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Sample records for activity students enter

  1. Enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... enteritis E coli enteritis Food poisoning Radiation enteritis Salmonella enteritis Shigella enteritis Staph aureus food poisoning Symptoms ... store food that needs to stay chilled. Images Salmonella typhi organism Yersinia enterocolitica organism Campylobacter jejuni organism ...

  2. Comparison of Spatial Skills of Students Entering Different Engineering Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veurink, N.; Sorby, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial skills have been shown to be important to success in an engineering curriculum, and some question if poor spatial skills prevent students from entering STEM fields or if students with weak spatial skills avoid engineering disciplines believed to highly spatially-oriented. Veurink and Hamlin (2011) found that freshmen students entering…

  3. Overconfidence of Vocational Education Students When Entering Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Mark P.; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Bahtsevanoglou, John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is evidence that students who attend Technical and Further Education (TAFE) prior to entering higher education underperform in their first year of study. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of self-efficacy in understanding the performance of students who completed TAFE in the previous year in a first year subject of…

  4. Communication Characteristics of Students Entering MSSD 1977-78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Nancy S.; And Others

    A communication profile of each student entering the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (MSSD) is composed of rankings in five areas: expressive manual communication including signing, fingerspelling, and synchronization; speech intelligibility; articulation; speech reading, including words and sentences; and audiometric test performance…

  5. The Distance to Delight: A Graduate Student Enters the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tieken, Mara Casey

    2013-01-01

    This article documents the first stage of the qualitative research process: "entering the field." In it, the author, a young graduate student, uses portraiture to describe her journey to find a "research site" and then establish a "research relationship" with this community, a town in rural Arkansas. This portrait…

  6. Differences in Student Engagement of Entering Texas Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Trevena B.

    2013-01-01

    Improving the academic achievement of students for success in college in ways that lead to college degree attainment is a growing concern for our nation. Educators are exploring the topic of student engagement to better understand critical issues surrounding college degree attainment. Through analysis of data collected from the Survey of Entering…

  7. Factors Influencing Entering Teacher Candidates' Preferences for Instructional Activities: A glimpse into their orientations towards teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanquer, Vicente; Novodvorsky, Ingrid; Tomanek, Debra

    2010-07-01

    The present study was designed to identify and characterize the major factors that influence entering science teacher candidates' preferences for different types of instructional activities, and to analyze what these factors suggest about teacher candidates' orientations towards science teaching. The study involved prospective teachers enrolled in the introductory science teaching course in an undergraduate science teacher preparation program. Our analysis was based on data collected using a teaching and learning beliefs questionnaire, together with structured interviews. Our results indicate that entering science teacher candidates have strong preferences for a few activity types. The most influential factors driving entering science teacher candidates' selections were the potential of the instructional activities to motivate students, be relevant to students' personal lives, result in transfer of skills to non-science situations, actively involve students in goal-directed learning, and implement curriculum that represents what students need to know. This set of influencing factors suggests that entering science teacher candidates' orientations towards teaching are likely driven by one or more of these three central teaching goals: (1) motivating students, (2) developing science process skills, and (3) engaging students in structured science activities. These goals, and the associated beliefs about students, teaching, and learning, can be expected to favor the development or enactment of three major orientations towards teaching in this population of future science teachers: "motivating students," "process," and "activity-driven."

  8. Analysis of Persistence after Six Semesters. Fall 1975 Entering Students. Student Flow Project, Report No. 45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Community Coll. System.

    As part of a continuing study of student flow in the Hawaii community colleges, this report analyzes the persistence patterns of 1975 entering students after six semesters for the community college total and the seven campuses. The persistence patterns of the 8,979 students showed that 24% enrolled for only one semester (non-persisters), 41%…

  9. Fall 1975 Entering Students Enrolled in Fall 1978 (Seventh Semester). Student Flow Project, Report No. 49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Community Coll. System.

    This report continues an analysis of the student flow patterns of the fall 1975 entering students at the Hawaii community colleges. Focus is placed on the extreme persisters (students who were enrolled for all six semesters without a break in attendance at their campus of entry) who continued their studies for the seventh semester. Findings are…

  10. Anti-Hu antibodies activate enteric and sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Michel, Klaus; Annahazi, Anita; Demir, Ihsan E.; Ceyhan, Güralp O.; Zeller, Florian; Komorowski, Lars; Stöcker, Winfried; Beyak, Michael J.; Grundy, David; Farrugia, Gianrico; De Giorgio, Roberto; Schemann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    IgG of type 1 anti-neuronal nuclear antibody (ANNA-1, anti-Hu) specificity is a serological marker of paraneoplastic neurological autoimmunity (including enteric/autonomic) usually related to small-cell lung carcinoma. We show here that IgG isolated from such sera and also affinity-purified anti-HuD label enteric neurons and cause an immediate spike discharge in enteric and visceral sensory neurons. Both labelling and activation of enteric neurons was prevented by preincubation with the HuD antigen. Activation of enteric neurons was inhibited by the nicotinic receptor antagonists hexamethonium and dihydro-β-erythroidine and reduced by the P2X antagonist pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo (benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid (PPADS) but not by the 5-HT3 antagonist tropisetron or the N-type Ca-channel blocker ω-Conotoxin GVIA. Ca++ imaging experiments confirmed activation of enteric neurons but not enteric glia. These findings demonstrate a direct excitatory action of ANNA-1, in particular anti-HuD, on visceral sensory and enteric neurons, which involves nicotinic and P2X receptors. The results provide evidence for a novel link between nerve activation and symptom generation in patients with antibody-mediated gut dysfunction. PMID:27905561

  11. Fall 1975 Entering Students Not Continuing in the Same Community College in Fall 1976. Student Flow Project, Report No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Community Coll. System.

    A questionnaire was sent to 2,045 students who had entered Hawaii community colleges in fall 1975, continued their enrollment in spring 1976, but who did not enroll in fall 1976 for a third semester. The purpose of the questionnaire was to obtain data on reasons for non-continuance, to obtain information on the fall 1976 activities of…

  12. Characteristics and Opinions of Entering Undergraduate Students at Montana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulniak, Dennis J.

    Montana State University's (MSU) use of the Student-Outcomes Information Services (SOIS), developed jointly by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) and the College Board for surveying the characteristics and opinions of entering undergraduate students, is examined. The Entering-Student Questionnaire, one of five…

  13. Intracellular activity of azithromycin against bacterial enteric pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Rakita, R M; Jacques-Palaz, K; Murray, B E

    1994-01-01

    Azithromycin, a new azalide antibiotic, is active in vitro against a variety of enteric bacterial pathogens. Since it is concentrated inside human neutrophils and other cells, it might be particularly useful in the treatment of infections caused by enteropathogens that invade host tissues. The intracellular activity of azithromycin against several enteric pathogens that had been phagocytosed by neutrophils was determined. Azithromycin was effective in reducing the intracellular viabilities of almost all strains tested, including representative strains of Salmonella, Shigella, and enteroinvasive, enteropathogenic, enterotoxigenic, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Erythromycin was also effective in this model system, although azithromycin was generally more effective than erythromycin against strains of invasive enteric pathogens. Cefotaxime reduced intracellular bacterial viability to a lesser extent than either azithromycin or erythromycin. The presence of neutrophils did not significantly affect the activity of azithromycin in this system. Azithromycin may be a useful agent for the treatment of bacterial diarrhea, and clinical trials should be considered. PMID:7810998

  14. Physical Health and Stress in Entering Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, Loretta K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A study of the health and exercise habits of first-year dental students found that a large proportion had a healthy lifestyle and, somewhat more males than females, regular exercise. A significant negative correlation appeared between trait anxiety and physical activity level. Implications are discussed. (MSE)

  15. Entry and Exit: Student Progression and Persistence in Hawaii's Community Colleges. Six-Semester Study of Fall 1975 Entering Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosaki, Mildred D.; And Others

    This report brings together the many findings gathered during a three-year study of the 8,979 students who entered Hawaii's seven community colleges in fall 1975. Study results are organized in the following sections: (1) selected highlights from the literature and description of the flow project; (2) characteristics of entering students and…

  16. Knowledge Structures of Entering Computer Networking Students and Their Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCerbo, Kristen E.

    2007-01-01

    Students bring prior knowledge to their learning experiences. This prior knowledge is known to affect how students encode and later retrieve new information learned. Teachers and content developers can use information about students' prior knowledge to create more effective lessons and materials. In many content areas, particularly the sciences,…

  17. Are STEM High School Students Entering the STEM Pipeline?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco, M. Suzanne; Patel, Nimisha H.; Lindsey, Jill

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the career skills and interests for students in two STEM schools to national data. Students completed the KUDER skills assessment and career planning online tools. Results were compared across school, grade level, and sex. The results provided evidence that STEM high school students expressed career intents in predominately…

  18. Increasing Employment Skill Awareness for Students To Be Better Prepared To Enter the World of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Theresa; McCarroll, Jo Ann; Popek, David

    This report describes a program for increasing employment skill awareness for students to be better prepared to enter the world of work. The problem of insufficient employment skills is documented by data revealing large numbers of students who are unable to meet the demands of employers. Analysis of probable-cause data revealed students' lack of…

  19. Analysis of Special Counseling Students Entering Fall, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Robert M.

    Title V of the California State Administrative Codes requires community colleges to provide special counseling services for students who are not high school graduates or who are graduates with less than a 2.0 high school grade point average (GPA). In an effort to better serve the special counseling students at Reedley College (California), 18…

  20. Entering Student Affairs: A Comparative Study of Graduate School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertz, Norma; Eckman, Ellen; Strayhorn, Terrell

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the college choice process of graduate students in College Student Personnel programs at a public university and a private religiously affiliated university. Despite differences in size, mission, and location of the two institutions studied, the research findings show that respondent populations were similar demographically…

  1. Diagnostic Tests for Entering and Departing Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, Chris; Kotlicki, A.

    2006-12-01

    A diagnostic test administered at the start of a class should test basic concepts which are recognized as course prerequisites. The questions should not be over-packaged: e.g. students should be required to create models, rather than this being done for them each time. Students should be allowed great latitude in their answers, so we can discover what they are thinking. When administered at the end of a class the goals should be similar: testing concepts taught in the class itself and the retention of necessary concepts from previous classes. Great care has to be taken to avoid teaching to the test. In assessing an entire program, for example an undergraduate majors degree in physics, then one looks for very general skills and knowledge not specific to any one course. The purpose of an undergraduate degree in physics (or indeed any science) is to equip the students with a set of problem-solving skills and basic knowledge which can be applied in a large variety of workplace settings and to allow that student to contribute to civic society as a science-literate person. The creator of any diagnostic test should always have these big goals in mind. We have developed a set of questions which we think fulfill these criteria, yet are not specific to any particular level of science education. They have been administered to students in secondary schools across Canada, incoming first-year science students and final-year physics students at the University of British Columbia. The results will be presented.

  2. Statement on Competencies in Mathematics Expected of Entering College Students. April 2010. Revised May 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this" Statement on Competencies in Mathematics Expected of Entering College Students" is to provide a clear and coherent message about the mathematics that students need to know and to be able to do to be successful in college. While parts of this Statement were written with certain audiences in mind, the document as a whole…

  3. Factors That Influence a Student Not To Enter into a High School Vocational Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetti, Rosemarie

    In view of the steady decline in vocational enrollments since 1979, a study was conducted to identify factors that influence students not to enter into a high school vocational curriculum. The study questionnaire was given to 633 nonvocational 11th-grade students from 5 randomly selected southwestern Ohio high schools. One month after the student…

  4. Who Are the Future Teachers in Turkey? Characteristics of Entering Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksu, Meral; Demir, Cennet Engin; Daloglu, Aysegul; Yildirim, Soner; Kiraz, Ercan

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the background characteristics, socio-cultural values and pedagogical beliefs that entering student teachers bring with them into the faculties of education and explores their possible implications for teacher education in the Turkish context. The study comprised 18,226 first-year student teachers from 51 faculties…

  5. Case Studies of Re-Entering Students in Advanced Composition: Composing Using the Word Processor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaunder, Eleanor Parks

    A qualitative study examined the revision of writing on the word processor of two re-entering students in advanced composition in comparison to three traditional-age students. Its purposes were to see whether there was any difference in adaptation to the word processor between the two groups and whether each writer had a consistent revision…

  6. Importance of Computer Competencies for Entering JCCC Students: A Survey of Faculty and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weglarz, Shirley

    Johnson County Community College (JCCC) conducted a survey in response to faculty comments regarding entering students' lack of rudimentary computer skills. Faculty were spending time in non-computer related classes teaching students basic computer skills. The aim of the survey was to determine what the basic computer competencies for entering…

  7. Academic and personality correlates of career indecision in medical students entering training.

    PubMed

    Walters, G D

    1982-11-01

    The academic and personality correlates of medical career indecision were investigated in two separate studies. In the first, the effect of career indecision on academic performance was examined in a group of ninety-eight (eighty male, eighteen female) medical students entering Texas Tech University School of Medicine over a 2-year period. These medical students voluntarily completed the Medical Specialty Preference Inventory (MSPI) as part of a routine preadmission test battery. Subjects were assigned to one of three conditions-decided, high-interest undecided and low-interest undecided--based on results from the MSPI. As predicted, 'low-interest undecided' students achieved significantly lower initial medical school grades relative to 'decided' students, whereas 'high-interest undecided' students did not differ from the 'decided' students. The second study investigated the influence of career indecision upon personality. Subjects for this study were eighty-eight (sixty-six male, twenty-two female) medical students entering Texas Tech University School of Medicine over a 1-year period. These students voluntarily completed the MSPI and several personality measures as part of a pre-admission test battery. The results only partially supported the stated hypotheses. Although 'low-interest undecided' students demonstrated less personal integration compared with 'decided' students, they were no more anxious.

  8. Burnout among Entering MSW Students: Exploring the Role of Personal Attributes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Meekyung; Lee, Sang E.; Lee, Peter Allan

    2012-01-01

    Although individual susceptibility to burnout within a similar structural context is well-documented in other helping professions, little is known about the relationship between personal attributes and burnout in social work. Furthermore, despite a large number of entering MSW students with prior work experience, there is a paucity of research…

  9. Student Activities. Managing Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Barbara; And Others

    This monograph suggests ways that college or university administrations can undertake a systematic and careful review of the risks posed by students' activities. Its purpose is to provide guidance in integrating the risk management process into a school's existing approaches to managing student organizations and activities. It is noted that no…

  10. 77 FR 69650 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers Which Enter the United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers... concerning the Holders or Containers which Enter the United States Duty Free. This request for comment is...: Title: Holders or Containers which Enter the United States Duty Free. OMB Number: 1651-0035. Form...

  11. Stress and cardiometabolic manifestations among Saudi students entering universities: a cross-sectional observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this observational study, we aimed to see whether transition in Saudi students entering university life could be a breeding stage for cardiometabolic risk factor emergence and clustering. Methods A total of 1878 apparently healthy Saudi students of the Preparatory Year, King Saud University, Riyadh, KSA (1112 men and 766 women) spanning 2 academic years were included. They were divided into 2 groups based on the validated perceived stress test (PST). Anthropometrics were obtained and fasting blood samples were collected for measurement of fasting blood glucose and a lipid profile. Results PST score (>27) considered indicative of stress was noted in 44.4% of students. The prevalence of this score was higher in women than in men (49.7% versus 40.7%). The prevalence of obesity, hypertension and dyslipidemia was significantly higher in men than women (p < 0.01), and this was even more apparent among stressed men, who had a significantly higher prevalence of all the above cardiometabolic factors than the non-stressed ones (p < 0.01). Conclusion Perceived stress is alarmingly high among Saudi students entering universities. This study sheds light on the social responsibility of universities in promoting a healthy lifestyle, particularly in this age group, when exposure to different kinds of stressors may result in body weight and metabolic changes. PMID:24755010

  12. Motivations to nurse: an exploration of what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enter nursing.

    PubMed

    Usher, Kim; West, Caryn; Macmanus, Mary; Waqa, Silina; Stewart, Lee; Henry, Renee; Lindsay, David; Conaglen, Jo; Hall, Julianne; McAuliffe, Marie; Redman-MacLaren, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the motivations of student nurses enrolled in nursing courses across a variety of Pacific Island countries. The image of nursing, the desire to help others, family and friends in the profession, personal experience, security, travel opportunities and flexibility have all been identified as motivators for people to enter nursing. To date, what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enrol in a nursing course has not been investigated. An exploratory qualitative approach using focus group interviews with 152 nursing students was undertaken. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis, revealing four themes: (i) helping others; (ii) 'making a difference for my people'; (iii) following in the footsteps of others; and (iv) financial and professional gain. In a time of health and nursing workforce shortages, developing a deeper understanding of what drives people can be used to improve recruitment strategies in the future.

  13. Attrition and Student Progress at Bronx Community College for Entering Classes: Fall 1972 to Fall 1976 (Progress to Fall 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagle, Norman

    Data tables summarize the semester-by-semester persistence of each class of regularly matriculated students entering Bronx Community College (BCC) between Fall 1972 and Fall 1976 in terms of graduation and retention rates. For each entering class, the tables provide progress analyses up to Fall 1978 by curriculum group and high school grade…

  14. Vagal nerve stimulation protects against burn-induced intestinal injury through activation of enteric glia cells

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Todd W.; Bansal, Vishal; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Putnam, James G.; Peterson, Carrie Y.; Loomis, William H.; Wolf, Paul; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    The enteric nervous system may have an important role in modulating gastrointestinal barrier response to disease through activation of enteric glia cells. In vitro studies have shown that enteric glia activation improves intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering the expression of tight junction proteins. We hypothesized that severe injury would increase expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of enteric glial activation. We also sought to define the effects of vagal nerve stimulation on enteric glia activation and intestinal barrier function using a model of systemic injury and local gut mucosal involvement. Mice with 30% total body surface area steam burn were used as model of severe injury. Vagal nerve stimulation was performed to assess the role of parasympathetic signaling on enteric glia activation. In vivo intestinal permeability was measured to assess barrier function. Intestine was collected to investigate changes in histology; GFAP expression was assessed by quantitative PCR, by confocal microscopy, and in GFAP-luciferase transgenic mice. Stimulation of the vagus nerve prevented injury-induced intestinal barrier injury. Intestinal GFAP expression increased at early time points following burn and returned to baseline by 24 h after injury. Vagal nerve stimulation prior to injury increased GFAP expression to a greater degree than burn alone. Gastrointestinal bioluminescence was imaged in GFAP-luciferase transgenic animals following either severe burn or vagal stimulation and confirmed the increased expression of intestinal GFAP. Injection of S-nitrosoglutathione, a signaling molecule released by activated enteric glia cells, following burn exerts protective effects similar to vagal nerve stimulation. Intestinal expression of GFAP increases following severe burn injury. Stimulation of the vagus nerve increases enteric glia activation, which is associated with improved intestinal barrier function. The vagus nerve may mediate the

  15. A Five Year Follow-up Study of Entering Fall 1970 Basic Skills Students at Queensborough Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Irwin

    In order to ascertain the effect of open admissions by investigating the graduation rate of basic skills students, a follow-up study was conducted of the 1,728 students who entered Queensborough Community College in fall 1970 and who were assigned to remedial reading and/or writing. Of a total enrollment of 3,230, 24% or 774 students were…

  16. The Influence of Religion and High School Biology Courses on Students' Knowledge of Evolution When They Enter College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Randy; Cotner, Sehoya; Bates, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Students whose high school biology course included evolution but not creationism knew more about evolution when they entered college than did students whose courses included evolution plus creationism or whose courses included neither evolution nor creationism. Similarly, students who believed that their high school biology classes were the…

  17. They Do Not Buy It: Exploring the Extent to Which Entering First-Year Students View Themselves as Customers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    While a number of scholars have discussed the pervasiveness of the conceptualization of students as customers, to date there has been limited reliable research examining the extent to which students actually view themselves as customers. Using a survey that was administered to a census of entering first-year students at a large public research…

  18. Computers + Student Activities Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masie, Elliott; Stein, Michele

    Designed to provide schools with the tools to start utilizing computers for student activity programs without additional expenditures, this handbook provides beginning computer users with suggestions and ideas for using computers in such activities as drama clubs, yearbooks, newspapers, activity calendars, accounting programs, room utilization,…

  19. Cognitive Profile of Students Who Enter Higher Education with an Indication of Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Brysbaert, Marc

    2012-01-01

    For languages other than English there is a lack of empirical evidence about the cognitive profile of students entering higher education with a diagnosis of dyslexia. To obtain such evidence, we compared a group of 100 Dutch-speaking students diagnosed with dyslexia with a control group of 100 students without learning disabilities. Our study showed selective deficits in reading and writing (effect sizes for accuracy between d = 1 and d = 2), arithmetic (d≈1), and phonological processing (d>0.7). Except for spelling, these deficits were larger for speed related measures than for accuracy related measures. Students with dyslexia also performed slightly inferior on the KAIT tests of crystallized intelligence, due to the retrieval of verbal information from long-term memory. No significant differences were observed in the KAIT tests of fluid intelligence. The profile we obtained agrees with a recent meta-analysis of English findings suggesting that it generalizes to all alphabetic languages. Implications for special arrangements for students with dyslexia in higher education are outlined. PMID:22719864

  20. [Meaning of the death/dying process for entering nursing students].

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Gabriella Michel dos Santos; de Oliveira, Kézia; de Oliveira, William Tiago; Sales, Catarina Aparecida; Ferreira, Patrícia Chatalov

    2013-03-01

    This is a qualitative study, based on Heidegger's existential phenomenology, with the purpose of revealing the meaning of death/dying for freshmen students of the nursing program. The study was developed in a public university in the northwest of Paraná, Brazil between August and October 2010, and 33 entering students from a Nursing program were interviewed. The following existential themes emerged from the phenomenological analysis: "Understanding death as a difficult process to be understood"; "Understanding death as a natural process"; and "Perceiving death as a passage to another life". The present study allowed to understand that knowledge and death are entangled in the temporality and the historicity of every being, which requires a scientific, ethical and philosophical understanding of the death/dying phenomenon so that the scholar may prepare for the humanized care of the patient and his/her family.

  1. Is the Valles caldera entering a new cycle of activity?

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, J.A.; Gardner, J.N.

    1995-05-01

    The Valles caldera formed during two major rhyolitic ignimbrite eruptive episodes (the Bandelier Tuff) at 1.61 and 1.22 Ma, after some 12 m.y. of activity in the Jemez Mountains volcanic field, New Mexico. Several subsequent eruptions between 1.22 and 0.52 Ma produced dominantly high-silica rhyolite lava domes and tephras within the caldera. These were followed by a dormancy of 0.46 m.y. prior to the most recent intracaldera activity, the longest hiatus since the inception of the Bandelier magma system at approximately 1.8 Ma. The youngest volcanic activity at approximately 60 ka produced the SW moat rhyolites, a series of lavas and tuffs that display abundant petrologic evidence of being newly generated melts. Petrographic textures conform closely to published predictions for silicic magmas generated by intrusion of basaltic magma into continental crust. The Valles caldera may currently be the site of renewed silicic magma generation, induced by intrusion of mafic magma at depth. Recent seismic investigations revealed the presence of a large low-velocity anomaly in the lower crust beneath the caldera. The generally aseismic character of the caldera, despite abundant regional seismicity, may be attributed to a heated crustal column, the local effect of 13 m.y. of magmatism and emplacement of mid-crustal plutons. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Investigation of MEK activity in COS7 cells entering mitosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaiping; Zhang, Tianying; Yi, Yongqing; Luo, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Although the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been extensively investigated, numerous events remain unclear. In the present study, we examined mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) expression from interphase to mitosis. Following nocodazole treatment, COS7 cells gradually became round as early as 4 h after treatment. Cyclin B1 expression gradually increased from 4 to 24 h in the presence of nocodazole. When cells were treated with nocodazole for 4 h, the level of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated MEK phosphorylation did not significantly change between nocodazole-untreated and -treated (4 h) cells (P>0.05). However, EGF-mediated MEK phosphorylation was significantly inhibited upon treatment with nocodazole for 8 and 24 h compared to nocodazole-untreated cells (P<0.05). MEK phosphorylation levels were comparable between 1, 5, 10 and 50 ng/ml EGF treatments. Phorbol 12-myristic 13-acetate (PMA) did not activate MEK in mitotic cells. Following treatment of COS7 cells at the interphase with AG1478 or U0126, MEK phosphorylation was blocked. In addition, the investigation of the expression of proteins downstream of MEK demonstrated that EGF does not significantly affect the phosphorylation level of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK) and Elk in mitotic cells (P>0.05). The results showed that MEK expression is gradually inhibited from cell interphase to mitosis, and that MEK downstream signaling is affected by this inhibition, which probably reflects the requirements of cell physiology during mitosis.

  3. Active Students in Webinars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolås, Line; Nordseth, Hugo; Yri, Jørgen Sørlie

    2015-01-01

    To ensure student activity in webinars we have defined 10 learning tasks focusing on production and communication e.g. collaborative writing, discussion and polling, and investigated how the technology supports the learning activities. The three project partners in the VisPed-project use different video-conferencing systems, and we analyzed how it…

  4. Students Active in Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brutcher, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Describes SAIL (Students Active in Leadership) as a school-based, youth-directed group. States that the program helps teenagers learn leadership skills by developing and implementing community service activities. SAIL finds partners with whom to collaborate among local businesses, government, and health associations, and these partners provide the…

  5. A Comparison of the Academic Experiences and Achievement of University Students Entering by Traditional and Non-Traditional Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Robert; Archer, Jennifer; Bourke, Sid

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of three years of student records revealed a marginal disadvantage in academic performance for students entering the University of Newcastle via three different non-traditional enabling programs (findings differed by program), but a positive effect on academic performance of mature age on entry. (EV)

  6. Career Assimilation Program for Entering Russian Students (Project CAPERS). Final Evaluation Report, 1993-94. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    The Career Assimilation Program for Entering Russian Students (Project CAPERS) was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII project in its second year in 1993-94. The project operated at three schools in a community school district in Brooklyn (New York), and served 128 Russian-speaking students, 104 of whom were of limited English…

  7. Would medical students enter an exclusion zone in an infected district with a high mortality rate? An analysis of book reports on 28 (secondary publication).

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Hong, Hyung Sun; Heo, Won Young

    2014-08-11

    This study aimed to ascertain whether medical students would enter a closed area where there was a raging epidemic of an infectious disease with a high fatality rate, and includes reasons for the students entering or refusing to enter. Participants included 50 second-year medical students. They were assigned to read a novel entitled 28, written by Youjeong Jeong, and discuss it in groups. Using their book reports, their decisions of whether or not to enter Hwayang, the city from the novel, and the reasons for their decisions were analyzed; we furthermore investigated the factors affecting their decisions. Among the 50 respondents, 18 students (36%) answered that they would enter, and the remaining 32 students (64%) answered that they would not enter the zone. The reasons given for entering were responsibility (44%), sense of ethics (33%), social duty (17%), and sense of guilt (6%). The reasons the students provided for not entering were inefficiency (44%), worry regarding family (28%), needlessness of sacrifice (19%), and safety not ensured (9%). Students who had four or fewer family members were more likely to enter Hwayang than were students who had five or more family members (odds ratio, 1.85). Students who had completed over 100 hours of volunteer work were more likely to enter Hwayang than were students who had volunteered less than 100 hours (odds ratio, 2.04). Owing to their "responsibility" as a doctor, 36% of medical students answered that they would enter an exclusion zone in an infected district with a high fatality rate. However, 64% answered they would not enter because of "inefficiency." For the medical students it is still a question 'To enter or not to enter?'

  8. Students from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups entering the dental hygiene profession.

    PubMed

    Sandino, Alma H; Rowe, Dorothy J

    2014-03-01

    African American, Hispanic/Latina, and American Indian/Alaska Native persons are markedly underrepresented racial and ethnic groups (UREG) in the dental hygiene profession. The purpose of this study was to survey UREG dental hygiene students to determine their perceptions of the barriers and facilitators that influenced their decision to enter the dental hygiene profession. Participants were eighty-four UREG students attending entry-level dental hygiene programs across the state of California. We conducted face-to-face interviews using a survey guide that consisted of forty-two mostly closed-ended questions. Most (57 percent) participants reported that they had either perceived or experienced barriers: primarily costs associated with the program and the lack of role models in their race/ethnicity. Almost all participants reported that there had been a person, mainly a dental professional, who influenced them to become a dental hygienist; 62 percent of these individuals were reported to be from a similar UREG group as the participant. Funding (57 percent) and emotional support from family and friends (87 percent) were the predominant facilitators employed by the participants to overcome barriers. Based on these results, we recommend three strategies to recruit more UREG students into the dental hygiene profession: more extensive outreach programs, enhanced mentoring by UREG dental professionals, and a modified admission process.

  9. 78 FR 9720 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers Which Enter the United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers Which Enter the United States Duty Free AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of... collection. SUMMARY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the Department of Homeland Security will...

  10. Extracurricular Activities and Student Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, John H.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews research on the link between extracurricular activities and student engagement. Finds that extracurricular activities appeal to student interests, encourage peer interaction, prompt cooperation, build student-adult relationships, provide structure and challenge, and draw students--especially minorities and women--to science. (PKP)

  11. Student Enrollment Patterns, 1972-77: A Report Presenting the Enrollment Patterns of Full- and Part-time Students by Entering Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    To understand patterns of student enrollment, particularly with regard to student attrition, Mercer County Community College developed a computerized information tracking system which monitors enrollment for each semester's entering class, both full- and part-time, for a period of six semesters. This report details enrollment patterns for fall…

  12. Socioeconomic Characteristics and Motivations for Entering a Medical College--Differences between Graduate and Undergraduate Saudi Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AL-Jahdali, Hamdan; Alqarni, Turki; AL-Jahdali, Sarah; Baharoon, Salim A.; AL-Harbi, Abdullah S.; Binsalih, Salih A.; Alshimemeri, Abdulah; Al Sayyari, Abdullah A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the reasons for and the factors associated with deciding to enter a medical school in our graduate and undergraduate medical students and whether differ between the two groups. Method: This is a cross-sectional study. The survey we developed to investigate demographic and socioeconomic data and…

  13. AN ANALYSIS OF THE RECORDS OF STUDENTS ENTERING EL CAMINO COLLEGE ON PROBATION FROM OTHER INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUCK, STEVEN J.; UNDEM, JAN

    BETWEEN 1959 AND 1963, 351 TRANSFER STUDENTS ENTERING EL CAMINO COLLEGE WERE IN A PROBATIONARY STATUS BECAUSE OF UNSATISFACTORY GRADES EARNED AT THEIR PREVIOUS INSTITUTIONS. OF THIS GROUP, 55 PERCENT WERE LATER SUCCESSFUL (REMOVED THEMSELVES FROM PROBATIONARY STATUS). MORE THAN 70 PERCENT OF THOSE TRANSFERRING FROM 4-YEAR INSTITUTIONS AND 33…

  14. Colon cancer chemopreventive effects of baicalein, an active enteric microbiome metabolite from baicalin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Chen, Lina; Anderson, Samantha; Lu, Fang; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-11-01

    Baicalin is a major constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis, which is a commonly used herbal medicine in many Asian countries. After oral ingestion, intestinal microbiota metabolism may change parent compound's structure and its biological activities. However, whether baicalin can be metabolized by enteric microbiota and the related anticancer activity is not clear. In this study, using human enteric microbiome incubation and HPLC analysis, we observed that baicalin can be quickly converted to baicalein. We compared the antiproliferative effects of baicalin and baicalein using a panel of human cancer cell lines, including three human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. In vitro antiproliferative effects on CRC cells were verified using an in vivo xenograft nude mouse model. Baicalin showed limited antiproliferative effects on some of these cancer cell lines. Baicalein, however, showed significant antiproliferative effects in all the tested cancer cell lines, especially on HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells. In vivo antitumor results supported our in vitro data. We demonstrated that baicalein exerts potent S phase cell cycle arrest and pro-apoptotic effects in HCT-116 cells. Baicalein induced the activation of caspase 3 and 9. The in silico modeling suggested that baicalein forms hydrogen bonds with residues Ser251 and Asp253 at the active site of caspase 3, while interactions with residues Leu227 and Asp228 in caspase 9 through its hydroxyl groups. Data from this study suggested that baicalein is a potent anticancer metabolite derived from S. baicalensis. Enteric microbiota play a key role in the colon cancer chemoprevention of S. baicalensis.

  15. Student-Centered Reading Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, James; Wagner, Betty Jane

    1991-01-01

    Offers student-centered reading activities designed to bring students to reading maturity and involvement in literature. Discusses partner reading, dramatizing and performing texts, transforming texts, journal writing, discussion, and writing. (PRA)

  16. 76 FR 2754 - Agency Information Collection (Pay Now Enter Info Page) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... payments through VA's Pay Now Enter Info Page website. Data enter on the Pay Now Enter Info Page is redirected to the Department of Treasury's Pay.gov website allowing claimants to make payments with credit...

  17. Phenolic Compounds of Potato Peel Extracts: Their Antioxidant Activity and Protection against Human Enteric Viruses.

    PubMed

    Silva-BeltrÁn, Norma Patricia; Chaidez-Quiroz, Cristóbal; López-Cuevas, Osvaldo; Ruiz-Cruz, Saul; López-Mata, Marco A; Del-Toro-SÁnchez, Carmen Lizette; Marquez-Rios, Enrique; Ornelas-Paz, José de Jesús

    2017-02-28

    Potato peels (PP) contain several bioactive compounds. These compounds are known to provide human health benefits, including antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. In addition, these compounds could have effects on human enteric viruses that have not yet been reported. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the phenolic composition, antioxidant properties in the acidified ethanol extract (AEE) and water extract of PP, and the antiviral effects on the inhibition of Av-05 and MS2 bacteriophages, which were used as human enteric viral surrogates. The AEE showed the highest phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Chlorogenic and caffeic acids were the major phenolic acids. In vitro analysis indicated that PP had a strong antioxidant activity. A 3 h incubation with AEE at a concentration of 5 mg/ml was needed to reduce the PFU/ml (plaque-forming unit per unit volume) of Av-05 and MS2 by 2.8 and 3.9 log₁₀, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Our data suggest that PP has potential to be a source of natural antioxidants against enteric viruses.

  18. An Examination of Assessment Scores between Students Who Attend Public Schools and Students Who Were Homeschooled Prior to Entering a Virtual Charter School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Virtual charter schools, emerging in the 1990s, are a recent development in the education field and reflect today's technology-oriented society. This study examined existing data to evaluate what, if any, difference existed between students who attended public school and those who were homeschooled prior to entering the virtual charter school. …

  19. Motivating Students in Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Carol; Hunter, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Physical educators have a responsibility to motivate students to develop personal fitness. This is a critical concept as physical education is the only part of the curriculum capable of meeting the health needs of students regarding physical activity. Current physical educators must promote fitness in ways that motivate students to engage in…

  20. Students' Educational Activities During Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Logs completed by 201 medical students in third-year clerkships at nine community-based hospitals indicated students received 6.5 hours of teaching with an instructor daily, spending 4.9 more hours in clerkship-related learning. Most teaching was by full-time faculty and residents. In half their educational activities, students participated with…

  1. Student Activity Funds: Procedures & Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    Student activity funds may create educational opportunities for students, but they frequently create problems for business administrators. The first part of this work reviews the types of organizational issues and transactions an organized student group is likely to encounter, including establishing a constitution, participant roles,…

  2. Activities and functions of peripheral neurons in the enteric nervous system of Aplysia and Lymnaea.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, M; Ito, S; Okamoto, T

    2008-01-01

    In order to explore the functions of the peripheral neurons in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of the gastropods, Aplysia and Lymnaea, we investigated the correlation between peripheral neuronal activities and movements of the digestive tract. In Aplysia, movements of the gizzard were distinguished into two types of contraction: a large constriction of the whole gizzard following bursting activities of the neurons on the gizzard and EJP-like potentials in the musculature; and a small contraction of a restricted part of the gizzard following a slow muscle potential. When TTX was applied to isolated gizzard preparation, the bursting activities were blocked and the EJP-like potentials and the subsequent constriction disappeared, whereas the slow potentials in the musculature and partial contractions appeared to be unaffected. Therefore, it was suggested that the peripheral neurons on the gizzard were motor neurons for constriction, while the partial contraction was thought to be myogenic. In Lymnaea, we recorded periodic bursting activities in the enteric nervous system that were followed by EJP-like potentials and gastrointestinal movements. The results show that, in both species, there may exist motor neurons in the ENS that are responsible for neurogenic movements of the digestive tract.

