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Sample records for activity suppresses foxo1

  1. Small molecule inhibition of PAX3-FOXO1 through AKT activation suppresses malignant phenotypes of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Jothi, Mathivanan; Mal, Munmun; Keller, Charles; Mal, Asoke K.

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) comprises a rare highly malignant tumor presumed to be associated with skeletal muscle lineage in children. The hallmark of the majority of ARMS is a chromosomal translocation that generates the PAX3-FOXO1 fusion protein, which is an oncogenic transcription factor responsible for the development of the malignant phenotype of this tumor. ARMS cells are dependent to the oncogenic activity of PAX3-FOXO1 and its expression status in ARMS tumors correlates with worst patient outcome, suggesting that blocking this activity of PAX3-FOXO1 may be an attractive therapeutic strategy against this fusion-positive disease. In this study, we screened small-molecule chemical libraries for inhibitors of PAX3-FOXO1 transcriptional activity using a cell-based readout system. We identified the Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA) inhibitor thapsigargin as an effective inhibitor of PAX3-FOXO1. Subsequent experiments in ARMS cells demonstrated that activation of AKT by thapsigargin inhibited PAX3-FOXO1 activity via phosphorylation. Moreover, this AKT activation appears to be associated with the effects of thapsigargin on intracellular calcium levels. Furthermore, thapsigargin inhibited the binding of PAX3-FOXO1 to target genes and subsequently promoted its proteosomal degradation. In addition, thapsigargin treatment decreases the growth and invasive capacity of ARMS cells while inducing apoptosis in vitro. Finally, thapsigargin can suppress the growth of an ARMS xenograft tumor in vivo. These data reveal that thapsigargin-induced activation of AKT is an effective mechanism to inhibit PAX3-FOXO1 and a potential agent for targeted therapy against ARMS. PMID:24107448

  2. AKT-phosphorylated FOXO1 suppresses ERK activation and chemoresistance by disrupting IQGAP1-MAPK interaction.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chun-Wu; Jin, Xin; Zhao, Yu; Pan, Yunqian; Yang, Jing; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liguo; Huang, Haojie

    2017-03-09

    Nuclear FOXO proteins act as tumor suppressors by transcriptionally activating genes involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, and these anticancer functions are inhibited by AKT-induced phosphorylation and cytoplasmic sequestration of FOXOs. We found that, after AKT-mediated phosphorylation at serine 319, FOXO1 binds to IQGAP1, a hub for activation of the MAPK pathway, and impedes IQGAP1-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (pERK1/2). Conversely, decreased FOXO1 expression increases pERK1/2 in cancer cell lines and correlates with increased pERK1/2 levels in patient specimens and disease progression. Treatment of cancer cells with PI3K inhibitors or taxane causes FOXO1 localization in the nucleus, increased expression of pERK1/2, and drug resistance. These effects are reversed by administering a small FOXO1-derived phospho-mimicking peptide inhibitor in vitro and in mice. Our results show a tumor suppressor role of AKT-phosphorylated FOXO1 in the cytoplasm and suggest that this function of FOXO1 can be harnessed to overcome chemoresistance in cancer.

  3. FOXO1 delays skeletal muscle regeneration and suppresses myoblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Atsushi; Hatazawa, Yukino; Hirose, Yuma; Ono, Yusuke; Kamei, Yasutomi

    2016-08-01

    Unloading stress, such as bed rest, inhibits the regenerative potential of skeletal muscles; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. FOXO1 expression, which induces the upregulated expression of the cell cycle inhibitors p57 and Gadd45α, is known to be increased in the skeletal muscle under unloading conditions. However, there is no report addressing FOXO1-induced inhibition of myoblast proliferation. Therefore, we induced muscle injury by cardiotoxin in transgenic mice overexpressing FOXO1 in the skeletal muscle (FOXO1-Tg mice) and observed regeneration delay in skeletal muscle mass and cross-sectional area in FOXO1-Tg mice. Increased p57 and Gadd45α mRNA levels, and decreased proliferation capacity were observed in C2C12 myoblasts expressing a tamoxifen-inducible active form of FOXO1. These results suggest that decreased proliferation capacity of myoblasts by FOXO1 disrupts skeletal muscle regeneration under FOXO1-increased conditions, such as unloading.

  4. Elevated nuclear Foxo1 suppresses excitability of skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Schachter, Tova Neustadt

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box O 1 (Foxo1) controls the expression of proteins that carry out processes leading to skeletal muscle atrophy, making Foxo1 of therapeutic interest in conditions of muscle wasting. The transcription of Foxo1-regulated proteins is dependent on the translocation of Foxo1 to the nucleus, which can be repressed by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) treatment. The role of Foxo1 in muscle atrophy has been explored at length, but whether Foxo1 nuclear activity affects skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling has not yet been examined. Here, we use cultured adult mouse skeletal muscle fibers to investigate the effects of Foxo1 overexpression on EC coupling. Fibers expressing Foxo1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) exhibit an inability to contract, impaired propagation of action potentials, and ablation of calcium transients in response to electrical stimulation compared with fibers expressing GFP alone. Evaluation of the transverse (T)-tubule system morphology, the membranous system involved in the radial propagation of the action potential, revealed an intact T-tubule network in fibers overexpressing Foxo1-GFP. Interestingly, long-term IGF-1 treatment of Foxo1-GFP fibers, which maintains Foxo1-GFP outside the nucleus, prevented the loss of normal calcium transients, indicating that Foxo1 translocation and the atrogenes it regulates affect the expression of proteins involved in the generation and/or propagation of action potentials. A reduction in the sodium channel Nav1.4 expression in fibers overexpressing Foxo1-GFP was also observed in the absence of IGF-1. We conclude that increased nuclear activity of Foxo1 prevents the normal muscle responses to electrical stimulation and that this indicates a novel capability of Foxo1 to disable the functional activity of skeletal muscle. PMID:23804205

  5. Control of Foxo1 Gene Expression by Co-activator P300*

    PubMed Central

    Wondisford, Anne R.; Xiong, Lishou; Chang, Evan; Meng, Shumei; Meyers, David J.; Li, Mingsong; Cole, Philip A.; He, Ling

    2014-01-01

    FOXO1 is an important downstream mediator of the insulin signaling pathway. In the fed state, elevated insulin phosphorylates FOXO1 via AKT, leading to its nuclear exclusion and degradation. A reduction in nuclear FOXO1 levels then leads to suppression of hepatic glucose production. However, the mechanism leading to expression of Foxo1 gene in the fasted state is less clear. We found that Foxo1 mRNA and FOXO1 protein levels of Foxo1 were increased significantly in the liver of mice after 16 h of fasting. Furthermore, dibutyrl cAMP stimulated the expression of Foxo1 at both mRNA and protein level in hepatocytes. Because cAMP-PKA regulates hepatic glucose production through cAMP-response element-binding protein co-activators, we depleted these co-activators using adenoviral shRNAs. Interestingly, only depletion of co-activator P300 resulted in the decrease of Foxo1 mRNA and FOXO1 protein levels. In addition, inhibition of histone acetyltransferase activity of P300 significantly decreased hepatic Foxo1 mRNA and FOXO1 protein levels in fasted mice, as well as fasting blood glucose levels. By characterization of Foxo1 gene promoter, P300 regulates the Foxo1 gene expression through the binding to tandem cAMP-response element sites in the proximal promoter region of Foxo1 gene. PMID:24379407

  6. Constitutively active FOXO1 diminishes activin induction of Fshb transcription in immortalized gonadotropes.

    PubMed

    Park, Chung Hyun; Skarra, Danalea V; Rivera, Alissa J; Arriola, David J; Thackray, Varykina G

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate whether the FOXO1 transcription factor modulates activin signaling in pituitary gonadotropes. Our studies show that overexpression of constitutively active FOXO1 decreases activin induction of murine Fshb gene expression in immortalized LβT2 cells. We demonstrate that FOXO1 suppression of activin induction maps to the -304/-95 region of the Fshb promoter containing multiple activin response elements and that the suppression requires the FOXO1 DNA-binding domain (DBD). FOXO1 binds weakly to the -125/-91 region of the Fshb promoter in a gel-shift assay. Since this region of the promoter contains a composite SMAD/FOXL2 binding element necessary for activin induction of Fshb transcription, it is possible that FOXO1 DNA binding interferes with SMAD and/or FOXL2 function. In addition, our studies demonstrate that FOXO1 directly interacts with SMAD3/4 but not SMAD2 in a FOXO1 DBD-dependent manner. Moreover, we show that SMAD3/4 induction of Fshb-luc and activin induction of a multimerized SMAD-binding element-luc are suppressed by FOXO1 in a DBD-dependent manner. These results suggest that FOXO1 binding to the proximal Fshb promoter as well as FOXO1 interaction with SMAD3/4 proteins may result in decreased activin induction of Fshb in gonadotropes.

