS as Environments for Implementing Mathematical Microworlds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpers, Burkhard

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether computer algebra systems (CAS) are suitable environments for implementing mathematical microworlds. Recalls what constitutes a microworld and explores how CAS can be used for implementation, stating potentials as well as limitations. Provides as an example the microworld "Formula 1", implemented in Maple Software. (Author/KHR)

  12. Beyond editing: repurposing CRISPR–Cas9 for precision genome regulation and interrogation

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Antonia A.; Lim, Wendell A.; Qi, Lei S.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial CRISPR–Cas9 system has emerged as a multifunctional platform for sequence-specific regulation of gene expression. This Review describes the development of technologies based on nuclease-deactivated Cas9, termed dCas9, for RNA-guided genomic transcription regulation, both by repression through CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) and by activation through CRISPR activation (CRISPRa). We highlight different uses in diverse organisms, including bacterial and eukaryotic cells, and summarize current applications of harnessing CRISPR–dCas9 for multiplexed, inducible gene regulation, genome-wide screens and cell fate engineering. We also provide a perspective on future developments of the technology and its applications in biomedical research and clinical studies. PMID:26670017

  13. Beyond editing: repurposing CRISPR-Cas9 for precision genome regulation and interrogation.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Antonia A; Lim, Wendell A; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has emerged as a multifunctional platform for sequence-specific regulation of gene expression. This Review describes the development of technologies based on nuclease-deactivated Cas9, termed dCas9, for RNA-guided genomic transcription regulation, both by repression through CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) and by activation through CRISPR activation (CRISPRa). We highlight different uses in diverse organisms, including bacterial and eukaryotic cells, and summarize current applications of harnessing CRISPR-dCas9 for multiplexed, inducible gene regulation, genome-wide screens and cell fate engineering. We also provide a perspective on future developments of the technology and its applications in biomedical research and clinical studies. PMID:26670017

  14. In early returns scoring scores big.

    PubMed

    Butman, Samuel M

    2016-07-01

    A scoring or cutting balloon is always useful in preventing slippage during therapy of in-stent restenosis. A drug-coated scoring balloon for in-stent restenosis may be an alternative to a drug-coated balloon Definitive comparison trials are needed and likely to help define their exact role in patients with in-stent restenosis. PMID:27400636

  15. activation d'hépatite virale B chez un patient traité pour lymphome non hodgkinien B diffus à grandes cellules par rituximab: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Houssou, Bienvenu; Massi, Romaric Mahutondji; Camara, Marième; Mifdal, Hassan; Nourichafi, Nadia; Zafad, Saadia; Oukkache, Bouchra

    2015-01-01

    La réactivation du virus de l'hépatite B est secondaire à une diminution de l'immunité de l'hôte et peut être suivie d'une poussée d'hépatite aigue potentiellement mortelle. Nous rapportons le cas d'un patient D.H, 47 ans, sexe masculin, AgHBs négatif, jamais transfusé, jamais vacciné contre l'hépatite B qui avait présenté en mars 2013 un LNH B diffus à grandes cellules stade IV par moelle. Traité par 8 cures R-CHOP, il était en rémission complète clinique et paraclinique. Neuf mois après, il fait une rechute de son lymphome classé stade III, associée à une hépatite virale B en réplication virale (18.000 copies/mL): réactivation virale B chez porteur occulte traité avec entécavir 0.5mg par jour pendant 6 mois, l'ADN du VHB était indétectable en fin de traitement. Il avait reçu deux cures de DHAP puis deux cures R-DHAP avec une rémission complète. Lors du recueil des cellules souches en vue de l'autogreffe, l'AgHBs est à nouveau positif. Il a été greffé le 12/01/2015 et continue son traitement antiviral pour 6 mois encore. PMID:26664523

  16. CAS

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, B.; Pomeroy, G. )

    1989-12-02

    The Security Alarm System is a data acquisition and control system which collects data from intrusion sensors and displays the information in a real-time environment for operators. The Access Control System monitors and controls the movement of personnel with the use of card readers and biometrics hand readers.

  17. Greater Independence in Activities of Daily Living is Associated with Higher Health-Related Quality of Life Scores in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Charice S.; Slaughter, Susan E.; Jones, C. Allyson; Wagg, Adrian S.

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) for nursing home residents is important, however, the concept of quality of life is broad, encompasses many domains and is difficult to assess in people with dementia. Basic activities of daily living (ADL) are measured routinely in nursing homes using the Resident Assessment Instrument-Minimum Data Set Version 2.0 (RAI-MDS) and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) instrument. We examined the relationship between HRQL and ADL to assess the future possibility of ADL dependency level serving as a surrogate measure of HRQL in residents with dementia. To assess ADL, measures derived from the RAI-MDS and FIM data were gathered for 111 residents at the beginning of our study and at 6-month follow-up. Higher scores for independence in ADL were correlated with higher scores for a disease-specific HRQL measure, the Quality of Life—Alzheimer’s Disease Scale. Preliminary evidence suggests that FIM-assessed ADL is associated with HRQL for these residents. The associations of the dressing and toileting items with HRQL were particularly strong. This finding suggests the importance of ADL function in HRQL. The RAI-MDS ADL scales should be used with caution to evaluate HRQL.

  18. Effects of Crude Oil/Dispersant Mixture and Dispersant Components on PPARγ Activity in Vitro and in Vivo: Identification of Dioctyl Sodium Sulfosuccinate (DOSS; CAS #577-11-7) as a Probable Obesogen

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Alexis M.; Bowers, Robert R.; Magaletta, Margaret E.; Holshouser, Steven; Maggi, Adriana; Ciana, Paolo; Guillette, Louis J.; Bowden, John A.; Kucklick, John R.; Baatz, John E.; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.

    2015-01-01

    adipocyte differentiation. Conclusions We conclude that DOSS is a putative obesogen worthy of further study, including epidemiological and clinical investigations into laxative prescriptions consisting of DOSS. Citation Temkin AM, Bowers RR, Magaletta ME, Holshouser S, Maggi A, Ciana P, Guillette LJ, Bowden JA, Kucklick JR, Baatz JE, Spyropoulos DD. 2016. Effects of crude oil/dispersant mixture and dispersant components on PPARγ activity in vitro and in vivo: identification of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DOSS; CAS #577-11-7) as a probable obesogen. Environ Health Perspect 124:112–119; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409672 PMID:26135921

  19. [Research progress in the third-generation genomic editing technology - CRISPR/Cas9].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yalan; Zong, Yanan; Kong, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology originated from type II CRISPR/Cas system, which is widely found in bacteria and equips them with acquired immunity against viruses and plasmids. CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is a RNA-guided endonuclease, which can efficiently introduce double-strand breaks at specific sites and activate homologous recombination and/or non-homologous end joining mechanism for the repair of impaired DNA. Features such as easy-to-use, cost-effectiveness, multiple targeting ability have made it the third-generation genomic engineering tool following ZFNs and TALENs. Here the history of discovery and molecular mechanism of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology are reviewed. The rapid advance in its various applications, especially for the treatment of human genetic disorders, as well as some concomitant problems are discussed. PMID:27577230

  20. Genome Editing in Escherichia coli with Cas9 and synthetic CRISPRs

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ze; Richardson, Sarah; Robinson, David; Deutsch, Samuel; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2014-03-14

    Recently, the Cas9-CRISPR system has proven to be a useful tool for genome editing in eukaryotes, which repair the double stranded breaks made by Cas9 with non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination. Escherichia coli lacks non-homologous end joining and has a very low homologous recombination rate, effectively rendering targeted Cas9 activity lethal. We have developed a heat curable, serializable, plasmid based system for selectionless Cas9 editing in arbitrary E. coli strains that uses synthetic CRISPRs for targeting and -red to effect repairs of double stranded breaks. We have demonstrated insertions, substitutions, and multi-target deletions with our system, which we have tested in several strains.

  1. RXTE Observations of Cas A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Heindl, W. A.; Blanco, P. R.; Pelling, M. R.; Gruber, D. E.; Allen, G. E.; Jahoda, K.; Swank, J. H.; Woosley, S. E.; Nomoto, K.; Higdon, J. C.; Dermer, Charles D. (Editor); Strickman, Mark S. (Editor); Kurfess, James D. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The exciting detection by the COMPTEL instrument of the 1157 keV Ti-44 line from the supernova remnant Cas A sets important new constraints on supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis. The Ti-44 decay also produces x-ray lines at 68 and 78 keV, whose flux should be essentially the same as that of the gamma ray line. The revised COMPTEL flux of 4 x l0(exp -5) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) is very near the sensitivity limit for line detection by the HEXTE instrument on RXTE. We report on the results from two RXTE observations - 20 ks during In Orbit Checkout in January 1996 and 200 ks in April 1996. We also find a strong continuum emission suggesting cosmic ray electron acceleration in the remnant.

  2. 48 CFR 9903.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. (a) Full coverage. Full coverage requires that the business unit comply with all of the CAS specified in part...

  3. 48 CFR 9903.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. (a) Full coverage. Full coverage requires that the business unit comply with all of the CAS specified in part...

  4. 48 CFR 9903.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Types of CAS coverage. 9903... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. (a) Full coverage. Full coverage requires that the business unit comply with all of the CAS specified in part...

  5. Assisting Students' Cognitive Strategies with the Use of CAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarvari, Csaba; Lavicza, Zsolt; Klincsik, Mihaly

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines various cognitive strategies applied while CAS (Computer Algebra System) are used in undergraduate-level engineering mathematics teaching and learning. We posed some questions in relation to such CAS use: What kind of tools can CAS offer to enhance different cognitive strategies of students? How can the use of CAS widen the…

  6. 48 CFR 9903.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. (a) Full coverage. Full coverage requires that the business unit comply with all of the CAS specified in part...

  7. Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering from a single lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Kabadi, Ami M; Ousterout, David G; Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2014-10-29

    Engineered DNA-binding proteins that manipulate the human genome and transcriptome have enabled rapid advances in biomedical research. In particular, the RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been engineered to create site-specific double-strand breaks for genome editing or to direct targeted transcriptional regulation. A unique capability of the CRISPR/Cas9 system is multiplex genome engineering by delivering a single Cas9 enzyme and two or more single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) targeted to distinct genomic sites. This approach can be used to simultaneously create multiple DNA breaks or to target multiple transcriptional activators to a single promoter for synergistic enhancement of gene induction. To address the need for uniform and sustained delivery of multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering tools, we developed a single lentiviral system to express a Cas9 variant, a reporter gene and up to four sgRNAs from independent RNA polymerase III promoters that are incorporated into the vector by a convenient Golden Gate cloning method. Each sgRNA is efficiently expressed and can mediate multiplex gene editing and sustained transcriptional activation in immortalized and primary human cells. This delivery system will be significant to enabling the potential of CRISPR/Cas9-based multiplex genome engineering in diverse cell types. PMID:25122746

  8. Cas6 is an endoribonuclease that generates guide RNAs for invader defense in prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Carte, Jason; Wang, Ruiying; Li, Hong; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2010-11-09

    An RNA-based gene silencing pathway that protects bacteria and archaea from viruses and other genome invaders is hypothesized to arise from guide RNAs encoded by CRISPR loci and proteins encoded by the cas genes. CRISPR loci contain multiple short invader-derived sequences separated by short repeats. The presence of virus-specific sequences within CRISPR loci of prokaryotic genomes confers resistance against corresponding viruses. The CRISPR loci are transcribed as long RNAs that must be processed to smaller guide RNAs. Here we identified Pyrococcus furiosus Cas6 as a novel endoribonuclease that cleaves CRISPR RNAs within the repeat sequences to release individual invader targeting RNAs. Cas6 interacts with a specific sequence motif in the 5{prime} region of the CRISPR repeat element and cleaves at a defined site within the 3{prime} region of the repeat. The 1.8 angstrom crystal structure of the enzyme reveals two ferredoxin-like folds that are also found in other RNA-binding proteins. The predicted active site of the enzyme is similar to that of tRNA splicing endonucleases, and concordantly, Cas6 activity is metal-independent. cas6 is one of the most widely distributed CRISPR-associated genes. Our findings indicate that Cas6 functions in the generation of CRISPR-derived guide RNAs in numerous bacteria and archaea.

  9. Fingerprinting of music scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Jonathan; Schmucker, Martin

    2004-06-01

    Publishers of sheet music are generally reluctant in distributing their content via the Internet. Although online sheet music distribution's advantages are numerous the potential risk of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) infringement, e.g. illegal online distributions, disables any innovation propensity. While active protection techniques only deter external risk factors, additional technology is necessary to adequately treat further risk factors. For several media types including music scores watermarking technology has been developed, which ebeds information in data by suitable data modifications. Furthermore, fingerprinting or perceptual hasing methods have been developed and are being applied especially for audio. These methods allow the identification of content without prior modifications. In this article we motivate the development of watermarking and fingerprinting technologies for sheet music. Outgoing from potential limitations of watermarking methods we explain why fingerprinting methods are important for sheet music and address potential applications. Finally we introduce a condept for fingerprinting of sheet music.

  10. Translation, Validation and Cross-Cultural Adaptation of a Simplified-Chinese Version of the Tegner Activity Score in Chinese Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongxia; Jiang, Yanfang; Yang, Jie; Feng, Tao; Gong, Xi; Wang, Jianquan; Ao, Yingfang

    2016-01-01

    Aims To translate the English version of Tegner Activity Score into a Simplified-Chinese version (Tegner-C) and evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods Tegner-C was cross-culturally adapted according to established guidelines. The validity and reliability of Tegner-C were assessed in 78 participants, with 19–20 participants in each of the four groups: before anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (pre-ACLR) group, 2–3 months after ACLR group, 3–12 months after ACLR group, and healthy control group. Each participant was asked to complete the Tegner-C and Chinese version of International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (IKDC-SKF-C) twice, with an interval of 5±2 days. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC2, 1) was used to assess the reliability and Spearman’s rank correlation was used for construct validity. Results The ICC2,1 was higher than 0.90 for all groups except in the pre-ACLR group, for which the ICC2,1 was 0.71 (0.41, 0.87) (All with p<0.001). The absolute reliability as evaluated by the smallest detectable change was 0.43, 2.12, 0.89, and 0.44 for the healthy control group, pre-ACLR group, 2–3 months after ACLR group, and 3–12 months after ACLR group, respectively. Neither a ceiling effect nor a floor effect was observed for any group. Significant difference was observed for both Tegner-C and IKDC-SKF-C scores between the control and the other three groups (all with p<0.001), and between pre-ACLR and the 2–3 months after ACLR group (p<0.001). Conclusions Tegner-C demonstrated comparable psychometric properties to the original English version and thus is reliable and valid for Chinese-speaking patients with ACL injury. PMID:27186880

  11. The Apgar Score.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    The Apgar score provides an accepted and convenient method for reporting the status of the newborn infant immediately after birth and the response to resuscitation if needed. The Apgar score alone cannot be considered as evidence of, or a consequence of, asphyxia; does not predict individual neonatal mortality or neurologic outcome; and should not be used for that purpose. An Apgar score assigned during resuscitation is not equivalent to a score assigned to a spontaneously breathing infant. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourage use of an expanded Apgar score reporting form that accounts for concurrent resuscitative interventions. PMID:26416932

  12. Structure and specificity of the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 during DNA interrogation, target binding and cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Eric A.; Kocak, D. Dewran; Fitzgibbon, Christopher J.; McMenemy, Joshua; Gersbach, Charles A.; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 cuts DNA at variable target sites designated by a Cas9-bound RNA molecule. Cas9's ability to be directed by single ‘guide RNA’ molecules to target nearly any sequence has been recently exploited for a number of emerging biological and medical applications. Therefore, understanding the nature of Cas9's off-target activity is of paramount importance for its practical use. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we directly resolve individual Cas9 and nuclease-inactive dCas9 proteins as they bind along engineered DNA substrates. High-resolution imaging allows us to determine their relative propensities to bind with different guide RNA variants to targeted or off-target sequences. Mapping the structural properties of Cas9 and dCas9 to their respective binding sites reveals a progressive conformational transformation at DNA sites with increasing sequence similarity to its target. With kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, these results provide evidence of a ‘conformational gating’ mechanism driven by the interactions between the guide RNA and the 14th–17th nucleotide region of the targeted DNA, the stabilities of which we find correlate significantly with reported off-target cleavage rates. KMC simulations also reveal potential methodologies to engineer guide RNA sequences with improved specificity by considering the invasion of guide RNAs into targeted DNA duplex. PMID:26384421

  13. Regulation of the Type I-F CRISPR-Cas system by CRP-cAMP and GalM controls spacer acquisition and interference

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Adrian G.; Chang, James T.; Taylor, Corinda; Fineran, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas prokaryotic ‘adaptive immune systems’ represent a sophisticated defence strategy providing bacteria and archaea with protection from invading genetic elements, such as bacteriophages or plasmids. Despite intensive research into their mechanism and application, how CRISPR-Cas systems are regulated is less clear, and nothing is known about the regulation of Type I-F systems. We used Pectobacterium atrosepticum, a Gram-negative phytopathogen, to study CRISPR-Cas regulation, since it contains a single Type I-F system. The CRP-cAMP complex activated the cas operon, increasing the expression of the adaptation genes cas1 and cas2–3 in addition to the genes encoding the Csy surveillance complex. Mutation of crp or cyaA (encoding adenylate cyclase) resulted in reductions in both primed spacer acquisition and interference. Furthermore, we identified a galactose mutarotase, GalM, which reduced cas operon expression in a CRP- and CyaA-dependent manner. We propose that the Type I-F system senses metabolic changes, such as sugar availability, and regulates cas genes to initiate an appropriate defence response. Indeed, elevated glucose levels reduced cas expression in a CRP- and CyaA-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings highlight that a metabolite-sensing regulatory pathway controls expression of the Type I-F CRISPR-Cas system to modulate levels of adaptation and interference. PMID:26007654

  14. Kinetics of the CRISPR-Cas9 effector complex assembly and the role of 3′-terminal segment of guide RNA

    PubMed Central

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Semenova, Ekaterina; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 is widely applied for genome engineering in various organisms. The assembly of single guide RNA (sgRNA) with the Cas9 protein may limit the Cas9/sgRNA effector complex function. We developed a FRET-based assay for detection of CRISPR–Cas9 complex binding to its targets and used this assay to investigate the kinetics of Cas9 assembly with a set of structurally distinct sgRNAs. We find that Cas9 and isolated sgRNAs form the effector complex efficiently and rapidly. Yet, the assembly process is sensitive to the presence of moderate concentrations of non-specific RNA competitors, which considerably delay the Cas9/sgRNA complex formation, while not significantly affecting already formed complexes. This observation suggests that the rate of sgRNA loading into Cas9 in cells can be determined by competition between sgRNA and intracellular RNA molecules for the binding to Cas9. Non-specific RNAs exerted particularly large inhibitory effects on formation of Cas9 complexes with sgRNAs bearing shortened 3′-terminal segments. This result implies that the 3′-terminal segment confers sgRNA the ability to withstand competition from non-specific RNA and at least in part may explain the fact that use of sgRNAs truncated for the 3′-terminal stem loops leads to reduced activity during genomic editing. PMID:26945042

  15. Assessment of Disease Activity in Small Bowel Crohn's Disease: Comparison between Endoscopy and Magnetic Resonance Enterography Using MRIA and Modified MRIA Score

    PubMed Central

    Scardapane, Arnaldo; Ambrosi, Annalisa; Salinaro, Emanuela; Mancini, Maria Elisabetta; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Di Leo, Alfredo; Lorusso, Filomenamila; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To retrospectively compare the results of the MRIA (magnetic resonance index of activity) with a modified MRIA (mMRIA), which was calculated excluding from MRIA formula the data of relative contrast enhancement (RCE). Materials and Methods. MR-E and corresponding endoscopic records of 100 patients were reviewed. MRIA, mMRIA, and SES endoscopic index were calculated for all the patients. Namely, MRIA was calculated as follows: (1.5 × wall thickening + 0.02 × RCE + 5 × intramural edema + 10 × ulcers), while mMRIA was calculated with the modified formula (1.5 × wall thickening + 5 × intramural edema + 10 × ulcers). Results. Mean MRIA and mMRIA values were 19.3 and 17.68, respectively (p < 0.0001). A significant correlation (p < 0.0001) was observed between MRIA and mMRIA scores and between both MR indexes and SES (p < 0.0001). Conclusions. mMRIA was comparable to MRIA in the evaluation of disease activity in Crohn's disease. PMID:26759554

  16. V723 Cas a borderline classical nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedjung, M.; Iijima, T.

    2002-11-01

    V723 Cas had a light curve similar to that of HR Del before maximum, with a very slow pre-maximum rise, explained according to [2] by the presence of an optically thin wind before maximum unlike the optically thick wind generally seen for classical novae after maximum. Examination of the Fe II emission lines by the SAC method, is compatible with this also having been the case for V723 Cas.

  17. Inactivation of CRISPR-Cas systems by anti-CRISPR proteins in diverse bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Pawluk, April; Staals, Raymond H J; Taylor, Corinda; Watson, Bridget N J; Saha, Senjuti; Fineran, Peter C; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems provide sequence-specific adaptive immunity against foreign nucleic acids(1,2). They are present in approximately half of all sequenced prokaryotes(3) and are expected to constitute a major barrier to horizontal gene transfer. We previously described nine distinct families of proteins encoded in Pseudomonas phage genomes that inhibit CRISPR-Cas function(4,5). We have developed a bioinformatic approach that enabled us to discover additional anti-CRISPR proteins encoded in phages and other mobile genetic elements of diverse bacterial species. We show that five previously undiscovered families of anti-CRISPRs inhibit the type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems of both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pectobacterium atrosepticum, and a dual specificity anti-CRISPR inactivates both type I-F and I-E CRISPR-Cas systems. Mirroring the distribution of the CRISPR-Cas systems they inactivate, these anti-CRISPRs were found in species distributed broadly across the phylum Proteobacteria. Importantly, anti-CRISPRs originating from species with divergent type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems were able to inhibit the two systems we tested, highlighting their broad specificity. These results suggest that all type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems are vulnerable to inhibition by anti-CRISPRs. Given the widespread occurrence and promiscuous activity of the anti-CRISPRs described here, we propose that anti-CRISPRs play an influential role in facilitating the movement of DNA between prokaryotes by breaching the barrier imposed by CRISPR-Cas systems. PMID:27573108

  18. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in soybean by TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongyang; Zeng, Xuanrui; Zhao, Meng; Cui, Xiaopei; Wang, Qing; Yang, Hui; Cheng, Hao; Yu, Deyue

    2016-01-10

    Gene targeting (GT) is of great significance for advancing basic plant research and crop improvement. Both TALENs (transcription activator-like effectors nucleases) and CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated 9) systems have been developed for genome editing in eukaryotes, including crop plants. In this work, we present the comparative analysis of these two technologies for two soybean genome editing targets, GmPDS11 and GmPDS18. We found GT in soybean hairy roots with a single targeting efficiency range of 17.5-21.1% by TALENs, 11.7-18.1% by CRISPR/Cas9 using the AtU6-26 promoter, and 43.4-48.1% by CRISPR/Cas9 using the GmU6-16g-1 promoter, suggesting that the CRISPR/Cas9 using the GmU6-16g-1 promoter is probably a much more efficient tool compared to the other technologies. Similarly, our double mutation GT efficiency experiment with these three technologies displayed a targeting efficiency of 6.25% by TALENs, 12.5% by CRISPR/Cas9 using the AtU6-26 promoter, and 43.4-48.1% by CRISPR/Cas9 using the GmU6-16g-1 promoter, suggesting that CRISPR/Cas9 is still a better choice for simultaneous editing of multiple homoeoalleles. Furthermore, we observed albino and dwarf buds (PDS knock-out) by soybean transformation in cotyledon nodes. Our results demonstrated that both TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 systems are powerful tools for soybean genome editing. PMID:26603121

  19. In Vitro CRISPR/Cas9 System for Efficient Targeted DNA Editing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunkun; Tao, Weixin; Wen, Shishi; Li, Zhengyuan; Yang, Anna; Deng, Zixin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, an RNA-guided nuclease for specific genome editing in vivo, has been adopted in a wide variety of organisms. In contrast, the in vitro application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has rarely been reported. We present here a highly efficient in vitro CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing (ICE) system that allows specific refactoring of biosynthetic gene clusters in Streptomyces bacteria and other large DNA fragments. Cleavage by Cas9 of circular pUC18 DNA was investigated here as a simple model, revealing that the 3′→5′ exonuclease activity of Cas9 generates errors with 5 to 14 nucleotides (nt) randomly missing at the editing joint. T4 DNA polymerase was then used to repair the Cas9-generated sticky ends, giving substantial improvement in editing accuracy. Plasmid pYH285 and cosmid 10A3, harboring a complete biosynthetic gene cluster for the antibiotics RK-682 and holomycin, respectively, were subjected to the ICE system to delete the rkD and homE genes in frame. Specific insertion of the ampicillin resistance gene (bla) into pYH285 was also successfully performed. These results reveal the ICE system to be a rapid, seamless, and highly efficient way to edit DNA fragments, and a powerful new tool for investigating and engineering biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:26556277

  20. Insert, remove or replace: A highly advanced genome editing system using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Ceasar, S Antony; Rajan, Vinothkumar; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Berman, Jason N; Ignacimuthu, S

    2016-09-01

    The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) system discovered as an adaptive immunity mechanism in prokaryotes has emerged as the most popular tool for the precise alterations of the genomes of diverse species. CRISPR/Cas9 system has taken the world of genome editing by storm in recent years. Its popularity as a tool for altering genomes is due to the ability of Cas9 protein to cause double-stranded breaks in DNA after binding with short guide RNA molecules, which can be produced with dramatically less effort and expense than required for production of transcription-activator like effector nucleases (TALEN) and zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN). This system has been exploited in many species from prokaryotes to higher animals including human cells as evidenced by the literature showing increasing sophistication and ease of CRISPR/Cas9 as well as increasing species variety where it is applicable. This technology is poised to solve several complex molecular biology problems faced in life science research including cancer research. In this review, we highlight the recent advancements in CRISPR/Cas9 system in editing genomes of prokaryotes, fungi, plants and animals and provide details on software tools available for convenient design of CRISPR/Cas9 targeting plasmids. We also discuss the future prospects of this advanced molecular technology. PMID:27350235

  1. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhan-Qi; Chen, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Nan; Cao, Ming-Ya; Dong, Fei-Fan; Jiang, Ya-Ming; Chen, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Pan, Min-Hui

    2016-06-01

    Although current antiviral strategies can inhibit baculovirus infection and decrease viral DNA replication to a certain extent, novel tools are required for specific and accurate elimination of baculovirus genomes from infected insects. Using the newly developed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) technology, we disrupted a viral genome in infected insect cells in vitro as a defense against viral infection. We optimized the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit foreign and viral genome in insect cells. Using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) as a model, we found that the CRISPR/Cas9 system was capable of cleaving the replication key factor ie-1 in BmNPV thus effectively inhibiting virus proliferation. Furthermore, we constructed a virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 editing system, which minimized the probability of off-target effects and was rapidly activated after viral infection. This is the first report describing the application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect antiviral research. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells provides insights to produce virus-resistant transgenic strains for future. PMID:26979473

  2. CRISPR-Cas9 for medical genetic screens: applications and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui-Ying; Ji, Li-Juan; Gao, Ai-Mei; Liu, Ping; He, Jing-Dong; Lu, Xiao-Jie

    2016-02-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated nuclease 9) systems have emerged as versatile and convenient (epi)genome editing tools and have become an important player in medical genetic research. CRISPR-Cas9 and its variants such as catalytically inactivated Cas9 (dead Cas9, dCas9) and scaffold-incorporating single guide sgRNA (scRNA) have been applied in various genomic screen studies. CRISPR screens enable high-throughput interrogation of gene functions in health and diseases. Compared with conventional RNAi screens, CRISPR screens incur less off-target effects and are more versatile in that they can be used in multiple formats such as knockout, knockdown and activation screens, and can target coding and non-coding regions throughout the genome. This powerful screen platform holds the potential of revolutionising functional genomic studies in the near future. Herein, we introduce the mechanisms of (epi)genome editing mediated by CRISPR-Cas9 and its variants, introduce the procedures and applications of CRISPR screen in functional genomics, compare it with conventional screen tools and at last discuss current challenges and opportunities and propose future directions. PMID:26673779

  3. Progress of application and off-target effects of CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng; Feng, Gu

    2015-10-01

    The clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system mediates genome editing and is revolutionizing genetic researches. Scientists are able to manipulate the gene of interest from any organism with CRISPR/Cas9. Compared with zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technologies, the CRISPR/Cas9 technology provides an easy and efficient approach to manipulate the genome. In this system, sgRNA (Single guide RNA), a short RNA matching the targeted DNA fragment, guides the CRISPR/Cas9 to interrogate the genome. Because sgRNA can tolerate certain mismatches to the DNA targets and thereby promote undesired off-target mutagenesis, the key limit of this technology is off-target effects. To eliminate the off-target effects, different strategies have been adopted. In this review, we summarize the application of CRISPR/Cas9 and different strategies for addressing off-target effects. PMID:26496752

  4. Differences Between the “Chinese AMS Score” and the Lake Louise Score in the Diagnosis of Acute Mountain Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jialin; Gu, Haoran; Luo, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Chinese AMS score (CAS) is used in clinical medicine and research to diagnosis acute mountain sickness (AMS). However, the Lake Louise Score (LLS) is the well-accepted standard for diagnosing AMS. The difference between the CAS and LLS questionnaires is that the CAS considers more nonspecific symptoms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate differences in AMS prevalence according to the LLS and CAS criteria. We surveyed 58 males who traveled from Chongqing (300 m) to Lhasa (3658 m) via the Qinghai-Tibet train. Cases of AMS were diagnosed using LLS and CAS questionnaires in a few railway stations at different evaluation areas along the road. We subsequently evaluated discrepancies in values related to the prevalence of AMS determined using the 2 types of questionnaires (CAS and LLS). The prevalence of CAS-diagnosed AMS indicated that the percentage of AMS cases among the 58 young men was 29.3% in Golmud, 60.3% in Tanggula, 63.8% in Lhasa, 22.4% on the first day after arrival in Lhasa, 27.6% on the second day, 24.1% on the third day, and 12.1% on the fourth day. The prevalence of LLS-diagnosed AMS in Golmud was 10.3%, 38% in Lhasa, and 6.9% on day 1, the prevalence in each station was lower than that as assessed by the CAS. Our experimental data indicate that AMS diagnoses ascertained using the CAS indicate a higher AMS prevalence than those ascertained using the LLS. Through statistical analysis, the CAS seems capable of effectively diagnosing AMS as validated by LLS (sensitivity 61.8%, specificity 92.7%). PMID:27227918

  5. Mapping health assessment questionnaire disability index (HAQ-DI) score, pain visual analog scale (VAS), and disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) onto the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) utility score with the KORean Observational study Network for Arthritis (KORONA) registry data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Lin; Kim, Dam; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Min-Young; Song, Hyun Jin; Park, Sun-Young; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Won, Soyoung; Bang, So-Young; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Chung, Won Tae; Hong, Seung-Jae; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Jong; Koh, Eunmi; Lee, Hwajeong; Lee, Hye-Soon; Lee, Jisoo; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Sung Won; Park, Sung-Hoon; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Yoo, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Bo Young; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the mapping model for EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) utility values using the health assessment questionnaire disability index (HAQ-DI), pain visual analog scale (VAS), and disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) in a large, nationwide cohort of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in Korea. The KORean Observational study Network for Arthritis (KORONA) registry data on 3557 patients with RA were used. Data were randomly divided into a modeling set (80 % of the data) and a validation set (20 % of the data). The ordinary least squares (OLS), Tobit, and two-part model methods were employed to construct a model to map to the EQ-5D index. Using a combination of HAQ-DI, pain VAS, and DAS28, four model versions were examined. To evaluate the predictive accuracy of the models, the root-mean-square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) were calculated using the validation dataset. A model that included HAQ-DI, pain VAS, and DAS28 produced the highest adjusted R (2) as well as the lowest Akaike information criterion, RMSE, and MAE, regardless of the statistical methods used in modeling set. The mapping equation of the OLS method is given as EQ-5D = 0.95-0.21 × HAQ-DI-0.24 × pain VAS/100-0.01 × DAS28 (adjusted R (2) = 57.6 %, RMSE = 0.1654 and MAE = 0.1222). Also in the validation set, the RMSE and MAE were shown to be the smallest. The model with HAQ-DI, pain VAS, and DAS28 showed the best performance, and this mapping model enabled the estimation of an EQ-5D value for RA patients in whom utility values have not been measured. PMID:26849891

  6. Putting the CAS Standards to Work. Training Manual for the CAS Self Assessment Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerian, Jean M.; Miller, Theodore K., Ed.