  3. Longitudinal Study of Performance of Students Entering Harper College, 1967-1980. Volume XI, No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, John A.

    A longitudinal study of full- and part-time students was undertaken at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to provide institutional data about student performance over time. Each fall from 1967 to 1980, transcripts of a random sample of 200 full-time and 200 part-time beginning credit students were analyzed to obtain data about students'…

  4. Detection of enteric viruses in activated sludge by feasible concentration methods.

    PubMed

    Prado, Tatiana; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Human enteric viruses are responsible to cause several diseases, including gastroenteritis and hepatitis, and can be present in high amounts in sewage sludge. This study compared virus recovery efficiency of two feasible concentration methods used for detecting human adenovirus (HAdV), rotavirus species A (RV-A), norovirus genogroup II (NoV GII) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) in sewage sludge from an activated sludge process. Twelve sewage sludge samples were collected bi-monthly from January to July, 2011. Ultracentrifugation was compared with a simplified protocol based on beef extract elution for recovering enteric viruses. Viruses were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR assays and virus recovery efficiency and limits of detection were determined. Methods showed mean recovery rates lower than 7.5%, presenting critical limits of detection (higher than 10(2) - 10(3) genome copies - GC L(-1) for all viruses analyzed). Nevertheless, HAdV were detected in 90% of the analyzed sewage sludge samples (range: 1.8 × 10(4) to 1.1 × 10(5) GC L(-1)), followed by RV-A and NoV (both in 50%) and HAV (8%). Results suggesting that activated sludge is contaminated with high viral loads and HAdV are widely disseminated in these samples. The low virus recovery rates achieved, especially for HAV, indicate that other feasible concentration methods could be developed to improve virus recovery efficiency in these environmental matrices.

  5. Distinguishing Differences in the Academic Motivation of Entering and Persisting Transfer Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Forrest C.; Martin, Georgianna L.; Thompson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Transfer students make up a significant portion of the student body in higher education today; yet, representation of their college experiences and outcomes in the literature seems sparse. This study explored transfer students to determine whether their level of engagement and belonging in college was related to their academic motivation. We…

  6. A Statistical Profile of the Entering Class at Broome Community College, Fall 1983: Student Characteristics, Needs and Goals. Working Paper Series No. 1-85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Richard M., Comp.

    Broome Community College (BCC) is developing a series of questionnaires to assess the impact of college on its students, and to measure the college's role, if any, in promoting social mobility. The first study in this series focused on the backgrounds, needs, and goals of students who entered BCC during June, July, and August of 1983. Students who…

  7. Specific hunger- and satiety-induced tuning of guinea pig enteric nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Roosen, Lina; Boesmans, Werend; Dondeyne, Marjan; Depoortere, Inge; Tack, Jan; Vanden Berghe, Pieter

    2012-09-01

    Although hunger and satiety are mainly centrally regulated, there is convincing evidence that also gastrointestinal motor activity and hormone fluctuations significantly contribute to appetite signalling. In this study, we investigated how motility and enteric nerve activity are set by fasting and feeding. By means of video-imaging, we tested whether peristaltic activity differs in ex vivo preparations from fasted and re-fed guinea pigs. Ca(2+) imaging was used to investigate whether the feeding state directly alters neuronal activity, either occurring spontaneously or evoked by (an)orexigenic signalling molecules. We found that pressure-induced (2 cmH(2)O) peristaltic activity occurs at a higher frequency in ileal segments from re-fed animals (re-fed versus fasted, 6.12 ± 0.22 vs. 4.84 ± 0.52 waves min(-1), P = 0.028), even in vitro hours after death. Myenteric neuronal responses were tuned to the feeding status, since neurons in tissues from re-fed animals remained hyper-responsive to high K(+)-evoked depolarization (P < 0.001) and anorexigenic molecules (P < 0.001), while being less responsive to orexigenic ghrelin (P = 0.013). This illustrates that the feeding status remains ‘imprinted' ex vivo. We were able to reproduce this feeding state-related memory in vitro and found humoral feeding state-related factors to be implicated. Although the molecular link with hyperactivity is not entirely elucidated yet, glucose-dependent pathways are clearly involved in tuning neuronal excitability. We conclude that a bistable memory system that tunes neuronal responses to fasting and re-feeding is present in the enteric nervous system, increasing responses to depolarization and anorexigenic molecules in the re-fed state, while decreasing responses to orexigenic ghrelin. Unlike the hypothalamus, where specific cell populations sensitive to either orexigenic or anorexigenic molecules exist, the enteric feeding state-related memory system is present at the functional level

  8. 76 FR 26750 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Documentation Requirements for Articles Entered Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... Requirements for Articles Entered Under Various Special Tariff Treatment Provisions AGENCY: U.S. Customs and... Articles Entered Under Various Special Tariff Treatment Provisions. This request for comment is being made... Requirements for Articles Entered Under Various Special Tariff Treatment Provisions. OMB Number:...

  9. From Home to Hall: The Transitional Experiences of Homeschooled Students Entering Residential University Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soufleris, Dawn Meza

    2014-01-01

    Research regarding homeschooled students and their transition to college has been focused on two distinct areas: their academic performance and success integrating into a university community. The purpose of this study was to analyze the transition experiences of students who were homeschooled prior to attendance at a residential university campus…

  10. How to Motivate Students to Study before They Enter the Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pogacnik, Lea; Cigic, Blaz

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory exercises constitute an important part of chemical and biochemical courses at the university level. Nevertheless, students frequently are insufficiently prepared for the practical work, which often reduces their work to the level of a technician. A system designed to motivate students to study prior to the laboratory exercise was…

  11. Community and Diversity in Urban Community Colleges: Coursetaking among Entering Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, William; Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Cypers, Scott; Moon, Hye S.; Brocato, Phillip; Wahl, Kelly; Prather, George

    2003-01-01

    Examines a sample of 15 courses in relation to four variables of student characteristics: gender, ethnicity, age, and full- or part-time status. Presents findings from the transcript analyses of 6,196 first-semester students from nine urban colleges, which reveal the strongest relations between curriculum and ethnicity. (Contains seven tables and…

  12. A Diagnostic Evaluation of the Entering Competency Levels of University Introductory Biology Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souchek, Russell D.

    Results of a study that examined entry competency levels of 1,511 students enrolled in 12 sections of introductory biology at Texas A&M University are reported. A pretest was developed and administered to students which tested basic competencies over nine concept areas considered prerequisite to the introductory biology course. A questionnaire…

  13. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  14. Physical Activity Patterns and Self-Efficacy of Selected College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Matt; Drolet, Judy C.; Ogletree, Roberta J.

    2010-01-01

    Much attention has been given to the fact that Americans are becoming less active. This study was designed to examine the levels of exercise-specific self-efficacy and physical activity rates in a selected group of college students. Students were recruited as they entered a fitness facility. Participation consisted of completing a survey that…

  15. Enteric pathogens deploy cell cycle inhibiting factors to block the bactericidal activity of Perforin-2

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Ryan M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Olsson, Melissa L; Podack, Eckhard R; Munson, George P

    2015-01-01

    Perforin-2 (MPEG1) is an effector of the innate immune system that limits the proliferation and spread of medically relevant Gram-negative, -positive, and acid fast bacteria. We show here that a cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complex containing cullin-1 and βTrCP monoubiquitylates Perforin-2 in response to pathogen associated molecular patterns such as LPS. Ubiquitylation triggers a rapid redistribution of Perforin-2 and is essential for its bactericidal activity. Enteric pathogens such as Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli disarm host cells by injecting cell cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) into mammalian cells to deamidate the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. Because CRL activity is dependent upon NEDD8, Cif blocks ubiquitin dependent trafficking of Perforin-2 and thus, its bactericidal activity. Collectively, these studies further underscore the biological significance of Perforin-2 and elucidate critical molecular events that culminate in Perforin-2-dependent killing of both intracellular and extracellular, cell-adherent bacteria. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06505.001 PMID:26418746

  16. Antibacterial Activity of Polyphenolic Fraction of Kombucha Against Enteric Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Patra, Madhu Manti; Chakravorty, Somnath; Sarkar, Soumyadev; Chakraborty, Writachit; Koley, Hemanta; Gachhui, Ratan

    2016-12-01

    The emergence of multi-drug-resistant enteric pathogens has prompted the scientist community to explore the therapeutic potentials of traditional foods and beverages. The present study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of Kombucha, a fermented beverage of sugared black tea, against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Shigella flexneri and Salmonella Typhimurium followed by the identification of the antibacterial components present in Kombucha. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by determining the inhibition zone diameter, minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration. Kombucha fermented for 14 days showed maximum activity against the bacterial strains. Its ethyl acetate extract was found to be the most effective upon sequential solvent extraction of the 14-day Kombucha. This potent ethyl acetate extract was then subjected to thin layer chromatography for further purification of antibacterial ingredients which led to the isolation of an active polyphenolic fraction. Catechin and isorhamnetin were detected as the major antibacterial compounds present in this polyphenolic fraction of Kombucha by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Catechin, one of the primary antibacterial polyphenols in tea was also found to be present in Kombucha. But isorhamnetin is not reported to be present in tea, which may thereby suggest the role of fermentation process of black tea for its production in Kombucha. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the presence of isorhamnetin in Kombucha. The overall study suggests that Kombucha can be used as a potent antibacterial agent against entero-pathogenic bacterial infections, which mainly is attributed to its polyphenolic content.

  17. Enteric pathogens deploy cell cycle inhibiting factors to block the bactericidal activity of Perforin-2.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Ryan M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Olsson, Melissa L; Podack, Eckhard R; Munson, George P

    2015-09-29

    Perforin-2 (MPEG1) is an effector of the innate immune system that limits the proliferation and spread of medically relevant Gram-negative, -positive, and acid fast bacteria. We show here that a cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complex containing cullin-1 and βTrCP monoubiquitylates Perforin-2 in response to pathogen associated molecular patterns such as LPS. Ubiquitylation triggers a rapid redistribution of Perforin-2 and is essential for its bactericidal activity. Enteric pathogens such as Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli disarm host cells by injecting cell cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) into mammalian cells to deamidate the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. Because CRL activity is dependent upon NEDD8, Cif blocks ubiquitin dependent trafficking of Perforin-2 and thus, its bactericidal activity. Collectively, these studies further underscore the biological significance of Perforin-2 and elucidate critical molecular events that culminate in Perforin-2-dependent killing of both intracellular and extracellular, cell-adherent bacteria.

  18. Student Perceptions of Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela; Achen, Rebecca M.; Dodd, Regan K.

    2015-01-01

    A paradigm shift from lecture-based courses to interactive classes punctuated with engaging, student-centered learning activities has begun to characterize the work of some teachers in higher education. Convinced through the literature of the values of using active learning strategies, we assessed through an action research project in five college…

  19. Coal Activities for Secondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coal Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This collection of lesson plans designed for teachers of 4th- through 12th-grade students utilizes an assortment of teaching strategies for topics related to coal and the coal industry. Activities cover the following topics: coal formation; coal identification; "the geologist's dilemma" (a supply and demand activity); geologic time and…

  20. 76 FR 39416 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Documentation Requirements for Articles Entered Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Requirements for Articles Entered Under Various Special Tariff Treatment Provisions AGENCY: U.S. Customs and... Treatment Provisions. This is a proposed extension of an information collection that was previously approved.... Title: Documentation Requirements for Articles Entered Under Various Special Tariff Treatment...

  1. Individualized Education Program (IEP) Planning Guide for Special Education Students Entering High School Vocational Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Lewis P.

    This guide is designed to assist school program planners who are working with mainstreamed special education students in vocational education programs. The guide, covering grades 11 and 12, contains vocational program goals, objectives, and evaluation measures for 30 secondary vocational education programs in 15 curriculum areas, as well as for…

  2. Suggestions for Screening Entering Kindergarten Students To Assist in the Identification of Possibly Gifted Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Starr

    This monograph is designed for New York parents and school personnel charged with administering the screening instruments for incoming kindergarten students to determine possible giftedness. It begins by explaining Article 65 of New York's Compulsory Education and School Census Law, Section 3208, which requires that parents be notified if their…

  3. Students Hearing Impaired from the 1963-1965 Rubella Epidemic Begin to Enter College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuckless, E. Ross; Walter, Gerard G.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of the postsecondary qualifications among 8,000 or more children born hearing impaired as a result of the 1963-65 rubella epidemic revealed a favorable prognosis for postsecondary education for many rubella students graduating from secondary programs in 1983, l984, and l985. (Author/CL)

  4. Does the Rising Cost of Tuition Affect the Socio-Economic Status of Students Entering University?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Wayne; Shale, Doug

    2004-01-01

    As tuition fees increase, universities need to be concerned whether costs have risen to a point where students from low-income families are being disproportionately excluded. Given the rates of increases in tuition fees in recent times, this outcome seems plausible and is often the opening point of discussions on this matter (see for example, the…

  5. Enter the Madcap Prince of Wales: Students Directing "Henry IV, Part I."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earthman, Elise Ann

    1993-01-01

    Argues that William Shakespeare's "Henry IV, Part I" is an appropriate and useful text for secondary English classrooms. Shows how the play lends itself to performance-based instruction. Outlines ways of accomplishing student engagement, using film versions, and assigning written work. (HB)

  6. Teaching Entering Graduate Students the Role of Journal Articles in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Priscilla J.

    2006-01-01

    Graduate students need to understand the role of technical articles in research and to become familiar with the journal submission process. Although this knowledge is important to their careers, it is rarely included in coursework. To correct this, class discussion on the role of technical articles in research as well as the submission process has…

  7. Why Students of Color Are Not Entering the Field of Teaching: Reflections from Minority Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, June A.

    This paper explores the issue of low interest and involvement in teaching careers by students of color. The study discussed in the paper was designed to consider the following general supposition: teacher education programs, as they have traditionally selected, trained, and supported teachers, no longer suffice for the needs of today's…

  8. Measuring What Students Entering School Know and Can Do: PIPS Australia 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildy, Helen; Styles, Irene

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports analysis of 2006-2007 on-entry assessment data from the Performance Indicators in Primary Schools Baseline Assessment (PIPS-BLA) of random samples of students in England, Scotland, New Zealand and Australia. The analysis aimed, first, to investigate the validity and reliability of that instrument across countries and sexes, and,…

  9. Enteric glia promote intestinal mucosal healing via activation of focal adhesion kinase and release of proEGF

    PubMed Central

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Chevalier, Julien; Mahé, Maxime M.; Wedel, Thilo; Urvil, Petri; Derkinderen, Pascal; Savidge, Tor

    2011-01-01

    Wound healing of the gastrointestinal mucosa is essential for the maintenance of gut homeostasis and integrity. Enteric glial cells play a major role in regulating intestinal barrier function, but their role in mucosal barrier repair remains unknown. The impact of conditional ablation of enteric glia on dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced mucosal damage and on healing of diclofenac-induced mucosal ulcerations was evaluated in vivo in GFAP-HSVtk transgenic mice. A mechanically induced model of intestinal wound healing was developed to study glial-induced epithelial restitution. Glial-epithelial signaling mechanisms were analyzed by using pharmacological inhibitors, neutralizing antibodies, and genetically engineered intestinal epithelial cells. Enteric glial cells were shown to be abundant in the gut mucosa, where they associate closely with intestinal epithelial cells as a distinct cell population from myofibroblasts. Conditional ablation of enteric glia worsened mucosal damage after DSS treatment and significantly delayed mucosal wound healing following diclofenac-induced small intestinal enteropathy in transgenic mice. Enteric glial cells enhanced epithelial restitution and cell spreading in vitro. These enhanced repair processes were reproduced by use of glial-conditioned media, and soluble proEGF was identified as a secreted glial mediator leading to consecutive activation of epidermal growth factor receptor and focal adhesion kinase signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. Our study shows that enteric glia represent a functionally important cellular component of the intestinal epithelial barrier microenvironment and that the disruption of this cellular network attenuates the mucosal healing process. PMID:21350188

  10. Perceived Stress Scores among Saudi Students Entering Universities: A Prospective Study during the First Year of University Life

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M.; Al-Othman, Abdulaziz; Albanyan, Abdulmajeed; Al-Attas, Omar S.; Alokail, Majed S.; Sabico, Shaun; Chrousos, George P.

    2014-01-01

    In this prospective study we wanted to determine whether perceived stress over time among students in the Preparatory Year of King Saud University (KSU) predisposes them to cardiometabolic abnormalities. A total of 110 apparently healthy Saudi students (35 men and 75 women enrolled during the 2010−2011 academic year) were included. Perceived stress was determined at baseline and 1 year later. Anthropometrics were obtained and morning fasting serum glucose, lipid profile and cortisol were measured at both times. Perceived stress was noted among 48.2% of subjects at baseline and was not significantly different after follow-up, with 45.4% scoring high. In men, the prevalence of perceived stress was 48.6% at baseline (13 out of 35) and 37.1% at follow-up (13 out of 35), while in women it was 48% at baseline and 49.3% at follow-up. Interestingly, significant improvements in the blood pressure and lipid profiles, with the exception of HDL-cholesterol, were observed in both men and women, while fasting glucose also improved in women. Serum cortisol was inversely associated to fasting glucose, and total- and LDL-cholesterol (p-values 0.007, 0.04 and 0.04, respectively). These data are opposite to findings in students entering Western universities, in whom increasing stress and a deteriorating cardiometabolic profile have been repeatedly noted. Perceived stress and morning cortisol levels among students of the Preparatory Year in KSU remained constant for both genders over time, yet an improved cardiometabolic profile was observed, suggesting good adaptation among our pre-college students in their first year of university life. PMID:24727357

  11. Perceived stress scores among Saudi students entering universities: a prospective study during the first year of university life.

    PubMed

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Al-Othman, Abdulaziz; Albanyan, Abdulmajeed; Al-Attas, Omar S; Alokail, Majed S; Sabico, Shaun; Chrousos, George P

    2014-04-10

    In this prospective study we wanted to determine whether perceived stress over time among students in the Preparatory Year of King Saud University (KSU) predisposes them to cardiometabolic abnormalities. A total of 110 apparently healthy Saudi students (35 men and 75 women enrolled during the 2010-2011 academic year) were included. Perceived stress was determined at baseline and 1 year later. Anthropometrics were obtained and morning fasting serum glucose, lipid profile and cortisol were measured at both times. Perceived stress was noted among 48.2% of subjects at baseline and was not significantly different after follow-up, with 45.4% scoring high. In men, the prevalence of perceived stress was 48.6% at baseline (13 out of 35) and 37.1% at follow-up (13 out of 35), while in women it was 48% at baseline and 49.3% at follow-up. Interestingly, significant improvements in the blood pressure and lipid profiles, with the exception of HDL-cholesterol, were observed in both men and women, while fasting glucose also improved in women. Serum cortisol was inversely associated to fasting glucose, and total- and LDL-cholesterol (p-values 0.007, 0.04 and 0.04, respectively). These data are opposite to findings in students entering Western universities, in whom increasing stress and a deteriorating cardiometabolic profile have been repeatedly noted. Perceived stress and morning cortisol levels among students of the Preparatory Year in KSU remained constant for both genders over time, yet an improved cardiometabolic profile was observed, suggesting good adaptation among our pre-college students in their first year of university life.

  12. Emporiatric enteritis: lessons learned from U.S. students in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, H. L.; Ericsson, C. D.; Dupont, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    In the studies reported, evidence has been presented that U.S. students traveling to Mexico represent a model for the study of travelers' diarrhea. The incidence of illness acquisition approximates that published in other studies of travelers. Natural immunity was shown to develop as students remained in Mexico presumably through repeated exposure to prevalent agents, particularly ETEC. ETEC, shigella strains and no detectable agent represented the largest groups when etiologic assessment was made. Food probably served as the important source of diarrhea particularly that due to ETEC and shigella strains. The level of bacteria isolated from food suggested that organism replication occurred due to improper temperature storage rather than to heavy initial contamination. The location of food consumption was related to degree of risk: self preparation was the safest, eating in Mexican homes the least safe and consumption of food in public restaurants was intermediate in risk. Water probably played a role in the transmission of viral infection. The risk of water contamination appeared to be highest during the rainy seasons. Finally, the antimicrobial agents TMP/SMX and TMP alone were shown to effectively prevent and treat this form of travelers' diarrhea. PMID:3837965

  13. Landsat: Space Activities for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Steven K.

    1979-01-01

    An aerospace education activity is described which is suitable for grades 3-12. Students piece together several images from the Landsat satellite to make a mosaic of their state. From the mosaic clear acetate overlay maps can be made relating to such subjects as agriculture, geology, hydrology, or urban planning. (BB)

  14. HPV vaccine awareness and willingness of first-year students entering university in Western Turkey.

    PubMed

    Durusoy, Raika; Yamazhan, Mustafa; Taşbakan, Meltem Işikgöz; Ergin, Işil; Aysin, Murat; Pullukçu, Hüsnü; Yamazhan, Tansu

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the level of knowledge on HPV and HPV vaccination, and to determine vaccination attitude among Ege university students in Izmir, Turkey. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in first-year English preparatory class. Systematic cluster sampling was applied and 717 (72.6%) of students registered to the 54 classes in 17 different faculties/schools were contacted. Data were collected between April 30 and May 18, 2010, through a self-reported questionnaire including 40 questions. A knowledge score was calculated by summing up the number of correct answers given to the 12 knowledge questions. Analyses were done using t-test, chi-square test, univariate and multivariate logistic regression. The mean age of participants was 19.7±1.5 and 445 (62.1%) were female. Overall, 132 (18.9%) had experienced sexual intercourse, but only 7 of them were female. Among participants, 24.1% had heard of HPV and 25.1% about HPV vaccine. The knowledge item with the highest correct answer rate (32.3%) was that HPV caused cervical cancer. The mean total knowledge score was remarkably poor (1.8±2.6 over 12 items), with 59.6% of respondents having zero as their score. There was no difference in mean knowledge scores between males and females. Higher income, history of sexual intercourse and higher knowledge score were significant factors increasing HPV and vaccine awareness for the whole group, adjusted for gender. Genital cancer history in the family significantly increased awareness, but only among girls. Only three students (0.4%) had already been vaccinated, all being female. Among females, 11.6% intended to be vaccinated vs. 10.1% for males, without any significant difference. Visiting a gynaecologist/urologist in the last three years, a history of genital cancer in the family, vaccine awareness, a higher total knowledge score, and being from the East of Turkey were significant predictors of a positive vaccination attitude. HPVvaccination still

  15. Spitzer - Hot & Colorful Student Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, D.; Rebull, L. M.; DeWolf, C.; Guastella, P.; Johnson, C. H.; Schaefers, J.; Spuck, T.; McDonald, J. G., III; DeWolf, T.; Brock, S.; Boerma, J.; Bemis, G.; Paulsen, K.; Yueh, N.; Peter, A.; Wassmer, W.; Haber, R.; Scaramucci, A.; Butchart, J.; Holcomb, A.; Karns, B.; Kennedy, S.; Siegel, R.; Weiser, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this poster, we present the results of several activities developed for the general science student to explore infrared light. The first activity involved measuring infrared radiation using an updated version of Newton's experiment of splitting white light and finding IR radiation. The second used Leslie's cube to allow students to observe different radiators, while the third used a modern infrared thermometer to measure and identify IR sources in an enclosed box. The last activity involved students making false-color images from narrow-band filter images from data sets from Spitzer Space Telescope, STScI Digitized Sky Survey and other sources. Using computer programs like Adobe Photoshop and free software such as ds9, Spot and Leopard, poster-like images were created by the students. This research is funded by the Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Please see our companion poster, Johnson et al., on the science aspect of this program, and another poster on the educational aspects, Guastella et al.

  16. Activation of enteric nerve pathways in the guinea-pig duodenum by cholecystokinin octapeptide and pentagastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Ngu, M C

    1985-01-01

    The action and mechanism of action of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) and pentagastrin on isolated segments of guinea-pig duodenum were examined using contractility studies and by intracellular recordings made from smooth muscle cells. Both CCK-8 and pentagastrin caused an excitatory contractile response. The threshold concentration ranged from 5 X 10(-11) to 10(-9) M for CCK-8 and 5 X 10(-10) to 10(-8) M for pentagastrin. The excitatory response was abolished by tetrodotoxin (3.1 X 10(-6) M) and atropine (1.5 X 10(-6) M) and inhibited by d-tubocurarine (up to 2.9 X 10(-5) M). In the presence of atropine a proportion of preparations relaxed in response to CCK-8 (nineteen of thirty-one) and pentagastrin (thirteen of seventeen). This response was only seen at high concentrations of the peptides (10(-8)-10(-7) M) and was abolished by tetrodotoxin (3 X 10(-6) M). Intracellular recordings from duodenal smooth muscle revealed multiple excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) in response to CCK-8 and to pentagastrin. These e.j.p.s were identical to those evoked by transmural nerve stimulation and were abolished by atropine (1.5 X 10(-7) M) and by tetrodotoxin (3 X 10(-6) M). Inhibitory junction potentials (i.j.p.s) were not recorded in response to the peptides except on one occasion. It is suggested that CCK-8 and pentagastrin cause an increase in duodenal motility by the selective activation of excitatory pathways in the enteric nervous system. PMID:4032301

  17. Student Activities . . . an Extension of the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Joan B.

    1981-01-01

    Extracurricular activities in secondary schools are an important part of student preparation for adult life. This document presents guidelines on the components, administration, and evaluation of student activities. It suggests that a comprehensive activity program should include student government, publications, cultural activities, service…

  18. Platelet-activating factor in the enteric nervous system of the guinea pig small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Fang, Xiu-Cai; Liu, Sumei; Gao, Na; Xia, Yun

    2006-11-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a proinflammatory mediator that may influence neuronal activity in the enteric nervous system (ENS). Electrophysiology, immunofluorescence, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR were used to study the action of PAF and the expression of PAF receptor (PAFR) in the ENS. PAFR immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed by 6.9% of the neurons in the myenteric plexus and 14.5% of the neurons in the submucosal plexus in all segments of the guinea pig intestinal tract as determined by double staining with anti-human neuronal protein antibody. PAFR IR was found in 6.1% of the neurons with IR for calbindin, 35.8% of the neurons with IR for neuropeptide Y (NPY), 30.6% of the neurons with IR for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and 1.96% of the neurons with IR for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the submucosal plexus. PAFR IR was also found in 1.5% of the neurons with IR for calbindin, 51.1% of the neurons with IR for NPY, and 32.9% of the neurons with IR for ChAT in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, exposure to PAF (200-600 nM) evoked depolarizing responses (8.2 +/- 3.8 mV) in 12.4% of the neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and uniaxonal morphology and in 12.5% of the neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology, whereas in the myenteric preparations, depolarizing responses were elicited by a similar concentration of PAF in 9.5% of the neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and uniaxonal morphology and in 12.0% of the neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology. The results suggest that subgroups of secreto- and musculomotor neurons in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses express PAFR. Coexpression of PAFR IR with ChAT IR in the myenteric plexus and ChAT IR and VIP IR in the submucosal plexus suggests that PAF, after release in the inflamed bowel, might act to elevate the excitability of submucosal secretomotor and myenteric musculomotor

  19. The Academic and Remedial Placement of Students Entering B. C. C. in September 1975 by Curriculum Group. Research Report BCC-9-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronx Community Coll., NY.

    This report describes the Bronx Community College (B.C.C.) freshmen class entering in September 1975, in terms of high school grade average and scores on reading-English and mathematics placement tests. As of the fall of 1974, B.C.C. enrolled a markedly higher proportion of students with high school averages below 70 percent than any other college…

  20. A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark; Mangold, Karen; Trainor, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The transition from medical student to intern is a challenging process characterized by a steep learning curve. Focused courses targeting skills necessary for success as a resident have increased self-perceived preparedness, confidence, and medical knowledge. Our aim was to create a brief educational intervention for 4th-year medical students entering pediatric, family practice, and medicine/pediatric residencies to target skills necessary for an internship. The curriculum used a combination of didactic presentations, small group discussions, role-playing, facilitated debriefing, and simulation-based education. Participants completed an objective structured clinical exam requiring synthesis and application of multiple boot camp elements before and after the elective. Participants completed anonymous surveys assessing self-perceived preparedness for an internship, overall and in regards to specific skills, before the elective and after the course. Participants were asked to provide feedback about the course. Using checklists to assess performance, students showed an improvement in performing infant lumbar punctures (47.2% vs 77.0%; p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.2, 0.4%) and providing signout (2.5 vs. 3.9 (5-point scale) p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.6, 2.3). They did not show an improvement in communication with a parent. Participants demonstrated an increase in self-reported preparedness for all targeted skills, except for obtaining consults and interprofessional communication. There was no increase in reported overall preparedness. All participants agreed with the statements, “The facilitators presented the material in an effective manner,” “I took away ideas I plan to implement in internship,” and “I think all students should participate in a similar experience.” When asked to assess the usefulness of individual modules, all except order writing received a mean Likert score > 4. A focused boot camp addressing key knowledge and skills

  1. A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies.

    PubMed

    Burns, Rebekah; Adler, Mark; Mangold, Karen; Trainor, Jennifer

    2016-02-09

    The transition from medical student to intern is a challenging process characterized by a steep learning curve. Focused courses targeting skills necessary for success as a resident have increased self-perceived preparedness, confidence, and medical knowledge. Our aim was to create a brief educational intervention for 4th-year medical students entering pediatric, family practice, and medicine/pediatric residencies to target skills necessary for an internship. The curriculum used a combination of didactic presentations, small group discussions, role-playing, facilitated debriefing, and simulation-based education. Participants completed an objective structured clinical exam requiring synthesis and application of multiple boot camp elements before and after the elective. Participants completed anonymous surveys assessing self-perceived preparedness for an internship, overall and in regards to specific skills, before the elective and after the course. Participants were asked to provide feedback about the course. Using checklists to assess performance, students showed an improvement in performing infant lumbar punctures (47.2% vs 77.0%; p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.2, 0.4%) and providing signout (2.5 vs. 3.9 (5-point scale) p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.6, 2.3). They did not show an improvement in communication with a parent. Participants demonstrated an increase in self-reported preparedness for all targeted skills, except for obtaining consults and interprofessional communication. There was no increase in reported overall preparedness. All participants agreed with the statements, "The facilitators presented the material in an effective manner," "I took away ideas I plan to implement in internship," and "I think all students should participate in a similar experience." When asked to assess the usefulness of individual modules, all except order writing received a mean Likert score > 4. A focused boot camp addressing key knowledge and skills required for

  2. Opioid-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in rat enteric neurons following chronic morphine treatment.

    PubMed

    Duraffourd, Celine; Kumala, Erica; Anselmi, Laura; Brecha, Nicholas C; Sternini, Catia

    2014-01-01

    Opioids, acting at μ opioid receptors, are commonly used for pain management. Chronic opioid treatment induces cellular adaptations, which trigger long-term side effects, including constipation mediated by enteric neurons. We tested the hypothesis that chronic opioid treatment induces alterations of μ opioid receptor signaling in enteric neurons, which are likely to serve as mechanisms underlying opioid-induced constipation. In cultured rat enteric neurons, either untreated (naïve) or exposed to morphine for 4 days (chronic), we compared the effect of morphine and DAMGO (D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5 enkephalin) on μ opioid receptor internalization and downstream signaling by examining the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (MAPK/ERK) pathway, cAMP accumulation and transcription factor cAMP Response Element-Binding protein (CREB) expression. μ opioid receptor internalization and MAPK/ERK phosphorylation were induced by DAMGO, but not morphine in naïve neurons, and by both opioids in chronic neurons. MAPK/ERK activation was prevented by the receptor antagonist naloxone, by blocking receptor trafficking with hypertonic sucrose, dynamin inhibitor, or neuronal transfection with mutated dynamin, and by MAPK inhibitor. Morphine and DAMGO inhibited cAMP in naïve and chronic enteric neurons, and induced desensitization of cAMP signaling. Chronic morphine treatment suppressed desensitization of cAMP and MAPK signaling, increased CREB phosphorylation through a MAPK/ERK pathway and induced delays of gastrointestinal transit, which was prevented by MAPK/ERK blockade. This study showed that opioids induce endocytosis- and dynamin-dependent MAPK/ERK activation in enteric neurons and that chronic morphine treatment triggers changes at the receptor level and downstream signaling resulting in MAPK/ERK-dependent CREB activation. Blockade of this signaling pathway prevents the development of gastrointestinal motility

  3. Enteral feedings.

    PubMed

    Chernoff, R

    1980-01-01

    The benefits, equipment used, commercially available sources, and the indications and techniques for administration of enteral nutrients are reviewed. In many malabsorption states, enteral feeding is preferable and parenteral nutrients are seldom indicated. Transitional enteral nutrient support usually is indicated after parenteral nutrient therapy. Enteral tube-feeding formulas should be matched to the patient's needs; formulas using blenderized natural foods or intact isolated nutrients are appropriate for patients with intact gastrointestinal tracts. Patients should be monitored for glucosuria and hyperglycemia, bloating, nausea, dehydration, and renal, hepatic and hematologic status. Formula dilution, and a reduced flow rate or use of continuous-drip feeding, will reduce the incidence of osmotic diarrhea. The effectiveness, low cost and low potential for serious complications make enteral feeding preferable to parenteral nutrient therapy for many patients.

  4. The Evolutionary Conformation from Traditional Lecture to Active Learning in an Undergraduate Biology Course and Its Effects on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diederich, Kirsten Bakke

    2010-01-01

    In response to the declining number of students in the United States entering into the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) disciplines, there has been an attempt to retain student interest in the sciences through the implementation of more active learning in the classroom. Active learning is defined as any instructional method that…

  5. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airhart, Douglas L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University's Program of Special Education sponsors a "Super Saturday" of enrichment activities for gifted and talented students as well as students with learning disabilities. A session on horticulture was planned and arranged by students in a class on horticultural therapy who designed learning activities of…

  6. A Student Activity That Simulates Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nichole L.; Lang-Walker, Rosalyn; Fail, Joseph L., Jr.; Champion, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an activity that uses cards to simulate evolution. The mechanism of the evolutionary pressure in the simulation is clearly indicated for the students. This simulation is useful for allowing student experimentation by varying conditions.