  7. Constitutively Active FOXO1 Diminishes Activin Induction of Fshb Transcription in Immortalized Gonadotropes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chung Hyun; Skarra, Danalea V.; Rivera, Alissa J.; Arriola, David J.; Thackray, Varykina G.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate whether the FOXO1 transcription factor modulates activin signaling in pituitary gonadotropes. Our studies show that overexpression of constitutively active FOXO1 decreases activin induction of murine Fshb gene expression in immortalized LβT2 cells. We demonstrate that FOXO1 suppression of activin induction maps to the −304/−95 region of the Fshb promoter containing multiple activin response elements and that the suppression requires the FOXO1 DNA-binding domain (DBD). FOXO1 binds weakly to the −125/−91 region of the Fshb promoter in a gel-shift assay. Since this region of the promoter contains a composite SMAD/FOXL2 binding element necessary for activin induction of Fshb transcription, it is possible that FOXO1 DNA binding interferes with SMAD and/or FOXL2 function. In addition, our studies demonstrate that FOXO1 directly interacts with SMAD3/4 but not SMAD2 in a FOXO1 DBD-dependent manner. Moreover, we show that SMAD3/4 induction of Fshb-luc and activin induction of a multimerized SMAD-binding element-luc are suppressed by FOXO1 in a DBD-dependent manner. These results suggest that FOXO1 binding to the proximal Fshb promoter as well as FOXO1 interaction with SMAD3/4 proteins may result in decreased activin induction of Fshb in gonadotropes. PMID:25423188

  8. Activation of FOXO1 Is Critical for the Anticancer Effect of Methylseleninic Acid in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haitao; Fang, Jian; Yao, Dian; Wu, Yue; Ip, Clement; Dong, Yan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous studies have demonstrated that physiological concentrations of methylseleninic acid (MSA) inhibits the growth of prostate cancer cells. The growth inhibitory effect could be attributed to cell cycle block and apoptosis induction. The current study was designed to investigate the involvement of forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in the anticancer effect of MSA. METHODS LNCaP and LAPC-4 cells were treated with 10 µM MSA for various time points, and the expression of FOXO1 was analyzed by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. FOXO1 activity was determined by a luciferase construct containing FOXO binding sites. The trans-activation activity of the androgen receptor (AR) was determined by the ARE-luciferase assay. FOXO1 gene silencing was achieved by using a small interfering RNA (siRNA). RESULTS MSA treatment led to a rapid and robust increase of FOXO1 expression, as well as an increase of the FOXO1 transcriptional activity. Blocking FOXO1 activation by gene silencing abolished apoptosis induction by MSA, suggesting FOXO1 plays a critical role in mediating the apoptotic effect of MSA. Recent studies have shown that FOXO1 and AR antagonize the actions of each other. We examined the consequence of FOXO1 induction on AR activity. Consistent with previous reports, we found that ectopic expression of FOXO1 suppressed the transcriptional activity of AR. Furthermore, FOXO1 silencing attenuated MSA suppression of AR activity, suggesting that FOXO1 induction contributes to suppression of AR signaling by MSA. CONCLUSIONS In prostate cancer cells, MSA activates the FOXO1 signaling pathway. FOXO1 activation is critical for the anticancer effects of MSA. PMID:20623629

  9. FOXO1 orchestrates the bone-suppressing function of gut-derived serotonin.

    PubMed

    Kode, Aruna; Mosialou, Ioanna; Silva, Barbara C; Rached, Marie-Therese; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Ji; Townes, Tim M; Hen, Rene; DePinho, Ronald A; Guo, X Edward; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2012-10-01

    Serotonin is a critical regulator of bone mass, fulfilling different functions depending on its site of synthesis. Brain-derived serotonin promotes osteoblast proliferation, whereas duodenal-derived serotonin suppresses it. To understand the molecular mechanisms of duodenal-derived serotonin action on osteoblasts, we explored its transcriptional mediation in mice. We found that the transcription factor FOXO1 is a crucial determinant of the effects of duodenum-derived serotonin on bone formation We identified two key FOXO1 complexes in osteoblasts, one with the transcription factor cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 1 (CREB) and another with activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Under normal levels of circulating serotonin, the proliferative activity of FOXO1 was promoted by a balance between its interaction with CREB and ATF4. However, high circulating serotonin levels prevented the association of FOXO1 with CREB, resulting in suppressed osteoblast proliferation. These observations identify FOXO1 as the molecular node of an intricate transcriptional machinery that confers the signal of duodenal-derived serotonin to inhibit bone formation.

  10. FOXO1 orchestrates the bone-suppressing function of gut-derived serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Kode, Aruna; Mosialou, Ioanna; Silva, Barbara C.; Rached, Marie-Therese; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Ji; Townes, Tim M.; Hen, Rene; DePinho, Ronald A.; Guo, X. Edward; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is a critical regulator of bone mass, fulfilling different functions depending on its site of synthesis. Brain-derived serotonin promotes osteoblast proliferation, whereas duodenal-derived serotonin suppresses it. To understand the molecular mechanisms of duodenal-derived serotonin action on osteoblasts, we explored its transcriptional mediation in mice. We found that the transcription factor FOXO1 is a crucial determinant of the effects of duodenum-derived serotonin on bone formation We identified two key FOXO1 complexes in osteoblasts, one with the transcription factor cAMP-responsive element–binding protein 1 (CREB) and another with activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Under normal levels of circulating serotonin, the proliferative activity of FOXO1 was promoted by a balance between its interaction with CREB and ATF4. However, high circulating serotonin levels prevented the association of FOXO1 with CREB, resulting in suppressed osteoblast proliferation. These observations identify FOXO1 as the molecular node of an intricate transcriptional machinery that confers the signal of duodenal-derived serotonin to inhibit bone formation. PMID:22945629

  11. SIRT2 Suppresses Adipocyte Differentiation by Deacetylating FOXO1 and Enhancing FOXO1's Repressive Interaction with PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei

    2009-01-01

    Sirtuin family of proteins possesses NAD-dependent deacetylase and ADP ribosyltransferase activities. They are found to respond to nutrient deprivation and profoundly regulate metabolic functions. We have previously reported that caloric restriction increases the expression of one of the seven mammalian sirtuins, SIRT2, in tissues such as white adipose tissue. Because adipose tissue is a key metabolic organ playing a critical role in whole body energy homeostasis, we went on to explore the function of SIRT2 in adipose tissue. We found short-term food deprivation for 24 h, already induces SIRT2 expression in white and brown adipose tissues. Additionally, cold exposure elevates SIRT2 expression in brown adipose tissue but not in white adipose tissue. Intraperitoneal injection of a β-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol) enhances SIRT2 expression in white adipose tissue. Retroviral expression of SIRT2 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes promotes lipolysis. SIRT2 inhibits 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation in low-glucose (1 g/l) or low-insulin (100 nM) condition. Mechanistically, SIRT2 suppresses adipogenesis by deacetylating FOXO1 to promote FOXO1's binding to PPARγ and subsequent repression on PPARγ transcriptional activity. Overall, our results indicate that SIRT2 responds to nutrient deprivation and energy expenditure to maintain energy homeostasis by promoting lipolysis and inhibiting adipocyte differentiation. PMID:19037106

  12. FOXO1 couples metabolic activity and growth state in the vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Kerstin; Happel, Katharina; Eelen, Guy; Schoors, Sandra; Oellerich, Mark F.; Lim, Radiance; Zimmermann, Barbara; Aspalter, Irene M.; Franco, Claudio A.; Boettger, Thomas; Braun, Thomas; Fruttiger, Marcus; Rajewsky, Klaus; Keller, Charles; Brüning, Jens C.; Gerhardt, Holger; Carmeliet, Peter; Potente, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are plastic cells that can switch between growth states with different bioenergetic and biosynthetic requirements1. Although quiescent in most healthy tissues, ECs divide and migrate rapidly upon proangiogenic stimulation2,3. Adjusting endothelial metabolism to growth state is central to normal vessel growth and function1,4, yet poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report that the forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor FOXO1 is an essential regulator of vascular growth that couples metabolic and proliferative activities in ECs. Endothelial-restricted deletion of FOXO1 in mice induces a profound increase in EC proliferation that interferes with coordinated sprouting, thereby causing hyperplasia and vessel enlargement. Conversely, forced expression of FOXO1 restricts vascular expansion and leads to vessel thinning and hypobranching. We find that FOXO1 acts as a gatekeeper of endothelial quiescence, which decelerates metabolic activity by reducing glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Mechanistically, FOXO1 suppresses signalling by c-MYC (termed MYC hereafter), a powerful driver of anabolic metabolism and growth5,6. MYC ablation impairs glycolysis, mitochondrial function and proliferation of ECs while its EC-specific overexpression fuels these processes. Moreover, restoration of MYC signalling in FOXO1-overexpressing endothelium normalises metabolic activity and branching behaviour. Our findings identify FOXO1 as a critical rheostat of vascular expansion and define the FOXO1 – MYC transcriptional network as a novel metabolic checkpoint during endothelial growth and proliferation. PMID:26735015

  13. FOXO1 Regulates Bacteria-Induced Neutrophil Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guangyu; Song, Liang; Tian, Chen; Wang, Yu; Miao, Fang; Zheng, Jiabao; Lu, Chanyi; Alsadun, Sarah; Graves, Dana T.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the innate immune response to microbial infection and are particularly important in clearing bacterial infection. We investigated the role of the transcription factor FOXO1 in the response of neutrophils to bacterial challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis in vivo and in vitro. In these experiments, the effect of lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion in LyzM.Cre+FOXO1L/L mice was compared with matched littermate controls. FOXO1 deletion negatively affected several critical aspects of neutrophil function in vivo including mobilization of neutrophils from the bone marrow (BM) to the vasculature, recruitment of neutrophils to sites of bacterial inoculation, and clearance of bacteria. In vitro FOXO1 regulated neutrophil chemotaxis and bacterial killing. Moreover, bacteria-induced expression of CXCR2 and CD11b, which are essential for several aspects of neutrophil function, was dependent on FOXO1 in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, FOXO1 directly interacted with the promoter regions of CXCR2 and CD11b. Bacteria-induced nuclear localization of FOXO1 was dependent upon toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and/or TLR4 and was significantly reduced by inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide synthase) and deacetylases (Sirt1 and histone deacetylases). These studies show for the first time that FOXO1 activation by bacterial challenge is needed to mobilize neutrophils to transit from the BM to peripheral tissues in response to infection as well as for bacterial clearance in vivo. Moreover, FOXO1 regulates neutrophil function that facilitates chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and bacterial killing. PMID:28928749

