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Sample records for activity site-directed mutagenesis

  1. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  2. Improving the activity of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meizhi; Deng, Xiongwei; Bao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jieyuan; Cai, Yongjun; Jia, Yan; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2015-09-25

    Nattokinase (NK), a bacterial serine protease from Bacillus subtilis var. natto, is a potential cardiovascular drug exhibiting strong fibrinolytic activity. To broaden its commercial and medical applications, we constructed a single-mutant (I31L) and two double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) by site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and were purified to homogeneity. The kinetic parameters of enzymes were examined by spectroscopy assay and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. The substitution of Leu(31) for Ile(31) resulted in about 2-fold enhancement of catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) compared with wild-type NK. The specific activities of both double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) were significantly increased when compared with the single-mutants (M222A and T220S) and the oxidative stability of M222A/I31L mutant was enhanced with respect to wild-type NK. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving activity of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve the activity of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  3. Improving the neutral phytase activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Wang, Zupeng; Yan, Xiuhua

    2015-03-01

    Neutral phytase is used as a feed additive for degradation of anti-nutritional phytate in aquatic feed industry. Site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 phytase was performed with an aim to increase its activity. Mutation residues were chosen based on multiple sequence alignments and structure analysis of neutral phytsaes from different microorganisms. The mutation sites on surface (D148E, S197E and N156E) and around the active site (D52E) of phytase were selected. Analysis of the phytase variants showed that the specific activities of mutants D148E and S197E remarkably increased by about 35 and 13% over a temperature range of 40-75 °C at pH 7.0, respectively. The k cat of mutants D148E and S197E were 1.50 and 1.25 times than that of the wild-type phytase, respectively. Both D148E and S197E showed much higher thermostability than that of the wild-type phytase. However, mutants N156E and D52E led to significant loss of specific activity of the enzyme. Structural analysis revealed that these mutations may affect conformation of the active site of phytase. The present mutant phytases D148E and S197E with increased activities and thermostabilities have application potential as additives in aquaculture feed.

  4. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    PubMed

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity.

  5. Site Directed Mutagenesis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Glutathione Synthetase Produces an Enzyme with Homoglutathione Synthetase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dworeck, Tamara; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Three different His-tagged, mutant forms of the fission yeast glutathione synthetase (GSH2) were derived by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in E. coli DH5α and affinity purified in a two-step procedure. Analysis of enzyme activity showed that it was possible to shift the substrate specificity of GSH2 from Gly (km 0,19; wild-type) to β-Ala or Ser. One mutation (substitution of Ile471, Cy472 to Met and Val and Ala 485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro) increased the affinity of GSH2 for β-Ala (km 0,07) and lowered the affinity for Gly (km 0,83), which is a characteristic of the enzyme homoglutathione synthetase found in plants. Substitution of Ala485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro only, increased instead the affinity of GSH2 for Ser (km 0,23) as a substrate, while affinity to Gly was preserved (km 0,12). This provides a new biosynthetic pathway for hydroxymethyl glutathione, which is known to be synthesized from glutathione and Ser in a reaction catalysed by carboxypeptidase Y. The reported findings provide further insight into how specific amino acids positioned in the GSH2 active site facilitate the recognition of different amino acid substrates, furthermore they support the evolutionary theory that homoglutathione synthetase evolved from glutathione synthetase by a single gene duplication event. PMID:23091597

  6. Site-directed mutagenesis of an alkaline phytase: influencing specificity, activity and stability in acidic milieu.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thuy T; Mamo, Gashaw; Búxo, Laura; Le, Nhi N; Gaber, Yasser; Mattiasson, Bo; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2011-07-10

    Site-directed mutagenesis of a thermostable alkaline phytase from Bacillus sp. MD2 was performed with an aim to increase its specific activity and activity and stability in an acidic environment. The mutation sites are distributed on the catalytic surface of the enzyme (P257R, E180N, E229V and S283R) and in the active site (K77R, K179R and E227S). Selection of the residues was based on the idea that acid active phytases are more positively charged around their catalytic surfaces. Thus, a decrease in the content of negatively charged residues or an increase in the positive charges in the catalytic region of an alkaline phytase was assumed to influence the enzyme activity and stability at low pH. Moreover, widening of the substrate-binding pocket is expected to improve the hydrolysis of substrates that are not efficiently hydrolysed by wild type alkaline phytase. Analysis of the phytase variants revealed that E229V and S283R mutants increased the specific activity by about 19% and 13%, respectively. Mutation of the active site residues K77R and K179R led to severe reduction in the specific activity of the enzyme. Analysis of the phytase mutant-phytate complexes revealed increase in hydrogen bonding between the enzyme and the substrate, which might retard the release of the product, resulting in decreased activity. On the other hand, the double mutant (K77R-K179R) phytase showed higher stability at low pH (pH 2.6-3.0). The E227S variant was optimally active at pH 5.5 (in contrast to the wild type enzyme that had an optimum pH of 6) and it exhibited higher stability in acidic condition. This mutant phytase, displayed over 80% of its initial activity after 3h incubation at pH 2.6 while the wild type phytase retained only about 40% of its original activity. Moreover, the relative activity of this mutant phytase on calcium phytate, sodium pyrophosphate and p-nitro phenyl phosphate was higher than that of the wild type phytase.

  7. Improvement of stability and enzymatic activity by site-directed mutagenesis of E. coli asparaginase II.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shikha; Mehta, Ranjit Kumar; Maiti, Prasanta; Röhm, Klaus-Heinrich; Sonawane, Avinash

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial asparaginases (EC 3.5.1.1) have attracted considerable attention because enzymes of this group are used in the therapy of certain forms of leukemia. Class II asparaginase from Escherichia coli (EcA), a homotetramer with a mass of 138 kDa, is especially effective in cancer therapy. However, the therapeutic potential of EcA is impaired by the limited stability of the enzyme in vivo and by the induction of antibodies in the patients. In an attempt to modify the properties of EcA, several variants with amino acid replacements at subunit interfaces were constructed and characterized. Chemical and thermal denaturation analysis monitored by activity, fluorescence, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry showed that certain variants with exchanges that weaken dimer-dimer interactions exhibited complex denaturation profiles with active dimeric and/or inactive monomeric intermediates appearing at low denaturant concentrations. By contrast, other EcA variants showed considerably enhanced activity and stability as compared to the wild-type enzyme. Thus, even small changes at a subunit interface may markedly affect EcA stability without impairing its catalytic properties. Variants of this type may have a potential for use in the asparaginase therapy of leukemia.

  8. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis of the toxin from the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BmKAS): insight into sites related to analgesic activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Song, Yong-Bo; Ma, Lin; Liu, Yan-Feng; Li, Guo-Dong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Jing-Hai

    2010-10-01

    This study utilized the E. coli expression system to investigate the role of amino acid residues in toxin from the Chinese scorpion--Buthus martensii Karsch (BmKAS). To evaluate the extent to which residues of the toxin core contribute to its analgesic activity, ten mutants of BmKAS were obtained by PCR. Using site-directed mutagenesis, all of these residues were substituted with different amino acids. This study represents a thorough mapping and elucidation of the epitopes that form the molecular basis of the toxin's analgesic activity. Our results showed large mutant-dependent differences that emphasize the important roles of the studied residues.

  10. Molecular Docking and Site-directed Mutagenesis of a Bacillus thuringiensis Chitinase to Improve Chitinolytic, Synergistic Lepidopteran-larvicidal and Nematicidal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Hong; Zeng, Siquan; Qin, Xu; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shan; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chitinases are useful in the biocontrol of agriculturally important pests and fungal pathogens. However, the utility of naturally occurring bacterial chitinases is often limited by their low enzyme activity. In this study, we constructed mutants of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase with enhanced activity based on homology modeling, molecular docking, and the site-directed mutagenesis of target residues to modify spatial positions, steric hindrances, or hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity. We first identified a gene from B. thuringiensis YBT-9602 that encodes a chitinase (Chi9602) belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 18 with conserved substrate-binding and substrate-catalytic motifs. We constructed a structural model of a truncated version of Chi9602 (Chi960235-459) containing the substrate-binding domain using the homologous 1ITX protein of Bacillus circulans as the template. We performed molecular docking analysis of Chi960235-459 using di-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine as the ligand. We then selected 10 residues of interest from the docking area for the site-directed mutagenesis experiments and expression in Escherichia coli. Assays of the chitinolytic activity of the purified chitinases revealed that the three mutants exhibited increased chitinolytic activity. The ChiW50A mutant exhibited a greater than 60 % increase in chitinolytic activity, with similar pH, temperature and metal ion requirements, compared to wild-type Chi9602. Furthermore, ChiW50A exhibited pest-controlling activity and antifungal activity. Remarkable synergistic effects of this mutant with B. thuringiensis spore-crystal preparations against Helicoverpa armigera and Caenorhabditis elegans larvae and obvious activity against several plant-pathogenic fungi were observed. PMID:25678849

  11. Molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase to improve chitinolytic, synergistic lepidopteran-larvicidal and nematicidal activities.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hong; Zeng, Siquan; Qin, Xu; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shan; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chitinases are useful in the biocontrol of agriculturally important pests and fungal pathogens. However, the utility of naturally occurring bacterial chitinases is often limited by their low enzyme activity. In this study, we constructed mutants of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase with enhanced activity based on homology modeling, molecular docking, and the site-directed mutagenesis of target residues to modify spatial positions, steric hindrances, or hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity. We first identified a gene from B. thuringiensis YBT-9602 that encodes a chitinase (Chi9602) belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 18 with conserved substrate-binding and substrate-catalytic motifs. We constructed a structural model of a truncated version of Chi9602 (Chi9602(35-459)) containing the substrate-binding domain using the homologous 1ITX protein of Bacillus circulans as the template. We performed molecular docking analysis of Chi9602(35-459) using di-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine as the ligand. We then selected 10 residues of interest from the docking area for the site-directed mutagenesis experiments and expression in Escherichia coli. Assays of the chitinolytic activity of the purified chitinases revealed that the three mutants exhibited increased chitinolytic activity. The ChiW50A mutant exhibited a greater than 60 % increase in chitinolytic activity, with similar pH, temperature and metal ion requirements, compared to wild-type Chi9602. Furthermore, ChiW50A exhibited pest-controlling activity and antifungal activity. Remarkable synergistic effects of this mutant with B. thuringiensis spore-crystal preparations against Helicoverpa armigera and Caenorhabditis elegans larvae and obvious activity against several plant-pathogenic fungi were observed.

  12. Analysis of mammalian cytochrome P450 structure and function by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Domanski, T L; Halpert, J R

    2001-06-01

    Over the past decade, site-directed mutagenesis has become an essential tool in the study of mammalian cytochrome P450 structure-function relationships. Residues affecting substrate specificity, cooperativity, membrane localization, and interactions with redox partners have been identified using a combination of amino-acid sequence alignments, homology modeling, chimeragenesis, and site-directed mutagenesis. As homology modeling and substrate docking technology continue to improve, the ability to predict more precise functions for specific residues will also advance, making it possible to utilize site-directed mutagenesis to test these predictions. Future studies will employ site-directed mutagenesis to learn more about cytochrome P450 substrate access channels, to define the role of residues that do not lie within substrate recognition sites, to engineer additional soluble forms of microsomal cytochromes P450 for x-ray crystallography, and to engineer more efficient enzymes for drug activation and/or bioremediation.

  13. Decreasing the sialidase activity of multifunctional Pasteurella multocida α2-3-sialyltransferase 1 (PmST1) by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sugiarto, Go; Lau, Kam; Li, Yanhong; Khedri, Zahra; Yu, Hai; Le, Diem-Thuy; Chen, Xi

    2011-11-01

    Pasteurella multocida α2-3-sialyltransferase 1 (PmST1) is a multifunctional enzyme which has α2-6-sialyltransferase, α2-3-sialidase, and α2-3-trans-sialidase activities in addition to its major α2-3-sialyltransferase activity. The presence of the α2-3-sialidase activity of PmST1 complicates its application in enzymatic synthesis of α2-3-linked sialosides as the product formed can be hydrolyzed by the enzyme. Herein we show that the α2-3-sialidase activity of PmST1 can be significantly decreased by protein crystal structure-based site-directed mutagenesis. A PmST1 double mutant E271F/R313Y showed a significantly (6333-fold) decreased sialidase activity without affecting its α2-3-sialyltransferase activity. The double mutant E271F/R313Y, therefore, is a superior enzyme for enzymatic synthesis of α2-3-linked sialosides.

  14. Structural evolution of luciferase activity in Zophobas mealworm AMP/CoA-ligase (protoluciferase) through site-directed mutagenesis of the luciferin binding site.

    PubMed

    Prado, R A; Barbosa, J A; Ohmiya, Y; Viviani, V R

    2011-07-01

    The structural origin and evolution of bioluminescent activity of beetle luciferases from AMP/CoA ligases remains a mystery. Previously we cloned the luciferase-like enzyme from Zophobas morio mealworm, a reasonable protoluciferase model that could shine light on this mystery. Kinetic characterization and studies with D- and L-luciferin and their adenylates showed that stereoselectivity constitutes a critical feature for the origin of luciferase activity in AMP/CoA ligases. Comparison of the primary structures and modeling studies of this protoluciferase and the three main families of beetle luciferases showed that the carboxylic acid substrate binding site of this enzyme is smaller and more hydrophobic than the luciferin binding site of beetle luciferases, showing several substitutions of otherwise conserved residues. Thus, here we performed a site-directed mutagenesis survey of the carboxylic binding site motifs of the protoluciferase by replacing their residues by the respective conserved ones found in beetle luciferases in order to identify the structural determinants of luciferase/oxygenase activity. Although most of the substitutions had negative impact on the luminescence activity of the protoluciferase, only the substitution I327T improved the luminescence activity, resulting in a broad and 15 nm blue-shifted luminescence spectrum. Such substitution indicates the importance of the loop motif 322YGMSEI327 (341YGLTETT347 in Photinus pyralis luciferase) for luciferase activity, and indicates a possible route for the evolution of bioluminescence function of beetle luciferases.

  15. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass.

  16. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting ^8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of ^8-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among ^8-sphingolipid desaturases and ^6-fatty acid desaturase from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb5 (cytochrome b5) HPGG motif and...

  17. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  18. Improved efficacy of soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) fusion protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Jun; Han, Jihye; Lee, Jae Yeon; Kim, HaHyung; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-06-01

    Soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B fusion immunoglobulin (hRANK-Ig) has been considered as one of the therapeutic agents to treat osteoporosis or diseases associated with bone destruction by blocking the interaction between RANK and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, no scientific record showing critical amino acid residues within the structural interface between the human RANKL and RANK complex is yet available. In this study, we produced several mutants of hRANK-Ig by replacement of amino acid residue(s) and tested whether the mutants had increased binding affinity to human RANKL. Based on the results from flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analyses, the replacement of E(125) with D(125), or E(125) and C(127) with D(125) and F(127) within loop 3 of cysteine-rich domain 3 of hRANK-Ig increases binding affinity to human RANKL over the wild-type hRANK-Ig. This result may provide the first example of improvement in the efficacy of hRANK-Ig by protein engineering and may give additional information to understand a more defined structural interface between hRANK and RANKL.

  19. Probing the catalytic mechanism of bovine CD38/NAD+ glycohydrolase by site directed mutagenesis of key active site residues.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Isabelle; Kellenberger, Esther; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Schuber, Francis

    2014-07-01

    Bovine CD38/NAD(+) glycohydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to nicotinamide and ADP-ribose and the formation of cyclic ADP-ribose via a stepwise reaction mechanism. Our recent crystallographic study of its Michaelis complex and covalently-trapped intermediates provided insights into the modalities of substrate binding and the molecular mechanism of bCD38. The aim of the present work was to determine the precise role of key conserved active site residues (Trp118, Glu138, Asp147, Trp181 and Glu218) by focusing mainly on the cleavage of the nicotinamide-ribosyl bond. We analyzed the kinetic parameters of mutants of these residues which reside within the bCD38 subdomain in the vicinity of the scissile bond of bound NAD(+). To address the reaction mechanism we also performed chemical rescue experiments with neutral (methanol) and ionic (azide, formate) nucleophiles. The crucial role of Glu218, which orients the substrate for cleavage by interacting with the N-ribosyl 2'-OH group of NAD(+), was highlighted. This contribution to catalysis accounts for almost half of the reaction energy barrier. Other contributions can be ascribed notably to Glu138 and Asp147 via ground-state destabilization and desolvation in the vicinity of the scissile bond. Key interactions with Trp118 and Trp181 were also proven to stabilize the ribooxocarbenium ion-like transition state. Altogether we propose that, as an alternative to a covalent acylal reaction intermediate with Glu218, catalysis by bCD38 proceeds through the formation of a discrete and transient ribooxocarbenium intermediate which is stabilized within the active site mostly by electrostatic interactions.

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 nitrogenase active site to increase photobiological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Masukawa, Hajime; Inoue, Kazuhito; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Wolk, C Peter; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use sunlight and water to produce hydrogen gas (H₂), which is potentially useful as a clean and renewable biofuel. Photobiological H₂ arises primarily as an inevitable by-product of N₂ fixation by nitrogenase, an oxygen-labile enzyme typically containing an iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) active site. In Anabaena sp. strain 7120, the enzyme is localized to the microaerobic environment of heterocysts, a highly differentiated subset of the filamentous cells. In an effort to increase H₂ production by this strain, six nitrogenase amino acid residues predicted to reside within 5 Å of the FeMo-co were mutated in an attempt to direct electron flow selectively toward proton reduction in the presence of N₂. Most of the 49 variants examined were deficient in N₂-fixing growth and exhibited decreases in their in vivo rates of acetylene reduction. Of greater interest, several variants examined under an N₂ atmosphere significantly increased their in vivo rates of H₂ production, approximating rates equivalent to those under an Ar atmosphere, and accumulated high levels of H₂ compared to the reference strains. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering cyanobacterial strains for enhanced photobiological production of H₂ in an aerobic, nitrogen-containing environment.

  1. His-65 in the proton–sucrose symporter is an essential amino acid whose modification with site-directed mutagenesis increases transport activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jade M.-Y.; Bush, Daniel R.

    1998-01-01

    The proton–sucrose symporter that mediates phloem loading is a key component of assimilate partitioning in many higher plants. Previous biochemical investigations showed that a diethyl pyrocarbonate-sensitive histidine residue is at or near the substrate-binding site of the symporter. Among the proton–sucrose symporters cloned to date, only the histidine residue at position 65 of AtSUC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is conserved across species. To test whether His-65 is involved in the transport reaction, we have used site-directed mutagenesis and functional expression in yeast to determine the significance of this residue in the reaction mechanism. Symporters with mutations at His-65 exhibited a range of activities; for example, the H65C mutant resulted in the complete loss of transport capacity, whereas H65Q was almost as active as wild type. Surprisingly, the H65K and H65R symporters transport sucrose at significantly higher rates (increased Vmax) than the wild-type symporter, suggesting His-65 may be associated with a rate-limiting step in the transport reaction. RNA gel blot and protein blot analyses showed that, with the exception of H65C, the variation in transport activity was not because of alterations in steady-state levels of mRNA or symporter protein. Significantly, those symporters with substitutions of His-65 that remained transport competent were no longer sensitive to inactivation by diethyl pyrocarbonate, demonstrating that this is the inhibitor-sensitive histidine residue. Taken together with our previous results, these data show that His-65 is involved in sucrose binding, and increased rates of transport implicate this region of the protein in the transport reaction. PMID:9671798

  2. Molecular basis of agonist docking in a human GPR103 homology model by site-directed mutagenesis and structure–activity relationship studies

    PubMed Central

    Neveu, C; Dulin, F; Lefranc, B; Galas, L; Calbrix, C; Bureau, R; Rault, S; Chuquet, J; Boutin, J A; Guilhaudis, L; Ségalas-Milazzo, I; Vaudry, D; Vaudry, H; Santos, J Sopkova-de Oliveira; Leprince, J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The neuropeptide 26RFa and its cognate receptor GPR103 are involved in the control of food intake and bone mineralization. Here, we have tested, experimentally, the predicted ligand-receptor interactions by site-directed mutagenesis of GPR103 and designed point-substituted 26RFa analogues. Experimental Approach Using the X-ray structure of the β2-adrenoceptor, a 3-D molecular model of GPR103 has been built. The bioactive C-terminal octapeptide 26RFa(19–26), KGGFSFRF-NH2, was docked in this GPR103 model and the ligand-receptor complex was submitted to energy minimization. Key Results In the most stable complex, the Phe-Arg-Phe-NH2 part was oriented inside the receptor cavity, whereas the N-terminal Lys residue remained outside. A strong intermolecular interaction was predicted between the Arg25 residue of 26RFa and the Gln125 residue located in the third transmembrane helix of GPR103. To confirm this interaction experimentally, we tested the ability of 26RFa and Arg-modified 26RFa analogues to activate the wild-type and the Q125A mutant receptors transiently expressed in CHO cells. 26RFa (10−6 M) enhanced [Ca2+]i in wild-type GPR103-transfected cells, but failed to increase [Ca2+]i in Q125A mutant receptor-expressing cells. Moreover, asymmetric dimethylation of the side chain of arginine led to a 26RFa analogue, [ADMA25]26RFa(20–26), that was unable to activate the wild-type GPR103, but antagonized 26RFa-evoked [Ca2+]i increase. Conclusion and Implications Altogether, these data provide strong evidence for a functional interaction between the Arg25 residue of 26RFa and the Gln125 residue of GPR103 upon ligand-receptor activation, which can be exploited for the rational design of potent GPR103 agonists and antagonists. PMID:24913445

  3. Partial Restoration of Antibacterial Activity of the Protein Encoded by a Cryptic Open Reading Frame (cyt1Ca) from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Itsko, Mark; Manasherob, Robert; Zaritsky, Arieh

    2005-01-01

    Insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis belong to two unrelated toxin families: receptor-specific Cry toxins against insects and Cyt toxins that lyse a broad range of cells, including bacteria, via direct binding to phospholipids. A new cyt-like open reading frame (cyt1Ca) encoding a 60-kDa protein, has recently been discovered (C. Berry et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68:5082-5095, 2002). Cyt1Ca displays the structure of a two-domain fusion protein: the N-terminal moiety resembles the full-length Cyt toxins, and the C-terminal moiety is similar to the receptor-binding domains of several ricin-like toxins, such as Mtx1. Neither the larvicidal activity of cyt1Ca expressed in Escherichia coli nor the hemolytic effect of His-tagged purified Cyt1Ca has been observed (R. Manasherob et al., unpublished). This was attributed to five amino acid differences between the sequences of its N-terminal moiety and Cyt1Aa. The 3′ end of cyt1Ca was truncated (removing the ricin-binding domain of Cyt1Ca), and six single bases were appropriately changed by site-directed mutagenesis, sequentially replacing the noncharged amino acids by charged ones, according to Cyt1Aa, to form several versions. Expression of these mutated cyt1Ca versions caused loss of the colony-forming ability of the corresponding E. coli cells to different extents compared with the original gene. In some mutants this antibacterial effect was associated by significant distortion of cell morphology and in others by generation of multiple inclusion bodies spread along the cell envelope. The described deleterious effects of mutated cyt1Ca versions against E. coli may reflect an evolutionary relationship between Cyt1Aa and Cyt1Ca. PMID:16159771

  4. Critical active-site residues identified by site-directed mutagenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase, a new member of the haloacid dehalogenases hydrolase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Beassoni, Paola R; Otero, Lisandro H; Massimelli, Maria J; Lisa, Angela T; Domenech, Carlos E

    2006-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PChP), the product of the PA5292 gene, is synthesized when the bacteria are grown with choline, betaine, dimethylglycine, or carnitine. In the presence of Mg(2+), PChP catalyzes the hydrolysis of both phosphorylcholine (PCh) and p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP). PCh saturation curve analysis of the enzyme with or without the signal peptide indicated that the peptide was the fundamental factor responsible for decreasing the affinity of the second site of PChP for PCh, either at pH 5.0 or pH 7.4. PChP contained three conserved motifs characteristic of the haloacid dehalogenases superfamily. In the PChP without the signal peptide, motifs I, II, and III correspond to the residues (31)DMDNT(35), (166)SAA(168), and K(242)/(261)GDTPDSD(267), respectively. To determine the catalytic importance of the D31, D33, T35, S166, K242, D262, D265, and D267 on the enzyme activity, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. D31, D33, D262, and D267 were identified as the more important residues for catalysis. D265 and D267 may be involved in the stabilization of motif III, or might contribute to substrate specificity. The substitution of T35 by S35 resulted in an enzyme with a low PChP activity, but conserves the catalytic sites involved in the hydrolysis of PCh (K(m1) 0.03 mM: , K(m2) 0.5 mM: ) or p-NPP (K(m) 2.1 mM: ). Mutating either S166 or K242 revealed that these residues are also important to catalyze the hydrolysis of both substrates. The substitution of lysine by arginine or by glutamine revealed the importance of the positive charged group, either from the amino or guanidinium groups, because K242Q was inactive, whereas K242R was a functional enzyme.

  5. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk'solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 4(sub 3) axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to greater than 500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 yields PHE or ALA and ASN 113 yields ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 4(sub 3) helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  6. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1999-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 43 axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to (3)500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 (Registered) PHE or ALA and ASN 113 (Registered) ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 43 helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  7. Enhancement of Polymerase Activity of the Large Fragment in DNA Polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus by Site-Directed Mutagenesis at the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhang, Beilei; Wang, Meng; Ou, Yanghui

    2016-01-01

    The large fragment of DNA polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus GIM1.543 (Bst DNA polymerase) with 5′-3′ DNA polymerase activity while in absence of 5′-3′ exonuclease activity possesses high thermal stability and polymerase activity. Bst DNA polymerase was employed in isothermal multiple self-matching initiated amplification (IMSA) which amplified the interest sequence with high selectivity and was widely applied in the rapid detection of human epidemic diseases. However, the detailed information of commercial Bst DNA polymerase is unpublished and well protected by patents, which makes the high price of commercial kits. In this study, wild-type Bst DNA polymerase (WT) and substitution mutations for improving the efficiency of DNA polymerization were expressed and purified in E. coli. Site-directed substitutions of four conserved residues (Gly310, Arg412, Lys416, and Asp540) in the activity site of Bst DNA polymerase influenced efficiency of polymerizing dNTPs. The substitution of residue Gly310 by alanine or leucine and residue Asp540 by glutamic acid increased the efficiency of polymerase activity. All mutants with higher polymerizing efficiency were employed to complete the rapid detection of EV71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) by IMSA approach with relatively shorter period which is suitable for the primary diagnostics setting in rural and underdeveloped areas. PMID:27981047

  8. Probing the importance of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong-liang; Ye, Mao-qing; Zuo, Zhen-yu; Liu, Zhi-gang; Tai, Keng-chang; Zou, Guo-lin

    2006-05-01

    Hydrogen bonds occurring in the catalytic triad (Asp32, His64 and Ser221) and the oxyanion hole (Asn155) are very important to the catalysis of peptide bond hydrolysis by serine proteases. For the subtilisin NK (nattokinase), a bacterial serine protease, construction and analysis of a three-dimensional structural model suggested that several hydrogen bonds formed by four residues function to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. These four residues are Ser33, Asp60, Ser62 and Thr220. In order to remove the effect of these hydrogen bonds, four mutants (Ser33-->Ala33, Asp60-->Ala60, Ser62-->Ala62, and Thr220-->Ala220) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results of enzyme kinetics indicated that removal of these hydrogen bonds increases the free-energy of the transition state (DeltaDeltaG(T)). We concluded that these hydrogen bonds are more important for catalysis than for binding the substrate, because removal of these bonds mainly affects the kcat but not the K(m) values. A substrate, SUB1 (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide), was used during enzyme kinetics experiments. In the present study we have also shown the results of FEP (free-energy perturbation) calculations with regard to the binding and catalysis reactions for these mutant subtilisins. The calculated difference in FEP also suggested that these four residues are more important for catalysis than binding of the substrate, and the simulated values compared well with the experimental values from enzyme kinetics. The results of MD (molecular dynamics) simulations further demonstrated that removal of these hydrogen bonds partially releases Asp32, His64 and Asn155 so that the stability of the transition state decreases. Another substrate, SUB2 (H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-p-nitroanilide), was used for FEP calculations and MD simulations.

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifL and nifH promoters and in vivo analysis of promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, M; Khan, H; Dixon, R

    1985-01-01

    The role of conserved nucleotides in nitrogen-fixation promoter function has been examined using both oligonucleotide and chemical mutagenesis to introduce base changes in the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifL and nifH promoters. Among ten mutations analysed, including six spontaneous mutations, base changes at -12, -13, -14, and -26, located in previously identified conserved sequences, perturbed the activity of the promoters, demonstrating that these sequences are required for transcription. Not all base changes produced similar strong promoter down phenotypes when the nifL and nifH promoters were compared: activation of the nifH promoter by the nifA gene product was less sensitive to base changes in conserved nucleotides than was activation of the equivalently altered nifL promoter by the nifA or ntrC products. We have found that the nifH promoter can be weakly activated by the ntrC product; this activation shows the same down response to base changes seen with ntrC activation of the nifL promoter. We present evidence that the efficient activation of the nifH promoter by nifA (but not ntrC) can be attributed to specific upstream sequences present in the nifH promoter. PMID:3906564

  10. Identification of essential residues for binding and activation in the human 5-HT7(a) serotonin receptor by molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Impellizzeri, Agata Antonina Rita; Pappalardo, Matteo; Basile, Livia; Manfra, Ornella; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel; Krobert, Kurt Allen; Messina, Angela; Levy, Finn Olav; Guccione, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The human 5-HT7 receptor is expressed in both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues and is a potential drug target in behavioral and psychiatric disorders. We examined molecular determinants of ligand binding and G protein activation by the human 5-HT7(a) receptor. The role of several key residues in the 7th transmembrane domain (TMD) and helix 8 were elucidated combining in silico and experimental mutagenesis. Several single and two double point mutations of the 5-HT7(a) wild type receptor were made (W7.33V, E7.35T, E7.35R, E7.35D, E7.35A, R7.36V, Y7.43A, Y7.43F, Y7.43T, R8.52D, D8.53K; E7.35T-R7.36V, R8.52D-D8.53K), and their effects upon ligand binding were assessed by radioligand binding using a potent agonist (5-CT) and a potent antagonist (SB269970). In addition, the ability of the mutated 5-HT7(a) receptors to activate G protein after 5-HT-stimulation was determined through activation of adenylyl cyclase. In silico investigation on mutated receptors substantiated the predicted importance of TM7 and showed critical roles of residues E7.35, W7.33, R7.36 and Y7.43 in agonist and antagonist binding and conformational changes of receptor structure affecting adenylyl cyclase activation. Experimental data showed that mutants E7.35T and E7.35R were incapable of ligand binding and adenylyl cyclase activation, consistent with a requirement for a negatively charged residue at this position. The mutant R8.52D was unable to activate adenylyl cyclase, despite unaffected ligand binding, consistent with the R8.52 residue playing an important role in the receptor-G protein interface. The mutants Y7.43A and Y7.43T displayed reduced agonist binding and AC agonist potency, not seen in Y7.43F, consistent with a requirement for an aromatic residue at this position. Knowledge of the molecular interactions important in h5-HT7 receptor ligand binding and G protein activation will aid the design of selective h5-HT7 receptor ligands for potential pharmacological use. PMID

  11. Identification of essential residues for binding and activation in the human 5-HT7(a) serotonin receptor by molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Impellizzeri, Agata Antonina Rita; Pappalardo, Matteo; Basile, Livia; Manfra, Ornella; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel; Krobert, Kurt Allen; Messina, Angela; Levy, Finn Olav; Guccione, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The human 5-HT7 receptor is expressed in both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues and is a potential drug target in behavioral and psychiatric disorders. We examined molecular determinants of ligand binding and G protein activation by the human 5-HT7(a) receptor. The role of several key residues in the 7th transmembrane domain (TMD) and helix 8 were elucidated combining in silico and experimental mutagenesis. Several single and two double point mutations of the 5-HT7(a) wild type receptor were made (W7.33V, E7.35T, E7.35R, E7.35D, E7.35A, R7.36V, Y7.43A, Y7.43F, Y7.43T, R8.52D, D8.53K; E7.35T-R7.36V, R8.52D-D8.53K), and their effects upon ligand binding were assessed by radioligand binding using a potent agonist (5-CT) and a potent antagonist (SB269970). In addition, the ability of the mutated 5-HT7(a) receptors to activate G protein after 5-HT-stimulation was determined through activation of adenylyl cyclase. In silico investigation on mutated receptors substantiated the predicted importance of TM7 and showed critical roles of residues E7.35, W7.33, R7.36 and Y7.43 in agonist and antagonist binding and conformational changes of receptor structure affecting adenylyl cyclase activation. Experimental data showed that mutants E7.35T and E7.35R were incapable of ligand binding and adenylyl cyclase activation, consistent with a requirement for a negatively charged residue at this position. The mutant R8.52D was unable to activate adenylyl cyclase, despite unaffected ligand binding, consistent with the R8.52 residue playing an important role in the receptor-G protein interface. The mutants Y7.43A and Y7.43T displayed reduced agonist binding and AC agonist potency, not seen in Y7.43F, consistent with a requirement for an aromatic residue at this position. Knowledge of the molecular interactions important in h5-HT7 receptor ligand binding and G protein activation will aid the design of selective h5-HT7 receptor ligands for potential pharmacological use.

  12. Combined Overlap Extension PCR Method for Improved Site Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Nikson Fatt-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The combined overlap extension PCR (COE-PCR) method developed in this work combines the strengths of the overlap extension PCR (OE-PCR) method with the speed and ease of the asymmetrical overlap extension (AOE-PCR) method. This combined method allows up to 6 base pairs to be mutated at a time and requires a total of 40–45 PCR cycles. A total of eight mutagenesis experiments were successfully carried out, with each experiment mutating between two to six base pairs. Up to four adjacent codons were changed in a single experiment. This method is especially useful for codon optimization, where doublet or triplet rare codons can be changed using a single mutagenic primer set, in a single experiment. PMID:27995143

  13. In vivo site-directed mutagenesis using oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Storici, F; Lewis, L K; Resnick, M A

    2001-08-01

    Functional characterization of the genes of higher eukaryotes has been aided by their expression in model organisms and by analyzing site-specific changes in homologous genes in model systems such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modifying sequences in yeast or other organisms such that no heterologous material is retained requires in vitro mutagenesis together with subcloning. PCR-based procedures that do not involve cloning are inefficient or require multistep reactions that increase the risk of additional mutations. An alternative approach, demonstrated in yeast, relies on transformation with an oligonucleotide, but the method is restricted to the generation of mutants with a selectable phenotype. Oligonucleotides, when combined with gap repair, have also been used to modify plasmids in yeast; however, this approach is limited by restriction-site availability. We have developed a mutagenesis approach in yeast based on transformation by unpurified oligonucleotides that allows the rapid creation of site-specific DNA mutations in vivo. A two-step, cloning-free process, referred to as delitto perfetto, generates products having only the desired mutation, such as a single or multiple base change, an insertion, a small or a large deletion, or even random mutations. The system provides for multiple rounds of mutation in a window up to 200 base pairs. The process is RAD52 dependent, is not constrained by the distribution of naturally occurring restriction sites, and requires minimal DNA sequencing. Because yeast is commonly used for random and selective cloning of genomic DNA from higher eukaryotes such as yeast artificial chromosomes, the delitto perfetto strategy also provides an efficient way to create precise changes in mammalian or other DNA sequences.

  14. Site-directed mutagenesis and saturation mutagenesis for the functional study of transcription factors involved in plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Kong, Que; Yuan, Ling

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is largely coordinated by a complex network of interactions between transcription factors (TFs), co-factors, and their cognate cis-regulatory elements in the genome. TFs are multidomain proteins that arise evolutionarily through protein domain shuffling. The modular nature of TFs has led to the idea that specific modules of TFs can be re-designed to regulate desired gene(s) through protein engineering. Utilization of designer TFs for the control of metabolic pathways has emerged as an effective approach for metabolic engineering. We are interested in engineering the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH, Myc-type) transcription factors. Using site-directed and saturation mutagenesis, in combination with efficient and high-throughput screening systems, we have identified and characterized several amino acid residues critical for higher transactivation activity of a Myc-like bHLH transcription factor involved in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in plants. Site-directed and saturation mutagenesis should be generally applicable to engineering of all TFs.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation and site-directed mutagenesis of alcohol acyltransferase: a proposed mechanism of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Morales-Quintana, Luis; Nuñez-Tobar, María Ximena; Moya-León, María Alejandra; Herrera, Raúl

    2013-10-28

    Aroma in Vasconcellea pubescens fruit is determined by esters, which are the products of catalysis by alcohol acyltransferase (VpAAT1). VpAAT1 protein structure displayed the conserved HxxxD motif facing the solvent channel in the center of the structure. To gain insight into the role of these catalytic residues, kinetic and site-directed mutagenesis studies were carried out in VpAAT1 protein. Based on dead-end inhibition studies, the kinetic could be described in terms of a ternary complex mechanism with the H166 residue as the catalytic base. Kinetic results showed the lowest Km value for hexanoyl-CoA. Additionally, the most favorable predicted substrate orientation was observed for hexanoyl-CoA, showing a coincidence between kinetic studies and molecular docking analysis. Substitutions H166A, D170A, D170N, and D170E were evaluated in silico. The solvent channel in all mutant structures was lost, showing large differences with the native structure. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were able to describe unfavored energies for the interaction of the mutant proteins with different alcohols and acyl-CoAs. Additionally, in vitro site-directed mutagenesis of H166 and D170 in VpAAT1 induced a loss of activity, confirming the functional role of both residues for the activity, H166 being directly involved in catalysis.

  16. Development of Therapeutic Chimeric Uricase by Exon Replacement/Restoration and Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guangrong; Yang, Weizhen; Chen, Jing; Li, Miaomiao; Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Baixue; Chen, Si; Wang, Min; Chen, Jianhua

    2016-05-20

    The activity of urate oxidase was lost during hominoid evolution, resulting in high susceptibility to hyperuricemia and gout in humans. In order to develop a more "human-like" uricase for therapeutic use, exon replacement/restoration and site-directed mutagenesis were performed to obtain porcine-human uricase with higher homology to deduced human uricase (dHU) and increased uricolytic activity. In an exon replacement study, substitution of exon 6 in wild porcine uricase (wPU) gene with corresponding exon in dhu totally abolished its activity. Substitutions of exon 5, 3, and 1-2 led to 85%, 60%, and 45% loss of activity, respectively. However, replacement of exon 4 and 7-8 did not significantly change the enzyme activity. When exon 5, 6, and 3 in dhu were replaced by their counterparts in wpu, the resulting chimera H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 was active, but only about 28% of wPU. Multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling predicted that mutations of E24D and E83G in H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 were favorable for further increase of its activity. After site-directed mutagenesis, H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 (E24D & E83G) with increased homology (91.45%) with dHU and higher activity and catalytic efficiency than the FDA-approved porcine-baboon chimera (PBC) was obtained. It showed optimum activity at pH 8.5 and 35 °C and was stable in a pH range of 6.5-11.0 and temperature range of 20-40 °C.

  17. Identification of catalytically essential residues in Escherichia coli esterase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Haruki, M; Oohashi, Y; Mizuguchi, S; Matsuo, Y; Morikawa, M; Kanaya, S

    1999-07-09

    Escherichia coli esterase (EcE) is a member of the hormone-sensitive lipase family. We have analyzed the roles of the conserved residues in this enzyme (His103, Glu128, Gly163, Asp164, Ser165, Gly167, Asp262, Asp266 and His292) by site-directed mutagenesis. Among them, Gly163, Asp164, Ser165, and Gly167 are the components of a G-D/E-S-A-G motif. We showed that Ser165, Asp262, and His292 are the active-site residues of the enzyme. We also showed that none of the other residues, except for Asp164, is critical for the enzymatic activity. The mutation of Asp164 to Ala dramatically reduced the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme by the factor of 10(4) without seriously affecting the substrate binding. This residue is probably structurally important to make the conformation of the active-site functional.

  18. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli’s natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or “coliroids,” rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein’s local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system’s performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling. PMID:26799494

  19. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Olshefsky, Audrey; Shehata, Laila; Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli's natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or "coliroids," rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein's local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system's performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling.

  20. Engineering of Recombinant Poplar Deoxy-D-Xylulose-5-Phosphate Synthase (PtDXS) by Site-Directed Mutagenesis Improves Its Activity

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Aparajita; Preiser, Alyssa L.

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) dependent enzyme, plays a regulatory role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), the end products of this pathway, inhibit DXS by competing with ThDP. Feedback inhibition of DXS by IDP and DMADP constitutes a significant metabolic regulation of this pathway. The aim of this work was to experimentally test the effect of key residues of recombinant poplar DXS (PtDXS) in binding both ThDP and IDP. This work also described the engineering of PtDXS to improve the enzymatic activity by reducing its inhibition by IDP and DMADP. We have designed and tested modifications of PtDXS in an attempt to reduce inhibition by IDP. This could possibly be valuable by removing a feedback that limits the usefulness of the MEP pathway in biotechnological applications. Both ThDP and IDP use similar interactions for binding at the active site of the enzyme, however, ThDP being a larger molecule has more anchoring sites at the active site of the enzyme as compared to the inhibitors. A predicted enzyme structure was examined to find ligand-enzyme interactions, which are relatively more important for inhibitor-enzyme binding than ThDP-enzyme binding, followed by their modifications so that the binding of the inhibitors can be selectively affected compared to ThDP. Two alanine residues important for binding ThDP and the inhibitors were mutated to glycine. In two of the cases, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were increased. In another case, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were reduced. This provides proof of concept that it is possible to reduce the feedback from IDP on DXS activity. PMID:27548482

  1. Engineering of Recombinant Poplar Deoxy-D-Xylulose-5-Phosphate Synthase (PtDXS) by Site-Directed Mutagenesis Improves Its Activity.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aparajita; Preiser, Alyssa L; Sharkey, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) dependent enzyme, plays a regulatory role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), the end products of this pathway, inhibit DXS by competing with ThDP. Feedback inhibition of DXS by IDP and DMADP constitutes a significant metabolic regulation of this pathway. The aim of this work was to experimentally test the effect of key residues of recombinant poplar DXS (PtDXS) in binding both ThDP and IDP. This work also described the engineering of PtDXS to improve the enzymatic activity by reducing its inhibition by IDP and DMADP. We have designed and tested modifications of PtDXS in an attempt to reduce inhibition by IDP. This could possibly be valuable by removing a feedback that limits the usefulness of the MEP pathway in biotechnological applications. Both ThDP and IDP use similar interactions for binding at the active site of the enzyme, however, ThDP being a larger molecule has more anchoring sites at the active site of the enzyme as compared to the inhibitors. A predicted enzyme structure was examined to find ligand-enzyme interactions, which are relatively more important for inhibitor-enzyme binding than ThDP-enzyme binding, followed by their modifications so that the binding of the inhibitors can be selectively affected compared to ThDP. Two alanine residues important for binding ThDP and the inhibitors were mutated to glycine. In two of the cases, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were increased. In another case, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were reduced. This provides proof of concept that it is possible to reduce the feedback from IDP on DXS activity.

  2. Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium: Role of Glutamate 186 in Catalysis Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis, Alternate Substrates, and Active-site Inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium (SXA) is the most active enzyme known for catalyzing hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides to D xylose. Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation states of catalytic ...

  3. Site directed mutagenesis of StSUT1 reveals target amino acids of regulation and stability.

    PubMed

    Krügel, Undine; Wiederhold, Elena; Pustogowa, Jelena; Hackel, Aleksandra; Grimm, Bernhard; Kühn, Christina

    2013-11-01

    Plant sucrose transporters (SUTs) are functional as sucrose-proton-cotransporters with an optimal transport activity in the acidic pH range. Recently, the pH optimum of the Solanum tuberosum sucrose transporter StSUT1 was experimentally determined to range at an unexpectedly low pH of 3 or even below. Various research groups have confirmed these surprising findings independently and in different organisms. Here we provide further experimental evidence for a pH optimum at physiological extrema. Site directed mutagenesis provides information about functional amino acids, which are highly conserved and responsible for this extraordinary increase in transport capacity under extreme pH conditions. Redox-dependent dimerization of the StSUT1 protein was described earlier. Here the ability of StSUT1 to form homodimers was demonstrated by heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis and Xenopus leavis using Western blots, and in plants by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Mutagenesis of highly conserved cysteine residues revealed their importance in protein stability. The accessibility of regulatory amino acid residues in the light of StSUT1's compartmentalization in membrane microdomains is discussed.

  4. Software-supported USER cloning strategies for site-directed mutagenesis and DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jespersen, Jakob Berg; Sommer, Morten O A; Wernersson, Rasmus; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2015-03-20

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/AMUSER/.

  5. Functional Analysis by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the NAD+-Reducing Hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Tanja; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2002-01-01

    The tetrameric cytoplasmic [NiFe] hydrogenase (SH) of Ralstonia eutropha couples the oxidation of hydrogen to the reduction of NAD+ under aerobic conditions. In the catalytic subunit HoxH, all six conserved motifs surrounding the [NiFe] site are present. Five of these motifs were altered by site-directed mutagenesis in order to dissect the molecular mechanism of hydrogen activation. Based on phenotypic characterizations, 27 mutants were grouped into four different classes. Mutants of the major class, class I, failed to grow on hydrogen and were devoid of H2-oxidizing activity. In one of these isolates (HoxH I64A), H2 binding was impaired. Class II mutants revealed a high D2/H+ exchange rate relative to a low H2-oxidizing activity. A representative (HoxH H16L) displayed D2/H+ exchange but had lost electron acceptor-reducing activity. Both activities were equally affected in class III mutants. Mutants forming class IV showed a particularly interesting phenotype. They displayed O2-sensitive growth on hydrogen due to an O2-sensitive SH protein. PMID:12399498

  6. Ligand Promiscuity of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists and Antagonists Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Soshilov, Anatoly A.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that can be activated by structurally diverse chemicals. To examine the mechanisms responsible for the promiscuity in AhR ligand binding, we determined the effects of mutations within the AhR ligand-binding domain (LBD) on the activity of diverse AhR ligands. Site-directed mutagenesis identified Ile319 of the mouse AhR and, to a lesser extent, Phe318 as residues involved in ligand-selective modulation of AhR transformation using a panel of 12 AhR ligands. These ligands could be categorized into four distinct structurally related groups based on their ability to activate AhR mutants at position 319 in vitro. The mutation I319K was selectively activated by FICZ and not by other examined ligands in vitro and in cell culture. F318L and F318A mutations resulted in the conversion of AhR agonists β-naphthoflavone and 3-methylcholanthrene, respectively, into partial agonists/antagonists. Hsp90 binding to the AhR was decreased with several mutations and was inversely correlated with AhR ligand-binding promiscuity. Together, these data define overlapping amino acid residues within the AhR LBD involved in the selectivity of ligand binding, the agonist or antagonist mode of ligand binding, and hsp90 binding and provide insights into the ligand diversity of AhR activators. PMID:24591650

  7. Examination of the thiamin diphosphate binding site in yeast transketolase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Meshalkina, L; Nilsson, U; Wikner, C; Kostikowa, T; Schneider, G

    1997-03-01

    The role of two conserved amino acid residues in the thiamin diphosphate binding site of yeast transketolase has been analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of E162, which is part of a cluster of glutamic acid residues at the subunit interface, by alanine or glutamine results in mutant enzymes with most catalytic properties similar to wild-type enzyme. The two mutant enzymes show, however, significant increases in the K0.5 values for thiamin diphosphate in the absence of substrate and in the lag of the reaction progress curves. This suggests that the interaction of E162 with residue E418, and possibly E167, from the second subunit is important for formation and stabilization of the transketolase dimer. Replacement of the conserved residue D382, which is buried upon binding of thiamin diphosphate, by asparagine and alanine, results in mutant enzymes severely impaired in thiamin diphosphate binding and catalytic efficiency. The 25-80-fold increase in K0.5 for thiamin diphosphate suggests that D382 is involved in cofactor binding, probably by electrostatic compensation of the positive charge of the thiazolium ring and stabilization of a flexible loop at the active site. The decrease in catalytic activities in the D382 mutants indicates that this residue might also be important in subsequent steps in catalysis.

  8. Characterization of lysosomal acid lipase by site-directed mutagenesis and heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, S; Du, H; Grabowski, G A

    1995-11-17

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is essential for the hydrolysis of cholesterol esters and triglycerides that are delivered to the lysosomes via the low density lipoprotein receptor system. The deficiency of LAL is associated with cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) and Wolman's disease (WD). We cloned the human LAL cDNA and expressed the active enzyme in the baculovirus system. Two molecular forms (M(r) approximately 41,000 and approximately 46,000) with different glycosylation were found intracellularly, and approximately 24% of the M(r) approximately 46,000 form was secreted into the medium. Tunicamycin treatment produced only an inactive M(r) approximately 41,000 form. This result implicates glycosylation occupancy in the proper folding for active-site function. Catalytic activity was greater toward cis- than trans-unsaturated fatty acid esters of 4-methylumbelliferone and toward esters with 7-carbon length acyl chains. LAL cleaved cholesterol esters and mono-, tri-, and diglycerides. Heparin had a biphasic effect on enzymatic activity with initial activation followed by inhibition. Inhibition of LAL activity by tetrahydrolipstatin and diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate suggested the presence of active serines in binding/catalytic domain(s) of the protein. Site-directed mutagenesis at two putative active centers, GXSXG, showed that Ser153 was important to catalytic activity, whereas Ser99 was not and neither was the catalytic nucleophile. Three reported mutations (L179P, L336P, and delta AG302 deletion) from CESD patients were created and expressed in the Sf9 cell system. None cleaved cholesterol esters, and L179P and L336P cleaved only triolein at approximately 4% of wild-type levels. These results suggest that mechanisms, in addition to LAL defects, may operate in the selective accumulation of cholesterol esters or triglycerides in CESD and WD patients.

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis of lysine-329 of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, T.S.; Larimer, F.W.; Mural, R.J.; Machanoff, R.; Foote, R.S.; Lee, E.H.; Hartman, F.C.

    1987-05-01

    A variety of data suggest that Lys-329 of the title enzyme serves a catalytic function. To test this postulate, Lys-329 has been replaced with Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Arg, or Glu by a technique of site-directed mutagenesis that utilizes a suitably gapped plasmid carrying the target gene. The mutant proteins were produced in E. coli JM107 and purified to near homogeneity by immunoaffinity chromatography; they were shown to be dimers, like the wild-type enzyme, by gel electrophoresis. Hence, these amino acid substitutions are compatible with proper folding and association of subunits. The purified mutant proteins do not exhibit detectable enzyme activity nor do they form a stable quaternary complex with Mg/sup 2 +/, CO/sub 2/, and a transition-state analog as observed for wild-type enzyme. However, based on ligand-selective elution of the mutant proteins from an affinity matrix (green A agarose) they do retain the ability to bind substrate analogs. These results support an absolute essentiality of Lys-329; its precise function may be illuminated by further characterization of the mutant proteins.

  10. Study of substrate specificity of human aromatase by site directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Auvray, P; Nativelle, C; Bureau, R; Dallemagne, P; Séralini, G-E; Sourdaine, P

    2002-03-01

    Human aromatase is responsible for estrogen biosynthesis and is implicated, in particular, in reproduction and estrogen-dependent tumor proliferation. The molecular structure model is largely derived from the X-ray structure of bacterial cytochromes sharing only 15-20% identities with hP-450arom. In the present study, site directed mutagenesis experiments were performed to examine the role of K119, C124, I125, K130, E302, F320, D309, H475, D476, S470, I471 and I474 of aromatase in catalysis and for substrate binding. The catalytic properties of mutants, transfected in 293 cells, were evaluated using androstenedione, testosterone or nor-testosterone as substrates. In addition, inhibition profiles for these mutants with indane or indolizinone derivatives were obtained. Our results, together with computer modeling, show that catalytic properties of mutants vary in accordance with the substrate used, suggesting possible differences in substrates positioning within the active site. In this respect, importance of residues H475, D476 and K130 was discussed. These results allow us to hypothesize that E302 could be involved in the aromatization mechanism with nor-androgens, whereas D309 remains involved in androgen aromatization. This study highlights the flexibility of the substrate-enzyme complex conformation, and thus sheds new light on residues that may be responsible for substrate specificity between species or aromatase isoforms.

  11. Identification of functional regions in the Rhodospirillum rubrum L-asparaginase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Pokrovskaya, M V; Aleksandrova, S S; Pokrovsky, V S; Veselovsky, A V; Grishin, D V; Abakumova, O Yu; Podobed, O V; Mishin, A A; Zhdanov, D D; Sokolov, N N

    2015-03-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of Rhodospirillum rubrum L-asparaginase (RrA) was performed in order to identify sites of the protein molecule important for its therapeutic and physico-chemical properties. Ten multipoint mutant genes were obtained, and five recombinant RrA variants were expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) cells and isolated as functionally active highly purified proteins. Protein purification was performed using Q-Sepharose and DEAE-Toyopearl chromatography. Overall yield of the active enzymes was 70-80 %, their specific activity at pH 7.4 and 37 °C varied of 140-210 U/mg. L-Glutaminase activity did not exceed 0.01 % of L-asparaginase activity. All RrA mutants showed maximum enzyme activity at pH 9.3-9.5 and 53-58 °C. Km and Vmax values for L-asparagine were evaluated for all mutants. Mutations G86P, D88H, M90K (RrAH), G121L, D123A (RrАI) caused the loss of enzyme activity and confirmed the importance of these sites in the implementation of catalytic functions. Removal of four residues from C-terminal area of the enzyme (RrAK) resulted in the enzyme instability. Mutations D60K, F61L(RrАD), and R118H, G120R(RrАJ) led to the improvement of kinetic parameters and enzyme stabilization. Substitutions E149R, V150P (RrАB) improved antineoplastic and cytotoxic activity of the RrA. A64V, E67K substitutions, especially in combination with E149R, V150P (RrАE), considerably destabilized recombinant enzyme.

  12. QM/MM Model of the Mouse Olfactory Receptor MOR244-3 Validated by Site-Directed Mutagenesis Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sekharan, Sivakumar; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Zhuang, Hanyi; Block, Eric; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Zhang, Ruina; Wei, Jennifer N.; Pan, Yi; Batista, Victor S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding structure/function relationships of olfactory receptors is challenging due to the lack of x-ray structural models. Here, we introduce a QM/MM model of the mouse olfactory receptor MOR244-3, responsive to organosulfur odorants such as (methylthio)methanethiol. The binding site consists of a copper ion bound to the heteroatoms of amino-acid residues H105, C109, and N202. The model is consistent with site-directed mutagenesis experiments and biochemical measurements of the receptor activation, and thus provides a valuable framework for further studies of the sense of smell at the molecular level. PMID:25185561

  13. Structure-function studies on human retinol-binding protein using site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sivaprasadarao, A; Findlay, J B

    1994-01-01

    Retinol-binding protein (RBP) transports vitamin A in the plasma. It consists of eight anti-parallel beta-strands (A to H) that fold to form an orthogonal barrel. The loops connecting the strands A and B, C and D, and E and F form the entrance to the binding site in the barrel. The retinol molecule is found deep inside this barrel. Apart from its specific interaction with retinol, RBP is involved in two other molecular-recognition properties, that is it binds to transthyretin (TTR), another serum protein, and to a cell-surface receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis, specific changes were made to the loop regions of human RBP and the resultant mutant proteins were tested for their ability to bind to retinol, to TTR and to the RBP receptor. While all the variants retained their ability to bind retinol, that in which residues 92 to 98 of the loop E-F were deleted completely lost its ability to interact with TTR, but retained some binding activity for the receptor. In contrast, the double mutant in which leucine residues at positions 63 and 64 of the loop C-D were changed to arginine and serine respectively partially retained its TTR-binding ability, but completely lost its affinity for the RBP receptor. Mutation of Leu-35 of loop A-B to valine revealed no apparent effect on any of the binding activities of RBP. However, substitution of leucine for proline at position 35 markedly reduced the affinity of the protein for TTR, but showed no apparent change in its receptor-binding activity. These results demonstrate that RBP interacts with both TTR and the receptor via loops C-D and E-F. The binding sites, however, are overlapping rather than identical. RBP also appears to make an additional contact with TTR via its loop A-B. A further implication of these results is that RBP, when bound to TTR, cannot bind simultaneously to the receptor. This observation is consistent with our previously proposed mechanism for delivery of retinol to target tissues [Sivaprasadarao and

  14. Improving the catalytic efficiency of Bacillus pumilus CotA-laccase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Luo, Quan; Zhou, Wen; Xie, Zeng; Cai, Yu-Jie; Liao, Xiang-Ru; Guan, Zheng-Bing

    2017-03-01

    Bacterial laccases are potential enzymes for biotechnological applications because of their remarkable advantages, such as broad substrate spectrum, various reactions, high thermostability, wide pH range, and resistance to strongly alkaline environments. However, the use of bacterial laccases for industrialized applications is limited because of their low expression level and catalytic efficiency. In this study, CotA, a bacterial laccase from Bacillus pumilus, was engineered through presumptive reasoning and rational design approaches to overcome low catalytic efficiency and thermostability. L386W/G417L, a CotA double-mutant, was constructed through site-directed mutagenesis. The catalytic efficiency of L386W/G417L was 4.3 fold higher than that of wild-type CotA-laccase, but the thermostability of the former was decreased than that of the latter and other mutants. The half-life (t 1/2) of wild-type and G417L were 1.14 and 1.47 h, but the half-life of L386W/G417L was only 0.37 h when incubating the enzyme at 80 °C. Considering the high catalytic efficiency of L386W/G417L, we constructed L386W/G417L/G57F, another mutant, to improve thermostability. Results showed that the half-life of L386W/G417L/G57F was 0.54 h when incubating the enzyme at 90 °C for 2 h with about 34% residual activity, but the residual activity of L386W/G417L was less than 40% when incubating the enzyme at 90 °C for 5 min. L386W/G417L was more efficient in decolorizing various industrial dyes at pH 10 than other mutants. L386W/G417L/G57F also exhibited an efficient decolorization ability. L386W/G417L/G57F is appropriate for biotechnological applications because of its high activity and thermostability in decolorizing industrial dyes. CotA-laccase may be further subjected to molecular modification and be used as an enhancer to improve decolorization efficiency for the physical and chemical treatment of dye wastewater.

  15. Characterisation of the Rab binding properties of Rab coupling protein (RCP) by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Andrew J; McCaffrey, Mary W

    2004-07-30

    Rab coupling protein (RCP) is a member of the Rab11-family of interacting proteins (Rab11-FIPs). Family members are characterised by their ability to interact with Rab11. This property is mediated by a conserved Rab binding domain (RBD) located at their carboxy-termini. Several Rab11-FIPs can also interact with other small GTPases. RCP interacts with Rab4 in addition to Rab11. To dissect out the individual properties of the Rab4 and Rab11 interactions with RCP, conserved amino acids within the RBD of RCP were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. The effect of these mutations on Rab4 and Rab11 binding, and the intracellular localisation of RCP, was examined. Our results indicate that Rab11, rather than Rab4, mediates the intracellular localisation of RCP, and that the class I Rab11-FIPs compete for binding to Rab11.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation studies and in vitro site directed mutagenesis of avian beta-defensin Apl_AvBD2

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Defensins comprise a group of antimicrobial peptides, widely recognized as important elements of the innate immune system in both animals and plants. Cationicity, rather than the secondary structure, is believed to be the major factor defining the antimicrobial activity of defensins. To test this hypothesis and to improve the activity of the newly identified avian β-defensin Apl_AvBD2 by enhancing the cationicity, we performed in silico site directed mutagenesis, keeping the predicted secondary structure intact. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies were done to predict the activity. Mutant proteins were made by in vitro site directed mutagenesis and recombinant protein expression, and tested for antimicrobial activity to confirm the results obtained in MD simulation analysis. Results MD simulation revealed subtle, but critical, structural variations between the wild type Apl_AvBD2 and the more cationic in silico mutants, which were not detected in the initial structural prediction by homology modelling. The C-terminal cationic 'claw' region, important in antimicrobial activity, which was intact in the wild type, showed changes in shape and orientation in all the mutant peptides. Mutant peptides also showed increased solvent accessible surface area and more number of hydrogen bonds with the surrounding water molecules. In functional studies, the Escherichia coli expressed, purified recombinant mutant proteins showed total loss of antimicrobial activity compared to the wild type protein. Conclusion The study revealed that cationicity alone is not the determining factor in the microbicidal activity of antimicrobial peptides. Factors affecting the molecular dynamics such as hydrophobicity, electrostatic interactions and the potential for oligomerization may also play fundamental roles. It points to the usefulness of MD simulation studies in successful engineering of antimicrobial peptides for improved activity and other desirable functions. PMID

  17. Identification of the Catalytic Residue of Rat Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase 9 by Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Deng, Senwen; Wang, Yiping

    2017-01-13

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD 9) is the ninth member of ACADs involved in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and possibly complex I assembly. Sequence alignment suggested that Glu389 of rat ACAD 9 was highly conserved and located near the active center and might act as an important base for the dehydrogenation reaction. The role of Glu389 in the catalytic reaction was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. Both wild-type and mutant ACAD 9 proteins were purified and their catalytic characterization was studied. When Glu389 was replaced by other residues, the enzyme activity could be lost to a large extent. Those results suggested that Glu389 could function as the catalytic base that abstracted the α-proton of the acyl-CoA substrate in a proposed catalytic mechanism.

  18. Enhancement of oxidative stability of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Weng, MeiZhi; Zheng, ZhongLiang; Bao, Wei; Cai, YongJun; Yin, Yan; Zou, GuoLin; Zou, GouLin

    2009-11-01

    Nattokinase (subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with strong fibrinolytic activity and it is a potent cardiovascular drug. In medical and commercial applications, however, it is susceptible to chemical oxidation, and subsequent inactivation or denaturation. Here we show that the oxidative stability of NK was substantially increased by optimizing the amino acid residues Thr(220) and Met(222), which were in the vicinity of the catalytic residue Ser(221) of the enzyme. Two nonoxidative amino acids (Ser and Ala) were introduced at these sites using site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and enzymes were purified to homogeneity. The purified enzymes were analyzed with respect to oxidative stability, kinetic parameters, fibrinolytic activity and thermal stability. M222A mutant was found to have a greatly increased oxidative stability compared with wild-type enzyme and it was resistant to inactivation by more than 1 M H(2)O(2), whereas the wild-type enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M H(2)O(2) (t(1/2) approximately 11.6 min). The other mutant (T220S) also showed an obvious increase in antioxidative ability. Molecular dynamic simulations on wild-type and T220S mutant proteins suggested that a hydrogen bond was formed between Ser(220) and Asn(155), and the spatial structure of Met(222) was changed compared with the wild-type. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of improving oxidative stability of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve stability of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  19. Improvements in Glucose Sensitivity and Stability of Trichoderma reesei β-Glucosidase Using Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Glucose sensitivity and pH and thermal stabilities of Trichoderma reesei Cel1A (Bgl II) were improved by site-directed mutagenesis of only two amino acid residues (L167W or P172L) at the entrance of the active site. The Cel1A mutant showed high glucose tolerance (50% of inhibitory concentration = 650 mM), glucose stimulation (2.0 fold at 50 mM glucose), and enhanced specific activity (2.4-fold) compared with those of the wild-type Cel1A. Furthermore, the mutant enzyme showed stability at a wide pH range of 4.5–9.0 and possessed high thermal stability up to 50°C with 80% of the residual activities compared with the stability seen at the pH range of 6.5–7.0 and temperatures of up to 40°C in the wild-type Cel1A. Kinetic studies for hydrolysis revealed that the Cel1A mutant was competitively inhibited by glucose at similar levels as the wild-type enzyme. Additionally, the mutant enzyme exhibited substrate inhibition, which gradually disappeared with an increasing glucose concentration. These data suggest that the glucose stimulation was caused by relieve the substrate inhibition in the presence of glucose. To conclude, all the properties improved by the mutagenesis would be great advantages in degradation of cellulosic biomass together with cellulases. PMID:26790148

  20. Synthesis of Recombinant P48 of Mycoplasma agalactiae by Site Directed Mutagenesis and its Immunological Characterization.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Pawanjit Singh; Singh, Satparkash; Kathiresan, S; Kumar, Ramesh; Bhanot, Vandna; Singh, Vijendra Pal

    2017-01-02

    Contagious agalactia caused by Mycoplasma agalactiae is an economically important disease of sheep and goats and has been prevalent worldwide including India. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the membrane protein P48 of M. agalactiae for specific diagnosis of disease. For this, p48 gene of the organism was amplified by PCR and subjected to site directed mutagenesis to convert three TGA codons to TGG's and, subsequently, cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pPRO EX HTb. Purified recombinant P48 protein reacted to anti-P48 serum in western blotting, which confirmed its immunogenic nature. Furthermore, the immune-blotting of the cell lysates from various Indian isolates of M. agalactiae against anti-P48 serum resulted in a single band at ∼ 48 kDa among all isolates, indicating the conserved nature of P48 antigen in M. agalactiae. Also, the cross reactivity of P48 antigen among various Mycoplasma spp. was checked by western blotting which revealed reactivity only with M. agalactiae and M. bovis. Hence, this antigen could be exploited to differentiate M. agalactiae from other pathogenic Mycoplasma species except M. bovis. However, the inability of P48 to distinguish M. agalactiae from M. bovis does not downgrade the significance of P48 as the two species are usually host specific.

  1. Viable transmembrane region mutants of bacteriophage M13 coat protein prepared by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Deber, C M

    1991-10-31

    Bacteriophage M13 coat protein - a 50-residue protein located at the E. coli host membrane during phage reproduction - is subjected to cytoplasmic, membrane-bound, and DNA-interactive environments during the phage life cycle. In research to examine the specific features of primary/secondary structure in the effective transmembrane (TM) region of the protein (residues 21-39: YIGYAWAMVVVIVGATIGI) which modulate its capacity to respond conformationally to the progressive influences of these varying environments, we have prepared over two dozen viable mutant phages with alterations in their coat protein TM regions. Mutants were obtained through use of site-directed mutagenesis techniques in combination with three "randomized" oligonucleotides which spanned the TM region. No subcloning was required. Among mutations observed were those in which each of the four TM Val residues was changed to Ala, and several with increased Ser or Thr content, including one double Ser mutant (G23S-A25S). Polar substitutions arising at Gly23 and Tyr24-including G23D, Y24H, Y24D and Y24N-suggested that this local segment resides external to the host membrane. Milligram quantities of mutant coat proteins are obtained by growing M13 mutant phages in liter preparations, with isotopic (e.g., 13C) labelling at desired sites, for subsequent characterization and conformational analysis in membrane-mimetic media.