  7. Kinematics Card Sort Activity: Insight into Students' Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryhill, Erin; Herrington, Deborah; Oliver, Keith

    2016-12-01

    Kinematics is a topic students are unknowingly aware of well before entering the physics classroom. Students observe motion on a daily basis. They are constantly interpreting and making sense of their observations, unintentionally building their own understanding of kinematics before receiving any formal instruction. Unfortunately, when students take their prior conceptions to understand a new situation, they often do so in a way that inaccurately connects their learning. We were motivated to identify strategies to help our students make accurate connections to their prior knowledge and understand kinematics at a deeper level. To do this, we integrated a formative assessment card sort into a kinematic graphing unit within an introductory high school physics course. Throughout the activities, we required students to document and reflect upon their thinking. This allowed their learning to build upon their own previously held conceptual understanding, which provided an avenue for cognitive growth. By taking a more direct approach to eliciting student reasoning, we hoped to improve student learning and guide our assessment of their learning.

  8. Enhancing Engagement through Active Student Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tincani, Matt; Twyman, Janet S.

    2016-01-01

    Student engagement is critical to academic success. High-Active Student Response (ASR) teaching techniques are an effective way to improve student engagement and are an important component of evidence-based practice. High-ASR teaching strategies accompany important assumptions: (1) ASR is an alterable variable; (2) teachers can increase ASR in…

  9. Active Learning via Student Karaoke Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Gary D.; Richards, Travis

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated students' perceptions and reactions to an active learning Karaoke Video project in both a large (104 student) undergraduate class in Natural History of Georgia and a small graduate seminar in Fish Ecology. Undergraduate responses were evaluated with both questionnaires and triangulation interviews and graduate student responses…

  10. Enteric viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characteristic clinical signs associated with viral enteritis in young poultry include diarrhea, anorexia, litter eating, ruffled feathers, and poor growth. Intestines may have lesions; intestines are typically dilated and are filled with fluid and gaseous contents. The sequela to clinical disease...

  11. Radiation enteritis.

    PubMed

    Harb, Ali H; Abou Fadel, Carla; Sharara, Ala I

    2014-01-01

    Radiation enteritis continues to be a major health concern in recipients of radiation therapy. The incidence of radiation enteritis is expected to continue to rise during the coming years paralleling the unprecedented use of radiotherapy in pelvic cancers. Radiation enteritis can present as either an acute or chronic syndrome. The acute form presents within hours to days of radiation exposure and typically resolves within few weeks. The chronic form may present as early as 2 months or as long as 30 years after exposure. Risk factors can be divided into patient and treatment-related factors. Chronic radiation enteritis is characterized by progressive obliterative endarteritis with exaggerated submucosal fibrosis and can manifest by stricturing, formation of fistulae, local abscesses, perforation, and bleeding. In the right clinical context, diagnosis can be confirmed by cross-sectional imaging, flexible or video capsule endoscopy. Present treatment strategies are directed primarily towards symptom relief and management of emerging complications. Recently, however, there has been a shift towards rational drug design based on improved understanding of the molecular basis of disease in an effort to limit the fibrotic process and prevent organ damage.

  12. 5-Fluorouracil enteric-coated nanoparticles for improved apoptotic activity and therapeutic index in treating colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Shashank; Kuppusamy, Gowthamarajan; Satish Kumar, M N; Praveen, T K; Wadhwani, Ashish

    2016-10-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is one among the anti-cancer agents in FOLFORINOX treatment along with oxaliplatin and irinotecan for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Despite its potential activity on the tumor cells, it lacks site specificity partly attributed by its biodistribution to healthy cells resulting in toxic effects to healthy cells. Therefore, we have formulated 5-fluorouracil enteric-coated nanoparticles (5-FUEC) to localize the drug in the colon area that enables its prolonged presence in target area in a sustained manner. The current work emphasizes on enhanced anti-cancer activity of 5-FUEC sequencing its apoptotic activity on HCT 116 colorectal cancer cell lines in vitro. MTT assay exhibited 5.5-fold decrease in IC50 value of nanoparticles comparable to 5-FU. Nuclear fragmentation with irregular edges in nucleus of cells justified its improved activity. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis confirms the majority of cells gated in early apoptotic (39.75%) and late apoptotic phase (36.25%). Acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining (AO/EB) exhibited cells with red fluorescence (indicating apoptosis) comparable to the control and 5-FU. γ-Scintigraphic studies determined the applicability and feasibility of the enteric coating with mean gastric emptying time, mean intestinal transit time and mean colon arrival time of 1.89 ± 0.03, 2.15 ± 0.05 and 4.03 ± 0.27 h, respectively. Moreover, nanoparticulate approach was found significant in reducing tumor size and volume in xenograft tumor models in vivo along with sustained release. These superior anti-cancer activities exhibited by 5-FUEC indicated that it could be a potential alternative to chemotherapy for colorectal cancer.

  13. Promoting Business Education through Student Organization Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelverton, Sandra

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the promotion of business education through the activities of student organizations. Describes specific programs, projects, and leadership development activities and their effectiveness in publicizing business education programs. (JOW)

  14. Propelling Students into Active Grammar Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurhill, Dennis A.

    2011-01-01

    "O! this learning, what a thing it is." -W. Shakespeare, "The Taming of the Shrew." The aim of this action research was to find out if active grammar involvement amongst students might lead to better results. My approach was to activate my students during grammar instruction by using cooperative learning: that is a form of…

  15. Hypothetical Biotechnology Companies: A Role-Playing Student Centered Activity for Undergraduate Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuck, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Science students leaving undergraduate programs are entering the biotechnology industry where they are presented with issues which require integration of science content. Students find this difficult as through-out their studies, most content is limited to a single subdiscipline (e.g., biochemistry, immunology). In addition, students need…

  16. Significant difference in active metabolite levels of ginseng in humans consuming Asian or Western diet: The link with enteric microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jin-Yi; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Zhang, Qi-Hui; Liu, Zhi; Musch, Mark W; Bissonnette, Marc; Chang, Eugene B; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2017-04-01

    After ingestion of ginseng, the bioavailability of its parent compounds is low and enteric microbiota plays an important role in parent compound biotransformation to their metabolites. Diet type can influence the enteric microbiota profile. When human subjects on different diets ingest ginseng, their different gut microbiota profiles may influence the metabolism of ginseng parent compounds. In this study, the effects of different diet type on gut microbiota metabolism of American ginseng saponins were investigated. We recruited six healthy adults who regularly consumed different diet types. These subjects received 7 days' oral American ginseng, and their biological samples were collected for LC-Q-TOF-MS analysis. We observed significant ginsenoside Rb1 (a major parent compound) and compound K (a major active metabolite) level differences in the samples from the subjects consuming different diets. Subjects on an Asian diet had much higher Rb1 levels but much lower compound K levels compared with those on a Western diet. Since compound K possesses much better cancer chemoprevention potential, our data suggested that consumers on a Western diet should obtain better cancer prevention effects with American ginseng intake compared with those on an Asian diet. Ginseng compound levels could be enhanced or reduced via gut microbiota manipulation for clinical utility.

  17. Real and simulated microgravity can activate signals stimulating cells to enter the S phase during lens regeneration in urodelean amphibians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E. N.; Anton, H. J.; Mitashov, V. I.

    2006-01-01

    The model of Wolffian lens regeneration was used to study the effect of microgravity on the proliferative activity of cell giving rise to the regenerating lens. In vivo experiments were performed aboard Russian biosatellites and under laboratory conditions, using clinorotation to simulate microgravity. The data of autoradiographic analysis and BrdU assay showed that exposure to micro-g resulted in a 1.2- to 2-fold increase in the number of cells entering the S phase, compared to that in the on-ground control (1g). This increase was observed both in the zone of regeneration (the dorsal iris) and in the eye growth zone (the pars ciliaris ora serrata complex). In the regenerating lens proper, the number of cells entering the S phase was also greater under experimental conditions. This often resulted in an increased size of the lens (compared to the control) and disturbances in its morphogenesis. Along with in vivo experiments, we developed a quasi-in vivo system of iris/lens culturing in vitro in a high-speed miniroller, which allows us now to compare the direct effects of low g and the effects mediated by various body systems on proliferation in the same eye tissues. Probable mechanisms of the influence of newt body systems on lens regeneration upon exposure to microgravity are discussed. A hypothesis is proposed that the key role in this influence may belong to early events in the responses of blood circulatory and immune systems to microgravity.

  18. Explaining Students' Appraisal of Lectures and Student-Activating Teaching: Perceived Context and Student Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyven, Katrien; Dochy, Filip; Janssens, Steven

    2012-01-01

    During lectures, some students are continuously focused and attentive, whereas others tend to be bored, jittery, or inattentive. The same might happen when students are given student-activating assignments. Some students simply love one type of instruction, whereas others tend to resent it. Moreover, it is not the context itself, but the context…

  19. A Study on Body Mass Index, Blood Pressure, and Red Blood Cell Indices in New Entering Students of the University of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Moafi, Alireza; Rahgozar, Soheila; Ghias, Majid; ahar, Elham Vahdat; Borumand, Amirbahador; Sabbaghi, Amirhosein; Sameti, Amirabass; Hashemi, Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Obesity and increased blood pressure are identified as risk factors for cardiac and pulmonary disorders. On the other hand, iron deficiency (another preventable disease) is common in adolescence and considered as associated with health impairment. The present study evaluates body mass index (BMI) and its association with blood pressure and hematological indices in freshman students entering the University of Isfahan in 2009. Methods: All the 1675 students who entered the University of Isfahan in September 2009 were examined. Height, weight, BMI, blood pressure, hemoglobin (Hb) and red blood cell (RBC) indices of these students were measured. The prevalence of high blood pressure, its association with BMI and the relation between BMI and anemia, iron deficiency and educational achievement were assessed. Results: All participants, including 514 males and 1161 females, went under clinical observations. The average age was 20.7 ± 3.8. year Among the students, 18.2% of males and 20% of females were underweight. High systolic blood pressure was more common in the students with BMI > 25 kg/m2 (p < 0.001). Anemia was seen in 8.7% of females. In males, however, a relation between anemia frequency and BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 was more distinct (p = 0.002). There was no association between anemia and students’ average test scores. Conclusions: High incidence of abnormal BMI in the study population, and its association with systolic blood pressure indicate the importance of nutritional guidelines and counseling programs for freshman students. On the other hand, high incidence of anemia in this population ascertains the necessity of anemia screening programs before academic studies. PMID:22174970

  20. Engaging Students with Active Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, Carl E.

    This Peer Review issue focuses on science and engaged learning. As any advertising executive or politician can tell you, engaging people is all about attitudes and beliefs, not abstract tacts. There is a lot we can learn from these professional communicators about how to effectively engage students. Far too often we, as educators, provide students with the content of science-often in the distilled formal representations that we have found to be the most concise and general-but fail to address students' own attitudes and beliefs. (Although heaven forbid that we should totally abandon reason and facts, as is typical in politics and advertising).

  1. Barriers to Physical Activity on University Student

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajat; Sultoni, K.; Suherman, A.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the research is to analyze the factors that become barriers to physical activity in university students based on physical activity level. An internet-based survey was conducted. The participants were 158 University students from Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia. Barriers to Physical Activity Quiz (BPAQ) were used to assessed the factors that become barriers to physical activity in university students. IPAQ (short form) were used to assessed physical activity level. The results show there was no differences BPAQ based on IPAQ level. But when analyzed further based on seven factors barriers there are differences in factors “social influence and lack of willpower” based IPAQ level. Based on this it was concluded that the “influence from other and lack of willpower” an inhibiting factor on students to perform physical activity.

  2. GeoFORCE Texas: An Outreach Program that is Increasing the Number and Diversity of Students Completing STEM Degrees and Entering the Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, E.; Moore, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    GeoFORCE Texas is an outreach program of the Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin. Established in 2005 with the goal of increasing the number and diversity of students studying geosciences and engineering and entering the high-tech workforce, GeoFORCE has been highly successful. Key elements to that success will be presented here. GeoFORCE targets bright students in rural and inner-city schools where they are generally not academically challenged. Every summer throughout high school we take them on geologic field trips all over the country. In 2014, GeoFORCE led 15 field academies for about 600 students. The program is rigorous and academic. We emphasize college-level thinking skills. Because it is a 4-year program, they have a pretty good grounding in physical geology by the time they graduate. More importantly, they develop confidence in their ability to handle college, and a strong motivation to earn a college degree. GeoFORCE students are mostly minority (85%) and more than half will be the first in their family to graduate from college. GeoFORCE students exceed national averages in rates of going to college (97%), majoring in STEM fields (66%), majoring in geosciences (15%) and engineering (13%), and graduating from college (~85%). GeoFORCE is a public/private partnership and a workforce-focused program. The Jackson School funds staff and operating expenses (37%). Money for student programs comes from private industry (44%), state and federal grants (14%), and foundations and individual donors (5%). Our corporate partners are in the energy sector. In addition to funding, corporate sponsors attend the summer field programs, mentor GeoFORCE students, and provide opportunities for the students to visit the companies. As our students move toward college graduation, our industry and government partners have begun to hire them as interns. GeoFORCE graduates are now entering the workforce. Our first two cohorts are 4 and 5 years past high

  3. Body Composition, Fitness Status, and Health Behaviors Upon Entering College: An Examination of Female College Students From Diverse Populations

    PubMed Central

    Price, Amanda A.; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C.; Kraus, Caroline L.; McKenzie, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Although poor health-related behaviors that impact development of chronic diseases begin much earlier than when actual disease is evident, few studies have examined health behaviors in college students, who may be at an important transitional period where early intervention could prevent development of chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine health-related factors in female college students (N = 61) by race/ethnicity and weight status. We found significant differences in health profiles between non-Hispanic White (White) and African American students, including greater physical fitness and healthier diets among White students. Overweight/obese students had worse health profiles than healthy BMI students. Furthermore, weight status was significantly associated with cardiovascular fitness. This supports a focus on PA promotion for interventions in the period of emerging adulthood, alongside the other healthy behaviors, to elicit improvements in weight status and potential reduction of chronic disease risks. PMID:27279760

  4. Independent Activities for Accelerated Students: Individualized Reading Instruction for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapides Parish School Board, Alexandria, LAa.

    The teaching guide for use with accelerated elementary school students contains suggestions for independent reading activities, a list of independent reading books for beginning readers, and suggestions for creative activities. Stressed is the value of sharing enthusiasm about books to spur independent reading. Suggestions are given for talking…

  5. Entering the urban frame: early lesbian activism and public space in Montréal.

    PubMed

    Podmore, Julie A; Chamberland, Line

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the spatial strategies used by Montréal lesbian activists in the 1970s and 1980s to fight for the lesbian "right to the city." After situating lesbian public activism within Henri Lefebvre's ideal of spatial justice, this article provides case studies of four moments during which Montréal lesbian activists joined or initiated public demonstrations as lesbians. The focus is on the multiple ways in which lesbian activists performed politicized lesbian identities in urban public spaces. Their spatial strategies in this first era of the lesbian and gay rights movement provide an alternative account of claiming lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer rights to the heterosexual city.

  6. Team Building Activities for Young Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Team building activities are an excellent way to challenge students and teach them the critical communication and problem solving skills that encourage trust, empathy, and ability to work together. They create an atmosphere that enhances the ability to meet fitness and skill goals because students, regardless of skill level, will possess increased…

  7. Student Activities in Meteorology: SAM. Version 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Beverly L.; Passarelli, Elisa

    The task of providing hands-on as well as minds-on activities for students in science is one of concern to many scientists and educators. In an effort to inspire student interest in science and technology, scientists from the Forecast Systems Laboratory, a laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Environmental…

  8. Influences on the Decision to Enter Higher Education in Cyprus: A Comparison of Students' and Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the main influences on the decision of secondary school graduates to select higher education over labour-market entry. It reports the views of prospective higher education students and secondary school teachers regarding the main influences on the students' intention to pursue higher studies. Survey research was used to…

  9. Enteric Fever.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Kumar, Ruchika

    2017-03-01

    Enteric fever is an important public-health problem in India. The clinical presentation of typhoid fever is very variable, ranging from fever with little other morbidities to marked toxemia and associated multisystem complications. Fever is present in majority of patients (>90 %) irrespective of their age group. Mortality is higher in younger children. Blood culture remains gold standard for diagnosis. Widal test has low sensitivity and specificity but may be used in second week to support the diagnosis. Emerging resistance to several antibiotics should be kept in mind when selecting antibiotics or revising the treatment. The key preventive strategies are safe water, safe food, personal hygiene, and appropriate sanitation. Vaccination is an additional effective tool for prevention.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of bismuth subsalicylate on Clostridium difficile, Escherichia coli O157:H7, norovirus, and other common enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pitz, Adam M; Park, Geun Woo; Lee, David; Boissy, Ying L; Vinjé, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown bismuth subsalicylate (BSS) has antimicrobial properties, but few studies have addressed the mechanism of action. Furthermore, following BSS ingestion other bismuth salts form throughout the gastrointestinal tract including bismuth oxychloride (BiOCl) that also act upon enteric pathogens. To further understand the antimicrobial activity of bismuth in infectious diarrhea, the antimicrobial effect of BSS and BiOCl on Clostridium difficile, Salmonella, Shigella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains and norovirus (NoV) were measured. Bacterial enteric pathogens in pure culture or in human fecal material were exposed to 35mg/ml BSS or BiOCl with or without a vehicle suspension. BSS and BiOCl treated samples were quantified and visualized by transmission electron microscopy. To measure the effect on NoV, reduction of infectious murine NoV (MNV), a surrogate for human NoV, and Norwalk virus RNA levels were measured by viral plaque assay and RT-qPCR, respectively. BSS and BiOCl reduced bacterial growth by 3-9 logs in all strains with majority resulting in populations of <10 cfu/ml within 24 h. Similar results were found when fecal material was included. Microscopy images detected bismuth on bacterial membranes and within the bacterial organisms at 30 min post-treatment. At 8.8mg/ml BSS and BiOCl reduced infectivity of MNV significantly by 2.7 and 2.0 log after 24 h of exposure. In addition, both BSS and BiOCl slightly reduced the level of Norwalk replicon-bearing cells suggesting that bismuth may inhibit NoV in vivo. Collectively, our results confirm and build on existing data that BSS has antimicrobial properties against a wide-range of diarrhea-causing pathogens.

  11. Student Activities in Meteorology (SAM), June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, B.L.; Passarelli, E.

    1994-06-01

    In an effort to inspire student interest in science and technology, scientists from the Forecast Systems Laboratory, a laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Environmental Research Laboratories, and classroom teachers from the Boulder Valley School District collaborated to produce a series of classroom science activities on meteorology and atmospheric science. We call this series 'Student Activities in Meteorology,' or SAM. The goal is to provide activities that are interesting to students, and at the same time convenient and easy to use for teachers. The activity topics chosen are to incorporate trend setting scientific research and cutting edge technology. Several of the activities focus on the meteorological concerns of the Denver metropolitan area because many of NOAA's research labs are located in Boulder, where much of the research and testing for the region is performed. We believe that these activities are versatile and can be easily integrated into current science, environmental studies, health, social studies, and math curricula.

  12. Kinematics Card Sort Activity: Insight into Students' Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryhill, Erin; Herrington, Deborah; Oliver, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Kinematics is a topic students are unknowingly aware of well before entering the physics classroom. Students observe motion on a daily basis. They are constantly interpreting and making sense of their observations, unintentionally building their own understanding of kinematics before receiving any formal instruction. Unfortunately, when students…

  13. Traditionally taught students learn; actively engaged students remember

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Scott V.; Sayre, Eleanor C.; Clark, Jessica W.

    2014-08-01

    A common narrative in physics education research is that students taught in lecture-based classes learn less than those taught with activity-based reformed methods. We show this narrative is simplistic and misses important dynamics of student learning. In particular, we find students of both methods show equal short-term learning gains on a conceptual question dealing with electric potential. For traditionally taught students, this learning rapidly decays on a time scale of weeks, vanishing by the time of the typical end-of-term post-test. For students in reform-based classes, however, the knowledge is retained and may even be enhanced by subsequent instruction. This difference explains the many previous pre- and post-test studies that have found minimal learning gains in lecture-based courses. Our findings suggest a more nuanced model of student learning, one that is sensitive to time-dependent effects such as forgetting and interference. In addition, the findings suggest that lecture-based courses, by incorporating aspects designed to reinforce student understanding of previously covered topics, might approach the long-term learning found in research-based pedagogies.

  14. Sports Medicine. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, Student Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is for a course designed for students investigating the activities within the sports medicine department or considering any of the areas of kinesiology as a career. The material is designed for individualized study and is competency based with educational outcomes stated for…

  15. Physical Activity among Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.; Ross, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study provides insight into the perceived physical activity levels of students attending a Midwestern 2-year community college. Over 60% of respondents were classified as overweight or obese based on a BMI measurement. The majority of respondents were not participating regularly in physical activity to gain any health benefits,…

  16. Activities to Develop Your Students' Motor Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Mary Kay; Safran, Joan S.

    1986-01-01

    Instructions and illustrations support this discussion of learning activities designed to remediate deficiences and build skills in balance and/or motor skills for mildly handicapped students who may not have access to physical therapy or adaptive physical education. Appropriate for both regular and special classes, activities include arm…

  17. Advanced Placement Economics. Macroeconomics: Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, John S.

    This book is designed to help advanced placement students better understand macroeconomic concepts through various activities. The book contains 6 units with 64 activities, sample multiple-choice questions, sample short essay questions, and sample long essay questions. The units are entitled: (1) "Basic Economic Concepts"; (2) "Measuring Economic…

  18. Health Activities for Primary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This manual targets new and second-year Peace Corps volunteers, presenting health lessons and activities for primary school students in Thailand. Each section of the manual outlines basic technical information about the topic, contains several detailed lesson plans, and lists quick activities that can be carried out at schools. Songs and recipes…

  19. Practical Activities in Astronomy for Nonscience Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisard, Walter J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes science activities which have been successful with nonscience majors. Each activity requires students to make observations, record the data gathered, interpret data, and prepare a written report. Subject areas include motion of stars, sunspots, lunar orbits, sunset points, meteor showers, and sun shadows. (JN)

  20. Entering the (Postgraduate) Field: Underrepresented Students' Acquisition of Cultural and Social Capital in Graduate School Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle; McCoy, Dorian L.

    2016-01-01

    Examining the role of humanities graduate preparation programs in facilitating underrepresented undergraduate students' socialization to the field (social context) of graduate education, this critical multisite case study finds that these programs are crucial to bidirectional anticipatory socialization for graduate education, where one gains new…

  1. The Effects of Race and Gender on the Satisfaction Levels of Entering and Advanced Level Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labon, Tiffany Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral education is an aspect of higher education that can be both rewarding and challenging for anyone who attempts the journey. Thelin (2004) stated many graduate students obtain the necessary skills that their individual fields of study require in their master's and doctoral programs of study. Levine (2005), however, has found that the…

  2. The Application and Evaluation of a Two-Concept Diagnostic Instrument with Students Entering College General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heredia, Keily; Xu, Xiaoying; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2012-01-01

    The Particulate Nature of Matter and Chemical Bonding Diagnostic Instrument (Othman J., Treagust D. F. and Chandrasegaran A. L., (2008), "Int. J. Sci. Educ.," 30(11), 1531-1550) is used to investigate college students' understanding of two chemistry concepts: particulate nature of matter and chemical bonding. The instrument, originally…

  3. Assessing the Quality of Student Thinking Directly: An Exploratory Study of Two Cohorts Entering Engineering Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woollacott, L.; Snell, D.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an exploratory investigation involving the direct assessment of the quality of abstract thinking of two cohorts of South African university entrants who had very good school leaving qualifications. The investigation was prompted by the observation of difficulties these students seemed to have had in a first…

  4. Enter Sandbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clucas, T.; Wirth, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Interactive geospatial education tools can excite students and public audiences alike. Alaska EPSCoR and UAF GINA have taken one such tool - an augmented-reality sandbox invented at UC-Davis - and created a completely mobile version, which can be easily transported and deployed on and off the road system. In addition, EPSCoR has developed model curricula that use the sandbox to teach basic topography and hydrology skills. More advanced curricular modules in development will teach about flooding, tsunamis, and other hydrologic and landscape hazards. Instructions on building a mobile sandbox, curricula, and video of the sandbox in action are available at www.alaska.edu/epscor/Augmented-Reality%20Sandbox/

  5. Student-Student Online Coaching: Conceptualizing an Emerging Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Stenbom, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe student-student online coaching, defined as "an online service where a student gets support on a specific subject matter from a more experienced student". Student-student online coaching emphasizes learning a subject matter by giving a student the opportunity to get coached by a coach, i.e. a more experienced…

  6. Bacterial Enteric Infections Among Older Adults in the United States: Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network, 1996–2012

    PubMed Central

    Scallan, Elaine; Crim, Stacy M.; Runkle, Arthur; Henao, Olga L.; Mahon, Barbara E.; Hoekstra, Robert M.; Griffin, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A growing segment of the population—adults aged ≥65 years—is more susceptible than younger adults to certain enteric (including foodborne) infections and experience more severe disease. Materials and Methods Using data on laboratory-confirmed infections from the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), we describe trends in the incidence of Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli O157, Listeria monocytogenes, and nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in adults aged ≥65 years over time and by age group and sex. We used data from FoodNet and other sources to estimate the total number of illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths in the United States caused by these infections each year using a statistical model to adjust for underdiagnosis (taking into account medical care-seeking, stool sample submission, laboratory practices, and test sensitivity). Results From 1996 to 2012, 4 pathogens caused 21,405 laboratory-confirmed infections among older adults residing in the FoodNet surveillance area; 49.3% were hospitalized, and 2.6% died. The average annual rate of infection was highest for Salmonella (12.8/100,000) and Campylobacter (12.1/100,000). Salmonella and Listeria led as causes of death. Among older adults, rates of laboratory-confirmed infection and the percentage of patients who were hospitalized and who died generally increased with age. A notable exception was the rate of Campylobacter infections, which decreased with increasing age. Adjusting for underdiagnosis, we estimated that these pathogens caused about 226,000 illnesses (~600/100,000) annually among U.S. adults aged ≥65 years, resulting in ~9700 hospitalizations and ~500 deaths. Conclusion Campylobacter, E. coli O157, Listeria, and Salmonella are major contributors to illness in older adults, highlighting the value of effective and targeted intervention. PMID:26067228

  7. Astronomy Student Activities Using Stellarium Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benge, Raymond D.; Tuttle, S. R.

    2012-01-01

    Planetarium programs can be used to provide a valuable learning experience for introductory astronomy students. Educational activities can be designed to utilize the capabilities of the software to display the sky, coordinates, motions in the sky, etc., in order to learn basic astronomical concepts. Most of the major textbook publishers have an option of bundling planetarium software and even laboratory activities using such software with textbooks. However, commercial planetarium software often is updated on a different schedule from the textbook revision and new edition schedule. The software updates also sometimes occur out of sync with college textbook adoption deadlines. Changes in software and activity curriculum often translate into increases costs for students and the college. To provide stability to the process, faculty at Tarrant County College have developed a set of laboratory exercises, entitled Distant Nature, using free open source Stellarium software. Stellarium is a simple, yet powerful, program that is available in formats that run on a variety of operating systems (Windows, Apple, linux). A web site was developed for the Distant Nature activities having a set version of Stellarium that students can download and install on their own computers. Also on the web site, students can access the instructions and worksheets associated with the various Stellarium based activities. A variety of activities are available to support two semesters of introductory astronomy. The Distant Nature web site has been used for one year with Tarrant County College astronomy students and is now available for use by other institutions. The Distant Nature web site is http://www.stuttle1.com/DN_Astro/index.html .

  8. Farkle Fundamentals and Fun. Activities for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooley, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    The dice game Farkle provides an excellent basis for four activities that reinforce probability and expected value concepts for students in an introductory statistics class. These concepts appear in the increasingly popular AP statistics course (Peck 2011) and are used in analyzing ethical issues from insurance and gambling (COMAP 2009; Woodward…

  9. Student Activity Funds: Procedures and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    An effective internal-control system can help school business administrators meet the challenges of accounting for student activity funds. Such a system should include appropriate policies and procedures, identification of key control points, self-assessments, audit trails, and internal and external audits. (MLH)

  10. Quilts of Alaska--Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Museum, Juneau.

    This student activities booklet, "Quilts of Alaska," contains historical and educational information on quilts. It is colorfully illustrated with examples of different types of quilts. The booklet describes album or signature quilts, which from 1840 to the 1890s, were a U.S. fad, such as were autograph albums. As the name suggests, these…

  11. Developing a New Activity: STUDENT APPROVED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smit, Julie; Cavallo-Medved, Dora; Poling, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    Do you have an idea for a new activity or laboratory exercise that you would like to incorporate into your course but feel unsure as to how it will be received by your students? This was our concern when developing first-year biology labs for a biology majors' course at University of Windsor. Through a Centred on Learning Innovation Fund (CLIF)…

  12. 2 CFR 200.469 - Student activity costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Student activity costs. 200.469 Section 200... REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS Cost Principles General Provisions for Selected Items of Cost § 200.469 Student activity costs. Costs incurred for intramural activities, student publications, student clubs, and...

  13. Incorporating Student Activities into Climate Change Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, H.; Kelly, K.; Klein, D.; Cadavid, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    atmospheric circulation with applications of the Lorenz model, explored the land-sea breeze problem with the Dynamics and Thermodynamics Circulation Model (DTDM), and developed simple radiative transfer models. Class projects explored the effects of varying the content of CO2 and CH4 in the atmosphere, as well as the properties of paleoclimates in atmospheric simulations using EdGCM. Initial assessment of student knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors associated with these activities, particularly about climate change, was measured. Pre- and post-course surveys provided student perspectives about the courses and their learning about remote sensing and climate change concepts. Student performance on the tutorials and course projects evaluated students' ability to learn and apply their knowledge about climate change and skills with remote sensing to assigned problems or proposed projects of their choice. Survey and performance data illustrated that the exercises were successful in meeting their intended learning objectives as well as opportunities for further refinement and expansion.

  14. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... activities that include special interest clubs, physical activities, student government, and cultural affairs... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Standard XVI-Student activities. 36.43 Section 36.43... § 36.43 Standard XVI—Student activities. All schools shall provide and maintain a well-balanced...

  15. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... activities that include special interest clubs, physical activities, student government, and cultural affairs... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard XVI-Student activities. 36.43 Section 36.43... § 36.43 Standard XVI—Student activities. All schools shall provide and maintain a well-balanced...

  16. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... activities that include special interest clubs, physical activities, student government, and cultural affairs... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Standard XVI-Student activities. 36.43 Section 36.43... § 36.43 Standard XVI—Student activities. All schools shall provide and maintain a well-balanced...

  17. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... activities that include special interest clubs, physical activities, student government, and cultural affairs... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Standard XVI-Student activities. 36.43 Section 36.43... § 36.43 Standard XVI—Student activities. All schools shall provide and maintain a well-balanced...

  18. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... activities that include special interest clubs, physical activities, student government, and cultural affairs... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Standard XVI-Student activities. 36.43 Section 36.43... § 36.43 Standard XVI—Student activities. All schools shall provide and maintain a well-balanced...

  19. Number Wonders: 171 Activities to Meet Math Standards & Inspire Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhns, Catherine Jones

    2006-01-01

    In this book, author Catherine Jones Kuhns introduces student- and teacher-friendly math activities designed to get students thinking like mathematicians and loving mathematics, while addressing content standards through grade 2. She also shows how to make math fun for students, get children actively engaged in learning, create a student-centered…

  20. Assessing High School Student Learning on Science Outreach Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Courtney L.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of hands-on laboratory activities on secondary student learning was examined. Assessment was conducted over a two-year period, with 262 students participating the first year and 264 students the second year. Students took a prequiz, performed a laboratory activity (gas chromatography of alcohols, or photosynthesis and respiration), and…

  1. The Academic and Remedial Placement Profile of Students Entering B.C.C. in September, 1976 [and September 1977] by Curriculum Group. Research Report BCC 4-76 [and] 4-77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagle, Norman

    Profiles of freshmen students entering Bronx Community College (BCC) in September, 1976 and September, 1977 are presented in terms of their academic and remedial placement. For both years, nearly 70% of those who took placement tests in the reading/English area and subsequently enrolled were recommended for at least one remedial course; 75% of…

  2. Curcumin Protects Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Function of Rat Enteritis via Activation of MKP-1 and Attenuation of p38 and NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fan-Su; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Zeng, Jian-Ying; Xiao, Li-Ping; Yu, Xin-Pei; Peng, Dan-dan; Su, Lei; Xiao, Bing; Zhang, Zhen-Shu

    2010-01-01

    Background Intestinal mucosa barrier (IMB) dysfunction results in many notorious diseases for which there are currently few effective treatments. We studied curcumin's protective effect on IMB and examined its mechanism by using methotrexate (MTX) induced rat enteritis model and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated cell death model. Methodology/Principal Findings Curcumin was intragastrically administrated from the first day, models were made for 7 days. Cells were treated with curcumin for 30 min before exposure to LPS. Rat intestinal mucosa was collected for evaluation of pathological changes. We detected the activities of D-lactate and diamine oxidase (DAO) according to previous research and measured the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) by colorimetric method. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were determined by RT-PCR and IL-10 production was determined by ELISA. We found Curcumin decreased the levels of D-lactate, DAO, MPO, ICAM-1, IL-1β and TNF-α, but increased the levels of IL-10 and SOD in rat models. We further confirmed mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) was activated but phospho-p38 was inhibited by curcumin by western blot assay. Finally, NF-κB translocation was monitored by immunofluorescent staining. We showed that curcumin repressed I-κB and interfered with the translocation of NF-κB into nucleus. Conclusions/Significance The effect of curcumin is mediated by the MKP-1-dependent inactivation of p38 and inhibition of NF-κB-mediated transcription. Curcumin, with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities may be used as an effective reagent for protecting intestinal mucosa barrier and other related intestinal diseases. PMID:20885979

  3. Determination of Factors Affecting Physical Activity Status of University Students on a Health Sciences Campus

    PubMed Central

    Dayi, Ayfer; Acikgoz, Ayla; Guvendi, Guven; Bayrak, Levent; Ersoy, Burcu; Gur, Cagri; Ozmen, Omer

    2017-01-01

    Background Upon graduation, students studying in departments related to health will work in the health sector and will guide and enlighten people with their knowledge and behavior. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors affecting the physical activity (PA) conditions of university students on a health sciences campus. Material/Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out on 706 students in a Turkish university. The data was obtained from a survey prepared by the researchers. The 26-question survey aimed to discover the students’ socio-demographic characteristics and their awareness and practices concerning PA. Results We found that 30% of the students engage in some type of PA during their university education. A relationship was observed concerning their current PA and their family inactivity levels, as well as between inactivity before entering the university and inactivity during their education. The presence of a chronic disease in family members does not affect student PA. A majority of the students believe PA is beneficial (98.7%), 93.9% believe it relieves stress, and 94.5% believe it helps control body weight. Conclusions Although students of medicine and related disciplines are aware of the importance of proper diet and adequate levels of PA in health, they did not implement theory into practice. Thus, it is questionable how young health professionals will promote the positive effects and necessity of regular physical activity if they do not apply these activities to their own lifestyle. PMID:28103207

  4. College Student Environmental Activism: How Experiences and Identities Influence Environmental Activism Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Laura A. H.

