Science.gov

Sample records for activity student teams

  1. Team Building Activities for Young Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Team building activities are an excellent way to challenge students and teach them the critical communication and problem solving skills that encourage trust, empathy, and ability to work together. They create an atmosphere that enhances the ability to meet fitness and skill goals because students, regardless of skill level, will possess increased…

  2. Student Team Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    Three Student Team Learning techniques have been extensively researched and found to significantly increase student learning. In Student Teams Achievement Divisions (STAD), teams are made up of high, average, and low performing students of both genders and different racial and ethnic backgrounds. Team members study worksheets, work problems in…

  3. Heart Rates of High School Physical Education Students during Team Sports, Individual Sports, and Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurson, Kelly R.; Brown, Dale D.; Cullen, Robert W.; Dennis, Karen K.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how activity type influenced heart rates and time spent in target heart rate zones of high school students participating in physical education classes. Significantly higher average heart rates existed for fitness (142 plus or minus 24 beats per minute [bpm]) compared to team (118 plus or minus 24 bpm) or individual (114 plus or…

  4. Teaching Engineering Students Team Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levi, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide professor's in engineering classes which the background necessary to use student team projects effectively. This manual describes some of the characteristics of student teams and how to use them in class. It provides a set of class activities and films which can be used to introduce and support student teams. Finally, a set of teaching modules used in freshmen, sophomore, and senior aeronautical engineering classes are presented. This manual was developed as part of a NASA sponsored project to improve the undergraduate education of aeronautical engineers. The project has helped to purchase a set of team work films which can be checked out from Cal Poly's Learning Resources Center in the Kennedy Library. Research for this project has included literature reviews on team work and cooperative learning; interviews, observations, and surveys of Cal Poly students from Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Psychology; participation in the Aeronautical Engineering senior design lab; and interviews with engineering faculty. In addition to this faculty manual, there is a student team work manual which has been designed to help engineering students work better in teams.

  5. Experiential Team Building for Student Leaders in Union Activities and Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Don; And Others

    This guide offers college or university student union and housing office personnel assistance in developing experiential team building workshops for student leaders. The rationale for providing such training is discussed in terms of the following: (1) resident assistants are usually vital compus leaders, with the potential to be vital student…

  6. Physical Activity and Sports Team Participation: Associations with Academic Outcomes in Middle School and High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Claudia K.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Wall, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have found that higher physical activity levels are associated with greater academic achievement among students. However, it remains unclear whether associations are due to the physical activity itself or sports team participation, which may involve requirements for maintaining certain grades, for example. The purpose…

  7. Student Perceptions of Value Added in an Active Learning Experience: Producing, Reviewing and Evaluating a Sales Team Video Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, James J.; Kezim, Boualem; Stewart, James

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a video team-based activity as a learning experience in a sales management course. Students perceived this learning activity approach as a beneficial and effective instructional technique. The benefits of making a video in a marketing course reinforce the understanding and the use of the sales process…

  8. Tracking dynamic team activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tambe, M.

    1996-12-31

    AI researchers are striving to build complex multi-agent worlds with intended applications ranging from the RoboCup robotic soccer tournaments, to interactive virtual theatre, to large-scale real-world battlefield simulations. Agent tracking - monitoring other agent`s actions and inferring their higher-level goals and intentions - is a central requirement in such worlds. While previous work has mostly focused on tracking individual agents, this paper goes beyond by focusing on agent teams. Team tracking poses the challenge of tracking a team`s joint goals and plans. Dynamic, real-time environments add to the challenge, as ambiguities have to be resolved in real-time. The central hypothesis underlying the present work is that an explicit team-oriented perspective enables effective team tracking. This hypothesis is instantiated using the model tracing technology employed in tracking individual agents. Thus, to track team activities, team models are put to service. Team models are a concrete application of the joint intentions framework and enable an agent to track team activities, regardless of the agent`s being a collaborative participant or a non-participant in the team. To facilitate real-time ambiguity resolution with team models: (i) aspects of tracking are cast as constraint satisfaction problems to exploit constraint propagation techniques; and (ii) a cost minimality criterion is applied to constrain tracking search. Empirical results from two separate tasks in real-world, dynamic environments one collaborative and one competitive - are provided.

  9. Effects of Varying Team Sizes on Physical Activity Levels of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudreault, Karen Lux; Cluphf, David; Russell, Jared; Lecheminant, James

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine physical activity levels among various team sizes for basketball and soccer in a C/UIPAP setting. Twenty-eight university physical education majors participated in the study. Participants engaged in three-on-three and five-on-five basketball and five-on-five and 11-on-11 soccer games. All games…

  10. Increasing Student-Learning Team Effectiveness with Team Charters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Phillip; Pavett, Cynthia; Hunsaker, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Because teams are a ubiquitous part of most organizations today, it is common for business educators to use team assignments to help students experientially learn about course concepts and team process. Unfortunately, students frequently experience a number of problems during team assignments. The authors describe the results of their research and…

  11. How do interprofessional student teams interact in a primary care clinic? A qualitative analysis using activity theory.

    PubMed

    Kent, Fiona; Francis-Cracknell, Alison; McDonald, Rachael; Newton, Jennifer M; Keating, Jennifer L; Dodic, Miodrag

    2016-10-01

    Practice based interprofessional education opportunities are proposed as a mechanism for health professionals to learn teamwork skills and gain an understanding of the roles of others. Primary care is an area of practice that offers a promising option for interprofessional student learning. In this study, we investigated what and how students from differing professions learn together. Our findings inform the design of future interprofessional education initiatives. Using activity theory, we conducted an ethnographic investigation of interprofessional education in primary care. During a 5 months period, we observed 14 clinic sessions involving mixed discipline student teams who interviewed people with chronic disease. Teams were comprised of senior medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy and physiotherapy entry level students. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted with seven clinical educators. Data were analysed to ascertain the objectives, tools, rules and division of labour. Two integrated activity systems were identified: (1) student teams gathering information to determine patients' health care needs and (2) patients either as health consumers or student educators. Unwritten rules regarding 'shared contribution', 'patient as key information source' and 'time constraints' were identified. Both the significance of software literacy on team leadership, and a pre-determined structure of enquiry, highlighted the importance of careful consideration of the tools used in interprofessional education, and the way they can influence practice. The systems of practice identified provide evidence of differing priorities and values, and multiple perspectives of how to manage health. The work reinforced the value of the patients' voice in clinical and education processes. PMID:26781698

  12. Mapping student response team activities to public health competencies: are we adequately preparing the next generation of public health practitioners?

    PubMed

    Montgomery, JoLynn P; Durbeck, Heidi; Thomas, Dana; Beck, Angela J; Sarigiannis, Amy N; Boulton, Matthew L

    2010-01-01

    This article compares activities of the University of Michigan School of Public Health Public Health Action Support Team (PHAST) to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists Applied Epidemiology Competencies (AECs) to determine the utility of using the competencies to assess extracurricular student training. We mapped the activities from eight PHAST trips occurring from 2006 to 2009 to the 34 AECs for Tier 1 epidemiologists by examining project activities to determine how closely they aligned with the AECs. PHAST trips provided students with opportunities to address 65% of the AECs; 29% of the AECs were addressed by all eight trips. The domains of AECs most often addressed by PHAST trips were leadership and systems thinking, cultural competency, and community dimensions of practice. Mapping PHAST trips to the AECs was useful for all public health students, not just epidemiologists in training. PMID:21133064

  13. The Effects of a Team Charter on Student Team Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, Joshua R.; McDowell, William C.; Herdman, Andrew O.

    2014-01-01

    The authors contribute to growing evidence that team charters contribute positively to performance by empirically testing their effects on key team process outcomes. Using a sample of business students in a team-based task requiring significant cooperative and coordinative behavior, the authors compare emergent team norms under a variety of team…

  14. Student Team Projects by Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Paula R.; Tullar, William L.; McKowen, Diana

    2000-01-01

    Presents a project where educators assign a joint class project to students at the University of Northern Carolina at Greensboro, at Indiana University, and at Fachhochschule Rheinland-Pfalz in Worms, Germany. Discusses how team members use the Internet to participate in electronic meetings leading to a group consensus. Encourages readers to…

  15. Cohesion in Online Student Teams versus Traditional Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have found that the electronic methods in use for online team communication today increase communication quality in project-based work situations. Because communication quality is known to influence group cohesion, the present research examined whether online student project teams are more cohesive than traditional teams. We tested…

  16. Maximizing Student Teams to Support IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caughron, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Illinois Wesleyan University created the Trust the Wisdom in Student Teams (TWIST) project to develop student teams into essential components of IT support. This article explains how and why to apply the TWIST concepts. When deciding if a student team is a good choice, to meet a particular institution's IT support requirements, several things need…

  17. Entrepreneurial Thinking in Interdisciplinary Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumeyer, Xaver; McKenna, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Our work investigates students' perception of collaborative expertise and the role of inquiry-based learning in the context of team-based entrepreneurship education. Specifically, we examine students' perception of communication, division of work, shared goals, team conflicts and leadership in their respective teams. In addition, we look at the…

  18. Forming Student Online Teams for Maximum Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel D.; Ringhand, Darlene G.; Kalinski, Ray C.; Ziegler, James G.

    2015-01-01

    What is the best way to assign graduate business students to online team-based projects? Team assignments are frequently made on the basis of alphabet, time zones or previous performance. This study reviews personality as an indicator of student online team performance. The personality assessment IDE (Insights Discovery Evaluator) was administered…

  19. Student Accountability in Team-Based Learning Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Rachel E.; Colyer, Corey J.; Manning, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is a form of small-group learning that assumes stable teams promote accountability. Teamwork promotes communication among members; application exercises promote active learning. Students must prepare for each class; failure to do so harms their team's performance. Therefore, TBL promotes accountability. As part of the…

  20. Student perceptions of team learning in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Carol E; Cobb, Martha D; Givens, Raquel Hernandez; Arnold, Joanna; Joslin, Sarah; Keller, Jill Leslie

    2008-05-01

    Nurse educators are challenged to find instructional methods that actively engage learners and help students understand concepts for application in practice situations. During the 2003-2004 academic year, faculty implemented team learning in a first-semester clinical nursing course in a baccalaureate nursing program at a Research I state university in the southwestern United States. Team learning engages small groups in learning tasks that require problem solving and decision making. Student perceptions about team learning were evaluated using classroom observations and interviews. The results verified that team learning predominantly promotes learner-to-learner engagement and indicated that students struggled with application problems that had several plausible answers yet recognized the relevance to clinical practice. Students appreciated the need for increased individual accountability for learning and identified value in learning through discussion, both characteristics inherent to team learning. Students were concerned about their team learning grade and its dependence on group performance. PMID:18522153

  1. Using Student Team Learning. The Johns Hopkins Team Learning Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    The purpose of this manual is to give teachers the information they need to use student team learning, which is described as a method to promote major academic and nonacademic goals such as improved basic skills, improved student self-concept, and better interpersonal/cross-racial relationships. Complete directions are given for three techniques:…

  2. Consequences of team charter quality: Teamwork mental model similarity and team viability in engineering design student teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway Hughston, Veronica

    Since 1996 ABET has mandated that undergraduate engineering degree granting institutions focus on learning outcomes such as professional skills (i.e. solving unstructured problems and working in teams). As a result, engineering curricula were restructured to include team based learning---including team charters. Team charters were diffused into engineering education as one of many instructional activities to meet the ABET accreditation mandates. However, the implementation and execution of team charters into engineering team based classes has been inconsistent and accepted without empirical evidence of the consequences. The purpose of the current study was to investigate team effectiveness, operationalized as team viability, as an outcome of team charter implementation in an undergraduate engineering team based design course. Two research questions were the focus of the study: a) What is the relationship between team charter quality and viability in engineering student teams, and b) What is the relationship among team charter quality, teamwork mental model similarity, and viability in engineering student teams? Thirty-eight intact teams, 23 treatment and 15 comparison, participated in the investigation. Treatment teams attended a team charter lecture, and completed a team charter homework assignment. Each team charter was assessed and assigned a quality score. Comparison teams did not join the lecture, and were not asked to create a team charter. All teams completed each data collection phase: a) similarity rating pretest; b) similarity posttest; and c) team viability survey. Findings indicate that team viability was higher in teams that attended the lecture and completed the charter assignment. Teams with higher quality team charter scores reported higher levels of team viability than teams with lower quality charter scores. Lastly, no evidence was found to support teamwork mental model similarity as a partial mediator of the team charter quality on team viability

  3. Enhancing Student Collaboration in Global Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohut, Gary F.

    2012-01-01

    With the growth in the global economy and the rapid development of communication and information technologies, global virtual teams are quickly becoming the norm in the workplace. Research indicates, however, that many students have little or no experience working in such teams. Students who learn through these experiences benefit from higher task…

  4. Safety Teams: An Approach to Engage Students in Laboratory Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaimo, Peter J.; Langenhan, Joseph M.; Tanner, Martha J.; Ferrenberg, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    We developed and implemented a yearlong safety program into our organic chemistry lab courses that aims to enhance student attitudes toward safety and to ensure students learn to recognize, demonstrate, and assess safe laboratory practices. This active, collaborative program involves the use of student "safety teams" and includes hands-on safety…

  5. Industry-Supported Team Students' Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glozman, Vladimir

    The industry-supported team students' project enhances professional, intellectual, and personal development of students while addressing the needs of local industry. In addition to achieving academic excellence, the students are exposed to industry requirements, and excel in effective oral communication and cooperative teamwork. The teamwork…

  6. Developing a Student Community Health Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Gary D.

    1976-01-01

    An interdisciplinary, team-approach program has been developed at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, in which students (1) apply principles of community research, (2) join a multidisciplinary team, (3) identify components of a service agency, (4) become involved in its working, and (5) demonstrate the incorporation of health education…

  7. Determinants of Student Attitudes toward Team Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinig, Bruce A.; Horowitz, Ira; Whittenburg, Gene

    2014-01-01

    We examine how student attitudes toward their group, learning method, and perceived development of professional skills are initially shaped and subsequently evolve through multiple uses of team exams. Using a Tobit regression model to analyse a sequence of 10 team quizzes given in a graduate-level tax accounting course, we show that there is an…

  8. Student Teams Learning to Cope with Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Janet; Neal, Joan C.; Waner, Karen K.

    2005-01-01

    Because employers want workers who can successfully run meetings and manage teams with diverse characteristics, conflict management is a skill that every business graduate should possess. The purpose of the study was to identify the most popular and effective ways that students used to manage conflicts when working on team projects. A survey was…

  9. Student Team Reading and Writing. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Student team reading and writing" refers to two cooperative learning programs for secondary students included in this intervention report: (1) "Student Team Reading and Writing" and (2) Student Team Reading. The "Student Team Reading and Writing" program (Stevens, 2003) is an integrated approach to reading and language arts for early adolescents.…

  10. Peer-Led Team Learning Helps Minority Students Succeed

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Julia J.; Sloane, Jeremy D.; Dunk, Ryan D. P.; Wiles, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    Active learning methods have been shown to be superior to traditional lecture in terms of student achievement, and our findings on the use of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) concur. Students in our introductory biology course performed significantly better if they engaged in PLTL. There was also a drastic reduction in the failure rate for underrepresented minority (URM) students with PLTL, which further resulted in closing the achievement gap between URM and non-URM students. With such compelling findings, we strongly encourage the adoption of Peer-Led Team Learning in undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses. PMID:26959826

  11. Peer-Led Team Learning Helps Minority Students Succeed.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Julia J; Sloane, Jeremy D; Dunk, Ryan D P; Wiles, Jason R

    2016-03-01

    Active learning methods have been shown to be superior to traditional lecture in terms of student achievement, and our findings on the use of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) concur. Students in our introductory biology course performed significantly better if they engaged in PLTL. There was also a drastic reduction in the failure rate for underrepresented minority (URM) students with PLTL, which further resulted in closing the achievement gap between URM and non-URM students. With such compelling findings, we strongly encourage the adoption of Peer-Led Team Learning in undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses. PMID:26959826

  12. Structured Learning Teams: Reimagining Student Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lendvay, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Even in a standards-based curriculum, teachers can apply constructivist practices such as structured learning teams. In this environment, students become invested in the learning aims, triggering the desire in students to awaken, get information, interpret, remix, share, and design scenarios.

  13. Teams That Work: Preparing Student Teams for the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Diane D.; Webb, Fred L.

    2013-01-01

    Organizations today often require collaboration in the form of work teams. Many tasks completed within organizations, whether in the workplace or in academia, however, can be beyond the capabilities of individuals alone. Productive teamwork and cooperative activities in business are expected and can begin very early in a person's career. The…

  14. Designing student learning teams improving team performance in a college biology laboratory by designing learning teams based on student's intra-team function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Lisarenee

    Cooperative learning is likely the most utilized form of classroom management in college science laboratory courses. Time restrictions, equipment availability and physical space limitations promote use of cooperation if for no other reason than convenience and necessity. In college laboratory courses, students are often assigned to learning teams the first day of class. Student placement in these learning teams is usually a task for the instructor in charge and may depend on student preference, proximity, or random assignment according to an arbitrary character such as the student's last name. Regardless of placement method, learning teams often experience negative outcomes due to friction between team members. This study addresses the possibility that friction is caused by intra team competition and that intra team competition can be eliminated through team design using the Intra-Team Function Assay (ITFA) (English 2001). Eight hundred and ninety one college students, in 62 sections of an introductory biology laboratory course, participated in the ITFA study during the Fall 2001, Spring 2002, and Summer 2002 semesters. Using a Latin Square all laboratory sections were assigned to one of the following groups: control, Hawthorne, or experimental. Students in the control and Hawthorne sections were assigned to student teams randomly without regard for the ITFA results, while students in the experimental group were assigned to teams dependent on their identified intra-team function. In seven out of ten grade assessments, students in the experimental group earned significantly higher grades than did students in the control group; with no significant difference in the remaining three measures. Student grades in the experimental group where significantly higher than student grades in the Hawthorne group on all team assessments with the exception of the final examination. Students in the experimental group also earned higher semester grades than did students in either the

  15. Benefits and Problems with Student Teams: Suggestions for Improving Team Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Randall S.

    2006-01-01

    Business school faculty have been placing students into teams for group projects for many years, with mixed results. Obvious benefits accrue in using teams, but so do numerous problems. One of the main issues is that many business faculty often place students in teams with little or no guidance on how teams properly function. In this article, the…

  16. A Student's Perspective: The Green Team's Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Kyle

    2011-01-01

    In Mr. Wood's technology class, students learned about many aspects of engineering, including design of a product, teamwork, testing hypotheses, and testing the final product. In this article, the author describes how his class, particularly his team, applied everything they learned about the process to their kayak design challenge using the IDEAL…

  17. Holding Students Accountable in Team Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an efficient peer evaluation process that can be implemented at the middle and high school levels, and that holds students accountable for their individual contributions in a team-based project. Teachers faced with this challenge will welcome the web-based peer-evaluation interface that was capable of soliciting student…

  18. The Student Study Team Process: Impact on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Student Study Team Meetings are a function of general education and are conducted to meet the needs of struggling students. A great deal of time, effort, and fiscal resources are dedicated to the Student Study Team process by highly qualified school personnel. The intention of the Student Study Team process is to implement appropriate…

  19. Peer Evaluation in Blended Team Project-Based Learning: What Do Students Find Important?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Lim, Cheolil

    2012-01-01

    Team project-based learning is reputed to be an appropriate way to activate interactions among students and to encourage knowledge building through collaborative learning. Peer evaluation is an effective way for each student to participate actively in a team project. This article investigates the issues that are important to students when…

  20. Preservice Teacher Perspectives on Prereferral Intervention and Student Support Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogg, Kathryn R.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative inquiry evaluated the Student Support Team Project and its effects on preservice teachers' knowledge and perceptions of prereferral intervention and student support teams. This investigation is important because prereferral intervention and student support teams have been used increasingly to provide assistance to teachers and to…

  1. Performance of student software development teams: the influence of personality and identifying as team members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, Conal; Bizumic, Boris; Reynolds, Katherine; Smithson, Michael; Johns-Boast, Lynette; van Rooy, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    One prominent approach in the exploration of the variations in project team performance has been to study two components of the aggregate personalities of the team members: conscientiousness and agreeableness. A second line of research, known as self-categorisation theory, argues that identifying as team members and the team's performance norms should substantially influence the team's performance. This paper explores the influence of both these perspectives in university software engineering project teams. Eighty students worked to complete a piece of software in small project teams during 2007 or 2008. To reduce limitations in statistical analysis, Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed to extrapolate from the results of the original sample to a larger simulated sample (2043 cases, within 319 teams). The results emphasise the importance of taking into account personality (particularly conscientiousness), and both team identification and the team's norm of performance, in order to cultivate higher levels of performance in student software engineering project teams.

  2. The Application of Six Sigma Methodologies to University Processes: The Use of Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Mildred Golden; Alexander, Christine; Taneja, Sonia; Tirumalasetty, Sowmya; Chadalavada, Deepthi

    2012-01-01

    The first student Six Sigma team (activated under a QEP Process Sub-team) evaluated the course and curriculum approval process. The goal was to streamline the process and thereby shorten process cycle time and reduce confusion about how the process works. Members of this team developed flowcharts on how the process is supposed to work (by…

  3. Using a Team Approach to Address Bullying of Students with Asperger's Syndrome in Activity-Based Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia; Simpson, Cynthia; Gaus, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    The rate of bullying among individuals with disabilities is alarming. Because of the social and motor deficiencies that individuals with Asperger's syndrome (AS) often display, they are frequently targets of bullying. The physical education setting often consists of a larger number of students than the typical academic instructional setting. This…

  4. An Implementation of Active Learning: Assessing the Effectiveness of the Team Infomercial Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matveev, Alexei V.; Milter, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of the team infomercial assignment as an active learning tool in undergraduate courses. The structure and three phases of the team infomercial assignment, as well as student evaluations and feedback, are presented. We investigated student experiences working on the team infomercial assignment, the common…

  5. Exploring primary care activities in ACT teams.

    PubMed

    Vanderlip, Erik R; Williams, Nancy A; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Katon, Wayne

    2014-05-01

    People with serious mental illness often receive inadequate primary and preventive care services. Federal healthcare reform endorses team-based care that provides high quality primary and preventive care to at risk populations. Assertive community treatment (ACT) teams offer a proven, standardized treatment approach effective in improving mental health outcomes for the seriously mentally ill. Much is known about the effectiveness of ACT teams in improving mental health outcomes, but the degree to which medical care needs are addressed is not established. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which ACT teams address the physical health of the population they serve. ACT team leaders were invited to complete an anonymous, web-based survey to explore attitudes and activities involving the primary care needs of their clients. Information was collected regarding the use of health screening tools, physical health assessments, provision of medical care and collaboration with primary care systems. Data was analyzed from 127 team leaders across the country, of which 55 completed the entire survey. Nearly every ACT team leader believed ACT teams have a role in identifying and managing the medical co-morbidities of their clientele. ACT teams report participation in many primary care activities. ACT teams are providing a substantial amount of primary and preventive services to their population. The survey suggests standardization of physical health identification, management or referral processes within ACT teams may result in improved quality of medical care. ACT teams are in a unique position to improve physical health care by virtue of having medically trained staff and frequent, close contact with their clients. PMID:24337472

  6. Social Work Students' Perceptions of Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macke, Caroline; Taylor, Jessica Averitt; Taylor, James E.; Tapp, Karen; Canfield, James

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to examine social work students' perceptions of Team-Based Learning (N = 154). Aside from looking at overall student perceptions, comparative analyses examined differences in perceptions between BSW and MSW students, and between Caucasian students and students of color. Findings for the overall sample revealed favorable…

  7. Exploring the "Lone Wolf" Phenomenon in Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Terri Feldman; Dixon, Andrea L.; Gassenheimer, Jule B.

    2005-01-01

    The proliferation of projects using student teams has motivated researchers to examine factors that affect both team process and outcomes. This research introduces an individual difference variable found in the business environment that has not been examined in a classroom context. The lone wolf appears to play a role in how teams function and…

  8. Managing Global Virtual Teams across Classrooms, Students and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Timothy P.; Sherer, Pamela D.; Quilling, Rosemary D.; Blewett, Craig N.

    2011-01-01

    Virtual teams are becoming commonplace in business today so our business school students should have experience in effectively working in virtual teams. Based on a month-long virtual team project conducted by the authors between classes in South Africa and the United States, this paper discusses the opportunities and challenges of using global…

  9. Training Students to Work Effectively in Partially Distributed Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocker, Rosalie; Rosson, Mary Beth; Kracaw, Dana; Hiltz, S. Roxanne

    2009-01-01

    Information technology teams are often partially distributed teams (PDTs). A PDT consists of two or more subteams that are separated geographically. This article describes research focused on the use of PDTs to engage students in "real world" IT team learning about the subject matter while also teaching them the skills they will need to work in…

  10. Evaluating Team Work on Student Projects: The Use of Behaviorally Anchored Scales To Evaluate Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, Daniel; Cadiz, David

    One of the biggest problems students face in team projects is social loafing, a situation in which students may view team projects as a free ride. Social loafers let others do the work, knowing that the professor will only grade the completed project. This research examined the performance of students grading other student team members on a group…

  11. Team-Based Classroom Pedagogy Reframed: The Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Jennifer L.; Wilson, Joel R.; Hess, Kenneth C.

    2010-01-01

    Postsecondary learning environments often utilize team-based pedagogical practices to challenge and support student learning outcomes. This manuscript presents the findings of a qualitative research study that analyzed the viewpoints and perceptions of group or team-based projects among undergraduate business students. Results identified five…

  12. Interdisciplinary Team Teaching: An Effective Method to Transform Student Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Amanda; Hoel, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In order to maximize student development in an interdisciplinary context, we implemented and evaluated a business-biology team teaching approach. The class project involved teams of environmental science and business students analyzing an industry stakeholder interested in participating in the development of a community composting network. We…

  13. Student Teachers' Team Teaching: How Do Learners in the Classroom Experience Team-Taught Lessons by Student Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeten, Marlies; Simons, Mathea

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on student teachers' team teaching. Two team teaching models (sequential and parallel teaching) were applied by 14 student teachers in a quasi-experimental design. When implementing new teaching models, it is important to take into account the perspectives of all actors involved. Although learners are key actors in the teaching…

  14. Student-Led Project Teams: Significance of Regulation Strategies in High- and Low-Performing Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Judith

    2016-01-01

    We studied group and individual co-regulatory and self-regulatory strategies of self-managed student project teams using data from intragroup peer evaluations and a postproject survey. We found that high team performers shared their research and knowledge with others, collaborated to advise and give constructive criticism, and demonstrated moral…

  15. The Impact of the Data Team Structure on Collaborative Teams and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rone, Brenda Catherine

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if implementing a specific collaborative structure would create effective teacher teams that in turn would lead to improved student achievement. An effective team can be viewed as one that uses collaboration to increase its knowledge and improve its practices. The structure that was implemented during…

  16. Effective Student Teams for Collaborative Learning in an Introductory University Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Jason J. B.; Harrison, David M.; Meyertholen, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the types of student teams that are most effective for collaborative learning in a large freshman university physics course. We compared teams in which the students were all of roughly equal ability to teams with a mix of student abilities, we compared teams with three members to teams with four members, and we examined teams with…

  17. Interdisciplinary Student Teams Projects: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruck, S. E.; Teer, Faye P.

    2009-01-01

    In today's organizations team work has become an integral part of the day-to-day routine. For this reason, University professors are including group projects in many courses. In such group assessments, we advocate the use of interdisciplinary teams, where possible. As a case study, we report an interdisciplinary group technical project with…

  18. Comparing Team-Based and Mixed Active-Learning Methods in an Ambulatory Care Elective Course

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Andrea S.; Guirguis, Alexander B.; George, Christa M.; Howard-Thompson, Amanda; Heidel, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess students' performance and perceptions of team-based and mixed active-learning methods in 2 ambulatory care elective courses, and to describe faculty members' perceptions of team-based learning. Methods Using the 2 teaching methods, students' grades were compared. Students' perceptions were assessed through 2 anonymous course evaluation instruments. Faculty members who taught courses using the team-based learning method were surveyed regarding their impressions of team-based learning. Results The ambulatory care course was offered to 64 students using team-based learning (n = 37) and mixed active learning (n = 27) formats. The mean quality points earned were 3.7 (team-based learning) and 3.3 (mixed active learning), p < 0.001. Course evaluations for both courses were favorable. All faculty members who used the team-based learning method reported that they would consider using team-based learning in another course. Conclusions Students were satisfied with both teaching methods; however, student grades were significantly higher in the team-based learning course. Faculty members recognized team-based learning as an effective teaching strategy for small-group active learning. PMID:21301594

  19. Preparing Students for Flipped or Team-Based Learning Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balan, Peter; Clark, Michele; Restall, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching methods such as Flipped Learning and Team-Based Learning require students to pre-learn course materials before a teaching session, because classroom exercises rely on students using self-gained knowledge. This is the reverse to "traditional" teaching when course materials are presented during a lecture, and students are…

  20. Student Perceptions of Social Loafing in Undergraduate Business Classroom Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jassawalla, Avan R.; Malshe, Avinash; Sashittal, Hemant

    2008-01-01

    There is a rich body of research devoted to the causes and remedies of social loafing in workplace teams. However, the social loafing phenomenon remains underinvestigated from the perspective of students in undergraduate business classroom teams. In particular, how they define and respond to loafing remains unknown. This article reports findings…

  1. A Preliminary Study of Student Learning in Interdisciplinary Health Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edinberg, Mark A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Self-reported learning in a 12-week interdisciplinary health team training experience at the University of Nevada, Reno, was measured. Analysis of 14 students from seven disciplines in three settings shows there was significant learning in the areas of team skills and processes and in knowledge of and abilities in client communication but not in…

  2. A Team Approach to Using Student Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Terry

    2011-01-01

    Effective use of data is key to improving student outcomes. This requires leaders to ensure teachers have developed the skills to convert student data to useful information to effectively plan for instruction and student interventions; to hold collaborative discussions that are structured for these purposes; to broaden the view of data to include…

  3. Mentoring Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Students via a Team Effort

    PubMed Central

    Karsai, Istvan; Knisley, Jeff; Knisley, Debra; Yampolsky, Lev; Godbole, Anant

    2011-01-01

    We describe how a team approach that we developed as a mentoring strategy can be used to recruit, advance, and guide students to be more interested in the interdisciplinary field of mathematical biology, and lead to success in undergraduate research in this field. Students are introduced to research in their first semester via lab rotations. Their participation in the research of four faculty members—two from biology and two from mathematics—gives them a first-hand overview of research in quantitative biology and also some initial experience in research itself. However, one of the primary goals of the lab rotation experience is that of developing teams of students and faculty that combine mathematics and statistics with biology and the life sciences, teams that subsequently mentor undergraduate research in genuine interdisciplinary environments. Thus, the team concept serves not only as a means of establishing interdisciplinary research, but also as a means of incorporating new students into existing research efforts that will then track those students into meaningful research of their own. We report how the team concept is used to support undergraduate research in mathematical biology and what types of team-building strategies have worked for us. PMID:21885821

  4. Building an Undergraduate STEM Team Using Team-Based Learning Leading to the Production of a Storyboard Appropriate for Elementary Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutright, Teresa J.; Evans, Edward; Brantner, Justin S.

    2014-06-01

    A unique undergraduate team that spans five different engineering disciplines, chemistry, biology, and mathematics was formed. The team was formed to promote cross-disciplinary learning, to improve retention, and to prepare the students for the kind of problems they will face in their careers. This paper describes the variety of activities used over 2 years to tie the team together, as well as afford opportunities to develop team-building skills. The activities described highlight the critical elements of a faculty leader whose own work is interdisciplinary, correct balance of disciplines in the team, and sufficient time for team development. The use of external feedback was essential for all activities. Clearly defined goals and hard deadlines were critical for the completion of individual activities, as well as developing a healthy team environment. Although the student cohort has learned from the activities, more time is needed to assess whether the students have become a fully efficient team. Furthermore, an additional cohort would be needed to assess whether the approach was able to assist with student's interest in STEM and their desire to help other people.

  5. Open architecture controller activities in Technology Enabling Agile Manufacturing (TEAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCue, Howard K.

    1997-01-01

    As part of its manufacturing initiative, TEAM is actively involved in open architecture controller activities. WIthin the TEAM community of members, TEAM is developing an open architecture controller requirements document and an open architecture controller application programming interface document. In addition, TEAM is also evaluating early open architecture controllers in a shop floor environment.

  6. Team Knowledge Sharing Intervention Effects on Team Shared Mental Models and Student Performance in an Undergraduate Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikorski, Eric G.; Johnson, Tristan E.; Ruscher, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a shared mental model (SMM) based intervention on student team mental model similarity and ultimately team performance in an undergraduate meteorology course. The team knowledge sharing (TKS) intervention was designed to promote team reflection, communication, and improvement planning.…

  7. Study of connectivity in student teams by observation of their learning processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Patricio H.; Correa, Rafael D.

    2016-05-01

    A registration procedure based data tracking classroom activities students formed into teams, which are immersed in basic learning processes, particularly physical sciences is presented. For the analysis of the data various mathematical tools to deliver results in numerical indicators linking their learning, performance, quality of relational nexus to transformation their emotions. The range of variables under observation and further study, which is influenced by the evolution of the emotions of the different teams of students, it also covers the traditional approach to information delivery from outside (teaching in lecture) or from inside each team (abilities of pupils) to instructional materials that enhance learning inquiry and persuasion.