  2. A combination of site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification to improve diastereopreference of Pseudomonas alcaligenes lipase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Wu, Jianping; Yang, Lirong; Xu, Gang

    2013-12-01

    A combination of site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification was employed to alter protein structure with the objective of improving diastereopreference over that achieved by simple site-directed mutagenesis. Conformational analysis using molecular dynamic (MD) simulation of Pseudomonas alcaligenes lipase (PAL) indicated that stronger steric exclusion and structural rigidity facilitated diastereopreference. A cysteine (Cys) residue was introduced using site-directed mutagenesis to construct variant A272C. The modifier 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) was then reacted with the introduced Cys residue to provide stronger steric exclusion and structural rigidity. The modification was verified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Diastereopreference was improved significantly. The diastereomeric excess (dep) of l-menthol increased from 35% with wild type PAL to 90% with A272C-DTNB modified PAL when the conversion ratio of l-menthyl propionate was nearly 100%. Conformation and kinetic parameter analysis showed that A272C-DTNB modified PAL exhibited stronger steric exclusion and increased structural rigidity around the modification site that inhibited the hydrolysis of non-targeted substrates. The combination of site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification could be an effective method to alter protein properties and enhance diastereopreference through the combined effect of steric exclusion and structural rigidity.

  3. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Nidovirus Replicative Endoribonuclease NendoU Exerts Pleiotropic Effects on the Arterivirus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Posthuma, Clara C.; Nedialkova, Danny D.; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Blokhuis, Jeroen H.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Snijder, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    The highly conserved NendoU replicative domain of nidoviruses (arteriviruses, coronaviruses, and roniviruses) belongs to a small protein family whose cellular branch is prototyped by XendoU, a Xenopus laevis endoribonuclease involved in nucleolar RNA processing. Recently, sequence-specific in vitro endoribonuclease activity was demonstrated for the NendoU-containing nonstructural protein (nsp) 15 of several coronaviruses. To investigate the biological role of this novel enzymatic activity, we have characterized a comprehensive set of arterivirus NendoU mutants. Deleting parts of the NendoU domain from nsp11 of equine arteritis virus was lethal. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved residues exerted pleiotropic effects. In a first-cycle analysis, replacement of two conserved Asp residues in the C-terminal part of NendoU rendered viral RNA synthesis and virus production undetectable. In contrast, mutagenesis of other conserved residues, including two putative catalytic His residues that are absolutely conserved in NendoU and cellular homologs, produced viable mutants displaying reduced plaque sizes (20 to 80% reduction) and reduced yields of infectious progeny of up to 5 log units. A more detailed analysis of these mutants revealed a moderate reduction in RNA synthesis, with subgenomic RNA synthesis consistently being more strongly affected than genome replication. Our data suggest that the arterivirus nsp11 is a multifunctional protein with a key role in viral RNA synthesis and additional functions in the viral life cycle that are as yet poorly defined. PMID:16439522

  4. Site-directed Mutagenesis Switching a Dimethylallyl Tryptophan Synthase to a Specific Tyrosine C3-Prenylating Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Aili; Zocher, Georg; Stec, Edyta; Stehle, Thilo; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2 and 7-DMATS (7-dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase) from Aspergillus fumigatus catalyze C4- and C7-prenylation of the indole ring, respectively. 7-DMATS was found to accept l-tyrosine as substrate as well and converted it to an O-prenylated derivative. An acceptance of l-tyrosine by FgaPT2 was also observed in this study. Interestingly, isolation and structure elucidation revealed the identification of a C3-prenylated l-tyrosine as enzyme product. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis led to creation of a mutant FgaPT2_K174F, which showed much higher specificity toward l-tyrosine than l-tryptophan. Its catalytic efficiency toward l-tyrosine was found to be 4.9-fold in comparison with that of non-mutated FgaPT2, whereas the activity toward l-tryptophan was less than 0.4% of that of the wild-type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on an enzymatic C-prenylation of l-tyrosine as free amino acid and altering the substrate preference of a prenyltransferase by mutagenesis. PMID:25477507

  5. Construction of a guide-RNA for site-directed RNA mutagenesis utilising intracellular A-to-I RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Masatora; Umeno, Hiromitsu; Nose, Kanako; Nishitarumizu, Azusa; Noguchi, Ryoma; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-02

    As an alternative to DNA mutagenesis, RNA mutagenesis can potentially become a powerful gene-regulation method for fundamental research and applied life sciences. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing alters genetic information at the transcript level and is an important biological process that is commonly conserved in metazoans. Therefore, a versatile RNA-mutagenesis method can be achieved by utilising the intracellular RNA-editing mechanism. Here, we report novel guide RNAs capable of inducing A-to-I mutations by guiding the editing enzyme, human adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR). These guide RNAs successfully introduced A-to-I mutations into the target-site, which was determined by the reprogrammable antisense region. In ADAR2-over expressing cells, site-directed RNA editing could also be performed by simply introducing the guide RNA. Our guide RNA framework provides basic insights into establishing a generally applicable RNA-mutagenesis method.

  6. Construction of a guide-RNA for site-directed RNA mutagenesis utilising intracellular A-to-I RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masatora; Umeno, Hiromitsu; Nose, Kanako; Nishitarumizu, Azusa; Noguchi, Ryoma; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    As an alternative to DNA mutagenesis, RNA mutagenesis can potentially become a powerful gene-regulation method for fundamental research and applied life sciences. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing alters genetic information at the transcript level and is an important biological process that is commonly conserved in metazoans. Therefore, a versatile RNA-mutagenesis method can be achieved by utilising the intracellular RNA-editing mechanism. Here, we report novel guide RNAs capable of inducing A-to-I mutations by guiding the editing enzyme, human adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR). These guide RNAs successfully introduced A-to-I mutations into the target-site, which was determined by the reprogrammable antisense region. In ADAR2-over expressing cells, site-directed RNA editing could also be performed by simply introducing the guide RNA. Our guide RNA framework provides basic insights into establishing a generally applicable RNA-mutagenesis method. PMID:28148949

  7. One-Tube-Only Standardized Site-Directed Mutagenesis: An Alternative Approach to Generate Amino Acid Substitution Collections

    PubMed Central

    Mingo, Janire; Erramuzpe, Asier; Luna, Sandra; Aurtenetxe, Olaia; Amo, Laura; Diez, Ibai; Schepens, Jan T. G.; Hendriks, Wiljan J. A. J.; Cortés, Jesús M.; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) is a powerful tool to create defined collections of protein variants for experimental and clinical purposes, but effectiveness is compromised when a large number of mutations is required. We present here a one-tube-only standardized SDM approach that generates comprehensive collections of amino acid substitution variants, including scanning- and single site-multiple mutations. The approach combines unified mutagenic primer design with the mixing of multiple distinct primer pairs and/or plasmid templates to increase the yield of a single inverse-PCR mutagenesis reaction. Also, a user-friendly program for automatic design of standardized primers for Ala-scanning mutagenesis is made available. Experimental results were compared with a modeling approach together with stochastic simulation data. For single site-multiple mutagenesis purposes and for simultaneous mutagenesis in different plasmid backgrounds, combination of primer sets and/or plasmid templates in a single reaction tube yielded the distinct mutations in a stochastic fashion. For scanning mutagenesis, we found that a combination of overlapping primer sets in a single PCR reaction allowed the yield of different individual mutations, although this yield did not necessarily follow a stochastic trend. Double mutants were generated when the overlap of primer pairs was below 60%. Our results illustrate that one-tube-only SDM effectively reduces the number of reactions required in large-scale mutagenesis strategies, facilitating the generation of comprehensive collections of protein variants suitable for functional analysis. PMID:27548698

  8. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of a Hyperthermophilic Endoglucanase Cel12B from Thermotoga maritima Based on Rational Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Shi, Hao; Xu, Linyu; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiangqian

    2015-01-01

    To meet the demand for the application of high activity and thermostable cellulases in the production of new-generation bioethanol from nongrain-cellulose sources, a hyperthermostable β-1,4-endoglucase Cel12B from Thermotoga maritima was selected for further modification by gene site-directed mutagenesis method in the present study, based on homology modeling and rational design. As a result, two recombinant enzymes showed significant improvement in enzyme activity by 77% and 87%, respectively, higher than the parental enzyme TmCel12B. Furthermore, the two mutants could retain 80% and 90.5% of their initial activity after incubation at 80°C for 8 h, while only 45% for 5 h to TmCel12B. The Km and Vmax of the two recombinant enzymes were 1.97±0.05 mM, 4.23±0.15 μmol·mg-1·min-1 of TmCel12B-E225H-K207G-D37V, and 2.97±0.12 mM, 3.15±0.21 μmol·mg-1·min-1 of TmCel12B-E225H-K207G, respectively, when using CMC-Na as the substrate. The roles of the mutation sites were also analyzed and evaluated in terms of electron density, hydrophobicity of the modeled protein structures. The recombinant enzymes may be used in the hydrolysis of cellulose at higher temperature in the future. It was concluded that the gene mutagenesis approach of a certain active residues may effectively improve the performance of cellulases for the industrial applications and contribute to the study the thermostable mechanism of thermophilic enzymes. PMID:26218520

  9. Crystallization of a fragment of human fibronectin: introduction of methionine by site-directed mutagenesis to allow phasing via selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Leahy, D J; Erickson, H P; Aukhil, I; Joshi, P; Hendrickson, W A

    1994-05-01

    Crystals of a fragment of human fibronectin encompassing the 7th through the RGD-containing 10th type III repeats (FN7-10) have been produced with protein expressed in E. coli. The crystals are monoclinic with one molecule in the asymmetric unit and diffract to beyond 2.0 A Bragg spacings. A mutant FN7-10 was produced in which three methionines, in addition to the single native methionine already present, have been introduced by site-directed mutagenesis. Diffraction-quality crystals of this mutant protein have been grown in which methionine was replaced with selenomethionine. The introduction of methionine by site-directed mutagenesis to allow phasing from selenomethionyl-substituted crystals is shown to be feasible by this example and is proposed as a general approach to solving the crystallographic phase problem. Strategies for selecting propitious sites for methionine mutations are discussed.

  10. Improving the Thermostability and Catalytic Efficiency of Bacillus deramificans Pullulanase by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xuguo; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Pullulanase (EC 3.2.1.41) is a well-known starch-debranching enzyme. Its instability and low catalytic efficiency are the major factors preventing its widespread application. To address these issues, Asp437 and Asp503 of the pullulanase from Bacillus deramificans were selected in this study as targets for site-directed mutagenesis based on a structure-guided consensus approach. Four mutants (carrying the mutations D503F, D437H, D503Y, and D437H/D503Y) were generated and characterized in detail. The results showed that the D503F, D437H, and D503Y mutants had an optimum temperature of 55°C and a pH optimum of 4.5, similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. However, the half-lives of the mutants at 60°C were twice as long as that of the wild-type enzyme. In addition, the D437H/D503Y double mutant displayed a larger shift in thermostability, with an optimal temperature of 60°C and a half-life at 60°C of more than 4.3-fold that of the wild-type enzyme. Kinetic studies showed that the Km values for the D503F, D437H, D503Y, and D437H/D503Y mutants decreased by 7.1%, 11.4%, 41.4%, and 45.7% and the Kcat/Km values increased by 10%, 20%, 140%, and 100%, respectively, compared to those of the wild-type enzyme. Mechanisms that could account for these enhancements were explored. Moreover, in conjunction with the enzyme glucoamylase, the D503Y and D437H/D503Y mutants exhibited an improved reaction rate and glucose yield during starch hydrolysis compared to those of the wild-type enzyme, confirming the enhanced properties of the mutants. The mutants generated in this study have potential applications in the starch industry. PMID:23624477

  11. Improvement in the thermostability of D-psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens by random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Geun; Ju, Yo-Han; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2011-10-01

    The S213C, I33L, and I33L S213C variants of D-psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, which were obtained by random and site-directed mutagenesis, displayed increases of 2.5, 5, and 7.5°C in the temperature for maximal enzyme activity, increases of 3.3-, 7.2-, and 29.9-fold in the half-life at 50°C, and increases of 3.1, 4.3, and 7.6°C in apparent melting temperature, respectively, compared with the wild-type enzyme. Molecular modeling suggests that the improvement in thermostability in these variants may have resulted from increased putative hydrogen bonds and formation of new aromatic stacking interactions. The immobilized wild-type enzyme with and without borate maintained activity for 8 days at a conversion yield of 70% (350 g/liter psicose) and for 16 days at a conversion yield of 30% (150 g/liter psicose), respectively. After 8 or 16 days, the enzyme activity gradually decreased, and the conversion yields with and without borate were reduced to 22 and 9.6%, respectively, at 30 days. In contrast, the activities of the immobilized I33L S213C variant with and without borate did not decrease during the operation time of 30 days. These results suggest that the I33L S213C variant may be useful as an industrial producer of D-psicose.

  12. Preparation by site-directed mutagenesis and characterization of the E211Q mutant of yeast enolase 1.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, V S; Glover, C V; Robson, R L; Holland, M J; Lebioda, L; Brewer, J M

    1995-08-16

    The published 'charge shuttle' mechanism of enolase (Lebioda, L. and Stec, B. (1991) Biochemistry 30, 2817-2822) assigns Glu-211 the task of orienting a water molecule that serves as the catalytic base which removes the proton from carbon-2 of the substrate. We prepared the E211Q mutant of yeast enolase 1 by site-directed mutagenesis. It appears to be folded correctly and to respond similarly to many of the normal ligands of enolase: it is stabilized against thermal denaturation by conformational Mg2+ and by Mg2+ and substrate and binds the chromophoric substrate analogue D-tartronate semialdehyde-2-phosphate (TSP) with affinity comparable to that of the native enzyme. However, it has only 0.01% (10(-4)) of the activity of native enolase under standard assay conditions and does not exhibit significantly more activity at various pH values or higher concentrations of substrate and Mg2+. Its ability to produce the form of enzyme-bound and reacted TSP that absorbs at shorter wavelengths is greatly slowed, while the longer wavelength absorbing form is produced rapidly. Overall, these observations are consistent with the hypothetical mechanism.

  13. X-Ray Structure and Site-Directed Mutagenesis Analysis of the Escherichia coli Colicin M Immunity Protein▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Fabien; Brooks, Mark A.; Barreteau, Hélène; Touzé, Thierry; Graille, Marc; Bouhss, Ahmed; Blanot, Didier; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Colicin M (ColM), which is produced by some Escherichia coli strains to kill competitor strains from the same or related species, was recently shown to inhibit cell wall peptidoglycan biosynthesis through enzymatic degradation of its lipid II precursor. ColM-producing strains are protected from the toxin that they produce by coexpression of a specific immunity protein, named Cmi, whose mode of action still remains to be identified. We report here the resolution of the crystal structure of Cmi, which is composed of four β strands and four α helices. This rather compact structure revealed a disulfide bond between residues Cys31 and Cys107. Interestingly, these two cysteines and several other residues appeared to be conserved in the sequences of several proteins of unknown function belonging to the YebF family which exhibit 25 to 35% overall sequence similarity with Cmi. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to assess the role of these residues in the ColM immunity-conferring activity of Cmi, which showed that the disulfide bond and residues from the C-terminal extremity of the protein were functionally essential. The involvement of DsbA oxidase in the formation of the Cmi disulfide bond is also demonstrated. PMID:21037007

  14. Identification of functional regions on the I-Ab molecule by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, L E; Glimcher, L H; Waldmann, R A; Smith, J A; Ben-Nun, A; Seidman, J G; Choi, E

    1986-01-01

    Functional analysis of mutant class II major histocompatibility complex molecules has begun to identify regions important for antibody binding and for T-cell activation. By using in vitro mutagenesis directed at the beta 1 domain of the Ab beta gene we have constructed three structurally distinct mutant Ab beta genes. Each of these genes, as well as the wild-type Ab beta gene, was cotransfected together with the wild-type Ab alpha gene into the Ia-negative B-lymphoma cell line M12.C3. Transfection resulted in the successful synthesis and cell surface expression of three mutant class II antigens that showed serological and functional alterations as compared to the I-Ab antigens from the M12.C3 cell transfected with the wild-type gene. The variable patterns of both I-Ab-specific monoclonal antibody binding and activation of I-Ab-specific T-cell hybridomas show that the mutations result in the loss of structural epitopes required for both monoclonal antibody binding and for T-cell recognition. The data suggest that there are multiple sites on a single Ia molecule that are recognized by T helper cells and also that the tertiary conformation of the Ia molecule can be critical in the formation of such sites. PMID:2418441

  15. Site-directed mutagenesis of serine 158 demonstrates its role in spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; McMichael, R. Jr; Krause, K. P.; Kurreck, J.; Sonnewald, U.; Stitt, M.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) was performed to investigate the role of Ser158 in the modulation of spinach leaf SPS. Tobacco plants expressing the spinach wild-type (WT), S158A, S158T and S157F/S158E SPS transgenes were produced. Expression of transgenes appeared not to reduce expression of the tobacco host SPS. SPS activity in the WT and the S158T SPS transgenics showed light/dark modulation, whereas the S158A and S157F/S158E mutants were not similarly light/dark modulated: the S158A mutant enzyme was not inactivated in the dark, and the S157F/S158E was not activated in the light. The inability to modulate the activity of the S158A mutant enzyme by protein phosphorylation was demonstrated in vitro. The WT spinach enzyme immunopurified from dark transgenic tobacco leaves had a low initial activation state, and could be activated by PP2A and subsequently inactivated by SPS-kinase plus ATP. Rapid purification of the S158A mutant enzyme from dark leaves of transgenic plants using spinach-specific monoclonal antibodies yielded enzyme that had a high initial activation state, and pre-incubation with leaf PP2A or ATP plus SPS-kinase (the PKIII enzyme) caused little modulation of activity. The results demonstrate the regulatory significance of Ser158 as the major site responsible for dark inactivation of spinach SPS in vivo, and indicate that the significance of phosphorylation is the introduction of a negative charge at the Ser158 position.

  16. From green to blue: site-directed mutagenesis of the green fluorescent protein to teach protein structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Girón, María D; Salto, Rafael

    2011-07-01

    Structure-function relationship studies in proteins are essential in modern Cell Biology. Laboratory exercises that allow students to familiarize themselves with basic mutagenesis techniques are essential in all Genetic Engineering courses to teach the relevance of protein structure. We have implemented a laboratory course based on the site-directed mutagenesis of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The GFP is ideal because the students are able to correlate the changes introduced into the structure of the protein with the observable modification of its fluorescence properties. By using noncommercial kits, we set up a non PCR-thermocycling reaction using mutagenic primers, followed by removal of the original plasmid template by DpnI digestion. By introducing only one (Y66H) or two mutations (Y66H/Y145F) in the "cycle 3" variant of GFP (F99S, M153T, and V163A) or GFPuv, students are able to analyze the changes from green to blue in the fluorescence emission of the mutated proteins and to correlate these differences in fluorescence with the structural changes using three-dimensional structure visualization software. This inexpensive laboratory course familiarizes the students with the design of mutagenic oligonucleotides, site-directed mutagenesis, bacterial transformation, restriction analysis of the mutated plasmids, and protein characterization by SDS-PAGE and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  17. Evolution of flavone synthase I from parsley flavanone 3beta-hydroxylase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Yvonne Helen; Witte, Simone; Steuber, Holger; Matern, Ulrich; Martens, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    Flavanone 3beta-hydroxylase (FHT) and flavone synthase I (FNS I) are 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases with 80% sequence identity, which catalyze distinct reactions in flavonoid biosynthesis. However, FNS I has been reported exclusively from a few Apiaceae species, whereas FHTs are more abundant. Domain-swapping experiments joining the N terminus of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) FHT with the C terminus of parsley FNS I and vice versa revealed that the C-terminal portion is not essential for FNS I activity. Sequence alignments identified 26 amino acid substitutions conserved in FHT versus FNS I genes. Homology modeling, based on the related anthocyanidin synthase structure, assigned seven of these amino acids (FHT/FNS I, M106T, I115T, V116I, I131F, D195E, V200I, L215V, and K216R) to the active site. Accordingly, FHT was modified by site-directed mutagenesis, creating mutants encoding from one to seven substitutions, which were expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) for FNS I and FHT assays. The exchange I131F in combination with either M106T and D195E or L215V and K216R replacements was sufficient to confer some FNS I side activity. Introduction of all seven FNS I substitutions into the FHT sequence, however, caused a nearly complete change in enzyme activity from FHT to FNS I. Both FHT and FNS I were proposed to initially withdraw the beta-face-configured hydrogen from carbon-3 of the naringenin substrate. Our results suggest that the 7-fold substitution affects the orientation of the substrate in the active-site pocket such that this is followed by syn-elimination of hydrogen from carbon-2 (FNS I reaction) rather than the rebound hydroxylation of carbon-3 (FHT reaction).

  18. Kinetic and site-directed mutagenesis studies of the cysteine residues of bovine low molecular weight phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Davis, J P; Zhou, M M; Van Etten, R L

    1994-03-25

    The roles of the 8 conserved cysteines and 1 arginine in the low molecular weight phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases were investigated using site-directed mutagenesis of the recombinant bovine heart enzyme. Single mutants of cysteine to serine were studied for each cysteine; alanine replacements were also made for Cys-12, Cys-17, and Arg-18. The CD spectra of the purified proteins were effectively superimposable, consistent with the conclusion that no major structural alterations had occurred, but 1H NMR spectroscopy did reveal some spectral shifts in the aromatic region. Kinetic analysis of the mutant proteins demonstrated that only Cys-12, Cys-17, and Arg-18 had significantly altered catalytic activity toward the substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate at pH 5. The Cys-12 and Arg-18 mutants were effectively inactive. Thus, it is concluded that Cys-12 is the catalytic nucleophile, and Arg-18 presumably serves an essential function in substrate binding. The C17S mutant had 6% residual activity compared with wild type protein, whereas the C17A mutant had 37% activity. Consistent with the observed activity of the Cys-17 mutant, a covalent phosphocysteine intermediate was trapped and identified by 31P NMR. Further kinetic analysis of C17A using several aryl phosphate monoester substrates with different leaving group pK alpha values indicated that no change in the rate-determining step of the catalytic mechanism had occurred, that is, dephosphorylation of the covalent phosphoenzyme intermediate remains rate-limiting. The C17A mutant had a 4-fold higher phosphate Ki and slightly higher Km values for p-nitrophenyl phosphate suggesting that Cys-17 may be important for optimal positioning of the substrate phosphate moiety.

  19. Transcarboxylase (TC): demonstration by site-directed mutagenesis that methionines at the biotin site are essential for catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, H.G.; Shenoy, B.C.; Kumar, G.K.; Paranjape, S.; Murtif, V.; Samols, D.

    1987-05-01

    All biotin enzymes that have thus far been sequenced contain a conserved region ALA MET BCT MET. Two possible roles of the conserved region are (i) for recognition of the specific lysine of the enzyme that is to be biotinated posttranslationally by the synthetase or (ii) for activation of the biotin to function as a carboxyl carrier. The BCT of TC is at residue 89 of the 1.3S subunit. By site-directed mutagenesis, single amino acid substitutions have been made giving LEU 88, THR 88 and LEU 90 and these mutant subunits have been expressed in E. coli and isolated. Catalysis by TC involves Partial Reactions: (1) /sup -/00/sup 14/CCH/sub 2/COCOO/sup -/ + 1.3S biotin pyruvate + 1.3S biotin-COO/sup -/ catalyzed by the 5S subunit (2) /sub 14/CH/sub 3/CH(/sup 14/COO/sup -/)COSCoA + 1.3S biotin CH/sub 3/CH/sub 2/COSCoA + 1.3S biotin-/sup 14/COO/sup -/, catalyzed by the 12S subunit. The mutant subunits LEU 88 and THR 88 are inactive in Reaction 1. In Reaction 2, they are 8% as active as the 1.3S wild type. At 10 times the concentration of the wild type, they are 40% as active. The LEU 90 subunit is about 40% as active as wild type in both Reactions 1 and 2. Thus, the two METS are functionally not equivalent. What their catalytic roles are remains to be determined. Shenoy et al. have shown these modifications do not effect the synthetase reaction.

  20. Manganese oxidation site in Pleurotus eryngii versatile peroxidase: a site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic, and crystallographic study.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Morales, María; Pérez-Boada, Marta; Choinowski, Thomas; Martínez, María Jesús; Piontek, Klaus; Martínez, Angel T

    2007-01-09

    The molecular architecture of versatile peroxidase (VP) includes an exposed tryptophan responsible for aromatic substrate oxidation and a putative Mn2+ oxidation site. The crystal structures (solved up to 1.3 A) of wild-type and recombinant Pleurotus eryngii VP, before and after exposure to Mn2+, showed a variable orientation of the Glu36 and Glu40 side chains that, together with Asp175, contribute to Mn2+ coordination. To evaluate the involvement of these residues, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. The E36A, E40A, and D175A mutations caused a 60-85-fold decrease in Mn2+ affinity and a decrease in the Mn2+ oxidation activity. Transient-state kinetic constants showed that reduction of both compounds I and II was affected (80-325-fold lower k2app and 103-104-fold lower k3app, respectively). The single mutants retained partial Mn2+ oxidation activity, and a triple mutation (E36A/E40A/D175A) was required to completely suppress the activity (<1% kcat). The affinity for Mn2+ also decreased ( approximately 25-fold) with the shorter carboxylate side chain in the E36D and E40D variants, which nevertheless retained 30-50% of the maximal activity, whereas similar mutations caused a 50-100-fold decrease in kcat in the case of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium manganese peroxidase (MnP). Additional mutations showed that introduction of a basic residue near Asp175 did not improve Mn2+ oxidation as found for MnP and ruled out an involvement of the C-terminal tail of the protein in low-efficiency oxidation of Mn2+. The structural and kinetic data obtained highlighted significant differences in the Mn2+ oxidation site of the new versatile enzyme compared to P. chrysosporium MnP.

  1. HTP-OligoDesigner: An Online Primer Design Tool for High-Throughput Gene Cloning and Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Camilo, Cesar M; Lima, Gustavo M A; Maluf, Fernando V; Guido, Rafael V C; Polikarpov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Following burgeoning genomic and transcriptomic sequencing data, biochemical and molecular biology groups worldwide are implementing high-throughput cloning and mutagenesis facilities in order to obtain a large number of soluble proteins for structural and functional characterization. Since manual primer design can be a time-consuming and error-generating step, particularly when working with hundreds of targets, the automation of primer design process becomes highly desirable. HTP-OligoDesigner was created to provide the scientific community with a simple and intuitive online primer design tool for both laboratory-scale and high-throughput projects of sequence-independent gene cloning and site-directed mutagenesis and a Tm calculator for quick queries.

  2. Characterization and site-directed mutagenesis of an α-galactosidase from the deep-sea bacterium Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Qin, Yongjun; Huang, Zongqing; Liu, Ziduo

    2014-03-05

    A novel gene (BmelA) (1323bp) encoding an α-galactosidase of 440 amino acids was cloned from the deep-sea bacterium Bacillus megaterium and the protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) with an estimated molecular mass of about 45 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 4, with the highest identity (74%) to α-galactosidase Mel4A from Bacillus halodurans among the characterized α-galactosidases. The recombinant BmelA displayed its maximum activity at 35 °C and pH 8.5-9.0 in 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer, and could hydrolyze different substrates with the Km values against p-nitrophenyl-α-D-galactopyranoside (pNP-α-Gal), raffinose and stachyose being 1.02±0.02, 2.24±0.11 and 3.42±0.17 mM, respectively. Besides, 4 mutants (I38 V, I38A, I38F and Q84A) were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis based on molecular modeling and sequence alignment. The kinetic analysis indicated that mutants I38 V and I38A exhibited a 1.7- and 1.4-fold increase over the wild type enzyme in catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) against pNP-α-Gal, respectively, while mutant I38F showed a 3.5-fold decrease against pNP-α-Gal and mutant Q84A almost completely lost its activity. All the results suggest that I38 and Q84 sites play a vital role in enzyme activity probably due to their steric and polar effects on the predicted "tunnel" structure and NAD+ binding to the enzyme.

  3. Identification by site-directed mutagenesis of three essential histidine residues in membrane dipeptidase, a novel mammalian zinc peptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Keynan, S; Hooper, N M; Turner, A J

    1997-01-01

    Membrane dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19) is a plasma membrane zinc peptidase that is involved in the renal metabolism of glutathione and its conjugates, such as leukotriene D4. The enzyme lacks the classical signatures of other zinc-dependent hydrolases and shows no homology with any other mammalian protein. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to explore the roles of five histidine residues in pig membrane dipeptidase that are conserved among mammalian species. When expressed in COS-1 cells, the mutants H49K and H128L exhibited a specific activity and Km for the substrate Gly-D-Phe comparable with those of the wild-type enzyme. However, the mutants H20L, H152L and H198K were inactive, but were expressed at the cell surface at equivalent levels to the wild-type, as assessed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. These three mutants were compared with regard to their ability to bind to the competitive inhibitor cilastatin, which binds with equal efficacy to native and EDTA-treated pig kidney membrane dipeptidase. Expressed wild-type enzyme and mutants H20L and H198K were efficiently bound by cilastatin-Sepharose, but H152L failed to bind. Thus His-152 appears to be involved in the binding of substrate or inhibitor, whereas His-20 and His-198 appear to be involved in catalysis. Membrane dipeptidase shares some similarity with a dipeptidase recently cloned from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. In particular, His-20 and His-198 of membrane dipeptidase are conserved in the bacterial enzyme, as are Glu-125 and His-219, previously shown to be required for catalytic activity. PMID:9337849

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis around the CuA site of a polyphenol oxidase from Coreopsis grandiflora (cgAUS1).

    PubMed

    Kaintz, Cornelia; Mayer, Rupert L; Jirsa, Franz; Halbwirth, Heidi; Rompel, Annette

    2015-03-24

    Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (cgAUS1), catalyzing conversion of butein to sulfuretin in a type-3 copper center, is a rare example of a polyphenol oxidase involved in anabolism. Site-directed mutagenesis around the CuA site of AUS1 was performed, and recombinant enzymes were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Replacement of the coordinating CuA histidines with alanine resulted in the presence of a single copper and loss of diphenolase activity. The thioether bridge-building cysteine and a phenylalanine over the CuA site, exchanged to alanine, have no influence on copper content but appear to play an important role in substrate binding.

  5. Dissecting the Catalytic Mechanism of Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase Using Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, C.; Gratson, A.A.; Evans, J.C.; Jiracek, J.; Collinsova, M.; Ludwig, M.L.; Garrow, T.A.

    2010-03-05

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from glycine betaine (Bet) to homocysteine (Hcy) to form dimethylglycine (DMG) and methionine (Met). Previous studies in other laboratories have indicated that catalysis proceeds through the formation of a ternary complex, with a transition state mimicked by the inhibitor S-({delta}-carboxybutyl)-l-homocysteine (CBHcy). Using changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to determine the affinity of human BHMT for substrates, products, or CBHcy, we now demonstrate that the enzyme-substrate complex reaches its transition state through an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which Hcy is the first substrate to bind and Met is the last product released. Hcy, Met, and CBHcy bind to the enzyme to form binary complexes with K{sub d} values of 7.9, 6.9, and 0.28 {micro}M, respectively. Binary complexes with Bet and DMG cannot be detected with fluorescence as a probe, but Bet and DMG bind tightly to BHMT-Hcy to form ternary complexes with K{sub d} values of 1.1 and 0.73 {micro}M, respectively. Mutation of each of the seven tryptophan residues in human BHMT provides evidence that the enzyme undergoes two distinct conformational changes that are reflected in the fluorescence of the enzyme. The first is induced when Hcy binds, and the second, when Bet binds. As predicted by the crystal structure of BHMT, the amino acids Trp44 and Tyr160 are involved in binding Bet, and Glu159 in binding Hcy. Replacing these residues by site-directed mutagenesis significantly reduces the catalytic efficiency (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of the enzyme. Replacing Tyr77 with Phe abolishes enzyme activity.

  6. Proton Transfers in a Channelrhodopsin-1 Studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Difference Spectroscopy and Site-directed Mutagenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Ogren, John I.; Yi, Adrian; Mamaev, Sergey; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L.; Rothschild, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Channelrhodopsin-1 from the alga Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) is a low-efficiency light-activated cation channel that exhibits properties useful for optogenetic applications such as a slow light inactivation and a red-shifted visible absorption maximum as compared with the more extensively studied channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2). Previously, both resonance Raman and low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy revealed that unlike CrChR2, CaChR1 under our conditions exhibits an almost pure all-trans retinal composition in the unphotolyzed ground state and undergoes an all-trans to 13-cis isomerization during the primary phototransition typical of other microbial rhodopsins such as bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Here, we apply static and rapid-scan FTIR difference spectroscopy along with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the proton transfer events occurring upon the formation of the long-lived conducting P2380 state of CaChR1. Assignment of carboxylic C=O stretch bands indicates that Asp-299 (homolog to Asp-212 in BR) becomes protonated and Asp-169 (homolog to Asp-85 in BR) undergoes a net change in hydrogen bonding relative to the unphotolyzed ground state of CaChR1. These data along with earlier FTIR measurements on the CaChR1 → P1 transition are consistent with a two-step proton relay mechanism that transfers a proton from Glu-169 to Asp-299 during the primary phototransition and from the Schiff base to Glu-169 during P2380 formation. The unusual charge neutrality of both Schiff base counterions in the P2380 conducting state suggests that these residues may function as part of a cation selective filter in the open channel state of CaChR1 as well as other low-efficiency ChRs. PMID:25802337

  7. Proton transfers in a channelrhodopsin-1 studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ogren, John I; Yi, Adrian; Mamaev, Sergey; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2015-05-15

    Channelrhodopsin-1 from the alga Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) is a low-efficiency light-activated cation channel that exhibits properties useful for optogenetic applications such as a slow light inactivation and a red-shifted visible absorption maximum as compared with the more extensively studied channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2). Previously, both resonance Raman and low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy revealed that unlike CrChR2, CaChR1 under our conditions exhibits an almost pure all-trans retinal composition in the unphotolyzed ground state and undergoes an all-trans to 13-cis isomerization during the primary phototransition typical of other microbial rhodopsins such as bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Here, we apply static and rapid-scan FTIR difference spectroscopy along with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the proton transfer events occurring upon the formation of the long-lived conducting P2 (380) state of CaChR1. Assignment of carboxylic C=O stretch bands indicates that Asp-299 (homolog to Asp-212 in BR) becomes protonated and Asp-169 (homolog to Asp-85 in BR) undergoes a net change in hydrogen bonding relative to the unphotolyzed ground state of CaChR1. These data along with earlier FTIR measurements on the CaChR1 → P1 transition are consistent with a two-step proton relay mechanism that transfers a proton from Glu-169 to Asp-299 during the primary phototransition and from the Schiff base to Glu-169 during P2 (380) formation. The unusual charge neutrality of both Schiff base counterions in the P2 (380) conducting state suggests that these residues may function as part of a cation selective filter in the open channel state of CaChR1 as well as other low-efficiency ChRs.

  8. The catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF esterase: characterization by site-directed mutagenesis and functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Pleschka, S; Klenk, H D; Herrler, G

    1995-10-01

    Influenza C virus is able to inactivate its own cellular receptors by virtue of a sialate 9-O-acetylesterase that releases the acetyl residue at position C-9 of N-acetyl-9-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2). The receptor-destroying enzyme activity is a function of the surface glycoprotein HEF and this esterase belongs to the class of serine hydrolases. In their active site, these enzymes contain a catalytic triad made up of a serine, a histidine and an aspartic acid residue. Sequence comparison with other serine esterases has indicated that, in addition to serine-71 (S71), the amino acids histidine-368 or -369 (H368/369) and aspartic acid 261 (D261) are the most likely candidates to form the catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein. By site-directed mutagenesis, mutants were generated in which alanine substituted for either of these amino acids. Using a phagemid expression vector, pSP1D-HEF the HEF gene was expressed in both COS 7 and MDCK I cells. The glycoprotein was obtained in a functional form only in the latter cells, as indicated by its transport to the cell surface and measurable enzyme activity. The low level of expression could be increased by stimulating the NF-KB-binding activity of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter/enhancer element of the vector. The esterase activity of the mutant proteins was compared with that of the wild-type glycoprotein. With Neu5,9Ac2 as the substrate, the esterase specific activities of the S71/A mutant and the H368,369/A mutant were reduced by more than 90%. In the case of the D261/A mutant the specific activity was reduced by 64%. From this data we conclude that S71, H368/369 and D261 are likely to represent the catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF. In addition, N280 is proposed to stabilize the oxyanion of the presumptive transition state intermediate formed by the enzyme-substrate complex.

  9. Biochemical studies of the multicopper oxidase (small laccase) from Streptomyces coelicolor using bioactive phytochemicals and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Mohammed; Waung, Debbie; Korbeci, Bihter; Mavisakalyan, Valentina; Flick, Robert; Brown, Greg; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Yakunin, Alexander F; Master, Emma R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Multicopper oxidases can act on a broad spectrum of phenolic and non-phenolic compounds. These enzymes include laccases, which are widely distributed in plants and fungi, and were more recently identified in bacteria. Here, we present the results of biochemical and mutational studies of small laccase (SLAC), a multicopper oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor (SCO6712). In addition to typical laccase substrates, SLAC was tested using phenolic compounds that exhibit antioxidant activity. SLAC showed oxidase activity against 12 of 23 substrates tested, including caffeic acid, ferulic acid, resveratrol, quercetin, morin, kaempferol and myricetin. The kinetic parameters of SLAC were determined for 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, quercetin, morin and myricetin, and maximum reaction rates were observed with myricetin, where kcat and Km values at 60°C were 8.1 (± 0.8) s−1 and 0.9 (± 0.3) mM respectively. SLAC had a broad pH optimum for activity (between pH 4 and 8) and temperature optimum at 60–70°C. It demonstrated remarkable thermostability with a half-life of over 10 h at 80°C and over 7 h at 90°C. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed 17 amino acid residues important for SLAC activity including the 10 His residues involved in copper coordination. Most notably, the Y229A and Y230A mutant proteins showed over 10-fold increase in activity compared with the wild-type SLAC, which was correlated to higher copper incorporation, while kinetic analyses with S929A predicts localization of this residue near the meta-position of aromatic substrates. Funding Information Funding for this research was provided by the Government of Ontario for the project ‘FFABnet: Functionalized Fibre and Biochemicals’ (ORF-RE-05-005), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. PMID:23815400

  10. Investigation by site-directed mutagenesis of the role of cytochrome P450 2B4 non-active site residues in protein-ligand interactions based on crystal structures of the ligand-bound enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, P. Ross; Gay, Sean C.; Jang, Hyun-Hee; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C. David; Halpert, James R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Residues located outside of the active site of cytochromes P450 2B have exhibited importance in ligand binding, structural stability, and drug metabolism. However, contributions of non-active site residues to the plasticity of these enzymes are not known. Thus, a systematic investigation was undertaken of unique residue-residue interactions found in crystal structures of P450 2B4 in complex with 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole (4-CPI), a closed conformation, or in complex with bifonazole, an expanded conformation. Nineteen mutants distributed over eleven sites were constructed, expressed in E. coli, and purified. Most mutants showed significantly decreased expression, especially in the case of interactions found in the 4-CPI structure. Six mutants (H172A, H172F, H172Q, L437A, E474D, and E474Q) were chosen for detailed functional analysis. Among these, the Ks of H172F for bifonazole was ~20-times higher than wild type 2B4, and the Ks of L437A for 4-CPI was ~50-times higher than wild type, leading to significantly altered inhibitor selectivity. Enzyme function was tested with the substrates 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-EFC), 7-methoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-MFC), and 7-benzyloxyresorufin (7-BR). H172F was inactive with all three substrates, and L437A did not turn over 7-BR. Furthermore, H172A, H172Q, E474D and E474Q showed large changes in kcat/KM for each of the three substrates, in some cases up to 50-fold. Concurrent molecular dynamics simulations yield distances between some of the residues in these putative interaction pairs that are not consistent with contact. The results indicate that small changes in the protein scaffold lead to large differences in solution behavior and enzyme function. PMID:22051155

  11. Reversal of coenzyme specificity and improvement of catalytic efficiency of Pichia stipitis xylose reductase by rational site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qi-Kai; Du, Hong-Li; Wang, Jing-Fang; Wei, Dong-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Li, Yi-Xue; Lin, Ying

    2009-07-01

    A major problem when xylose is used for ethanol production is the intercellular redox imbalance arising from different coenzyme specificities of xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase. The residue Lys21 in XR from Pichia stipitis was subjected to site-directed mutagenesis to alter its coenzyme specificity. The N272D mutant exhibited improved catalytic efficiency when NADH was the coenzyme. Both K21A and K21A/N272D preferred NADH to NADPH, their catalytic efficiencies for NADPH were almost zero. The catalytic efficiency of K21A/N272D for NADH was almost 9-fold and 2-fold that of K21A and the wild-type enzyme, respectively. Complete reversal of coenzyme specificity toward NADH and improved catalytic efficiency were achieved.

  12. Alteration of coenzyme specificity of malate dehydrogenase from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Y D; Song, P; Cao, Z Y; Wang, P; Zhu, G P

    2014-07-29

    We describe here for the first time the alteration of coenzyme specificity of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) (ScMDH). In the present study, we replaced four amino acid residues in the Rossmann fold (βB-αC) region of NADH-dependent ScMDH by site-directed mutagenesis with those of NADPH-dependent MDH (Glu42Gly, Ile43Ser, Pro45Arg, and Ala46Ser). The coenzyme specificity of the mutant enzyme (ScMDH-T4) was examined. Coenzyme specificity of ScMDH-T4 was shifted 2231.3-fold toward NADPH using kcat/Km(coenzyme) as the measurement of coenzyme specificity. Accordingly, the effect of the replacements on coenzyme specificity is discussed. Our work provides further insight into the coenzyme specificity of ScMDH.

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis of IRX9, IRX9L and IRX14 proteins involved in xylan biosynthesis: glycosyltransferase activity is not required for IRX9 function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yanfang; Hansen, Sara Fasmer; Ebert, Berit; Lau, Jane; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2014-01-01

    Xylans constitute the main non-cellulosic polysaccharide in the secondary cell walls of plants. Several genes predicted to encode glycosyltransferases are required for the synthesis of the xylan backbone even though it is a homopolymer consisting entirely of β-1,4-linked xylose residues. The putative glycosyltransferases IRX9, IRX14, and IRX10 (or the paralogs IRX9L, IRX14L, and IRX10L) are required for xylan backbone synthesis in Arabidopsis. To investigate the function of IRX9, IRX9L, and IRX14, we identified amino acid residues known to be essential for catalytic function in homologous mammalian proteins and generated modified cDNA clones encoding proteins where these residues would be mutated. The mutated gene constructs were used to transform wild-type Arabidopsis plants and the irx9 and irx14 mutants, which are deficient in xylan synthesis. The ability of the mutated proteins to complement the mutants was investigated by measuring growth, determining cell wall composition, and microscopic analysis of stem cross-sections of the transgenic plants. The six different mutated versions of IRX9 and IRX9-L were all able to complement the irx9 mutant phenotype, indicating that residues known to be essential for glycosyltransferases function in homologous proteins are not essential for the biological function of IRX9/IRX9L. Two out of three mutated IRX14 complemented the irx14 mutant, including a mutant in the predicted catalytic amino acid. A IRX14 protein mutated in the substrate-binding DxD motif did not complement the irx14 mutant. Thus, substrate binding is important for IRX14 function but catalytic activity may not be essential for the function of the protein. The data indicate that IRX9/IRX9L have an essential structural function, most likely by interacting with the IRX10/IRX10L proteins, but do not have an essential catalytic function. Most likely IRX14 also has primarily a structural role, but it cannot be excluded that the protein has an important enzymatic

  14. Drug uptake pathways of multidrug transporter AcrB studied by molecular simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin-Qiu; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Murakami, Satoshi; Takada, Shoji

    2013-05-22

    Multidrug resistance has been a critical issue in current chemotherapy. In Escherichia coli , a major efflux pump responsible for the multidrug resistance contains a transporter AcrB. Crystallographic studies and mutational assays of AcrB provided much of structural and overall functional insights, which led to the functionally rotating mechanism. However, the drug uptake pathways are somewhat controversial because at least two possible pathways, the vestibule and the cleft paths, were suggested. Here, combining molecular simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments, we addressed the uptake mechanism finding that the drug uptake pathways can be significantly different depending on the properties of drugs. First, in the computational free energy analysis of drug movements along AcrB tunnels, we found a ligand-dependent drug uptake mechanism. With the same molecular sizes, drugs that are both strongly hydrophobic and lipophilic were preferentially taken in via the vestibule path, while other drugs favored the cleft path. Second, direct simulations realized totally about 3500 events of drug uptake by AcrB for a broad range of drug property. These simulations confirmed the ligand-dependent drug uptake and further suggested that a smaller drug favors the vestibule path, while a larger one is taken in via the cleft path. Moreover, the direct simulations identified an alternative uptake path which is not visible in the crystal structure. Third, site-directed mutagenesis of AcrB in E. coli verified that mutations of residues located along the newly identified path significantly reduced the efflux efficiency, supporting its relevance in in vivo function.

  15. Virus-based Photo-Responsive Nanowires Formed By Linking Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Murali; Abbineni, Gopal; Nimmo, Susan L.; Cao, Binrui; Mao, Chuanbin

    2013-05-01

    Owing to the genetic flexibility and error-free bulk production, bio-nanostructures such as filamentous phage showed great potential in materials synthesis, however, their photo-responsive behaviour is neither explored nor unveiled. Here we show M13 phage genetically engineered with tyrosine residues precisely fused to the major coat protein is converted into a photo-responsive organic nanowire by a site-specific chemical reaction with an aromatic amine to form an azo dye structure on the surface. The resulting azo-M13-phage nanowire exhibits reversible photo-responsive properties due to the photo-switchable cis-trans isomerisation of the azo unit formed on the phage. This result shows that site-specific display of a peptide on bio-nanostructures through site-directed genetic mutagenesis can be translated into site-directed chemical reaction for developing advanced materials. The photo-responsive properties of the azo-M13-phage nanowires may open the door for the development of light controllable smart devices for use in non-linear optics, holography data storage, molecular antenna, and actuators.

  16. Novel structure--function information on biogenic amine transporters revealed by site-directed mutagenesis and alkylation.

    PubMed

    Reith, Maarten E A

    2013-07-01

    The study reported by Wenge and Bönisch in this issue provides critical structural information regarding extracellular loop 2 (EL2) of the human norepinephrine transporter (NET). A systematic search among all 10 cysteine and 13 histidine residues in NET led to His222 in EL2 as the target for N-ethylmaleimide: its alkylation interferes with [(3)H]nisoxetine binding, indicating the part of EL2 containing His 222 reaches back into the protein interior where it prevents access by nisoxetine to its binding site. Thus, EL2 in human NET does much more than conformationally assisting substrate translocation. The present study underscores the importance of site-directed mutagenesis approaches to elucidate structural features that cannot be deduced from crystals of homolog proteins. In the case of NET, the closest crystal structure is that of the homolog LeuT, but EL2 is difficult to align with 22 less loop residues in LeuT than in NET. The present results could only be achieved by the systematic mutagenesis study of all cysteines and all histidines in NET.

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modelling studies show the role of Asp82 and cysteines in rat acylase 1, a member of the M20 family

    SciTech Connect

    Herga, Sameh; Brutus, Alexandre; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Miche, Helene; Perrier, Josette; Puigserver, Antoine; Scaloni, Andrea; Giardina, Thierry . E-mail: thierry.giardina@univ.u-3mrs.fr

    2005-05-06

    Acylase 1 from rat kidney catalyzes the hydrolysis of acyl-amino acids. Sequence alignment has shown that this enzyme belongs to the metalloprotein family M20. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments led to the identification of one functionally important amino acid residue located near one of the zinc coordinating residues, which play a critical role in the enzymatic activity. The D82N- and D82E-substituted forms showed no significant activity and very low activity, respectively, along with a loss of zinc coordination. Molecular modelling investigations indicated a putative role of D82 in ensuring a proper protonation of catalytic histidine. In addition, none of the five cysteine residues present in the rat kidney acylase 1 sequence seemed involved in the catalytic process: the loss of activity induced by the C294A substitution was probably due to a conformational change in the 3D structure.

  18. A site-directed mutagenesis analysis of tNOX functional domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chueh, Pin-Ju; Morre, Dorothy M.; Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    Constitutive NADH oxidase proteins of the mammalian cell surface exhibit two different activities, oxidation of hydroquinones (or NADH) and protein disulfide-thiol interchange which alternate to yield oscillatory patterns with period lengths of 24 min. A drug-responsive tNOX (tumor-associated NADH oxidase) has a period length of about 22 min. The tNOX cDNA has been cloned and expressed. These two proteins are representative of cycling oxidase proteins of the plant and animal cell surface. In this report, we describe a series of eight amino acid replacements in tNOX which, when expressed in Escherichia coli, were analyzed for enzymatic activity, drug response and period length. Replacement sites selected include six cysteines that lie within the processed plasma membrane (34 kDa) form of the protein, and amino acids located in putative drug and adenine nucleotide (NADH) binding domains. The latter, plus two of the cysteine replacements, resulted in a loss of enzymatic activity. The recombinant tNOX with the modified drug binding site retained activity but the activity was no longer drug-responsive. The four remaining cysteine replacements were of interest in that both activity and drug response were retained but the period length for both NADH oxidation and protein disulfide-thiol interchange was increased from 22 min to 36 or 42 min. The findings confirm the correctness of the drug and adenine nucleotide binding motifs within the tNOX protein and imply a potential critical role of cysteine residues in determining the period length.

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis of beta-lactamase I: role of Glu-166.

    PubMed

    Leung, Y C; Robinson, C V; Aplin, R T; Waley, S G

    1994-05-01

    Two Glu-166 mutants of beta-lactamase I from Bacillus cereus 569/H were constructed: one with a lengthened side chain (E166Cmc, the S-carboxymethylcysteine mutant) and the other with the side chain shortened and made non-polar (E166A). Their kinetic properties were studied and compared with those of the wild-type and the E166D mutant (with a shortened side chain) previously made by Gibson, Christensen and Waley (1990) (Biochem. J. 272, 613-619). Surprisingly, with good penicillin substrates, Km, kcat. and kcat./Km of the two conservative mutants (E166Cmc and E166D) are similar to those of the non-conservative mutant E166A. Their kcat. values are 3000-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme, showing that Glu-166 is a very important residue. The acylenzyme intermediate of E166A and a good substrate, penicillin V, was trapped by acid-quench and observed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, suggesting that Glu-166 is more important in catalysing the deacylation step than the acylation step. The beta-lactamase I E166A mutant is about 200-fold more active than the Bacillus licheniformis E166A mutant with nitrocefin or 6 beta-furylacryloyl-amidopenicillanic acid as substrate. This suggested that other groups in the active site of the beta-lactamase I mutant may activate the catalytic water molecule for deacylation.

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis of beta-lactamase I: role of Glu-166.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Y C; Robinson, C V; Aplin, R T; Waley, S G

    1994-01-01

    Two Glu-166 mutants of beta-lactamase I from Bacillus cereus 569/H were constructed: one with a lengthened side chain (E166Cmc, the S-carboxymethylcysteine mutant) and the other with the side chain shortened and made non-polar (E166A). Their kinetic properties were studied and compared with those of the wild-type and the E166D mutant (with a shortened side chain) previously made by Gibson, Christensen and Waley (1990) (Biochem. J. 272, 613-619). Surprisingly, with good penicillin substrates, Km, kcat. and kcat./Km of the two conservative mutants (E166Cmc and E166D) are similar to those of the non-conservative mutant E166A. Their kcat. values are 3000-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme, showing that Glu-166 is a very important residue. The acylenzyme intermediate of E166A and a good substrate, penicillin V, was trapped by acid-quench and observed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, suggesting that Glu-166 is more important in catalysing the deacylation step than the acylation step. The beta-lactamase I E166A mutant is about 200-fold more active than the Bacillus licheniformis E166A mutant with nitrocefin or 6 beta-furylacryloyl-amidopenicillanic acid as substrate. This suggested that other groups in the active site of the beta-lactamase I mutant may activate the catalytic water molecule for deacylation. PMID:7910734

  1. Site-directed mutagenesis of cation coordinating residues in the gastric H,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Rulli, S J; Louneva, N M; Skripnikova, E V; Rabon, E C

    2001-03-01

    Site-mutations were introduced into putative cation binding site 1 of the H,K-ATPase at glu-797, thr-825, and glu-938. The side chain oxygen of each was not essential but the mutations produced different activation and inhibition kinetics. Site mutations thr-825 (ala, leu) and glu-938 (ala, gln) modestly decreased the apparent affinity to K+, while glu-797 (gln) was equivalent to wild type. As expected of competitive inhibition, mutations of thr-825 and glu-938 that decreased the apparent affinity for K+ also increased the apparent affinity for SCH28080. This is consistent with the participation of thr-825 and glu-938 in a cation binding domain. The sidechain geometry, but not the sidechain charge of glu-797, is essential to ATPase function as the site mutant glu-797 (gly) inactivated the H,K-ATPase, while glu-797 (gln) was active but the apparent affinity to SCH 28080 was decreased by four-fold. Lys-793, a unique residue of the H,K-ATPase, was essential for ATPase function. Since this residue is adjacent to site 1, the result suggests that charge pairing between lys-793 and residues at or near this site may be essential to ATPase function.

  2. Distinct ETA Receptor Binding Mode of Macitentan As Determined by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Bur, Daniel; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The competitive endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) bosentan and ambrisentan, which have long been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, are characterized by very short (1 min) occupancy half-lives at the ETA receptor. The novel ERA macitentan, displays a 20-fold increased receptor occupancy half-life, causing insurmountable antagonism of ET-1-induced signaling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. We show here that the slow ETA receptor dissociation rate of macitentan was shared with a set of structural analogs, whereas compounds structurally related to bosentan displayed fast dissociation kinetics. NMR analysis showed that macitentan adopts a compact structure in aqueous solution and molecular modeling suggests that this conformation tightly fits into a well-defined ETA receptor binding pocket. In contrast the structurally different and negatively charged bosentan-type molecules only partially filled this pocket and expanded into an extended endothelin binding site. To further investigate these different ETA receptor-antagonist interaction modes, we performed functional studies using ETA receptor variants harboring amino acid point mutations in the presumed ERA interaction site. Three ETA receptor residues significantly and differentially affected ERA activity: Mutation R326Q did not affect the antagonist activity of macitentan, however the potencies of bosentan and ambrisentan were significantly reduced; mutation L322A rendered macitentan less potent, whereas bosentan and ambrisentan were unaffected; mutation I355A significantly reduced bosentan potency, but not ambrisentan and macitentan potencies. This suggests that – in contrast to bosentan and ambrisentan - macitentan-ETA receptor binding is not dependent on strong charge-charge interactions, but depends predominantly on hydrophobic interactions. This different binding mode could be the reason for macitentan's sustained target occupancy and insurmountable antagonism. PMID

  3. MALS: an efficient strategy for multiple site-directed mutagenesis employing a combination of DNA amplification, ligation and suppression PCR

    PubMed Central

    Fushan, Alexey A; Drayna, Dennis T

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple approaches for the site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) have been developed. However, only several of them are designed for simultaneous introduction of multiple nucleotide alterations, and these are time consuming. In addition, many of the existing multiple SDM methods have technical limitations associated with type and number of mutations that can be introduced, or are technically demanding and require special chemical reagents. Results In this study we developed a quick and efficient strategy for introduction of multiple complex mutations in a target DNA without intermediate subcloning by using a combination of connecting SDM and suppression PCR. The procedure consists of sequential rounds, with each individual round including PCR amplification of target DNA with two non-overlapping pairs of oligonucleotides. The desired mutation is incorporated at the 5' end of one or both internal oligonucleotides. DNA fragments obtained during amplification are mixed and ligated. The resulting DNA mixture is amplified with external oligonucleotides that act as suppression adapters. Suppression PCR limits amplification to DNA molecules representing full length target DNA, while amplification of other types of molecules formed during ligation is suppressed. To create additional mutations, an aliquot of the ligation mixture is then used directly for the next round of mutagenesis employing internal oligonucleotides specific for another region of target DNA. Conclusion A wide variety of complex multiple mutations can be generated in a short period of time. The procedure is rapid, highly efficient and does not require special chemical reagents. Thus, MALS represents a powerful alternative to the existing methods for multiple SDM. PMID:19778447

  4. Improving the binding affinity of an antibody using molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Casipit, C. L.; Tal, R.; Wittman, V.; Chavaillaz, P. A.; Arbuthnott, K.; Weidanz, J. A.; Jiao, J. A.; Wong, H. C.

    1998-01-01

    Activated Factor X releases F1.2, a 271-amino acid peptide, from the amino terminus of prothrombin during blood coagulation. A nine-amino acid peptide, C9 (DSDRAIEGR), corresponding to the carboxyl terminus of F1.2 was synthesized and used to produce a monoclonal antibody, TA1 (K(D)) 1.22 x 10(-6) M). To model the TA1 antibody, we entered the sequence information of the cloned TA1 Fv into the antibody modeling program, ABM, which combines homology methods, conformational search procedures, and energy screening and has proved to be a reliable and reproducible antibody modeling method. Using a novel protein fusion procedure, we expressed the C9 peptide fused to the carboxyl terminus of the PENI repressor protein from Bacillus licheniformis in Escherichia coli. We constructed fusion proteins containing alanine substitutions for each amino acid in the C9 epitope. Binding studies, using the C9 alanine mutants and TA1, and spatial constraints predicted by the modeled TA1 binding cleft enabled us to establish a plausible conformation for C9 complexed with TA1. Furthermore, based on binding results of conservative amino acid substitutions in C9 and mutations in the antibody, we were able to refine the complex model and identify antibody mutations that would improve binding affinity. PMID:10082364

  5. Thimet oligopeptidase: site-directed mutagenesis disproves previous assumptions about the nature of the catalytic site.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Stevens, R A; Wray, P W; Rawlings, N D; Barrett, A J

    1998-09-11

    Zinc metallopeptidases that contain the His-Glu-Xaa-Xaa-His (HEXXH) motif generally have a third ligand of the metal ion that may be either a Glu residue (in clan MA) or a His residue (in clan MB) (Rawlings and Barrett (1995) Methods Enzymol. 248, 183-228). Thimet oligopeptidase has not yet been assigned to either clan, and both Glu and His residues have been proposed as the third ligand. We mutated candidate ligand residues in the recombinant enzyme and identified Glu, His and Asp residues that are important for catalytic activity and/or stability of the protein. However, neither of the Glu and His residues close to the HEXXH motif that have previously been suggested to be ligands is required for the binding of zinc. We conclude that thimet oligopeptidase is not a member of clan MA or clan MB and it is likely that the enzyme possesses a catalytic site and protein fold different from those identified in any metallopeptidase to date. The definitive identification of the third zinc ligand may well require the determination of the crystallographic structure of thimet oligopeptidase or one of its homologues.

  6. Defining Fibronectin's Cell Adhesion Synergy Site by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Redick, Sambra D.; Settles, Daniel L.; Briscoe, Gina; Erickson, Harold P.

    2000-01-01

    Fibronectin's RGD-mediated binding to the α5β1 integrin is dramatically enhanced by a synergy site within fibronectin III domain 9 (FN9). Guided by the crystal structure of the cell-binding domain, we selected amino acids in FN9 that project in the same direction as the RGD, presumably toward the integrin, and mutated them to alanine. R1379 in the peptide PHSRN, and the nearby R1374 have been shown previously to be important for α5β1-mediated adhesion (Aota, S., M. Nomizu, and K.M. Yamada. 1994. J. Biol. Chem. 269:24756–24761). Our more extensive set of mutants showed that R1379 is the key residue in the synergistic effect, but other residues contribute substantially. R1374A decreased adhesion slightly by itself, but the double mutant R1374A-R1379A was significantly less adhesive than R1379A alone. Single mutations of R1369A, R1371A, T1385A, and N1386A had negligible effects on cell adhesion, but combining these substitutions either with R1379A or each other gave a more dramatic reduction of cell adhesion. The triple mutant R1374A/P1376A/R1379A had no detectable adhesion activity. We conclude that, in addition to the R of the PHRSN peptide, other residues on the same face of FN9 are required for the full synergistic effect. The integrin-binding synergy site is a much more extensive surface than the small linear peptide sequence. PMID:10769040

  7. Cloning, Functional Characterization and Site-Directed Mutagenesis of 4-Coumarate: Coenzyme A Ligase (4CL) Involved in Coumarin Biosynthesis in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Yao, Ruolan; Zhao, Yucheng; Xu, Sheng; Huang, Chuanlong; Luo, Jun; Kong, Lingyi

    2017-01-01

    Coumarins are the main bioactive compounds in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn, a common Chinese herbal medicine. Nevertheless, the genes involved in the biosynthesis of core structure of coumarin in P. praeruptorum have not been identified yet. 4-Coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL) catalyzes the formation of hydroxycinnamates CoA esters, and plays an essential role at the divergence point from general phenylpropanoid metabolism to major branch pathway of coumarin. Here, three novel putative 4CL genes (Pp4CL1, Pp4CL7, and Pp4CL10) were isolated from P. praeruptorum. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant proteins revealed that Pp4CL1 utilized p-coumaric and ferulic acids as its two main substrates for coumarin biosynthesis in P. praeruptorum. Furthermore, Pp4CL1 also exhibited activity toward caffeic, cinnamic, isoferulic, and o-coumaric acids and represented a bona fide 4CL. Pp4CL7 and Pp4CL10 had no catalytic activity toward hydroxycinnamic acid compounds. But they had close phylogenetic relationship to true 4CLs and were defined as 4CL-like genes. Among all putative 4CLs, Pp4CL1 was the most highly expressed gene in roots, and its expression level was significantly up-regulated in mature roots compared with seedlings. Subcellular localization studies showed that Pp4CL1 and Pp4CL10 proteins were localized in the cytosol. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of Pp4CL1 demonstrated that amino acids of Tyr-239, Ala-243, Met-306, Ala-309, Gly-334, Lys-441, Gln-446, and Lys-526 were essential for substrate binding or catalytic activities. The characterization and site-directed mutagenesis studies of Pp4CL1 lays a solid foundation for elucidating the biosynthetic mechanisms of coumarins in P. praeruptorum and provides further insights in understanding the structure-function relationships of this important family of proteins.

  8. Cloning, Functional Characterization and Site-Directed Mutagenesis of 4-Coumarate: Coenzyme A Ligase (4CL) Involved in Coumarin Biosynthesis in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Yao, Ruolan; Zhao, Yucheng; Xu, Sheng; Huang, Chuanlong; Luo, Jun; Kong, Lingyi

    2017-01-01

    Coumarins are the main bioactive compounds in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn, a common Chinese herbal medicine. Nevertheless, the genes involved in the biosynthesis of core structure of coumarin in P. praeruptorum have not been identified yet. 4-Coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL) catalyzes the formation of hydroxycinnamates CoA esters, and plays an essential role at the divergence point from general phenylpropanoid metabolism to major branch pathway of coumarin. Here, three novel putative 4CL genes (Pp4CL1, Pp4CL7, and Pp4CL10) were isolated from P. praeruptorum. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant proteins revealed that Pp4CL1 utilized p-coumaric and ferulic acids as its two main substrates for coumarin biosynthesis in P. praeruptorum. Furthermore, Pp4CL1 also exhibited activity toward caffeic, cinnamic, isoferulic, and o-coumaric acids and represented a bona fide 4CL. Pp4CL7 and Pp4CL10 had no catalytic activity toward hydroxycinnamic acid compounds. But they had close phylogenetic relationship to true 4CLs and were defined as 4CL-like genes. Among all putative 4CLs, Pp4CL1 was the most highly expressed gene in roots, and its expression level was significantly up-regulated in mature roots compared with seedlings. Subcellular localization studies showed that Pp4CL1 and Pp4CL10 proteins were localized in the cytosol. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of Pp4CL1 demonstrated that amino acids of Tyr-239, Ala-243, Met-306, Ala-309, Gly-334, Lys-441, Gln-446, and Lys-526 were essential for substrate binding or catalytic activities. The characterization and site-directed mutagenesis studies of Pp4CL1 lays a solid foundation for elucidating the biosynthetic mechanisms of coumarins in P. praeruptorum and provides further insights in understanding the structure–function relationships of this important family of proteins. PMID:28144249

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis of an acetylcholinesterase gene from the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti confers insecticide insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, A; Rocheleau, T; ffrench-Constant, R

    1997-11-01

    Insecticide resistance is a serious problem facing the effective control of insect vectors of disease. Insensitive acetylcholinesterase (AChE) confers resistance to organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate insecticides and is a widespread resistance mechanism in vector mosquitoes. Although the point mutations that underlie AChE insensitivity have been described from Drosophila, the Colorado potato beetle, and house flies, no resistance associated mutations have been documented from mosquitoes to date. We are therefore using a cloned acetylcholinesterase gene from the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti as a model in which to perform site directed mutagenesis in order to understand the effects of potential resistance associated mutations. The same resistance associated amino-acid replacements as found in other insects also confer OP and carbamate resistance to the mosquito enzyme. Here we describe the levels of resistance conferred by different combinations of these mutations and the effects of these mutations on the kinetics of the AChE enzyme. Over-expression of these constructs in baculovirus will facilitate purification of each of the mutant enzymes and a more detailed analysis of their associated inhibition kinetics.

  10. Modifying the photoelectric behavior of bacteriorhodopsin by site-directed mutagenesis: electrochemical and genetic engineering approaches to molecular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, F. T.; Hong, F. H.; Needleman, R. B.; Ni, B.; Chang, M.

    1992-07-01

    Bacteriorhodopsins (bR's) modified by substitution of the chromophore with synthetic vitamin A analogues or by spontaneous mutation have been reported as successful examples of using biomaterials to construct molecular optoelectronic devices. The operation of these devices depends on desirable optical properties derived from molecular engineering. This report examines the effect of site-directed mutagenesis on the photoelectric behavior of bR thin films with an emphasis on their application to the construction of molecular devices based on their unique photoelectric behavior. We examine the photoelectric signals induced by a microsecond light pulse in thin films which contain reconstituted oriented purple membrane sheets isolated from several mutant strains of Halobacterium halobium. A recently developed expression system is used to synthesize mutant bR's in their natural host, H. halobium. We then use a unique analytical method (tunable voltage clamp method) to investigate the effect of pH on the relaxation of two components of the photoelectric signals, B1 and B2. We found that for the four mutant bR's examined, the pH dependence of the B2 component varies significantly. Our results suggest that genetic engineering approaches can produce mutant bR's with altered photoelectric characteristics that can be exploited in the construction of devices.