  14. Graded Foxo1 Activity in Regulatory T Cells Differentiates Tumor Immunity from Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chong T.; Liao, Will; Dadi, Saida; Toure, Ahmed; Li, Ming O.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T (Treg) cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 have a pivotal role in maintaining immunological self-tolerance1-5; yet, excessive Treg cell activities suppress anti-tumor immune responses6-8. Compared to resting phenotype Treg (rTreg) cells in the secondary lymphoid organs, Treg cells in non-lymphoid tissues including solid tumors exhibit an activated Treg (aTreg) cell phenotype9-11. However, aTreg cell function and whether its generation can be manipulated to promote tumor immunity without evoking autoimmunity are largely unexplored. Here we show that the transcription factor Foxo1, previously demonstrated to promote Treg cell suppression of lymphoproliferative diseases12,13, has an unexpected function in inhibiting aTreg cell-mediated immune tolerance. We found that aTreg cells turned over at a slower rate than rTreg cells, but were not locally maintained in tissues. Transcriptome analysis revealed that aTreg cell differentiation was associated with repression of Foxo1-dependent gene transcription, concomitant with reduced Foxo1 expression and enhanced Foxo1 phosphorylation at sites of the Akt kinase. Treg cell-specific expression of an Akt-insensitive Foxo1 mutant prevented downregulation of lymphoid organ homing molecules, and depleted aTreg cells, causing CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Compared to Treg cells from healthy tissues, tumor-infiltrating Treg cells downregulated Foxo1 target genes more substantially. Expression of the Foxo1 mutant at a lower dose was sufficient to deplete tumor-associated Treg cells, activate effector CD8+ T cells, and inhibit tumor growth without inflicting autoimmunity. Thus, Foxo1 inactivation is essential for the generation of aTreg cells that have a crucial function in suppressing CD8+ T cell responses; and the Foxo signaling pathway in Treg cells can be titrated to preferentially break tumor immune tolerance. PMID:26789248

  15. Graded Foxo1 activity in Treg cells differentiates tumour immunity from spontaneous autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chong T; Liao, Will; Dadi, Saida; Toure, Ahmed; Li, Ming O

    2016-01-28

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 have a pivotal role in maintaining immunological self-tolerance; yet, excessive Treg cell activities suppress anti-tumour immune responses. Compared to the resting Treg (rTreg) cell phenotype in secondary lymphoid organs, Treg cells in non-lymphoid tissues exhibit an activated Treg (aTreg) cell phenotype. However, the function of aTreg cells and whether their generation can be manipulated are largely unexplored. Here we show that the transcription factor Foxo1, previously demonstrated to promote Treg cell suppression of lymphoproliferative diseases, has an unexpected function in inhibiting aTreg-cell-mediated immune tolerance in mice. We find that aTreg cells turned over at a slower rate than rTreg cells, but were not locally maintained in tissues. aTreg cell differentiation was associated with repression of Foxo1-dependent gene transcription, concomitant with reduced Foxo1 expression, cytoplasmic localization and enhanced phosphorylation at the Akt sites. Treg-cell-specific expression of an Akt-insensitive Foxo1 mutant prevented downregulation of lymphoid organ homing molecules, and impeded Treg cell homing to non-lymphoid organs, causing CD8(+) T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Compared to Treg cells from healthy tissues, tumour-infiltrating Treg cells downregulated Foxo1 target genes more substantially. Expression of the Foxo1 mutant at a lower dose was sufficient to deplete tumour-associated Treg cells, activate effector CD8(+) T cells, and inhibit tumour growth without inflicting autoimmunity. Thus, Foxo1 inactivation is essential for the migration of aTreg cells that have a crucial function in suppressing CD8(+) T-cell responses; and the Foxo signalling pathway in Treg cells can be titrated to break tumour immune tolerance preferentially.

  16. Impaired medulloblastoma cell survival following activation of the FOXO1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vinit Krishna; Yasruel, Zivart; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2009-11-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most frequent type of childhood brain tumour. The insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) plays a significant neuroprotective role in medulloblastoma survival through regulation of the downstream effectors of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase-protein kinase-B (PI3K-PKB/c-Akt) pathway. One such target is Forkhead box O1 (FOXO1; FKHR), which is part of the FOXO family of Forkhead transcription factors. Phosphorylation by Akt results in cytoplasmic sequestration of FOXO1 thus inhibiting the expression of genes controlling cell death, cell proliferation, differentiation, cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. Here we show that serum starvation of medulloblastoma cells is accompanied by nuclear translocation of FOXO1. IGF-I stimulation of serum-starved cells resulted in rapid phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO1, and was associated with a significant increase in cell viability. In contrast, expression of a constitutively active form of FOXO1 that cannot be phosphorylated led to a significant reduction in medulloblastoma cell viability, even in the presence of growth factors provided by fetal bovine serum (FBS). These data suggest that the transcription factor FOXO1 may be a critical effector of medulloblastoma growth suppression.

  17. Metformin inhibits estrogen-dependent endometrial cancer cell growth by activating the AMPK-FOXO1 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jingfang; Hong, Liangli; Luo, Chaohuan; Li, Zhi; Zhu, Yuzhang; Huang, Tianliang; Zhang, Yongneng; Yuan, Huier; Hu, Yaqiu; Wen, Tengfei; Zhuang, Wanling; Cai, Bozhi; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Jiexiong; Cheng, Jidong

    2016-12-01

    Metformin is an oral biguanide commonly used for treating type II diabetes and has recently been reported to possess antiproliferative properties that can be exploited for the prevention and treatment of a variety of cancers. The mechanisms underlying this effect have not been fully elucidated. Our study shows a marked loss of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and nuclear human Forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) protein in estrogen-dependent endometrial cancer (EC) tumors compared to normal control endometrium. Metformin treatment suppressed EC cell growth in a time-dependent manner in vitro; this effect was cancelled by cotreatment with an AMPK inhibitor, compound C. Metformin decreased FOXO1 phosphorylation and increased FOXO1 nuclear localization in Ishikawa and HEC-1B cells, with non-significant increase in FOXO1 mRNA expression. Moreover, compound C blocked the metformin-induced changes of FOXO1 and its phosphorylation protein, suggesting that metformin upregulated FOXO1 activity by AMPK activation. Similar results were obtained after treatment with insulin. In addition, transfection with siRNA for FOXO1 cancelled metformin-inhibited cell growth, indicating that FOXO1 mediated metformin to inhibit EC cell proliferation. A xenograft mouse model further revealed that metformin suppressed HEC-1B tumor growth, accompanied by downregulated ki-67 and upregulated AMPK phosphorylation and nuclear FOXO1 protein. Taken together, these data provide a novel mechanism of antineoplastic effect for metformin through the regulation of FOXO1, and suggest that the AMPK-FOXO1 pathway may be a therapeutic target to the development of new antineoplastic drugs. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. FOXO1 regulates dendritic cell activity through ICAM-1 and CCR7.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guangyu; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Wenmei; Pacios Pujado, Sandra; Xu, Fanxing; Tian, Chen; Xiao, E; Choi, Yongwon; Graves, Dana T

    2015-04-15

    The transcription factor FOXO1 regulates cell function and is expressed in dendritic cells (DCs). We investigated the role of FOXO1 in activating DCs to stimulate a lymphocyte response to bacteria. We show that bacteria induce FOXO1 nuclear localization through the MAPK pathway and demonstrate that FOXO1 is needed for DC activation of lymphocytes in vivo. This occurs through FOXO1 regulation of DC phagocytosis, chemotaxis, and DC-lymphocyte binding. FOXO1 induces DC activity by regulating ICAM-1 and CCR7. FOXO1 binds to the CCR7 and ICAM-1 promoters, stimulates CCR7 and ICAM-1 transcriptional activity, and regulates their expression. This is functionally important because transfection of DCs from FOXO1-deleted CD11c.Cre(+)FOXO1(L/L) mice with an ICAM-1-expressing plasmid rescues the negative effect of FOXO1 deletion on DC bacterial phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Rescue with both CCR7 and ICAM-1 reverses impaired DC homing to lymph nodes in vivo when FOXO1 is deleted. Moreover, Ab production following injection of bacteria is significantly reduced with lineage-specific FOXO1 ablation. Thus, FOXO1 coordinates upregulation of DC activity through key downstream target genes that are needed for DCs to stimulate T and B lymphocytes and generate an Ab defense to bacteria.

  19. Activation of FOXO1 by Cdk1 in cycling cells and postmitotic neurons.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zengqiang; Becker, Esther B E; Merlo, Paola; Yamada, Tomoko; DiBacco, Sara; Konishi, Yoshiyuki; Schaefer, Erik M; Bonni, Azad

    2008-03-21

    Activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) has been linked to cell death of postmitotic neurons in brain development and disease. We found that Cdk1 phosphorylated the transcription factor FOXO1 at Ser249 in vitro and in vivo. The phosphorylation of FOXO1 at Ser249 disrupted FOXO1 binding with 14-3-3 proteins and thereby promoted the nuclear accumulation of FOXO1 and stimulated FOXO1-dependent transcription, leading to cell death in neurons. In proliferating cells, Cdk1 induced FOXO1 Ser249 phosphorylation at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, resulting in FOXO1-dependent expression of the mitotic regulator Polo-like kinase (Plk). These findings define a conserved signaling link between Cdk1 and FOXO1 that may have a key role in diverse biological processes, including the degeneration of postmitotic neurons.

  20. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma–associated PAX3-FOXO1 promotes tumorigenesis via Hippo pathway suppression

    PubMed Central

    Crose, Lisa E.S.; Galindo, Kathleen A.; Kephart, Julie Grondin; Chen, Candy; Fitamant, Julien; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Bentley, Rex C.; Galindo, Rene L.; Ashley Chi, Jen-Tsan; Linardic, Corinne M.