  8. Defining and Assessing Team Skills of Business and Accountancy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghalith, Nabil; Blum, Michael; Medlock, Amanda; Weber, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the project are (1) to define the skills necessary for students to work effectively with others to achieve common goals, and (2) to develop an assessment instrument to measure student progress toward achieving these skills. The defined skill set will form a basis for common expectations related to team skills that will be shared…

  9. Mentoring Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Students via a Team Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karsai, Istvan; Knisley, Jeff; Knisley, Debra; Yampolsky, Lev; Godbole, Anant

    2011-01-01

    We describe how a team approach that we developed as a mentoring strategy can be used to recruit, advance, and guide students to be more interested in the interdisciplinary field of mathematical biology, and lead to success in undergraduate research in this field. Students are introduced to research in their first semester via lab rotations. Their…

  10. Using Student Peer Evaluations to Evaluate Team Taught Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Kimberly Smith

    2005-01-01

    In order to assess whether students fully grasped the six teaching standards in the "Professional Standards for Teaching Mathematics" (NCTM, 1991), the researcher had each student submit peer evaluations of the team lessons that were taught in a Methods and Materials of Teaching Mathematics in the Middle Grades class during the Fall semester of…

  11. Building an Undergraduate STEM Team Using Team-Based Learning Leading to the Production of a Storyboard Appropriate for Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutright, Teresa J.; Evans, Edward; Brantner, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    A unique undergraduate team that spans five different engineering disciplines, chemistry, biology, and mathematics was formed. The team was formed to promote cross-disciplinary learning, to improve retention, and to prepare the students for the kind of problems they will face in their careers. This paper describes the variety of activities used…

  12. Share the Stage! Teaming Students with Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Lynn

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the production of the opera, "The Mikado," a joint venture between a junior high school vocal department and a professional opera company. Explains funding, student casting, rehearsals, and other details of production. Concludes with the results of the performance, including the community response and student improvements in musical…

  13. Give Your Student Support Team a SPARC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyra, Bob; Meyers, Paul

    2003-01-01

    To help school counselors communicate what they do and how students are different because of what they do, the California Department of Education and Los Angeles County Office of Education have developed a continuous improvement tool for schools to use to demonstrate accountability and promote counseling and student support programs to the school…

  14. Collaborative Teaching Practices in Undergraduate Active Learning Classrooms: A Report of Faculty Team Teaching Models and Student Reflections from Two Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Kelsey J.

    2015-01-01

    Effectively managing active learning classrooms (ALCs), particularly large ALCs, can present a variety of challenges for instructors. There is a rapidly growing body of research literature addressing the impact of ALCs on student engagement and learning, but fewer studies have focused on investigating instructional practices and instructors in…

  15. Early Career Summer Interdisciplinary Team Experiences and Student Persistence in STEM Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Pedone, V. A.; Horn, W.; Rich, H.

    2015-12-01

    STEPS (Students Targeting Engineering and Physical Science) is an NSF-funded program designed to increase the number of California State University Northridge students getting bachelor's degrees in the natural sciences, mathematics, engineering and computer science. The greatest loss of STEM majors occurs between sophomore and junior- years, so we designed Summer Interdisciplinary Team Experience (SITE) as an early career program for these students. Students work closely with a faculty mentor in teams of ten to investigate regionally relevant problems, many of which relate to sustainability efforts on campus or the community. The projects emphasize hands-on activities and team-based learning and decision making. We report data for five years of projects, qualitative assessment through entrance and exit surveys and student interviews, and in initial impact on retention of the participants.

  16. Team Nutrition School Activity Planner. A How-To Guide for Team Nutrition Schools and Supporters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Consumer Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This "how-to" guide for Team Nutrition fairs and tasting activities helps Team Nutrition supporters and schools understand how to work together to improve the health and education of children. Team Nutrition is the implementation tool for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's School Meals Initiative for Healthy Children. Section 1 of the guide…

  17. The Impact of Individual Ability, Favorable Team Member Scores, and Student Perception of Course Importance on Student Preference of Team-Based Learning and Grading Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Allan Yen-Lun

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the impact of individual ability and favorable team member scores on student preference of team-based learning and grading methods, and examines the moderating effects of student perception of course importance on student preference of team-based learning and grading methods. The author also investigates the relationship…

  18. Student teams prepare robots for regional competition at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Student teams and sponsors, with their robots, fill the Center for Space Education at KSC as they look over the competition. Thirty schools from around the country have converged at KSC for the 1999 Southeastern Regional robotic competition March 4-6. The event pits the team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. KSC is hosting the event being sponsored by the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers.

  19. Team Up at Home. Team Nutrition Activity Booklet. Fun Nutrition Activities for the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Consumer Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This guide booklet helps parents teach their children about healthy nutrition at home. It is part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Team Nutrition, which is designed to improve the health and education of children and which actively involves children and their families in nutrition education activities in the school, community, and home. The…

  20. Scrum: Enhancing Student Team Organization and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opt, Susan; Sims, Christy-Dale L.

    2015-01-01

    To teach collaboration and overcome students' aversion to teamwork, Pope-Ruark (2012) recommends the Scrum approach, which she has used to manage major client-based course projects in writing and publishing courses. The Scrum approach emerged out of the software development industry in the 1990s as a framework for improving team…

  1. A Meta-Analysis of Research on Student Team Effectiveness: A Proposed Application of Phased Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Charlotte S.

    Despite the increased emphasis on team work in the academic environment, managing a student team so that the team process is effective remains problematic. In fact, some professors believe students are being taught ineffective team behavior such as free loading or relying on star performers and procrastination . Most research on student team…

  2. Team Preceptorship Model: A Solution for Students' Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cooper Brathwaite, Angela; Lemonde, Manon

    2011-01-01

    There is a shortage of registered nurses in developed countries, and this shortage is due to the aging nursing workforce, demand for healthcare services, and shortage of nursing professors to teach students. In order to increase the number of clinical placements for nursing students, the authors developed and implemented a collaborative preceptorship model between a Canadian University and Public Health Department to facilitate the clinical experiences of Bachelor of Science of Nursing (BScN) students. This paper describes the Team Preceptorship Model which guided the clinical experience of nine students and 14 preceptors. It also highlights the model's evaluation, strengths, and limitations. PMID:21994893

  3. NASA Microgravity Science Competition for High-school-aged Student Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Stocker, Dennis; Hodanbosi, Carol; Baumann, Eric

    2002-01-01

    NASA participates in a wide variety of educational activities including competitive events. There are competitive events sponsored by NASA and student teams which are mentored by NASA centers. This participation by NASA in public forums serves to bring the excitement of aerospace science to students and educators. A new competition for highschool-aged student teams involving projects in microgravity has completed two pilot years and will have national eligibility for teams during the 2002-2003 school year. A team participating in the Dropping In a Microgravity Environment will research the field of microgravity, develop a hypothesis, and prepare a proposal for an experiment to be conducted in a microgravity drop tower facility. A team of NASA scientists and engineers will select the top proposals and those teams will then design and build their experiment apparatus. When the experiment apparatus are completed, team representatives will visit NASA Glenn in Cleveland, Ohio for operation of their facility and participate in workshops and center tours. Presented in this paper will be a description of DIME, an overview of the planning and execution of such a program, results from the first two pilot years, and a status of the first national competition.

  4. Disseminating Student Team Learning in Desegregated Schools: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollifield, John H.; Slavin, Robert E.

    This paper describes the dissemination effort that has resulted in the extensive use of the Student Team Learning Program, an instructional process designed for the purpose of improving race relations in desegregated schools. Various attributes of the program that have enhanced its adoption in over 1000 school districts are examined and the…

  5. Examining Factors That Affect Students' Knowledge Sharing within Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Jinxia; Gunter, Glenda

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that might impact student knowledge sharing within virtual teams through online discussion boards. These factors include: trust, mutual influence, conflict, leadership, and cohesion. A path model was developed to determine whether relationships exist among knowledge sharing from asynchronous group…

  6. Young Adolescent Voices: Students' Perceptions of Interdisciplinary Teaming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Susan J.; Bishop, Penny A.

    2004-01-01

    Interdisciplinary teaming in middle schools has increased dramatically over the past few decades (McEwin, Dickinson & Jensen, 2003); nevertheless, students have rarely been consulted as important sources of insight into this practice (Dickinson & Erb, 1997) of two or more teachers sharing the responsibility for instruction, curriculum, and…

  7. Using Student Teams in the Classroom: A Faculty Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Ruth Federman; Hurd, Sandra

    Part 1 of this guide to using teamwork in the classroom introduces the theory underlying teamwork and suggests basic ways to think about incorporating teamwork into the college classroom. Part 2 contains practical information for anyone who is planning to use teams, with guidelines, examples, and materials to help students communicate effectively…

  8. Teacher Collaboration in Instructional Teams and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Farmer, Susanna Owens; McQueen, Kiel; Grissom, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    This study draws upon survey and administrative data on over 9,000 teachers in 336 Miami-Dade County public schools over 2 years to investigate the kinds of collaborations that exist in instructional teams across the district and whether these collaborations predict student achievement. While different kinds of teachers and schools report…

  9. Relationship between High School Leadership Team Practices and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Timothy M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated if a relationship existed between student achievement in 10th grade Missouri Assessment Program mathematics and 11th grade communication arts scores in 2007 and high school leadership team perceptions of the extent to which they demonstrated leadership practices. The secondary purpose was to compare perceptional…

  10. The PSE&G Student Project Team Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    1991-01-01

    The Public Service Electric & Gas Company in New Jersey uses graduate/undergraduate student project teams to explore promising technology that can be further explored in a more formal, contracted research arrangement between the company and academic institutions such as the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Stevens Institute of Technology.…

  11. Action Research to Improve Collaboration among Student Support Services Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salm, Twyla

    2014-01-01

    This study explores action research as a professional development strategy to improve interprofessional collaboration in a school division team focused on supporting students with a variety of learning and behavioural needs. Occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, a psychologist, and a social worker worked together to learn more…

  12. Team Teaching: Integration of Inclusion and Regular Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Key, Dana Lynn

    This study described the experiences of five interns and their cooperating teachers during internships in high school language arts classrooms that included diverse students and used team teaching. The study investigated participants' perceptions and experiences in this type of classroom versus previous experiences in inclusive classrooms without…

  13. Relationship between Personality and Behavioral Intention in Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, William R.; Tashchian, Armen; Shore, Ted H.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the applicability of the Big Five and FIRO-B frameworks as predictors of group process outcomes in the context of student teams. The personality dimensions of Agreeableness, Extraversion, Conscientiousness, and Neuroticism were correlated with the interpersonal behavior dimensions of Inclusion, Affection, and Control. The…

  14. Executive Management Team Demography and Minority Student Retention: Does Executive Team Diversity Influence the Retention of Minority Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Mark; Katsinas, Stephen; Bush, V. Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Many colleges and universities are expected to produce more graduates while responding to an increasing level of racial and ethnic diversity among students. While the importance of diversity within executive management leadership teams may be accepted among nonprofit higher education institutions, the connection between diversity among the…

  15. Interdependence and Integration Learning in Student Project Teams: Do Team Project Assignments Achieve What We Want Them to?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skilton, Paul F.; Forsyth, David; White, Otis J.

    2008-01-01

    Building from research on learning in workplace project teams, the authors work forward from the idea that the principal condition enabling integration learning in student team projects is project complexity. Recognizing the challenges of developing and running complex student projects, the authors extend theory to propose that the experience of…

  16. The impact of individual ability, favorable team member scores, and student perception of course importance on student preference of team-based learning and grading methods.

    PubMed

    Su, Allan Yen-Lun

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the impact of individual ability and favorable team member scores on student preference of team-based learning and grading methods, and examines the moderating effects of student perception of course importance on student preference of team-based learning and grading methods. The author also investigates the relationship between student perception of course importance and their responses to social loafing. Results indicate that individual ability on the preference of team-based learning was affected by the three levels of favorable team member scores. For students with a low level of individual ability, the preference for team-based learning was significant among students with each of three levels of favorable team member scores (p < .05). However, the team-based learning and grading methods was not significant (p > .05). The findings also reveal a negative correlation between student perception of course importance and their responses to social loafing (p < .05). Findings note the importance of teachers' grading methods, student perceptions of course importance as well as individual ability and favorable team member scores in the team selection process to promote student attitude toward team-based learning. PMID:18229513

  17. Fueling the public health workforce pipeline through student surge capacity response teams.

    PubMed

    Horney, J A; Davis, M K; Ricchetti-Masterson, K L; MacDonald, P D M

    2014-02-01

    In January 2003, the University of North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness established Team Epi-Aid to match graduate student volunteers with state and local health departments to assist with outbreaks and other applied public health projects. This study assessed whether Team Epi-Aid participation by full-time graduate students impacted post-graduation employment, particularly by influencing students to work in governmental public health upon graduation. In September 2010, 223 program alumni were contacted for an online survey and 10 selected for follow-up interviews. Eighty-three Team Epi-Aid alumni answered the survey (response rate = 37 %). Forty-one (49 %) reported participating in at least one activity, with 12/41 (29 %) indicating participation in Team Epi-Aid influenced their job choice following graduation. In 6 months prior to enrolling at UNC, 30 (36 %) reported employment in public health, with 16/30 (53 %) employed in governmental public health. In 6 months following graduation, 34 (41 %) reported employment in public health, with 27 (80 %) employed in governmental public health. Eight alumni completed telephone interviews (response rate = 80 %). Five credited Team Epi-Aid with influencing their post-graduation career. Experience in applied public health through a group such as Team Epi-Aid may influence job choice for public health graduates. PMID:23942945

  18. NORSTAR Project: Norfolk public schools student team for acoustical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortunato, Ronald C.

    1987-01-01

    Development of the NORSTAR (Norfolk Public Student Team for Acoustical Research) Project includes the definition, design, fabrication, testing, analysis, and publishing the results of an acoustical experiment. The student-run program is based on a space flight organization similar to the Viking Project. The experiment will measure the scattering transfer of momentum from a sound field to spheres in a liquid medium. It is hoped that the experimental results will shed light on a difficult physics problem - the difference in scattering cross section (the overall effect of the sound wave scattering) for solid spheres and hollow spheres of differing wall thicknesses.

  19. Student teams practice for regional robotic competition at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Student teams (background) maneuver their robots on the playing field during practice rounds of the 1999 Southeastern Regional robotic competition at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex . Thirty schools from around the country have converged at KSC for the event that pits gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. As one of their goals, the robots have to retrieve pillow-like disks from the floor. KSC is hosting the event being sponsored by the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers.

  20. Student teams prepare robots for regional competition at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Students look over one of the robots to compete in the 1999 Southeastern Regional robotic competition being held at Kennedy Space Center March 4-6. Thirty schools from around the country have converged at KSC for the event that pits the team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. KSC is hosting the event being sponsored by the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers.

  1. Student teams prepare robots for regional competition at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    These students from Astronaut High and Titusville High Schools, in Brevard County, Florida, known as the CombBat Team, make adjustments on their robot entered in the 1999 Southeastern Regional robotic competition at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex March 4-6. Thirty schools from around the country have converged at KSC for the event that pits gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. KSC is hosting the event being sponsored by the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers.

  2. A Standards-Based Approach to Team-Based Student Projects in an Information Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenkamp, Annette Lerine

    Team-based student projects have become an intrinsic part of coursework in information technology courses. The rationale is that once students enter the work environment they will be required to work in teams. Challenges of teamwork are reviewed and factors influencing student team performance are identified. An approach is described which deals…

  3. Cross-Cultural Management Learning through Innovative Pedagogy: An Exploratory Study of Globally Distributed Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartel-Radic, Anne; Moos, J. Chris; Long, Suzanna K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an innovative pedagogy based on student participation in globally distributed project teams. The study questions the link between student learning of intercultural competence and the global teaming experience. Data was collected from 115 students participating in 22 virtual intercultural teams. Results revealed that students…

  4. Using Action Research to Teach Students to Manage Team Learning and Improve Teamwork Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Ladd, Brenda; Chan, Christopher C. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating strategies that students can use to develop skills in managing team learning. Two groups of second-year management students participated in a semester-long action research project over two semesters. The students were educated on team development, team processes and conflict management and how to…

  5. Effective student teams for collaborative learning in an introductory university physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Jason J. B.; Harrison, David M.; Meyertholen, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    We have studied the types of student teams that are most effective for collaborative learning in a large freshman university physics course. We compared teams in which the students were all of roughly equal ability to teams with a mix of student abilities, we compared teams with three members to teams with four members, and we examined teams with only one female student and the rest of the students male. We measured team effectiveness by the gains on the Force Concept Inventory and by performance on the final examination. None of the factors that we examined had significant impact on student learning. We also investigated student satisfaction as measured by responses to an anonymous evaluation at the end of the term, and found small but statistically significant differences depending on how the nine teams in the group were constructed.

  6. The Use of Team-Based Learning as an Approach to Increased Engagement and Learning for Marketing Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chad, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Marketing educators are often faced with poor preclass preparation by students, declining student interest in attending classes as the semester progresses, and student complaints regarding previous bad experiences with team assessment activities. Team-based learning (TBL) is an innovative teaching strategy using semiformalized guidelines aimed to…

  7. Using Existing Teams to Teach about Teams: How an MBA Course in Managing Teams Helps Students and the Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isabella, Lynn A.

    2005-01-01

    This article chronicles the unique manner in which a second-year MBA elective course in managing teams has been crafted using existing first-year learning teams as its core. The design and orchestration of this course are detailed, as are the challenges posed, in delivering a course that not only teaches about teams and team dynamics but does so…

  8. Consequences of Team Charter Quality: Teamwork Mental Model Similarity and Team Viability in Engineering Design Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway Hughston, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Since 1996 ABET has mandated that undergraduate engineering degree granting institutions focus on learning outcomes such as professional skills (i.e. solving unstructured problems and working in teams). As a result, engineering curricula were restructured to include team based learning--including team charters. Team charters were diffused into…

  9. Making the Grade and Staying Engaged: The Influence of Student Management Teams on Student Classroom Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troisi, Jordan D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of student management teams (SMTs) is a relatively new teaching technique designed to increase the quality of college courses and student performance and engagement within those courses. However, to date, little systematic, empirical research has validated the effectiveness of using SMTs. To test the effectiveness of this technique, the…

  10. Student Management Teams Increase College Students' Feelings of Autonomy in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troisi, Jordan D.

    2015-01-01

    The use of Student Management Teams (SMTs) is a relatively new teaching technique designed to increase students' motivation and involvement with the planning and execution of college courses. However, to date, little systematic, empirical research has validated the effectiveness of using SMTs. To test the effectiveness of this technique, the…

  11. The Social Foundation of Team-Based Learning: Students Accountable to Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Michael; Pelton-Sweet, Laura M.

    2008-01-01

    As one form of small group learning, team-based learning's (TBL's) unique sequence of individual and group work with immediate feedback enables and encourages students to engage course content and each other in remarkable ways. Specifically, TBL creates an environment where students can fulfill their human need to belong in the process of…

  12. Student Study Teams: A Resource Manual for Trainers and Implementors. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radius, Marcie, Comp.; Lesniak, Pat, Comp.

    The Student Study Team (SST) is a school site team which involves parents, students, and teachers working together to assist regular education students who are not progressing satisfactorily. The SST model aims to increase positive outcomes for students; improve the quality and efficiency of meetings; and increase personal satisfaction levels for…

  13. Matchmaking in Marketing Class: Using Fisher's Personality Profiling to Form Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutto, Alexandra; Black, Gregory S.; Frontczak, Nancy T.

    2011-01-01

    Each term, instructors are dealt a hand when presented with a surprise buffet of personalities from which to form teams. We need to make the best of it. While the benefits of team projects in marketing classes are well documented, they are not without pitfalls. A primary issue with student teams relates to the method of team formation, which often…

  14. Turning Points during the Life of Student Project Teams: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raes, Elisabeth; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study a more flexible alternative of conceptualising changes over time in teams is tested within student project teams. The conceptualisation uses turning points during the lifespan of a team to outline team development, based on work by Erbert, Mearns, & Dena (2005). Turning points are moments that made a significant…

  15. Leadership: Building a Team Using Structured Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas, Olivia; Jones, Irma S.

    2012-01-01

    Educators strive to anticipate reactions or outcomes of instruction so that the learning or acquiring of information by others is as pain-free as possible. Leaders also strive to build cohesiveness and trust in groups or teams of employees so that the end goal or task is produced in a timely manner. However, setting the stage or mood for teamwork…

  16. Navigating the Role of Graduate Student on the Teaching Team: Life in the Incubator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Laurel P.; Anderson, Mallory A.; Tucker, Teresa W.; Powell, Gwynn M.

    2013-01-01

    Pride, fear, and stress exist on the roller coaster that is the work-life of a graduate student functioning in the role of team member in a mixed-level, collaborative teaching team. These emotions are not uncommon to faculty/graduate student work relationships, but given the power differential, the interdependent team dynamic adds an incubator…

  17. Differences in Elementary School Team Communication and Practices for Students of Varied Educational Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroll, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on interdisciplinary problem-solving teams used to address the academic needs of elementary students struggling with reading. Use of teams has a strong theoretical base and wide endorsement by educational leaders, but limited empirical base. Three studies explore teams that convene students of differing academic status:…

  18. Ground Rules in Team Projects: Findings from a Prototype System to Support Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatley, Janice

    2009-01-01

    Student team project work in higher education is one of the best ways to develop team working skills at the same time as learning about the subject matter. As today's students require the freedom to learn at times and places that better match their lifestyles, there is a need for any support for team project work to be also available online. Team…

  19. Generating Effective Facilitation Questions for Team-Building/Personal-Challenge Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabbei, Ritchie

    2004-01-01

    Team-building/personal-challenge (TB/PC) activities have become popular ways to address students' interpersonal and intrapersonal skills and abilities associated with the affective domain. The outcomes associated with TB/PC activities are often best experienced and learned through the use of indirect methods of instruction. Typically, many…

  20. Student teams practice for regional robotic competition at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Student teams (right and left) behind protective walls maneuver their robots on the playing field during practice rounds of the 1999 Southeastern Regional robotic competition at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex . Thirty schools from around the country have converged at KSC for the event that pits gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The robots have to retrieve pillow-like disks from the floor, as well as climb onto the platform (foreground) and raise the cache of pillows to a height of eight feet. KSC is hosting the event being sponsored by the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers.

  1. Medically related activities of application team program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Application team methodology identifies and specifies problems in technology transfer programs to biomedical areas through direct contact with users of aerospace technology. The availability of reengineering sources increases impact of the program on the medical community and results in broad scale application of some bioinstrumentation systems. Examples are given that include devices adapted to the rehabilitation of neuromuscular disorders, power sources for artificial organs, and automated monitoring and detection equipment in clinical medicine.

  2. Performance of Student Software Development Teams: The Influence of Personality and Identifying as Team Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Conal; Bizumic, Boris; Reynolds, Katherine; Smithson, Michael; Johns-Boast, Lynette; van Rooy, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    One prominent approach in the exploration of the variations in project team performance has been to study two components of the aggregate personalities of the team members: conscientiousness and agreeableness. A second line of research, known as self-categorisation theory, argues that identifying as team members and the team's performance…

  3. High-school Student Teams in a National NASA Microgravity Science Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Hodanbosi, Carol; Stocker, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    The Dropping In a Microgravity Environment or DIME competition for high-school-aged student teams has completed the first year for nationwide eligibility after two regional pilot years. With the expanded geographic participation and increased complexity of experiments, new lessons were learned by the DIME staff. A team participating in DIME will research the field of microgravity, develop a hypothesis, and prepare a proposal for an experiment to be conducted in a NASA microgravity drop tower. A team of NASA scientists and engineers will select the top proposals and then the selected teams will design and build their experiment apparatus. When completed, team representatives will visit NASA Glenn in Cleveland, Ohio to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower and participate in workshops and center tours. NASA participates in a wide variety of educational activities including competitive events. There are competitive events sponsored by NASA (e.g. NASA Student Involvement Program) and student teams mentored by NASA centers (e.g. For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology Robotics Competition). This participation by NASA in these public forums serves to bring the excitement of aerospace science to students and educators.Researchers from academic institutions, NASA, and industry utilize the 2.2 Second Drop Tower at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio for microgravity research. The researcher may be able to complete the suite of experiments in the drop tower but many experiments are precursor experiments for spaceflight experiments. The short turnaround time for an experiment's operations (45 minutes) and ready access to experiment carriers makes the facility amenable for use in a student program. The pilot year for DIME was conducted during the 2000-2001 school year with invitations sent out to Ohio- based schools and organizations. A second pilot year was conducted during the 2001-2002 school year for teams in the six-state region

  4. A status of the Turbine Technology Team activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.

    1992-01-01

    The recent activities of the Turbine Technology Team of the Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology is presented. The team consists of members from the government, industry, and universities. The goal of this team is to demonstrate the benefits to the turbine design process attainable through the application of CFD. This goal is to be achieved by enhancing and validating turbine design tools for improved loading and flowfield definition and loss prediction, and transferring the advanced technology to the turbine design process. In order to demonstrate the advantages of using CFD early in the design phase, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) turbines for the National Launch System (NLS) were chosen on which to focus the team's efforts. The Turbine Team activities run parallel to the STME design work.

  5. The Impact of Team-Based Learning on Nervous System Examination Knowledge of Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati Maslakpak, Masomeh; Parizad, Naser; Zareie, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Team-based learning is one of the active learning approaches in which independent learning is combined with small group discussion in the class. This study aimed to determine the impact of team-based learning in nervous system examination knowledge of nursing students. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 3rd grade nursing students, including 5th semester (intervention group) and 6th semester (control group). The traditional lecture method and the team-based learning method were used for educating the examination of the nervous system for intervention and control groups, respectively. The data were collected by a test covering 40-questions (multiple choice, matching, gap-filling and descriptive questions) before and after intervention in both groups. Individual Readiness Assurance Test (RAT) and Group Readiness Assurance Test (GRAT) used to collect data in the intervention group. In the end, the collected data were analyzed by SPSS ver. 13 using descriptive and inferential statistical tests. Results: In team-based learning group, mean and standard deviation was 13.39 (4.52) before the intervention, which had been increased to 31.07 (3.20) after the intervention and this increase was statistically significant. Also, there was a statistically significant difference between the scores of RAT and GRAT in team-based learning group. Conclusion: Using team-based learning approach resulted in much better improvement and stability in the nervous system examination knowledge of nursing students compared to traditional lecture method; therefore, this method could be efficiently used as an effective educational approach in nursing education. PMID:26744732

  6. An Interdisciplinary Team Project: Psychology and Computer Science Students Create Online Cognitive Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Kathleen A.; Malita, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    We present our case study of an interdisciplinary team project for students taking either a psychology or computer science (CS) course. The project required psychology and CS students to combine their knowledge and skills to create an online cognitive task. Each interdisciplinary project team included two psychology students who conducted library…

  7. The Effect of Team-Based Learning on Student Attitudes and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinig, Bruce A.; Horowitz, Ira; Whittenburg, Gerald E.

    2011-01-01

    We examined student attitudes toward a team-based learning method known as the readiness assurance process encompassing team exams to model how student satisfaction is initially shaped and subsequently changed over time as a function of scholastic performance and perceived development of professional skills (PS). We found that students were…

  8. Current Activity of the U.S. ASTER Science Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Abrams, M. J.; Hook, S. J.; Pieri, D. C.; Ramsey, M.; Rowan, L. C.; Schmugge, T.; Wessels, R.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. ASTER Science Team is currently engaged in numerous ASTER related activities, many of them jointly with our Japanese colleagues. These include vicarious instrument calibration, algorithm development and validation for higher level data products, assistance to ERSDAC for scheduling activities (primarily for U.S. users), assistance to data users other than Science Team members, and science applications of ASTER data, notably in the areas of glacial monitoring, volcanic monitoring, heat balance determinations, geologic mapping, and cloud studies.

  9. Team-Based Activities to Promote Engaged Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightner, Sharon; Bober, Marcie J.; Willi, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Like their counterparts in other disciplines, accounting educators are gradually moving away from talk-and-chalk lectures to project-based learning, real-world problem solving, and team collaboration. Slower to change are the ways in which the impact of these innovative teaching methods have been assessed, with student reactions and traditional…

  10. Effect of Team Size in Soccer on Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnett, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the percentages of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in soccer games with different team sizes. Twenty-two university physical education majors evenly divided between males and females volunteered for the study. Students were blind to the purpose of the study. Data were collected over three…

  11. Student teams practice for regional robotic competition at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During practice rounds of the 1999 Southeastern Regional robotic competition at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, team members adjust components of their robot on the floor. Thirty schools from around the country have converged at KSC for the event that pits gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The robots have to retrieve pillow-like disks from the floor, as well as climb onto a platform and raise the cache of pillows to a height of eight feet. KSC is hosting the event being sponsored by the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers.

  12. An Innovative Teaching Method To Promote Active Learning: Team-Based Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, R.

    2007-12-01

    Traditional teaching practice based on the textbook-whiteboard- lecture-homework-test paradigm is not very effective in helping students with diverse academic backgrounds achieve higher-order critical thinking skills such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Consequently, there is a critical need for developing a new pedagogical approach to create a collaborative and interactive learning environment in which students with complementary academic backgrounds and learning skills can work together to enhance their learning outcomes. In this presentation, I will discuss an innovative teaching method ('Team-Based Learning (TBL)") which I recently developed at National University of Singapore to promote active learning among students in the environmental engineering program with learning abilities. I implemented this new educational activity in a graduate course. Student feedback indicates that this pedagogical approach is appealing to most students, and promotes active & interactive learning in class. Data will be presented to show that the innovative teaching method has contributed to improved student learning and achievement.

  13. Academic Learning Teams in Accelerated Adult Programs: Online and On-Campus Students' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Favor, Judy K.; Kulp, Amanda M.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports adult students' (N = 632) perceptions of long-functioning academic learning teams in accelerated online and on-campus business cohort groups in six constructs: attraction to team, performance expectation alignment, workload distribution, intra-team conflict, preference for teamwork, and impact on learning. Comparisons between…

  14. A Team-Based Practicum Bringing Together Students Across Educational Institutions and Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    George, Paul; Nimmagadda, Jayashree; Brown, Samantha; Gremel, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess student perceptions of teamwork during an interprofessional exercise and to evaluate if students could identify domestic violence through a standardized patient interview. Design. Medical, pharmacy, nursing, physical therapy, and social work students were assigned to teams to interview and examine a patient with a “cut on the hand” later revealed a result of domestic violence. They also practiced suturing technique and developed a patient care plan. A postexercise survey was administered. Assessment. From 70% to 94% of students surveyed agreed or strongly agreed, respectively, that their responsibilities were clear. All (100%) recognized the benefits of team-based care. Only 38% of the medical students reported team members providing insight into domestic violence, and 52% did not recognize team members as resources for these cases. Conclusion. Students gained perspective of knowledge and responsibilities of each team member. However, the results suggest further enhancements of curriculum related to domestic violence are needed. PMID:27170820

  15. A Team-Based Practicum Bringing Together Students Across Educational Institutions and Health Professions.

    PubMed

    MacDonnell, Celia; George, Paul; Nimmagadda, Jayashree; Brown, Samantha; Gremel, Kathleen

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To assess student perceptions of teamwork during an interprofessional exercise and to evaluate if students could identify domestic violence through a standardized patient interview. Design. Medical, pharmacy, nursing, physical therapy, and social work students were assigned to teams to interview and examine a patient with a "cut on the hand" later revealed a result of domestic violence. They also practiced suturing technique and developed a patient care plan. A postexercise survey was administered. Assessment. From 70% to 94% of students surveyed agreed or strongly agreed, respectively, that their responsibilities were clear. All (100%) recognized the benefits of team-based care. Only 38% of the medical students reported team members providing insight into domestic violence, and 52% did not recognize team members as resources for these cases. Conclusion. Students gained perspective of knowledge and responsibilities of each team member. However, the results suggest further enhancements of curriculum related to domestic violence are needed. PMID:27170820

  16. The Student Curriculum Review Team: How we catalyze curricular changes through a student-centered approach.

    PubMed

    Hsih, Katie W; Iscoe, Mark S; Lupton, Joshua R; Mains, Tyler E; Nayar, Suresh K; Orlando, Megan S; Parzuchowski, Aaron S; Sabbagh, Mark F; Schulz, John C; Shenderov, Kevin; Simkin, Daren J; Vakili, Sharif; Vick, Judith B; Xu, Tim; Yin, Ophelia; Goldberg, Harry R

    2015-01-01

    Student feedback is a valuable asset in curriculum evaluation and improvement, but many institutions have faced challenges implementing it in a meaningful way. In this article, we report the rationale, process and impact of the Student Curriculum Review Team (SCRT), a student-led and faculty-supported organization at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. SCRT's evaluation of each pre-clinical course is composed of a comprehensive three-step process: a review of course evaluation data, a Town Hall Meeting and online survey to generate and assess potential solutions, and a thoughtful discussion with course directors. Over the past two years, SCRT has demonstrated the strength of its approach by playing a substantial role in improving medical education, as reported by students and faculty. Furthermore, SCRT's uniquely student-centered, collaborative model has strengthened relationships between students and faculty and is one that could be readily adapted to other medical schools or academic institutions. PMID:25532595

  17. Tackling student neurophobia in neurosciences block with team-based learning

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Khurshid; Shaikh, Abdul A.; Sajid, Muhammad R.; Cahusac, Peter; Alarifi, Norah A.; Al Shedoukhy, Ahlam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally, neurosciences is perceived as a difficult course in undergraduate medical education with literature suggesting use of the term “Neurophobia” (fear of neurology among medical students). Instructional strategies employed for the teaching of neurosciences in undergraduate curricula traditionally include a combination of lectures, demonstrations, practical classes, problem-based learning and clinico-pathological conferences. Recently, team-based learning (TBL), a student-centered instructional strategy, has increasingly been regarded by many undergraduate medical courses as an effective method to assist student learning. Methods In this study, 156 students of year-three neuroscience block were divided into seven male and seven female groups, comprising 11–12 students in each group. TBL was introduced during the 6 weeks of this block, and a total of eight TBL sessions were conducted during this duration. We evaluated the effect of TBL on student learning and correlated it with the student's performance in summative assessment. Moreover, the students’ perceptions regarding the process of TBL was assessed by online survey. Results We found that students who attended TBL sessions performed better in the summative examinations as compared to those who did not. Furthermore, students performed better in team activities compared to individual testing, with male students performing better with a more favorable impact on their grades in the summative examination. There was an increase in the number of students achieving higher grades (grade B and above) in this block when compared to the previous block (51.7% vs. 25%). Moreover, the number of students at risk for lower grades (Grade B- and below) decreased in this block when compared to the previous block (30.6% vs. 55%). Students generally elicited a favorable response regarding the TBL process, as well as expressed satisfaction with the content covered and felt that such activities led to

  18. Student Activities. Managing Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Barbara; And Others

    This monograph suggests ways that college or university administrations can undertake a systematic and careful review of the risks posed by students' activities. Its purpose is to provide guidance in integrating the risk management process into a school's existing approaches to managing student organizations and activities. It is noted that no…

  19. Team Satisfaction and Student Group Performance: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeitun, Rami M.; Abdulqader, Khalid Shams; Alshare, Khaled A.