    These 18 self-assessment guides and training manual from the Council for the Advancement of Standards (CAS) for Student Services/Development Programs translate the CAS Standards and Guidelines of 1986 into a format for self-study purposes. These self-study guides allow an institution to assure compliance with minimally-acceptable practice, gain an…

  7. I can see CRISPR now, even when phage are gone: a view on alternative CRISPR-Cas functions from the prokaryotic envelope

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Hannah K.; Sampson, Timothy R.; Weiss, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose CRISPR-Cas systems are prokaryotic immune systems against invading nucleic acids that adapt as new environmental threats arise. There are emerging examples of CRISPR-Cas functions in bacterial physiology beyond their role in adaptive immunity. This highlights the poorly understood, but potentially common, moonlighting functions of these abundant systems. We propose that these non-canonical CRISPR-Cas activities have evolved to respond to stresses at the cell envelope. Recent findings Here, we discuss recent literature describing the impact of the extracellular environment on the regulation of CRISPR-Cas systems, and the influence of CRISPR-Cas activity on bacterial physiology. The described non-canonical CRISPR-Cas functions allow the bacterial cell to respond to the extracellular environment, primarily through changes in envelope physiology. Summary This review discusses the expanding non-canonical functions of CRISPR-Cas systems, including their roles in virulence, focusing mainly on their relationship to the cell envelope. We first examine the effects of the extracellular environment on regulation of CRISPR-Cas components, and then discuss the impact of CRISPR-Cas systems on bacterial physiology, focusing on their roles in influencing interactions with the environment including host organisms. PMID:25887612

  8. Imipenem represses CRISPR-Cas interference of DNA acquisition through H-NS stimulation in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Lung; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Ru; Wu, Meng-Chuan; Wang, Jin-Town

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the genome of Klebsiella pneumoniae NTUH-K2044 strain revealed the presence of two clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) arrays separated with CRISPR-associated (cas) genes. Carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were observed to be less likely to have CRISPR-Cas than sensitive strains (5/85 vs. 22/132). Removal of the transcriptional repressor, H-NS, was shown to prevent the transformation of plasmids carrying a spacer and putative proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM). The CRISPR-Cas system also decreased pUC-4K plasmid stability, resulting in plasmid loss from the bacteria with acquisition of new spacers. Analysis of the acquired proto-spacers in pUC-4K indicated that 5'-TTN-3' was the preferred PAM in K. pneumoniae. Treatment of cells by imipenem induced hns expression, thereby decreasing cas3 expression and consequently repressed CRISPR-Cas activity resulted in increase of plasmid stability. In conclusion, NTUH-K2044 CRISPR-Cas contributes to decrease of plasmid transformation and stability. Through repression of CRISPR-Cas activity by induced H-NS, bacteria might be more able to acquire DNA to confront the challenge of imipenem. PMID:27531594

  9. Imipenem represses CRISPR-Cas interference of DNA acquisition through H-NS stimulation in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Lung; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Ru; Wu, Meng-Chuan; Wang, Jin-Town

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the genome of Klebsiella pneumoniae NTUH-K2044 strain revealed the presence of two clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) arrays separated with CRISPR-associated (cas) genes. Carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were observed to be less likely to have CRISPR-Cas than sensitive strains (5/85 vs. 22/132). Removal of the transcriptional repressor, H-NS, was shown to prevent the transformation of plasmids carrying a spacer and putative proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM). The CRISPR-Cas system also decreased pUC-4K plasmid stability, resulting in plasmid loss from the bacteria with acquisition of new spacers. Analysis of the acquired proto-spacers in pUC-4K indicated that 5′-TTN-3′ was the preferred PAM in K. pneumoniae. Treatment of cells by imipenem induced hns expression, thereby decreasing cas3 expression and consequently repressed CRISPR-Cas activity resulted in increase of plasmid stability. In conclusion, NTUH-K2044 CRISPR-Cas contributes to decrease of plasmid transformation and stability. Through repression of CRISPR-Cas activity by induced H-NS, bacteria might be more able to acquire DNA to confront the challenge of imipenem. PMID:27531594

  10. Creating and evaluating accurate CRISPR-Cas9 scalpels for genomic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bolukbasi, Mehmet Fatih; Gupta, Ankit; Wolfe, Scot A

    2016-01-01

    The simplicity of site-specific genome targeting by type II clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases, along with their robust activity profile, has changed the landscape of genome editing. These favorable properties have made the CRISPR-Cas9 system the technology of choice for sequence-specific modifications in vertebrate systems. For many applications, whether the focus is on basic science investigations or therapeutic efficacy, activity and precision are important considerations when one is choosing a nuclease platform, target site and delivery method. Here we review recent methods for increasing the activity and accuracy of Cas9 and assessing the extent of off-target cleavage events. PMID:26716561

  11. Reducing CAS-SDCI space. Using selected spaces in configuration interaction calculations in an efficient way.

    PubMed

    Pitarch-Ruiz, José; Sánchez-Marín, José; Maynau, Daniel

    2002-09-01

    A new method is presented, which allows an important reduction of the size of some Configuration Interaction (CI) matrices. Starting from a Complete Active Space (CAS), the numerous configurations that have a small weight in the CAS wave function are eliminated. When excited configurations (e.g., singly and doubly excited) are added to the reference space, the resulting MR-SDCI space is reduced in the same proportion as compared with the full CAS-SDCI. A set of active orbitals is chosen, but some selection of the most relevant excitations is performed because not all the possible excitations act as SDCI generators. Thanks to a new addressing technique, the computational time is drastically reduced, because the new addressing of the selected active space is as efficient as the addressing of the CAS. The presentation of the method is followed by two test calculations on the N(2) and HCCH molecules. For the N(2) the FCI results are taken as a benchmark reference. The outer valence ionization potentials of HCCH are compared to the experimental values. Both examples allow to test the accuracy of the MR-SDCI compared to that of the corresponding CAS-SDCI, despite the noticeable reduction of the CI space. The algorithm is suitable for the dressing techniques that allow for the correction of the size-extensivity error. The corrected results are also shown and discussed. PMID:12116385

  12. Home Energy Score

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-16

    The Home Energy Score allows a homeowner to compare her or his home's energy consumption to that of other homes, similar to a vehicle's mile-per-gallon rating. A home energy assessor will collect energy information during a brief home walk-through and then score that home on a scale of 1 to 10.

  13. SCORE - A DESCRIPTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SLACK, CHARLES W.

    REINFORCEMENT AND ROLE-REVERSAL TECHNIQUES ARE USED IN THE SCORE PROJECT, A LOW-COST PROGRAM OF DELINQUENCY PREVENTION FOR HARD-CORE TEENAGE STREET CORNER BOYS. COMMITTED TO THE BELIEF THAT THE BOYS HAVE THE POTENTIAL FOR ETHICAL BEHAVIOR, THE SCORE WORKER FOLLOWS B.F. SKINNER'S THEORY OF OPERANT CONDITIONING AND REINFORCES THE DELINQUENT'S GOOD…

  14. Reporting Valid and Reliable Overall Scores and Domain Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Lihua

    2010-01-01

    In educational assessment, overall scores obtained by simply averaging a number of domain scores are sometimes reported. However, simply averaging the domain scores ignores the fact that different domains have different score points, that scores from those domains are related, and that at different score points the relationship between overall…

  15. Cas9-chromatin binding information enables more accurate CRISPR off-target prediction

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ritambhara; Kuscu, Cem; Quinlan, Aaron; Qi, Yanjun; Adli, Mazhar

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR system has become a powerful biological tool with a wide range of applications. However, improving targeting specificity and accurately predicting potential off-targets remains a significant goal. Here, we introduce a web-based CRISPR/Cas9 Off-target Prediction and Identification Tool (CROP-IT) that performs improved off-target binding and cleavage site predictions. Unlike existing prediction programs that solely use DNA sequence information; CROP-IT integrates whole genome level biological information from existing Cas9 binding and cleavage data sets. Utilizing whole-genome chromatin state information from 125 human cell types further enhances its computational prediction power. Comparative analyses on experimentally validated datasets show that CROP-IT outperforms existing computational algorithms in predicting both Cas9 binding as well as cleavage sites. With a user-friendly web-interface, CROP-IT outputs scored and ranked list of potential off-targets that enables improved guide RNA design and more accurate prediction of Cas9 binding or cleavage sites. PMID:26032770

  16. Promoting an active form of learning out-of-class via answering online "study questions" leads to higher than expected exam scores in General Biology.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Susan I

    2015-01-01

    A rising need for workers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields has fueled interest in improving teaching within STEM disciplines. Numerous studies have demonstrated the benefits of active learning approaches on student learning outcomes. However, many of these studies have been conducted in experimental, rather than real-life class, settings. In addition, most of these studies have focused on in-class active learning exercises. This study tested the effects of answering questions outside of class on exam performance for General Biology students at the University of Minnesota. An online database of 1,020 multiple-choice questions covering material from the first half of the course was generated. Students in seven course sections (with an average of ∼265 students per section) were given unlimited access to the online study questions. These students made extensive use of the online questions, with students answering an average of 1,323 questions covering material from the half of the semester for which the questions were available. After students answered a set of questions, they were shown the correct answers for those questions. More specific feedback describing how to arrive at the correct answer was provided for the 73% of the questions for which the correct answers were not deemed to be self-explanatory. The extent to which access to the online study questions improved student learning outcomes was assessed by comparing the performance on exam questions of students in the seven course sections with access to the online study questions with the performance of students in course sections without access to the online study questions. Student performance was analyzed for a total of 89 different exams questions that were not included in the study questions, but that covered the same material covered by the study questions. Each of these 89 questions was used on one to five exams given to students in course sections that had access to the

  17. Promoting an active form of learning out-of-class via answering online “study questions” leads to higher than expected exam scores in General Biology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A rising need for workers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields has fueled interest in improving teaching within STEM disciplines. Numerous studies have demonstrated the benefits of active learning approaches on student learning outcomes. However, many of these studies have been conducted in experimental, rather than real-life class, settings. In addition, most of these studies have focused on in-class active learning exercises. This study tested the effects of answering questions outside of class on exam performance for General Biology students at the University of Minnesota. An online database of 1,020 multiple-choice questions covering material from the first half of the course was generated. Students in seven course sections (with an average of ∼265 students per section) were given unlimited access to the online study questions. These students made extensive use of the online questions, with students answering an average of 1,323 questions covering material from the half of the semester for which the questions were available. After students answered a set of questions, they were shown the correct answers for those questions. More specific feedback describing how to arrive at the correct answer was provided for the 73% of the questions for which the correct answers were not deemed to be self-explanatory. The extent to which access to the online study questions improved student learning outcomes was assessed by comparing the performance on exam questions of students in the seven course sections with access to the online study questions with the performance of students in course sections without access to the online study questions. Student performance was analyzed for a total of 89 different exams questions that were not included in the study questions, but that covered the same material covered by the study questions. Each of these 89 questions was used on one to five exams given to students in course sections that had access to the

  18. Identifying and Visualizing Functional PAM Diversity across CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    PubMed

    Leenay, Ryan T; Maksimchuk, Kenneth R; Slotkowski, Rebecca A; Agrawal, Roma N; Gomaa, Ahmed A; Briner, Alexandra E; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Beisel, Chase L

    2016-04-01

    CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems in prokaryotes boast a diversity of protein families and mechanisms of action, where most systems rely on protospacer-adjacent motifs (PAMs) for DNA target recognition. Here, we developed an in vivo, positive, and tunable screen termed PAM-SCANR (PAM screen achieved by NOT-gate repression) to elucidate functional PAMs as well as an interactive visualization scheme termed the PAM wheel to convey individual PAM sequences and their activities. PAM-SCANR and the PAM wheel identified known functional PAMs while revealing complex sequence-activity landscapes for the Bacillus halodurans I-C (Cascade), Escherichia coli I-E (Cascade), Streptococcus thermophilus II-A CRISPR1 (Cas9), and Francisella novicida V-A (Cpf1) systems. The PAM wheel was also readily applicable to existing high-throughput screens and garnered insights into SpyCas9 and SauCas9 PAM diversity. These tools offer powerful means of elucidating and visualizing functional PAMs toward accelerating our ability to understand and exploit the multitude of CRISPR-Cas systems in nature. PMID:27041224

  19. Versatile in vivo regulation of tumor phenotypes by dCas9-mediated transcriptional perturbation.

    PubMed

    Braun, Christian J; Bruno, Peter M; Horlbeck, Max A; Gilbert, Luke A; Weissman, Jonathan S; Hemann, Michael T

    2016-07-01

    Targeted transcriptional regulation is a powerful tool to study genetic mediators of cellular behavior. Here, we show that catalytically dead Cas9 (dCas9) targeted to genomic regions upstream or downstream of the transcription start site allows for specific and sustainable gene-expression level alterations in tumor cells in vitro and in syngeneic immune-competent mouse models. We used this approach for a high-coverage pooled gene-activation screen in vivo and discovered previously unidentified modulators of tumor growth and therapeutic response. Moreover, by using dCas9 linked to an activation domain, we can either enhance or suppress target gene expression simply by changing the genetic location of dCas9 binding relative to the transcription start site. We demonstrate that these directed changes in gene-transcription levels occur with minimal off-target effects. Our findings highlight the use of dCas9-mediated transcriptional regulation as a versatile tool to reproducibly interrogate tumor phenotypes in vivo. PMID:27325776

  20. No evidence of inhibition of horizontal gene transfer by CRISPR-Cas on evolutionary timescales.

    PubMed

    Gophna, Uri; Kristensen, David M; Wolf, Yuri I; Popa, Ovidiu; Drevet, Christine; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-09-01

    The CRISPR (clustered, regularly, interspaced, short, palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated genes) systems of archaea and bacteria provide adaptive immunity against viruses and other selfish elements and are believed to curtail horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Limiting acquisition of new genetic material could be one of the sources of the fitness cost of CRISPR-Cas maintenance and one of the causes of the patchy distribution of CRISPR-Cas among bacteria, and across environments. We sought to test the hypothesis that the activity of CRISPR-Cas in microbes is negatively correlated with the extent of recent HGT. Using three independent measures of HGT, we found no significant dependence between the length of CRISPR arrays, which reflects the activity of the immune system, and the estimated number of recent HGT events. In contrast, we observed a significant negative dependence between the estimated extent of HGT and growth temperature of microbes, which could be explained by the lower genetic diversity in hotter environments. We hypothesize that the relevant events in the evolution of resistance to mobile elements and proclivity for HGT, to which CRISPR-Cas systems seem to substantially contribute, occur on the population scale rather than on the timescale of species evolution. PMID:25710183

  1. No evidence of inhibition of horizontal gene transfer by CRISPR–Cas on evolutionary timescales

    PubMed Central

    Gophna, Uri; Kristensen, David M; Wolf, Yuri I; Popa, Ovidiu; Drevet, Christine; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered, regularly, interspaced, short, palindromic repeats)–Cas (CRISPR-associated genes) systems of archaea and bacteria provide adaptive immunity against viruses and other selfish elements and are believed to curtail horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Limiting acquisition of new genetic material could be one of the sources of the fitness cost of CRISPR–Cas maintenance and one of the causes of the patchy distribution of CRISPR–Cas among bacteria, and across environments. We sought to test the hypothesis that the activity of CRISPR–Cas in microbes is negatively correlated with the extent of recent HGT. Using three independent measures of HGT, we found no significant dependence between the length of CRISPR arrays, which reflects the activity of the immune system, and the estimated number of recent HGT events. In contrast, we observed a significant negative dependence between the estimated extent of HGT and growth temperature of microbes, which could be explained by the lower genetic diversity in hotter environments. We hypothesize that the relevant events in the evolution of resistance to mobile elements and proclivity for HGT, to which CRISPR–Cas systems seem to substantially contribute, occur on the population scale rather than on the timescale of species evolution. PMID:25710183

  2. The relation of autologous serum and plasma skin test results with urticarial activity score, sex and age in patients with chronic urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Aktar, Sirac; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Calka, Omer; Karadag, Ayse Serap

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Some previous studies reported autoimmunity as an etiologic factor in chronic urticaria (CU), but the results of some autoimmunity tests in these studies are conflicting. Aim To concretize whether there was any relation of autologous serum skin test (ASST) and autologous plasma skin test (APST) results with sex, age and urticarial activity score (UAS) in patients with CU. Material and methods Fifty patients with CU and twenty healthy subjects admitted to our dermatology clinic were included in the present study. The ASST and APST were applied to all individuals. Results The positiveness rates of ASST and APST were significantly higher in the patient group than controls (p = 0.027, p = 0.001, respectively). Among patients, the APST positiveness rate (72%) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than ASST (46%). It was seen that 48% of patients with negative ASST results had positive APST. However, no patient with negative APST results had positive ASST. There were significant (p < 0.05) relations of the tests’ positiveness rates with sex and old age but with UAS. The diameter of the erythematous papule was remarkably (p < 0.05) larger in APST than ASST and also significantly (p < 0.05) larger in females compared to males in both tests (p < 0.05). It was positively increased with old age (p < 0.05). Conclusions We can suggest that APST is more sensitive than ASST in the assessment of autoimmunity in CU. A high positiveness rate of APST results may be attributed to high numbers of autoantibodies and coagulation factors present in plasma that might probably play a role in etiopathogenesis of CU. PMID:26161057

  3. The CRISPR-Cas system - from bacterial immunity to genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Czarnek, Maria; Bereta, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Precise and efficient genome modifications present a great value in attempts to comprehend the roles of particular genes and other genetic elements in biological processes as well as in various pathologies. In recent years novel methods of genome modification known as genome editing, which utilize so called "programmable" nucleases, came into use. A true revolution in genome editing has been brought about by the introduction of the CRISP-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) system, in which one of such nucleases, i.e. Cas9, plays a major role. This system is based on the elements of the bacterial and archaeal mechanism responsible for acquired immunity against phage infections and transfer of foreign genetic material. Microorganisms incorporate fragments of foreign DNA into CRISPR loci present in their genomes, which enables fast recognition and elimination of future infections. There are several types of CRISPR-Cas systems among prokaryotes but only elements of CRISPR type II are employed in genome engineering. CRISPR-Cas type II utilizes small RNA molecules (crRNA and tracrRNA) to precisely direct the effector nuclease - Cas9 - to a specific site in the genome, i.e. to the sequence complementary to crRNA. Cas9 may be used to: (i) introduce stable changes into genomes e.g. in the process of generation of knock-out and knock-in animals and cell lines, (ii) activate or silence the expression of a gene of interest, and (iii) visualize specific sites in genomes of living cells. The CRISPR-Cas-based tools have been successfully employed for generation of animal and cell models of a number of diseases, e.g. specific types of cancer. In the future, the genome editing by programmable nucleases may find wide application in medicine e.g. in the therapies of certain diseases of genetic origin and in the therapy of HIV-infected patients. PMID:27594566

  4. 48 CFR 970.3002 - CAS program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CAS program requirements. 970.3002 Section 970.3002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY....3002 CAS program requirements....

  5. 48 CFR 970.3002 - CAS program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CAS program requirements. 970.3002 Section 970.3002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY....3002 CAS program requirements....

  6. 48 CFR 970.3002 - CAS program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CAS program requirements. 970.3002 Section 970.3002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY....3002 CAS program requirements....

  7. 48 CFR 970.3002 - CAS program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CAS program requirements. 970.3002 Section 970.3002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY....3002 CAS program requirements....

  8. 48 CFR 970.3002 - CAS program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CAS program requirements. 970.3002 Section 970.3002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY....3002 CAS program requirements....

  9. CRISPR-Cas: Revolutionising genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Samantha Anne; Pepper, Michael Sean

    2016-09-01

    The ability to permanently alter or repair the human genome has been the subject of a number of science fiction films, but with the recent advent of several customisable sequence-specific endonuclease technologies, genome engineering looks set to become a clinical reality in the near future. This article discusses recent advancements in the technology called 'clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated genes' (CRISPR-Cas), the potential of CRISPR-Cas to revolutionise molecular medicine, and the ethical and regulatory hurdles facing its application. PMID:27601107

  10. Prediction of Large Joint Destruction in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Using 18F-FDG PET/CT and Disease Activity Score

    PubMed Central

    Suto, Takahito; Okamura, Koichi; Yonemoto, Yukio; Okura, Chisa; Tsushima, Yoshito; Takagishi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The assessments of joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are mainly restricted to small joints in the hands and feet. However, the development of arthritis in RA patients often involves the large joints, such as the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and ankle. Few studies have been reported regarding the degree of large joint destruction in RA patients. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) visualizes the disease activity in large joints affected by RA. In this study, the associations between destruction of the large joints and the findings of FDG-PET/CT as well as laboratory parameters were investigated, and factors associated with large joint destruction after the administration of biological therapy were identified in RA patients. A total of 264 large joints in 23 RA patients (6 men and 17 women; mean age of 66.9 ± 7.9 years) were assessed in this study. FDG-PET/CT was performed at baseline and 6 months after the initiation of biological therapy. The extent of FDG uptake in large joints (shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle) was analyzed using the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Radiographs of the 12 large joints per patient obtained at baseline and after 2 years were assessed according to Larsen's method. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors most significantly contributing to the progression of joint destruction within 2 years. Radiographic progression of joint destruction was detected in 33 joints. The SUVmax at baseline and 6 months, and the disease activity score (DAS) 28-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) at 6, 12, and 24 months were significantly higher in the group with progressive joint destruction. The SUVmax at baseline and DAS28-ESR at 6 months were found to be factors associated with joint destruction at 2 years (P < 0.05). The FDG uptake in the joints with destruction was higher than that observed in the

  11. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P.; Prew, Michelle S.; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Topkar, Ved; Nguyen, Nhu T.; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P.W.; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J.; Joung, J. Keith

    2015-01-01

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing1, 2, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM)3–6. As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-Seq analysis7. In addition, we identified and characterized another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also found that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities. PMID:26098369

  12. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities.

    PubMed

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Prew, Michelle S; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Topkar, Ved V; Nguyen, Nhu T; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P W; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2015-07-23

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome-editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-seq analysis. In addition, we identify and characterize another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also find that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities. PMID:26098369

  13. Spatiotemporal Control of Type III-A CRISPR-Cas Immunity: Coupling DNA Degradation with the Target RNA Recognition.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskiene, Migle; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Kostiuk, Georgij; Venclovas, Česlovas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2016-04-21

    Streptococcus thermophilus (St) type III-A CRISPR-Cas system restricts MS2 RNA phage and cuts RNA in vitro. However, the CRISPR array spacers match DNA phages, raising the question: does the St CRISPR-Cas system provide immunity by erasing phage mRNA or/and by eliminating invading DNA? We show that it does both. We find that (1) base-pairing between crRNA and target RNA activates single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) degradation by StCsm; (2) ssDNase activity is confined to the HD-domain of Cas10; (3) target RNA cleavage by the Csm3 RNase suppresses Cas10 DNase activity, ensuring temporal control of DNA degradation; and (4) base-pairing between crRNA 5'-handle and target RNA 3'-flanking sequence inhibits Cas10 ssDNase to prevent self-targeting. We propose that upon phage infection, crRNA-guided StCsm binding to the emerging transcript recruits Cas10 DNase to the actively transcribed phage DNA, resulting in degradation of both the transcript and phage DNA, but not the host DNA. PMID:27105119

  14. The Youth Throwing Score

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Christopher S.; Padaki, Ajay S.; Noticewala, Manish Suresh; Makhni, Eric Chugh; Popkin, Charles Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Epidemic levels of shoulder and elbow injuries have been reported in youth and adolescent baseball players. Despite the concerning frequency of these injuries, no instrument has been validated to assess upper extremity injury in this patient population. The purpose of this study was to validate an upper extremity assessment tool specifically designed for youth baseball players. We hypothesize this tool will be reliable, responsive and valid. Methods: The Youth Throwing Score (YTS) was constructed by a multidisciplinary healthcare provider team in addition to baseball coaches as a tool to assess upper extremity injury in 10 to 18 year old baseball players. The instrument was comprised of a demographics section and a 14 item assessment of pain, fatigue and psychosocial health. The 14 items were scored from 1 to 5 and weighted equally, with higher scores reflecting fewer symptoms and less functional disability. The psychometric properties, including the test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and responsiveness were calculated. Additionally, the Pearson correlation coefficient to 4 validated outcomes was determined. Results: A pilot form of the instrument was administered to 25 players to assess comprehension and mean item importance. Pilot analysis resulted in none of the 14 items receiving less than a 3 out of 5 mean athlete importance rating and the final instrument read at a Flesch-Kincaid level of 4.1, appropriate for patients age 9 and older. A total of 223 players completed the Youth Throwing Score, with an average player age of 14.3 ± 2.7 years old. The players self-assigned injury status, resulting in an average survey score of 59.7 ± 8.4 for the 148 players ‘playing without pain,’ 42.0 ± 11.5 for the 60 players ‘playing with pain,’ and 40.4 ± 10.5 for the 15 players ‘not playing due to pain.’ Players playing without pain scored significantly higher than those playing with pain (p < .001). The scoring tiers of the Youth

  15. Nutrient Density Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Annette; Thompson, William T.

    1979-01-01

    Announces a nutrient density food scoring system called the Index of Nutritional Quality (INQ). It expresses the ratio between the percent RDA of a nutrient and the percent daily allowance of calories in a food. (Author/SA)

  16. Volleyball Scoring Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, William; Dargahi-Noubary, G. R.; Shi, Yixun

    2002-01-01

    The widespread interest in sports in our culture provides an excellent opportunity to catch students' attention in mathematics and statistics classes. One mathematically interesting aspect of volleyball, which can be used to motivate students, is the scoring system. (MM)

  17. Histopathological differences utilizing the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease activity score criteria in diabetic (type 2 diabetes mellitus) and non-diabetic patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Puchakayala, Bharat K; Verma, Siddharth; Kanwar, Pushpjeet; Hart, John; Sanivarapu, Raghavendra R; Mohanty, Smruti R

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study clinical and histopathological features of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using updated nonalcoholic steatohepatitis clinical research network (NASH-CRN) grading system. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed data of 235 patients with biopsy proven NAFLD with and without T2DM. This database was utilized in the previously published study comparing ethnicity outcomes in NAFLD by the same corresponding author. The pathology database from University of Chicago was utilized for enrolling consecutive patients who met the criteria for NAFLD and their detailed clinical and histopathology findings were obtained for comparison. The relevant clinical profile of patients was collected from the Electronic Medical Records around the time of liver biopsy and the histology was read by a single well-trained histopathologist. The updated criteria for type 2 diabetes have been utilized for analysis. Background data of patients with NASH and NAFLD has been included. The mean differences were compared using χ2 and t-test along with regression analysis to evaluate the predictors of NASH and advanced fibrosis. RESULTS: Patients with NAFLD and T2DM were significantly older (49.9 vs 43.0, P < 0.01), predominantly female (71.4 vs 56.3, P < 0.02), had higher rate of metabolic syndrome (88.7 vs 36.4, P < 0.01), had significantly higher aspartate transaminase (AST)/alanine transaminase (ALT) ratio (0.94 vs 0.78, P < 0.01) and Fib-4 index (1.65 vs 1.06, P < 0.01) as markers of NASH, showed higher mean NAFLD activity score (3.5 vs 3.0, P = 0.03) and higher mean fibrosis score (1.2 vs 0.52, P < 0.01) compared to patients with NAFLD without T2DM. Furthermore, advanced fibrosis (32.5 vs 12.0, P < 0.01) and ballooning (27.3 vs 13.3, P < 0.01) was significantly higher among patients with NAFLD and T2DM compared to patients with NAFLD without T2DM. On multivariate analysis, T2DM was independently associated with NASH

  18. Fatty acid composition in serum correlates with that in the liver and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity scores in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-He; Li, Chun-Yan; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Zhang, Xiu-Ying

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the correlation between the serum fatty acid composition and hepatic steatosis, inflammation, hepatocellular ballooning scores, and liver fatty acids composition in mice fed a high-fat diet. Livers were collected for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease score analysis. Fatty acid compositions were analysed by gas chromatography. Correlations were determined by Pearson correlation coefficient. Exposed to a high-fat diet, mice developed fatty liver disease with varying severity without fibrosis. The serum fatty acid variation became more severe with prolonged exposure to a high-fat diet. This variation also correlated significantly with the variation in livers, with the types of fatty acids corresponding to liver steatosis, inflammation, and hepatocellular ballooning scores. Results of this study lead to the following hypothesis: the extent of serum fatty acid variation may be a preliminary biomarker of fatty liver disease caused by high-fat intake. PMID:27179602

  19. 48 CFR 30.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-1 CAS applicability. See 48 CFR 9903.201-1 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CAS applicability....

  20. 48 CFR 30.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. See 48 CFR 9903.201-2 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage....

  1. 48 CFR 30.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-1 CAS applicability. See 48 CFR 9903.201-1 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CAS applicability....

  2. 48 CFR 30.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. See 48 CFR 9903.201-2 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage....

  3. 48 CFR 9903.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CAS applicability. 9903... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-1 CAS applicability. (a) This subsection describes the rules for determining whether a proposed contract or subcontract is exempt from...

  4. 48 CFR 30.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. See 48 CFR 9903.201-2 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage....