  11. Site-directed mutagenesis of a tetrameric dandelion polyphenol oxidase (PPO-6) reveals the site of subunit interaction.

    PubMed

    Dirks-Hofmeister, Mareike E; Inlow, Jennifer K; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2012-09-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) catalyze the oxidation of ortho-diphenols to the corresponding quinones (EC 1.10.3.1). In plants PPOs appear in gene families, and the corresponding isoenzymes are located to the thylakoid lumen of chloroplasts. Although plant PPOs are often discussed with regard to their role in defense reactions, a common physiological function has not yet been defined. We analyzed a tetrameric PPO isoenzyme (PPO-6) from dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and found it to display cooperativity in catalysis, a phenomenon that has rarely been shown for plant PPOs previously. The identification of a surface-exposed cysteine (197) through molecular modeling followed by site-directed mutagenesis proved this amino acid residue to stabilize the tetramer via a disulfide linkage. The C197S-mutein still forms a tetrameric structure but shows impaired enzymatic efficiency and cooperativity and a reduction in stability. These findings indicate that oligomerization may be a physiological requirement for PPO-6 stability and function in vivo and raise new questions regarding distinct functions for specific PPO isoenzymes in plants.

  12. Enhancement of thermostability and kinetic efficiency of Aspergillus niger PhyA phytase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hesampour, Ardeshir; Siadat, Seyed Ehsan Ranaei; Malboobi, Mohammad Ali; Mohandesi, Nooshin; Arab, Seyed Shahriar; Ghahremanpour, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-03-01

    Phytase efficiently catalyzes the hydrolysis of phytate to phosphate; it can be utilized as an animal supplement to provide animals their nutrient requirements for phosphate and to mitigate environmental pollution caused by unutilized feed phosphate. Owing to animal feed being commonly pelleted at 70 to 90 °C, phytase with a sufficiently high thermal stability is desirable. Based on the crystal structure of PhyA and bioinformatics analysis at variant heat treatments, 12 single and multiple mutants were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis in order to improve phytase thermostability. Mutated constructs were expressed in Pichia pastoris. The manipulated phytases were purified; their biochemical and kinetic investigation revealed that while the thermostability of six mutants was improved, P9 (T314S Q315R V62N) and P12 (S205N S206A T151A T314S Q315R) showed the highest heat stability (P < 0.05) with 24 and 22.6 % greater retention, respectively, compared with the PhyA of the wild type at 80 °C. The K m value of the improved thermostable P9 and P12 mutant enzymes for sodium phytate were 35 and 20 % lower (P < 0.05) with respect to the wild-type enzyme. In conclusion, it is feasible to simultaneously improve the thermostability and the catalytic efficiency of phytase to be used as an animal feed supplement.

  13. Engineering of cytochrome P450 3A4 for enhanced peroxide-mediated substrate oxidation using directed evolution and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Liu, Hong; Halpert, James R

    2006-12-01

    CYP3A4 has been subjected to random and site-directed mutagenesis to enhance peroxide-supported metabolism of several substrates. Initially, a high-throughput screening method using whole cell suspensions was developed for H2O2-supported oxidation of 7-benzyloxyquinoline. Random mutagenesis by error-prone polymerase chain reaction and activity screening yielded several CYP3A4 mutants with enhanced activity. L216W and F228I showed a 3-fold decrease in Km, HOOH and a 2.5-fold increase in kcat/Km, HOOH compared with CYP3A4. Subsequently, T309V and T309A were created based on the observation that T309V in CYP2D6 has enhanced cumene hydroperoxide (CuOOH)-supported activity. T309V and T309A showed a > 6- and 5-fold higher kcat/Km, CuOOH than CYP3A4, respectively. Interestingly, L216W and F228I also exhibited, respectively, a > 4- and a > 3-fold higher kcat/Km, CuOOH than CYP3A4. Therefore, several multiple mutants were constructed from rationally designed and randomly isolated mutants; among them, F228I/T309A showed an 11-fold higher kcat/Km, CuOOH than CYP3A4. Addition of cytochrome b5, which is known to stimulate peroxide-supported activity, enhanced the kcat/Km, CuOOH of CYP3A4 by 4- to 7-fold. When the mutants were tested with other substrates, T309V and T433S showed enhanced kcat/Km, CuOOH with 7-benzyloxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin and testosterone, respectively, compared with CYP3A4. In addition, in the presence of cytochrome b5, T433S has the potential to produce milligram quantities of 6beta-hydroxytestosterone through peroxide-supported oxidation. In conclusion, a combination of random and site-directed mutagenesis approaches yielded CYP3A4 enzymes with enhanced peroxide-supported metabolism of several substrates.

  14. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Dods, Rachel L; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-11-23

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide-receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design.

  15. Elucidation of strain-specific interaction of a GII-4 norovirus with HBGA receptors by site-directed mutagenesis study

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Ming |; Xia Ming; Cao Sheng; Huang Pengwei; Farkas, Tibor |; Meller, Jarek |; Hegde, Rashmi S. |; Li Xuemei; Rao Zihe; Jiang Xi |

    2008-09-30

    Noroviruses interact with histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) receptors in a strain-specific manner probably detecting subtle structural differences in the carbohydrate receptors. The specific recognition of types A and B antigens by various norovirus strains is a typical example. The only difference between the types A and B antigens is the acetamide linked to the terminal galactose of the A but not to the B antigen. The crystal structure of the P dimer of a GII-4 norovirus (VA387) bound to types A and B trisaccharides has elucidated the A/B binding site on the capsid but did not explain the binding specificity of the two antigens. In this study, using site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified three residues on the VA387 capsid that are sterically close to the acetamide and are required for binding to A but not B antigens, indicating that the acetamide determines the binding specificity between the A and B antigens. Further mutational analysis showed that a nearby open cavity may also be involved in binding specificity to HBGAs. In addition, a systematic mutational analysis of residues in and around the binding interface has identified a group of amino acids that are required for binding but do not have direct contact with the carbohydrate antigens, implying that these residues may be involved in the structural integrity of the receptor binding interface. Taken together, our study provides new insights into the carbohydrate/capsid interactions which are a valuable complement to the atomic structures in understanding the virus/host interaction and in the future design of antiviral agents.

  16. Identification of the anti-inflammatory protein tristetraprolin as a hyperphosphorylated protein by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Heping; Deterding, Leesa J; Venable, John D; Kennington, Elizabeth A; Yates, John R; Tomer, Kenneth B; Blackshear, Perry J

    2006-02-15

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a zinc-finger protein that binds to AREs (AU-rich elements) within certain mRNAs and causes destabilization of those mRNAs. Mice deficient in TTP develop a profound inflammatory syndrome with erosive arthritis, autoimmunity and myeloid hyperplasia. Previous studies showed that TTP is phosphorylated extensively in intact cells. However, limited information is available about the identities of these phosphorylation sites. We investigated the phosphorylation sites in human TTP from transfected HEK-293 cells by MS and site-directed mutagenesis. A number of phosphorylation sites including Ser66, Ser88, Thr92, Ser169, Ser186, Ser197, Ser218, Ser228, Ser276 and Ser296 were identified by MS analyses using MALDI (matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization)-MS, MALDI-tandem MS, LC (liquid chromatography)-tandem MS and multidimensional protein identification technology. Mutations of Ser197, Ser218 and Ser228 to alanine in the human protein significantly increased TTP's gel mobility (likely to be stoichiometric), whereas mutations at the other sites had little effect on its gel mobility. Dephosphorylation and in vivo labelling studies showed that mutant proteins containing multiple mutations were still phosphorylated, and all were able to bind to RNA probes containing AREs. Confocal microscopy showed a similar cytosolic localization of TTP among the various proteins. Ser197, Ser218 and Ser228 are predicted by motif scanning to be potential sites for protein kinase A, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1 (both Ser218 and Ser228) respectively. The present study has identified multiple phosphorylation sites in the anti-inflammatory protein TTP in mammalian cells and should provide the molecular basis for further studies on the function and regulation of TTP in controlling pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  17. Identification of the anti-inflammatory protein tristetraprolin as a hyperphosphorylated protein by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Heping; Deterding, Leesa J.; Venable, John D.; Kennington, Elizabeth A.; Yates, John R.; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2005-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a zinc-finger protein that binds to AREs (AU-rich elements) within certain mRNAs and causes destabilization of those mRNAs. Mice deficient in TTP develop a profound inflammatory syndrome with erosive arthritis, autoimmunity and myeloid hyperplasia. Previous studies showed that TTP is phosphorylated extensively in intact cells. However, limited information is available about the identities of these phosphorylation sites. We investigated the phosphorylation sites in human TTP from transfected HEK-293 cells by MS and site-directed mutagenesis. A number of phosphorylation sites including Ser66, Ser88, Thr92, Ser169, Ser186, Ser197, Ser218, Ser228, Ser276 and Ser296 were identified by MS analyses using MALDI (matrix-assisted laser-desorption–ionization)-MS, MALDI-tandem MS, LC (liquid chromatography)–tandem MS and multidimensional protein identification technology. Mutations of Ser197, Ser218 and Ser228 to alanine in the human protein significantly increased TTP's gel mobility (likely to be stoichiometric), whereas mutations at the other sites had little effect on its gel mobility. Dephosphorylation and in vivo labelling studies showed that mutant proteins containing multiple mutations were still phosphorylated, and all were able to bind to RNA probes containing AREs. Confocal microscopy showed a similar cytosolic localization of TTP among the various proteins. Ser197, Ser218 and Ser228 are predicted by motif scanning to be potential sites for protein kinase A, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1 (both Ser218 and Ser228) respectively. The present study has identified multiple phosphorylation sites in the anti-inflammatory protein TTP in mammalian cells and should provide the molecular basis for further studies on the function and regulation of TTP in controlling pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:16262601

  18. New system based on site-directed mutagenesis for highly accurate comparison of resistance levels conferred by SHV beta-lactamases.

    PubMed Central

    Nüesch-Inderbinen, M T; Hächler, H; Kayser, F H

    1995-01-01

    We developed a system based on site-directed mutagenesis that allows a precise comparison of SHV enzymes under isogenic conditions. In addition, the influences of two different, naturally occurring promoters were examined for each SHV derivative. The system comprised two separately cloned DNA fragments, each the size of 3.6 kb. Both fragments encoded an SHV gene originating from clinical isolates but with different promoters. The structural genes were made identical by site-directed mutagenesis. Other mutations were then introduced into both fragments by means of site-directed mutagenesis, resulting in the SHV derivatives SHV-1, SHV-2, SHV-2a, SHV-3, and SHV-5. The amino acid exchange of glutamic acid at position 235 for lysine in SHV-5 resulted in the highest resistance levels. SHV-3, differing from SHV-2 by the exchange of arginine at position 201 for leucine and previously described as indistinguishable from SHV-2, was shown to cause slightly higher resistance to ceftazidime and lower resistance to ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, and cefepime than SHV-2. The point mutation in SHV-2a, with the leucine-to-glutamine replacement at the unusual position 31, previously considered almost insignificant, proved to increase resistance to ceftazidime but reduced the MICs of all other cephalosporins tested when compared with those for SHV-2. For all clones harboring SHV derivatives, resistance was increased by a stronger promoter, in some cases masking the effect of the point mutation itself and demonstrating the importance of regulatory mechanisms of resistance. PMID:7486909

  19. Preparation of leptin antagonists by site-directed mutagenesis of human, ovine, rat, and mouse leptin's site III: implications on blocking undesired leptin action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gili; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Gonen-Berger, Dana; Callebaut, Isabelle; Djiane, Jean; Gertler, Arieh

    2006-12-01

    Six muteins of human, ovine, rat, and mouse leptins mutated to Ala in amino acids 39-41 or 39-42 were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis of the putative site III, which does not affect binding but is necessary for receptor activation, then expressed, solubilized in 4.5 M urea, at pH 11.3 in presence of cysteine, refolded and purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose or combination of anion-exchange chromatography followed by gel filtration. The overall yields were 400-800 mg from 5 L of fermentation. All proteins were >98% pure as evidenced by SDS-PAGE and contained at least 95% monomers as documented by gel-filtration chromatography under nondenaturing conditions. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that all six muteins have identical secondary structure characteristic of nonmutated leptins, namely 52-63% of alpha helix content. All muteins formed a 1:1 complex with chicken leptin binding domain, (chLBD) and bound chLBD or membrane-embedded leptin receptor with affinity identical to WT leptins. Muteins were devoid of any biological activity in several bioassays but were potent competitive antagonists. Some muteins were pegylated using 40 kDa PEG. Although pegylation decreased the in vitro activity, increasing circulation half-life can recompensate this deficit, so pegylated antagonists are expected to be more potent in vivo.

  20. Alteration of leucine aminopeptidase from Streptomyces septatus TH-2 to phenylalanine aminopeptidase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Arima, Jiro; Uesugi, Yoshiko; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2005-11-01

    To tailor leucine aminopeptidase from Streptomyces septatus TH-2 (SSAP) to become a convenient biocatalyst, we are interested in Phe221 of SSAP, which is thought to interact with the side chain of the N-terminal residue of the substrate. By using saturation mutagenesis, the feasibility of altering the performance of SSAP was evaluated. The hydrolytic activities of 19 mutants were investigated using aminoacyl p-nitroanilide (pNA) derivatives as substrates. Replacement of Phe221 resulted in changes in the activities of all the mutants. Three of these mutants, F221G, F221A, and F221S, specifically hydrolyzed L-Phe-pNA, and F221I SSAP exhibited hydrolytic activity with L-Leu-pNA exceeding that of the wild type. Although the hydrolytic activities with peptide substrates decreased, the hydrolytic activities with amide and methyl ester substrates were proportional to the changes in the hydrolytic activities with pNA derivatives. Furthermore, based on a comparative kinetic study, the mechanism underlying the alteration in the preference of SSAP from leucine to phenylalanine is discussed.

  1. Novel induced mlo mutant alleles in combination with site-directed mutagenesis reveal functionally important domains in the heptahelical barley Mlo protein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recessively inherited natural and induced mutations in the barley Mlo gene confer durable broad-spectrum resistance against the powdery mildew pathogen, Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei. Mlo codes for a member of a plant-specific family of polytopic integral membrane proteins with unknown biochemical activity. Resistant barley mlo mutant alleles identify amino acid residues that are critical for Mlo function in the context of powdery mildew susceptibility. Results We molecularly analyzed a novel set of induced barley mlo mutants and used site-directed mutagenesis in combination with transient gene expression to unravel novel amino acid residues of functional significance. We integrate these results with previous findings to map functionally important regions of the heptahelical Mlo protein. Our data reveal the second and third cytoplasmic loop as being particularly sensitive to functional impediment by mutational perturbation, suggesting that these regions are critical for the susceptibility-conferring activity of the Mlo protein. In contrast, only mutations in the second but not the third cytoplasmic loop appear to trigger the Endoplasmic Reticulum-localized quality control machinery that ensures the biogenesis of properly folded membrane proteins. Conclusion Our findings identify functionally important regions of the polytopic barley Mlo protein and reveal the differential sensitivity of individual protein domains to cellular quality control. PMID:20170486

  2. Probing secondary glutaminyl cyclase (QC) inhibitor interactions applying an in silico-modeling/site-directed mutagenesis approach: implications for drug development.

    PubMed

    Koch, Birgit; Buchholz, Mirko; Wermann, Michael; Heiser, Ulrich; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-12-01

    Glutaminyl cyclases (QCs) catalyze the formation of pyroglutamate-modified amyloid peptides deposited in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Inhibitors of QC are currently in development as potential therapeutics. The crystal structures of the potent inhibitor PBD150 bound to human and murine QC (hQC, mQC) have been described recently. The binding modes of a dimethoxyphenyl moiety of the inhibitor are significantly different between the structures, which contrasts with a similar K(i) value. We show the conformation of PBD150 prone to disturbance by protein-protein interactions within the crystals. Semi-empirical calculations of the enzyme-inhibitor interaction within the crystal suggest significant differences in the dissociation constants between the binding modes. To probe for interactions in solution, a site-directed mutagenesis on hQC was performed. The replacement of F325 and I303 by alanine or asparagine resulted in a 800-fold lower activity of the inhibitor, whereas the exchange of S323 by alanine or valine led to a 20-fold higher activity of PBD150. The results provide an example of deciphering the interaction mode between a target enzyme and lead substance in solution, if co-crystallization does not mirror such interactions properly. Thus, the study might provide implications for rapid screening of binding modes also for other drug targets.

  3. Benzophenone synthase and chalcone synthase from Hypericum androsaemum cell cultures: cDNA cloning, functional expression, and site-directed mutagenesis of two polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benye; Falkenstein-Paul, Hildegard; Schmidt, Werner; Beerhues, Ludger

    2003-06-01

    Benzophenone derivatives, such as polyprenylated benzoylphloroglucinols and xanthones, are biologically active secondary metabolites. The formation of their C13 skeleton is catalyzed by benzophenone synthase (BPS; EC 2.3.1.151) that has been cloned from cell cultures of Hypericum androsaemum. BPS is a novel member of the superfamily of plant polyketide synthases (PKSs), also termed type III PKSs, with 53-63% amino acid sequence identity. Heterologously expressed BPS was a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 42.8 kDa. Its preferred starter substrate was benzoyl-CoA that was stepwise condensed with three malonyl-CoAs to give 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzophenone. BPS did not accept activated cinnamic acids as starter molecules. In contrast, recombinant chalcone synthase (CHS; EC 2.3.1.74) from the same cell cultures preferentially used 4-coumaroyl-CoA and also converted CoA esters of benzoic acids. The enzyme shared 60.1% amino acid sequence identity with BPS. In a phylogenetic tree, the two PKSs occurred in different clusters. One cluster was formed by CHSs including the one from H. androsaemum. BPS grouped together with the PKSs that functionally differ from CHS. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids shaping the initiation/elongation cavity of CHS yielded a triple mutant (L263M/F265Y/S338G) that preferred benzoyl-CoA over 4-coumaroyl-CoA.

  4. Identification of amino acids related to catalytic function of Sulfolobus solfataricus P1 carboxylesterase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Ho; Lee, Ye-Na; Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Sung-Jin; Lee, Hee-Bong

    2016-01-01

    The archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P1 carboxylesterase is a thermostable enzyme with a molecular mass of 33.5 kDa belonging to the mammalian hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) family. In our previous study, we purified the enzyme and suggested the expected amino acids related to its catalysis by chemical modification and a sequence homology search. For further validating these amino acids in this study, we modified them using site-directed mutagenesis and examined the activity of the mutant enzymes using spectrophotometric analysis and then estimated by homology modeling and fluorescence analysis. As a result, it was identified that Ser151, Asp244, and His274 consist of a catalytic triad, and Gly80, Gly81, and Ala152 compose an oxyanion hole of the enzyme. In addition, it was also determined that the cysteine residues are located near the active site or at the positions inducing any conformational changes of the enzyme by their replacement with serine residues. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 349-354] PMID:27222124

  5. Site-directed Mutagenesis of Key Residues Unveiled a Novel Allosteric Site on Human Adenosine Kinase for Pyrrolobenzoxa(thia)zepinone Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Savi, Lida; Brindisi, Margherita; Alfano, Gloria; Butini, Stefania; La Pietra, Valeria; Novellino, Ettore; Marinelli, Luciana; Lossani, Andrea; Focher, Federico; Cavella, Caterina; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Most nucleoside kinases, besides the catalytic domain, feature an allosteric domain which modulates their activity. Generally, non-substrate analogs, interacting with allosteric sites, represent a major opportunity for developing more selective and safer therapeutics. We recently developed a series of non-nucleoside non-competitive inhibitors of human adenosine kinase (hAK), based on a pyrrolobenzoxa(thia)zepinone scaffold. Based on computational analysis, we hypothesized the existence of a novel allosteric site on hAK, topographically distinct from the catalytic site. In this study, we have adopted a multidisciplinary approach including molecular modeling, biochemical studies, and site-directed mutagenesis to validate our hypothesis. Based on a three-dimensional model of interaction between hAK and our molecules, we designed, cloned, and expressed specific, single and double point mutants of hAK (Q74A, Q78A, H107A, K341A, F338A, and Q74A-F338A). Kinetic characterization of recombinant enzymes indicated that these mutations did not affect enzyme functioning; conversely, mutated enzymes are endowed of reduced susceptibility to our non-nucleoside inhibitors, while maintaining comparable affinity for nucleoside inhibitors to the wild-type enzyme. This study represents the first characterization and validation of a novel allosteric site in hAK and may pave the way to the development of novel selective and potent non-nucleoside inhibitors of hAK endowed with therapeutic potential.

  6. Site-directed mutagenesis of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF): analysis of O-glycosylation sites and properties.

    PubMed

    Davis-Fleische, K M; Brigstock, D R; Besner, G E

    2001-01-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a 22 kDa, O-glycosylated protein. HeLa cells infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing human HB-EGF produced a secreted, bioactive protein, with Mr 22,000 that was decreased to 14,000 by treatment with O-glycanase. Site-directed mutagenesis of HB-EGF cDNA using oligonucleotide- and PCR-directed techniques was performed to change the potential glycosylation sites, Thr75 and Thr85, to alanine residues to prevent O-glycosylation. Purification and characterization of the mutant proteins demonstrated that: (i) both O-glycosylation sites of HB-EGF are utilized, (ii) HB-EGF secretion does not require O-glycosylation, (iii) removal of O-glycans does not affect proteolytic cleavage of the HB-EGF precursor, nor does it influence HB-EGF intracellular trafficking or subcellular localization, and (iv) HB-EGF produced by HeLa cells is heavily sialylated. Comparisons between glycosylation mutants and wild-type HB-EGF revealed no significant apparent differences in receptor binding activity.

  7. Characterization and site-directed mutagenesis of a novel class II 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase from the deep-sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Yi, Licong; Lin, Yongjun; Zhang, Lili; Shao, Zongze; Liu, Ziduo

    2014-09-01

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is a key enzyme in the aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway in microorganisms and plants, which catalyzes the formation of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) from shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). In this study, a novel AroA-encoding gene was identified from the deep sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27 through screening the genomic library and termed as AroAA.sp. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that AroAA.sp (1317 bp and 438 amino acids) is a class II AroA. This enzyme exhibited considerable activity between pH 5.5 and pH 8.0 and notable activity at low temperatures. The KM for PEP and IC50 [glyphosate] values (the concentration of glyphosate that inhibited enzyme activity by 50%) of AroAA.sp were 78 μM and 1.5 mM, respectively. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the G100A mutant had a 30-fold increase in the IC50 [glyphosate] value; while the L105P mutant showed only 20% catalytic activity compared to wild-type AroAA.sp. The specific activity of the wild-type AroAA.sp, the G100A mutant and the L105P mutant were 7.78 U/mg, 7.26 U/mg and 1.76 U/mg, respectively. This is the first report showing that the G100A mutant of AroA displays considerably improved glyphosate resistance and demonstrates that Leu105 is essential for the enzyme's activity.

  8. Probing the substrate binding site of Candida tenuis xylose reductase (AKR2B5) with site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Regina; Leitgeb, Stefan; Wilson, David K; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about how substrates bind to CtXR (Candida tenuis xylose reductase; AKR2B5) and other members of the AKR (aldo-keto reductase) protein superfamily. Modelling of xylose into the active site of CtXR suggested that Trp23, Asp50 and Asn309 are the main components of pentose-specific substrate-binding recognition. Kinetic consequences of site-directed substitutions of these residues are reported. The mutants W23F and W23Y catalysed NADH-dependent reduction of xylose with only 4 and 1% of the wild-type efficiency (kcat/K(m)) respectively, but improved the wild-type selectivity for utilization of ketones, relative to xylose, by factors of 156 and 471 respectively. Comparison of multiple sequence alignment with reported specificities of AKR members emphasizes a conserved role of Trp23 in determining aldehyde-versus-ketone substrate selectivity. D50A showed 31 and 18% of the wild-type catalytic-centre activities for xylose reduction and xylitol oxidation respectively, consistent with a decrease in the rates of the chemical steps caused by the mutation, but no change in the apparent substrate binding constants and the pattern of substrate specificities. The 30-fold preference of the wild-type for D-galactose compared with 2-deoxy-D-galactose was lost completely in N309A and N309D mutants. Comparison of the 2.4 A (1 A=0.1 nm) X-ray crystal structure of mutant N309D bound to NAD+ with the previous structure of the wild-type holoenzyme reveals no major structural perturbations. The results suggest that replacement of Asn309 with alanine or aspartic acid disrupts the function of the original side chain in donating a hydrogen atom for bonding with the substrate C-2(R) hydroxy group, thus causing a loss of transition-state stabilization energy of 8-9 kJ/mol.

  9. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. This study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin. PMID:25724962

  10. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; ...

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential formore » mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.« less

  11. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of α-L-rhamnosidase from Alternaria sp. L1 to enhance synthesis yield of reverse hydrolysis based on rational design.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Liu, Xiaohong; Yin, Zhenhao; Liu, Qian; Lu, Lili; Xiao, Min

    2016-12-01

    The α-L-rhamnosidase catalyzes the hydrolytic release of rhamnose from polysaccharides and glycosides and is widely used due to its applications in a variety of industrial processes. Our previous work reported that a wild-type α-L-rhamnosidase (RhaL1) from Alternaria sp. L1 could synthesize rhamnose-containing chemicals (RCCs) though reverse hydrolysis reaction with inexpensive rhamnose as glycosyl donor. To enhance the yield of reverse hydrolysis reaction and to determine the amino acid residues essential for the catalytic activity of RhaL1, site-directed mutagenesis of 11 residues was performed in this study. Through rationally designed mutations, the critical amino acid residues which may form direct or solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds with donor rhamnose (Asp(252), Asp(257), Asp(264), Glu(530), Arg(548), His(553), and Trp(555)) and may form the hydrophobic pocket in stabilizing donor (Trp(261), Tyr(302), Tyr(316), and Trp(369)) in active-site of RhaL1 were analyzed, and three positive mutants (W261Y, Y302F, and Y316F) with improved product yield stood out. From the three positive variants, mutant W261Y accelerated the reverse hydrolysis with a prominent increase (43.7 %) in relative yield compared to the wild-type enzyme. Based on the 3D structural modeling, we supposed that the improved yield of mutant W261Y is due to the adjustment of the spatial position of the putative catalytic acid residue Asp(257). Mutant W261Y also exhibited a shift in the pH-activity profile in hydrolysis reaction, indicating that introducing of a polar residue in the active site cavity may affect the catalysis behavior of the enzyme.

  13. From Green to Blue: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Green Fluorescent Protein to Teach Protein Structure-Function Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giron, Maria D.; Salto, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Structure-function relationship studies in proteins are essential in modern Cell Biology. Laboratory exercises that allow students to familiarize themselves with basic mutagenesis techniques are essential in all Genetic Engineering courses to teach the relevance of protein structure. We have implemented a laboratory course based on the…

  14. Insights into the catalytic mechanism of human sEH phosphatase by site-directed mutagenesis and LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Annette; Homburg, Shirli; Dürk, Heike; Richter, Ingrid; Adamska, Magdalena; Frère, Frederic; Arand, Michael

    2008-11-14

    We have recently reported that human soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a bifunctional enzyme with a novel phosphatase enzymatic activity. Based on a structural relationship with other members of the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily, the sEH N-terminal phosphatase domain revealed four conserved sequence motifs, including the proposed catalytic nucleophile D9, and several other residues potentially implicated in substrate turnover and/or Mg(2+) binding. To enlighten the catalytic mechanism of dephosphorylation, we constructed sEH phosphatase active-site mutants by site-directed mutagenesis. A total of 18 mutants were constructed and recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble proteins, purified to homogeneity and subsequently analysed for their kinetic parameters. A replacement of residues D9, K160, D184 or N189 resulted in a complete loss of phosphatase activity, consistent with an essential function for catalysis. In contrast, a substitution of D11, T123, N124 and D185 leads to sEH mutant proteins with altered kinetic properties. We further provide evidence of the formation of an acylphosphate intermediate on D9 by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry based on the detection of homoserine after NaBH(4) reduction of the phosphorylated enzyme, which identifies D9 as the catalytic nucleophile. Surprisingly, we could only show such homoserine formation using the D11N mutant, which strongly suggests D11 to be involved in the acylphosphate hydrolysis. In the D11 mutant, the second catalytic step becomes rate limiting, which then allows trapping of the labile intermediate. Substrate turnover in the presence of (18)H(2)O revealed that the nucleophilic attack during the second reaction step occurs at the acylphosphate phosphorous. Based on these findings, we propose a two-step catalytic mechanism of dephosphorylation that involves the phosphate substrate hydrolysis by nucleophilic attack by the catalytic nucleophile D9 followed by hydrolysis of the

  15. Probing the substrate binding site of Candida tenuis xylose reductase (AKR2B5) with site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Regina; Leitgeb, Stefan; Wilson, David K.; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how substrates bind to CtXR (Candida tenuis xylose reductase; AKR2B5) and other members of the AKR (aldo–keto reductase) protein superfamily. Modelling of xylose into the active site of CtXR suggested that Trp23, Asp50 and Asn309 are the main components of pentose-specific substrate-binding recognition. Kinetic consequences of site-directed substitutions of these residues are reported. The mutants W23F and W23Y catalysed NADH-dependent reduction of xylose with only 4 and 1% of the wild-type efficiency (kcat/Km) respectively, but improved the wild-type selectivity for utilization of ketones, relative to xylose, by factors of 156 and 471 respectively. Comparison of multiple sequence alignment with reported specificities of AKR members emphasizes a conserved role of Trp23 in determining aldehyde-versus-ketone substrate selectivity. D50A showed 31 and 18% of the wild-type catalytic-centre activities for xylose reduction and xylitol oxidation respectively, consistent with a decrease in the rates of the chemical steps caused by the mutation, but no change in the apparent substrate binding constants and the pattern of substrate specificities. The 30-fold preference of the wild-type for D-galactose compared with 2-deoxy-D-galactose was lost completely in N309A and N309D mutants. Comparison of the 2.4 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) X-ray crystal structure of mutant N309D bound to NAD+ with the previous structure of the wild-type holoenzyme reveals no major structural perturbations. The results suggest that replacement of Asn309 with alanine or aspartic acid disrupts the function of the original side chain in donating a hydrogen atom for bonding with the substrate C-2(R) hydroxy group, thus causing a loss of transition-state stabilization energy of 8–9 kJ/mol. PMID:16336198

  16. Crystal structure and site-directed mutagenesis of 3-ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 explain its catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rohman, Ali; van Oosterwijk, Niels; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2013-12-06

    3-Ketosteroid Δ(1)-dehydrogenases are FAD-dependent enzymes that catalyze the 1,2-desaturation of 3-ketosteroid substrates to initiate degradation of the steroid nucleus. Here we report the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of the 56-kDa enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 (Δ(1)-KSTD1). The enzyme contains two domains: an FAD-binding domain and a catalytic domain, between which the active site is situated as evidenced by the 2.3 Å resolution structure of Δ(1)-KSTD1 in complex with the reaction product 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione. The active site contains four key residues: Tyr(119), Tyr(318), Tyr(487), and Gly(491). Modeling of the substrate 4-androstene-3,17-dione at the position of the product revealed its interactions with these residues and the FAD. The C1 and C2 atoms of the substrate are at reaction distance to the N5 atom of the isoalloxazine ring of FAD and the hydroxyl group of Tyr(318), respectively, whereas the C3 carbonyl group is at hydrogen bonding distance from the hydroxyl group of Tyr(487) and the backbone amide of Gly(491). Site-directed mutagenesis of the tyrosines to phenylalanines confirmed their importance for catalysis. The structural features and the kinetic properties of the mutants suggest a catalytic mechanism in which Tyr(487) and Gly(491) work in tandem to promote keto-enol tautomerization and increase the acidity of the C2 hydrogen atoms of the substrate. With assistance of Tyr(119), the general base Tyr(318) abstracts the axial β-hydrogen from C2 as a proton, whereas the FAD accepts the axial α-hydrogen from the C1 atom of the substrate as a hydride ion.

  17. Site-Directed Mutagenesis from Arg195 to His of a Microalgal Putatively Chloroplastidial Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase Causes an Increase in Phospholipid Levels in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Long-Ling; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Ji-Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the contribution of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) to the first acylation of glycerol-3-phosphate (G-3-P), the present study focused on a functional analysis of the GPAT gene from Lobosphaera incisa (designated as LiGPAT). A full-length cDNA of LiGPAT consisting of a 1,305-bp ORF, a 1,652-bp 5′-UTR, and a 354-bp 3′-UTR, was cloned. The ORF encoded a 434-amino acid peptide, of which 63 residues at the N-terminus defined a chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny analysis of GPAT homologs provided the convincible bioinformatics evidence that LiGPAT was localized to chloroplasts. Considering the conservation of His among the G-3-P binding sites from chloroplastidial GPATs and the substitution of His by Arg at position 195 in the LiGPAT mature protein (designated mLiGPAT), we established the heterologous expression of either mLiGPAT or its mutant (Arg195His) (sdmLiGPAT) in the GPAT-deficient yeast mutant gat1Δ. Lipid profile analyses of these transgenic yeasts not only validated the acylation function of LiGPAT but also indicated that the site-directed mutagenesis from Arg195 to His led to an increase in the phospholipid level in yeast. Semi-quantitative analysis of mLiGPAT and sdmLiGPAT, together with the structural superimposition of their G-3-P binding sites, indicated that the increased enzymatic activity was caused by the enlarged accessible surface of the phosphate group binding pocket when Arg195 was mutated to His. Thus, the potential of genetic manipulation of GPAT to increase the glycerolipid level in L. incisa and other microalgae would be of great interest. PMID:27014309

  18. Signal transduction by the formyl peptide receptor. Studies using chimeric receptors and site-directed mutagenesis define a novel domain for interaction with G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Amatruda, T T; Dragas-Graonic, S; Holmes, R; Perez, H D

    1995-11-24

    The binding of small peptide ligands to high affinity chemoattractant receptors on the surface of neutrophils and monocytes leads to activation of heterotrimeric G-proteins, stimulation of phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC), and subsequently to the inflammatory response. It was recently shown (Amatruda, T. T., Gerard, N. P., Gerard, C., and Simon, M. I. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 10139-10144) that the receptor for the chemoattractant peptide C5a specifically interacts with G alpha 16, a G-protein alpha subunit of the Gq class, to trigger ligand-dependent stimulation of PI-PLC in transfected cells. In order to further characterize this chemoattractant peptide signal transduction pathway, we transfected cDNAs encoding the formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine receptor (fMLPR) into COS cells and measured the production of inositol phosphates. Ligand-dependent activation of PI-PLC was seen in COS cells transfected with the fMLPR and G alpha 16 and stimulated with fMLP but not in cells transfected with receptor alone or with receptor plus G alpha q. Chimeric receptors in which the N-terminal extracellular domain, the second intracellular domain, or the intracellular C-terminal tail of the fMLP receptor was replaced with C5a receptor domains (Perez, H. D., Holmes, R., Vilander, L. R., Adams, R. R., Manzana, W., Jolley, D., and Andrews, W. H. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2292-2295) were capable of ligand-dependent activation of PI-PLC when co-transfected with G alpha 16. A chimeric receptor exchanging the first intracellular domain of the fMLPR was constitutively activated, stimulating PI-PLC in the absence of ligand. Constitutive activation of PI-PLC, to a level 233% of that seen in cells transfected with wild-type fMLP receptors, was dependent on G alpha 16. Site-directed mutagenesis of the first intracellular domain of the fMLPR (amino acids 54-62) reveals this to be a domain necessary for ligand-dependent activation of G alpha 16. These results suggest that

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved amino acids in the alpha subunit of toluene dioxygenase: potential mononuclear non-heme iron coordination sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, H; Parales, R E; Lynch, N A; Gibson, D T

    1996-01-01

    The terminal oxygenase component of toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 is an iron-sulfur protein (ISP(TOL)) that requires mononuclear iron for enzyme activity. Alignment of all available predicted amino acid sequences for the large (alpha) subunits of terminal oxygenases showed a conserved cluster of potential mononuclear iron-binding residues. These were between amino acids 210 and 230 in the alpha subunit (TodC1) of ISP(TOL). The conserved amino acids, Glu-214, Asp-219, Tyr-221, His-222, and His-228, were each independently replaced with an alanine residue by site-directed mutagenesis. Tyr-266 in TodC1, which has been suggested as an iron ligand, was treated in an identical manner. To assay toluene dioxygenase activity in the presence of TodC1 and its mutant forms, conditions for the reconstitution of wild-type ISP(TOL) activity from TodC1 and purified TodC2 (beta subunit) were developed and optimized. A mutation at Glu-214, Asp-219, His-222, or His-228 completely abolished toluene dioxygenase activity. TodC1 with an alanine substitution at either Tyr-221 or Tyr-266 retained partial enzyme activity (42 and 12%, respectively). In experiments with [14C]toluene, the two Tyr-->Ala mutations caused a reduction in the amount of Cis-[14C]-toluene dihydrodiol formed, whereas a mutation at Glu-214, Asp-219, His-222, or His-228 eliminated cis-toluene dihydrodiol formation. The expression level of all of the mutated TWO proteins was equivalent to that of wild-type TodC1 as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot (immunoblot) analyses. These results, in conjunction with the predicted amino acid sequences of 22 oxygenase components, suggest that the conserved motif Glu-X3-4,-Asp-X2-His-X4-5-His is critical for catalytic function and the glutamate, aspartate, and histidine residues may act as mononuclear iron ligands at the site of oxygen activation. PMID:8655491

  20. Delineation of the complement receptor type 2-C3d complex by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Craig D; Storek, Michael J; Young, Kendra A; Kovacs, James M; Thurman, Joshua M; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2010-12-10

    The interactions between the complement receptor type 2 (CR2) and the C3 complement fragments C3d, C3dg, and iC3b are essential for the initiation of a normal immune response. A crystal-derived structure of the two N-terminal short consensus repeat (SCR1-2) domains of CR2 in complex with C3d has previously been elucidated. However, a number of biochemical and biophysical studies targeting both CR2 and C3d appear to be in conflict with these structural data. Previous mutagenesis and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy studies directed toward the C3d-binding site on CR2 have indicated that the CR2-C3d cocrystal structure may represent an encounter/intermediate or nonphysiological complex. With regard to the CR2-binding site on C3d, mutagenesis studies by Isenman and coworkers [Isenman, D. E., Leung, E., Mackay, J. D., Bagby, S. & van den Elsen, J. M. H. (2010). Mutational analyses reveal that the staphylococcal immune evasion molecule Sbi and complement receptor 2 (CR2) share overlapping contact residues on C3d: Implications for the controversy regarding the CR2/C3d cocrystal structure. J. Immunol. 184, 1946-1955] have implicated an electronegative "concave" surface on C3d in the binding process. This surface is discrete from the CR2-C3d interface identified in the crystal structure. We generated a total of 18 mutations targeting the two (X-ray crystallographic- and mutagenesis-based) proposed CR2 SCR1-2 binding sites on C3d. Using ELISA analyses, we were able to assess binding of mutant forms of C3d to CR2. Mutations directed toward the concave surface of C3d result in substantially compromised CR2 binding. By contrast, targeting the CR2-C3d interface identified in the cocrystal structure and the surrounding area results in significantly lower levels of disruption in binding. Molecular modeling approaches used to investigate disparities between the biochemical data and the X-ray structure of the CR2-C3d cocrystal result in highest-scoring solutions in which CR2 SCR1-2 is

  1. Absence of opioid stress-induced analgesia in mice lacking beta-endorphin by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M; Mogil, J S; Japón, M; Chan, E C; Allen, R G; Low, M J

    1996-04-30

    A physiological role for beta-endorphin in endogenous pain inhibition was investigated by targeted mutagenesis of the proopiomelanocortin gene in mouse embryonic stem cells. The tyrosine codon at position 179 of the proopiomelanocortin gene was converted to a premature translational stop codon. The resulting transgenic mice display no overt developmental or behavioral alterations and have a normally functioning hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Homozygous transgenic mice with a selective deficiency of beta-endorphin exhibit normal analgesia in response to morphine, indicating the presence of functional mu-opiate receptors. However, these mice lack the opioid (naloxone reversible) analgesia induced by mild swim stress. Mutant mice also display significantly greater nonopioid analgesia in response to cold water swim stress compared with controls and display paradoxical naloxone-induced analgesia. These changes may reflect compensatory upregulation of alternative pain inhibitory mechanisms.

  2. Absence of opioid stress-induced analgesia in mice lacking beta-endorphin by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, M; Mogil, J S; Japón, M; Chan, E C; Allen, R G; Low, M J

    1996-01-01

    A physiological role for beta-endorphin in endogenous pain inhibition was investigated by targeted mutagenesis of the proopiomelanocortin gene in mouse embryonic stem cells. The tyrosine codon at position 179 of the proopiomelanocortin gene was converted to a premature translational stop codon. The resulting transgenic mice display no overt developmental or behavioral alterations and have a normally functioning hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Homozygous transgenic mice with a selective deficiency of beta-endorphin exhibit normal analgesia in response to morphine, indicating the presence of functional mu-opiate receptors. However, these mice lack the opioid (naloxone reversible) analgesia induced by mild swim stress. Mutant mice also display significantly greater nonopioid analgesia in response to cold water swim stress compared with controls and display paradoxical naloxone-induced analgesia. These changes may reflect compensatory upregulation of alternative pain inhibitory mechanisms. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8633004

  3. Exploration of the ligand binding site of the human 5-HT(4) receptor by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Mialet, J; Dahmoune, Y; Lezoualc'h, F; Berque-Bestel, I; Eftekhari, P; Hoebeke, J; Sicsic, S; Langlois, M; Fischmeister, R

    2000-06-01

    Among the five human 5-HT(4) (h5-HT(4)) receptor isoforms, the h5-HT(4(a)) receptor was studied with a particular emphasis on the molecular interactions involved in ligand binding. For this purpose, we used site-directed mutagenesis of the transmembrane domain. Twelve mutants were constructed with a special focus on the residue P4.53 of helix IV which substitutes in h5-HT(4) receptors the highly conserved S residue among the rhodopsin family receptors. The mutated receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. Ligand binding or competition studies with two h5-HT(4) receptor agonists, serotonin and ML10302 and two h5-HT(4) receptor antagonists, [(3)H]-GR113808 and ML10375 were performed on wild type and mutant receptors. Functional activity of the receptors was evaluated by measuring the ability of serotonin to stimulate adenylyl cyclase. Ligand binding experiments revealed that [(3)H]-GR113808 did not bind to mutants P4.53A, S5.43A, F6.51A, Y7.43A and to double mutant F6.52V/N6.55L. On the other hand mutations D3.32N, S5.43A and Y7.43A appeared to promote a dramatic decrease of h5-HT(4(a)) receptor functional activity. From these studies, S5.43 and Y7.43 clearly emerged as common anchoring sites to antagonist [(3)H]-GR113808 and to serotonin. According to these results, we propose ligand-receptor complex models with serotonin and [(3)H]-GR113808. For serotonin, three interaction points were selected including ionic interaction with D3.32, a stabilizing interaction of this ion pair by Y7.43 and a hydrogen bond with S5.43. [(3)H]-GR113808 was also docked, based on the same type of interactions with S5.43 and D3.32: the proposed model suggested a possible role of P4.53 in helix IV structure allowing the involvement of a close hydrophobic residue, W4.50, in a hydrophobic pocket for hydrophobic interactions with the indole ring of [(3)H]-GR113808.

  4. Catalytic roles of lysines (K9, K27, K31) in the N-terminal domain in human adenylate kinase by random site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ayabe, T; Park, S K; Takenaka, H; Sumida, M; Uesugi, S; Takenaka, O; Hamada, M

    1996-11-01

    To elucidate lysine residues in the N-terminal domain of human cytosolic adenylate kinase (hAK1, EC 2.7.4.3), random site-directed mutagenesis of K9, K27, and K31 residues was performed, and six mutants were analyzed by steady-state kinetics. K9 residue may play an important role in catalysis by interacting with AMP2-. K27 and K31 residues appear to play a functional role in catalysis by interacting with MgATP2-. In human AK, the epsilon-amino group in the side chain of these lysine residues would be essential for phosphoryl transfer between MgATP2- and AMP2- during transition state.

  5. Effect of site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved aspartate and glutamate on E. coli undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, J J; Yang, L W; Liang, P H

    2000-11-14

    Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UPPs) catalyzes condensation of eight molecules of isopentenyl pyrophosphate with farnesyl pyrophosphate to yield C(55)-undecaprenyl pyrophosphate. We have mutated the aspartates and glutamates in the five conserved regions (I to V) of UPPs protein sequence to evaluate their effects on substrate binding and catalysis. The mutant enzymes including D26A, E73A, D150A, D190A, E198A, E213A, D218A, and D223A were expressed and purified to great homogeneity. Kinetic analyses of these mutant enzymes indicated that the substitution of D26 in region I with alanine resulted in a 10(3)-fold decrease of k(cat) value compared to wild-type UPPs. Its IPP K(m) value has only minor change. The mutagenesis of D150A has caused a much lower IPP affinity with IPP K(m) value 50-fold larger than that of wild-type UPPs but did not affect the FPP K(m) and the k(cat). The E213A mutant UPPs has a 70-fold increased IPP K(m) value and has a 100-fold decreased k(cat) value compared to wild-type. These results suggest that D26 of region I is critical for catalysis and D150 in region IV plays a significant role of IPP binding. The E213 residue in region V is also important in IPP binding as well as catalysis. Other mutant UPPs enzymes in this study have shown no significant change (<5-fold) of k(cat) with exception of E73A and D218A. Both enzymes have 10-fold lower k(cat) value relative to wild-type UPPs.

  6. Mapping the lipoylation site of Arabidopsis thaliana plastidial dihydrolipoamide S-acetyltransferase using mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The catalytic enhancement achieved by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) results from a combination of substrate channeling plus active-site coupling. The mechanism for active-site coupling involves lipoic acid prosthetic groups covalently attached to Lys residues in the primary ...

  7. Catalytic Mechanism of Heparinase II Investigated by Site-directed Mutagenesis and the Crystal Structure with Its Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Shaya, D.; Zhao, W; Garron, M; Xiao, Z; Cui, Q; Zhang, Z; Sulea, T; Linhardt, R; Cygler, M

    2010-01-01

    Heparinase II (HepII) is an 85-kDa dimeric enzyme that depolymerizes both heparin and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans through a {beta}-elimination mechanism. Recently, we determined the crystal structure of HepII from Pedobacter heparinus (previously known as Flavobacterium heparinum) in complex with a heparin disaccharide product, and identified the location of its active site. Here we present the structure of HepII complexed with a heparan sulfate disaccharide product, proving that the same binding/active site is responsible for the degradation of both uronic acid epimers containing substrates. The key enzymatic step involves removal of a proton from the C5 carbon (a chiral center) of the uronic acid, posing a topological challenge to abstract the proton from either side of the ring in a single active site. We have identified three potential active site residues equidistant from C5 and located on both sides of the uronate product and determined their role in catalysis using a set of defined tetrasaccharide substrates. HepII H202A/Y257A mutant lost activity for both substrates and we determined its crystal structure complexed with a heparan sulfate-derived tetrasaccharide. Based on kinetic characterization of various mutants and the structure of the enzyme-substrate complex we propose residues participating in catalysis and their specific roles.

  8. Catalytic mechanism of heparinase II investigated by site-directed mutagenesis and the crystal structure with its substrate.

    PubMed

    Shaya, David; Zhao, Wenjing; Garron, Marie-Line; Xiao, Zhongping; Cui, Qizhi; Zhang, Zhenqing; Sulea, Traian; Linhardt, Robert J; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2010-06-25

    Heparinase II (HepII) is an 85-kDa dimeric enzyme that depolymerizes both heparin and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans through a beta-elimination mechanism. Recently, we determined the crystal structure of HepII from Pedobacter heparinus (previously known as Flavobacterium heparinum) in complex with a heparin disaccharide product, and identified the location of its active site. Here we present the structure of HepII complexed with a heparan sulfate disaccharide product, proving that the same binding/active site is responsible for the degradation of both uronic acid epimers containing substrates. The key enzymatic step involves removal of a proton from the C5 carbon (a chiral center) of the uronic acid, posing a topological challenge to abstract the proton from either side of the ring in a single active site. We have identified three potential active site residues equidistant from C5 and located on both sides of the uronate product and determined their role in catalysis using a set of defined tetrasaccharide substrates. HepII H202A/Y257A mutant lost activity for both substrates and we determined its crystal structure complexed with a heparan sulfate-derived tetrasaccharide. Based on kinetic characterization of various mutants and the structure of the enzyme-substrate complex we propose residues participating in catalysis and their specific roles.

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis maps interactions that enhance cognate and limit promiscuous catalysis by an alkaline phosphatase superfamily phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Wiersma-Koch, Helen; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-12-23

    Catalytic promiscuity, an evolutionary concept, also provides a powerful tool for gaining mechanistic insights into enzymatic reactions. Members of the alkaline phosphatase (AP) superfamily are highly amenable to such investigation, with several members having been shown to exhibit promiscuous activity for the cognate reactions of other superfamily members. Previous work has shown that nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP) exhibits a >10⁶-fold preference for the hydrolysis of phosphate diesters over phosphate monoesters, and that the reaction specificity is reduced 10³-fold when the size of the substituent on the transferred phosphoryl group of phosphate diester substrates is reduced to a methyl group. Here we show additional specificity contributions from the binding pocket for this substituent (herein termed the R' substituent) that account for an additional ~250-fold differential specificity with the minimal methyl substituent. Removal of four hydrophobic side chains suggested on the basis of structural inspection to interact favorably with R' substituents decreases phosphate diester reactivity 10⁴-fold with an optimal diester substrate (R' = 5'-deoxythymidine) and 50-fold with a minimal diester substrate (R' = CH₃). These mutations also enhance the enzyme's promiscuous phosphate monoesterase activity by nearly an order of magnitude, an effect that is traced by mutation to the reduction of unfavorable interactions with the two residues closest to the nonbridging phosphoryl oxygen atoms. The quadruple R' pocket mutant exhibits the same activity toward phosphate diester and phosphate monoester substrates that have identical leaving groups, with substantial rate enhancements of ~10¹¹-fold. This observation suggests that the Zn²⁺ bimetallo core of AP superfamily enzymes, which is equipotent in phosphate monoester and diester catalysis, has the potential to become specialized for the hydrolysis of each class of phosphate esters via addition

  10. Engineering of α1-antitrypsin variants with improved specificity for the proprotein convertase furin using site-directed random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hada, Koichiro; Isshiki, Kinuka; Matsuda, Shinya; Yuasa, Keizo; Tsuji, Akihiko

    2013-02-01

    Furin, PACE4, PC5/6 and PC7 are members of the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase (SPC) family. Although these enzymes are known to play critical roles in various physiological and pathological events including cell differentiation, tumor growth, virus replication and the activation of bacterial toxins, their distinct functions are yet to be fully delineated. α1-PDX is an engineered α1-antitrypsin variant carrying the RXXR consensus motif for furin within its reactive site loop. However, α1-PDX inhibits other SPCs in addition to furin. In this work, we prepared various rat α1-antitrypsin variants containing Arg at the P1 site within the reactive site loop, and examined their respective selectivity. The novel α1-antitrypsin variant AVNR (AVPM(352)/AVNR) was identified as a highly selective inhibitor of furin. This variant formed a sodium dodecyl sulfate- and heat-stable furin/α1-antitrypsin complex and inhibited furin activity ex vivo and in vitro. Other SPC members including PACE4, PC5/6 and PC7 were not inhibited by the AVNR variant. Furin-mediated maturation of bone morphogenetic protein-4 was completely inhibited by ectopic expression of the AVNR variant. The AVNR variant should prove to be a useful inhibitor in identifying the specific role of furin.

  11. Enhancement of thermal stability of chondroitinase ABC I by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot.

    PubMed

    Nazari-Robati, Mahdieh; Khajeh, Khosro; Aminian, Mahdi; Mollania, Nasrin; Golestani, Abolfazl

    2013-02-01

    The application of chondroitinase ABC I (cABC I) in damaged nervous tissue is believed to prune glycosaminoglycan chains of proteoglycans, thereby facilitates axon regeneration. However, the utilization of cABC I as therapeutics is notably restricted due to its thermal instability. In the present study, we have explored the possibility of thermostabilization of cABC I through release of its conformational strain using Ramachandran plot information. In this regard, Gln140 with non-optimal φ and ψ values were replaced with Gly, Ala and Asn. The results indicated that Q140G and Q140A mutants were able to improve both activity and thermal stability of the enzyme while Q140N variant reduced the enzyme activity and destabilized it. Moreover, the two former variants displayed a remarkable resistance to trypsin degradation. Structural analysis of all mutants showed an increase in intrinsic fluorescence intensity and secondary structure content of Q140G and Q140A compared to the wild type which indicated more compact structure upon mutation. This investigation demonstrated that relief of conformational tension can be considered as a possible approach to increase the stability of the protein.

  12. Exploring residues crucial for nitrilase function by site directed mutagenesis to gain better insight into sequence-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Shubhangi; Mohan, Utpal; Banerjee, Uc

    2012-01-01

    Nitrilases represent a very important class of enzymes having an array of applications. In the present scenario, where the indepth information about nitrilases is limited, the present work is an attempt to shed light on the residues crucial for the nitrilase activity. The nitrilase sequences demonstrating varying degree of identity with P. putida nitrilase were explored. A stretch of residues, fairly conserved throughout the range of higher (96%) to lower (27%) sequence identity among different nitrilases was selected and investigated for the possible functional role in nitrilase enzyme system. Subsequently, the alanine substitution mutants (T48A, W49A, L50A, P51A, G52A, Y53A and P54A) were generated. Substitution of the rationally selected conserved residues altered the substrate recognition ability, catalysis and affected the substrate specificity but had very little impact on enantioselectivity and pattern of nitrile hydrolysis.

  13. Hypericum perforatum hydroxyalkylpyrone synthase involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis--phylogeny, site-directed mutagenesis, and expression in nonanther tissues.

    PubMed

    Jepson, Christina; Karppinen, Katja; Daku, Rhys M; Sterenberg, Brian T; Suh, Dae-Yeon

    2014-09-01

    Anther-specific chalcone synthase-like enzyme (ASCL), an ancient plant type III polyketide synthase, is involved in the biosynthesis of sporopollenin, the stable biopolymer found in the exine layer of the wall of a spore or pollen grain. The gene encoding polyketide synthase 1 from Hypericum perforatum (HpPKS1) was previously shown to be expressed mainly in young flower buds, but also in leaves and other tissues at lower levels. Angiosperm ASCLs, identified by sequence and phylogenetic analyses, are divided into two sister clades, the Ala-clade and the Val-clade, and HpPKS1 belongs to the Ala-clade. Recombinant HpPKS1 produced triketide and, to a lesser extent, tetraketide alkylpyrones from medium-chain (C6) to very long-chain (C24) fatty acyl-CoA substrates. Like other ASCLs, HpPKS1 also preferred hydroxyl fatty acyl-CoA esters over the analogous unsubstituted fatty acyl-CoA esters. To study the structural basis of the substrate preference, mutants of Ala200 and Ala215 at the putative active site and Arg202 and Asp211 at the modeled acyl-binding tunnel were constructed. The A200T/A215Q mutant accepted decanoyl-CoA, a poor substrate for the wild-type enzyme, possibly because of active site constriction by bulkier substitutions. The substrate preference of the A215V and A200T/A215Q mutants shifted toward nonhydroxylated, medium-chain to long-chain fatty acyl-CoA substrates. The R202L/D211V double mutant was selective for acyl-CoA with chain lengths of C16-C18, and showed a diminished preference for the hydroxylated acyl-CoA substrates. Transient upregulation by abscisic acid and downregulation by jasmonic acid and wounding suggested that HpPKS1, and possibly other Ala-clade ASCLs, may be involved in the biosynthesis of minor cell wall components in nonanther tissues.

  14. Increasing the refolding efficiency in vitro by site-directed mutagenesis of Cys383 in rat procarboxypeptidase B.

    PubMed

    Li, Suxia; Zhang, Luosheng; Wu, Qian; Xin, Aijie; Zhao, Jian; Fan, Liqiang

    2011-07-10

    This study examines a novel method to reduce the probability of disulfide mismatches during the refolding process by the replacement of cysteines within a protein. Specifically, Cys383 of recombinant rat procarboxypeptidase B was replaced by other amino acids to increase the refolding efficiency in vitro. Mutants C383G, C383A and C383S could refold successfully, but mutants C383R, C383E, C383L and C383Y failed to refold correctly. Compared with wild type, the refolding efficiencies of mutants C383G and C383A were enhanced. The Cys383 mutations changed some of the properties of rat carboxypeptidase B. Mutants C383G, C383A had higher k(cat)/K(m) values which indicated increased catalytic abilities. And both had higher thermal stability. pH had different effects on the activities and stabilities of the mutant and wild type proteins. The studies suggested that mutating Cys383 of rat procarboxypeptidase B could improve the renaturation process by increasing the refolding efficiency. This new method could be taken as a new attempt to improve the refolding efficiency of other recombinant proteins containing disulfide bonds that are expressed as inclusion bodies. While the results also claimed that the potential effects of the substituted amino acid on the protein itself should be seriously considered in addition to its ability to reduce the probability of disulfide mismatches.

  15. Engineering aluminum binding affinity in an isolated EF-hand from troponin C: a computational site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed

    Bongini, Rachel E; Culver, Soluman B; Elkins, Kelly M

    2007-09-01

    Peptides with the ability to specifically bind aluminum would potentially be of great use in the fields of biochemistry and environmental chemistry. Unfortunately no such peptides are known. An aluminum-specific peptide may be used as an in vivo chelator, for metalloprotein design, for understanding metal-ion induced folding and metal-ion trafficking, and as an environmental sensor to monitor metal pollution in the environment. Plants genetically engineered to produce an aluminum binding peptide might be useful in environmental remediation in areas of high free aluminum ion concentration. In this paper, which is the theoretical complement to the experimental work, we analyzed crystallographic structures of EF-hands bound to various metals in order to determine the ligand distances and identities to compare to metal-ion size, charge, electronegativity, and coordination number and performed energy minimization calculations to identify possible mutations. We then constructed various mutant sequences in silico in an isolated EF-hand from troponin C and analyzed their binding behavior using molecular mechanics for binding to Tb(3+) as compared to Al(3+). As a result of these analyses we were able to isolate some characteristics that could lead to mutant peptides with enhanced aluminum activity that we plan to test experimentally in the future. We also performed metal-ion binding studies with the isolated EF-hand used in the computational work to examine the ability of Al(3+) and comparative metals to bind the peptide. In competition studies, the peptide demonstrated preference for Tb(3+) over Al(3+).

  16. Domain folding and flexibility of Escherichia coli FtsZ determined by tryptophan site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Espinoza, Rodrigo; Garcés, Andrea P.; Arbildua, José J.; Montecinos, Felipe; Brunet, Juan E.; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2007-01-01

    FtsZ has two domains, the amino GTPase domain with a Rossmann fold, and the carboxyl domain that resembles the chorismate mutase fold. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that the interdomain interaction is stronger than the interaction of the protofilament longitudinal interfaces. Crystal B factor analysis of FtsZ and detected conformational changes suggest a connection between these domains. The unfolding/folding characteristics of each domain of FtsZ were tested by introducing tryptophans into the flexible region of the amino (F135W) and the carboxyl (F275W and I294W) domains. As a control, the mutation F40W was introduced in a more rigid part of the amino domain. These mutants showed a native-like structure with denaturation and renaturation curves similar to wild type. However, the I294W mutant showed a strong loss of functionality, both in vivo and in vitro when compared to the other mutants. The functionality was recovered with the double mutant I294W/F275A, which showed full in vivo complementation with a slight increment of in vitro GTPase activity with respect to the single mutant. The formation of a stabilizing aromatic interaction involving a stacking between the tryptophan introduced at position 294 and phenylalanine 275 could account for these results. Folding/unfolding of these mutants induced by guanidinium chloride was compatible with a mechanism in which both domains within the protein show the same stability during FtsZ denaturation and renaturation, probably because of strong interface interactions. PMID:17656575

  17. Mapping the heparin-binding site of the BMP antagonist gremlin by site-directed mutagenesis based on predictive modelling.

    PubMed

    Tatsinkam, Arnold Junior; Mulloy, Barbara; Rider, Christopher C

    2015-08-15

    Gremlin is a member of the CAN (cerberus and DAN) family of secreted BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) antagonists and also an agonist of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) receptor-2. It is critical in limb skeleton and kidney development and is re-expressed during tissue fibrosis. Gremlin binds strongly to heparin and heparan sulfate and, in the present study, we sought to investigate its heparin-binding site. In order to explore a putative non-contiguous binding site predicted by computational molecular modelling, we substituted a total of 11 key arginines and lysines located in three basic residue sequence clusters with homologous sequences from cerberus and DAN (differential screening selected gene abberative in neuroblastoma), CAN proteins which lack basic residues in these positions. A panel of six Myc-tagged gremlin mutants, MGR-1-MGR-6 (MGR, mutant gremlin), each containing different combinations of targeted substitutions, all showed markedly reduced affinity for heparin as demonstrated by their NaCl elution on heparin affinity chromatography, thus verifying our predictions. Both MGR-5 and MGR-6 retained BMP-4-binding activity comparable to that of wild-type gremlin. Low-molecular-mass heparin neither promoted nor inhibited BMP-4 binding. Finally, glutaraldehyde cross-linking demonstrated that gremlin forms non-covalent dimers, similar behaviour to that of DAN and also PRDC (protein related to cerberus and DAN), another CAN protein. The resulting dimer would possess two heparin-binding sites, each running along an exposed surface on the second β-strand finger loop of one of the monomers.

  18. Functional characterization of the phosphorylating D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the archaeon Methanothermus fervidus by comparative molecular modelling and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Talfournier, F; Colloc'h, N; Mornon, J P; Branlant, G

    1999-10-01

    Phosphorylating archaeal D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GraP-DHs) share only 15-20% identity with their glycolytic bacterial and eukaryotic counterparts. Unlike the latter which are NAD-specific, archaeal GraP-DHs exhibit a dual-cofactor specificity with a marked preference for NADP. In the present study, we have constructed a three-dimensional model of the Methanothermus fervidus GraP-DH based upon the X-ray structures of the Bacillus stearothermophilus and Escherichia coli GraP-DHs. The overall structure of the archaeal enzyme is globally similar to homology modelling-derived structures, in particular for the cofactor binding domain, which might adopt a classical Rossmann fold. M. fervidus GraP-DH can be considered as a dimer of dimers which exhibits negative and positive cooperativity in binding the coenzymes NAD and NADP, respectively. As expected, the differences between the model and the templates are located mainly within the loops. Based on the predictions derived from molecular modelling, site-directed mutagenesis was performed to characterize better the cofactor binding pocket and the catalytic domain. The Lys32Ala, Lys32Glu and Lys32Asp mutants led to a drastic increase in the Km value for NADP (i.e. 165-, 500- and 1000-fold, respectively), thus demonstrating that the invariant Lys32 residue is one of the most important determinants favouring the adenosine 2'-PO42- binding of NADP. The involvement of the side chain of Asn281, which was postulated to play a role equivalent to that of the Asn313 of bacterial and eukaryotic GraP-DHs in fixing the position of the nicotinamide ring in a syn orientation [Fabry, S. & Hensel, R. (1988) Gene 64, 189-197], was ruled out. Most of the amino acids involved in catalysis and in substrate recognition in bacterial and eukaryotic GraP-DHs are not conserved in the archaeal enzyme except for the essential Cys149. Inspection of our model suggests that side chains of invariant residues Asn150, Arg176, Arg177 and

  19. A structure-based site-directed mutagenesis study on the neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16) and thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15) catalysis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vitor; Araújo, Maurício C; Rioli, Vanessa; de Camargo, Antonio C M; Tersariol, Ivarne L S; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Ferro, Emer S

    2003-04-24

    Neurolysin (EP24.16) and thimet oligopeptidase (EP24.15) are closely related metalloendopeptidases. Site-directed mutagenesis of Tyr(613) (EP24.16) or Tyr(612) (EP24.15) to either Phe or Ala promoted a strong reduction of k(cat)/K(M) for both enzymes. These data suggest the importance of both hydroxyl group and aromatic ring at this specific position during substrate hydrolysis by these peptidases. Furthermore, the EP24.15 A607G mutant showed a k(cat)/K(M) of 2x10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for the Abz-GFSIFRQ-EDDnp substrate, similar to that of EP24.16 (k(cat)/K(M)=3x10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) which contains Gly at the corresponding position; the wild type EP24.15 has a k(cat)/K(M) of 2.5x10(4) M(-1) s(-1) for this substrate.

  20. Assignment of histidine resonances in the sup 1 H NMR (500 MHz) spectrum of subtilisin BPN prime using site-directed mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bycroft, M.; Fersht, A.R. )

    1988-09-20

    A spin-echo pulse sequence has been used to resolve the six histidine C-2H protons in the 500-MHz NMR spectrum of subtilisin BPN{prime}. Five of these residues have been substituted by site-directed mutagenesis, and this has enabled a complete assignment of these protons to be obtained. Analysis of the pH titration curves of these signals has provided microscopic pK{sub a}'s for the six histidines in this enzyme. The pK{sub a}'s of the histidine residues in subtilisin BPN{prime} have been compared with the values obtained for the histidines in the homologous enzyme from Bacillus licheniformis (subtilisin Carlsberg). Four of the five conserved histidines titrate with essentially identical pK{sub a}'s in the two enzymes. It therefore appears that the assignments made for these residues in subtilisin BPN{prime} can be transferred to subtilisin Carlsberg. On the basis of these assignments, the one histidine that titrates with a substantially different pK{sub a} in the two enzymes can be assigned to histidine-238. This difference in pK{sub a} has been attributed to a Trp to Lys substitution at position 241 in subtilisin Carlsberg.

  1. A systematic survey of conserved histidines in the core subunits of Photosystem I by site-directed mutagenesis reveals the likely axial ligands of P700.