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between team satisfaction and students' performance in group projects in two universities, one from the United States and one from Qatar. The results showed that there is a significant positive correlation between team satisfaction and group performance only for the American students. Demographic factors…

  20. Teaching MBA Students Teamwork and Team Leadership Skills: An Empirical Evaluation of a Classroom Educational Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Charles J.; Strupeck, David; Griffin, Andrea; Szostek, Jana; Rominger, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive educational program for teaching behavioral teamwork and team leadership skills was rigorously evaluated with 148 MBA students enrolled at an urban regional campus of a Midwestern public university. Major program components included (1) videotaped student teams in leaderless group discussion (LGD) exercises at the course beginning…

  1. Beyond the Process of Teaming: Administrative Support, Classroom Practices, and Student Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Susan B.; Peterson, Gary W.

    This paper examines the relationships among administrative support, interdisciplinary team functioning, classroom practices, and student outcomes. It is premised on the need to move beyond examinations of the team process and explore the effects of processes on student learning. The report is based on a systemic research project that studied 60…

  2. Serial Team Teaching and the Evolving Scholarship of Learning: Students' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Melody; Bank, Charly; Browning, Scott; Clarke, Jim; Harlow, Jason; Harrison, David; Ing, Karen; Kushnir, Lena; Kutas, Cecilia; Pitre, John; Serbanescu, Ruxandra; Wall, Marty; Wilson, Ron

    2008-01-01

    Faculty and students at the University of Toronto were surveyed and interviewed to form a case study of serial team teaching, in which multiple instructors take turns teaching a segment of the same course in sequence. Student opinions ranged from slightly opposed to slightly in favour of team teaching overall. When asked about specific aspects of…

  3. Will We Teach Leadership or Skilled Incompetence? The Challenge of Student Project Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmer, Leanna L.

    2001-01-01

    Defensive routines and tolerance of skilled incompetence can harm student team performance. Strategies to overcome these problems include emphasizing the importance of process learning, teaching team development, providing practice in communication skills, coaching individual students, and providing graded feedback for process quality. (Contains…

  4. An Empirical Study of Hospitality Management Student Attitudes toward Group Projects: Instructional Factors and Team Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Youngsoo; Ro, Heejung

    2012-01-01

    The development of positive attitudes in team-based work is important in management education. This study investigates hospitality students' attitudes toward group projects by examining instructional factors and team problems. Specifically, we examine how the students' perceptions of project appropriateness, instructors' support, and evaluation…

  5. The Role of Coaching in Student Teams: A "Just-in-Time" Approach to Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Michele Kremen

    1999-01-01

    Describes ways teachers can support student teams: (1) starting on the right foot by laying the groundwork of group process; (2) increasing effectiveness by helping teams manage diversity and conflict; and (3) helping students learn from the teamwork experience. Appropriate coaching behaviors for each step are presented. (SK)

  6. Enhancing Intercultural Communication and Understanding: Team Translation Project as a Student Engagement Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects on a team translation project on Aboriginal culture designed to enhance university students' intercultural communication competence and understanding through engaging in an interactive team translation project funded by the Australia-China Council. A selected group of Chinese speaking translation students participated in the…

  7. Enhancing Student Team Effectiveness: Application of Myers-Briggs Personality Assessment in Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Christie H.; Amato, Louis H.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between student perceptions of team learning experience and communication style. Student group learning perceptions were evaluated and team communication style was measured using dyads derived from Myers-Briggs personality profiles. Groups containing similar personalities were classified as compatible,…

  8. Getting into Teams in Physical Education and Exclusion Processes among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimminger, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Although splitting up a class into teams is a consistent didactical element in physical education (PE), it is under-investigated in terms of how students handle the social dynamics in these situations. Therefore, the present study examines the strategies of exclusion as markers for non-recognition when students are split up into teams/pairs. The…

  9. Making Science Teams Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    2004-01-01

    Science teachers, likely have more experience with students working together than teachers in any other subject area due to teaming students for hands-on activities. While the importance of teamwork is emphasized in the National Science Education Standards, getting teams to actually work-meaning getting students to share equally in the academic…

  10. Insight into team competence in medical, nursing and respiratory therapy students.

    PubMed

    Sigalet, Elaine L; Donnon, Tyrone L; Grant, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information for educators about levels of competence in teams comprised of medical, nursing and respiratory therapy students after receiving a simulation-based team-training (SBT) curriculum with and without an additional formalized 30-min team-training (TT) module. A two-group pre- and post-test research design was used to evaluate team competence with respect to leadership, roles and responsibilities, communication, situation awareness and resource utilization. All scenarios were digitally recorded and evaluated using the KidSIM Team Performance Scale by six experts from medicine, nursing and respiratory therapy. The lowest scores occurred for items that reflected situation awareness. All teams improved their aggregate scores from Time 1 to Time 2 (p < 0.05). Student teams in the intervention group achieved significantly higher performance scores at Time 1 (Cohen's d = 0.92, p < 0.001) and Time 2 (d = 0.61, p < 0.01). All student teams demonstrated significant improvement in their ability to work more effectively by Time 2. The results suggest that situational awareness is an advanced expectation for the undergraduate student team. The provision of a formalized TT module prior to engaging student teams in a simulation-based TT curriculum led to significantly higher performances at Time 1 and 2. PMID:25051085

  11. Evaluation of a university hospital trauma team activation protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Admission with a multidisciplinary trauma team may be vital for the severely injured patient, as this facilitates rapid diagnosis and treatment. On the other hand, patients with minor injuries do not need the trauma team for adequate care. Correct triage is important for optimal resource utilization. The aim of the study was to evaluate our criteria for activating the trauma team, and identify suboptimal criteria that might be changed in the interest of precision. Methods The study is an observational, retrospective cohort-study. All patients admitted with the trauma team (n = 382), all severely injured (Injury Severity Score (ISS) >15) (n = 161), and all undergoing an emergency procedure aimed at counteracting compromised airways, respiration or circulation at our hospital (n = 142) during 2006-2007 were included. Data were recorded from the admission records and the electronic patient records. The trauma team activation protocol was evaluated against the occurrence of severe injury and the occurrence of emergency procedures. Results A total of 441 patients were included. The overtriage was 71% and undertriage 32% when evaluating against ISS >15 as the standard of reference. When occurrence of emergency procedures was held as the standard of standard of reference, the over- and undertriage was 71% and 21%, respectively. Mechanism of injury-criteria for trauma team activation contributed the most to overtriage. The emergency procedures performed were mostly endotracheal intubation and external fixation of fractures. Less than 3% needed haemostatic laparotomy or thoracotomy. Approximately 2/3 of the overtriage represented isolated head or cervical spine injuries, and/or interhospital transfers. Conclusions The over- and undertriage of our protocol are both too high. To decrease overtriage we suggest omissions and modifications of some of the criteria. To decrease undertriage, transferred patients and patients with head injuries should be more thoroughly

  12. Using a real-life case scenario to integrate additional health professions students into an existing interprofessional team seminar.

    PubMed

    Pole, David; Breitbach, Anthony P; Howell, Timothy G

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization stated that the goal of interprofessional education (IPE) is to prepare students as collaboration-ready members of interprofessional care teams. Educators try to create meaningful and relevant learning experiences for multiple health professions students. A longitudinal Interprofessional Team Seminar (IPTS) course includes over 650 students from seven health professions at the professional training level. Recommendations from the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) promote the inclusion of athletic training (AT) students in IPE initiatives. A new IPTS module included AT students focusing on the attributes of rapidly forming and different care teams as the patient transitions from an on-field injury, to acute care, inpatient care, and rehabilitative care, and back to activities of daily living. Qualitative review of reflections from the students assessed the impact of these IPTS modules. The intentional design of this course, focusing on behaviours of collaborative practice and supporting students to be collaboration ready, effectively introduced and highlighted profession-specific strengths and unique contributions to team-based care. PMID:26889945

  13. Student Response to Team-Based Learning and Mixed Gender Teams in an Undergraduate Medical Informatics Course

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Team-based learning (TBL) is increasingly being used in medical and medically-related courses. The aim of this study was to evaluate student responses to a TBL-based course in medical informatics at the Sultan Qaboos University, Oman. Methods: A total of 11 TBL sessions were run during a 14-week semester of the Medical Informatics II course at SQU. An online student evaluation was performed in week 13 of the course. Results: Of the 108 students on the course, 96 (88.9%) of the students responded to the survey. For the most part, the students regarded TBL favourably, and derived great benefit from the TBL sessions. Cultural norms, however, appear to have impacted negatively on the females’ experience of the TBL sessions. Conclusion: TBL’s benefits in the medical informatics course were recognised by the students. In such an environment, however, facilitators will have to bear in mind and continually address cultural issues. PMID:22912928

  14. Student Perceptions of Team-based Learning vs Traditional Lecture-based Learning

    PubMed Central

    Frame, Tracy R.; Cailor, Stephanie M.; Chen, Aleda M.; Kiersma, Mary E.; Sheppard, Lorin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate pharmacy student perceptions of team-based learning (TBL) vs traditional lecture-based learning formats. Methods. First professional year pharmacy students (N=111) at two universities used TBL in different courses during different semesters (fall vs spring). Students completed a 22-item team perceptions instrument before and after the fall semester. A 14-item teaching style preference instrument was completed at the end of the spring semester. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank test and Mann-Whitney U test. Results. Students who experienced TBL in the fall and went back to traditional format in the spring reported improved perceptions of teams and preferred TBL format over a traditional format more than students who experienced a traditional format followed by TBL. Students at both universities agreed that the TBL format assists with critical-thinking, problem-solving, and examination preparation. Students also agreed that teams should consist of individuals with different personalities and learning styles. Conclusion. When building teams, faculty members should consider ways to diversify teams by considering different views, perspectives, and strengths. Offering TBL early in the curriculum prior to traditional lecture-based formats is better received by students, as evidenced by anecdotal reports from students possibly because it allows students time to realize the benefits and assist them in building teamwork-related skills. PMID:26089560

  15. Team-Based Learning in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory Improves Academic Performance and Students' Attitudes toward Teamwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huitt, Tiffany W.; Killins, Anita; Brooks, William S.

    2015-01-01

    As the healthcare climate shifts toward increased interdisciplinary patient care, it is essential that students become accomplished at group problem solving and develop positive attitudes toward teamwork. Team-based learning (TBL) has become a popular approach to medical education because of its ability to promote active learning, problem-solving…

  16. A Multi-Instructor, Team-Based, Active-Learning Exercise to Integrate Basic and Clinical Sciences Content

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Darren M.; Akhtar de la Fuente, Ayesha

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To introduce a multiple-instructor, team-based, active-learning exercise to promote the integration of basic sciences (pathophysiology, pharmacology, and medicinal chemistry) and clinical sciences in a doctor of pharmacy curriculum. Design. A team-based learning activity that involved pre-class reading assignments, individual-and team-answered multiple-choice questions, and evaluation and discussion of a clinical case, was designed, implemented, and moderated by 3 faculty members from the pharmaceutical sciences and pharmacy practice departments. Assessment. Student performance was assessed using a multiple-choice examination, an individual readiness assurance test (IRAT), a team readiness assurance test (TRAT), and a subjective, objective, assessment, and plan (SOAP) note. Student attitudes were assessed using a pre- and post-exercise survey instrument. Students’ understanding of possible correct treatment strategies for depression improved. Students were appreciative of this true integration of basic sciences knowledge in a pharmacotherapy course and to have faculty members from both disciplines present to answer questions. Mean student score on the on depression module for the examination was 80.4%, indicating mastery of the content. Conclusions. An exercise led by multiple instructors improved student perceptions of the importance of team-based teaching. Integrated teaching and learning may be achieved when instructors from multiple disciplines work together in the classroom using proven team-based, active-learning exercises. PMID:22438605

  17. A Peer Assessment System to Improve Student Team Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Robert; Goodman, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Groups are frequently used in courses, but there is substantial evidence that insufficient attention is paid to creating conditions for successful teamwork. One key condition is high-quality, individual, and team-level feedback. An online peer assessment system and team improvement process was developed for this test case based on three design…

  18. Collaboration within Student Design Teams Participating in Architectural Design Competitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erbil, Livanur; Dogan, Fehmi

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates design collaboration with reference to convergent and divergent idea generation processes in architectural design teams entering a design competition. Study of design teams offer a unique opportunity to investigate how creativity is fostered through collaborative work. While views of creativity often relate creativity to…

  19. Assessing the impact of an eating disorders treatment team approach with college students.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sharon L; Klein, Jessalyn; Maduramente, Althea

    2015-01-01

    An interdisciplinary treatment team approach is considered the standard of care for individuals with eating disorders; however, there is limited research on the efficacy of such teams. This study used retrospective chart review to compare client characteristics and treatment utilization for college students treated with psychotherapy alone versus an interdisciplinary treatment team approach (i.e., a mental health counselor, a physician, and a dietitian). Clients with prior counseling histories, a bulimia nervosa diagnosis, or a personality disorder diagnosis were more likely to be referred to the eating disorders treatment team. Female counselors were more likely than male counselors to refer clients to the team. Overall, findings suggest that the team approach is associated with students staying in therapy longer and terminating therapy in a planned fashion. PMID:25298146

  20. Emotional Intelligence, Communication Competence, and Student Perceptions of Team Social Cohesion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troth, Ashlea C.; Jordan, Peter J.; Lawrence, Sandra A.

    2012-01-01

    Students generally report poor experiences of group work in university settings. This study examines whether individual student perceptions of team social cohesion are determined by their level of emotional intelligence (EI) and whether this relationship is mediated by their communication skills. Business students (N = 273) completed the 16-item…

  1. Understanding Middle Grades Students' Perceptions of Their Peer Worlds: Implications for Teaming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiefer, Sarah Marie; Ellerbrock, Cheryl R.

    2010-01-01

    The authors investigated characteristics middle grades students associated with social success among peers in school and studied how these perceptions changed over time. They suggest that interdisciplinary teams can promote positive student-student relationships and a healthy peer culture based on positive peer values. (Contains 2 figures.)

  2. Reflections from an Undergraduate Student Peer Facilitator in the Team Up for Healthy Living School-Based Obesity Prevention Project

    PubMed Central

    Crenshaw, Caroline E.; Mozen, Diana M.; Dalton, William T.; Slawson, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Team Up for Healthy Living was a cluster-randomized trial to evaluate a cross-peer school-based obesity prevention program in Southern Appalachia. Undergraduate students from the disciplines of Kinesiology, Nutrition, and Public Health were trained as peer facilitators to deliver an 8-week curriculum in high school Lifetime Wellness classes. The focus of the curriculum was on improving diet and physical activity with an additional emphasis on enhancing leadership and communication skills. Control group participants received their regularly scheduled Lifetime Wellness curriculum. The current article is about the experiences of an undergraduate kinesiology student participating as a peer-facilitator in the Team-Up for Healthy Living trial. A brief overview of the program and peer facilitator training is followed by this students reflections on both personal development and student outcomes. PMID:26636111

  3. Active Students in Webinars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolås, Line; Nordseth, Hugo; Yri, Jørgen Sørlie

    2015-01-01

    To ensure student activity in webinars we have defined 10 learning tasks focusing on production and communication e.g. collaborative writing, discussion and polling, and investigated how the technology supports the learning activities. The three project partners in the VisPed-project use different video-conferencing systems, and we analyzed how it…

  4. Multiple Team Structures and Student Learning in a High Risk Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Susan B.; Peterson, Gary W.

    This study investigated the relationship between a multiple team structure and student achievement in a high minority (predominantly African American), low socioeconomic status middle school over 3 years. Part of a larger 5-year investigation of team structures in high performing restructured middle schools, the study observed the components and…

  5. Students' Perceptions of Long-Functioning Cooperative Teams in Accelerated Adult Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Favor, Judy

    2012-01-01

    This study examined 718 adult students' perceptions of long-functioning cooperative study teams in accelerated associate's, bachelor's, and master's business degree programs. Six factors were examined: attraction toward team, alignment of performance expectations, intrateam conflict, workload sharing, preference for teamwork, and impact on…

  6. Cross-Cultural Study into ICT Student Attitudes and Behaviours Concerning Teams and Project Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Deborah; Bilgin, Ayse

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a project involving information and communication technology (ICT) students in Australia and Singapore, working together as a virtual global team. The authors investigated the question: Can differences be found in the behaviours and attitudes of our two cohorts to working in teams? This would allow…

  7. Academic Alignment to Reduce the Presence of "Social Loafers" and "Diligent Isolates" in Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieterse, Vreda; Thompson, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of effective teamwork skills is crucial in all disciplines. Using an interpretive approach, this study investigates collaboration and co-operation in teams of software engineering students. Teams whose members were both homogeneous and heterogeneous in terms of their members' academic abilities, skills and goals were identified and…

  8. Team Teaching a College Core Foundations Course: Instructors' and Students' Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Samuel; Downing, Jan E.

    This study examined college instructors' and students' perspectives on the effectiveness of team teaching an undergraduate educational foundations course. A course entitled "School and Society" at Eastern Kentucky University was team-taught by an African American male instructor and a Caucasian female instructor. A total of 10 male and 22 female…

  9. Hidden Disruptions: Technology and Technological Literacy as Influences on Professional Writing Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrady, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study designed to explore whether and in what ways individual students' technological literacies might impact collaborative teams. For the collaborative team discussed in this article, technological literacy--specifically, limited repertoires for solving technical problems, clashes between document management strategies,…

  10. Making Students Do the Thinking: Team-Based Learning in a Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Shawn R.

    2014-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is a teaching pedagogy for flipping the classroom that moves the focus of the classroom from the instructor conveying course concepts via lecture to the application of concepts by student teams. It has been used extensively in lecture courses; however, there is little evidence of its use in laboratory courses. The purpose…

  11. Teaching Research to MSW Students: Effectiveness of the Team-Based Learning Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macke, Caroline; Tapp, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Social work students often have been labeled as research-reluctant. Consequently, it is important to identify effective teaching strategies. One innovative strategy is team-based learning. The effectiveness of team-based learning has not yet been evaluated with a social work research class. As a result, the current study compared the effectiveness…

  12. Finding Time for Teams: Student Achievement Grows as District Support Boosts Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Jef; Knight, Mary; Miller, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Finding time for teams to work in schools is both a necessity and a responsibility. If educators are sincere about efforts to improve student learning, leaders must take responsibility for providing team time for teachers and a structure in which they are able to work collaboratively. The Papillion-La Vista (Nebraska) Public Schools took to heart…

  13. The Impact of Preparing Faculty in the Effective Use of Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbach, Mark E.; Matkin, Gina S.; Gambrell, Kem M.; Harding, Heath E.

    2010-01-01

    Companies increasingly rely on teams to improve productivity, and consequently employers expect colleges and universities to prepare graduates to effectively work in teams. To help with this need, instructors must be equipped to prepare students to fully capitalize on the power of teamwork. This study examines the effect of college instructor…

  14. uCollaborator: Framework for STEM Project Collaboration among Geographically-Dispersed Student/Faculty Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiore, Stephen M.; Rodriguez, Walter E.; Carstens, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for facilitating communication among STEM project teams that are geographically dispersed in synchronous or asynchronous online courses. The framework has been developed to: (a) improve how engineering and technology students and faculty work with collocated and geographically-dispersed teams; and (b) to connect the…

  15. Adapting STePS, an Adult Team Problem Solving Model, for Use with Sixth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheive, L. T.; And Others

    Structured Team Problem Solving (STePS) is a problem solving model for shared decision making. This project uses the model to discover if children can learn using this method, and what adaptations would be necessary for child use. Sixth grade students in their social studies class worked together in teams (6-8) to identify what they already think…

  16. Surface Mobility Technology (SMT) Team members and Students and Faculty from Case Western Reserve Un

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Surface Mobility Technology (SMT) Team members and Students and Faculty from Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) with the Modular Mobility Technology Demonstrator (MMTD) in the Simulated Lunar Operations (SLOPE) Laboratory

  17. Surface Mobility Technology (SMT) Team member with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) Students a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Surface Mobility Technology (SMT) Team member with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) Students and Faculty in the Control Room of the Simulated Lunar Operations (SLOPE) Laboratory for the Modular Mobility Technology Demonstrator (MMTD)

  18. Improving educational services for students with TBI through statewide consulting teams.

    PubMed

    Glang, Ann; Tyler, Janet; Pearson, Sue; Todis, Bonnie; Morvant, Martha

    2004-01-01

    Since 1991, when Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) was established as a disability category under IDEA, educators nationwide have become increasingly aware of the unique and complex challenges these students present. Yet professionals, advocates and family members share a growing concern that the instructional needs of these students are not being met. School personnel serving these students need systematic support that includes both information about specific aspects of the student's disability and access to expert technical assistance. The goal of the TBI Team model, as developed and implemented in Iowa, Kansas, and Oregon, is to make available to schools statewide a group of well-trained peer consultants who can provide in-service training and ongoing consultation. The TBI Team model has four components: (a) needs assessment, (b) team recruitment, (c) team training, and (d) evaluation of both implementation and outcomes. Trained Team members provide in-service training, classroom consultation, and information and resources for school staff and parents. Team operations are maintained and supported through a central office at the Department of Education. Evaluation data suggest that the Team model is a cost effective and efficient approach to supporting teachers who work with students with TBI. PMID:15502255

  19. High-fidelity simulation: Assessment of student nurses' team achievements of clinical judgment.

    PubMed

    Hallin, Karin; Bäckström, Britt; Häggström, Marie; Kristiansen, Lisbeth

    2016-07-01

    Nursing educators have the challenge of preparing nursing students to handle complex patient care situations in real life, but much remains unknown about the ability to make clinical judgments. In this study, high-fidelity simulation (HFS) was used at a Swedish university to find answers about pre-licensure nursing students' success in clinical judgment in terms of team ability and relationships with theoretical achievements, and personal and scenario circumstances. The matrix Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) was used to analyze and score the students' ability in teams to notice, interpret and respond to complex care situations. Overall, the results showed the student teams in their first meeting with HFS in a complex care situation achieved low clinical judgment points; most teams were in the stages of Beginning and Developing. For attaining high team achievements the majority of the students in the team should theoretically be "high performance". Being observers and having HFS experience before nursing education was significant too. However, age, health care experience, and assistant nurse degrees were of secondary importance. Further research at universities regionally, nationally, and internationally is needed. PMID:27428686

  20. What Do Students Experience as Peer Leaders of Learning Teams?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Erik C.; Robbins, Brett A.; Loui, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    In a course for engineering freshmen, peer leaders facilitated optional study sessions, which implemented peer-led team learning workshops. Some leaders were paid teaching assistants, but most were undergraduate volunteers. To understand the experiences of the peer leaders, we asked them to keep weekly reflective journals. By performing a basic…

  1. Preparing Students to Be Empathic Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation Team Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Lynn; Gitchel, Dent; Higgins, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Interdisciplinary collaboration is a key component of rehabilitation practice. It ensures that a holistic and coordinated approach to planning is implemented. Just as the therapeutic relationship is enhanced through empathic understanding and communication, so too is the effectiveness of the interdisciplinary rehabilitation team in achieving…

  2. Cooperation and Accommodation Strategies for Learning-Disabled Students in Team-Based Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treise, Debbie; Wagner, Elaine

    2002-01-01

    Explores how university disability professionals can assist advertising or public relations campaigns teachers in accommodating the Learning Disabled (LD) student in the team or group-based learning situation to foster a cooperative environment among students and faculty. Attempts to open the discussion about what faculty should consider when…

  3. Team Teaching in the Conservatoire: The Views of Music Performance Staff and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollner, Clemens; Ginsborg, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Team teaching--two or more teachers sharing the training of a group of students--has only recently been implemented in the curricula of many higher music education institutions. This article reports on a survey of 142 music students and their tutors from three departments (the Schools of Strings, Vocal and Opera Studies, and Wind, Brass and…

  4. Student Perceptions of Cognitive and Social Learning in Global Virtual Teams: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohut, Gary F.; Yon, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    The global work environment requires graduates to have skills to work collaboratively over distance and time. This pilot study presents the findings of a survey of student perceptions concerning a global virtual team (GVT) experience that used both synchronous and asynchronous collaboration. Our findings revealed that while students experienced…

  5. Undergraduate Students' Self-Efficacy and Cognitive Behaviors for Learning in Multidisciplinary Project Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiaojun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate individual students' learning from the perspectives of self-efficacy and cognitive learning expressions in multidisciplinary project teams. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected to address the major research questions, which are aimed at understanding individual students'…

  6. Preferences for Team Learning and Lecture-Based Learning among First-Year Undergraduate Accounting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opdecam, Evelien; Everaert, Patricia; Van Keer, Hilde; Buysschaert, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates students' "preference" for team learning and its effectiveness, compared to lecture-based learning. A quasi-experiment was set up in a financial accounting course in the first-year undergraduate of the Economics and Business Administration Program, where students had to choose between one of the two learning…

  7. Team-Based Learning: Perceptions of Instructors and Students in Thai Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sovajassatakul, Thanongsak; Jitgarun, Kalayanee; Shinatrakool, Raveewan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study reported on in this paper was to identify and compare instructors' and students' perceptions of Team-Based Learning (TBL). Participants were 270 instructors and 288 fourth year students from the faculties of Industrial Education at six universities in Bangkok. The data were analyzed using factor analysis and structural…

  8. Evaluating the Impact and Determinants of Student Team Performance: Using LMS and CATME Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braender, Lynn M.; Naples, Michele I.

    2013-01-01

    Practitioners find it difficult to allocate grades to individual students based on their contributions to the team project. They often use classroom observation of teamwork and student peer evaluations to differentiate an individual's grade from the group's grade, which can be subjective and imprecise. We used objective data from student…

  9. Improving Student Motivation. A Guide for Teachers and School Improvement Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meece, Judith; McColskey, Wendy

    This guide provides a general overview of research on student motivation in classroom and school settings and a guide to help teachers and school teams to analyze the sources of students motivational problems and consider changes that will improve motivation. Chapter 1 defines motivation, considers the extent of the motivation problem, and…

  10. Effects of Personality on Conflict Resolution in Student Teams: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, William R; Tashchian, Armen

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports results of a study of the effects of five personality dimensions on conflict resolution preferences in student teams. Two hundred and sixteen students provided self-reports of personality dimensions and conflict styles using the Neo-FFI and ROCI-II scales. Simultaneous effects of five personality dimensions on five conflict…

  11. NASA Human Spaceflight Architecture Team Lunar Destination Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, J. F.; Mueller, R. P.; Whitley, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Human Spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT) Lunar Destination Team has been developing a number of "Design Reference Missions" (DRM) to inform exploration architecture development, transportation approaches, and destination elements and operations. There are four destinations being considered in the HAT studies: Cis-Lunar, Lunar, Near Earth Asteroids and Mars. The lunar destination includes all activities that occur on the moon itself, but not low lunar orbit operations or Earth Moon LaGrange points which are the responsibility of the HAT Cis-Lunar Team. This paper will review the various surface DRMs developed as representative scenarios that could occur in a human lunar return. The approaches have been divided into two broad categories: a seven day short stay mission with global capabilities and a longer extended duration stay of 28 days which is limited to the lunar poles as a landing zone. The surface elements, trade studies, traverses, concept of operations and other relevant issues and methodologies will be presented and discussed in the context and framework of the HAT ground rules and assumptions which are constrained by NASA's available transportation systems. An international collaborative effort based on the 2011 Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) will also be examined and evaluated.

  12. Coaching Tutors to Observe and Regulate Leadership in PBL Student Teams or You Can Lead a Horse to Water but You Can't Make It Drink…

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, Noreen; Verzat, Caroline; Raucent, Benoit; Ducarme, Delphine; Bouvy, Thérèse; Herman, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how PBL student teams develop specific leadership configurations when implementing interdisciplinary projects and whether or not tutors help in dealing with the group interactions that are subsequently generated. The data set was drawn from 2 cohorts of first-year students engaged in PBL activities in an…

  13. Computer Competencies for UW-Stout Students. TQM Team Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie.

    This study used a total quality management (TQM) approach to evaluate the perceived computer competency needs of students at the University of Wisconsin-Stout by surveying students (who were asked which of a list of competencies they had), administrators, alumni, and employers (who were asked which competencies they used or expected in employees).…

  14. Teaming Up: Linking Collaboration Networks, Collective Efficacy, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.; Daly, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Improving student achievement through teacher collaboration networks is a current focus of schools in many countries. Yet, empirical evidence on the relationship between teacher networks and student achievement and mechanisms that may explain this relationship is limited. This study examined the relationship between teacher networks and student…

  15. Mars Exploration Student Data Teams: Building Foundations and Influencing Students to Pursue STEM Careers through Experiences with Authentic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turney, D.; Grigsby, B.; Murchie, S. L.; Buczkowski, D.; Seelos, K. D.; Nair, H.; McGovern, A.; Morgan, F.; Viviano, C. E.; Goudge, T. A.; Thompson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT) immerses diverse teams of high school and undergraduate students in an authentic research Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) based experience and allows students to be direct participants in the scientific process by working with scientists to analyze data sets from NASA's Mars program, specifically from the CRISM instrument. MESDT was created by Arizona State University's Mars Education Program, and is funded through NASA's Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars or CRISM, an instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Students work with teacher mentors and CRISM team members to analyze data, develop hypotheses, conduct research, submit proposals, critique and revise work. All students begin the program with basic Mars curriculum lessons developed by the MESDT education team. This foundation enables the program to be inclusive of all students. Teachers have reported that populations of students with diverse academic needs and abilities have been successful in this program. The use of technology in the classroom allows the MESDT program to successfully reach a nationwide audience and funding provided by NASA's CRISM instrument allows students to participate free of charge. Recent changes to the program incorporate a partnership with United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a CRISM sponsored competitive scholarship for two teams of students to present their work at the annual USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting. Returning MESDT teachers have attributed an increase in student enrollment and interest to this scholarship opportunity. The 2013 USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting was held in Washington DC which provided an opportunity for the students to meet with their Senators at the US Capitol to explain the science work they had done throughout the year as well as the impact that the program had had on their goals for the future. This opportunity extended to the students by the

  16. NASA Teams With Pharrell Williams to Encourage Students

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA and producer and recording artist Pharrell Williams hosted an education event Sat., Apr. 23, at Williams Farms Park in Virginia Beach, Va. The event encouraged students to pursue science, tech...

  17. The Influence of Learning Styles on Student Perception and Satisfaction in a Highly Collaborative Team Taught Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Daniel; Colburn, Michael; Fox, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Team teaching an undergraduate business capstone course has the potential of providing students with an enhanced learning experience in a number of ways. This study examines the relationship between faculty and student learning styles and their impact on student perception and satisfaction in a highly collaborative team taught undergraduate…

  18. No Evidence That Incentive Pay for Teacher Teams Improves Student Outcomes: Results from a Randomized Trial. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers examined whether rewarding teams of teachers for student performance had an effect on student achievement or teacher practices or attitudes in a demonstration project in Round Rock, Texas. They found that the intervention had no effect in any of these areas. Students taught by teacher teams who were offered incentives scored slightly…

  19. Improving motivation and engagement in core engineering courses with student teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenshaw, Kathryn Faye

    Team-based projects are common in capstone engineering design courses and increasingly common in first-year engineering programs. Despite high enrollments and budget cutbacks affecting many programs, second- and third-year students can also benefit from team-based project experiences, which motivate them to succeed in engineering and prepare them for a globally competitive workforce. My dissertation research demonstrates that team design projects can be incorporated into the curricula of engineering departments, and these projects result in positive affective outcomes for students. Using ABET outcomes and Self Determination Theory (SDT) as the background for my studies, I investigated students' confidence, motivation, and sense of community after experiencing team design projects in two different engineering departments at a large public institution. In the first study, I used a sequential mixed methods approach with a primary quantitative phase followed by an explanatory qualitative phase to evaluate a chemical engineering program that integrated team design projects throughout the curriculum. The evaluation methods included a survey based on desired ABET outcomes for students and focus groups to expand on the quantitative results. Students reported increased confidence in their design, teamwork, and communication skills after completing the projects. In my second and third studies, I used qualitative interviews based on SDT to explore student motivation in an electrical and computer engineering course redesigned to support students' intrinsic motivation to learn. SDT states that intrinsic motivation to learn is supported by increasing students' sense of autonomy, competence, and relatedness in regard to their learning. Using both narrative inquiry and phenomenological methodologies, I analyzed data from interviews of students for mentions of autonomy, competence, and relatedness as well as course events that were critical in changing students' motivation

  20. Assessment of students’ satisfaction with a student-led team-based learning course

    PubMed Central

    Bouw, Justin W.; Gupta, Vasudha; Hincapie, Ana L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To date, no studies in the literature have examined student delivery of team-based learning (TBL) modules in the classroom. We aimed to assess student perceptions of a student-led TBL elective. Methods: Third-year pharmacy students were assigned topics in teams and developed learning objectives, a 15-minute mini-lecture, and a TBL application exercise and presented them to student colleagues. Students completed a survey upon completion of the course and participated in a focus group discussion to share their views on learning. Results: The majority of students (n=23/30) agreed that creating TBL modules enhanced their understanding of concepts, improved their self-directed learning skills (n=26/30), and improved their comprehension of TBL pedagogy (n=27/30). However, 60% disagreed with incorporating student-generated TBL modules into core curricular classes. Focus group data identified student-perceived barriers to success in the elective, in particular the development of TBL application exercises. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that students positively perceived student-led TBL as encouraging proactive learning from peer-to-peer teaching. PMID:26063493

  1. Cooperative Study Groups: Give Your Students the Home Team Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerma, Tony

    2007-01-01

    In this article I discuss the factors that led me to implement study groups in the teaching of mathematics. An important influence in this decision began with an experimental study conducted with two College Algebra classes in which students were randomly assigned to treatment groups. While there was no statistical difference between the study…

  2. An Agent System to Support Student Teams Working Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatley, Janice

    2004-01-01

    Online learning is now a reality, with distributed learning and blended learning becoming more widely used in Higher Education. Novel ways in which undergraduate and postgraduate learning material can be presented are being developed, and methods for helping students to learn online are needed, especially if we require them to collaborate with…

  3. Factors That Influence Students to Participate in Team Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, William R.; Tashchian, Armen

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of personality on participation in decision making in a sample of 225 business students. The Neo-FFI scale was used to measure the five personality dimensions of openness, agreeableness, extroversion, conscientiousness and neuroticism. Analysis indicated that personality dimensions, extroversion and…

  4. Energy Smarts Team Training Manual. A Teacher's Guide to Energy Conservation Activities for Grades 3-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Extension Service.