  5. 48 CFR 9903.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CAS applicability. 9903... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-1 CAS applicability. (a) This subsection describes the rules for determining whether a proposed contract or subcontract is exempt from...

  6. 48 CFR 30.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. See 48 CFR 9903.201-2 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage....

  7. 48 CFR 30.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-1 CAS applicability. See 48 CFR 9903.201-1 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CAS applicability....

  8. 48 CFR 9903.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CAS applicability. 9903... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-1 CAS applicability. (a) This subsection describes the rules for determining whether a proposed contract or subcontract is exempt from...

  9. 48 CFR 30.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-1 CAS applicability. See 48 CFR 9903.201-1 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CAS applicability....

  10. 48 CFR 9903.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true CAS applicability. 9903.201... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-1 CAS applicability. (a) This subsection describes the rules for determining whether a proposed contract or subcontract is exempt from...

  11. 48 CFR 30.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. See 48 CFR 9903.201-2 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage....

  12. 48 CFR 30.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-1 CAS applicability. See 48 CFR 9903.201-1 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CAS applicability....

  13. Oswestry Disability Index Scoring Made Easy

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, A; Baker, D; Disney, S; Pynsent, PB

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Low back pain effects up to 80% of the population at some time during their active life. Questionnaires are available to help measure pain and disability. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) is the most commonly used outcome measure for low back pain. The aim of this study was to see if training in completing the ODI forms improved the scoring accuracy. PATIENTS AND METHODS The last 100 ODI forms completed in a hospital's spinal clinic were reviewed retrospectively and errors in the scoring were identified. Staff members involved in scoring the questionnaire were made aware of the errors and the correct method of scoring explained. A chart was created with all possible scores to aid the staff with scoring. A prospective audit on 50 questionnaires was subsequently performed. RESULTS The retrospective study showed that 33 of the 100 forms had been incorrectly scored. All questionnaires where one or more sections were not completed by the patient were incorrectly scored. A scoring chart was developed and staff training was implemented. This reduced the error rate to 14% in the prospective audit. CONCLUSIONS Clinicians applying outcome measures should read the appropriate literature to ensure they understand the scoring system. Staff must then be given adequate training in the application of the questionnaires. PMID:18598595

  14. NSP-Cas protein structures reveal a promiscuous interaction module in cell signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, P.D.; Robinson, H.; Wallez, Y.; Dobaczewska, M. K.; Lee, J. J.; Pasquale, E. B.; Riedl, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Members of the novel SH2-containing protein (NSP) and Crk-associated substrate (Cas) protein families form multidomain signaling platforms that mediate cell migration and invasion through a collection of distinct signaling motifs. Members of each family interact via their respective C-terminal domains, but the mechanism of this association has remained enigmatic. Here we present the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain from the NSP protein BCAR3 and the complex of NSP3 with p130Cas. BCAR3 adopts the Cdc25-homology fold of Ras GTPase exchange factors, but it has a 'closed' conformation incapable of enzymatic activity. The structure of the NSP3-p130Cas complex reveals that this closed conformation is instrumental for interaction of NSP proteins with a focal adhesion-targeting domain present in Cas proteins. This enzyme-to-adaptor conversion enables high-affinity, yet promiscuous, interactions between NSP and Cas proteins and represents an unprecedented mechanistic paradigm linking cellular signaling networks.

  15. Protospacer Adjacent Motif (PAM)-Distal Sequences Engage CRISPR Cas9 DNA Target Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ethier, Sylvain; Schmeing, T. Martin; Dostie, Josée; Pelletier, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided nuclease that has been widely adapted for genome editing in eukaryotic cells. However, the in vivo target specificity of Cas9 is poorly understood and most studies rely on in silico predictions to define the potential off-target editing spectrum. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq), we delineate the genome-wide binding panorama of catalytically inactive Cas9 directed by two different single guide (sg) RNAs targeting the Trp53 locus. Cas9:sgRNA complexes are able to load onto multiple sites with short seed regions adjacent to 5′NGG3′ protospacer adjacent motifs (PAM). Yet among 43 ChIP-seq sites harboring seed regions analyzed for mutational status, we find editing only at the intended on-target locus and one off-target site. In vitro analysis of target site recognition revealed that interactions between the 5′ end of the guide and PAM-distal target sequences are necessary to efficiently engage Cas9 nucleolytic activity, providing an explanation for why off-target editing is significantly lower than expected from ChIP-seq data. PMID:25275497

  16. A CRISPR/Cas9 Toolbox for Multiplexed Plant Genome Editing and Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lowder, Levi G; Zhang, Dengwei; Baltes, Nicholas J; Paul, Joseph W; Tang, Xu; Zheng, Xuelian; Voytas, Daniel F; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Zhang, Yong; Qi, Yiping

    2015-10-01

    The relative ease, speed, and biological scope of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated Protein9 (Cas9)-based reagents for genomic manipulations are revolutionizing virtually all areas of molecular biosciences, including functional genomics, genetics, applied biomedical research, and agricultural biotechnology. In plant systems, however, a number of hurdles currently exist that limit this technology from reaching its full potential. For example, significant plant molecular biology expertise and effort is still required to generate functional expression constructs that allow simultaneous editing, and especially transcriptional regulation, of multiple different genomic loci or multiplexing, which is a significant advantage of CRISPR/Cas9 versus other genome-editing systems. To streamline and facilitate rapid and wide-scale use of CRISPR/Cas9-based technologies for plant research, we developed and implemented a comprehensive molecular toolbox for multifaceted CRISPR/Cas9 applications in plants. This toolbox provides researchers with a protocol and reagents to quickly and efficiently assemble functional CRISPR/Cas9 transfer DNA constructs for monocots and dicots using Golden Gate and Gateway cloning methods. It comes with a full suite of capabilities, including multiplexed gene editing and transcriptional activation or repression of plant endogenous genes. We report the functionality and effectiveness of this toolbox in model plants such as tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and rice (Oryza sativa), demonstrating its utility for basic and applied plant research. PMID:26297141

  17. A CRISPR/Cas9 Toolbox for Multiplexed Plant Genome Editing and Transcriptional Regulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lowder, Levi G.; Zhang, Dengwei; Baltes, Nicholas J.; Paul, Joseph W.; Tang, Xu; Zheng, Xuelian; Voytas, Daniel F.; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Zhang, Yong; Qi, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    The relative ease, speed, and biological scope of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated Protein9 (Cas9)-based reagents for genomic manipulations are revolutionizing virtually all areas of molecular biosciences, including functional genomics, genetics, applied biomedical research, and agricultural biotechnology. In plant systems, however, a number of hurdles currently exist that limit this technology from reaching its full potential. For example, significant plant molecular biology expertise and effort is still required to generate functional expression constructs that allow simultaneous editing, and especially transcriptional regulation, of multiple different genomic loci or multiplexing, which is a significant advantage of CRISPR/Cas9 versus other genome-editing systems. To streamline and facilitate rapid and wide-scale use of CRISPR/Cas9-based technologies for plant research, we developed and implemented a comprehensive molecular toolbox for multifaceted CRISPR/Cas9 applications in plants. This toolbox provides researchers with a protocol and reagents to quickly and efficiently assemble functional CRISPR/Cas9 transfer DNA constructs for monocots and dicots using Golden Gate and Gateway cloning methods. It comes with a full suite of capabilities, including multiplexed gene editing and transcriptional activation or repression of plant endogenous genes. We report the functionality and effectiveness of this toolbox in model plants such as tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and rice (Oryza sativa), demonstrating its utility for basic and applied plant research. PMID:26297141

  18. Large fragment deletion using a CRISPR/Cas9 system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huanhuan; Wang, Xiaofei; Jia, Haiyan; Yu, Miao; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Tang, Hui; Zhang, Liping

    2016-09-15

    Large chromosomal modifications have been performed in natural and laboratory evolution studies and hold tremendous potential for use in foundational research, medicine, and biotechnology applications. Recently, the type II bacterial Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat and CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas9) system has emerged as a powerful tool for genome editing in various organisms. In this study, we applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system to preform large fragment deletions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compared the performance activity to that of a traditional method that uses the Latour system. Here we report in S. Cerevisiae the CRIPR/Cas9 system has been used to delete fragments exceeding 30 kb. The use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for generating chromosomal segment excision showed some potential advantages over the Latour system. All the results indicated that CRISPR/Cas9 system was a rapid, efficient, low-cost, and versatile method for genome editing and that it can be applied in further studies in the fields of biology, agriculture, and medicine. PMID:27402178

  19. Highly Improved Gene Targeting by Germline-Specific Cas9 Expression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Shu; Ueda, Ryu

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple yet extremely efficient platform for systematic gene targeting by the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 in Drosophila. The system comprises two transgenic strains: one expressing Cas9 protein from the germline-specific nanos promoter and the other ubiquitously expressing a custom guide RNA (gRNA) that targets a unique site in the genome. The two strains are crossed to form an active Cas9–gRNA complex specifically in germ cells, which cleaves and mutates the target site. We demonstrate rapid generation of mutants in seven neuropeptide and two microRNA genes in which no mutants have been described. Founder animals stably expressing Cas9–gRNA transmitted germline mutations to an average of 60% of their progeny, a dramatic improvement in efficiency over the previous methods based on transient Cas9 expression. Simultaneous cleavage of two sites by co-expression of two gRNAs efficiently induced internal deletion with frequencies of 4.3–23%. Our method is readily scalable to high-throughput gene targeting, thereby accelerating comprehensive functional annotation of the Drosophila genome. PMID:24002648

  20. CRISPR-Cas9 nuclear dynamics and target recognition in living cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hanhui; Tu, Li-Chun; Naseri, Ardalan; Huisman, Maximiliaan; Zhang, Shaojie; Grunwald, David; Pederson, Thoru

    2016-08-29

    The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has been repurposed for genome engineering, transcription modulation, and chromosome imaging in eukaryotic cells. However, the nuclear dynamics of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein 9 (Cas9) guide RNAs and target interrogation are not well defined in living cells. Here, we deployed a dual-color CRISPR system to directly measure the stability of both Cas9 and guide RNA. We found that Cas9 is essential for guide RNA stability and that the nuclear Cas9-guide RNA complex levels limit the targeting efficiency. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements revealed that single mismatches in the guide RNA seed sequence reduce the target residence time from >3 h to as low as <2 min in a nucleotide identity- and position-dependent manner. We further show that the duration of target residence correlates with cleavage activity. These results reveal that CRISPR discriminates between genuine versus mismatched targets for genome editing via radical alterations in residence time. PMID:27551060

  1. Historic light curve of V890 Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesci, R.

    2016-05-01

    The variability of V890 Cas is studied with 87 -band plates of the Asiago archive. The star shows variations of about 5 mag with an average magnitude =13 and a period of 486 days. An 5.0 color index is also derived near the maximum luminosity.

  2. Using the CAS Standards in Assessment Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the use of professional standards of practice in assessment and of the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS). It outlines a model for conducting program self-studies and discusses the importance of implementing change based on assessment results.

  3. Lessons Learned on Management of CAS Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyadjieff, Kiril

    1995-01-01

    Computer-assisted studies (CAS) attract foreign language professionals' attention due to the reliability of personal computers, the decreasing cost of available technology, and the new generation of students for whom electronic media are a familiar habitat. This article focuses on a project of the Defense Language Institute that produced over…

  4. Increasing Active Student Responding in a University Applied Behavior Analysis Course: The Effect of Daily Assessment and Response Cards on End of Week Quiz Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malanga, Paul R.; Sweeney, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The study compared the effects of daily assessment and response cards on average weekly quiz scores in an introduction to applied behavior analysis course. An alternating treatments design (Kazdin 1982, "Single-case research designs." New York: Oxford University Press; Cooper et al. 2007, "Applied behavior analysis." Upper Saddle River:…

  5. Rapid characterization of CRISPR-Cas9 protospacer adjacent motif sequence elements.

    PubMed

    Karvelis, Tautvydas; Gasiunas, Giedrius; Young, Joshua; Bigelyte, Greta; Silanskas, Arunas; Cigan, Mark; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-01-01

    To expand the repertoire of Cas9s available for genome targeting, we present a new in vitro method for the simultaneous examination of guide RNA and protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) requirements. The method relies on the in vitro cleavage of plasmid libraries containing a randomized PAM as a function of Cas9-guide RNA complex concentration. Using this method, we accurately reproduce the canonical PAM preferences for Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR3 (Sth3), and CRISPR1 (Sth1). Additionally, PAM and sgRNA solutions for a novel Cas9 protein from Brevibacillus laterosporus are provided by the assay and are demonstrated to support functional activity in vitro and in plants. PMID:26585795

  6. Off-target Effects in CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Tee, Louis Y; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Huang, Qun-Shan; Yang, Shi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is a versatile genome-editing technology that is widely used for studying the functionality of genetic elements, creating genetically modified organisms as well as preclinical research of genetic disorders. However, the high frequency of off-target activity (≥50%)—RGEN (RNA-guided endonuclease)-induced mutations at sites other than the intended on-target site—is one major concern, especially for therapeutic and clinical applications. Here, we review the basic mechanisms underlying off-target cutting in the CRISPR/Cas9 system, methods for detecting off-target mutations, and strategies for minimizing off-target cleavage. The improvement off-target specificity in the CRISPR/Cas9 system will provide solid genotype–phenotype correlations, and thus enable faithful interpretation of genome-editing data, which will certainly facilitate the basic and clinical application of this technology. PMID:26575098

  7. Exploiting the CRISPR/Cas9 PAM Constraint for Single-Nucleotide Resolution Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Mendiratta, Saurabh; Ehrhardt, Kristina; Kashyap, Neha; White, Michael A.; Bleris, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is an enabling RNA-guided technology for genome targeting and engineering. An acute DNA binding constraint of the Cas9 protein is the Protospacer Adjacent Motif (PAM). Here we demonstrate that the PAM requirement can be exploited to specifically target single-nucleotide heterozygous mutations while exerting no aberrant effects on the wild-type alleles. Specifically, we target the heterozygous G13A activating mutation of KRAS in colorectal cancer cells and we show reversal of drug resistance to a MEK small-molecule inhibitor. Our study introduces a new paradigm in genome editing and therapeutic targeting via the use of gRNA to guide Cas9 to a desired protospacer adjacent motif. PMID:26788852

  8. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing of Epigenetic Factors for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shaohua; He, Zhiyao; Chen, Chong

    2015-07-01

    Advances in engineered recombinant nuclease have provided facile and reliable methods for genome editing. Especially with the development of the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease) system, the discovery of various versions of Cas9 proteins and delivery carriers, it is now practicable to introduce desired mutations into the genome, to correct disease-related mutations, and to activate or suppress genes of interest. Epigenetic regulators are often disturbed in cancer cells and are essential for the transformation of normal to cancerous cells. Tumor-related epigenetic alterations or epigenetic factor mutations play a major part during the various steps of carcinogenesis and affect a variety of cancer-related genes and a wide range of cancerous phenotypes. Therefore, epigenetic regulatory enzymes might be candidate targets for cancer therapy. In this review, we discuss prospects of CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing in targeting epigenetics for cancer gene therapy. PMID:26075804

  9. [High-throughput functional screening using CRISPR/Cas9 system].

    PubMed

    Wang, Gancheng; Ming, Ma; Ye, Yanzhen; Xi, Jianzhong

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput screening, a powerful tool for the discovery of functionally important genes responsible for certain phenotypes, is performed according to loss-of-function or gain-of-function strategies. RNAi technology or knockout approaches have been widely used in high throughput screening due to their advantages of ease use, low cost and so on. However, imcomplete knockdown activity and off-target effect hindered their utility. More recently, CRISPR/Cas9 technology is becoming a robust tool for genome editing in diverse cells or animals, since it could generate a gene mutation in a target-specific manner. In this review, we first summarize the characterization of CRISPR/Cas9 and make comparison with traditional genetic tools, then describe recent achievements of genetic screen in several model organisms using CRISPR/Cas9, finally discuss on its future challenges and opportunities. PMID:27232487

  10. Transcriptional regulation with CRISPR-Cas9: principles, advances, and applications.

    PubMed

    Didovyk, Andriy; Borek, Bartłomiej; Tsimring, Lev; Hasty, Jeff

    2016-08-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 has recently emerged as a promising system for multiplexed genome editing as well as epigenome and transcriptome perturbation. Due to its specificity, ease of use and highly modular programmable nature, it has been widely adopted for a variety of applications such as genome editing, transcriptional inhibition and activation, genetic screening, DNA localization imaging, and many more. In this review, we will discuss non-editing applications of CRISPR-Cas9 for transcriptome perturbation, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology. PMID:27344519

  11. CasHRA (Cas9-facilitated Homologous Recombination Assembly) method of constructing megabase-sized DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianting; Wu, Ronghai; Xue, Xiaoli; Qin, Zhongjun

    2016-08-19

    Current DNA assembly methods for preparing highly purified linear subassemblies require complex and time-consuming in vitro manipulations that hinder their ability to construct megabase-sized DNAs (e.g. synthetic genomes). We have developed a new method designated 'CasHRA (Cas9-facilitated Homologous Recombination Assembly)' that directly uses large circular DNAs in a one-step in vivo assembly process. The large circular DNAs are co-introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae by protoplast fusion, and they are cleaved by RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease to release the linear DNA segments for subsequent assembly by the endogenous homologous recombination system. The CasHRA method allows efficient assembly of multiple large DNA segments in vivo; thus, this approach should be useful in the last stage of genome construction. As a proof of concept, we combined CasHRA with an upstream assembly method (Gibson procedure of genome assembly) and successfully constructed a 1.03 Mb MGE-syn1.0 (Minimal Genome of Escherichia coli) that contained 449 essential genes and 267 important growth genes. We expect that CasHRA will be widely used in megabase-sized genome constructions. PMID:27220470

  12. Controlling UCAVs by JTACs in CAS missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaş, A. E.

    2014-06-01

    By means of evolving technology, capabilities of UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle)s are increasing rapidly. This development provides UAVs to be used in many different areas. One of these areas is CAS (Close Air Support) mission. UAVs have several advantages compared to manned aircraft, however there are also some problematic areas. The remote controlling of these vehicles from thousands of nautical miles away via satellite may lead to various problems both ethical and tactical aspects. Therefore, CAS missions require a good level of ALI (Air-Land Integration), a high SA (situational awareness) and precision engagement. In fact, there is an aware friendly element in the target area in CAS missions, unlike the other UAV operations. This element is an Airman called JTAC (Joint Terminal Attack Controller). Unlike the JTAC, UAV operators are too far away from target area and use the limited FOV (Field of View) provided by camera and some other sensor data. In this study, target area situational awareness of a UAV operator and a JTAC, in a high-risk mission for friendly ground forces and civilians such as CAS, are compared. As a result of this comparison, answer to the question who should control the UCAV (Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle) in which circumstances is sought. A literature review is made in UAV and CAS fields and recent air operations are examined. The control of UCAV by the JTAC is assessed by SWOT analysis and as a result it is deduced that both control methods can be used in different situations within the framework of the ROE (Rules Of Engagement) is reached.

  13. The CRISPR/Cas9 system for gene editing and its potential application in pain research

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linlin; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a research hotspot in genome editing and regulation. Currently, it is used in genomic silencing and knock-in experiments as well as transcriptional activation and repression. This versatile system consists of two components: a guide RNA (gRNA) and a Cas9 nuclease. Recognition of a genomic DNA target is mediated through base pairing with a 20-base gRNA. The latter further recruits the Cas9 endonuclease protein to the target site and creates double-stranded breaks in the target DNA. Compared with traditional genome editing directed by DNA-binding protein domains, this short RNA-directed Cas9 endonuclease system is simple and easily programmable. Although this system may have off-target effects and in vivo delivery and immune challenges, researchers have employed this system in vivo to establish disease models, study specific gene functions under certain disease conditions, and correct genomic information for disease treatment. In regards to pain research, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may act as a novel tool in gene correction therapy for pain-associated hereditary diseases and may be a new approach for RNA-guided transcriptional activation or repression of pain-related genes. In addition, this system is also applied to loss-of-function mutations in pain-related genes and knockin of reporter genes or loxP tags at pain-related genomic loci. The CRISPR/Cas9 system will likely be carried out widely in both bench work and clinical settings in the pain field. PMID:27500183

  14. Targeted mutagenesis in soybean using the CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xianjun; Hu, Zheng; Chen, Rui; Jiang, Qiyang; Song, Guohua; Zhang, Hui; Xi, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is a valuable technique for gene function analysis and crop improvement. Over the past two years, the CRISPR-Cas9 system has emerged as a powerful tool for precisely targeted gene editing. In this study, we predicted 11 U6 genes in soybean (Glycine max L.). We then constructed two vectors (pCas9-GmU6-sgRNA and pCas9-AtU6-sgRNA) using the soybean U6-10 and Arabidopsis U6-26 promoters, respectively, to produce synthetic guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for targeted gene mutagenesis. Three genes, Glyma06g14180, Glyma08g02290 and Glyma12g37050, were selected as targets. Mutations of these three genes were detected in soybean protoplasts. The vectors were then transformed into soybean hairy roots by Agrobacterium rhizogenes infection, resulting in efficient target gene editing. Mutation efficiencies ranged from 3.2-9.7% using the pCas9-AtU6-sgRNA vector and 14.7-20.2% with the pCas9-GmU6-sgRNA vector. Biallelic mutations in Glyma06g14180 and Glyma08g02290 were detected in transgenic hairy roots. Off-target activities associated with Glyma06g14180 and Glyma12g37050 were also detected. Off-target activity would improve mutation efficiency for the construction of a saturated gene mutation library in soybean. Targeted mutagenesis using the CRISPR-Cas9 system should advance soybean functional genomic research, especially that of genes involved in the roots and nodules. PMID:26022141

  15. In vivo genome editing using Staphylococcus aureus Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Ran, F. Ann; Cong, Le; Yan, Winston X.; Scott, David A.; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Kriz, Andrea J.; Zetsche, Bernd; Shalem, Ophir; Wu, Xuebing; Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene; Sharp, Phillip A.; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 has emerged as a versatile genome-editing platform. However, the size of the commonly used Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) limits its utility for basic research and therapeutic applications that employ the highly versatile adeno-associated virus (AAV) delivery vehicle. Here, we characterize six smaller Cas9 orthologs and show that Cas9 from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9) can edit the genome with efficiencies similar to those of SpCas9, while being >1kb shorter. We packaged SaCas9 and its sgRNA expression cassette into a single AAV vector and targeted the cholesterol regulatory gene Pcsk9 in the mouse liver. Within one week of injection, we observed >40% gene modification, accompanied by significant reductions in serum Pcsk9 and total cholesterol levels. We further demonstrate the power of using BLESS to assess the genome-wide targeting specificity of SaCas9 and SpCas9, and show that SaCas9 can mediate genome editing in vivo with high specificity. PMID:25830891

  16. Structure and Engineering of Francisella novicida Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Hisato; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Horii, Takuro; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Kimura, Mika; Hsu, Patrick D.; Nakane, Takanori; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Hatada, Izuho; Zhang, Feng; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Summary The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 cleaves double-stranded DNA targets complementary to the guide RNA, and has been applied to programmable genome editing. Cas9-mediated cleavage requires a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) juxtaposed with the DNA target sequence, thus constricting the range of targetable sites. Here, we report the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structures of Cas9 from Francisella novicida (FnCas9), one of the largest Cas9 orthologs, in complex with a guide RNA and its PAM-containing DNA targets. A structural comparison of FnCas9 with other Cas9 orthologs revealed striking conserved and divergent features among distantly related CRISPR-Cas9 systems. We found that FnCas9 recognizes the 5′-NGG-3′ PAM, and used the structural information to create a variant that can recognize the more relaxed 5′-YG-3′ PAM. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pre-assembled FnCas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes can be microinjected into mouse zygotes to edit endogenous sites with the 5′-YG-3′ PAMs, thus expanding the target space of the CRISPR-Cas9 toolbox. PMID:26875867

  17. Structure and Engineering of Francisella novicida Cas9.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Hisato; Gootenberg, Jonathan S; Horii, Takuro; Abudayyeh, Omar O; Kimura, Mika; Hsu, Patrick D; Nakane, Takanori; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Hatada, Izuho; Zhang, Feng; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-02-25

    The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 cleaves double-stranded DNA targets complementary to the guide RNA and has been applied to programmable genome editing. Cas9-mediated cleavage requires a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) juxtaposed with the DNA target sequence, thus constricting the range of targetable sites. Here, we report the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structures of Cas9 from Francisella novicida (FnCas9), one of the largest Cas9 orthologs, in complex with a guide RNA and its PAM-containing DNA targets. A structural comparison of FnCas9 with other Cas9 orthologs revealed striking conserved and divergent features among distantly related CRISPR-Cas9 systems. We found that FnCas9 recognizes the 5'-NGG-3' PAM, and used the structural information to create a variant that can recognize the more relaxed 5'-YG-3' PAM. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the FnCas9-ribonucleoprotein complex can be microinjected into mouse zygotes to edit endogenous sites with the 5'-YG-3' PAM, thus expanding the target space of the CRISPR-Cas9 toolbox. PMID:26875867

  18. Scoring from Contests

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Elizabeth Maggie

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new model for scoring alternatives from “contest” outcomes. The model is a generalization of the method of paired comparison to accommodate comparisons between arbitrarily sized sets of alternatives in which outcomes are any division of a fixed prize. Our approach is also applicable to contests between varying quantities of alternatives. We prove that under a reasonable condition on the comparability of alternatives, there exists a unique collection of scores that produces accurate estimates of the overall performance of each alternative and satisfies a well-known axiom regarding choice probabilities. We apply the method to several problems in which varying choice sets and continuous outcomes may create problems for standard scoring methods. These problems include measuring centrality in network data and the scoring of political candidates via a “feeling thermometer.” In the latter case, we also use the method to uncover and solve a potential difficulty with common methods of rescaling thermometer data to account for issues of interpersonal comparability. PMID:24748759

  19. Automated Essay Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikli, Semire

    2006-01-01

    The impacts of computers on writing have been widely studied for three decades. Even basic computers functions, i.e. word processing, have been of great assistance to writers in modifying their essays. The research on Automated Essay Scoring (AES) has revealed that computers have the capacity to function as a more effective cognitive tool (Attali,…

  20. Developing Scoring Algorithms

    Cancer.gov

    We developed scoring procedures to convert screener responses to estimates of individual dietary intake for fruits and vegetables, dairy, added sugars, whole grains, fiber, and calcium using the What We Eat in America 24-hour dietary recall data from the 2003-2006 NHANES.

  1. Syncopation and the Score

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chunyang; Simpson, Andrew J. R.; Harte, Christopher A.; Pearce, Marcus T.; Sandler, Mark B.

    2013-01-01

    The score is a symbolic encoding that describes a piece of music, written according to the conventions of music theory, which must be rendered as sound (e.g., by a performer) before it may be perceived as music by the listener. In this paper we provide a step towards unifying music theory with music perception in terms of the relationship between notated rhythm (i.e., the score) and perceived syncopation. In our experiments we evaluated this relationship by manipulating the score, rendering it as sound and eliciting subjective judgments of syncopation. We used a metronome to provide explicit cues to the prevailing rhythmic structure (as defined in the time signature). Three-bar scores with time signatures of 4/4 and 6/8 were constructed using repeated one-bar rhythm-patterns, with each pattern built from basic half-bar rhythm-components. Our manipulations gave rise to various rhythmic structures, including polyrhythms and rhythms with missing strong- and/or down-beats. Listeners (N = 10) were asked to rate the degree of syncopation they perceived in response to a rendering of each score. We observed higher degrees of syncopation in time signatures of 6/8, for polyrhythms, and for rhythms featuring a missing down-beat. We also found that the location of a rhythm-component within the bar has a significant effect on perceived syncopation. Our findings provide new insight into models of syncopation and point the way towards areas in which the models may be improved. PMID:24040323

  2. Programmable plasmid interference by the CRISPR-Cas system in Thermococcus kodakarensis

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Joshua R.; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Sato, Takaaki; Olson, Sara; Glover, III, Claiborne V.C.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Atomi, Haruyuki; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems are RNA-guided immune systems that protect prokaryotes against viruses and other invaders. The CRISPR locus encodes crRNAs that recognize invading nucleic acid sequences and trigger silencing by the associated Cas proteins. There are multiple CRISPR-Cas systems with distinct compositions and mechanistic processes. Thermococcus kodakarensis (Tko) is a hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon that has both a Type I-A Csa and a Type I-B Cst CRISPR-Cas system. We have analyzed the expression and composition of crRNAs from the three CRISPRs in Tko by RNA deep sequencing and northern analysis. Our results indicate that crRNAs associated with these two CRISPR-Cas systems include an 8-nucleotide conserved sequence tag at the 5′ end. We challenged Tko with plasmid invaders containing sequences targeted by endogenous crRNAs and observed active CRISPR-Cas-mediated silencing. Plasmid silencing was dependent on complementarity with a crRNA as well as on a sequence element found immediately adjacent to the crRNA recognition site in the target termed the PAM (protospacer adjacent motif). Silencing occurred independently of the orientation of the target sequence in the plasmid, and appears to occur at the DNA level, presumably via DNA degradation. In addition, we have directed silencing of an invader plasmid by genetically engineering the chromosomal CRISPR locus to express customized crRNAs directed against the plasmid. Our results support CRISPR engineering as a feasible approach to develop prokaryotic strains that are resistant to infection for use in industry. PMID:23535213

  3. Photometric analysis of the overcontact binary CW Cas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Li, L. J.; Zhao, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    New CCD photometric observations of overcontact binary CW Cas were carried out in 2004 and 2011. In particular, the light curve obtained in 2004 shows a remarkable O'Connell effect. Compared with light curves in different observing seasons, variations were found. These variations can be explained by dark spot activities on the surface of at least one component. Using the Wilson-Devinney code with a spot model, we find that the photometric solutions confirm CW Cas is a shallow W-subtype overcontact binary with a spotted massive component. Our new determined times of minimum light together with the others published in the literature were analyzed to find a change of orbital period. From the O – C curves, the period of the system shows a cyclic period change (P {sub 3} = 69.9 yr, A {sub 3} = 0.03196 days) superposed on the linear increase. The cyclic variation, if explained as the light-travel time effect, reveals the presence of a tertiary companion.

  4. Photometric Analysis of the Overcontact Binary CW Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Li, L. J.; Zhao, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    New CCD photometric observations of overcontact binary CW Cas were carried out in 2004 and 2011. In particular, the light curve obtained in 2004 shows a remarkable O'Connell effect. Compared with light curves in different observing seasons, variations were found. These variations can be explained by dark spot activities on the surface of at least one component. Using the Wilson-Devinney code with a spot model, we find that the photometric solutions confirm CW Cas is a shallow W-subtype overcontact binary with a spotted massive component. Our new determined times of minimum light together with the others published in the literature were analyzed to find a change of orbital period. From the O - C curves, the period of the system shows a cyclic period change (P 3 = 69.9 yr, A 3 = 0.03196 days) superposed on the linear increase. The cyclic variation, if explained as the light-travel time effect, reveals the presence of a tertiary companion.