    PubMed Central

    Redding, K; MacMillan, F; Leibl, W; Brettel, K; Hanley, J; Rutherford, A W; Breton, J; Rochaix, J D

    1998-01-01

    The Photosystem I complex catalyses the transfer of an electron from lumenal plastocyanin to stromal ferredoxin, using the energy of an absorbed photon. The initial photochemical event is the transfer of an electron from the excited state of P700, a pair of chlorophylls, to a monomer chlorophyll serving as the primary electron acceptor. We have performed a systematic survey of conserved histidines in the last six transmembrane segments of the related polytopic membrane proteins PsaA and PsaB in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. These histidines, which are present in analogous positions in both proteins, were changed to glutamine or leucine by site-directed mutagenesis. Double mutants in which both histidines had been changed to glutamine were screened for changes in the characteristics of P700 using electron paramagnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared and visible spectroscopy. Only mutations in the histidines of helix 10 (PsaA-His676 and PsaB-His656) resulted in changes in spectroscopic properties of P700, leading us to conclude that these histidines are most likely the axial ligands to the P700 chlorophylls. PMID:9427740

  2. Improving the Thermostability and Catalytic Efficiency of the d-Psicose 3-Epimerase from Clostridium bolteae ATCC BAA-613 Using Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenli; Jia, Min; Yu, Shuhuai; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Leon; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2016-05-04

    d-Psicose is a highly valuable rare sugar because of its excellent physiological properties and commercial potential. d-Psicose 3-epimerase (DPEase) is the key enzyme catalyzing the isomerization of d-fructose to d-psicose. However, the poor thermostability and low catalytic efficiency are serious constraints on industrial application. To address these issues, site-directed mutagenesis of Tyr68 and Gly109 of the Clostridium bolteae DPEase was performed. Compared with the wild-type enzyme, the Y68I variant displayed the highest substrate-binding affinity and catalytic efficiency, and the G109P variant showed the highest thermostability. Furthermore, the double-site Y68I/G109P variant was generated and exhibited excellent enzyme characteristics. The Km value decreased by 17.9%; the kcat/Km increased by 1.2-fold; the t1/2 increased from 156 to 260 min; and the melting temperature (Tm) increased by 2.4 °C. Moreover, Co(2+) enhanced the thermostability significantly, including the t1/2 and Tm values. All of these indicated that the Y68I/G109P variant would be appropriate for the industrial production of d-psicose.

  3. Site-directed mutagenesis of the cAMP-binding sites of the recombinant type I regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuno, T; Shuntoh, H; Sakaue, M; Saijoh, K; Takeda, T; Fukuda, K; Tanaka, C

    1988-06-30

    The type I regulatory subunit (R-I) of rat brain cAMP-dependent protein kinase was expressed in E. coli and site-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute amino acids in the putative cAMP-binding sites. The wild-type recombinant R-I bound 2 mol of cAMP/mol subunit, while two mutant R-Is with a single amino acid substitution in one of the two intrachain cAMP-binding sites (clone N153:a glutamate for Gly-200, and clone C254:an aspartate for Gly-324) bound 1 mol of cAMP/mol subunit. When these two substitutions were made in one mutant, cAMP did not bind to this mutant, indicating that binding of cAMP to N153 or C254 was to their nonmutated sites. Competition experiments with site-selective analogs and dissociation of bound cAMP from mutant R-Is provided evidence for strong intrachain interactions between the two classes of cAMP-binding sites in R-I.

  4. Improvement of the optimum pH of Aspergillus niger xylanase towards an alkaline pH by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Xie, Jingcong; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhao, Linguo

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to shift the optimal pH of the xylanase B (XynB) from Aspergillus niger towards alkalinity, target mutation sites were selected by alignment between Aspergillus niger xylanase B and other xylanases that have alkalophilic pH optima that highlight charged residues in the eight-residues-longer loop in the alkalophilic xylanase. Multiple engineered XynB mutants were created by site-directed mutagenesis with substitutions Q164K and Q164K+D117N. The variant XynB-117 had the highest optimum pH (at 5.5), which corresponded to a basic 0.5 pH unit shift when compared with the wild-type enzyme. However, the optimal pH of the XynB- 164 mutation was not changed, similar to the wild type. These results suggest that the residues at positions 164 and 117 in the eight-residues-longer loop and the cleft's edge are important in determining the pH optima of XynB from Aspergillus niger.

  5. Differences in the intrinsic immunogenicity and allergenicity of Bet v 1 and related food allergens revealed by site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Roulias, A; Pichler, U; Hauser, M; Himly, M; Hofer, H; Lackner, P; Ebner, C; Briza, P; Bohle, B; Egger, M; Wallner, M; Ferreira, F

    2014-01-01

    Background Birch pollen allergies are frequently associated with adverse reactions to various fruits, nuts, or vegetables, described as pollen–food syndrome (PFS) and caused by cross-reactive IgE antibodies primarily directed against Bet v 1. Specific immunotherapy (SIT) represents an effective treatment for inhalant allergies; however, successful birch pollen SIT does not correlate well with the amelioration of concomitant food allergies. Methods As vaccine candidates, apple Mal d 1 as well as hazelnut Cor a 1 derivatives were designed by in silico backbone analyses of the respective allergens. The proteins were produced by site-directed mutagenesis as fold variants of their parental allergens. Because Mal d 1 and Cor a 1 form cysteine-mediated aggregates, nonaggregative cysteine to serine mutants were also generated. The proteins were characterized physicochemically, immunologically, and in in vivo models with or without adjuvant. Results The structurally modified proteins showed significantly decreased IgE binding capacity. Notably, both in vivo models revealed reduced immunogenicity of the hypoallergenic fold variants. When formulated with alum, the monomeric cysteine mutants induced a similar immune response as the aggregated parental allergens, which is in contrast with data published on Bet v 1. Conclusion These findings lead to the suggestion that the Bet v 1 structure has unique intrinsic properties, which could account for its high allergenicity. Obviously, these characteristics are not entirely shared with its food homologues from apple and hazelnut. Thus, it is important to tackle pollen-related food allergies from different angles for the generation of effective vaccine candidates to treat birch PFS. PMID:24224690

  6. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Surface-Exposed Lysine Residues Leads to Improved Transduction by AAV2, But Not AAV8, Vectors in Murine Hepatocytes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baozheng; Ma, Wenqin; Ling, Chen; Van Vliet, Kim; Huang, Lin-Ya; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Srivastava, Arun; Aslanidi, George V.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome pathway plays a critical role in the intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors, which negatively impacts the transduction efficiency of these vectors. Because ubiquitination occurs on lysine (K) residues, we performed site-directed mutagenesis where we replaced each of 10 surface-exposed K residues (K258, K490, K507, K527, K532, K544, K549, K556, K665, and K706) with glutamic acid (E) because of similarity of size and lack of recognition by modifying enzymes. The transduction efficiency of K490E, K544E, K549E, and K556E scAAV2 vectors increased in HeLa cells in vitro up to 5-fold compared with wild-type (WT) AAV2 vectors, with the K556E mutant being the most efficient. Intravenous delivery of WT and K-mutant ssAAV2 vectors further corroborated these results in murine hepatocytes in vivo. Because AAV8 vectors transduce murine hepatocytes exceedingly well, and because some of the surface-exposed K residues are conserved between these serotypes, we generated and tested two single mutants (K547E and K569E), and one double-mutant (K547 + 569E) AAV8 vector. However, no significant increase in the transduction efficiency of any of these mutant AAV8 vectors was observed in murine hepatocytes in vivo. These studies suggest that although targeting the surface-exposed K residues is yet another strategy to improve the transduction efficiency of AAV vectors, phenotypic outcome is serotype specific. PMID:26421998

  7. Site-directed mutagenesis of tyrosine 118 within the central constriction site of the LamB (Maltoporin) channel of Escherichia coli. I. Effect on ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Orlik, Frank; Andersen, Christian; Benz, Roland

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the malto-oligosaccharide-specific LamB-channel of Escherichia coli (also called maltoporin) is known from x-ray crystallography. The central constriction of the channel formed by the external loop 3 is controlled by a tyrosine residue (Y118). Y118 was replaced by site-directed mutagenesis by ten other amino acids (alanine, isoleucine, asparagine, serine, cysteine, aspartic acid, arginine, histidine, phenylalanine, and tryptophane) including neutral ones, negatively and positively charged amino acids to study the effect of their size, hydrophobicity, and charge on ion transport through LamB. The mutant proteins were purified to homogeneity. They were reconstituted into lipid bilayer membranes and single-channel conductance and ion selectivity were measured to get insight into the mechanism of ion transport through LamB. The mutation of Y118 to any other nonaromatic amino acid led to a substantial increase of the single-channel conductance by more than a factor of six at maximum. The highest effect was observed for Y118D. Additionally, a nonlinear relationship between the salt concentration in the aqueous phase and the channel conductance was observed for this mutant, indicating strong discrete charge effects on ion conductance. For all other mutants, with the exception of Y118R, linear relationships were found between single-channel conductance and bulk aqueous concentration. The individual hydrophobicity indices of the amino acids introduced inside the central constriction of the LamB channel had a somewhat smaller effect on the single-channel conductance as compared with the effect of their size and charge. PMID:11964234

  8. Prediction and characterization of novel epitopes of serotype A foot-and-mouth disease viruses circulating in East Africa using site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Fufa Dawo; Parida, Satya; Asfor, Amin S.; Haydon, Daniel T.; Reeve, Richard; Paton, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Epitopes on the surface of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid have been identified by monoclonal antibody (mAb) escape mutant studies leading to the designation of four antigenic sites in serotype A FMDV. Previous work focused on viruses isolated mainly from Asia, Europe and Latin America. In this study we report on the prediction of epitopes in African serotype A FMDVs and testing of selected epitopes using reverse genetics. Twenty-four capsid amino acid residues were predicted to be of antigenic significance by analysing the capsid sequences (n = 56) using in silico methods, and six residues by correlating capsid sequence with serum–virus neutralization data. The predicted residues were distributed on the surface-exposed capsid regions, VP1–VP3. The significance of residue changes at eight of the predicted epitopes was tested by site-directed mutagenesis using a cDNA clone resulting in the generation of 12 mutant viruses involving seven sites. The effect of the amino acid substitutions on the antigenic nature of the virus was assessed by virus neutralization (VN) test. Mutations at four different positions, namely VP1-43, VP1-45, VP2-191 and VP3-132, led to significant reduction in VN titre (P value = 0.05, 0.05, 0.001 and 0.05, respectively). This is the first time, to our knowledge, that the antigenic regions encompassing amino acids VP1-43 to -45 (equivalent to antigenic site 3 in serotype O), VP2-191 and VP3-132 have been predicted as epitopes and evaluated serologically for serotype A FMDVs. This identifies novel capsid epitopes of recently circulating serotype A FMDVs in East Africa. PMID:25614587

  9. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Surface-Exposed Lysine Residues Leads to Improved Transduction by AAV2, But Not AAV8, Vectors in Murine Hepatocytes In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Baozheng; Ma, Wenqin; Ling, Chen; Van Vliet, Kim; Huang, Lin-Ya; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Srivastava, Arun; Aslanidi, George V

    2015-12-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays a critical role in the intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors, which negatively impacts the transduction efficiency of these vectors. Because ubiquitination occurs on lysine (K) residues, we performed site-directed mutagenesis where we replaced each of 10 surface-exposed K residues (K258, K490, K507, K527, K532, K544, K549, K556, K665, and K706) with glutamic acid (E) because of similarity of size and lack of recognition by modifying enzymes. The transduction efficiency of K490E, K544E, K549E, and K556E scAAV2 vectors increased in HeLa cells in vitro up to 5-fold compared with wild-type (WT) AAV2 vectors, with the K556E mutant being the most efficient. Intravenous delivery of WT and K-mutant ssAAV2 vectors further corroborated these results in murine hepatocytes in vivo. Because AAV8 vectors transduce murine hepatocytes exceedingly well, and because some of the surface-exposed K residues are conserved between these serotypes, we generated and tested two single mutants (K547E and K569E), and one double-mutant (K547 + 569E) AAV8 vector. However, no significant increase in the transduction efficiency of any of these mutant AAV8 vectors was observed in murine hepatocytes in vivo. These studies suggest that although targeting the surface-exposed K residues is yet another strategy to improve the transduction efficiency of AAV vectors, phenotypic outcome is serotype specific.

  10. Testing a structural model for viral DNA packaging motor function by optical tweezers measurements, site directed mutagenesis, and molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicholas A.; Migliori, Amy D.; Arya, Gaurav; Rao, Venigalla B.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2013-09-01

    Many double-stranded DNA viruses employ a molecular motor to package DNA into preformed capsid shells. Based on structures of phage T4 motor proteins determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, Rao, Rossmann and coworkers recently proposed a structural model for motor function. They proposed that DNA is ratcheted by a large conformational change driven by electrostatic interactions between charged residues at an interface between two globular domains of the motor protein. We have conducted experiments to test this model by studying the effect on packaging under applied load of site-directed changes altering these residues. We observe significant impairment of packaging activity including reductions in packaging rate, percent time packaging, and time active under high load. We show that these measured impairments correlate well with alterations in free energies associated with the conformational change predicted by molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Structural Studies Suggest that the Germination Protease, GPR, in Spores of Bacillus Species Is an Atypical Aspartic Acid Protease

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Thomas M.; Setlow, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Germination protease (GPR) initiates the degradation of small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) during germination of spores of Bacillus and Clostridium species. The GPR amino acid sequence is not homologous to members of the major protease families, and previous work has not identified residues involved in GPR catalysis. The current work has focused on identifying catalytically essential amino acids by mutagenesis of Bacillus megaterium gpr. A residue was selected for alteration if it (i) was conserved among spore-forming bacteria, (ii) was a potential nucleophile, and (iii) had not been ruled out as inessential for catalysis. GPR variants were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the active form (P41) was assayed for activity against SASP and the zymogen form (P46) was assayed for the ability to autoprocess to P41. Variants inactive against SASP and unable to autoprocess were analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy and multiangle laser light scattering to determine whether the variant's inactivity was due to loss of secondary or quaternary structure, respectively. Variation of D127 and D193, but no other residues, resulted in inactive P46 and P41, while variants of each form were well structured and tetrameric, suggesting that D127 and D193 are essential for activity and autoprocessing. Mapping these two aspartate residues and a highly conserved lysine onto the B. megaterium P46 crystal structure revealed a striking similarity to the catalytic residues and propeptide lysine of aspartic acid proteases. These data indicate that GPR is an atypical aspartic acid protease. PMID:16199582

  12. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the Helicobacter pylori CagL protein of the Cag type IV secretion system identifies novel functional domains

    PubMed Central

    Bönig, Tobias; Olbermann, Patrick; Bats, Simon H.; Fischer, Wolfgang; Josenhans, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The Cag Type IV secretion system, which contributes to inflammation and cancerogenesis during chronic infection, is one of the major virulence factors of the bacterial gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We have generated and characterized a series of non-marked site-directed chromosomal mutants in H. pylori to define domains of unknown function of the essential tip protein CagL of the Cag secretion system. Characterizing the CagL mutants, we determined that their function to activate cells and transport the effector CagA was reduced to different extents. We identified three novel regions of the CagL protein, involved in its structural integrity, its possible interaction with the CagPAI T4SS pilus protein CagI, and in its binding to integrins and other host cell ligands. In particular two novel variable CagL motifs were involved in integrin binding, TSPSA, and TASLI, which is located opposite of its integrin binding motif RGD. We thereby defined functionally important subdomains within the CagL structure, which can be used to clarify CagL contributions in the context of other CagPAI proteins or for inhibition of the CagT4SS. This structure-function correlation of CagL domains can also be instructive for the functional characterization of other potential VirB5 orthologs whose structure is not yet known. PMID:27922023

  13. Inference of relationships in the ‘twilight zone’ of homology using a combination of bioinformatics and site-directed mutagenesis: a case study of restriction endonucleases Bsp6I and PvuII

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak, Sebastian D.; Radlinska, Monika; Chmiel, Agnieszka A.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Skowronek, Krzysztof J.

    2005-01-01

    Thus far, identification of functionally important residues in Type II restriction endonucleases (REases) has been difficult using conventional methods. Even though known REase structures share a fold and marginally recognizable active site, the overall sequence similarities are statistically insignificant, unless compared among proteins that recognize identical or very similar sequences. Bsp6I is a Type II REase, which recognizes the palindromic DNA sequence 5′GCNGC and cleaves between the cytosine and the unspecified nucleotide in both strands, generating a double-strand break with 5′-protruding single nucleotides. There are no solved structures of REases that recognize similar DNA targets or generate cleavage products with similar characteristics. In straightforward comparisons, the Bsp6I sequence shows no significant similarity to REases with known structures. However, using a fold-recognition approach, we have identified a remote relationship between Bsp6I and the structure of PvuII. Starting from the sequence–structure alignment between Bsp6I and PvuII, we constructed a homology model of Bsp6I and used it to predict functionally significant regions in Bsp6I. The homology model was supported by site-directed mutagenesis of residues predicted to be important for dimerization, DNA binding and catalysis. Completing the picture of sequence–structure–function relationships in protein superfamilies becomes an essential task in the age of structural genomics and our study may serve as a paradigm for future analyses of superfamilies comprising strongly diverged members with little or no sequence similarity. PMID:15684412

  14. Computer-aided active-site-directed modeling of the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and human thymidine kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkers, Gerd; Trumpp-Kallmeyer, Susanne; Gutbrod, Oliver; Krickl, Sabine; Fetzer, Jürgen; Keil, Günther M.

    1991-10-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK), which is induced by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1), plays a key role in the antiviral activity of guanine derivatives such as aciclovir (ACV). In contrast, ACV shows only low affinity to the corresponding host cell enzyme. In order to define the differences in substrate binding of the two enzymes on molecular level, models for the three-dimensional (3-D) structures of the active sites of HSV1-TK and human TK were developed. The reconstruction of the active sites started from primary and secondary structure analysis of various kinases. The results were validated to homologous enzymes with known 3-D structures. The models predict that both enzymes consist of a central core β-sheet structure, connected by loops and α-helices very similar to the overall structure of other nucleotide binding enzymes. The phosphate binding is made up of a highly conserved glycine-rich loop at the N-terminus of the proteins and a conserved region at the C-terminus. The thymidine recognition site was found about 100 amino acids downstream from the phosphate binding loop. The differing substrate specificity of human and HSV1-TK can be explained by amino-acid substitutions in the homologous regions. To achieve a better understanding of the structure of the active site and how the thymidine kinase proteins interact with their substrates, the corresponding complexes of thymidine and dihydroxypropoxyguanine (DHPG) with HSV1 and human TK were built. For the docking of the guanine derivative, the X-ray structure of Elongation Factor Tu (EF-Tu), co-crystallized with guanosine diphosphate, was taken as reference. Fitting of thymidine into the active sites was done with respect to similar interactions found in thymidylate kinase. To complement the analysis of the 3-D structures of the two kinases and the substrate enzyme interactions, site-directed mutagenesis of the thymidine recognition site of HSV1-TK has been undertaken, changing Asp162 in the thymidine recognition site

  15. Analysis of the nucleus-encoded and chloroplast-targeted rieske protein by classic and site-directed mutagenesis of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    de Vitry, C; Finazzi, G; Baymann, F; Kallas, T

    1999-01-01

    Three mutants of the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii affected in the nuclear PETC gene encoding the Rieske iron-sulfur protein 2Fe-2S subunit of the chloroplast cytochrome b(6)f complex have been characterized. One has a stable deletion that eliminates the protein; two others carry substitutions Y87D and W163R that result in low accumulation of the protein. Attenuated expression of the stromal protease ClpP increases accumulation and assembly into b(6)f complexes of the Y87D and W163R mutant Rieske proteins in quantities sufficient for analysis. Electron-transfer kinetics of these complexes were 10- to 20-fold slower than those for the wild type. The deletion mutant was used as a recipient for site-directed mutant petC alleles. Six glycine residues were replaced by alanine residues (6G6A) in the flexible hinge that is critical for domain movement; substitutions were created near the 2Fe-2S cluster (S128 and W163); and seven C-terminal residues were deleted (G171och). Although the 6G6A and G171och mutations affect highly conserved segments in the chloroplast Rieske protein, photosynthesis in the mutants was similar to that of the wild type. These results establish the basis for mutational analysis of the nuclear-encoded and chloroplast-targeted Rieske protein of photosynthesis. PMID:10521530

  16. Analysis of the nucleus-encoded and chloroplast-targeted rieske protein by classic and site-directed mutagenesis of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    de Vitry, C; Finazzi, G; Baymann, F; Kallas, T

    1999-10-01

    Three mutants of the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii affected in the nuclear PETC gene encoding the Rieske iron-sulfur protein 2Fe-2S subunit of the chloroplast cytochrome b(6)f complex have been characterized. One has a stable deletion that eliminates the protein; two others carry substitutions Y87D and W163R that result in low accumulation of the protein. Attenuated expression of the stromal protease ClpP increases accumulation and assembly into b(6)f complexes of the Y87D and W163R mutant Rieske proteins in quantities sufficient for analysis. Electron-transfer kinetics of these complexes were 10- to 20-fold slower than those for the wild type. The deletion mutant was used as a recipient for site-directed mutant petC alleles. Six glycine residues were replaced by alanine residues (6G6A) in the flexible hinge that is critical for domain movement; substitutions were created near the 2Fe-2S cluster (S128 and W163); and seven C-terminal residues were deleted (G171och). Although the 6G6A and G171och mutations affect highly conserved segments in the chloroplast Rieske protein, photosynthesis in the mutants was similar to that of the wild type. These results establish the basis for mutational analysis of the nuclear-encoded and chloroplast-targeted Rieske protein of photosynthesis.

  17. Isolation of precise plastid deletion mutants by homology-based excision: a resource for site-directed mutagenesis, multi-gene changes and high-throughput plastid transformation.

    PubMed

    Kode, Vasumathi; Mudd, Elisabeth A; Iamtham, Siriluck; Day, Anil

    2006-06-01

    We describe a simple and efficient homology-based excision method to delete plastid genes. The procedure allows one or more adjacent plastid genes to be deleted without the retention of a marker gene. We used aadA-based transformation to duplicate a 649 bp region of plastid DNA corresponding to the atpB promoter region. Efficient recombination between atpB repeats deletes the intervening foreign genes and 1,984 bp of plastid DNA (co-ordinates 57,424-59,317) containing the rbcL gene. Only five foreign bases are present in DeltarbcL plants illustrating the precision of homology-based excision. Sequence analysis of non-functional rbcL-related sequences in DeltarbcL plants indicated an extra-plastidic origin. Mutant DeltarbcL plants were heterotrophic, pale-green and contained round plastids with reduced amounts of thylakoids. Restoration of autotrophy and leaf pigmentation following aadA-based transformation with the wild-type rbcL gene ruled out mutations in other genes. Excision and re-use of aadA shows that, despite the multiplicity of plastid genomes, homology-based excision ensures complete removal of functional aadA genes. Rescue of the DeltarbcL mutation and autotrophic growth stabilizes transgenic plastids in heteroplasmic transformants following antibiotic withdrawal, enhancing the overall efficiency of plastid transformation. Unlike the available set of homoplasmic knockout mutants in 25 plastid genes, the rbcL deletion mutant isolated here is readily transformed with the efficient aadA marker gene. This improvement in deletion design facilitates advanced studies that require the isolation of double mutants in distant plastid genes and the replacement of the deleted locus with site-directed mutant alleles and is not easily achieved using other methods.

  18. Ligand-bound Structures and Site-directed Mutagenesis Identify the Acceptor and Secondary Binding Sites of Streptomyces coelicolor Maltosyltransferase GlgE*

    PubMed Central

    Syson, Karl; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Miah, Farzana; Barclay, J. Elaine; Tang, Minhong; Gorelik, Andrii; Rashid, Abdul M.; Lawson, David M.; Bornemann, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    GlgE is a maltosyltransferase involved in α-glucan biosynthesis in bacteria that has been genetically validated as a target for tuberculosis therapies. Crystals of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme diffract at low resolution so most structural studies have been with the very similar Streptomyces coelicolor GlgE isoform 1. Although the donor binding site for α-maltose 1-phosphate had been previously structurally defined, the acceptor site had not. Using mutagenesis, kinetics, and protein crystallography of the S. coelicolor enzyme, we have now identified the +1 to +6 subsites of the acceptor/product, which overlap with the known cyclodextrin binding site. The sugar residues in the acceptor subsites +1 to +5 are oriented such that they disfavor the binding of malto-oligosaccharides that bear branches at their 6-positions, consistent with the known acceptor chain specificity of GlgE. A secondary binding site remote from the catalytic center was identified that is distinct from one reported for the M. tuberculosis enzyme. This new site is capable of binding a branched α-glucan and is most likely involved in guiding acceptors toward the donor site because its disruption kinetically compromises the ability of GlgE to extend polymeric substrates. However, disruption of this site, which is conserved in the Streptomyces venezuelae GlgE enzyme, did not affect the growth of S. venezuelae or the structure of the polymeric product. The acceptor subsites +1 to +4 in the S. coelicolor enzyme are well conserved in the M. tuberculosis enzyme so their identification could help inform the design of inhibitors with therapeutic potential. PMID:27531751

  19. Structure-function relationships in the Na,K-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: site-directed mutagenesis of glutamine-111 to arginine and asparagine-122 to aspartic acid generates a ouabain-resistant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Lingrel, J.B.

    1988-11-01

    Na,K-ATPases from various species differ greatly in their sensitivity to cardiac glycosides such as ouabain. The sheep and human enzymes are a thousand times more sensitive than the corresponding ones from rat and mouse. To define the region of the ..cap alpha..1 subunit responsible for this differential sensitivity, chimeric cDNAs of sheep and rat were constructed and expressed in ouabain-sensitive HeLa cells. The construct containing the amino-terminal half of the rat ..cap alpha..1 subunit coding region and carboxyl-terminal half of the sheep conferred the ouabain-resistant phenotype to HeLa cells while the reverse construct did not. This indicates that the determinants involved in ouabain sensitivity are located in the amino-terminal half of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit. By use of site-directed mutagenesis, the amino acid sequence of the first extracellular domain (H1-H2) of the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit was changed to that of the rat. When expressed in HeLa cells, this mutated sheep ..cap alpha..1 construct, like the rat/sheep chimera, was able to confer ouabain resistance to these cells. Furthermore, similar results were observed when HeLa cells were transfected with a sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNA containing only two amino acid substitutions. The resistant cells, whether transfected with the rat ..cap alpha..1 cDNA, the rat/sheep chimera, or the mutant sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNAs, exhibited identical biochemical characteristics including ouabain-inhibitable cell growth, /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake, and Na,K-ATPase activity. These results demonstrate that the presence of arginine and aspartic acid on the amino end and carboxyl end, respectively, of the H1-H2 extracellular domain of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit together is responsible for the ouabain-resistant character of the rat enzyme and the corresponding residues in the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit (glutamine and asparagine) are somehow involved in ouabain binding.

  20. The phosphorylation targets of p47phox, a subunit of the respiratory burst oxidase. Functions of the individual target serines as evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Faust, L R; el Benna, J; Babior, B M; Chanock, S J

    1995-01-01

    The respiratory burst oxidase of phagocytes and B lymphocytes catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to O2- at the expense of NADPH. Dormant in resting cells, the oxidase is activated by exposing the cells to appropriate stimuli. During activation, p47phox, a cytosolic oxidase subunit, becomes extensively phosphorylated on a number of serines located between S303 and S379. To determine whether this phosphorylation is necessary for oxidase activation, we examined phorbol-elicited oxidase activity in EBV-transformed B lymphoblasts deficient in p47phox after transfection with plasmids expressing various S-->A mutants of p47phox. The mutant containing S-->A mutations involving all serines between S303 and S379 [S(303-379)A] was not phosphorylated, did not translocate to plasma membrane during activation and was almost devoid of function. As to individual serines, S379 was of special interest because (a) p47 phox S379 was phosphorylated in phorbol-activated lymphoblasts expressing wild-type p47phox, and (b) p47phox S379A failed to translocate to the membrane, and was as functionless as p47phox S(303-379)A; other single S-->A mutations had little effect on oxidase activity. These findings suggest that the phosphorylation of S379 may be important for oxidase activation in whole cells. Images PMID:7657821

  1. Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium: Role of Glutamate 186 in Catalysis Revealed by Site-directed Mutagenesis, Alternate Substrates, and Inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium (SXA) is the most active enzyme known for catalyzing hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides to D-xylose. Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation states of catalytic ...

  2. Novel intracellular GH10 xylanase from Cohnella laeviribosi HY-21: biocatalytic properties and alterations of substrate specificities by site-directed mutagenesis of Trp residues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Young; Han, Mi Kyoung; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Bae, Kyung Sook; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Kim, Sung Uk; Shin, Dong-Ha; Kim, In-Ho; Rhee, Young Ha; Son, Kwang-Hee; Park, Ho-Yong

    2010-11-01

    The novel intracellular GH10 xylanase (iXylC) gene (1023-bp) of Cohnella laeviribosi HY-21 encoded a protein consisting of 340 amino acids with a deduced molecular mass of 39,330Da and a calculated pI of 5.81. The primary structure of iXylC was 70% identical to that of Geobacillus sp. GH10 enzyme (GenBank accession number: EDV78425). Xylanolytic activity of the His-tagged iXylC overproduced in Escherichiacoli BL21 was stimulated by 2.2-fold in the presence of 0.5% non-ionic detergents. iXylC produced a mixture of xylooligosaccharides (xylobiose to xylooctaose) from xylotriose and xylotetraose used as the hydrolytic substrate. In addition, it exhibited considerable cleavage activities for p-nitrophenylxylopyranoside (PNP-xylopyranoside) and PNP-cellobioside, indicating that iXylC is a unique GH10 enzyme. The hydrolytic activity (57.8IUmL(-1)) of iXylC toward PNP-xylopyranoside increased to 8.3-fold by W217A and W315A mutations, while mutations of W133A, W295A, and W303A abolished the hydrolytic activity of the enzyme.

  3. Probing the Catalytic Potential of the Hamster Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase 2 Catalytic Triad by Site-directed Mutagenesis of the Proximal Conserved Residue, Tyrosine 190

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Naixia; Liu, Li; Walters, Kylie J.; Hanna, Patrick E.; Wagner, Carston R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) play an important role in both detoxification of arylamine and hydrazine drugs and activation of arylamine carcinogens. Since the catalytic triad, Cys-His-Asp, of mammalian NATs has been shown to be essential for maintaining protein stability, rendering it impossible to assess alterations of the triad on catalysis, we explored the impact of the highly conserved proximal residue, Tyr-190, which forms a direct hydrogen bond interaction with one of the triad residues, Asp-122, as well as a potential pi-pi stacking interaction with the active site His-107. Replacement of Hamster NAT2 Tyr-190 by either phenylalanine, isoleucine, or alanine was well tolerated and did not result in significant alterations in the overall fold of the protein. Nevertheless, stopped-flow and steady-state kinetic analysis revealed that Tyr-190 was critical for maximizing the acetylation rate of NAT2 and the transacetylation rate of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) when compared to wild type. Tyr-190 was also shown to play an important role in determining the pKa of the active site cysteine during acetylation, as well as the pH versus rate profile for transacetylation. We hypothesized that the pH-dependence was associated with global changes in the active site structure, which was revealed by the superposition of [1H, 15N] HSQC spectra for wild type and Y190A. These results suggest that NAT2 catalytic efficiency is partially governed by the ability of Tyr-190 to mediate the collective impact of multiple side chains on the electrostatic potential and local conformation of active site. PMID:19860825

  4. Cooperativity in the two-domain arginine kinase from the sea anemone Anthopleura japonicus. II. Evidence from site-directed mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Tada, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2010-08-01

    The arginine kinase (AK) from the sea anemone Anthopleura japonicus has an unusual two-domain structure (contiguous dimer; denoted by D1-D2). In a previous report, we suggested cooperativity in the contiguous dimer, which may be a result of domain-domain interactions, using MBP-fused enzymes. To further understand this observation, we inserted six-Lys residues into the linker region of the two-domain AK (D1-K6-D2 mutant) using His-tagged enzyme. The dissociation constants, K(a) and K(ia), of the mutant were similar to those of the wild-type enzyme but the catalytic constant, k(cat), was decreased to 28% that of the wild-type, indicating that some of the domain-domain interactions are lost due to the six-Lys insertion. Y68 plays a major role in arginine binding in the catalytic pocket in Limulus AK, and introduction of mutation at the Y68 position virtually abolishes catalytic activity. Thus, the constructed D1(Y68G)-D2 and D1-D2(Y68G) mutants mimic the D1(inactive)-D2(active) and D1(active)-D2(inactive) enzymes, respectively. The k(cat) values of both Y68 mutants were decreased to 13-18% that of the wild-type enzyme, which is much less than the 50% level of the two-domain enzyme. Thus, it is clear that substrate-binding to both domains is necessary for full expression of activity. In other words, substrate-binding appears to act as the trigger of the functional cooperativity in two-domain AK.

  5. Analysis of an invariant cofactor-protein interaction in thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzymes by site-directed mutagenesis. Glutamic acid 418 in transketolase is essential for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wikner, C; Meshalkina, L; Nilsson, U; Nikkola, M; Lindqvist, Y; Sundström, M; Schneider, G

    1994-12-23

    A homologous expression system and a purification protocol for pure, highly active recombinant yeast transketolase have been developed. The invariant transketolase residue Glu418, which forms a hydrogen bond to the N-1' nitrogen atom of the pyrimidine ring of the cofactor thiamin diphosphate has been replaced by glutamine and alanine. Crystallographic analyses of the mutants show that these amino acid substitutions do not induce structural changes beyond the site of mutation. In both cases, the cofactor binds in a manner identical to the wild-type enzyme. Significant differences in the CD spectra of the mutant transketolases compared with the spectrum of wild-type enzyme indicate differences in the electron distribution of the aminopyrimidine ring of the cofactor. The E418Q mutant shows 2% and the E418A mutant shows about 0.1% of the catalytic activity of wild-type enzyme. The affinities of the mutant enzymes for thiamin diphosphate are comparable with wild-type transketolase. The hydrogen bond between the coenzyme and the side chain of Glu418 is thus not required for coenzyme binding but essential for catalytic activity. The results demonstrate the functional importance of this interaction and support the molecular model for cofactor deprotonation, the first step in enzymatic thiamin catalysis.

  6. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Assess the Binding Capacity of Class S Protein of Staphylococcus aureus Leucotoxins to the Surface of Polymorphonuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, L. Baba; Werner, S.; Coraiola, M.; Colin, D. A.; Keller, D.; Sanni, A.; Serra, M. Dalla; Monteil, H.; Prévost, G.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcal leucotoxins result from the association of class S components and class F component inducing the activation and the permeabilization of the target cells. Like α-toxin, the leucotoxins are pore-forming toxins with more than 70% β-sheet. This was confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. In addition, threonine 28 of a predicted and conserved β-sheet at the N-terminal extremity of class S proteins composing leucotoxins aligns with histidine 35 of α-toxin, which has a key role in oligomerization of the final pore. Flow cytometry was used to study different aminoacid substitutions of the threonine 28 in order to evaluate its role in the biological activity of these class S proteins. Finally, results show that threonine 28 of the leucotoxin probably plays a role similar to that of histidine 35 of α-toxin. Mutations on this threonin largely influenced the secondary interaction of the class F component and led to inactive toxin. PMID:16883055

  7. Improving special hydrolysis characterization into Talaromyces thermophilus F1208 xylanase by engineering of N-terminal extension and site-directed mutagenesis in C-terminal.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Sun, Baoguo; Xiong, Ke; Teng, Chao; Xu, Youqiang; Li, Liangjun; Li, Xiuting

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the hydrolysis characteristics of xylanase in producing xylo-oligosaccharides and to improve these by protein engineering. In this study, a hybrid enzyme (T-XynFM) was created from Talaromyces thermophilus F1208 xylanase (T-Xyn) by replacement of the N-terminal extension Phe1-Pro16 with Ala1-Gln8 and substitution of amino acid Phe193 (185) with Ser in the C-terminal. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 55°C and pH 6.5. Its residual activity was more than 55% after treatment at 50°C, pH 6.5 for 12h Km values of T-XynFM for beechwood xylan, birchwood xylan, and oat-spelt xylan were 10.31, 10.03, and 8.90mgmL(-1), respectively. The enzyme displayed special hydrolysis characteristics: almost no xylose was produced on using xylotriose (X3), xylotetraose (X4), and xylopentaose as substrates. Moreover, over 60% X4 existed in hydrolyzed products of X3, indicating that T-XynFM possesses formidable transglycosylation properties.

  8. Molecular basis of the inhibition of human aromatase (estrogen synthetase) by flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens: A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed

    Kao, Y C; Zhou, C; Sherman, M; Laughton, C A; Chen, S

    1998-02-01

    Flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens are plant chemicals and are known to be competitive inhibitors of cytochrome P450 aromatase with respect to the androgen substrate. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen; therefore, these plant chemicals are thought to be capable of modifying the estrogen level in women. In this study, the inhibition profiles of four flavones [chrysin (5, 7-dihydroxyflavone), 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), and galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone)], two isoflavones [genistein (4,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxyisoflavone)], one flavanone [naringenin (4, 5,7-trihydroxyflavanone)], and one naphthoflavone (alpha-naphthoflavone) on the wild-type and six human aromatase mutants (I133Y, P308F, D309A, T310S, I395F, and I474Y) were determined. In combination with computer modeling, the binding characteristics and the structure requirement for flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens to inhibit human aromatase were obtained. These compounds were found to bind to the active site of aromatase in an orientation in which rings A and C mimic rings D and C of the androgen substrate, respectively. This study also provides a molecular basis as to why isoflavones are significantly poorer inhibitors of aromatase than flavones.

  9. Molecular basis of the inhibition of human aromatase (estrogen synthetase) by flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens: A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Y C; Zhou, C; Sherman, M; Laughton, C A; Chen, S

    1998-01-01

    Flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens are plant chemicals and are known to be competitive inhibitors of cytochrome P450 aromatase with respect to the androgen substrate. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen; therefore, these plant chemicals are thought to be capable of modifying the estrogen level in women. In this study, the inhibition profiles of four flavones [chrysin (5, 7-dihydroxyflavone), 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), and galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone)], two isoflavones [genistein (4,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxyisoflavone)], one flavanone [naringenin (4, 5,7-trihydroxyflavanone)], and one naphthoflavone (alpha-naphthoflavone) on the wild-type and six human aromatase mutants (I133Y, P308F, D309A, T310S, I395F, and I474Y) were determined. In combination with computer modeling, the binding characteristics and the structure requirement for flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens to inhibit human aromatase were obtained. These compounds were found to bind to the active site of aromatase in an orientation in which rings A and C mimic rings D and C of the androgen substrate, respectively. This study also provides a molecular basis as to why isoflavones are significantly poorer inhibitors of aromatase than flavones. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9435150

  10. Expression of the Isoamylase Gene of Flavobacterium odoratum KU in Escherichia coli and Identification of Essential Residues of the Enzyme by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Jun-ichi; Ushijima, Chiaki; Hizukuri, Susumu

    1999-01-01

    The isoamylase gene from Flavobacterium odoratum KU was cloned into and expressed in Escherichia coli JM109. The promoter of the gene was successful in E. coli, and the enzyme produced was excreted into the culture medium, depending on the amount of the enzyme expressed. The enzyme found in the culture medium showed almost the same Mr, heat-inactivating constant, and N-terminal sequence as those of the enzyme accumulated in the periplasmic space. This result indicated that the enzyme accumulated in an active form at the periplasm was transported out of the cell. The primary sequence of the enzyme, which was deduced from its nucleotide sequence, showed that the mature enzyme consisted of 741 amino acid residues. By changing five possible residues to Ala independently, it was found that Asp-374, Glu-422, and Asp-497 were essential. The sequences around those residues were highly conserved in isoamylases of different origins and the glycogen operon protein X, GlgX. The comparison of the distance between these essential residues with those of various amylases suggested that the bacterial and plant isoamylase but not GlgX had a longer fourth loop than the other amylases. This longer fourth loop had a possible role in accommodating the long branched chains of native glycogens and starches. PMID:10473430

  11. Importance of the conserved lysine 83 residue of Zea mays cytochrome b(561) for ascorbate-specific transmembrane electron transfer as revealed by site-directed mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Nobuyuki; Rahman, Motiur Md; Sakamoto, Yoichi; Takigami, Tadakazu; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Hori, Hiroshi; Hase, Toshiharu; Park, Sam-Yong; Tsubaki, Motonari

    2009-11-10

    Cytochromes b(561), a novel class of transmembrane electron transport proteins residing in a large variety of eukaryotic cells, have a number of common structural features including six hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helices and two heme ligation sites. We found that recombinant Zea mays cytochrome b(561) obtained by a heterologous expression system using yeast Pichia pastoris cells could utilize the ascorbate/mondehydroascorbate radical as a physiological electron donor/acceptor. We found further that a concerted proton/electron transfer mechanism might be operative in Z. mays cytochrome b(561) as well upon the electron acceptance from ascorbate to the cytosolic heme center. The well-conserved Lys(83) residue in a cytosolic loop was found to have a very important role(s) for the binding of ascorbate and the succeeding electron transfer via electrostatic interactions based on the analyses of three site-specific mutants, K83A, K83E, and K83D. Further, unusual behavior of the K83A mutant in pulse radiolysis experiments indicated that Lys(83) might also be responsible for the intramolecular electron transfer to the intravesicular heme. On the other hand, pulse radiolysis experiments on two site-specific mutants, S118A and W122A, for the well-conserved residues in the putative monodehydroascorbate radical binding site showed that their electron transfer activities to the monodehydroascorbate radical were very similar to those of the wild-type protein, indicating that Ser(118) and Trp(122) do not have major roles for the redox events on the intravesicular side.

  12. L-allo-threonine aldolase from Aeromonas jandaei DK-39: gene cloning, nucleotide sequencing, and identification of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-binding lysine residue by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J Q; Dairi, T; Kataoka, M; Shimizu, S; Yamada, H

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated the gene encoding L-allo-threonine aldolase (L-allo-TA) from Aeromonas jandaei DK-39, a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that stereospecifically catalyzes the interconversion of L-allo-threonine and glycine. The gene contains an open reading frame consisting of 1,014 nucleotides corresponding to 338 amino acid residues. The protein molecular weight was estimated to be 36,294, which is in good agreement with the subunit molecular weight of the enzyme determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme was overexpressed in recombinant Escherichia coli cells and purified to homogeneity by one hydrophobic column chromatography step. The predicted amino acid sequence showed no significant similarity to those of the currently known PLP-dependent enzymes but displayed 40 and 41% identity with those of the hypothetical GLY1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the GLY1-like protein of Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively. Accordingly, L-allo-TA might represent a new type of PLP-dependent enzyme. To determine the PLP-binding site of the enzyme, all of the three conserved lysine residues of L-allo-TA were replaced by alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified mutant enzymes, K51A and K224A, showed properties similar to those of the wild type, while the mutant enzyme K199A was catalytically inactive, with corresponding disappearance of the absorption maximum at 420 nm. Thus, Lys199 of L-allo-TA probably functions as an essential catalytic residue forming an internal Schiff base with PLP of the enzyme to catalyze the reversible aldol reaction. PMID:9171400

  13. The maturation mechanism of γ-glutamyl transpeptidases: Insights from the crystal structure of a precursor mimic of the enzyme from Bacillus licheniformis and from site-directed mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Pica, Andrea; Chi, Meng-Chun; Chen, Yi-Yu; d'Ischia, Marco; Lin, Long-Liu; Merlino, Antonello

    2016-02-01

    γ-Glutamyl transpeptidases (γ-GTs) are members of N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. They are synthetized as single-chain precursors, which are then cleaved to form mature enzymes. Basic aspects of autocatalytic processing of these pro-enzymes are still unknown. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the precursor mimic of Bacillus licheniformis γ-GT (BlGT), obtained by mutating catalytically important threonine to alanine (T399A-BlGT), and report results of autoprocessing of mutants of His401, Thr415, Thr417, Glu419 and Arg571. Data suggest that Thr417 is in a competent position to activate the catalytic threonine (Thr399) for nucleophilic attack of the scissile peptide bond and that Thr415 plays a major role in assisting the process. On the basis of these new structural results, a possible mechanism of autoprocessing is proposed. This mechanism, which guesses the existence of a six-membered transition state involving one carbonyl and two hydroxyl groups, is in agreement with all the available experimental data collected on γ-GTs from different species and with our new Ala-scanning mutagenesis data.

  14. Site-directed mutagenesis of human beta-adrenergic receptors: substitution of aspartic acid-130 by asparagine produces a receptor with high-affinity agonist binding that is uncoupled from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, C M; Chung, F Z; Wang, C D; Venter, J C

    1988-01-01

    By using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, we have produced a point mutation (guanine to adenine) at nucleotide 388 of the gene for human beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR) that results in a substitution of asparagine for the highly conserved aspartic acid at position 130 in the putative third transmembrane domain of the human beta AR ([Asn130]beta AR). We have examined the functional significance of this mutation in B-82 cells continuously expressing the mutant [Asn130]beta AR. The mutant [Asn130]beta AR displayed normal antagonist binding but unusually high-affinity agonist binding (5- to 10-fold higher than wild-type beta AR), consistent with a single class of high-affinity binding sites. The mutant beta AR displayed guanine nucleotide-sensitive changes in agonist affinity (3- to 5-fold shift) implying an interaction between the beta AR and the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein; however, the ability of guanine nucleotides to alter agonist affinity was attenuated. Addition of saturating concentrations of isoproterenol to cell cultures expressing mutant [Asn130]-beta ARs had no effect on intracellular levels of cAMP, indicating that the mutant beta AR is unable to affect stimulation of adenylate cyclase. These results indicate that substitution of the aspartic acid with asparagine at residue 130 of the human beta AR dissociates the well-characterized guanine nucleotide effects on agonist affinity from those on activation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein and adenylate cyclase and suggests the existence of two distinct counterions for the amine portion of catecholamines that are associated with high- and low-affinity agonist binding states of beta AR. Images PMID:2840663

  15. Active-site-mutagenesis study of rat liver betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    González, Beatriz; Campillo, Nuria; Garrido, Francisco; Gasset, María; Sanz-Aparicio, Juliana; Pajares, María A

    2003-03-15

    A site-directed-mutagenesis study of putative active-site residues in rat liver betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase has been carried out. Identification of these amino acids was based on data derived from a structural model of the enzyme. No alterations in the CD spectra or the gel-filtration chromatography elution pattern were observed with the mutants, thus suggesting no modification in the secondary structure content or in the association state of the proteins. All the mutants obtained showed a reduction of the enzyme activity, the most dramatic effect being that of Glu(159), followed by Tyr(77) and Asp(26). Changes in affinity for either of the substrates, homocysteine or betaine, were detected when substitutions were performed of Glu(21), Asp(26), Phe(74) and Cys(186). Interestingly, Asp(26), postulated to be involved in homocysteine binding, has a strong effect on affinity for betaine. The relevance of these results is discussed in the light of very recent structural data obtained for the human enzyme.

  16. Structure-Based and Random Mutagenesis Approaches Increase the Organophosphate-Degrading Activity of a Phosphotriesterase Homologue from Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Hawwa, Renda; Larsen, Sonia D.; Ratia, Kiira; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2010-11-09

    An enzyme from the amidohydrolase family from Deinococcus radiodurans (Dr-OPH) with homology to phosphotriesterase has been shown to exhibit activity against both organophosphate (OP) and lactone compounds. We have characterized the physical properties of Dr-OPH and have found it to be a highly thermostable enzyme, remaining active after 3 h of incubation at 60 C and withstanding incubation at temperatures up to 70 C. In addition, it can withstand concentrations of at least 200 mg/mL. These properties make Dr-OPH a promising candidate for development in commercial applications. However, compared to the most widely studied OP-degrading enzyme, that from Pseudomonas diminuta, Dr-OPH has low hydrolytic activity against certain OP substrates. Therefore, we sought to improve the OP-degrading activity of Dr-OPH, specifically toward the pesticides ethyl and methyl paraoxon, using structure-based and random approaches. Site-directed mutagenesis, random mutagenesis, and site-saturation mutagenesis were utilized to increase the OP-degrading activity of Dr-OPH. Out of a screen of more than 30,000 potential mutants, a total of 26 mutant enzymes were purified and characterized kinetically. Crystal structures of w.t. Dr-OPH, of Dr-OPH in complex with a product analog, and of 7 mutant enzymes were determined to resolutions between 1.7 and 2.4 {angstrom}. Information from these structures directed the design and production of 4 additional mutants for analysis. In total, our mutagenesis efforts improved the catalytic activity of Dr-OPH toward ethyl and methyl paraoxon by 126- and 322-fold and raised the specificity for these two substrates by 557- and 183-fold, respectively. Our work highlights the importance of an iterative approach to mutagenesis, proving that large rate enhancements are achieved when mutations are made in already active mutants. In addition, the relationship between the kinetic parameters and the introduced mutations has allowed us to hypothesize on those

  17. Cloning of the genomes of human cytomegalovirus strains Toledo, TownevarRIT3, and Towne long as BACs and site-directed mutagenesis using a PCR-based technique.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Gabriele; Rose, Dietlind; Wagner, Markus; Rhiel, Sylvia; McVoy, Michael A

    2003-03-01

    The 230-kb human cytomegalovirus genome is among the largest of the known viruses. Experiments to determine the genetic determinants of attenuation, pathogenesis, and tissue tropism are underway; however, a lack of complete sequence data for multiple strains and substantial problems with genetic instability during in vitro propagation create serious complications for such studies. For example, recent findings suggest that common laboratory strains Towne and AD169 passaged in cultured human fibroblasts are missing up to 15 kb of genetic information relative to clinical isolates. To establish standard, genetically stable genomes that can be sequenced, disseminated, and repeatedly reconstituted to produce virus stocks, we have undertaken to clone two variants of Towne, designated Towne(long) and Towne(short) (referred to as TownevarRIT3) (A., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 7829-7834), and the pathogenic strain Toledo into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). We further demonstrate the ease with which mutagenesis can be achieved by deleting 13.5 kb from the Toledo genome using a PCR-based technique.

  18. Site-Directed Mutagenesis, in Vivo Electroporation and Mass Spectrometry in Search for Determinants of the Subcellular Targeting of Rab7b Paralogue in the Model Eukaryote Paramecium Octaurelia

    PubMed Central

    Wyroba, E.; Kwaśniak, P.; Miller, K.; Kobyłecki, K.; Osińska, M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein products of paralogous genes resulting from whole genome duplication may acquire new functions. The role of post-translational modifications (PTM) in proper targeting of Paramecium Rab7b paralogue (distinct from that of Rab7a directly involved in phagocytosis) was studied using point mutagenesis, proteomic analysis and double immunofluorescence after in vivo electroporation of the mutagenized protein. Here we show that substitution of Thr200 by Ala diminished the incorporation of [P32] by 37% and of [C14-]UDP-glucose by 24% into recombinant Rab7b_200 in comparison to the non-mutagenized control. Double confocal imaging revealed that Rab7b_200 was mistargeted upon electroporation into living cells in contrast to non-mutagenized recombinant Rab7b correctly incorporated in the cytostome area. Using nano LC-MS/MS to compare the peptide map of Rab7b with that after deglycosylation with a mixture of five enzymes of different specificity we identified a peptide ion at m/z=677.63+ representing a glycan group attached to Thr200. Based on its mass and quantitative assays with [P32] and [C14]UDP-glucose, the suggested composition of the adduct attached to Thr200 is (Hex)1(HexNAc)1(Phos)3 or (HexNAc)1 (Deoxyhexose)1 (Phos)1 (HexA)1. These data indicate that PTM of Thr200 located in the hypervariable C-region of Paramecium octaurelia Rab7b is crucial for the proper localization/function of this protein. Moreover, the two Rab7 paralogues differ also in another PTM: substantially more phosphorylated amino acid residues are in Rab7b than in Rab7a. PMID:27349314

  19. Identification of a determinant for strict NADP(H)-specificity and high sensitivity to mixed-type steroid inhibitor of rabbit aldo-keto reductase 1C33 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Ikari, Akira; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira; Kitade, Yukio

    2015-03-01

    In rabbit tissues, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily exists in six isoforms (AKRs: 1C5 and 1C29-1C33), sharing >73% amino acid sequence identity. AKR1C33 is strictly NADPH-specific, in contrast to dual NADPH/NADH specificity of the other isoforms. All coenzyme-binding residues of the structurally elucidated AKR1C5 are conserved in other isoforms, except that S217 (interacting with the pyrophosphate moiety) and T273 (interacting with the 2'-phosphate moiety) are replaced with F217 and N272, respectively, in AKR1C33. To explore the determinants for the NADPH specificity of AKR1C33, we prepared its F217S and N272T mutant enzymes. The mutation of F217S, but not N272T, converted AKR1C33 into a dually coenzyme-specific form that showed similar kcat values for NAD(P)H to those of AKR1C32. The reverse mutation (S217F) in dually coenzyme-specific AKR1C32 produced a strictly NADPH-specific form. The F217S mutation also abolished the activity towards 3-keto-5β-cholestanes that are substrates specific to AKR1C33, and markedly decreased the sensitivity to 4-pregnenes (such as deoxycorticosterone and medroxyprogesterone acetate) that were found to be potent mixed-type inhibitors of the wild-type enzyme. The results indicate the important role of F217 in the strict NADPH-dependency, as well as its involvement in the unique catalytic properties of AKR1C33.

  20. Probing the location and function of the conserved histidine residue of phosphoglucose isomerase by using an active site directed inhibitor N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, M.; Chane, T. L.; Sun, Y. J.; Hsiao, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) catalyzes the interconversion of D-glucopyranose-6-phosphate and D-fructofuranose-6-phosphate by promoting an intrahydrogen transfer between C1 and C2. A conserved histidine exists throughout all phosphoglucose isomerases and was hypothesized to be the base catalyzing the isomerization reaction. In the present study, this conserved histidine, His311, of the enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus was subjected to mutational analysis, and the mutational effect on the inactivation kinetics by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate was investigated. The substitution of His311 with alanine, asparagine, or glutamine resulted in the decrease of activity, in k(cat)/K(M), by a factor of 10(3), indicating the importance of this residue. N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate inactivated irreversibly the activity of wild-type phosphoglucose isomerase; however, His311 --> Ala became resistant to this inhibitor, indicating that His311 is located in the active site and is responsible for the inactivation of the enzyme by this active site-directed inhibitor. The pKa of His311 was estimated to be 6.31 according to the pH dependence of the inactivation. The proximity of this value with the pKa value of 6.35, determined from the pH dependence of k(cat)/K(M), supports a role of His311 as a general base in the catalysis. PMID:10595547

  1. Structure of Bacillus subtilis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase in complex with acivicin: diversity of the binding mode of a classical and electrophilic active-site-directed glutamate analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Hiratake, Jun; Wada, Kei

    2014-02-01

    The binding modes of acivicin, a classical and an electrophilic active-site-directed glutamate analogue, to bacterial γ-glutamyltranspeptidases were found to be diverse. γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) is an enzyme that plays a central role in glutathione metabolism, and acivicin is a classical inhibitor of GGT. Here, the structure of acivicin bound to Bacillus subtilis GGT determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.8 Å resolution is presented, in which it binds to the active site in a similar manner to that in Helicobacter pylori GGT, but in a different binding mode to that in Escherichia coli GGT. In B. subtilis GGT, acivicin is bound covalently through its C3 atom with sp{sup 2} hybridization to Thr403 O{sup γ}, the catalytic nucleophile of the enzyme. The results show that acivicin-binding sites are common, but the binding manners and orientations of its five-membered dihydroisoxazole ring are diverse in the binding pockets of GGTs.

  2. In Vitro Activity of Simeprevir against Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Clinical Isolates and Its Correlation with NS3 Sequence and Site-Directed Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fevery, Bart; Vijgen, Leen; Jacobs, Tom; De Meyer, Sandra; Lenz, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Simeprevir (TMC435) is a once-daily, single-pill, oral hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitor approved for the treatment of chronic HCV infection. Phenotypic characterization of baseline isolates and isolates from HCV genotype 1-infected patients failing with a simeprevir-based regimen was performed using chimeric replicons carrying patient-derived NS3 protease sequences. Cutoff values differentiating between full susceptibility to simeprevir (≤2.0-fold reduction in simeprevir activity) and low-level versus high-level resistance (≥50-fold reduction in simeprevir activity) were determined. The median simeprevir fold change in the 50% effective concentration (FC) of pretreatment genotype 1a isolates, with and without Q80K, and genotype 1b isolates was 11, 0.9, and 0.4, respectively. Naturally occurring NS3 polymorphisms that reduced simeprevir activity, other than Q80K, were uncommon in the simeprevir studies and generally conferred low-level resistance in vitro. Although the proportion of patients with failure differed by HCV geno/subtype and/or presence of baseline Q80K, the level of simeprevir resistance observed at failure was similarly high irrespective of type of failure, HCV genotype 1 subtype, and presence or absence of baseline Q80K. At the end of the study, simeprevir activity against isolates that lost the emerging amino acid substitution returned to pretreatment values. Activity of simeprevir against clinical isolates and site-directed mutant replicons harboring the corresponding single or double amino acid substitutions correlated well, showing that simeprevir resistance can be attributed to these substitutions. In conclusion, pretreatment NS3 isolates were generally fully susceptible (FC, ≤2.0) or conferred low-level resistance to simeprevir in vitro (FC, >2.0 and <50). Treatment failure with a simeprevir-based regimen was associated with emergence of high-level-resistance variants (FC, ≥50). PMID:26392483

  3. Aromatic amino acid mutagenesis at the substrate binding pocket of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase Lip2 affects its activity and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guilong; Liu, Zimin; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2014-01-01

    The lipase2 from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLip2) is a yeast lipase exhibiting high homologous to filamentous fungal lipase family. Though its crystal structure has been resolved, its structure-function relationship has rarely been reported. By contrast, there are two amino acid residues (V94 and I100) with significant difference in the substrate binding pocket of YLLip2; they were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) to introduce aromatic amino acid mutations. Two mutants (V94W and I100F) were created. The enzymatic properties of the mutant lipases were detected and compared with the wild-type. The activities of mutant enzymes dropped to some extent towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPC16) and their optimum temperature was 35°C, which was 5°C lower than that of the wild-type. However, the thermostability of I100F increased 22.44% after incubation for 1 h at 40°C and its optimum substrate shifted from p-nitrophenyl laurate (pNPC12) to p-nitrophenyl caprate (pNPC10). The above results demonstrated that the two substituted amino acid residuals have close relationship with such enzymatic properties as thermostability and substrate selectivity.

  4. Generation of interleukin-6 receptor antagonists by molecular-modeling guided mutagenesis of residues important for gp130 activation.

    PubMed Central

    Savino, R; Lahm, A; Salvati, A L; Ciapponi, L; Sporeno, E; Altamura, S; Paonessa, G; Toniatti, C; Ciliberto, G

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) drives the sequential assembly of a receptor complex formed by the IL-6 receptor (IL-6R alpha) and the signal transducing subunit, gp130. A model of human IL-6 (hIL-6) was constructed by homology using the structure of bovine granulocyte colony stimulating factor. The modeled cytokine was predicted to interact sequentially with the cytokine binding domains of IL-6R alpha and gp130 bridging them in a way similar to that of the interaction between growth hormone and its homodimeric receptor. Several residues on helices A and C which were predicted as contact points between IL-6 and gp130 and therefore essential for IL-6 signal transduction, were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis individually or in combined form. Interestingly, while single amino acid changes never produced major alterations in IL-6 bioactivity, a subset of double mutants of Y31 and G35 showed a considerable reduction of biological activity and were selectively impaired from associating with gp130 in binding assays in vitro, while they maintained wild-type affinity towards hIL-6-R alpha. More importantly, we demonstrated the antagonistic effect of mutant Y31D/G35F versus wild-type IL-6. Images PMID:7511100

  5. The significance of disulfide bonding in biological activity of HB-EGF, a mutagenesis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, J.T.; Zhou, Z.; Harding, P.A.

    2008-10-31

    A site-directed mutagenesis approach was taken to disrupt each of 3 disulfide bonds within human HB-EGF by substituting serine for both cysteine residues that contribute to disulfide bonding. Each HB-EGF disulfide analogue (HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121}, HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132}, and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 134/143}) was cloned under the regulation of the mouse metallothionein (MT) promoter and stably expressed in mouse fibroblasts. HB-EGF immunoreactive proteins with M{sub r} of 6.5, 21 and 24 kDa were observed from lysates of HB-EGF and each HB-EGF disulfide analogue. HB-EGF immunohistochemical analyses of each HB-EGF stable cell line demonstrated ubiquitous protein expression except HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121} and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132} stable cell lines which exhibited accumulated expression immediately outside the nucleus. rHB-EGF, HB-EGF, and HB-EGF{sub 134/143} proteins competed with {sup 125}I-EGF in an A431 competitive binding assay, whereas HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121} and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132} failed to compete. Each HB-EGF disulfide analogue lacked the ability to stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of the 170 kDa EGFR. These results suggest that HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 134/143} antagonizes EGFRs.

  6. Partial reactions and chemical rescue of site-directed mutants of Rubisco as mechanistic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Harpel, M.R.; Larimer, F.W.; Lee, E.H.; Mural, R.J.; Smith, H.B.; Soper, T.S.; Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    Given the current state of knowledge of the reaction pathways catalyzed by D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of several different forms of the enzyme, sit-directed mutagenesis offers the potential to decipher catalytic roles of active-site residues and to unravel the functional significance of various structural elements. Especially intriguing are intersubunit, electrostatic interactions at the active site between Glu48 and Lys168 of the nonactivated (noncarbamylated) enzyme and between Glu48 and Lys329 of the activated (carbamylated) enzyme. In this paper, we describe two approaches to address the roles of electrostatic interactions at the active site and the roles of the participant residues: (1) characterization of pertinent site-directed mutants, including their abilities to catalyze partial reactions and (2) subtle alteration of the active-site microenvironment by manipulation of these proteins with exogenous reagents.

  7. Partial reactions and chemical rescue of site-directed mutants of Rubisco as mechanistic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Harpel, M.R.; Larimer, F.W.; Lee, E.H.; Mural, R.J.; Smith, H.B.; Soper, T.S.; Hartman, F.C.

    1991-12-31

    Given the current state of knowledge of the reaction pathways catalyzed by D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of several different forms of the enzyme, sit-directed mutagenesis offers the potential to decipher catalytic roles of active-site residues and to unravel the functional significance of various structural elements. Especially intriguing are intersubunit, electrostatic interactions at the active site between Glu48 and Lys168 of the nonactivated (noncarbamylated) enzyme and between Glu48 and Lys329 of the activated (carbamylated) enzyme. In this paper, we describe two approaches to address the roles of electrostatic interactions at the active site and the roles of the participant residues: (1) characterization of pertinent site-directed mutants, including their abilities to catalyze partial reactions and (2) subtle alteration of the active-site microenvironment by manipulation of these proteins with exogenous reagents.

  8. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  9. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka using custom-designed transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This induction of mutations occurred in a dose-dependent manner. All screened G0 fish injected with the TALENs transmitted the TALEN-induced mutations to the next generation with high efficiency (44-100%). We also confirmed that these TALENs induced site-specific mutations because none of the mutations were found at potential off-target sites. In addition, the DJ-1 protein was lost in DJ-1(Δ7/Δ7) fish that carried a TALEN-induced frameshift mutation in both alleles. We also investigated the effect of the N- and C-terminal regions of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domain on the gene-disrupting activity of DJ1-TALENs and found that 287 amino acids at the N terminus and 63 amino acids at the C terminus of the TAL domain exhibited the highest disrupting activity in the injected embryos. Our results suggest that TALENs enable us to rapidly and efficiently establish knockout medaka strains. This is the first report of targeted mutagenesis in medaka using TALENs. The TALEN technology will expand the potential of medaka as a model system for genetics and genomics.

  10. Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis in Medaka Using Custom-Designed Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This induction of mutations occurred in a dose-dependent manner. All screened G0 fish injected with the TALENs transmitted the TALEN-induced mutations to the next generation with high efficiency (44–100%). We also confirmed that these TALENs induced site-specific mutations because none of the mutations were found at potential off-target sites. In addition, the DJ-1 protein was lost in DJ-1Δ7/Δ7 fish that carried a TALEN-induced frameshift mutation in both alleles. We also investigated the effect of the N- and C-terminal regions of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domain on the gene-disrupting activity of DJ1-TALENs and found that 287 amino acids at the N terminus and 63 amino acids at the C terminus of the TAL domain exhibited the highest disrupting activity in the injected embryos. Our results suggest that TALENs enable us to rapidly and efficiently establish knockout medaka strains. This is the first report of targeted mutagenesis in medaka using TALENs. The TALEN technology will expand the potential of medaka as a model system for genetics and genomics. PMID:23288935

  11. Improving the chitinolytic activity of Bacillus pumilus SG2 by random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vahed, Majid; Motalebi, Ebrahim; Rigi, Garshasb; Akbari Noghabi, Kambiz; Soudi, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Ahmadian, Gholamreza

    2013-11-28

    Bacillus pumilus SG2, a halotolerant strain, expresses two major chitinases designated ChiS and ChiL that were induced by chitin and secreted into the supernatant. The present work aimed to obtain a mutant with higher chitinolytic activity through mutagenesis of Bacillus pumilus SG2 using a combination of UV irradiation and nitrous acid treatment. Following mutagenesis and screening on chitin agar and subsequent formation of halos, the mutated strains were examined for degradation of chitin under different conditions. A mutant designated AV2-9 was selected owing to its higher chitinase activity. To search for possible mutations in the whole operon including ChiS and ChiL, the entire chitinase operon, including the intergenic region, promoter, and two areas corresponding to the ChiS and ChiL ORF, was suquenced. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the complete chitinase operon from the SG2 and AV2-9 strains showed the presence of a mutation in the catalytic domain (GH18) of chitinase (ChiL). The results demonstrated that a single base change had occurred in the ChiL sequence in AV2- 9. The wild-type chitinase, ChiL, and the mutant (designated ChiLm) were cloned, expressed, and purified in E. coli. Both enzymes showed similar profiles of activity at different ranges of pH, NaCl concentration, and temperature, but the mutant enzyme showed approximately 30% higher catalytic activity under all the conditions tested. The results obtained in this study showed that the thermal stability of chitinase increased in the mutant strain. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to predict changes in the stability of proteins caused by mutation.