    2016-01-01

    College student environmental activism is one way students civically engage in addressing social issues. This study explores the environmental activism of twelve college students and how their experiences outside of college and in college influenced their activism. In addition, how students' identities influenced their approach to activism was…

  5. Student Perceptions of Social Justice and Social Justice Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres-Harding, Susan R.; Steele, Cheronda; Schulz, Erica; Taha, Farah; Pico, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging students to engage in activities that actively seek to promote social justice is a goal of many educators. This study analyzed college student perceptions around social justice and related activities in a medium-sized, urban university in the United States. Students' open-ended responses to questions assessing their perceptions of…

  6. Hands-On Activities and Their Influence on Students' Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstermann, Nina; Grube, Dietmar; Bogeholz, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of hands-on activities on students' interest. We researched whether students with experience in specific hands-on activities show higher interest in these activities than students without experience. Furthermore, the relationship between the quality of the hands-on experience and interest in the respective…

  7. Differential release of β-NAD+ and ATP upon activation of enteric motor neurons in primate and murine colons

    PubMed Central

    DURNIN, LEONIE; SANDERS, KENTON M.; MUTAFOVA-YAMBOLIEVA, VIOLETA N.

    2012-01-01

    Background The purinergic component of enteric inhibitory neurotransmission is important for normal motility in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Controversies exist about the purine(s) responsible for inhibitory responses in GI muscles: adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) has been assumed to be the purinergic neurotransmitter released from enteric inhibitory motor neurons, however recent studies demonstrate that β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD+) and ADP-ribose mimic the inhibitory neurotransmitter better than ATP in primate and murine colons. The study was designed to clarify the sources of purines in colons of Cynomolgus monkeys and C57BL/6 mice. Methods HPLC with fluorescence detection was used to analyze purines released by stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) and serotonergic 5-HT3 receptors (5-HT3R), known to be present on cell bodies and dendrites of neurons within the myenteric plexus. Key Results nAChR or 5-HT3R agonists increased overflow of ATP and β-NAD+ from tunica muscularis of monkey and murine colon. The agonists did not release purines from circular muscles of monkey colon lacking myenteric ganglia. Agonist-evoked overflow of β-NAD+, but not ATP, was inhibited by tetrodotoxin (0.5 μM) or ω-conotoxin GVIA (50 nM), suggesting that β-NAD+ release requires nerve action potentials and junctional mechanisms known to be critical for neurotransmission. ATP was likely released from nerve cell bodies in myenteric ganglia and not from nerve terminals of motor neurons. Conclusions & Inferences These results support the conclusion that ATP is not a motor neurotransmitter in the colon and are consistent with the hypothesis that β-NAD+, or its metabolites, serve as the purinergic inhibitory neurotransmitter. PMID:23279315

  8. Active learning and leadership in an undergraduate curriculum: How effective is it for student learning and transition to practice?

    PubMed

    Middleton, Rebekkah

    2013-03-01

    Nurses are being increasingly asked to develop leadership skills in their practice and to be actively involved in continuous change processes in the workplace. Nursing students need to be developing leadership skills prior to entering the workplace to ensure they are able to meet the challenges associated with organisations and the cultures present in nursing, along with having highly tuned communication skills and leadership attributes that contribute to best patient care and outcomes. This paper looks at how the use of Active Learning in an undergraduate setting enabled the development and implementation of a leadership subject for nursing students preparing for professional practice. Through the use of a specific model of Active Learning, incorporating multiple intelligences into education allows students to bring deeper learning to their conscience so that whole person learning is an engaged experience. It seems apparent that Active Learning is an effective means of learning about leadership in undergraduate students who are developing towards a career as a health professional.

  9. Students' Attitudes toward an After-School Physical Activity Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Though considerable research on student attitudes has been conducted in physical education, little information exists concerning student attitudes toward after-school physical activity programmes. This study assessed students' attitudes toward their after-school physical activity programme located in southwest Texas, USA. Participants included 158…

  10. Silent Students' Participation in a Large Active Learning Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Active learning in large science classrooms furthers opportunities for students to engage in the content and in meaningful learning, yet students can still remain anonymously silent. This study aims to understand the impact of active learning on these silent students in a large General Chemistry course taught via Socratic questioning and…

  11. Student Activism: An Exploration of Pre-Service Teacher Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Tol, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated university student activism from both a theoretical and applied perspective. The aims were to explore some of the elements that might enable or constrain student activism and to facilitate the students' opportunity to act on an issue of their choice. The three elements of self-efficacy, group work, and time were reviewed in…

  12. Inspiring Students to a Lifetime of Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lawrence F.; Anderson, Steven P.

    2002-01-01

    Presents strategies that physical education teachers can use to encourage their students to lead physically active lives. The strategies include: focus on lifelong physical activity; use goal setting and self-assessment; inspire students by personal example; model skills (either a teacher or skilled student may do the modeling); and combine…

  13. Student Activism, Diversity, and the Struggle for a Just Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    This introductory article provides a historical overview of various student movements and forms of student activism from the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement to the present. Accordingly, the historical trajectory of student activism is framed in terms of 3 broad periods: the sixties, the postsixties, and the contemporary context. The author…

  14. Conservation II. Science Activities in Energy. [Student's and] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed for science students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, the activities in this unit illustrate principles and problems related to the conservation of energy. Eleven student activities using art, economics, arithmetic, and other skills and disciplines help teachers directly involve students in exploring scientific questions and making…

  15. Exploring Careers in Science and Engineering. Second Edition. [Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC.

    This program (which consists of 12 activities) is aimed at increasing the career relevance of science education for all students in grades 4 through 9, while at the same time particularly encouraging female and minority students to consider careers in science and engineering. Major areas addressed in the activities are: (1) students' images of…

  16. Student Activism and Democratic Quality in Ghana's Fourth Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Gyampo, Ransford Edward

    2013-01-01

    Student activism has been pivotal in Ghana's political and democratic history. Prior to Ghana's Fourth Republic, student activism was highly confrontational and entailed student support or opposition to the various regimes depending on the extent to which the regimes were accepted by all as being rightful or legitimate. After 23 years of…

  17. Mandatory Student Activity Fees: Educational and Legal Consideration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Annette

    1980-01-01

    Colleges continue to face questions, pressures, and even legal confrontations concerning the constitutionality of mandatory student activity fees. In addition, the educational and administrative considerations are equally as problematic on many campuses as students press their positions that run contrary to traditional student activity programs.…

  18. Students as Doers: Examples of Successful E-Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tammelin, Maija; Peltonen, Berit; Puranen, Pasi; Auvinen, Lis

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses learning language and communication activities that focus on students' concrete involvement in their learning process. The activities first deal with student-produced blogs and digital videos in business Spanish. They then present student-produced podcasts for Swedish business communication learners that are meant for speakers…

  19. The hallucinogenic herb Salvia divinorum and its active ingredient salvinorin A inhibit enteric cholinergic transmission in the guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Capasso, R; Borrelli, F; Capasso, F; Siebert, D J; Stewart, D J; Zjawiony, J K; Izzo, A A

    2006-01-01

    Salvia divinorum is a widespread hallucinogenic herb traditionally employed for divination, as well as a medicament for several disorders including disturbances of gastrointestinal motility. In the present study we evaluated the effect of a standardized extract from the leaves of S. divinorum (SDE) on enteric cholinergic transmission in the guinea-pig ileum. SDE reduced electrically evoked contractions without modifying the contractions elicited by exogenous acetylcholine, thus suggesting a prejunctional site of action. The inhibitory effect of SDE on twitch response was abolished by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and by the kappa-opioid antagonist nor-binaltorphimine, but not by naltrindole (a delta-opioid receptor antagonist), CTOP (a mu-opioid receptor antagonist), thioperamide (a H(3) receptor antagonist), yohimbine (an alpha(2)-receptor antagonist), methysergide (a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist), N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (an inhibitor of NO synthase) or apamin (a blocker of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels). Salvinorin A, the main active ingredient of S. divinorum, inhibited in a nor-binaltorphimine- and naloxone-sensitive manner electrically induced contractions. It is concluded that SDE depressed enteric cholinergic transmission likely through activation of kappa-opioid receptors and this may provide the pharmacological basis underlying its traditional antidiarrhoeal use. Salvinorin A might be the chemical ingredient responsible for this activity.

  20. Relevance of Student Teaching Skills and Activities from the Perspective of the Student Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.; Paulsen, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive survey study was to determine the extent to which student teachers deem traditional student teaching skills and activities relevant as part of the capstone student teaching experience. The study population consisted of all (N = 140) fall 2012 and spring 2013 agricultural education student teachers in the North…

  1. New Forms of Student Activism: Lobbying, Trusteeing, and Collective Bargaining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeler, Kent D.

    1979-01-01

    This article focuses on three new forms of student activism: lobbying, trusteeing, and collective bargaining. Related aspects of student involvement in the political, legal, and consumer areas are discussed briefly. (Author)

  2. Transfer Student Success: Educationally Purposeful Activities Predictive of Undergraduate GPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauria, Renee M.; Fuller, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers evaluated the effects of Educationally Purposeful Activities (EPAs) on transfer and nontransfer students' cumulative GPAs. Hierarchical, linear, and multiple regression models yielded seven statistically significant educationally purposeful items that influenced undergraduate student GPAs. Statistically significant positive EPAs for…

  3. Vegetative Bacillus amyloliquefaciens cells do not confer protection against necrotic enteritis in broilers despite high antibacterial activity of its supernatant against Clostridium perfringens in vitro.

    PubMed

    Geeraerts, S; Delezie, E; Ducatelle, R; Haesebrouck, F; Devreese, B; Van Immerseel, F

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the effect of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens on Clostridium perfringens was tested in vitro and in vivo. Using an agar well diffusion assay, the inhibitory activity of B. amyloliquefaciens supernatant was analysed against a large collection of netB-positive and netB-negative C. perfringens strains. Although strong growth inhibiting activity was detected against all C. perfringens isolates, it was significantly higher against virulent netB-positive C. perfringens strains compared with avirulent netB-negative isolates. Subsequently, the efficacy of in-feed administration of lyophilised vegetative cells of B. amyloliquefaciens to prevent necrotic enteritis was tested in vivo using an established experimental infection model in broilers. Ross 308 broilers received either B. amyloliquefaciens supplemented or unsupplemented feed throughout the experiment. No significant differences could be detected between the untreated positive control group and the B. amyloliquefaciens treated group in body weight, the number of chickens that developed necrotic lesions and in pathological lesion scores. These results demonstrate that despite its substantial inhibitory activity in vitro, lyophilised vegetative B. amyloliquefaciens cells had no beneficial effect against necrotic enteritis in the in vivo model used here.

  4. A Study of Student Engagement Activities, Discipline Referrals, and Student Achievement in Reading First Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fransen, Shelly Lynette

    2013-01-01

    High quality student engagement activities are essential if students are to be successful learners. Over the years, many instructional strategies and models have been devised to encourage teachers to develop student engagement activities that result in high achievement. The Reading First Model initiative was introduced as a part of the No Child…

  5. Impact of tetrodotoxin application and lidocaine supplementation on equine jejunal smooth muscle contractility and activity of the enteric nervous system in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tappenbeck, K; Hoppe, S; Geburek, F; Feige, K; Huber, K

    2014-09-01

    By blocking the enteric nervous system (ENS) using tetrodotoxin (TTX), previous studies have documented the contractility-enhancing (CE) effects of lidocaine in equine intestinal smooth muscle (SM) at the level of SM cells and/or interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). The present study examined the impact of ENS deactivation on CE lidocaine effects, and investigated the effects of lidocaine on ENS activity. TTX application did not affect the CE effects of lidocaine, indicating that these were not mediated by TTX-sensitive sodium channels. Application of TTX or ≥100 mg/L lidocaine reduced ENS activity. Although such concentrations of lidocaine exceed therapeutic blood concentrations, tissue concentrations may be higher with the potential to reduce ENS activity and impair intestinal motility in vivo. Improved understanding of underlying mechanisms is relevant for therapeutic use of lidocaine in horses with postoperative ileus.

  6. Introduction to the Symposium "Leading Students and Faculty to Quantitative Biology through Active Learning".

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Lindsay D; Miller, Laura A

    2015-11-01

    The broad aim of this symposium and set of associated papers is to motivate the use of inquiry-based, active-learning teaching techniques in undergraduate quantitative biology courses. Practical information, resources, and ready-to-use classroom exercises relevant to physicists, mathematicians, biologists, and engineers are presented. These resources can be used to address the lack of preparation of college students in STEM fields entering the workforce by providing experience working on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary problems in mathematical biology in a group setting. Such approaches can also indirectly help attract and retain under-represented students who benefit the most from "non-traditional" learning styles and strategies, including inquiry-based, collaborative, and active learning.

  7. Self-Organization Activities of College Students: Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmurygina, Natalia; Bazhenova, Natalia; Bazhenov, Ruslan; Nikolaeva, Natalia; Tcytcarev, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The article provides the analysis of self-organization activities of college students related to their participation in youth associations activities. The purpose of research is to disclose a degree of students' activities demonstration based on self-organization processes, assessment of existing self-organization practices of the youth,…

  8. Activity Preferences of Middle School Physical Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Michael; Stillwell, Jim; Byars, Allyn

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the physical education activity preferences of middle school students who completed a checklist featuring a variety of activities. Overall, middle school boys and girls both differed and agreed on their interests for specific activities. Most students liked basketball, bicycling, roller skating, soccer, swimming, and volleyball but…

  9. Tobacco abuse and physical activity among medical students

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective This lifestyle is mainly determined during childhood and connected with poor public prophylactic health policy. The aim of this study was to estimate physical activity and level of tobacco abuse, as well as knowledge about health behaviours, among medical students. Methods Questionnaires were completed by Polish (243) and foreign medical students (80). Results It was stated that about 20% of the students smoked cigarettes. Female students from Norway took up smoking significantly more often than other participants, whereas there were more smokers among those from Poland. There was a significantly larger percentage of smoking males from Norway than among male Polish students. The same students presented a low level of physical activity. The smallest level of physical activity was characteristic of the Polish women. Conclusion This situation requires an intensification of activities aimed at supporting pro-health lifestyles and the elimination of unfavourable effects, especially among medical students. PMID:20156733

  10. Oxalate Blockage of Calcium and Iron: A Student Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1988-01-01

    Describes a student learning activity used to teach the meaning of percentage composition, mole concept, selective precipitation, and limiting factors. Presents two word problems and their solutions. (CW)

  11. Science Teaching and Learning Activities and Students' Engagement in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampden-Thompson, Gillian; Bennett, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the variation in students' reports of engagement in science across science teaching and learning activities. In addition, this study examines student and school characteristics that may be associated with students' levels of engagement in science. Data are drawn from the Programme for International…

  12. Student Technological Creativity Using Online Problem-Solving Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of online (web-based) creative problem-solving (CPS) activities on student technological creativity and to examine the characteristics of student creativity in the context of online CPS. A pretest-posttest quasi-experiment was conducted with 107 fourth-grade students in Taiwan. The…

  13. Examining Participation of University Students in Recreational Entertainment Marketing Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pala, Adem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine participation of university students in recreational entertainment marketing activities. The survey population consisted of university student in Marmara University Province of Istanbul. The sample constituted a total of 272 students (150 male and 122 female), determined by circumstantial method. The survey…

  14. An Activity to Teach Students about Schematic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbell, Linda M.; Tyler, James M.; Burns, Kathleen C.

    2007-01-01

    We designed a classroom activity to foster students' understanding of what schemas are and how they function. We used a video of the instructor as an infant to illustrate how schemas influence gender stereotyping. Before the video, we told students that the baby was either a boy or a girl. After the video, students rated whether the baby would…

  15. Healthy Activity for Secondary Students. A Collaborative Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, Brooks A.; Turman, Jo

    1996-01-01

    Describes a collaborative project designed to help high school students understand healthy exercise. The project involved preservice physical education majors who acted as fitness facilitators and motivators to the high school students who selected on and off campus, moderate intensity activities. Both groups of students tracked progress and…

  16. Science Teaching and Learning Activities and Students' Engagement in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampden-Thompson, Gillian; Bennett, Judith

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the variation in students' reports of engagement in science across science teaching and learning activities. In addition, this study examines student and school characteristics that may be associated with students' levels of engagement in science. Data are drawn from the Programme for International Student Assessment 2006 study. The analysis employs a quantitative approach that includes descriptive and inferential statistics to examine three measures of student engagement for a nationally representative sample of approximately 12,000 15-year-old students in the UK. The main results indicate that there is an association between students' motivation towards science, enjoyment of science and future orientation towards science, and the frequency in which various teaching and learning activities take place in the classroom. Understanding student engagement in science and the factors that influence it is essential in addressing the issue of uptake of science after compulsory schooling.

  17. Building and Activating Students' Background Knowledge: It's What They Already Know That Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy; Lapp, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Students enter the middle grades with varying amounts of background knowledge. Teachers must assess student background knowledge for gaps or misconceptions and then provide instruction to build on that base. This article discusses effective strategies for assessing and developing students' background knowledge so they can become independent…

  18. Role of enteric nerves in immune-mediated changes in protease activated receptor 2 effects on gut function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) are expressed on structural cells and immune cells. Control of the initiation, duration, and magnitude of the PAR effects are linked to the level of receptor expression, the availability of proteases, and the intracellular signal transduction machinery. We inve...

  19. Staff and Student Experiences of Dialogue Days, a Student Engagement Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asghar, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a descriptive phenomenological exploration of the lived experience of dialogue days, a student engagement activity, from the perspectives of staff and students. I suggest that dialogue days enhance the relational and emotional aspects of learning with the potential to impact on future student engagement and…

  20. The New Student Activism: Supporting Students as Agents of Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The "new student activism," as it is often called, is a hot topic in higher education as well as in the popular press and social media. As a college student in the late '60s and early '70s, a long-time student affairs professional, a scholar and practitioner of service-learning, and an academic teaching a course on social change, the…

  1. Working in Pharmacies. Instructor's Guide. Student's Manual. Student Learning Activities. Second Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driever, Carl W.; And Others

    This document combines three separately bound volumes, a student manual, an instructor's guide, and student learning activities designed for students who are either in beginning-level pharmacy technician courses or considering careers in pharmacy. The material is intended to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. The…

  2. Efficacy of Cinnamaldehyde Against Enteric Viruses and Its Activity After Incorporation Into Biodegradable Multilayer Systems of Interest in Food Packaging.

    PubMed

    Fabra, M J; Castro-Mayorga, J L; Randazzo, W; Lagarón, J M; López-Rubio, A; Aznar, R; Sánchez, G

    2016-06-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CNMA), an organic compound that gives cinnamon its flavor and odor, was investigated for its virucidal activity on norovirus surrogates, murine norovirus (MNV) and feline calicivirus (FCV), and hepatitis A virus (HAV). Initially, different concentrations of CNMA (0.1, 0.5 and 1 %) were individually mixed with each virus at titers of ca. 6-7 log10 TCID50/ml and incubated 2 h at 4 and 37 °C. CNMA was effective in reducing the titers of norovirus surrogates in a dose-dependent manner after 2 h at 37 °C, while HAV titers were reduced by 1 log10 after treatment with 1 % of CNMA. When incubation time was extended, HAV titers were reduced by 3.4 and 2.7 log10 after overnight incubation at 37 °C with 1 and 0.5 % of CNMA, respectively. Moreover, this paper analyzed, for the first time, the antiviral activity of adding an active electrospun interlayer based on zein and CNMA to a polyhydroxybutyrate packaging material (PHB) in a multilayer form. Biodegradable multilayer systems prepared with 2.60 mg/cm(2) (~9.7 %) of CNMA completely inactivated FCV according to ISO 22196:2011, while MNV titers were reduced by 2.75 log10. When the developed multilayer films were evaluated after one month of preparation or at 25 °C, the antiviral activity was reduced as compared to freshly prepared multilayer films evaluated at 37 °C. The results show the excellent potential of this system for food contact applications as well as for active packaging technologies in order to maintain or extend food quality and safety.

  3. Effect of trypsin inhibitor activity in soya bean on growth performance, protein digestibility and incidence of sub-clinical necrotic enteritis in broiler chicken flocks.

    PubMed

    Palliyeguru, M W C D; Rose, S P; Mackenzie, A M

    2011-06-01

    1. The effect of three different levels of dietary trypsin inhibitor activity (achieved by varying the amount of non-toasted full fat soya bean in replacement for toasted full fat soya bean) on the incidence of spontaneously-occurring sub-clinical necrotic enteritis (NE) in broiler chickens was compared. A fourth dietary treatment compared the effect of a diet that used potato protein concentrate as the major protein source. The determined trypsin inhibitor activity increased with the increasing content of non-toasted soya bean: 1·90, 6·21, 8·46 and 3·72 mg/g for the three soya bean diets (0, 100 and 200 g of non-toasted soya bean/kg) and the potato protein diet respectively. 2. Although increasing amounts of the non-toasted full-fat soya bean increased the feed intakes of the birds, there was a marked reduction in protein digestibility, weight gain and feed conversion efficiency. 3. There was a linear increase in sub-clinical NE lesions in the duodenum, jejunum, mid small intestine and ileum with increasing non-toasted soya bean. Caecal Clostridium perfringens counts increased with the increasing dietary content of non-toasted soya bean. Serum α-toxin antibodies were higher in the birds fed the 200 g non-toasted soya bean/kg diet compared with the other diets. 4. The results demonstrated that variation in the amount of non-toasted dietary soya bean not only affects growth performance of broilers but also affects the incidence of sub-clinical necrotic enteritis in the flock. Ensuring the lowest possible trypsin-inhibitor activity in soya bean samples is a valuable tool to improve the health and welfare of birds and in reducing the financial losses from this disease.

  4. Pediatric enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, David; Kazmerski, Kimberly; Iyer, Kishore

    2006-01-01

    Common to all pediatric patients receiving enteral nutrition is the inability to consume calories orally. This is often secondary to issues of inadequate weight gain, inadequate growth, prolonged feeding times, weight loss, a decrease in weight/age or weight/height ratios, or a persistent triceps skinfold thickness <5% for age. Enteral nutrition requires enteral access. In the neonatal period the nasoenteric route is usually used. In pediatric patients requiring long-term enteral access, surgically, endoscopically, or radiologically placed percutaneous feeding tubes are common. Jejunal feeding tubes are used in pediatric patients with gastric feeding intolerance or persistent gastroesophageal reflux. Low-profile enteral access devices are preferred by most pediatric patients because of their cosmetic appearance. For most children, a standard pediatric polypeptide enteral formula is well tolerated. There are specialized pediatric enteral formulas available for patients with decreased intestinal length, altered intestinal absorptive capacity, or altered pancreatic function. Weaning patients from tube feeding to oral nutrition is the ultimate nutrition goal. A multidisciplinary approach to patients with short bowel syndrome will maximize the use of enteral nutrition while preserving parenteral nutrition for patients with true enteral nutrition therapy failure.

  5. Students as Researchers: An Inclined-Plane Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an inquiry activity in which students explore the variables that influence the amount of time it takes a ball to roll down an inclined plane. Relates features of the activity to recommendations in the NCTM Standards. (MKR)

  6. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF INSTRUCTION IN AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS FOR VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE STUDENTS IN ARKANSAS WHO ENTER NON-FARMING OCCUPATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROBERTS, ROY W.

    TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A NEW PROGRAM, A STUDY WAS MADE TO DETERMINE -- (1) OCCUPATIONS ENTERED, (2) EFFECT OF NUMBER OF YEARS IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE ON OCCUPATIONAL CHOICE, (3) MECHANICAL SKILLS USEFUL IN THE OCCUPATION, (4) ADDITIONAL SKILLS NEEDED, AND (5) CHANGES NEEDED IN THE COURSE OF STUDY. THE SAMPLE INCLUDED 802 FORMER…

  7. In vitro probiotic characterization of Lactobacillus strains from fermented radish and their anti-adherence activity against enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Karthiyaini; Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the probiotic properties of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus, and Lactobacillus fermentum strains isolated from fermented radish. All the strains survived the simulated oro-gastrointestinal transit condition and showed significantly higher adherence to Caco-2 cells compared with the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. The strains showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, autoaggregation, and coaggregation capacity with pathogens. Furthermore, the Lactobacillus strains inhibited the adherence of Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. enterocolitica, Shigella boydii, and Salmonella choleraesuis to the Caco-2 cell line. The strains possessed bile salt hydrolase activity and their cholesterol-lowering activity in vitro was above 50% in the presence of bile. Strains of L. plantarum and L. pentosus possessed the plantaricin-encoding plnEF gene. In addition, the Lactobacillus strains maintained about 80% cell viability after freeze-drying in the presence of a combination of 5% skim milk and 5% maltodextrin as cryoprotectant, and 70% recovery of cell viability was observed in the absence of any cryoprotectant.

  8. Student Activism within Christian College Cultures: A Symbolic Interactionist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    This study contributes to the understanding of the structural and cultural influences of Christian college environments on student activism through the framework of symbolic interactionism (Blumer, 1969; Mead, 1934). The goal of this research was to examine how the students at Christian institutions understand and engage in activism within their…

  9. Active and Reflective Learning to Engage All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how teachers effectively manage learning through active engagement of all students throughout each class period. A case study is presented which demonstrates how students learn through active and reflective engagement with ideas, the environment, and other learners (National Middle School Association, 2010). The case study…

  10. The Role of Active Learning in College Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braxton, John M.; Jones, Willis A.; Hirschy, Amy S.; Hartley, Harold V., III

    2008-01-01

    Active learning, which entails any class activity that "involves students doing things and thinking about the things that they are doing," stands as an important pedagogical practice. Discussion, the types of questions faculty ask students in class, role playing, cooperative learning, debates, and the types of questions faculty ask on examinations…

  11. Bias in Student Survey Findings from Active Parental Consent Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Thérèse; Cross, Donna; Thomas, Laura T.; Zubrick, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, researchers are required to obtain active (explicit) parental consent prior to surveying children and adolescents in schools. This study assessed the potential bias present in a sample of actively consented students, and in the estimates of associations between variables obtained from this sample. Students (n = 3496) from 36…

  12. College Students' Perceptions of Wellness and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klepfer, Shaley DePolo

    2013-01-01

    College students are increasingly less physically active. Investigation into this problem is important because individuals develop lifelong habits during the college time period. College students' perceptions regarding physical activity and overall wellness are important factors in creating positive change toward healthier lifestyle habits. Based…

  13. Promoting Physical Activity through Student Life and Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Tyler; Melton, Bridget F.; Langdon, Jody

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A physical activity passport (PAP) was developed to increase student's physical activity through the collaboration of student life and academics. The purpose was to measure the effectiveness of the PAP. Design: The research design used was a quantitative, descriptive, quasi-experimental design with experimental and control groups.…

  14. Physiological Effects of Bouldering Activities in Upper Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fencl, Matthew; Muras, Jennifer; Steffen, Jeff; Battista, Rebecca; Elfessi, Abdulaziz

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the physiological responses of two different types of bouldering activities in upper elementary school students. As part of a physical education fitness unit, fourth and fifth grade students (N = 64) from two Midwestern elementary schools participated in two different activities at the…

  15. Video Demo of UMBC's "Check My Activity" Tool for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, John

    2010-01-01

    The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) uses a Blackboard course management system (CMS) to support faculty and students. To supplement the CMS, the university created a custom "Check My Activity" (CMA) self-service feedback tool for students. In addition to comparing their online course activity against a class average,…

  16. PETE Students' Perceptions of a Healthy and Active Lifestyle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Carol; Pennington, Todd; Barney, David; Lockhart, Barbara; Hager, Ron; Prusak, Keven

    2014-01-01

    Participants were male and female students (n = 12) in a physical education teacher education (PETE) program with a healthy and active lifestyle management (HALM) focus, at a university in the Intermountain West. The purpose of the study was to examine PETE students' perceptions of a healthy and active lifestyle (HAL). Following inductive content…

  17. Race and Sex Differences in College Student Physical Activity Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, Laura H.; Raedeke, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess sex/race differences on psychosocial correlates of physical activity among college students. Methods: Survey research protocol. Results: Students (n = 636) exercised an average of 3.5 days per week, with black females being the least active. Across subgroups, health/fitness was rated as the most important motive for exercise,…

  18. Developing Science and Math Integrated Activities for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherrod, Sonya Ellouise; Dwyer, Jerry; Narayan, Ratna

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the development and refinement of science and mathematics integrated activities for middle school students. The expectations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics that students develop an understanding of mathematics and an ability to apply it gave birth to these activities. The expectations of the National…

  19. The evolutionary conformation from traditional lecture to active learning in an undergraduate biology course and its effects on student achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Kirsten Bakke

    In response to the declining number of students in the United States entering into the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) disciplines, there has been an attempt to retain student interest in the sciences through the implementation of more active learning in the classroom. Active learning is defined as any instructional method that requires students do something in the classroom rather than simply listen to a lecture (Herreid, 2006). These student centered approaches provide the students with the opportunity to work cooperatively while developing the skills required for critical inquiry. They also help the students make the connections between what is being taught and how it can be applied in a real world setting. Science education researchers have attempted to analyze the efficacy of active learning. Although they find it difficult to compare the data, they state unequivocally that "Active learning is a better strategy for learning than the traditional didactic lecture format" (Prince, 2004). However, even though research supports the efficacy of active learning, instructors find it difficult to adopt this pedagogy into their classrooms due to concerns such as loss of content knowledge and student resistance. This three year qualitative and quantitative study addressed the level of student learning and satisfaction in an introductory vertebrate biology class at a small liberal arts college. The courses were taught by the same instructor using three pedagogical methods; traditional lecture (TL), problem-based learning (PBL), and case-based learning (CBL). Student grades and levels of assessment were compared between the TL and PBL, while student attrition rates, course satisfaction and views of active and group learning were analyzed across all three sections. The evolutionary confirmations from TL to PBL and ultimately the adoption of CBL as the method of choice are discussed from the view of both the faculty member and the students.

  20. Anatomic modifications in the enteric nervous system of piebald mice and physiological consequences to colonic motor activity.

    PubMed

    Ro, Seungil; Hwang, Sung Jin; Muto, Melodie; Jewett, William Keith; Spencer, Nick J

    2006-04-01

    It has been assumed that in piebald lethal mice that develop megacolon, impaired colonic motor activity is restricted to the aganglionic distal colon. Peristaltic mechanical recordings, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative PCR were used to investigate whether regions of the colon, other than the aganglionic segment, may also show anatomical modifications and dysfunctional colonic motor activity. Contrary to expectations, colonic migrating motor complexes (MMCs) were absent along the whole colon of piebald lethal homozygote mice and severely impaired in heterozygote siblings. Aganglionosis was detected not only in the distal colon of piebald homozygote lethal mice (mean length: 20.4 +/- 2.1 mm) but also surprisingly in their heterozygote siblings (mean length: 12.4 +/- 1.1 mm). Unlike homozygote lethal mice, piebald heterozygotes showed no signs of megacolon. Interestingly, mRNA expression for PGP 9.5 was also dramatically reduced (by 71-99%) throughout the entire small and large bowel in both homozygote lethal and heterozygous littermates (by 67-87%). Histochemical staining confirmed a significant reduction in myenteric ganglia along the whole colon. In summary, the piebald mutation in homozygote lethal and heterozygote siblings is associated with dramatic reductions in myenteric ganglia throughout the entire colon and not limited to the distal colon as originally thought. Functionally, this results in an absence or severe impairment of colonic MMC activity in both piebald homozygote lethal and heterozygote siblings, respectively. The observation that piebald heterozygotes have an aganglionic distal colon (mean length: 12 mm) but live a normal murine life span without megacolon suggests that aganglionosis >12 mm and the complete absence of colonic MMCs may be required before any symptoms of megacolon arise.

  1. Supporting Students' Knowledge Transfer in Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piksööt, Jaanika; Sarapuu, Tago

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates ways to enhance secondary school students' knowledge transfer in complex science domains by implementing question prompts. Two samples of students applied two web-based models to study molecular genetics--the model of genetic code (n = 258) and translation (n = 245). For each model, the samples were randomly divided into…

  2. Steady Stream of High School Graduates Enter B.C. Public Post-Secondary Education for the First Time Each Year. Research Results from the Student Transitions Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Student Transitions Project, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Student Transition project (STP) has collected eleven years of grade 12 and post-secondary enrollment data, since it's inception in 2003. This information is used to track student transitions from grade 12 graduation into post-secondary education, student mobility between post-secondary institutions and post-secondary credential completions.…

  3. Reluctant Colossus: America Enters the Age of Imperialism. Public Policy Debate in the Classroom. Choices for the 21st Century Education Project. Student and Teacher's Resource Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Don

    This packet contains student materials and a teacher's guide. The materials are designed to make complex international issues understandable and meaningful for students. The unit probes the political, moral, and racial issues raised by the Spanish-American War and the acquisition of an overseas empire. Students compare the values and concerns at…

  4. Constitutively Active 5-HT Receptors: An Explanation of How 5-HT Antagonists Inhibit Gut Motility in Species Where 5-HT is Not an Enteric Neurotransmitter?

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.

    2015-01-01

    Antagonists of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors are well known to inhibit gastrointestinal (GI)-motility and transit in a variety of mammals, including humans. Originally, these observations had been interpreted by many investigators (including us) as evidence that endogenous 5-HT plays a major role in GI motility. This seemed a logical assumption. However, the story changed dramatically after recent studies revealed that 5-HT antagonists still blocked major GI motility patterns (peristalsis and colonic migrating motor complexes) in segments of intestine depleted of all 5-HT. Then, these results were further supported by Dr. Gershons' laboratory, which showed that genetic deletion of all genes that synthesizes 5-HT had minor, or no inhibitory effects on GI transit in vivo. If 5-HT was essential for GI motility patterns and transit, then one would expect major disruptions in motility and transit when 5-HT synthesis was genetically ablated. This does not occur. The inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility clearly occur independently of any 5-HT in the gut. Evidence now suggests that 5-HT antagonists act on 5-HT receptors in the gut which are constitutively active, and don't require 5-HT for their activation. This would explain a long-standing mystery of how 5-HT antagonists inhibit gut motility in species like mice, rats, and humans where 5-HT is not an enteric neurotransmitter. Studies are now increasingly demonstrating that the presence of a neurochemical in enteric neurons does not mean they function as neurotransmitters. Caution should be exercised when interpreting any inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility. PMID:26732863

  5. Enteric viruses of poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the economic importance of the poultry gut, very little is known about the complex gut microbial community. Enteric disease syndromes such as Runting-Stunting Syndrome (RSS) in broiler chickens and Poult Enteritis Complex (PEC) in young turkeys are difficult to characterize and reproduce in ...

  6. Mature students learning statistics: The activity theory perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Sue

    1993-09-01

    The concept of approach "stresses relationships between intention, process and outcome within a specified context as described by an individual" (Schmeck, 1988, p. 10). This paper explores the approaches to learning of a group of mature students from the theoretical perspective of activity theory in order to gain an insight into some of the ways statistics is learned. In this framework, learning, regarded as goal-directed behaviour, is analysed by exploring the socio-historical factors relating to students' self regulation of their cognitive activities. The material is derived from questionnaires and interviews with five students, and focuses on the students' own interpretations of the contexts affecting their approaches.