  5. An X-ray flare from 47 Cas

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Jeewan C.; Karmakar, Subhajeet

    2015-02-01

    Using XMM-Newton observations, we investigate properties of a flare from the very active but poorly known stellar system 47 Cas. The luminosity at the peak of the flare is found to be 3.54 × 10{sup 30} erg s{sup −1}, which is ∼2 times higher than that at a quiescent state. The quiescent state corona of 47 Cas can be represented by two temperature plasma: 3.7 and 11.0 MK. The time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of the flare show the variable nature of the temperature, the emission measure, and the abundance. The maximum temperature during the flare is derived as 72.8 MK. We infer the length of a flaring loop to be 3.3 × 10{sup 10} cm using a hydrodynamic loop model. Using the RGS spectra, the density during the flare is estimated as 4.0 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The loop scaling laws are also applied when deriving physical parameters of the flaring plasma.

  6. The Relation between Factor Score Estimates, Image Scores, and Principal Component Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velicer, Wayne F.

    1976-01-01

    Investigates the relation between factor score estimates, principal component scores, and image scores. The three methods compared are maximum likelihood factor analysis, principal component analysis, and a variant of rescaled image analysis. (RC)

  7. CRISPR-Cas9-assisted recombineering in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jee-Hwan; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and the CRISPR-associated (Cas) nuclease protect bacteria and archeae from foreign DNA by site-specific cleavage of incoming DNA. Type-II CRISPR-Cas systems, such as the Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR-Cas9 system, can be adapted such that Cas9 can be guided to a user-defined site in the chromosome to introduce double-stranded breaks. Here we have developed and optimized CRISPR-Cas9 function in the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475. We established proof-of-concept showing that CRISPR-Cas9 selection combined with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recombineering is a realistic approach to identify at high efficiencies edited cells in a lactic acid bacterium. We show for three independent targets that subtle changes in the bacterial genome can be recovered at efficiencies ranging from 90 to 100%. By combining CRISPR-Cas9 and recombineering, we successfully applied codon saturation mutagenesis in the L. reuteri chromosome. Also, CRISPR-Cas9 selection is critical to identify low-efficiency events such as oligonucleotide-mediated chromosome deletions. This also means that CRISPR-Cas9 selection will allow identification of recombinant cells in bacteria with low recombineering efficiencies, eliminating the need for ssDNA recombineering optimization procedures. We envision that CRISPR-Cas genome editing has the potential to change the landscape of genome editing in lactic acid bacteria, and other Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25074379

  8. Expanding the catalog of cas genes with metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Doak, Thomas G; Ye, Yuzhen

    2014-02-01

    The CRISPR (clusters of regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas adaptive immune system is an important defense system in bacteria, providing targeted defense against invasions of foreign nucleic acids. CRISPR-Cas systems consist of CRISPR loci and cas (CRISPR-associated) genes: sequence segments of invaders are incorporated into host genomes at CRISPR loci to generate specificity, while adjacent cas genes encode proteins that mediate the defense process. We pursued an integrated approach to identifying putative cas genes from genomes and metagenomes, combining similarity searches with genomic neighborhood analysis. Application of our approach to bacterial genomes and human microbiome datasets allowed us to significantly expand the collection of cas genes: the sequence space of the Cas9 family, the key player in the recently engineered RNA-guided platforms for genome editing in eukaryotes, is expanded by at least two-fold with metagenomic datasets. We found genes in cas loci encoding other functions, for example, toxins and antitoxins, confirming the recently discovered potential of coupling between adaptive immunity and the dormancy/suicide systems. We further identified 24 novel Cas families; one novel family contains 20 proteins, all identified from the human microbiome datasets, illustrating the importance of metagenomics projects in expanding the diversity of cas genes. PMID:24319142

  9. Precision Targeted Mutagenesis via Cas9 Paired Nickases in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi; Endo, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of CRISPR- (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) mediated heritable mutagenesis in plants highlight the need for accuracy of the mutagenesis directed by this system. Off-target mutations are an important issue when considering functional gene analysis, as well as the molecular breeding of crop plants with large genome size, i.e. with many duplicated genes, and where the whole-genome sequence is still lacking. In mammals, off-target mutations can be suppressed by using Cas9 paired nickases together with paired guide RNAs (gRNAs). However, the performance of Cas9 paired nickases has not yet been fully assessed in plants. Here, we analyzed on- and off-target mutation frequency in rice calli and regenerated plants using Cas9 nuclease or Cas9 nickase with paired gRNAs. When Cas9 paired nickases were used, off-target mutations were fully suppressed in rice calli and regenerated plants. However, on-target mutation frequency also decreased compared with that induced by the Cas9 paired nucleases system. Since the gRNA sequence determines specific binding of Cas9 protein–gRNA ribonucleoproteins at the targeted sequence, the on-target mutation frequency of Cas9 paired nickases depends on the design of paired gRNAs. Our results suggest that a combination of gRNAs that can induce mutations at high efficiency with Cas9 nuclease should be used together with Cas9 nickase. Furthermore, we confirmed that a combination of gRNAs containing a one nucleotide (1 nt) mismatch toward the target sequence could not induce mutations when expressed with Cas9 nickase. Our results clearly show the effectiveness of Cas9 paired nickases in delivering on-target specific mutations. PMID:26936792

  10. Efficient Mitochondrial Genome Editing by CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Areum; Ham, Sangwoo; Lee, Gum Hwa; Lee, Yun-Il; Kim, SangSeong; Lee, Yun-Song; Shin, Joo-Ho; Lee, Yunjong

    2015-01-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system has been widely used for nuclear DNA editing to generate mutations or correct specific disease alleles. Despite its flexible application, it has not been determined if CRISPR/Cas9, originally identified as a bacterial defense system against virus, can be targeted to mitochondria for mtDNA editing. Here, we show that regular FLAG-Cas9 can localize to mitochondria to edit mitochondrial DNA with sgRNAs targeting specific loci of the mitochondrial genome. Expression of FLAG-Cas9 together with gRNA targeting Cox1 and Cox3 leads to cleavage of the specific mtDNA loci. In addition, we observed disruption of mitochondrial protein homeostasis following mtDNA truncation or cleavage by CRISPR/Cas9. To overcome nonspecific distribution of FLAG-Cas9, we also created a mitochondria-targeted Cas9 (mitoCas9). This new version of Cas9 localizes only to mitochondria; together with expression of gRNA targeting mtDNA, there is specific cleavage of mtDNA. MitoCas9-induced reduction of mtDNA and its transcription leads to mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and cell growth inhibition. This mitoCas9 could be applied to edit mtDNA together with gRNA expression vectors without affecting genomic DNA. In this brief study, we demonstrate that mtDNA editing is possible using CRISPR/Cas9. Moreover, our development of mitoCas9 with specific localization to the mitochondria should facilitate its application for mitochondrial genome editing. PMID:26448933

  11. Disruption of the Transcriptional Regulator Cas5 Results in Enhanced Killing of Candida albicans by Fluconazole

    PubMed Central

    Vasicek, Erin M.; Berkow, Elizabeth L.; Bruno, Vincent M.; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Barker, Katherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Azole antifungal agents such as fluconazole exhibit fungistatic activity against Candida albicans. Strategies to enhance azole antifungal activity would be therapeutically appealing. In an effort to identify transcriptional pathways that influence the killing activity of fluconazole, we sought to identify transcription factors (TFs) involved in this process. From a collection of C. albicans strains disrupted for genes encoding TFs (O. R. Homann, J. Dea, S. M. Noble, and A. D. Johnson, PLoS Genet. 5:e1000783, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000783), four strains exhibited marked reductions in minimum fungicidal concentration (MFCs) in both RPMI and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) media. One of these genes, UPC2, was previously characterized with regard to its role in azole susceptibility. Of mutants representing the three remaining TF genes of interest, one (CAS5) was unable to recover from fluconazole exposure at concentrations as low as 2 μg/ml after 72 h in YPD medium. This mutant also showed reduced susceptibility and a clear zone of inhibition by Etest, was unable to grow on solid medium containing 10 μg/ml fluconazole, and exhibited increased susceptibility by time-kill analysis. CAS5 disruption in highly azole-resistant clinical isolates exhibiting multiple resistance mechanisms did not alter susceptibility. However, CAS5 disruption in strains with specific resistance mutations resulted in moderate reductions in MICs and MFCs. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed in the presence of fluconazole and was consistent with the suggested role of CAS5 in cell wall organization while also suggesting a role in iron transport and homeostasis. These findings suggest that Cas5 regulates a transcriptional network that influences the response of C. albicans to fluconazole. Further delineation of this transcriptional network may identify targets for potential cotherapeutic strategies to enhance the activity of the azole class of antifungals

  12. Function of the CRISPR-Cas System of the Human Pathogen Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Boudry, Pierre; Semenova, Ekaterina; Monot, Marc; Datsenko, Kirill A.; Lopatina, Anna; Sekulovic, Ognjen; Ospina-Bedoya, Maicol; Fortier, Louis-Charles; Severinov, Konstantin; Dupuy, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium difficile is the cause of most frequently occurring nosocomial diarrhea worldwide. As an enteropathogen, C. difficile must be exposed to multiple exogenous genetic elements in bacteriophage-rich gut communities. CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to foreign genetic invaders. Our recent data revealed active expression and processing of CRISPR RNAs from multiple type I-B CRISPR arrays in C. difficile reference strain 630. Here, we demonstrate active expression of CRISPR arrays in strain R20291, an epidemic C. difficile strain. Through genome sequencing and host range analysis of several new C. difficile phages and plasmid conjugation experiments, we provide evidence of defensive function of the CRISPR-Cas system in both C. difficile strains. We further demonstrate that C. difficile Cas proteins are capable of interference in a heterologous host, Escherichia coli. These data set the stage for mechanistic and physiological analyses of CRISPR-Cas-mediated interactions of important global human pathogen with its genetic parasites. PMID:26330515

  13. Efficient biallelic mutation in porcine parthenotes using a CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Yang, Mingyao; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zhenni; Wu, Zhonghong; Tian, Jianhui; An, Lei; Wang, Shumin

    2016-08-01

    The parthenotes represent ideal models mimicking the embryonic development and characterizing the function of maternal genomes as well as an alternative source of pluripotent cell lines. Besides, parthenogenetically activated (PA) embryos serve as a rapid assay system to maximize the efficiency of generating genetically modified pig CRISPR/Cas9 system, an efficient and multiplex gene editing tool, has been utilized to modify the genome of porcine parthenotes. However, lower biallelic mutation rate and high mosaicism frequency were observed. Here, we aimed to enhance the biallelic mutation rate with reduced mosaicism by optimization of the concentration and injection time of the Cas9/sgRNA mixture in porcine parthenotes. The results showed that the efficient biallelic mutation (93%) and low mosaicism (33%) could be achieved in porcine parthenotes by cytoplasmic injection of Cas9 mRNA/sgRNA (125/12.5 ng/μl) after 8 h of parthenogenetical activation. Thus, our study provides an effective strategy for increasing the biallelic mutation rate and population homogeneity of genetically modified parthenotes, which will strengthen the role of parthenotes in uncovering early embryonic development and assessing the mutation efficiency due to the simplicity and adaptability of CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27221047

  14. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated reporter knock-in in mouse haploid embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasuyoshi; Oda, Masaaki; Nakatani, Tsunetoshi; Sekita, Yoichi; Monfort, Asun; Wutz, Anton; Mochizuki, Hideki; Nakano, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Mouse parthenogenetic haploid embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells generated from chemically activated oocytes. Haploid ESCs provide an opportunity to study the effect of genetic alterations because of their hemizygotic characteristics. However, their further application for the selection of unique phenotypes remains limited since ideal reporters to monitor biological processes such as cell differentiation are missing. Here, we report the application of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in of a reporter cassette, which does not disrupt endogenous target genes in mouse haploid ESCs. We first validated the system by inserting the P2A-Venus reporter cassette into the housekeeping gene locus. In addition to the conventional strategy using the Cas9 nuclease, we employed the Cas9 nickase and truncated sgRNAs to reduce off-target mutagenesis. These strategies induce targeted insertions with an efficiency that correlated with sgRNA guiding activity. We also engineered the neural marker gene Sox1 locus and verified the precise insertion of the P2A-Venus reporter cassette and its functionality by monitoring neural differentiation. Our data demonstrate the successful application of the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in system for establishing haploid knock-in ESC lines carrying gene specific reporters. Genetically modified haploid ESCs have potential for applications in forward genetic screening of developmental pathways. PMID:26039937

  15. Scoring Dawg Core Breakoff and Retention Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Backes, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    This novel core break-off and retention mechanism consists of a scoring dawg controlled by a set of two tubes (a drill tube and an inner tube). The drill tube and the inner tube have longitudinal concentric holes. The solution can be implemented in an eccentric tube configuration as well where the tubes have eccentric longitudinal holes. The inner tube presents at the bottom two control surfaces for controlling the orientation of the scoring dawg. The drill tube presents a sunk-in profile on the inside of the wall for housing the scoring dawg. The inner tube rotation relative to the drill tube actively controls the orientation of the scoring dawg and hence its penetration and retrieval from the core. The scoring dawg presents a shaft, two axially spaced arms, and a tooth. The two arms slide on the control surfaces of the inner tube. The tooth, when rotated, can penetrate or be extracted from the core. During drilling, the two tubes move together maintaining the scoring dawg completely outside the core. After the desired drilling depth has been reached the inner tube is rotated relative to the drill tube such that the tooth of the scoring dawg moves toward the central axis. By rotating the drill tube, the scoring dawg can score the core and so reduce its cross sectional area. The scoring dawg can also act as a stress concentrator for breaking the core in torsion or tension. After breaking the core, the scoring dawg can act as a core retention mechanism. For scoring, it requires the core to be attached to the rock. If the core is broken, the dawg can be used as a retention mechanism. The scoring dawg requires a hard-tip insert like tungsten carbide for scoring hard rocks. The relative rotation of the two tubes can be controlled manually or by an additional actuator. In the implemented design solution the bit rotation for scoring was in the same direction as the drilling. The device was tested for limestone cores and basalt cores. The torque required for breaking the

  16. Advances in therapeutic CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing.

    PubMed

    Savić, Nataša; Schwank, Gerald

    2016-02-01

    Targeted nucleases are widely used as tools for genome editing. Two years ago the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated Cas9 nuclease was used for the first time, and since then has largely revolutionized the field. The tremendous success of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing tool is powered by the ease design principle of the guide RNA that targets Cas9 to the desired DNA locus, and by the high specificity and efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9-generated DNA breaks. Several studies recently used CRISPR/Cas9 to successfully modulate disease-causing alleles in vivo in animal models and ex vivo in somatic and induced pluripotent stem cells, raising hope for therapeutic genome editing in the clinics. In this review, we will summarize and discuss such preclinical CRISPR/Cas9 gene therapy reports. PMID:26470680

  17. Evaporated CaS thin films for AC electroluminescence devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Tanaka, S.; Shanker, V.; Shiiki, M.; Deguchi, H.

    1985-08-01

    The growth behavior of evaporated CaS thin films has been investigated to achieve bright electroluminescence. The crystallinity of CaS films is improved with substrate temperature and for temperatures higher than 300°C, the films orient to the (200) plane. Sulfur coevaporation further helps to form a more perfect film even at lower temperatures. A CaS: Ce,Cl electroluminescent thin film device has been fabricated with a brightness of 650 cd/m 2.

  18. CRISPR-Cas9-guided Genome Engineering in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Min; Colaiácovo, Monica P.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) system is successfully being used for efficient and targeted genome editing in various organisms including the nematode C. elegans. Recent studies developed various CRISPR-Cas9 approaches to enhance genome engineering via two major DNA double-strand break repair pathways: non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination. Here we describe a protocol for Cas9-mediated C. elegans genome editing together with single guide RNA (sgRNA) and repair template cloning and injection methods required for delivering Cas9, sgRNAs and repair template DNA into the C. elegans germline. PMID:27366893

  19. Cas9 as a versatile tool for engineering biology

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Prashant; Esvelt, Kevin M; Church, George M

    2014-01-01

    RNA-guided Cas9 nucleases derived from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas systems have dramatically transformed our ability to edit the genomes of diverse organisms. We believe tools and techniques based on Cas9, a single unifying factor capable of colocalizing RNA, DNA and protein, will grant unprecedented control over cellular organization, regulation and behavior. Here we describe the Cas9 targeting methodology, detail current and prospective engineering advances and suggest potential applications ranging from basic science to the clinic. PMID:24076990

  20. Repurposing the CRISPR-Cas9 system for targeted DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Aleksandar; Dobrinić, Paula; Tadić, Vanja; Bočkor, Luka; Korać, Petra; Julg, Boris; Klasić, Marija; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic studies relied so far on correlations between epigenetic marks and gene expression pattern. Technologies developed for epigenome editing now enable direct study of functional relevance of precise epigenetic modifications and gene regulation. The reversible nature of epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, has been already exploited in cancer therapy for remodeling the aberrant epigenetic landscape. However, this was achieved non-selectively using epigenetic inhibitors. Epigenetic editing at specific loci represents a novel approach that might selectively and heritably alter gene expression. Here, we developed a CRISPR-Cas9-based tool for specific DNA methylation consisting of deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) nuclease and catalytic domain of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A targeted by co-expression of a guide RNA to any 20 bp DNA sequence followed by the NGG trinucleotide. We demonstrated targeted CpG methylation in a ∼35 bp wide region by the fusion protein. We also showed that multiple guide RNAs could target the dCas9-DNMT3A construct to multiple adjacent sites, which enabled methylation of a larger part of the promoter. DNA methylation activity was specific for the targeted region and heritable across mitotic divisions. Finally, we demonstrated that directed DNA methylation of a wider promoter region of the target loci IL6ST and BACH2 decreased their expression. PMID:26969735

  1. Repurposing the CRISPR-Cas9 system for targeted DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Vojta, Aleksandar; Dobrinić, Paula; Tadić, Vanja; Bočkor, Luka; Korać, Petra; Julg, Boris; Klasić, Marija; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic studies relied so far on correlations between epigenetic marks and gene expression pattern. Technologies developed for epigenome editing now enable direct study of functional relevance of precise epigenetic modifications and gene regulation. The reversible nature of epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, has been already exploited in cancer therapy for remodeling the aberrant epigenetic landscape. However, this was achieved non-selectively using epigenetic inhibitors. Epigenetic editing at specific loci represents a novel approach that might selectively and heritably alter gene expression. Here, we developed a CRISPR-Cas9-based tool for specific DNA methylation consisting of deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) nuclease and catalytic domain of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A targeted by co–expression of a guide RNA to any 20 bp DNA sequence followed by the NGG trinucleotide. We demonstrated targeted CpG methylation in a ∼35 bp wide region by the fusion protein. We also showed that multiple guide RNAs could target the dCas9-DNMT3A construct to multiple adjacent sites, which enabled methylation of a larger part of the promoter. DNA methylation activity was specific for the targeted region and heritable across mitotic divisions. Finally, we demonstrated that directed DNA methylation of a wider promoter region of the target loci IL6ST and BACH2 decreased their expression. PMID:26969735

  2. Distinct patterns of Cas9 mismatch tolerance in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fu, Becky X H; St Onge, Robert P; Fire, Andrew Z; Smith, Justin D

    2016-06-20

    Cas9, a CRISPR-associated RNA-guided nuclease, has been rapidly adopted as a tool for biochemical and genetic manipulation of DNA. Although complexes between Cas9 and guide RNAs (gRNAs) offer remarkable specificity and versatility for genome manipulation, mis-targeted events occur. To extend the understanding of gRNA::target homology requirements, we compared mutational tolerance for a set of Cas9::gRNA complexes in vitro and in vivo (in Saccharomyces cerevisiae). A variety of gRNAs were tested with variant libraries based on four different targets (with varying GC content and sequence features). In each case, we challenged a mixture of matched and mismatched targets, evaluating cleavage activity on a wide variety of potential target sequences in parallel through high-throughput sequencing of the products retained after cleavage. These experiments evidenced notable and consistent differences between in vitro and S. cerevisiae (in vivo) Cas9 cleavage specificity profiles including (i) a greater tolerance for mismatches in vitro and (ii) a greater specificity increase in vivo with truncation of the gRNA homology regions. PMID:27198218

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated efficient targeted mutagenesis in Chardonnay (Vitis vinifera L.).

    PubMed

    Ren, Chong; Liu, Xianju; Zhang, Zhan; Wang, Yi; Duan, Wei; Li, Shaohua; Liang, Zhenchang

    2016-01-01

    The type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 system (CRISPR/Cas9) has been successfully applied to edit target genes in multiple plant species. However, it remains unknown whether this system can be used for genome editing in grape. In this study, we described genome editing and targeted gene mutation in 'Chardonnay' suspension cells and plants via the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Two single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were designed to target distinct sites of the L-idonate dehydrogenase gene (IdnDH). CEL I endonuclease assay and sequencing results revealed the expected indel mutations at the target site, and a mutation frequency of 100% was observed in the transgenic cell mass (CM) as well as corresponding regenerated plants with expression of sgRNA1/Cas9. The majority of the detected mutations in transgenic CM were 1-bp insertions, followed by 1- to 3-nucleotide deletions. Off-target activities were also evaluated by sequencing the potential off-target sites, and no obvious off-target events were detected. Our results demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is an efficient and specific tool for precise genome editing in grape. PMID:27576893

  4. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated efficient targeted mutagenesis in Chardonnay (Vitis vinifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chong; Liu, Xianju; Zhang, Zhan; Wang, Yi; Duan, Wei; Li, Shaohua; Liang, Zhenchang

    2016-01-01

    The type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 system (CRISPR/Cas9) has been successfully applied to edit target genes in multiple plant species. However, it remains unknown whether this system can be used for genome editing in grape. In this study, we described genome editing and targeted gene mutation in ‘Chardonnay’ suspension cells and plants via the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Two single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were designed to target distinct sites of the L-idonate dehydrogenase gene (IdnDH). CEL I endonuclease assay and sequencing results revealed the expected indel mutations at the target site, and a mutation frequency of 100% was observed in the transgenic cell mass (CM) as well as corresponding regenerated plants with expression of sgRNA1/Cas9. The majority of the detected mutations in transgenic CM were 1-bp insertions, followed by 1- to 3-nucleotide deletions. Off-target activities were also evaluated by sequencing the potential off-target sites, and no obvious off-target events were detected. Our results demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is an efficient and specific tool for precise genome editing in grape. PMID:27576893

  5. CRISPR/Cas9-Based Multiplex Genome Editing in Monocot and Dicot Plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingliang; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated genome targeting system has been applied to a variety of organisms, including plants. Compared to other genome-targeting technologies such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), the CRISPR/Cas9 system is easier to use and has much higher editing efficiency. In addition, multiple "single guide RNAs" (sgRNAs) with different target sequences can be designed to direct the Cas9 protein to multiple genomic sites for simultaneous multiplex editing. Here, we present a procedure for highly efficient multiplex genome targeting in monocot and dicot plants using a versatile and robust CRISPR/Cas9 vector system, emphasizing the construction of binary constructs with multiple sgRNA expression cassettes in one round of cloning using Golden Gate ligation. We also describe the genotyping of targeted mutations in transgenic plants by direct Sanger sequencing followed by decoding of superimposed sequencing chromatograms containing biallelic or heterozygous mutations using the Web-based tool DSDecode. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27366892

  6. Distinct patterns of Cas9 mismatch tolerance in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Becky X.H.; St. Onge, Robert P.; Fire, Andrew Z.; Smith, Justin D.

    2016-01-01

    Cas9, a CRISPR-associated RNA-guided nuclease, has been rapidly adopted as a tool for biochemical and genetic manipulation of DNA. Although complexes between Cas9 and guide RNAs (gRNAs) offer remarkable specificity and versatility for genome manipulation, mis-targeted events occur. To extend the understanding of gRNA::target homology requirements, we compared mutational tolerance for a set of Cas9::gRNA complexes in vitro and in vivo (in Saccharomyces cerevisiae). A variety of gRNAs were tested with variant libraries based on four different targets (with varying GC content and sequence features). In each case, we challenged a mixture of matched and mismatched targets, evaluating cleavage activity on a wide variety of potential target sequences in parallel through high-throughput sequencing of the products retained after cleavage. These experiments evidenced notable and consistent differences between in vitro and S. cerevisiae (in vivo) Cas9 cleavage specificity profiles including (i) a greater tolerance for mismatches in vitro and (ii) a greater specificity increase in vivo with truncation of the gRNA homology regions. PMID:27198218

  7. A new age in functional genomics using CRISPR/Cas9 in arrayed library screening

    PubMed Central

    Agrotis, Alexander; Ketteler, Robin

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR technology has rapidly changed the face of biological research, such that precise genome editing has now become routine for many labs within several years of its initial development. What makes CRISPR/Cas9 so revolutionary is the ability to target a protein (Cas9) to an exact genomic locus, through designing a specific short complementary nucleotide sequence, that together with a common scaffold sequence, constitute the guide RNA bridging the protein and the DNA. Wild-type Cas9 cleaves both DNA strands at its target sequence, but this protein can also be modified to exert many other functions. For instance, by attaching an activation domain to catalytically inactive Cas9 and targeting a promoter region, it is possible to stimulate the expression of a specific endogenous gene. In principle, any genomic region can be targeted, and recent efforts have successfully generated pooled guide RNA libraries for coding and regulatory regions of human, mouse and Drosophila genomes with high coverage, thus facilitating functional phenotypic screening. In this review, we will highlight recent developments in the area of CRISPR-based functional genomics and discuss potential future directions, with a special focus on mammalian cell systems and arrayed library screening. PMID:26442115

  8. Decomposition and reduction of N2O on CaS (100) surface: A theoretical account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lingnan; Qin, Wu; Hu, Xiaoying; Ju, Shaoda; Dong, Changqing; Yang, Yongping

    2015-02-01

    The catalytic effect of CaS on N2O decomposition and reduction was investigated using density functional theory calculations. N2O approached the CaS (100) surface and crossed an energy barrier of 1.228 eV, decomposing into a free N2 molecule and an adsorbed O atom. The generated adsorbed O atom could be removed through two reaction pathways: binding with a neighboring adsorbed O atom into O2 with the barrier energy of 1.877 eV or reacting with another N2O molecule generating an adsorbed O2 with the barrier of 1.863 eV. The removal of the surface adsorbed O atom is the rate-determining step of the catalytic decomposition of N2O. In comparison with the homogeneous reaction between N2O and CO, CO accelerated the removal of the adsorbed O atom, hence improving the reduction of N2O on CaS (100). Furthermore, while compared with the CaO-catalytic removal of N2O, CaS is not as active as CaO for the decomposition and reduction of N2O. Our study is the first attempt to theoretically reveal the mechanism of CaS-catalytic decomposition and reduction of N2O, which provides a better understanding of the nitrogen chemistry in the reducing atmosphere zone of circulating fluidized bed boilers.

  9. Expression of CRISPR/Cas single guide RNAs using small tRNA promoters.

    PubMed

    Mefferd, Adam L; Kornepati, Anand V R; Bogerd, Hal P; Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-09-01

    The in vivo application of CRISPR/Cas-based DNA editing technology will require the development of efficient delivery methods that likely will be dependent on adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based viral vectors. However, AAV vectors have only a modest, ∼4.7-kb packaging capacity, which will necessitate the identification and characterization of highly active Cas9 proteins that are substantially smaller than the prototypic Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 protein, which covers ∼4.2 kb of coding sequence, as well as the development of single guide RNA (sgRNA) expression cassettes substantially smaller than the current ∼360 bp size. Here, we report that small, ∼70-bp tRNA promoters can be used to express high levels of tRNA:sgRNA fusion transcripts that are efficiently and precisely cleaved by endogenous tRNase Z to release fully functional sgRNAs. Importantly, cells stably expressing functional tRNA:sgRNA precursors did not show a detectable change in the level of endogenous tRNA expression. This novel sgRNA expression strategy should greatly facilitate the construction of effective AAV-based Cas9/sgRNA vectors for future in vivo use. PMID:26187160

  10. Targeting CDK11 in osteosarcoma cells using the CRISPR-Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yong; Sassi, Slim; Shen, Jacson K; Yang, Xiaoqian; Gao, Yan; Osaka, Eiji; Zhang, Jianming; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao; Mankin, Henry J.; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common type primary malignant tumor of bone. Patients with regional osteosarcoma are routinely treated with surgery and chemotherapy. In addition, many patients with metastatic or recurrent osteosarcoma show poor prognosis with current chemotherapy agents. Therefore, it is important to improve the general condition and the overall survival rate of patients with osteosarcoma by identifying novel therapeutic strategies. Recent studies have revealed that CDK11 is essential in osteosarcoma cell growth and survival by inhibiting CDK11 mRNA expression with RNAi. Here, we apply the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system, a robust and highly efficient novel genome editing tool, to determine the effect of targeting endogenous CDK11 gene at the DNA level in osteosarcoma cell lines. We show that CDK11 can be efficiently silenced by CRISPR-Cas9. Inhibition of CDK11 is associated with decreased cell proliferation and viability, and induces cell death in osteosarcoma cell lines KHOS and U-2OS. Furthermore, the migration and invasion activities are also markedly reduced by CDK11 knockout. These results demonstrate that CRISPR-Cas9 system is a useful tool for the modification of endogenous CDK11 gene expression, and CRISPR-Cas9 targeted CDK11 knockout may be a promising therapeutic regimen for the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:25348612

  11. Tenth anniversary of CAS ONLINE service : What CAS services should be in the new era of chemical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostakos, Charles N.

    Chemical Abstracts Service celebrated 10th anniversary of CAS online information service in 1990. A speech given on the occasion reviewed history of the CAS ONLINE, in relation to its most important benefits for scientists and engineers. The development of STN international, the network through which CAS ONLINE is accessible around the world, was also discussed in the speech. The CAS ONLINE now contains a wide variety of files relating to chemical field including CA file, Registry file. CA previews,. CASREACT, CIN. MARPAT, etc for supplying chemical information worldwide.