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (aRMS) is an aggressive sarcoma of skeletal muscle characterized by expression of the paired box 3-forkhead box protein O1 (PAX3-FOXO1) fusion oncogene. Despite its discovery nearly two decades ago, the mechanisms by which PAX3-FOXO1 drives tumor development are not well characterized. Previously, we reported that PAX3-FOXO1 supports aRMS initiation by enabling bypass of cellular senescence checkpoints. We have now found that this bypass occurs in part through PAX3-FOXO1–mediated upregulation of RASSF4, a Ras-association domain family (RASSF) member. RASSF4 expression was upregulated in PAX3-FOXO1–positive aRMS cell lines and tumors. Enhanced RASSF4 expression promoted cell cycle progression, senescence evasion, and tumorigenesis through inhibition of the Hippo pathway tumor suppressor MST1. We also found that the downstream Hippo pathway target Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP), which is ordinarily restrained by Hippo signaling, was upregulated in RMS tumors. These data suggest that Hippo pathway dysfunction promotes RMS. This work provides evidence for Hippo pathway suppression in aRMS and demonstrates a progrowth role for RASSF4. Additionally, we identify a mechanism used by PAX3-FOXO1 to inhibit MST1 signaling and promote tumorigenesis in aRMS. PMID:24334454

  1. FoxO1-Mediated Activation of Akt Plays a Critical Role in Vascular Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lei; Dupuis, Dylan; Beeler, David; Spokes, Katherine C.; Janes, Lauren; Sciuto, Tracey; Kang, Peter M.; Jaminet, Shou-Ching S.; Dvorak, Ann; Grant, Marianne A.; Regan, Erzsébet Ravasz; Aird, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Forkhead box-O transcription factors (FoxOs) transduce a wide range of extracellular signals, resulting in changes in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and a number of cell type-specific responses. FoxO1 is expressed in many cell types, including endothelial cells. Previous studies have shown that FoxO1 knockout in mice results in embryonic lethality at E11 due to impaired vascular development. In contrast, somatic deletion of FoxO1 is associated with hyperproliferation of endothelial cells. Thus, the precise role of FoxO1 in the endothelium remains enigmatic. Objective To determine the effect of endothelial-specific knockout and overexpression of FoxO1 on vascular homeostasis. Methods and Results We show that endothelial cell (EC)-specific disruption of FoxO1 in mice phenocopies the full knockout. While endothelial expression of FoxO1 rescued otherwise FoxO-null animals, overexpression of constitutively active FoxO1 resulted in increased EC size, occlusion of capillaries, elevated peripheral resistance, heart failure and death. Knockdown of FoxO1 in ECs resulted in marked inhibition of basal and VEGF-induced Akt-mTOR1 signaling. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in mice endothelial expression of FoxO1 is both necessary and sufficient for embryonic development. Moreover, FoxO1-mediated feedback activation of Akt maintains growth factor-responsive Akt/mTORC1 activity within a homeostatic range. PMID:24874427

  2. Quercetin induces autophagy via FOXO1-dependent pathways and autophagy suppression enhances quercetin-induced apoptosis in PASMCs in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    He, Yuanzhou; Cao, Xiaopei; Guo, Pujian; Li, Xiaochen; Shang, Huihui; Liu, Jin; Xie, Min; Xu, Yongjian; Liu, Xiansheng

    2017-02-01

    Quercetin, an important dietary flavonoid has been demonstrated to potentially reverse or even prevent pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) progression. However, the effects of quercetin on apoptosis and autophagy in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) have not yet been clearly elucidated. The current study found that quercetin significantly induce the apoptotic and autophagic capacities of PASMCs in vitro and in vivo in hypoxia. In addition, we found that quercetin increases FOXO1 (a major mediator in autophagy regulation) expression and transcriptional activity. Moreover, FOXO1 knockdown by siRNAs inhibited the phosphorylation of mTOR and 4E-BPI, which is downstream of P70-S6K, and markedly blocked quercetin-induced autophagy. We also observed that FOXO1-mediated autophagy was achieved via SESN3 not Rictor upregulation and after mTOR suppression. Furthermore, Treatment with autophagy-specific inhibitors could markedly enhance quercetin-induced apoptosis in PASMCs under hypoxia. Finally, quercetin in combination with autophagy inhibition treatment could enhance the therapeutic effects of quercetin in hypoxia-associated PAH in vivo. Taken together, quercetin could enhance hypoxia-induced autophagy through the FOXO1-SENS3-mTOR pathway in PASMCs. Combining quercetin and autophagy inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic strategy for treating hypoxia-associated PAH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. FOXO3 induces FOXO1-dependent autophagy by activating the AKT1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingyi; Liao, Wenjuan; Yang, Jing; Ma, Ke; Li, Xue; Wang, Yachen; Wang, Donglai; Wang, Lina; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Yuxin; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcriptional protein family members, including FOXO1 and FOXO3, are involved in the modulation of autophagy. However, whether there is redundancy between FOXO1 and FOXO3 in the ability to induce autophagy remains unclear. In this study, we showed that FOXO3 induced a transcription-dependent autophagy, and FOXO1 was required for this process. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO3 (WT) or FOXO3 (3A), which harbors alanine mutations at residues Thr32, Ser253 and Ser315, but not transcription-inactive FOXO3 (∆DB3A), significantly induced autophagy in the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell lines. Interestingly, depletion of FOXO1 by siRNA attenuated FOXO3-induced autophagy. Our data also showed that FOXO3 overexpression did not increase the expression of FOXO1 at the protein level, although FOXO3 was capable of binding the promoter region of FOXO1 and inducing an increase in the transcription of FOXO1 mRNA. Furthermore, our results showed that FOXO3 promoted the translocation of FOXO1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, resulting in an increase in FOXO1-induced autophagy. Moreover, our results supported a mechanism whereby FOXO3 dramatically increased the expression of the class I PtdIns3K catalytic subunit PIK3CA, leading to an increase in AKT1 activity, which resulted in the phosphorylation and nuclear export of FOXO1. To the best of our knowledge, our data are the first to suggest that FOXO1 plays a central role in FOXO3-induced autophagy. PMID:22931788

  4. FOXO1 Binds to the TAU5 Motif and Inhibits Constitutively Active Androgen Receptor Splice Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bohrer, Laura R.; Liu, Ping; Zhong, Jian; Pan, Yunqian; Angstman, James; Brand, Lucas J.; Dehm, Scott M.; Huang, Haojie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aberrant activation of the androgen receptor (AR) is a major factor highly relevant to castration-resistant progression of prostate cancer (PCa). FOXO1, a key downstream effector of PTEN, inhibits androgen-independent activation of the AR. However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. METHODS The inhibitory effect of FOXO1 on full-length and constitutively active splice variants of the AR was examined by luciferase reporter assays and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). In vitro protein binding assays and western blot analyses were used to determine the regions in FOXO1 and AR responsible for their interaction. RESULTS We found that a putative transcription repression domain in the NH2-terminus of FOXO1 is dispensable for FOXO1 inhibition of the AR. In vitro protein binding assays showed that FOXO1 binds to the transcription activation unit 5 (TAU5) motif in the AR NH2-terminal domain (NTD), a region required for recruitment of p160 activators including SRC-1. Ectopic expression of SRC-1 augmented transcriptional activity of some, but not all AR splice variants examined. Forced expression of FOXO1 blocked the effect of SRC-1 on AR variants’ transcriptional activity by decreasing the binding of SRC-1 to the AR NTD. Ectopic expression of FOXO1 inhibited expression of endogenous genes activated primarily by alternatively spliced AR variants in human castration-resistant PCa 22Rv1 cells. CONCLUSIONS FOXO1 binds to the TAU5 motif in the AR NTD and inhibits ligand-independent activation of AR splice variants, suggesting the PTEN/FOXO1 pathway as a potential therapeutic target for inhibition of aberrant AR activation and castration-resistant PCa growth. PMID:23389878

  5. Chemotherapy resistance and metastasis-promoting effects of thyroid hormone in hepatocarcinoma cells are mediated by suppression of FoxO1 and Bim pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Chen, Shen-Liang; Cheng, Yi-Hung; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Tsai, Ming-Ming; Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Huang, Ya-Hui; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and systemic chemotherapy is the major treatment strategy for late-stage HCC patients. Poor prognosis following chemotherapy is the general outcome owing to recurrent resistance. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to cytotoxic effects on tumor cells, chemotherapy can induce an alternative cascade that supports tumor growth and metastasis. In the present investigation, we showed that thyroid hormone (TH), a potent hormone-mediating cellular differentiation and metabolism, acts as an antiapoptosis factor upon challenge of thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-expressing HCC cells with cancer therapy drugs, including cisplatin, doxorubicin and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). TH/TR signaling promoted chemotherapy resistance through negatively regulating the pro-apoptotic protein, Bim, resulting in doxorubicin-induced metastasis of chemotherapy-resistant HCC cells. Ectopic expression of Bim in hepatoma cells challenged with chemotherapeutic drugs abolished TH/TR-triggered apoptosis resistance and metastasis. Furthermore, Bim expression was directly transactivated by Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1), which was negatively regulated by TH/TR. TH/TR suppressed FoxO1 activity through both transcriptional downregulation and nuclear exclusion of FoxO1 triggered by Akt-mediated phosphorylation. Ectopic expression of the constitutively active FoxO1 mutant, FoxO1-AAA, but not FoxO1-wt, diminished the suppressive effect of TH/TR on Bim. Our findings collectively suggest that expression of Bim is mediated by FoxO1 and indirectly downregulated by TH/TR, leading to chemotherapy resistance and doxorubicin-promoted metastasis of hepatoma cells. PMID:27490929

  6. A Limonoid Kihadanin B from Immature Citrus unshiu Peels Suppresses Adipogenesis through Repression of the Akt-FOXO1-PPARγ Axis in Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Baba, Shizuka; Ueno, Yasuaki; Kikuchi, Takashi; Tanaka, Reiko; Fujimori, Ko