  7. Interprofessional pharmacy observation activity for third-year dental students.

    PubMed

    Conway, Susan E; Smith, Winter J; Truong, Teresa H; Shadid, Jill

    2014-09-01

    Interprofessional learning is a key component of today's health sciences education. Within a two-course series in dental pharmacology and therapeutics, a dental curriculum was revised to provide an interprofessional activity to expose dental students to a community pharmacy setting. The objectives of this activity were to augment students' learning about drug laws and prescription writing, as well as to foster interprofessional relationships and collaboration between pharmacists and dentists. Dental students were scheduled for one-hour observations at community pharmacies on campus. Learning objectives to guide this activity focused on demonstrating community pharmacy operating procedures, identifying ways to minimize prescribing and dosing errors, and understanding how pharmacists can assist dentists in prescribing. Following the observation, students were required to submit a written assignment, which accounted for 14 percent of their course grade. All 119 dental students (100 percent) enrolled in the course for the summers of 2012 and 2013 completed the activity. The average grade on the written assignment was 96.2 out of 100. At the end of the course, students were asked to participate in an online course evaluation survey, for which response rates were 37 percent and 43 percent for 2012 and 2013, respectively. The students rated the pharmacy observation activity favorably on this course evaluation. The pharmacy observation activity provided a successful interprofessional component to the didactic pharmacy course and was well received by the dental students as well as the community pharmacists.

  8. An integrated mathematics/science activity for secondary students: Development, implementation, and student feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, Abigail Rose

    Mathematics teachers are often challenged by their students to give reasoning for why learning mathematics is necessary. An approach to address this question is to show students the value in learning mathematics by enlightening them on the connections that mathematics has with other disciplines and the real-world applications of mathematics. Integration is a method of teaching that can be used to give students insight as to how mathematics is useful in a variety of different fields. In addition to engaging students with relevant curriculum, leading students to discover the connections between mathematics and science (among other fields) is helpful in showing students why learning mathematics is valuable. This thesis reports on my experiences in developing and implementing an integrated mathematics/science activity in a STEM Technology class at a local high school as well as discusses student feedback about the activity, about their interdisciplinary STEM Technology class, and about the integration of mathematics and science in the classroom.

  9. Shaker-type Kv1 channel blockers increase the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum by stimulating acetylcholine and tachykinins release by the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Vianna-Jorge, Rosane; Oliveira, Cyntia F; Garcia, Maria L; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme

    2003-01-01

    1 A constant intraluminal pressure system was used to evaluate the effects of Kv1 channel blockers on the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum. 2 The nortriterpene correolide, a non-selective inhibitor of all Kv1 sub-types, causes progressive and sustained reduction of the pressure threshold for eliciting peristaltic contractions. 3 Margatoxin (MgTX), alpha-dendrotoxin (alpha-DTX) and dendrotoxin-K (DTX-K), highly selective peptidyl inhibitors of certain Kv1 sub-types, cause immediate reduction of the pressure threshold. This effect subsides with time, irrespective of the peptides' concentration in the bath. In preparations pretreated with saturating concentrations of MgTX, correolide further stimulates the peristaltic activity. 4 Iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective inhibitor of the high-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels, and charybdotoxin (ChTX), which inhibits Kv1.2 and Kv1.3 as well as BK channels, fail to stimulate the peristaltic activity. 5 Blockade of muscarinic receptors by atropine reduces, and occasionally suppresses the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum. In atropine-treated preparations, correolide and MgTX retain their abilities to reduce the pressure threshold and are able to restore the peristaltic reflex in the preparations where this reflex was suppressed by atropine. 6 The stimulatory effect of correolide and MgTX in atropine-treated preparations is abolished by subsequent addition of selective antagonists of both NK1 and NK2 receptors. 7 In conclusion, blockade of Kv1, particularly Kv1.1 channels, increases the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum by enhancing the release of neurotransmitters at the enteric nervous system. In contrast, stimulation of the myogenic motility by blockade of BK channels does not affect the threshold for the peristaltic reflex.

  10. Shaker-type Kv1 channel blockers increase the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum by stimulating acetylcholine and tachykinins release by the enteric nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Vianna-Jorge, Rosane; Oliveira, Cyntia F; Garcia, Maria L; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme

    2003-01-01

    A constant intraluminal pressure system was used to evaluate the effects of Kv1 channel blockers on the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum. The nortriterpene correolide, a non-selective inhibitor of all Kv1 sub-types, causes progressive and sustained reduction of the pressure threshold for eliciting peristaltic contractions. Margatoxin (MgTX), alpha-dendrotoxin (α-DTX) and dendrotoxin-K (DTX-K), highly selective peptidyl inhibitors of certain Kv1 sub-types, cause immediate reduction of the pressure threshold. This effect subsides with time, irrespective of the peptides' concentration in the bath. In preparations pretreated with saturating concentrations of MgTX, correolide further stimulates the peristaltic activity. Iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective inhibitor of the high-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels, and charybdotoxin (ChTX), which inhibits Kv1.2 and Kv1.3 as well as BK channels, fail to stimulate the peristaltic activity. Blockade of muscarinic receptors by atropine reduces, and occasionally suppresses the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum. In atropine-treated preparations, correolide and MgTX retain their abilities to reduce the pressure threshold and are able to restore the peristaltic reflex in the preparations where this reflex was suppressed by atropine. The stimulatory effect of correolide and MgTX in atropine-treated preparations is abolished by subsequent addition of selective antagonists of both NK1 and NK2 receptors. In conclusion, blockade of Kv1, particularly Kv1.1 channels, increases the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum by enhancing the release of neurotransmitters at the enteric nervous system. In contrast, stimulation of the myogenic motility by blockade of BK channels does not affect the threshold for the peristaltic reflex. PMID:12522073

  11. Preparing students to participate in an active learning environment.

    PubMed

    Modell, H I

    1996-06-01

    Most students have spent the majority of their school career in passive learning environments in which faculty were disseminators of information, and students were required to memorize information or use specified algorithms to "solve problems." In an active learning environment, students are encouraged to engage in the process of building and testing their own mental models from information that they are acquiring. In such a learner-centered environment, faculty become facilitators of learning, and students become active participants, engaging in a dialogue with their colleagues and with the instructor. To create a successful active learning environment, both faculty and students must make adjustments to what has been their respective "traditional" roles in the classroom. For the instructor who is committed to promoting active learning, the challenge lies in helping students understand the necessity of becoming active colleagues in learning. This process can be facilitated if the curriculum includes exercises to direct students' attention to a number of issues that impact their learning. This paper describes four such exercises designed to help students form appropriate course expectations, recognize the need for seeking clarification when communicating, recognize the role of personal experience in building mental models, and become familiar with study aids for building formal models.

  12. [Home enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Virgili, N; Vilarasau, M C

    1999-04-01

    Enteral nutrition in the home is applied to stabilized patients who do not require hospitalization or to chronically ill patients who can stay in their homes. However, ensuring the correct administration of this treatment requires a coordinated, expert multidisciplinary team. This article reviews the conditions for use of enteral nutrition in the home, the means of access, the nutritional formulas, the administrative technique, and the complications enteral nutrition in the home may present. Furthermore, the composition and characteristics of the multidisciplinary team which will be in charge of carrying out this treatment is discussed.

  13. Teaching students to read the primary literature using POGIL activities.

    PubMed

    Murray, Tracey Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The ability to read, interpret, and evaluate articles in the primary literature are important skills that science majors will use in graduate school and professional life. Because of this, it is important that students are not only exposed to the primary literature in undergraduate education, but also taught how to read and interpret these articles. To achieve this objective, POGIL activities were designed to use the primary literature in a majors biochemistry sequence. Data show that students were able to learn content from the literature without separate activities or lecture. Students also reported an increase in comfort and confidence in approaching the literature as a result of the activities.

  14. The Impact of Study Abroad on Academic Success: An Analysis of First-Time Students Entering Old Dominion University, Virginia, 2000-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Min; de Silva, Chandra R.; Neufeldt, Ellen; Dane, Jane H.

    2013-01-01

    There is a widespread assumption that study abroad develops skills that are marketable in an increasingly global market. Students at many institutions, including Old Dominion University (ODU), have undertaken study abroad mostly after their sophomore year, well after they have chosen a major. The profile of U.S. students studying abroad compiled…

  15. Profile of Degree/Certificate-Seeking Entering Undergraduate Students, by Control and Level of Institution. Web Tables. NCES 2011-252

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginder, Scott; Mason, Marcinda

    2011-01-01

    The Student Right to Know Act requires institutions that participate in any student financial assistance program under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (as amended) to disclose graduation rates. To assist institutions in meeting this requirement, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) collects these rates as part of the…

  16. Entering Adulthood: Understanding Depression and Suicide. A Curriculum for Grades 9-12. Contemporary Health Series. [Teacher's Guide and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Nanette D.

    This curriculum guide for high school students sensitively and expertly addresses the escalating social problem of suicide. This guide is part of a series designed to provide educators with the curricular tools necessary to challenge students to take personal responsibility for their health. With seven structured lessons, this teaching unit…

  17. Summer Melt" and the Entering First-Year College Student: Insights from the College Match Pilot Program. College Match Issue Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MDRC, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Many students fail to enroll in college even after they have made a formal commitment to attend. Research has shown that nationally, between 10 percent and 40 percent of high school graduates who intend to go to college don't enroll the following fall. Among low-income students, these "summer melt" rates are even higher. The College…

  18. Predictors of Political Activism among Social Work Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swank, Eric W.

    2012-01-01

    This article identifies factors inspiring greater political participation among undergraduate social work students (N=125). When separating students into self-identified liberals and conservatives, the study uses resource, mobilizing, and framing variables to explain greater levels of activism. After several multivariate regressions, this article…

  19. Student Use of Facebook for Organizing Collaborative Classroom Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampe, Cliff; Wohn, Donghee Yvette; Vitak, Jessica; Ellison, Nicole B.; Wash, Rick

    2011-01-01

    Social network sites such as Facebook are often conceived of as purely social spaces; however, as these sites have evolved, so have the ways in which students are using them. In this study, we examine how undergraduate students use the social network site Facebook to engage in classroom-related collaborative activities (e.g., arranging study…

  20. Using the Web to Increase Physical Activity in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magoc, Dejan; Tomaka, Joe; Bridges-Arzaga, Amber

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a theoretically based and Web-delivered intervention using common course technology for increasing physical activity in a college student sample. Methods: One hundred four students randomly participated in either a Web-based intervention involving 7 theory-based learning lessons or a control group that…

  1. Cooperating Teachers' Perspectives of Student Teaching Skills and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.; Paulsen, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which cooperating teachers deem required student teaching skills and activities relevant to the agricultural education student teaching experience. The population for this descriptive study consisted of individuals who served as cooperating teachers in Iowa and South Dakota during the last 5…

  2. Economics and Entrepreneurship: Student Activities. Master Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Economic Education, New York, NY.

    Correlated to the Economics and Entrepreneurship Teaching Strategies Master Curriculum Guide, this book features 66 student activities, case studies, comprehension quizzes, and lessons related to economic concepts. Designed for high school students of economics, social studies, and business education, this curriculum guide combines study of basic…

  3. Factors Related to Exclusion of Students from School Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Larry J.; And Others

    A survey of 130 high school principals in 3 southern states revealed alcohol abuse, insubordination, and other misbehavior as the major causes for excluding students from participation in school activities. The study also indicated that students have to meet disproportionately higher standards to participate in athletics, cheerleading, and student…

  4. "Student as Worker:" A Simple Yet Effective Career Education Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes career education activity, "Student as Worker," in which elementary school children pretend school is their job and respond to questions about what is expected of them on the job as students. Responses are related to factors considered important in most jobs, such as punctuality, appropriate attire, hard work and effort, competency,…

  5. Do Active-Learning Strategies Improve Students' Critical Thinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Larry P.; Crow, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Improving students' ability to recognize work-related problems and apply effective strategies and solutions to fundamental challenges in the field is at the crux of a good college preparation. This paper attempts to investigate if active-learning strategies improve students' critical thinking ability in this regard. Participants were pre-service…

  6. Student Activity and Learning Outcomes in a Virtual Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanov, Kalle; Nevgi, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between degree of participation and learning outcomes in an e-learning course on medical informatics. Overall activity in using course materials and degree of participation in the discussion forums of an online course were studied among 39 medical students. Students were able to utilise the…

  7. An Evolving Framework for Describing Student Engagement in Classroom Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Flavio S.; diSessa, Andrea A.; Sherin, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Student engagement in classroom activities is usually described as a function of factors such as human needs, affect, intention, motivation, interests, identity, and others. We take a different approach and develop a framework that models classroom engagement as a function of students' "conceptual competence" in the "specific content" (e.g., the…

  8. Effects of Teacher Professional Learning Activities on Student Achievement Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiba, Motoko; Liang, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of six types of teacher professional learning activities on student achievement growth over 4 years using statewide longitudinal survey data collected from 467 middle school mathematics teachers in 91 schools merged with 11,192 middle school students' mathematics scores in a standardized assessment in Missouri. The…

  9. Services for Older Adults. Reference Book [and] Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    This student activity book and reference book, which are part of a family and consumer sciences education series focusing on a broad range of employment opportunities, are intended for use in 1- and 2- programs preparing Texas high school students for employment in occupations related to providing services for older adults. The reference book…

  10. Students' Learning Activities While Studying Biological Process Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kragten, Marco; Admiraal, Wilfried; Rijlaarsdam, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Process diagrams describe how a system functions (e.g. photosynthesis) and are an important type of representation in Biology education. In the present study, we examined students' learning activities while studying process diagrams, related to their resulting comprehension of these diagrams. Each student completed three learning tasks. Verbal…

  11. Perceiving the General: The Multisemiotic Dimension of Students' Algebraic Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Luis; Bardino, Caroline; Sabena, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we deal with students' algebraic generalizations set in the context of elementary geometric-numeric patterns. Drawing from Vygotsky's psychology, Leont'ev's Activity Theory, and Husserl's phenomenology, we focus on the various semiotic resources mobilized by students in their passage from the particular to the general. Two small…

  12. An Aging Game Simulation Activity for Allied Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Carolinda; Henry, Beverly W.; Kostiwa, Irene M.

    2008-01-01

    The Aging Game, a simulation activity, has been used successfully with medical students in the development of empathetic attitudes toward older adults. To date, the Aging Game has not been used extensively with allied health students. It has been viewed as too costly, time-consuming and labor-intensive. The purpose of this study was to examine the…

  13. Student Perceptions of a Conceptual Physical Education Activity Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jayne M.; Jenkins, Patience; Collums, Ashley; Werhonig, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Conceptual physical education (CPE) courses are typically included in university course work to provide students knowledge and skills to engage in physical activity for life. The purpose of this study was to identify CPE course characteristics that contributed to positive and negative student perceptions. Participants included 157 undergraduates…

  14. Sport and Other Motor Activities of Warsaw Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biernat, Elzbieta

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess the engagement of students of Warsaw university schools in sports and in recreational motor activities. Material and methods: A cohort (n = 1100) of students attending B.S. or M.S. courses at 6 university schools in Warsaw were studied by applying questionnaire techniques. The questions pertained to participation in…

  15. Making Chemistry Activities Meaningful to Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanitski, Conrad L.; Sears, Curtis T.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the use of bio-medically significant materials to teach a self-pacing chemistry laboratory course to nursing majors. Indicates that the student can learn from the course to determine values of body fluid constituents, about their variations among healthy populations, and about difficulties inherent in making such measurements. (CC)

  16. Building on Student Diversity: Profiles and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowdery, Joy R.; Rogness, Linda Ingling; Morrow, Linda E.; Wilson, Vicki A.

    2006-01-01

    This text captures the profiles and cumulative records of six diverse students at early childhood, middle childhood, and then high school level. Intended for the preservice teacher, this book illustrates how to create a caring school environment; accommodate for special learning needs in instructional and assessments; and interact with families…

  17. Magnetism and Electricity Activity "Attracts" Student Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Electricity and magnetism are intimately linked, this relationship forming the basis of the modern electric utility system and the generation of bulk electrical energy. There is rich literature from which to teach students the basics, but nothing drives the point home like having them learn from firsthand experience--and that is what this…

  18. Enhancing Active Learning in the Student Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modell, Harold I.; Michael, Joel A.; Adamson, Tom; Horwitz, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    We previously examined how three approaches to directing students in a laboratory setting impacted their ability to repair a faulty mental model in respiratory physiology (Modell, HI, Michael JA, Adamson T, Goldberg J, Horwitz BA, Bruce DS, Hudson ML, Whitescarver SA, and Williams S. Adv Physiol Educ 23: 82?90, 2000). This study addresses issues…

  19. Outdoor Education Activities for Elementary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Connie L.

    Outdoor education is an informal method of teaching and learning which offers opportunities for elementary school students, regardless of intellectual abilities, to learn about and appreciate their environment and acquire skills with which to enjoy a lifetime of creative, productive, and healthful living. Outdoor education can enrich, vitalize,…

  20. Learning Activities: Students and Recycling. [and] Automobile Aerodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Charles H., Jr.; Schieber, Rich

    1994-01-01

    The first learning activity is intended to heighten students' awareness of the need for recycling, reuse, and reduction of materials; the second explores the aerodynamics of automobiles. Both include context, concept, objectives, procedure, and materials needed. (SK)

  1. Saving Tropical Rain Forests through Teacher-Student Activism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    Described are the formation, goals, and activities of a network of teachers and students designed to help raise consciousness about conservation topics. A two-week minicourse on tropical diversity, ecology, and society is outlined. (CW)

  2. Activated Sludge. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Owen K.; Klopping, Paul H.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a seven-lesson unit on activated sludge. Topic areas addressed in the lessons include: (1) activated sludge concepts and components (including aeration tanks, aeration systems, clarifiers, and sludge pumping systems); (2) activated sludge variations and modes; (3) biological nature of activated…

  3. Student Perceptions of an Assessed, Online, Collaborative Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haresnape, Janet

    2015-01-01

    In this online collaborative activity, adapted from a face-to-face tutorial activity, students each provided data and suggestions about its interpretation, by contributing to a series of wiki pages. They undertook an assessment question based on interpretation and implications of their findings. The activity involved probing questions inviting…

  4. Nordic Walking: A Simple Lifetime Physical Activity for Every Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Luis; Fernandez-Rio, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Children who become competent in a wide variety of motor skills and movement patterns are more likely to remain physically active for life. Physical education can achieve this goal by providing an extensive selection of activities and by including learning units that encourage students to increase their skill level and stay active year-round.…

  5. Mastery inspired activities to help at risk students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, Tim; Gladding, Gary; Gutmann, Brianne; Lundsgaard, Morten; Schroeder, Noah

    2016-03-01

    Introductory physics is a roadblock for many aspiring engineers at the University of Illinois. The overall attrition rate in our introductory mechanics and E&M courses is approximately 15%, however that rate doubles for some under-represented populations. We introduced a set of online activities designed to provide students both an accurate assessment of their current understanding, and the resources to improve their performance. This talk will describe the design of these activities, and their impact on student attitude and understanding.

  6. Developing and evaluating effective bioscience learning activities for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Salvage-Jones, Judith; Hamill, Jessie; Todorovic, Michael; Barton, Matthew J; Johnston, Amy N B

    2016-07-01

    Effective engagement of nursing students in the study of biosciences remains a challenge for many tertiary institutes. In this study we attempted to implement and then evaluate a simple hands-on intervention, consisting of a series of hands-on games and puzzles, to increase nursing student engagement with core concepts and anatomical learning involved in clinical anatomy and physiology. The study used a quazi-experimental longitudinal before and after design, to explore the effect of a learning intervention on student performance. Set across three different campuses of the same University, it included 1320 first year undergraduate nursing students from 2013 to 2014 who were studying Anatomy and Physiology. Students were exposed to the interventions or not, and concomitant academic performance, weekly quiz scores, performance in fortnightly worksheets and, across the semester, exam performance were compared. The results show that while the intervention appeared to increase academic performance in students on one campus (2013) compared to the other two, this difference was not sustained into 2014 when a bigger cohort was examined. Despite significant subjective student satisfaction and enthusiasm about these learning and teaching interventions, the data does not support the capacity of these activities to enhance student academic performance. Tertiary entrance scores, being a non-native English speakers and socio-economic status all had a bigger impact on student performance than engagement with fun anatomy and physiology activities.

  7. Students' Performance in Investigative Activity and Their Understanding of Activity Aims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomes, Alessandro Damasio Trani; Borges, A. Tarciso; Justi, Rosaria

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the students' understanding of the aims of an investigative activity and their performance when conducting it. One hundred and eighty-one year nine students from a public middle school in Brazil took part in the study. Students working in pairs were asked to investigate two problems using a…

  8. Student Behavior and Epistemological Framing: Examples from Collaborative Active-Learning Activities in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Hammer, David

    2009-01-01

    The concept of framing from anthropology and sociolinguistics is useful for understanding student reasoning. For example, a student may frame a learning activity as an opportunity for sensemaking or as an assignment to fill out a worksheet. The student's framing affects what she notices, what knowledge she accesses, and how she thinks to act. We…

  9. Using Sales Management Students to Manage Professional Selling Students in an Innovative Active Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Joyce A.; Hawes, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an application of active learning within two different courses: professional selling and sales management. Students assumed the roles of sales representatives and sales managers for an actual fund-raiser--a golf outing--sponsored by a student chapter of the American Marketing Association. The sales project encompassed an…

  10. A Look at Welcome Week: The Role of College Unions and Student Activities in Welcoming Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudisille, Justin; Stringer, Elizabeth; Thiebe, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Members of the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Central Office staff went on the road on August 18-24, 2011, making stops at 20 institutions in six states during the course of seven days. The ACUI Campus Tour: Welcome Week 2011 included visits with college union and student activities staff and students at a variety of…

  11. Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes among Students Using Anthropometry Activities in High-School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightburn, Millard E.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to evaluate the use of anthropometric activities among a sample of 761 high-school biology students in terms of student outcomes (achievement and attitudes) and classroom environment (assessed with the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory, SLEI). Data analyses supported the SLEI's factorial validity,…

  12. Bridging the Gap: Linking Co-Curricular Activities to Student Learning Outcomes in Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storey, Katie Lauren

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which participation in co-curricular events enhances the achievement of student-learning outcomes in community college students. One community college in Illinois--Chicago Metropolitan Area Community College (CMACC), a pseudonym--was selected to research based on its robust co-curricular activity programming.…

  13. Measuring Students' Physical Activity Levels: Validating SOFIT for Use with High-School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Mars, Hans; Rowe, Paul J.; Schuldheisz, Joel M.; Fox, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to validate the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) for measuring physical activity levels of high-school students. Thirty-five students (21 girls and 14 boys from grades 9-12) completed a standardized protocol including lying, sitting, standing, walking, running, curl-ups, and push-ups. Heart rates and…

  14. Motivational activities based on previous knowledge of students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J. A.; Gómez-Robledo, L.; Huertas, R.; Perales, F. J.

    2014-07-01

    Academic results depend strongly on the individual circumstances of students: background, motivation and aptitude. We think that academic activities conducted to increase motivation must be tuned to the special situation of the students. Main goal of this work is analyze the students in the first year of the Degree in Optics and Optometry in the University of Granada and the suitability of an activity designed for those students. Initial data were obtained from a survey inquiring about the reasons to choose this degree, their knowledge of it, and previous academic backgrounds. Results show that: 1) the group is quite heterogeneous, since students have very different background. 2) Reasons to choose the Degree in Optics and Optometry are also very different, and in many cases were selected as a second option. 3) Knowledge and motivations about the Degree are in general quite low. Trying to increase the motivation of the students we designed an academic activity in which we show different topics studied in the Degree. Results show that students that have been involved in this activity are the most motivated and most satisfied with their election of the degree.

  15. Curvature of spacetime: A simple student activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Monika; Smith, Warren; Jackson, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    The following is a description of an inexpensive and simple student experiment for measuring the differences between the three types of spacetime topology—Euclidean (flat), Riemann (spherical), and Lobachevskian (saddle) curvatures. It makes use of commonly available tools and materials, and requires only a small amount of construction. The experiment applies to astronomical topics such as gravity, spacetime, general relativity, as well as geometry and mathematics.

  16. Student expectations in a group learning activity on harmonic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczynski, Adam; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Students in a sophomore-level mechanics course participated in a new group learning activity that was intended to support model-building and finding coherence between multiple representations in the context of an underdamped harmonic system. Not all of the student groups framed the activity in the same way, and many attempted tasks that existed outside of the prompts of the activity. For one group, this meant that instead of providing a rich verbal description, they framed the activity as finding a mathematical expression.

  17. The Relationship of Participation in Extracurricular Activities to Student Achievement, Student Attendance, and Student Behavior in a Nebraska School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible relationships between participation in extracurricular activities and student achievement, participation in extracurricular activities and attendance, and participation in extracurricular activities and behavior. The setting for this study was a high school in western Nebraska. Data for 275 of the…

  18. Students' and experts' perspectives on three learning and teaching activities.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2014-09-01

    Nursing is a profession that closely related to human life, and nurses are required to demonstrate critical thinking and creativity in providing health care services. However, traditional teaching approaches usually limit students' autonomy and freedom of expressing their thoughts and feelings. In order to develop the corresponding competence of nursing students, I adopted three teaching innovations, namely writing poems, composing songs, and using role plays in a nursing problem-based learning class in a university in Hong Kong. According to students' reflective notes and comments from two international expert reviewers, participating in these activities is a valuable experience and students were able to develop clinical reasoning, empathy, team spirit, motivation to learn, creativity, and ability to summarise and reconstruct knowledge. It is hoped that more innovative learning activities will be implemented, to prepare professional and ethical nurses in the future. It is also hoped that this study could provide other PBL educators some insights in innovative problem-based learning activities.

  19. Student Constructions of "Active Citizenship": What Does Participation Mean to Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Kerry J.

    2007-01-01

    "Active citizenship" is currently a popular term in citizenship education policy discourse. Despite this policy interest, there is no agreement about the meaning of "active citizenship". This article draws on data from the IEA Civic Education Study to explore how students themselves construct "active citizenship". The results show that students…

  20. Allergic enteritis in children

    PubMed Central

    Czerwionka-Szaflarska, Mieczysława; Gawryjołek, Julia

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal form of food allergy is very common in children. The most frequently observed types are allergic proctitis and proctocolitis. In most cases the symptoms subside within the first 2 months of life. The babies seem healthy, and the only abnormality is a small amount of blood in stool. Symptoms can also include small intestine inflammation and colitis. Patients may present with irritability, abdominal pain, flatulence, colic, postprandial vomiting, chronic diarrhoea, and hindered physical development. The diagnosis of allergic enteritis is based on the clinical examination and the results of additional tests including an endoscopy of the lower digestive tract with histopathological assessment. Cow’s milk proteins are the most common nutrition proteins responsible for the development of the symptoms of allergic enteritis. The most essential method of treating allergic enteritis is the elimination diet. The symptoms should subside within 1–2 weeks from the beginning of the diet. PMID:28337229

  1. Intestinal endocrine cells in radiation enteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Pietroletti, R.; Blaauwgeers, J.L.; Taat, C.W.; Simi, M.; Brummelkamp, W.H.; Becker, A.E. )

    1989-08-01

    In this study, the intestinal endocrine cells were investigated in 13 surgical specimens affected by radiation enteritis. Endocrine cells were studied by means of Grimelius' silver staining and immunostaining for chromogranin, a general marker of endocrine cells. Positively stained cells were quantified by counting their number per unit length of muscularis mucosa. Results in radiation enteritis were compared with matched control specimens by using Student's t test. Chromogranin immunostaining showed a statistically significant increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis specimens compared with controls both in small and large intestine (ileum, 67.5 +/- 23.5 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 17.0 +/- 6.1 in controls; colon, 40.9 +/- 13.7 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 9.5 +/- 4.1 in controls--p less than 0.005 in both instances). Increase of endocrine cells was demonstrated also by Grimelius' staining; however, without reaching statistical significance. It is not clear whether or not the increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis reported in this study is caused by a hyperplastic response or by a sparing phenomenon. We should consider that increased endocrine cells, when abnormally secreting their products, may be involved in some of the clinical features of radiation enteropathy. In addition, as intestinal endocrine cells produce trophic substances to the intestine, their increase could be responsible for the raised risk of developing carcinoma of the intestine in long standing radiation enteritis.

  2. [Creating optimal hygienic conditions for students' activities].

    PubMed

    Grebniak, N P

    1990-05-01

    Optimization of the preparation of school-children for the working activity may be presented as a model consisting of 4 blocks. Socially significant functions are system-forming factors of this model, i.e. the functions of an organism with which successful implementation of the major types of activities is associated. System approach to the management of schoolchildren's activities based on the dynamic control of socially significant functions and on selective influence on external and internal factors with the help of prophylactic and corrective activities make it possible to maintain its hygienic optimization.

  3. Health status, physical activity, and orthorexia nervosa: A comparison between exercise science students and business students.

    PubMed

    Malmborg, Julia; Bremander, Ann; Olsson, M Charlotte; Bergman, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Orthorexia nervosa is described as an exaggerated fixation on healthy food. It is unclear whether students in health-oriented academic programs, highly focused on physical exercise, are more prone to develop orthorexia nervosa than students in other educational areas. The aim was to compare health status, physical activity, and frequency of orthorexia nervosa between university students enrolled in an exercise science program (n = 118) or a business program (n = 89). The students completed the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and ORTO-15, which defines orthorexia nervosa as a sensitive and obsessive behavior towards healthy nutrition. The SF-36 showed that exercise science students scored worse than business students regarding bodily pain (72.8 vs. 82.5; p = 0.001), but better regarding general health (83.1 vs. 77.1; p = 0.006). Of 188 students, 144 (76.6%) had an ORTO-15 score indicating orthorexia nervosa, with a higher proportion in exercise science students than in business students (84.5% vs. 65.4%; p = 0.002). Orthorexia nervosa in combination with a high level of physical activity was most often seen in men in exercise science studies and less often in women in business studies (45.1% vs. 8.3%; p < 0.000). A high degree of self-reporting of pain and orthorexia nervosa in exercise science students may cause problems in the future, since they are expected to coach others in healthy living. Our findings may be valuable in the development of health-oriented academic programs and within student healthcare services.

  4. 78 FR 6852 - Agency Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity Under OMB Review....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Student Verification of Enrollment, VA Form 22-8979. OMB Control Number: 2900... a student's certification of actual attendance and verification of the student's...

  5. ENFit Enteral Nutrition Connectors.

    PubMed

    Guenter, Peggi; Lyman, Beth

    2016-12-01

    New enteral connectors are now available based on the development of standards using the International Organization of Standardization process to prevent misconnections between systems that should not connect. Enteral devices with the new patient access connectors, called ENFit, are being now introduced for the purpose of improving patient safety. Transitioning to these new connectors poses benefits and challenges for facilities or agencies implementing these new devices. Information from appropriate resources should be sought by clinicians who need to partner with their suppliers and clinical organizations to see how best to meet these challenges.

  6. Groundwater: A Vital Resource. Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carla, Ed.

    Twenty-three activities dealing with various aspects of groundwater are provided in this manual. The activities are arranged under four headings: (1) the water cycle; (2) water distribution in soils (considering such topics as calculating water table depth and purifying water by filtering); (3) water quality (considering such topics as acid rain,…

  7. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  8. Hands-on Activities and Their Influence on Students' Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstermann, Nina; Grube, Dietmar; Bögeholz, Susanne

    2010-11-01

    This study investigates the influence of hands-on activities on students’ interest. We researched whether students with experience in specific hands-on activities show higher interest in these activities than students without experience. Furthermore, the relationship between the quality of the hands-on experience and interest in the respective activity was examined. In total, 28 typical hands-on activities of biology education were considered. The activities were divided into the categories experimentation, dissection, work with microscopes, and classification. A total of 141 students from the 11th grade completed questionnaires on interest in the hands-on activities, their experience with each activity, and the quality of the respective experience. Students’ interest in experimenting, working with microscopes, dissecting and classifying tends to benefit from performing hands-on activities. However, findings indicated that the performance of various hands-on activities can influence students’ interest differently. For seven hands-on activities, we identified a positive effect of hands-on experience on interest, while in one case, practical work appeared to have influenced students’ interest negatively. However, for most hands-on activities, no effect of experience on interest was found. The quality of hands-on experiences showed positive correlations with interest in the respective hands-on activities. Therefore, this paper argues in favour of designing biology lessons that allow for experiences with hands-on activities that also interest students. Our findings underline the necessity of investigating the effects of various hands-on activities in a differentiated manner.

  9. Learning and Teaching: Where Does Einstein's Concept of Learning about "Service of Our Fellow Man" Enter into Our Discussions about Student Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manthey, George

    2005-01-01

    The author of this paper discusses the significance of Albert Einstein's concept of learning about "service of our fellow man" into the discussions about student achievement. Albert Einstein wrote in 1954 of what he considered an evil of modern life--that the "individual feels more than ever dependent on society, but it is not felt in the positive…

  10. The analysis and reconciliation of students' rebuttals in argumentation activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Ren; Hung, Jeng-Fung

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the guidance provided by science teachers to resolve conflicts during socioscientific issue-based argumentation activities. A graphical representation (GR) was developed as a tool to code and analyze the dialogue interaction process. Through the GR and qualitative analysis, we identified three types of dialogue reconciling strategies. The first one consists of teacher management, in which the teacher temporarily maintains the right to speak when students get mired in an emotional rebuttal situation. The second strategy involves the use of qualifiers to identify the strengths and weaknesses of an opposing argument. The third strategy consists of providing students with guidance to keep both parties (i.e. the students taking, respectively, the affirmative and negative positions) on the same discussion topic and can be used to assist teachers with forming broad questions that prompt students to conduct deeper discussions. These reconciling strategies were beneficial in that they helped students to argue in a more reflective way.

  11. Multimedia Activities for Students: A Teachers' and Librarians' Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorrow, Barbara Head

    This book is a collection of multimedia ideas and activities for use in classrooms and libraries. Each activity is intended to be adaptable and for use in many subject areas and for a wide range of age groups. The book emphasizes the creative learning of the student, programs, and available resources. Six chapters are as follows: (1)…

  12. Physical Activity, Sports Participation, and Suicidal Behavior among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David R.; Blanton, Curtis J.

    2002-01-01

    Used data from the 1995 National College Health Risk Behavior Survey to evaluate the relationship between physical activity, sports participation, and suicide among college students. Overall, selected physical activity patterns were associated in a non-systematic manner with decreased or increased odds of suicidal behavior among male and female…

  13. Drinking Water Activities for Students, Teachers, and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide provides teachers with materials, information, and classroom activities to enhance any drinking water curriculum. Students can use the activity sheets to further lessons and stimulate thought. Parents can use the guide to develop science projects that will provoke thought, encourage research, and provide a scientific approach to…

  14. Factors Shaping Students' Opportunities to Engage in Argumentative Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayalon, Michal; Even, Ruhama

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how students' opportunities to engage in argumentative activity are shaped by the teacher, the class, and the mathematical topic. It compares the argumentative activity between two classes taught by the same teacher using the same textbook and across two beginning algebra topics--investigating algebraic expressions and…

  15. Correlates of School-Day Physical Activity in Preschool Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Leah E.; Wadsworth, Danielle D.; Peoples, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship among sex, body mass index, motor skill competence (MSC), perceived physical competence (PPC), and school-day physical activity in preschool students (N = 34). Physical activity was assessed by steps accumulated during the school day, while MSC and PPC were assessed with the Test of Gross Motor Development--2nd…

  16. The Draws and Drawbacks of College Students' Active Procrastination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, Lauren C.