    Energy Smarts Team members are energy conscious students who want to save energy at school and at home. Students in a classroom and their teacher form an Energy Smarts Team. Selected students monitor their building each day at recess, lunch, or after school for lights or other electrical equipment that has been left on. The team members keep a log…

  5. Team-based learning in the gross anatomy laboratory improves academic performance and students' attitudes toward teamwork.

    PubMed

    Huitt, Tiffany W; Killins, Anita; Brooks, William S

    2015-01-01

    As the healthcare climate shifts toward increased interdisciplinary patient care, it is essential that students become accomplished at group problem solving and develop positive attitudes toward teamwork. Team-based learning (TBL) has become a popular approach to medical education because of its ability to promote active learning, problem-solving skills, communication, and teamwork. However, its documented use in the laboratory setting and physical therapy education is limited. We used TBL as a substitute for one-third of cadaveric dissections in the gross anatomy laboratories at two Doctor of Physical Therapy programs to study its effect on both students' perceptions and academic performance. We surveyed students at the beginning and completion of their anatomy course as well as students who had previously completed a traditional anatomy course to measure the impact of TBL on students' perceptions of teamwork. We found that the inclusion of TBL in the anatomy laboratory improves students' attitudes toward working with peers (P < 0.01). Non-TBL students had significantly lower attitudes toward teamwork (P < 0.01). Comparison of academic performance between TBL and non-TBL students revealed that students who participated in TBL scored significantly higher on their first anatomy practical examination and on their head/neck written examination (P < 0.001). When asked to rate their role in a team, a 10.5% increase in the mean rank score for Problem Solver resulted after the completion of the TBL-based anatomy course. Our data indicate that TBL is an effective supplement to cadaveric dissection in the laboratory portion of gross anatomy, improving both students' grades and perceptions of teamwork. PMID:24799448

  6. Module Design, Materials, and Packaging Research Team: Activities and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T. J.; del Cueto, J.; Glick, S.; Jorgensen, G.; Kempe, M.; Kennedy, C.; Pern, J.; Terwilliger, K

    2005-01-01

    Our team activities are directed at improving PV module reliability by incorporating new, more effective, and less expensive packaging materials and techniques. New and existing materials or designs are evaluated before and during accelerated environmental exposure for the following properties: (1) Adhesion and cohesion: peel strength and lap shear. (2) Electrical conductivity: surface, bulk, interface and transients. (3) Water vapor transmission: solubility and diffusivity. (4) Accelerated weathering: ultraviolet, temperature, and damp heat tests. (5) Module and cell failure diagnostics: infrared imaging, individual cell shunt characterization, coring. (6) Fabrication improvements: SiOxNy barrier coatings and enhanced wet adhesion. (7) Numerical modeling: Moisture ingress/egress, module and cell performance, and cell-to-frame leakage current. (8) Rheological properties of polymer encapsulant and sheeting materials. Specific examples will be described.

  7. A meta-synthesis of team members' voices: what we need and what we do to support students who use AAC.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun-Ching; Stoner, Julia B

    2016-09-01

    The ultimate goal of AAC provision is to promote students' active participation across settings through interactions involving a variety of partners and functions. To achieve such outcomes, educational teams must collaborate and consider the characteristics of students, their families, and relevant environments during AAC assessment and intervention. To date, AAC team collaboration has rarely been evaluated collectively outside intervention or case study research. In this investigation, a meta-synthesis was conducted to review qualitative studies of perspectives of team members on supporting students who used AAC, ranging in age from kindergarten to post-secondary, in public schools in the United States. Analyses yielded three primary themes necessary for effective AAC services; inputs, activities, and outcomes. Implications and recommendations for service providers and future researchers are described. PMID:27615203

  8. Implementation of the Peer-Led Team-Learning Instructional Model as a Stopgap Measure Improves Student Achievement for Students Opting Out of Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Julia J.; Carter, B. Elijah; Wiles, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    In entry-level university courses in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields, students participating in associated laboratory sessions generally do better than those who have no related lab classes. This is a problem when, for various reasons, not enough lab sections can be offered for students and/or when students opt out of optional available lab courses. Faced with such a situation, this study evaluated the efficacy of the peer-led team-learning (PLTL) instructional model as a potential method for narrowing the achievement gap among undergraduate students electing not to enroll in an optional laboratory component of an introductory biology course. In peer-led workshops, small groups of students participated in solving problems and other activities that encouraged active learning. Students led by peer leaders attained significantly higher exam and final course grades in introductory biology than comparable students not participating in PLTL. Among the introductory biology students who opted not to enroll in the optional lab course, those who participated in PLTL averaged more than a letter grade higher than those who did not. This difference was statistically significant, and the PLTL workshops almost entirely closed the achievement gap in lecture exam and final grades for students who did not take the lab. PMID:25673354

  9. Implementation of the peer-led team-learning instructional model as a stopgap measure improves student achievement for students opting out of laboratory.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Julia J; Carter, B Elijah; Wiles, Jason R

    2015-03-01

    In entry-level university courses in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields, students participating in associated laboratory sessions generally do better than those who have no related lab classes. This is a problem when, for various reasons, not enough lab sections can be offered for students and/or when students opt out of optional available lab courses. Faced with such a situation, this study evaluated the efficacy of the peer-led team-learning (PLTL) instructional model as a potential method for narrowing the achievement gap among undergraduate students electing not to enroll in an optional laboratory component of an introductory biology course. In peer-led workshops, small groups of students participated in solving problems and other activities that encouraged active learning. Students led by peer leaders attained significantly higher exam and final course grades in introductory biology than comparable students not participating in PLTL. Among the introductory biology students who opted not to enroll in the optional lab course, those who participated in PLTL averaged more than a letter grade higher than those who did not. This difference was statistically significant, and the PLTL workshops almost entirely closed the achievement gap in lecture exam and final grades for students who did not take the lab. PMID:25673354

  10. Team Leadership for Student Achievement: The Roles of the School Board and the Superintendent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Ellen; Henry, Jeannie; Saks, Judith Brody; Wright, Anne

    A school district's board of education is a governing body that has the responsibility of creating vision and direction, setting policy, providing resources, and monitoring the results of student achievement initiatives for its district. The board and superintendent must work together as a leadership team for the district, modeling to the staff…

  11. Examining Factors that Affect Knowledge Sharing and Students' Attitude toward Their Learning Experience within Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Jinxia

    2009-01-01

    This study examined factors that might impact student knowledge sharing within virtual teams through online discussion boards. These factors included: trust, mutual influence, conflict, leadership, and cohesion. A path model was developed to determine whether relationships exist among knowledge sharing from asynchronous group discussion and the…

  12. Strengthening Geriatric Knowledge and Use of Interdisciplinary Teams among Allied Health Students and Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Susan L.; Blue, Rebecca; Miller, Doreen; Jensen, Gwenneth; Zawada, Edward T., Jr.; Hill, Paula; Johannsen, Gail; Elsberry, Dorothy Anne; Nelson, Debralee; Lockwood, Dean

    1999-01-01

    In a three-year collaborative venture between a hospital and a university, an interdisciplinary team trained 684 allied health professionals and students in geriatrics. Outcomes included increased geriatric knowledge, more graduates serving rural underserved areas, and more interdisciplinary clinical initiatives. (SK)

  13. Team Building through Physical Challenges in Gender-Segregated Classes and Student Self-Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Sandra L.; Ebbeck, Vicki

    2011-01-01

    It was of interest to determine if earlier research findings, where female students were particularly advantaged by the Team Building Through Physical Challenges (TBPC; Glover & Midura, 1992) program in a coeducational setting, would still be observed in gender-segregated physical education classes. A total of 260 female (n = 127) and male (n =…

  14. Enhancing the Experience of Student Teams in Large Classes: Training Teaching Assistants to Be Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, Leisa D.; Allen, Belinda C.; Frahm, Jennifer A.; Morris, Gayle

    2009-01-01

    To address the increasing demand for mass undergraduate management education and, at the same time, a greater emphasis on student teamwork, this study outlines the development, delivery, and evaluation of a training intervention designed to build team-coaching skills in teaching assistants. Specifically, "practice-centered" and "problem-centered"…

  15. Student Work-Teams: A Computer-Based Self-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkema, Roger J.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 118 upperclass students was divided into 22 work-teams in an introductory management course. Each participant was asked to use and evaluate a computer program, QUORUM, for diagnosing group problems and managing meetings. Problems found were a lack of group structure and poor participation. (CH)

  16. Elementary Teacher Assessments of Principal Servant Leadership, Their Experience with Team Learning and Student Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahn, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This study compared teacher assessments of principal servant leadership and their experience with team learning in high, moderate, and low student academic achieving elementary schools. The participants were from fifteen moderate need elementary schools located in southern New York State counties. One hundred sixty two teachers responded to a 36…

  17. Assessment of Student Learning about Native American Cultures in a Team Coordinated Interdisciplinary Freshmen Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julie M.; Jacob, Greg; Faaleava, Toeutu

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine whether students in three sections of a team coordinated interdisciplinary course received the same educational experience. An essay covering three aspects of Native American history was evaluated for content and critical thinking. Significant differences were seen between classes in describing cultural…

  18. Balancing Autonomy and Comparability: State Approaches to Assessment Selection for Student Learning Objectives. Ask the Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushing, Ellen; Meyer, Cassandra

    2014-01-01

    States take a wide range of approaches to Student Learning Objectives (SLO) assessment selection. This "Ask the Team" brief helps states consider the trade-offs between approaches that offer more teacher choice and those that offer better comparability across SLOs. The brief identifies four common approaches to selecting SLO assessments:…

  19. Promoting Student Success: What Accreditation Teams Can Do. Occasional Paper No. 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griego, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The process of accreditation review in the U.S. serves two primary functions: quality assurance and continual improvement. The experienced educators who voluntarily serve on accreditation teams apply common standards of quality that serve students and meet public accountability expectations and offer suggestions and recommendations for…

  20. Parent Feedback about Individualized Education Program Team Meetings for Students in Kindergarten through Grade 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Martin, Elizabeth; Wilson, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents parent feedback from a study that focused on experiences at Individualized Education Program (IEP) team meetings and also explored parent satisfaction with delivery of special education services. The study included all parents of Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) students who had educational disabilities, were…

  1. Using Team-Based Learning to Teach Grade 7 Biology: Student Satisfaction and Improved Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarjoura, Christiane; Tayeh, Paula Abou; Zgheib, Nathalie K.

    2015-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an innovative form of collaborative learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate TBL's effect on the performance and satisfaction of grade 7 students in biology in a private school in Lebanon, as well as teachers' willingness to implement this new methodology. An exploratory study was performed whereby two…

  2. Student Team Projects in Information Systems Development: Measuring Collective Creative Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Hsiu-Hua; Yang, Heng-Li

    2011-01-01

    For information systems development project student teams, learning how to improve software development processes is an important training. Software process improvement is an outcome of a number of creative behaviours. Social cognitive theory states that the efficacy of judgment influences behaviours. This study explores the impact of three types…

  3. Strong Teams, Strong Schools: Teacher-to-Teacher Collaboration Creates Synergy that Benefits Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Schools rise and fall based on the quality of the teamwork that occurs within their walls. Well-functioning leadership and teaching teams are essential to the continuous improvement of teaching and learning. That is particularly true when schools have clearly articulated, stretching aspirations for the learning of all their students. Effective…

  4. Effects of Student Teams and Individualized Instruction on Cross-Race and Cross-Sex Friendships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oishi, Sabine; And Others

    A sample of 160 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students in a Baltimore City (Maryland) magnet school participated in an experimental study on the effects within cross-race and cross-sex friendships on a mathematics program that used Team Assisted Individualization (TAI). TAI is an instructional method that combines individualized instruction with…

  5. Change and Renewal: The Role of a Change Team in Improving Student Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Charlotte; Kelly, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    How do open and distance learning institutions review and renew themselves to ensure their continued fitness for purpose? Here we report on the work of a change team in the UK Open University, a Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning created to examine, innovate and improve student support. The existence of the Centre for five years from…

  6. The Effect of Team-Based Learning as an Instructional Strategy on Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniewel, Marla Dawn

    2012-01-01

    National bodies of nursing have identified that nurse educators in undergraduate nursing education need to incorporate student-centered and evidenced-based instructional strategies to promote application of nursing concepts. Team-based learning (TBL) has been identified as an effective method of fostering a deeper understanding of content and…

  7. "Just working in a team was a great experience…" - Student perspectives on the learning experiences of an interprofessional education program.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Rebecca; Cottrell, Neil; Moran, Monica

    2013-07-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) programs aim to improve collaboration between health- and social-care professionals and to optimize clinical outcomes. Such programs are complex to design, and evaluation of effectiveness is difficult. Combining qualitative and quantitative data may provide greater understanding of how a program affects participants and what aspects are influential on attitudes and behavior. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews and interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore undergraduate student perspectives on what attributes of a 4-week IPE program they considered contributed to a successful learning experience. Due to the fact that the students were not formally assessed, the realistic context of the activities and the quality of the facilitators created an environment where the students felt empowered to interact freely without fear of reproach. Learning the roles of other professions and their contribution to a healthcare team broadened the students' perspectives on healthcare and increased their sense of self-worth and pride in their professions. In addition, being able to identify the relevance of the learning experience to their future practice motivated the students. This information can be used to create optimal learning environments for facilitating the development of successful future healthcare teams. PMID:23421342

  8. Angelo State Society of Physics Students Peer Pressure Team Public Engagement Efforts -- Do we make a difference?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeremy; Sauncy, Toni

    2011-10-01

    The Angelo State Society of Physics Students Peer Pressure Team travels throughout West-CentralTexas for a week following the spring semester. The goals of this activity are two-fold. First the group seeks to engage undergraduate presenters in public servive; the second goal is to enhance attitudes about science and encourage students in K-12 public schools to study science. Many of the schools we choose for our outreach visits are geographically isolated and populated with socioeconomically disadvantaged students, and/or groups underrepresented in physics. Over the week, the Peer Pressure Team visited over 1300 students, teachers and administrators. At each visit, surveys were collected to gauge the program's effectiveness. Student responses indicate a strong desire to study more science in their regular school curriculum. In addition, results are used to determine which demonstrations leave the most lasting impression on the audience participants. The 2011 Road Tour was dedicated to the 100^th anniversary of the discovery of the nucleus by Rutherford.

  9. Non-Critical-Care Nurses' Perceptions of Facilitators and Barriers to Rapid Response Team Activation.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Sheryl Henry; Astroth, Kim Schafer; Woith, Wendy Mann

    2015-01-01

    Rapid response teams can save lives but are only effective when activated. We surveyed 50 nurses for their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to activation. Findings showed that participants need more education on their role and when to activate the rapid response team. Nurses who comprise the team need help building their communication skills. We recommend nursing professional development specialists increase the frequency of offerings and expand the focus on roles, activation criteria, and communication skills. PMID:26381336

  10. Observing Engineering Student Teams from the Organization Behavior Perspective Using Linguistic Analysis of Student Reflections and Focus Group Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Kerri S.; Damron, Rebecca; Sohoni, Sohum

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates group/team development in computer engineering courses at a University in the Central USA from the perspective of organization behavior theory, specifically Tuckman's model of the stages of group development. The investigation, conducted through linguistic analysis of student reflection essays, and through focus group…

  11. Inclusion and Student Learning: A Quantitative Comparison of Special and General Education Student Performance Using Team and Solo-Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamison, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study sought to determine whether there were significant statistical differences between the performance scores of special education and general education students' scores when in team or solo-teaching environments as may occur in inclusively taught classrooms. The investigated problem occurs because despite education's stated…

  12. Regular college preparatory students' perceptions of the student teams achievement divisions approach in an academic college preparatory biology class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Aarti P.

    Cooperative learning allows individuals with varying abilities to work alongside their peers. Students are placed into achievement levels based on placement test scores. The Regular College Preparatory (RCP) level is a score of 59% or lower and Academic College Preparatory (ACP) level is a score of 60-92% on the placement test. The purpose of this study was to obtain 9th grade RCP students' perceptions of the student teams achievement divisions (STAD) approach which allows each member of a team to have a defined role in group work. The research questions addressed 9 th grade RCP students' perceptions of integrated STAD teams. Qualitative data from 6 RCP participants were collected from interviews and observations. Data were analyzed using typological analysis by creating codes and categories. Findings indicated that RCP students retained more content and enhanced their skills in communication, critical thinking, and problem solving. Teachers need to serve as guides to monitor motivation and enhance peer interaction. School administrators are advised to provide professional development opportunities allowing educators to learn how to incorporate cooperation for optimal student learning communication, negotiation, and problem solving.

  13. The Relationship between Student-Centred Lectures, Emotional Intelligence, and Study Teams: A Social Telemetry Study with Mobile Telephony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Carl; Howard, Christopher; Reddy, Peter; Clark, Robin; Lim, Ming

    2012-01-01

    A student-centred approach to teaching has been conceptualized as a key driver in higher education to facilitate understanding of concepts and improve attainment. The occurrence of student study team behaviours is diagnostic of this approach to teaching. However, the extent to which team behaviours are performed outside the parameters of formal…

  14. Re-Conceptualizing Student Study Teams within a Response to Intervention Framework: A Web-Based Guide for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holleran, Stephanie Elise

    2013-01-01

    Student Study Teams (SSTs), a type of collaborative pre-referral team comprised of multidisciplinary members, are used to exhaust all potential interventions within the general education setting and resolve a student's academic or behavior issue prior to suggesting and/or initiating a referral for special education assessment. Current…

  15. Students' perceptions of the interprofessional team in practice through the application of servant leadership principles.

    PubMed

    Neill, Mark; Hayward, Karen S; Peterson, Teri

    2007-08-01

    This study examined students' perceptions of interprofessional practice within a framework of servant leadership principles, applied in the care of rural older adults utilizing a service learning model. Mobile wellness services were provided through the Idaho State University Senior Health Mobile project in a collaborative team approach in the community-based setting. Students from varied health professional programs were placed in teams for the provision of wellness care, with communication among team members facilitated by a health professions faculty member serving as field coordinator. The Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was used to measure students' perceptions of interprofessional practice using a pretest post-test research design. Multivariate analysis was performed revealing a significant pretest to post-test effect on students' perceptions as measured by factors inherent in the IEPS and deemed essential to effective interprofessional practice. Univariate analysis revealed a significant change in students' perception of professional competence and autonomy, actual cooperation and resource sharing within and across professions, and an understanding of the value and contributions of other professionals from pretest to post-test. PMID:17654159

  16. Making students do the thinking: team-based learning in a laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Shawn R

    2014-03-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is a teaching pedagogy for flipping the classroom that moves the focus of the classroom from the instructor conveying course concepts via lecture to the application of concepts by student teams. It has been used extensively in lecture courses; however, there is little evidence of its use in laboratory courses. The purpose of this report is to describe the implementation of TBL in a graduate exercise physiology laboratory course. Using TBL in a graduate laboratory course was very successful and well received by both the students and instructor. Students reported increased content learning, skill development, and retention. They took on the responsibility for learning and were more accountable. The learners drove the process and were guided by the instructor rather than through instructor-centered delivery. PMID:24585470

  17. Interdisciplinary preceptor teams to improve the clinical nurse leader student experience.

    PubMed

    Moore, Penny; Schmidt, Debra; Howington, Lynnette

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) role was introduced by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in 2003 (AACN, 2003). There are now over 2,500 certified CNLs in the United States. Still some areas of the country have no CNLs in practice; this was true of north central Texas until May 2010 when Texas Christian University (TCU) had its first graduating class. Lack of CNLs to serve as preceptors for the practicum courses in the CNL program was one concern, although AACN does offer options when CNLs are not available. TCU's CNL teaching team developed the interdisciplinary preceptor team (IPT) model to strengthen the practicum component of CNL education at TCU. One advantage of the IPT model is the match it provides with several CNL competencies: lateral integration of care via interdisciplinary teams, member and leader of health care teams, skillful communication within teams, and implementation of an interdisciplinary approach to safe, quality, patient care. Components of the IPT model are discussed with specific information about preceptor selection, team development, and examples of feedback from preceptors and students. PMID:24939328

  18. Students' Educational Activities During Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Logs completed by 201 medical students in third-year clerkships at nine community-based hospitals indicated students received 6.5 hours of teaching with an instructor daily, spending 4.9 more hours in clerkship-related learning. Most teaching was by full-time faculty and residents. In half their educational activities, students participated with…

  19. Perspectives on Student Political Activism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a historical and international overview of student political movements. Discusses the sporadic nature of student activism, effects of mass media attention and government response, characteristics of activist leaders and participants, and the cultural and educational impact of student protest in Third World and industrialized countries.…

  20. Student Activity Funds: Procedures & Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    Student activity funds may create educational opportunities for students, but they frequently create problems for business administrators. The first part of this work reviews the types of organizational issues and transactions an organized student group is likely to encounter, including establishing a constitution, participant roles,…

  1. Motivating Students in Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Carol; Hunter, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Physical educators have a responsibility to motivate students to develop personal fitness. This is a critical concept as physical education is the only part of the curriculum capable of meeting the health needs of students regarding physical activity. Current physical educators must promote fitness in ways that motivate students to engage in…

  2. Student Perceptions of and Confidence in Self-Care Course Concepts Using Team-based Learning.

    PubMed

    Frame, Tracy R; Gryka, Rebecca; Kiersma, Mary E; Todt, Abby L; Cailor, Stephanie M; Chen, Aleda M H

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To evaluate changes in student perceptions of and confidence in self-care concepts after completing a team-based learning (TBL) self-care course. Methods. Team-based learning was used at two universities in first professional year, semester-long self-care courses. Two instruments were created and administered before and after the semester. The instruments were designed to assess changes in student perceptions of self-care using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) domains and confidence in learning self-care concepts using Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to evaluate pre/post changes, and Mann Whitney U tests were used to evaluate university differences. Results. Fifty-three Cedarville University and 58 Manchester University students completed both instruments (100% and 92% response rates, respectively). Student self-care perceptions with TPB decreased significantly on nine of 13 items for Cedarville and decreased for one of 13 items for Manchester. Student confidence in self-care concepts improved significantly on all questions for both universities. Conclusion. Data indicate TBL self-care courses were effective in improving student confidence about self-care concepts. Establishing students' skill sets prior to entering the profession is beneficial because pharmacists will use self-directed learning to expand their knowledge and adapt to problem-solving situations. PMID:27170817

  3. What Principals Should Know about Building and Maintaining Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Randall L.; Wolff, Krista; Waterbury, Christopher; Zumalt, Jon

    2002-01-01

    A field study conducted by 8 students and a faculty supervisor of a principal preparation program determined that individual and team reflection resulted in shared learning from team training and ongoing team activities. An industrial concept known as value-chain teams has implications for monitoring student progress from kindergarten through…

  4. Effect of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) on Student Achievement, Attitude, and Self-Concept in College General Chemistry in Randomized and Quasi Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Julia Y. K.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated exam achievement and affective characteristics of students in general chemistry in a fully-randomized experimental design, contrasting Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) participation with a control group balanced for time-on-task and study activity. This study population included two independent first-semester courses with…

  5. Astronomical activities of the Apollo orbital science photographic team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    A partial accounting of Apollo Orbital Science Photographic Team (APST) work is presented as reported by one of its members who provided scientific recommendations for, guidance in, and reviews of photography in astronomy. Background on the formation of the team and its functions and management are discussed. It is concluded that the APST clearly performed the overall objective for which it was established - to improve the scientific value of the Apollo lunar missions. Specific reasons for this success are given.

  6. Student Perceptions of and Confidence in Self-Care Course Concepts Using Team-based Learning

    PubMed Central

    Gryka, Rebecca; Kiersma, Mary E.; Todt, Abby L.; Cailor, Stephanie M.; Chen, Aleda M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate changes in student perceptions of and confidence in self-care concepts after completing a team-based learning (TBL) self-care course. Methods. Team-based learning was used at two universities in first professional year, semester-long self-care courses. Two instruments were created and administered before and after the semester. The instruments were designed to assess changes in student perceptions of self-care using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) domains and confidence in learning self-care concepts using Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to evaluate pre/post changes, and Mann Whitney U tests were used to evaluate university differences. Results. Fifty-three Cedarville University and 58 Manchester University students completed both instruments (100% and 92% response rates, respectively). Student self-care perceptions with TPB decreased significantly on nine of 13 items for Cedarville and decreased for one of 13 items for Manchester. Student confidence in self-care concepts improved significantly on all questions for both universities. Conclusion. Data indicate TBL self-care courses were effective in improving student confidence about self-care concepts. Establishing students’ skill sets prior to entering the profession is beneficial because pharmacists will use self-directed learning to expand their knowledge and adapt to problem-solving situations. PMID:27170817

  7. Enhancing Team-Based Active Learning Through Hands-On Experience With Nicotine Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To enhance tobacco cessation active-learning in an ambulatory care elective course by adding hands-on experience with nicotine replacement therapy to a team-based learning (TBL) session. Design. A hands-on experience that included students chewing a piece of nicotine gum was added to a TBL class session. Student pairs used a skills checklist to evaluate and give peer feedback on appropriate counseling and gum use. Assessment. Students’ scores on a tobacco cessation examination were higher than those of students enrolled in the previous course in which TBL alone had been used. Based on pre- and post-experience survey responses, students’ perceptions regarding their abilities to provide tobacco cessation counseling improved. Subjective student comments regarding the experience were positive. Conclusion. Participating in a TBL session that incorporated hands-on experience with nicotine gum in an ambulatory care elective course increased students’ confidence in their ability to provide tobacco cessation counseling and provided a unique perspective on the product’s characteristics. PMID:23966731

  8. Poultry education team: a novel approach to public education and student recruitment.

    PubMed

    Chamblee, T N

    2007-12-01

    Changing public perception of the production of poultry meat and eggs is a challenge faced by all poultry scientists. The lack of public knowledge can be an obstacle to poultry integrator plans for expansion and for university recruitment of undergraduate Poultry Science majors. While many programs have been utilized for disseminating information to a wide range of people, an innovative approach for providing public education has been developed by the undergraduate students in the Department of Poultry Science at Mississippi State University. The students formed the Poultry Education Team to provide educational programs for K-12 schools, community colleges, university events, and supermarkets. Poultry Education Team members receive formal training from faculty and industry personnel prior to providing educational programs. PMID:18029818

  9. School-Based Collaborative Teams: An Exploratory Study of Tasks and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillippo, Kate; Stone, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This study reports findings from a content analysis of the activities and tasks of a school-based problem-solving team. Analyses of observational data collected over the course of five months found that team tasks and activities fell into the following five clusters: (1) needs identification, program development, and planning; (2) intrateam…

  10. International Physicists’ Tournament—the team competition in physics for university students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanovskiy, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    This paper is about one of the most fascinating competitions between university students: the International Physicists’ Tournament (IPT). The IPT is a team competition. The most interesting and challenging problems for the IPT are selected by vote long before the contest. The competition is meant to be close to real scientific life: the solution of the problem is presented, and then opposed and reviewed; the solution usually contains self-made and profound theoretical and experimental investigations. The tournament promotes science among the students and helps them establish international scientific relations.

  11. Threat Assessment Teams: A Model for Coordinating the Institutional Response and Reducing Legal Liability when College Students Threaten Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penven, James C.; Janosik, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of college students with mental health issues are enrolling in college. If these students threaten suicide they present serious legal issues for college officials. Lack of communication and coordination of a response to these students exacerbates the issue. Threat assessment teams can serve as mechanisms to coordinate the…

  12. WWC Review of the Report "Mastery Learning and Student Teams: A Factorial Experiment in Urban General Mathematics Classes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The study reviewed in this paper examined the effects of "mastery learning" and "student team learning" on the math achievement of high school students. The analysis included 588 ninth-grade students in 16 urban Philadelphia high schools. The study assessed the effectiveness of the different conditions after one year by comparing student…

  13. Linking First-Year and Senior Engineering Design Teams: Engaging Early Academic Career Students in Engineering Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Garey A.; Weckler, Paul; Thomas, Dan

    2015-01-01

    In Biosystems Engineering at Oklahoma State University, senior design is a two semester course in which students work on real-world projects provided by clients. First-year (freshmen and trans­fer) students enroll in an introductory engineering course. Historically, these students worked on a team-based analysis project, and the engineering design…

  14. Examples from the Trenches: Improving Student Learning in the Sciences Using Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metoyer, Sandra K.; Miller, Scott T.; Mount, Jennifer; Westmoreland, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Half of students who start college pursuing a degree in science drop out of the sciences by their senior year. This is due, in part, to low attendance and lack of preparation by the students. The failure to develop instructional strategies that actively engage students in science, however, is also a marked factor. A crucial need to reform how…

  15. Precinct Domestic Violence Teams: Whose Goals Should Determine Program Activities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisz, Arlene N.; Black, Beverly M.; Nahan, Neva

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an urban community's attempts to increase domestic violence survivors' participation in the criminal justice system by combining social work advocacy, specialized police officers, and prosecutors into precinct domestic violence teams. An analysis of the outcomes of 1,057 domestic violence reports found that the presence of…

  16. Team-Based Learning for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities in High School Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Shawn; Wanzek, Jeanne; Swanson, Elizabeth A.; Vaughn, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of implementing team-based learning (TBL) practices on content acquisition for 11th grade students with high-incidence disabilities enrolled in general education social studies courses. TBL components focus on collaborative discourse within heterogeneous teams. TBL, which requires critical thinking and the application…

  17. Executive Team Demography and Retention: The Relationship between the Background of Decision-Makers and Success in Retaining Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Mark; Katsinas, Stephen G.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the demographic makeup of Texan university executive management groups in their relationship to institutional success as measured by student retention rates. Executive management teams that are diverse in age, time served as an executive, and the number of executives on the team may be particularly advantageous in enhancing…

  18. Does Emotional Intelligence Change during Medical School Gross Anatomy Course? Correlations with Students' Performance and Team Cohesion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Michelle A.; Porter, Samuel G.; Pawlina, Wojciech; Juskewitch, Justin E.; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with increased academic achievement, but its impact on medical education is relatively unexplored. This study sought to evaluate change in EI, performance outcomes, and team cohesion within a team-based medical school anatomy course. Forty-two medical students completed a pre-course and post-course…

  19. The Effects of the Loss of the Middle School Team Planning Period on Student Discipline, Grades, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Amy D.

    2012-01-01

    The middle school concept provides recommendations for schools that teach adolescents. One of the components of this philosophy is the common team planning period, which is in addition to the teacher's individual planning period. This planning period was designed to have team teachers meet together to discuss curriculum, students, and…

  20. Gender and Modes of Collaboration in an Engineering Classroom: A Profile of Two Women on Student Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Sandra; Parker, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Profiles two women from student engineering teams who participated in a study on collaboration and the role of gender. Shows that men and women alike displayed both gender-linked and non-gender-linked behavior, and that successful collaboration was influenced less by gender and more by such factors as a strong work ethic, team commitment, and…

  1. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  2. Improving Student Achievement in Introductory Computer Science Courses Using Peer-Led Team Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Sonya Maria

    2013-01-01

    There has been a steady decline of majors in the disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics ("STEM majors"). In an effort to improve recruitment and retention in "STEM" majors, an active-learning methodology--"peer-led team learning" ("PLTL")--was implemented by the participating…

  3. Faculty and Student Teams and National Laboratories: Expanding the Reach of Research Opportunities and Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn,N.; White, K.; Stegman, M.

    2009-08-05

    The Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) Program, a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and the National Science Foundation (NSF), brings together collaborative research teams composed of a researcher at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and a faculty member with two or three undergraduate students from a college or university. Begun by the Department of Energy in 2000 with the primary goal of building research capacity at a faculty member's home institution, the FaST Program focuses its recruiting efforts on faculty from colleges and universities with limited research facilities and those institutions that serve populations under-represented in the fields of science, engineering and technology, particularly women and minorities. Once assembled, a FaST team spends a summer engaged in hands-on research working alongside a laboratory scientist. This intensely collaborative environment fosters sustainable relationships between the faulty members and BNL that allow faculty members and their BNL colleagues to submit joint proposals to federal agencies, publish papers in peer-reviewed journals, reform local curriculum, and develop new or expand existing research labs at their home institutions.

  4. A comparison of conventional lecture and team-based learning methods in terms of student learning and teaching satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Team-based learning (TBL) is a structured type of cooperative learning that has growing application in medical education. This study compares levels of student learning and teaching satisfaction for a neurology course between conventional lecture and team-based learning. Methods: The study incorporated 70 students aged 19 to 22 years at the school of rehabilitation. One half of the 16 sessions of the neurology course was taught by lectures and the second half with team-based learning. Teaching satisfaction for the teaching methods was determined on a scale with 5 options in response to 20 questions. Results: Significant difference was found between lecture-based and team-based learning in final scores (p<0.001). Content validity index of the scale of student satisfaction was 94%, and external and internal consistencies of the scale were 0.954 and 0.921 orderly (p<0.001). The degree of satisfaction from TBL compared to the lecture method was 81.3%. Conclusion: Results revealed more success and student satisfaction from team-based learning compared to conventional lectures in teaching neurology to undergraduate students. It seems that application of new teaching methods such as team-based learning could be effectively introduced to improve levels of education and student learning PMID:25250250

  5. Boundary Activities of Middle School Teacher Teams in a Global Era: Empirical Evidence from China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Shengnan; Feng, Daming

    2016-01-01

    With the tide of globalization, the external environment that schools face turns uncertain and complex. In response to the new challenges, teacher teams need to manage boundaries to maintain the sustainable development. The two studies reported in this paper, aimed to examine the boundary activities of teacher teams of middle schools in China. In…

  6. Eagle Pass Jr. High Seismology Team: Strategies for Engaging Middle School "At-Risk" Students in Authentic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, M. R.; Ellins, K. K.; Frohlich, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2008, during my participation in the NSF-sponsored Texas Earth & Space Science (TXESS) Revolution professional development program, I was awarded an AS-1 seismograph through IRIS's Seismographs in Schools Program. This program serves to create an international educational seismic network that allows teachers across the country and around the world to share seismic data in real-time using online tools, classroom activities, and technical support documents for seismic instruments. Soon after receiving my AS-1, I founded and began sponsoring the Eagle Pass Jr. High Seismology Team which consists of selected 7th and 8th grade students. Eagle Pass Jr. High is a Title 1 school that serves a predominantly "at-risk" Hispanic population. We meet after school once a week to learn about earthquakes, seismic waves, analyze recorded seismic event data using computer software programming, and correspond with other students from schools around the country. This team approach has been well received by fellow TXESS Revolution teachers with AS-1 seismographs and will be implemented by David Boyd, STEM coordinator for Williams Preparatory Academy in Dallas, Texas this fall 2011. All earthquakes recorded by our seismograph station (EPTX), which has remained online and actively recording seismic data since 2008, are catalogued and then plotted on a large world map displayed on my classroom wall. A real-time seismogram image updates every five minutes and along with all earthquakes recorded since installation can be viewed on our webpage http://www.iris.edu/hq/ssn/schools/view/eptx. During the 2010-2011 school year, my seismology team and I participated in an earthquake research study led by Dr. Cliff Frohlich at the Institute for Geophysics. The study examined seismograms and felt reports for the 25 April 2010 Alice, Texas, earthquake, in order to investigate its possible connection to oil and gas production in the Stratton oil and gas field. A research paper detailing our findings

  7. Physics and Science Education through Project Activities of University Students and Regional Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Makoto

    A project team "Rika-Kobo" organized by university students has actively performed various science education activities at primary and secondary schools and other educational facilities as well as in science events in local areas. The activities of this student project team are related to various fields of physics and sciences. In order to provide more attractive activities, the student members prepare original experiment tools and easily-understandable presentation and explanation. Through such activities, the members can have opportunities of obtaining new knowledge and refreshing their already-obtained understandings in related fields of physics and sciences. They can also have chances of improving their skills and abilities such as presentation, problem-finding and solving, which are useful for realizing their career development. The activities of the student project team have been also welcomed by children, parents, teachers and other people in local areas because the activities provide them with opportunities of knowing and learning new knowledge in physics and sciences.