  12. Recent Advances in Genome Editing Using CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuduan; Li, Hong; Chen, Ling-Ling; Xie, Kabin

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated nuclease 9) system is a versatile tool for genome engineering that uses a guide RNA (gRNA) to target Cas9 to a specific sequence. This simple RNA-guided genome-editing technology has become a revolutionary tool in biology and has many innovative applications in different fields. In this review, we briefly introduce the Cas9-mediated genome-editing method, summarize the recent advances in CRISPR/Cas9 technology, and discuss their implications for plant research. To date, targeted gene knockout using the Cas9/gRNA system has been established in many plant species, and the targeting efficiency and capacity of Cas9 has been improved by optimizing its expression and that of its gRNA. The CRISPR/Cas9 system can also be used for sequence-specific mutagenesis/integration and transcriptional control of target genes. We also discuss off-target effects and the constraint that the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) puts on CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering. To address these problems, a number of bioinformatic tools are available to help design specific gRNAs, and new Cas9 variants and orthologs with high fidelity and alternative PAM specificities have been engineered. Owing to these recent efforts, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is becoming a revolutionary and flexible tool for genome engineering. Adoption of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology in plant research would enable the investigation of plant biology at an unprecedented depth and create innovative applications in precise crop breeding. PMID:27252719

  13. Cas9 Variants Expand the Target Repertoire in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ryan T; Fu, Becky X H; Fire, Andrew Z

    2016-02-01

    The proliferation of CRISPR/Cas9-based methods in Caenorhabditis elegans has enabled efficient genome editing and precise genomic tethering of Cas9 fusion proteins. Experimental designs using CRISPR/Cas9 are currently limited by the need for a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) in the target with the sequence NGG. Here we report the characterization of two modified Cas9 proteins in C. elegans that recognize NGA and NGCG PAMs. We found that each variant could stimulate homologous recombination with a donor template at multiple loci and that PAM specificity was comparable to that of wild-type Cas9. To directly compare effectiveness, we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to generate a set of assay strains with a common single-guide RNA (sgRNA) target sequence, but that differ in the juxtaposed PAM (NGG, NGA, or NGCG). In this controlled setting, we determined that the NGA PAM Cas9 variant can be as effective as wild-type Cas9. We similarly edited a genomic target to study the influence of the base following the NGA PAM. Using four strains with four NGAN PAMs differing only at the fourth position and adjacent to the same sgRNA target, we observed that efficient homologous replacement was attainable with any base in the fourth position, with an NGAG PAM being the most effective. In addition to demonstrating the utility of two Cas9 mutants in C. elegans and providing reagents that permit CRISPR/Cas9 experiments with fewer restrictions on potential targets, we established a means to benchmark the efficiency of different Cas9::PAM combinations that avoids variations owing to differences in the sgRNA sequence. PMID:26680661

  14. Automated Essay Scoring versus Human Scoring: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jinhao; Brown, Michelle Stallone

    2007-01-01

    The current research was conducted to investigate the validity of automated essay scoring (AES) by comparing group mean scores assigned by an AES tool, IntelliMetric [TM] and human raters. Data collection included administering the Texas version of the WriterPlacer "Plus" test and obtaining scores assigned by IntelliMetric [TM] and by human…

  15. Booker T. Washington. Kindergarten-Third Grade Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahe, Amy

    This illustrated activity for primary students features the life and accomplishments of Booker T. Washington. This educator began his life as a plantation slave and later founded Tuskegee Institute, one of the first colleges that African Americans could attend. The activity tells how Booker T. Washington and his students built the Tuskegee…

  16. Maxillofacial trauma scoring systems.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    The changing complexity of maxillofacial fractures in recent years has created a situation where classical systems of classification of maxillofacial injuries fall short of defining trauma particularly that observed with high-velocity collisions where more than one region of the maxillofacial skeleton is affected. Trauma scoring systems designed specifically for the maxillofacial region are aimed to provide a more accurate assessment of the injury, its prognosis, the possible treatment outcomes, economics, length of hospital stay, and triage. The evolution and logic of such systems along with their merits and demerits are discussed. The author also proposes a new system to aid users in quickly and methodically choosing the system best suited to their needs without having to study a plethora of literature available in order to isolate their choice. PMID:26971084

  17. Generation and validation of PAX7 reporter lines from human iPS cells using CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianbo; Hunt, Samuel D; Xue, Haipeng; Liu, Ying; Darabi, Radbod

    2016-03-01

    Directed differentiation of iPS cells toward various tissue progenitors has been the focus of recent research. Therefore, generation of tissue-specific reporter iPS cell lines provides better understanding of developmental stages in iPS cells. This technical report describes an efficient strategy for generation and validation of knock-in reporter lines in human iPS cells using the Cas9-nickase system. Here, we have generated a knock-in human iPS cell line for the early myogenic lineage specification gene of PAX7. By introduction of site-specific double-stranded breaks (DSB) in the genomic locus of PAX7 using CRISPR/Cas9 nickase pairs, a 2A-GFP reporter with selection markers has been incorporated before the stop codon of the PAX7 gene at the last exon. After positive and negative selection, single cell-derived human iPS clones have been isolated and sequenced for in-frame positioning of the reporter construct. Finally, by using a nuclease-dead Cas9 activator (dCas9-VP160) system, the promoter region of PAX7 has been targeted for transient gene induction to validate the GFP reporter activity. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analysis and immunostaining for PAX7 and GFP. This technical report provides a practical guideline for generation and validation of knock-in reporters using CRISPR/Cas9 system. PMID:26826926

  18. Olympic Scoring of English Compositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follman, John; Panther, Edward

    1974-01-01

    Examines empirically the efficacy of utilizing Olympic diving and gymnastic scoring systems for grading graduate students' English compositions. Results indicated that such scoring rules do not produce ratings different in reliability or in level from conventional letter grades. (ED)

  19. CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Owen W; Poddar, Snigdha; Cate, Jamie H D

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing that results in scarless and marker-free integrations of DNA into Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. DNA integration results from cotransforming (1) a single plasmid (pCAS) that coexpresses the Cas9 endonuclease and a uniquely engineered single guide RNA (sgRNA) expression cassette and (2) a linear DNA molecule that is used to repair the chromosomal DNA damage by homology-directed repair. For target specificity, the pCAS plasmid requires only a single cloning modification: replacing the 20-bp guide RNA sequence within the sgRNA cassette. This CRISPR-Cas9 protocol includes methods for (1) cloning the unique target sequence into pCAS, (2) assembly of the double-stranded DNA repair oligonucleotides, and (3) cotransformation of pCAS and linear repair DNA into yeast cells. The protocol is technically facile and requires no special equipment. It can be used in any S. cerevisiae strain, including industrial polyploid isolates. Therefore, this CRISPR-Cas9-based DNA integration protocol is achievable by virtually any yeast genetics and molecular biology laboratory. PMID:27250940

  20. Interacting Parallel Constructions of Knowledge in a CAS Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidron, Ivy; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2010-01-01

    We consider the influence of a CAS context on a learner's process of constructing a justification for the bifurcations in a logistic dynamical process. We describe how instrumentation led to cognitive constructions and how the roles of the learner and the CAS intertwine, especially close to the branching and combining of constructing actions. The…

  1. Transformation of OODT CAS to Perform Larger Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Daniel; Hughes, John; Ramirez, Paul; Hardman, Sean; Woollard, David; Kelly, Sean

    2008-01-01

    A computer program denoted OODT CAS has been transformed to enable performance of larger tasks that involve greatly increased data volumes and increasingly intensive processing of data on heterogeneous, geographically dispersed computers. Prior to the transformation, OODT CAS (also alternatively denoted, simply, 'CAS') [wherein 'OODT' signifies 'Object-Oriented Data Technology' and 'CAS' signifies 'Catalog and Archive Service'] was a proven software component used to manage scientific data from spaceflight missions. In the transformation, CAS was split into two separate components representing its canonical capabilities: file management and workflow management. In addition, CAS was augmented by addition of a resource-management component. This third component enables CAS to manage heterogeneous computing by use of diverse resources, including high-performance clusters of computers, commodity computing hardware, and grid computing infrastructures. CAS is now more easily maintainable, evolvable, and reusable. These components can be used separately or, taking advantage of synergies, can be used together. Other elements of the transformation included addition of a separate Web presentation layer that supports distribution of data products via Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds, and provision for full Resource Description Framework (RDF) exports of metadata.

  2. 48 CFR 970.3002-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....3002-1 CAS applicability. The provisions of 48 CFR part 30 and 48 CFR chapter 99 (FAR Appendix) shall... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CAS applicability. 970.3002-1 Section 970.3002-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  3. 48 CFR 970.3002-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....3002-1 CAS applicability. The provisions of 48 CFR part 30 and 48 CFR chapter 99 (FAR Appendix) shall... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CAS applicability. 970.3002-1 Section 970.3002-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  4. 48 CFR 970.3002-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....3002-1 CAS applicability. The provisions of 48 CFR part 30 and 48 CFR chapter 99 (FAR Appendix) shall... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CAS applicability. 970.3002-1 Section 970.3002-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  5. Teaching Undergraduate Mathematics Using CAS Technology: Issues and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Patrick C.; Weiss, Vida

    2016-01-01

    The use of handheld CAS technology in undergraduate mathematics courses in Australia is paradoxically shrinking under sustained disapproval or disdain from the professional mathematics community. Mathematics education specialists argue with their mathematics colleagues over a range of issues in course development and this use of CAS or even…

  6. 48 CFR 970.3002-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....3002-1 CAS applicability. The provisions of 48 CFR part 30 and 48 CFR chapter 99 (FAR Appendix) shall... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CAS applicability. 970.3002-1 Section 970.3002-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  7. 48 CFR 970.3002-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....3002-1 CAS applicability. The provisions of 48 CFR part 30 and 48 CFR chapter 99 (FAR Appendix) shall... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CAS applicability. 970.3002-1 Section 970.3002-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  8. From Calculus to Dynamical Systems through DGS and CAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Jeanett López; Zamudio, Jorge Javier Jiménez

    2015-01-01

    Several factors have motivated the use of CAS or DGS in the teaching-learning process, such as: the development of new technologies, the availability of computers, and the widespread use of the Internet, among others. Even more, the trend to include CAS and DGS in the curricula of some undergraduate studies has resulted in the instruction of the…

  9. Simplified CRISPR-Cas genome editing for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Generoso, Wesley Cardoso; Gottardi, Manuela; Oreb, Mislav; Boles, Eckhard

    2016-08-01

    CRISPR-Cas has become a powerful technique for genetic engineering of yeast. Here, we present an improved version by using only one single plasmid expressing Cas9 and one or two guide-RNAs. A high gene deletion efficiency was achieved even with simultaneous recombination cloning of the plasmid and deletion in industrial strains. PMID:27327211

  10. Recent Progress in CRISPR/Cas9 Technology.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yue; Wang, Yan; Chen, Huiqian; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Ju, Xing-Da

    2016-02-20

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, a simple and efficient tool for genome editing, has experienced rapid progress in its technology and applicability in the past two years. Here, we review the recent advances in CRISPR/Cas9 technology and the ways that have been adopted to expand our capacity for precise genome manipulation. First, we introduce the mechanism of CRISPR/Cas9, including its biochemical and structural implications. Second, we highlight the latest improvements in the CRISPR/Cas9 system, especially Cas9 protein modifications for customization. Third, we review its current applications, in which the versatile CRISPR/Cas9 system was employed to edit the genome, epigenome, or RNA of various organisms. Although CRISPR/Cas9 allows convenient genome editing accompanied by many benefits, we should not ignore the significant ethical and biosafety concerns that it raises. Finally, we discuss the prospective applications and challenges of several promising techniques adapted from CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:26924689

  11. Line Lengths and Starch Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Sandra E.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates readability of different line lengths in advertising body copy, hypothesizing a normal curve with lower scores for shorter and longer lines, and scores above the mean for lines in the middle of the distribution. Finds support for lower scores for short lines and some evidence of two optimum line lengths rather than one. (SKC)

  12. Expression of the genes encoding the CasK/R two-component system and the DesA desaturase during Bacillus cereus cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Diomandé, Sara Esther; Doublet, Bénédicte; Vasaï, Florian; Guinebretière, Marie-Hélène; Broussolle, Véronique; Brillard, Julien

    2016-08-01

    Two-component systems (TCS) allow a cell to elaborate a variety of adaptive responses to environment changes. The recently discovered CasK/R TCS plays a role in the optimal unsaturation of fatty acids necessary for cold adaptation of the foodborne-pathogen Bacillus cereus Here, we showed that the promoter activity of the operon encoding this TCS was repressed during growth at low temperature in the stationary phase in the parental strain when compared to the casK/R mutant, suggesting that CasR negatively regulates the activity of its own promoter in these conditions. The promoter activity of the desA gene encoding the Δ5 fatty acid desaturase, providing unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) required for low temperature adaptation, was repressed in the casK/R mutant grown at 12°C versus 37°C. This result suggests that CasK/R activates desA expression during B. cereus growth at low temperature, allowing an optimal unsaturation of the fatty acids. In contrast, desA expression was repressed during the lag phase at low temperature in presence of UFAs, in a CasK/R-independent manner. Our findings confirm that the involvement of this major TCS in B. cereus cold adaptation is linked to the upregulation of a fatty acid desaturase. PMID:27435329

  13. Cas9-mediated targeting of viral RNA in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Price, Aryn A.; Sampson, Timothy R.; Ratner, Hannah K.; Grakoui, Arash; Weiss, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats–CRISPR associated (CRISPR-Cas) systems are prokaryotic RNA-directed endonuclease machineries that act as an adaptive immune system against foreign genetic elements. Using small CRISPR RNAs that provide specificity, Cas proteins recognize and degrade nucleic acids. Our previous work demonstrated that the Cas9 endonuclease from Francisella novicida (FnCas9) is capable of targeting endogenous bacterial RNA. Here, we show that FnCas9 can be directed by an engineered RNA-targeting guide RNA to target and inhibit a human +ssRNA virus, hepatitis C virus, within eukaryotic cells. This work reveals a versatile and portable RNA-targeting system that can effectively function in eukaryotic cells and be programmed as an antiviral defense. PMID:25918406

  14. Expression of a phosphorylated p130Cas substrate domain attenuates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt survival pathway in tamoxifen resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Shefali; Lin, Bor-Tyh; August, Avery; Nicholson, Robert I.; Kirsch, Kathrin H.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated expression of p130Cas/BCAR1 (breast cancer anti estrogen resistance 1) in human breast tumors is a marker of poor prognosis and poor overall survival. Specifically, p130Cas signaling has been associated with antiestrogen resistance, for which the mechanism is currently unknown. TAM-R cells, which were established by long-term exposure of estrogen (E2)-dependent MCF-7 cells to tamoxifen, displayed elevated levels of total and activated p130Cas. Here we have investigated the effects of p130Cas inhibition on growth factor signaling in tamoxifen resistance. To inhibit p130Cas, a phosphorylated substrate domain of p130Cas, that acts as a dominant-negative (DN) p130Cas molecule by blocking signal transduction downstream of the p130Cas substrate domain, as well as knockdown by siRNA was employed. Interference with p130Cas signaling/expression induced morphological changes, which were consistent with a more epithelial-like phenotype. The phenotypic reversion was accompanied by reduced migration, attenuation of the ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathways, and induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was accompanied by downregulation of the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Importantly, these changes re-sensitized TAM-R cells to tamoxifen treatment by inducing cell death. Therefore, our findings suggest that targeting the product of the BCAR1 gene by a peptide which mimics the phosphorylated substrate domain may provide a new molecular avenue for treatment of antiestrogen resistant breast cancers. PMID:19330798

  15. Sequence features associated with the cleavage efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Homma, Ayaka; Sayadi, Jamasb; Yang, Shu; Ohashi, Jun; Takumi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system has recently emerged as a versatile tool for biological and medical research. In this system, a single guide RNA (sgRNA) directs the endonuclease Cas9 to a targeted DNA sequence for site-specific manipulation. In addition to this targeting function, the sgRNA has also been shown to play a role in activating the endonuclease activity of Cas9. This dual function of the sgRNA likely underlies observations that different sgRNAs have varying on-target activities. Currently, our understanding of the relationship between sequence features of sgRNAs and their on-target cleavage efficiencies remains limited, largely due to difficulties in assessing the cleavage capacity of a large number of sgRNAs. In this study, we evaluated the cleavage activities of 218 sgRNAs using in vitro Surveyor assays. We found that nucleotides at both PAM-distal and PAM-proximal regions of the sgRNA are significantly correlated with on-target efficiency. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that the genomic context of the targeted DNA, the GC percentage, and the secondary structure of sgRNA are critical factors contributing to cleavage efficiency. In summary, our study reveals important parameters for the design of sgRNAs with high on-target efficiencies, especially in the context of high throughput applications. PMID:26813419

  16. Synthetic CRISPR RNA-Cas9–guided genome editing in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Rahdar, Meghdad; McMahon, Moira A.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Swayze, Eric E.; Bennett, C. Frank; Cleveland, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing with the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nuclease system is a powerful technology for manipulating genomes, including introduction of gene disruptions or corrections. Here we develop a chemically modified, 29-nucleotide synthetic CRISPR RNA (scrRNA), which in combination with unmodified transactivating crRNA (tracrRNA) is shown to functionally replace the natural guide RNA in the CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease system and to mediate efficient genome editing in human cells. Incorporation of rational chemical modifications known to protect against nuclease digestion and stabilize RNA–RNA interactions in the tracrRNA hybridization region of CRISPR RNA (crRNA) yields a scrRNA with enhanced activity compared with the unmodified crRNA and comparable gene disruption activity to the previously published single guide RNA. Taken together, these findings provide a platform for therapeutic applications, especially for nervous system disease, using successive application of cell-permeable, synthetic CRISPR RNAs to activate and then silence Cas9 nuclease activity. PMID:26589814

  17. Implementing the CAS Standards: The Implementation of the CAS Standards in Student Affairs as a Comprehensive Assessment Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Jesse A.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing use of the CAS standards as a comprehensive assessment approach in divisions of student affairs necessitates a more in-depth understanding of how the CAS standards are being implemented in these settings. In response to increasing calls for improvement, accountability and professionalism in student affairs (Bresciani, 2006; Cooper…

  18. You Score With Nutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, Ruth McNabb

    1976-01-01

    The leader's guide and student activity booklet contain learning activities, ideas, information, games, and resources for nutrition instruction designed to appeal to the interests of teens and pre-teens and to improve their knowledge of nutrition and their eating habits. (MS)

  19. Using Momentary Time Sampling to Estimate Minutes of Physical Activity in Physical Education: Validation of Scores for the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Edward M.; Coleman, Karen J.; Lensegrav, Tera L.; Fallon, Jennifer A.

    2006-01-01

    The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) is a direct observation system specifically developed for use during physical education (PE; McKenzie, 1991; McKenzie, Sallis, & Nader, 1991). The purpose of this study was to validate the estimates of time spent in various physical activity intensities obtained with the paper and pencil…

  20. An Adventure to the New World. Fifth Grade Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boilon, Susan

    This activity plan for fifth graders posits that the student is an agent for the King and Queen and are authorized to make a journey to the New World on behalf of the kingdom. The mission is to claim all land for the monarchy, locate a new trading route across the ocean, look for the Northwest Passage, and bring back gold, silver, spices, new…

  1. The Ancient World Explorer: Space Invaders, Copycats or Independent Inventors? Sixth Grade Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoit, Ty

    When archaeologists dig up the artifacts of ancient civilizations, they make discoveries and attempt to find out what life was like for ancient people. Students in the classroom explore the civilizations of the ancient world attempting to answer questions about how people lived thousands of years ago. In this activity for grade 6, students, in…

  2. Orange Juice--From the Tree to the Glass! Second Grade Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricchiuti, Linda M.

    The goal of this lesson plan is for second-grade students to understand the steps in how food is made and delivered to the grocery store. Students create a play where each person plays a part in the production and distribution of food. The lesson suggests that the class perform the play on parents' night. It provides five activities for students…

  3. Arctic Animals of Alaska. First Grade Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Sandra

    The Arctic is covered with ice and snow for most of the year. Animals that live in Alaska's arctic region must be able to survive long winters and very cold temperatures. Surprisingly, many animals live in the harsh, cold climate. This first-grade activity plan helps students learn about the animals of the far north. The plan gives six steps for…

  4. Design of a CRISPR-Cas system to increase resistance of Bacillus subtilis to bacteriophage SPP1.

    PubMed

    Jakutyte-Giraitiene, Lina; Gasiunas, Giedrius

    2016-08-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) together with CRISPR-associated (cas) genes form an adaptive prokaryotic immune system which provides acquired resistance against viruses and plasmids. Bacillus subtilis presently is the best-characterized laboratory model for Gram-positive bacteria and also widely used for industrial production of enzymes, vitamins and antibiotics. In this study, we show that type II-A CRISPR-Cas system from Streptococcus thermophilus can be transferred into B. subtilis and provides heterologous protection against phage infection. We engineered a heterologous host by cloning S. thermophilus Cas9 and a spacer targeting bacteriophage SPP1 into the chromosome of B. subtilis, which does not harbor its own CRISPR-Cas systems. We found that the heterologous CRISPR-Cas system is functionally active in B. subtilis and provides resistance against bacteriophage SPP1 infection. The high efficiency of the acquired immunity against phage could be useful in generation of biotechnologically important B. subtilis strains with engineered chromosomes. PMID:27255973

  5. CRISPR-Cas9(D10A) nickase-based genotypic and phenotypic screening to enhance genome editing.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ting-Wei Will; le Sage, Carlos; Larrieu, Delphine; Demir, Mukerrem; Jackson, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease is being widely employed to engineer the genomes of various cells and organisms. Despite the efficient mutagenesis induced by Cas9, off-target effects have raised concerns over the system's specificity. Recently a "double-nicking" strategy using catalytic mutant Cas9(D10A) nickase has been developed to minimise off-target effects. Here, we describe a Cas9(D10A)-based screening approach that combines an All-in-One Cas9(D10A) nickase vector with fluorescence-activated cell sorting enrichment followed by high-throughput genotypic and phenotypic clonal screening strategies to generate isogenic knockouts and knock-ins highly efficiently, with minimal off-target effects. We validated this approach by targeting genes for the DNA-damage response (DDR) proteins MDC1, 53BP1, RIF1 and P53, plus the nuclear architecture proteins Lamin A/C, in three different human cell lines. We also efficiently obtained biallelic knock-in clones, using single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides as homologous templates, for insertion of an EcoRI recognition site at the RIF1 locus and introduction of a point mutation at the histone H2AFX locus to abolish assembly of DDR factors at sites of DNA double-strand breaks. This versatile screening approach should facilitate research aimed at defining gene functions, modelling of cancers and other diseases underpinned by genetic factors, and exploring new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:27079678

  6. CRISPR-Cas9D10A nickase-based genotypic and phenotypic screening to enhance genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ting-Wei Will; le Sage, Carlos; Larrieu, Delphine; Demir, Mukerrem; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease is being widely employed to engineer the genomes of various cells and organisms. Despite the efficient mutagenesis induced by Cas9, off-target effects have raised concerns over the system’s specificity. Recently a “double-nicking” strategy using catalytic mutant Cas9D10A nickase has been developed to minimise off-target effects. Here, we describe a Cas9D10A-based screening approach that combines an All-in-One Cas9D10A nickase vector with fluorescence-activated cell sorting enrichment followed by high-throughput genotypic and phenotypic clonal screening strategies to generate isogenic knockouts and knock-ins highly efficiently, with minimal off-target effects. We validated this approach by targeting genes for the DNA-damage response (DDR) proteins MDC1, 53BP1, RIF1 and P53, plus the nuclear architecture proteins Lamin A/C, in three different human cell lines. We also efficiently obtained biallelic knock-in clones, using single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides as homologous templates, for insertion of an EcoRI recognition site at the RIF1 locus and introduction of a point mutation at the histone H2AFX locus to abolish assembly of DDR factors at sites of DNA double-strand breaks. This versatile screening approach should facilitate research aimed at defining gene functions, modelling of cancers and other diseases underpinned by genetic factors, and exploring new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:27079678

  7. One-step generation of triple knockout CHO cell lines using CRISPR/Cas9 and fluorescent enrichment.

    PubMed

    Grav, Lise Marie; Lee, Jae Seong; Gerling, Signe; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Hansen, Anders Holmgaard; Kol, Stefan; Lee, Gyun Min; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2015-09-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology has previously been shown to be a highly efficient tool for generating gene disruptions in CHO cells. In this study we further demonstrate the applicability and efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing by disrupting FUT8, BAK and BAX simultaneously in a multiplexing setup in CHO cells. To isolate Cas9-expressing cells from transfected cell pools, GFP was linked to the Cas9 nuclease via a 2A peptide. With this method, the average indel frequencies generated at the three genomic loci were increased from 11% before enrichment to 68% after enrichment. Despite the high number of genome editing events in the enriched cell pools, no significant off-target effects were observed from off-target prediction followed by deep sequencing. Single cell sorting of enriched multiplexed cells and deep sequencing of 97 clones revealed the presence of four single, 23 double and 34 triple gene-disrupted cell lines. Further characterization of selected potential triple knockout clones confirmed the removal of Bak and Bax protein and disrupted fucosylation activity as expected. The knockout cell lines showed improved resistance to apoptosis compared to wild-type CHO-S cells. Taken together, multiplexing with CRISPR/Cas9 can accelerate genome engineering efforts in CHO cells even further. PMID:25864574

  8. [CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing systems and the analysis of targeted genome mutations in plants].

    PubMed

    Xingliang, Ma; Yaoguang, Liu

    2016-02-01

    Targeted genomic editing technologies use programmable DNA nucleases to cleave genomic target sites, thus inducing targeted mutations in the genomes. The newly prevailed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system that consists of the Cas9 nuclease and single guide RNA (sgRNA) has the advantages of simplicity and high efficiency as compared to other programmable DNA nuclease systems such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs). Currently, a number of cases have been reported on the application of the CRISPR/Cas9 genomic editing technology in plants. In this review, we summarize the strategies for preparing the Cas9 and sgRNA expression constructs, the transformation method for obtaining targeted mutations, the efficiency and features of the resulting mutations and the methods for detecting or genotyping of the mutation sites. We also discuss the existing problems and perspectives of CRISPR/Cas9-based genomic editing in plants. PMID:26907775

  9. Pharmacophore-Based Similarity Scoring for DOCK

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacophore modeling incorporates geometric and chemical features of known inhibitors and/or targeted binding sites to rationally identify and design new drug leads. In this study, we have encoded a three-dimensional pharmacophore matching similarity (FMS) scoring function into the structure-based design program DOCK. Validation and characterization of the method are presented through pose reproduction, crossdocking, and enrichment studies. When used alone, FMS scoring dramatically improves pose reproduction success to 93.5% (∼20% increase) and reduces sampling failures to 3.7% (∼6% drop) compared to the standard energy score (SGE) across 1043 protein–ligand complexes. The combined FMS+SGE function further improves success to 98.3%. Crossdocking experiments using FMS and FMS+SGE scoring, for six diverse protein families, similarly showed improvements in success, provided proper pharmacophore references are employed. For enrichment, incorporating pharmacophores during sampling and scoring, in most cases, also yield improved outcomes when docking and rank-ordering libraries of known actives and decoys to 15 systems. Retrospective analyses of virtual screenings to three clinical drug targets (EGFR, IGF-1R, and HIVgp41) using X-ray structures of known inhibitors as pharmacophore references are also reported, including a customized FMS scoring protocol to bias on selected regions in the reference. Overall, the results and fundamental insights gained from this study should benefit the docking community in general, particularly researchers using the new FMS method to guide computational drug discovery with DOCK. PMID:25229837

  10. Association of the interferon signature metric with serological disease manifestations but not global activity scores in multiple cohorts of patients with SLE

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, William P; Maciuca, Romeo; Wolslegel, Kristen; Tew, Wei; Abbas, Alexander R; Chaivorapol, Christina; Morimoto, Alyssa; McBride, Jacqueline M; Brunetta, Paul; Richardson, Bruce C; Davis, John C; Behrens, Timothy W; Townsend, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The interferon (IFN) signature (IS) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) includes over 100 genes induced by type I IFN pathway activation. We developed a method to quantify the IS using three genes—the IS metric (ISM)—and characterised the clinical characteristics of patients with SLE with different ISM status from multiple clinical trials. Methods Blood microarray expression data from a training cohort of patients with SLE confirmed the presence of the IS and identified surrogate genes. We assayed these genes in a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay, yielding an ISM from the IS. The association of ISM status with clinical disease characteristics was assessed in patients with extrarenal lupus and lupus nephritis from four clinical trials. Results Three genes, HERC5, EPSTI and CMPK2, correlated well with the IS (p>0.96), and composed the ISM qPCR assay. Using the 95th centile for healthy control data, patients with SLE from different studies were classified into two ISM subsets—ISM-Low and ISM-High—that are longitudinally stable over 36 weeks. Significant associations were identified between ISM-High status and higher titres of anti-dsDNA antibodies, presence of anti extractable nuclear antigen autoantibodies, elevated serum B cell activating factor of the tumour necrosis factor family (BAFF) levels, and hypocomplementaemia. However, measures of overall clinical disease activity were similar for ISM-High and ISM-Low groups. Conclusions The ISM is an IS biomarker that divides patients with SLE into two subpopulations—ISM-High and ISM-Low—with differing serological manifestations. The ISM does not distinguish between high and low disease activity, but may have utility in identifying patients more likely to respond to treatment(s) targeting IFN-α. Clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT00962832. PMID:25861459

  11. Pilomatricome: étude de 22 cas

    PubMed Central

    Nasreddine, Fatima Zahra; Hali, Fouzia; Chiheb, Soumiya

    2016-01-01

    Le pilomatricome est une tumeur cutanée fréquente et bénigne du follicule pileux chez l'enfant. C'est une tumeur annexielle souvent méconnue et confondue avec d'autres lésions cutanées. Les localisations habituelles sont la tête et le cou. Le but de ce travail est de rapporter une série de 22 cas comportant des formes inhabituelles colligées au service de dermatologie sur une période allant de Janvier 2006 jusqu'au Mai 2015. L’étude a concerné 16 femmes et 6 hommes. La moyenne d’âge était de 23,3 ans (4-80 ans). La localisation cervico faciale a été observée dans 12 cas, 2 patients avaient des localisations multiples, un garçon de 4ans avait une localisation au niveau fronto-temporal et une fillette de 14 ans avait une localisation au niveau du visage et de l'avant-bras, et un patient de 48 ans avait une localisation sous unguéale. L'aspect clinique était typique dans tous les cas avec des nodules sous cutanés de consistance pierreuse. Tous les patients ont bénéficié d'une exérèse des nodules sous anesthésie locale. L’étude histologique était en faveur d'un épithélioma momifié de Malherbe d'exérèse complète sans signes de malignité. Aucun patient n'a présenté de rechute. L'originalité de notre étude réside dans la présence de localisations exceptionnelles au niveau latéro-vertébral, des membres et sous-unguéale, l’âge de survenue inhabituel à 80 ans et la présence de localisations multiples signalées chez 2 enfants. PMID:27516819

  12. High Efficiency, Homology-Directed Genome Editing in Caenorhabditis elegans Using CRISPR-Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Paix, Alexandre; Folkmann, Andrew; Rasoloson, Dominique; Seydoux, Geraldine

    2015-09-01

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of breaks induced by the RNA-programmed nuclease Cas9 has become a popular method for genome editing in several organisms. Most HDR protocols rely on plasmid-based expression of Cas9 and the gene-specific guide RNAs. Here we report that direct injection of in vitro-assembled Cas9-CRISPR RNA (crRNA) trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) ribonucleoprotein complexes into the gonad of Caenorhabditis elegans yields HDR edits at a high frequency. Building on our earlier finding that PCR fragments with 35-base homology are efficient repair templates, we developed an entirely cloning-free protocol for the generation of seamless HDR edits without selection. Combined with the co-CRISPR method, this protocol is sufficiently robust for use with low-efficiency guide RNAs and to generate complex edits, including ORF replacement and simultaneous tagging of two genes with fluorescent proteins. PMID:26187122

  13. High Efficiency, Homology-Directed Genome Editing in Caenorhabditis elegans Using CRISPR-Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Paix, Alexandre; Folkmann, Andrew; Rasoloson, Dominique; Seydoux, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of breaks induced by the RNA-programmed nuclease Cas9 has become a popular method for genome editing in several organisms. Most HDR protocols rely on plasmid-based expression of Cas9 and the gene-specific guide RNAs. Here we report that direct injection of in vitro–assembled Cas9-CRISPR RNA (crRNA) trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) ribonucleoprotein complexes into the gonad of Caenorhabditis elegans yields HDR edits at a high frequency. Building on our earlier finding that PCR fragments with 35-base homology are efficient repair templates, we developed an entirely cloning-free protocol for the generation of seamless HDR edits without selection. Combined with the co-CRISPR method, this protocol is sufficiently robust for use with low-efficiency guide RNAs and to generate complex edits, including ORF replacement and simultaneous tagging of two genes with fluorescent proteins. PMID:26187122

  14. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-Guided FokI-dCas9 Nucleases Directed by Truncated gRNAs for Highly Specific Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Topkar, Ved V.; Khayter, Cyd; Joung, J. Keith; Tsai, Shengdar Q.