  12. Mutagenesis of aspartic acid-116 enhances the ribonucleolytic activity and angiogenic potency of angiogenin.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, J W; Vallee, B L

    1988-01-01

    Site-specific mutagenesis of the blood vessel-inducing protein angiogenin has been used to further explore both its homology to pancreatic ribonuclease and the functional roles of particular residues. Replacement of Asp-116 in angiogenin by either asparagine (D116N), alanine (D116A), or histidine (D116H) markedly enhances both its ribonucleolytic activity and angiogenic potency. Activity toward tRNA is 8-, 15-, and 18-fold greater than native angiogenin for D116N-, D116A-, and D116H-angiogenin, respectively. The enzymatic specificity of angiogenin, however, has been maintained. Thus, cleavage of 18S and 28S rRNA by the most active His-116 mutant yields the same pattern of polynucleotide products as from angiogenin, whereas there are only minor alterations in activity with cytidylyl(3',5')adenosine and uridylyl(3',5')-adenosine. Extensive biological assays on the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane demonstrate that D116H-angiogenin is one to two orders of magnitude more potent in inducing neovascularization than native angiogenin, which correlates well with enhanced enzymatic action. These results support the proposition that the enzymatic and angiogenic activities on angiogenin are interrelated. PMID:2459697

  13. HIV-1 Receptor Binding Site-Directed Antibodies Using a VH1-2 Gene Segment Orthologue Are Activated by Env Trimer Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Shridhar; Phad, Ganesh E.; Guenaga, Javier; Wilson, Richard; Soldemo, Martina; McKee, Krisha; Sundling, Christopher; Mascola, John; Li, Yuxing; Wyatt, Richard T.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) isolated from chronically HIV-1 infected individuals reveal important information regarding how antibodies target conserved determinants of the envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike such as the primary receptor CD4 binding site (CD4bs). Many CD4bs-directed bNAbs use the same heavy (H) chain variable (V) gene segment, VH1-2*02, suggesting that activation of B cells expressing this allele is linked to the generation of this type of Ab. Here, we identify the rhesus macaque VH1.23 gene segment to be the closest macaque orthologue to the human VH1-2 gene segment, with 92% homology to VH1-2*02. Of the three amino acids in the VH1-2*02 gene segment that define a motif for VRC01-like antibodies (W50, N58, flanking the HCDR2 region, and R71), the two identified macaque VH1.23 alleles described here encode two. We demonstrate that immunization with soluble Env trimers induced CD4bs-specific VH1.23-using Abs with restricted neutralization breadth. Through alanine scanning and structural studies of one such monoclonal Ab (MAb), GE356, we demonstrate that all three HCDRs are involved in neutralization. This contrasts to the highly potent CD4bs-directed VRC01 class of bNAb, which bind Env predominantly through the HCDR2. Also unlike VRC01, GE356 was minimally modified by somatic hypermutation, its light (L) chain CDRs were of average lengths and it displayed a binding footprint proximal to the trimer axis. These results illustrate that the Env trimer immunogen used here activates B cells encoding a VH1-2 gene segment orthologue, but that the resulting Abs interact distinctly differently with the HIV-1 Env spike compared to VRC01. PMID:25166308

  14. Mutagenesis and behavioral screening for altered circadian activity identifies the mouse mutant, Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pickard, G E; Sollars, P J; Rinchik, E M; Nolan, P M; Bucan, M

    1995-12-24

    The molecular processes underlying the generation of circadian behavior in mammals are virtually unknown. To identify genes that regulate or alter circadian activity rhythms, a mouse mutagenesis program was initiated in conjunction with behavioral screening for alterations in circadian period (tau), a fundamental property of the biological clock. Male mice of the inbred BALB/c strain, treated with the potent mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea were mated with wild-type hybrids. Wheel-running activity of approximately 300 male progeny was monitored for 6-10 weeks under constant dark (DD) conditions. The tau DD of a single mouse (#187) was longer than the population mean by more than three standard deviations (24.20 vs. 23.32 +/- 0.02 h; mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 277). In addition, mouse #187 exhibited other abnormal phenotypes, including hyperactive bi-directional circling/spinning activity and an abnormal response to light. Heterozygous progeny of the founder mouse, generated from outcrossings with wild-type C57BL/6J mice, displayed lengthened tau DD although approximately 20% of the animals showed no wheel-running activity despite being quite active. Under light:dark conditions, all animals displaying circling behavior that ran in the activity wheels exhibited robust wheel-running activity at lights-ON and these animals also showed enhanced wheel-running activity in constant light conditions. The genetic dissection of the complex behavior associated with this mutation was facilitated by the previously described genetic mapping of the mutant locus causing circling behavior, designated Wheels (Whl), to the subcentromeric portion of mouse chromosome 4. In this report, the same locus is shown to be responsible for the abnormal responses to light and presumably for the altered circadian behavior. Characterization of the gene altered in the novel Whl mutation will contribute to understanding the molecular elements involved in mammalian circadian regulation.

  15. Improved somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Moore, Finola E; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Martinez, Sarah A; Blackburn, Jessica S; Khayter, Cyd; Ramirez, Cherie L; Joung, J Keith; Langenau, David M

    2012-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebrafish. We find that TALENs exhibited a higher success rate for obtaining active nucleases capable of inducing mutations than compared with CoDA ZFNs. For example, all six TALENs tested induced DNA mutations at genomic target sites while only a subset of CoDA ZFNs exhibited detectable rates of mutagenesis. TALENs also exhibited higher mutation rates than CoDA ZFNs that had not been pre-screened using a bacterial two-hybrid assay, with DNA mutation rates ranging from 20%-76.8% compared to 1.1%-3.3%. Furthermore, the broader targeting range of TALENs enabled us to induce mutations at the methionine translation start site, sequences that were not targetable using the CoDA ZFN platform. TALENs exhibited similar toxicity to CoDA ZFNs, with >50% of injected animals surviving to 3 days of life. Taken together, our results suggest that TALEN technology provides a robust alternative to CoDA ZFNs for inducing targeted gene-inactivation in zebrafish, making it a preferred technology for creating targeted knockout mutants in zebrafish.

  16. Targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes in Xenopus laevis using two pairs of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been extensively used in genome editing in various organisms. In some cases, however, it is difficult to efficiently disrupt both paralogous genes using a single pair of TALENs in Xenopus laevis because of its polyploidy. Here, we report targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes using two pairs of TALENs in X. laevis. First, we show simultaneous targeted mutagenesis of three genes, tyrosinase paralogues (tyra and tyrb) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) by injection of two TALENs pairs in transgenic embryos carrying egfp. Consistent with the high frequency of both severe phenotypic traits, albinism and loss of GFP fluorescence, frameshift mutation rates of tyr paralogues and egfp reached 40-80%. Next, we show early introduction of TALEN-mediated mutagenesis of these target loci during embryogenesis. Finally, we also demonstrate that two different pairs of TALENs can simultaneously introduce mutations to both paralogues encoding histone chaperone with high efficiency. Our results suggest that targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes using TALENs can be applied to analyze the functions of paralogous genes with redundancy in X. laevis.

  17. Faux Mutagenesis: Teaching Troubleshooting through Controlled Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartberg, Yasha

    2006-01-01

    By shifting pedagogical goals from obtaining successful mutations to teaching students critical troubleshooting skills, it has been possible to introduce site-directed mutagenesis into an undergraduate teaching laboratory. Described in this study is an inexpensive laboratory exercise in which students follow a slightly modified version of…

  18. Combinatorial effect of mutagenesis and medium component optimization on Bacillus amyloliquefaciens antifungal activity and efficacy in eradicating Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Masmoudi, Fatma; Ben Khedher, Saoussen; Kamoun, Amel; Zouari, Nabil; Tounsi, Slim; Trigui, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    This work is directed towards Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain BLB371 metabolite production for biocontrol of fungal phytopathogens. In order to maximise antifungal metabolite production by this strain, two approaches were combined: random mutagenesis and medium component optimization. After three rounds of mutagenesis, a hyper active mutant, named M3-7, was obtained. It produces 7 fold more antifungal metabolites (1800AU/mL) than the wild strain in MC medium. A hybrid design was applied to optimise a new medium to enhance antifungal metabolite production by M3-7. The new optimized medium (35g/L of peptone, 32.5g/L of sucrose, 10.5g/L of yeast extract, 2.4g/L of KH2PO4, 1.3g/L of MgSO4 and 23mg/L of MnSO4) achieved 1.62 fold enhancement in antifungal compound production (3000AU/mL) by this mutant, compared to that achieved in MC medium. Therefore, combinatory effect of these two approaches (mutagenesis and medium component optimization) allowed 12 fold improvement in antifungal activity (from 250UA/mL to 3000UA/mL). This improvement was confirmed against several phytopathogenic fungi with an increase of MIC and MFC over than 50%. More interestingly, a total eradication of gray mold was obtained on tomato fruits infected by Botrytis cinerea and treated by M3-7, compared to those treated by BLB371. From the practical point of view, combining random mutagenesis and medium optimization could be considered as an excellent tool for obtaining promising biological products useful against phytopathogenic fungi.

  19. Extensive mutagenesis of a transcriptional activation domain identifies single hydrophobic and acidic amino acids important for activation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, M B; Goff, S A; Chandler, V L

    1997-01-01

    C1 is a transcriptional activator of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes of the maize anthocyanin pigment pathway. C1 has an amino terminus homologous to Myb DNA-binding domains and an acidic carboxyl terminus that is a transcriptional activation domain in maize and yeast cells. To identify amino acids critical for transcriptional activation, an extensive random mutagenesis of the C1 carboxyl terminus was done. The C1 activation domain is remarkably tolerant of amino acid substitutions, as changes at 34 residues had little or no effect on transcriptional activity. These changes include introduction of helix-incompatible amino acids throughout the C1 activation domain and alteration of most single acidic amino acids, suggesting that a previously postulated amphipathic alpha-helix is not required for activation. Substitutions at two positions revealed amino acids important for transcriptional activation. Replacement of leucine 253 with a proline or glutamine resulted in approximately 10% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Leucine 253 is in a region of C1 in which several hydrophobic residues align with residues important for transcriptional activation by the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. However, changes at all other hydrophobic residues in C1 indicate that none are critical for C1 transcriptional activation. The other important amino acid in C1 is aspartate 262, as a change to valine resulted in only 24% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Comparison of our C1 results with those from VP16 reveal substantial differences in which amino acids are required for transcriptional activation in vivo by these two acidic activation domains. PMID:8972191

  20. Coronaviruses lacking exoribonuclease activity are susceptible to lethal mutagenesis: evidence for proofreading and potential therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Blanc, Hervé; Surdel, Matthew C; Vignuzzi, Marco; Denison, Mark R

    2013-08-01

    No therapeutics or vaccines currently exist for human coronaviruses (HCoVs). The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) epidemic in 2002-2003, and the recent emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in April 2012, emphasize the high probability of future zoonotic HCoV emergence causing severe and lethal human disease. Additionally, the resistance of SARS-CoV to ribavirin (RBV) demonstrates the need to define new targets for inhibition of CoV replication. CoVs express a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease in nonstructural protein 14 (nsp14-ExoN) that is required for high-fidelity replication and is conserved across the CoV family. All genetic and biochemical data support the hypothesis that nsp14-ExoN has an RNA proofreading function. Thus, we hypothesized that ExoN is responsible for CoV resistance to RNA mutagens. We demonstrate that while wild-type (ExoN+) CoVs were resistant to RBV and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), CoVs lacking ExoN activity (ExoN-) were up to 300-fold more sensitive. While the primary antiviral activity of RBV against CoVs was not mutagenesis, ExoN- CoVs treated with 5-FU demonstrated both enhanced sensitivity during multi-cycle replication, as well as decreased specific infectivity, consistent with 5-FU functioning as a mutagen. Comparison of full-genome next-generation sequencing of 5-FU treated SARS-CoV populations revealed a 16-fold increase in the number of mutations within the ExoN- population as compared to ExoN+. Ninety percent of these mutations represented A:G and U:C transitions, consistent with 5-FU incorporation during RNA synthesis. Together our results constitute direct evidence that CoV ExoN activity provides a critical proofreading function during virus replication. Furthermore, these studies identify ExoN as the first viral protein distinct from the RdRp that determines the sensitivity of RNA viruses to mutagens. Finally, our results show the importance of ExoN as a target for inhibition

  1. Intramolecular relationships in cholinesterases revealed by oocyte expression of site-directed and natural variants of human BCHE.

    PubMed Central

    Neville, L F; Gnatt, A; Loewenstein, Y; Seidman, S; Ehrlich, G; Soreq, H

    1992-01-01

    Structure-function relationships of cholinesterases (CHEs) were studied by expressing site-directed and naturally occurring mutants of human butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE) in microinjected Xenopus oocytes. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved electronegative Glu441,Ile442,Glu443 domain to Gly441,Ile442,Gln443 drastically reduced the rate of butyrylthiocholine (BTCh) hydrolysis and caused pronounced resistance to dibucaine binding. These findings implicate the charged Glu441,Ile442,Glu443 domain as necessary for a functional CHE catalytic triad as well as for binding quinoline derivatives. Asp70 to Gly substitution characteristic of 'atypical' BCHE, failed to alter its Km towards BTCh or dibucaine binding but reduced hydrolytic activity to 25% of control. Normal hydrolytic activity was restored to Gly70 BCHE by additional His114 or Tyr561 mutations, both of which co-appear with Gly70 in natural BCHE variants, which implies a likely selection advantage for these double BCHE mutants over the single Gly70 BCHE variant. Gly70 BCHE variants also displayed lower binding as compared with Asp70 BCHE to cholinergic drugs, certain choline esters and solanidine. These effects were ameliorated in part by additional mutations or in binding solanidine complexed with sugar residues. These observations indicate that structural interactions exist between N' and C' terminal domains in CHEs which contribute to substrate and inhibitor binding and suggest a crucial involvement of both electrostatic and hydrophobic domains in the build-up of the CHE active center. Images PMID:1373381

  2. Efficient mutagenesis by Cas9 protein-mediated oligonucleotide insertion and large-scale assessment of single-guide RNAs.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, James A; Valen, Eivind; Thyme, Summer B; Huang, Peng; Akhmetova, Laila; Ahkmetova, Laila; Pauli, Andrea; Montague, Tessa G; Zimmerman, Steven; Richter, Constance; Schier, Alexander F

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been implemented in a variety of model organisms to mediate site-directed mutagenesis. A wide range of mutation rates has been reported, but at a limited number of genomic target sites. To uncover the rules that govern effective Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in zebrafish, we targeted over a hundred genomic loci for mutagenesis using a streamlined and cloning-free method. We generated mutations in 85% of target genes with mutation rates varying across several orders of magnitude, and identified sequence composition rules that influence mutagenesis. We increased rates of mutagenesis by implementing several novel approaches. The activities of poor or unsuccessful single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) initiating with a 5' adenine were improved by rescuing 5' end homogeneity of the sgRNA. In some cases, direct injection of Cas9 protein/sgRNA complex further increased mutagenic activity. We also observed that low diversity of mutant alleles led to repeated failure to obtain frame-shift mutations. This limitation was overcome by knock-in of a stop codon cassette that ensured coding frame truncation. Our improved methods and detailed protocols make Cas9-mediated mutagenesis an attractive approach for labs of all sizes.

  3. Thermostability enhancement of cellobiose 2-epimerase from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus by site-directed mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellobiose 2-epimerase from the thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus (CsCE) catalyzes the isomerization of lactose into lactulose, a non-digestible disaccharide widely used in food and pharmaceutical industries. Semi-rational approaches were applied to enhance the thermostability of CsCE...

  4. In vivo analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HO nuclease recognition site by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, J A; Singer, J D; Heffron, F

    1990-01-01

    HO nuclease introduces a specific double-strand break in the mating-type locus (MAT) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, initiating mating-type interconversion. To define the sequence recognized by HO nuclease, random mutations were produced in a 30-base-pair region homologous to either MAT alpha or MATa by a chemical synthesis procedure. The mutant sites were introduced into S. cerevisiae on a shuttle vector and tested for the ability to stimulate recombination in an assay that mimics mating-type interconversion. The results suggest that a core of 8 noncontiguous bases near the Y-Z junction of MAT is essential for HO nuclease to bind and cleave its recognition site. Other contacts must be required because substrates that contain several mutations outside an intact core reduce or eliminate cleavage in vivo. The results show that HO site recognition is a complex phenomenon, similar to promoter-polymerase interactions. Images PMID:2406563

  5. Specific mutagenesis of a chlorophyll-binding protein. Progress report.

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton-Rye, Dr., Julian; Shen, Gaozhong

    1990-01-01

    During the first phase of the project regarding specific mutagenesis of the chlorophyll-binding protein CP47 in photosystem II (PS II) most of the time has been devoted to (1) establishment of an optimal procedure for the reintroduction of psbB (the gene encoding CP47) carrying a site-directed mutation into the experimental organism, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, (2) preparations for site-directed mutagenesis, and (3) creation and analysis of chimaeric spinach/cyanobacterial CP47 mutants of Synechocystis. In the coming year, psbB constructs with site-directed mutations in potential chlorophyll-binding regions of CP47 will be introduced into the Synechocystis genome, and site-directed mutants will be characterized according to procedures described in the original project description. In addition, analysis of chimaeric CP47 mutants will be continued.

  6. Random mutagenesis improves the low-temperature activity of the tetrameric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michika; Uno, Mayumi; Akanuma, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2008-12-01

    In general, the enzymes of thermophilic organisms are more resistant to thermal denaturation than are those of mesophilic or psychrophilic organisms. Further, as is true for their mesophilic and psychrophilic counterparts, the activities of thermophilic enzymes are smaller at temperatures that are less than the optimal temperature. In an effort to characterize the properties that would improve its activity at temperatures less than the optimal, we subjected the thermostable Sulfolobus tokodaii (S. tokodaii) 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase to two rounds of random mutagenesis and selected for improved low-temperature activity using an in vivo recombinant Escherichia coli system. Five dehydrogenase mutants were purified and their catalytic properties and thermostabilities characterized. The mutations favorably affect the K(m) values for NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and/or the k(cat) values. The results of thermal stability measurements show that, although the mutations somewhat decrease the stability of the enzyme, the mutants are still very resistant to heat. The locations and properties of the mutations found for the S. tokodaii enzyme are compared with those found for the previously isolated low-temperature adapted mutants of the homologous Thermus thermophilus enzyme. However, there are few, if any, common properties that enhance the low-temperature activities of both enzymes; therefore, there may be many ways to improve the low-temperature catalytic activity of a thermostable enzyme.

  7. Random mutagenesis of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 trans-activator of transcription (HIV-1 Tat).

    PubMed Central

    Siderovski, D P; Matsuyama, T; Frigerio, E; Chui, S; Min, X; Erfle, H; Sumner-Smith, M; Barnett, R W; Mak, T W

    1992-01-01

    A new method is described for the direct construction of randomly mutagenized genes by applying the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to an oligonucleotide synthesized using doped nucleotide reservoirs. We have demonstrated the utility of this method by generating a library of mutant HIV-1 tat genes. Several arbitrarily selected, inactive tat clones were sequenced to evaluate the extent of the mutagenesis. Moreover, fourteen recombinants encoding varying levels of transcriptional trans-activator activity were isolated by transient transfection of sub-library pools into a HeLa cell line bearing an HIV-LTR-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene. Sequence data revealed a spectrum of alterations including nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions, suggesting that mutations arose from both the doped DNA synthesis and the subsequent PCR 'rescue' of full-length product. Sequence comparison between inactive and active Tat clones revealed a selection pressure against amino-acid substitutions within the N-terminal domains of Tat, indicating the importance of this region to trans-activation competence. In addition, single and double missense mutations within the basic-rich, TAR RNA-binding domain were seen to be tolerated within active Tat clones. Images PMID:1437550

  8. Mechanistic Insights into the Bifunctional Non-Heme Iron Oxygenase Carbapenem Synthase by Active Site Saturation Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Ryan M.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    The carbapenem class of β-lactam antibiotics is known for its remarkable potency, antibacterial spectrum and resistance to β-lactamase-mediated inactivation. While the biosynthesis of structurally “complex” carbapenems, such as thienamycin, share initial biochemical steps with carbapenem-3-carboxylate (“simple” carbapenem), the requisite inversion at C5 and formation of the characteristic α,β-unsaturated carboxylate are different in origin between the two groups. Here we consider carbapenem synthase, a mechanistically distinct bifunctional non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate-dependent enzyme responsible for the terminal reactions, C5 epimerization and desaturation, in simple carbapenem production. Interestingly, this enzyme accepts two stereoisomeric substrates and transforms each to a common active antibiotic. Owing both to enzyme and product instability, resort to saturation mutagenesis of active site and selected second-sphere residues gave clearly differing profiles of CarC tolerance to structural modification. Guided by a crystal structure and the mutational data, in silico docking was used to suggest the positioning of each disastereomeric substrate in the active site. The two orientations relative to the reactive iron-oxo center are manifest in the two distinct reactions, C5-epimerization and C2/3-desaturation. These observations favor a two-step reaction scheme involving two complete oxidative cycles as opposed to a single catalytic cycle in which an active site tyrosine, Tyr67, after hydrogen donation to achieve bicyclic ring inversion, is further hypothesized to serve as a radical carrier. PMID:23611403

  9. Active conformation of the erythropoietin receptor: random and cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of the extracellular juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-17

    In the absence of erythropoietin (Epo) cell surface Epo receptors (EpoR) are dimeric; dimerization is mediated mainly by the transmembrane domain. Binding of Epo changes the orientation of the two receptor subunits. This conformational change is transmitted through the juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase and induction of proliferation and survival signals. To define the active EpoR conformation(s) we screened libraries of EpoRs with random mutations in the transmembrane domain and identified several point mutations that activate the EpoR in the absence of ligand, including changes of either of the first two transmembrane domain residues (Leu(226) and Ile(227)) to cysteine. Following this discovery, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis in the EpoR juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains. Many mutants formed disulfide-linked receptor dimers, but only EpoR dimers linked by cysteines at positions 223, 226, or 227 activated EpoR signal transduction pathways and supported proliferation of Ba/F3 cells in the absence of cytokines. These data suggest that activation of dimeric EpoR by Epo binding is achieved by reorienting the EpoR transmembrane and the connected cytosolic domains and that certain disulfide-bonded dimers represent the activated dimeric conformation of the EpoR, constitutively activating downstream signaling. Based on our data and the previously determined structure of Epo bound to a dimer of the EpoR extracellular domain, we present a model of the active and inactive conformations of the Epo receptor.

  10. Design, evaluation, and screening methods for efficient targeted mutagenesis with transcription activator-like effector nucleases in medaka.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Inohaya, Keiji; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Schartl, Manfred; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has become a powerful technology for reverse genetics. In this study, we have described efficient detection methods for TALEN-induced mutations at endogenous loci and presented guidelines of TALEN design for efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka, Oryzias latipes. We performed a heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) using an automated microchip electrophoresis system, which is a simple and high-throughput method for evaluation of in vivo activity of TALENs and for genotyping mutant fish of F1 or later generations. We found that a specific pattern of mutations is dominant for TALENs harboring several base pairs of homologous sequences in target sequence. Furthermore, we found that a 5' T, upstream of each TALEN-binding sequence, is not essential for genomic DNA cleavage. Our findings provide information that expands the potential of TALENs and other engineered nucleases as tools for targeted genome editing in a wide range of organisms, including medaka.

  11. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were also identified. Interestingly, many nonspecific substitutions in the N-terminal half of the active site omega loop were found to increase ceftazidime hydrolytic activity and decrease ampicillin hydrolytic activity. To complete the active sight study, eight additional random libraries were constructed and screened for specificity-altering mutations. All additional substitutions found to alter the substrate specificity were located in the C-terminal half of the active site loop. These mutants, much like the N-terminal omega loop mutants, appear to be less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Further analysis of a 165-YYG-167 triple mutant, selected for high levels of ceftazidime hydrolytic activity, provides an example of the correlation which exists between enzyme instability and increased ceftazidime hydrolytic activity in the ceftazidime-selected omega loop mutants. PMID:8606154

  12. Saturation Mutagenesis of Lysine 12 Leads to the Identification of Derivatives of Nisin A with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Evelyn M.; Field, Des; Connor, Paula M. O'.; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that innovations from the “golden age” of antibiotics are becoming ineffective, resulting in a pressing need for novel therapeutics. The bacteriocin family of antimicrobial peptides has attracted much attention in recent years as a source of potential alternatives. The most intensively studied bacteriocin is nisin, a broad spectrum lantibiotic that inhibits Gram-positive bacteria including important food pathogens and clinically relevant antibiotic resistant bacteria. Nisin is gene-encoded and, as such, is amenable to peptide bioengineering, facilitating the generation of novel derivatives that can be screened for desirable properties. It was to this end that we used a site-saturation mutagenesis approach to create a bank of producers of nisin A derivatives that differ with respect to the identity of residue 12 (normally lysine; K12). A number of these producers exhibited enhanced bioactivity and the nisin A K12A producer was deemed of greatest interest. Subsequent investigations with the purified antimicrobial highlighted the enhanced specific activity of this modified nisin against representative target strains from the genera Streptococcus, Bacillus, Lactococcus, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus. PMID:23505531

  13. Cyclin A2 Mutagenesis Analysis: A New Insight into CDK Activation and Cellular Localization Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Bendris, Nawal; Lemmers, Bénédicte; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Arsic, Nikola

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin A2 is essential at two critical points in the somatic cell cycle: during S phase, when it activates CDK2, and during the G2 to M transition when it activates CDK1. Based on the crystal structure of Cyclin A2 in association with CDKs, we generated a panel of mutants to characterize the specific amino acids required for partner binding, CDK activation and subcellular localization. We find that CDK1, CDK2, p21, p27 and p107 have overlapping but distinct requirements for association with this protein. Our data highlight the crucial importance of the N-terminal α helix, in conjunction with the α3 helix within the cyclin box, in activating CDK. Several Cyclin A2 mutants selectively bind to either CDK1 or CDK2. We demonstrate that association of Cyclin A2 to proteins such as CDK2 that was previously suggested as crucial is not a prerequisite for its nuclear localization, and we propose that the whole protein structure is involved. PMID:21829545

  14. Structure, recombinant expression and mutagenesis studies of the catalase with oxidase activity from Scytalidium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Yuzugullu, Yonca; Trinh, Chi H; Smith, Mark A; Pearson, Arwen R; Phillips, Simon E V; Sutay Kocabas, Didem; Bakir, Ufuk; Ogel, Zumrut B; McPherson, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    Scytalidium thermophilum produces a catalase with phenol oxidase activity (CATPO) that catalyses the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water and also oxidizes various phenolic compounds. A codon-optimized catpo gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The crystal structures of native and recombinant S. thermophilum CATPO and two variants, H82N and V123F, were determined at resolutions of 2.7, 1.4, 1.5 and 1.9 Å, respectively. The structure of CATPO reveals a homotetramer with 698 residues per subunit and with strong structural similarity to Penicillium vitale catalase. The haem component is cis-hydroxychlorin γ-spirolactone, which is rotated 180° with respect to small-subunit catalases. The haem-binding pocket contains two highly conserved water molecules on the distal side. The H82N mutation resulted in conversion of the native d-type haem to a b-type haem. Kinetic studies of the H82N and V123F mutants indicate that both activities are likely to be associated with the haem centre and suggest that the secondary oxidase activity may be a general feature of catalases in the absence of hydrogen peroxide.

  15. A low-toxic site-directed mutant of Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin as a potential candidate vaccine against enterotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Xin, Wenwen; Gao, Shan; Kang, Lin; Wang, Jinglin

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), one of the most potent toxins known, is a potential biological weapon; therefore, the development of an effective vaccine is important for preventing intoxication or disease by ETX. In this study, genetically detoxified epsilon toxin mutants were developed as candidate vaccines. We used site-directed mutagenesis to mutate the essential amino acid residues (His106, Ser111 and Phe199). Six site-directed mutants of ETX (mETXH106P, mETXS111H, mETXS111Y, mETXF199H, mETXF199E, mETXS111YF199E) were generated and then expressed in Escherichia coli. Both mETXF199E and mETXH106P with low or non-cytotoxicity that retained their immunogenicity were selected to immunize mice 3 times, and the mouse survival data were recorded after challenging with recombinant wild-type ETX. mETXF199E induces the same protection as mETXH106P, which was reported previously as a promising toxin mutant for vaccine, and both of them could protect immunized mice against a 100× LD50 dose of active wild-type recombinant ETX. This work showed that mETXF199E is another promising candidate vaccine against enterotoxemia and other diseases caused by ETX. PMID:23835363

  16. Structure-guided mutagenesis reveals a hierarchical mechanism of Parkin activation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Matthew Y.; Vranas, Marta; Krahn, Andrea I.; Pundlik, Shayal; Trempe, Jean- François; Fon, Edward A.

    2017-01-01

    Parkin and PINK1 function in a common pathway to clear damaged mitochondria. Parkin exists in an auto-inhibited conformation stabilized by multiple interdomain interactions. The binding of PINK1-generated phospho-ubiquitin and the phosphorylation of the ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domain of Parkin at Ser65 release its auto-inhibition, but how and when these events take place in cells remain to be defined. Here we show that mutations that we designed to activate Parkin by releasing the Repressor Element of Parkin (REP) domain, or by disrupting the interface between the RING0:RING2 domains, can completely rescue mutations in the Parkin Ubl that are defective in mitochondrial autophagy. Using a FRET reporter assay we show that Parkin undergoes a conformational change upon phosphorylation that can be mimicked by mutating Trp403 in the REP. We propose a hierarchical model whereby pUb binding on mitochondria enables Parkin phosphorylation, which, in turn, leads to REP removal, E3 ligase activation and mitophagy. PMID:28276439

  17. Molecular mutagenesis of ppGpp: turning a RelA activator into an inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Beljantseva, Jelena; Kudrin, Pavel; Jimmy, Steffi; Ehn, Marcel; Pohl, Radek; Varik, Vallo; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Shingler, Victoria; Tenson, Tanel; Rejman, Dominik; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2017-01-01

    The alarmone nucleotide (p)ppGpp is a key regulator of bacterial metabolism, growth, stress tolerance and virulence, making (p)ppGpp-mediated signaling a promising target for development of antibacterials. Although ppGpp itself is an activator of the ribosome-associated ppGpp synthetase RelA, several ppGpp mimics have been developed as RelA inhibitors. However promising, the currently available ppGpp mimics are relatively inefficient, with IC50 in the sub-mM range. In an attempt to identify a potent and specific inhibitor of RelA capable of abrogating (p)ppGpp production in live bacterial cells, we have tested a targeted nucleotide library using a biochemical test system comprised of purified Escherichia coli components. While none of the compounds fulfilled this aim, the screen has yielded several potentially useful molecular tools for biochemical and structural work. PMID:28157202

  18. Identification of amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity of gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867.

    PubMed

    Chua, C H; Feng, Y; Yeo, C C; Khoo, H E; Poh, C L

    2001-10-16

    Gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (GDO, EC 1.13.11.4) is a ring cleavage enzyme that utilizes gentisate as a substrate yielding maleylpyruvate as the ring fission product. Mutant GDOs were generated by both random mutagenesis and site-directed mutagenesis of the gene cloned from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867. Alignment of known GDO sequences indicated the presence of a conserved central core region. Mutations generated within this central core resulted in the complete loss of enzyme activity whereas mutations in the flanking regions yielded GDOs with enzyme activities that were reduced by up to 78%. Site-directed mutagenesis was also performed on a pair of highly conserved HRH and HXH motifs found within this core region. Conversion of these His residues to Asp resulted in the complete loss of catalytic activity. Mutagenesis within the core region could have affected quaternary structure formation as well as cofactor binding. A mutant enzyme with increased catalytic activities was also characterized.

  19. Carnosol, a Constituent of Zyflamend, Inhibits Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Mediated Activation of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 Transcription and Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mohebati, Arash; Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kochhar, Amit; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated member of the basic-helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, plays a significant role in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) induced carcinogenesis. In the upper aerodigestive tract of humans, tobacco smoke, a source of PAHs, activates the AhR leading to increased expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, which encode proteins that convert PAHs to genotoxic metabolites. Inhibitors of Hsp90 ATPase cause a rapid decrease in levels of AhR, an Hsp90 client protein, and thereby block PAH-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1. The main objective of this study was to determine whether Zyflamend, a polyherbal preparation, suppressed PAH-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 and inhibited DNA adduct formation and mutagenesis. We also investigated whether carnosol, one of multiple phenolic antioxidants in Zyflamend, had similar inhibitory effects. Treatment of cell lines derived from oral leukoplakia (MSK-Leuk1) and skin (HaCaT) with benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a prototypic PAH, induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 transcription, resulting in enhanced levels of message and protein. Both Zyflamend and carnosol suppressed these effects of B[a]P. Notably, both Zyflamend and carnosol inhibited Hsp90 ATPase activity and caused a rapid reduction in AhR levels. The formation of B[a]P induced DNA adducts and mutagenesis were also inhibited by Zyflamend and carnosol. Collectively, these results show that Zyflamend and carnosol inhibit Hsp90 ATPase leading to reduced levels of AhR, suppression of B[a]P-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 and inhibition of mutagenesis. Carnosol-mediated inhibition of Hsp90 ATPase activity can help explain the chemopreventive activity of herbs such as Rosemary, which contain this phenolic antioxidant. PMID:22374940

  20. Escherichia coli UmuC active site mutants: effects on translesion DNA synthesis, mutagenesis and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Kuban, Wojciech; Vaisman, Alexandra; McDonald, John P.; Karata, Kiyonobu; Yang, Wei; Goodman, Myron F.; Woodgate, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli polymerase V (pol V/UmuD'2C) is a low-fidelity DNA polymerase that has recently been shown to avidly incorporate ribonucleotides (rNTPs) into undamaged DNA. The fidelity and sugar selectivity of pol V can be modified by missense mutations around the “steric gate” of UmuC. Here, we analyze the ability of three steric gate mutants of UmuC to facilitate translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) of a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) in vitro, and to promote UV-induced mutagenesis and cell survival in vivo. The pol V (UmuC_F10L) mutant discriminates against rNTP and incorrect dNTP incorporation much better than wild-type pol V and although exhibiting a reduced ability to bypass a CPD in vitro, does so with high-fidelity and consequently produces minimal UV-induced mutagenesis in vivo. In contrast, pol V (UmuC_Y11A) readily misincorporates both rNTPs and dNTPs during efficient TLS of the CPD in vitro. However, cells expressing umuD'C (Y11A) were considerably more UV-sensitive and exhibited lower levels of UV-induced mutagenesis than cells expressing wild-type umuD'C or umuD'C (Y11F). We propose that the increased UV-sensitivity and reduced UV-mutability of umuD'C (Y11A) is due to excessive incorporation of rNTPs during TLS that are subsequently targeted for repair, rather than an inability to traverse UV-induced lesions. PMID:22784977

  1. Active site directed irreversible inactivation of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase by the conjugated substrate analogue (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid: development of a suicide substrate.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Jordan, F

    1983-08-02

    (E)-4-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid (CPB) was found to irreversibly inactivate brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1) in a biphasic, sigmoidal manner, as is found for the kinetic behavior of substrate. An expression was derived for two-site irreversible inhibition of allosteric enzymes, and the kinetic behavior of CPB fit the expression for two-site binding. The calculated Ki's of 0.7 mM and 0.3 mM for CPB were assigned to the catalytic site and the regulatory site, respectively. The presence of pyruvic acid at high concentrations protected PDC from inactivation, whereas low concentrations of pyruvic acid accelerated inactivation by CPB. Pyruvamide, a known allosteric activator of PDC, was found to enhance inactivation by CPB. The results can be explained if pyruvamide binds only to a regulatory site, but CPB and pyruvic acid compete for both the regulatory and the catalytic centers. [1-14C]CPB was found to lose 14CO2 concurrently with the inactivation of the enzyme. Therefore, CPB was being turned over by PDC, in addition to inactivating it. CPB can be labeled a suicide-type inactivator for PDC.

  2. Saturation mutagenesis of selected residues of the α-peptide of the lantibiotic lacticin 3147 yields a derivative with enhanced antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Field, Des; Molloy, Evelyn M; Iancu, Catalin; Draper, Lorraine A; O' Connor, Paula M; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2013-01-01

    Summary The lantibiotic lacticin 3147 consists of two ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified antimicrobial peptides, Ltnα and Ltnβ, which act synergistically against a wide range of Gram-positive microorganisms. We performed saturation mutagenesis of specific residues of Ltnα to determine their functional importance. The results establish that Ltnα is more tolerant to change than previously suggested by alanine scanning mutagenesis. One substitution, LtnαH23S, was identified which improved the specific activity of lacticin 3147 against one pathogenic strain, Staphylococcus aureus NCDO1499. This represents the first occasion upon which the activity of a two peptide lantibiotic has been enhanced through bioengineering. Funding Information Work in the authors' laboratory is supported by the Irish Government under the National Development Plan; by the Irish Research Council for Science Engineering and Technology (IRCSET); by Enterprise Ireland; and by Science Foundation Ireland (SFI), through the Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) at University College Cork, Ireland, which is supported by the SFI-funded Centre for Science, Engineering and Technology (SFI-CSET) and provided P.D.C., C.H and R.P.R. with SFI Principal Investigator funding. PMID:23433070

  3. TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination Produces Site-Directed DNA Base Change and Herbicide-Resistant Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Liu, Bo; Chen, Chih Ying; Yang, Bing

    2016-05-20

    Over the last decades, much endeavor has been made to advance genome editing technology due to its promising role in both basic and synthetic biology. The breakthrough has been made in recent years with the advent of sequence-specific endonucleases, especially zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) guided nucleases (e.g., Cas9). In higher eukaryotic organisms, site-directed mutagenesis usually can be achieved through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair to the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) caused by the exogenously applied nucleases. However, site-specific gene replacement or genuine genome editing through homologous recombination (HR) repair to DSBs remains a challenge. As a proof of concept gene replacement through TALEN-based HR in rice (Oryza sativa), we successfully produced double point mutations in rice acetolactate synthase gene (OsALS) and generated herbicide resistant rice lines by using TALENs and donor DNA carrying the desired mutations. After ballistic delivery into rice calli of TALEN construct and donor DNA, nine HR events with different genotypes of OsALS were obtained in T0 generation at the efficiency of 1.4%-6.3% from three experiments. The HR-mediated gene edits were heritable to the progeny of T1 generation. The edited T1 plants were as morphologically normal as the control plants while displayed strong herbicide resistance. The results demonstrate the feasibility of TALEN-mediated genome editing in rice and provide useful information for further genome editing by other nuclease-based genome editing platforms.

  4. Simple and efficient oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis using one primer and circular plasmid DNA template.

    PubMed

    Marotti, K R; Tomich, C S

    1989-01-01

    A rapid and simple procedure for site-directed mutagenesis is described. This method uses only a single oligonucleotide primer with the double-stranded circular plasmid DNA as the template for mutagenesis. The phage T4 gene 32 product is included during primer extension in vitro to increase efficiency. Single and multiple changes as well as deletions have been obtained at an efficiency of 1-2%.

  5. In silico functional dissection of saturation mutagenesis: Interpreting the relationship between phenotypes and changes in protein stability, interactions and activity

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Douglas E. V.; Chen, Jing; Blundell, Tom L.; Ascher, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite interest in associating polymorphisms with clinical or experimental phenotypes, functional interpretation of mutation data has lagged behind generation of data from modern high-throughput techniques and the accurate prediction of the molecular impact of a mutation remains a non-trivial task. We present here an integrated knowledge-driven computational workflow designed to evaluate the effects of experimental and disease missense mutations on protein structure and interactions. We exemplify its application with analyses of saturation mutagenesis of DBR1 and Gal4 and show that the experimental phenotypes for over 80% of the mutations correlate well with predicted effects of mutations on protein stability and RNA binding affinity. We also show that analysis of mutations in VHL using our workflow provides valuable insights into the effects of mutations, and their links to the risk of developing renal carcinoma. Taken together the analyses of the three examples demonstrate that structural bioinformatics tools, when applied in a systematic, integrated way, can rapidly analyse a given system to provide a powerful approach for predicting structural and functional effects of thousands of mutations in order to reveal molecular mechanisms leading to a phenotype. Missense or non-synonymous mutations are nucleotide substitutions that alter the amino acid sequence of a protein. Their effects can range from modifying transcription, translation, processing and splicing, localization, changing stability of the protein, altering its dynamics or interactions with other proteins, nucleic acids and ligands, including small molecules and metal ions. The advent of high-throughput techniques including sequencing and saturation mutagenesis has provided large amounts of phenotypic data linked to mutations. However, one of the hurdles has been understanding and quantifying the effects of a particular mutation, and how they translate into a given phenotype. One approach to overcome

  6. In silico functional dissection of saturation mutagenesis: Interpreting the relationship between phenotypes and changes in protein stability, interactions and activity.

    PubMed

    Pires, Douglas E V; Chen, Jing; Blundell, Tom L; Ascher, David B

    2016-01-22

    Despite interest in associating polymorphisms with clinical or experimental phenotypes, functional interpretation of mutation data has lagged behind generation of data from modern high-throughput techniques and the accurate prediction of the molecular impact of a mutation remains a non-trivial task. We present here an integrated knowledge-driven computational workflow designed to evaluate the effects of experimental and disease missense mutations on protein structure and interactions. We exemplify its application with analyses of saturation mutagenesis of DBR1 and Gal4 and show that the experimental phenotypes for over 80% of the mutations correlate well with predicted effects of mutations on protein stability and RNA binding affinity. We also show that analysis of mutations in VHL using our workflow provides valuable insights into the effects of mutations, and their links to the risk of developing renal carcinoma. Taken together the analyses of the three examples demonstrate that structural bioinformatics tools, when applied in a systematic, integrated way, can rapidly analyse a given system to provide a powerful approach for predicting structural and functional effects of thousands of mutations in order to reveal molecular mechanisms leading to a phenotype. Missense or non-synonymous mutations are nucleotide substitutions that alter the amino acid sequence of a protein. Their effects can range from modifying transcription, translation, processing and splicing, localization, changing stability of the protein, altering its dynamics or interactions with other proteins, nucleic acids and ligands, including small molecules and metal ions. The advent of high-throughput techniques including sequencing and saturation mutagenesis has provided large amounts of phenotypic data linked to mutations. However, one of the hurdles has been understanding and quantifying the effects of a particular mutation, and how they translate into a given phenotype. One approach to overcome

  7. Structural Motif-Based Homology Modeling of CYP27A1 and Site-Directed Mutational Analyses Affecting Vitamin D Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, David E.; Guo, YuDing; Jia, Zongchao; Jones, Glenville

    2006-01-01

    Human CYP27A1 is a mitochondrial cytochrome P450, which is principally found in the liver and plays important roles in the biological activation of vitamin D3 and in the biosynthesis of bile acids. We have applied a systematic analysis of hydrogen bonding patterns in 11 prokaryotic and mammalian CYP crystal structures to construct a homology-based model of CYP27A1. Docking of vitamin D3 structures into the active site of this model identified potential substrate contact residues in the F-helix, the β-3 sheet, and the β-5 sheet. Site-directed mutagenesis and expression in COS-1 cells confirmed that these positions affect enzymatic activity, in some cases shifting metabolism of 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 to favor 25- or 27-hydroxylation. The results suggest that conserved hydrophobic residues in the β-5 hairpin help define the shape of the substrate binding cavity and that this structure interacts with Phe-248 in the F-helix. Mutations directed toward the β-3a strand suggested a possible heme-binding interaction centered on Asn-403 and a structural role for substrate contact residues Thr-402 and Ser-404. PMID:16500955

  8. Kinetic studies of site-directed mutational isomalto-dextranase-catalyzed hydrolytic reactions on a 27 MHz quartz-crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Nihira, Takanori; Mizuno, Masahiro; Tonozuka, Takashi; Sakano, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Toshiaki; Okahata, Yoshio

    2005-07-12

    A quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) technique was applied to analyze effects of site-directed mutagenesis of a glycosidase (isomalto-dextranase) on the hydrolysis mechanism of the substrate binding (k(on), k(off), and K(d)) and the catalytic process (k(cat)), separately, by using a dextran-immobilized QCM in buffer solution. D266N, D198N, and D313N mutants, which are predicted as critical residues of the isomalto-dextranase hydrolytic activity, dramatically decreased the apparent enzyme activity. The D266N mutant, however, did not change the substrate binding ability (K(d)), and the D198N and D313N mutants largely increased K(d) values due to the increase of k(off) and/or the decrease of k(on) values, as well as the negatively small k(cat) values. From these results, we estimate the reaction mechanism, in which Asp266 acts as only a general acid in the catalytic process, Asp198 acts as both nucleophile in the catalytic process and binding the substrate, and Asp313 acts as only the substrate binding.

  9. Rational and random mutagenesis of firefly luciferase to identify an efficient emitter of red bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchini, Bruce R.; Southworth, Tara L.; Khattak, Neelum F.; Murtiashaw, Martha H.; Fleet, Sarah E.

    2004-06-01

    Firefly luciferase, which emits yellow-green (557 nm) light, and the corresponding cDNA have been used successfully as a bioluminescence reporter of gene expression. One particularly exciting application is in the area of in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Our interest is in developing improved reagents by identifying Photinus pyralis luciferase mutants that efficiently emit red bioluminescence. In this way, the proven advantages of the P. pyralis protein can be combined with the potential advantages of a red-shifted emitter. Using site-directed mutagenesis techniques, we have identified many mutants emitting red bioluminescence. Unfortunately, these enzymes generally have significantly decreased bioluminescence activity. Interestingly, we discovered a mutation, Ile351Ala, that produced a moderate 16 nm red-shift, while maintaining excellent bioluminescence activity. We then undertook a random mutagenesis approach to identify luciferase mutants that emit further red-shifted bioluminescence with minimal loss of activity. Libraries of mutants were created using an error-prone PCR method and the Ile351Ala luciferase mutant as the template DNA. The libraries were screened by in vivo bacterial assays and the promising mutants were purified to enable accurate determination of bioluminescence emission spectra and total bioluminescence activity. We will report the characterization results, including the identification of the randomly altered amino acids, of several mutants that catalyze bioluminescence with emission maxima of approximately 600 nm.

  10. B-branch electron transfer in reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides assessed with site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Arjo L; Neerken, Sieglinde; de Wijn, Rik; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Gast, Peter; Vijgenboom, Erik; Hoff, Arnold J

    2002-01-01

    Mutants of Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides are described which were designed to study electron transfer along the so-called B-branch of reaction center (RC) cofactors. Combining the mutation L(M214)H, which results in the incorporation of a bacteriochlorophyll, beta, for H(A) [Kirmaier et al. (1991) Science 251: 922-927] with two mutations, G(M203)D and Y(M210)W, near B(A), we have created a double and a triple mutant with long lifetimes of the excited state P(*) of the primary donor P, viz. 80 and 160 ps at room temperature, respectively. The yield of P(+)Q(A) (-) formation in these mutants is reduced to 50 and 30%, respectively, of that in wildtype RCs. For both mutants, the quantum yield of P(+)H(B) (-) formation was less than 10%, in contrast to the 15% B-branch electron transfer demonstrated in RCs of a similar mutant of Rba. capsulatus with a P(*) lifetime of 15 ps [Heller et al. (1995) Science 269: 940-945]. We conclude that the lifetime of P(*) is not a governing factor in switching to B-branch electron transfer. The direct photoreduction of the secondary quinone, Q(B), was studied with a triple mutant combining the G(M203)D, L(M214)H and A(M260)W mutations. In this triple mutant Q(A) does not bind to the reaction center [Ridge et al. (1999) Photosynth Res 59: 9-26]. It is shown that B-branch electron transfer leading to P(+)Q(B) (-) formation occurs to a minor extent at both room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures (about 3% following a saturating laser flash at 20 K). In contrast, in wildtype RCs P(+)Q(B) (-) formation involves the A-branch and does not occur at all at cryogenic temperatures. Attempts to accumulate the P(+)Q(B) (-) state under continuous illumination were not successful. Charge recombination of P(+)Q(B) (-) formed by B-branch electron transfer in the new mutant is much faster (seconds) than has been previously reported for charge recombination of P(+)Q(B) (-) trapped in wildtype RCs (10(5) s) [Kleinfeld et al. (1984b) Biochemistry 23: 5780-5786]. This difference is discussed in light of the different binding sites for Q(B) and Q(B) (-) that recently have been found by X-ray crystallography at cryogenic temperatures [Stowell et al. (1997) Science 276: 812-816]. We present the first low-temperature absorption difference spectrum due to P(+)Q(B) (-).

  11. Exploring the Interaction of SV2A with Racetams Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Dynamics and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joanna; Daniels, Veronique; Sands, Zara A.; Lebon, Florence; Shi, Jiye; Biggin, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    The putative Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) transporter, SV2A, is the target for levetiracetam (LEV), which is a successful anti-epileptic drug. Furthermore, SV2A knock out mice display a severe seizure phenotype and die after a few weeks. Despite this, the mode of action of LEV is not known at the molecular level. It would be extremely desirable to understand this more fully in order to aid the design of improved anti-epileptic compounds. Since there is no structure for SV2A, homology modelling can provide insight into the ligand-binding site. However, it is not a trivial process to build such models, since SV2A has low sequence identity to those MFS transporters whose structures are known. A further level of complexity is added by the fact that it is not known which conformational state of the receptor LEV binds to, as multiple conformational states have been inferred by tomography and ligand binding assays or indeed, if binding is exclusive to a single state. Here, we explore models of both the inward and outward facing conformational states of SV2A (according to the alternating access mechanism for MFS transporters). We use a sequence conservation analysis to help guide the homology modelling process and generate the models, which we assess further with Molecular Dynamics (MD). By comparing the MD results in conjunction with docking and simulation of a LEV-analogue used in radioligand binding assays, we were able to suggest further residues that line the binding pocket. These were confirmed experimentally. In particular, mutation of D670 leads to a complete loss of binding. The results shed light on the way LEV analogues may interact with SV2A and may help with the on-going design of improved anti-epileptic compounds. PMID:25692762

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of beta-lactamase I. Single and double mutants of Glu-166 and Lys-73.

    PubMed

    Gibson, R M; Christensen, H; Waley, S G

    1990-12-15

    Two single mutants and the corresponding double mutant of beta-lactamase I from Bacillus cereus 569/H were constructed and their kinetics investigated. The mutants have Lys-73 replaced by arginine (K73R), or Glu-166 replaced by aspartic acid (E166D), or both (K73R + E166D). All four rate constants in the acyl-enzyme mechanism were determined for the E166D mutant by the methods described by Christensen, Martin & Waley [(1990) Biochem. J. 266, 853-861]. Both the rate constants for acylation and deacylation for the hydrolysis of benzylpenicillin were decreased about 2000-fold in this mutant. In the K73R mutant, and in the double mutant, the rate constants for acylation were decreased about 100-fold and 10,000-fold respectively. All three mutants also had lowered values for the rate constants for the formation and dissociation of the non-covalent enzyme-substrate complex. The specificities of the mutants did not differ greatly from those of wild-type beta-lactamase, but the hydrolysis of cephalosporin C by the K73R mutant gave 'burst' kinetics.

  13. Mechanism-oriented redesign of an isomaltulose synthase to an isomelezitose synthase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Görl, Julian; Timm, Malte; Seibel, Jürgen

    2012-01-02

    An isomelezitose synthase was redesigned out of the sucrose isomerase from Protaminobacter rubrum for the synthesis of isomelezitose (6-O(F)-glucosylsucrose), a potential nutraceutical. The variants F297A, F297P, R333K, F321A_F319A and E428D catalyze the formation of isomelezitose in up to 70 % yield.

  14. Site-directed mutagenesis reveals regions implicated in the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Miryam I; Canul-Tec, Juan C; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A; Becerril, Baltazar

    2015-01-30

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this work, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40-60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. This mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL.

  15. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2014-12-11

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this paper, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. Finally, this mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL.

  16. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains

    DOE PAGES

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; ...

    2014-12-11

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this paper, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, themore » second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. Finally, this mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL.« less

  17. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains*

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this work, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. This mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL. PMID:25505244

  18. [Mutagenesis of the human histamine H1 receptor and design of new antihistamine agents].

    PubMed

    Differding, E; Gillard, M; Moguilevsky, N; Varsalona, F; Noyer, M; Daliers, J; Goldstein, S; Neuwels, M; Lassoie, M A; Guillaume, J P; Bascour, M; Bollen, A; Hénichart, J P

    1996-01-01

    The binding cavity of histamine and histamine antagonists is explored using site directed mutagenesis of the human histamine H1 receptor and the amino acids involved in ligand binding are identified. Whereas Asp107 and Phe199 are important for both agonists and antagonists, two additional amino acids (Asn198 and Trp103) are required for efficient histamine binding. The binding site of antagonists is best defined as resulting from a strong ionic bond to Asp107, an orthogonal interaction between one of the aromatic rings with Phe199, and probably a hydrophobic interaction between the second aromatic ring and the lipophilic amino acids of the upper part of TMIV and TMV. This is consistent with structure-activity data of most described antagonists.

  19. Cloning of human epidermal growth factor as a bacterial secretory protein, its properties and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, D.A.; Matsunami, R.K.; Campion, S.R.; Foote, R.S.; Mural, R.J.; Larimer, F.W.; Stevens, A.; Niyogi, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    A chimeric gene, containing the DNA coding for the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) and that for the signal peptide of E. coli alkaline phosphatase, was constructed by the annealing and subsequent ligation of appropriate DNA oligonucleotides synthesized in an automated DNA synthesizer. The gene was then cloned into a bacterial plasmid under the transcriptional control of the E. coli trp-lac (tac) promoter, and then transformed into E. coli. Following induction with isopropylthiogalactoside, the secretion of EGF into the E. coli periplasmic space and some into the growth medium was confirmed by its specific binding to the EGF receptor and stimulation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The size and physicochemical properties of the purified protein mimicked those of authentic human EGF. Studies of structure/function relationships by specific alterations of targeted amino acid residues in the EGF molecule have been initiated by utilizing site-directed mutagenesis.

  20. Site-specific mutagenesis and functional analysis of active sites of sulfur oxygenase reductase from Gram-positive moderate thermophile Sulfobacillus acidophilus TPY.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijun; Guo, Wenbin; Xu, Changan; Zhou, Hongbo; Chen, Xinhua

    2013-12-14

    Sequence alignments revealed that the conserved motifs of SORSa which formed an independent branch between archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs according to the phylogenetic relationship were similar with the archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs. In order to investigate the active sites of SORSa, cysteines 31, 101 and 104 (C31, C101, C104), histidines 86 and 90 (H86 and H90) and glutamate 114 (E114) of SORSa were chosen as the target amino acid residues for site-specific mutagenesis. The wild type and six mutant SORs were expressed in E. coli BL21, purified and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis. Enzyme activity determination revealed that the active sites of SORSa were identical with the archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs reported. Replacement of any cysteine residues reduced SOR activity by 53-100%, while the mutants of H86A, H90A and E114A lost their enzyme activities largely, only remaining 20%, 19% and 32% activity of the wild type SOR respectively. This study will enrich our awareness for active sites of SOR in a Gram-positive bacterium.

  1. Site-directed gene replacement of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Elisa E; Nepomuceno, Roberto S L; Faria, Juarez B; Ferreira, Luís C S; Ferreira, Rita C C

    2006-04-01

    In this work we defined experimental conditions for site-directed gene replacement of the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac), an economically relevant pathogen of citrus plants. The procedure involved, first, optimizing the electrotransformation conditions of the Xac 306 strain and, second, constructing non-replicative suicide vectors carrying knockout copies of the target gene. Using specific experimental conditions, transformation efficiencies of Xac were at least 100 fold higher than those achieved with electroporation protocols previously designed for X. campestris transformation. Successful gene replacement events were achieved with a suicide vector derived from R6K plasmid (pWR-SS) but not with those with ColE1 replication origin. We have chosen the oppA as a target gene, encoding the binding component (OppA) of the major oligopeptide uptake system found in the genome of the Xac 306 strain, although not in X. campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). Defining the experimental conditions, which allow for the specific mutagenesis of the Xac 306 strain, represents a step in the understanding of both genetics and physiology of this economically important bacterial species.

  2. Computer Simulation of Mutagenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, J. C.; Dent, M. T.

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN program is described which simulates point-substitution mutations in the DNA strands of typical organisms. Its objective is to help students to understand the significance and structure of the genetic code, and the mechanisms and effect of mutagenesis. (Author/BB)

  3. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  4. Mechanism of proflavin mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sarabhai, A; Lamfrom, H

    1969-08-01

    The mutagenic action of proflavin on bacteriophage T4 is greater in the presence of defective T4 ligase than in the presence of normal T4 ligase. This suggests that the persistence of single-strand breaks in DNA enhances proflavin mutagenesis.

  5. Directed evolution and mutagenesis of glutamate decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 to broaden the range of its activity toward a near-neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Xie, Yilong; Jiang, Junjun; Wang, Nannan; Li, Yongfu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) transforms l-glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the consumption of a proton. GAD derived from lactic acid bacteria exhibits optimum activity at pH 4.0-5.0 and significantly loses activity at near-neutral pH. To broaden the active range of the GAD GadB1 from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 toward a near-neutral pH, irrational design using directed evolution and rational design using site-specific mutagenesis were performed. For directed evolution of GadB1, a sensitive high-throughput screening strategy based on a pH indicator was established. One improved mutant, GadB1(T17I/D294G/Q346H), was selected from 800 variants after one round of EP-PCR. It exhibited 3.9- and 25.0-fold increase in activity and catalytic efficiency, respectively at pH 6.0. Through site-specific mutagenesis, several improved mutants were obtained, with GadB1(E312S) being the best one. The combined mutant GadB1(T17I/D294G/E312S/Q346H) showed even higher catalytic efficiency, 13.1- and 43.2-fold that of wild-type GadB1 at pH 4.6 and 6.0, respectively. The amount of GABA produced in gadB1(T17I/D294G/Q346H)-, gadB1(E312S)- and gadB1(T17I/D294G/E312S/Q346H)-expressing Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 from endogenous l-glutamate increased by 9.6%, 20.3% and 63.9%, respectively. These results indicate that these mutations have beneficial effects on expanding the active pH range and on GABA biosynthesis, suggesting these GadB1 variants as potent candidates for GABA production.

  6. Restriction enzyme-free construction of random gene mutagenesis libraries in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pai, Jen C; Entzminger, Kevin C; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2012-02-15

    Directed evolution relies on both random and site-directed mutagenesis of individual genes and regulatory elements to create variants with altered activity profiles for engineering applications. Central to these experiments is the construction of large libraries of related variants. However, a number of technical hurdles continue to limit routine construction of random mutagenesis libraries in Escherichia coli, in particular, inefficiencies during digestion and ligation steps. Here, we report a restriction enzyme-free approach to library generation using megaprimers termed MegAnneal. Target DNA is first exponentially amplified using error-prone polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and then linearly amplified with a single 3' primer to generate long, randomly mutated, single-stranded megaprimers. These are annealed to single-stranded dUTP-containing template plasmid and extended with T7 polymerase to create a complementary strand, and the resulting termini are ligated with T4 DNA ligase. Using this approach, we are able to reliably generate libraries of approximately 10⁷ colony-forming units (cfu)/μg DNA/transformation in a single day. We have created MegAnneal libraries based on three different single-chain antibodies and identified variants with enhanced expression and ligand-binding affinity. The key advantages of this approach include facile amplification, restriction enzyme-free library generation, and a significantly reduced risk of mutations outside the targeted region and wild-type contamination as compared with current methods.

  7. One-step combined focused epPCR and saturation mutagenesis for thermostability evolution of a new cold-active xylanase.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Juan Pablo; Reetz, Manfred T; Asenjo, Juan A; Parra, Loreto P

    2017-05-01

    Enzymes active at low temperature are of great interest for industrial bioprocesses due to their high efficiency at a low energy cost. One of the particularities of naturally evolved cold-active enzymes is their increased enzymatic activity at low temperature, however the low thermostability presented in this type of enzymes is still a major drawback for their application in biocatalysis. Directed evolution of cold-adapted enzymes to a more thermostable version, appears as an attractive strategy to fulfill the stability and activity requirements for the industry. This paper describes the recombinant expression and characterization of a new and highly active cold-adapted xylanase from the GH-family 10 (Xyl-L), and the use of a novel one step combined directed evolution technique that comprises saturation mutagenesis and focused epPCR as a feasible semi-rational strategy to improve the thermostability. The Xyl-L enzyme was cloned from a marine-Antarctic bacterium, Psychrobacter sp. strain 2-17, recombinantly expressed in E. coli strain BL21(DE3) and characterized enzymatically. Molecular dynamic simulations using a homology model of the catalytic domain of Xyl-L were performed to detect flexible regions and residues, which are considered to be the possible structural elements that define the thermolability of this enzyme. Mutagenic libraries were designed in order to stabilize the protein introducing mutations in some of the flexible regions and residues identified. Twelve positive mutant clones were found to improve the T50(15) value of the enzyme, in some cases without affecting the activity at 25°C. The best mutant showed a 4.3°C increase in its T50(15). The efficiency of the directed evolution approach can also be expected to work in the protein engineering of stereoselectivity.

  8. Site-directed mutation studies of human liver cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes in the CYP2C subfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Veronese, M E; Doecke, C J; Mackenzie, P I; McManus, M E; Miners, J O; Rees, D L; Gasser, R; Meyer, U A; Birkett, D J

    1993-01-01

    Evidence from human studies in vivo and in vitro strongly suggests that the methylhydroxylation of tolbutamide and the 4-hydroxylation of phenytoin, the major pathways in the elimination of these two drugs, are catalysed by the same cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme(s). In the present study we used site-directed mutagenesis and cDNA expression in COS cells to characterize in detail the kinetics of tolbutamide and phenytoin hydroxylations by seven CYP2C proteins (2C8, 2C9 and variants, and 2C10) in order to define the effects of small changes in amino acid sequences and the likely proteins responsible in the metabolism of these two drugs in man. Tolbutamide was hydroxylated to varying extents by all expressed cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes, although activity was much lower for the expressed 2C8 protein. While the apparent Km values for the 2C9/10 isoenzymes (71.6-131.7 microM) were comparable with the range of apparent Km values previously observed in human liver microsomes, the apparent Km for 2C8 (650.5 microM) was appreciably higher. The 2C8 enzyme also showed quite different sulphaphenazole inhibition characteristics. The 4-hydroxylation of phenytoin was also more efficiently catalysed by the 2C9/10 enzymes. These enzymes showed similarities in kinetics of phenytoin hydroxylation and sulphaphenazole inhibition compared with human liver phenytoin hydroxylase. Also of interest was the observation that, among the 2C9 variants, small differences in amino acid composition could appreciably affect both tolbutamide and phenytoin hydroxylations. The amino acid substitution Cys-144-->Arg increased both the rates of tolbutamide and phenytoin hydroxylations, while the Leu-359-->Ile change had a greater effect on phenytoin hydroxylation. We conclude that: (1) although 2C8 and 2C9/10 proteins metabolize tolbutamide. only 2C9/10 proteins play a major role in human liver; (2) 2C9/10 proteins also appear to be chiefly responsible for phenytoin hydroxylation; and (3) subtle differences in

  9. Mutagenesis of putative catalytic and regulatory residues of Streptomyces chromofuscus phospholipase D differentially modifies phosphatase and phosphodiesterase activities.

    PubMed

    Zambonelli, Carlo; Casali, Monica; Roberts, Mary F

    2003-12-26

    Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus (sc-PLD) is a member of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes that also includes purple acid phosphatases, protein phosphatases, and nucleotide phosphodiesterases. Whereas iron is an essential cofactor for scPLD activity, Mn2+ is also found in the enzyme. A third metal ion, Ca2+, has been shown to enhance scPLD catalytic activity although it is not an essential cofactor. Sequence alignment of scPLD with known phosphodiesterases and phosphatases requiring metal ions suggested that His-212, Glu-213, and Asp-389 could be involved in Mn2+ binding. H212A, E213A, and D389A were prepared to test this hypothesis. These three mutant enzymes and wild type scPLD show similar metal content but considerably different catalytic properties, suggesting different roles for each residue. His-212 appears involved in binding the phosphate group of substrates, whereas Glu-213 acts as a ligand for Ca2+. D389A showed a greatly reduced phosphodiesterase activity but almost unaltered ability to hydrolyze the phosphate group in p-nitrophenyl phosphate suggesting it had a critical role in aligning groups at the active site to control phosphodiesterase versus phosphatase activities. We propose a model for substrate and cofactor binding to the catalytic site of scPLD based on these results and on sequence alignment to purple acid phosphatases of known structure.

  10. Targeted Mutagenesis and Combinatorial Library Screening Enables Control of Protein Orientation on Surfaces and Increased Activity of Adsorbed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Teran, Carlos A; Carlin, Kevin B; Efimenko, Kirill; Genzer, Jan; Rao, Balaji M

    2016-08-30

    While nonspecific adsorption is widely used for immobilizing proteins on solid surfaces, the random nature of protein adsorption may reduce the activity of immobilized proteins due to occlusion of the active site. We hypothesized that the orientation a protein assumes on a given surface can be controlled by systematically introducing mutations into a region distant from its active site, thereby retaining activity of the immobilized protein. To test this hypothesis, we generated a combinatorial protein library by randomizing six targeted residues in a binding protein derived from highly stable, nonimmunoglobulin Sso7d scaffold; mutations were targeted in a region that is distant from the binding site. This library was screened to isolate binders that retain binding to its cognate target (chicken immunoglobulin Y, cIgY) as well as exhibit adsorption on unmodified silica at pH 7.4 and high ionic strength conditions. A single mutant, Sso7d-2B5, was selected for further characterization. Sso7d-2B5 retained binding to cIgY with an apparent dissociation constant similar to that of the parent protein; both mutant and parent proteins saturated the surface of silica with similar densities. Strikingly, however, silica beads coated with Sso7d-2B5 could achieve up to 7-fold higher capture of cIgY than beads coated with the parent protein. These results strongly suggest that mutations introduced in Sso7d-2B5 alter its orientation relative to the parent protein, when adsorbed on silica surfaces. Our approach also provides a generalizable strategy for introducing mutations in proteins so as to improve their activity upon immobilization, and has direct relevance to development of protein-based biosensors and biocatalysts.

  11. Mutagenesis of conserved active site residues of dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase enhances the accumulation of α-ketoglutarate in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (α-KG) is an important intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and has broad applications. The mitochondrial ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH) complex catalyzes the oxidation of α-KG to succinyl-CoA. Disruption of KGDH, which may enhance the accumulation of α-KG theoretically, was found to be lethal to obligate aerobic cells. In this study, individual overexpression of dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST), which serves as the inner core of KGDH, decreased overall activity of the enzyme complex. Furthermore, two conserved active site residues of DLST, His419, and Asp423 were identified. In order to determine whether these residues are engaged in enzyme reaction or not, these two conserved residues were individually mutated. Analysis of the kinetic parameters of the enzyme variants provided evidence that the catalytic reaction of DLST depended on residues His419 and Asp423. Overexpression of mutated DLST not only impaired balanced assembly of KGDH, but also disrupted the catalytic integrity of the enzyme complex. Replacement of the Asp423 residue by glutamate increased extracellular α-KG by 40 % to 50 g L(-1) in mutant strain. These observations uncovered catalytic roles of two conserved active site residues of DLST and provided clues for effective metabolic strategies for rational carbon flux control for the enhanced production of α-KG and related bioproducts.