  8. A Study of Student Activism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Leonard L.

    Available data on interests, achievement goals, competencies, self-concepts and personalities were used to survey 12, 432 college freshmen at 31 institutions in Spring 1964. The following spring a checklist which combined a Student Activism Scale with items relating to other extracurricular activities was presented to a sample of 5,129 of the…

  9. Coal Activities for Secondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coal Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This collection of lesson plans designed for teachers of 4th- through 12th-grade students utilizes an assortment of teaching strategies for topics related to coal and the coal industry. Activities cover the following topics: coal formation; coal identification; "the geologist's dilemma" (a supply and demand activity); geologic time and the…

  10. Student Perceptions of Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela; Achen, Rebecca M.; Dodd, Regan K.

    2015-01-01

    A paradigm shift from lecture-based courses to interactive classes punctuated with engaging, student-centered learning activities has begun to characterize the work of some teachers in higher education. Convinced through the literature of the values of using active learning strategies, we assessed through an action research project in five college…

  11. Student Assistance Team (SAT) and the Three Tier Model of Student Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoblock, Kathleen, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The term three-tier model of intervention is a model consisting of three well-defined and separate processes running on different levels within a system. In New Mexico, this principle has been applied to develop a model of student intervention for school-aged students. The model has three distinct levels of instructional interventions that account…

  12. The Design and Development of CollaborAT: A Groupware Solution for IEP Teams Supporting School-Age Students Who Use Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geist, Lori A.

    2010-01-01

    Team collaboration is necessary to fully support school-age students who use assistive technology (AT). Teams should include the student, his or her family, and school professionals. Unfortunately, team collaboration is often not realized due to constraints that range from scheduling conflicts and language barriers to lack of defined roles and…

  13. NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

  14. Pharmacy students' attitudes towards physician-pharmacist collaboration: Intervention effect of integrating cooperative learning into an interprofessional team-based community service.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Hu, Xiamin; Liu, Juan; Li, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the attitudes towards physician-pharmacist collaboration among pharmacy students in order to develop an interprofessional education (IPE) opportunity through integrating cooperative learning (CL) into a team-based student-supported community service event. The study also aimed to assess the change in students' attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration after participation in the event. A bilingual version of the Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration (SATP(2)C) in English and Chinese was completed by pharmacy students enrolled in Wuhan University of Science and Technology, China. Sixty-four students (32 pharmacy students and 32 medical students) in the third year of their degree volunteered to participate in the IPE opportunity for community-based diabetes and hypertension self-management education. We found the mean score of SATP(2)C among 235 Chinese pharmacy students was 51.44. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.90. Our key finding was a significant increase in positive attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration after participation in the IPE activity. These data suggest that there is an opportunity to deliver IPE in Chinese pharmacy education. It appears that the integration of CL into an interprofessional team-based community service offers a useful approach for IPE. PMID:27310204

  15. Student teams maneuver robots in qualifying match at regional robotic competition at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    All four robots, maneuvered by student teams behind protective walls, converge on a corner of the playing field during qualifying matches of the 1999 Southeastern Regional robotic competition at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex . Thirty schools from around the country have converged at KSC for the event that pits gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The robots have to retrieve pillow- like disks from the floor, as well as climb onto the platform (with flags) and raise the cache of pillows to a height of eight feet. KSC is hosting the event being sponsored by the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers.

  16. Raising Student Achievement in the Dayton Public Schools. Report of the Dayton Public Schools Strategic Support Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, Washington, DC.

    This report describes the Dayton Public Schools Strategic Support Teams (SSTs), which address stagnant student achievement among Dayton's students. They are composed of superintendents and other senior urban school managers from across the country who have struggled with the same issues as Dayton. Chapter 1 summarizes SST findings about challenges…

  17. The Relationship Between Student Perceptions of Team Dynamics and Simulation Game Outcomes: An Individual-Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jonathan R.

    2005-01-01

    In many business courses, computer-based simulations are becoming a popular choice of pedagogical technique, yet research is only beginning to consider how these simulation games impact student outcomes. In this study, the author investigated individual perceptions of simulation team dynamics and their relationship to student affect regarding the…

  18. High School Students' Experiences in a Sport Education Unit: The Importance of Team Autonomy and Problem-Solving Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smither, Katelyn; Xihe Zhu,

    2011-01-01

    This study examined high school students' experiences in a Sport Education unit being implemented with smaller teams and fewer roles. The participants included one physical education teacher and her 70 ninth-grade students. Each week, we conducted two to three observations and four to six informal interviews with the participants for over eight…

  19. Competitive Team-Based Learning versus Group Investigation with Reference to the Language Proficiency of Iranian EFL Intermediate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Hassan

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a report on an experimental study which intended to look into the possible effects of Competitive Team-Based Learning (CTBL) vis-à-vis Group Investigation (GI) method of Cooperative Learning (CL) on the language proficiency of Iranian EFL intermediate students. Seventy homogeneous Iranian intermediate students were selected out of a…

  20. Team-Based Learning in a Capstone Course in Speech-Language Pathology: Learning Outcomes and Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL), although found to increase student engagement and higher-level thinking, has not been examined in the field of speech-language pathology. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of integrating TBL into a capstone course in evidence-based practice (EBP). The researcher evaluated 27 students' understanding of…

  1. The Effects of Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) on Students' Prosocial Classroom Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Carl G.

    2010-01-01

    Students with challenging, disruptive behavior have difficulty learning in school and their behavior adversely impacts the learning of other students and the classroom teacher. Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) is a promising approach that teachers can use to prevent and reduce problem behavior and increase prosocial…

  2. Exploring the Effects of Online Team-Based Learning and Co-Regulated Learning on Students' Development of Computing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2016-01-01

    As more and more educational institutions are providing online courses, it is necessary to design effective teaching methods integrated with technologies to benefit both teachers and students. The researcher in this study designed innovative online teaching methods of team-based learning (TBL) and co-regulated learning (CRL) to improve students'…

  3. Team-based Service Delivery for Students with Disabilities: Practice Options and Guidelines for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Billy T.; Bull, Jeannette; Drew, Ruby; Lunnen, Karen Y.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the assessment procedures, treatment procedures, and the advantages and disadvantages of three professional-family team models: multidisciplinary teams, interdisciplinary teams, and transdisciplinary teams. Guidelines for optimal team participation are provided. The importance of mission statements, communication, trust,…

  4. Instructing and Assessing Cooperative Team-Building Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagood, Susan; Lynn, Susan; Riverso, Orlando

    2005-01-01

    Children need to learn teamwork and communication skills so that they can work successfully as a part of a community. Social-skill deficits in children have been linked to delinquency, school drop out, and substance abuse (McCay & Keyes, 2001). Physical education can teach students the importance of working together to create a positive learning…

  5. Team Learning and Team Composition in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Olaf; Van Linge, Roland; Van Petegem, Peter; Elseviers, Monique; Denekens, Joke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore team learning activities in nursing teams and to test the effect of team composition on team learning to extend conceptually an initial model of team learning and to examine empirically a new model of ambidextrous team learning in nursing. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative research utilising exploratory…

  6. Landsat: Space Activities for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Steven K.

    1979-01-01

    An aerospace education activity is described which is suitable for grades 3-12. Students piece together several images from the Landsat satellite to make a mosaic of their state. From the mosaic clear acetate overlay maps can be made relating to such subjects as agriculture, geology, hydrology, or urban planning. (BB)

  7. Yea, Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinn, Fauneil J.; Weir, Sybil B.

    1984-01-01

    Four problems in higher education are identified: hardening curriculum, graying faculty, shrinking budget, and disappearing students. Team teaching is suggested as one solution. A conceptual framework for types of team teaching is presented and practical suggestions to those who want to work within that framework are provided. (Author/MLW)

  8. Spitzer - Hot & Colorful Student Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, D.; Rebull, L. M.; DeWolf, C.; Guastella, P.; Johnson, C. H.; Schaefers, J.; Spuck, T.; McDonald, J. G., III; DeWolf, T.; Brock, S.; Boerma, J.; Bemis, G.; Paulsen, K.; Yueh, N.; Peter, A.; Wassmer, W.; Haber, R.; Scaramucci, A.; Butchart, J.; Holcomb, A.; Karns, B.; Kennedy, S.; Siegel, R.; Weiser, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this poster, we present the results of several activities developed for the general science student to explore infrared light. The first activity involved measuring infrared radiation using an updated version of Newton's experiment of splitting white light and finding IR radiation. The second used Leslie's cube to allow students to observe different radiators, while the third used a modern infrared thermometer to measure and identify IR sources in an enclosed box. The last activity involved students making false-color images from narrow-band filter images from data sets from Spitzer Space Telescope, STScI Digitized Sky Survey and other sources. Using computer programs like Adobe Photoshop and free software such as ds9, Spot and Leopard, poster-like images were created by the students. This research is funded by the Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Please see our companion poster, Johnson et al., on the science aspect of this program, and another poster on the educational aspects, Guastella et al.

  9. The Impact of Nursing Students' Chemistry Learning Performance Assessment in Taiwan: Competitive versus Non-Competitive Student Team Achievement Division Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Kai-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of competitive Student Team Achievement Division (STAD), non-competitive STAD, and traditional learning on chemistry learning and learning perceptions. Sample, design and methods: By adopting the STAD approach, this study examined 144 nursing students at a five-year junior…

  10. It Takes a Team to Run a Restaurant: Introducing Elementary Students to the Interrelatedness of Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Andrew V.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a career awareness activity in which elementary students use pantomime and role playing to learn about the workers needed to run a restaurant and the importance of teamwork. Provides a narrative for the activity and follow-up discussion questions. (SK)

  11. The Five-Factor Model Personality Assessment for Improved Student Design Team Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogot, Madara; Okudan, Gul E.

    2006-01-01

    Researchers have long noted the correlation of various personality traits and team performance. Studies relating aggregate team personality traits to team performance are scattered in the literature and may not always be relevant to engineering design teams. This paper synthesizes the results from applicable Five-Factor Model (FFM)-based…

  12. Student Experiences: the 2013 Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team's Apply to Sail Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, H.; Hooft, E. E.; Fattaruso, L.

    2013-12-01

    During the summer of 2013, the Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team led six oceanographic expeditions to recover and redeploy ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) across the Cascadia subduction zone and Juan de Fuca plate. The Cascadia Initiative (CI) is an onshore/offshore seismic and geodetic experiment to study questions ranging from megathrust earthquakes to volcanic arc structure to the formation, deformation and hydration of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates with the overarching goal of understanding the entire subduction zone system. The Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team is a team of scientists charged with leading the oceanographic expeditions to deploy and recover CI OBSs and developing the associated Education and Outreach effort. Students and early career scientists were encouraged to apply to join the cruises via the Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team's Apply to Sail Program. The goal of this call for open participation was to help expand the user base of OBS data by providing opportunities for students and scientists to directly experience at-sea acquisition of OBS data. Participants were required to have a strong interest in learning field techniques, be willing to work long hours at sea assisting in OBS deployment, recovery and preliminary data processing and have an interest in working with the data collected. In total, there were 51 applicants to the Apply to Sail Program from the US and 4 other countries; 21 graduate students as well as a few undergraduate students, postdocs and young scientists from the US and Canada were chosen to join the crew. The cruises lasted from 6 to 14 days in length. OBS retrievals comprised the three first legs, of which the first two were aboard the Research Vessel Oceanus. During each of the retrievals, multiple acoustic signals were sent while the vessel completed a semi-circle around the OBS to accurately determine its position, a final signal was sent to drop the seismometer's anchor, and finally the ship and crew

  13. How Individual Performance Affects Variability of Peer Evaluations in Classroom Teams: A Distributive Justice Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, H. Kristl; Mishra, Vipanchi; Bing, Mark N.; Frink, Dwight D.

    2014-01-01

    Business school courses often require team projects, both for pedagogical reasons as well as to prepare students for the kinds of team-based activities that are common in organizations these days. However, social loafing is a common problem in teams, and peer evaluations by team members are sometimes used in such team settings to assess…

  14. What and how do students learn in an interprofessional student-run clinic? An educational framework for team-based care

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Désirée A.; Forest, Christopher P.; Walsh, Anne; Banzali, Yvonne; Lohenry, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background The student-run clinic (SRC) has the potential to address interprofessional learning among health professions students. Purpose To derive a framework for understanding student learning during team-based care provided in an interprofessional SRC serving underserved patients. Methods The authors recruited students for a focus group study by purposive sampling and snowballing. They constructed two sets of semi-structured questions for uniprofessional and multiprofessional groups. Sessions were audiotaped, and transcripts were independently coded and adjudicated. Major themes about learning content and processes were extracted. Grounded theory was followed after data synthesis and interpretation to establish a framework for interprofessional learning. Results Thirty-six students from four professions (medicine, physician assistant, occupational therapy, and pharmacy) participated in eight uniprofessional groups; 14 students participated in three multiprofessional groups (N = 50). Theme saturation was achieved. Six common themes about learning content from uniprofessional groups were role recognition, team-based care appreciation, patient experience, advocacy-/systems-based models, personal skills, and career choices. Occupational therapy students expressed self-advocacy, and medical students expressed humility and self-discovery. Synthesis of themes from all groups suggests a learning continuum that begins with the team huddle and continues with shared patient care and social interactions. Opportunity to observe and interact with other professions in action is key to the learning process. Discussion Interprofessional SRC participation promotes learning ‘with, from, and about’ each other. Participation challenges misconceptions and sensitizes students to patient experiences, health systems, advocacy, and social responsibility. Learning involves interprofessional interactions in the patient encounter, reinforced by formal and informal communications

  15. Tag team simulation: An innovative approach for promoting active engagement of participants and observers during group simulations.

    PubMed

    Levett-Jones, Tracy; Andersen, Patrea; Reid-Searl, Kerry; Guinea, Stephen; McAllister, Margaret; Lapkin, Samuel; Palmer, Lorinda; Niddrie, Marian

    2015-09-01

    Active participation in immersive simulation experiences can result in technical and non-technical skill enhancement. However, when simulations are conducted in large groups, maintaining the interest of observers so that they do not disengage from the learning experience can be challenging. We implemented Tag Team Simulation with the aim of ensuring that both participants and observers had active and integral roles in the simulation. In this paper we outline the features of this innovative approach and provide an example of its application to a pain simulation. Evaluation was conducted using the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale. A total of 444 year nursing students participated from a population of 536 (response rate 83%). Cronbach's alpha for the Scale was .94 indicating high internal consistency. The mean satisfaction score for participants was 4.63 compared to 4.56 for observers. An independent sample t test revealed no significant difference between these scores (t (300) = -1.414, p = 0.16). Tag team simulation is an effective approach for ensuring observers' and participants' active involvement during group-based simulations and one that is highly regarded by students. It has the potential for broad applicability across a range of leaning domains both within and beyond nursing. PMID:25936431

  16. College students as facilitators in reducing adolescent obesity disparity in Southern Appalachia: Team Up for Healthy Living

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, William T.; Dula, Taylor McKeehan; Southerland, Jodi; Wang, Liang; Littleton, Mary Ann; Mozen, Diana; Relyea, George; Schetzina, Karen; Lowe, Elizabeth F.; Stoots, James M.; Wu, Tiejian

    2015-01-01

    The proportion of obese adolescents in Southern Appalachia is among the highest in the nation. Through funding from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities – National Institutes of Health, the Team Up for Healthy Living project was a cluster-randomized trial targeting obesity prevention in adolescents through a cross-peer intervention. The specific aims of the project were to: 1) develop a peer-based health education program focusing on establishing positive peer norms towards healthy eating and physical activity (PA) among high school students, 2) test program efficacy, and 3) explore mechanisms underlying the program. The study was guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior, which presupposes that human behavior is primarily driven by attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and social support. To deliver the intervention, undergraduate students from the disciplines of public health, nutrition, and kinesiology were hired as peer facilitators. Ten area high schools were invited to participate, were matched on demographics and then randomized to intervention or control. The primary outcomes of the study included body mass status, dietary behaviors, PA, and sedentary behaviors which were assessed at baseline and at three and twelve months post baseline. Intervention schools received Team Up for Healthy Living curriculum, which consists of eight 40-minute sessions. The curriculum focused on improving nutrition awareness, PA, leadership and communication. Control schools received their regularly scheduled Lifetime Wellness curriculum. The long-term goal of the study was to establish an effective academia–community partnership program to address adolescent obesity disparity in Southern Appalachia. PMID:25937506

  17. College students as facilitators in reducing adolescent obesity disparity in Southern Appalachia: Team Up for Healthy Living.

    PubMed

    Slawson, Deborah Leachman; Dalton, William T; Dula, Taylor McKeehan; Southerland, Jodi; Wang, Liang; Littleton, Mary Ann; Mozen, Diana; Relyea, George; Schetzina, Karen; Lowe, Elizabeth F; Stoots, James M; Wu, Tiejian

    2015-07-01

    The proportion of obese adolescents in Southern Appalachia is among the highest in the nation. Through funding from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities--National Institutes of Health, the Team Up for Healthy Living project was a cluster-randomized trial targeting obesity prevention in adolescents through a cross-peer intervention. The specific aims of the project were to: 1) develop a peer-based health education program focusing on establishing positive peer norms towards healthy eating and physical activity (PA) among high school students, 2) test program efficacy, and 3) explore mechanisms underlying the program. The study was guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior, which presupposes that human behavior is primarily driven by attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and social support. To deliver the intervention, undergraduate students from the disciplines of public health, nutrition, and kinesiology were hired as peer facilitators. Ten area high schools were invited to participate, were matched on demographics and then randomized to intervention or control. The primary outcomes of the study included body mass status, dietary behaviors, PA, and sedentary behaviors which were assessed at baseline and at three and twelve months post baseline. Intervention schools received Team Up for Healthy Living curriculum, which consists of eight 40-minute sessions. The curriculum focused on improving nutrition awareness, PA, leadership and communication. Control schools received their regularly scheduled Lifetime Wellness curriculum. The long-term goal of the study was to establish an effective academia-community partnership program to address adolescent obesity disparity in Southern Appalachia. PMID:25937506

  18. Sports Teams Extend Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    Unlike traditional high school athletic teams, Unified Sports teams are designed to immerse students with intellectual disabilities in a facet of school culture that has largely eluded them. Nationwide, more than 2,000 schools in 42 states have the teams, where the ideal is for about half the athletes on each team to be students with intellectual…

  19. Integrating Therapy Dog Teams in a Physical Activity Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obrusnikova, Iva; Bibik, Janice M.; Cavalier, Albert R.; Manley, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    The use of therapy-dog teams in programs for children with disabilities is becoming increasingly popular in school and therapeutic settings and has been shown to provide physical, social, and emotional benefits for the children. This article describes the basic steps for implementing therapy dog-assisted activities in physical activity programs…

  20. 76 FR 58533 - Powder River Regional Coal Team Activities; Notice of Public Meeting in Casper, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Powder River Regional Coal Team Activities; Notice of Public Meeting in Casper, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting. SUMMARY: The Powder... management activities in the Powder River Coal Production Region. DATES: The RCT meeting will begin at 9...

  1. 78 FR 23951 - Powder River Regional Coal Team Activities: Notice of Public Meeting in Casper, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Powder River Regional Coal Team Activities: Notice of Public Meeting in Casper, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Powder... management activities in the Powder River Coal Production Region. DATES: The RCT meeting will begin at 9...

  2. Effects of Implementing STEM-I Project-Based Learning Activities for Female High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Tsai, Huei-Yin; Tseng, Kuo-Hung; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore the application of STEM-I (STEM-Imagination) project-based learning activities and its effects on the effectiveness, processes, and characteristics of STEM integrative knowledge learning and imagination development for female high school students. A total of 72 female high school students were divided into 18 teams.…

  3. Does emotional intelligence change during medical school gross anatomy course? Correlations with students' performance and team cohesion.

    PubMed

    Holman, Michelle A; Porter, Samuel G; Pawlina, Wojciech; Juskewitch, Justin E; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with increased academic achievement, but its impact on medical education is relatively unexplored. This study sought to evaluate change in EI, performance outcomes, and team cohesion within a team-based medical school anatomy course. Forty-two medical students completed a pre-course and post-course Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test (SSEIT). Individual EI scores were then compared with composite course performance grade and team cohesion survey results. Mean pre-course EI score was 140.3 out of a possible 160. During the course, mean individual EI scores did not change significantly (P = 0.17) and no correlation between EI scores and academic performance was noted (P = 0.31). In addition, EI did not correlate with team cohesion (P = 0.16). While business has found significant utility for EI in increasing performance and productivity, its role in medical education is still uncertain. PMID:26062161

  4. A status of the activities of the NASA/MSFC pump stage technology team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R.; Williams, R.; Dakhoul, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology was established to aid the transfer of CFD related advancements among academia, government agencies, and industry. The specific goals of the Consortium are to develop CFD methodologies necessary to solve propulsion problems, to validate these methodologies, and to apply these methodologies in the design process. To accomplish these goals, a team of experts in various related fields was formed, a schedule of activities necessary to meet the goals was generated, and funding for the activities was obtained from NASA. During the past year (Mar. 1991 - Mar. 1992) the team's activities have focused on preliminary code validation and on the design of an advanced impeller. Six codes were used to calculate the flow in a Rocketdyne 0.3 flow coefficient inducer, and the results were compared to L2F data available for the inducer. This activity identified shortcomings in the experimental data sets and in the analytical solutions which must be surmounted in any future team activity. The design of the advanced impeller relied heavily on CFD results to obtain an optimized geometry. The optimized geometry was analyzed using four different codes, at design and off-design conditions. Activities for the next year include the optimization of a tandem blade impeller design, benchmark of CFD codes for diffuser and volute flows, the collection of L2F data for 'state-of-the-art' impeller and inducer, and the verification of the advanced pump team impeller design in a water rig.

  5. Learning in style: Investigation of factors impacting student success in chemical engineering at individual and team-levels with a focus on student learning styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskioglu, Elif Eda

    Our three studies examine the factors of learning styles, student self-efficacy, collective (team) efficacy, attitudes, perceptions, and performance at individual and team levels. Each study addresses a different environment: (i) Individual Level-we are interested in how variability in learning styles engaged by specific exam problems may correlate with student learning styles, self-efficacy, and performance in our introductory chemical engineering course, Process Fundamentals (i.e., mass and energy or material balances); (ii) Team Level-we are interested in understanding how team composition with respect to learning styles (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous teams) may influence these factors in the upper level Unit Operations course; (iii) Combinatorial Level-we are interested in understanding how collective efficacy may influence individual self-efficacy and again if there are any correlations with learning styles and performance in the senior level Process Design and Development course. Some of the most interesting results of these studies have stemmed from the study on individual students, which has shown correlations between learning style preferences and performance in specific instances. Even more interesting, evaluating and characterizing the learning styles that exam problems engage has shown strong variations in problem types by instructor. This presents new questions regarding how these variations may affect student understanding and subsequent performance. Also included are details regarding a course developed in Technical and Professional Communication (for Chemical Engineers) that was offered Spring 2014 and Spring 2015.

  6. The Perceptions of Students in the Allied Health Professions towards Stroke Rehabilitation Teams and the SLP's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Insalaco, Deborah; Ozkurt, Elcin; Santiago, Dign

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions and knowledge of final-year speech-language pathology (SLP), physical and occupational therapy (PT, OT) students toward stroke rehabilitation teams and the SLPs' roles on them. The investigators adapted a survey developed by (Felsher & Ross, 1994) and administered it to 35 PT, 35 OT, and…

  7. A Qualitative Exploration of the Influence a Simulated Virtual Team Learning Experience Had on Business School Students' Leadership Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standard Smith, Kristy

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the influence a simulated virtual team learning experience had on business school students' leadership competencies. The researcher sought to discover the relationship between filling the leadership role in the simulated virtual environment and developing leadership competencies. A…

  8. Over the Counter Drugs (and Dietary Supplement) Exercise: A Team-based Introduction to Biochemistry for Health Professional Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phadtare, Sangita; Abali, Emine; Brodsky, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    For successful delivery of basic science topics for health-professional students, it is critical to reduce apprehension and illustrate relevance to clinical settings and everyday life. At the beginning of the Biochemistry course for Physician Assistants, a team-based assignment was designed to develop an understanding of the mechanism of action,…

  9. The Effectiveness of Student Team-Achievement Division (STAD) for Teaching High School Chemistry in the United Arab Emirates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfakih, Nagib M. A.

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of Student-Team Achievement Division (STAD) for teaching chemistry in randomly selected high school classes in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Also examines the differences among groups with regard to gender, geographic area, and ability. Findings indicate that STAD is a more effective teaching method than…

  10. Texas Assessment of Academic Skills and TEAMS Exit Level. Student Performance Results, October 1990. Volume 2. Performance by School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    This report of the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) Student Performance Results lists performance results on the TAAS and the Texas Educational Assessment of Minimum Skills (TEAMS), an exit examination, alphabetically by school district for each grade level tested (grades 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 for the TAAS and grades 11 and 12 for the initial…

  11. Managing Student Behavior with Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: An Observational Study in Early Elementary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldarella, Paul; Williams, Leslie; Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive evidence-based interventions are needed to help early childhood educators manage challenging student behaviors. One such intervention, class-wide function-related intervention teams (CW-FIT), is a multi-tiered behavioral intervention program based on positive behavior support principles, including four main elements: (a) teaching…

  12. Effects of Framing and Team Assisted Individualised Instructional Strategies on Senior Secondary School Students' Attitudes toward Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awofala, Adeneye O. A.; Arigbabu, Abayomi A.; Awofala, Awoyemi A.

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the relative effectiveness of framing and team assisted individualised (TAI) instructional strategies on the attitudes toward mathematics of 350 senior secondary school year two Nigerian students. The moderating effects of gender and style of categorisation were also examined. The study adopted pre-test and post-test control…

  13. MTF Database: A Repository of Students' Academic Performance Measurements for the Development of Techniques for Evaluating Team Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, Chin-Min; Zheng, Xiang-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The Measurements for Team Functioning (MTF) database contains a series of student academic performance measurements obtained at a national university in Taiwan. The measurements are acquired from unit tests and homework tests performed during a core mechanical engineering course, and provide an objective means of assessing the functioning of…

  14. How to Implement Support Services for NonTraditional Students. Teams for NonTraditional. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Bettie

    Based on the experience of Teams of NonTraditionals Support Network at Jefferson State Vocational Technical School (Kentucky), this manual is designed to help teachers and administrators to implement a support system for nontraditional students (primarily females in traditional male fields) in vocational and technical education programs. The…

  15. Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching Experience for a Computer and Nuclear Energy Course for Electrical and Computer Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Charles; Jackson, Deborah; Keiller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A new, interdisciplinary, team-taught course has been designed to educate students in Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) so that they can respond to global and urgent issues concerning computer control systems in nuclear power plants. This paper discusses our experience and assessment of the interdisciplinary computer and nuclear energy…

  16. The Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Laboratory: A Student Team Approach to the Fourth-Year Research Thesis Project Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Boyd, Cleo; Barzda, Virginijus; Gradinaru, Claudiu C.; Krull, Ulrich J.; Stefanovic, Sasa; Stewart, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The advanced interdisciplinary research laboratory (AIRLab) represents a novel, effective, and motivational course designed from the interdisciplinary research interests of chemistry, physics, biology, and education development faculty members as an alternative to the independent thesis project experience. Student teams are assembled to work…

  17. SWAT (Student Weekend Arborist Team): A Model for Land Grant Institutions and Cooperative Extension Systems to Conduct Street Tree Inventories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowett, F.D.; Bassuk, N.L.

    2012-01-01

    SWAT (Student Weekend Arborist Team) is a program affiliated with Cornell University and Extension founded to conduct street tree inventories in New York State communities with 10,000 residents or fewer, a group of communities underserved in community forestry planning. Between 2002 and 2010, SWAT conducted 40 inventories, and data from these…

  18. Team Up to Increase Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Barbara; And Others

    The presentation describes the development of an interdisciplinary team approach to working with mildly retarded students (5-9 years old). The approach featured group discussions and activities to enhance students' listening, communication, and social skills, and to improve individual and group behavior. Individual and group goals were designed by…

  19. Team Learning in Large Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Information and suggestions are provided on the use of team learning in large college classes. Introductory material discusses the negative cycle of student-teacher interaction that may be provoked by large classes, and the use of permanent, heterogeneous, six- or seven-member student learning groups as the central focus of class activity as a…

  20. A Case Study of Team-Initiated Problem Solving Addressing Student Behavior in One Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Anne W.; Horner, Robert H.; Berry, Dorothy; Sanders, Carol; Bugni, Michelle; Currier, Allison; Potts, Nicky; Newton, J. Stephen; Algozzine, Bob; Algozzine, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Team-Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) is an approach for organizing school team meetings to improve identification of targeted problems, use of data in the development of solutions, and development of implemented action plans. TIPS has been demonstrated in single-case and randomized controlled trial studies to improve the effectiveness of teams to…

  1. Team Teaching in Social Work: Sharing Power with Bachelor of Social Work Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapf, Michael Kim; Jerome, Les; Williams, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Team teaching in social work education usually involves sequential lectures delivered by different instructors--relay or tag-team teaching. Truly collaborative or collegial team teaching involves a committed group of diverse instructors interacting together as equals in the classroom. Having more than one teacher in the classroom confounds…

  2. Perceptions and Attitudes of First-Year Medical Students on a Modified Team-Based Learning (TBL) Strategy in Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Inuwa, Ibrahim M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Although team-based learning (TBL) is widely used in medical education, its evaluation from the perspectives of the students exposed to it has been limited. This paper reports on a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of perceptions of first year medical students towards TBL. Methods: Lectures in an anatomy course were transformed into a series of TBL sessions for two cohorts of first-year medical students. Each session consisted of pre-class reading, in-class readiness assurance tests, and problem-solving of clinical cases by student teams. At the end of each course, students were surveyed using qualitative and quantitative instruments to assess their perceptions of the strategy. Internal consistency of questionnaire items was determined by a reliability analysis (Cronbach’s alpha). Principal component factor analysis and correspondence analysis were conducted on the quantitative data. Open-ended questions were explored by thematic analysis. Results: Students’ evaluations indicated that TBL is a welcome alternative to lecture-based teaching; as implemented in this study, it encouraged clinical problem solving and fruitful in-class discussion. Principal component factor analysis identified five factors (Cronbach’s alpha 0.602–0.875). However, the majority of students disapproved of mixed gender TBL teams. Most students agreed that the strategy facilitated consistency in their study, generated an increased awareness about self-directed learning, and had a positive impact on their learning attitudes. Conclusion: TBL is a welcome instructional strategy as reported by our first-year medical students. It was perceived to be a better approach compared to content-based lectures. The effect on actual student performance is currently being investigated. PMID:22912927

  3. Formative Evaluation of Project "TEAM" (Teens Making Environment and Activity Modifications)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Jessica M.; Roemer, Kristin; Liljenquist, Kendra; Shin, Julia; Hart, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    Research documents the negative impact of physical and social environmental barriers on engagement in school, work, and the community for youth with intellectual and /or developmental disabilities (IDD). Project "TEAM" (Teens making Environment and Activity Modifications) was designed to teach youth to systematically identify…

  4. Fostering Teachers' Design Expertise in Teacher Design Teams: Conducive Design and Support Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huizinga, Tjark; Handelzalts, Adam; Nieveen, Nienke; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Supporting Teacher Design Teams (TDTs) during local curriculum development efforts is essential. To be able to provide high-quality support, insights are needed about how TDTs carry out design activities and how support is valued by the members of TDTs and how it affects their design expertise. In this study, the design and support processes of…

  5. Activities of information retrieval in Daicel Corporation : The roles and efforts of information retrieval team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Towako

    In order to stabilize and improve quality of information retrieval service, the information retrieval team of Daicel Corporation has given some efforts on standard operating procedures, interview sheet for information retrieval, structured format for search report, and search expressions for some technological fields of Daicel. These activities and efforts will also lead to skill sharing and skill tradition between searchers. In addition, skill improvements are needed not only for a searcher individually, but also for the information retrieval team totally when playing searcher's new roles.