    2016-12-28

    Citrus limonoids are secondary metabolites and exhibit a variety of biological activities. In this study, we elucidated the suppression of adipogenesis by a Citrus limonoid kihadanin B and determined its molecular mechanism in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Kihadanin B was purified from the peels of immature Citrus unshiu by HPLC, and its chemical structure was determined by NMR and mass spectrometry. Kihadanin B reduced the lipid accumulation with the reduction of the expression levels of the adipogenic and lipogenic genes, but did not affect lipolysis in adipocytes. Phosphorylation levels of Akt and a forkhead transcriptional factor, FOXO1, a repressor of PPARγ, were lowered by kihadanin B. Furthermore, kihadanin B increased the binding level of FOXO1 to the PPARγ gene promoter in adipocytes. These results indicate that a Citrus limonoid kihadanin B repressed the adipogenesis by decreasing lipid accumulation through the suppression of the Akt-FOXO1-PPARγ axis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  7. Quercetin induces growth arrest through activation of FOXO1 transcription factor in EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yin; Chan, Chien-Yi; Chou, I-Tai; Lien, Chia-Hsien; Hung, Hsiao-Chi; Lee, Ming-Fen

    2013-09-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHNs) with aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling are often associated with poor prognosis and low survival. Therefore, efficient inhibition of the EGFR signaling could intervene with the development of malignancy. Quercetin appears to be antitumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear in oral cancer. Fork-head box O (FOXO) transcription factors, Akt downstream effectors, are important regulators of cell growth. Here, we hypothesized that FOXO1 might be crucial in quercetin-induced growth inhibition in EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer. Quercetin treatment suppressed cell growth by inducing G2 arrest and apoptosis in EGFR-overexpressing HSC-3 and TW206 oral cancer cells. Quercetin inhibited EGFR/Akt activation with a concomitant induction of FOXO1 activation. FOXO1 knockdown attenuated quercetin-induced p21 and FasL expression and subsequent G2 arrest and apoptosis, respectively. Likewise, quercetin suppressed tumor growth in HSC-3 xenograft mice. Taken together, our data indicate that quercetin is an effective anticancer agent and that FOXO1 is crucial in quercetin-induced growth suppression in EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Opposing actions of angiopoietin-2 on Tie2 signaling and FOXO1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minah; Allen, Breanna; Korhonen, Emilia A.; Nitschké, Maximilian; Baluk, Peter; Alitalo, Kari; Daly, Christopher; Thurston, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Angiopoietin-2 (ANG2) regulates blood vessel remodeling in many pathological conditions through differential effects on Tie2 signaling. While ANG2 competes with ANG1 to inhibit Tie2, it can paradoxically also promote Tie2 phosphorylation (p-Tie2). A related paradox is that both inactivation and overactivation of Tie2 can result in vascular remodeling. Here, we reconciled these opposing actions of ANG2 by manipulating conditions that govern its actions in the vasculature. ANG2 drove vascular remodeling during Mycoplasma pulmonis infection by acting as a Tie2 antagonist, which led to p-Tie2 suppression, forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) activation, increased ANG2 expression, and vessel leakiness. These changes were exaggerated by anti-Tie2 antibody, inhibition of PI3K signaling, or ANG2 overexpression and were reduced by anti-ANG2 antibody or exogenous ANG1. In contrast, under pathogen-free conditions, ANG2 drove vascular remodeling by acting as an agonist, promoting high p-Tie2, low FOXO1 activation, and no leakage. Tie1 activation was strong under pathogen-free conditions, but infection or TNF-α led to Tie1 inactivation by ectodomain cleavage and promoted the Tie2 antagonist action of ANG2. Together, these data indicate that ANG2 activation of Tie2 supports stable enlargement of normal nonleaky vessels, but reduction of Tie1 in inflammation leads to ANG2 antagonism of Tie2 and initiates a positive feedback loop wherein FOXO1-driven ANG2 expression promotes vascular remodeling and leakage. PMID:27548529

  9. Menin and PRMT5 suppress GLP1 receptor transcript and PKA-mediated phosphorylation of FOXO1 and CREB.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Abdul Bari; Xing, Bowen; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Ma, Xiaosong; Simmons, Rebecca A; Hua, Xianxin

    2017-03-07

    Menin is a scaffold protein that interacts with several epigenetic mediators to regulate gene transcription, and suppresses pancreatic beta cell proliferation. Tamoxifen inducible deletion of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene, which encodes the protein menin, increases beta cell mass in multiple murine models of diabetes and ameliorates diabetes. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP1) is another key physiological modulator of beta cell mass and glucose homeostasis. However, it is not clearly understood whether menin crosstalks with GLP1 signaling. Here we show that menin and protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) suppress GLP1 receptor (GLP1R) transcript levels. Notably, a GLP1R agonist induces phosphorylation of forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) at S253, and the phosphorylation is mediated by protein kinase A (PKA). Interestingly, menin suppresses GLP1-induced and PKA-mediated phosphorylation of both FOXO1 and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB), likely through a protein arginine methyltransferase. Menin mediated suppression of FOXO1 and CREB phosphorylation increases FOXO1 levels and suppresses CREB target genes, respectively. A small molecule menin inhibitor reverses menin-mediated suppression of both FOXO1 and CREB phosphorylation. In addition, ex vivo treatment of both mouse and human pancreatic islets with a menin inhibitor increases levels of proliferation marker Ki67. In conclusion, our results suggest that menin and PRMT5 suppress GLP1R transcript levels and PKA-mediated phosphorylation of FOXO1 and CREB, and a menin inhibitor may reverse this suppression to induce beta cell proliferation.

  10. Modulating effect of SIRT1 activation induced by resveratrol on Foxo1-associated apoptotic signalling in senescent heart.

    PubMed

    Sin, Thomas K; Yu, Angus P; Yung, Benjamin Y; Yip, Shea Ping; Chan, Lawrence W; Wong, Cesar S; Ying, Michael; Rudd, John A; Siu, Parco M

    2014-06-15

    Elevations of cardiomyocyte apoptosis and fibrotic deposition are major characteristics of the ageing heart. Resveratrol, a polyphenol in grapes and red wine, is known to improve insulin resistance and increase mitochondrial biogenesis through the SIRT1-PGC-1α signalling axis. Recent studies attempted to relate SIRT1 activation by resveratrol to the regulation of apoptosis in various disease models of cardiac muscle. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that long-term (8-month) treatment of resveratrol would activate SIRT1 and improve the cardiac function of senescent mice through suppression of Foxo1-associated pro-apoptotic signalling. Our echocardiographic measurements indicated that the cardiac systolic function measured as fractional shortening and ejection fraction was significantly reduced in aged mice when compared with the young mice. These reductions, however, were not observed in resveratrol-treated hearts. Ageing significantly reduced the deacetylase activity, but not the protein abundance of SIRT1 in the heart. This reduction was accompanied by increased acetylation of the Foxo1 transcription factor and transactivation of its target, pro-apoptotic Bim. Subsequent analyses indicated that pro-apoptotic signalling measured as p53, Bax and apoptotic DNA fragmentation was up-regulated in the heart of aged mice. In contrast, resveratrol restored SIRT1 activity and suppressed elevations of Foxo1 acetylation, Bim and pro-apoptotic signalling in the aged heart. In parallel, resveratrol also attenuated the ageing-induced elevations of fibrotic collagen deposition and markers of oxidative damage including 4HNE and nitrotyrosine. In conclusion, these novel data demonstrate that resveratrol mitigates pro-apoptotic signalling in senescent heart through a deacetylation mechanism of SIRT1 that represses the Foxo1-Bim-associated pro-apoptotic signalling axis.

  11. Modulating effect of SIRT1 activation induced by resveratrol on Foxo1-associated apoptotic signalling in senescent heart

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Thomas K; Yu, Angus P; Yung, Benjamin Y; Yip, Shea Ping; Chan, Lawrence W; Wong, Cesar S; Ying, Michael; Rudd, John A; Siu, Parco M

    2014-01-01

    Elevations of cardiomyocyte apoptosis and fibrotic deposition are major characteristics of the ageing heart. Resveratrol, a polyphenol in grapes and red wine, is known to improve insulin resistance and increase mitochondrial biogenesis through the SIRT1–PGC-1α signalling axis. Recent studies attempted to relate SIRT1 activation by resveratrol to the regulation of apoptosis in various disease models of cardiac muscle. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that long-term (8-month) treatment of resveratrol would activate SIRT1 and improve the cardiac function of senescent mice through suppression of Foxo1-associated pro-apoptotic signalling. Our echocardiographic measurements indicated that the cardiac systolic function measured as fractional shortening and ejection fraction was significantly reduced in aged mice when compared with the young mice. These reductions, however, were not observed in resveratrol-treated hearts. Ageing significantly reduced the deacetylase activity, but not the protein abundance of SIRT1 in the heart. This reduction was accompanied by increased acetylation of the Foxo1 transcription factor and transactivation of its target, pro-apoptotic Bim. Subsequent analyses indicated that pro-apoptotic signalling measured as p53, Bax and apoptotic DNA fragmentation was up-regulated in the heart of aged mice. In contrast, resveratrol restored SIRT1 activity and suppressed elevations of Foxo1 acetylation, Bim and pro-apoptotic signalling in the aged heart. In parallel, resveratrol also attenuated the ageing-induced elevations of fibrotic collagen deposition and markers of oxidative damage including 4HNE and nitrotyrosine. In conclusion, these novel data demonstrate that resveratrol mitigates pro-apoptotic signalling in senescent heart through a deacetylation mechanism of SIRT1 that represses the Foxo1–Bim-associated pro-apoptotic signalling axis. PMID:24639483

  12. GAS5 suppresses malignancy of human glioma stem cells via a miR-196a-5p/FOXO1 feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xihe; Liu, Yunhui; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Xiaobai; Chen, Jiajia; Liu, Libo; Wang, Ping; Xue, Yixue