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) nucleases have been widely adopted for simple and robust targeted genome editing but also have the potential to induce high-frequency off-target mutations. In principle, two orthogonal strategies for reducing off-target cleavage, truncated guide RNAs (tru-gRNAs) and dimerization-dependent RNA-guided FokI-dCas9 nucleases (RFNs), could be combined as tru-RFNs to further improve genome editing specificity. Here we identify a robust tru-RFN architecture that shows high activity in human cancer cell lines and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that tru-gRNAs reduce the undesirable mutagenic effects of monomeric FokI-dCas9. Tru-RFNs combine the advantages of two orthogonal strategies for improving the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases and therefore provide a highly specific platform for performing genome editing. PMID:26068112

  15. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-Guided FokI-dCas9 Nucleases Directed by Truncated gRNAs for Highly Specific Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Topkar, Ved V; Khayter, Cyd; Joung, J Keith; Tsai, Shengdar Q

    2015-07-01

    Monomeric clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) nucleases have been widely adopted for simple and robust targeted genome editing but also have the potential to induce high-frequency off-target mutations. In principle, two orthogonal strategies for reducing off-target cleavage, truncated guide RNAs (tru-gRNAs) and dimerization-dependent RNA-guided FokI-dCas9 nucleases (RFNs), could be combined as tru-RFNs to further improve genome editing specificity. Here we identify a robust tru-RFN architecture that shows high activity in human cancer cell lines and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that tru-gRNAs reduce the undesirable mutagenic effects of monomeric FokI-dCas9. Tru-RFNs combine the advantages of two orthogonal strategies for improving the specificity of CRISPR-Cas nucleases and therefore provide a highly specific platform for performing genome editing. PMID:26068112

  16. CRISPR/Cas9 in Genome Editing and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haifeng; La Russa, Marie; Qi, Lei S

    2016-06-01

    The Cas9 protein (CRISPR-associated protein 9), derived from type II CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) bacterial immune systems, is emerging as a powerful tool for engineering the genome in diverse organisms. As an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease, Cas9 can be easily programmed to target new sites by altering its guide RNA sequence, and its development as a tool has made sequence-specific gene editing several magnitudes easier. The nuclease-deactivated form of Cas9 further provides a versatile RNA-guided DNA-targeting platform for regulating and imaging the genome, as well as for rewriting the epigenetic status, all in a sequence-specific manner. With all of these advances, we have just begun to explore the possible applications of Cas9 in biomedical research and therapeutics. In this review, we describe the current models of Cas9 function and the structural and biochemical studies that support it. We focus on the applications of Cas9 for genome editing, regulation, and imaging, discuss other possible applications and some technical considerations, and highlight the many advantages that CRISPR/Cas9 technology offers. PMID:27145843

  17. CRISPR/Cas9 Based Genome Editing of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Pohl, C; Kiel, J A K W; Driessen, A J M; Bovenberg, R A L; Nygård, Y

    2016-07-15

    CRISPR/Cas9 based systems have emerged as versatile platforms for precision genome editing in a wide range of organisms. Here we have developed powerful CRISPR/Cas9 tools for marker-based and marker-free genome modifications in Penicillium chrysogenum, a model filamentous fungus and industrially relevant cell factory. The developed CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox is highly flexible and allows editing of new targets with minimal cloning efforts. The Cas9 protein and the sgRNA can be either delivered during transformation, as preassembled CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) or expressed from an AMA1 based plasmid within the cell. The direct delivery of the Cas9 protein with in vitro synthesized sgRNA to the cells allows for a transient method for genome engineering that may rapidly be applicable for other filamentous fungi. The expression of Cas9 from an AMA1 based vector was shown to be highly efficient for marker-free gene deletions. PMID:27072635

  18. HPCCP/CAS Workshop Proceedings 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulbach, Catherine; Mata, Ellen (Editor); Schulbach, Catherine (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This publication is a collection of extended abstracts of presentations given at the HPCCP/CAS (High Performance Computing and Communications Program/Computational Aerosciences Project) Workshop held on August 24-26, 1998, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The objective of the Workshop was to bring together the aerospace high performance computing community, consisting of airframe and propulsion companies, independent software vendors, university researchers, and government scientists and engineers. The Workshop was sponsored by the HPCCP Office at NASA Ames Research Center. The Workshop consisted of over 40 presentations, including an overview of NASA's High Performance Computing and Communications Program and the Computational Aerosciences Project; ten sessions of papers representative of the high performance computing research conducted within the Program by the aerospace industry, academia, NASA, and other government laboratories; two panel sessions; and a special presentation by Mr. James Bailey.

  19. Adaptation in CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Samuel H; Richter, Hagen; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Qimron, Udi

    2016-03-17

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins constitute an adaptive immune system in prokaryotes. The system preserves memories of prior infections by integrating short segments of foreign DNA, termed spacers, into the CRISPR array in a process termed adaptation. During the past 3 years, significant progress has been made on the genetic requirements and molecular mechanisms of adaptation. Here we review these recent advances, with a focus on the experimental approaches that have been developed, the insights they generated, and a proposed mechanism for self- versus non-self-discrimination during the process of spacer selection. We further describe the regulation of adaptation and the protein players involved in this fascinating process that allows bacteria and archaea to harbor adaptive immunity. PMID:26949040

  20. CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing in Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The prokaryotic CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9, an RNA-guided endonuclease, has been shown to mediate efficient genome editing in a wide variety of organisms. In the present study, the CRISPR-Cas9 system has been adapted to Leishmania donovani, a protozoan parasite that causes fatal human visceral leishmaniasis. We introduced the Cas9 nuclease into L. donovani and generated guide RNA (gRNA) expression vectors by using the L. donovani rRNA promoter and the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme. It is demonstrated within that L. donovani mainly used homology-directed repair (HDR) and microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) to repair the Cas9 nuclease-created double-strand DNA break (DSB). The nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway appears to be absent in L. donovani. With this CRISPR-Cas9 system, it was possible to generate knockouts without selection by insertion of an oligonucleotide donor with stop codons and 25-nucleotide homology arms into the Cas9 cleavage site. Likewise, we disrupted and precisely tagged endogenous genes by inserting a bleomycin drug selection marker and GFP gene into the Cas9 cleavage site. With the use of Hammerhead and HDV ribozymes, a double-gRNA expression vector that further improved gene-targeting efficiency was developed, and it was used to make precise deletion of the 3-kb miltefosine transporter gene (LdMT). In addition, this study identified a novel single point mutation caused by CRISPR-Cas9 in LdMT (M381T) that led to miltefosine resistance, a concern for the only available oral antileishmanial drug. Together, these results demonstrate that the CRISPR-Cas9 system represents an effective genome engineering tool for L. donovani. PMID:26199327

  1. SCORE, A Measurement of Reference Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeler, Richard J.

    The University of Denver Libraries employed SCORE (Service Components Reliability and Efficiency), a cost analysis technique, to measure effectiveness and cost of reference activity. This report examines the results and the problems encountered in application of this methodology. A reference model, designed as a flow chart, was developed by…

  2. FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GACH, PENELOPE J.; AND OTHERS

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMICAL FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS IS DESCRIBED. THREE PROTOTYPE SYSTEMS WERE DEVELOPED--(1) A METAL FOIL ACTIVATING AN ELECTRICAL PROBE, (2) A METAL FOIL REACTING WITH A MAGNETIC PROBE, AND (3) INVISIBLE FLUORESCENT INK REVEALED BY THE APPLICATION OF LONGWAVE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT. (MS)

  3. 41 CFR 102-33.435 - What CAS cost and utilization data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What CAS cost and... Services (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.435 What CAS cost and utilization data must we report? You must report the costs and flying hours for each CAS aircraft you hire. You must also report...

  4. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If we hire CAS, what are... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are... agreements; (b) Accounting for the cost of your aircraft and services hired as CAS; (c) Accounting for use...

  5. 41 CFR 102-33.440 - Who must report CAS cost and utilization data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Who must report CAS cost... (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.440 Who must report CAS cost and utilization data? Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and U.S. intelligence agencies, must report CAS cost and utilization...

  6. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false If we hire CAS, what are... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are... agreements; (b) Accounting for the cost of your aircraft and services hired as CAS; (c) Accounting for use...

  7. 41 CFR 102-33.435 - What CAS cost and utilization data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What CAS cost and... Services (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.435 What CAS cost and utilization data must we report? You must report the costs and flying hours for each CAS aircraft you hire. You must also report...

  8. 41 CFR 102-33.440 - Who must report CAS cost and utilization data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who must report CAS cost... (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.440 Who must report CAS cost and utilization data? Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and U.S. intelligence agencies, must report CAS cost and utilization...

  9. 41 CFR 102-33.435 - What CAS cost and utilization data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What CAS cost and... Services (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.435 What CAS cost and utilization data must we report? You must report the costs and flying hours for each CAS aircraft you hire. You must also report...

  10. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false If we hire CAS, what are... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are... agreements; (b) Accounting for the cost of your aircraft and services hired as CAS; (c) Accounting for use...

  11. 41 CFR 102-33.440 - Who must report CAS cost and utilization data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who must report CAS cost... (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.440 Who must report CAS cost and utilization data? Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and U.S. intelligence agencies, must report CAS cost and utilization...

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.435 - What CAS cost and utilization data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What CAS cost and... Services (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.435 What CAS cost and utilization data must we report? You must report the costs and flying hours for each CAS aircraft you hire. You must also report...

  13. 41 CFR 102-33.440 - Who must report CAS cost and utilization data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Who must report CAS cost... (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.440 Who must report CAS cost and utilization data? Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and U.S. intelligence agencies, must report CAS cost and utilization...

  14. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false If we hire CAS, what are... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are... agreements; (b) Accounting for the cost of your aircraft and services hired as CAS; (c) Accounting for use...

  15. 41 CFR 102-33.435 - What CAS cost and utilization data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What CAS cost and... Services (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.435 What CAS cost and utilization data must we report? You must report the costs and flying hours for each CAS aircraft you hire. You must also report...

  16. 41 CFR 102-33.440 - Who must report CAS cost and utilization data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Who must report CAS cost... (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.440 Who must report CAS cost and utilization data? Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and U.S. intelligence agencies, must report CAS cost and utilization...

  17. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false If we hire CAS, what are... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are... agreements; (b) Accounting for the cost of your aircraft and services hired as CAS; (c) Accounting for use...

  18. Determination of the Physical Dimensions of μ Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, K.; Kang, W.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the physical properties of the nearby astrometric binary μ Cas based on a spectroscopic analysis and evolutionary calculations. The chemical composition of the μ Cas system has been determined based on high resolution spectroscopy from BOES. Combining our spectroscopic analysis with observations from Hipparcos and CHARA, we determine the evolutionary status of μ Cas. With well-constrained stellar parameters, the internal structure and frequency modes have also been calculated. The ultimate goal of this study is to describe the physical processes inside stars through a comprehensive modeling.

  19. Grossesse intra murale à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    de Tové, Kofi-Mensa Savi; Salifou, Kabibou; Imorou, Rachidi Sidi; Biaou, Olivier; Boco, Vicentia

    2015-01-01

    La grossesse intra-murale est la variété la plus rare de grossesse extra-utérine. Il s'agit de la localisation de l’œuf dans l’épaisseur du myomètre. En cas de retard diagnostic, l’évolution peut être catastrophique avec rupture utérine et hémorragie cataclysmique. L’échographie permet dans certains cas un diagnostic pré opératoire. Les auteurs rapportent un cas survenu chez une patiente aux antécédents de curetage. PMID:26448812

  20. Automated Essay Scoring versus Human Scoring: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jinhao; Brown, Michelle Stallone

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to analyze the relationship between automated essay scoring (AES) and human scoring in order to determine the validity and usefulness of AES for large-scale placement tests. Specifically, a correlational research design was used to examine the correlations between AES performance and human raters' performance.…

  1. Rationale and study protocol for the supporting children’s outcomes using rewards, exercise and skills (SCORES) group randomized controlled trial: A physical activity and fundamental movement skills intervention for primary schools in low-income communities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many Australian children are insufficiently active to accrue health benefits and physical activity (PA) levels are consistently lower among youth of low socio-economic position. PA levels decline dramatically during adolescence and evidence suggests that competency in a range of fundamental movement skills (FMS) may serve as a protective factor against this trend. Methods/design The Supporting Children’s Outcomes Using Rewards Exercise and Skills (SCORES) intervention is a multi-component PA and FMS intervention for primary schools in low-income communities, which will be evaluated using a group randomized controlled trial. The socio-ecological model provided a framework for the 12-month intervention, which includes the following components: teacher professional learning, student leadership workshops (including leadership accreditation and rewards, e.g., stickers, water bottles), PA policy review, PA equipment packs, parental engagement via newsletters, FMS homework and a parent evening, and community partnerships with local sporting organizations. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 6- and 12-months. The primary outcomes are PA (accelerometers), FMS (Test of Gross Motor Development II) and cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage fitness test). Secondary outcomes include body mass index [using weight (kg)/height (m2)], perceived competence, physical self-esteem, and resilience. Individual and environmental mediators of behavior change (e.g. social support and enjoyment) will also be assessed. The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time will be used to assess the impact of the intervention on PA within physical education lessons. Statistical analyses will follow intention-to-treat principles and hypothesized mediators of PA behavior change will be explored. Discussion SCORES is an innovative primary school-based PA and FMS intervention designed to support students attending schools in low-income communities to be more skilled and active. The

  2. Genetic screens and functional genomics using CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

    PubMed

    Hartenian, Ella; Doench, John G

    2015-04-01

    Functional genomics attempts to understand the genome by perturbing the flow of information from DNA to RNA to protein, in order to learn how gene dysfunction leads to disease. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is the newest tool in the geneticist's toolbox, allowing researchers to edit DNA with unprecedented ease, speed and accuracy, and representing a novel means to perform genome-wide genetic screens to discover gene function. In this review, we first summarize the discovery and characterization of CRISPR/Cas9, and then compare it to other genome engineering technologies. We discuss its initial use in screening applications, with a focus on optimizing on-target activity and minimizing off-target effects. Finally, we comment on future challenges and opportunities afforded by this technology. PMID:25728500

  3. Generating and identifying axolotls with targeted mutations using Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease.

    PubMed

    Flowers, G Parker; Crews, Craig M

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease now enables a reverse genetics approach to investigate the function of genes of interest during regeneration in the axolotl. The process of generating the constructs necessary for targeting a gene of interest is considerably less labor intensive than for other methods of targeted mutagenesis such as Zinc finger nucleases or Transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Here, we describe the identification of targetable sequences in the gene of interest, the construction of unique guide RNAs, the microinjection of these RNAs with Cas9-encoding mRNA, the selection of well-injected animals, and an inexpensive, PCR-based method for identifying highly mutagenized animals. PMID:25740494

  4. The CRISPR/Cas9 system for plant genome editing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Bortesi, Luisa; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome editing using artificial nucleases has the potential to accelerate basic research as well as plant breeding by providing the means to modify genomes rapidly in a precise and predictable manner. Here we describe the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, a recently developed tool for the introduction of site-specific double-stranded DNA breaks. We highlight the strengths and weaknesses of this technology compared with two well-established genome editing platforms: zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). We summarize recent results obtained in plants using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, discuss possible applications in plant breeding and consider potential future developments. PMID:25536441

  5. TALEN and CRISPR/Cas Genome Editing Systems: Tools of Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Nemudryi, A. A.; Valetdinova, K. R.; Medvedev, S. P.; Zakian, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Precise studies of plant, animal and human genomes enable remarkable opportunities of obtained data application in biotechnology and medicine. However, knowing nucleotide sequences isn’t enough for understanding of particular genomic elements functional relationship and their role in phenotype formation and disease pathogenesis. In post-genomic era methods allowing genomic DNA sequences manipulation, visualization and regulation of gene expression are rapidly evolving. Though, there are few methods, that meet high standards of efficiency, safety and accessibility for a wide range of researchers. In 2011 and 2013 novel methods of genome editing appeared – this are TALEN (Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases) and CRISPR (Clustered Regulatory Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas9 systems. Although TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 appeared recently, these systems have proved to be effective and reliable tools for genome engineering. Here we generally review application of these systems for genome editing in conventional model objects of current biology, functional genome screening, cell-based human hereditary disease modeling, epigenome studies and visualization of cellular processes. Additionally, we review general strategies for designing TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 and analyzing their activity. We also discuss some obstacles researcher can face using these genome editing tools. PMID:25349712

  6. Genomic Access to Monarch Migration Using TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeted Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Markert, Matthew J; Zhang, Ying; Enuameh, Metewo S; Reppert, Steven M; Wolfe, Scot A; Merlin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The eastern North American monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is an emerging model system to study the neural, molecular, and genetic basis of animal long-distance migration and animal clockwork mechanisms. While genomic studies have provided new insight into migration-associated and circadian clock genes, the general lack of simple and versatile reverse-genetic methods has limited in vivo functional analysis of candidate genes in this species. Here, we report the establishment of highly efficient and heritable gene mutagenesis methods in the monarch butterfly using transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and CRISPR-associated RNA-guided nuclease Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9). Using two clock gene loci, cryptochrome 2 and clock (clk), as candidates, we show that both TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 generate high-frequency nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-mediated mutations at targeted sites (up to 100%), and that injecting fewer than 100 eggs is sufficient to recover mutant progeny and generate monarch knockout lines in about 3 months. Our study also genetically defines monarch CLK as an essential component of the transcriptional activation complex of the circadian clock. The methods presented should not only greatly accelerate functional analyses of many aspects of monarch biology, but are also anticipated to facilitate the development of these tools in other nontraditional insect species as well as the development of homology-directed knock-ins. PMID:26837953

  7. Genomic Access to Monarch Migration Using TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeted Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Markert, Matthew J.; Zhang, Ying; Enuameh, Metewo S.; Reppert, Steven M.; Wolfe, Scot A.; Merlin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The eastern North American monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is an emerging model system to study the neural, molecular, and genetic basis of animal long-distance migration and animal clockwork mechanisms. While genomic studies have provided new insight into migration-associated and circadian clock genes, the general lack of simple and versatile reverse-genetic methods has limited in vivo functional analysis of candidate genes in this species. Here, we report the establishment of highly efficient and heritable gene mutagenesis methods in the monarch butterfly using transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and CRISPR-associated RNA-guided nuclease Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9). Using two clock gene loci, cryptochrome 2 and clock (clk), as candidates, we show that both TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 generate high-frequency nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-mediated mutations at targeted sites (up to 100%), and that injecting fewer than 100 eggs is sufficient to recover mutant progeny and generate monarch knockout lines in about 3 months. Our study also genetically defines monarch CLK as an essential component of the transcriptional activation complex of the circadian clock. The methods presented should not only greatly accelerate functional analyses of many aspects of monarch biology, but are also anticipated to facilitate the development of these tools in other nontraditional insect species as well as the development of homology-directed knock-ins. PMID:26837953

  8. Functional Analysis of Bacteriophage Immunity through a Type I-E CRISPR-Cas System in Vibrio cholerae and Its Application in Bacteriophage Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Box, Allison M.; McGuffie, Matthew J.; O'Hara, Brendan J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The classical and El Tor biotypes of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1, the etiological agent of cholera, are responsible for the sixth and seventh (current) pandemics, respectively. A genomic island (GI), GI-24, previously identified in a classical biotype strain of V. cholerae, is predicted to encode clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated proteins (Cas proteins); however, experimental evidence in support of CRISPR activity in V. cholerae has not been documented. Here, we show that CRISPR-Cas is ubiquitous in strains of the classical biotype but excluded from strains of the El Tor biotype. We also provide in silico evidence to suggest that CRISPR-Cas actively contributes to phage resistance in classical strains. We demonstrate that transfer of GI-24 to V. cholerae El Tor via natural transformation enables CRISPR-Cas-mediated resistance to bacteriophage CP-T1 under laboratory conditions. To elucidate the sequence requirements of this type I-E CRISPR-Cas system, we engineered a plasmid-based system allowing the directed targeting of a region of interest. Through screening for phage mutants that escape CRISPR-Cas-mediated resistance, we show that CRISPR targets must be accompanied by a 3′ TT protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) for efficient interference. Finally, we demonstrate that efficient editing of V. cholerae lytic phage genomes can be performed by simultaneously introducing an editing template that allows homologous recombination and escape from CRISPR-Cas targeting. IMPORTANCE Cholera, caused by the facultative pathogen Vibrio cholerae, remains a serious public health threat. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and CRISPR-associated proteins (CRISPR-Cas) provide prokaryotes with sequence-specific protection from invading nucleic acids, including bacteriophages. In this work, we show that one genomic feature differentiating sixth pandemic (classical biotype) strains from seventh pandemic (El Tor

  9. More than Just Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M.

    2012-01-01

    Around the world we hear considerable talk about creating world-class schools. Usually the term refers to schools whose students get very high scores on the international comparisons of student achievement such as PISA or TIMSS. The practice of restricting the meaning of exemplary schools to the narrow criterion of achievement scores is usually…

  10. Trends in Classroom Observation Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casabianca, Jodi M.; Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations and ratings of classroom teaching and interactions collected over time are susceptible to trends in both the quality of instruction and rater behavior. These trends have potential implications for inferences about teaching and for study design. We use scores on the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary (CLASS-S) protocol from…

  11. Improving Test Scores. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2003-01-01

    What strategies can improve test scores? According to research done by Amrein and Berliner, who studied 18 states with high stakes testing, their conclusion was that students did not necessarily score higher and often remained at the same level prior to the introduction of the high stakes testing. In other research done by Carnoy and Loeb, their…

  12. Skyrocketing Scores: An Urban Legend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krashen, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    A new urban legend claims, "As a result of the state dropping bilingual education, test scores in California skyrocketed." Krashen disputes this theory, pointing out that other factors offer more logical explanations of California's recent improvements in SAT-9 scores. He discusses research on the effects of California's Proposition 227, which…

  13. Interpreting Linked Psychomotor Performance Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Given that equating/linking applications are now appearing in kinesiology literature, this article provides an overview of the different types of linked test scores: equated, concordant, and predicted. It also addresses the different types of evidence required to determine whether the scores from two different field tests (measuring the same…

  14. Classification of current scoring functions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Renxiao

    2015-03-23

    Scoring functions are a class of computational methods widely applied in structure-based drug design for evaluating protein-ligand interactions. Dozens of scoring functions have been published since the early 1990s. In literature, scoring functions are typically classified as force-field-based, empirical, and knowledge-based. This classification scheme has been quoted for more than a decade and is still repeatedly quoted by some recent publications. Unfortunately, it does not reflect the recent progress in this field. Besides, the naming convention used for describing different types of scoring functions has been somewhat jumbled in literature, which could be confusing for newcomers to this field. Here, we express our viewpoint on an up-to-date classification scheme and appropriate naming convention for current scoring functions. We propose that they can be classified into physics-based methods, empirical scoring functions, knowledge-based potentials, and descriptor-based scoring functions. We also outline the major difference and connections between different categories of scoring functions. PMID:25647463

  15. The Machine Scoring of Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCurry, Doug

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the kind of computer software that is used to score student writing in some high stakes testing programs, and that is being promoted as a teaching and learning tool to schools. It sketches the state of play with machines for the scoring of writing, and describes how these machines work and what they do.…

  16. High Scores but Low Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Liqun; Neilson, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper college admissions are based on test scores and students can exert two types of effort: real learning and exam preparation. The former improves skills but the latter is more effective in raising test scores. In this setting the students with the lowest skills are no longer the ones with the lowest aptitude, but instead are the ones…

  17. A single blastocyst assay optimized for detecting CRISPR/Cas9 system-induced indel mutations in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microinjection of clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-related RNA and DNA into fertilized eggs is a novel approach for creating gene-modified mice. Blastocysts obtained just before implantation may be appropriate for testing the fidelity of CRIPSR/Cas9-mediated genome editing because they can be individually handled in vitro and obtained 3 days after microinjection, thus allowing researchers to check mutations rapidly. However, it is not known whether indel mutations caused by the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be reproducibly detected in embryos. In this study, we assessed the detection of CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations in embryos. Results T7 endonuclease I was more effective than Surveyor nuclease for detecting mutations in annealed fragments derived from 2 plasmids, which contained nearly identical sequences. Mouse fertilized eggs were microinjected with CRISPR/Cas9-related RNA/DNA to examine whether non-homologous end joining-mediated knockout and homologous recombination-mediated knockin occurred in the endogenous receptor (G protein-coupled) activity modifying protein 2 (Ramp2) gene. Individual blastocysts were lysed to obtain crude DNA solutions, which were used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. T7 endonuclease I-based PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that 25–100% of the embryos were knockout embryos and 7–57% of the embryos were knockin embryos. Our results also established that crude DNA from a single blastocyst was an appropriate template for Whole genome amplification and subsequent assessment by PCR and the T7 endonuclease I-based assay. Conclusions The single blastocyst-based assay was useful for determining whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing worked in murine embryos. PMID:25042988

  18. Detailed Phenotypic and Molecular Analyses of Genetically Modified Mice Generated by CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Editing

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Bijal A.; Beckman, Diana L.; Patel, Swapneel J.; White, J. Michael; Yokoyama, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has been adapted for use as a genome editing tool. While several recent reports have indicated that successful genome editing of mice can be achieved, detailed phenotypic and molecular analyses of the mutant animals are limited. Following pronuclear micro-injection of fertilized eggs with either wild-type Cas9 or the nickase mutant (D10A) and single or paired guide RNA (sgRNA) for targeting of the tyrosinase (Tyr) gene, we assessed genome editing in mice using rapid phenotypic readouts (eye and coat color). Mutant mice with insertions or deletions (indels) in Tyr were efficiently generated without detectable off-target cleavage events. Gene correction of a single nucleotide by homologous recombination (HR) could only occur when the sgRNA recognition sites in the donor DNA were modified. Gene repair did not occur if the donor DNA was not modified because Cas9 catalytic activity was completely inhibited. Our results indicate that allelic mosaicism can occur following -Cas9-mediated editing in mice and appears to correlate with sgRNA cleavage efficiency at the single-cell stage. We also show that larger than expected deletions may be overlooked based on the screening strategy employed. An unbiased analysis of all the deleted nucleotides in our experiments revealed that the highest frequencies of nucleotide deletions were clustered around the predicted Cas9 cleavage sites, with slightly broader distributions than expected. Finally, additional analysis of founder mice and their offspring indicate that their general health, fertility, and the transmission of genetic changes were not compromised. These results provide the foundation to interpret and predict the diverse outcomes following CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing experiments in mice. PMID:25587897

  19. The Structural Biology of CRISPR-Cas Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas genomic loci encode RNA-mediated adaptive immune systems that bear some functional similarities with eukaryotic RNA interference. Acquired and heritable immunity against bacteriophage and plasmids begins with integration of ~30 base pair foreign DNA sequences into the host genome. CRISPR-derived transcripts assemble with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to target complementary nucleic acids for degradation. Here we review recent advances in the structural biology of these targeting complexes, with a focus on structural studies of the multisubunit Type I CRISPR RNA-guided surveillance and the Cas9 DNA endonuclease found in Type II CRISPR-Cas systems. These complexes have distinct structures that are each capable of site-specific double-stranded DNA binding and local helix unwinding. PMID:25723899

  20. CAS Standards and Guidelines for Student Services/Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NACADA Journal, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The Council for the Advancement of Standards for Student Services/Development Programs (CAS) developed and adopted standards and interpretive guidelines for specific functional areas of student services/development programs within postsecondary educational institutions. These guidelines are presented. (MLW)

  1. CRISPR-Cas9-Guided Genome Engineering in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Min; Colaiácovo, Monica P

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) system is successfully being used for efficient and targeted genome editing in various organisms, including the nematode C. elegans. Recent studies have developed various CRISPR-Cas9 approaches to enhance genome engineering via two major DNA double-strand break repair pathways: non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination. Here we describe a protocol for Cas9-mediated C. elegans genome editing together with single guide RNA (sgRNA) and repair template cloning, as well as injection methods required for delivering Cas9, sgRNAs, and repair template DNA into the C. elegans germline. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27366893

  2. Engineering the Caenorhabditis elegans genome with CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Selma; Boxem, Mike

    2014-08-01

    The development in early 2013 of CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering promises to dramatically advance our ability to alter the genomes of model systems at will. A single, easily produced targeting RNA guides the Cas9 endonuclease to a specific DNA sequence where it creates a double strand break. Imprecise repair of the break can yield mutations, while homologous recombination with a repair template can be used to effect specific changes to the genome. The tremendous potential of this system led several groups to independently adapt it for use in Caenorhabditiselegans, where it was successfully used to generate mutations and to create tailored genome changes through homologous recombination. Here, we review the different approaches taken to adapt CRISPR/Cas9 for C. elegans, and provide practical guidelines for CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering. PMID:24685391

  3. CRISPR-Cas systems: Prokaryotes upgrade to adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2014-04-24

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and associated proteins (Cas) comprise the CRISPR-Cas system, which confers adaptive immunity against exogenic elements in many bacteria and most archaea. CRISPR-mediated immunization occurs through the uptake of DNA from invasive genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses, followed by its integration into CRISPR loci. These loci are subsequently transcribed and processed into small interfering RNAs that guide nucleases for specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Conceptually, CRISPR-Cas shares functional features with the mammalian adaptive immune system, while also exhibiting characteristics of Lamarckian evolution. Because immune markers spliced from exogenous agents are integrated iteratively in CRISPR loci, they constitute a genetic record of vaccination events and reflect environmental conditions and changes over time. Cas endonucleases, which can be reprogrammed by small guide RNAs have shown unprecedented potential and flexibility for genome editing and can be repurposed for numerous DNA targeting applications including transcriptional control. PMID:24766887