  6. Physical therapy students’ perceptions of team-based learning in gross anatomy using the Team-Based Learning Student Assessment Instrument

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to assess physical therapy student perceptions of team-based learning (TBL) in a graduate level gross anatomy course using the TBL Student Assessment Instrument (TBL-SAI). Methods: The TBL-SAI was administered to 85 doctor of physical therapy (DPT) students, comprising three cohorts (classes of 2013, 2014, and 2015), who successfully completed a gross anatomy course where TBL was implemented. The TBL-SAI surveys 33 items, each rated from one (strongly disagree) to five (strongly agree) and measures three subscales: students’ perceptions of accountability, preference for lecture or TBL, and student satisfaction. Results: The means for each subscale and the total TBL-SAI score for each cohort fell above the neutral score. The 2015 group (mean, 37.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 35.67 to 40.26) reported significantly higher satisfaction than that of the 2013 group (mean, 32.71; 95% CI, 30.31 to 35.05) and the 2014 group (mean, 33.11; 95% CI, 30.69 to 35.53). The 2015 group (mean, 125.3; 95% CI, 120.6 to 130.3) also had a significantly higher total score than that of the 2013 group (mean, 115.6; 95% CI, 110.5 to 120.5). Conclusion: The physical therapy students reported an overall positive experience in using TBL to learn gross anatomy in terms of accountability, preference for learning mode, and satisfaction. This positive experience with TBL was accompanied by their successful academic performance. Given the traits and learning preferences in this generation of graduate students, TBL could be a teaching method that is received positively elsewhere and results in successful academic performance and learning. PMID:24699446

  7. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airhart, Douglas L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University's Program of Special Education sponsors a "Super Saturday" of enrichment activities for gifted and talented students as well as students with learning disabilities. A session on horticulture was planned and arranged by students in a class on horticultural therapy who designed learning activities of two types:…

  8. Research activities on Antarctic middle atmosphere by JARE 25th team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirasawa, T.; Eiwasaka, Y. AFTANAKA, M. agfujii, r.0 typ; Eiwasaka, Y. AFTANAKA, M. agfujii, r.0 typ

    1985-01-01

    The Antarctic Middle Atmosphere (AMA)-Japan research project was set about by the JARE (Japan Antarctic Research Expedition) 23rd team in 1982, and since then the JARE-24th and JARE-25th teams have been continuing reseach on the Antarctic Middle Atmosphere. Results gained by JARE-25th team members who are now working at Syowa Station (69.99 deg S, 39.35 deg E), Antarctica are presented. In their activities satellite measurements (Exos-C) and rocket soundings are used. Three rockets of the S310 type were launched at Syowa Station (Geomagnetic Latitude = 69.9 deg S) for the purpose of directly observing the electron density, ionospheric temperature, auroral patterns and luminosity in situ. Vertical profiles of electron density and auroral emission 4278A measured by three rockets are compared.

  9. Adapting Creative and Relaxation Activities to Students with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenko, Nika; Stopar, Mojca Lipec

    2015-01-01

    The team which forms a comprehensive treatment plan for students with cancer includes, among other experts, special educators. In cooperation with other team members, their role is to enable students to integrate in the educational process, having regard to their individual needs. In the present paper we introduce the study of specific methodical…

  10. A Student Activity That Simulates Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nichole L.; Lang-Walker, Rosalyn; Fail, Joseph L., Jr.; Champion, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an activity that uses cards to simulate evolution. The mechanism of the evolutionary pressure in the simulation is clearly indicated for the students. This simulation is useful for allowing student experimentation by varying conditions.

  11. Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning…

  12. Assessing Team Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Susan; Rottier, Jerry

    Interdisciplinary middle school level teams capitalize on the idea that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Administrators and team members can maximize the advantages of teamwork using team assessments to increase the benefits for students, teachers, and the school environment. Assessing team performance can lead to high performing…

  13. TeamXchange: A Team Project Experience Involving Virtual Teams and Fluid Team Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dineen, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    TeamXchange, an online team-based exercise, is described. TeamXchange is consistent with the collaborative model of learning and provides a means of fostering enhanced student learning and engagement through collaboration in virtual teams experiencing periodic membership changes. It was administered in an undergraduate Organizational Behavior…

  14. Guidelines to Student Activity Fund Accounting. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

    This booklet provides guidelines to help school business officials develop sound procedures for keeping proper accounts of and managing the money raised and spent in the course of conducting student activity programs. The booklet notes the roles of the administrators and activity advisers related to management of the student activity fund, then…

  15. The delta cooperative model: a dynamic and innovative team-work activity to develop research skills in microbiology.

    PubMed

    Rios-Velazquez, Carlos; Robles-Suarez, Reynaldo; Gonzalez-Negron, Alberto J; Baez-Santos, Ivan

    2006-05-01

    The Delta Cooperative Model (DCM) is a dynamic and innovative teamwork design created to develop fundamentals in research skills. High school students in the DCM belong to the Upward Bound Science and Math (UBSM) program at the Inter American University, Ponce Campus. After workshops on using the scientific method, students were organized into groups of three students with similar research interests. Each student had to take on a role within the group as either a researcher, data analyst, or research editor. Initially, each research team developed hypothesis-driven ideas on their proposed project. In intrateam research meetings, they emphasized team-specific tasks. Next, interteam meetings were held to present ideas and receive critical input. Finally, oral and poster research presentations were conducted at the UBSM science fair. Several team research projects covered topics in medical, environmental, and general microbiology. The three major assessment areas for the workshop and DCM included: (i) student's perception of the workshops' effectiveness in developing skills, content, and values; (ii) research team self- and group participation evaluation, and (iii) oral and poster presentation during the science fair. More than 91% of the students considered the workshops effective in the presentation of scientific method fundamentals. The combination of the workshop and the DCM increased student's knowledge by 55% from pre- to posttests. Two rubrics were designed to assess the oral presentation and poster set-up. The poster and oral presentation scores averaged 83% and 75% respectively. Finally, we present a team assessment instrument that allows the self- and group evaluation of each research team. While the DCM has educational plasticity and versatility, here we document how the this model has been successfully incorporated in training and engaging students in scientific research in microbiology. PMID:23653564

  16. Predictors of Team Work Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlyn-Harris, James H.; Hurst, Barbara J.; von Baggo, Karola; Bayley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to work in teams is an attribute highly valued by employers of information technology (IT) graduates. For IT students to effectively engage in team work tasks, the process of working in teams should be satisfying for the students. This work explored whether university students who were involved in compulsory team work were satisfied…

  17. Collective Efficacy Beliefs in Student Work Teams: Relation to Self-Efficacy, Cohesion, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, Robert W.; Schmidt, Janet; Schmidt, Linda

    2006-01-01

    A measure of collective efficacy was developed and administered to undergraduates working in project teams in engineering courses. Findings in each of two samples revealed that the measure contained a single factor and was related to ratings of team cohesion and personal efficacy. Collective efficacy was also found to relate to indicators of team…

  18. Exploration of Social Capital and Knowledge Sharing: An Empirical Study on Student Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ying Chieh; Li, FengChia

    2012-01-01

    Although research on virtual teams is becoming more popular, there is a gap in the understanding of how social capital affects knowledge sharing and creating, and their impacts on virtual team performance. To fill in this gap, this study establishes a framework by incorporating social capital with the SECI model and further examines it with an…

  19. Relationships between Sports Team Participation and Health-Risk Behaviors among Alternative High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karen E.; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Bearinger, Linda H.; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Sieving, Renee E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that sports team participation differentially relates to health-risk behaviors. Few studies have explored relationships among high-risk youth. Purpose: To examine associations between weekly sports team participation and health-risk behaviors (substance use, sexual risk-taking, violence involvement) among alternative…

  20. Team-Based Learning for Nursing and Medical Students: Focus Group Results From an Interprofessional Education Project.

    PubMed

    Feather, Rebecca A; Carr, Doug E; Reising, Deanna L; Garletts, Derrick M

    2016-01-01

    Past research indicates that inadequacies in health care delivery create substantial preventable quality issues that can be addressed through improving relationships among clinicians to decrease the negative effects on patient outcomes. The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of an interprofessional education project with senior nursing and third-year medical students working in teams in a clinical setting. Results include data from focus groups conducted at the conclusion of the project. PMID:26771940

  1. Laboratory Team Leaders in a General Psychology Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnagey, William J.; Girmscheid, David

    This study is concerned with the effect of involving small groups in team research work in a large psychology class at Illinois State University. Phase I (fall) dealt with developing, organizing, and evaluating a lab team method and sought to have students actively participate in discussion of study questions and in team research by combining a…

  2. Effects of wearing compression garments on thermoregulation during simulated team sport activity in temperate environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Laurence A; Dawson, Brian; Maloney, Shane K

    2009-03-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests compression garments (CGs) are being worn underneath normal playing attire during team sports. Wearing CGs as a baselayer could possibly increase heat storage, and so this field study investigated the effects of wearing CGs, comprising knee-length shorts and short-sleeved top underneath normal match-day attire (COMP), versus normal match-day attire alone (NORM) on thermoregulation during simulated team sport activity. Ten match-fit field hockey players twice performed 4x15min exercise bouts consisting of repeated cycles of intermittent, varied-intensity 20m shuttle running (Loughborough intermittent shuttle test), once in COMP and once in NORM. Testing was conducted in an indoor gymnasium (ambient conditions: approximately 17 degrees C, approximately 60% relative humidity). Participants acted as their own controls. Heart rate (HR), 15m sprint time, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), blood lactate concentration, sweat rate and body core temperature (T(core)) were similar between trials (p>0.05). Mean skin temperature (T(skin)) was significantly higher in COMP than NORM (p<0.05). Overall, CGs worn as a baselayer during simulated team sport exercise in temperate ambient conditions had no thermoregulatory benefits nor any detrimental effects on T(core), physiological performance or dehydration. However, the higher T(skin) may affect individual preference for wearing CGs as an undergarment during team sports. PMID:18078787

  3. A Consensus-Based Criterion Standard Definition for Pediatric Patients Who Needed the Highest-Level Trauma Team Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, E. Brooke; Drendel, Amy L.; Falcone, Richard A.; Weitze, Keith C.; Badawy, Mohamed K.; Cooper, Arthur; Cushman, Jeremy T.; Drayna, Patrick C.; Gourlay, David M.; Gray, Matthew P.; Shah, Manish I.; Shah, Manish N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Verbal prehospital reports on an injured patient’s condition are typically used by trauma centers to determine if a trauma team should be present in the emergency department prior to patient arrival (i.e., trauma team activation). Efficacy studies of trauma team activation protocols cannot be conducted without a criterion standard definition for which pediatric patients need a trauma team activation. Objective To develop a consensus-based criterion standard definition for pediatric patients who needed the highest-level trauma team activation. Methods Ten local and national experts in emergency medicine, emergency medical services, and trauma were recruited to participate in a Modified Delphi survey process. The initial survey was populated based on outcomes that had been used in previously published literature on trauma team activation. The criterion standard definition for trauma team activation was refined iteratively based on survey responses until at least 80% agreement was achieved for each criterion. Results After five voting rounds a consensus-based definition for pediatric trauma team activation was developed. Twelve criteria were identified along with a corresponding time interval in which each criterion had to occur. The criteria include receiving specific surgery types, interventional radiology, advanced airway management, thoracostomy, blood products, spinal injury, emergency cesarean section, vasopressors, burr hole or other procedure to relieve intracranial pressure, pericardiocentesis, thoracotomy, and death in the emergency department. All expert panel members voted in all 5 voting rounds, except 1 member missed rounds 1 and 2. Each criterion had greater than 80% agreement from the panel. Conclusion A criterion standard definition for the highest-level pediatric trauma team activation was developed. This criterion standard definition will advance trauma research by allowing investigators to determine the accuracy and effectiveness of

  4. Infusion of collaborative inquiry throughout a biology curriculum increases student learning: a four-year study of "Teams and Streams".

    PubMed

    Luckie, Douglas B; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Loznak, Sarah D; Krha, Marija

    2004-12-01

    Are traditional laboratories in the core introductory biology courses teaching physiology majors the art and trade of science, or simply leaving them with a memory of trivial experiments done for unknown reasons? Our students, a population dominated by pre-med and physiology majors, think the latter and have encouraged us to challenge this model, and it turns out scientists and education researchers agree with our students (4, 31, 32). In an effort to remedy this, we began a long-term redesign of the introductory biology sequence to become what is now a sequence of inquiry laboratories we term "Teams and Streams" (TS). In these TS inquiry labs, student research teams pose a scientific question/hypothesis, propose an experimental design, perform multi-week investigations and then present their findings in various forms (web, interviews, and papers). The response to this classroom laboratory design has been overwhelmingly positive. In a qualitative study of student opinion (where 260 student responses were studied), surveys conducted at the end of semesters where traditional scripted labs were used (n = 70 comments) had predominantly negative opinions (80% negative responses), whereas the reverse was true for students (n = 190 comments) who participated in courses using the TS inquiry labs (78% positive responses). In a quantitative assessment of content knowledge, students who participated in new TS inquiry labs (n = 245) outscored their peers in traditional labs (n = 86) on Medical College Admission Test-style standardized exams (59.3 +/- 0.8% vs. 48.9 +/- 1.3%, respectively; P < 0.0001). We believe these quantitative data support the qualitative findings and suggest the TS inquiry lab approach increases student learning. PMID:15545349

  5. Differential Impacts of Intensive District-Level Technical Assistance on Student Achievement: A Study of California's District Assistance and Intervention Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strunk, Katharine O.; McEachin, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Building on Strunk, McEachin, and Westover (2011), the authors examine whether or not District Assistance and Intervention Teams (DAITs) have a differential impact on student performance across school and student characteristics. They use a quasi-experimental design to examine the impacts of DAITs on student achievement on math and English…

  6. Propelling Students into Active Grammar Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurhill, Dennis A.

    2011-01-01

    "O! this learning, what a thing it is." -W. Shakespeare, "The Taming of the Shrew." The aim of this action research was to find out if active grammar involvement amongst students might lead to better results. My approach was to activate my students during grammar instruction by using cooperative learning: that is a form of learning in which…

  7. A Student Activity on Visual Resolving Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, T. H.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple activity in which students measure the resolving power of their eyes. The approach can be used at various levels of sophistication with students having a wide variety of skills and scientific training. We discuss our experiences using this activity with a class of non-science majors as well as with a group of pre-engineering…

  8. Exposure and attitudes toward interprofessional teams: a three-year prospective study of longitudinal integrated clerkship versus rotation-based clerkship students.

    PubMed

    Myhre, Douglas L; Woloschuk, Wayne; Pedersen, Jeanette Somlak

    2014-05-01

    This study explored exposure to, and attitudes toward, interprofessional (IP) teams between third-year longitudinal integrated clerkship (LIC) and traditional rotation-based clerkship (RBC) students at the University of Calgary medical school. Students completed a survey pre-post 32-week LIC or 6-week rural, regional or urban RBC family medicine rotations. Pre and post rotation surveys were completed by 213 (48%) students (LIC = 33/34; rural = 76/152; regional = 24/46; urban = 80/208). More LIC students (76%) reported participating on six or more IP teams than RBC students (rural = 38%; regional = 25%; urban = 21%). At pre rotation, the mean attitude to IP teams score of LIC and rural RBC students was high and did not differ. At post rotation, the mean attitude score of LIC students was significantly greater than the mean reported by rural RBC students. Only LIC students reported a significant pre-post rotation increase in attitude. Exposure to IP teams, possibly facilitated by a longer duration of rotation, appears to be an important factor in affecting attitude to IP teams. PMID:24000879

  9. Comparing Perceptions of Teamness between Adult, First- and Second-Generation Mexican American and All Other Students Enrolled in a Cohort-Based, Accelerated, Bachelor's Degree Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Tami

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a difference in the perception of the degree of teamness, as measured by the Characteristics of Effective Teams Survey (Harvey & Drolet, 2004), interviews, and archival data, between adult first- and second-generation Mexican American students and adult non-first- and…

  10. An Examination of the Impact of the IEP Team Composition and Transition Planning upon the Success of Students with Disabilities in Urban Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Petrina D.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this correlational study was to examine the impact of IEP team composition (team member attendance) and transition planning (types of transition outcomes) upon the success (graduation) of students with disabilities in urban districts. Other factors also included gender, academic status of school, socioeconomic status of the…

  11. Knowledge and Attitudes of Allied Health Professional Students regarding the Stroke Rehabilitation Team and the Role of the Speech and Language Therapist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Aine; Pettigrew, Catharine M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: One of the major barriers to effective team working among healthcare professionals is a lack of knowledge of each other's roles. The importance of understanding Irish healthcare students' attitudes towards team working and each other's roles led to the development of this study. Aims: The aims were to investigate allied health…

  12. Classification of team sport activities using a single wearable tracking device.

    PubMed

    Wundersitz, Daniel W T; Josman, Casey; Gupta, Ritu; Netto, Kevin J; Gastin, Paul B; Robertson, Sam

    2015-11-26

    Wearable tracking devices incorporating accelerometers and gyroscopes are increasingly being used for activity analysis in sports. However, minimal research exists relating to their ability to classify common activities. The purpose of this study was to determine whether data obtained from a single wearable tracking device can be used to classify team sport-related activities. Seventy-six non-elite sporting participants were tested during a simulated team sport circuit (involving stationary, walking, jogging, running, changing direction, counter-movement jumping, jumping for distance and tackling activities) in a laboratory setting. A MinimaxX S4 wearable tracking device was worn below the neck, in-line and dorsal to the first to fifth thoracic vertebrae of the spine, with tri-axial accelerometer and gyroscope data collected at 100Hz. Multiple time domain, frequency domain and custom features were extracted from each sensor using 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5s movement capture durations. Features were further screened using a combination of ANOVA and Lasso methods. Relevant features were used to classify the eight activities performed using the Random Forest (RF), Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Logistic Model Tree (LMT) algorithms. The LMT (79-92% classification accuracy) outperformed RF (32-43%) and SVM algorithms (27-40%), obtaining strongest performance using the full model (accelerometer and gyroscope inputs). Processing time can be reduced through feature selection methods (range 1.5-30.2%), however a trade-off exists between classification accuracy and processing time. Movement capture duration also had little impact on classification accuracy or processing time. In sporting scenarios where wearable tracking devices are employed, it is both possible and feasible to accurately classify team sport-related activities. PMID:26472301

  13. Team Problem-Solving Strategies: Introducing Students to Industry Practices. A Peer-Reviewed Article.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes a teaching method involving problem-solving techniques used by project teams in industry that have been tailored for use in an introductory engineering technology course. Provides step-by-step guidelines for each component. (JOW)

  14. The Delta Cooperative Model: a Dynamic and Innovative Team-Work Activity to Develop Research Skills in Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    RIOS-VELAZQUEZ, CARLOS; ROBLES-SUAREZ, REYNALDO; GONZALEZ-NEGRON, ALBERTO J.; BAEZ-SANTOS, IVAN

    2006-01-01

    The Delta Cooperative Model (DCM) is a dynamic and innovative teamwork design created to develop fundamentals in research skills. High school students in the DCM belong to the Upward Bound Science and Math (UBSM) program at the Inter American University, Ponce Campus. After workshops on using the scientific method, students were organized into groups of three students with similar research interests. Each student had to take on a role within the group as either a researcher, data analyst, or research editor. Initially, each research team developed hypothesis-driven ideas on their proposed project. In intrateam research meetings, they emphasized team-specific tasks. Next, interteam meetings were held to present ideas and receive critical input. Finally, oral and poster research presentations were conducted at the UBSM science fair. Several team research projects covered topics in medical, environmental, and general microbiology. The three major assessment areas for the workshop and DCM included: (i) student’s perception of the workshops’ effectiveness in developing skills, content, and values; (ii) research team self- and group participation evaluation, and (iii) oral and poster presentation during the science fair. More than 91% of the students considered the workshops effective in the presentation of scientific method fundamentals. The combination of the workshop and the DCM increased student’s knowledge by 55% from pre- to posttests. Two rubrics were designed to assess the oral presentation and poster set-up. The poster and oral presentation scores averaged 83% and 75% respectively. Finally, we present a team assessment instrument that allows the self- and group evaluation of each research team. While the DCM has educational plasticity and versatility, here we document how the this model has been successfully incorporated in training and engaging students in scientific research in microbiology. PMID:23653564

  15. Bringing Students out of the Classroom and into Research Projects: An Undergraduate Team Research (UTR) Program at the University of Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, I. V.; Quirk, M.; Culbert, K. N.; Whitesides, A. S.; Sun, H.; Black, C. J.; Cao, W.; Zhang, T.; Paterson, S. R.; Memeti, V.; Anderson, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    In 2006, USC Earth Sciences professors Paterson and Anderson created the Undergraduate Team Research (UTR) program, a year-long, multidisciplinary, learner-centered, student research experience. This program is open to all USC undergraduate students, but has also involved a few outstanding undergraduate students from other universities. Since its inception the 47 participants have been a diverse group: 53% women, ~17% minorities, and 43% non-Earth Science majors. To date, 15 abstracts written by UTR participants have been presented at national GSA and AGU meetings and several research papers for publication are in preparation. 12 presentations have been produced at University-sponsored research symposia and culminated in a number of senior theses. The central component of this program is a field-based research experience which involves several weeks of geologic mapping in various locations around the world. During the summer expedition, participants organize themselves into 3-4 person mapping teams consisting of a mix of undergraduate geology majors, non-majors, and mentors (professors and graduate students). At the end of each day, student researchers (with limited mentoring) work together to draft a geologic map while discussing their findings, formulating hypotheses about possible geologic histories, and planning research goals and organizing mapping teams for the next day. Throughout the following academic year, the student researchers continue to work in teams to digitize their geologic map, decide which analyses need to be done, and prepare collected rock samples for various structural, geochemical, and geochronologic studies. Most student researchers agree that they learned more in a few weeks than they often did in an entire semester course. What aspects of the UTR program elicit these high-yield results, even for non-majors that can be applied to other learning environments? We speculate that three critical elements are important: (1) The most notable is

  16. Supporting Student Research Group Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopatin, Dennis E.

    1993-01-01

    This discussion describes methods that foster a healthy Student Research Group (SRG) and permits it to fulfill its responsibility in the development of the student researcher. The model used in the discussion is that of the University of Michigan School of Dentistry SRG. (GLR)

  17. Explaining Students' Appraisal of Lectures and Student-Activating Teaching: Perceived Context and Student Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyven, Katrien; Dochy, Filip; Janssens, Steven

    2012-01-01

    During lectures, some students are continuously focused and attentive, whereas others tend to be bored, jittery, or inattentive. The same might happen when students are given student-activating assignments. Some students simply love one type of instruction, whereas others tend to resent it. Moreover, it is not the context itself, but the context…

  18. How to Collaborate through Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Teachers are spending more of their time and making more decisions within teams. Effective teacher-based teams provide academic and behavioral support for students as well as professional development for teachers. Learn how the best teams function.

  19. Students' and experts' perspectives on three learning and teaching activities.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2014-09-01

    Nursing is a profession that closely related to human life, and nurses are required to demonstrate critical thinking and creativity in providing health care services. However, traditional teaching approaches usually limit students' autonomy and freedom of expressing their thoughts and feelings. In order to develop the corresponding competence of nursing students, I adopted three teaching innovations, namely writing poems, composing songs, and using role plays in a nursing problem-based learning class in a university in Hong Kong. According to students' reflective notes and comments from two international expert reviewers, participating in these activities is a valuable experience and students were able to develop clinical reasoning, empathy, team spirit, motivation to learn, creativity, and ability to summarise and reconstruct knowledge. It is hoped that more innovative learning activities will be implemented, to prepare professional and ethical nurses in the future. It is also hoped that this study could provide other PBL educators some insights in innovative problem-based learning activities. PMID:24679519

  20. NOVA ACADEMIC TEAMS PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WOLFE, ARTHUR B.

    AN ACADEMIC TEAMS PROGRAM TO PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR DEVELOPING OPTIMUM LEARNING POTENTIAL AND FOR FULFILLING DESIRES OF TALENTED STUDENTS IS PROPOSED. THE PROGRAM WILL BE INITIATED THROUGH A SERIES OF DISCUSSIONS WITH STUDENTS, FACULTY, PARENTS, AND CONSULTANTS, THE AREA OF CONCENTRATION FOR THE SELECTED TEAMS OF STUDENTS WILL BE IN THE FIELD…

  1. Independent Activities for Accelerated Students: Individualized Reading Instruction for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapides Parish School Board, Alexandria, LAa.

    The teaching guide for use with accelerated elementary school students contains suggestions for independent reading activities, a list of independent reading books for beginning readers, and suggestions for creative activities. Stressed is the value of sharing enthusiasm about books to spur independent reading. Suggestions are given for talking…

  2. Team-based learning increases active engagement and enhances development of teamwork and communication skills in a first-year course for veterinary and animal science undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Hazel, Susan J; Heberle, Nicole; McEwen, Margaret-Mary; Adams, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) was implemented into a first-year course (Principles in Animal Behaviour, Welfare and Ethics) for BSc Veterinary Bioscience (VB) and Animal Science (AS) students. TBL is now used widely in teaching medical students, but has had more limited uptake in veterinary education. This study reports its use over 2 years with cohorts of 126 and 138 students in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Average individual marks for multiple-choice question (MCQ) tests in the Readiness Assurance component of TBL were higher for the teams than for individuals for each session, explicitly demonstrating the advantages of teamwork. Students reported that they felt actively involved and that TBL helped them both with their learning and in developing other important skills, such as teamwork and communication. Qualitative analysis of written feedback from the students revealed positive themes of discussion, application, revelation, socializing, engagement, clarification, and retention/revision. In 2011 negative comments included the need to shorten the TBL sessions, but in 2012 tightening of the timelines meant that this was no longer a major concern. Requests to provide better introductory and background materials and ambiguity in questions in the TBL activities were what students least liked about the TBL. However, most comments were positive rather than negative in nature, and many students preferred the TBL to lectures. With requirements for curricula to teach professional skills, such as communication and teamwork, and the positive results from TBL's implementation, it is hoped that this study will encourage others to trial the use of TBL in veterinary education. PMID:24077314

  3. Break the Silence. Gay and Straight Students in Massachusetts Team Up to Make a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Lisa

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) at a high school in Canton (Massachusetts), a school-sanctioned student organization that gives gay and straight students a safe place to discuss sexual orientation issues. The GSA serves as a forum for educating students and can be a base for larger community education efforts. (SLD)

  4. Educational Activity Sites for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troutner, Joanne

    2005-01-01

    Finding quality Internet resources for high school students is a continuing challenge. Several high-quality web sites are presented for educators and students. These sites offer activities to learn how an art conservator looks at paintings, create a newspaper, research and develop an end product, build geometry and physics skills, explore science…

  5. Student Activism and the War in Vietnam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Jesse D.; Howard, Gary

    The present study represents an attempt to further delineate the sociological and psychological variables that predispose a student to become an activist of the "new left." A total of 103 students participated in the study, 48 experimental and 55 control subjects. Measures used included a self report, an activism index, a Vietnam opinion Survey,…

  6. Student Activities in Meteorology: SAM. Version 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Beverly L.; Passarelli, Elisa

    The task of providing hands-on as well as minds-on activities for students in science is one of concern to many scientists and educators. In an effort to inspire student interest in science and technology, scientists from the Forecast Systems Laboratory, a laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Environmental…

  7. The community health worker cultural mentoring project: preparing professional students for team work with health workers from urban communities.

    PubMed

    Sherwen, Laurie N; Schwolsky-Fitch, Elena; Rodriquez, Romelia; Horta, Greg; Lopez, Ivanna

    2007-01-01

    Community Health Workers or CHWs (also known by a variety of alternative titles) are health workers drawn from communities to provide access to care for members of their communities. CHWs have been documented as effective in delivering a variety of services in a culturally-sensitive manner, and in providing a bridge between health professionals and underserved or minority communities. Yet, CHWs have not been well incorporated into interdisciplinary health care teams. The majority of health professionals are not even aware of the possible role and skills of CHWs. Believing that the best time to educate professionals about this valuable health worker and ensure that CHWs become part of interdisciplinary health care teams is during the student years, the Hunter College Schools of the Health Professions, and the Community Health Worker Network of New York City developed a pilot project, the Community Health Worker Cultural Mentoring Project. Community Health Workers, who were members of the Network, served as "community mentors" for health professions students drawn from the programs of community health education, nursing, and nutrition. CHWs worked with faculty of selected courses in each of the professional programs, and served as panelists in these courses, presenting information about health beliefs and alternative health practices of diverse cultural groups in communities of New York City. Class sessions were first held in the fall of 2004; subsequent sessions were held in following semesters. Approximately 40 students participated in 7 classes, with 6 CHWs serving as mentors - two per class. At the end of the classroom presentations, students wrote reflections relating to their understanding of the CHW role and relevance for their future interdisciplinary practice. The majority of reflections met the goal of increasing professional students' understanding of the CHW role and skills. At this point, quantitative and qualitative data will need to be collected to

  8. Validation of Virtual Learning Team Competencies for Individual Students in a Distance Education Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topchyan, Ruzanna; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, the study aimed to validate the scale of the Virtual Team Competency Inventory in distance education, which had initially been designed for a corporate setting. Second, the methodological advantages of Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling (ESEM) framework over Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA)…

  9. Team Collaboration: The Use of Behavior Principles for Serving Students with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Amy L.; Stahmer, Aubyn C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and behavior analysts are key members of school-based teams that serve children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Behavior analysts approach assessment and intervention through the lens of applied behavior analysis (ABA). ABA-based interventions have been found effective for targeting skills across…

  10. Teaching 2.0: Teams Keep Teachers and Students Plugged into Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, Michelle; Hunt, Bud

    2011-01-01

    A Colorado district develops a two-year program that gives teacher teams an opportunity to learn how to use digital tools in the classroom. Called the Digital Learning Collaborative, it is built on three things about professional learning: (1) Learning takes time; (2) Learning is a social process; and (3) Learning about technology should be…

  11. A Unique Team Approach to the Total Education of the Student with a Neurological Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cant, Malcolm J.

    The paper outlines the program of services provided by a multidisciplinary professional team for the neurologically disordered child from preschool to young adulthood. Noted among the services offered are the following: an infant stimulation program, preschool prep program, group sensory integration program, special educational assistance, summer…

  12. The Effects of Communicative Genres on Intra-Group Conflict in Virtual Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Jung-Lung; Chou, Huey-Wen

    2009-01-01

    With increasing convenience and prevalence, the distant communication application has become a promising way for individuals who are eager to cooperate and interact virtually. This study explored the question of whether the collaborative interaction of the virtual teams has any effect on the conflict and network structure of virtual groups. A…

  13. Athletes on Top-Ranked Teams Lack Grades and Test Scores of Other Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naughton, Jim

    1997-01-01

    A National Collegiate Athletic Association study has found that the average athlete on a top college football or men's basketball team enters college in the bottom quarter of his class. Critics say the pursuit of success in athletics is corrupting higher education. Some attribute this pattern to racial bias in testing that skews athletes' test…

  14. Team Participation in Environmental Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musgrave, A. J.

    1969-01-01

    Describes experiments on the nutrition of weevils suitable for student teams, each team replicating the same experiment or experiments. Gives step by step experimental procedures and useful background information on weevils. Designed to introduce students to teamwork in science. (EB)

  15. Team-based learning in pharmacy education.

    PubMed

    Ofstad, William; Brunner, Lane J

    2013-05-13

    Instructors wanting to engage students in the classroom seek methods to augment the delivery of factual information and help students move from being passive recipients to active participants in their own learning. One such method that has gained interest is team-based learning. This method encourages students to be prepared before class and has students work in teams while in the classroom. Key benefits to this pedagogy are student engagement, improved communication skills, and enhanced critical-thinking abilities. In most cases, student satisfaction and academic performance are also noted. This paper reviews the fundamentals of team-based learning in pharmacy education and its implementation in the classroom. Literature reports from medical, nursing, and pharmacy programs are also discussed. PMID:23716738

  16. Team-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Ofstad, William

    2013-01-01

    Instructors wanting to engage students in the classroom seek methods to augment the delivery of factual information and help students move from being passive recipients to active participants in their own learning. One such method that has gained interest is team-based learning. This method encourages students to be prepared before class and has students work in teams while in the classroom. Key benefits to this pedagogy are student engagement, improved communication skills, and enhanced critical-thinking abilities. In most cases, student satisfaction and academic performance are also noted. This paper reviews the fundamentals of team-based learning in pharmacy education and its implementation in the classroom. Literature reports from medical, nursing, and pharmacy programs are also discussed. PMID:23716738

  17. Rapid Response Team activation in New Zealand hospitals-a multicentre prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Psirides, A J; Hill, J; Jones, D

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to describe the epidemiology of Rapid Response Team (RRT) activation in New Zealand public hospitals. We undertook a prospective multicentre observational study of RRT activations in 11 hospitals for consecutive 14-day periods during October-December 2014. A standardised case report form was used to collect data on patient demographics, RRT activation criteria and timing, vital signs on RRT arrival, team composition and intervention, treatment limitation and patient outcome at day 30. Three hundred and thirteen patients received 351 RRT calls during the study period. Patients were admitted under a medical specialty in 177 (56.5%) instances. Median duration from hospital admission to first RRT call was two days. Eighty-six percent of RRT calls were to inpatient wards. A total of 43.4% of RRT calls occurred between 0800 and 1700 hours (38% of the day) and 75.5% of RRT calls were activated by ward nurses. A median of three staff attended each call. Common triggers for RRT activation were increased Early Warning Score (56.2%) and staff concern (25.7%). During the RRT call, 2.8% of patients died; 19.8% died by day 30. New 'Not For Resuscitation' orders were written in 22.5% of RRT calls. By day 30, 56.2% of patients had been discharged home alive. In conclusion, RRTs in New Zealand are multidisciplinary, mostly nurse-activated and predominantly respond to deteriorating medical (rather than surgical) patients. Most patients remain on the ward. The RRT frequently implements treatment limitations. Given almost one in five patients die within 30 days, over half of whom die within 72 hours of RRT review, surviving the RRT call may provide false reassurance that the patient will subsequently do well. PMID:27246940

  18. The integrated model for interprofessional education: a design for preparing health professions' students to work in interprofessional teams.