    2017-10-01

    Glioma stem cells (GSCs) make up highly tumorigenic subpopulations within gliomas, and aberrant expression of GSC genes is a major underlying cause of glioma pathogenesis and treatment failure. The present study characterized the expression and function of long non-coding RNA growth arrest specific 5 (GAS5) in GSCs in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which GAS5 contributes to glioma pathogenesis. We demonstrate that GAS5 suppresses GSC malignancy by binding to miR-196a-5p. miR-196a-5p, an onco-miRNA, stimulates GSC proliferation, migration, and invasion, in addition to reducing levels of apoptosis. miR-196a-5p specifically downregulates the expression of forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) by targeting its 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR). FOXO1 upregulates expression of phosphotyrosine interaction domain containing 1 (PID1), thereby inhibiting GSC tumorigenicity and growth. FOXO1 also upregulates migration and invasion inhibitory protein (MIIP), resulting in attenuation of migration and invasion activities. Interestingly, we also show that FOXO1 promotes GAS5 transcription, thus forminga positive feedback loop. These data provide insights into potential new pathways for GSC molecular therapy and suggest that GAS5 may be an efficacious target for glioma treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. miR-101 suppresses HBV replication and expression by targeting FOXO1 in hepatoma carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanjing; Tian, Hui

    2017-05-20

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to participate in the progression of cancers and in the infection of viruses. miR-101 expression has been found to be suppressed by HBV, however, the regulatory relationship between miR-101 and HBV replication remains elusive. In this report, miR-101 was significantly downregulated in HepG2.2.15 cells with HBV expression. miR-101 overexpression dramatically suppressed HBV replication and expression. Oppositely, overexpression of FOXO1 significantly promoted HBV replication and expression. Moreover, luciferase reporter analysis, qRT-PCR analysis and western blot assay confirmed that FOXO1 was a functional target of miR-101. Furthermore, restored FOXO1 expression abolished the inhibitory effect of miR-101 overexpression on HBV replication and expression in HepG2.2.15 cells. Our data suggested that miR-101 suppressed HBV replication and expression partially by targeting FOXO1, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms of miR-101 in HBV-host interactions and a promising therapeutic target for HBV replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Aquatide Activation of SIRT1 Reduces Cellular Senescence through a SIRT1-FOXO1-Autophagy Axis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Jin; Lee, Yong-Moon; Kang, Seung Goo; Lim, Hyung W; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Huh, Yang Hoon; Choi, Suin; Kor, Myungho; Seo, Ho Seong; Park, Byeong Deog; Park, Keedon; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Park, Kyungho

    2017-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is a relevant environment factor to induce cellular senescence and photoaging. Both autophagy- and silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1)-dependent pathways are critical cellular processes of not only maintaining normal cellular functions, but also protecting cellular senescence in skin exposed to UV irradiation. In the present studies, we investigated whether modulation of autophagy induction using a novel synthetic SIRT1 activator, heptasodium hexacarboxymethyl dipeptide-12 (named as Aquatide), suppresses the UVB irradiation-induced skin aging. Treatment with Aquatide directly activates SIRT1 and stimulates autophagy induction in cultured human dermal fibroblasts. Next, we found that Aquatide-mediated activation of SIRT1 increases autophagy induction via deacetylation of forkhead box class O (FOXO) 1. Finally, UVB irradiation-induced cellular senescence measured by SA-β-gal staining was significantly decreased in cells treated with Aquatide in parallel to occurring SIRT1 activation-dependent autophagy. Together, Aquatide modulates autophagy through SIRT1 activation, contributing to suppression of skin aging caused by UV irradiation.

  15. Metabolic stress–induced activation of FoxO1 triggers diabetic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Hojayev, Berdymammet; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Zhao V.; Luo, Xiang; Iglewski, Myriam; Shelton, John M.; Gerard, Robert D.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Gillette, Thomas G.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is cardiovascular disease; diabetic cardiomyopathy is typified by alterations in cardiac morphology and function, independent of hypertension or coronary disease. However, the molecular mechanism that links diabetes to cardiomyopathy is incompletely understood. Insulin resistance is a hallmark feature of diabetes, and the FoxO family of transcription factors, which regulate cell size, viability, and metabolism, are established targets of insulin and growth factor signaling. Here, we set out to evaluate a possible role of FoxO proteins in diabetic cardiomyopathy. We found that FoxO proteins were persistently activated in cardiac tissue in mice with diabetes induced either genetically or by high-fat diet (HFD). FoxO activity was critically linked with development of cardiomyopathy: cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of FoxO1 rescued HFD-induced declines in cardiac function and preserved cardiomyocyte insulin responsiveness. FoxO1-depleted cells displayed a shift in their metabolic substrate usage, from free fatty acids to glucose, associated with decreased accumulation of lipids in the heart. Furthermore, we found that FoxO1-dependent downregulation of IRS1 resulted in blunted Akt signaling and insulin resistance. Together, these data suggest that activation of FoxO1 is an important mediator of diabetic cardiomyopathy and is a promising therapeutic target for the disease. PMID:22326951

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorβ/δ activation is essential for modulating p-Foxo1/Foxo1 status in functional insulin-positive cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Li, T; Zhang, Y; Pan, Z; Wu, B; Huang, X; Zhang, Y; Mei, Y; Ge, L; Shen, G; Ge, R-s; Zhu, D; Lou, Y

    2015-04-09

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) participate in energy homeostasis and play essential roles in diabetes therapy through their effects on non-pancreas tissues. Pathological microenvironment may influence the metabolic requirements for the maintenance of stem cell differentiation. Accordingly, understanding the mechanisms of PPARs on pancreatic β-cell differentiation may be helpful to find the underlying targets of disrupted energy homeostasis under the pancreatic disease condition. PPARs are involved in stem cell differentiation via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, but the subtype member activation and the downstream regulation in functional insulin-positive (INS+) cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we show a novel role of PPARβ/δ activation in determining INS+ cell differentiation and functional maturation. We found PPARβ/δ expression selectively upregulated in mouse embryonic pancreases or stem cells-derived INS+ cells at the pancreatic mature stage in vivo and in vitro. Strikingly, given the inefficiency of generating INS+ cells in vitro, PPARβ/δ activation displayed increasing mouse and human ES cell-derived INS+ cell numbers and insulin secretion. This phenomenon was closely associated with the forkhead box protein O1 (Foxo1) nuclear shuttling, which was dependent on PPARβ/δ downstream PI3K/Akt signaling transduction. The present study reveals the essential role of PPARβ/δ activation on p-Foxo1/Foxo1 status, and in turn, determining INS+ cell generation and insulin secretion via affecting pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 expression. The results demonstrate the underlying mechanism by which PPARβ/δ activation promotes functional INS+ cell differentiation. It also provides potential targets for anti-diabetes drug discovery and hopeful clinical applications in human cell therapy.

  17. Blunted Refeeding Response and Increased Locomotor Activity in Mice Lacking FoxO1 in Synapsin-Cre–Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongxia; Plum-Morschel, Leona; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Lu, Taylor Y.; Kim-Muller, Ja Young; Heinrich, Garrett; Wardlaw, Sharon L.; Silver, Rae; Accili, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Successful development of antiobesity agents requires detailed knowledge of neural pathways controlling body weight, eating behavior, and peripheral metabolism. Genetic ablation of FoxO1 in selected hypothalamic neurons decreases food intake, increases energy expenditure, and improves glucose homeostasis, highlighting the role of this gene in insulin and leptin signaling. However, little is known about potential effects of FoxO1 in other neurons. To address this question, we executed a broad-based neuronal ablation of FoxO1 using Synapsin promoter–driven Cre to delete floxed Foxo1 alleles. Lineage-tracing experiments showed that NPY/AgRP and POMC neurons were minimally affected by the knockout. Nonetheless, Syn-Cre-Foxo1 knockouts demonstrated a catabolic energy homeostatic phenotype with a blunted refeeding response, increased sensitivity to leptin and amino acid signaling, and increased locomotor activity, likely attributable to increased melanocortinergic tone. We confirmed these data in mice lacking the three Foxo genes. The effects on locomotor activity could be reversed by direct delivery of constitutively active FoxO1 to the mediobasal hypothalamus, but not to the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The data reveal that the integrative function of FoxO1 extends beyond the arcuate nucleus, suggesting that central nervous system inhibition of FoxO1 function can be leveraged to promote hormone sensitivity and prevent a positive energy balance. PMID:23835335

  18. Blunted refeeding response and increased locomotor activity in mice lacking FoxO1 in synapsin-Cre-expressing neurons.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongxia; Plum-Morschel, Leona; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Lu, Taylor Y; Kim-Muller, Ja Young; Heinrich, Garrett; Wardlaw, Sharon L; Silver, Rae; Accili, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Successful development of antiobesity agents requires detailed knowledge of neural pathways controlling body weight, eating behavior, and peripheral metabolism. Genetic ablation of FoxO1 in selected hypothalamic neurons decreases food intake, increases energy expenditure, and improves glucose homeostasis, highlighting the role of this gene in insulin and leptin signaling. However, little is known about potential effects of FoxO1 in other neurons. To address this question, we executed a broad-based neuronal ablation of FoxO1 using Synapsin promoter-driven Cre to delete floxed Foxo1 alleles. Lineage-tracing experiments showed that NPY/AgRP and POMC neurons were minimally affected by the knockout. Nonetheless, Syn-Cre-Foxo1 knockouts demonstrated a catabolic energy homeostatic phenotype with a blunted refeeding response, increased sensitivity to leptin and amino acid signaling, and increased locomotor activity, likely attributable to increased melanocortinergic tone. We confirmed these data in mice lacking the three Foxo genes. The effects on locomotor activity could be reversed by direct delivery of constitutively active FoxO1 to the mediobasal hypothalamus, but not to the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The data reveal that the integrative function of FoxO1 extends beyond the arcuate nucleus, suggesting that central nervous system inhibition of FoxO1 function can be leveraged to promote hormone sensitivity and prevent a positive energy balance.