  4. CRISPR-Cas systems: prokaryotes upgrade to adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Marraffini, Luciano A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), and associated proteins (Cas) comprise the CRISPR-Cas system, which confers adaptive immunity against exogenic elements in many bacteria and most archaea. CRISPR-mediated immunization occurs through the uptake of DNA from invasive genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses, followed by its integration into CRISPR loci. These loci are subsequently transcribed and processed into small interfering RNAs that guide nucleases for specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Conceptually, CRISPR-Cas shares functional features with the mammalian adaptive immune system, while also exhibiting characteristics of Lamarckian evolution. Because immune markers spliced from exogenous agents are integrated iteratively in CRISPR loci, they constitute a genetic record of vaccination events and reflect environmental conditions and changes over time. Cas endonucleases, which can be reprogrammed by small guide RNAs have shown unprecedented potential and flexibility for genome editing, and can be repurposed for numerous DNA targeting applications including transcriptional control. PMID:24766887

  5. An updated evolutionary classification of CRISPR-Cas systems.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Alkhnbashi, Omer S; Costa, Fabrizio; Shah, Shiraz A; Saunders, Sita J; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Brouns, Stan J J; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Haft, Daniel H; Horvath, Philippe; Moineau, Sylvain; Mojica, Francisco J M; Terns, Rebecca M; Terns, Michael P; White, Malcolm F; Yakunin, Alexander F; Garrett, Roger A; van der Oost, John; Backofen, Rolf; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of CRISPR-cas loci, which encode adaptive immune systems in archaea and bacteria, involves rapid changes, in particular numerous rearrangements of the locus architecture and horizontal transfer of complete loci or individual modules. These dynamics complicate straightforward phylogenetic classification, but here we present an approach combining the analysis of signature protein families and features of the architecture of cas loci that unambiguously partitions most CRISPR-cas loci into distinct classes, types and subtypes. The new classification retains the overall structure of the previous version but is expanded to now encompass two classes, five types and 16 subtypes. The relative stability of the classification suggests that the most prevalent variants of CRISPR-Cas systems are already known. However, the existence of rare, currently unclassifiable variants implies that additional types and subtypes remain to be characterized. PMID:26411297

  6. Target specificity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuebing; Kriz, Andrea J.; Sharp, Phillip A.

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system, naturally a defense mechanism in prokaryotes, has been repurposed as an RNA-guided DNA targeting platform. It has been widely used for genome editing and transcriptome modulation, and has shown great promise in correcting mutations in human genetic diseases. Off-target effects are a critical issue for all of these applications. Here we review the current status on the target specificity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. PMID:25722925

  7. Increasing the performance of pooled CRISPR-Cas9 drop-out screening.

    PubMed

    Cross, Benedict C S; Lawo, Steffen; Archer, Caroline R; Hunt, Jessica R; Yarker, Joanne L; Riccombeni, Alessandro; Little, Annette S; McCarthy, Nicola J; Moore, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Components of the type II CRISPR-Cas complex in bacteria have been used successfully in eukaryotic cells to facilitate rapid and accurate cell line engineering, animal model generation and functional genomic screens. Such developments are providing new opportunities for drug target identification and validation, particularly with the application of pooled genetic screening. As CRISPR-Cas is a relatively new genetic screening tool, it is important to assess its functionality in a number of different cell lines and to analyse potential improvements that might increase the sensitivity of a given screen. To examine critical aspects of screening quality, we constructed ultra-complex libraries containing sgRNA sequences targeting a collection of essential genes. We examined the performance of screening in both haploid and hypotriploid cell lines, using two alternative guide design algorithms and two tracrRNA variants in a time-resolved analysis. Our data indicate that a simple adaptation of the tracrRNA substantially improves the robustness of guide loss during a screen. This modification minimises the requirement for high numbers of sgRNAs targeting each gene, increasing hit scoring and creating a powerful new platform for successful screening. PMID:27545104

  8. Increasing the performance of pooled CRISPR–Cas9 drop-out screening

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Benedict C. S.; Lawo, Steffen; Archer, Caroline R.; Hunt, Jessica R.; Yarker, Joanne L.; Riccombeni, Alessandro; Little, Annette S.; McCarthy, Nicola J.; Moore, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Components of the type II CRISPR–Cas complex in bacteria have been used successfully in eukaryotic cells to facilitate rapid and accurate cell line engineering, animal model generation and functional genomic screens. Such developments are providing new opportunities for drug target identification and validation, particularly with the application of pooled genetic screening. As CRISPR–Cas is a relatively new genetic screening tool, it is important to assess its functionality in a number of different cell lines and to analyse potential improvements that might increase the sensitivity of a given screen. To examine critical aspects of screening quality, we constructed ultra-complex libraries containing sgRNA sequences targeting a collection of essential genes. We examined the performance of screening in both haploid and hypotriploid cell lines, using two alternative guide design algorithms and two tracrRNA variants in a time-resolved analysis. Our data indicate that a simple adaptation of the tracrRNA substantially improves the robustness of guide loss during a screen. This modification minimises the requirement for high numbers of sgRNAs targeting each gene, increasing hit scoring and creating a powerful new platform for successful screening. PMID:27545104

  9. CHOPCHOP: a CRISPR/Cas9 and TALEN web tool for genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Tessa G.; Cruz, José M.; Gagnon, James A.; Church, George M.; Valen, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in genome editing have recently been made possible with the development of the TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 methods. The speed and ease of implementing these technologies has led to an explosion of mutant and transgenic organisms. A rate-limiting step in efficiently applying TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 methods is the selection and design of targeting constructs. We have developed an online tool, CHOPCHOP (https://chopchop.rc.fas.harvard.edu), to expedite the design process. CHOPCHOP accepts a wide range of inputs (gene identifiers, genomic regions or pasted sequences) and provides an array of advanced options for target selection. It uses efficient sequence alignment algorithms to minimize search times, and rigorously predicts off-target binding of single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and TALENs. Each query produces an interactive visualization of the gene with candidate target sites displayed at their genomic positions and color-coded according to quality scores. In addition, for each possible target site, restriction sites and primer candidates are visualized, facilitating a streamlined pipeline of mutant generation and validation. The ease-of-use and speed of CHOPCHOP make it a valuable tool for genome engineering. PMID:24861617

  10. Highly specific targeted mutagenesis in plants using Staphylococcus aureus Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Hidetaka; Mikami, Masafumi; Endo, Akira; Endo, Masaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is an efficient and convenient tool for genome editing in plants. Cas9 nuclease derived from Streptococcus pyogenes (Sp) is commonly used in this system. Recently, Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9)-mediated genome editing was reported in human cells and Arabidopsis. Because SaCas9 (1053 a.a.) is smaller than SpCas9 (1368 a.a.), SaCas9 could have substantial advantages for delivering and expressing Cas9 protein, especially using virus vectors. Since the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequence of SaCas9 (5′-NNGRRT-3′) differs from that of SpCas9 (5′-NGG-3′), the use of this alternative Cas9 nuclease could expand the selectivity at potential cleavage target sites of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Here we show that SaCas9 can mutagenize target sequences in tobacco and rice with efficiencies similar to those of SpCas9. We also analyzed the base preference for ‘T’ at the 6th position of the SaCas9 PAM. Targeted mutagenesis efficiencies in target sequences with non-canonical PAMs (5′-NNGRRV-3′) were much lower than those with a canonical PAM (5′-NNGRRT-3′). The length of target sequence recognized by SaCas9 is one or two nucleotides longer than that recognized by SpCas9. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SaCas9 has higher sequence recognition capacity than SpCas9 and is useful for reducing off-target mutations in crop. PMID:27226350

  11. Highly specific targeted mutagenesis in plants using Staphylococcus aureus Cas9.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Hidetaka; Mikami, Masafumi; Endo, Akira; Endo, Masaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is an efficient and convenient tool for genome editing in plants. Cas9 nuclease derived from Streptococcus pyogenes (Sp) is commonly used in this system. Recently, Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9)-mediated genome editing was reported in human cells and Arabidopsis. Because SaCas9 (1053 a.a.) is smaller than SpCas9 (1368 a.a.), SaCas9 could have substantial advantages for delivering and expressing Cas9 protein, especially using virus vectors. Since the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequence of SaCas9 (5'-NNGRRT-3') differs from that of SpCas9 (5'-NGG-3'), the use of this alternative Cas9 nuclease could expand the selectivity at potential cleavage target sites of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Here we show that SaCas9 can mutagenize target sequences in tobacco and rice with efficiencies similar to those of SpCas9. We also analyzed the base preference for 'T' at the 6th position of the SaCas9 PAM. Targeted mutagenesis efficiencies in target sequences with non-canonical PAMs (5'-NNGRRV-3') were much lower than those with a canonical PAM (5'-NNGRRT-3'). The length of target sequence recognized by SaCas9 is one or two nucleotides longer than that recognized by SpCas9. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SaCas9 has higher sequence recognition capacity than SpCas9 and is useful for reducing off-target mutations in crop. PMID:27226350

  12. Efficient Genome Editing in Apple Using a CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, Chikako; Hirai, Narumi; Komori, Sadao; Wada, Masato; Okada, Kazuma; Osakabe, Keishi; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Osakabe, Yuriko

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is a powerful technique for genome modification in molecular research and crop breeding, and has the great advantage of imparting novel desired traits to genetic resources. However, the genome editing of fruit tree plantlets remains to be established. In this study, we describe induction of a targeted gene mutation in the endogenous apple phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Four guide RNAs (gRNAs) were designed and stably transformed with Cas9 separately in apple. Clear and partial albino phenotypes were observed in 31.8% of regenerated plantlets for one gRNA, and bi-allelic mutations in apple PDS were confirmed by DNA sequencing. In addition, an 18-bp gRNA also induced a targeted mutation. These CRIPSR/Cas9 induced-mutations in the apple genome suggest activation of the NHEJ pathway, but with some involvement also of the HR pathway. Our results demonstrate that genome editing can be practically applied to modify the apple genome. PMID:27530958

  13. A CRISPR-Cas9 sex-ratio distortion system for genetic control

    PubMed Central

    Galizi, Roberto; Hammond, Andrew; Kyrou, Kyros; Taxiarchi, Chrysanthi; Bernardini, Federica; O’Loughlin, Samantha M.; Papathanos, Philippos-Aris; Nolan, Tony; Windbichler, Nikolai; Crisanti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Genetic control aims to reduce the ability of insect pest populations to cause harm via the release of modified insects. One strategy is to bias the reproductive sex ratio towards males so that a population decreases in size or is eliminated altogether due to a lack of females. We have shown previously that sex ratio distortion can be generated synthetically in the main human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, by selectively destroying the X-chromosome during spermatogenesis, through the activity of a naturally-occurring endonuclease that targets a repetitive rDNA sequence highly-conserved in a wide range of organisms. Here we describe a CRISPR-Cas9 sex distortion system that targets ribosomal sequences restricted to the member species of the Anopheles gambiae complex. Expression of Cas9 during spermatogenesis resulted in RNA-guided shredding of the X-chromosome during male meiosis and produced extreme male bias among progeny in the absence of any significant reduction in fertility. The flexibility of CRISPR-Cas9 combined with the availability of genomic data for a range of insects renders this strategy broadly applicable for the species-specific control of any pest or vector species with an XY sex-determination system by targeting sequences exclusive to the female sex chromosome. PMID:27484623

  14. Double nicking by RNA-guided CRISPR Cas9 for enhanced genome editing specificity

    PubMed Central

    Ran, F. Ann; Hsu, Patrick D.; Lin, Chie-Yu; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Konermann, Silvana; Trevino, Alexandro; Scott, David A.; Inoue, Azusa; Matoba, Shogo; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genome editing technologies have enabled a broad range of research and medical applications. The Cas9 nuclease from the microbial CRISPR-Cas system is targeted to specific genomic loci by a 20-nt guide sequence, which can tolerate certain mismatches to the DNA target and thereby promote undesired off-target mutagenesis. Here, we describe an approach that combines a Cas9 nickase mutant with pairs of guide RNAs to introduce targeted double-strand breaks. Given that individual nicks in the genome are repaired with high fidelity, simultaneous nicking via appropriately offset guide RNAs effectively extends the number of specifically recognized bases in the target site. We demonstrate that paired nicking can be used to reduce off-target activity by 50–1,000 fold in cell lines and facilitate gene knockout in mouse zygotes without sacrificing on-target cleavage efficiency. This versatile strategy thus enables a wide variety of genome editing applications with higher levels of specificity. PMID:23992846

  15. A CRISPR-Cas9 sex-ratio distortion system for genetic control.

    PubMed

    Galizi, Roberto; Hammond, Andrew; Kyrou, Kyros; Taxiarchi, Chrysanthi; Bernardini, Federica; O'Loughlin, Samantha M; Papathanos, Philippos-Aris; Nolan, Tony; Windbichler, Nikolai; Crisanti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Genetic control aims to reduce the ability of insect pest populations to cause harm via the release of modified insects. One strategy is to bias the reproductive sex ratio towards males so that a population decreases in size or is eliminated altogether due to a lack of females. We have shown previously that sex ratio distortion can be generated synthetically in the main human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, by selectively destroying the X-chromosome during spermatogenesis, through the activity of a naturally-occurring endonuclease that targets a repetitive rDNA sequence highly-conserved in a wide range of organisms. Here we describe a CRISPR-Cas9 sex distortion system that targets ribosomal sequences restricted to the member species of the Anopheles gambiae complex. Expression of Cas9 during spermatogenesis resulted in RNA-guided shredding of the X-chromosome during male meiosis and produced extreme male bias among progeny in the absence of any significant reduction in fertility. The flexibility of CRISPR-Cas9 combined with the availability of genomic data for a range of insects renders this strategy broadly applicable for the species-specific control of any pest or vector species with an XY sex-determination system by targeting sequences exclusive to the female sex chromosome. PMID:27484623

  16. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Immunity to Geminiviruses: Differential Interference and Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Zahir; Ali, Shakila; Tashkandi, Manal; Zaidi, Syed Shan-e-Ali; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been used to confer molecular immunity against several eukaryotic viruses, including plant DNA geminiviruses. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the efficiencies of targeting different coding and non-coding sequences in the genomes of multiple geminiviruses. Moreover, we analyze the ability of geminiviruses to evade the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery. Our results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery can efficiently target coding and non-coding sequences and interfere with various geminiviruses. Furthermore, targeting the coding sequences of different geminiviruses resulted in the generation of viral variants capable of replication and systemic movement. By contrast, targeting the noncoding intergenic region sequences of geminiviruses resulted in interference, but with inefficient recovery of mutated viral variants, which thus limited the generation of variants capable of replication and movement. Taken together, our results indicate that targeting noncoding, intergenic sequences provides viral interference activity and significantly limits the generation of viral variants capable of replication and systemic infection, which is essential for developing durable resistance strategies for long-term virus control. PMID:27225592

  17. Efficient Genome Editing in Apple Using a CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Nishitani, Chikako; Hirai, Narumi; Komori, Sadao; Wada, Masato; Okada, Kazuma; Osakabe, Keishi; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Osakabe, Yuriko

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is a powerful technique for genome modification in molecular research and crop breeding, and has the great advantage of imparting novel desired traits to genetic resources. However, the genome editing of fruit tree plantlets remains to be established. In this study, we describe induction of a targeted gene mutation in the endogenous apple phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Four guide RNAs (gRNAs) were designed and stably transformed with Cas9 separately in apple. Clear and partial albino phenotypes were observed in 31.8% of regenerated plantlets for one gRNA, and bi-allelic mutations in apple PDS were confirmed by DNA sequencing. In addition, an 18-bp gRNA also induced a targeted mutation. These CRIPSR/Cas9 induced-mutations in the apple genome suggest activation of the NHEJ pathway, but with some involvement also of the HR pathway. Our results demonstrate that genome editing can be practically applied to modify the apple genome. PMID:27530958

  18. The genome editing revolution: A CRISPR-Cas TALE off-target story.

    PubMed

    Stella, Stefano; Montoya, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    In the last 10 years, we have witnessed a blooming of targeted genome editing systems and applications. The area was revolutionized by the discovery and characterization of the transcription activator-like effector proteins, which are easier to engineer to target new DNA sequences than the previously available DNA binding templates, zinc fingers and meganucleases. Recently, the area experimented a quantum leap because of the introduction of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic sequence). This ribonucleoprotein complex protects bacteria from invading DNAs, and it was adapted to be used in genome editing. The CRISPR ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecule guides to the specific DNA site the Cas9 nuclease to cleave the DNA target. Two years and more than 1000 publications later, the CRISPR-Cas system has become the main tool for genome editing in many laboratories. Currently the targeted genome editing technology has been used in many fields and may be a possible approach for human gene therapy. Furthermore, it can also be used to modifying the genomes of model organisms for studying human pathways or to improve key organisms for biotechnological applications, such as plants, livestock genome as well as yeasts and bacterial strains. PMID:27417121

  19. Development and potential applications of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tang; Shen, Jacson K; Li, Zhihong; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-04-01

    Sarcomas include some of the most aggressive tumors and typically respond poorly to chemotherapy. In recent years, specific gene fusion/mutations and gene over-expression/activation have been shown to drive sarcoma pathogenesis and development. These emerging genomic alterations may provide targets for novel therapeutic strategies and have the potential to transform sarcoma patient care. The RNA-guided nuclease CRISPR-Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein-9 nuclease) is a convenient and versatile platform for site-specific genome editing and epigenome targeted modulation. Given that sarcoma is believed to develop as a result of genetic alterations in mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells, CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technologies hold extensive application potentials in sarcoma models and therapies. We review the development and mechanisms of the CRISPR-Cas9 system in genome editing and introduce its application in sarcoma research and potential therapy in clinic. Additionally, we propose future directions and discuss the challenges faced with these applications, providing concise and enlightening information for readers interested in this area. PMID:26806808

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Immunity to Geminiviruses: Differential Interference and Evasion.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zahir; Ali, Shakila; Tashkandi, Manal; Zaidi, Syed Shan-E-Ali; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been used to confer molecular immunity against several eukaryotic viruses, including plant DNA geminiviruses. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the efficiencies of targeting different coding and non-coding sequences in the genomes of multiple geminiviruses. Moreover, we analyze the ability of geminiviruses to evade the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery. Our results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery can efficiently target coding and non-coding sequences and interfere with various geminiviruses. Furthermore, targeting the coding sequences of different geminiviruses resulted in the generation of viral variants capable of replication and systemic movement. By contrast, targeting the noncoding intergenic region sequences of geminiviruses resulted in interference, but with inefficient recovery of mutated viral variants, which thus limited the generation of variants capable of replication and movement. Taken together, our results indicate that targeting noncoding, intergenic sequences provides viral interference activity and significantly limits the generation of viral variants capable of replication and systemic infection, which is essential for developing durable resistance strategies for long-term virus control. PMID:27225592

  1. The Impact of CRISPR/Cas9-Based Genomic Engineering on Biomedical Research and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Go, D E; Stottmann, R W

    2016-01-01

    There has been prolonged and significant interest in manipulating the genome for a wide range of applications in biomedical research and medicine. An existing challenge in realizing this potential has been the inability to precisely edit specific DNA sequences. Past efforts to generate targeted double stranded DNA cleavage have fused DNA-targeting elements such as zinc fingers and DNA-binding proteins to endonucleases. However, these approaches are limited by both design complexity and inefficient, costineffective operation. The discovery of CRISPR/Cas9, a branch of the bacterial adaptive immune system, as a potential genomic editing tool holds the promise of facile targeted cleavage. Its novelty lies in its RNA-guided endonuclease activity, which enhances its efficiency, scalability, and ease of use. The only necessary components are a Cas9 endonuclease protein and an RNA molecule tailored to the gene of interest. This lowbarrier of adoption has facilitated a plethora of advances in just the past three years since its discovery. In this review, we will discuss the impact of CRISPR/Cas9 on biomedical research and its potential implications in medicine. PMID:26980700

  2. Efficient Genome Editing in Chicken DF-1 Cells Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yichun; He, Linjie; Li, Pengcheng; Xu, Kun; Shao, Simin; Ren, Chonghua; Liu, Zhongtian; Wei, Zehui; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, genome engineering technology has provided unprecedented opportunities for site-specific modification of biological genomes. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 is one such means that can target a specific genome locus. It has been applied in human cells and many other organisms. Meanwhile, to efficiently enrich targeted cells, several surrogate systems have also been developed. However, very limited information exists on the application of CRISPR/Cas9 in chickens. In this study, we employed the CRISPR/Cas9 system to induce mutations in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), ATP synthase epsilon subunit (ATP5E), and ovalbumin (OVA) genes in chicken DF-1 cells. The results of T7E1 assays showed that the mutation rate at the three different loci was 0.75%, 0.5%, and 3.0%, respectively. In order to improve the mutation efficiency, we used the Puro(R) gene for efficient enrichment of genetically modified cells with the surrogate reporter system. The mutation rate, as assessed via the T7E1 assay, increased to 60.7%, 61.3%, and 47.3%, and subsequent sequence analysis showed that the mutation efficiency increased to 94.7%, 95%, and 95%, respectively. In addition, there were no detectable off-target mutations in three potential off-target sites using the T7E1 assay. As noted above, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a robust tool for chicken genome editing. PMID:26869617

  3. Functional Genomic Screening Approaches in Mechanistic Toxicology and Potential Future Applications of CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua; McHale, Cliona M.; Smith, Martyn T; Zhang, Luoping

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing variability in the extent and nature of responses to environmental exposures is a critical aspect of human health risk assessment. Chemical toxicants act by many different mechanisms, however, and the genes involved in adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) and AOP networks are not yet characterized. Functional genomic approaches can reveal both toxicity pathways and susceptibility genes, through knockdown or knockout of all non-essential genes in a cell of interest, and identification of genes associated with a toxicity phenotype following toxicant exposure. Screening approaches in yeast and human near-haploid leukemic KBM7 cells, have identified roles for genes and pathways involved in response to many toxicants but are limited by partial homology among yeast and human genes and limited relevance to normal diploid cells. RNA interference (RNAi) suppresses mRNA expression level but is limited by off-target effects (OTEs) and incomplete knockdown. The recently developed gene editing approach called clustered regularly interspaced short palindrome repeats-associated nuclease (CRISPR)-Cas9, can precisely knock-out most regions of the genome at the DNA level with fewer OTEs than RNAi, in multiple human cell types, thus overcoming the limitations of the other approaches. It has been used to identify genes involved in the response to chemical and microbial toxicants in several human cell types and could readily be extended to the systematic screening of large numbers of environmental chemicals. CRISPR-Cas9 can also repress and activate gene expression, including that of non-coding RNA, with near-saturation, thus offering the potential to more fully characterize AOPs and AOP networks. Finally, CRISPR-Cas9 can generate complex animal models in which to conduct preclinical toxicity testing at the level of individual genotypes or haplotypes. Therefore, CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful and flexible functional genomic screening approach that can be harnessed to provide

  4. Efficient Genome Editing in Chicken DF-1 Cells Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yichun; He, Linjie; Li, Pengcheng; Xu, Kun; Shao, Simin; Ren, Chonghua; Liu, Zhongtian; Wei, Zehui; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, genome engineering technology has provided unprecedented opportunities for site-specific modification of biological genomes. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 is one such means that can target a specific genome locus. It has been applied in human cells and many other organisms. Meanwhile, to efficiently enrich targeted cells, several surrogate systems have also been developed. However, very limited information exists on the application of CRISPR/Cas9 in chickens. In this study, we employed the CRISPR/Cas9 system to induce mutations in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), ATP synthase epsilon subunit (ATP5E), and ovalbumin (OVA) genes in chicken DF-1 cells. The results of T7E1 assays showed that the mutation rate at the three different loci was 0.75%, 0.5%, and 3.0%, respectively. In order to improve the mutation efficiency, we used the PuroR gene for efficient enrichment of genetically modified cells with the surrogate reporter system. The mutation rate, as assessed via the T7E1 assay, increased to 60.7%, 61.3%, and 47.3%, and subsequent sequence analysis showed that the mutation efficiency increased to 94.7%, 95%, and 95%, respectively. In addition, there were no detectable off-target mutations in three potential off-target sites using the T7E1 assay. As noted above, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a robust tool for chicken genome editing. PMID:26869617

  5. Functional genomic screening approaches in mechanistic toxicology and potential future applications of CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hua; McHale, Cliona M; Smith, Martyn T; Zhang, Luoping

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing variability in the extent and nature of responses to environmental exposures is a critical aspect of human health risk assessment. Chemical toxicants act by many different mechanisms, however, and the genes involved in adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) and AOP networks are not yet characterized. Functional genomic approaches can reveal both toxicity pathways and susceptibility genes, through knockdown or knockout of all non-essential genes in a cell of interest, and identification of genes associated with a toxicity phenotype following toxicant exposure. Screening approaches in yeast and human near-haploid leukemic KBM7 cells have identified roles for genes and pathways involved in response to many toxicants but are limited by partial homology among yeast and human genes and limited relevance to normal diploid cells. RNA interference (RNAi) suppresses mRNA expression level but is limited by off-target effects (OTEs) and incomplete knockdown. The recently developed gene editing approach called clustered regularly interspaced short palindrome repeats-associated nuclease (CRISPR)-Cas9, can precisely knock-out most regions of the genome at the DNA level with fewer OTEs than RNAi, in multiple human cell types, thus overcoming the limitations of the other approaches. It has been used to identify genes involved in the response to chemical and microbial toxicants in several human cell types and could readily be extended to the systematic screening of large numbers of environmental chemicals. CRISPR-Cas9 can also repress and activate gene expression, including that of non-coding RNA, with near-saturation, thus offering the potential to more fully characterize AOPs and AOP networks. Finally, CRISPR-Cas9 can generate complex animal models in which to conduct preclinical toxicity testing at the level of individual genotypes or haplotypes. Therefore, CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful and flexible functional genomic screening approach that can be harnessed to provide

  6. Imatinib and Nilotinib increase glioblastoma cell invasion via Abl-independent stimulation of p130Cas and FAK signalling.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Antonina; Evans, Ian M; Li, Ningning; Sidlauskas, Kastytis; Paliashvili, Ketevan; Lockwood, Nicola; Barrett, Angela; Brandner, Sebastian; Zachary, Ian C; Frankel, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib was the first targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor to be approved for clinical use, and remains first-line therapy for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+)-positive chronic myelogenous leukaemia. We show that treatment of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumour cells with imatinib and the closely-related drug, nilotinib, strikingly increases tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the downstream adaptor protein paxillin (PXN), resulting in enhanced cell migration and invasion. Imatinib and nilotinib-induced tyrosine phosphorylation was dependent on expression of p130Cas and FAK activity and was independent of known imatinib targets including Abl, platelet derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) and the collagen receptor DDR1. Imatinib and nilotinib treatment increased two dimensional cell migration and three dimensional radial spheroid invasion in collagen. In addition, silencing of p130Cas and inhibition of FAK activity both strongly reduced imatinib and nilotinib stimulated invasion. Importantly, imatinib and nilotinib increased tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas, FAK, PXN and radial spheroid invasion in stem cell lines isolated from human glioma biopsies. These findings identify a novel mechanism of action in GBM cells for two well established front line therapies for cancer resulting in enhanced tumour cell motility. PMID:27293031

  7. Imatinib and Nilotinib increase glioblastoma cell invasion via Abl-independent stimulation of p130Cas and FAK signalling

    PubMed Central

    Frolov, Antonina; Evans, Ian M.; Li, Ningning; Sidlauskas, Kastytis; Paliashvili, Ketevan; Lockwood, Nicola; Barrett, Angela; Brandner, Sebastian; Zachary, Ian C.; Frankel, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib was the first targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor to be approved for clinical use, and remains first-line therapy for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+)-positive chronic myelogenous leukaemia. We show that treatment of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumour cells with imatinib and the closely-related drug, nilotinib, strikingly increases tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the downstream adaptor protein paxillin (PXN), resulting in enhanced cell migration and invasion. Imatinib and nilotinib-induced tyrosine phosphorylation was dependent on expression of p130Cas and FAK activity and was independent of known imatinib targets including Abl, platelet derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) and the collagen receptor DDR1. Imatinib and nilotinib treatment increased two dimensional cell migration and three dimensional radial spheroid invasion in collagen. In addition, silencing of p130Cas and inhibition of FAK activity both strongly reduced imatinib and nilotinib stimulated invasion. Importantly, imatinib and nilotinib increased tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas, FAK, PXN and radial spheroid invasion in stem cell lines isolated from human glioma biopsies. These findings identify a novel mechanism of action in GBM cells for two well established front line therapies for cancer resulting in enhanced tumour cell motility. PMID:27293031

  8. Efficient mutagenesis by Cas9 protein-mediated oligonucleotide insertion and large-scale assessment of single-guide RNAs.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, James A; Valen, Eivind; Thyme, Summer B; Huang, Peng; Akhmetova, Laila; Ahkmetova, Laila; Pauli, Andrea; Montague, Tessa G; Zimmerman, Steven; Richter, Constance; Schier, Alexander F

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been implemented in a variety of model organisms to mediate site-directed mutagenesis. A wide range of mutation rates has been reported, but at a limited number of genomic target sites. To uncover the rules that govern effective Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in zebrafish, we targeted over a hundred genomic loci for mutagenesis using a streamlined and cloning-free method. We generated mutations in 85% of target genes with mutation rates varying across several orders of magnitude, and identified sequence composition rules that influence mutagenesis. We increased rates of mutagenesis by implementing several novel approaches. The activities of poor or unsuccessful single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) initiating with a 5' adenine were improved by rescuing 5' end homogeneity of the sgRNA. In some cases, direct injection of Cas9 protein/sgRNA complex further increased mutagenic activity. We also observed that low diversity of mutant alleles led to repeated failure to obtain frame-shift mutations. This limitation was overcome by knock-in of a stop codon cassette that ensured coding frame truncation. Our improved methods and detailed protocols make Cas9-mediated mutagenesis an attractive approach for labs of all sizes. PMID:24873830

  9. Genome-wide target specificities of CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases revealed by multiplex Digenome-seq

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daesik; Kim, Sojung; Kim, Sunghyun; Park, Jeongbin; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    We present multiplex Digenome-seq to profile genome-wide specificities of up to 11 CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases simultaneously, saving time and reducing cost. Cell-free human genomic DNA was digested using multiple sgRNAs combined with the Cas9 protein and then subjected to whole-genome sequencing. In vitro cleavage patterns, characteristic of on- and off-target sites, were computationally identified across the genome using a new DNA cleavage scoring system. We found that many false-positive, bulge-type off-target sites were cleaved by sgRNAs transcribed from an oligonucleotide duplex but not by those transcribed from a plasmid template. Multiplex Digenome-seq captured many bona fide off-target sites, missed by other genome-wide methods, at which indels were induced at frequencies <0.1%. After analyzing 964 sites cleaved in vitro by these sgRNAs and measuring indel frequencies at hundreds of off-target sites in cells, we propose a guideline for the choice of target sites for minimizing CRISPR-Cas9 off-target effects in the human genome. PMID:26786045