    PubMed

    Grapczynski, Cynthia A; Schuurman, Shelley; Booth, Andrew D; Bambini, Deborah; Beel-Bates, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the process of helping students learn to work interprofessionally is figuring out how to design high-impact learning experiences that engage students in meaningful learning that is collaborative and experiential and can transform students understanding of their own and others' roles in the health care process. In this article, a model for interprofessional education, the Integrated Model for Interprofessional Education (IMIPE), is shared for introducing students in the health professions to the roles and responsibilities of some of the other healthcare professionals with whom they will work in practice. The IMIPE is a process model developed by an interprofessional faculty team used as the focal point of a pilot educational event for students from nursing, occupational therapy, physician assistant studies, and social work. The IMIPE is a derived model that combines concepts of holism, participation, and practical education, grounded in the adult educational philosophy of progressivism. Progressive adult education is focused on practical knowledge and problem-solving skills. The model uses collaborative, experiential, and transformative learning approaches to foster outcomes of communication, critical reflection, teamwork, ethics, and recognition of patient-client needs. These outcomes represent those identified by the World Health Organization and the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel. PMID:26046119

  19. To Become a Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standley, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of team-building in organizations looks at the essential components of trust, common purpose, supportive internal and external environments, and cohesion. Barriers to team development, such as internal competition or communication problems, and the role of the team leader are also discussed. A student campus organization is used for…

  20. Development of Environmental Knowledge, Team Working Skills and Desirable Behaviors on Environmental Conservation of Matthayomsuksa 6 Students Using Good Science Thinking Moves Method with Metacognition Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladawan, Charinrat; Singseewo, Adisak; Suksringarm, Paitool

    2015-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate environmental knowledge, team working skills, and desirable behaviors of students learning through the good science thinking moves method with metacognition techniques. The sample group included Matthayomsuksa 6 students from Nadoon Prachasan School, Nadoon District, Maha Sarakham Province. The research tools were…

  1. Alternative Strategies for the Problem Learner: Student Support Team Strategies Manual. A Handbook collected and Adapted by the Georgia Learning Resources Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Learning Resources System/Child Serve, Columbus.

    The manual presents the framework of the Student Support Team (SST), an approach involving two or more professionals who develop alternative instructional strategies for students in lieu of special education placement. General considerations are offered for classroom management, curriculum adaptations, and adaptations for the visually and hearing…

  2. Working Together To Become Proficient Readers. Early Impact of the Talent Development Middle School's Student Team Literature Program. Report No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac Iver, Douglas J.; Plank, Stephen B.; Balfanz, Robert

    The Talent Development Model of Middle School Reform includes a "Student Team Literature" (STL) program that relies on: (1) curricular materials designed to assist students to study great literature; (2) recommended instructional practices, peer assistance processes, and assessments; and (3) staff development, mentoring, and advising to support…

  3. Parental Influence on Psychological Value Perception of Co-Curricular Activities: Its Links with Improving Personality Traits of Higher Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, G. N. Sunith; Arockiasamy, S.

    2012-01-01

    Co-curricular activities provide prospects for better youth development and growth experiences. These activities are particularly good at providing opportunities for students to work in teams, to exercise leadership, and to take the initiative themselves. The active participation of the students is required to reap out maximum benefits out of such…

  4. Health Mentor-Reported Outcomes and Perceptions of Student Team Performance in a Longitudinal Interprofessional Education Program.

    PubMed

    Umland, Elena; Collins, Lauren; Baronner, Ashley; Lim, Edwin; Giordano, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The need to evaluate the impact of interprofessional education (IPE) on learner outcomes is clear, but assessment of IPE's impact on patient health and well-being is lacking. This mixed-methods study evaluated perspectives of community volunteers, health mentors (HMs) who have at least one chronic condition, who participated in an IPE curriculum. In May 2014, 93 HMs concluding the Health Mentors Program completed a survey evaluating their student teams according to the Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies' four domains and program impact on health/wellbeing using a 4-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree; 4=strongly agree). The average response to statements regarding the four domains of values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, communication, and teamwork statements were all >3.0. HMs rated program satisfaction on a 10-point scale (1=least satisfied, 10=most satisfied) and answered open-ended outcome questions. The average program satisfaction score was 9.13±1.43; increased motivation to make and maintain healthy behaviors was reported. In a follow-up focus group with 10 mentors, high satisfaction levels from working with interprofessional student teams were reported, and substantial improvements in managing health conditions and improving overall health status were relayed. Further studies will determine if the patient-reported outcomes of the mentors correlate with objective health measures. PMID:27585619

  5. Overview of Advanced Space Propulsion Activities in the Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David; Carruth, Ralph; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd; Kamenetzky, Rachel; Gray, Perry

    2000-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system, and beyond, requires spacecraft velocities beyond our current technological level. Technologies addressing this limitation are numerous. The Space Environmental Effects (SEE) Team at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is focused on three discipline areas of advanced propulsion; Tethers, Beamed Energy, and Plasma. This presentation will give an overview of advanced propulsion related activities in the Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC. Advancements in the application of tethers for spacecraft propulsion were made while developing the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS). New tether materials were developed to meet the specifications of the ProSEDS mission and new techniques had to be developed to test and characterize these tethers. Plasma contactors were developed, tested and modified to meet new requirements. Follow-on activities in tether propulsion include the Air-SEDS activity. Beamed energy activities initiated with an experimental investigation to quantify the momentum transfer subsequent to high power, 5J, ablative laser interaction with materials. The next step with this experimental investigation is to quantify non-ablative photon momentum transfer. This step was started last year and will be used to characterize the efficiency of solar sail materials before and after exposure to Space Environmental Effects (SEE). Our focus with plasma, for propulsion, concentrates on optimizing energy deposition into a magnetically confined plasma and integration of measurement techniques for determining plasma parameters. Plasma confinement is accomplished with the Marshall Magnetic Mirror (M3) device. Initial energy coupling experiments will consist of injecting a 50 amp electron beam into a target plasma. Measurements of plasma temperature and density will be used to determine the effect of changes in magnetic field structure, beam current, and gas species. Experimental observations will be compared to

  6. Effect of team rank and player classification on activity profiles of elite wheelchair rugby players.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, James M; Mason, Barry S; Malone, Laurie A; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to establish which indicators of mobility are associated with successful wheelchair rugby performance and determine whether these indicators differed across classification. Data were collected from 11 international teams during 30 matches (353 match observations) using a radio-frequency-based, indoor tracking system across two tournaments. Players (n = 111) were first grouped by team rank as determined by their International Wheelchair Rugby Federation (IWRF) world ranking (LOW, MID, HIGH) and then into one of four groups based on their IWRF classification: Group I (0.5), Group II (1.0-1.5), Group III (2.0-2.5) and Group IV (3.0-3.5). The volume of activity (relative distance and mean speed), peak speed and time spent within classification-specific arbitrary speed zones were calculated for each individual. Although no differences were identified in the volume of activity, playing time was significantly reduced in LOW (34:51 ± 8:35) compared to MID (48:54 ± 0:51) and HIGH (45:38 ± 9:53), which was further supported by the greater number of substitutions performed by LOW. HIGH achieved greater peak speeds (3.55 ± 0.40 m · s-(1)) than LOW (3.27 ± 0.42 m · s(-1)) and MID (3.45 ± 0.41 m · s(-1)). Peak speed was further shown to be classification-dependent (P ≤ 0.005), whereby HIGH Groups III and IV players achieved greater peak speeds than LOW and MID. The time spent performing high-intensity activities was also greater in HIGH compared to LOW and MID, whilst further influenced by classification (P ≤ 0.0005). To conclude, peak speed and the ability to perform a greater number of high-intensity activities were associated with successful performance in wheelchair rugby. PMID:25812720

  7. UW Team Reaches Out to Grade- and High-School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Leroy

    1994-01-01

    Describes an outreach program designed to expose high school students to cutting-edge science. High school students are provided with hands-on experience in molecular biology (polymerase chain reaction, restriction mapping, chromatography, gel electrophoresis, human DNA sequencing, etc.) and may have an opportunity to participate in the Human…

  8. Instructional Leadership: The Role of the Administrative Team and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pink, William T.

    In an effort to support the contention that the levels of student achievement and discipline depend more on administrative style and school ethos than on inner city location and/or social class, race, or IQ of students, an investigation was conducted of a single midwestern urban high school. The procedure consisted of observation and interviews of…

  9. Communicative Competence Inventory for Students Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication: A Team Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Yun-Ching; Douglas, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Students who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) represent a heterogonous group with complex communication needs. AAC--including aided communication means (e.g., pictures, devices) and unaided (e.g., signs, gestures)--is often used to support students who have difficulties with speech production, language comprehension, and…

  10. The Effects of Extroversion on Conflict Resolution in Student Teams: A Cross-Cultural Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tashchian, Armen; Forrester, William R.; Kalamas, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a cross-cultural investigation of the role of Extroversion in determining the conflict resolution styles of business students in the United States and the Republic of Armenia. PLS modeling showed that Extroversion was associated with the Dominating style among US students and with the Compromising and Obliging…

  11. Flexibility for Fairness: Crafting Business Rules for Student Learning Objectives. Ask the Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potemski, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Across the United States, a wide cross-section of administrators and teachers are learning the ins and outs of setting, assessing, and scoring student learning objectives (SLOs). An SLO is a set of goals that measures an educator's progress in achieving student growth targets. SLOs are particularly helpful for teachers in nontested subjects and…

  12. Team Conflict Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectancy of Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Robert W.; Bailey, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of a self-efficacy framework, the authors present a theoretically sound model explaining the behavioral intentions of students to apply teamwork skills they learn in business courses. The model links variables at least partially controllable by faculty in a classroom setting to students' behavioral intentions to use teamwork skills.…

  13. Dealing with the Aftermath of a Student Suicide: A T.E.A.M. Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Richard L.; Lepkowski, William J.; Davidson, Kimberly K.

    1998-01-01

    Suicide, currently the second major cause of death among youth, is increasing. Dealing with the aftermath of student suicide requires unusual interventions called "postventions." Important functions include preventing cluster suicides, reducing student isolation, and aiding survivors in the grieving process. Planning involves four steps:…

  14. Measuring Thermal Variations in a Valley Environment Using a Team, Field Project Designed by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, J. Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Students frequently struggle when scientific instruction seems divorced from personal experience, especially in the physical sub-disciplines, like climatology, where exercise books often present historical or abstracted case studies. In contrast I present a three-phase project involving student input on experimental design, data collection, and…

  15. Strategies and Intervening Factors Influencing Student Social Interaction and Experiential Learning in an Interdisciplinary Research Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryser, Laura; Halseth, Greg; Thien, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Faculty have long incorporated students into interdisciplinary research projects to meet increasingly common demands for collaborative research by federal funding agencies. Despite the critical role of experiential learning in building student research skills and capacity, few have explored social interaction mechanisms used to facilitate student…

  16. Sports Medicine. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, Student Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is for a course designed for students investigating the activities within the sports medicine department or considering any of the areas of kinesiology as a career. The material is designed for individualized study and is competency based with educational outcomes stated for…

  17. Let's Debate: Active Learning Encourages Student Participation and Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oros, Andrew L.

    2007-01-01

    Structured classroom debates (SCDs), whereby teams of students debate a question prepared outside of class, help advance two goals many political science instructors struggle to achieve with their students: classroom participation beyond the "usual suspects" present in every classroom and critical thinking and analysis of political issues. This…

  18. Advanced Placement Economics. Macroeconomics: Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, John S.

    This book is designed to help advanced placement students better understand macroeconomic concepts through various activities. The book contains 6 units with 64 activities, sample multiple-choice questions, sample short essay questions, and sample long essay questions. The units are entitled: (1) "Basic Economic Concepts"; (2) "Measuring Economic…

  19. Advanced Placement Economics. Microeconomics: Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, John S.

    This book is designed to help advanced placement students better understand microeconomic concepts through various activities. The book contains 5 units with 73 activities, sample multiple-choice questions, sample short essay questions, and sample long essay questions. The units are entitled: (1) "The Basic Economic Problem"; (2) "The Nature and…

  20. Physical Activity among Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.; Ross, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study provides insight into the perceived physical activity levels of students attending a Midwestern 2-year community college. Over 60% of respondents were classified as overweight or obese based on a BMI measurement. The majority of respondents were not participating regularly in physical activity to gain any health benefits,…

  1. Practical Activities in Astronomy for Nonscience Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisard, Walter J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes science activities which have been successful with nonscience majors. Each activity requires students to make observations, record the data gathered, interpret data, and prepare a written report. Subject areas include motion of stars, sunspots, lunar orbits, sunset points, meteor showers, and sun shadows. (JN)

  2. Helping Students Become Active and Smart!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Rhonda

    2005-01-01

    With the recently released Position Statement, "Physical Activity for Children Guidelines" (NASPE, 2004), the time is ideal for physical educators to look for ways to encourage students to be active outside the classroom. The first guideline recommends "children accumulate at least 60 minutes, and up to several hours of age-appropriate physical…

  3. Health Activities for Primary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This manual targets new and second-year Peace Corps volunteers, presenting health lessons and activities for primary school students in Thailand. Each section of the manual outlines basic technical information about the topic, contains several detailed lesson plans, and lists quick activities that can be carried out at schools. Songs and recipes…

  4. Activities to Develop Your Students' Motor Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Mary Kay; Safran, Joan S.

    1986-01-01

    Instructions and illustrations support this discussion of learning activities designed to remediate deficiences and build skills in balance and/or motor skills for mildly handicapped students who may not have access to physical therapy or adaptive physical education. Appropriate for both regular and special classes, activities include arm…

  5. Using Summer Faculty-Student Consultant Teams to Solve Industrial Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelsen, Donald L.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes a three-week, faculty-student summer project involving the study of waste-water treatment of refinery effluents. Discusses the use of such projects to aid industry in analyzing their problems. (MLH)

  6. Involving postgraduate's students in undergraduate small group teaching promotes active learning in both

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ruchi; Modi, Jyoti Nath; Vyas, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lecture is a common traditional method for teaching, but it may not stimulate higher order thinking and students may also be hesitant to express and interact. The postgraduate (PG) students are less involved with undergraduate (UG) teaching. Team based small group active learning method can contribute to better learning experience. Aim: To-promote active learning skills among the UG students using small group teaching methods involving PG students as facilitators to impart hands-on supervised training in teaching and managerial skills. Methodology: After Institutional approval under faculty supervision 92 UGs and 8 PGs participated in 6 small group sessions utilizing the jigsaw technique. Feedback was collected from both. Observations: Undergraduate Feedback (Percentage of Students Agreed): Learning in small groups was a good experience as it helped in better understanding of the subject (72%), students explored multiple reading resources (79%), they were actively involved in self-learning (88%), students reported initial apprehension of performance (71%), identified their learning gaps (86%), team enhanced their learning process (71%), informal learning in place of lecture was a welcome change (86%), it improved their communication skills (82%), small group learning can be useful for future self-learning (75%). Postgraduate Feedback: Majority performed facilitation for first time, perceived their performance as good (75%), it was helpful in self-learning (100%), felt confident of managing students in small groups (100%), as facilitator they improved their teaching skills, found it more useful and better identified own learning gaps (87.5%). Conclusions: Learning in small groups adopting team based approach involving both UGs and PGs promoted active learning in both and enhanced the teaching skills of the PGs. PMID:26380201

  7. The impact of nursing students' chemistry learning performance assessment in Taiwan: competitive versus non-competitive student team achievement division approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai-Ping

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of competitive Student Team Achievement Division (STAD), non-competitive STAD, and traditional learning on chemistry learning and learning perceptions. Sample, design and methods: By adopting the STAD approach, this study examined 144 nursing students at a five-year junior college in northern Taiwan during the first semester (totaling 18 weeks) of the 2008 academic year. Results: The findings reveal that both a heterogeneous group with external pressure (involving competitive STAD) and a friendship group with affective pressure (involving traditional learning) enhance group cohesion and assist students' meaningful learning; the heterogeneous group without extra pressure (involving non-competitive STAD), by contrast, fails because of apathy and lassitude. Moreover, learning effectiveness will obviously predominate until the learning strategy continues for a long period or at least one semester. Conclusions: This study revealed that the learning performance level of the competitive STAD group is significantly different from that of the non-competitive STAD group; and the learning performance level of the traditional group is significantly different from that of the non-competitive STAD group. Both the competitive STAD group and traditional group of medium ability students are significantly different from the non-competitive STAD group. Low-ability students from the competitive STAD group are significantly different from those of the non-competitive STAD, though no significant differences were found in learning perception. However, both a lack of friendship and a lack of ability in using algorithms may affect students' chemistry learning. Furthermore, gender imbalance, educational culture, and group emotions are factors that may influence student learning performance. Further study should focus on the use of grouping, improve responsibility in group discussion, and investigate group interaction

  8. A Student Team in a University of Michigan Biomedical Engineering Design Course Constructs a Microfluidic Bioreactor for Studies of Zebrafish Development

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu-chi; Li, David; Al-Shoaibi, Ali; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Chen, Hao; Ali, Shahid; Flak, Betsy; Perrin, Catherine; Winslow, Max; Shah, Harsh; Ramamurthy, Poornapriya; Schmedlen, Rachael H.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish is a valuable model for teaching developmental, molecular, and cell biology; aquatic sciences; comparative anatomy; physiology; and genetics. Here we demonstrate that zebrafish provide an excellent model system to teach engineering principles. A seven-member undergraduate team in a biomedical engineering class designed, built, and tested a zebrafish microfluidic bioreactor applying microfluidics, an emerging engineering technology, to study zebrafish development. During the semester, students learned engineering and biology experimental design, chip microfabrication, mathematical modeling, zebrafish husbandry, principles of developmental biology, fluid dynamics, microscopy, and basic molecular biology theory and techniques. The team worked to maximize each person's contribution and presented weekly written and oral reports. Two postdoctoral fellows, a graduate student, and three faculty instructors coordinated and directed the team in an optimal blending of engineering, molecular, and developmental biology skill sets. The students presented two posters, including one at the Zebrafish meetings in Madison, Wisconsin (June 2008). PMID:19292670

  9. The advantages of early trauma team activation in the management of major trauma patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Youngsun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Trauma team activation (TTA) has been shown to have fundamental impact on trauma patients' outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term outcomes of use of a new TTA protocol in the management of major trauma patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy. Methods The medical records of trauma patients who had been treated by the new TTA protocol (NT) over 18 months were compared with those of trauma patients treated by the old TTA protocol (OT) over 18 months. Comparisons between the two groups in terms of the time interval between accident and emergency room (ER) arrival, between ER arrival and CT scanning, between ER arrival and operating room (OR) presentation, between accident and OR presentation, mean intensive care unit (ICU) stay, mean hospital stay, mortality within 24 hours, mean mortality within one month, and overall mortality were performed using the Pearson chi-squared test and Student t-test. Results The time interval between accident and ER arrival, between ER arrival and CT scanning, between ER arrival and OR presentation, and between accident and OR presentation was found to have decreased significantly with the use of NT compared to OT. However, the mean ICU stay, mean hospital stay, mortality within 24 hours, mortality within one month, and overall mortality were found not to have improved. Conclusion While initiation of early TTA can shorten the time interval in the management of trauma patients, it may not improve patient outcomes. PMID:25485240

  10. Technical activity profile and influence of body anthropometry on playing performance in female elite team handball.

    PubMed

    Michalsik, Lars B; Aagaard, Per; Madsen, Klavs

    2015-04-01

    To determine the physical demands placed on female elite team handball (TH) players in relation to playing position and body anthropometry, female elite TH primarily field players were monitored during match-play using video recording and subsequent computerized technical match analysis during 5 regular tournament match seasons. Technical match activities were distributed in 6 major types of playing actions (shots, breakthroughs, fast breaks, technical errors, defensive errors, and tackles) and further divided into various subcategories (e.g., type of shot, hard or light tackles, claspings, screenings, and blockings). Furthermore, anthropometric measurements were performed. Each player had 28.3 ± 11.0 (group means ± SD) high-intense playing actions per match with a total effective playing time of 50.70 ± 5.83 minutes. On average, each player made 2.8 ± 2.6 fast breaks, gave 7.9 ± 14.4 screenings, received 14.6 ± 9.2 tackles in total, and performed 7.7 ± 3.7 shots while in offense, along with 3.5 ± 3.8 blockings, 1.9 ± 2.7 claspings, and 6.2 ± 3.8 hard tackles in defense. Mean body height, body mass, and age in the Danish Premier Female Team Handball League were 175.4 ± 6.1 cm, 69.5 ± 6.5 kg, and 25.4 ± 3.7 years, respectively. Wing players were lighter (63.5 ± 4.8 kg, p < 0.001) and smaller (169.3 ± 4.9 cm, p < 0.001) than backcourt players (BP) (70.6 ± 5.3 kg, 177.0 ± 5.4 cm) and pivots (PV) (72.5 ± 4.9 kg, 177.7 ± 4.9 cm). In conclusion, the present match observations revealed that female elite TH players during competitive games intermittently perform a high number of short-term, high-intense technical playing actions making modern female elite TH a physically demanding team sport. No sign of technical fatigue were observed, since the amount of intense technical playing actions remained unchanged in the second half. Marked positional differences in the physical demands were demonstrated, with wing players performing more fast breaks and less

  11. Student-Student Online Coaching: Conceptualizing an Emerging Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Stenbom, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe student-student online coaching, defined as "an online service where a student gets support on a specific subject matter from a more experienced student". Student-student online coaching emphasizes learning a subject matter by giving a student the opportunity to get coached by a coach, i.e. a more experienced…

  12. The Global Youth Service Team: students applying science and technology in remote, developing region of the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, Doug

    2012-03-01

    Eh Kalu, director of the Karen Department of Health and Welfare along the border region between Thailand and Burma said, ``It is very difficult to attend to a medical emergency at night when all you have are candles for light.'' The Global Youth Service Team (GYST) provides high school and college students with the opportunity to apply science that they have learned in the performance of international humanitarian service. Volunteers with the GYST build solar powered electrical systems, ultraviolet water purifiers, provide training and education to people who are most in need due to energy poverty, lack access to resources, natural disasters or human rights violations. GYST volunteers train with photovoltaic materials and equipment to become solar energy technicians. They then travel to remote communities in developing countries where we are able to catalyze improvements in education and health care, promote sustainable energy initiatives and help communities develop the capacity to use their own resources by which to create opportunity.

  13. Meeting the Needs of Students with 2e: It Takes a Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mary Ruth; Gallagher, Shelagh

    2015-01-01

    The provision of flexible, multidimensional, customized supports and services for a twice-exceptional (2e) child requires a system of education that is capable of dynamic and personalized interventions that respond to a 2e student's learning strengths and challenges. We believe that this kind of educational response entails more than an excellent…

  14. Developing Students' Capacity for Learning and Thinking through Integrated Curriculum and Team Learning Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jutras, Phillip F.

    Regis College (Massachusetts) has expanded student learning skills through through changes in the management program toward increasing integration of management and liberal arts disciplines and increased opportunities for cooperative and experiential learning. The program stresses making conceptual connections and part/whole relations in…

  15. Doctoral Students' Experience with Using the Reflecting Team Model of Supervision Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sindlinger, Jodi

    2011-01-01

    Evidence of the increasing use of technology in counselor education is indicated by the increase in journal articles, programs, websites, and books on this topic (Albrecht & Jones, 2001; Layne & Hohenshil, 2005). The Internet has emerged as an important tool in the training and supervision of counseling students (Conn, Roberts, & Powell, 2009;…

  16. Communication, and Team-Working Skills in Second-Year Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Goldrick, Niamh B.; Marzec, Bartosz; Scully, P. Noelle; Draper, Sylvia M.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2002, a multidisciplinary program has been used to encourage science students to build on their chemical knowledge and to appreciate how it applies to the world around them. The program is interactive and instills a new set of core learning skills that are often underrepresented in undergraduate curricula, namely, cooperative learning,…

  17. Student Team Achievement Divisions (STAD) Technique through the Moodle to Enhance Learning Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiantong, Monchai; Teemuangsai, Sanit

    2013-01-01

    One of the benefits of using collaborative learning is enhancing learning achievement and increasing social skills, and the second benefits is as the more students work together in collaborative groups, the more they understand, retain, and feel better about themselves and their peers, moreover working together in a collaborative environment…

  18. Establishing and Maintaining High Expectations for Deaf/Blind Students Using a Team Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mockler, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    As a teacher of the deaf as well as the classroom teacher, Kimberly Mockler works very closely with the teacher of the visually impaired. This involves sharing ideas, resources, and lesson plans for the deaf/blind students. Their lessons and goals are very similar and overlap in several areas. A major challenge for both of them is maintaining high…

  19. Who Does What on the Interdisciplinary Team: Regarding Physical Education for Students with Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Deborah R.; Sayers, L. Kristi

    2003-01-01

    This article provides information about the roles and responsibilities of physical therapists, occupational therapists, therapeutic recreation specialists, and adapted physical educators working with students with disabilities. Examples are provided of individualized education programs that combine the expertise of these professionals. Examples of…

  20. Leadership Team Actions that Manifest Collective Autonomy and Their Impact on Student Growth and Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegley, Brian K.

    2012-01-01

    To be successful in the age of accountability, principals and all school leaders need to continue to build their capacity to lead meaningful, systemic and sustainable student improvement efforts that incorporate the required areas of reading and mathematics. A review of the educational literature revealed several studies that identified the…

  1. Addressing Student Problem Behavior: An IEP Team's Introduction to Functional Behavioral Assessment and Behavior Intervention Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Mary Magee; Gable, Robert A.; Rutherford, Robert B., Jr.; Nelson, C. Michael; Howell, Kenneth W.

    This paper provides guidelines for conducting a functional behavioral assessment and developing positive behavior intervention plans with students who have behavior disorders or other disabilities in the context of requirements of the 1997 Amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). After an introduction, rights and…

  2. Second Language Socialization through Team Interaction among Electrical and Computer Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Caroline H.

    2007-01-01

    This article, based on a longitudinal, ethnographic study among engineering students, examines the interactional processes surrounding second language (L2) socialization. L2 socialization perspectives argue that the cognitive and the social are interconnected, and that learning an L2 is a process of coming to understand socially constructed…

  3. Turbine Technology Team - An overview of current and planned activities relevant to the National Launch System (NLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    The current status of the activities and future plans of the Turbine Technology Team of the Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics is reviewed. The activities of the Turbine Team focus on developing and enhancing codes and models, obtaining data for code validation and general understanding of flows through turbines, and developing and analyzing the aerodynamic designs of turbines suitable for use in the Space Transportation Main Engine fuel and oxidizer turbopumps. Future work will include the experimental evaluation of the oxidizer turbine configuration, the development, analysis, and experimental verification of concepts to control secondary and tip losses, and the aerodynamic design, analysis, and experimental evaluation of turbine volutes.

  4. Team Machine: A Decision Support System for Team Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergey, Paul; King, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the cross-disciplinary research that resulted in a decision-support tool, Team Machine (TM), which was designed to create maximally diverse student teams. TM was used at a large United States university between 2004 and 2012, and resulted in significant improvement in the performance of student teams, superior overall balance…

  5. Making Teamwork Work: Team Knowledge for Team Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Guchait, Priyanko; Lei, Puiwa; Tews, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the impact of two types of team knowledge on team effectiveness. The study assessed the impact of taskwork knowledge and teamwork knowledge on team satisfaction and performance. A longitudinal study was conducted with 27 service-management teams involving 178 students in a real-life restaurant setting. Teamwork knowledge was found to impact both team outcomes. Furthermore, team learning behavior was found to mediate the relationships between teamwork knowledge and team outcomes. Educators and managers should therefore ensure these types of knowledge are developed in teams along with learning behavior for maximum effectiveness. PMID:25856724

  6. Regular College Preparatory Students' Perceptions of the Student Teams Achievement Divisions Approach in an Academic College Preparatory Biology Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Aarti P.

    2009-01-01

    Cooperative learning allows individuals with varying abilities to work alongside their peers. Students are placed into achievement levels based on placement test scores. The Regular College Preparatory (RCP) level is a score of 59% or lower and Academic College Preparatory (ACP) level is a score of 60-92% on the placement test. The purpose of this…

  7. Astronomy Student Activities Using Stellarium Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benge, Raymond D.; Tuttle, S. R.

    2012-01-01

    Planetarium programs can be used to provide a valuable learning experience for introductory astronomy students. Educational activities can be designed to utilize the capabilities of the software to display the sky, coordinates, motions in the sky, etc., in order to learn basic astronomical concepts. Most of the major textbook publishers have an option of bundling planetarium software and even laboratory activities using such software with textbooks. However, commercial planetarium software often is updated on a different schedule from the textbook revision and new edition schedule. The software updates also sometimes occur out of sync with college textbook adoption deadlines. Changes in software and activity curriculum often translate into increases costs for students and the college. To provide stability to the process, faculty at Tarrant County College have developed a set of laboratory exercises, entitled Distant Nature, using free open source Stellarium software. Stellarium is a simple, yet powerful, program that is available in formats that run on a variety of operating systems (Windows, Apple, linux). A web site was developed for the Distant Nature activities having a set version of Stellarium that students can download and install on their own computers. Also on the web site, students can access the instructions and worksheets associated with the various Stellarium based activities. A variety of activities are available to support two semesters of introductory astronomy. The Distant Nature web site has been used for one year with Tarrant County College astronomy students and is now available for use by other institutions. The Distant Nature web site is http://www.stuttle1.com/DN_Astro/index.html .

  8. Student Active Learning Methods in Physical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, Robert J.; Kovac, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    We describe two strategies for implementing active learning in physical chemistry. One involves supplementing a traditional lecture course with heavily computer-based active-learning exercises carried out by cooperative groups in a department computer lab. The other uses cooperative learning almost exclusively, supplemented by occasional mini-lectures. Both approaches seemed to result in better student learning and a more positive attitude toward the subject. On the basis of our respective experiences using active learning techniques, we discuss some of the strengths of these techniques and some of the challenges we encountered using the active-learning approach in teaching physical chemistry.

  9. Quilts of Alaska--Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Museum, Juneau.

    This student activities booklet, "Quilts of Alaska," contains historical and educational information on quilts. It is colorfully illustrated with examples of different types of quilts. The booklet describes album or signature quilts, which from 1840 to the 1890s, were a U.S. fad, such as were autograph albums. As the name suggests, these quilts…

  10. Student Activity Funds: Procedures and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    An effective internal-control system can help school business administrators meet the challenges of accounting for student activity funds. Such a system should include appropriate policies and procedures, identification of key control points, self-assessments, audit trails, and internal and external audits. (MLH)

  11. Embedding Research Activities to Enhance Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Cynthia M.; Kenney, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper's novel, research-oriented approach is to embed research-based activities in a core second-year course of a university business degree program to support and develop student research capabilities. Design/methodology/approach: The design draws on Boud and Prosser's work to foster participation in a…

  12. The Characteristics of a Student Activities Director.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughs, Teena

    Twenty-four characteristics of effective leaders are described as an aid in helping others become effective student activities directors. It is stated that leaders are made, not born; leadership must be learned from experience, not from a textbook; and one must build on successes and learn from mistakes. Among the characteristics of effective…

  13. Farkle Fundamentals and Fun. Activities for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooley, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    The dice game Farkle provides an excellent basis for four activities that reinforce probability and expected value concepts for students in an introductory statistics class. These concepts appear in the increasingly popular AP statistics course (Peck 2011) and are used in analyzing ethical issues from insurance and gambling (COMAP 2009; Woodward…

  14. Journey to China: Activities for Elementary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Program on International and Cross Cultural Education.

    Ten lessons designed to introduce elementary students to China are featured in this document. The lessons are aimed at second through fourth grade, but they also include follow-up activities for kindergarten through sixth grade and are easily adapted to a given grade level. The lessons also are designed to incorporate elements and skills…

  15. Incorporating Student Activities into Climate Change Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, H.; Kelly, K.; Klein, D.; Cadavid, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    atmospheric circulation with applications of the Lorenz model, explored the land-sea breeze problem with the Dynamics and Thermodynamics Circulation Model (DTDM), and developed simple radiative transfer models. Class projects explored the effects of varying the content of CO2 and CH4 in the atmosphere, as well as the properties of paleoclimates in atmospheric simulations using EdGCM. Initial assessment of student knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors associated with these activities, particularly about climate change, was measured. Pre- and post-course surveys provided student perspectives about the courses and their learning about remote sensing and climate change concepts. Student performance on the tutorials and course projects evaluated students' ability to learn and apply their knowledge about climate change and skills with remote sensing to assigned problems or proposed projects of their choice. Survey and performance data illustrated that the exercises were successful in meeting their intended learning objectives as well as opportunities for further refinement and expansion.

  16. Team Based Engineering Design Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to explore design thinking among teams of high school students. This objective is encompassed in the research question driving this inquiry: How do teams of high school students allocate time across stages of design? Design thinking on the professional level typically occurs in a team environment. Many…

  17. Team Based Engineering Design Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to explore design thinking among teams of high school students. This objective was encompassed in the research question driving the inquiry: How do teams of high school students allocate time across stages of design? Design thinking on the professional level typically occurs in a team environment. Many…

  18. Planning a pharmacy-led medical mission trip, part 2: servant leadership and team dynamics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dana A; Brown, Daniel L; Yocum, Christine K

    2012-06-01

    While pharmacy curricula can prepare students for the cognitive domains of pharmacy practice, mastery of the affective aspects can prove to be more challenging. At the Gregory School of Pharmacy, medical mission trips have been highly effective means of impacting student attitudes and beliefs. Specifically, these trips have led to transformational changes in student leadership capacity, turning an act of service into an act of influence. Additionally, building team unity is invaluable to the overall effectiveness of the trip. Pre-trip preparation for teams includes activities such as routine team meetings, team-building activities, and implementation of committees, as a means of promoting positive team dynamics. While in the field, team dynamics can be fostered through activities such as daily debriefing sessions, team disclosure times, and provision of medical services. PMID:22619473

  19. Student-Driven Engagement: An Interdisciplinary-Team Research-Learning Renewable Energy Laboratory Experience for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuominen, Mark

    How does engagement and deep learning happen? Every science department seeks to cultivate an excellent level of scientific skills and knowledge in its undergraduate students. Yet, this is not sufficient to thrive as a professional. Engaging directly in real-world challenges can foster a professional attitude: a high level of self-efficacy, a genuine sense of relevance, and proactivity. This talk will describe pedagogical developments of a junior-year renewable energy laboratory course at the University of Massachusetts Amherst that is part of a four-year Integrated Concentration in Science (iCons) program. Over the four years, the interdisciplinary iCons students-from 24 various majors-work through case studies, selection and analysis of real-world problems, inception and development of potential solutions, integrative communication, experimental practice, and capstone research. The team dynamic is a central aspect of the experience, yielding significant educational and developmental benefits. The third-year energy course uses adopts a culture of a small vibrant R and D company (I3E - ``Energy, Powered By Intelligence''), in which every person in the course has a vital responsibility and creative resourcefulness must be employed in the project work. The course emphasizes the practice of using reflection and redesign, as a means of generating better solutions and embedding the practice of learning in a real-world context. This work is supported in part by NSF Grant DUE-1140805.