  12. A 5000-fold increase in the specificity of a bacterial phosphotriesterase for malathion through combinatorial active site mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Tatheer; Warden, Andrew C; French, Nigel; Sugrue, Elena; Carr, Paul D; Jackson, Colin J; Scott, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Phosphotriesterases (PTEs) have been isolated from a range of bacterial species, including Agrobcaterium radiobacter (PTEAr), and are efficient enzymes with broad substrate ranges. The turnover rate of PTEAr for the common organophosphorous insecticide malathion is lower than expected based on its physical properties; principally the pka of its leaving group. In this study, we rationalise the turnover rate of PTEAr for malathion using computational docking of the substrate into a high resolution crystal structure of the enzyme, suggesting that malathion is too large for the PTEAr binding pocket. Protein engineering through combinatorial active site saturation testing (CASTing) was then used to increase the rate of malathion turnover. Variants from a CASTing library in which Ser308 and Tyr309 were mutated yielded variants with increased activity towards malathion. The most active PTEAr variant carried Ser308Leu and Tyr309Ala substitutions, which resulted in a ca. 5000-fold increase in kcat/KM for malathion. X-ray crystal structures for the PTEAr Ser308Leu\\Tyr309Ala variant demonstrate that the access to the binding pocket was enhanced by the replacement of the bulky Tyr309 residue with the smaller alanine residue.

  13. A 5000-Fold Increase in the Specificity of a Bacterial Phosphotriesterase for Malathion through Combinatorial Active Site Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Tatheer; Warden, Andrew C.; French, Nigel; Sugrue, Elena; Carr, Paul D.; Jackson, Colin J.; Scott, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Phosphotriesterases (PTEs) have been isolated from a range of bacterial species, including Agrobcaterium radiobacter (PTEAr), and are efficient enzymes with broad substrate ranges. The turnover rate of PTEAr for the common organophosphorous insecticide malathion is lower than expected based on its physical properties; principally the pka of its leaving group. In this study, we rationalise the turnover rate of PTEAr for malathion using computational docking of the substrate into a high resolution crystal structure of the enzyme, suggesting that malathion is too large for the PTEAr binding pocket. Protein engineering through combinatorial active site saturation testing (CASTing) was then used to increase the rate of malathion turnover. Variants from a CASTing library in which Ser308 and Tyr309 were mutated yielded variants with increased activity towards malathion. The most active PTEAr variant carried Ser308Leu and Tyr309Ala substitutions, which resulted in a ca. 5000-fold increase in kcat/KM for malathion. X-ray crystal structures for the PTEAr Ser308Leu\\Tyr309Ala variant demonstrate that the access to the binding pocket was enhanced by the replacement of the bulky Tyr309 residue with the smaller alanine residue. PMID:24721933

  14. Mutagenesis of the redox-active disulfide in mercuric ion reductase: Catalysis by mutant enzymes restricted to flavin redox chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, M.D.; Au, K.G.; Walsh, C.T. )

    1989-02-07

    Mercuric reductase, a flavoenzyme that possesses a redox-active cystine, Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}, catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by NADPH. As a probe of mechanism, the authors have constructed mutants lacking a redox-active disulfide by eliminating Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}), Cys{sub 14} (Cys{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}), or both (Ala{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}). Additionally, they have made double mutants that lack Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 140}) or Cys{sub 140} (Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Ala{sub 140}) but introduce a new Cys in place of Gly{sub 139} with the aim of constructing dithiol pairs in the active site that do not form a redox-active disulfide. The resulting mutant enzymes all lack redox-active disulfides and are hence restricted to FAD/FADH{sub 2} redox chemistry. Each mutant enzyme possesses unique physical and spectroscopic properties that reflect subtle differences in the FAD microenvironment. Preliminary evidence for the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 14} mutant enzyme suggests that this protein forms a disulfide between the two adjacent Cys residues. Hg(II) titration experiments that correlate the extent of charge-transfer quenching with Hg(II) binding indicate that the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140} protein binds Hg(II) with substantially less avidity than does the wild-type enzyme. All mutant mercuric reductases catalyze transhydrogenation and oxygen reduction reactions through obligatory reduced flavin intermediates at rates comparable to or greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. In multiple-turnover assays which monitored the production of Hg(0), two of the mutant enzymes were observed to proceed through at least 30 turnovers at rates ca. 1000-fold slower than that of wild-type mercuric reductase. They conclude that the Cys{sub 135} and Cys{sub 140} thiols serve as Hg(II) ligands that orient the Hg(II) for subsequent reduction by a reduced flavin intermediate.

  15. Mutagenesis of Paramyxovirus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Membrane-Proximal Stalk Region Influences Stability, Receptor Binding, and Neuraminidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Kim, Lori S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviridae consist of a large family of enveloped, negative-sense, nonsegmented single-stranded RNA viruses that account for a significant number of human and animal diseases. The fusion process for nearly all paramyxoviruses involves the mixing of the host cell plasma membrane and the virus envelope in a pH-independent fashion. Fusion is orchestrated via the concerted action of two surface glycoproteins: an attachment protein called hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN [also called H or G depending on virus type and substrate]), which acts as a receptor binding protein, and a fusion (F) protein, which undergoes a major irreversible refolding process to merge the two membranes. Recent biochemical evidence suggests that receptor binding by HN is dispensable for cell-cell fusion. However, factors that influence the stability and/or conformation of the HN 4-helix bundle (4HB) stalk have not been studied. Here, we used oxidative cross-linking as well as functional assays to investigate the role of the structurally unresolved membrane-proximal stalk region (MPSR) (residues 37 to 58) of HN in the context of headless and full-length HN membrane fusion promotion. Our data suggest that the receptor binding head serves to stabilize the stalk to regulate fusion. Moreover, we found that the MPSR of HN modulates receptor binding and neuraminidase activity without a corresponding regulation of F triggering. IMPORTANCE Paramyxoviruses require two viral membrane glycoproteins, the attachment protein variously called HN, H, or G and the fusion protein (F), to couple host receptor recognition to virus-cell fusion. The HN protein has a globular head that is attached to a membrane-anchored flexible stalk of ∼80 residues and has three activities: receptor binding, neuraminidase, and fusion activation. In this report, we have identified the functional significance of the membrane-proximal stalk region (MPSR) (HN, residues 37 to 56) of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus

  16. In vitro models of mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Strauss, B S; Larson, K; Sagher, D; Rabkin, S; Shenkar, R; Sahm, J

    1985-01-01

    The bypass of lesions in DNA with insertion of nucleotides opposite damaged bases has been studied as a model for mutagenesis in an in vitro system. Lesions introduced by dimethyl sulfate at adenines and by ultraviolet light at pyrimidine dimers act as termination sites on both double- and single-stranded DNA templates. Base selection opposite noninformational lesions is, in part, a property of the polymerases: different polymerases have different selectivities although all polymerases tested seem to prefer purines. The ability to insert "incorrect" bases is determined in part by the sequence 5' to the lesion on the template strand. The hypothesis that damaged purines tend to result in transversions can be applied to published data on activation of the c-ras oncogene.

  17. Mutagenesis of the potato ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase and characterization of an allosteric mutant defective in 3-phosphoglycerate activation

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, T.W.; Chantler, S.E.; Kahn, M.L.

    1996-02-20

    ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (glucose-1-phosphate adenylytransferase; AD P:{alpha}-D-glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.27) catalyzes a key regulatory step in {alpha}-glucan synthesis in bacteria and higher plants. We have previously shown that the expression of the cDNA sequences of the potato tuber large (LS) and small (SS) subunits yielded a functional heterotetrameric enzyme capable of complementing a mutation in the single AGP (glgC) structural gene of Escherichia coli. This heterologous complementation provides a powerful genetic approach to obtain biochemical information on the specific roles of LS and SS in enzyme function. By mutagenizing the LS cDNA with hydroxylamine and then coexpressing with wild-type SS in an E. coli glgC{sup {minus}} strain, >350 mutant colonies were identified that were impaired in glycogen production. One mutant exhibited enzymatic and antigen levels comparable to the wild-type recombinant enzyme but required 45-fold greater levels of the activator 3-phosphoglycerate for maximum activity. Sequence analysis identified a single nucleotide change that resulted in the change of Pro-52 to Leu. This heterologous genetic system provides and efficient means to identify residues important for catalysis and allosteric functioning and should lead to novel approaches to increase plant productivity. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Inactivation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum urease gene using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-based targeted mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Weyman, Philip D; Beeri, Karen; Lefebvre, Stephane C; Rivera, Josefa; McCarthy, James K; Heuberger, Adam L; Peers, Graham; Allen, Andrew E; Dupont, Christopher L

    2015-05-01

    Diatoms are unicellular photosynthetic algae with promise for green production of fuels and other chemicals. Recent genome-editing techniques have greatly improved the potential of many eukaryotic genetic systems, including diatoms, to enable knowledge-based studies and bioengineering. Using a new technique, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), the gene encoding the urease enzyme in the model diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was targeted for interruption. The knockout cassette was identified within the urease gene by PCR and Southern blot analyses of genomic DNA. The lack of urease protein was confirmed by Western blot analyses in mutant cell lines that were unable to grow on urea as the sole nitrogen source. Untargeted metabolomic analysis revealed a build-up of urea, arginine and ornithine in the urease knockout lines. All three intermediate metabolites are upstream of the urease reaction within the urea cycle, suggesting a disruption of the cycle despite urea production. Numerous high carbon metabolites were enriched in the mutant, implying a breakdown of cellular C and N repartitioning. The presented method improves the molecular toolkit for diatoms and clarifies the role of urease in the urea cycle.

  19. DNA damage and repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis: implications of structure-activity relationships for cross-species extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, E W; Nivard, M J; Ballering, L A; Bartsch, H; Barbin, A; Nair, J; Comendador, M A; Sierra, L M; Aguirrezabalaga, I; Tosal, L; Ehrenberg, L; Fuchs, R P; Janel-Bintz, R; Maenhaut-Michel, G; Montesano, R; Hall, J; Kang, H; Miele, M; Thomale, J; Bender, K; Engelbergs, J; Rajewsky, M F

    1996-06-12

    Previous studies on structure-activity relationships (SARs) between types of DNA modifications and tumour incidence revealed linear positive relationships between the log TD50 estimates and s-values for a series of mostly monofunctional alkylating agents. The overall objective of this STEP project was to further elucidate the mechanistic principles underlying these correlations, because detailed knowledge on mechanisms underlying the formation of genotoxic damage is an absolute necessity for establishing guidance values for exposures to genotoxic agents. The analysis included: (1) the re-calculation and further extension of TD50 values in mmol/kg body weight for chemicals carcinogenic in rodents. This part further included the checking up data for Swain-Scott s-values and the use of the covalent binding index (CBI); (2) the elaboration of genetic toxicity including an analysis of induced mutation spectra in specific genes at the DNA level, i.e., the vermilion gene of Drosophila, a plasmid system (pX2 assay) and the HPRT gene in cultured mammalian cells (CHO-9); and (3) the measurement of specific DNA alkylation adducts in animal models (mouse, rat, hamster) and mammalian cells in culture. The analysis of mechanisms controlling the expression of mammalian DNA repair genes (alkyltransferases, glycosylases) as a function of the cell type, differentiation stage, and cellular microenvironment in mammalian cells. The 3 classes of genotoxic carcinogens selected for the project were: (1) chemicals forming monoalkyl adducts upon interaction with DNA; (2) genotoxins capable of forming DNA etheno-adducts; and (3) N-substituted aryl compounds forming covalent adducts at the C8 position of guanine in DNA. In general, clear SARs and AARs (activity-activity relationships) between physiochemical parameters (s-values, O6/N7-alkylguanine ratios, CBI), carcinogenic potency in rodents and several descriptors of genotoxic activity in germ cells (mouse, Drosophila) became apparent when

  20. Construction, characterization, and mutagenesis of an anti-fluorescein single chain antibody idiotype family.

    PubMed

    Denzin, L K; Voss, E W

    1992-05-05

    In addition to crystallographic studies that determined antigen contact residues for monoclonal anti-fluorescein (Fl) antibody 4-4-20 (Ka = 2.5 x 10(10) M-1), primary structure comparisons revealed idiotypically cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 9-40 (Ka = 4.4 x 10(7) M-1), 12-40 (Ka = 4.0 x 10(8) M-1), and 5-14 (Ka = 2.4 x 10(8) M-1) possessed identical Fl contact residues, with the exception of L34His for L34Arg. Site-specific mutagenesis of single chain antibody (SCA) 4-4-20 in which L34Arg was changed to L34His resulted in approximately 1000- and 3-fold decreases in binding affinity and Qmax (maximum quenching of bound Fl), respectively, which suggested that L34Arg was directly involved in increased binding affinity and fluorescence quenching. Therefore, substitution of Arg for His at residue L34 in mAbs 9-40, 12-40, and 5-14 should result in increased binding affinity and Qmax. To facilitate site-specific mutagenesis studies, single chain derivatives of mAbs 9-40, 12-40, and 5-14 were constructed. Following expression in Escherichia coli, characterization of the SCAs demonstrated that when compared with the respective parental mAb, the SCAs possessed identical binding affinities and similar Qmax and lambda max (absorption profiles of bound Fl) values. These results validated SCA 9-40, 12-40, and 5-14 for use in site-directed mutagenesis studies. Results of mutagenesis studies indicated that substitution of L34Arg into the active sites of 9-40, 12-40, and 5-14 was not enough to produce 4-4-20-like binding characteristics. Therefore, the following single chain mutants were constructed: 9-40L34Arg/L46Val, 12-40L34Arg/L46Val and 5-14L34Arg/L46Val, 9-40L34Arg/L46Val/H101Asp and 4-4-20H101Ala. Results demonstrated that these mutations were not able to render the mutant SCAs with increased binding affinity and fluorescence quenching values. Collectively, these results suggest that the combining sites of mAb 9-40, 12-40, and 5-14 may possess different active

  1. Crystal structure and structure-based mutagenesis of actin-specific ADP-ribosylating toxin CPILE-a as novel enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Toniti, Waraphan; Yoshida, Toru; Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Irikura, Daisuke; Monma, Chie; Kamata, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Unusual outbreaks of food poisoning in Japan were reported in which Clostridium perfringens was strongly suspected to be the cause based on epidemiological information and fingerprinting of isolates. The isolated strains lack the typical C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) but secrete a new enterotoxin consisting of two components: C. perfringens iota-like enterotoxin-a (CPILE-a), which acts as an enzymatic ADP-ribosyltransferase, and CPILE-b, a membrane binding component. Here we present the crystal structures of apo-CPILE-a, NAD+-CPILE-a and NADH-CPILE-a. Though CPILE-a structure has high similarity with known iota toxin-a (Ia) with NAD+, it possesses two extra-long protruding loops from G262-S269 and E402-K408 that are distinct from Ia. Based on the Ia–actin complex structure, we focused on actin-binding interface regions (I-V) including two protruding loops (PT) and examined how mutations in these regions affect the ADP-ribosylation activity of CPILE-a. Though some site-directed mutagenesis studies have already been conducted on the actin binding site of Ia, in the present study, mutagenesis studies were conducted against both α- and β/γ-actin in CPILE-a and Ia. Interestingly, CPILE-a ADP-ribosylates both α- and β/γ-actin, but its sensitivity towards β/γ-actin is 36% compared with α-actin. Our results contrast to that only C2-I ADP-ribosylates β/γ-actin. We also showed that PT-I and two convex-concave interactions in CPILE-a are important for actin binding. The current study is the first detailed analysis of site-directed mutagenesis in the actin binding region of Ia and CPILE-a against both α- and β/γ-actin. PMID:28199340

  2. Examining the conformational dynamics of membrane proteins in situ with site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Richards, Ryan; Dempski, Robert E

    2011-05-29

    Two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology (TEVC) is a powerful tool to investigate the mechanism of ion transport1 for a wide variety of membrane proteins including ion channels, ion pumps, and transporters. Recent developments have combined site-specific fluorophore labeling alongside TEVC to concurrently examine the conformational dynamics at specific residues and function of these proteins on the surface of single cells. We will describe a method to study the conformational dynamics of membrane proteins by simultaneously monitoring fluorescence and current changes using voltage-clamp fluorometry. This approach can be used to examine the molecular motion of membrane proteins site-specifically following cysteine replacement and site-directed fluorophore labeling. Furthermore, this method provides an approach to determine distance constraints between specific residues. This is achieved by selectively attaching donor and acceptor fluorophores to two mutated cysteine residues of interest. In brief, these experiments are performed following functional expression of the desired protein on the surface of Xenopus leavis oocytes. The large surface area of these oocytes enables facile functional measurements and a robust fluorescence signal. It is also possible to readily change the extracellular conditions such as pH, ligand or cations/anions, which can provide further information on the mechanism of membrane proteins. Finally, recent developments have also enabled the manipulation of select internal ions following co-expression with a second protein. Our protocol is described in multiple parts. First, cysteine scanning mutagenesis proceeded by fluorophore labeling is completed at residues located at the interface of the transmembrane and extracellular domains. Subsequent experiments are designed to identify residues which demonstrate large changes in fluorescence intensity (<5%) upon a conformational change of the protein. Second, these changes in fluorescence

  3. Preliminary Work in Obtaining Site-Directed Mutants of Hen Egg White Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Leonard D.

    1996-01-01

    < ------ > dimer < ------- > tetramer < ------ > octamer < ------ > higher order. It is believed that multimer aggregation of lysozyme occurs by interaction at specific binding sites on the surface of the protein crystals. If the presence of discrete binding sites and the aggregation hypothesis is true, then it follows that the alteration of the binding site(s) should have significant effect on the measurements obtained during growth experiments. Site-directed mutagenesis allows the specific alteration of proteins by replacement, deletion or addition of specific amino acid residues. This report outlines the approach for this strategy and the progress made thus far toward that end.

  4. Rational Mutagenesis of Cyclodextrin Glucanotransferase at the Calcium Binding Regions for Enhancement of Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Poh Hong; Illias, Rosli Md.; Goh, Kian Mau

    2012-01-01

    Studies related to the engineering of calcium binding sites of CGTase are limited. The calcium binding regions that are known for thermostability function were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis in this study. The starting gene-protein is a variant of CGTase Bacillus sp. G1, reported earlier and denoted as “parent CGTase” herein. Four CGTase variants (S182G, S182E, N132R and N28R) were constructed. The two variants with a mutation at residue 182, located adjacent to the Ca-I site and the active site cleft, possessed an enhanced thermostability characteristic. The activity half-life of variant S182G at 60 °C was increased to 94 min, while the parent CGTase was only 22 min. This improvement may be attributed to the formation of a shorter α-helix and the alleviation of unfavorable steric strains by glycine at the corresponding region. For the variant S182E, an extra ionic interaction at the A/B domain interface increased the half-life to 31 min, yet it reduced CGTase activity. The introduction of an ionic interaction at the Ca-I site via the mutation N132R disrupted CGTase catalytic activity. Conversely, the variant N28R, which has an additional ionic interaction at the Ca-II site, displayed increased cyclization activity. However, thermostability was not affected. PMID:22754298

  5. Mutagenesis and functional analysis of the pore-forming toxin HALT-1 from Hydra magnipapillata.

    PubMed

    Liew, Yvonne Jing Mei; Soh, Wai Tuck; Jiemy, William Febry; Hwang, Jung Shan

    2015-02-03

    Actinoporins are small 18.5 kDa pore-forming toxins. A family of six actinoporin genes has been identified in the genome of Hydra magnipapillata, and HALT-1 (Hydra actinoporin-like toxin-1) has been shown to have haemolytic activity. In this study, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of amino acids in the pore-forming N-terminal region and the conserved aromatic cluster required for cell membrane binding. A total of 10 mutants of HALT-1 were constructed and tested for their haemolytic and cytolytic activity on human erythrocytes and HeLa cells, respectively. Insertion of 1-4 negatively charged residues in the N-terminal region of HALT-1 strongly reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity, suggesting that the length or charge of the N-terminal region is critical for pore-forming activity. Moreover, substitution of amino acids in the conserved aromatic cluster reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity by more than 80%, suggesting that these aromatic amino acids are important for attachment to the lipid membrane as shown for other actinoporins. The results suggest that HALT-1 and other actinoporins share similar mechanisms of pore formation and that it is critical for HALT-1 to maintain an amphipathic helix at the N-terminus and an aromatic amino acid-rich segment at the site of membrane binding.

  6. Transposon Mutagenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Largaespada, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the functional landscape of the mammalian genome is the next big challenge of biomedical research. The completion of the first phases of the mouse and human genome projects, and expression analyses using microarray hybridization, generate critically important questions about the functional landscape and structure of the mammalian genome: how many genes, and of what type, are there; what kind of functional elements make up a properly functioning gene? One step in this process will be to create mutations in every identifiable mouse gene and analyze the resultant phenotypes. Transposons are being considered as tools to further initiatives to create a comprehensive resource of mutant mouse strains. Also, it may be possible to use transposons in true forward genetic screens in the mouse. The “Sleeping Beauty” (SB) transposon system is one such tool. Moreover, due to its tendency for local hopping, SB has been proposed as a method for regional saturation mutagenesis of the mouse genome. In this chapter, we review the tools and methods currently available to create mutant mice using in vivo, germline transposition in mice. PMID:19266336

  7. Protein fragment swapping: a method for asymmetric, selective site-directed recombination.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Griswold, Karl E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2010-03-01

    This article presents a new approach to site-directed recombination, swapping combinations of selected discontiguous fragments from a source protein in place of corresponding fragments of a target protein. By being both asymmetric (differentiating source and target) and selective (swapping discontiguous fragments), our method focuses experimental effort on a more restricted portion of sequence space, constructing hybrids that are more likely to have the properties that are the objective of the experiment. Furthermore, since the source and target need to be structurally homologous only locally (rather than overall), our method supports swapping fragments from functionally important regions of a source into a target "scaffold" (for example, to humanize an exogenous therapeutic protein). A protein fragment swapping plan is defined by the residue position boundaries of the fragments to be swapped; it is assessed by an average potential score over the resulting hybrid library, with singleton and pairwise terms evaluating the importance and fit of the swapped residues. While we prove that it is NP-hard to choose an optimal set of fragments under such a potential score, we develop an integer programming approach, which we call Swagmer, that works very well in practice. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method in three swapping problems: selective recombination between beta-lactamases, activity swapping between glutathione transferases, and activity swapping between carboxylases and mutases in the purE family. We show that the selective recombination approach generates better plan (in terms of resulting potential score) than traditional site-directed recombination approaches. We also show that in all cases the optimized experiments are significantly better than ones that would result from stochastic methods.

  8. A Defect in DNA Ligase4 Enhances the Frequency of TALEN-Mediated Targeted Mutagenesis in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cermak, Tomas; Sugimoto, Kazuhiko; Saika, Hiroaki; Mori, Akiko; Osakabe, Keishi; Hamada, Masao; Katayose, Yuichi; Voytas, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    We have established methods for site-directed mutagenesis via transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in the endogenous rice (Oryza sativa) waxy gene and demonstrated stable inheritance of TALEN-induced somatic mutations to the progeny. To analyze the role of classical nonhomologous end joining (cNHEJ) and alternative nonhomologous end joining (altNHEJ) pathways in TALEN-induced mutagenesis in plant cells, we investigated whether a lack of DNA Ligase4 (Lig4) affects the kinetics of TALEN-induced double-strand break repair in rice cells. Deep-sequencing analysis revealed that the frequency of all types of mutations, namely deletion, insertion, combination of insertion with deletion, and substitution, in lig4 null mutant calli was higher than that in a lig4 heterozygous mutant or the wild type. In addition, the ratio of large deletions (greater than 10 bp) and deletions repaired by microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) to total deletion mutations in lig4 null mutant calli was higher than that in the lig4 heterozygous mutant or wild type. Furthermore, almost all insertions (2 bp or greater) were shown to be processed via copy and paste of one or more regions around the TALENs cleavage site and rejoined via MMEJ regardless of genetic background. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dysfunction of cNHEJ leads to a shift in the repair pathway from cNHEJ to altNHEJ or synthesis-dependent strand annealing. PMID:26668331

  9. Enhanced maltose production through mutagenesis of acceptor binding subsite +2 in Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yecheng; Duan, Xuguo; Wang, Lei; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-10

    Maltogenic amylases are used to decrease the maltotriose content of high maltose syrups. However, due to the interplay between the hydrolysis and transglycosylation activities of maltogenic amylases, the maltotriose contents of these syrups are still greater than that necessary for pure maltose preparation. In this study, the maltogenic amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus was engineered to decrease its transglycosylation activity with the expectation that this would enhance maltose production. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate Trp 177 variants W177F, W177Y, W177L, W177N, and W177S. The transglycosylation activities of the mutant enzymes decreased as the hydrophilicity of the residue at position 177 increased. The mutant enzymes exhibited notable enhancements in maltose production, with a minimum of maltotriose contents of 0.2%, compared with 3.2% for the wild-type enzyme. Detailed characterization of the mutant enzymes suggests that the best of them, W177S, will deliver performance superior to that of the wild-type under industrial conditions.

  10. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2013-04-01

    The reports included in this report are for project activities that occurred from October 2011 through September 2012. These reports describe in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our talented and enthusiastic principal investigators (PIs). Many of the reports describe R&D efforts that were “successful” in their pursuits and resulted in a positive outcome or technology realization. As we’ve stated before, and continue to stress, in some cases the result is a “negative” finding, for instance a technology is currently impractical or out of reach. This can often be viewed erroneously as a “failure,” but is actually a valid outcome in the pursuit of high-risk research, which often leads to unforeseen new paths of discovery. Either result advances our knowledge and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or likewise avoid costly paths not appropriate for the challenges presented. The SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation and development that returns multifold to the NNSS mission. Overall the program is a strong R&D innovation engine, benefited by an enhanced mission, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum benefit. The 23 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security.

  11. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, H. A.

    2015-04-22

    The reports contained herein are for project activities that occurred from October 2013 through September 2014. Project life cycle is indicated under the title as well as the original proposal number (in the following format: site abbreviation--ID #--originating fiscal year; e.g., STL-03-14). Each of the reports describes in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our principal investigators. As SDRD, by definition, invests in “high-risk” and hopefully “high-payoff” research, the element of uncertainty is inherent. While many of our efforts are “successful” and result in positive outcomes or technology utilization, some fall short of expectations, but cannot be construed as “failure” in the negative sense. The latter is a natural and valid part of the process of advanced research and often leads to unforeseen new pathways to future discovery. Regardless, either result advances our knowledge base and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or avoid costly and unwarranted paths for future challenges. In summary, the SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation that returns multifold to our customers, to national security, and to the general public. The program is a vibrant R&D innovation engine, benefited by its discretionary pedigree, enhanced mission spectrum, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum taxpayer benefit. The 25 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security. Further SDRD performance metrics can be found in the appendix at the end of this report.

  12. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Aerin; Shin, Jung Won; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv), we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL) with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7) and two VH (H13 and H16) mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE) as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process.

  13. Effects of site-specific mutagenesis of tyrosine 105 in a class A beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, W A; Miller, J; Fink, A L

    1994-01-01

    Tyr-105 is a conserved residue in the Class A beta-lactamases and is in close proximity to the active-site. Tyr-105 in beta-lactamase from Bacillus licheniformis was converted into Phe by site-directed mutagenesis. This mutation caused no significant effect on the structure of the enzyme and had only small effects on the catalytic properties. In particular, in comparison to the wild-type, kcat. for benzylpenicillin was increased slightly, whereas it was decreased slightly for several other substrates. For each substrate examined, Km increased 3-4-fold in the mutant compared with the wild-type enzyme. Examination of the effect of pH on the catalytic reaction revealed only small perturbations in the pK values for the acidic and basic limbs of the kcat./Km pH profiles due to the mutation. Overall effects of the Y105F substitution on the catalytic efficiency for different penicillin and cephalosporin substrates ranged from 14% to 56% compared with the wild-type activity. We conclude that Tyr-105 is not an essential residue for beta-lactamase catalysis, but does contribute to substrate binding. PMID:7980417

  14. Dopamine D1 receptor-agonist interactions: A mutagenesis and homology modeling study.

    PubMed

    Mente, Scot; Guilmette, Edward; Salafia, Michelle; Gray, David

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that regulates intracellular signaling via agonist activation. Although the number of solved GPCR X-ray structures has been steadily increasing, still no structure of the D1 receptor exists. We have used site-directed mutagenesis of 12 orthosteric vicinity residues of possible importance to G protein-coupled activation to examine the function of prototypical orthosteric D1 agonists and partial agonists. We find that residues from four different regions of the D1 receptor make significant contributions to agonist function. All compounds studied, which are catechol-amines, are found to interact with the previously identified residues: the conserved D103(3.32), as well as the trans-membrane V serine residues. Additional key interactions are found for trans-membrane VI residues F288(6.51), F289(6.52) and N292(6.55), as well as the extra-cellular loop residue L190(ECL2). Molecular dynamics simulations of a D1 homology model have been used to help put the ligand-residue interactions into context. Finally, we considered the rescaling of fold-shift data as a method to account for the change in the size of the mutated side-chain and found that this rescaling helps to relate the calculated ligand-residue energies with observed experimental fold-shifts.

  15. Facilitating Structure-Function Studies of CFTR Modulator Sites with Efficiencies in Mutagenesis and Functional Screening.

    PubMed

    Molinski, Steven V; Ahmadi, Saumel; Hung, Maurita; Bear, Christine E

    2015-12-01

    There are nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene associated with cystic fibrosis disease, and to date, the only approved drug, Kalydeco, has been effective in rescuing the functional expression of a small subset of these mutant proteins with defects in channel activation. However, there is currently an urgent need to assess other mutations for possible rescue by Kalydeco, and further, definition of the binding site of such modulators on CFTR would enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of such therapeutics. Here, we describe a simple and rapid one-step PCR-based site-directed mutagenesis method to generate mutations in the CFTR gene. This method was used to generate CFTR mutants bearing deletions (p.Gln2_Trp846del, p.Ser700_Asp835del, p.Ile1234_Arg1239del) and truncation with polyhistidine tag insertion (p.Glu1172-3Gly-6-His*), which either recapitulate a disease phenotype or render tools for modulator binding site identification, with subsequent evaluation of drug responses using a high-throughput (384-well) membrane potential-sensitive fluorescence assay of CFTR channel activity within a 1 wk time frame. This proof-of-concept study shows that these methods enable rapid and quantitative comparison of multiple CFTR mutants to emerging drugs, facilitating future large-scale efforts to stratify mutants according to their "theratype" or most promising targeted therapy.

  16. Site-directed lipid modification of IgG-binding protein by intracellular bacterial lipoprotein process.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, H; Ebihara, T; Yanagida, Y; Haruyama, T; Kobatake, E; Aizawa, M

    1999-09-24

    IgG-binding protein was genetically expressed and lipid-modified in a site-directed manner in Escherichia coli. The DNA sequence encoding the signal peptide and the nine N-terminal amino acid residues of the major lipoprotein of E. coli (lpp) was fused to the sequence of B-domain which was one of the IgG binding domains of Staphylococcal Protein A (SpA). The N-terminal cysteine residue of the resulting protein was enzymatically linked with lipids in the bacterial membrane. The lipid-modified protein was translocated at the bacterial membrane in a manner similar to native bacterial lipoprotein, and it was purified with IgG-Sepharose by affinity chromatography. The lipid modified proteins (lppB1 and lppB5) showed a similar IgG binding activity to unmodified proteins, which was estimated by competitive ELISA. Proteoliposomes of lipid modified proteins were prepared in an elegant fashion so that the IgG binding site should be properly oriented on the surface of an individual liposome by anchoring the lipid-tail into the hydrophobic layer of the liposome membrane. As compared with the unmodified one, the lipid modified protein incorporated into the proteoliposome exhibited higher IgG binding activity.

  17. Site-directed fluorescence studies of a prokaryotic ClC antiporter.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan P; Curran, Patricia K; Choi, Sean; Mindell, Joseph A

    2006-06-06

    Channels and transporters of the ClC family serve a variety of physiological functions. Understanding of their gating and transport mechanisms remains incomplete, with disagreement over the extent of protein conformational change involved. Using site-directed fluorescence labeling, we probe ClC-ec1, a prokaryotic ClC, for transport-related structural rearrangements. We specifically label cysteines introduced at several positions in the R helix of ClC-ec1 with AlexaFluor 488, an environment-sensitive fluorophore, and demonstrate that the labeled mutants show H+/Cl- transport activity indistinguishable from that of the wild-type protein. At each position that we examined we observe fluorescence changes upon acidification over the same pH range that is known to activate transport. The fluorescence change is also sensitive to Cl- concentration; furthermore, the Cl- and H+ dependencies are coupled as would be expected if the fluorescence change reflected a conformational change required for transport. Together, the results suggest that the changes in fluorescence report protein conformational changes underlying the transport process. Labeled transporters mutated to remove a glutamate critical to proton-coupled chloride transport retain pH-dependent fluorescence changes, suggesting that multiple residues confer pH dependence on the transport mechanism. These results have implications for models of transport and gating in ClC channels and transporters.

  18. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration. FY2005 report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Will

    2006-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  19. An efficient TALEN mutagenesis system in rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunling; Shan, Qiwei; Gao, Caixia

    2014-08-15

    Targeted gene mutagenesis is a powerful tool for elucidating gene function and facilitating genetic improvement in rice. TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases), consisting of a custom TALE DNA binding domain fused to a nonspecific FokI cleavage domain, are one of the most efficient genome engineering methods developed to date. The technology of TALENs allows DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to be introduced into predetermined chromosomal loci. DSBs trigger DNA repair mechanisms and can result in loss of gene function by error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), or they can be exploited to modify gene function or activity by precise homologous recombination (HR). In this paper, we describe a detailed protocol for constructing TALEN expression vectors, assessing nuclease activities in vivo using rice protoplast-based assays, generating and introducing TALEN DNAs into embryogenic calluses of rice and identifying TALEN-generated mutations at targeted genomic sites. Using these methods, T0 rice plants resulting from TALEN mutagenesis can be produced within 4-5 months.

  20. Site-Directed Spin Labeling Reveals Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Gating Motions

    PubMed Central

    Dellisanti, Cosma D.; Ghosh, Borna; Hanson, Susan M.; Raspanti, James M.; Grant, Valerie A.; Diarra, Gaoussou M.; Schuh, Abby M.; Satyshur, Kenneth; Klug, Candice S.; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are neurotransmitter-activated receptors that mediate fast synaptic transmission. In pLGICs, binding of agonist to the extracellular domain triggers a structural rearrangement that leads to the opening of an ion-conducting pore in the transmembrane domain and, in the continued presence of neurotransmitter, the channels desensitize (close). The flexible loops in each subunit that connect the extracellular binding domain (loops 2, 7, and 9) to the transmembrane channel domain (M2–M3 loop) are essential for coupling ligand binding to channel gating. Comparing the crystal structures of two bacterial pLGIC homologues, ELIC and the proton-activated GLIC, suggests channel gating is associated with rearrangements in these loops, but whether these motions accurately predict the motions in functional lipid-embedded pLGICs is unknown. Here, using site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and functional GLIC channels reconstituted into liposomes, we examined if, and how far, the loops at the ECD/TMD gating interface move during proton-dependent gating transitions from the resting to desensitized state. Loop 9 moves ∼9 Å inward toward the channel lumen in response to proton-induced desensitization. Loop 9 motions were not observed when GLIC was in detergent micelles, suggesting detergent solubilization traps the protein in a nonactivatable state and lipids are required for functional gating transitions. Proton-induced desensitization immobilizes loop 2 with little change in position. Proton-induced motion of the M2–M3 loop was not observed, suggesting its conformation is nearly identical in closed and desensitized states. Our experimentally derived distance measurements of spin-labeled GLIC suggest ELIC is not a good model for the functional resting state of GLIC, and that the crystal structure of GLIC does not correspond to a desensitized state. These findings advance our

  1. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    SciTech Connect

    Couto, Sheila G.; Cristina Nonato, M.

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  2. Role of the "helix clamp" in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase catalytic cycling as revealed by alanine-scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Beard, W A; Minnick, D T; Wade, C L; Prasad, R; Won, R L; Kumar, A; Kunkel, T A; Wilson, S H

    1996-05-24

    Residues 259-284 of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase exhibit sequence homology with other nucleic acid polymerases and have been termed the "helix clamp" (Hermann, T., Meier, T., Gotte, M., and Heumann, H. (1994) Nucleic Acids Res. 22, 4625-4633), since crystallographic evidence indicates these residues are part of two alpha-helices (alpha H and alpha I) that interact with DNA. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis has previously demonstrated that several residues in alpha H make important interactions with nucleic acid and influence frameshift fidelity. To define the role of alpha I (residues 278-286) during catalytic cycling, we performed systematic site-directed mutagenesis from position 277 through position 287 by changing each residue, one by one, to alanine. Each mutant protein was expressed and, except for L283A and T286A, was soluble. The soluble mutant enzymes were purified and characterized. In contrast to alanine mutants of alpha H, alanine substitution in alpha I did not have a significant effect on template.primer (T.P) binding as revealed by a lack of an effect on Km, T.P, Ki for 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, koff, T.P and processivity. Consistent with these observations, the fidelity of the mutant enzymes was not influenced. However, alanine mutagenesis of alpha I lowered the apparent activity of every mutant relative to wild-type enzyme. Titration of two mutants exhibiting the lowest activity with T.P (L282A and R284A) demonstrated that these mutant enzymes could bind T.P stoichiometrically and tightly. In contrast, active site concentrations determined from "burst" experiments suggest that the lower activity is due to a smaller populations of enzyme bound productively to T.P. The putative electrostatic interactions between the basic side chains of the helix clamp and the DNA backbone are either very weak or kinetically silent. In contrast, interactions between several residues of alpha H and the DNA minor groove, 3-5 nucleotides from the 3

  3. Site-directed spin labeling of proteins for distance measurements in vitro and in cells.

    PubMed

    Roser, P; Schmidt, M J; Drescher, M; Summerer, D

    2016-06-15

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy allows studying the structure, dynamics, and interactions of proteins via distance measurements in the nanometer range. We here give an overview of available spin labels, the strategies for their introduction into proteins, and the associated potentials for protein structural studies in vitro and in the context of living cells.

  4. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Demonstration of a functional relationship between aspartate 93 and Mg2+ by site-directed mutagenesis and proton, phosphorus-31, and magnesium-25 NMR.

    PubMed

    Yan, H G; Tsai, M D

    1991-06-04

    Earlier magnetic resonance studies suggested no direct interaction between Mg2+ ions and adenylate kinase (AK) in the AK.MgATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate) complex. However, recent NMR studies concluded that the carboxylate of aspartate 119 accepts a hydrogen bond from a water ligand of the bound Mg2+ ion in the muscle AK.MgATP complex [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. On the other hand, in the 2.6-A crystal structure of the yeast AK.MgAP5A [P1,P5-bis(5'-adenosyl)pentaphosphate] complex, the Mg2+ ion is in proximity to aspartate 93 [Egner, U., Tomasselli, A.G., & Schulz, G.E. (1987) J. Mol. Biol. 195, 649-658]. Substitution of Asp-93 with alanine resulted in no change in dissociation constants, 4-fold increases in Km, and a 650-fold decrease in kcat. Notable changes have been observed in the chemical shifts of the aromatic protons of histidine 36 and a few other aromatic residues. However, the results of detailed analyses of the free enzymes and the AK.MgAP5A complexes by one- and two-dimensional NMR suggested that the changes are due to localized perturbations. Thus it is concluded that Asp-93 stabilizes the transition state by ca. 3.9 kcal/mol. The next question is how. Since proton NMR results indicated that binding of Mg2+ to the AK.AP5A complex induces some changes in the proton NMR signals of WT but not those of D93A, the functional role of Asp-93 should be in binding to Mg2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Identification of an immunodominant region on the I-A beta chain using site-directed mutagenesis and DNA-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    To identify which polymorphic residues determine the allospecific antibody binding sites on A beta polypeptides, mutant Ak beta genes were constructed encoding single or multiple amino acids of the d allele at 14 polymorphic positions in the beta 1 domain. Cell lines expressing these genes were analyzed by quantitative immunofluorescence using 16 mAbs reactive to Ak beta or Ad beta. Substitution of d allele residues at positions 63 and 65-67 in the Ak beta polypeptide resulted in the loss of binding of all Ak beta-reactive antibodies and the gain of binding of most Ad beta-reactive antibodies. Two Ad beta-reactive mAbs bound to the mutant Ak beta polypeptide containing d allele- characteristic residue at position 40. In contrast, substitution of the other polymorphic residues in the NH2-terminal and COOH-terminal regions of the beta 1 domain did not alter antibody binding. PMID:2450160

  6. Stabilization of Penicillin G Acylase from Escherichia coli: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Protein Surface To Increase Multipoint Covalent Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Abian, Olga; Grazú, Valeria; Hermoso, Juan; González, Ramón; García, José Luis; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Three mutations on the penicillin acylase surface (increasing the number of Lys in a defined area) were performed. They did not alter the enzyme's stability and kinetic properties; however, after immobilization on glyoxyl-agarose, the mutant enzyme showed improved stability under all tested conditions (e.g., pH 2.5 at 4°C, pH 5 at 60°C, pH 7 at 55°C, or 60% dimethylformamide), with stabilization factors ranging from 4 to 11 compared with the native enzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose. PMID:14766616

  7. Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium: role of glutamate 186 in catalysis revealed by site-directed mutagenesis, alternate substrates, and inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium is the best catalyst known for promoting hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides, and it has potential utility in industrial saccharification processes. Kinetic parameters, kcat and kcat/Km, are more than 10-fold larger than those reported for th...

  8. Cytochrome c peroxidase-cytochrome c complex: locating the second binding domain on cytochrome c peroxidase with site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Leesch, V W; Bujons, J; Mauk, A G; Hoffman, B M

    2000-08-22

    Cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) can bind as many as two cytochrome c (Cc) molecules in an electrostatic complex. The location of the two binding domains on CcP has been probed by photoinduced interprotein electron transfer (ET) between zinc-substituted horse cytochrome c (ZnCc) and CcP with surface charge-reversal mutations and by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). These results, which are the first experimental evidence for the location of domain 2, indicate that the weak-binding domain includes residues 146-150 on CcP. CcP(E290K) has a charge-reversal mutation in the tight-binding domain, which should weaken binding, and it weakens the 1:1 complex; K(1) decreases 20-fold at 18 mM ionic strength. We have employed two mutations to probe the proposed location for the weak-binding domain on the CcP surface: (i) D148K, a "detrimental" mutation with a net (+2) change in the charge of CcP, and (ii) K149E, a "beneficial" mutation with a net (-2) change in the charge. The interactions between FeCc and CcP(WT and K149E) also have been studied with ITC. The CcP(D148K) mutation causes no substantial change in the 2:1 binding but an increase in the reactivity of the 2:1 complex. The latter can be interpreted as a long-range influence on the heme environment or, more likely, the enhancement of a minority subset of binding conformations with favorable pathways for ET. CcP(K149E) has a charge-reversal mutation in the weak-binding domain that produces a substantial increase in the 2:1 binding constant as measured by both quenching and ITC. For the 1:1 complex of CcP(WT), DeltaG(1) = -8.2 kcal/mol (K(1) = 1.3 x 10(6) M(-)(1)), DeltaH(1) = +2.7 kcal/mol, and DeltaS(1) = +37 cal/K.mol at 293 K; for the second binding stage, K(2) < 5 x 10(3) M(-)(1), but accurate thermodynamic parameters were not obtained. For the 1:1 complex of CcP(K149E), DeltaG(1) = -8.5 kcal/mol (K(1) = 2 x 10(6) M(-)(1)), DeltaH(1) = +2. 0 kcal/mol, and DeltaS(1) = +36 cal/K.mol; for the second stage, DeltaG(2) = -5.5 kcal/mol (K(1) = 1.3 x 10(4) M(-)(1)), DeltaH(2) = +2.9 kcal/mol, and DeltaS(2) = +29 cal/K.mol.

  9. Alternative method for diagnosis of two polymorphisms in the human transforming growth factor-beta1 by PCR-mediated double site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hubacek, J A; Lacha, J

    2000-05-01

    Cytokine transforming growth factor-beta1 plays an important role in physiological processes during ontogenesis, cell differentiation, immune responses, carcinogenesis, inflammation, wound healing, fibroproduction, progression of renal insufficiency and arteriosclerotic lesion development. Its biological function is influenced through the two signal peptide polymorphisms. We describe a new, economical, easy and fast alternative method which allows detection of both polymorphisms from one PCR product with subsequent restriction analysis with two different restriction enzymes. This method could facilitate further research on the role of this cytokine in human disease.

  10. Molecular cloning, homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis of vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidase (GcVBPO1) from Gracilaria changii (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Baharum, H; Chu, W-C; Teo, S-S; Ng, K-Y; Rahim, R Abdul; Ho, C-L

    2013-08-01

    Vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases belong to a class of vanadium enzymes that may have potential industrial and pharmaceutical applications due to their high stability. In this study, the 5'-flanking genomic sequence and complete reading frame encoding vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidase (GcVBPO1) was cloned from the red seaweed, Fracilaria changii, and the recombinant protein was biochemically characterized. The deduced amino acid sequence of GcVBPO1 is 1818 nucleotides in length, sharing 49% identity with the vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidases from Corralina officinalis and Cor. pilulifera, respectively. The amino acid residues associated with the binding site of vanadate cofactor were found to be conserved. The Km value of recombinant GcVBPO1 for Br(-) was 4.69 mM, while its Vmax was 10.61 μkat mg(-1) at pH 7. Substitution of Arg(379) with His(379) in the recombinant protein caused a lower affinity for Br(-), while substitution of Arg(379) with Phe(379) not only increased its affinity for Br(-) but also enabled the mutant enzyme to oxidize Cl(-). The mutant Arg(379)Phe was also found to have a lower affinity for I(-), as compared to the wild-type GcVBPO1 and mutant Arg(379)His. In addition, the Arg(379)Phe mutant has a slightly higher affinity for H2O2 compared to the wild-type GcVBPO1. Multiple cis-acting regulatory elements associated with light response, hormone signaling, and meristem expression were detected at the 5'-flanking genomic sequence of GcVBPO1. The transcript abundance of GcVBPO1 was relatively higher in seaweed samples treated with 50 parts per thousand (ppt) artificial seawater (ASW) compared to those treated in 10 and 30 ppt ASW, in support of its role in the abiotic stress response of seaweed.

  11. Characterization of the free energy dependence of an interprotein electron transfer reaction by variation of pH and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Dow, Brian A; Davidson, Victor L

    2015-10-01

    The interprotein electron transfer (ET) reactions of the cupredoxin amicyanin, which mediates ET from the tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor of methylamine dehydrogenase to cytochrome c-551i have been extensively studied. However, it was not possible to perform certain key experiments in that native system. This study examines the ET reaction from reduced amicyanin to an alternative electron acceptor, the diheme protein MauG. It was possible to vary the ΔG° for this ET reaction by simply changing pH to determine the dependence of kET on ΔG°. A P94A mutation of amicyanin significantly altered its oxidation-reduction midpoint potential value. It was not possible to study the ET from reduced P94A amicyanin to cytochrome c-551i in the native system because that reaction was kinetically coupled. However, the reaction from reduced P94A amicyanin to MauG was a true ET reaction and it was possible to determine values of reorganization energy (λ) and electronic coupling for the reactions of this variant as well as native amicyanin. Comparison of the λ values associated with the ET reactions between amicyanin and the TTQ of methylamine dehydrogenase, the diheme center of MauG and the single heme of cytochrome c-551i, provides insight into the factors that dictate the λ values for the respective reactions. These results demonstrate how study of ET reactions with alternative redox partner proteins can complement and enhance our understanding of the reactions with the natural redox partners, and further our understanding of mechanisms of protein ET reactions.

  12. Adenovirus DNA replication in vitro: site-directed mutagenesis of the nuclear factor I binding site of the Ad2 origin.

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, E; van Driel, W; Tromp, M; van Boom, J; van der Vliet, P C

    1985-01-01

    The template requirements for efficient adenovirus DNA replication were studied in vitro in a reconstituted system with cloned DNA fragments, containing the Ad2 origin region, as templates. Replication is enhanced by nuclear factor I, a cellular protein that binds specifically to the Ad2 origin. This stimulation is shown to be strongly dependent on the concentration of the adenovirus DNA binding protein. Using synthetic oligonucleotides we have constructed plasmids with base substitutions in the nuclear factor I binding region. Footprint analysis and competition filter binding studies show that two of the three small blocks of conserved nucleotides in this region are involved in the binding of nuclear factor I. The binding affinity can be influenced by the base composition of the degenerate region just outside these two blocks. In vitro initiation and DNA chain elongation experiments with the mutants demonstrate that binding of nuclear factor I to the Ad2 origin is necessary for stimulation. However, binding alone is not always sufficient since a mutation which only slightly disturbs binding is strongly impaired in stimulation of DNA replication by nuclear factor I. Images PMID:4040630

  13. Redesign of the coenzyme specificity in L-lactate dehydrogenase from bacillus stearothermophilus using site-directed mutagenesis and media engineering.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, N; Ryde, U; Bülow, L

    1999-10-01

    L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from Bacillus stearothermophilus is a redox enzyme which has a strong preference for NADH over NADPH as coenzyme. To exclude NADPH from the coenzyme-binding pocket, LDH contains a conserved aspartate residue at position 52. However, this residue is probably not solely responsible for the NADH specificity. In this report we examine the possibilities of altering the coenzyme specificity of LDH by introducing a range of different point mutations in the coenzyme-binding domain. Furthermore, after choosing the mutant with the highest selectivity for NADPH, we also investigated the possibility of further altering the coenzyme specificity by adding an organic solvent to the reaction mixture. The LDH mutant, I51K:D52S, exhibited a 56-fold increased specificity to NADPH over the wild-type LDH in a reaction mixture containing 15% methanol. Furthermore, the NADPH turnover number of this mutant was increased almost fourfold as compared with wild-type LDH. To explain the altered coenzyme specificity exhibited by the D52SI51K double mutant, molecular dynamics simulations were performed.

  14. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Spontaneous mutagenesis of a plant potyvirus genome after insertion of a foreign gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dolja, V V; Herndon, K L; Pirone, T P; Carrington, J C

    1993-01-01

    The RNA genome of tobacco etch potyvirus (TEV) was engineered to express bacterial beta-glucuronidase (GUS) fused to the virus helper component proteinase (HC-Pro). It was shown previously that prolonged periods (approximately 1 month) of TEV-GUS propagation in plants resulted in the appearance of spontaneous deletion variants. Nine deletion mutants were identified by nucleotide sequence analysis of 40 cDNA clones obtained after polymerase chain reaction amplification. The mutants were missing between 1,741 and 2,074 nucleotides from TEV-GUS, including the sequences coding for most of GUS and the N-terminal region of HC-Pro. This region of HC-Pro contains determinants involved in helper component activity during aphid transmission, as well as a highly conserved series of cysteine residues. The deletion variants were shown to replicate and move systemically without the aid of a helper virus. Infectious viruses harboring the two largest HC-Pro deletions (termed TEV-2del and TEV-7del) were reconstructed by subcloning the corresponding mutated regions into full-length DNA copies of the TEV genome. Characterization of these and additional variants derived by site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that deletion of sequences coding for the HC-Pro N-terminal domain had a negative effect on accumulation of viral RNA and coat protein. The TEV-2del variant possessed an aphid-nontransmissible phenotype that could be rescued partially by prefeeding of aphids on active HC-Pro from another potyvirus. These data suggest that the N-terminal domain of HC-Pro or its coding sequence enhances virus replication or genome expression but does not provide an activity essential for these processes. The function of this domain, as well as a proposed deletion mechanism involving nonhomologous recombination, is discussed. Images PMID:8371351

  16. Mutagenesis assays of human amniotic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Everson, R.B.; Milne, K.L.; Warbuton, D.; McClamrock, H.D.; Buchanan, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Extracts of amniocentesis samples from 144 women were tested for the presence of mutagenic substances using tester strain TA1538 in the Ames Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test. Because the volume of amniotic fluid in these samples was limited (generally less than 10 ml), the authors investigated modifications of this mutagenesis assay that could increase its ability to detect effects from small quantities of test material. Using mutagenicity in samples of urine from smokers as a model, it appeared that improved ability to detect small amounts of mutagen could be obtained by reducing volumes of media and reagents while keeping the amount of test sample constant. Tests of amniotic fluid extracts by this modified procedure showed small increases in revertants, about 50% above dimethylsulfoxide solvent control values. The increases suggest the presence of small amounts of mutagenic material in many of the amniotic fluid samples. At the doses employed, mutagenic activity in these samples was not associated with maternal smoking.

  17. Design of protease-resistant myelin basic protein-derived peptides by cleavage site directed amino acid substitutions.

    PubMed

    Burster, Timo; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Boehm, Bernhard O; Dunn, Shannon; Rotzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Weber, Ekkehard; Verhelst, Steven H L; Kalbacher, Hubert; Driessen, Christoph

    2007-11-15

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is considered to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. An attractive strategy to prevent activation of autoaggressive T cells in MS, is the use of altered peptide ligands (APL), which bind to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. To be of clinical use, APL must be capable of resisting hostile environments including the proteolytic machinery of antigen presenting cells (APC). The current design of APL relies on cost- and labour-intensive strategies. To overcome these major drawbacks, we used a deductive approach which involved modifying proteolytic cleavage sites in APL. Cleavage site-directed amino acid substitution of the autoantigen myelin basic protein (MBP) resulted in lysosomal protease-resistant, high-affinity binding peptides. In addition, these peptides mitigated T cell activation in a similar fashion as conventional APL. The strategy outlined allows the development of protease-resistant APL and provides a universal design strategy to improve peptide-based immunotherapeutics.

  18. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation.

    PubMed

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-05-07

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy.

  19. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy. PMID:25950479

  20. New recA mutations that dissociate the various RecA protein activities in Escherichia coli provide evidence for an additional role for RecA protein in UV mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Dutreix, M; Moreau, P L; Bailone, A; Galibert, F; Battista, J R; Walker, G C; Devoret, R

    1989-01-01

    To isolate strains with new recA mutations that differentially affect RecA protein functions, we mutagenized in vitro the recA gene carried by plasmid mini-F and then introduced the mini-F-recA plasmid into a delta recA host that was lysogenic for prophage phi 80 and carried a lac duplication. By scoring prophage induction and recombination of the lac duplication, we isolated new recA mutations. A strain carrying mutation recA1734 (Arg-243 changed to Leu) was found to be deficient in phi 80 induction but proficient in recombination. The mutation rendered the host not mutable by UV, even in a lexA(Def) background. Yet, the recA1734 host became mutable upon introduction of a plasmid encoding UmuD*, the active carboxyl-terminal fragment of UmuD. Although the recA1734 mutation permits cleavage of lambda and LexA repressors, it renders the host deficient in the cleavage of phi 80 repressor and UmuD protein. Another strain carrying mutation recA1730 (Ser-117 changed to Phe) was found to be proficient in phi 80 induction but deficient in recombination. The recombination defect conferred by the mutation was partly alleviated in a cell devoid of LexA repressor, suggesting that, when amplified, RecA1730 protein is active in recombination. Since LexA protein was poorly cleaved in the recA1730 strain while phage lambda was induced, we conclude that RecA1730 protein cannot specifically mediate LexA protein cleavage. Our results show that the recA1734 and recA1730 mutations differentially affect cleavage of various substrates. The recA1730 mutation prevented UV mutagenesis, even upon introduction into the host of a plasmid encoding UmuD* and was dominant over recA+. With respect to other RecA functions, recA1730 was recessive to recA+. This demonstrates that RecA protein has an additional role in mutagenesis beside mediating the cleavage of LexA and UmuD proteins. Images PMID:2651400

  1. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development, FY 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2008-02-20

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2007. Twenty-nine new projects were selected for funding this year, and eight projects started in FY 2006 were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.67 million, for an average per-project cost of $153 thousand. An external audit conducted in September 2007 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: programmatic adoption of 8 SDRD-developed technologies; the filing of 9 invention disclosures for innovation evolving from SDRD projects; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD Symposium that was broadly attended by Nevada Test Site (NTS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), LDRD, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2007 projects; and the successful completion of 37 R&D projects, as presented in this report. In response to a company-wide call, authors throughout the NTS complex submitted 182 proposals for FY 2007 SDRD projects. The SDRD program has seen a dramatic increase in the yearly total of submitted proposals--from 69 in FY 2002 to 182 this year--while the number of projects funded has actually decreased from a program high of 57 in FY 2004. The overall effect of this trend has helped ensure an increasingly competitive program that benefited from a broader set of innovative ideas, making project selection both challenging and rewarding. Proposals were evaluated for technical merit, including such factors as innovation, probability of success, potential benefit, and mission applicability. Authors and reviewers benefited from the use of a shortfalls list entitled the 'NTS Technology Needs Assessment' that was compiled from NTS, National Weapons Laboratory (NWL), and

  2. Improved activity and modulated action pattern obtained by random mutagenesis at the fourth beta-alpha loop involved in substrate binding to the catalytic (beta/alpha)8-barrel domain of barley alpha-amylase 1.

    PubMed

    Matsui, I; Svensson, B

    1997-09-05

    The functionality of the sequence Arg183-Gly184-Tyr185 of the substrate binding fourth beta-alpha loop in the (beta/alpha)8-barrel of barley alpha-amylase isozyme 1 (AMY1) was studied by random mutagenesis. A motif of polar Gly184 hydrophobic residues was present in active mutants, selected by starch plate screening of yeast transformants. Gly184 was important, probably due to the carbonyl group binding to Ca2+ and the spatial proximity of Phe181. Mutation of both flanking residues as in Ser183-Gly184-Met185 (SGM-) and TGL-AMY1 decreased the Ca2+ affinity. SGM-AMY1 has 2-fold increased activity for amylose but reduced activity on maltooligosaccharides, whereas KGY-AMY1 has up to 3-fold elevated activity toward the oligosaccharides. TGL-AMY1 has modest activity on all substrates. Shifted action pattern on maltooligosaccharides for NGY-, SGM-, and TGL-AMY1 support that Arg183 in wild type is located at subsites +1 and +2, accommodating two sugar rings toward the reducing end from the site of cleavage. In the crystal structure of barley alpha-amylase 2 (AMY2), Lys182 (equivalent to AMY1 Arg183) is hydrogen-bonded with sugar OH-3 in subsite +2. Higher Ki app for acarbose inhibition of KGY-AMY1 and parent AMY1 compared with the other mutants suggests favorable substrate interactions for Arg/Lys183. KGY-AMY1 was not inhibited by the AMY2-specific proteinaceous barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor, although Lys182 of AMY2 is salt-linked to the inhibitor.

  3. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of the catalytic residues of the papain family protease bleomycin hydrolase: new insights into active-site structure

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, Paul A.; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2006-01-01

    Bleomycin hydrolase (BH) is a hexameric papain family cysteine protease which is involved in preparing peptides for antigen presentation and has been implicated in tumour cell resistance to bleomycin chemotherapy. Structures of active-site mutants of yeast BH yielded unexpected results. Replacement of the active-site asparagine with alanine, valine or leucine results in the destabilization of the histidine side chain, demonstrating unambiguously the role of the asparagine residue in correctly positioning the histidine for catalysis. Replacement of the histidine with alanine or leucine destabilizes the asparagine position, indicating a delicate arrangement of the active-site residues. In all of the mutants, the C-terminus of the protein, which lies in the active site, protrudes further into the active site. All mutants were compromised in their catalytic activity. The structures also revealed the importance of a tightly bound water molecule which stabilizes a loop near the active site and which is conserved throughout the papain family. It is displaced in a number of the mutants, causing destabilization of this loop and a nearby loop, resulting in a large movement of the active-site cysteine. The results imply that this water molecule plays a key structural role in this family of enzymes. PMID:17007609

  4. Minimizing off-Target Mutagenesis Risks Caused by Programmable Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Kentaro; Gee, Peter; Hotta, Akitsu

    2015-01-01

    Programmable nucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats associated protein-9 (CRISPR-Cas9), hold tremendous potential for applications in the clinical setting to treat genetic diseases or prevent infectious diseases. However, because the accuracy of DNA recognition by these nucleases is not always perfect, off-target mutagenesis may result in undesirable adverse events in treated patients such as cellular toxicity or tumorigenesis. Therefore, designing nucleases and analyzing their activity must be carefully evaluated to minimize off-target mutagenesis. Furthermore, rigorous genomic testing will be important to ensure the integrity of nuclease modified cells. In this review, we provide an overview of available nuclease designing platforms, nuclease engineering approaches to minimize off-target activity, and methods to evaluate both on- and off-target cleavage of CRISPR-Cas9. PMID:26501275

  5. Random mutagenesis by error-prone pol plasmid replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David L; Lilly, Joshua; Hernandez, Jaime; Romsdahl, Jillian; Troll, Christopher J; Camps, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Directed evolution is an approach that mimics natural evolution in the laboratory with the goal of modifying existing enzymatic activities or of generating new ones. The identification of mutants with desired properties involves the generation of genetic diversity coupled with a functional selection or screen. Genetic diversity can be generated using PCR or using in vivo methods such as chemical mutagenesis or error-prone replication of the desired sequence in a mutator strain. In vivo mutagenesis methods facilitate iterative selection because they do not require cloning, but generally produce a low mutation density with mutations not restricted to specific genes or areas within a gene. For this reason, this approach is typically used to generate new biochemical properties when large numbers of mutants can be screened or selected. Here we describe protocols for an advanced in vivo mutagenesis method that is based on error-prone replication of a ColE1 plasmid bearing the gene of interest. Compared to other in vivo mutagenesis methods, this plasmid-targeted approach allows increased mutation loads and facilitates iterative selection approaches. We also describe the mutation spectrum for this mutagenesis methodology in detail, and, using cycle 3 GFP as a target for mutagenesis, we illustrate the phenotypic diversity that can be generated using our method. In sum, error-prone Pol I replication is a mutagenesis method that is ideally suited for the evolution of new biochemical activities when a functional selection is available.

  6. Identifying and quantitating conformational exchange in membrane proteins using site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Cafiso, David S

    2014-10-21

    Protein structures are not static but sample different conformations over a range of amplitudes and time scales. These fluctuations may involve relatively small changes in bond angles or quite large rearrangements in secondary structure and tertiary fold. The equilibrium between discrete structural substates on the microsecond to millisecond time scale is sometimes termed conformational exchange. Protein dynamics and conformational exchange are believed to provide the basis for many important activities, such as protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, enzymatic activity and protein allostery; however, for many proteins, the dynamics and conformational exchange that lead to function are poorly defined. Spectroscopic methods, such as NMR, are among the most important methods to explore protein dynamics and conformational exchange; however, they are difficult to implement in some systems and with some types of exchange events. Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is an EPR based approach that is particularly well-suited to high molecular-weight systems such as membrane proteins. Because of the relatively fast time scale for EPR spectroscopy, it is an excellent method to examine exchange. Conformations that are in exchange are captured as distinct populations in the EPR spectrum, and this feature when combined with the use of methods that can shift the free energy of conformational substates allows one to identify regions of proteins that are in dynamic exchange. In addition, modern pulse EPR methods have the ability to examine conformational heterogeneity, resolve discrete protein states, and identify the substates in exchange. Protein crystallography has provided high-resolution models for a number of membrane proteins; but because of conformational exchange, these models do not always reflect the structures that are present when the protein is in a native bilayer environment. In the case of the Escherichia coli vitamin B12 transporter, BtuB, the energy

  7. Identifying and Quantitating Conformational Exchange in Membrane Proteins Using Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Protein structures are not static but sample different conformations over a range of amplitudes and time scales. These fluctuations may involve relatively small changes in bond angles or quite large rearrangements in secondary structure and tertiary fold. The equilibrium between discrete structural substates on the microsecond to millisecond time scale is sometimes termed conformational exchange. Protein dynamics and conformational exchange are believed to provide the basis for many important activities, such as protein–protein and protein–ligand interactions, enzymatic activity and protein allostery; however, for many proteins, the dynamics and conformational exchange that lead to function are poorly defined. Spectroscopic methods, such as NMR, are among the most important methods to explore protein dynamics and conformational exchange; however, they are difficult to implement in some systems and with some types of exchange events. Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is an EPR based approach that is particularly well-suited to high molecular-weight systems such as membrane proteins. Because of the relatively fast time scale for EPR spectroscopy, it is an excellent method to examine exchange. Conformations that are in exchange are captured as distinct populations in the EPR spectrum, and this feature when combined with the use of methods that can shift the free energy of conformational substates allows one to identify regions of proteins that are in dynamic exchange. In addition, modern pulse EPR methods have the ability to examine conformational heterogeneity, resolve discrete protein states, and identify the substates in exchange. Protein crystallography has provided high-resolution models for a number of membrane proteins; but because of conformational exchange, these models do not always reflect the structures that are present when the protein is in a native bilayer environment. In the case of the Escherichia coli vitamin B12 transporter, Btu

  8. Transposon mutagenesis of probiotic Lactobacillus casei identifies asnH, an asparagine synthetase gene involved in its immune-activating capacity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masahiro; Kim, Yun-Gi; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Takuya; Kiwaki, Mayumi; Nomoto, Koji; Danbara, Hirofumi; Okada, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei ATCC 27139 enhances host innate immunity, and the J1 phage-resistant mutants of this strain lose the activity. A transposon insertion mutant library of L. casei ATCC 27139 was constructed, and nine J1 phage-resistant mutants out of them were obtained. Cloning and sequencing analyses identified three independent genes that were disrupted by insertion of the transposon element: asnH, encoding asparagine synthetase, and dnaJ and dnaK, encoding the molecular chaperones DnaJ and DnaK, respectively. Using an in vivo mouse model of Listeria infection, only asnH mutant showed deficiency in their ability to enhance host innate immunity, and complementation of the mutation by introduction of the wild-type asnH in the mutant strain recovered the immuno-augmenting activity. AsnH protein exhibited asparagine synthetase activity when the lysozyme-treated cell wall extracts of L. casei ATCC 27139 was added as substrate. The asnH mutants lost the thick and rigid peptidoglycan features that are characteristic to the wild-type cells, indicating that AsnH of L. casei is involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. These results indicate that asnH is required for the construction of the peptidoglycan composition involved in the immune-activating capacity of L. casei ATCC 27139.