  19. The long non-coding RNA lncFOXO1 suppresses growth of human breast cancer cells through association with BAP1.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jie; Feng, Jing; Li, Qian; Li, Xia; Zeng, Saitian

    2017-05-01

    Breast cancer, one of the common cancers of women, is the leading cause of death among women below the age of 50 years in western countries. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to be involved in diverse biological processes, both physical and pathological. However, to date, only a few lncRNAs have been functionally identified in breast cancer, and the overall pathophysiological contributions of lncRNAs to breast cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, we identified a novel lncRNA termed lncFOXO1 through microarray screening. lncFOXO1 is significantly decreased in breast cancer tissues and cell lines and downregulation of lncFOXO1 expression associates with poorer overall survival. Functional assays demonstrated its suppressive role in breast cancer in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistically, lncFOXO1 suppressed the growth of breast cancer by increasing FOXO1 transcription. Moreover, we found that lncFOXO1 associated with BRCA-1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) and regulates its binding and the level of mono-ubiquitinated H2A at K119 (ubH2AK119) at FOXO1 promoter.

  20. Liver Med23 ablation improves glucose and lipid metabolism through modulating FOXO1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yajing; Rosso, Leonardo Gómez; Huang, Ping; Wang, Zhichao; Xu, Yichi; Yao, Xiao; Bao, Menghan; Yan, Jun; Song, Haiyun; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Mediator complex is a molecular hub integrating signaling, transcription factors, and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) machinery. Mediator MED23 is involved in adipogenesis and smooth muscle cell differentiation, suggesting its role in energy homeostasis. Here, through the generation and analysis of a liver-specific Med23-knockout mouse, we found that liver Med23 deletion improved glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as insulin responsiveness, and prevented diet-induced obesity. Remarkably, acute hepatic Med23 knockdown in db/db mice significantly improved the lipid profile and glucose tolerance. Mechanistically, MED23 participates in gluconeogenesis and cholesterol synthesis through modulating the transcriptional activity of FOXO1, a key metabolic transcription factor. Indeed, hepatic Med23 deletion impaired the Mediator and RNAPII recruitment and attenuated the expression of FOXO1 target genes. Moreover, this functional interaction between FOXO1 and MED23 is evolutionarily conserved, as the in vivo activities of dFOXO in larval fat body and in adult wing can be partially blocked by Med23 knockdown in Drosophila. Collectively, our data revealed Mediator MED23 as a novel regulator for energy homeostasis, suggesting potential therapeutic strategies against metabolic diseases. PMID:25223702

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitors induce autophagy through FOXO1-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianbin; Ng, Shukie; Wang, Jigang; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Shi-Hao; Yang, Naidi; Lin, Qingsong; Xia, Dajing; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-04-03

    Autophagy is a catabolic process in response to starvation or other stress conditions to sustain cellular homeostasis. At present, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to induce autophagy in cells through inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) pathway. FOXO1, an important transcription factor regulated by AKT, is also known to play a role in autophagy induction. At present, the role of FOXO1 in the HDACIs-induced autophagy has not been reported. In this study, we first observed that HDACIs increased the expression of FOXO1 at the mRNA and protein level. Second, we found that FOXO1 transcriptional activity was enhanced by HDACIs, as evidenced by increased FOXO1 nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity. Third, suppression of FOXO1 function by siRNA knockdown or by a chemical inhibitor markedly blocked HDACIs-induced autophagy. Moreover, we found that FOXO1-mediated autophagy is achieved via its transcriptional activation, leading to a dual effect on autophagy induction: (i) enhanced expression of autophagy-related (ATG) genes, and (ii) suppression of MTOR via transcription of the SESN3 (sestrin 3) gene. Finally, we found that inhibition of autophagy markedly enhanced HDACIs-mediated cell death, indicating that autophagy serves as an important cell survival mechanism. Taken together, our studies reveal a novel function of FOXO1 in HDACIs-mediated autophagy in human cancer cells and thus support the development of a novel therapeutic strategy by combining HDACIs and autophagy inhibitors in cancer therapy.

  2. The metabolic activator FOXO1 binds hepatitis B virus DNA and activates its transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomai, Amir; Shaul, Yosef

    2009-04-17

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA virus that targets the liver and infects humans worldwide. Recently we have shown that the metabolic regulator PGC-1{alpha} coactivates HBV transcription thereby rendering the virus susceptible to fluctuations in the nutritional status of the liver. PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV is mediated through the liver-enriched nuclear receptor HNF4{alpha} and through another yet unknown transcription factor(s). Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, a known target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation and a central mediator of glucose metabolism in the liver, binds HBV core promoter and activates its transcription. This activation is further enhanced in the presence of PGC-1{alpha}, implying that FOXO1 is a target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV transcription. Thus, our results identify another key metabolic regulator as an activator of HBV transcription, thereby supporting the principle that HBV gene expression is regulated in a similar way to key hepatic metabolic genes.

  3. New Insight Into Metformin Action: Regulation of ChREBP and FOXO1 Activities in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyu; Kover, Karen L.; Heruth, Daniel P.; Watkins, Dara J.; Moore, Wayne V.; Jackson, Kathyrin; Zang, Mengwei

    2015-01-01

    Metformin has been considered a potential adjunctive therapy in treating poorly controlled type 1 diabetes with obesity and insulin resistance, owing to its potent effects on improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying mechanism of metformin's vascular protective effects remains obscure. Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP), a key regulator of cellular redox state induced by high-glucose concentration, decreases thioredoxin reductase activity and mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. Here we report that high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction is associated with induction of TXNIP expression in primary human aortic endothelial cells exposed to high-glucose conditions, whereas the metformin treatment suppresses high-glucose-induced TXNIP expression at mRNA and protein levels. We further show that metformin decreases the high-glucose-stimulated nuclear entry rate of two transcription factors, carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) and forkhead box O1 (FOXO1), as well as their recruitment on the TXNIP promoter. An AMP-activated protein kinase inhibitor partially compromised these metformin effects. Our data suggest that endothelial dysfunction resulting from high-glucose concentrations is associated with TXNIP expression. Metformin down-regulates high-glucose-induced TXNIP transcription by inactivating ChREBP and FOXO1 in endothelial cells, partially through AMP-activated protein kinase activation. PMID:26147751

  4. Parecoxib suppresses CHOP and Foxo1 nuclear translocation, but increases GRP78 levels in a rat model of focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhi; Wang, Na; Xia, Pingping; Wang, E; Liao, Juan; Guo, Qulian

    2013-04-01

    Parecoxib, a novel COX-2 inhibitor, functions as a neuroprotective agent and rescues neurons from cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury-induced apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying parecoxib neuroprotection remain to be elucidated. There is growing evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays an important role in neuronal death caused by brain ischemia. However, very little is known about the role of parecoxib in mediating pathophysiological reactions to ER stress induced by ischemic reperfusion injury. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated whether delayed administration of parecoxib attenuates brain damage via suppressing ER stress-induced cell death. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered parecoxib (10 or 30 mg kg(-1), IP) or isotonic saline twice a day starting 24 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for three consecutive days. The expressions of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and oxygen-regulated protein 150 (ORP150) and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) and forkhead box protein O 1 (Foxo1) in cytoplasmic and nuclear fraction were determined by Western blotting. The levels of caspase-12 expression were checked by immunohistochemistry analysis, served as a marker for ER stress-induced apoptosis. Parecoxib significantly suppressed cerebral ischemic injury-induced nuclear translocation of CHOP and Foxo1 and attenuated the immunoreactivity of caspase-12 in ischemic penumbra. Furthermore, the protective effect of delayed administration of parecoxib was accompanied by an increased GRP78 and ORP150 expression. Therefore, our study suggested that elevation of GRP78 and ORP150, and suppression of CHOP and Foxo1 nuclear translocation may contribute to parecoxib-mediated neuroprotection during ER stress responses.

  5. CAR-mediated repression of Foxo1 transcriptional activity regulates the cell cycle inhibitor p21 in mouse livers.

    PubMed

    Kazantseva, Yuliya A; Yarushkin, Andrei A; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O

    2014-07-03

    1,4-Bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP), an agonist of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), is a well-known strong primary chemical mitogen for the mouse liver. Despite extensive investigation of the role of CAR in the regulation of cell proliferation, our knowledge of the intricate mediating mechanism is incomplete. In this study, we demonstrated that long-term CAR activation by TCPOBOP increased liver-to-body weight ratio and decreased tumour suppressor Foxo1 expression and transcriptional activity, which were correlated with reduced expression of genes regulated by Foxo1, including the cell-cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a(p21), and upregulation of the cell-cycle regulator Cyclin D1. Moreover, we demonstrated the negative regulatory effect of TCPOBOP-activated CAR on the association of Foxo1 with the target Foxo1 itself and Cdkn1a(p21) promoters. Thus, we identified CAR-mediated repression of cell cycle inhibitor p21, as mediated by repression of FOXO1 expression and transcriptional activity. CAR-FOXO1 cross-talk may provide new opportunities for understanding liver diseases and developing more effective therapeutic approaches to better drug treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MicroRNA-21 plays an oncogenic role by targeting FOXO1 and activating the PI3K/AKT pathway in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pil-Jong; Kim, Young-Goo; Nam, Soo Jeong; Paik, Jin Ho; Kim, Tae Min; Heo, Dae Seog; Kim, Chul-Woo; Jeon, Yoon Kyung

    2015-01-01

    The prognostic implications of miR-21, miR-17-92 and miR-155 were evaluated in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients, and novel mechanism by which miR-21 contributes to the oncogenesis of DLBCL by regulating FOXO1 and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway was investigated. The expressions of miR-21, miR-17-92 and miR-155 measured by quantitative reverse-transcription-PCR were significantly up-regulated in DLBCL tissues (n=200) compared to control tonsils (P=0.012, P=0.001 and P<0.0001). Overexpression of miR-21 and miR-17-92 was significantly associated with shorter progression-free survival (P=0.003 and P=0.014) and overall survival (P=0.004 and P=0.012). High miR-21 was an independent prognostic factor in DLBCL patients treated with rituximab-combined chemotherapy. MiR-21 level was inversely correlated with the levels of FOXO1 and PTEN in DLBCL cell lines. Reporter-gene assay showed that miR-21 directly targeted and suppressed the FOXO1 expression, and subsequently inhibited Bim transcription in DLBCL cells. MiR-21 also down-regulated PTEN expression and consequently activated the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which further decreased FOXO1 expression. Moreover, miR-21 inhibitor suppressed the expression and activity of MDR1, thereby sensitizing DLBCL cells to doxorubicin. These data demonstrated that miR-21 plays an important oncogenic role in DLBCL by modulating the PI3K/AKT/mTOR/FOXO1 pathway at multiple levels resulting in strong prognostic implication. Therefore, targeting miR-21 may have therapeutic relevance in DLBCL. PMID:25909227