    2016-01-01

    When students procrastinate, they divert time from academics toward other activities, returning to academics at a later time. Active procrastination is a departure from the form of procrastination defined by scholars as passive (i.e., avoidant, maladaptive) in nature. Hensley selected the methodology (phenomenology) in order to undertake an…

  17. Protect Minnesota's Agricultural Land: Components and Activities for Elementary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noy, Laura

    An endeavor to alert elementary teachers and students to the need to protect and conserve one of Minnesota's basic resources, soil, these supplementary instructional activities are designed for easy integration into science, social studies, language arts, mathematics, and art subject and skill areas. Each activity includes a brief description of…

  18. Breaking the Ice: Career Development Activities for Accounting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Bob G.; Wilburn, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes two co-curricular career development activities, mock interviews and speed networking that we provide for accounting majors at our university. The driving force behind both activities was to increase comfort levels for students when interacting with professionals and to enhance their job interview and networking skills.…

  19. Improving Students' Attitudes to Chance with Games and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbet, Steven; Williams, Anne

    2009-01-01

    A study was undertaken to implement a series of chance games and activities in a Year 7 classroom, and investigate the students' knowledge about probability concepts, as well as their attitudes to chance. Initially, the project involved selecting a set of appropriate learning activities to develop key probability concepts which are integral to the…

  20. Physical Activity & Sport for the Secondary School Student. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Neil J., Ed.

    This collection of papers offers a comprehensive text about contemporary physical activities and sports forms. It provides students with an overview of the various physical activities, skill technique required, safety, scoring, rules and etiquette, strategies, equipment, and related terminology. The 26 papers are: (1) "Physical Fitness"…

  1. Peer Listening in the Middle School: Training Activities for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazouri, Sandra Peyser; Smith, Miriam Frey

    This workbook presents activities for training middle school student peer listeners. The first of the workbook's 10 chapters contains an introduction to peer listening. Activities include a pretest on a series of true-false statements called the "Peer Listening Inventory," defining the meaning of the words that describe the qualities of a peer…

  2. Educational outcomes necessary to enter pharmacy residency training.

    PubMed

    Hester, Elizabeth Kelly; McBane, Sarah E; Bottorff, Michael B; Carnes, Tristan A; Dell, Kamila; Gonyeau, Michael J; Greco, Angelo J; McConnell, Karen J; Skaar, Debra J; Splinter, Michele Y; Trujillo, Toby C

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) that formal postgraduate residency training, or equivalent experience, is required to enter direct patient care practice. Therefore, it is important to align professional degree educational outcomes with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to enter residency training. This position statement addresses the outcomes necessary in the professional degree program curriculum to ensure the ability of pharmacy graduates to transition effectively into postgraduate year one residency training. Five key outcome areas are identified: communication, direct patient care, professionalism, research, and practice management. The position statement examines how performance in each of the five outcome areas should be addressed by professional degree programs. The ACCP believes that for the student to achieve the clinical proficiency necessary to enter residency training, the professional degree program should emphasize, assess, and provide adequate opportunities for students to practice: communication with patients, caregivers, and members of the health care team in direct patient care environments; provision of direct patient care in a wide variety of practice settings, especially those involving patient-centered, team-based care; professionalism under the supervision and guidance of faculty and preceptors who model and teach the traits of a health care professional; application of principles of research that engender an appreciation for the role of research and scholarship in one's professional development; and application of practice management, including documentation of direct patient care activities that affect drug-related outcomes.

  3. Expansion of student activities in Africa: from south to north

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherif, Rim; Ben Salem, Amine; Gueddana, Amor; Zghal, Mourad; Naidoo, Darryl; Forbes, Andrew; Heidt, Alexander M.; Rohwer, Erich G.

    2014-07-01

    Optics and photonics research in Africa has gradually grown in the past ten years with a very active optical community involved in state-of-the-art research. Despite relatively low resources, optics research in the continent is competitive with many international benchmarks and has had a significant impact within the African continent. In the past five years, a group of dynamic students have developed the student chapter network from Tunisia to South Africa. The first student chapters of the optical society of America (OSA) and the international society for optics and photonics (SPIE) were established in South Africa (in the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and in the University of Stellenbosch), followed by a chapter in Tunisia (Engineering school of communications of Tunis, Sup'Com). In this paper, we will present the major activities of the student chapters of Tunisia and South Africa, and how they are promoting optics and photonics in Africa.

  4. Enteric Redmouth Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yersinia ruckeri, the causative agent of Enteric Redmouth Disease (ERM), is a disease of salmonid fish species that is endemic in areas of the world where salmonids are intensively cultured. The disease causes a chronic to acute hemorrhagic septicemia which can lead to high rates of mortality partic...

  5. Enteric bacteria mandibular osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Scolozzi, Paolo; Lombardi, Tommaso; Edney, Timothy; Jaques, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    Osteomyelitis of the mandible is a relatively rare inflammatory disease that usually stems from the odontogenic polymicrobial flora of the oral cavity. We are reporting 2 unusual cases of mandibular osteomyelitis resulting from enteric bacteria infection. In one patient, abundant clinical evidence suggested a diagnosis of a chronic factitious disease, whereas in the second patient no obvious etiology was found.

  6. Fibre and enteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D B

    1989-01-01

    The recent launch of a number of fibre enriched polymeric diet in the United States and Europe has stimulated considerable interest in the topic of fibre and enteral nutrition, and several commercial concerns appear to be under considerable pressures from their consumers to produce similar products. As a means of identifying areas of potential application of fibre to enteral nutrition some of the recent knowledge gained about the physical properties of dietary fibre and the processes involved in the intestinal assimilation of fibre has been reviewed. Two areas of interest are identifiable. The first relates to the bulking properties of fibre and the application of this to the regulation of bowel function in enterally fed patients. It is clear from the clinical studies that have been reviewed that there remains a paucity of controlled data, and a great deal more research is needed before widespread use of fibre supplemented diets can be supported. Perhaps of greater interest academically is the potentially beneficial effects that appear to be exerted by the VFA's, liberated as a consequence of colonic bacterial fermentation of fibre, on morphology and function of ileal and colonic mucosa. Although there are a number of potential applications of fibre supplemented enteral diets in this area, more research is required before any firm recommendations can be made about recommending their use. The one exception concerns patients with the nutritionally inadequate short bowel syndrome. There does seem to be sufficient experimental evidence to suggest that clinical studies should be commenced using a pectin supplemented predigested 'elemental' diet in these patients. Overall therefore, one is forced to conclude that the increasing interest and use of fibre supplemented enteral diets is being driven more by market than scientific forces. Nevertheless, the promotion of these diets has already provided a powerful stimulus to the scientific community, and it remains entirely

  7. GeoMapApp Learning Activities: A Virtual Lab Environment for Student-Centred Engagement with Geoscience Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, S.; Goodwillie, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    As STEM learning requirements enter the mainstream, there is benefit to providing the tools necessary for students to engage with research-quality geoscience data in a cutting-edge, easy-to-use map-based interface. Funded with an NSF GeoEd award, GeoMapApp Learning Activities ( http://serc.carleton.edu/geomapapp/collection.html ) are being created to help in that endeavour. GeoMapApp Learning Activities offer step-by-step instructions within a guided inquiry approach that enables students to dictate the pace of learning. Based upon GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), a free, easy-to-use map-based data exploration and visualisation tool, each activity furnishes the educator with an efficient package of downloadable documents. This includes step-by-step student instructions and answer sheet; an educator's annotated worksheet containing teaching tips, additional content and suggestions for further work; and, quizzes for use before and after the activity to assess learning. Examples of activities so far created involve calculation and analysis of the rate of seafloor spreading; compilation of present-day evidence for huge ancient landslides on the seafloor around the Hawaiian islands; a study of radiometrically-dated volcanic rocks to help understand the concept of hotspots; and, the optimisation of contours as a means to aid visualisation of 3-D data sets on a computer screen. The activities are designed for students at the introductory undergraduate, community college and high school levels, and present a virtual lab-like environment to expose students to content and concepts typically found in those educational settings. The activities can be used in the classroom or out of class, and their guided nature means that the requirement for teacher intervention is reduced thus allowing students to spend more time analysing and understanding geoscience data, content and concepts. Each activity is freely available through the SERC-Carleton web site.

  8. The Rcs phosphorelay system is specific to enteric pathogens/commensals and activates ydeI, a gene important for persistent Salmonella infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kimberly D; Detweiler, Corrella S

    2006-11-01

    Bacteria utilize phosphorelay systems to respond to environmental or intracellular stimuli. Salmonella enterica encodes a four-step phosphorelay system that involves two sensor kinase proteins, RcsC and RcsD, and a response regulator, RcsB. The physiological stimulus for Rcs phosphorelay activation is unknown; however, Rcs-regulated genes can be induced in vitro by osmotic shock, low temperature and antimicrobial peptide exposure. In this report we investigate the role of the Rcs pathway using phylogenetic analysis and experimental techniques. Phylogenetic analysis determined that full-length RcsC- and RcsD-like proteins are generally restricted to Enterobacteriaceae species that have an enteric pathogenic or commensal relationship with the host. Experimental data show that RcsD and RcsB, in addition to RcsC, are important for systemic infection in mice and polymyxin B resistance in vitro. To identify Rcs-regulated genes that confer these phenotypes, we took advantage of our observation that RcsA, a transcription factor and binding partner of RcsB, is not required for polymyxin B resistance or survival in mice. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium oligonucleotide microarrays were used to identify 18 loci that are activated by RcsC, RcsD and RcsB but not RcsA. Five of the 18 loci encode genes that contribute to polymyxin B resistance. One of these genes, ydeI, was shown by quantitative real-time PCR to be regulated by the Rcs pathway independently of RcsA. Additionally, the stationary-phase sigma factor, RpoS (sigmaS), regulates ydeI transcription. In vivo infections show that ydeI mutants are out-competed by wild type 10- to 100-fold after oral inoculation, but are only modestly attenuated after intraperitoneal inoculation. These data indicate that ydeI is an Rcs-activated gene that plays an important role in persistent infection of mice, possibly by increasing bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

  9. Understanding and Facilitating Student Bloggers: Towards a Blogging Activity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derntl, Michael

    Since instructors have started recognizing the potential of Web 2.0 integration in web-based courses, blogs have been used to provide students with means of virtual communication, contribution, collaboration and community building. In this paper we aim to take another step forward by presenting and analyzing the integration of student blogs in an undergraduate computer science course on software architecture and web technologies: we implemented an LMS extension that acted as a course blog portal by collecting and displaying feeds of externally hosted blogs and logging usage data. Data analysis reveals that students who perform better academically also tend to participate more actively in the course blogosphere. Subsequently, we propose a blogging activity model, which aims to reveal and explain relationships between blogging activity variables—including peer visits, commenting and posting—to achieve a better understanding of lively blog communities in courses.

  10. Enteral nutrition by tube.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P J; Hand, M S; Frederick, G S

    1990-01-01

    When oral intake is unsatisfactory or contraindicated, maintenance of nutrition by tube feeding is an alternative to the parenteral route. A large volume of research data supports the decision to use the enteral route whenever possible. Entry of food into the alimentary tract is a stimulus to structural and functional maintenance of that tract. Enteral nutrition can be given via indwelling nasoesophageal, pharyngostomy, esophagostomy, percutaneous or surgical gastrostomy, or enterostomy tube. Use of an appropriate catheter, familiarity with the technique used, and careful patient selection and monitoring are important factors in successful tube feeding. Blenderized pet food diets should be fed whenever possible; commercially available liquid diets provide an alternative when tube caliber or patient factors preclude the use of blenderized foods.

  11. How Active Are Your Students? Increasing Physical Activity in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Marybell; Brandt, Janet

    2010-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that youth engage in at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day, most of which should be either moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity. Half of this amount (30 minutes) should be achieved during the school day. NASPE provides guidance in the form of a…

  12. Basic Business and Economics: Varied Activities Encourage Active Student Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Robert Lee, Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a variety of activities for the basic business classroom, such as having guest speakers, question-and-answer sessions, simulations, role playing, debates, small group work, field trips, games, and individualized instruction. Includes a report of business teachers' knowledge of and attitudes toward these activities. (MF)

  13. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-06-10

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes--although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms.

  14. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L.; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K.; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes—although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms. PMID:24821756

  15. Perceived barriers to physical activity in university students.

    PubMed

    Arzu, Daskapan; Tuzun, Emine Handan; Eker, Levent

    2006-01-01

    Many studies which were published in other countries identified certain benefits and barriers to physical activity among young people. But there is no data about the subject pertaining to Turkish adolescents. This study tries to rectify this with a study of Turkish university students. Undergraduate university students (n = 303) were recruited to the study. Current exercise habits and perceived barriers to physical activity were assessed in the sample. Using a Likert Type scale, participants responded an instrument with 12 items representing barriers to physical activity. Mean scores were computed. External barriers were more important than internal barriers. "Lack of time due to busy lesson schedule", "My parents give academic success priority over exercise. "and "lack of time due to responsibilities related to the family and social environment "were most cited items for physical activity barriers. There is a need for future research, which will be carried out with larger sample groups to develop national standardized instrument. It will be helpful for accurately identify perceived barriers and then recommend changes to enhance physical activity among young people. Key PointsThe purpose of this study was to analyze perceived barriers to physical activity in the university students.The results showed that not having enough time was the most important barrier for not participating in physical activity among our samples.This study with relatively small sample must be considered as pilot study for related studies in the future.

  16. Factors Related to Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines in Active College Students: A Social Cognitive Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farren, G. L.; Zhang, T.; Martin, S. B.; Thomas, K. T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relations of sex, exercise self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and social support with meeting physical activity guidelines (PAGs). Participants: Three hundred ninety-six college students participated in this study in the summer 2013. Methods: Students completed online questionnaires that assessed physical activity…

  17. Moving (Literally) to Engage Students: Putting the (Physically) Active in Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strean, William B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores a variety of practices and classroom activities that engage the whole student. Grounded in a somatic perspective (from "soma" meaning the body in its wholeness--the integration of thinking, feeling, and acting), the discussion shows how students can be brought fully into learning through movement, music, and…

  18. MLS student active learning within a "cloud" technology program.

    PubMed

    Tille, Patricia M; Hall, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In November 2009, the MLS program in a large public university serving a geographically large, sparsely populated state instituted an initiative for the integration of technology enhanced teaching and learning within the curriculum. This paper is intended to provide an introduction to the system requirements and sample instructional exercises used to create an active learning technology-based classroom. Discussion includes the following: 1.) define active learning and the essential components, 2.) summarize teaching methods, technology and exercises utilized within a "cloud" technology program, 3.) describe a "cloud" enhanced classroom and programming 4.) identify active learning tools and exercises that can be implemented into laboratory science programs, and 5.) describe the evaluation and assessment of curriculum changes and student outcomes. The integration of technology in the MLS program is a continual process and is intended to provide student-driven active learning experiences.

  19. Boundary Breakers: A Team Building Guide for Student Activity Advisers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, John

    Boundary breakers, the modern term for "icebreakers," tear down barriers that sometimes form within student groups and organizations, and offer a low-risk way for group members to become better acquainted. This document is a "hands on" booklet that covers such boundary-breaking activities as "Send a Letter,""The Lap Game,""One-Minute Interview,"…

  20. Student Activity Guide for "Business in an Information Economy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, David; And Others

    The 20 chapters of this student activity guide provide study guides (key terms and concepts reviews), projects, cases for analyses, and self-assessment exercises for business and career education classes. Topics covered include the following: business winners (entrepreneurship); growth of the U.S. economy, the basics of economics, comparing…

  1. Another Way to Develop Chinese Students' Creativity: Extracurricular Innovation Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao-jiang, Zhao; Xue-ting, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    In China, improving students' creativity is becoming an important goal of modern colleges and universities, especially in the domain of science and technology. The efforts made for this goal can be observed not only in classroom, but also in activities and competitions which were held out-of-school. This paper will firstly give a brief description…

  2. Moodog: Tracking Student Activity in Online Course Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hangjin; Almeroth, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Many universities are currently using Course Management Systems (CMSes) to conduct online learning, for example, by distributing course materials or submitting homework assignments. However, most CMSes do not include comprehensive activity tracking and analysis capabilities. This paper describes a method to track students' online learning…

  3. Revealing Student Blogging Activities Using RSS Feeds and LMS Logs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derntl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Blogs are an easy-to-use, free alternative to classic means of computer-mediated communication. Moreover, they are authentically aligned with web activity patterns of today's students. The body of studies on integrating and implementing blogs in various educational settings has grown rapidly recently; however, it is often difficult to distill…

  4. Setting the Stage for Physical Activity for Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciccomascolo, Lori; Riebe, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Despite the positive long-term physiological and psychological effects of exercise, many young adults between the ages of 12 and 21 years do not participate in regular physical activity. With the time constraints and other challenges in teaching and assessing students, physical educators need realistic strategies that will help in their efforts to…

  5. Mid-USA, Making Informed Decisions: Using Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scovel, Donald A.; Nelson, Phillip J.

    This document presents a series of learning activities focusing on the role of state government in American society. It is intended for senior or junior high school students. Six objectives are: to identify information sources about state government; to increase knowledge about its organization, processes, services, and costs; to compare these…

  6. Office Reprographics. Instructor's Guide. Student Activity Packet. Office Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Diane E.

    This training package, one in a series of instructional modules consisting of an instructor's guide and a student activity packet, deals with office reprographics. Included in the instructor's guide are general directions for implementing the presentation; a detailed guide for teaching the lesson that includes performance objectives, suggestions…

  7. Behavioral Activation for Moderately Depressed University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawrysiak, Michael; Nicholas, Christopher; Hopko, Derek R.

    2009-01-01

    Although depression is prevalent among university students, limited and dated research has examined the efficacy of behavioral interventions in treating this population (C. Lee, 2005). On the basis of a modified version of the Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD; D. R. Hopko & C. W. Lejuez, 2007; C. W. Lejuez, D. R. Hopko, & S. D.…

  8. Satisfaction from Academic Activities among Medical Students in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of data about the levels of satisfaction among medical students in regards to their academic activities in Malaysia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to fill the gap in the existing knowledge. A cross sectional study was carried out at the International medical school, the Management and Science University of Malaysia,…

  9. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    In this teaching manual several activities are presented to introduce students to information on solar energy through classroom instruction. Wind power is also included. Instructions for constructing demonstration models for passive solar systems, photovoltaic cells, solar collectors and water heaters, and a bicycle wheel wind turbine are provided. (BCS)

  10. Shaping Student Activists: Discursive Sensemaking of Activism and Participation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taha, Diane E.; Hastings, Sally O.; Minei, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    As social media becomes a more potent force in society, particularly for younger generations, the role in activism has been contested. This qualitative study examines 35 interviews with students regarding their perceptions of the use of social media in social change, their perceptions of activists, and their level of self-identification as an…

  11. Active Geography: Engaging Students in Learning about Our World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkman, Patience; Eastman, Gloria; Merlau, Donna; Meisler, Susan; Miller, Barbara; Schukar, Ron; Singleton, Laurel R.; Thompson, Sara

    This set of lessons uses the six essential standards of "Geography for Life" as a basis. At least one lesson is provided for each standard and linked to one or more of the five fundamental themes of geography. At the end of each section is also a special active teaching feature to help students further focus on the concepts presented. The lessons…

  12. California DREAMers: Activism, Identity, and Empowerment among Undocumented College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAngelo, Linda; Schuster, Maximilian T.; Stebleton, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    There is a large gap in college access and success for undocumented students. This emergent population remains uniquely and precariously situated within campus environments, despite the passage of Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Acts in some states. These inequities have sparked activism for DREAMers associated with the…

  13. Freedom's Web: Student Activism in an Age of Cultural Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    This book examines student activism in the 1990s and finds its sources in the struggle over multiculturalism and issues of social justice and equality. It is argued that identity politics is a reaction to the cultural hegemony reinforced through longstanding monocultural norms of the academy. A case study methodology used such data as formal and…

  14. Holistic Instructional Activities for Students with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Giovanna; Milligan, Jerry L.

    1995-01-01

    Fourteen holistic, meaning-based reading and writing activities appropriate for students with learning disabilities are described, along with the theoretical background of the paradigm. As children experiment, approximate, and discover language naturally and socially, their immersion in authentic spoken and written language facilitates learning to…

  15. Educating Pharmacy Students about Nutrition and Physical Activity Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotecki, Jerome E.; Clayton, Bruce D.

    2003-01-01

    The current study provides measures of association between self-reported beliefs of currently practicing pharmacists and pharmacy students' beliefs about, willingness to provide, and preparedness to provide counseling on nutrition and physical activity following completion of a health education unit. A 3-week health education unit focusing on the…

  16. Environmental Pollution, Student's Book (Experiences/Experiments/Activities).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Elbert C.

    Described in this student's manual are numerous experiments to acquaint the learner with community environmental problems. Experiments are relatively simple and useful in the junior high school grades. Activities are provided which emphasize some of the materials involved in pollution problems, such as carbon dioxide, sulfur compounds, and others,…

  17. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    A view of solar energy from the standpoint of home economics is taken in this book of activities. Students are provided information on solar energy resources while performing these classroom activities. Instructions for the construction of a solar food dryer and a solar cooker are provided. Topics for study include window treatments, clothing, the history of solar energy, vitamins from the sun, and how to choose the correct solar home. (BCS)

  18. Contemporary Student Activism Context as a Vehicle for Leader Identity Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivester, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary college student activism efforts are growing. Little research has been conducted on student activism and leadership development. As student affairs educators consider leadership an important part of an undergraduate education it is important to consider how the context of activism actually influences student leader identity…

  19. Effectiveness of School-Initiated Physical Activity Program on Secondary School Students' Physical Activity Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gråstén, Arto; Yli-Piipari, Sami; Watt, Anthony; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The promotion of physical activity and health has become a universal challenge. The Sotkamo Physical Activity as Civil Skill Program was implemented to increase students' physical activity by promoting supportive psychological and physical school environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the…

  20. Pedagogical Distance: Explaining Misalignment in Student-Driven Online Learning Activities Using Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberry, Nicola; Franken, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an Activity Theory analysis of two online student-driven interactive learning activities to interrogate assumptions that such groups can effectively learn in the absence of the teacher. Such an analysis conceptualises learning tasks as constructed objects that drive pedagogical activity. The analysis shows a disconnect between…

  1. Effect of Learning Activity on Students' Motivation, Physical Activity Levels and Effort/Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Lee, Amelia M.; Xiang, Ping; Kosma, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The type of learning activity offered in physical education may influence students' motivational beliefs, physical activity participation and effort/persistence in class. However, most empirical studies have focused on the individual level rather than on the learner-content interactions. Accordingly, the potential effects of learning activities on…

  2. Protection by enteral glutamine is mediated by intestinal epithelial cell peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma during intestinal ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhanglong; Ban, Kechen; Wawrose, Richard A; Gover, Adam G; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that enteral glutamine provides protection to the post ischemic gut and that PPARγ plays a role in this protection. Using Cre/lox technology to generate an intestinal-epithelial cell (IEC) specific PPARγ null mouse model, we now investigated the contribution of IEC PPARγ to glutamine’s local and distant organ protective effects. These mice exhibited absence of expression of PPARγ in the intestine but normal PPARγ expression in other tissues. Following one hour of intestinal ischemia under isoflurane anesthesia, wild type and null mice received enteral glutamine (60 mM) or vehicle followed by 6 hours of reperfusion or 7 days in survival experiments and compared to shams. Small intestine. liver, and lungs were analyzed for injury and inflammatory parameters. Glutamine provided significant protection against gut injury and inflammation with similar protection in the lung and liver. Changes in systemic TNFα reflected those seen in the injured organs. Importantly, mice lacking IEC PPARγ had worsened injury and inflammation and glutamine lost its protective effects in the gut and lung. The survival benefit found in glutamine treated wild type mice was not observed in null mice. Using an IEC-targeted loss-of-function approach, these studies provide the first in vivo confirmation in native small intestine and lung that PPARγ is responsible for the protective effects of enteral glutamine in reducing intestinal and lung injury and inflammation and improving survival. These data suggest that early enteral glutamine may be a potential therapeutic modality to reduce shock-induced gut dysfunction and subsequent distant organ injury. PMID:25394240

  3. An Inquiry "Warm-Up" Activity: Preparing Students for an Active Classroom Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seagroves, S.

    2010-12-01

    An active learning community that engages in inquiry activities will employ strategies and structures that students from traditional classrooms may find unfamiliar or uncomfortable. These include group work, voicing questions, shifting from one part of an activity to another (and sometimes shifting groups at the same time), presenting informally to the group, and many others. In addition, the role of the instructor as facilitator rather than teacher may not be familiar to students. As inquiry activities become incorporated into the regular classroom curriculum at Maui Community College (through collaboration with the Professional Development Program as part of the Akamai Workforce Initiative), a need emerged to give students a "warm-up" early in the semester to help them practice these participation structures. This activity was designed to be used on the very first day of class, to be easy and accessible to students, and to give them practice with these features of inquiry activities that they would see again throughout the semester. In addition, the activity introduces the engineering technology concepts of requirements, trade-offs, and limitations. It is important to note that this activity is not in and of itself an inquiry activity; in fact the content and processes featured in the activity are not particularly challenging nor are they the main focus. Instead, this is a "warm-up" for inquiry, so that students gain some comfort with the unconventional features of inquiry activities. The particular activity presented is for 20-30 students in a ˜90 minute lab period, and highlights different imaging technologies of cameras; however, it is easily adaptable to other requirements, to different technology, or other needs.

  4. Effects of curricular activity on students' situational motivation and physical activity levels.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zan; Hannon, James C; Newton, Maria; Huang, Chaoqun

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine (a) the effects of three curricular activities on students'situational motivation (intrinsic motivation [IM], identified regulation [IR], external regulation, and amotivation [AM]) and physical activity (PA) levels, and (b) the predictive strength of situational motivation to PA levels. Four hundred twelve students in grades 7-9 participated in three activities (cardiovascular fitness, ultimate football, and Dance Dance Revolution [DDR]) in physical education. ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers were used to measure students' PA levels for three classes for each activity. Students also completed a Situational Motivation Scale (Guay, Vallerand, & Blanchard, 2000) at the end of each class. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that students spent significantly higher percentages of time in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) in fitness and football classes than they did in DDR class. Students reported higher lM and IR toward fitness than DDR They also scored higher in IR toward fitness than football. In contrast, students displayed significantly lower AM toward fitness than football and DDR Hierarchical Linear Modeling revealed that IM was the only positive predictor for time in MVPA (p = .02), whereas AM was the negative predictor (p < .01). The findings are discussed in regard to the implications for educational practice.

  5. [Enteral tube feeding].

    PubMed

    Haller, Alois

    2014-03-01

    Tube feeding is an integral part of medical therapies, and can be easily managed also in the outpatient setting. Tube feeding by the stomach or small intestine with nasogastral or nasojejunal tubes is common in clinical practice. Long-term nutrition is usually provided through a permanent tube, i. e. a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Modern portable nutrition pumps are used to cover the patient's nutritional needs. Enteral nutrition is always indicated if patients can not or should not eat or if nutritional requirements cannot be covered within 3 days after an intervention, e. g. after abdominal surgery. Industrially produced tube feedings with defined substrate concentrations are being used; different compositions of nutrients, such as glutamine fish oil etc., are used dependent on the the condition of the patient. Enteral nutrition may be associated with complications of the tube, e. g. dislocation, malposition or obstruction, as well as the feeding itself, e. g.hyperglycaemia, electrolyte disturbances, refeeding syndrome diarrhea or aspiration). However, the benefit of tube feeding usually exceeds the potential harm substantially.

  6. John Glenn Entering Friendship 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Overall view of astronaut John Glenn, Jr., as he enters into the spacecraft Friendship 7 prior to MA-6 launch operations at Launch Complex 14. Astronaut Glenn is entering his spacecraft to begin the first American manned Earth orbital mission.

  7. Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000164.htm Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems To use the sharing features ... trouble breathing, call 911. References Mcclave SA. Enteral nutrition. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  8. Challenging Science and Literacy Activities for K-9 Students - The Cricket Chronicles: Student Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    2006-01-01

    This is an extensive integrated unit of study focused on that common and familiar insect-the cricket. In this edition, students are provided with more than 30 activities on crickets, which will help them learn science content and skills including: (1) Taxonomy; (2) Anatomy; (3) Ecology; (4) Mark and recapture techniques for estimating population…

  9. Assisting in Radiology/Imaging. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, and Student Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is designed for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This…

  10. Assisting in the Medical Laboratory. Instructor's Guide, Students' Manual, and Student Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a hospital, clinic, or physician's office. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. The course is intended for individualized study and is…

  11. Understanding, Evaluating and Assessing What Students Learn from Leadership Activities: Student Research in Woodlea Primary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Student involvement in leadership activities is now common in English schools. It is generally assumed to have beneficial learning outcomes and there is some research which suggests that this is the case. However, there is still work to do to detail these learning outcomes--and to assess them. I present one case in which primary school students…

  12. 78 FR 54457 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of Education (ED). ACTION... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Student Assistance...

  13. 77 FR 70995 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Financial Assistance for Students With Intellectual Disabilities AGENCY: Department of Education (ED... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Student Assistance General...

  14. 78 FR 6081 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of Education (ED). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: National Student Loan Data System...

  15. 78 FR 54459 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart E--Verification Student Aid Application Information AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of... in ] response to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection:...

  16. 78 FR 48660 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of Education (ED). ACTION: Notice... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Student Assistance General...

  17. 78 FR 45517 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of Education (ED). ACTION: Notice... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Student Assistance...

  18. 78 FR 63972 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions AGENCY... considered public records. Title of Collection: Student Assistance General Provisions. OMB Control Number... is expiring. Sections of the regulations in 34 CFR part 668 Student Assistance General...

  19. Astronomical Activities for students-Motivating students interest in Physical Science through Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaiou, Alexis

    2010-05-01

    Astronomical Activities for students Motivating students interest in Physical Science through Astronomy Alexis Matthaiou Philekpaideftiki Etaireia, Arsakeio Lyceum Patron, Patras, Greece,(alexiosmat@yahoo.gr) School education aims not only to providing the necessary knowledge to the students but also to inspire and motivate them to realize their special abilities and inclinations and use their potential for making a joyful future for their lives. In this direction we present some activities held in the Arsakeio School of Patras during the years 2005-2008 in the field of Astronomy and Astrophysics, in order to share our experience with the teachers' community. Students from all grades of primary and secondary education participated with enthusiasm. In particular, they observed the Partial Solar Eclipse of October 3rd, 2005,and the Total Solar Eclipse of March 29th, 2006. They took part in observing and registering Solar Spots, using Astronomical equipments like different types of telescopes with filters and solar scopes. Students studied further the nature of Solar Phenomena and their effects on life, participating in the Environmental Program "Sun and Life"(2006-2007). Moreover, students took part in the International Program for measuring the Light Pollution "Globe at Night" (2006-2007) with observing and registering the luminosity of the Orion constellation in the night sky above their residence. Finally, the students participated in the European program "Hands on Universe" (HOU) (2005-2008) working on a project, which was the Greek contribution to HOU, developed from "Philekpaideftiki Etaireia". In particular, they studied the stars' spectrum and acquired information about the stars' life and age of stellar systems, using interactive multimedia technology.

  20. An investigation of the impact of selected prereading activities on student content learning through laboratory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, Jesse (Shaya)

    This study investigated whether two prereading activities impacted student learning from hands-on science activities. The study was based on constructivist learning theory. Based on the work of Piaget, it was hypothesized that students who activated prior knowledge would learn more from the activities. Based on the work of Vygotsky it was hypothesized that students who talk more and write more would learn more from the activity. The K-W-L chart and anticipation guide strategies were used with eighth grade students at Graves Middle School in Whittier, California before learning about levers and convection currents. D. M. Ogle (1986) created the three-column K-W-L chart to have students activate prior knowledge. In the first column, the students write what they already know about a subject, in the second column, the students write what they want to know about the subject, and the students complete the third column after learning about a subject by writing answers to the questions that they asked in the second column. Duffelmeyer (1994) created the anticipation guide based on Herber's (1978) reasoning guide. In the anticipation guide, the teacher creates three or four sentences that convey the major ideas of the topic and the students either agree or disagree with the statements. After learning about the topic, students revisit their answers and decide if they were correct or incorrect and they must defend their choices. This research used the Solomon (1947) four-square design and compared both the experimental groups to a control group that simply discussed the concepts before completing the activity. The research showed no significant difference between the control group and either of the treatment groups. The reasons for the lack of significant differences are considered. It was hypothesized that since the students were unfamiliar with the prereading activities and did not have much experience with using either writing-to-learn or talking-to-learn strategies, the

  1. [Fiber and enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Gómez Candela, C; de Cos Blanco, A I; Iglesias Rosado, C

    2002-01-01

    Dietary fibre is a mixture of various substances and is essential for maintaining appropriate intestinal functionality and it is currently considered to be a necessary part of a healthy diet. Current recommendations for fibre consumption by adults range from 20 to 35 g/day. Enteral nutrition is an emerging therapeutic variation in both hospital and domestic settings. To a great extent, this development has been made possible thanks to the design of new formulas that adapt better and better to the clinicla conditions or our patients. The type of fibre used in these preparations varies greatly. Some have only one source of fibre while others use differnet combinations. There are currently 32 formulas available on the Spanish market, without counting the modules or specific preparations of individual types of fibre. Despite the enormous advances in the knowledge of the beneficial effects of fibre, the fact of the matter is that enteral nutrition that we routinely prescribe in normal clinical practice does not contain fibre. The are several explanations for this, perhaps the most plausible is that these formulas may lead to problems in their administration and tolerance. It is necessary to choose the correct calibre of catheter and define the best infusion method and timing. Another difficulty may be the gastrointestinal tolerance of the formulas containing fibre. No large-scale problems of intolerance have however been described in healthy volunteers nor in patients with acute or chronic pathologies, although it is of fundamental importance to monitor the rhythm of depositions in all patients with enteral nutrition (EN) and ensure proper intake of liquids, which would also be useful to prevent occlusion of the catheter. The theoretical benefits of EN with fibre with a view to maintaining or improving normal intestinal structure and function are very varied. Nonetheless, it has noit yet been possible to prove many of these effects in controlled clinical trials. At the

  2. A Standards-Based Meteorological Activities for All Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Barry; Harding, Ian

    2000-11-01

    Canarsie High School is a typical urban high school in Brooklyn, New York. We have been involved in a District Initiative in collaboration with the City College of New York (CCNY) to initiate and incorporate relevant technologies into the science content areas and classrooms. Through changes in teaching strategies consistent with science education reform movements for mainstream, gifted and special education students; we have been able to effectively motivate student interest and to enhance and enrich the learning potential of all students. Our lessons involve extensive computer and Internet applications, concentrating our efforts in developing high-ordered reasoning skills to address the required concepts covered in Earth Science and Environmental Science curricula. This is a crucial aspect of applied learning approaches as related science concepts are integrated and clearly demonstrated in our daily lives. Our task was to infuse 'live' weather data into Earth Science and Environmental Science classrooms. Student-centered learning activities, laboratory experiences and long-term investigations were designed, written and included into classroom lessons and laboratory sections. This component is aligned with the New Learning and Performance Standards, and makes use of investigative and inquiry-based studies through technological resources. These were accomplished through data readings taken from our school weather station and various World Wide Web sites. Weather data from area "cluster" schools were also used to compare micro-climates within our local region. This fostered peer communication skills among students and staff throughout the Brooklyn High School District.