  9. Recovery of active beta-lactamases from Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 hybrid by random mutagenesis by using a dnaQ strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Mazinani, S M; Nakajima, E; Ihara, Y; Kameyama, K Z; Sugimoto, K

    1996-01-01

    Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 beta-lactamases that belong to molecular class A with 37% amino acid similarity were examined to find the relationship between amino acid residues and activity of enzymes. MICs of ampicillin were > 2,000 micrograms/ml for Escherichia coli cells producing these enzymes. We have made 18 hybrid genes by substituting the coding region of the P. vulgaris beta-lactamase gene with the equivalent portions from the RTEM-1 gene. Most of these hybrids produced inactive proteins, but a few hybrid enzymes had partial or trace activity. From one of the hybrid genes (MIC of ampicillin, 100 micrograms/ml), we recovered three kinds of active mutants which provided ampicillin MICs of 1,000 micrograms/ml by the selection of spontaneous mutations in a dnaQ strain of E. coli. In these mutants, Leu-148, Met-182, and Tyr-274 were replaced with Val, Thr, and His, respectively. These amino acids have not been identified as residues with functional roles in substrate hydrolysis. Furthermore, from these hybrid mutants, we obtained a second set of mutants which conferred ampicillin MICs of 1,500 micrograms/ml. Interestingly, the second mutations were limited to these three amino acid substitutions. These amino acid residues which do not directly interact with substrates have an effect on enzyme activity. These mutant enzymes exhibited lower K(m) values for cephaloridine than both parental enzymes. PMID:8878598

  10. Recovery of active beta-lactamases from Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 hybrid by random mutagenesis by using a dnaQ strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Mazinani, S M; Nakajima, E; Ihara, Y; Kameyama, K Z; Sugimoto, K

    1996-09-01

    Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 beta-lactamases that belong to molecular class A with 37% amino acid similarity were examined to find the relationship between amino acid residues and activity of enzymes. MICs of ampicillin were > 2,000 micrograms/ml for Escherichia coli cells producing these enzymes. We have made 18 hybrid genes by substituting the coding region of the P. vulgaris beta-lactamase gene with the equivalent portions from the RTEM-1 gene. Most of these hybrids produced inactive proteins, but a few hybrid enzymes had partial or trace activity. From one of the hybrid genes (MIC of ampicillin, 100 micrograms/ml), we recovered three kinds of active mutants which provided ampicillin MICs of 1,000 micrograms/ml by the selection of spontaneous mutations in a dnaQ strain of E. coli. In these mutants, Leu-148, Met-182, and Tyr-274 were replaced with Val, Thr, and His, respectively. These amino acids have not been identified as residues with functional roles in substrate hydrolysis. Furthermore, from these hybrid mutants, we obtained a second set of mutants which conferred ampicillin MICs of 1,500 micrograms/ml. Interestingly, the second mutations were limited to these three amino acid substitutions. These amino acid residues which do not directly interact with substrates have an effect on enzyme activity. These mutant enzymes exhibited lower K(m) values for cephaloridine than both parental enzymes.

  11. Enhanced antifungal and insect α-amylase inhibitory activities of Alpha-TvD1, a peptide variant of Tephrosia villosa defensin (TvD1) generated through in vitro mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, S; Imani, J; Tanneeru, K; Guruprasad, L; Kogel, K H; Kirti, P B

    2012-02-01

    TvD1 is a small, cationic, and highly stable defensin from the weedy legume, Tephrosia villosa with demonstrated in vitro antifungal activity. We show here peptide modifications in TvD1 that lead to enhanced antifungal activities. Three peptide variants, S32R, D37R, and Alpha-TvD1 (-G-M-T-R-T-) with variations in and around the β2-β3 loop region that imposes the two β-strands, β2 and β3 were generated through in vitro mutagenesis. Alpha-TvD1 exhibited enhanced antifungal activity against the fungal pathogens, Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium oxysporum with respective IC(50) values of 2.5 μM and 3.0 μM, when compared to S32R (<5.0 μM and >5.0 μM), D37R (5.5 μM and 4.5 μM), and the wild type TvD1 (6.5 μM). Because of the enhanced antifungal activity, this variant peptide was characterized further. Growth of F. culmorum in the presence of Alpha-TvD1 showed deformities in hyphal walls and nuclear damage. With respect to the plant pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000, both Alpha-TvD1 and the wild type TvD1 showed comparable antibacterial activity. Both wild type TvD1 and Alpha-TvD1 displayed inhibitory activity against the α-amylase of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor (TMA) with the latter showing enhanced activity. The human salivary as well as barley α-amylase activities were not inhibited even at concentrations of up to 50 μM, which has been predicted to be due to differences in the pocket size and the size of the interacting loops. Present study shows that the variant Alpha-TvD1 exhibits enhanced antifungal as well as insect α-amylase inhibitory activity.

  12. A comprehensive alanine-scanning mutagenesis study reveals roles for salt bridges in the structure and activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fei; Yue, Shousong; Peng, Zhenying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Chen, Gao; Yu, Jinhui; Xuan, Ning; Bi, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between salt bridges and stability/enzymatic activity is unclear. We studied this relationship by systematic alanine-scanning mutation analysis using the typical M4 family metalloprotease Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE, also known as pseudolysin) as a model. Structural analysis revealed seven salt bridges in the PAE structure. We constructed ten mutants for six salt bridges. Among these mutants, six (Asp189Ala, Arg179Ala, Asp201Ala, Arg205Ala, Arg245Ala and Glu249Ala) were active and four (Asp168Ala, Arg198Ala, Arg253Ala, and Arg279Ala) were inactive. Five mutants were purified, and their catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km), half-lives (t1/2) and thermal unfolding curves were compared with those of PAE. Mutants Asp189Ala and Arg179Ala both showed decreased thermal stabilities and increased activities, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp189-Arg179 stabilizes the protein at the expense of catalytic efficiency. In contrast, mutants Asp201Ala and Arg205Ala both showed slightly increased thermal stability and slightly decreased activity, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp201-Arg205 destabilizes the protein. Mutant Glu249Ala is related to a C-terminal salt bridge network and showed both decreased thermal stability and decreased activity. Furthermore, Glu249Ala showed a thermal unfolding curve with three discernable states [the native state (N), the partially unfolded state (I) and the unfolded state (U)]. In comparison, there were only two discernable states (N and U) in the thermal unfolding curve of PAE. These results suggest that Glu249 is important for catalytic efficiency, stability and unfolding cooperativity. This study represents a systematic mutational analyses of salt bridges in the model metalloprotease PAE and provides important insights into the structure-function relationship of enzymes.

  13. Direct interaction of multidrug efflux transporter AcrB and outer membrane channel TolC detected via site-directed disulfide cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Norihisa; Murakami, Satoshi; Oyama, Yoshiaki; Ishiguro, Masaji; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2005-08-23

    The AcrAB-TolC system exports a wide variety of drugs and toxic compounds, and confers intrinsic drug tolerance on Escherichia coli. The crystal structures suggested that AcrB and TolC directly dock with each other. However, biochemical and biophysical evidence of their interaction has been contradictory until recently. In this study, we examine the interaction sites by means of in vivo disulfide cross-linking between cysteine residues introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at the tops of the vertical hairpins of AcrB and the bottoms of the coiled coils of polyhistidine-tagged TolC molecules, which are structurally predicted docking sites. The AcrB-TolC complex formed through disulfide cross-linking was detected when a specific pair of mutants was coexpressed in E. coli. Our observations suggested that the AcrB-TolC complex may be formed through a two-step mechanism via transient tip-to-tip interaction of AcrB and TolC. The cross-linking was not affected by AcrA, the substrate, or a putative proton coupling site mutation.

  14. Site-directed mutations and kinetic studies show key residues involved in alkylammonium interactions and reveal two sites for phosphorylcholine in Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Beassoni, Paola R; Otero, Lisandro H; Boetsch, Cristhian; Domenech, Carlos E; González-Nilo, Fernado D; Lisa, Angela T

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine (Pcho) to produce choline and inorganic phosphate. PchP belongs to the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily (HAD) and possesses the three characteristic motifs of this family: motif I ((31)D and (33)D), motif II ((166)S), and motif III ((242)K, (261)G, (262)D and (267)D), which fold to form the catalytic site that binds the metal ion and the phosphate moiety of Pcho. Based on comparisons to the PHOSPHO1 and PHOSPHO2 human enzymes and the choline-binding proteins of Gram-(+) bacteria, we selected residues (42)E and (43)E and the aromatic triplet (82)YYY(84) for site-directed mutagenesis to study the interactions with Pcho and p-nitrophenylphosphate as substrates of PchP. Because mutations in (42)E, (43)E and the three tyrosine residues affect both the substrate affinity and the inhibitory effect produced by high Pcho concentrations, we postulate that two sites, one catalytic and one inhibitory, are present in PchP and that they are adjacent and share residues.

  15. Analysis by substituted cysteine scanning mutagenesis of the fourth transmembrane domain of the CXCR4 receptor in its inactive and active state.

    PubMed

    Boulais, Philip E; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard

    2013-02-15

    The chemokine SDF-1 (CXCL12) selectively binds to CXCR4, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. In this study, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) to identify specific residues of the fourth transmembrane domain (TM4) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of CXCR4 in its inactive and active state. We successively substituted each residue from E179((4.68)) to K154((4.43)) with cysteine and expressed the mutants in COS-7 cells. Mutant receptors were then alkylated with methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA), and binding inhibition was monitored using the CXCR4 antagonist FC131 [cyclo(-D-Tyr(1)-Arg(2)-Arg(3)-Nal(4)-Gly(5)-)], which displays anti-HIV activity. MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant reduction of FC131 binding to D171C((4.60)) and P170C((4.59)). To assess TM4 accessibility in an active state of CXCR4, TM4 cysteine mutants were transposed within the constitutively active mutant N119S((3.35)). MTSEA treatment of TM4 mutants N119S-S178C((4.67)), N119S-V177C((4.66)) and N119S-I173C((4.62)) resulted in a significant reduction in FC131 binding. Protection assays using FC131 prior to MTSEA treatment significantly reduced the alkylation of all MTSEA-sensitive mutants. The accessibility of the D171C((4.60)) and P170C((4.59)) residues suggests that they are oriented towards a water-accessible area of the binding pocket of CXCR4. S178C((4.67)), V177C((4.66)) and I173C((4.62)) showed binding inhibition only in an N119S((3.35)) background. Taken together our results suggest that TM4 and ECL2 undergo conformational changes during CXCR4 activation and also demonstrate how TM4 is an important feature for the binding of anti-HIV compounds.

  16. Maize-targeted mutagenesis: A knockout resource for maize.

    PubMed

    May, Bruce P; Liu, Hong; Vollbrecht, Erik; Senior, Lynn; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Roh, Donna; Pan, Xiaokang; Stein, Lincoln; Freeling, Mike; Alexander, Danny; Martienssen, Rob

    2003-09-30

    We describe an efficient system for site-selected transposon mutagenesis in maize. A total of 43,776 F1 plants were generated by using Robertson's Mutator (Mu) pollen parents and self-pollinated to establish a library of transposon-mutagenized seed. The frequency of new seed mutants was between 10-4 and 10-5 per F1 plant. As a service to the maize community, maize-targeted mutagenesis selects insertions in genes of interest from this library by using the PCR. Pedigree, knockout, sequence, phenotype, and other information is stored in a powerful interactive database (maize-targeted mutagenesis database) that enables analysis of the entire population and the handling of knockout requests. By inhibiting Mu activity in most F1 plants, we sought to reduce somatic insertions that may cause false positives selected from pooled tissue. By monitoring the remaining Mu activity in the F2, however, we demonstrate that seed phenotypes depend on it, and false positives occur in lines that appear to lack it. We conclude that more than half of all mutations arising in this population are suppressed on losing Mu activity. These results have implications for epigenetic models of inbreeding and for functional genomics.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human septin 1 with site-directed mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hao; Yu, Wen-bo; Li, Shu-xing; Ding, Xiang-ming; Yu, Long; Bi, Ru-Chang

    2006-02-01

    The homogeneity of septin 1 has been improved by site-directed mutation of serine residues and only a small alteration in the secondary structure is observed to arise from the mutations. Crystals of the septin 1 mutant were grown and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Septin 1 is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of GTP-binding and filament-forming proteins named septins, which function in diverse processes including cytokinasis, vesicle trafficking, apoptosis, remodelling of the cytoskeleton, infection, neurodegeneration and neoplasia. Human septin 1 has been expressed and purified, but suffers from severe aggregation. Studies have shown that septin 1 with site-directed mutations of five serine residues (Ser19, Ser206, Ser307, Ser312 and Ser315) has a much lower degree of aggregation and better structural homogeneity and that the mutations cause only slight perturbations in the secondary structure of septin 1. This septin 1 mutant was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The space group is P422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.028, c = 137.852 Å.

  18. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Nicole R.; Hecht, Karen A.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-01-08

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins incorporating a tetracysteine tag for site-directed labeling with biarsenical affinity probes and either EGFP or single chain antibody to test colocalization of probes with the EGFP-tagged recombinant protein or binding of biosilica-immobilized antibodies to large and small molecule antigens, respectively. Site-directed labeling with the biarsenical probes demonstrated colocalization with EGFP-encoded proteins in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting their use in studying biosilica maturation. Isolated biosilica transformed with a single chain antibody against either the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT) effectively bound the respective antigens. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime of the TNT surrogate Alexa Fluor 555-trinitrobenzene reflected the high binding specificity of the transformed isolated biosilica. These results demonstrated the potential use of biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies as binders for large and small molecule antigens in sensing and therapeutics.

  19. Site-directed immobilisation of antibody fragments for detection of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Vikholm-Lundin, Inger; Albers, Willem M

    2006-01-15

    C-reactive protein, CRP antibody Fab'-fragments have been attached on pre-cleaned gold slides and protein repellent polymers have been used to block the remaining free space in between the antibody fragments. At optimal conditions the antibody fragments are site-directly immobilised on the surface and non-specific binding is reduced. The amount of Fab'-fragments in the polymer host monolayer has been optimised for various buffers. Binding of CRP to Fab'-fragment/polymer layers produced in phosphate buffered saline decreased with NaCl salt concentration. In a 1M NaCl phosphate buffer, the antibodies seem to be randomly oriented on the surface with a similar response to CRP as that of an antibody F(ab)(2)-fragment layer. In a 150 mM NaCl phosphate buffer, on the other hand, the fragments seem to be site-directly oriented and the response to CRP was fivefold. The highest response to CRP was obtained to a layer with a Fab'-fragment concentration of 60 microg/ml. CRP could be detected in a concentration range of 1 ng/ml to 50 microg/ml from a standard solution in phosphate buffer and in a range of 4 ng/ml to 50 microg/ml from serum/PBS. CRP was, moreover, successfully detected in patient samples with good reproducibility. The layer would thus be sensitive enough to analyse the CRP concentration in human serum for predicting cardiovascular disease.

  20. Molecular characterization of a dual inhibitory and mutagenic activity of 5-fluorouridine triphosphate on viral RNA synthesis. Implications for lethal mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Rubén; Arias, Armando; Pariente, Nonia; Perales, Celia; Escarmís, Cristina; Jorge, Alberto; Marina, Anabel; Domingo, Esteban

    2008-10-10

    The basis for a dual inhibitory and mutagenic activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) RNA replication has been investigated with purified viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3D) in vitro. 5-Fluorouridine triphosphate acted as a potent competitive inhibitor of VPg uridylylation, the initial step of viral replication. Peptide analysis by mass spectrometry has identified a VPg fragment containing 5-fluorouridine monophosphate (FUMP) covalently attached to Tyr3, the amino acid target of the uridylylation reaction. During RNA elongation, FUMP was incorporated in the place of UMP or CMP by FMDV 3D, using homopolymeric and heteropolymeric templates. Incorporation of FUMP did not prevent chain elongation, and, in some sequence contexts, it favored misincorporations at downstream positions. When present in the template, FUMP directed the incorporation of AMP and GMP, with ATP being a more effective substrate than GTP. The misincorporation of GMP was 17-fold faster opposite FU than opposite U in the template. These results in vitro are consistent with the mutational bias observed in the mutant spectra of 5-FU-treated FMDV populations. The dual mutagenic and inhibitory activity of 5-fluorouridine triphosphate may contribute to the effective extinction of FMDV by 5-FU through virus entry into error catastrophe.

  1. Use of the Photoactic Ability of a Bacterium to Teach the Genetic Principles of Random Mutagenesis & Mutant Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Din, Neena; Bird, Terry H.; Berleman, James E.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a laboratory activity that relies on the use of a very versatile bacterial system to introduce the concept of how mutagenesis can be used for molecular and genetic analysis of living organisms. They have used the techniques of random mutagenesis and selection/screening to obtain strains of the organism "R.…

  2. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis of the RIN locus that regulates tomato fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Endo, Masaki; Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-11-06

    Site-directed mutagenesis using genetic approaches can provide a wealth of resources for crop breeding as well as for biological research. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) system is a novel strategy used to induce mutations in a specific genome region; the system functions in a variety of organisms, including plants. Here, we report application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to efficient mutagenesis of the tomato genome. In this study, we targeted the tomato RIN gene, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor regulating fruit ripening. Three regions within the gene were targeted and mutations consisting either of a single base insertion or deletion of more than three bases were found at the Cas9 cleavage sites in T0 regenerated plants. The RIN-protein-defective mutants produced incomplete-ripening fruits in which red color pigmentation was significantly lower than that of wild type, while heterologous mutants expressing the remaining wild-type gene reached full-ripening red color, confirming the important role of RIN in ripening. Several mutations that were generated at three independent target sites were inherited in the T1 progeny, confirming the applicability of this mutagenesis system in tomato.

  3. Insertional mutagenesis and illegitimate recombination in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, G V; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1991-01-01

    Mycobacteria, particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and Mycobacterium avium, are major pathogens of man. Although insertional mutagenesis has been an invaluable genetic tool for analyzing the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis, it has not yet been possible to apply it to the mycobacteria. To overcome intrinsic difficulties in directly manipulating the genetics of slow-growing mycobacteria, including M. tuberculosis and bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine strains, we developed a system for random shuttle mutagenesis. A genomic library of Mycobacterium smegmatis was subjected to transposon mutagenesis with Tn5 seq1, a derivative of Tn5, in Escherichia coli and these transposon-containing recombinant plasmids were reintroduced into mycobacterial chromosomes by homologous recombination. This system has allowed us to isolate several random auxotrophic mutants of M. smegmatis. To extend this strategy to M. tuberculosis and BCG, targeted mutagenesis was performed using a cloned BCG methionine gene that was subjected to Tn5 seq1 mutagenesis in E. coli and reintroduced into the mycobacteria. Surprisingly for prokaryotes, both BCG and M. tuberculosis were found to incorporate linear DNA fragments into illegitimate sites throughout the mycobacterial genomes at a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-4) relative to the number of transformants obtained with autonomously replicating vectors. Thus the efficient illegitimate recombination of linear DNA fragments provides the basis for an insertional mutagenesis system for M. tuberculosis and BCG. Images PMID:2052623

  4. The role of Ser54 in the antinociceptive activity of BmK9, a neurotoxin from the scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueqiu; Hao, Zhihui; Shao, Jianhua; Song, Yongbo; Li, Chunli; Li, Chuan; Zhao, Yongshan; Liu, Yanfeng; Wei, Tingting; Wu, Chunfu; Zhang, Jinghai

    2011-11-01

    Residue 54 has been shown to be important for bioactivity in several toxins. However, its role in the antinociceptive activity of toxins has not been evaluated yet. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis and mouse acetic acid writhing test were used to investigate the role of Ser54 in the antinociceptive activity of BmK9 neurotoxin from the Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion. Detailed mutagenesis analysis revealed that substitution of Ser54 by various polar amino acids produced no significant change in the antinociceptive activity, while all substitutions of nonpolar amino acid for Ser54 led to a significant loss of antinociceptive activity. Following the conformational analysis, it was suggested that Ser54 in BmK9 plays a functional role in the antinociceptive activity, the residue exerts its effect by means of a side-chain hydrogen bond.

  5. Targeted mutagenesis in sea urchin embryos using TALENs.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Sayaka; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with engineered nucleases such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has been reported in various animals. We previously described ZFN-mediated targeted mutagenesis and insertion of reporter genes in sea urchin embryos. In this study, we demonstrate that TALENs can induce mutagenesis at specific genomic loci of sea urchin embryos. Injection of TALEN mRNAs targeting the HpEts transcription factor into fertilized eggs resulted in the impairment of skeletogenesis. Sequence analyses of the mutations showed that deletions and/or insertions occurred at the HpEts target site in the TALEN mRNAs-injected embryos. The results suggest that targeted gene disruption using TALENs is feasible in sea urchin embryos.

  6. Threonine 57 is required for the post-translational activation of Escherichia coli aspartate α-decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Michael E.; Yorke, Briony A.; Kershaw, Tom; Lovelock, Sarah; Lobley, Carina M. C.; Kilkenny, Mairi L.; Smith, Alison G.; Blundell, Tom L.; Pearson, Arwen R.; Abell, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Aspartate α-decarboxylase is a pyruvoyl-dependent decarboxylase required for the production of β-alanine in the bacterial pantothenate (vitamin B5) biosynthesis pathway. The pyruvoyl group is formed via the intramolecular rearrangement of a serine residue to generate a backbone ester intermediate which is cleaved to generate an N-terminal pyruvoyl group. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues adjacent to the active site, including Tyr22, Thr57 and Tyr58, reveals that only mutation of Thr57 leads to changes in the degree of post-translational activation. The crystal structure of the site-directed mutant T57V is consistent with a non-rearranged backbone, supporting the hypothesis that Thr57 is required for the formation of the ester intermediate in activation. PMID:24699660

  7. Threonine 57 is required for the post-translational activation of Escherichia coli aspartate α-decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Webb, Michael E; Yorke, Briony A; Kershaw, Tom; Lovelock, Sarah; Lobley, Carina M C; Kilkenny, Mairi L; Smith, Alison G; Blundell, Tom L; Pearson, Arwen R; Abell, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Aspartate α-decarboxylase is a pyruvoyl-dependent decarboxylase required for the production of β-alanine in the bacterial pantothenate (vitamin B5) biosynthesis pathway. The pyruvoyl group is formed via the intramolecular rearrangement of a serine residue to generate a backbone ester intermediate which is cleaved to generate an N-terminal pyruvoyl group. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues adjacent to the active site, including Tyr22, Thr57 and Tyr58, reveals that only mutation of Thr57 leads to changes in the degree of post-translational activation. The crystal structure of the site-directed mutant T57V is consistent with a non-rearranged backbone, supporting the hypothesis that Thr57 is required for the formation of the ester intermediate in activation.

  8. Next-generation site-directed transgenesis in the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae: self-docking strains expressing germline-specific phiC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Janet M; Underhill, Ann; McArthur, Clare C; Eggleston, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Diseases transmitted by mosquitoes have a devastating impact on global health and the situation is complicated due to difficulties with both existing control measures and the impact of climate change. Genetically modified mosquitoes that are refractory to disease transmission are seen as having great potential in the delivery of novel control strategies. The Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase system has been successfully adapted for site-directed transgene integration in a range of insects, thus overcoming many limitations due to size constraints and random integration associated with transposon-mediated transformation. Using this technology, we previously published the first site-directed transformation of Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of human malaria. Mosquitoes were initially engineered to incorporate the phiC31 docking site at a defined genomic location. A second phase of genetic modification then achieved site-directed integration of an anti-malarial effector gene. In the current publication we report improved efficiency and utility of the phiC31 integrase system following the generation of Anopheles gambiae self-docking strains. Four independent strains, with docking sites at known locations on three different chromosome arms, were engineered to express integrase under control of the regulatory regions of the nanos gene from Anopheles gambiae. The resulting protein accumulates in the posterior oocyte to provide integrase activity at the site of germline development. Two self-docking strains, exhibiting significantly different levels of integrase expression, were assessed for site-directed transgene integration and found to demonstrate greatly improved survival and efficiency of transformation. In the fight against malaria, it is imperative to establish a broad repertoire of both anti-malarial effector genes and tissue-specific promoters to regulate their expression, enabling those offering maximum effect with minimum fitness cost to be identified

  9. Site-directed spin labeling studies on nucleic acid structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Glenna Z.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) uses electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to monitor the behavior of a stable nitroxide radical attached at specific locations within a macromolecule such as protein, DNA, or RNA. Parameters obtained from EPR measurements, such as internitroxide distances and descriptions of the rotational motion of a nitroxide, provide unique information on features near the labeling site. With recent advances in solid-phase synthesis of nucleic acids and developments in EPR methodologies, particularly pulsed EPR technologies, SDSL has been increasingly used to study the structure and dynamics of DNA and RNA at the level of the individual nucleotides. This chapter summarizes the current SDSL studies on nucleic acids, with discussions focusing on literature from the last decade. PMID:18929141

  10. Complementary-addressed site-directed spin labeling of long natural RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Babaylova, Elena S.; Malygin, Alexey A.; Lomzov, Alexander A.; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V.; Yulikov, Maxim; Jeschke, Gunnar; Krumkacheva, Olesya A.; Fedin, Matvey V.; Karpova, Galina G.; Bagryanskaya, Elena G.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale distance measurements by pulse dipolar Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy allow new insights into the structure and dynamics of complex biopolymers. EPR detection requires site directed spin labeling (SDSL) of biomolecule(s), which remained challenging for long RNAs up-to-date. Here, we demonstrate that novel complementary-addressed SDSL approach allows efficient spin labeling and following structural EPR studies of long RNAs. We succeeded to spin-label Hepatitis C Virus RNA internal ribosome entry site consisting of ≈330 nucleotides and having a complicated spatial structure. Application of pulsed double electron–electron resonance provided spin–spin distance distribution, which agrees well with the results of molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. Thus, novel SDSL approach in conjunction with EPR and MD allows structural studies of long natural RNAs with nanometer resolution and can be applied to systems of biological and biomedical significance. PMID:27269581

  11. Mutagenesis during plant responses to UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Holá, M; Vágnerová, R; Angelis, K J

    2015-08-01

    We tested an idea that induced mutagenesis due to unrepaired DNA lesions, here the UV photoproducts, underlies the impact of UVB irradiation on plant phenotype. For this purpose we used protonemal culture of the moss Physcomitrella patens with 50% of apical cells, which mimics actively growing tissue, the most vulnerable stage for the induction of mutations. We measured the UVB mutation rate of various moss lines with defects in DNA repair (pplig4, ppku70, pprad50, ppmre11), and in selected clones resistant to 2-Fluoroadenine, which were mutated in the adenosine phosphotrasferase gene (APT), we analysed induced mutations by sequencing. In parallel we followed DNA break repair and removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers with a half-life τ = 4 h 14 min determined by comet assay combined with UV dimer specific T4 endonuclease V. We show that UVB induces massive, sequence specific, error-prone bypass repair that is responsible for a high mutation rate owing to relatively slow, though error-free, removal of photoproducts by nucleotide excision repair (NER).

  12. Lethal Mutagenesis Failure May Augment Viral Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Paff, Matthew L.; Stolte, Steven P.; Bull, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis, the attempt to extinguish a population by elevating its mutation rate, has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach for treating viral infections. In support of the concept, in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. However, the one known mutagenic drug used on patients commonly fails to cure infections, and in vitro studies typically find a wide range of mutagenic conditions permissive for viral growth. A key question becomes how subsequent evolution is affected if the viral population is mutated but avoids extinction—Is viral adaptation augmented rather than suppressed? Here we consider the evolution of highly mutated populations surviving mutagenesis, using the DNA phage T7. In assays using inhibitory hosts, whenever resistance mutants were observed, the mutagenized populations exhibited higher frequencies, but some inhibitors blocked plaque formation by even the mutagenized stock. Second, outgrowth of previously mutagenized populations led to rapid and potentially complete fitness recovery but polymorphism was slow to decay, and mutations exhibited inconsistent patterns of change. Third, the combination of population bottlenecks with mutagenesis did cause fitness declines, revealing a vulnerability that was not apparent from mutagenesis of large populations. The results show that a population surviving high mutagenesis may exhibit enhanced adaptation in some environments and experience little negative fitness consequences in many others. PMID:24092771

  13. Photochemical mutagenesis: examples and toxicological relevance.

    PubMed

    Gocke, E

    2001-01-01

    Induction of DNA damage as a consequence of exposure to UV light has been established as the major cause of skin cancer. DNA molecules absorb photon energy directly for wavelengths <320 nm, and lead to well-characterized mutagenic DNA damage. Alternatively, endogenous or exogenous chemicals (sensitizers) may absorb light with the potential of subsequent energy or electron transfer, and lead indirectly to DNA damage. A few light-absorbing pharmaceuticals have long been known to cause photo(geno)toxic effects. Notably, psoralen and chlorpromazine derivatives have been established as photomutagens and the reaction mechanisms have been identified; the fluoroquinolone antibiotics have more recently been recognized as being photomutagenic. The type of DNA damage and the modulation by antioxidants indicate the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but other mechanisms are also reported for, at least, some derivatives. In routine genotoxicity studies, we observed the photomutagenic activity of a compound (Ro 19-8022) under development as an anxiolytic agent in the Ames tester strain TA102 under normal laboratory illumination conditions. Further investigations showed strong photogenotoxic activity in tests for gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells. The finding led to the termination of drug development. Another example of a pharmaceutical for which photogenotoxic properties were observed during development is Ro 47-7737, a bisquinoline derivative of the antimalaria compound chloroquine. Also in this case, the photochemical reactivity contributed to the termination of the development process. The risk/benefit assessment for the described compounds has to take into account the human exposure situation, for example, the ability to avoid light exposure during treatment. Consideration of photochemical mutagenesis is specifically important for sunscreen ingredients. The active components of sunscreen lotions are efficient UV absorbers. Consequently

  14. Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin C2 mutants: biological activity assay in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jing; Cao, Yan; Xiao, Fang; Zhang, Jin; Li, Hui; Hu, Fengqing

    2008-09-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) is one member of bacterial superantigens produced by Staphylococcus aureus. It can be attributed to its superantigenic activity to cross-link major histocompatibility complex class II molecules with T-cell receptors and activate a large number of resting T cells resulting in release of massive cytokines, which will produce significant tumor inhibition in vivo and in vitro. However, it could be not broadly applied to cure malignant tumors in clinic because of emetic activity of SEC2. The aim of this study was to inactivate emetic activity of SEC2 through site-directed mutagenesis. Cys93, Cys110 and His118 were selected as substitutional sites based on the functional sites responsible for emesis. The mutated proteins were used to determine Peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation activity and anti-tumor activity in vitro. Results showed that these mutated proteins efficiently stimulated T cell and exhibited the same tumor-inhibition effect as SEC2. It is possible to inactivate emetic activity of SEC2 through site-directed mutagenesis and provide satisfying agents for tumor treatment in clinic.

  15. Extinction of Hepatitis C Virus by Ribavirin in Hepatoma Cells Involves Lethal Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Prieto, Ana M.; Sheldon, Julie; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Tejero, Héctor; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan I.; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis, or virus extinction produced by enhanced mutation rates, is under investigation as an antiviral strategy that aims at counteracting the adaptive capacity of viral quasispecies, and avoiding selection of antiviral-escape mutants. To explore lethal mutagenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV), it is important to establish whether ribavirin, the purine nucleoside analogue used in anti-HCV therapy, acts as a mutagenic agent during virus replication in cell culture. Here we report the effect of ribavirin during serial passages of HCV in human hepatoma Huh-7.5 cells, regarding viral progeny production and complexity of mutant spectra. Ribavirin produced an increase of mutant spectrum complexity and of the transition types associated with ribavirin mutagenesis, resulting in HCV extinction. Ribavirin-mediated depletion of intracellular GTP was not the major contributory factor to mutagenesis since mycophenolic acid evoked a similar decrease in GTP without an increase in mutant spectrum complexity. The intracellular concentration of the other nucleoside-triphosphates was elevated as a result of ribavirin treatment. Mycophenolic acid extinguished HCV without an intervening mutagenic activity. Ribavirin-mediated, but not mycophenolic acid-mediated, extinction of HCV occurred via a decrease of specific infectivity, a feature typical of lethal mutagenesis. We discuss some possibilities to explain disparate results on ribavirin mutagenesis of HCV. PMID:23976977

  16. A new method for multilayered, site-directed immobilization of antibody on polystyrene surface.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Wang, Caiyun; Xie, Xiaomei; Feng, Xi; Li, Yuqin; Cao, Zhijian

    2014-07-18

    Polystyrene is a common substrate material for protein adsorption in biosensors and bioassays. Here, we present a new method for multilayered, site-directed immobilization of antibody on polystyrene surface through the linkage of a genetically engineered ligand and the assembly of staphylococcal protein A (SPA) with immunoglobulin G (IgG). In this method, antibodies were stacked on polystyrene surface layer by layer in a potential three-dimensional way and exposed the analyte-binding sites well. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that the new method showed a 32-fold higher detection sensitivity compared with the conventional one. Pull-down assay and Western blot analysis further confirmed that it is different from the ones of monolayer adsorption according to the comparison of adsorption capacity. The differentiated introduction of functional ligands, which is the key of this method, might offer a unique idea as a way to interfere with the dynamic behavior of a protein complex during the process of adsorption.

  17. Nevada National Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2012-04-25

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R&D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R&D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  18. Exploring intrinsically disordered proteins using site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Nolwenn; Martinho, Marlène; Mileo, Elisabetta; Etienne, Emilien; Gerbaud, Guillaume; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Belle, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are highly variable biological systems, not only in their structures but also in their dynamics. The most extreme example of dynamics is encountered within the family of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs), which are proteins lacking a well-defined 3D structure under physiological conditions. Among the biophysical techniques well-suited to study such highly flexible proteins, Site-Directed Spin Labeling combined with EPR spectroscopy (SDSL-EPR) is one of the most powerful, being able to reveal, at the residue level, structural transitions such as folding events. SDSL-EPR is based on selective grafting of a paramagnetic label on the protein under study and is limited neither by the size nor by the complexity of the system. The objective of this mini-review is to describe the basic strategy of SDSL-EPR and to illustrate how it can be successfully applied to characterize the structural behavior of IDPs. Recent developments aimed at enlarging the panoply of SDSL-EPR approaches are presented in particular newly synthesized spin labels that allow the limitations of the classical ones to be overcome. The potentialities of these new spin labels will be demonstrated on different examples of IDPs. PMID:26042221

  19. Nevada National Security Site: Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Howard A.

    2016-04-01

    This report presents results of multiple research projects, new and ongoing, funded under the Site-Directed Research and Development Program for the Nevada National Security Site during federal fiscal year 2015. The Site's legacy capabilities in remote sensing combined with new paradigms for emergency response and consequence management help drive the need to develop advanced aerial sensor platforms. Likewise, dynamic materials science is a critical area of scientific research for which basic physics issues are still unresolved. New methods of characterizing materials in extreme states are vitally needed, and these efforts are paving the way with new knowledge. Projects selected in FY 2015 for the Exploratory Research portfolio exhibit a strong balance of NNSS mission relevance. Geoscience, seismology, and techniques for detecting underground nuclear events are still essential focus areas. Many of the project reports in the second major section of this annual report are ongoing continuations in multi-year lifecycles. Diagnostic techniques for stockpile and nuclear security science figured prominently as well, with a few key efforts coming to fruition, such as phase transition detection. In other areas, modeling efforts toward better understanding plasma focus physics has also started to pay dividends for major program needs.

  20. Site-Directed Chemical Probing to map transient RNA/protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Duval, Mélodie; Marenna, Alessandra; Chevalier, Clément; Marzi, Stefano

    2017-03-15

    RNA-protein interactions are at the bases of many biological processes, forming either tight and stable functional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes (i.e. the ribosome) or transitory ones, such as the complexes involving RNA chaperone proteins. To localize the sites where a protein interacts on an RNA molecule, a common simple and inexpensive biochemical method is the footprinting technique. The protein leaves its footprint on the RNA acting as a shield to protect the regions of interaction from chemical modification or cleavages obtained with chemical or enzymatic nucleases. This method has proven its efficiency to study in vitro the organization of stable RNA-protein complexes. Nevertheless, when the protein binds the RNA very dynamically, with high off-rates, protections are very often difficult to observe. For the analysis of these transient complexes, we describe an alternative strategy adapted from the Site Directed Chemical Probing (SDCP) approach and we compare it with classical footprinting. SDCP relies on the modification of the RNA binding protein to tether an RNA probe (usually Fe-EDTA) to specific protein positions. Local cleavages on the regions of interaction can be used to localize the protein and position its domains on the RNA molecule. This method has been used in the past to monitor stable complexes; we provide here a detailed protocol and a practical example of its application to the study of Escherichia coli RNA chaperone protein S1 and its transitory complexes with mRNAs.

  1. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2011-04-04

    This annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program represents the highly significant R&D accomplishments conducted during fiscal year 2010. This year was noteworthy historically, as the Nevada Test Site was renamed to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This change not only recognizes how the site's mission has evolved, but also heralds a future of new challenges and opportunities for the NNSS. In many ways, since its inception in 2002, the SDRD program has helped shape that evolving mission. As we approach 2012, SDRD will also mark a milestone, having completed its first full decade of innovative R&D in support of the site and national security. The program continues to fund advanced science and technology development across traditional Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear security areas such as stockpile stewardship and non-proliferation while also supporting Department of Homeland Security (DHS) needs, and specialized work for government agencies like the Department of Defense (DoD) and others. The NNSS will also contribute technologies in the areas of treaty verification and monitoring, two areas of increasing importance to national security. Keyed to the NNSS's broadened scope, the SDRD program will continue to anticipate and advance R&D projects that will help the NNSS meet forthcoming challenges.

  2. CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENESIS
    Michael D. Waters
    US Environmental Protection Agency, MD-51A, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 USA

    Our rapidly growing understanding of the structure of the human genome is forming the basis for numerous new...

  3. Catalytic mechanism of a family 3 beta-glucosidase and mutagenesis study on residue Asp-247.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y K; Chir, J; Chen, F Y

    2001-01-01

    A family 3 beta-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) from Flavobacterium meningosepticum has been cloned and overexpressed. The mechanistic action of the enzyme was probed by NMR spectroscopy and kinetic investigations, including substrate reactivity, secondary kinetic isotope effects and inhibition studies. The stereochemistry of enzymic hydrolysis was identified as occurring with the retention of an anomeric configuration, indicating a double-displacement reaction. Based on the k(cat) values with a series of aryl glucosides, a Bronsted plot with a concave-downward shape was constructed. This biphasic behaviour is consistent with a two-step mechanism involving the formation and breakdown of a glucosyl-enzyme intermediate. The large Bronsted constant (beta=-0.85) for the leaving-group-dependent portion (pK(a) of leaving phenols >7) indicates substantial bond cleavage at the transition state. Secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects with 2,4-dinitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyanoside, o-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyanoside and p-cyanophenyl beta-D-glucopyanoside as substrates were 1.17+/-0.02, 1.19+/-0.02 and 1.04+/-0.02 respectively. These results support an S(N)1-like mechanism for the deglucosylation step and an S(N)2-like mechanism for the glucosylation step. Site-directed mutagenesis was also performed to study essential amino acid residues. The activities (k(cat)/K(m)) of the D247G and D247N mutants were 30000- and 200000-fold lower respectively than that of the wild-type enzyme, whereas the D247E mutant retained 20% of wild-type activity. These results indicate that Asp-247 is an essential amino acid. It is likely that this residue functions as a nucleophile in the reaction. This conclusion is supported by the kinetics of the irreversible inactivation of the wild-type enzyme by conduritol-B-epoxide, compared with the much slower inhibition of the D247E mutant and the lack of irreversible inhibition of the D247G mutant. PMID:11311148

  4. Structural changes during ATP hydrolysis activity of the ATP synthase from Escherichia coli as revealed by fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Turina, P

    2000-08-01

    F1F0-ATPase complexes undergo several changes in their tertiary and quaternary structure during their functioning. As a possible way to detect some of these different conformations during their activity, an environment-sensitive fluorescence probe was bound to cysteine residues, introduced by site-directed mutagenesis, in the gamma subunit of the Escherichia coli enzyme. Fluorescence changes and ATP hydrolysis rates were compared under various conditions in F1 and in reconstituted F1F0. The results are discussed in terms of possible modes of operation of the ATP synthases.

  5. Derivation of a growth hormone gene cassette for goat by mutagenesis of the corresponding bovine construct and its expression in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ruíz, Jorge M; Ascacio-Martínez, Jorge A; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2006-07-01

    Recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH), a 191-aa polypeptide that affects animal growth and lactation, has been used for several years to increase milk production in dairy cattle. It has also been used in goats (Capra hircus) instead of their own hormone (chGH), which is still not available in the market. Since both hormones differ in only one amino acid residue, a strategy based on PCR mediated site-directed mutagenesis, was used to convert the bGH expression cassette harbored by an integration plasmid for Pichia pastoris into a chGH. Transformation by homologous recombination of Pichia pastoris GS115 strain with the linearized new plasmid resulted in transformants that, upon fermentation and induction with methanol, secreted a band with the expected size and immunoreactivity for GH. Production of total proteins secreted into culture medium (50 ml) was 20 microg/ml, of which 60% was chGH as judged by densitometry in SDS-PAGE. Its biological activity was confirmed in vitro when 3T3 pre-adipocytes exposed to the induced culture medium differentiated into adipocytes in cell culture.

  6. Detection of the TCDD Binding-Fingerprint within the Ah Receptor Ligand Binding Domain by Structurally Driven Mutagenesis and Functional Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Song, Yujuan; Zhao, Jing; Bonati, Laura; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent, basic helix–loop–helix Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-containing transcription factor that can bind and be activated by structurally diverse chemicals, including the toxic environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Our previous three-dimensional homology model of the mouse AhR (mAhR) PAS B ligand binding domain allowed identification of the binding site and its experimental validation. We have extended this analysis by conducting comparative structural modeling studies of the ligand binding domains of six additional high-affinity mammalian AhRs. These results, coupled with site-directed mutagenesis and AhR functional analysis, have allowed detection of the “TCDD binding-fingerprint” of conserved residues within the ligand binding cavity necessary for high-affinity TCDD binding and TCDD-dependent AhR transformation DNA binding. The essential role of selected residues was further evaluated using molecular docking simulations of TCDD with both wild-type and mutant mAhRs. Taken together, our results dramatically improve our understanding of the molecular determinants of TCDD binding and provide a basis for future studies directed toward rationalizing the observed species differences in AhR sensitivity to TCDD and understanding the mechanistic basis for the dramatic diversity in AhR ligand structure. PMID:19456125

  7. Site-directed spin labeling reveals a conformational switch in the phosphorylation domain of smooth muscle myosin.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Wendy D; Blakely, Sarah E; Nesmelov, Yuri E; Thomas, David D

    2005-03-15

    We have used site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy to detect structural changes within the regulatory light chain (RLC) of smooth muscle myosin upon phosphorylation. Smooth muscle contraction is activated by phosphorylation of S19 on RLC, but the structural basis of this process is unknown. There is no crystal structure containing a phosphorylated RLC, and there is no crystal structure for the N-terminal region of any RLC. Therefore, we have prepared single-Cys mutations throughout RLC, exchanged each mutant onto smooth muscle heavy meromyosin, verified normal regulatory function, and used EPR to determine dynamics and solvent accessibility at each site. A survey of spin-label sites throughout the RLC revealed that only the N-terminal region (first 24 aa) shows a significant change in dynamics upon phosphorylation, with most of the first 17 residues showing an increase in rotational amplitude. Therefore, we focused on this N-terminal region. Additional structural information was obtained from the pattern of oxygen accessibility along the sequence. In the absence of phosphorylation, little or no periodicity was observed, suggesting a lack of secondary structural order in this region. However, phosphorylation induced a strong helical pattern (3.6-residue periodicity) in the first 17 residues, while increasing accessibility throughout the first 24 residues. We have identified a domain within RLC, the N-terminal phosphorylation domain, in which phosphorylation increases helical order, internal dynamics, and accessibility. These results support a model in which this disorder-to-order transition within the phosphorylation domain results in decreased head-head interactions, activating myosin in smooth muscle.

  8. Activity screening of environmental metagenomic libraries reveals novel carboxylesterase families

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Ana; Hai, Tran; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Hajighasemi, Mahbod; Nocek, Boguslaw; Khusnutdinova, Anna N.; Brown, Greg; Glinos, Julia; Flick, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Yim, Veronica; Brüls, Thomas; Paslier, Denis Le; Yakimov, Michail M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshina, Olga V.; Savchenko, Alexei; Golyshin, Peter N.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomics has made accessible an enormous reserve of global biochemical diversity. To tap into this vast resource of novel enzymes, we have screened over one million clones from metagenome DNA libraries derived from sixteen different environments for carboxylesterase activity and identified 714 positive hits. We have validated the esterase activity of 80 selected genes, which belong to 17 different protein families including unknown and cyclase-like proteins. Three metagenomic enzymes exhibited lipase activity, and seven proteins showed polyester depolymerization activity against polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Detailed biochemical characterization of four new enzymes revealed their substrate preference, whereas their catalytic residues were identified using site-directed mutagenesis. The crystal structure of the metal-ion dependent esterase MGS0169 from the amidohydrolase superfamily revealed a novel active site with a bound unknown ligand. Thus, activity-centered metagenomics has revealed diverse enzymes and novel families of microbial carboxylesterases, whose activity could not have been predicted using bioinformatics tools. PMID:28272521

  9. Replacement of tyrosine 181 by phenylalanine in gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase I from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIMB 9867 enhances catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chew Ling; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Khoo, Hoon Eng; Poh, Chit Laa

    2005-11-01

    xlnE, encoding gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.4), from Pseudomonas alcaligenes (P25X) was mutagenized by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant enzyme, Y181F, demonstrated 4-, 3-, 6-, and 16-fold increases in relative activity towards gentisate and 3-fluoro-, 4-methyl-, and 3-methylgentisate, respectively. The specific mutation conferred a 13-fold higher catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/Km) on Y181F towards 3-methylgentisate than that of the wild-type enzyme.

  10. Novel Random Mutagenesis Method for Directed Evolution.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hong; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhao, Hong-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Directed evolution is a powerful strategy for gene mutagenesis, and has been used for protein engineering both in scientific research and in the biotechnology industry. The routine method for directed evolution was developed by Stemmer in 1994 (Stemmer, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 91, 10747-10751, 1994; Stemmer, Nature 370, 389-391, 1994). Since then, various methods have been introduced, each of which has advantages and limitations depending upon the targeted genes and procedure. In this chapter, a novel alternative directed evolution method which combines mutagenesis PCR with dITP and fragmentation by endonuclease V is described. The kanamycin resistance gene is used as a reporter gene to verify the novel method for directed evolution. This method for directed evolution has been demonstrated to be efficient, reproducible, and easy to manipulate in practice.

  11. Final report [DNA Repair and Mutagenesis - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Graham C.

    2001-05-30

    The meeting, titled ''DNA Repair and Mutagenesis: Mechanism, Control, and Biological Consequences'', was designed to bring together the various sub-disciplines that collectively comprise the field of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis. The keynote address was titled ''Mutability Doth Play Her Cruel Sports to Many Men's Decay: Variations on the Theme of Translesion Synthesis.'' Sessions were held on the following themes: Excision repair of DNA damage; Transcription and DNA excision repair; UmuC/DinB/Rev1/Rad30 superfamily of DNA polymerases; Cellular responses to DNA damage, checkpoints, and damage tolerance; Repair of mismatched bases, mutation; Genome-instability, and hypermutation; Repair of strand breaks; Replicational fidelity, and Late-breaking developments; Repair and mutation in challenging environments; and Defects in DNA repair: consequences for human disease and aging.

  12. Mechanisms of Base Substitution Mutagenesis in Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bacolla, Albino; Cooper, David N.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequence data provide an invaluable resource for inferring the key mechanisms by which mutations arise in cancer cells, favoring their survival, proliferation and invasiveness. Here we examine recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the predominant type of genetic alteration found in cancer cells, somatic single base substitutions (SBSs). Cytosine methylation, demethylation and deamination, charge transfer reactions in DNA, DNA replication timing, chromatin status and altered DNA proofreading activities are all now known to contribute to the mechanisms leading to base substitution mutagenesis. We review current hypotheses as to the major processes that give rise to SBSs and evaluate their relative relevance in the light of knowledge acquired from cancer genome sequencing projects and the study of base modifications, DNA repair and lesion bypass. Although gene expression data on APOBEC3B enzymes provide support for a role in cancer mutagenesis through U:G mismatch intermediates, the enzyme preference for single-stranded DNA may limit its activity genome-wide. For SBSs at both CG:CG and YC:GR sites, we outline evidence for a prominent role of damage by charge transfer reactions that follow interactions of the DNA with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other endogenous or exogenous electron-abstracting molecules. PMID:24705290

  13. Role of enzyme-substrate flexibility in catalytic activity: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1998-09-21

    Site-directed mutagenesis has proved an effective experimental technique to investigate catalytic mechanisms and to determine relations between enzyme structure and function. This article invokes an analytical model based on evolution by mutation and natural selection-Nature's analogue of site-directed mutagenesis-to derive a set of general rules relating enzyme structure and activity. The catalysts are described in terms of the structural parameters, rigidity and flexibility, and the functional variables, reaction rate and substrate specificity. The evolutionary model predicts the following structure-activity relations: (a) rigid enzyme-flexible substrate: large variation in reaction rates, broad substrate specificity; (b) rigid enzyme-rigid substrate: diffusion controlled rates, absolute specificity; (c) flexible enzyme-rigid substrate: intermediate reaction rates, group specificity; (d) flexible enzyme-flexible substrate: slow rates, absolute specificity. Spectroscopic methods and X-ray crystallography now yield important characteristics of enzyme-substrate complexes such as molecular flexibility. The evolutionary analysis we have exploited provides general principles for inferring catalytic activity from structural studies of enzyme-substrate complexes.

  14. Targeted Mutagenesis in Rice Using TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masaki; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs), such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (Cas9) system, are powerful tools for understanding gene function and for developing novel traits in plants. In plant species for which transformation and regeneration systems using protoplasts are not yet established, direct delivery to nuclei of SSNs either in the form of RNA or protein is difficult. Thus, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of SSN expression constructs in cultured cells is a practical means of delivering targeted mutagenesis in some plant species including rice. Because targeted mutagenesis occurs stochastically in transgenic cells and SSN-mediated targeted mutagenesis often leads to no selectable phenotype, identification of highly mutated cell lines is a critical step in obtaining regenerated plants with desired mutations.

  15. Mutagenesis and phenotyping resources in zebrafish for studying development and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important model organism for studying development and human disease. The zebrafish has an excellent reference genome and the functions of hundreds of genes have been tested using both forward and reverse genetic approaches. Recent years have seen an increasing number of large-scale mutagenesis projects and the number of mutants or gene knockouts in zebrafish has increased rapidly, including for the first time conditional knockout technologies. In addition, targeted mutagenesis techniques such as zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short sequences (CRISPR) or CRISPR-associated (Cas), have all been shown to effectively target zebrafish genes as well as the first reported germline homologous recombination, further expanding the utility and power of zebrafish genetics. Given this explosion of mutagenesis resources, it is now possible to perform systematic, high-throughput phenotype analysis of all zebrafish gene knockouts. PMID:24162064

  16. Heritable site-specific mutagenesis using TALENs in maize.

    PubMed

    Char, Si Nian; Unger-Wallace, Erica; Frame, Bronwyn; Briggs, Sarah A; Main, Marcy; Spalding, Martin H; Vollbrecht, Erik; Wang, Kan; Yang, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technology has been utilized widely for targeted gene mutagenesis, especially for gene inactivation, in many organisms, including agriculturally important plants such as rice, wheat, tomato and barley. This report describes application of this technology to generate heritable genome modifications in maize. TALENs were employed to generate stable, heritable mutations at the maize glossy2 (gl2) locus. Transgenic lines containing mono- or di-allelic mutations were obtained from the maize genotype Hi-II at a frequency of about 10% (nine mutated events in 91 transgenic events). In addition, three of the novel alleles were tested for function in progeny seedlings, where they were able to confer the glossy phenotype. In a majority of the events, the integrated TALEN T-DNA segregated independently from the new loss of function alleles, producing mutated null-segregant progeny in T1 generation. Our results demonstrate that TALENs are an effective tool for genome mutagenesis in maize, empowering the discovery of gene function and the development of trait improvement.

  17. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P.; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L.; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions. PMID:26330610

  18. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-09-15

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions.

  19. Mutations affecting enzymatic activity in liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Vockley, J.G.; Tabor, D.E.; Goodman, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    The hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea is catalyzed by arginase in the last step of the urea cycle. We examined a group of arginase deficient patients by PCR-SSCP analysis to characterize the molecular basis of this disorder. A heterogeneous population of nonsense mutations, microdeletions, and missense mutations has been identified in our cohort. Microdeletions which introduce premature stop codons downstream of the deletion and nonsense mutations result in no arginase activity. These mutations occur randomly along the gene. The majority of missense mutations identified appear to occur in regions of high cross-species homology. To test the effect of these missense mutations on arginase activity, site-directed mutagenesis was used to re-create the patient mutations for in vivo expression studies in a prokaryotic fusion-protein expression system. Of 4 different missense mutations identified in 6 individuals, only one was located outside of a conserved region. The three substitution mutations within the conserved regions had a significant effect on enzymatic activity (0-3.1 nmole/30min, normal is 1300-1400 nmoles/30min, as determined by in vitro arginase assay), while the fourth mutation, a T to S substitution, did not. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create mutations not in residues postulated to play a significant role in the enzymatic function or active site formation in manganese-binding proteins such as arginase. We have determined that the substitution of glycine for a histidine residue, located in a very highly conserved region of exon 3, and the substitution of a histidine and an aspartic acid residue within a similarly conserved region in exon 4, totally abolishes enzymatic activity. Mutations substituting glycine for an additional histidine and aspartic acid residue in exon 4 and two aspartic acid residues in exon 7 have also been created. We are currently in the process of characterizing these mutations.

  20. AS52/GPT Mammalian Mutagenesis Assay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-10

    dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) at 50 and 100 f.J.g/rnl was used as a 3 TLS Project Nn. A0ŗ-003: AS52/GPT Mammalian Mutagenesis Assay promutagen that requires metabolic...Chemical Source Lot No. air Air Products N/A calcium chloride Sigma 84F-0723 d imeth y !sulfoxide Fisher 933274 dimethylnitrosamine Sigma 82B0365...methanesulfonate (EMS) at 150 and 300 J.i-g/ml is used as a direct-acting mutagen for the nonactivated portion, and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) at 150 and 300

  1. Fluorometric method of quantitative cell mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, Frank A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for assaying a cell culture for mutagenesis is described. A cell culture is stained first with a histochemical stain, and then a fluorescent stain. Normal cells in the culture are stained by both the histochemical and fluorescent stains, while abnormal cells are stained only by the fluorescent stain. The two stains are chosen so that the histochemical stain absorbs the wavelengths that the fluorescent stain emits. After the counterstained culture is subjected to exciting light, the fluorescence from the abnormal cells is detected.

  2. Fluorometric method of quantitative cell mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-12-12

    A method for assaying a cell culture for mutagenesis is described. A cell culture is stained first with a histochemical stain, and then a fluorescent stain. Normal cells in the culture are stained by both the histochemical and fluorescent stains, while abnormal cells are stained only by the fluorescent stain. The two stains are chosen so that the histochemical stain absorbs the wavelengths that the fluorescent stain emits. After the counterstained culture is subjected to exciting light, the fluorescence from the abnormal cells is detected.

  3. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency.

  4. Mutant fatty acid desaturase and methods for directed mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Whittle, Edward J.

    2008-01-29

    The present invention relates to methods for producing fatty acid desaturase mutants having a substantially increased activity towards substrates with fewer than 18 carbon atom chains relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon chain length specificity, the sequences encoding the desaturases and to the desaturases that are produced by the methods. The present invention further relates to a method for altering a function of a protein, including a fatty acid desaturase, through directed mutagenesis involving identifying candidate amino acid residues, producing a library of mutants of the protein by simultaneously randomizing all amino acid candidates, and selecting for mutants which exhibit the desired alteration of function. Candidate amino acids are identified by a combination of methods. Enzymatic, binding, structural and other functions of proteins can be altered by the method.

  5. New insights into behaviour using mouse ENU mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Peter L; Davies, Kay E

    2012-10-15

    Identifying genes involved in behavioural disorders in man is a challenge as the cause is often multigenic and the phenotype is modulated by environmental cues. Mouse mutants are a valuable tool for identifying novel pathways underlying specific neurological phenotypes and exploring the influence both genetic and non-genetic factors. Many human variants causing behavioural disorders are not gene deletions but changes in levels of expression or activity of a gene product; consequently, large-scale mouse ENU mutagenesis has the advantage over the study of null mutants in that it generates a range of point mutations that frequently mirror the subtlety and heterogeneity of human genetic lesions. ENU mutants have provided novel and clinically relevant functional information on genes that influence many aspects of mammalian behaviour, from neuropsychiatric endophenotypes to circadian rhythms. This review will highlight some of the most important findings that have been made using this method in several key areas of neurological disease research.

  6. Reaction Mechanism of N-Acetylneuraminic Acid Lyase Revealed by a Combination of Crystallography, QM/MM Simulation, and Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    N-Acetylneuraminic acid lyase (NAL) is a Class I aldolase that catalyzes the reversible condensation of pyruvate with N-acetyl-d-mannosamine (ManNAc) to yield the sialic acid N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). Aldolases are finding increasing use as biocatalysts for the stereospecific synthesis of complex molecules. Incomplete understanding of the mechanism of catalysis in aldolases, however, can hamper development of new enzyme activities and specificities, including control over newly generated stereocenters. In the case of NAL, it is clear that the enzyme catalyzes a Bi-Uni ordered condensation reaction in which pyruvate binds first to the enzyme to form a catalytically important Schiff base. The identity of the residues required for catalysis of the condensation step and the nature of the transition state for this reaction, however, have been a matter of conjecture. In order to address, this we crystallized a Y137A variant of the E. coli NAL in the presence of Neu5Ac. The three-dimensional structure shows a full length sialic acid bound in the active site of subunits A, B, and D, while in subunit C, discontinuous electron density reveals the positions of enzyme-bound pyruvate and ManNAc. These ‘snapshot’ structures, representative of intermediates in the enzyme catalytic cycle, provided an ideal starting point for QM/MM modeling of the enzymic reaction of carbon–carbon bond formation. This revealed that Tyr137 acts as the proton donor to the aldehyde oxygen of ManNAc during the reaction, the activation barrier is dominated by carbon–carbon bond formation, and proton transfer from Tyr137 is required to obtain a stable Neu5Ac-Lys165 Schiff base complex. The results also suggested that a triad of residues, Tyr137, Ser47, and Tyr110 from a neighboring subunit, are required to correctly position Tyr137 for its function, and this was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. This understanding of the mechanism and geometry of the transition states along the C

  7. Kinetic analysis of site-directed mutants of methionine synthase from Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Prasannan, Priya; Suliman, Huda S.; Robertus, Jon D.

    2009-05-15

    Fungal methionine synthase catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate to homocysteine to create methionine. The enzyme, called Met6p in fungi, is required for the growth of the pathogen Candida albicans, and is consequently a reasonable target for antifungal drug design. In order to understand the mechanism of this class of enzyme, we created a three-dimensional model of the C. albicans enzyme based on the known structure of the homologous enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana. A fusion protein was created and shown to have enzyme activity similar to the wild-type Met6p. Fusion proteins containing mutations at eight key sites were expressed and assayed in this background. The D614 carboxylate appears to ion pair with the amino group of homocysteine and is essential for activity. Similarly, D504 appears to bind to the polar edge of the folate and is also required for activity. Other groups tested have lesser roles in substrate binding and catalysis.

  8. New transposon delivery plasmids for insertional mutagenesis in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Adam C.; Perego, Marta; Hoch, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Two new transposon delivery vector systems utilizing Mariner and mini-Tn10 transposons have been developed for in vivo insertional mutagenesis in Bacillus anthracis and other compatible Gram-positive species. The utility of both systems was directly demonstrated through the mutagenesis of a widely used B. anthracis strain. PMID:17931726

  9. Site-directed mutants of human RECQ1 reveal functional importance of the zinc binding domain.

    PubMed

    Sami, Furqan; Gary, Ronald K; Fang, Yayin; Sharma, Sudha

    2016-08-01

    RecQ helicases are a highly conserved family of ATP-dependent DNA-unwinding enzymes with key roles in DNA replication and repair in all kingdoms of life. The RECQ1 gene encodes the most abundant RecQ homolog in humans. We engineered full-length RECQ1 harboring point mutations in the zinc-binding motif (amino acids 419-480) within the conserved RecQ-specific-C-terminal (RQC) domain known to be critical for diverse biochemical and cellular functions of RecQ helicases. Wild-type RECQ1 contains a zinc ion. Substitution of three of the four conserved cysteine residues that coordinate zinc severely impaired the ATPase and DNA unwinding activities but retained DNA binding and single strand DNA annealing activities. Furthermore, alteration of these residues attenuated zinc binding and significantly changed the overall conformation of full-length RECQ1 protein. In contrast, substitution of cysteine residue at position 471 resulted in a wild-type like RECQ1 protein. Differential contribution of the conserved cysteine residues to the structure and functions of the RECQ1 protein is also inferred by homology modeling. Overall, our results indicate that the zinc binding motif in the RQC domain of RECQ1 is a key structural element that is essential for the structure-functions of RECQ1. Given the recent association of RECQ1 mutations with breast cancer, these results will contribute to understanding the molecular basis of RECQ1 functions in cancer etiology.

  10. A transgenic probiotic secreting a parasite immunomodulator for site-directed treatment of gut inflammation.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Rose A; Rausch, Sebastian; Ebner, Friederike; Günzel, Dorothee; Richter, Jan F; Hering, Nina A; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter; Kühl, Anja A; Keles, Ahmed; Janczyk, Pawel; Nöckler, Karsten; Wieler, Lothar H; Hartmann, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    New treatment strategies for inflammatory bowel disease are needed and parasitic nematode infections or application of helminth components improve clinical and experimental gut inflammation. We genetically modified the probiotic bacterium Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 to secrete the powerful nematode immunomodulator cystatin in the gut. This treatment was tested in a murine colitis model and on post-weaning intestinal inflammation in pigs, an outbred model with a gastrointestinal system similar to humans. Application of the transgenic probiotic significantly decreased intestinal inflammation in murine acute colitis, associated with increased frequencies of Foxp3(+) Tregs, suppressed local interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-17A production, decreased macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/β, monocyte chemoattractant protein -1/3, and regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed, and secreted expression and fewer inflammatory macrophages in the colon. High dosages of the transgenic probiotic were well tolerated by post-weaning piglets. Despite being recognized by T cells, secreted cystatin did not lead to changes in cytokine expression or macrophage activation in the colon. However, colon transepithelial resistance and barrier function were significantly improved in pigs receiving the transgenic probotic and post-weaning colon inflammation was reduced. Thus, the anti-inflammatory efficiency of a probiotic can be improved by a nematode-derived immunoregulatory transgene. This treatment regimen should be further investigated as a potential therapeutic option for inflammatory bowel disease.

  11. A Transgenic Probiotic Secreting a Parasite Immunomodulator for Site-Directed Treatment of Gut Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Rose A; Rausch, Sebastian; Ebner, Friederike; Günzel, Dorothee; Richter, Jan F; Hering, Nina A; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter; Kühl, Anja A; Keles, Ahmed; Janczyk, Pawel; Nöckler, Karsten; Wieler, Lothar H; Hartmann, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    New treatment strategies for inflammatory bowel disease are needed and parasitic nematode infections or application of helminth components improve clinical and experimental gut inflammation. We genetically modified the probiotic bacterium Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 to secrete the powerful nematode immunomodulator cystatin in the gut. This treatment was tested in a murine colitis model and on post-weaning intestinal inflammation in pigs, an outbred model with a gastrointestinal system similar to humans. Application of the transgenic probiotic significantly decreased intestinal inflammation in murine acute colitis, associated with increased frequencies of Foxp3+ Tregs, suppressed local interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-17A production, decreased macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/β, monocyte chemoattractant protein -1/3, and regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed, and secreted expression and fewer inflammatory macrophages in the colon. High dosages of the transgenic probiotic were well tolerated by post-weaning piglets. Despite being recognized by T cells, secreted cystatin did not lead to changes in cytokine expression or macrophage activation in the colon. However, colon transepithelial resistance and barrier function were significantly improved in pigs receiving the transgenic probotic and post-weaning colon inflammation was reduced. Thus, the anti-inflammatory efficiency of a probiotic can be improved by a nematode-derived immunoregulatory transgene. This treatment regimen should be further investigated as a potential therapeutic option for inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24985163

  12. Validation studies of the site-directed docking program LibDock.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shashidhar N; Head, Martha S; Kulkarni, Amit; LaLonde, Judith M

    2007-01-01

    The performance of the site-features docking algorithm LibDock has been evaluated across eight GlaxoSmithKline targets as a follow-up to a broad validation study of docking and scoring software (Warren, G. L.; Andrews, W. C.; Capelli, A.; Clarke, B.; Lalonde, J.; Lambert, M. H.; Lindvall, M.; Nevins, N.; Semus, S. F.; Senger, S.; Tedesco, G.; Walls, I. D.; Woolven, J. M.; Peishoff, C. E.; Head, M. S. J. Med. Chem. 2006, 49, 5912-5931). Docking experiments were performed to assess both the accuracy in reproducing the binding mode of the ligand and the retrieval of active compounds in a virtual screening protocol using both the DJD (Diller, D. J.; Merz, K. M., Jr. Proteins 2001, 43, 113-124) and LigScore2 (Krammer, A. K.; Kirchoff, P. D.; Jiang, X.; Venkatachalam, C. M.; Waldman, M. J. Mol. Graphics Modell. 2005, 23, 395-407) scoring functions. This study was conducted using DJD scoring, and poses were rescored using all available scoring functions in the Accelrys LigandFit module, including LigScore2. For six out of eight targets at least 30% of the ligands were docked within a root-mean-square difference (RMSD) of 2.0 A for the crystallographic poses when the LigScore2 scoring function was used. LibDock retrieved at least 20% of active compounds in the top 10% of screened ligands for four of the eight targets in the virtual screening protocol. In both studies the LigScore2 scoring function enhanced the retrieval of crystallographic poses or active compounds in comparison with the results obtained using the DJD scoring function. The results for LibDock accuracy and ligand retrieval in virtual screening are compared to 10 other docking and scoring programs. These studies demonstrate the utility of the LigScore2 scoring function and that LibDock as a feature directed docking method performs as well as docking programs that use genetic/growing and Monte Carlo driven algorithms.

  13. Conditional gene-trap mutagenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Maddison, Lisette A; Li, Mingyu; Chen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish has become a widely used model for analysis of gene function. Several methods have been used to create mutations in this organism and thousands of mutant lines are available. However, all the conventional zebrafish mutations affect the gene in all cells at all time, making it difficult to determine tissue-specific functions. We have adopted a FlEx Trap approach to generate conditional mutations in zebrafish by gene-trap mutagenesis. Combined with appropriate Cre or Flp lines, the insertional mutants not only allow spatial- and temporal-specific gene inactivation but also permit spatial- and temporal-specific rescue of the disrupted gene. We provide experimental details on how to generate and use such mutations.