  10. A non-inheritable maternal Cas9-based multiple-gene editing system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takayuki; Kamiyoshi, Akiko; Kawate, Hisaka; Mori, Chie; Watanabe, Satoshi; Tanaka, Megumu; Uetake, Ryuichi; Sato, Masahiro; Shindo, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is capable of editing multiple genes through one-step zygote injection. The preexisting method is largely based on the co-injection of Cas9 DNA (or mRNA) and guide RNAs (gRNAs); however, it is unclear how many genes can be simultaneously edited by this method, and a reliable means to generate transgenic (Tg) animals with multiple gene editing has yet to be developed. Here, we employed non-inheritable maternal Cas9 (maCas9) protein derived from Tg mice with systemic Cas9 overexpression (Cas9 mice). The maCas9 protein in zygotes derived from mating or in vitro fertilization of Tg/+ oocytes and +/+ sperm could successfully edit the target genome. The efficiency of such maCas9-based genome editing was comparable to that of zygote microinjection–based genome editing widely used at present. Furthermore, we demonstrated a novel approach to create “Cas9 transgene-free” gene-modified mice using non-Tg (+/+) zygotes carrying maCas9. The maCas9 protein in mouse zygotes edited nine target loci simultaneously after injection with nine different gRNAs alone. Cas9 mouse-derived zygotes have the potential to facilitate the creation of genetically modified animals carrying the Cas9 transgene, enabling repeatable genome engineering and the production of Cas9 transgene-free mice. PMID:26817415

  11. A non-inheritable maternal Cas9-based multiple-gene editing system in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takayuki; Kamiyoshi, Akiko; Kawate, Hisaka; Mori, Chie; Watanabe, Satoshi; Tanaka, Megumu; Uetake, Ryuichi; Sato, Masahiro; Shindo, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is capable of editing multiple genes through one-step zygote injection. The preexisting method is largely based on the co-injection of Cas9 DNA (or mRNA) and guide RNAs (gRNAs); however, it is unclear how many genes can be simultaneously edited by this method, and a reliable means to generate transgenic (Tg) animals with multiple gene editing has yet to be developed. Here, we employed non-inheritable maternal Cas9 (maCas9) protein derived from Tg mice with systemic Cas9 overexpression (Cas9 mice). The maCas9 protein in zygotes derived from mating or in vitro fertilization of Tg/+ oocytes and +/+ sperm could successfully edit the target genome. The efficiency of such maCas9-based genome editing was comparable to that of zygote microinjection-based genome editing widely used at present. Furthermore, we demonstrated a novel approach to create "Cas9 transgene-free" gene-modified mice using non-Tg (+/+) zygotes carrying maCas9. The maCas9 protein in mouse zygotes edited nine target loci simultaneously after injection with nine different gRNAs alone. Cas9 mouse-derived zygotes have the potential to facilitate the creation of genetically modified animals carrying the Cas9 transgene, enabling repeatable genome engineering and the production of Cas9 transgene-free mice. PMID:26817415

  12. Reading Ages and Standardized Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookbinder, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of and objections to testing children's reading ages and recommends that test results be given for both reading age and percentile levels (rather than standardized scores). (JM)

  13. Formulas for Image Factor Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakstian, A. Ralph

    1973-01-01

    Formulas are presented in this paper for computing scores associated with factors of G, the image covariance matrix, under three conditions. The subject of the paper is restricted to "pure" image analysis. (Author/NE)

  14. The scoring of movements in sleep.

    PubMed

    Walters, Arthur S; Lavigne, Gilles; Hening, Wayne; Picchietti, Daniel L; Allen, Richard P; Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Kushida, Clete A; Bliwise, Donald L; Mahowald, Mark W; Schenck, Carlos H; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2007-03-15

    The International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-2) has separated sleep-related movement disorders into simple, repetitive movement disorders (such as periodic limb movements in sleep [PLMS], sleep bruxism, and rhythmic movement disorder) and parasomnias (such as REM sleep behavior disorder and disorders of partial arousal, e.g., sleep walking, confusional arousals, night terrors). Many of the parasomnias are characterized by complex behaviors in sleep that appear purposeful, goal directed and voluntary but are outside the conscious awareness of the individual and therefore inappropriate. All of the sleep-related movement disorders described here have specific polysomnographic findings. For the purposes of developing and/or revising specifications and polysomnographic scoring rules, the AASM Scoring Manual Task Force on Movements in Sleep reviewed background literature and executed evidence grading of 81 relevant articles obtained by a literature search of published articles between 1966 and 2004. Subsequent evidence grading identified limited evidence for reliability and/or validity for polysomnographic scoring criteria for periodic limb movements in sleep, REM sleep behavior disorder, and sleep bruxism. Published scoring criteria for rhythmic movement disorder, excessive fragmentary myoclonus, and hypnagogic foot tremor/alternating leg muscle activation were empirical and based on descriptive studies. The literature review disclosed no published evidence defining clinical consequences of excessive fragmentary myoclonus or hypnagogic foot tremor/alternating leg muscle activation. Because of limited or absent evidence for reliability and/or validity, a standardized RAND/UCLA consensus process was employed for recommendation of specific rules for the scoring of sleep-associated movements. PMID:17557425

  15. The CAS-NAS forum for new leaders in space science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David H.

    The space science community is thoroughly international, with numerous nations now capable of launching scientific payloads into space either independently or in concert with others. As such, it is important for national space-science advisory groups to engage with like-minded groups in other spacefaring nations. The Space Studies Board of the US National Academy of Sciences' (NAS') National Research Council has provided scientific and technical advice to NASA for more than 50 years. Over this period, the Board has developed important multilateral and bilateral partnerships with space scientists around the world. The primary multilateral partner is COSPAR, for which the Board serves as the US national committee. The Board's primary bilateral relationship is with the European Science Foundation’s European Space Science Committee. Burgeoning Chinese space activities have resulted in several attempts in the past decade to open a dialogue between the Board and space scientists in China. On each occasion, the external political environment was not conducive to success. The most recent efforts to engage the Chinese space researchers began in 2011 and have proved particularly successful. Although NASA is currently prohibited from engaging in bilateral activities with China, the Board has established a fruitful dialogue with its counterpart in the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). A joint NAS-CAS activity, the Forum for New Leaders in Space Science, has been established to provide opportunities for a highly select group of young space scientists from China and the United States to discuss their research activities in an intimate and collegial environment at meetings to be held in both nations. The presentation will describe the current state of US-China space relations, discuss the goals of the joint NAS-CAS undertaking and report on the activities at the May, 2014, Forum in Beijing and the planning for the November, 2014, Forum in Irvine, California.

  16. Neck pain patients’ preference scores for their current health

    PubMed Central

    Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Bayoumi, Ahmed M.; Côté, Pierre; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Hurwitz, Eric L.; Krahn, Murray

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To elicit neck pain (NP) patients’ preference scores for their current health, and investigate the association between their scores and NP disability. Methods Rating scale scores (RSs) and standard gamble scores (SGs) for current health were elicited from chronic NP patients (n = 104) and patients with NP following a motor vehicle accident (n = 116). Patients were stratified into Von Korff Pain Grades: Grade I (low-intensity pain, few activity limitations); Grade II (high-intensity pain, few activity limitations); Grade III (pain with high disability levels, moderate activity limitations); and Grade IV (pain with high disability levels, several activity limitations). Multivariable regression quantified the association between preference scores and NP disability. Results Mean SGs and RSs were as follows: Grade I patients: 0.81, 0.76; Grade II: 0.70, 0.60; Grade III: 0.64, 0.44; Grade IV: 0.57, 0.39. The association between preference scores and NP disability depended on type of NP and preference-elicitation method. Chronic NP patients’ scores were more strongly associated with depressive symptoms than with NP disability. In both samples, NP disability explained little more than random variance in SGs, and up to 51% of variance in RSs. Conclusion Health-related quality-of-life is considerably diminished in NP patients. Depressive symptoms and preference-elicitation methods influence preference scores that NP patients assign to their health. PMID:20349212

  17. Tuning CAS Application using AIMS: An Automated Instrumentation and Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehra, P.; Sarukkai, S.; Schmidt, M.; Schulbach, C.; VanVoorst, B.; Yan, Jerry; Woodrow, Thomas (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    To bring together NASA's scientists and engineers and their counterparts in industry, other government agencies, and academia working in the Computational AeroSciences (CAS) field. This workshop is part of the technology transfer plan of the High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP). Specific objectives of this Workshop are to: (1) communicate the goals and objectives of HPCCP in the area of CAS; (2) promote and disseminate CAS technology within the appropriate technical communities, including NASA, industry, academia, and other government labs; (3) help promote synergy among CAS scientists; and (4) permit feedback from peer researchers in issues pacing the CAS field in general and the HPCCP CAS program in particular.

  18. Spectroscopic studies of three Cepheids with high positive pulsation period increments: SZ Cas, BY Cas, and RU Sct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenko, I. A.; Klochkova, V. G.

    2015-07-01

    Three high-resolution spectra have been taken at different times with the 6-m SAO RAS telescope (LYNX and PFES spectrographs) for three Cepheids exhibiting high positive period increments: the small-amplitude (DCEPS) SZ Cas and BY Cas and the classical (DCEP) RU Sct. SZ Cas and RU Sct are members of the Galactic open clusters χ and h Per and Trump 35, respectively. Analysis of the spectra has shown that the interstellar Na I D1 and D2 lines in all objects are considerably stronger than the atmospheric ones and are redshifted in SZ Cas and BY Cas and blushifted in RU Sct. The core of the H α absorption line in BY Cas has an asymmetric knifelike shape, while RU Sct exhibits an intense emission in the blue wing of this line. Such phenomena are observed in long-period Cepheids and bright hypergiants with an extended envelope. In this case, the strong Mg Ib 5183.62 Å and Ba II 5853.67, 6141.713, and 6496.90 Å lines with low χlow in SZ Cas and RU Sct also show characteristic knifelike profiles with an asymmetry in the red region, while the Ba II 4934.095 Å line shows similar profiles in the blue one. The absorption lines of neutral atoms and singly ionized metals with different lowerlevel excitation potentials exhibit different degrees of asymmetry: from a pronounced one with secondary components in BY Cas (similar to those in the small-amplitude Cepheid BG Cru pulsating in the first overtone and having an envelope) to its insignificance or virtual absence in SZ Cas and RU Sct. Analysis of the secular changes in mean T eff determined from photometric color indices and spectra over the last 55 years for these stars has revealed periodic fluctuations of 200 K for SZ Cas and BY Cas and 500 K for RU Sct. For SZ Cas and RU Sct, T eff determined in some years from some color indices show much lower values, which together with the temperature fluctuations can be associated with mass loss and dust formation. Based on these facts, we hypothesize the existence of

  19. Site-Directed Genome Knockout in Chicken Cell Line and Embryos Can Use CRISPR/Cas Gene Editing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Qisheng; Wang, Yinjie; Cheng, Shaoze; Lian, Chao; Tang, Beibei; Wang, Fei; Lu, Zhenyu; Ji, Yanqing; Zhao, Ruifeng; Zhang, Wenhui; Jin, Kai; Song, Jiuzhou; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2016-01-01

    The present study established an efficient genome editing approach for the construction of stable transgenic cell lines of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). Our objectives were to facilitate the breeding of high-yield, high-quality chicken strains, and to investigate gene function in chicken stem cells. Three guide RNA (gRNAs) were designed to knockout the C2EIP gene, and knockout efficiency was evaluated in DF-1 chicken fibroblasts and chicken ESCs using the luciferase single-strand annealing (SSA) recombination assay, T7 endonuclease I (T7EI) assay, and TA clone sequencing. In addition, the polyethylenimine-encapsulated Cas9/gRNA plasmid was injected into fresh fertilized eggs. At 4.5 d later, frozen sections of the embryos were prepared, and knockout efficiency was evaluated by the T7EI assay. SSA assay results showed that luciferase activity of the vector expressing gRNA-3 was double that of the control. Results of the T7EI assay and TA clone sequencing indicated that Cas9/gRNA vector-mediated gene knockdown efficiency was approximately 27% in both DF-1 cells and ESCs. The CRISPR/Cas9 vector was also expressed in chicken embryos, resulting in gene knockdown in three of the 20 embryos (gene knockdown efficiency 15%). Taken together, our results indicate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can mediate stable gene knockdown at the cell and embryo levels in domestic chickens. PMID:27172204

  20. PANGU: a sub-GeV gamma-ray detector proposed for the joint CAS-ESA misson call

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng

    2015-08-01

    The ESA Directorate of Science and Robotic Exploration (ESA-SRE) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have agreed to jointly pursue a scientific space mission, to be implemented by the ESA Science Programme and the Chinese National Space Science Centre (NSSC) under the CAS. In this talk, I will briefly describe a proposed space mission for the low energy gamma-ray observations. The highly successful Fermi mission has proved the great potential of studying astrophysics, cosmology and fundamental physics in high energy gamma rays. One area of improvement is in the 10 MeV to 1 GeV region, where the PSF of Fermi is limited by the presence of the Tungsten converters. Another area is the polarization measurement. It is also crucial to have a gamma-ray all sky survey mission running in parallel with HERD and CTA. PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit) is a mission candidate proposed to the ESA-CAS joint mission. To achieve a PSF of ~1° at 100 MeV, PANGU proposes to use a fully active tracker use thin silicon strip detectors. Our proposal has been presented at the first dedicated workshop of the ESA-CAS joint mission, and was selected for oral presentation as the only high energy mission for the second workshop. PANUG mission involves ~100 scientists from both China and Europe.

  1. Highly efficient targeted mutagenesis in one-cell mouse embryos mediated by the TALEN and CRISPR/Cas systems.

    PubMed

    Yasue, Akihiro; Mitsui, Silvia Naomi; Watanabe, Takahito; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Oyadomari, Seiichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Since the establishment of embryonic stem (ES) cell lines, the combined use of gene targeting with homologous recombination has aided in elucidating the functions of various genes. However, the ES cell technique is inefficient and time-consuming. Recently, two new gene-targeting technologies have been developed: the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system. In addition to aiding researchers in solving conventional problems, these technologies can be used to induce site-specific mutations in various species for which ES cells have not been established. Here, by targeting the Fgf10 gene through RNA microinjection in one-cell mouse embryos with the TALEN and CRISPR/Cas systems, we produced the known limb-defect phenotypes of Fgf10-deficient embryos at the F0 generation. Compared to the TALEN system, the CRISPR/Cas system induced the limb-defect phenotypes with a strikingly higher efficiency. Our results demonstrate that although both gene-targeting technologies are useful, the CRISPR/Cas system more effectively elicits single-step biallelic mutations in mice. PMID:25027812

  2. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated efficient and heritable targeted mutagenesis in tomato plants in the first and later generations.

    PubMed

    Pan, Changtian; Ye, Lei; Qin, Li; Liu, Xue; He, Yanjun; Wang, Jie; Chen, Lifei; Lu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has successfully been used in various organisms for precise targeted gene editing. Although it has been demonstrated that CRISPR/Cas9 system can induce mutation in tomato plants, the stability of heredity in later generations and mutant specificity induced by the CRISPR/Cas9 system in tomato plants have not yet been elucidated in detail. In this study, two genes, SlPDS and SlPIF4, were used for testing targeted mutagenesis in tomato plants through an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. A high mutation frequency was observed in all tested targets in the T0 transgenic tomato plants, with an average frequency of 83.56%. Clear albino phenotypes were observed for the psd mutants. High frequencies of homozygous and biallelic mutants were detected even in T0 plants. The majority of the detected mutations were 1- to 3-nucleotide deletions, followed by 1-bp insertions. The target mutations in the T0 lines were stably transmitted to the T1 and T2 generations, without new modifications or revision. Off-target activities associated with SlPDS and SlPIF4 were also evaluated by sequencing the putative off-target sites, and no clear off-target events were detected. Our results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is an efficient tool for generating stable and heritable modifications in tomato plants. PMID:27097775

  3. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRISPR/Cas9 executes double-stranded DNA cleavage efficiently, closure of the broken chromosomes is dynamic, as varying degrees of heterogeneity of the cleavage products appear to accompany the emergence of the corrected base pair. We provide a detailed analysis of allelic variance at and surrounding the target site. In one particular case, we report sequence alteration directed by a distinct member of the same gene family. Our data suggests that single-stranded DNA molecules may influence DNA junction heterogeneity created by CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27609304

  4. Recent Mobility of Casposons, Self-Synthesizing Transposons at the Origin of the CRISPR-Cas Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Krupovic, Mart; Shmakov, Sergey; Makarova, Kira S.; Forterre, Patrick; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    Casposons are a superfamily of putative self-synthesizing transposable elements that are predicted to employ a homolog of Cas1 protein as a recombinase and could have contributed to the origin of the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity systems in archaea and bacteria. Casposons remain uncharacterized experimentally, except for the recent demonstration of the integrase activity of the Cas1 homolog, and given their relative rarity in archaea and bacteria, original comparative genomic analysis has not provided direct indications of their mobility. Here, we report evidence of casposon mobility obtained by comparison of the genomes of 62 strains of the archaeon Methanosarcina mazei. In these genomes, casposons are variably inserted in three distinct sites indicative of multiple, recent gains, and losses. Some casposons are inserted into other mobile genetic elements that might provide vehicles for horizontal transfer of the casposons. Additionally, many M. mazei genomes contain previously undetected solo terminal inverted repeats that apparently are derived from casposons and could resemble intermediates in CRISPR evolution. We further demonstrate the sequence specificity of casposon insertion and note clear parallels with the adaptation mechanism of CRISPR-Cas. Finally, besides identifying additional representatives in each of the three originally defined families, we describe a new, fourth, family of casposons. PMID:26764427

  5. Site-Directed Genome Knockout in Chicken Cell Line and Embryos Can Use CRISPR/Cas Gene Editing Technology.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Qisheng; Wang, Yinjie; Cheng, Shaoze; Lian, Chao; Tang, Beibei; Wang, Fei; Lu, Zhenyu; Ji, Yanqing; Zhao, Ruifeng; Zhang, Wenhui; Jin, Kai; Song, Jiuzhou; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2016-01-01

    The present study established an efficient genome editing approach for the construction of stable transgenic cell lines of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). Our objectives were to facilitate the breeding of high-yield, high-quality chicken strains, and to investigate gene function in chicken stem cells. Three guide RNA (gRNAs) were designed to knockout the C2EIP gene, and knockout efficiency was evaluated in DF-1 chicken fibroblasts and chicken ESCs using the luciferase single-strand annealing (SSA) recombination assay, T7 endonuclease I (T7EI) assay, and TA clone sequencing. In addition, the polyethylenimine-encapsulated Cas9/gRNA plasmid was injected into fresh fertilized eggs. At 4.5 d later, frozen sections of the embryos were prepared, and knockout efficiency was evaluated by the T7EI assay. SSA assay results showed that luciferase activity of the vector expressing gRNA-3 was double that of the control. Results of the T7EI assay and TA clone sequencing indicated that Cas9/gRNA vector-mediated gene knockdown efficiency was approximately 27% in both DF-1 cells and ESCs. The CRISPR/Cas9 vector was also expressed in chicken embryos, resulting in gene knockdown in three of the 20 embryos (gene knockdown efficiency 15%). Taken together, our results indicate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can mediate stable gene knockdown at the cell and embryo levels in domestic chickens. PMID:27172204

  6. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated efficient and heritable targeted mutagenesis in tomato plants in the first and later generations

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Changtian; Ye, Lei; Qin, Li; Liu, Xue; He, Yanjun; Wang, Jie; Chen, Lifei; Lu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has successfully been used in various organisms for precise targeted gene editing. Although it has been demonstrated that CRISPR/Cas9 system can induce mutation in tomato plants, the stability of heredity in later generations and mutant specificity induced by the CRISPR/Cas9 system in tomato plants have not yet been elucidated in detail. In this study, two genes, SlPDS and SlPIF4, were used for testing targeted mutagenesis in tomato plants through an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. A high mutation frequency was observed in all tested targets in the T0 transgenic tomato plants, with an average frequency of 83.56%. Clear albino phenotypes were observed for the psd mutants. High frequencies of homozygous and biallelic mutants were detected even in T0 plants. The majority of the detected mutations were 1- to 3-nucleotide deletions, followed by 1-bp insertions. The target mutations in the T0 lines were stably transmitted to the T1 and T2 generations, without new modifications or revision. Off-target activities associated with SlPDS and SlPIF4 were also evaluated by sequencing the putative off-target sites, and no clear off-target events were detected. Our results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is an efficient tool for generating stable and heritable modifications in tomato plants. PMID:27097775

  7. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRISPR/Cas9 executes double-stranded DNA cleavage efficiently, closure of the broken chromosomes is dynamic, as varying degrees of heterogeneity of the cleavage products appear to accompany the emergence of the corrected base pair. We provide a detailed analysis of allelic variance at and surrounding the target site. In one particular case, we report sequence alteration directed by a distinct member of the same gene family. Our data suggests that single-stranded DNA molecules may influence DNA junction heterogeneity created by CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27609304

  8. Repurposing CRISPR/Cas9 for in situ functional assays

    PubMed Central

    Malina, Abba; Mills, John R.; Cencic, Regina; Yan, Yifei; Fraser, James; Schippers, Laura M.; Paquet, Marilène; Dostie, Josée; Pelletier, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    RNAi combined with next-generation sequencing has proven to be a powerful and cost-effective genetic screening platform in mammalian cells. Still, this technology has its limitations and is incompatible with in situ mutagenesis screens on a genome-wide scale. Using p53 as a proof-of-principle target, we readapted the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR associated 9) genome-editing system to demonstrate the feasibility of this methodology for targeted gene disruption positive selection assays. By using novel “all-in-one” lentiviral and retroviral delivery vectors heterologously expressing both a codon-optimized Cas9 and its synthetic guide RNA (sgRNA), we show robust selection for the CRISPR-modified Trp53 locus following drug treatment. Furthermore, by linking Cas9 expression to GFP fluorescence, we use an “all-in-one” system to track disrupted Trp53 in chemoresistant lymphomas in the Eμ-myc mouse model. Deep sequencing analysis of the tumor-derived endogenous Cas9-modified Trp53 locus revealed a wide spectrum of mutants that were enriched with seemingly limited off-target effects. Taken together, these results establish Cas9 genome editing as a powerful and practical approach for positive in situ genetic screens. PMID:24298059

  9. SD-CAS: Spin Dynamics by Computer Algebra System.

    PubMed

    Filip, Xenia; Filip, Claudiu

    2010-11-01

    A computer algebra tool for describing the Liouville-space quantum evolution of nuclear 1/2-spins is introduced and implemented within a computational framework named Spin Dynamics by Computer Algebra System (SD-CAS). A distinctive feature compared with numerical and previous computer algebra approaches to solving spin dynamics problems results from the fact that no matrix representation for spin operators is used in SD-CAS, which determines a full symbolic character to the performed computations. Spin correlations are stored in SD-CAS as four-entry nested lists of which size increases linearly with the number of spins into the system and are easily mapped into analytical expressions in terms of spin operator products. For the so defined SD-CAS spin correlations a set of specialized functions and procedures is introduced that are essential for implementing basic spin algebra operations, such as the spin operator products, commutators, and scalar products. They provide results in an abstract algebraic form: specific procedures to quantitatively evaluate such symbolic expressions with respect to the involved spin interaction parameters and experimental conditions are also discussed. Although the main focus in the present work is on laying the foundation for spin dynamics symbolic computation in NMR based on a non-matrix formalism, practical aspects are also considered throughout the theoretical development process. In particular, specific SD-CAS routines have been implemented using the YACAS computer algebra package (http://yacas.sourceforge.net), and their functionality was demonstrated on a few illustrative examples. PMID:20843716

  10. Measurement of Flux Density of Cas A at Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajinkya; Fisher, R.

    2012-01-01

    Cas A is used as a flux calibrator throughout the radio spectrum. Therefore it is important to know the spectral and secular variations in its flux density. Earlier observations by Scott et. al. (1969) and Baars et. al. (1972) suggested a secular decrease in flux density of Cas A at a rate of about 1% per year at all frequencies. However later observations by Erickson & Perley (1975) and Read (1977) indicated anomalously high flux from Cas A at 38 MHz. Also, these observations suggested that the original idea of faster decay of the flux density rate at low frequencies may be in error or that something more complex than simple decay is affecting the flux density at low frequencies. The source changes at 38 MHz still remains a mystery. We intend to present the results of follow up observations made from 1995 to 1998 with a three element interferometer in Green Bank operating in frequency range 30 to 120 MHz. We will discuss the problems at such low frequencies due to large beamwidth and unstable ionosphere. We will also discuss the strategies we have used so far to to find the flux density of Cas A by calculating the ratio of flux density of Cas A to that of Cyg A, assuming flux density of Cyg A to be constant. Above mentioned work was performed in summer student program sponsored by National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

  11. Can Score Databanks Help Teaching?

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alessandro; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2011-01-01

    Background Basic courses in most medical schools assess students' performance by conferring scores. The objective of this work is to use a large score databank for the early identification of students with low performance and to identify course trends based on the mean of students' grades. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied scores from 2,398 medical students registered in courses over a period of 10 years. Students in the first semester were grouped into those whose ratings remained in the lower quartile in two or more courses (low-performance) and students who had up to one course in the lower quartile (high-performance). ROC curves were built, aimed at the identification of a cut-off average score in the first semesters that would be able to predict low performances in future semesters. Moreover, to follow the long-term pattern of each course, the mean of all scores conferred in a semester was compared to the overall course mean obtained by averaging 10 years of data. Individuals in the low-performance group had a higher risk of being in the lower quartile of at least one course in the second semester (relative risk 3.907; 95% CI: 3.378–4.519) and in the eighth semester (relative risk 2.873; 95% CI: 2.495–3.308). The prediction analysis revealed that an average score of 7.188 in the first semester could identify students that presented scores below the lower quartiles in both the second and eighth semesters (p<0.0001 for both AUC). When scores conferred by single courses were compared over time, three time-trend patterns emerged: low variation, upward trend and erratic pattern. Conclusion/Significance An early identification of students with low performance may be useful in promoting pedagogical strategies for these individuals. Evaluation of the time trend of scores conferred by courses may help departments monitoring changes in personnel and methodology that may affect a student's performance. PMID:21246033

  12. Displacement of p130Cas from focal adhesions links actomyosin contraction to cell migration.

    PubMed

    Machiyama, Hiroaki; Hirata, Hiroaki; Loh, Xia Kun; Kanchi, Madhu Mathi; Fujita, Hideaki; Tan, Song Hui; Kawauchi, Keiko; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-15

    Cell adhesion complexes provide platforms where cell-generated forces are transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins is crucial for cells to communicate with the extracellular environment. However, the mechanisms that transmit actin cytoskeletal motion to the extracellular environment to drive cell migration are poorly understood. We find that the movement of p130Cas (Cas, also known as BCAR1), a mechanosensor at focal adhesions, correlates with actin retrograde flow and depends upon actomyosin contraction and phosphorylation of the Cas substrate domain (CasSD). This indicates that CasSD phosphorylation underpins the physical link between Cas and the actin cytoskeleton. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal that CasSD phosphorylation, as opposed to the association of Cas with Src, facilitates Cas displacement from adhesion complexes in migrating cells. Furthermore, the stabilization of Src-Cas binding and inhibition of myosin II, both of which sustain CasSD phosphorylation but mitigate Cas displacement from adhesion sites, retard cell migration. These results indicate that Cas promotes cell migration by linking actomyosin contractions to the adhesion complexes through a dynamic interaction with Src as well as through the phosphorylation-dependent association with the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24928898

  13. [Trauma scores: reproducibility and reliability].

    PubMed

    Waydhas, C; Nast-Kolb, D; Trupka, A; Kerim-Sade, C; Kanz, G; Zoller, J; Schweiberer, L

    1992-02-01

    The inter-rater reliability of the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Polytraumaschlüssel (PTS) [multiple trauma code] was studied using diagnosis sheets filled in for 107 multiple injured patients. The scoring was performed by eight physicians with different levels of qualification. The scores for individual patients varied widely depending on the scorer, with extremes differing from the mean by about 80% and 70% for the ISS and PTS, respectively. The mean ISS and PTS for the whole study population also varied significantly between the scorers (P less than 0.0001, one-way analysis of variance). Raters with experience in trauma scoring calculated significantly higher scores (P less than 0.01, t-test) Neither the ISS nor the PTS seem reliable enough to describe injury severity in an individual patient. Treatment decisions must not be based on such grounds. Even for larger groups, caution must be exercised in comparison of different populations of multiple traumatized patients. PMID:1570531

  14. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms. PMID:21561101

  15. Applications of Engineered DNA-Binding Molecules Such as TAL Proteins and the CRISPR/Cas System in Biology Research

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2015-01-01

    Engineered DNA-binding molecules such as transcription activator-like effector (TAL or TALE) proteins and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) (CRISPR/Cas) system have been used extensively for genome editing in cells of various types and species. The sequence-specific DNA-binding activities of these engineered DNA-binding molecules can also be utilized for other purposes, such as transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, chromatin modification, visualization of genomic regions, and isolation of chromatin in a locus-specific manner. In this review, we describe applications of these engineered DNA-binding molecules for biological purposes other than genome editing. PMID:26404236

  16. Interpreting Force Concept Inventory Scores: Normalized Gain and SAT Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coletta, Vincent P.; Phillips, Jeffrey A.; Steinert, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    Preinstruction SAT scores and normalized gains (G) on the force concept inventory (FCI) were examined for individual students in interactive engagement (IE) courses in introductory mechanics at one high school (N=335) and one university (N=292), and strong, positive correlations were found for both populations (r=0.57 and r=0.46, respectively).…

  17. A Bootstrap Procedure of Propensity Score Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Propensity score estimation plays a fundamental role in propensity score matching for reducing group selection bias in observational data. To increase the accuracy of propensity score estimation, the author developed a bootstrap propensity score. The commonly used propensity score matching methods: nearest neighbor matching, caliper matching, and…

  18. Estimating Decision Indices Based on Composite Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knupp, Tawnya Lee

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an IRT model that would enable the estimation of decision indices based on composite scores. The composite scores, defined as a combination of unidimensional test scores, were either a total raw score or an average scale score. Additionally, estimation methods for the normal and compound multinomial models…

  19. Electronic Scoring of Essays: Does Topic Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Cindy L.

    2008-01-01

    The scoring of student essays by computer has generated much debate and subsequent research. The majority of the research thus far has focused on validating the automated scoring tools by comparing the electronic scores to human scores of writing or other measures of writing skills, and exploring the predictive validity of the automated scores.…

  20. CRISPR-Cas9: A Revolutionary Tool for Cancer Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Ruiz, Raul; Rodriguez-Perales, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The cancer-modelling field is now experiencing a conversion with the recent emergence of the RNA-programmable CRISPR-Cas9 system, a flexible methodology to produce essentially any desired modification in the genome. Cancer is a multistep process that involves many genetic mutations and other genome rearrangements. Despite their importance, it is difficult to recapitulate the degree of genetic complexity found in patient tumors. The CRISPR-Cas9 system for genome editing has been proven as a robust technology that makes it possible to generate cellular and animal models that recapitulate those cooperative alterations rapidly and at low cost. In this review, we will discuss the innovative applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to generate new models, providing a new way to interrogate the development and progression of cancers. PMID:26389881