  3. Extracurricular Activities and Their Effect on the Student's Grade Point Average: Statistical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakoban, R. A.; Aljarallah, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) are part of students' everyday life; they play important roles in students' lives. Few studies have addressed the question of how student engagements to ECA affect student's grade point average (GPA). This research was conducted to know whether the students' grade point average in King Abdulaziz University,…

  4. Entering the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vince, Gaia

    2016-04-01

    There is growing evidence that we are now entering a new geological age defined by human influence on the planet, the Anthropocene. Millions of years from now, a stripe in the accumulated layers of rock on Earth's surface will reveal our human fingerprint just as we can see evidence of dinosaurs in rocks of the Jurassic, or the explosion of life that marks the Cambrian. There is now no part of the planet untouched by human influence. The realisation that we wield such planetary power requires a quite extraordinary shift in perception, fundamentally toppling the scientific, cultural and religious philosophies that define our place in the world. This session explores these issues and examines our new relationship with nature now that we so strongly influence the biosphere. And this session will look at what the impacts of our planetary changes mean for us, and how we might deal with the consequences of the Anthropocene we have created.

  5. Periodic Properties and Inquiry: Student Mental Models Observed during a Periodic Table Puzzle Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Kathleen G.; Long, George R.; Briggs, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The mental models of both novice and advanced chemistry students were observed while the students performed a periodic table activity. The mental model framework seems to be an effective way of analyzing student behavior during learning activities. The analysis suggests that students do not recognize periodic trends through the examination of…

  6. Incorporating Active Learning and Student Inquiry into an Introductory Merchandising Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyun-Hwa; Hines, Jean D.

    2012-01-01

    Many educators believe that student learning is enhanced when they are actively involved in classroom activities that require student inquiry. The purpose of this paper is to report on three student inquiry projects that were incorporated into a merchandising class with the focus on making students responsible for their learning, rather than the…

  7. Connecting with Teachers and Students through K-12 Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Susan; Lindbo, David; Robinson, Clay

    2014-05-01

    The Soil Science Society of America has invested heavily in a significant outreach effort to reach teachers and students in the primary/secondary grades (K-12 grades in US/Canada) to raise awareness of soil as a critical resource. The SSSA K-12 committee has been charged with increasing interest and awareness of soil science as a scientific pursuit and career choice, and providing resources that integrate more information on soil science into biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science areas taught at multiple grade levels. Activities center around five main areas: assessment and standards, learning modules/lesson plans, website development, and books and materials, and partnership activities. Members (professionals and students) of SSSA are involved through committee participation, local events, materials review, and project development.

  8. Effects of Curricular Activity on Students' Situational Motivation and Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Hannon, James C.; Newton, Maria; Huang, Chaoqun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine (a) the effects of three curricular activities on students' situational motivation (intrinsic motivation [IM], identified regulation [IR], external regulation, and amotivation [AM]) and physical activity (PA) levels, and (b) the predictive strength of situational motivation to PA levels. Four hundred twelve…

  9. Assessing Overweight, Obesity, Diet, and Physical Activity in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Terry T.-K.; Harris, Kari Jo; Lee, Rebecca E.; Nazir, Niaman; Born, Wendi; Kaur, Harsohena

    2003-01-01

    The authors surveyed 738 college students aged 18 to 27 years to assess over weight, obesity, dietary habits, and physical activity. They used BMI (body mass index) [greater than or equal to] 25 kg/m[squared] or BMI [greater than or equal to] 85th percentile and BMI [greater than or equal to] 30 kg/m[squared] or BMI [greater than or equal to] 95th…

  10. The Effectiveness of Student Extracurricular Activities in Evaluating Violent Behavior among Students in the Preparatory Year at Hail University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aleid, Alkhamsah Saleh

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of student extracurricular activities in evaluating violent behavior among students in the preparatory year at Hail University. The researcher used the descriptive analytical method, and used two tools for the purpose of the study, the study sample consisted of 104 (violent) female students from the…

  11. The Ideal Science Student: Exploring the Relationship of Students' Perceptions to Their Problem Solving Activity in a Robotics Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Florence; Lin, Xiadong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of middle school students' perceptions of the ideal science student to their problem solving activity and conceptual understanding in the applied science area of robotics. Twenty-six 11 and 12 year-olds (22 boys) attending a summer camp for academically advanced students participated in the…

  12. U.S. College Student Activism during an Era of Neoliberalism: A Qualitative Study of Students Against Sweatshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Rachel Fix

    2009-01-01

    This article sets out to examine the experiences of college student activists involved in Students Against Sweatshops on the Beautiful River University campus. Based on observation and interview fieldwork, the paper explores how students negotiate and understand their activism against the backdrop of neoliberalism. The paper concludes that being a…

  13. Effects of Active Learning Classrooms on Student Learning: A Two-Year Empirical Investigation on Student Perceptions and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Pit Ho Patrio; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies on active learning classrooms (ACLs) have demonstrated their positive influence on student learning. However, most of the research evidence is derived from a few subject-specific courses or limited student enrolment. Empirical studies on this topic involving large student populations are rare. The present work involved a large-scale…

  14. University Student Agency, Representation, and Activism: A Case Study of Students Studying English at Universite Cheikh Anta Diop (Dakar, Senegal)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Casey

    2012-01-01

    This study explores and interrogates dominant representations of African university students by examining how students conceptualize and act upon their own agency. Using a qualitative case-study approach, the author examines how students actively confront the ideological and material conditions presented by schooling. [The dissertation citations…

  15. Effect of carbachol on intestinal mucosal blood flow, activity of Na+-K+-ATPase, expression of aquaporin-1, and intestinal absorption rate during enteral resuscitation of burn shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chengmei; Hu, Sen; Zhou, Guoyong; Tian, Yijun; Wu, Yan; Sheng, Zhiyong

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effect of carbachol (CAR, a cholinergic agent) on intestinal mucosal blood flow (IMBF), activity of Na-K-ATPase, expression of aquaporin (AQP)-1, and intestinal absorption rate during enteral resuscitation of a 35%TBSA scald in rats with a glucose electrolyte solution (GES). One hundred male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham scald (N group); scald without fluid resuscitation (S group); scald resuscitated with enteral GES alone (GES group); scald resuscitated with enteral CAR alone (CAR group); and scald resuscitated with enteral CAR plus GES (GES/CAR group). The rats were inflicted 35%TBSA third degree of scald injury on the back with boiling water (100 degrees C, 15 seconds) in all groups, except the sham scald group. A catheter was inserted into the proximal duodenum (5 cm distal to pylorus) and distal ileum (5 cm proximal to cecum), of each rats through laparotomy, thus a segment of intestine was virtually isolated to form a loop for inlet and outlet of introduced fluid. In N, GES, and GES/CAR groups, fluids were introduced 30 minutes after scald injury. The speed of fluid infusion was 4 ml/kg/1%TBSA for 4 hours. CAR (60 microg/kg) was injected into the intestinal lumen at 30-minute after injury in CAR and GES/CAR groups. At 2 and 4 hours after scald, intestinal absorption rate of water and Na, and IMBF were determined, respectively. Then, animals were killed, and specimens of intestinal tissue were obtained for the determination of the activity of Na-K-ATPase, hematoxylin-eosin coloring, and expression of AQP-1. The intestinal absorption rate was reduced markedly in GES group compared with sham scald group at 2 and 4 hours after scald, and absorption rate of small intestine in GES/CAR was significantly higher than that in GES group (P < .05). It was also found that there was significant decrease in IMBF, activity of Na-K-ATPase, and expression of AQP-1 in scald group compared with the sham group. However, in GES

  16. Active Learning and Student-centered Pedagogy Improve Student Attitudes and Performance in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Maya; Johnson, Erika; Weiss, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an instructional design that focused on bringing multiple forms of active learning and student-centered pedagogies to a one-semester, undergraduate introductory biology course for both majors and nonmajors. Our course redesign consisted of three major elements: 1) reordering the presentation of the course content in an attempt to teach specific content within the context of broad conceptual themes, 2) incorporating active and problem-based learning into every lecture, and 3) adopting strategies to create a more student-centered learning environment. Assessment of our instructional design consisted of a student survey and comparison of final exam performance across 3 years—1 year before our course redesign was implemented (2006) and during two successive years of implementation (2007 and 2008). The course restructuring led to significant improvement of self-reported student engagement and satisfaction and increased academic performance. We discuss the successes and ongoing challenges of our course restructuring and consider issues relevant to institutional change. PMID:19723815

  17. Physical Activity Patterns and Psychological Correlates of Physical Activity among Singaporean Primary, Secondary, and Junior College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, C. K. John; Koh, K. T.; Biddle, Stuart J. H.; Liu, W. C.; Chye, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine physical activity patterns and psychological correlates of physical activity among primary, secondary, and junior college students in Singapore. A sample of 3,333 school students aged 10 to 18 years took part in the study. Results showed that the younger students had significantly higher physical…

  18. Active Learning Promoting Student Teachers' Professional Competences in Finland and Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Hannele; Nevgi, Anne; Aksit, Fisun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates student teachers' active learning experiences in teacher education (TE) in Finnish and Turkish contexts and attempts to determine how active learning methods' impact student teachers' professional competences. Student teachers (N = 728) assessed their active learning experiences and the professional competences they…

  19. Still Bringing the Vietnam War Home: Sources of Contemporary Student Activism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Lauren E.; Stewart, Abigail J.

    1995-01-01

    Examined student activism concerning the Persian Gulf War. Results showed that students' reports of their parents' activities during the Vietnam War were strongly associated with students' activism. Other correlates included attitudes toward war, political consciousness, authoritarianism, and gender-role ideology. Parents' prowar attitudes had no…

  20. Democracy for Students: The Constitution Enters Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Louis

    1976-01-01

    Recent court litigation in the civil rights areas of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, personal appearance, freedom from racial and sexual discrimination, and due process have served notice that the end result of education ("the democratic way of life") must be accomplished by democratic means. (MB)

  1. Chaotic....!! Active and Engaged. Effects of an active learning classroom on student retention and engagement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palsole, S.; Serpa, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    Scientific literacy has been defined as the foremost challenge of this decade (AAAS, 2012). The Geological Society of American in its position statement postis that due to the systemic nature of the discipline of earth science, it is the most effective way to engage students in STEM disciplines. Given that the most common place for exposure to earth sciences is at the freshman level for non majors, we decided to transform a freshman introductory geology course to an active, student centered course, using an inquiry based approach. Our focus was to ensure the students saw the earth sciences as broadly applicative field, and not an esoteric science. To achieve this goal, we developed a series of problems that required the students to apply the concepts acquired through their self guided learning into the different topics of the course. This self guided learning took the form of didactic content uploaded into the learning management system (the various elements used to deliver the content were designed video clips, short text based lectures, short formative assessments, discussion boards and other web based discovery exercises) with the class time devoted to problem solving. A comparison of student performance in the active learning classroom vs. a traditional classroom as measured on a geoscience concept inventory (the questions were chosen by a third party who was not teaching either courses) showed that the the students in the active learning classroom scored 10% higher on the average in comparison to the traditional class. In addition to this heightened performance, the students in the active classroom also showed a higher degree of content retention 8 weeks after the semester had ended. This session will share the design process, some exercises and efficacy data collected.

  2. Relation between waking sport activities, reading, and dream content in sport students and psychology students.

    PubMed

    Schredl, Michael; Erlacher, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    The continuity hypothesis in its general form states that dreams reflect waking life: concerns, thoughts, and experiences (G. W. Domhoff, 1996; M. Schredl, 1999; I. Strauch & B. Meier, 1996). For example, athletes and sport students dream about sports more often than do psychology students, presumably reflecting their engagement in sport activities and sport theory (D. Erlacher & M. Schredl, 2004). In the present study, the authors tested the previously unexamined hypothesis that differences in dream content would directly reflect individuals' differing amounts of waking sport activities. As expected, the amount of time that individuals spent engaged in an activity (sports or reading) was directly related to their percentage of corresponding dreams. Also, individuals reported reading dreams less frequently than they did sport dreams, although reading was more prominent in their waking lives than were sport activities. The findings also indicated that other factors such as emotional involvement and associated worries might be of importance in explaining the relation between waking activities and dream events. Future studies using longitudinal designs would shed more light on this relation and would help derive a more precise formulation of the continuity hypothesis.

  3. What Is a Good Activity for Teaching World Literature to High School Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razzano, Elaine; Baldwin, Anna E.; Cobbs, Lewis; Whitaker, Sandra; Parker, Jessica; Krajcovic, Frank J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents six educators' ideas for good activities for teaching world literature to high school students. Describes ideas, activities, and experiences with innovative ways to teach World Literature. (SG)

  4. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  5. Hypophosphatemia associated with enteral alimentation in cats.

    PubMed

    Justin, R B; Hohenhaus, A E

    1995-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia is uncommon in cats, but it has been reported in association with diabetes mellitus and hepatic lipidosis, where it can cause hemolysis, rhabdomyopathy, depression, seizures, and coma. The purpose of this article is to describe 9 cats that developed low serum phosphorus concentrations (< 2.5 mg/dL) subsequent to enteral alimentation. Serum biochemical analyses from more than 6,000 cats were reviewed. The medical records of all cats with hypophosphatemia were examined for history of enteral alimentation; diabetic cats were excluded from the study. Nine cats, ranging in age from 3 to 17 years, were identified. All cats had normal serum phosphorus concentrations before tube feeding began. Onset of hypophosphatemia occurred 12 to 72 hours after initiation of enteral alimentation, and the nadir for phosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 2.4 mg/dL. Hemolysis occurred in 6 of the 9 cats. Hypophosphatemia secondary to enteral alimentation is an uncommon clinical finding in cats. Cats with high alanine aminotransferase activity, hyperbilirubinemia, and weight loss should be closely monitored for hypophosphatemia during the first 72 hours of enteral alimentation.

  6. Student Assessment System. Admissions Guide. Georgia Vocational Education Program Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul; And Others

    Designed for use by student personnel workers in Georgia's postsecondary vocational schools, this guide describes the recommended activities, standards, and procedures that can be used to grant advanced placement to entering students. It begins with brief overview of articulation. The next section describes the Student Assessment System, steps in…

  7. 78 FR 57371 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) Enrollment... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG...: Enrollment in the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) allows eligible entities...

  8. Using Activity Theory to Model the Taiwan Atayal Students' Classroom Mathematical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Fou-Lai

    2013-01-01

    From the sociocultural perspective, this research utilized activity theory as the theoretical framework to analyze the influences of cultural factors for Taiwanese Atayal junior high school students' study in mathematics. The research methodology adopted grounded theory, theoretical and methodological approaches which are illustrated through…

  9. Is Active Learning Like Broccoli? Student Perceptions of Active Learning in Large Lecture Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, C. Veronica; Cardaciotto, LeeAnn

    2011-01-01

    Although research suggests that active learning is associated with positive outcomes (e.g., memory, test performance), use of such techniques can be difficult to implement in large lecture-based classes. In the current study, 1,091 students completed out-of-class group exercises to complement course material in an Introductory Psychology class.…

  10. A Survey of Factors and Attitudes of Students at a Rural Two-Year College Which Promote Low Participation in Student Activities Programs: An Institutional Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolar, Steven M.

    In spring 1988, a survey was conducted of the student body at Cumberland County College (CCC) to obtain insight into students' perceptions of student activities programs at the college, the characteristics of participants in these activities, the activities students would like to see offered, and the most convenient times. A random sample of 202…

  11. Correlation between the Physical Activity Level and Grade Point Averages of Faculty of Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imdat, Yarim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find the correlation that exists between physical activity level and grade point averages of faculty of education students. The subjects consist of 359 (172 females and 187 males) under graduate students To determine the physical activity levels of the students in this research, International Physical Activity…

  12. Summer Activities of Students Enrolled in Grades 1-12. Indicator of the Month.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    Students engage in a variety of activities during their summer vacations that provide them with educational opportunities. In the summer of 1996, 9% of students in grades 1 through 12 attended summer school, and 38% participated in other organized summer activities. Among the students who were enrolled in grades 8 through 12, 26% worked for pay…

  13. A Study of Lipscomb University Students' Internet Use and Involvement in Extracurricular Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Samuel Aarron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Lipscomb University students' Internet use and involvement in extracurricular activities. A survey of students at Lipscomb University was conducted. As confirmed by the data the research was able to determine that the type of extracurricular activity a student participates in most often is related to the…

  14. Does Alcohol Use among Sexually Active College Students Moderate HIV Risk Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, John E.; Malow, Robert M.; Norman, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    College students frequently use alcohol and are very sexually active, but do the two behaviors result in greater HIV risk? We employed the AIDS Risk Reduction Model to assess condom use during vaginal intercourse for sexually active college students using and not using alcohol proximal to sex. Students reported multiple lifetime sex partners and…

  15. Relation between Academic Performance and Students' Engagement in Digital Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertheussen, Bernt Arne; Myrland, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effect of student engagement in digital learning activities on academic performance for 120 students enrolled in an undergraduate finance course. Interactive practice and exam problem files were available to each student, and individual download activity was automatically recorded during the first 50 days of the course.…

  16. Relationships among Physical Activity Levels, Psychomotor, Psychosocial, and Cognitive Development of Primary Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isler, Ayse Kin; Asci, F. Hulya; Kosar, S. Nazan

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the relationships of physical activity levels and psychomotor, psychosocial, and cognitive development among Turkish elementary school students. Student evaluations indicated that physical activity level was an important factor in determining student psychomotor development, but it was not important in determining psychosocial and…

  17. Student Buy-In to Active Learning in a College Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Andrew J.; Aragón, Oriana R.; Chen, Xinnian; Couch, Brian; Durham, Mary; Bobrownicki, Aiyana; Hanauer, David I.; Graham, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of introducing active learning in college science courses are well established, yet more needs to be understood about student buy-in to active learning and how that process of buy-in might relate to student outcomes. We test the exposure-persuasion-identification-commitment (EPIC) process model of buy-in, here applied to student (n =…

  18. Enhancing Student Motivation in College and University Physical Activity Courses Using Instructional Alignment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, MooSong; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Yun, Joonkoo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation is a key factor in promoting students' active engagement in regular physical activity. According to self-determination theory -- one of the prominent motivational theories -- for this to occur, students' basic psychological needs must be met (i.e., their need for autonomy, competence and relatedness). Students' self-determined…

  19. Alignment of Hands-On STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-01-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in…

  20. A Bridge to Active Learning: A Summer Bridge Program Helps Students Maximize Their Active-Learning Experiences and the Active-Learning Experiences of Others

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Katelyn M.; Ashley, Michael; Brownell, Sara E.

    2017-01-01

    National calls to improve student academic success in college have sparked the development of bridge programs designed to help students transition from high school to college. We designed a 2-week Summer Bridge program that taught introductory biology content in an active-learning way. Through a set of exploratory interviews, we unexpectedly identified that Bridge students had developed sophisticated views of active learning, even though this was not an explicit goal of the program. We conducted an additional set of semistructured interviews that focused on active learning and compared the interviews of Bridge students with those from non-Bridge students who had been eligible for but did not participate in the program. We used the constant comparative method to identify themes from the interviews. We found that Bridge students perceived that, because they knew how to approach active learning and viewed it as important, they benefited more from active learning in introductory biology than non-Bridge students. Specifically, Bridge students seemed to be more aware of their own learning gains from participating in active learning. Compared with the majority of non-Bridge students, the majority of Bridge students described using a greater variety of strategies to maximize their experiences in active learning. Finally, in contrast to non-Bridge students, Bridge students indicated that they take an equitable approach to group work. These findings suggest that we may be able to prime students to maximize their own and other’s experiences in active learning. PMID:28232588

  1. A Bridge to Active Learning: A Summer Bridge Program Helps Students Maximize Their Active-Learning Experiences and the Active-Learning Experiences of Others.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Katelyn M; Ashley, Michael; Brownell, Sara E

    2017-01-01

    National calls to improve student academic success in college have sparked the development of bridge programs designed to help students transition from high school to college. We designed a 2-week Summer Bridge program that taught introductory biology content in an active-learning way. Through a set of exploratory interviews, we unexpectedly identified that Bridge students had developed sophisticated views of active learning, even though this was not an explicit goal of the program. We conducted an additional set of semistructured interviews that focused on active learning and compared the interviews of Bridge students with those from non-Bridge students who had been eligible for but did not participate in the program. We used the constant comparative method to identify themes from the interviews. We found that Bridge students perceived that, because they knew how to approach active learning and viewed it as important, they benefited more from active learning in introductory biology than non-Bridge students. Specifically, Bridge students seemed to be more aware of their own learning gains from participating in active learning. Compared with the majority of non-Bridge students, the majority of Bridge students described using a greater variety of strategies to maximize their experiences in active learning. Finally, in contrast to non-Bridge students, Bridge students indicated that they take an equitable approach to group work. These findings suggest that we may be able to prime students to maximize their own and other's experiences in active learning.

  2. Introducing the Action Potential to Psychology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Dack, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    For this simple active learning technique for teaching, students are assigned "roles" and act out the process of the action potential (AP), including the firing threshold, ion-specific channels for ions to enter and leave the cell, diffusion, and the refractory period. Pre-post test results indicated that students demonstrated increased…

  3. Student Buy-In to Active Learning in a College Science Course

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Andrew J.; Aragón, Oriana R.; Chen, Xinnian; Couch, Brian; Durham, Mary; Bobrownicki, Aiyana; Hanauer, David I.; Graham, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of introducing active learning in college science courses are well established, yet more needs to be understood about student buy-in to active learning and how that process of buy-in might relate to student outcomes. We test the exposure–persuasion–identification–commitment (EPIC) process model of buy-in, here applied to student (n = 245) engagement in an undergraduate science course featuring active learning. Student buy-in to active learning was positively associated with engagement in self-regulated learning and students’ course performance. The positive associations among buy-in, self-regulated learning, and course performance suggest buy-in as a potentially important factor leading to student engagement and other student outcomes. These findings are particularly salient in course contexts featuring active learning, which encourage active student participation in the learning process. PMID:27909026

  4. Promoting Physical Activity for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Barriers, Benefits, and Strategies for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menear, Kristi S.; Neumeier, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Many students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) fall short of the recommended physical activity levels and experience challenges in physical activity and physical education settings. This article reviews factors that can improve the physical activity statistics of students with ASD, outlines the researched benefits of physical activity for…

  5. Technology and Engineering Education Students' Perceptions of Hands-On and Hands-Off Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sianez, David M.; Fugere, Madeleine A.; Lennon, Carter A.

    2010-01-01

    Technology and engineering education students responded to a survey regarding hands-on and hands-off activities. First, the students listed hands-on and hands-off activities and what characterized the two types of activities. Activities such as building or assembling something as well as working manually with tools were viewed as hands-on. Passive…

  6. Utilizing Student Feedback to Inform Faculty Development Activities for Online Course Development and Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Andria; Hoerig, Beverley

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to describe faculty development activities at one university and to show how these activities were reviewed for relevance to students. As a means to validate faculty development activities and make adjustments for future development activities, a survey of students was undertaken. A survey was completed by…

  7. Exit Valor, Enter Veracity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, William Bud

    1979-01-01

    Focuses on what can be done when a program fails. What are the causes for failure? What elements must be considered in the decision process? What strategies can be employed to recycle resources into more productive activities? What alternatives are available to aid in program repair or rejuvenation? (Author)

  8. Activism and Leadership Development: Examining the Relationship between College Student Activism Involvement and Socially Responsible Leadership Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Jeremy Dale

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between participation in student activism and leadership development among college students. This study applied the social change model of leadership development (SCM) as the theoretical model used to measure socially responsible leadership capacity in students. The study utilized data…

  9. Student activism, mental health, and English-Canadian universities in the 1960s.

    PubMed

    Jasen, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Student mental health services were created at many American universities during the interwar years in association with the mental hygiene movement of that era. In Canada, psychologists and psychiatrists became focused on the well-being of schoolchildren during this period, but services for university students were minimal or non-existent at most institutions until well after the Second World War. Influenced by American trends and in tune with rising public concern over the problems students were experiencing on Canada's burgeoning campuses, student organizations, in co-operation with the Canadian Mental Health Association, began a concerted campaign for improved services in the early 1960s. Through conferences, seminars, and surveys, they revealed the extent of student distress, and by 1965 their efforts were attracting increasing media attention and having a direct impact on university student health policies. Their campaign then entered a new phase, transformed by the same radicalization that infused the wider student movement in the wake of the Berkeley free speech protests. Dissatisfied with the institutional response and distrustful of the motives behind the services now provided, activists questioned the very meaning of 'mental health' in the context of their deeper critique of the university and society. By the end of the decade, the student mental health movement had run its course, but it left a lasting legacy in the ongoing reform of university health services and in attitudes towards student mental health.

  10. Lactobacillus paracasei CBA L74 Metabolic Products and Fermented Milk for Infant Formula Have Anti-Inflammatory Activity on Dendritic Cells In Vitro and Protective Effects against Colitis and an Enteric Pathogen In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zagato, Elena; Mileti, Erika; Massimiliano, Lucia; Fasano, Francesca; Budelli, Andrea; Penna, Giuseppe; Rescigno, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion of commercially available fermented food products raises important safety issues particularly when infant food is concerned. In many cases, the activity of the microorganisms used for fermentation as well as what will be the immunological outcome of fermented food intake is not known. In this manuscript we used complex in vitro, ex-vivo and in vivo systems to study the immunomodulatory properties of probiotic-fermented products (culture supernatant and fermented milk without live bacteria to be used in infant formula). We found in vitro and ex-vivo that fermented products of Lactobacillus paracasei CBA L74 act via the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine release leaving anti-inflammatory cytokines either unaffected or even increased in response to Salmonella typhimurium. These activities are not dependent on the inactivated bacteria but to metabolic products released during the fermentation process. We also show that our in vitro systems are predictive of an in vivo efficacy by the fermented products. Indeed CBA L74 fermented products (both culture medium and fermented milk) could protect against colitis and against an enteric pathogen infection (Salmonella typhimurium). Hence we found that fermented products can act via the inhibition of immune cell inflammation and can protect the host from pathobionts and enteric pathogens. These results open new perspectives in infant nutrition and suggest that L. paracasei CBA L74 fermented formula can provide immune benefits to formula-fed infants, without carrying live bacteria that may be potentially dangerous to an immature infant immune system. PMID:24520333

  11. Lactobacillus paracasei CBA L74 metabolic products and fermented milk for infant formula have anti-inflammatory activity on dendritic cells in vitro and protective effects against colitis and an enteric pathogen in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zagato, Elena; Mileti, Erika; Massimiliano, Lucia; Fasano, Francesca; Budelli, Andrea; Penna, Giuseppe; Rescigno, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion of commercially available fermented food products raises important safety issues particularly when infant food is concerned. In many cases, the activity of the microorganisms used for fermentation as well as what will be the immunological outcome of fermented food intake is not known. In this manuscript we used complex in vitro, ex-vivo and in vivo systems to study the immunomodulatory properties of probiotic-fermented products (culture supernatant and fermented milk without live bacteria to be used in infant formula). We found in vitro and ex-vivo that fermented products of Lactobacillus paracasei CBA L74 act via the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine release leaving anti-inflammatory cytokines either unaffected or even increased in response to Salmonella typhimurium. These activities are not dependent on the inactivated bacteria but to metabolic products released during the fermentation process. We also show that our in vitro systems are predictive of an in vivo efficacy by the fermented products. Indeed CBA L74 fermented products (both culture medium and fermented milk) could protect against colitis and against an enteric pathogen infection (Salmonella typhimurium). Hence we found that fermented products can act via the inhibition of immune cell inflammation and can protect the host from pathobionts and enteric pathogens. These results open new perspectives in infant nutrition and suggest that L. paracasei CBA L74 fermented formula can provide immune benefits to formula-fed infants, without carrying live bacteria that may be potentially dangerous to an immature infant immune system.

  12. Comparative in vitro activities of beta-lactam-tobramycin combinations against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and multidrug-resistant gram-negative enteric bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Fass, R J

    1982-01-01

    Piperacillin was more consistently active than tobramycin, carbenicillin, moxalactam, or ceftriaxone against strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from blood cultures and against multidrug-resistant strains. Moxalactam and ceftriaxone were more consistently active than tobramycin, carbenicillin, or piperacillin against multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Synergy between beta-lactam antibiotics and tobramycin was frequently observed against strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from blood cultures but not against multidrug-resistant organisms. Piperacillin plus tobramycin was the most active antibiotic combination against P. aeruginosa. Moxalactam plus tobramycin and ceftriaxone plus tobramycin were the most active antibiotic combinations against Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:6810755

  13. Activities for Students: Averaging Rates--Deciding when to Use the Harmonic or Arithmetic Mean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, S. L.; Rizzardi, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    The article describes the harmonic mean and explores situations for using it. Activities that involve hands-on practice for students are provided. Students learn to recognize which mean, harmonic or arithmetic, is appropriate.

  14. Persistence of physics and engineering students via peer mentoring, active learning, and intentional advising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCavit, K.; Zellner, N. E. B.

    2016-11-01

    Albion College, a private, undergraduate-only, liberal arts college in Michigan, USA, has developed and implemented a low-cost peer-mentoring programme that blends personal and academic support to help students achieve academic success in the introductory courses required for the Physics Major or the Dual-Degree Program in Engineering. This enhanced mentoring programme provides much-needed assistance for undergraduate students to master introductory physics and mathematics coursework, to normalise the struggle of learning hard material, and to accept their identity as physics or engineering students (among other goals). Importantly, this programme has increased retention among entering science, technology, engineering and mathematics students at Albion College as they move through the introductory classes, as shown by a 20% increase in retention from first-semester to third-semester physics courses compared to years when this programme was not in place.

  15. Emerging roles for enteric glia in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Enteric glia are important components of the enteric nervous system (ENS) and also form an extensive network in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Initially regarded as passive support cells, it is now clear that they are actively involved as cellular integrators in the control of motility and epithelial barrier function. Enteric glia form a cellular and molecular bridge between enteric nerves, enteroendocrine cells, immune cells, and epithelial cells, depending on their location. This Review highlights the role of enteric glia in GI motility disorders and in barrier and defense functions of the gut, notably in states of inflammation. It also discusses the involvement of enteric glia in neurological diseases that involve the GI tract. PMID:25689252

  16. The Effect of Active Student Responding during Computer-Assisted Instruction on Social Studies Learning by Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerome, Annamaria; Barbetta, Patricia M.

    2005-01-01

    An alternating treatments design with a best treatments phase was used to compare two active student response (ASR) conditions and one on-task (OT) condition on the acquisition and maintenance of social studies facts during computer-assisted instruction. Each week for six weeks, five students were provided daily computer-assisted instruction on 21…

  17. The Impact of EFL Teachers' Mediation in Wiki-Mediated Collaborative Writing Activities on Student-Student Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghasab, Maha

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on how teachers mediate wiki collaborative writing activities, and the impact of their mediations on students' collaboration. It is based on a study conducted with three English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers and their students (aged 17-18 years) at two government-funded girls' high schools in Kuwait. The selected groups…

  18. Effective Teachers for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Active Ingredients Leading to Positive Teacher and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Maureen A.; Sutherland, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) have varied skills and abilities. Within the field there are some teachers, who teach students with E/BD by actively engaging them in learning tasks and who have few behavior problems in comparison to other teachers, who struggle with classroom management. Many researchers have found…

  19. An Examination of Faculty and Student Online Activity: Predictive Relationships of Student Academic Success in a Learning Management System (LMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamm, Randy Lee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method research study was to examine relationships in student and instructor activity logs and student performance benchmarks specific to enabling early intervention by the instructor in a Learning Management System (LMS). Instructor feedback was collected through a survey instrument to demonstrate perceived importance of…

  20. NCAA Division I Graduation-Rates Report, 1996. Graduation-Rates Data (1986-87, 1987-88, 1988-89, and 1989-90 Entering Classes), Undergraduate Enrollment Data (Fall 1995), [and] Student-Athlete Admissions Data (1992-1995 Entering Freshmen Classes).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Marty, Ed.

    This report provides data on graduation rates of student-athletes at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I schools. Institution-specific reports for each of the 305 colleges and universities that returned surveys include graduation rates for all students enrolled in a full-time program for a degree and of student-athletes who…

  1. Correlates of college students' physical activity: cross-cultural differences.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Torabi, Mohammad R; Jiang, Nan; Fernandez-Rojas, Xinia; Park, Bock-Hee

    2009-10-01

    This study examined cross-cultural differences in personal and behavioral determinants of vigorous-intensity and moderate-intensity physical activity (PA) among college students living in distinctly different cultures, that is, the United States, Costa Rica, India, and South Korea. Participants of this study were recruited from randomly chosen public universities in the 4 countries during the 2006-2007 academic year. A total of 4685 students participated in the study (response rate 90%). Vigorous-intensity PA was measured by asking on how many of the past 7 days the participants participated in PA for at least 20 minutes that made them sweat or breathe hard. For moderate-intensity PA, participants were asked on how many of the past 7 days they participated in PA for at least 30 minutes that did not make them sweat or breathe hard. Findings indicate that whereas perceived overweight and fruit and vegetable consumption are relatively culture-free predictors of PA, gender and TV/video watching are culture-specific predictors. Binge drinking was not predictive of meeting the vigorous-intensity and moderate-intensity PA guidelines in any of the 4 countries.

  2. Professional Student Organizations and Experiential Learning Activities: What Drives Student Intentions to Participate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Laura; Miller, Richard; Poole, Sonja Martin

    2016-01-01

    Experiential learning theory has been referenced as a possible method for attracting and retaining members in student organizations. In a survey, undergraduate students evaluated a variety of organizational features pertaining to their intention to participate in professional student organizations. The study found that students value activities…

  3. Comparing Entering Freshmen's Perceptions of Campus Marijuana and Alcohol Use to Reported Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Gregg J.; Nguyen, Alyssa T.

    2009-01-01

    Use of marijuana and alcohol among current college students (N = 1101) was compared to the perceptions and use of entering freshmen (N = 481) surveyed before the start of classes. Entering freshmen significantly misperceived campus norms for marijuana use, over-estimating that almost every student used in the last 30 days, p less than 0.001.…

  4. Graduating College Students' Orientations toward Scientific Research Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubova, L. G.; Andreeva, O. N.; Antropova, O. A.

    2009-01-01

    The population of scientists in Russia is aging, and it is difficult to attract young graduates to enter the profession. Greater efforts need to be made to change the condition of work for scientists in order to make it attractive to those who will become the next generation of Russian scientists. Creating the conditions favorable to the…

  5. High School Students' Participation in Music Activities beyond the School Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the music activities that high school band students are involved in and how these activities might lead to lifelong music participation. Specific research questions were the following: (a) In what activities are high school band students involved? (b) What are high school band directors…

  6. Activities Contributing a Great Deal to the Students' Interactive Skills in Foreign Language Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asatryan, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    While teaching speaking it is desired to provide a rich environment in class for meaningful communication to take place. With this aim, various speaking activities can contribute a great deal to students in developing their interactive skills necessary for life. These activities make students active in the learning process and at the same time…

  7. NEW APPROACHES: Addressing students' common difficulties in basic electricity by qualitative simulation-based activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronen, M.; Eliahu, M.

    1997-11-01

    Simulation-based activities provide students with an opportunity to compare their physical intuition with the behaviour of the model and can sometimes offer unique advantages over other methods. This article presents various approaches to the development of qualitative simulation- based activities and describes how these activities can be addressed to students' common difficulties in basic electricity.