  14. From Chemical Mutagenesis to Post‐Expression Mutagenesis: A 50 Year Odyssey

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Tom H.; Vallée, M. Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Site‐directed (gene) mutagenesis has been the most useful method available for the conversion of one amino acid residue of a given protein into another. Until relatively recently, this strategy was limited to the twenty standard amino acids. The ongoing maturation of stop codon suppression and related technologies for unnatural amino acid incorporation has greatly expanded access to nonstandard amino acids by expanding the scope of the translational apparatus. However, the necessity for translation of genetic changes restricts the diversity of residues that may be incorporated. Herein we highlight an alternative approach, termed post‐expression mutagenesis, which operates at the level of the very functional biomolecules themselves. Using the lens of retrosynthesis, we highlight prospects for new strategies in protein modification, alteration, and construction which will enable protein science to move beyond the constraints of the “translational filter” and lead to a true synthetic biology. PMID:27119221

  15. Enhanced toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A delta-endotoxin in coleopterans by mutagenesis in a receptor binding loop.

    PubMed

    Wu, S J; Koller, C N; Miller, D L; Bauer, L S; Dean, D H

    2000-05-12

    We used site-directed mutagenesis to modify the Bacillus thuringiensis cry3A gene in amino acid residues 350-354. Two mutant toxins, A1 (R(345)A,Y(350)F,Y(351)F) and A2 (R(345)A,DeltaY(350), DeltaY(351)), showed significantly improved toxicity against Tenebrio molitor (yellow mealworm). The mutant toxin A1 was also more potent against both Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Colorado potato beetle) and Chrysomela scripta (cottonwood leaf beetle), while A2 displayed enhanced toxicity only in L. decemlineata. Competitive binding assays of L. decemlineata brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) revealed that binding affinities for the A1 and A2 mutant toxins were ca. 2.5-fold higher than for the wild-type Cry3 toxin. Similar binding assays with C. scripta BBMV revealed a ca. 5-fold lower dissociation rate for the A1 mutant as compared to that of Cry3A.

  16. Error-Prone PCR-Based Mutagenesis Strategy for Rapidly Generating High-Yield Influenza Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jianqiang; Wen, Feng; Xu, Yifei; Zhao, Nan; Long, Liping; Sun, Hailiang; Yang, Jialiang; Cooley, Jim; Pharr, G. Todd; Webby, Richard; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is the primary strategy for the prevention and control of influenza outbreaks. However, the manufacture of influenza vaccine requires a high-yield seed strain, and the conventional methods for generating such strains are time consuming. In this study, we developed a novel method to rapidly generate high-yield candidate vaccine strains by integrating error-prone PCR, site-directed mutagenesis strategies, and reverse genetics. We used this method to generate seed strains for the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and produced six high-yield candidate strains. We used a mouse model to assess the efficacy of two of the six candidate strains as a vaccine seed virus: both strains provided complete protection in mice against lethal challenge, thus validating our method. Results confirmed that the efficacy of these candidate vaccine seed strains was not affected by the yield-optimization procedure. PMID:25899178

  17. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junping; Wang, Genhong; Ma, Sanyuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Wu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Xingtan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is one of the most powerful tools for revealing gene function and improving crop plants. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing using the type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system has been used as a powerful and efficient tool for genome editing in various organisms. Here, we report genome editing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Two genes, NtPDS and NtPDR6, were used for targeted mutagenesis. First, we examined the transient genome editing activity of this system in tobacco protoplasts, insertion and deletion (indel) mutations were observed with frequencies of 16.2-20.3% after transfecting guide RNA (gRNA) and the nuclease Cas9 in tobacco protoplasts. The two genes were also mutated using multiplexing gRNA at a time. Additionally, targeted deletions and inversions of a 1.8-kb fragment between two target sites in the NtPDS locus were demonstrated, while indel mutations were also detected at both the sites. Second, we obtained transgenic tobacco plants with NtPDS and NtPDR6 mutations induced by Cas9/gRNA. The mutation percentage was 81.8% for NtPDS gRNA4 and 87.5% for NtPDR6 gRNA2. Obvious phenotypes were observed, etiolated leaves for the psd mutant and more branches for the pdr6 mutant, indicating that highly efficient biallelic mutations occurred in both transgenic lines. No significant off-target mutations were obtained. Our results show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a useful tool for targeted mutagenesis of the tobacco genome.

  18. Structure-based design of combinatorial mutagenesis libraries.

    PubMed

    Verma, Deeptak; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The development of protein variants with improved properties (thermostability, binding affinity, catalytic activity, etc.) has greatly benefited from the application of high-throughput screens evaluating large, diverse combinatorial libraries. At the same time, since only a very limited portion of sequence space can be experimentally constructed and tested, an attractive possibility is to use computational protein design to focus libraries on a productive portion of the space. We present a general-purpose method, called "Structure-based Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis" (SOCoM), which can optimize arbitrarily large combinatorial mutagenesis libraries directly based on structural energies of their constituents. SOCoM chooses both positions and substitutions, employing a combinatorial optimization framework based on library-averaged energy potentials in order to avoid explicitly modeling every variant in every possible library. In case study applications to green fluorescent protein, β-lactamase, and lipase A, SOCoM optimizes relatively small, focused libraries whose variants achieve energies comparable to or better than previous library design efforts, as well as larger libraries (previously not designable by structure-based methods) whose variants cover greater diversity while still maintaining substantially better energies than would be achieved by representative random library approaches. By allowing the creation of large-scale combinatorial libraries based on structural calculations, SOCoM promises to increase the scope of applicability of computational protein design and improve the hit rate of discovering beneficial variants. While designs presented here focus on variant stability (predicted by total energy), SOCoM can readily incorporate other structure-based assessments, such as the energy gap between alternative conformational or bound states.

  19. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development: FY 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2007-08-01

    The Nevada Test Site–Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed its fifth successful year of research and development activities in FY 2006. Forty new projects were selected for funding this year, and ten FY 2005 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $6 million, for an average per-project cost of $120 thousand. Beginning in May, 2006 programmatic burden rates were applied to SDRD project costs. An external audit conducted in September 2006 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: the filing of 27 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2006 projects; programmatic adoption of four FY 2005 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2006 projects; and the successful completion of 50 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  20. Mutagenesis of bacteriophage IKe major coat protein transmembrane domain: role of an interfacial proline residue.

    PubMed

    Williams, K A; Deber, C M

    1993-10-15

    The transmembrane (TM) domain of the 53-residue major coat protein of the M13-related bacteriophage IKe (residues 24-42: LISQTWPVVTTVVVAGVLI) has been subjected to randomized mutagenesis to probe the conformation and stability of the TM domain, as well as the effect of structurally-important residues such as proline. TM mutants were obtained by the Eckstein method of site-directed mutagenesis using the IKe genome as template so as to eliminate the need for subcloning. Over 40 single- and double-site viable mutants of bacteriophage IKe were isolated. Every residue in the TM segment, except the highly conserved Trp29, could be mutated to at least one other residue; polar and charged mutations occurred in the TM segment adjacent to the N-terminal domain (residues 24-28), while non-polar substitutions predominated in the C-terminal portion (residues 30-42). The Pro30 locus tolerated four mutations-Ala, Gly, Cys, and Ser- which represent the four side chains of least volume. Mutant coat proteins obtained directly from the phage in milligram quantities were studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE gels. Wild type IKe coat protein solubilized in sodium deoxycholate micelles was found to occur as an alpha-helical, monomeric species which is stable at 95 degrees C, whereas the mutant Pro30-->Gly undergoes an irreversible conformational transition at ca. 90 degrees C to an aggregated beta-sheet structure. The result that Pro30 stabilizes the TM helix in the micellar membrane suggests a sterically-restricted location for the wild type Pro pyrrolidine side chain in the bulky Trp-Pro-Val triad, where it may be positioned to direct the initiation of the subsequent TM core domain helix.

  1. Mutational analysis of amino acid residues involved in catalytic activity of a family 18 chitinase from tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Keisuke; Yamagami, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Masatsune

    2003-02-01

    We expressed chitinase-1 (TBC-1) from tulip bulbs (Tulipa bakeri) in E. coli cells and used site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity. Mutations at Glu-125 and Trp-251 completely abolished enzyme activity, and activity decreased with mutations at Asp-123 and Trp-172 when glycolchitin was the substrate. Activity changed with the mutations of Trp-251 to one of several amino acids with side-chains of little hydrophobicity, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction of Trp-251 is important for the activity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis with hevamine as the model compound showed that the distance between Asp-123 and Glu-125 was extended by mutation of Trp-251. Kinetic studies of Trp-251-mutated chitinases confirmed these various phenomena. The results suggested that Glu-125 and Trp-251 are essential for enzyme activity and that Trp-251 had a direct role in ligand binding.

  2. Mutational analysis of the three cysteines and active-site aspartic acid 103 of ketosteroid isomerase from Pseudomonas putida biotype B.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S W; Joo, S; Choi, G; Cho, H S; Oh, B H; Choi, K Y

    1997-01-01

    In order to clarify the roles of three cysteines in ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) from Pseudomonas putida biotype B, each of the cysteine residues has been changed to a serine residue (C69S, C81S, and C97S) by site-directed mutagenesis. All cysteine mutations caused only a slight decrease in the k(cat) value, with no significant change of Km for the substrate. Even modification of the sulfhydryl group with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) has almost no effect on enzyme activity. These results demonstrate that none of the cysteines in the KSI from P. putida is critical for catalytic activity, contrary to the previous identification of a cysteine in an active-site-directed photoinactivation study of KSI. Based on the three-dimensional structures of KSIs with and without dienolate intermediate analog equilenin, as determined by X-ray crystallography at high resolution, Asp-103 was found to be located within the range of the hydrogen bond to the equilenin. To assess the role of Asp-103 in catalysis, Asp-103 has been replaced with either asparagine (D103N) or alanine (D103A) by site-directed mutagenesis. For D103A mutant KSI there was a significant decrease in the k(cat) value: the k(cat) of the mutant was 85-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme; however, for the D103N mutant, which retained some hydrogen bonding capability, there was a minor decrease in the k(cat) value. These findings support the idea that aspartic acid 103 in the active site is an essential catalytic residue involved in catalysis by hydrogen bonding to the dienolate intermediate. PMID:9401033

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations and structure-guided mutagenesis provide insight into the architecture of the catalytic core of the ectoine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Widderich, Nils; Pittelkow, Marco; Höppner, Astrid; Mulnaes, Daniel; Buckel, Wolfgang; Gohlke, Holger; Smits, Sander H J; Bremer, Erhard

    2014-02-06

    Many bacteria amass compatible solutes to fend-off the detrimental effects of high osmolarity on cellular physiology and water content. These solutes also function as stabilizers of macromolecules, a property for which they are referred to as chemical chaperones. The tetrahydropyrimidine ectoine is such a compatible solute and is widely synthesized by members of the Bacteria. Many ectoine producers also synthesize the stress protectant 5-hydroxyectoine from the precursor ectoine, a process that is catalyzed by the ectoine hydroxylase (EctD). The EctD enzyme is a member of the non-heme-containing iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily. A crystal structure of the EctD protein from the moderate halophile Virgibacillus salexigens has previously been reported and revealed the coordination of the iron catalyst, but it lacked the substrate ectoine and the co-substrate 2-oxoglutarate. Here we used this crystal structure as a template to assess the likely positioning of the ectoine and 2-oxoglutarate ligands within the active site by structural comparison, molecular dynamics simulations, and site-directed mutagenesis. Collectively, these approaches suggest the positioning of the iron, ectoine, and 2-oxoglutarate ligands in close proximity to each other and with a spatial orientation that will allow the region-selective and stereo-specific hydroxylation of (4S)-ectoine to (4S,5S)-5-hydroxyectoine. Our study thus provides a view into the catalytic core of the ectoine hydroxylase and suggests an intricate network of interactions between the three ligands and evolutionarily highly conserved residues in members of the EctD protein family.

  4. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  5. Transposon-directed base-exchange mutagenesis (TDEM): a novel method for multiple-nucleotide substitutions within a target gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Cheol; Lee, Hui Sun; Yoon, Sukjoon; Morrison, Sherie L

    2009-06-01

    In this report we describe transposon-directed base-exchange mutagenesis (TDEM), an efficient and controllable method for introducing a mutation into a gene. Each round of TDEM can remove up to 11 base pairs from a randomly selected site within the target gene and replace them with any length of DNA of predetermined sequence. Therefore, the number of bases to be deleted and inserted can be independently regulated providing greater versatility than existing methods of transposon-based mutagenesis. Subsequently, multiple rounds of mutagenesis will provide a diverse mutant library that contains multiple mutations throughout the gene. Additionally, we developed a simple frame-checking procedure that eliminates nonfunctional mutants containing frameshifts or stop codons. As a proof of principle, we used TDEM to generate mutant lacZalpha lacking alpha-complementation activity and recovered active revertants using a second round of TDEM. Furthermore, a single round of TDEM yielded unique, inactive mutants of ccdB.

  6. Heat shock and herpes virus: enhanced reactivation without untargeted mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, C.D.; Carney, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Enhanced reactivation of Ultraviolet-irradiated virus has been reported to occur in heat-shocked host cells. Since enhanced virus reactivation is often accompanied by untargeted mutagenesis, we investigated whether such mutagenesis would occur for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in CV-1 monkey kidney cells subjected to heat shock. In addition to expressing enhanced reactivation, the treated cells were transiently more susceptible to infection by unirradiated HSV. No mutagenesis of unirradiated HSV was found whether infection occurred at the time of increased susceptibility to infection or during expression of enhanced viral reactivation.

  7. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  8. Impact of site-directed mutant luciferase on quantitative green and orange/red emission intensities in firefly bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Terakado, Kanako; Nakatsu, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Firefly bioluminescence has attracted great interest because of its high quantum yield and intriguing modifiable colours. Modifications to the structure of the enzyme luciferase can change the emission colour of firefly bioluminescence, and the mechanism of the colour change has been intensively studied by biochemists, structural biologists, optical physicists, and quantum-chemistry theorists. Here, we report on the quantitative spectra of firefly bioluminescence catalysed by wild-type and four site-directed mutant luciferases. While the mutation caused different emission spectra, the spectra differed only in the intensity of the green component (λmax ~ 560 nm). In contrast, the orange (λmax ~ 610 nm) and red (λmax ~ 650 nm) components present in all the spectra were almost unaffected by the modifications to the luciferases and changes in pH. Our results reveal that the intensity of the green component is the unique factor that is influenced by the luciferase structure and other reaction conditions.

  9. Site-Directed Glycosylation of Peptide/Protein with Homogeneous O-Linked Eukaryotic N-Glycans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhigang; Jiang, Kuan; Zhu, Hailiang; Ma, Cheng; Yu, Zaikuan; Li, Lei; Guan, Wanyi; Liu, Yunpeng; Zhu, He; Chen, Yanyi; Li, Shanshan; Li, Jing; Cheng, Jiansong; Zhang, Lianwen; Wang, Peng George

    2016-09-21

    Here we report a facile and efficient method for site-directed glycosylation of peptide/protein. The method contains two sequential steps: generation of a GlcNAc-O-peptide/protein, and subsequent ligation of a eukaryotic N-glycan to the GlcNAc moiety. A pharmaceutical peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and a model protein, bovine α-Crystallin, were successfully glycosylated using such an approach. It was shown that the GLP-1 with O-linked N-glycan maintained an unchanged secondary structure after glycosylation, suggesting the potential application of this approach for peptide/protein drug production. In summary, the coupled approach provides a general strategy to produce homogeneous glycopeptide/glycoprotein bearing eukaryotic N-glycans.

  10. Role of copper and ceruloplasmin in oxidative mutagenesis induced by the gluthathione-{gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase system and by other thiols

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, A.A.; Glass, G.A.

    1997-10-01

    Glutathione is activated to a mutagen by {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase. Other thiols, such as cysteine, penicillamine, cysteine ethylester, and cysteinylglycine, are direct mutagens in the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity test. Thiol mutagenesis is oxidative in nature and involves H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and possibly hydroxyl radicals. Transition metals are crucial for thiol autoxidation. The role of copper and ceruloplasmin (CP) in thiol-dependent mutagenesis was studied in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 102. Cu and CP at low concentrations enhanced thiol-dependent mutagenesis in the presence, but not in the absence, and added Fe. The degree of enhancement depended on the type of thiol. At high Cu or CP concentrations, thiol mutagenesis was inhibited. Cu also decreased the mutagenicity of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Cu- and CP-enhanced mutagenesis were inhibited by radical scavengers, catalase, and peroxidase but not by superoxide dismutase. The effects of Cu and CP on thiol-dependent mutagenesis were similar to their effects on thiol-driven lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that the role of Cu and CP in the enhancement of thiol mutagenesis is the facilitation of the transfer of electrons from a thiol to iron, rather than in catalysis of the Fenton reaction. 34 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Role of copper and ceruloplasmin in oxidative mutagenesis induced by the glutathione-gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase system and by other thiols.

    PubMed

    Stark, A A; Glass, G A

    1997-01-01

    Glutathione is activated to a mutagen by gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. Other thiols, such as cysteine, penicillamine, cysteine ethylester, and cysteinylglycine, are direct mutagens in the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity test. Thiol mutagenesis is oxidative in nature and involves H2O2 and possibly hydroxyl radicals. Transition metals are crucial for thiol autoxidation. The role of copper and ceruloplasmin (CP) in thiol-dependent mutagenesis was studied in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA102. Cu and CP at low concentrations enhanced thiol-dependent mutagenesis in the presence, but not in the absence, of added Fe. The degree of enhancement depended on the type of thiol. At high Cu or CP concentrations, thiol mutagenesis was inhibited. Cu also decreased the mutagenicity of H2O2. Cu- and CP-enhanced mutagenesis were inhibited by radical scavengers, catalase, and peroxidase but not by superoxide dismutase. The effects of Cu and CP on thiol-dependent mutagenesis were similar to their effects on thiol-driven lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that the role of Cu and CP in the enhancement of thiol mutagenesis is the facilitation of the transfer of electrons from a thiol to iron, rather than in catalysis of the Fenton reaction.

  12. Homodimeric chicken galectin CG-1B (C-14): Crystal structure and detection of unique redox-dependent shape changes involving inter- and intrasubunit disulfide bridges by gel filtration, ultracentrifugation, site-directed mutagenesis, and peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    López-Lucendo, María F; Solís, Dolores; Sáiz, José Luis; Kaltner, Herbert; Russwurm, Roland; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Romero, Antonio

    2009-02-20

    Intrafamily gene diversification has led to three prototype galectins in chicken [i.e., chicken galectin (CG)-1A, CG-1B, and CG-2] that show distinct expression profiles and developmental regulation. In order to pinpoint structural disparities among them, we determined the crystal structure of CG-1B. Alteration of the position of the Trp ring in the lectin site and the presence of only two ordered water molecules therein, as well as changes in the interface region between the two subunits, set the structure of CG-1B clearly apart from that of CG-1A. Intriguingly, the unique presence of two Cys residues at positions 2 and 7 in the N-terminal region translated into formation of an intersubunit disulfide bridge between the Cys7 residues of the homodimer in the crystal. In solution, oxidation is associated with significant shape changes in the dimeric protein and the additional occurrence of a compacted form with an intrasubunit disulfide bridge between Cys2 and Cys7. The single-site mutant C7S/C7V was not subjected to such changes, supporting the crucial role of Cys7 in redox-dependent shape changes. These results point to the functional significance of the distinctive presence of the two Cys residues in the N-terminal region of CG-1B.

  13. Functional Differentiation of Antiporter-Like Polypeptides in Complex I; a Site-Directed Mutagenesis Study of Residues Conserved in MrpA and NuoL but Not in MrpD, NuoM, and NuoN

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Eva; Górecki, Kamil; Drakenberg, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that the three largest subunits in the membrane domain (NuoL, NuoM and NuoN) of complex I are homologous to each other, as well as to two subunits (MrpA and MrpD) from a Na+/H+ antiporter, Mrp. MrpA and NuoL are more similar to each other and the same is true for MrpD and NuoN. This suggests a functional differentiation which was proven experimentally in a deletion strain model system, where NuoL could restore the loss of MrpA, but not that of MrpD and vice versa. The simplest explanation for these observations was that the MrpA and MrpD proteins are not antiporters, but rather single subunit ion channels that together form an antiporter. In this work our focus was on a set of amino acid residues in helix VIII, which are only conserved in NuoL and MrpA (but not in any of the other antiporter-like subunits.) and to compare their effect on the function of these two proteins. By combining complementation studies in B. subtilis and 23Na-NMR, response of mutants to high sodium levels were tested. All of the mutants were able to cope with high salt levels; however, all but one mutation (M258I/M225I) showed differences in the efficiency of cell growth and sodium efflux. Our findings showed that, although very similar in sequence, NuoL and MrpA seem to differ on the functional level. Nonetheless the studied mutations gave rise to interesting phenotypes which are of interest in complex I research. PMID:27391676

  14. Site-directed mutagenesis of azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa enhances the formation of an electron-transfer complex with a copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6.

    PubMed

    Kukimoto, M; Nishiyama, M; Tanokura, M; Murphy, M E; Adman, E T; Horinouchi, S

    1996-09-23

    Kinetic analysis of electron transfer between azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and copper-containing nitrite reductase (NIR) from Akaligenes faecalis S-6 was carried out to investigate the specificity of electron transfer between copper-containing proteins. Apparent values of kcat and Km of NIR for azurin were 300-fold smaller and 172-fold larger than those for the physiological redox partner, pseudoazurin from A. faecalis S-6, respectively, suggesting that the electron transfer between azurin and NIR was less specific than that between pseudoazurin and NIR. One of the major differences in 3-D structure between these redox proteins, azurin and pseudoazurin, is the absence and presence of lysine residues near their type 1 copper sites, respectively. Three mutated azurins, D11K, P36K, and D11K/P36K, were constructed to evaluate the importance of lysine residues in the interaction with NIR. The redox potentials of D11K, P36K, and D11K/P36K azurins were higher than that of wild-type azurin by 48, 7, and 55 mV, respectively. As suggested by the increase in the redox potential, kinetic analysis of electron transfer revealed reduced ability of electron transfer in the mutated azurins. On the other hand, although each of the single mutations caused modest effects on the decrease in the Km value, the simultaneous mutations of D11K and P36K caused significant decrease in the Km value when compared to that for wild-type azurin. These results suggest that the introduction of two lysine residues into azurin facilitated docking to NIR.

  15. Binding of an antibody mimetic of the human low density lipoprotein receptor to apolipoprotein E is governed through electrostatic forces. Studies using site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Raffaï, R; Weisgraber, K H; MacKenzie, R; Rupp, B; Rassart, E; Hirama, T; Innerarity, T L; Milne, R

    2000-03-10

    Monoclonal antibody 2E8 is specific for an epitope that coincides with the binding site of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) on human apoE. Its reactivity with apoE variants resembles that of the LDLR: it binds well with apoE3 and poorly with apoE2. The heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDRH) 2 of 2E8 shows homology to the ligand-binding domain of the LDLR. To define better the structural basis of the 2E8/apoE interaction and particularly the role of electrostatic interactions, we generated and characterized a panel of 2E8 variants. Replacement of acidic residues in the 2E8 CDRHs showed that Asp(52), Glu(53), and Asp(56) are essential for high-affinity binding. Although Asp(31) (CDRH1), Glu(58) (CDRH2), and Asp(97) (CDRH3) did not appear to be critical, the Asp(97) --> Ala variant acquired reactivity with apoE2. A Thr(57) --> Glu substitution increased affinity for both apoE3 and apoE2. The affinities of wild-type 2E8 and variants for apoE varied inversely with ionic strength, suggesting that electrostatic forces contribute to both antigen binding and isoform specificity. We propose a model of the 2E8.apoE immune complex that is based on the 2E8 and apoE crystal structures and that is consistent with the apoE-binding properties of wild-type 2E8 and its variants. Given the similarity between the LDLR and 2E8 in terms of specificity, the LDLR/ligand interaction may also have an important electrostatic component.

  16. Understanding microscopic binding of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) trimer with substrate PGH2 and cofactor GSH: insights from computational alanine scanning and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Adel; Tong, Min; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Liu, Junjun; Goren, Alan C; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2010-04-29

    Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) is an essential enzyme involved in a variety of diseases and is the most promising target for the design of next-generation anti-inflammatory drugs. In order to establish a solid structural base, we recently developed a model of mPGES-1 trimer structure by using available crystal structures of both microsomal glutathione transferase-1 (MGST1) and ba3-cytochrome c oxidase as templates. The mPGES-1 trimer model has been used in the present study to examine the detailed binding of mPGES-1 trimer with substrate PGH(2) and cofactor GSH. Results obtained from the computational alanine scanning reveal the contribution of each residue at the protein-ligand interaction interface to the binding affinity, and the computational predictions are supported by the data obtained from the corresponding wet experimental tests. We have also compared our mPGES-1 trimer model with other available 3D models, including an alternative homology model and a low-resolution crystal structure, and found that our mPGES-1 trimer model based on the crystal structures of both MGST1 and ba3-cytochrome c oxidase is more reasonable than the other homology model of mPGES-1 trimer constructed by simply using a low-resolution crystal structure of MGST1 trimer alone as a template. The available low-resolution crystal structure of mPGES-1 trimer represents a closed conformation of the enzyme and thus is not suitable for studying mPGES-1 binding with ligands. Our mPGES-1 trimer model represents a reasonable open conformation of the enzyme and is therefore promising for studying mPGES-1 binding with ligands in future structure-based drug design targeting mPGES-1.

  17. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Brett A.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Espinoza-Fonseca, L. Michel; Thomas, David D.

    2016-01-01

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron–electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0–C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein’s flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein–protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility. PMID:26908877

  18. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colson, Brett A; Thompson, Andrew R; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Thomas, David D

    2016-03-22

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0-C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein's flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein-protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility.

  19. Elucidating the design principles of photosynthetic electron-transfer proteins by site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishara Silva, K; Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H; Lakshmi, K V

    2016-05-01

    Site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine solvent accessibility, side-chain dynamics, and inter-spin distances at specific sites in biological macromolecules. This information provides important insights into the structure and dynamics of both natural and designed proteins and protein complexes. Here, we discuss the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy in probing the charge-transfer cofactors in photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) such as photosystem I (PSI) and the bacterial reaction center (bRC). Photosynthetic RCs are large multi-subunit proteins (molecular weight≥300 kDa) that perform light-driven charge transfer reactions in photosynthesis. These reactions are carried out by cofactors that are paramagnetic in one of their oxidation states. This renders the RCs unsuitable for conventional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigations. However, the presence of native paramagnetic centers and the ability to covalently attach site-directed spin labels in RCs makes them ideally suited for the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy. The paramagnetic centers serve as probes of conformational changes, dynamics of subunit assembly, and the relative motion of cofactors and peptide subunits. In this review, we describe novel applications of SDSL EPR spectroscopy for elucidating the effects of local structure and dynamics on the electron-transfer cofactors of photosynthetic RCs. Because SDSL EPR Spectroscopy is uniquely suited to provide dynamic information on protein motion, it is a particularly useful method in the engineering and analysis of designed electron transfer proteins and protein networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  20. A Synthetic Approach to Stop-Codon Scanning Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Lihua; Lavinder, Jason J.; Sarkar, Mohosin; Stephany, Kimberly; Magliery, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A general combinatorial mutagenesis strategy using common DMT-protected mononucleotide phosphoramidites and a single orthogonally-protected trinucleotide phosphoramidite (Fmoc-TAG) was developed to scan a gene with the TAG amber stop codon with complete synthetic control. In combination with stop-codon suppressors that insert natural (e.g., alanine) or unnatural (e.g., p-benzoylphenylalanine or Bpa) amino acids, a single DNA library can be used to incorporate different amino acids for diverse purposes. Here, we scanned TAG codons through part of the gene for a model four-helix bundle protein, Rop, which regulates the copy number of ColE1 plasmids. Alanine was incorporated into Rop for mapping its binding site using an in vivo activity screen, and subtle but important differences from in vitro gel-shift studies of Rop function are evident. As a test, Bpa was incorporated using a Phe14 amber mutant isolated from the scanning library. Surprisingly, Phe14Bpa Rop is weakly active, despite the critical role of Phe14 in Rop activity. Bpa is a photoaffinity label unnatural amino acid that can form covalent bonds with adjacent molecules upon UV irradiation. Irradiation of Phe14Bpa-Rop, which is a dimer in solution like wild-type Rop, results in covalent dimers, trimers and tetramers. This suggests that Phe14Bpa Rop weakly associates as a tetramer in solution and highlights the use of Bpa crosslinking as a means of trapping weak and transient interactions. PMID:21452871

  1. Signature-tagged mutagenesis of Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, Mai; KASHIMOTO, Takashige; TONG, Ping; XIAO, Jianbo; SUGIYAMA, Michiko; INOUE, Miyuki; MATSUNAGA, Rie; HOSOHARA, Kohei; NAKATA, Kazue; YOKOTA, Kenji; OGUMA, Keiji; YAMAMOTO, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is the causative agent of primary septicemia, wound infection and gastroenteritis in immunocompromised people. In this study, signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) was applied to identify the virulence genes of V. vulnificus. Using STM, 6,480 mutants in total were constructed and divided into 81 sets (INPUT pools); each mutant in a set was assigned a different tag. Each INPUT pool was intraperitoneally injected into iron-overloaded mice, and in vivo surviving mutants were collected from blood samples from the heart (OUTPUT pools). From the genomic DNA of mixed INPUT or OUTPUT pools, digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes against the tagged region were prepared and used for dot hybridization. Thirty tentatively attenuated mutants, which were hybridized clearly with INPUT probes but barely with OUTPUT probes, were negatively selected. Lethal doses of 11 of the 30 mutants were reduced to more than 1/100; of these, the lethal doses of 2 were reduced to as low as 1/100,000. Transposon-inserted genes in the 11 attenuated mutants were those for IMP dehydrogenase, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-2-epimerase, aspartokinase, phosphoribosylformylglycinamidine cyclo-ligase, malate Na (+) symporter and hypothetical protein. When mice were immunized with an attenuated mutant strain into which IMP dehydrogenase had been inserted with a transposon, they were protected against V. vulnificus infection. In this study, we demonstrated that the STM method can be used to search for the virulence genes of V. vulnificus. PMID:25755021

  2. A mutagenesis study of a catalytic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.Y.; Prudent, J.R.; Baldwin, E.P.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have generated seven site-specific mutations in the genes encoding the variable region of the heavy chain domain (V{sub H}) of the phosphocholine-binding antibody S107.S107 is a member of a family of well-characterized highly homologous antibodies that bind phosphorylcholine mono- and diesters. Two of these antibodies, MOPC-167 and T15, have previously been shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl N-trimethylammonioethyl carbonate. Two conserved heavy-chain residues, Tyr-33 and Arg-52, were postulated to be involved in binding and hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylcholine carbonate esters. To more precisely define the catalytic roles of these residues, three Arg-52 mutants (R52K, R52Q, R52C) and four Tyr-33 mutants (Y33H, Y33F, Y33E, Y33D) of antibody S107 were generated. The genes encoding the V{sub H} binding domain of S107 were inserted into plasmid pUC-fl, and in vitro mutagenesis was performed. These results not only demonstrate the importance of electrostatic interactions in catalysis by antibody S107 but also show that catalytic side chains can be introduced into antibodies to enhance their catalytic efficiency.

  3. Exploitation of the S-layer self-assembly system for site directed immobilization of enzymes demonstrated for an extremophilic laminarinase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Tschiggerl, Helga; Breitwieser, Andreas; de Roo, Guy; Verwoerd, Theo; Schäffer, Christina; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2008-02-01

    A fusion protein based on the S-layer protein SbpA from Bacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 and the enzyme laminarinase (LamA) from Pyrococcus furiosus was designed and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Due to the construction principle, the S-layer fusion protein fully retained the self-assembly capability of the S-layer moiety, while the catalytic domain of LamA remained exposed at the outer surface of the formed protein lattice. The enzyme activity of the S-layer fusion protein monolayer obtained upon recrystallization on silicon wafers, glass slides and different types of polymer membranes was determined colorimetrically and related to the activity of sole LamA that has been immobilized with conventional techniques. LamA aligned within the S-layer fusion protein lattice in a periodic and orientated fashion catalyzed twice the glucose release from the laminarin polysaccharide substrate in comparison to the randomly immobilized enzyme. In combination with the good shelf-life and the high resistance towards temperature and diverse chemicals, these novel composites are regarded a promising approach for site-directed enzyme immobilization.

  4. Yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (Phialidium): structure and structure-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z. Souslova, Ekaterina; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Lukyanov, Sergey; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Arhipova, Svetlena; Artemyev, Igor; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2013-06-01

    The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (λ{sub em}{sup max} ≃ 537 nm) with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The latter fluorescent protein is one of only two known cases of naturally occurring proteins that exhibit emission spectra in the yellow–orange range (535–555 nm). Here, the crystal structure of phiYFPv has been determined at 2.05 Å resolution. The ‘yellow’ chromophore formed from the sequence triad Thr65-Tyr66-Gly67 adopts the bicyclic structure typical of fluorophores emitting in the green spectral range. It was demonstrated that perfect antiparallel π-stacking of chromophore Tyr66 and the proximal Tyr203, as well as Val205, facing the chromophore phenolic ring are chiefly responsible for the observed yellow emission of phiYFPv at 537 nm. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis has been used to identify the key functional residues in the chromophore environment. The obtained results have been utilized to improve the properties of phiYFPv and its homologous monomeric biomarker tagYFP.

  5. Reciprocal relationship between mouse germ-cell mutagenesis and basic genetics: from early beginnings to future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B

    1989-01-01

    The scientific foundations for several mammalian germ-line mutagenesis tests in common use today were laid in the 1930s, 1940s, and early 1950s. Subsequent developments in the field have had multiple objectives: detection of mutagenicity of environmental agents (which has led to the development of numerous methodologies), identification of biological and physical factors that affect mutation yield, analysis of the structural nature of the genetic alterations, and assessment of the organismic effects of various types of mutations. Mutagenesis studies have made numerous contributions to basic genetics by generating mutant types that led to elucidation of sex-determining mechanisms in mammals; formulation of the single-active-, or inactive-, X-chromosome hypothesis; correlation of genetic and cytological maps; discovery of genetic "imprinting" phenomena; study of developmental pathways and cell lineages, etc. Particularly useful are sets of complexly overlapping deletions that have been recovered in radiation mutagenesis studies, propagated in breeding stocks, and genetically analyzed; these have constituted prerequisites for molecular genetic studies aimed at development of the DNA structure-function relationships for important genomic regions. Mutagenesis experiments have also served to identify mutagens that are particularly effective in inducing specific types of genetic lesions desired for basic studies. Reciprocally, basic genetics has contributed to the development of mutagenesis tests and has enhanced the value of the specific-locus test by adding to its quantitative capabilities the capability for qualitatively characterizing the actions of mutagens.

  6. Enhancing effect of heterocyclic amines and beta-carbolines on UV or chemically induced mutagenesis in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Shimoi, K; Kawabata, H; Tomita, I

    1992-08-01

    Most heterocyclic amines and beta-carbolines--harman, norharman, harmine, harmaline--enhanced UVC (254 nm) induced mutagenesis without microsomal activation in E. coli B/r WP2. 3-Amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) was most effective and increased UVAB (295-400 nm) induced mutations as well as UVC induced ones. Trp-P-1 enhanced the frequencies of mutations induced by not only UV but also 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) or 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)acrylamide (AF2), while it showed little effect on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or gamma-ray induced mutagenesis. Trp-P-1 decreased the survival of UVC irradiated cells of CM571recA. However, these effects of Trp-P-1 on UVC induced mutagenesis and lethality were not observed in WP2suvrA which is excision repair deficient. The alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis demonstrated that Trp-P-1 blocked the incision step in DNA excision repair. Further, pretreatment with Trp-P-1 before UVC irradiation showed no effect on UVC induced mutagenesis. Similar effects were also seen in the case of harman or norharman. These results suggest that heterocyclic amines and beta-carbolines inhibit DNA excision repair directly or indirectly, thus enhancing UV or chemically induced mutagenesis.

  7. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents. (ERB)

  8. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-10-21

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses.

  9. A novel mechanism for regulating the activity of proliferating cell nuclear antigen by a small protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Huang, Richard Y-C; Yopp, Daniel C; Hileman, Travis H; Santangelo, Thomas J; Hurwitz, Jerard; Hudgens, Jeffrey W; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-05-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that associates with and influences the activity of many proteins participating in DNA metabolic processes and cell cycle progression. Previously, an uncharacterized small protein, encoded by TK0808 in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis, was shown to stably interact with PCNA in vivo. Here, we show that this protein, designated Thermococcales inhibitor of PCNA (TIP), binds to PCNA in vitro and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities likely by preventing PCNA trimerization. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, the interacting regions of PCNA and TIP were identified. Most proteins bind to PCNA via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that interacts with the inter domain connecting loop (IDCL) on PCNA. TIP, however, lacks any known PCNA-interacting motif, suggesting a new mechanism for PCNA binding and regulation of PCNA-dependent activities, which may support the development of a new subclass of therapeutic biomolecules for inhibiting PCNA.

  10. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-07-29

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  11. Functional characterization of a Plagiochasma appendiculatum flavone synthase I showing flavanone 2-hydroxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Yi-Feng; Gao, Shuai; Yu, Hai-Na; Xu, Rui-Xue; Lou, Hong-Xiang; Cheng, Ai-Xia

    2014-06-27

    FNS I is a 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenase (2-ODD) found mainly in species of the Apiaceae family. Here, an FNS I cDNA sequence was isolated from the liverwort Plagiochasma appendiculatum (Aytoniaceae) and characterized. The recombinant protein exhibited high FNS I activity catalyzing the conversion of naringenin to apigenin and 2-hydroxynaringenin. The critical residue for flavanone-2-hydroxylation activity was Tyr240, as identified from homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis. The recombinant protein also showed some flavonol synthase activity, as it can convert dihydrokaempferol to kaempferol. When the Leu311 residue was mutated to Phe, the enzyme's capacity to convert dihydrokaempferol to kaempferol was substantially increased. PaFNS I represents a 2-ODD in which a hydrophobic π-stacking interaction between the key residue and the naringenin A-ring determines 2-hydroxyflavanone formation.

  12. Insertional mutagenesis of preneoplastic astrocytes by Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Afanasieva, T A; Pekarik, V; Grazia D'Angelo, M; Klein, M A; Voigtländer, T; Stocking, C; Aguzzi, A

    2001-04-01

    Retroviral infection can induce transcriptional activation of genes flanking the sites of proviral integration in target cells. Because integration is essentially random, this phenomenon can be exploited for random mutagenesis of the genome, and analysis of integration sites in tumors may identify potential oncogenes. Here we have investigated this strategy in the context of astrocytoma progression. Neuroectodermal explants from astrocytoma-prone GFAP-v-src transgenic mice were infected with the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV). In situ hybridization and FACS analysis indicated that astrocytes from E12.5-13.5 embryos were highly susceptible to retroviral infection and expressed viral RNA and proteins both in vitro and in vivo. In average 80% of neuroectodermal cells were infected in vitro with 9-14 proviral integrations per cell. Virus mobility assays confirmed that Mo-MuLV remained transcriptionally active and replicating in neuroectodermal primary cultures even after 45 days of cultivation. Proviral insertion sites were investigated by inverse long-range PCR. Analysis of a limited number of provirus flanking sequences in clones originated from in vitro infected GFAP-v-src neuroectodermal cells identified loci of possible relevance to tumorigenesis. Therefore, the approach described here might be suitable for acceleration of tumorigenesis in preneoplastic astrocytes. We expect this method to be useful for identifying genes involved in astrocytoma development/progression in animal models.

  13. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A.; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)—the cause of multiple human diseases—have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential. PMID:25775519

  14. Molecular Determinants of Mutant Phenotypes, Inferred from Saturation Mutagenesis Data

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Arti; Gupta, Kritika; Khare, Shruti; Jain, Pankaj C.; Patel, Siddharth; Kumar, Prasanth; Pulianmackal, Ajai J.; Aghera, Nilesh; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how mutations affect protein activity and organismal fitness is a major challenge. We used saturation mutagenesis combined with deep sequencing to determine mutational sensitivity scores for 1,664 single-site mutants of the 101 residue Escherichia coli cytotoxin, CcdB at seven different expression levels. Active-site residues could be distinguished from buried ones, based on their differential tolerance to aliphatic and charged amino acid substitutions. At nonactive-site positions, the average mutational tolerance correlated better with depth from the protein surface than with accessibility. Remarkably, similar results were observed for two other small proteins, PDZ domain (PSD95pdz3) and IgG-binding domain of protein G (GB1). Mutational sensitivity data obtained with CcdB were used to derive a procedure for predicting functional effects of mutations. Results compared favorably with those of two widely used computational predictors. In vitro characterization of 80 single, nonactive-site mutants of CcdB showed that activity in vivo correlates moderately with thermal stability and solubility. The inability to refold reversibly, as well as a decreased folding rate in vitro, is associated with decreased activity in vivo. Upon probing the effect of modulating expression of various proteases and chaperones on mutant phenotypes, most deleterious mutants showed an increased in vivo activity and solubility only upon over-expression of either Trigger factor or SecB ATP-independent chaperones. Collectively, these data suggest that folding kinetics rather than protein stability is the primary determinant of activity in vivo. This study enhances our understanding of how mutations affect phenotype, as well as the ability to predict fitness effects of point mutations. PMID:27563054

  15. Characterization of the membrane quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli and characterization of a site-directed mutant in which histidine-262 has been changed to tyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Cozier, G E; Salleh, R A; Anthony, C

    1999-01-01

    The requirements for substrate binding in the quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) in the membranes of Escherichia coli are described, together with the changes in activity in a site-directed mutant in which His262 has been altered to a tyrosine residue (H262Y-GDH). The differences in catalytic efficiency between substrates are mainly related to differences in their affinity for the enzyme. Remarkably, it appears that, if a hexose is able to bind in the active site, then it is also oxidized, whereas some pentoses are able to bind (and act as competitive inhibitors), but are not substrates. The activation energies for the oxidation of hexoses and pentoses are almost identical. In a previously published model of the enzyme, His262 is at the entrance to the active site and appears to be important in holding the prosthetic group pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in place, and it has been suggested that it might play a role in electron transfer from the reduced PQQ to the ubiquinone in the membrane. The H262Y-GDH has a greatly diminished catalytic efficiency for all substrates, which is mainly due to a marked decrease in their affinities for the enzyme, but the rate of electron transfer to oxygen is unaffected. During the processing of the PQQ into the apoenzyme to give active enzyme, its affinity is markedly dependent on the pH, four groups with pK values between pH7 and pH8 being involved. Identical results were obtained with H262Y-GDH, showing that His262 it is not directly involved in this process. PMID:10359647

  16. Triplex technology in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M

    2011-08-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to the major groove of homopurine-homopyrimidine stretches of double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form DNA triplexes. TFOs by themselves or conjugated to reactive molecules can be used to direct sequence-specific DNA damage, which in turn results in the induction of several DNA metabolic activities. Triplex technology is highly utilized as a tool to study gene regulation, molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis. In addition, TFO targeting of specific genes has been exploited in the development of therapeutic strategies to modulate DNA structure and function. In this review, we discuss advances made in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis by using triplex technology to target specific DNA sequences.

  17. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beacham, T.A.; Macia, V. Mora; Rooks, P.; White, D.A.; Ali, S.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed. PMID:26753128

  18. Endogenous mutagenesis in recombinant sulfolobus plasmids.

    PubMed

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2013-06-01

    Low rates of replication errors in chromosomal genes of Sulfolobus spp. demonstrate that these extreme thermoacidophiles can maintain genome integrity in environments with high temperature and low pH. In contrast to this genetic stability, we observed unusually frequent mutation of the β-D-glycosidase gene (lacS) of a shuttle plasmid (pJlacS) propagated in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. The resulting Lac(-) mutants also grew faster than the Lac(+) parent, thereby amplifying the impact of the frequent lacS mutations on the population. We developed a mutant accumulation assay and corrections for the effects of copy number and differential growth for this system; the resulting measurements and calculations yielded a corrected rate of 5.1 × 10(-4) mutational events at the lacS gene per plasmid replication. Analysis of independent lacS mutants revealed three types of mutations: (i) G · C-to-A · T transitions, (ii) slipped-strand events, and (iii) deletions. These mutations were frequent in plasmid-borne lacS expressed at a high level but not in single-copy lacS in the chromosome or at lower levels of expression in a plasmid. Substitution mutations arose at only two of 12 potential priming sites of the DNA primase of the pRN1 replicon, but nearly all these mutations created nonsense (chain termination) codons. The spontaneous mutation rate of plasmid-borne lacS was 175-fold higher under high-expression than under low-expression conditions. The results suggest that important DNA repair or replication fidelity functions are impaired or overwhelmed in pJlacS, with results analogous to those of the "transcription-associated mutagenesis" seen in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  19. Exploring the role of putative active site amino acids and pro-region motif of recombinant falcipain-2: a principal hemoglobinase of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Dasaradhi, P V N; Chauhan, Virander S; Malhotra, Pawan

    2004-04-23

    Falcipain-2 is one of the principal hemoglobinases of Plasmodium falciparum, a human malaria parasite. It has a typical papain family cysteine protease structural organization, a large pro-domain, a mature domain with conserved active site amino acids. Pro-domain of falcipain-2 also contains two important conserved motifs, "GNFD" and "ERFNIN." The "GNFD" motif has been shown to be responsible for correct folding and stability in case of many papain family proteases. In the present study, we carried out site-directed mutagenesis to assess the roles of active site residues and pro-domain residues for the activity of falcipain-2. Our results showed that substitutions of putative active site residues; Q36, C42, H174, and N204 resulted in complete loss of falcipain-2 activity, while W206 and D155 mutants retained partial/complete activity in comparison to the wild type falcipain-2. Homology modeling data also corroborate the results of mutagenesis; Q36, C42, H174, N204, and W206 residues form the active site loop of the enzyme and D155 lie outside the active pocket. Substitutions in the pro-region did not affect the activity of falcipain-2. This implies that falcipain-2 shares active site residues with other members of papain family, however pro-region of falcipain-2 does not play any role in the activity of enzyme.

  20. Cryptococcus neoformans Virulence Gene Discovery through Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Idnurm, Alexander; Reedy, Jennifer L.; Nussbaum, Jesse C.; Heitman, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis was applied to Cryptococcus neoformans to identify genes associated with virulence attributes. Using biolistic transformation, we generated 4,300 nourseothricin (NAT)-resistant strains, of which 590 exhibited stable resistance. We focused on mutants with defects in established virulence factors and identified two with reduced growth at 37°C, four with reduced production of the antioxidant pigment melanin, and two with an increased sensitivity to nitric oxide (NO). The NAT insertion and mutant phenotypes were genetically linked in five of eight mutants, and the DNA flanking the insertions was characterized. For the strains with altered growth at 37°C and altered melanin production, mutations were in previously uncharacterized genes, while the two NO-sensitive strains bore insertions in the flavohemoglobin gene FHB1, whose product counters NO stress. Because of the frequent instability of nourseothricin resistance associated with biolistic transformation, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was tested. This transkingdom DNA delivery approach produced 100% stable nourseothricin-resistant transformants, and three melanin-defective strains were identified from 576 transformants, of which 2 were linked to NAT in segregation analysis. One of these mutants contained a T-DNA insertion in the promoter of the LAC1 (laccase) gene, which encodes a key enzyme required for melanin production, while the second contained an insertion in the promoter of the CLC1 gene, encoding a voltage-gated chloride channel. Clc1 and its homologs are required for ion homeostasis, and in their absence Cu+ transport into the secretory pathway is compromised, depriving laccase and other Cu+-dependent proteins of their essential cofactor. The NAT resistance cassette was optimized for cryptococcal codon usage and GC content and was then used to disrupt a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene, a predicted gene, and two putative chloride channel genes to analyze their

  1. Lesion-induced DNA weak structural changes detected by pulsed EPR spectroscopy combined with site-directed spin labelling

    PubMed Central

    Sicoli, Giuseppe; Mathis, Gérald; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Boulard, Yves; Gasparutto, Didier; Gambarelli, Serge

    2009-01-01

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) was applied to determine nanometre spin–spin distances on DNA duplexes that contain selected structural alterations. The present approach to evaluate the structural features of DNA damages is thus related to the interspin distance changes, as well as to the flexibility of the overall structure deduced from the distance distribution. A set of site-directed nitroxide-labelled double-stranded DNA fragments containing defined lesions, namely an 8-oxoguanine, an abasic site or abasic site analogues, a nick, a gap and a bulge structure were prepared and then analysed by the DEER spectroscopic technique. New insights into the application of 4-pulse DEER sequence are also provided, in particular with respect to the spin probes’ positions and the rigidity of selected systems. The lesion-induced conformational changes observed, which were supported by molecular dynamics studies, confirm the results obtained by other, more conventional, spectroscopic techniques. Thus, the experimental approaches described herein provide an efficient method for probing lesion-induced structural changes of nucleic acids. PMID:19304747

  2. Revealing interaction between sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin and reserpine by chemiluminescence and site-directed molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xunyu; Wu, Min; Zhao, Xinfeng; Song, Zhenghua

    2014-09-01

    The host-guest interaction between sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) and reserpine (RSP) is described using flow injection-chemiluminescence (FI-CL) and site-directed molecular docking methods. It was found that RSP could inhibit the CL intensity produced by a luminol/SBE-β-CD system. The decrease in CL intensity was logarithmic over an RSP concentration range of 0.03 to 700.0 nM, giving a regression equation of ∆I = 107.1lgCRES  + 186.1 with a detection limit of 10 pM (3σ). The CL assay was successfully applied in the determination of RSP in injection, saliva and urine samples with recoveries in the range 93.5-106.1%. Using the proposed CL model, the binding constant (KCD-R ) and the stoichiometric ratio of SBE-β-CD/RSP were calculated to be 7.4 × 10(6)  M(-1) and 1 : 1, respectively. Using molecular docking, it was confirmed that luminol binds to the small cavity of SBE-β-CD with a nonpolar interaction, while RSP targeted the larger cavity of SBE-β-CD and formed a 1 : 1 complex with hydrogen bonds. The proposed new CL method has the potential to become a powerful tool for revealing the host-guest interaction between CDs and drugs, as well as monitoring drugs with high sensitivity.

  3. Topology of OxlT, the oxalate transporter of Oxalobacter formigenes, determined by site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Ye, L; Jia, Z; Jung, T; Maloney, P C

    2001-04-01

    The topology of OxlT, the oxalate:formate exchange protein of Oxalobacter formigenes, was established by site-directed fluorescence labeling, a simple strategy that generates topological information in the context of the intact protein. Accessibility of cysteine to the fluorescent thiol-directed probe Oregon green maleimide (OGM) was examined for a panel of 34 single-cysteine variants, each generated in a His(9)-tagged cysteine-less host. The reaction with OGM was readily scored by examining the fluorescence profile after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of material purified by Ni2+ linked affinity chromatography. A position was assigned an external location if its single-cysteine derivative reacted with OGM added to intact cells; a position was designated internal if OGM labeling required cell lysis. We also showed that labeling of external, but not internal, positions was blocked by prior exposure of cells to the impermeable and nonfluorescent thiol-specific agent ethyltrimethylammonium methanethiosulfonate. Of the 34 positions examined in this way, 29 were assigned unambiguously to either an internal or external location; 5 positions could not be assigned, since the target cysteine failed to react with OGM. There was no evidence of false-positive assignment. Our findings document a simple and rapid method for establishing the topology of a membrane protein and show that OxlT has 12 transmembrane segments, confirming inferences from hydropathy analysis.

  4. Combinatorial mutagenesis and selection to understand and improve yeast promoters.

    PubMed

    Berg, Laila; Strand, Trine Aakvik; Valla, Svein; Brautaset, Trygve

    2013-01-01

    Microbial promoters are important targets both for understanding the global gene expression and developing genetic tools for heterologous expression of proteins and complex biosynthetic pathways. Previously, we have developed and used combinatorial mutagenesis methods to analyse and improve bacterial expression systems. Here, we present for the first time an analogous strategy for yeast. Our model promoter is the strong and inducible P AOX1 promoter in methylotrophic Pichia pastoris. The Zeocin resistance gene was applied as a valuable reporter for mutant P AOX1 promoter activity, and we used an episomal plasmid vector to ensure a constant reporter gene dosage in the yeast host cells. This novel design enabled direct selection for colonies of recombinant cells with altered Zeocin tolerance levels originating solely from randomly introduced point mutations in the P AOX1 promoter DNA sequence. We demonstrate that this approach can be used to select for P AOX1 promoter variants with abolished glucose repression in large mutant libraries. We also selected P AOX1 promoter variants with elevated expression level under induced conditions. The properties of the selected P AOX1 promoter variants were confirmed by expressing luciferase as an alternative reporter gene. The tools developed here should be useful for effective screening, characterization, and improvement of any yeast promoters.

  5. Analysis of HIV-2 Vpx by modeling and insertional mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnke, Lisa A. . E-mail: lmahnke@im.wustl.edu; Belshan, Michael; Ratner, Lee . E-mail: lratner@im.wustl.edu

    2006-04-25

    Vpx facilitates HIV-2 nuclear localization by a poorly understood mechanism. We have compared Vpx to an NMR structure HIV-1 Vpr in a central helical domain and probed regions of Vpx by insertional mutagenesis. A predicted loop between helices two and three appears to be unique, overlapping with a known novel nuclear localization signal. Overall, Vpx was found to be surprisingly flexible, tolerating a series of large insertions. We found that insertion within the polyproline-containing C-terminus destabilizes nuclear localization, whereas mutating a second helix in the central domain disrupts viral packaging. Other insertional mutants in the predicted loop and in a linker region between the central domain and the C-terminus may be useful as sites of intramolecular tags as they could be packaged adequately and retained preintegration complex associated integration activity in a serum starvation assay. An unexpected result was found within a previously defined nuclear localization motif near aa 71. This mutant retained robust nuclear localization in a GFP fusion assay and was competent for preintegration complex associated nuclear import. In summary, we have modeled helical content in Vpx and assessed potential sites of intramolecular tags which may prove useful for protein-protein interactions studies.

  6. Site Saturation Mutagenesis Applications on Candida methylica Formate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Özgün, Gülşah P.; Ordu, Emel B.; Tütüncü, H. Esra; Yelboğa, Emrah; Sessions, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    In NADH regeneration, Candida methylica formate dehydrogenase (cmFDH) is a highly significant enzyme in pharmaceutical industry. In this work, site saturation mutagenesis (SSM) which is a combination of both rational design and directed evolution approaches is applied to alter the coenzyme specificity of NAD+-dependent cmFDH from NAD+ to NADP+ and increase its thermostability. For this aim, two separate libraries are constructed for screening a change in coenzyme specificity and an increase in thermostability. To alter the coenzyme specificity, in the coenzyme binding domain, positions at 195, 196, and 197 are subjected to two rounds of SSM and screening which enabled the identification of two double mutants D195S/Q197T and D195S/Y196L. These mutants increase the overall catalytic efficiency of NAD+ to 5.6 × 104-fold and 5 × 104-fold value, respectively. To increase the thermostability of cmFDH, the conserved residue at position 1 in the catalytic domain of cmFDH is subjected to SSM. The thermodynamic and kinetic results suggest that 8 mutations on the first residue can be tolerated. Among all mutants, M1L has the best residual activity after incubation at 60°C with 17%. These studies emphasize that SSM is an efficient method for creating “smarter libraries” for improving the properties of cmFDH. PMID:27847673

  7. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα.

  8. Heterologous expression and purification of active human phosphoribosylglycinamide formyltransferase as a single domain.

    PubMed

    Kan, C C; Gehring, M R; Nodes, B R; Janson, C A; Almassy, R J; Hostomska, Z

    1992-10-01

    We report here for the first time that the GART domain of the human trifunctional enzyme possessing GARS, AIRS, and GART activities can be expressed independently in Escherichia coli at high levels as a stable protein with enzymatic characteristics comparable to those of native trifunctional protein. Human trifunctional enzyme is involved in de novo purine biosynthesis, and has long been recognized as a target for antineoplastic intervention. The GART domain was expressed in E. coli under the control of bacteriophage T7 promotor and isolated by a three-step chromatographic procedure. Two residues, Asp 951 and His 915, were shown to be catalytically crucial by site-directed mutagenesis and subsequent characterization of purified mutant proteins. The active monofunctional GART protein produced in E. coli can serve as a valuable substitute of trifunctional enzyme for structural and functional studies which have been until now hindered because of insufficient quantity, instability, and size of the trifunctional GART protein.

  9. Lid opening and unfolding in human pancreatic lipase at low pH revealed by site-directed spin labeling EPR and FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ranaldi, Sebastien; Belle, Valérie; Woudstra, Mireille; Rodriguez, Jorge; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Sturgis, James; Carriere, Frederic; Fournel, Andre

    2009-01-27

    The structural changes induced in human pancreatic lipase (HPL) by lowering the pH were investigated using a combined approach involving the use of site-directed spin labeling coupled to electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL-EPR) and Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The secondary structure of HPL observed with ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was found to be stable in the pH range of 3.0-6.5, where HPL remained active. Using a spin-label introduced into the lid of HPL at position 249, a reversible opening of the lid controlling the access to the active site was observed by EPR spectroscopy in the pH range of 3.0-5.0. In the same pH range, some structural changes were also found to occur outside the lid in a peptide stretch located near catalytic aspartate 176, using a spin-label introduced at position 181. Below pH 3.0, ATR-FTIR measurements indicated that HPL had lost most of its secondary structure. At these pH levels, the loss of enzyme activity was irreversible and the ability of HPL to bind to lipid emulsions was abolished. The EPR spectrum of the spin-label introduced at position 181, which was typical of a spin-label having a high mobility, confirmed the drastic structural change undergone by HPL in this particular region. The EPR spectrum of the spin-label at position 249 indicated, however, that the environment of this residue within the lid was not affected at pH 3.0 in comparison with that observed in the pH range of 3.0-5.0. This finding suggests that the disulfide bridge between the hinges of the lid kept the secondary structure of the lid intact, whereas the HPL was completely unfolded.

  10. The Site-Directed A184S Mutation in the HTH Domain of the Global Regulator IrrE Enhances Deinococcus radiodurans R1 Tolerance to UV Radiation and MMC Shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Zhou, Zhengfu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Zhen; Song, Yuan; Lu, Wei; Lin, Min; Chen, Ming

    2015-12-28

    IrrE is a highly conserved global regulator in the Deinococcus genus and contributes to survival from high doses of UV radiation, ionizing radiation, and desiccation. Drad-IrrE and Dgob-IrrE from Deinococcus radiodurans and Deinococcus gobiensis I-0 each share 66% sequence identity. However, Dgob-IrrE showed a stronger protection phenotype against UV radiation than Drad- IrrE in the D. radiodurans irrE-deletion mutant (ΔirrE), which may be due to amino acid residues differences around the DNA-binding HTH domain. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a Drad-IrrE A184S single mutant, which has been characterized and compared with the ΔirrE mutant complemented strain with Drad-irrE, designated ΔirrE-E. The effects of the A184S mutation following UV radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) shock were determined. The A184S mutant displayed significantly increased resistance to UV radiation and MMC shock. The corresponding A184 site in Dgob-IrrE was inversely mutated, generating the S131A mutant, which exhibited a loss of resistance against UV radiation, MMC shock, and desiccation. qPCR analysis revealed that critical genes in the DNA repair system, such as recA, pprA, uvrA, and ddrB, were remarkably induced after UV radiation and MMC shock in the ΔirrE-IE and A184S mutants. These data suggested that A184S improves the ability against UV radiation and MMC shock, providing new insights into the modification of IrrE. We speculated that the serine residue may determine the efficiency of DNA binding, leading to the increased expression of IrrE-dependent genes important for protection against DNA damage.

  11. Exhaustive mutagenesis of six secondary active-site residues in Escherichia coli chorismate mutase shows the importance of hydrophobic side chains and a helix N-capping position for stability and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Jonathan Kyle; Keeffe, Jennifer R; Kast, Peter; Mayo, Stephen L

    2007-06-12

    Secondary active-site residues in enzymes, including hydrophobic amino acids, may contribute to catalysis through critical interactions that position the reacting molecule, organize hydrogen-bonding residues, and define the electrostatic environment of the active site. To ascertain the tolerance of an important model enzyme to mutation of active-site residues that do not directly hydrogen bond with the reacting molecule, all 19 possible amino acid substitutions were investigated in six positions of the engineered chorismate mutase domain of the Escherichia coli chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase. The six secondary active-site residues were selected to clarify results of a previous test of computational enzyme design procedures. Five of the positions encode hydrophobic side chains in the wild-type enzyme, and one forms a helix N-capping interaction as well as a salt bridge with a catalytically essential residue. Each mutant was evaluated for its ability to complement an auxotrophic chorismate mutase deletion strain. Kinetic parameters and thermal stabilities were measured for variants with in vivo activity. Altogether, we find that the enzyme tolerated 34% of the 114 possible substitutions, with a few mutations leading to increases in the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The results show the importance of secondary amino acid residues in determining enzymatic activity, and they point to strengths and weaknesses in current computational enzyme design procedures.

  12. A threshold of endogenous stress is required to engage cellular response to protect against mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Saintigny, Yannick; Chevalier, François; Bravard, Anne; Dardillac, Elodie; Laurent, David; Hem, Sonia; Dépagne, Jordane; Radicella, J. Pablo; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous stress represents a major source of genome instability, but is in essence difficult to apprehend. Incorporation of labeled radionuclides into DNA constitutes a tractable model to analyze cellular responses to endogenous attacks. Here we show that incorporation of [3H]thymidine into CHO cells generates oxidative-induced mutagenesis, but, with a peak at low doses. Proteomic analysis showed that the cellular response differs between low and high levels of endogenous stress. In particular, these results confirmed the involvement of proteins implicated in redox homeostasis and DNA damage signaling pathways. Induced-mutagenesis was abolished by the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine and plateaued, at high doses, upon exposure to L-buthionine sulfoximine, which represses cellular detoxification. The [3H]thymidine-induced mutation spectrum revealed mostly base substitutions, exhibiting a signature specific for low doses (GC > CG and AT > CG). Consistently, the enzymatic activity of the base excision repair protein APE-1 is induced at only medium or high doses. Collectively, the data reveal that a threshold of endogenous stress must be reached to trigger cellular detoxification and DNA repair programs; below this threshold, the consequences of endogenous stress escape cellular surveillance, leading to high levels of mutagenesis. Therefore, low doses of endogenous local stress can jeopardize genome integrity more efficiently than higher doses. PMID:27406380

  13. 5-fluorouracil in lethal mutagenesis of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Rubén; Arias, Armando; Domingo, Esteban

    2009-06-01

    5-fluorouracil (FU) is a pyrimidine analogue extensively used in cancer chemotherapy. FU can be metabolized into 5-fluorouridine-triphosphate, which can be used as substrate for viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. This results in the incorporation of mutations into viral RNA. Accumulation of mutations may lead to loss of virus infectivity, in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. RNA virus pathogens are particularly difficult to control because they are highly mutable, and mutants resistant to antiviral agents are readily selected. Here, we review the basic principles of lethal mutagenesis as an antiviral approach, and the participation of FU in its development. Recent studies with foot-and-mouth disease virus indicate that FU can act both as an inhibitor and as a mutagen during foot-and-mouth disease virus replication. This dual activity renders FU an adequate drug for lethal mutagenesis. We suggest that structural and biochemical studies can contribute to the lead to new design of base or nucleoside analogues targeted specifically to viral polymerases.

  14. Structure of the Bifunctional Acyltransferase/Decarboxylase LnmK from the Leinamycin Biosynthetic Pathway Revealing Novel Activity for a Double-Hot-Dog Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Lohman, Jeremy R.; Bingman, Craig A.; George N. Phillips Jr.; Shen, Ben

    2013-01-15

    The β-branched C3 unit in leinamycin biosynthesis is installed by a set of four proteins, LnmFKLM. In vitro biochemical investigation confirmed that LnmK is a bifunctional acyltransferase/decarboxylase (AT/DC) that catalyzes first self-acylation using methylmalonyl-CoA as a substrate and subsequently transacylation of the methylmalonyl group to the phosphopantetheinyl group of the LnmL acyl carrier protein [Liu, T., Huang, Y., and Shen, B. (2009) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 6900–6901]. LnmK shows no sequence homology to proteins of known function, representing a new family of AT/DC enzymes. Here we report the X-ray structure of LnmK. LnmK is homodimer with each of the monomers adopting a double-hot-dog fold. Cocrystallization of LnmK with methylmalonyl-CoA revealed an active site tunnel terminated by residues from the dimer interface. But, to canonical AT and ketosynthase enzymes that employ Ser or Cys as an active site residue, none of these residues are found in the vicinity of the LnmK active site. Instead, three tyrosines were identified, one of which, Tyr62, was established, by site-directed mutagenesis, to be the most likely active site residue for the AT activity of LnmK. Moreover, LnmK represents the first AT enzyme that employs a Tyr as an active site residue and the first member of the family of double-hot-dog fold enzymes that displays an AT activity known to date. The LnmK structure sets the stage for probing of the DC activity of LnmK through site-directed mutagenesis. These findings highlight natural product biosynthetic machinery as a rich source of novel enzyme activities, mechanisms, and structures.

  15. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  16. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wassman, Christopher D.; Tam, Phillip Y.; Lathrop, Richard H.; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed ‘cross-hybridization’, as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries. PMID:15585664

  17. Actin-binding cleft closure in myosin II probed by site-directed spin labeling and pulsed EPR.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jennifer C; Burr, Adam R; Svensson, Bengt; Kennedy, Daniel J; Allingham, John; Titus, Margaret A; Rayment, Ivan; Thomas, David D

    2008-09-02

    We present a structurally dynamic model for nucleotide- and actin-induced closure of the actin-binding cleft of myosin, based on site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in Dictyostelium myosin II. The actin-binding cleft is a solvent-filled cavity that extends to the nucleotide-binding pocket and has been predicted to close upon strong actin binding. Single-cysteine labeling sites were engineered to probe mobility and accessibility within the cleft. Addition of ADP and vanadate, which traps the posthydrolysis biochemical state, influenced probe mobility and accessibility slightly, whereas actin binding caused more dramatic changes in accessibility, consistent with cleft closure. We engineered five pairs of cysteine labeling sites to straddle the cleft, each pair having one label on the upper 50-kDa domain and one on the lower 50-kDa domain. Distances between spin-labeled sites were determined from the resulting spin-spin interactions, as measured by continuous wave EPR for distances of 0.7-2 nm or pulsed EPR (double electron-electron resonance) for distances of 1.7-6 nm. Because of the high distance resolution of EPR, at least two distinct structural states of the cleft were resolved. Each of the biochemical states tested (prehydrolysis, posthydrolysis, and rigor), reflects a mixture of these structural states, indicating that the coupling between biochemical and structural states is not rigid. The resulting model is much more dynamic than previously envisioned, with both open and closed conformations of the cleft interconverting, even in the rigor actomyosin complex.