  20. A Team Approach to Enhance Scholarship Among Honors Students in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Jukkala, Angela M; Miltner, Rebecca S; Morrison, Shannon L; Gisiger-Camata, Sylvia; Todd, Allison; Moneyham, Linda D; Meneses, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    Honors programs within schools of nursing have the potential to enhance young nurses' interest in developing programs of research early in their careers and can thus contribute to the successful development of nursing knowledge. Such programs also provide opportunities to enhance knowledge and skill in leadership and teamwork at a critical time during the development of their professional nurse identity. This article presents the successful approach one organization took when revising its honors program to meet the current needs of students, society, and the profession. PMID:27405203

  1. Focus on Geography--Team Themes and Field Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Describes an approach used by the Wayland, Massachusetts, middle school to organizing students into instructional teams. Explains that each instructional team is organized into a "house" named after a significant individual around whom the curriculum and theme for field trips is designed. Highlights the Rachel Carson House activities of learning…

  2. Do collaborative practical tests encourage student-centered active learning of gross anatomy?

    PubMed

    Green, Rodney A; Cates, Tanya; White, Lloyd; Farchione, Davide

    2016-05-01

    Benefits of collaborative testing have been identified in many disciplines. This study sought to determine whether collaborative practical tests encouraged active learning of anatomy. A gross anatomy course included a collaborative component in four practical tests. Two hundred and seven students initially completed the test as individuals and then worked as a team to complete the same test again immediately afterwards. The relationship between mean individual, team, and difference (between team and individual) test scores to overall performance on the final examination (representing overall learning in the course) was examined using regression analysis. The overall mark in the course increased by 9% with a decreased failure rate. There was a strong relationship between individual score and final examination mark (P < 0.001) but no relationship for team score (P = 0.095). A longitudinal analysis showed that the test difference scores increased after Test 1 which may be indicative of social loafing and this was confirmed by a significant negative relationship between difference score on Test 4 (indicating a weaker student) and final examination mark (P < 0.001). It appeared that for this cohort, there was little peer-to-peer learning occurring during the collaborative testing and that weaker students gained the benefit from team marks without significant active learning taking place. This negative outcome may be due to insufficient encouragement of the active learning strategies that were expected to occur during the collaborative testing process. An improved understanding of the efficacy of collaborative assessment could be achieved through the inclusion of questionnaire based data to allow a better interpretation of learning outcomes. Anat Sci Educ 9: 231-237. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26415089

  3. Student Attitudes and Recommendations on Active Learning: A Student-Led Survey Gauging Course Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Seal, October; Sokolove, Phillip

    2001-01-01

    Describes an active learning approach used in an introductory biology class and evaluates the project with student surveys. Presents students' answers to survey questions. (Contains 16 references.) (YDS)

  4. Design and Evaluation of a Self-Care Educational Activity as a Student Learning Experience

    PubMed Central

    Skoy, Elizabeth T.; Eukel, Heidi N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To design an educational activity and evaluate its effectiveness on increasing third-year pharmacy students’ knowledge and confidence to recommend self-care products to patients. Design. Faculty members created a self-care activity, the Amazing Self-Care Race, for educational use in a pharmaceutical care laboratory course. Student teams worked competitively to complete 15 stations focused on self-care. A complex, real-world case was presented at each station. Student recommendations were presented to a facilitator. Prior to and following the activity, students were invited to complete an online anonymous survey instrument. Assessment. Eighty-six students completed presurvey and postsurvey instruments to assess their knowledge and perceived confidence to recommend a self-care product to a patient prior to and following participation in the Amazing Self-Care Race. Students demonstrated a significant increase in their ability and confidence to recommend self-care products following the activity (p<0.001). Conclusion. The Amazing Self-Care Race is an effective educational activity that increases student knowledge and confidence in self-care therapeutics. The activity helped students to develop self-care skills, enabled them to learn through doing, encouraged them to synthesize information while making self-care recommendations, and helped them to develop confidence by thinking on their feet. PMID:24558280

  5. College Student Effort Expenditure in Online versus Face-to-Face Courses: The Role of Gender, Team Learning Orientation, and Sense of Classroom Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yan; Cho, YoonJung; Mathew, Susan; Worth, Sheri

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the differential impact of sense of classroom community on effort in online versus face-to-face courses while controlling for potential effects of gender and team learning orientation. The interaction effects from ANOVA results suggested a gender difference across the two course delivery formats, with male students expending…

  6. Leveraging Mobile Technology in a School-Based Participatory Asthma Intervention: Findings from the Student Media-Based Asthma Research Team (SMART) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Christopher M.; Dyer, Ashley; Blumenstock, Jesse; Gupta, Ruchi S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Asthma places a heavy burden on Chicago's schoolchildren, particularly in low-income, minority communities. Recently, our group developed a 10-week afterschool program, the Student Asthma Research Team (START), which successfully engaged high school youth in a Photovoice investigation of factors impacting their asthma at school and in…

  7. A Qualitative Investigation into How Problem-Based Learning Impacts on the Development of Team-Working Skills in Occupational Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Alison

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that problem-based learning (PBL) has a positive impact on the team-working skills of medical, health and social care students. These skills are important for graduates to master to enable effective collaborative working in today's diverse health and social care settings. What is not clear from the literature is how…

  8. A Comparative Case Study of the Influence of Educational Governance Team Decision-Making Processes on District Climate and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored how the educational governance team, composed of the superintendent and school board, can, in their collaborative efforts and decision-making processes, influence school district climate and impact student achievement. Though in form and function, school boards have not changed much in their almost 200 years of existence,…

  9. Changes in Perceptions and Attitudes of Healthcare Profession Students Pre and Post Academic Course Experience of Team-Based 'Care for the Critically Ill'.

    PubMed

    Clark, Karen; Congdon, Heather Brennan; Macmillan, Kelley; Gonzales, Jeffrey P; Guerra, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the development and outcomes of an interprofessional course "Interprofessional Care of the Critically Ill," involving pharmacy, nursing, social work, and respiratory therapy students from two universities. An institutional review board-approved survey was adapted from the TeamSTEPPS surveys investigating clinical practitioners' attitudes and perceptions regarding teamwork, collaboration, and interprofessional engagement. Items applicable to an academic setting were revised and resulted in a 28-statement survey and comments section. Participation was voluntary, and students were requested to participate in the survey on the first and last day of class. There was a significant increase in the perceived understanding of scope of practice of other disciplines from the beginning to end of class (24.4 to 60%, strongly agreed/agreed). Furthermore, students gained appreciation for the complexities associated with working in an interprofessional team with a significant increase in the percent agreeing and strongly agreeing that working on an interdisciplinary team is challenging (66.7 to 81%). Students and faculty gained a greater understanding and appreciation for other disciplines represented in the class and are therefore better prepared to engage in health care teams upon graduation. IPE should be embedded in curriculums and not just an add-on. PMID:26194965

  10. The Talent Development Middle School. Creating a Motivational Climate Conducive to Talent Development in Middle Schools: Implementation and Effects of Student Team Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac Iver, Douglas J.; Plank, Stephen B.

    Central East Middle School in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), an urban school with about 45% Hispanic enrollment, and the Center for Research on the Education of Children Placed at Risk are working together to implement a Talent Development Middle School model of schooling. Part of this effort includes use of the Student Team Reading (STR) Program,…

  11. Enhancing the Connection to Undergraduate Engineering Students: A Hands-On and Team-Based Approach to Fluid Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Tie; Ford, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the integration of innovative hands-on activities within a sophomore-level Fluid Mechanics course at New Mexico Tech. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with emphasis on teaching key equations and methods of analysis for solving real-world problems. Strategies and examples…

  12. Active Learning Outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology.

    PubMed

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A; Siwicki, Kathleen K

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students' engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker backgrounds in biology. Peer leaders with experience in biology courses and training in science pedagogy facilitate work on faculty-generated challenge problems. During the eight semesters assessed in this study, URM students and those with less preparation attended SGMs with equal or greater frequency than their counterparts. Most agreed that SGMs enhanced their comprehension of biology and ability to articulate solutions. The historical grade gap between URM and non-URM students narrowed slightly in Biology 2, but not in other biology and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses. Nonetheless, URM students taking introductory biology after program implementation have graduated with biology majors or minors at the same rates as non-URM students, and have enrolled in postcollege degree programs at equal or greater rates. These results suggest that improved performance as measured by science grade point average may not be necessary to improve the persistence of students from underrepresented groups as life sciences majors. PMID:27496361

  13. Characterisation of a CMOS active pixel sensor for use in the TEAM microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Marco; Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Duden, Thomas; Krieger, Brad; Giubilato, Piero; Gnani, Dario; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2010-10-01

    A 1M- and a 4M-pixel monolithic CMOS active pixel sensor with 9.5×9.5 μm2 pixels have been developed for direct imaging in transmission electron microscopy as part of the TEAM project. We present the design and a full characterisation of the detector. Data collected with electron beams at various energies of interest in electron microscopy are used to determine the detector response. Data are compared to predictions of simulation. The line spread function measured with 80 and 300 keV electrons is (12.1±0.7) and (7.4±0.6) μm, respectively, in good agreement with our simulation. We measure the detection quantum efficiency to be 0.78±0.04 at 80 keV and 0.74±0.03 at 300 keV. Using a new imaging technique, based on single electron reconstruction, the line spread function for 80 and 300 keV electrons becomes (6.7±0.3) and (2.4±0.2) μm, respectively. The radiation tolerance of the pixels has been tested up to 5 Mrad and the detector is still functional with a decrease of dynamic range by ≃30%, corresponding to a reduction in full-well depth from ˜39 to ˜27 primary 300 keV electrons, due to leakage current increase, but identical line spread function performance.

  14. Activities of the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center pump stage technology team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R.; Mcconnaughey, P.; Eastland, A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to advance rocket propulsion technology, the Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology has been formed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Consortium consists of three Teams: the turbine stage team, the pump stage team (PST), and the combustion devices team. The PST has formulated and is implementing a plan for pump technology development whose end product will be validated CFD codes suitable for application to pump components, test data suitable for validating CFD codes, and advanced pump components optimized using CFD codes. The PST's work during the fall of 1991 and the winter and spring of 1992 is discussed in this paper. This work is highlighted by CFD analyses of an advanced impeller design and collection of laser two-focus velocimeter data for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Pump impeller.

  15. Number Wonders: 171 Activities to Meet Math Standards & Inspire Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhns, Catherine Jones

    2006-01-01

    In this book, author Catherine Jones Kuhns introduces student- and teacher-friendly math activities designed to get students thinking like mathematicians and loving mathematics, while addressing content standards through grade 2. She also shows how to make math fun for students, get children actively engaged in learning, create a student-centered…

  16. Assessing High School Student Learning on Science Outreach Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Courtney L.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of hands-on laboratory activities on secondary student learning was examined. Assessment was conducted over a two-year period, with 262 students participating the first year and 264 students the second year. Students took a prequiz, performed a laboratory activity (gas chromatography of alcohols, or photosynthesis and respiration), and…

  17. Exploring Young Students Creativity: The Effect of Model Eliciting Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilat, Talya; Amit, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how engaging students in real-life mathematical situations can stimulate their mathematical creative thinking. We analyzed the mathematical modeling of two girls, aged 10 and 13 years, as they worked on an authentic task involving the selection of a track team. The girls displayed several modeling cycles that…

  18. The Role of Predictor Courses and Teams on Individual Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker-Eveleth, Lori Jo; O'Neill, Michele; Sisodiya, Sanjay R.

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that diverse environments enhance conscious modes of thought, resulting in greater intellectual engagement and active thinking. Ordinal and multinomial logistic regression results indicate that accounting courses and business law classes are useful predictors of subsequent performance. Odds ratio estimates indicate that students…

  19. Active Learning Outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Siwicki, Kathleen K.

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students’ engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker backgrounds in biology. Peer leaders with experience in biology courses and training in science pedagogy facilitate work on faculty-generated challenge problems. During the eight semesters assessed in this study, URM students and those with less preparation attended SGMs with equal or greater frequency than their counterparts. Most agreed that SGMs enhanced their comprehension of biology and ability to articulate solutions. The historical grade gap between URM and non-URM students narrowed slightly in Biology 2, but not in other biology and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses. Nonetheless, URM students taking introductory biology after program implementation have graduated with biology majors or minors at the same rates as non-URM students, and have enrolled in postcollege degree programs at equal or greater rates. These results suggest that improved performance as measured by science grade point average may not be necessary to improve the persistence of students from underrepresented groups as life sciences majors. PMID:27496361

  20. Vital Signs Predict Rapid-Response Team Activation Within Twelve Hours of Emergency Department Admission

    PubMed Central

    Walston, James M.; Cabrera, Daniel; Bellew, Shawna D.; Olive, Marc N.; Lohse, Christine M.; Bellolio, M. Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rapid-response teams (RRTs) are interdisciplinary groups created to rapidly assess and treat patients with unexpected clinical deterioration marked by decline in vital signs. Traditionally emergency department (ED) disposition is partially based on the patients’ vital signs (VS) at the time of hospital admission. We aimed to identify which patients will have RRT activation within 12 hours of admission based on their ED VS, and if their outcomes differed. Methods We conducted a case-control study of patients presenting from January 2009 to December 2012 to a tertiary ED who subsequently had RRT activations within 12 hours of admission (early RRT activations). The medical records of patients 18 years and older admitted to a non-intensive care unit (ICU) setting were reviewed to obtain VS at the time of ED arrival and departure, age, gender and diagnoses. Controls were matched 1:1 on age, gender, and diagnosis. We evaluated VS using cut points (lowest 10%, middle 80% and highest 10%) based on the distribution of VS for all patients. Our study adheres to the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guidelines for reporting observational studies. Results A total of 948 patients were included (474 cases and 474 controls). Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% CI [1.25–3.27]), tachypneic (OR 2.92, 95% CI [1.73–4.92]), and had lower oxygen saturations (OR 2.25, 95% CI [1.42–3.56]) upon arrival to the ED. Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic at the time of disposition from the ED (OR 2.76, 95% CI [1.65–4.60]), more likely to have extremes of systolic blood pressure (BP) (OR 1.72, 95% CI [1.08–2.72] for low BP and OR 1.82, 95% CI [1.19–2.80] for high BP), higher respiratory rate (OR 4.15, 95% CI [2.44–7.07]) and lower oxygen saturation (OR 2.29, 95% CI [1.43–3.67]). Early RRT activation was associated with increased

  1. Evaluation of Student Activities through Surveys of Harper Students and Employees. Volume XXI, No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, John A.; And Others

    As part of the program review process at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) in Palatine, Illinois, surveys were administered to three groups of students and to all WRHC employees to provide a partial evaluation of student activities. The three samples of students surveyed included 100 Caucasian students, 100 minority students, and 100 disabled…

  2. American Student Activism: The Post-Sixties Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.; Cohen, Robert

    1990-01-01

    The trends in college student attitudes and activism in the 1980s are explored, focusing on patterns of attitudes, issues that motivate students, and the campuses on which activism appears to flourish. (MSE)

  3. Effects of Team Emotional Authenticity on Virtual Team Performance

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Catherine E.; Turel, Ofir

    2016-01-01

    Members of virtual teams lack many of the visual or auditory cues that are usually used as the basis for impressions about fellow team members. We focus on the effects of the impressions formed in this context, and use social exchange theory to understand how these impressions affect team performance. Our pilot study, using content analysis (n = 191 students), suggested that most individuals believe that they can assess others' emotional authenticity in online settings by focusing on the content and tone of the messages. Our quantitative study examined the effects of these assessments. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis (n = 81 student teams) suggested that team-level trust and teamwork behaviors mediate the relationship between team emotional authenticity and team performance, and illuminate the importance of team emotional authenticity for team processes and outcomes.

  4. Student Perceptions of Social Justice and Social Justice Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres-Harding, Susan R.; Steele, Cheronda; Schulz, Erica; Taha, Farah; Pico, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging students to engage in activities that actively seek to promote social justice is a goal of many educators. This study analyzed college student perceptions around social justice and related activities in a medium-sized, urban university in the United States. Students' open-ended responses to questions assessing their perceptions of…

  5. Hands-On Activities and Their Influence on Students' Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstermann, Nina; Grube, Dietmar; Bogeholz, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of hands-on activities on students' interest. We researched whether students with experience in specific hands-on activities show higher interest in these activities than students without experience. Furthermore, the relationship between the quality of the hands-on experience and interest in the respective…

  6. Creating student sleuths: how a team of graduate students helped solve an outbreak of Salmonella Heidelberg infections associated with kosher broiled chicken livers.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Heather; Hancock, W Thane; Harrison, Cassandra; Kornstein, Laura; Waechter, HaeNa; Reddy, Vasudha; Luker, John; Malavet, Michelle; Huth, Paula; Gieraltowski, Laura; Balter, Sharon

    2014-08-01

    Since 2009, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) has received FoodCORE funding to hire graduate students to conduct in-depth food exposure interviews of salmonellosis case patients. In 2011, an increase in the number of Salmonella Heidelberg infections with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis Xba I pattern JF6X01.0022 among observant Jewish communities in New York and New Jersey was investigated. As this pattern is common nationwide, some cases identified were not associated with the outbreak. To reduce the number of background cases, DOHMH focused on the community initially identified in the outbreak and defined a case as a person infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Heidelberg with illness onset from 1 April to 17 November 2011 and who consumed a kosher diet, spoke Yiddish, or self-identified as Jewish. Nationally, 190 individuals were infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Heidelberg; 63 New York City residents met the DOHMH case definition. In October 2011, the graduate students (Team Salmonella) interviewed three case patients who reported eating broiled chicken livers. Laboratory testing of chicken liver samples revealed the outbreak strain of Salmonella Heidelberg. Although they were only partially cooked, the livers appeared fully cooked, and consumers and retail establishment food handlers did not cook them thoroughly before eating or using them in a ready-to-eat spread. This investigation highlighted the need to prevent further illnesses from partially cooked chicken products. Removing background cases helped to focus the investigation. Training graduate students to collect exposure information can be a highly effective model for conducting foodborne disease surveillance and outbreak investigations for local and state departments of public health. PMID:25198602

  7. Team Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, David C.

    1963-01-01

    A study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of principals in structuring teaching teams; to assess background and personality characteristics appearing essential to successful individual and team performance; and to select personality factor scores which would predict individual and team success. Subjects were 31 teaching teams (99…

  8. Team Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John; Bentley, Scott

    Chapter 6 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter defines and explains management teams and describes several successful examples of team management. Superintendents have come to rely on their management team's expertise to resolve increasingly complex policy, administrative, and instructional issues. Although team management has…

  9. Sports Team Participation: A Risk Behavior Comparison of Montana High School Students Based on Sports Team Participation. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is administered by the Montana Office of Public Instruction every two years to students in grades 7 through 12. The purpose of the survey is to help monitor the prevalence of behaviors that not only influence youth health, but also put youth at risk for the most significant health and social problems…

  10. Combustion devices technology team - An overview and status of STME-related activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Croteau-Gillespie, Margie

    1992-07-01

    The Consortium for CFD applications in propulsion technology has been formed at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The combustion devices technology team is one of the three teams that constitute the Consortium. While generally aiming to advance combustion devices technology for rocket propulsion, the team's efforts for the last 1 and 1/2 years have been focused on issues relating to the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) nozzle. The nozzle design uses hydrogen-rich turbine exhaust to cool the wall in a film/dump scheme. This method of cooling presents challenges and associated risks for the nozzle designers and the engine/vehicle integrators. Within the nozzle itself, a key concern is the ability to effectively and efficiently film cool the wall. From the National Launch System vehicle base standpoint, there are concerns with dumping combustible gases at the nozzle exit and their potential adverse effects on the base thermal environment. The Combustion Team has developed and is implementing plans to use validated CFD tools to aid in risk mitigation for both areas.

  11. Combustion devices technology team - An overview and status of STME-related activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Croteau-Gillespie, Margie

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for CFD applications in propulsion technology has been formed at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The combustion devices technology team is one of the three teams that constitute the Consortium. While generally aiming to advance combustion devices technology for rocket propulsion, the team's efforts for the last 1 and 1/2 years have been focused on issues relating to the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) nozzle. The nozzle design uses hydrogen-rich turbine exhaust to cool the wall in a film/dump scheme. This method of cooling presents challenges and associated risks for the nozzle designers and the engine/vehicle integrators. Within the nozzle itself, a key concern is the ability to effectively and efficiently film cool the wall. From the National Launch System vehicle base standpoint, there are concerns with dumping combustible gases at the nozzle exit and their potential adverse effects on the base thermal environment. The Combustion Team has developed and is implementing plans to use validated CFD tools to aid in risk mitigation for both areas.

  12. Patient Activities Planning and Progress Noting a Humanistic Integrated-Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muilenburg, Ted

    This document outlines a system for planning recreation therapy, documenting progress, and relating the entire process to a team approach which includes patient assessment and involvement. The recreation program is seen as therapeutic, closely related to the total medical treatment program. The model is designed so that it can be adapted to almost…

  13. Graduate Student Scholarly Activities; Gender and Perceived Program Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Elizabeth L.; Weidman, John C.

    A segment of the socialization process of graduate students seeking advanced degrees in education is explored in order to discover how the students are socialized to the norm of cognitive rationality. The correlates of graduate student participation in certain scholarly activities with the students' perceptions of their academic program are…

  14. The Team Boat Exercise: Enhancing Team Communication Midsemester

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Pamela L.; Friedman, Barry A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the Team Boat Exercise, which was developed to provide students with a mechanism for addressing team problems and enhancing team communication midsemester. The inspiration for the exercise came from a video by Prentice Hall, Inc. (2001). Part III of the video, entitled "Corporate Coaching," shows senior staff members from the…

  15. Student Activism and Student Exclusions in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koen, Charlton; Cele, Mlungisi; Libhaber, Arial

    2006-01-01

    On average, about 25 percent of students leave higher education (HE) institutions annually in South Africa because they are excluded on academic and financial grounds. To resist such putouts, student boycotts and protests are common despite the fact that student organizations were incorporated into decision-making processes at HE institutions…

  16. Conservation II. Science Activities in Energy. [Student's and] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed for science students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, the activities in this unit illustrate principles and problems related to the conservation of energy. Eleven student activities using art, economics, arithmetic, and other skills and disciplines help teachers directly involve students in exploring scientific questions and making…

  17. Performing Keypunch Activities. Student Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Pat

    Supporting performance objective 55 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Secretarial Catalog, both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on performing keypunch activities are included in this packet. (Keypunch equipment is required.) The student materials include three student activities and a…

  18. Students as Doers: Examples of Successful E-Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tammelin, Maija; Peltonen, Berit; Puranen, Pasi; Auvinen, Lis

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses learning language and communication activities that focus on students' concrete involvement in their learning process. The activities first deal with student-produced blogs and digital videos in business Spanish. They then present student-produced podcasts for Swedish business communication learners that are meant for…

  19. Students' Attitudes toward an After-School Physical Activity Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Though considerable research on student attitudes has been conducted in physical education, little information exists concerning student attitudes toward after-school physical activity programmes. This study assessed students' attitudes toward their after-school physical activity programme located in southwest Texas, USA. Participants included 158…

  20. Silent Students' Participation in a Large Active Learning Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Active learning in large science classrooms furthers opportunities for students to engage in the content and in meaningful learning, yet students can still remain anonymously silent. This study aims to understand the impact of active learning on these silent students in a large General Chemistry course taught via Socratic questioning and…

  1. Team Projects and Peer Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, John Kevin; Meeker, Ralph D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors assign semester- or quarter-long team-based projects in several Computer Science and Finance courses. This paper reports on our experience in designing, managing, and evaluating such projects. In particular, we discuss the effects of team size and of various peer evaluation schemes on team performance and student learning. We report…

  2. Team LunaCY Outreach Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heise, James; Hull, Bethanne J.

    2012-01-01

    Iowa State University's Lunabotics Club, Team LunaCY, has worked hard to generate enthusiasm for robotics, engineering, and lunar activities. Team LunaCY participated in a variety of different outreach events making a strong impression on Iowa youth. These events led the chair of the mechanical engineering department, Dr. Ted Heindel, to refer to the club's outreach program as "the model that all other engineering clubs should follow." Team LunaCY's outreach activities totaled over 200 hours and captivated over 3000 students and adults throughout the course of this acaden1ic year, reaching out to people all over Iowa and to several special guests. These guests included Vice-President Joe Biden, during a visit to Iowa State University in March 2012, and astronaut Clayton Anderson, during a visit to Iowa State's campus in the fall 2011. Team LunaCY's outreach events created hands on learning opportunities for local youth ranging in age from elementary school children to high school students. The team strove to make a positive impression on Iowa youth and to encourage interest and involvement in scientific fields. The full list of events is shown in Table 1. Three of the major outreach events the team participated in were the FIRST LEGO League, Science Bound, and iExplore STEM Festival.

  3. A status of the activities of the NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center Combustion Devices Technology Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Kevin

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Applications in Propulsion Technology was established to focus on computational fluid dynamics applications in propulsion. Specific areas of effort include developing the CFD technology required to address rocket propulsion issues, validating the technology, and applying the validated technology to design problems. The Combustion Devices Technology Team was formed to implement the above objectives in the broad area of combustion driven flows. In an effort to bring CFD to bear in the design environment, the team has focused its efforts on the Space Transportation Main Engine nozzle. The main emphasis has been on the film cooling scheme used to cool the nozzle wall. Benchmark problems have been chosen to validate CFD film cooling capabilities. CFD simulations of the subscale nozzle have been made. Also, CFD predictions of the base flow resulting from this type of nozzle have been made. The status of these calculations is presented along with future plans. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  4. Overview and Results of ISS Space Medicine Operations Team (SMOT) Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. Magee; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Armstrong, Cheryl; McDonald, P. Vernon; Duncan, James M.; Bogomolov, V. V.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Medicine Operations Team (SMOT) was created to integrate International Space Station (ISS) Medical Operations, promote awareness of all Partners, provide emergency response capability and management, provide operational input from all Partners for medically relevant concerns, and provide a source of medical input to ISS Mission Management. The viewgraph presentation provides an overview of educational objectives, purpose, operations, products, statistics, and its use in off-nominal situations.

  5. Activity Profiles of Successful and Less-successful Semi-elite Rugby League Teams.

    PubMed

    Hulin, B T; Gabbett, T J

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated whether match intensities during predefined periods differed among successful and less-successful rugby league teams. 4 semi-elite rugby league teams were split into 'high-success' and 'low-success' groups based on their success rates. Movement was recorded using a global positioning system (10 Hz) during 20 rugby league matches. Following the peak ball-in-play time period, the high-success group was able to maintain ball-in-play time that was: (1) 22% greater than the low-success group (P=0.01) and (2) greater than their mean period of match-play (P=0.01). In the peak and mean periods of match play, hit-up forwards from the high-success group covered less total distance (P=0.02; P=0.01), less high-intensity running distance (P=0.01; P=0.01) and were involved in a greater number of collisions (P=0.03; P=0.01) than hit-up forwards from the low-success group. These results demonstrate that greater amounts of high-intensity running and total distance are not related to competitive success in semi-elite rugby league. Rather, competitive success is associated with involvement of hit-up forwards in a greater number of collisions and the ability of high-success teams to maintain a higher ball-in-play time following the peak period. Strength and conditioning programs that: (1) emphasize high-intensity running and neglect to combine these running demands with collisions, and (2) do not offer exposure to match specific ball-in-play time demands, may not provide sufficient physiological preparation for teams to be successful in rugby league. PMID:25734912

  6. Transfer Student Success: Educationally Purposeful Activities Predictive of Undergraduate GPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauria, Renee M.; Fuller, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers evaluated the effects of Educationally Purposeful Activities (EPAs) on transfer and nontransfer students' cumulative GPAs. Hierarchical, linear, and multiple regression models yielded seven statistically significant educationally purposeful items that influenced undergraduate student GPAs. Statistically significant positive EPAs for…

  7. Teaching Skills for Facilitating Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Derek R.

    2008-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is a unique student-centered instructional strategy that emphasizes learning to use concepts rather than merely learning about them. As such, TBL requires students to become active participants who are accountable and responsible for their learning. This does not occur, however, unless teachers transform their primary…

  8. Teaching massage to nursing students of geriatrics through active learning.

    PubMed

    Adler, Patricia A

    2009-03-01

    The use of massage in nursing practice has declined through the years in favor of high-tech interventions. This article describes a project using active learning to teach nursing students massage with dementia residents in assisted living. Students participated in a workshop to practice basic relaxation massage techniques with the guidance of their clinical instructor and then provided massages to resident volunteers. Afterward, students discussed their experience and completed a resident assessment form. The students requested more such activities, and the residents and facility management invited the students to return for another session. The instructor observed growth in the students' assessment skills and in their confidence. Use of massage to teach nursing students how to care for and relate to older adults with cognitive impairment is recommended. Further research is needed on the use of massage as an active learning method for nursing students in long-term care. PMID:19181909

  9. The Effect of Team Pentathlon on Ten- to Eleven-Year-Old Childrens' Engagement in Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaud, Valerie; Nadeau, Luc; Martel, Denis; Gagnon, Jocelyn; Godbout, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background: To promote regular physical activity (PA) among children and adolescents, authors recommend that physical education (PE) teachers offer their students programmes that would allow them to be physically active outside PE classes. However, such programmes are rarely rigorously assessed and it is recommended that further studies be…

  10. FY-12 INL KR CAPTURE ACTIVITIES SUPPORTING THE OFF-GAS SIGMA TEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D Law

    2012-08-01

    Tasks performed this year by INL Kr capture off-gas team members can be segregated into three separate task sub-sections which include: 1) The development and testing of a new engineered form sorbent, 2) An initial NDA gamma scan effort performed on the drum containing the Legacy Kr-85 sample materials, and 3) Collaborative research efforts with PNNL involving the testing of the Ni-DOBDC MOF and an initial attempt to make powdered chalcogel material into an engineered form using our binding process. This document describes the routes to success for the three task sub-sections.

  11. Creating a Team Archive During Fast-Paced Anomaly Response Activities in Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Hicks, LaDessa; Overland, David; Thronesbery, Carroll; Christofferesen, Klaus; Chow, Renee

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a Web-based system to support the temporary Anomaly Response Team formed from distributed subteams in Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions. The system was designed for easy and flexible creation of small collections of files and links associated with work on a particular anomaly. The system supports privacy and levels of formality for the subteams. First we describe the supported groups and an anomaly response scenario. Then we describe the support system prototype, the Anomaly Response Tracking and Integration System (ARTIS). Finally, we describe our evaluation approach and the results of the evaluation.

  12. Team Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John

    Chapter 5 of a volume on school leadership, this chapter reviews the literature to define and explain management teams and to describe several successful management team arrangements. The author begins by noting that team management has recently enjoyed a resurgence as a response to collective negotiations, but beyond this function can have value…

  13. Analysis of science team activities during the 1999 Marsokhod Rover Field Experiment: Implications for automated planetary surface exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Geb; Cabrol, Nathalie; Rathe, April

    2001-04-01

    This work analyzes the behavior and effectiveness of a science team using the Marsokhod mobile robot to explore the Silver Lake region in the Mojave Desert near Baker, California. The work addresses the manner in which the geologists organized themselves, how they allocated their time in different activities, how they formed and communicated scientific hypotheses, and the frequency with which they requested different types of data from the mission archive during the first 3 days of the mission. Eleven scientists from the NASA Ames Research Center and three of the five scientists who participated from their home institutions were videotaped as they worked throughout the 3-day experiment. The videotape record indicates that 46% of available person-hours were consumed in semistructured or formal meetings and that only 1% of their time was spent studying immersive, three-dimensional virtual reality models of the robot's surroundings. The remainder of their time was spent in unstructured work sessions in groups of two or three. Hypothesis formation and evolution patterns show a meager flow of information from the distributed science team to the on-site team and a bias against reporting speculative hypotheses. Analysis of the visual imagery received from the robot indicates that acquisition of the large panoramic information leads to high levels of redundancy in the data acquired. The scientists' archive requests indicate that small, specifically requested image targets were the most frequently accessed information. The work suggests alternative organizational structures that would expedite the flow of information within the geologic team. It also advocates emphasizing specific science targets over high-resolution, stereoscopic, panoramic imaging when programming a mobile robot's onboard cameras.

  14. Activity Preferences of Middle School Physical Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Michael; Stillwell, Jim; Byars, Allyn

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the physical education activity preferences of middle school students who completed a checklist featuring a variety of activities. Overall, middle school boys and girls both differed and agreed on their interests for specific activities. Most students liked basketball, bicycling, roller skating, soccer, swimming, and volleyball but…

  15. Effects of Team Climate on Substance Use Behaviors, Perceptions, and Attitudes of Student-Athletes at a Large, Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomon, Jennifer E.; Ting, S. Raymond

    2010-01-01

    College student-athletes comprise a special group on the college campus owing to their dual roles as students and athletes. Although many positives are associated with being a student-athlete, researchers have found that this population is faced with unique academic, physical, and social stressors that put student-athletes at greater risk for…

  16. Oxalate Blockage of Calcium and Iron: A Student Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1988-01-01

    Describes a student learning activity used to teach the meaning of percentage composition, mole concept, selective precipitation, and limiting factors. Presents two word problems and their solutions. (CW)

  17. Institutional Liability for Student Activities and Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Douglas R.

    1990-01-01

    Examines higher education institutional liability in the following areas: (1) in tort, based on negligence, for physical harm to students; (2) in tort, for defamation flowing from student media; and (3) in contract, arising out of student organizations' business relationships with third parties. (222 references) (MLF)

  18. Student Technological Creativity Using Online Problem-Solving Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of online (web-based) creative problem-solving (CPS) activities on student technological creativity and to examine the characteristics of student creativity in the context of online CPS. A pretest-posttest quasi-experiment was conducted with 107 fourth-grade students in Taiwan. The…

  19. An Activity to Teach Students about Schematic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbell, Linda M.; Tyler, James M.; Burns, Kathleen C.

    2007-01-01

    We designed a classroom activity to foster students' understanding of what schemas are and how they function. We used a video of the instructor as an infant to illustrate how schemas influence gender stereotyping. Before the video, we told students that the baby was either a boy or a girl. After the video, students rated whether the baby would…

  20. Students' Activity Focus in Online Asynchronous Peer Learning Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaspar, Alessio; Langevin, Sarah; Boyer, Naomi; Armitage, William

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how using Peer Learning Forums (PLF) in an online asynchronous computer programming course can be analyzed to derive information about Student Activity Focus (SAF) for adult Information Technology students. Three instruments are proposed to assist instructors classify questions posted by students on these forums,…