  8. Accelerometry-Determined Adherence to the "2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans" among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raynor, Douglas A.; Jankowiak, Noelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A need exists to determine whether college students engage in sufficient physical activity (PA) using objective methodology. Purpose: Accelerometry-based activity monitors were used to evaluate adherence to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Methods: College students (N =…

  9. Influence of High School Physical Education on University Student's Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Jessica; Jenkins, Jayne; Wallhead, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the Lifelong Physical Activity (LLPA) framework to examine the influence of high school physical education (PE) on university students' level of physical activity (PA). Participants included 365 undergraduate students from the Rocky Mountain West of the USA enrolled in a university physical activity course.…

  10. Student Activism as an Agent of Social Change: A Phenomenological Analysis of Contemporary Campus Unrest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    This study of student activism as a campus phenomenon analyzed over 200 major incidents of college student activism. Most of the incidents were associated with racial struggle, women's concerns or gay liberation activities. These represent what have been called "cultural wars,""campus wars,""identity wars," or "multicultural unrest." Five cases…

  11. Enteric viruses of chickens and turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although enteric disease in commercial poultry operations is common, and often unofficially reported and discussed by field veterinarians as “non-specific enteric disease”, three recognized enteric syndromes do exist in poultry: poult enteritis complex (PEC) and poult enteritis mortality syndrome (P...

  12. Student Activism in the High Schools of New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haake, Bernard F.; Langworthy, Philip B.

    The purpose of nine regional meetings between New York State Education Department personnel, educators and students from selected secondary school districts was to obtain information about unrest and the changing expectations of high school students. The following conclusions were made: (1) rising expectations of students are part of the "times,"…

  13. Learning Activities Utilized and Readiness for the Student Teaching Internship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Thoron, Andrew C.; Estepp, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural education has traditionally provided rich learning experiences for secondary school students; however, less attention has been paid to the learning experiences preservice agricultural education teachers utilize and provide secondary school students during the student teaching internship. This study sought to describe the learning…

  14. Active Listening Strategies of Academically Successful University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Murat; Kuzu, Sekvan; Yildirim, Bilal; Canpolat, Sevilay

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: In formal educational environments, the quality of student listening affects learning considerably. Students who are uninterested in a lesson listen reluctantly, wanting time to pass quickly and the class to end as soon as possible. In such situations, students become passive and, though appearing to be listening, will not use…

  15. Making Students Take a Stand: Active Learning in Introductory Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Michael E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    To teach critical thinking, introductory psychology students were asked to evaluate two books, "Walden Two" and "The Eden Express," from biological, humanistic, or environmental perspectives. Students wrote individual position papers, group position statements, and group critiques of other positions. Questionnaires revealed that students found…

  16. Learning Activities: Nightmares and Igors; Keeping Students Interested.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrington, Susan C.

    1983-01-01

    Because students were not retaining several key chemistry concepts, a series of problems, called nightmares (for first-year students) and Igors (for second-year chemistry students), was devised so that the concepts would be used repeatedly. Two examples each of nightmares and Igors are provided. (JN)

  17. [2010-2011 Federal Student Aid Handbook with Active Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Student Aid, US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This publication is intended for financial aid administrators and counselors who help students begin the aid process--filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), verifying information, and making corrections and other changes to the information reported on the FAFSA. The Federal Student Aid Handbook consists of the Application and…

  18. Aberrant mucosal mast cell protease expression in the enteric epithelium of nematode-infected mice lacking the integrin alphavbeta6, a transforming growth factor-beta1 activator.

    PubMed

    Knight, Pamela A; Brown, Jeremy K; Wright, Steven H; Thornton, Elisabeth M; Pate, Judith A; Miller, Hugh R P

    2007-10-01

    Infection of mice with the nematode Trichinella spiralis triggers recruitment and differentiation of intraepithelial intestinal mucosal mast cells expressing mouse mast cell protease 1 (Mcpt-1), which contributes to expulsion of the parasite. Expression of Mcpt-1 is transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-dependent in vitro. TGF-beta1, which is secreted within tissues as a biologically inactive complex with latency-associated peptide, requires extracellular modification to become functionally active. The integrin-alpha(nu)beta(6) mediates local activation of TGF-beta(1) in association with epithelia. Using T. spiralis-infected beta(6)(-/-) mice, we show accumulation of mucosal mast cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine with minimal recruitment into the epithelial compartment. This was accompanied by a coordinate reduction in expression of both Mcpt-1 and -2 in the jejunum and increased tryptase expression, whereas Mcpt-9 became completely undetectable. In contrast, the cytokine stem cell factor, a regulator of mast cell differentiation and survival, was significantly up-regulated in T. spiralis-infected beta(6)(-/-) mice compared with infected beta(6)(+/+) controls. Despite these changes, beta(6)(-/-) mice still appeared to expel the worms normally. We postulate that compromised TGF-beta(1) activation within the gastrointestinal epithelial compartment is a major, but not the only, contributing factor to the observed changes in mucosal mast cell protease and epithelial cytokine expression in beta(6)(-/-) mice.

  19. Architecture of enteric neural circuits involved in intestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Costa, M; Brookes, S H

    2008-08-01

    This short review describes the conceptual development in the search for the enteric neural circuits with the initial identifications of the classes of enteric neurons on the bases of their morphology, neurochemistry, biophysical properties, projections and connectivity. The discovery of the presence of multiple neurochemicals in the same nerve cells in specific combinations led to the concept of "chemical coding" and of "plurichemical transmission". The proposal that enteric reflexes are largely responsible for the propulsion of contents led to investigations of polarised reflex pathways and how these may be activated to generate the coordinated propulsive behaviour of the intestine. The research over the past decades attempted to integrate information of chemical neuroanatomy with functional studies, with the development of methods combining anatomical, functional and pharmacological techniques. This multidisciplinary strategy led to a full accounting of all functional classes of enteric neurons in the guinea-pig, and advanced wiring diagrams of the enteric neural circuits have been proposed. In parallel, investigations of the actual behaviour of the intestine during physiological motor activity have advanced with the development of spatio-temporal analysis from video recordings. The relation between neural pathways, their activities and the generation of patterns of motor activity remain largely unexplained. The enteric neural circuits appear not set in rigid programs but respond to different physico-chemical contents in an adaptable way (neuromechanical hypothesis). The generation of the complex repertoire of motor patterns results from the interplay of myogenic and neuromechanical mechanisms with spontaneous generation of migratory motor activity by enteric circuits.

  20. Promoting student-centered active learning in lectures with a personal response system.

    PubMed

    Gauci, Sally A; Dantas, Arianne M; Williams, David A; Kemm, Robert E

    2009-03-01

    We investigated whether an active learning approach, facilitated by a personal response system, would lead to improved student engagement and learning outcomes in large-group physiology lectures for undergraduate science students. We focused on encouraging students' active learning in lectures, whereas previous studies have made more use of audience response technology during lectures for formative or summative assessment. Students voluntarily answered questions posed during lectures with their personal response system (clickers), with individual answers automatically collated for immediate histogram display. This feedback then dictated the focus of followup discussions in the lecture. Student and instructor attitudes were surveyed through voluntary interviews with student responses correlated with their degree of clicker participation and individual exam results. Active lectures were found to increase both student motivation and engagement. Students who participated in answering questions achieved better results than students who chose not to. Students with the lowest scores in a prerequisite course (previous semester physiology exam marks of < 60%) showed significantly better outcomes from the use of clickers than both middle-achieving (60-75%) and high-achieving (>75%) entry students. Significant improvement was evident in both mid- and end-semester exam results compared with student cohorts from preceding years, although this could also be influenced by many other factors. Increased student engagement and the immediate feedback obtained during lectures were advantages commonly noted by lecturing staff.

  1. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

  2. Effects of Active Learning on Enhancing Student Critical Thinking in an Undergraduate General Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyoungna; Sharma, Priya; Land, Susan M.; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance students' critical thinking in an undergraduate general science course, we designed and implemented active learning modules by incorporating group-based learning with authentic tasks, scaffolding, and individual reports. This study examined the levels of critical thinking students exhibited in individual reports and the students'…

  3. 77 FR 2352 - Agency Information Collection (Notice of Change in Student Status): Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Notice of Change in Student Status): Activity Under OMB Review... INFORMATION: Title: Notice of Change in Student Status, VA Form 22-1999b. OMB Control Number: 2900-0156. Type... Form 22-1999b to report a student's enrollment status. Benefits are not payable when a...

  4. 76 FR 67556 - Proposed Information Collection (Notice of Change in Student Status) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Notice of Change in Student Status) Activity: Comment Request... comments for information needed to report changes in students' enrollment status. DATES: Written comments... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Titles: Notice of Change in Student...

  5. 77 FR 67737 - Proposed Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity: Comment Request...: Student Verification of Enrollment, VA Form 22-8979. OMB Control Number: 2900-0465. Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved collection. ] Abstract: VA Form 22-8979 contains a student's...

  6. 78 FR 52519 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of Education (ED). ACTION: Notice...: Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management. OMB Control Number: 1845-0049. Type...

  7. Policy and Practice on the Exclusion of Students from School Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Larry J.; McBee, Janice K.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of secondary school practitioners and policy makers reveals that (1) teachers had no authority to exclude students from class for lack of ability, (2) teachers have little authority to exclude students for misconduct, and (3) general agreement exists between the two groups concerning students' exclusion from extracurricular activities.…

  8. Investigation the Scientific Creativity of Gifted Students through Project-Based Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karademir, Ersin

    2016-01-01

    In this research, it is aimed to identify the scientific creativity of gifted students through project-based activities. In accordance with this purpose, a study has been carried out with 13 gifted students studying in third and fifth grade. In the study, students have been informed about the project development stages and they have been asked…

  9. Scholarly Networking among Business Students: Structured Discussion Board Activity and Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Kristen; Curren, Mary T.; Kiesler, Tina; Lammers, H. Bruce; Goldenson, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    The authors' intent was to show the effect of student discussion board activity on academic outcomes, after accounting for past academic performance. Data were collected from 516 students enrolled in a junior-level required business course. Controlling for students' grade point average, stepwise regression showed a significant…

  10. Beyond the Classroom: Involving Students with Disabilities in Extracurricular Activities at Levy Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam; And Others

    Six students in a special education classroom at Levy Middle School (Syracuse, New York) became involved in a variety of after-school activities with nondisabled students. The students participated in the school computer club, cross-country skiing, volleyball, stage crew, intramural basketball, the Spanish Club, and after-school programs at two…

  11. A Comparison of Motivational Factors and Barriers to Physical Activity among Traditional versus Nontraditional College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulavic, Kimberly; Hultquist, Cherilyn N.; McLester, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the motivational factors and the barriers to physical activity (PA) in traditional college students (TS) and nontraditional college students (NTS) and determine if differences exist between these 2 groups. Participants: A total of 746 college students; 628 were TS (19.1 [plus-minus] 1.2 years), and 118 were NTS (31.2…

  12. Nobody Says No: Student Self-Censorship in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Alan; Nason, Rod

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores student self-censorship within an online learning environment. Self-censorship in group activity can be seen as a two-edged sword. While it can be advantageous that a student censor personal frustration and angst when working with others, if the self-censorship impacts on the cognitive contribution a student makes then this may…

  13. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among Students Participating in University Physical Activity Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Ron E.; Xiang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Three hundred and sixty-one students participating in university physical activity classes completed questionnaires assessing perceived health and self-regulated learning. In addition, 20 students (11 men; 9 women) were interviewed about their reasons for enrolling, participation and goals in the class. Results indicated the students endorsed…

  14. An Action Research Study on the Effect of Interactive Technology and Active Learning on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bear, Teresa J.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative action science research study utilized a causal-comparative experimental research design in order to determine if the use of student response systems (clickers), as an active learning strategy in a community college course, improved student performance in the course. Students in the experimental group (n = 26) used clickers to…

  15. The Reasons for the Reluctance of Princess Alia University College Students' from Practicing Sports Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odat, Jebril

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the reasons lying behind the reluctance of participation in sport activities among Alia Princess College female students, using descriptive approach. The population of the study consisted of (2000) female students, whereas the sample was of (200) students. They were randomly selected and a questionnaire of 31…

  16. Promoting Health-Related Fitness during Warm-Up Activities for Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    It is common to begin a physical education class by having students run laps. Many teachers find that doing the same running warm-up day after day leads to boredom and a lack of interest in their students. This article provides teachers with developmentally appropriate warm-up activities that will not only motivate students, but also keep them…

  17. Look Around You. A Primary Student Activity Book Introducing Basic Environmental Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkey, Sharon

    This activity book, designed for student use, introduces environmental concepts to the primary student. The basic concept around which the guide is developed is the idea that the environment contains many interdependent things. Water, wind, clouds, non-living objects, plants, animals, and pollution are dealt with as part of the primary student's…

  18. 78 FR 59660 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Alternative Student Outcomes for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Alternative Student Outcomes for Growth... Student Outcomes for Growth Measures Case Studies. OMB Control Number: 1850-NEW. Type of Review: A new... Educational Laboratory (REL) Alternative Student Outcomes for Growth Measures Case Studies. The study is...

  19. Physical Activity Breaks and Student Learning: A Teacher-Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camahalan, Faye Marsha G.; Ipock, Amanda R.

    2015-01-01

    This study is a teacher initiated action research. The purpose is to improve student learning in math using physical activity breaks during classroom lessons. The study was conducted by tracking the results of ten 5th grade students for a period of one week. Using anecdotal notes, students showed improvement on attentiveness during class…

  20. A Review of Research on Small-School Student Participation in Extracurricular Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Neil G.; Peltier, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Research reveals that high school students in small schools participate more in extracurricular activities than their peers in large schools; that a high degree of student participation provides opportunities for enhancing leadership, responsibility, and motivation; that students in small schools feel needed; and that the benefits of…

  1. An Analysis of Teacher Discourse that Introduces Real Science Activities to High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pei-Ling; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2009-01-01

    Most academic science educators encourage teachers to provide their students with access to more authentic science activities. What can and do teachers say to increase students' interests in participating in opportunities to do real science? What are the discursive "resources" they draw on to introduce authentic science to students? The purpose of…

  2. Bacteriocin PJ4 active against enteric pathogen produced by Lactobacillus helveticus PJ4 isolated from gut microflora of wistar rat (Rattus norvegicus): partial purification and characterization of bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Jena, Prasant Kumar; Trivedi, Disha; Chaudhary, Harshita; Sahoo, Tapasa Kumar; Seshadri, Sriram

    2013-04-01

    The increase of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the restriction on the use antibiotics due to its side effects have drawn attention to the search for possible alternatives. Bacteriocins are small antimicrobial peptides produced by numerous bacteria. Much interest has been focused on bacteriocins because they exhibit inhibitory activity against pathogens. Lactic acid bacteria possess the ability to synthesize antimicrobial compounds (like bacteriocin) during their growth. In this study, an antibacterial substance (bacteriocin PJ4) produced by Lactobacillus helveticus PJ4, isolated from rat gut microflora, was identified as bacteriocin. It was effective against wide assay of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria involved in various diseases, including Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The antimicrobial peptide was relatively heat-resistant and also active over a wide pH range of 2-10. It has been partially purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation and size exclusion chromatography and checked on reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bacteriocin PJ4 purified through size exclusion chromatography resolved ~6.5 kDa protein with bacteriocin activity. The peptide is inactivated by proteolytic enzymes, trypsin, and lipase but not when treated with catalase, α-amylase, and pepsin. It showed a bactericidal mode of action against the indicator strains E. coli MTCC443, Lactobacillus casei MTCC1423, and E. faecalis DT48. Such characteristics indicate that this bacteriocin may be a potential candidate for alternative agents to control important pathogens.

  3. Entrapment and Structure of an Extrahelical Guanine Attempting to Enter the Active Site of a Bacterial DNA Glycosylase, MutM

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Spong, Marie C.; Nam, Kwangho; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2010-09-21

    MutM, a bacterial DNA glycosylase, protects genome integrity by catalyzing glycosidic bond cleavage of 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) lesions, thereby initiating base excision DNA repair. The process of searching for and locating oxoG lesions is especially challenging, because of the close structural resemblance of oxoG to its million-fold more abundant progenitor, G. Extrusion of the target nucleobase from the DNA double helix to an extrahelical position is an essential step in lesion recognition and catalysis by MutM. Although the interactions between the extruded oxoG and the active site of MutM have been well characterized, little is known in structural detail regarding the interrogation of extruded normal DNA bases by MutM. Here we report the capture and structural elucidation of a complex in which MutM is attempting to present an undamaged G to its active site. The structure of this MutM-extrahelical G complex provides insights into the mechanism MutM employs to discriminate against extrahelical normal DNA bases and into the base extrusion process in general.

  4. Antibacterial activity of GUAVA, Psidium guajava Linnaeus, leaf extracts on diarrhea-causing enteric bacteria isolated from Seabob shrimp, Xiphopenaeus kroyeri (Heller).

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Flávia A; Andrade Neto, Manoel; Bezerra, José N S; Macrae, Andrew; Sousa, Oscarina Viana de; Fonteles-Filho, Antonio A; Vieira, Regine H S F

    2008-01-01

    Guava leaf tea of Psidium guajava Linnaeus is commonly used as a medicine against gastroenteritis and child diarrhea by those who cannot afford or do not have access to antibiotics. This study screened the antimicrobial effect of essential oils and methanol, hexane, ethyl acetate extracts from guava leaves. The extracts were tested against diarrhea-causing bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli. Strains that were screened included isolates from seabob shrimp, Xiphopenaeus kroyeri (Heller) and laboratory-type strains. Of the bacteria tested, Staphylococcus aureus strains were most inhibited by the extracts. The methanol extract showed greatest bacterial inhibition. No statistically significant differences were observed between the tested extract concentrations and their effect. The essential oil extract showed inhibitory activity against S. aureus and Salmonella spp. The strains isolated from the shrimp showed some resistance to commercially available antibiotics. These data support the use of guava leaf-made medicines in diarrhea cases where access to commercial antibiotics is restricted. In conclusion, guava leaf extracts and essential oil are very active against S. aureus, thus making up important potential sources of new antimicrobial compounds.

  5. The impact of active/cooperative instruction on beginning nursing student learning strategy preference.

    PubMed

    Sand-Jecklin, Kari

    2007-07-01

    Rapid changes in the nursing field and high demand for practicing nurses put pressure on nursing faculty to educate increasing numbers of nursing students, often without corresponding increases in resources. Although the use of active and cooperative instruction methods in the classroom has been associated with improved student learning, these practices require increased effort on the part of both faculty and students. In addition, little is known about whether these methods influence student nurses' use of these more elaborative processing strategies in their independent study. The purpose of this quasi-experimental investigation was to identify the impact of incorporating active and cooperative classroom instructional activities on student preference for teaching methods and use of learning strategies in independent study. A convenience sample of beginning baccalaureate nursing students at a large Mid-Atlantic University was randomly assigned by the registrar to two class sections. Students in one section received primarily active/cooperative instruction, while the other received primarily traditional lecture-based instruction. Results indicated that student nurses exposed to active/cooperative instructional methods had an increased preference for these methods after a semester of instruction, while those exposed to traditional instruction had a higher preference for traditional methods. In addition, students participating in active class instruction reported increased preference for more elaborative independent study strategies, although overall preference for both groups indicated a reliance on surface study strategies of memorization and recall. Implications for use of instruction and student testing methodologies are presented.

  6. Faculty and second-year medical student perceptions of active learning in an integrated curriculum.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Alexander; Harris, David M

    2016-12-01

    Patients expect physicians to be lifelong learners who are able to interpret and evaluate diagnostic tests, and most medical schools list the development of lifelong learning in their program objectives. However, lecture is the most often utilized form of teaching in the first two years and is considered passive learning. The current generation of medical students has many characteristics that should support active learning pedagogies. The purpose of this study was to analyze student and faculty perceptions of active learning in an integrated medical curriculum at the second-year mark, where students have been exposed to multiple educational pedagogies. The first hypothesis of the study was that faculty would favor active learning methods. The second hypothesis was that Millennial medical students would favor active learning due to their characteristics. Primary faculty for years 1 and 2 and second-year medical students were recruited for an e-mail survey consisting of 12 questions about active learning and lecture. Students perceived that lecture and passive pedagogies were more effective for learning, whereas faculty felt active and collaborative learning was more effective. Students believed that more content should be covered by lecture than faculty. There were also significant differences in perceptions of what makes a good teacher. Students and faculty both felt that lack of time in the curriculum and preparation time were barriers for faculty. The data suggest that students are not familiar with the process of learning and that more time may be needed to help students develop lifelong learning skills.

  7. Biomarkers in canine parvovirus enteritis.

    PubMed

    Schoeman, J P; Goddard, A; Leisewitz, A L

    2013-07-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) enteritis has, since its emergence in 1978, remained a common and important cause of morbidity and mortality in young dogs. The continued incidence of parvoviral enteritis is partly due to the virus' capability to evolve into more virulent and resistant variants with significant local gastrointestinal and systemic inflammatory sequelae. This paper reviews current knowledge on historical-, signalment-, and clinical factors as well as several haematological-, biochemical- and endocrine parameters that can be used as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in CPV enteritis. These factors include season of presentation, purebred nature, bodyweight, vomiting, leukopaenia, lymphopaenia, thrombocytopaenia, hypercoagulability, hypercortisolaemia, hypothyroxinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, elevated C-reactive protein and tumour necrosis factor, hypocholesterolaemia and hypocitrullinaemia. Factors contributing to the manifestations of CPV infection are multiple with elements of host, pathogen, secondary infections, underlying stressors and environment affecting severity and outcome. The availability of several prognosticators has made identification of patients at high risk of death and their subsequent targeted management more rewarding.

  8. An Entering Year Program: Assisting with University Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetherington, Cheryl; Davis, June

    1984-01-01

    Describes the Entering Year Program at the University of Iowa, which provides a deliberate and systematic integration of educational support services within the residence hall environment. Goals and specific activities are described. (JAC)

  9. What Are Students Doing during Lecture? Evidence from New Technologies to Capture Student Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maltese, Adam V.; Danish, Joshua A.; Bouldin, Ryan M.; Harsh, Joseph A.; Bryan, Branden

    2016-01-01

    Engaging students in class is paramount if they are to gain a deep understanding of class content. Student engagement is manifested by attention to the various components of instruction. However, there is little research at the tertiary level focusing on what aspects of instruction are related to changes in student attention during class. To…

  10. Indiscretion enteritis. A Rabelaisian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robin, E D; Collins, J; Burke, C

    1986-12-01

    A 76-year-old man had small bowel obstruction and organic small bowel disease following a series of bizarre massive gustatory insults that involved food, medications, and mega-mineral-vitamin supplements. Intestinal obstruction required partial small bowel resection. The dietary indiscretions resulted in severe enteritis (indiscretion enteritis). The sequence has been termed a Rabelaisian syndrome after the great French writer and physician, Francois Rabelais, who vividly described bizarre gustatory habits. Gut injury may result from unwise oral intake of various foods and mineral supplements.

  11. Participation in School Food and Nutrition Activities among Grade 6-8 Students in Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Teya A; Black, Jennifer L; Chapman, Gwen E; Velazquez, Cayley E; Rojas, Alejandro

    2016-09-01

    This study examined student-reported participation in school food and nutrition activities in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), and whether engagement differed by gender and between elementary and secondary school students. A cross-sectional survey of grade 6-8 public school students (n = 937) from 20 elementary and 6 secondary schools assessed student-reported participation in a range of food and nutrition activities. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics and multilevel logistic regression to examine associations between participation with gender and school type. Overall, <50% of students reported engaging in most of the food and nutrition activities examined in the 2011-2012 school year, including: food preparation (36%), choosing/tasting healthy foods (27%), learning about Canada's Food Guide (CFG) (45%), learning about foods grown in BC (35%), gardening (21%), composting (32%), and recycling (51%). Females were more likely to report recycling and learning about CFG and BC-grown foods (P < 0.05). Secondary students were more likely to report activities focused on working with or learning about food/nutrition (P < 0.05). Despite local and provincial efforts to engage students in food and nutrition experiences, participation in most activities remains relatively low, with few students exposed to multiple activities. Continued advocacy is needed from the dietetics community to improve student engagement in food and nutrition activities.

  12. SLITHER: a web server for generating contiguous conformations of substrate molecules entering into deep active sites of proteins or migrating through channels in membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Kuo, Kuei-Ling; Chu, Pei-Ying; Liu, Eric M; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2009-07-01

    Many proteins use a long channel to guide the substrate or ligand molecules into the well-defined active sites for catalytic reactions or for switching molecular states. In addition, substrates of membrane transporters can migrate to another side of cellular compartment by means of certain selective mechanisms. SLITHER (http://bioinfo.mc.ntu.edu.tw/slither/or http://slither.rcas.sinica.edu.tw/) is a web server that can generate contiguous conformations of a molecule along a curved tunnel inside a protein, and the binding free energy profile along the predicted channel pathway. SLITHER adopts an iterative docking scheme, which combines with a puddle-skimming procedure, i.e. repeatedly elevating the potential energies of the identified global minima, thereby determines the contiguous binding modes of substrates inside the protein. In contrast to some programs that are widely used to determine the geometric dimensions in the ion channels, SLITHER can be applied to predict whether a substrate molecule can crawl through an inner channel or a half-channel of proteins across surmountable energy barriers. Besides, SLITHER also provides the list of the pore-facing residues, which can be directly compared with many genetic diseases. Finally, the adjacent binding poses determined by SLITHER can also be used for fragment-based drug design.

  13. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures.

    PubMed

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader's theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor's specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences.

  14. Medical student stories of participation in patient care-related activities: the construction of relational identity.

    PubMed

    Warmington, Sally; McColl, Geoffrey

    2017-03-01

    Professional identity formation is acknowledged as one of the fundamental tasks of contemporary medical education. Identity is a social phenomenon, constructed through participation in everyday activities and an integral part of every learning interaction. In this paper we report from an Australian ethnographic study into how medical students and patients use narrative to construct their identities. The dialogic narrative analysis employed focused on the production of meaning through the use of language devices in a given context, and the juxtaposition of multiple perspectives. Two stories told by students about their participation in patient care-related activities reveal how identities are constructed in this context through depictions of the relationships between medical students, patients and clinical teachers. These students use the rhetorical functions of stories to characterise doctors and patients in certain ways, and position themselves in relation to them. They defend common practices that circumvent valid consent processes, justified by the imperative to maximise students' participation in patient care-related activities. In doing so, they identify patients as their adversaries, and doctors as allies. Both students are influenced by others' expectations but one reveals the active nature of identity work, describing subtle acts of resistance. These stories illustrate how practices for securing students' access to patients can influence students' emerging identities, with implications for their future disclosure and consent practices. We argue that more collaborative ways of involving medical students in patient care-related activities will be facilitated if students and clinical teachers develop insight into the relational nature of identity work.

  15. Student Activity Ideas for the Technology Sequence Systems and Foundation Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This publication provides single-page outlines of brief ideas for high school student activities in each of the System and Foundation Courses of the New York State technology sequence. The idea outlines are provided as a resource to assist teachers in the development of student learning activities. The six courses for which ideas are presented are…

  16. Resource-based Learning Activities: Information Literacy for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleakley, Ann; Carrigan, Jackie L.

    This workbook is intended to help high school students achieve information literacy. It goes beyond basic library skills instruction to incorporate 50 different research activities into regular classroom curriculum. The activities provided for resource-based learning help the student to: (1) identify the kind of information needed; (2) locate and…

  17. A Literature Review of the Impact of Extracurricular Activities Participation on Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seow, Poh-Sun; Pan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) have become an important component of students' school life and many schools have invested significant resources on extracurricular activities. The authors suggest three major theoretical frameworks (zero-sum, developmental, and threshold) to explain the impact of ECA participation on students' academic…

  18. Evaluation of Classroom Active Engagement in Elementary Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparapani, Nicole; Morgan, Lindee; Reinhardt, Vanessa P.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Wetherby, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the classroom measure of active engagement (CMAE), an observational tool designed to measure active engagement in students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants included 196 students with ASD and their educators (n = 126) who were video-recorded at the beginning of the school year. Findings documented limited…

  19. Using an Exploratory Internet Activity & Trivia Game to Teach Students about Biomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in life science classes need an introduction to biomes, including an introduction to the concept, key biotic and abiotic features of biomes, and geographic locations of biomes. In this activity, students in seventh- and eighth-grade science classes used a directed exploratory Internet activity to learn about biomes. The author tested…

  20. Introduction of a Journal Excerpt Activity Improves Undergraduate Students' Performance in Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabin, Laura A.; Nutter-Upham, Katherine E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe an active learning exercise intended to improve undergraduate students' understanding of statistics by grounding complex concepts within a meaningful, applied context. Students in a journal excerpt activity class read brief excerpts of statistical reporting from published research articles, answered factual and interpretive questions,…

  1. Exploring Time Allocation for Academic Activities by University Students in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernex, Alain; Lima, Laurent; de Vries, Erica

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study how students allocate time to different university and extra-university activities and to identify factors that might explain variability both between and within fields of study. At the heart of this exercise is the question of the time students dedicate to academic activities in competition with a whole…

  2. Alternative High School Students' Physical Activity: Role of Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Denyelle Baete; Kubik, Martha Y.; Davey, Cynthia; Sirard, John; Fulkerson, Jayne A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine physical activity self-efficacy as a mediator of the association between perceived barriers to PA and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among alternative high school (AHS) students. Methods: Students (N = 145) from 6 AHS completed self-report questionnaires. Results: Mediation analyses revealed partial mediation…

  3. Middle-Class Parental Involvement in the Summer Activities of Four Elementary Students: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Iva B.; Chappell, Manya; Johnson, Susan; Ngassam, Marlise DePaul

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explore middle-class parental involvement in summer activities of four elementary students. Many researchers discuss summer programs initiated by institutions, but fail to explain how parents' availability, experiences, and related criteria affect student summer activities. From our interviews, observations, and artifacts, we…

  4. Undergraduate Student Construction and Interpretation of Graphs in Physics Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Godfrey, T. J.; Mayhew, Nicholas T.; Wiegert, Craig C.

    2016-01-01

    Lab activities are an important element of an undergraduate physics course. In these lab activities, students construct and interpret graphs in order to connect the procedures of the lab with an understanding of the related physics concepts. This study investigated undergraduate students' construction and interpretation of graphs with best-fit…

  5. Leadership Behaviour of College Students in Relation to Their Leisure Time Activities in College Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sethi, Priyanka

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated the Leadership behaviour of college students in relation to their Leisure time activities in college life. In this study, the researcher wants to see the contribution of leisure time activities in developing the qualities of leadership of college students. The main objective of the study was to find out the relationship…

  6. The Effect of Project-Based Activities on Intermediate EFL Students' Reading Comprehension Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiraz, Mona Poorverdi; Larsari, Ebrahim Ezati

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between the use of Project-based activities and intermediate EFL students' reading comprehension. The study addresses the questions of whether students' reading comprehension differs after implementing Project-based activities, and whether different projects lead to different degrees of reading…

  7. A Packet of Elementary Classroom Activities To Teach Students about Sex Role Stereotyping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Office for Sex Equity.

    Designed to help elementary school students understand sex role stereotyping, these classroom activities have been compiled from sex equity projects at local, state, and national levels. The selection criteria included: (1) appeal to elementary students; (2) the inclusion of mathematics or language arts exercises within an activity; and (3)…

  8. Secondary School Students' Physical Activity Participation across Physical Education Classes: The Expectancy-Value Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gråstén, Arto; Watt, Anthony; Hagger, Martin; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to analyze the link between students' expectancy beliefs, subjective task values, out-of-school activity, and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) participation across secondary school physical education (PE) classes. The sample comprised 96 students (58 girls, 38 boys; Mage = 15.03, SD = 0.94) from…

  9. Teaching Graduate Students about Social Class: Using a Classifying Activity with an Inductive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chennault, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching about social class holds special significance for students who will work in the fields of education and human services. In this article, the author describes how he teaches graduate students about social class using a classifying activity with an inductive approach. He follows this activity with a discussion of course readings that take a…

  10. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among University Students Participating in Physical Activity Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Ron E.; Altunsöz, Irmak Hürmeriç; Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; Demirhan, Giyasettin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore motivational indicators of self-regulated learning (SRL) and the relationship between self-regulation (SR) and perceived health among university students enrolled in physical activity (PA) classes. One hundred thirty-one Turkish students participating in physical education activity classes at two…

  11. Student Attitudes in the Transition to an Active-Learning Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koretsky, Milo D.; Brooks, Bill J.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in student perceptions to a novel technology-based, active-learning pedagogy using a custom, sophisticated, personal response system called WISE were studied over the first five years it was used. Students tended to view active learning more favorably over time, particularly in regards to statements that required them to be interpretive of…

  12. Changes in Short-Term Attitudes Toward Physical Activity and Exercise of University Personal Wellness Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Mick G.; Shaddox, Lea Ann

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the attitudes toward physical activity and exercise of university students enrolled in Personal Wellness classes. 1,625 undergraduate students completed the Attitudes Toward Exercise and Physical Activity (ATEPA) inventory on the first and last day of the class. Paired-samples t test results comparing the mean pretest ATEPA…

  13. Your Students Can Be Rocket Scientists! A Galaxy of Great Activities about Astronauts, Gravity, and Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1994-01-01

    Presents activities for a springtime Space Day that can teach students about astronauts, gravity, and motion. Activities include creating a paper bag spacecraft to study liftoff and having students simulate gravity's effects by walking in various manners and recording pulse rates. A list of resources is included. (SM)

  14. Arranging Instruction to Ensure the Active Participation of Severely Multihandicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Alison; And Others

    This task force report considers strategies designed to elicit active participation on the part of severely multihandicapped students. The first section considers ways to gather information on environments and daily activities of severely multihandicapped students. Hypothetical daily home and vocational routines were composed and estimates made of…

  15. Student Views of Diversity through a Multicultural Mathematics Activity: Viewing Transformation during the Middle School Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riskowski, Jody L.; Olbricht, Gayla

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was twofold: to explore students' thoughts of diversity in the U.S. and to determine how participation in a mathematics multicultural education activity affects student metacognition. The specific research questions for this study were: (1) How does participation in a multicultural education activity change middle…

  16. Student Perception of Metacognitive Activities in Entry-Level Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandall, Leah; Mamo, Martha; Speth, Carol; Lee, Don; Kettler, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    A research study investigated student perception of the use of metacognitive activities in the classroom. The courses were large enrollment (n greater than 100) introductory Plant and Soil Sciences courses taught in the fall semester. The courses implemented activities such as concept sketches or conceptual modeling to help students develop their…

  17. "Activities of Older Adults" Survey: Tapping into Student Views of the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtele, Sandy K.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an exercise used in a life span developmental psychology course to tap into undergraduates' perceptions of activities of the elderly. Students were asked to generate items to be included in a hypothetical Activities of Older Adults survey (to be administered to people 65 years and older). Responses from 1,340 students over a…

  18. Using Problem-Based Pre-Class Activities to Prepare Students for In-Class Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alayont, Feryal

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a problem-based approach that prepares students for future learning in the classroom. In this approach, students complete problem-based activities before coming to class to familiarize themselves with the topics to be covered. After the discussion on how the use of these activities relate to the learning and transfer…

  19. Sailing toward Understanding Surface Currents: A Science and Geography Integration Activity for Upper-Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eidietis, Laura; Rutherford, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    In the activities presented in this article, students mimic real scientists while constructing predictions and scientific explanations about surface currents. The activities are inspired by and couched within true scientific inquiries regarding the ocean and the North American Great Lakes. Students engage in a classroom inquiry and use map-reading…

  20. Leadership Development in Students: Teachers' Opinions Regarding Activities That Can Be Performed at Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlar, Hanifi; Türkoglu, Muhammet Emin; Cansoy, Ramazan

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine teachers' opinions regarding the activities that can be performed at schools to ensure leadership development in students. Accordingly, an attempt to reveal what the leadership qualities of students should be, the activities that can be performed for the acquisition of leadership qualities and the applicability level of…