  7. Overexpression of Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-3 (MKP-3) reduces FoxO1 phosphorylation in mice hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Bárbara de Almeida; Kuga, Gabriel Keine; Muñoz, Vitor Rosetto; Gaspar, Rafael Calais; Tavares, Mariana Rosolen; Botezelli, José Diego; da Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos; Cintra, Dennys Esper; de Moura, Leandro Pereira; Simabuco, Fernando Moreira; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo

    2017-10-17

    The mitogen-activated kinase phosphatase-3 (MKP-3) has gained great importance in the scientific community by acting as a regulator of the cell cycle through dephosphorylation of FoxO1, an important transcription factor involved in the insulin intracellular signaling cascade. When dephosphorylated and translocated to the nuclei, FoxO1 can promote the transcription of orexigenic neuropeptides (NPY/AgRP) in the hypothalamus, whereas insulin signaling is responsible for the disruption of this process. However, it is not understood if the hypothalamic activation of MKP-3 affects FoxO1 phosphorylation, and we hypothesized that MKP-3 overexpression reduces the capacity of the insulin signal to phosphorylate FoxO1. In the present study, we overexpressed the DUSP6 gene through an injection of adenovirus directly into the hypothalamic third ventricle of Swiss mice. The colocalization of the adenovirus was confirmed by the immunofluorescence assay. Then, MKP-3 overexpression resulted in a significant reduction of hypothalamic FoxO1 phosphorylation after insulin stimulation. This effect was independent of changes in Akt phosphorylation. Thus, the role of MKP-3 in the hypothalamus is closely associated with FoxO1 dephosphorylation and may provide a potential therapeutic target against hypothalamic disorders related to obesity and unbalanced food intake control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α regulates G1 progression through modulating FOXO1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Naini, Said Movahedi; Choukroun, Gabriel J.; Ryan, James R.; Hentschel, Dirk M.; Shah, Jagesh V.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Group IVA phospholipase A2 [cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α)] is a key mediator of inflammation and tumorigenesis. In this study, by using a combination of chemical inhibition and genetic approaches in zebrafish and murine cells, we identify a mechanism by which cPLA2α promotes cell proliferation. We identified 2 cpla2α genes in zebrafish, cpla2αa and cpla2αb, with conserved phospholipase activity. In zebrafish, loss of cpla2α expression or inhibition of cpla2α activity diminished G1 progression through the cell cycle. This phenotype was also seen in both mouse embryonic fibroblasts and mesangial cells. G1 progression was rescued by the addition of arachidonic acid or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), indicating a phospholipase-dependent mechanism. We further show that PGE2, through PI3K/AKT activation, promoted Forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) phosphorylation and FOXO1 nuclear export. This led to up-regulation of cyclin D1 and down-regulation of p27Kip1, thus promoting G1 progression. Finally, using pharmacologic inhibitors, we show that cPLA2α, rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (RAF)/MEK/ERK, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways cooperatively regulate G1 progression in response to platelet-derived growth factor stimulation. In summary, these data indicate that cPLA2α, through its phospholipase activity, is a critical effector of G1 phase progression through the cell cycle and suggest that pharmacological targeting of this enzyme may have important therapeutic benefits in disease mechanisms that involve excessive cell proliferation, in particular, cancer and proliferative glomerulopathies.—Naini, S. M., Choukroun, G. J., Ryan, J. R., Hentschel, D. M., Shah, J. V., Bonventre, J. V. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α regulates G1 progression through modulating FOXO1 activity. PMID:26644349

  9. FOXO1-suppressed miR-424 regulates the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs by targeting FGF2 under oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liangping; Qi, Qihua; Luo, Jiaquan; Huang, Sheng; Ling, Zemin; Gao, Manman; Zhou, Zhiyu; Stiehler, Maik; Zou, Xuenong

    2017-02-01

    Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as key regulators of the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Our previous in vivo study and other in vitro studies using miRNA microarrays suggest that miR-424 is involved in the regulation of bone formation. However, the role and mechanism of miR-424 in bone formation still remain unknown. Here, we identified that the downregulation of miR-424 mediates bone formation under oxidative stress, and we explored its underlying mechanism. Our results showed that miR-424 was significantly downregulated in an anterior lumbar interbody fusion model of pigs and in a cell model of oxidative stress induced by H2O2. The overexpression of miR-424 inhibited proliferation and osteogenic differentiation shown by a decrease in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization and osteogenic markers, including RUNX2 and ALP, whereas the knockdown of miR-424 led to the opposite results. Moreover, miR-424 exerts its effects by targeting FGF2. Furthermore, we found that FOXO1 suppressed miR-424 expression and bound to its promoter region. FOXO1 enhanced proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in part through the miR-424/FGF2 pathway. These results indicated that FOXO1-suppressed miR-424 regulates both the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs via targeting FGF2, suggesting that miR-424 might be a potential novel therapeutic strategy for promoting bone formation.

  10. FOXO1-suppressed miR-424 regulates the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs by targeting FGF2 under oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangping; Qi, Qihua; Luo, Jiaquan; Huang, Sheng; Ling, Zemin; Gao, Manman; Zhou, Zhiyu; Stiehler, Maik; Zou, Xuenong

    2017-01-01

    Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as key regulators of the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Our previous in vivo study and other in vitro studies using miRNA microarrays suggest that miR-424 is involved in the regulation of bone formation. However, the role and mechanism of miR-424 in bone formation still remain unknown. Here, we identified that the downregulation of miR-424 mediates bone formation under oxidative stress, and we explored its underlying mechanism. Our results showed that miR-424 was significantly downregulated in an anterior lumbar interbody fusion model of pigs and in a cell model of oxidative stress induced by H2O2. The overexpression of miR-424 inhibited proliferation and osteogenic differentiation shown by a decrease in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization and osteogenic markers, including RUNX2 and ALP, whereas the knockdown of miR-424 led to the opposite results. Moreover, miR-424 exerts its effects by targeting FGF2. Furthermore, we found that FOXO1 suppressed miR-424 expression and bound to its promoter region. FOXO1 enhanced proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in part through the miR-424/FGF2 pathway. These results indicated that FOXO1-suppressed miR-424 regulates both the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs via targeting FGF2, suggesting that miR-424 might be a potential novel therapeutic strategy for promoting bone formation. PMID:28186136

  11. Active FOXO1 is a Key Determinant of Isoform-Specific Progesterone Receptor Transactivation and Senescence Programming

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Caroline H.; Knutson, Todd P.; Lange, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Progesterone promotes differentiation coupled to proliferation and pro-survival in the breast, but inhibits estrogen-driven growth in the reproductive tract and ovaries. Herein, it is demonstrated, using progesterone receptor (PR) isoform-specific ovarian cancer model systems, that PR-A and PR-B promote distinct gene expression profiles that differ from PR-driven genes in breast cancer cells. In ovarian cancer models, PR-A primarily regulates genes independently of progestin, while PR-B is the dominant ligand-dependent isoform. Notably, FOXO1 and the PR/FOXO1 target-gene p21 (CDKN1A) are repressed by PR-A, but induced by PR-B. In the presence of progestin, PR-B, but not PR-A, robustly induced cellular senescence via FOXO1-dependent induction of p21 and p15 (CDKN2B). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays performed on PR-isoform specific cells demonstrated that while each isoform is recruited to the same PRE-containing region of the p21 promoter in response to progestin, only PR-B elicits active chromatin marks. Overexpression of constitutively active FOXO1 in PR-A-expressing cells conferred robust ligand-dependent upregulation of the PR-B target genes GZMA, IGFBP1, and p21, and induced cellular senescence. In the presence of endogenous active FOXO1, PR-A was phosphorylated on Ser294 and transactivated PR-B at PR-B target genes; these events were blocked by the FOXO1 inhibitor (AS1842856). PR isoform-specific regulation of the FOXO1/p21 axis recapitulated in human primary ovarian tumor explants treated with progestin; loss of progestin sensitivity correlated with high AKT activity. PMID:26577046

  12. MicroRNA-146b promotes adipogenesis by suppressing the SIRT1-FOXO1 cascade

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jiyun; Lee, Hyunjung; Jung, Chang Hwa; Jeon, Tae Il; Ha, Tae Youl

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) plays a critical role in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis and promotes fat mobilization in white adipose tissue. However, regulation of SIRT1 during adipogenesis, particularly through microRNAs, remains unclear. We observed that miR-146b expression was markedly increased during adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Differentiation of 3T3-L1 was induced by overexpression of miR-146b. Conversely, inhibition of miR-146b decreased adipocyte differentiation. Bioinformatics-based studies suggested that SIRT1 is a target of miR-146b. Further analysis confirmed that SIRT1 was negatively regulated by miR-146b. We also observed that miR-146b bound directly to the 3′-untranslated region of SIRT1 and inhibited adipogenesis through SIRT1 downregulation. The miR-146b/SIRT1 axis mediates adipogenesis through increased acetylation of forkhead box O1 (FOXO1). Expression of miR-146b was increased and SIRT1 mRNA subsequently decreased in the adipose tissues of diet-induced and genetically obese mice. Furthermore, in vivo knockdown of miR-146b by a locked nucleic acid miR-146b antagomir significantly reduced body weight and fat volume in accordance with upregulation of SIRT1 and subsequent acetylation of FOXO1. Therefore, the miR-146b/SIRT1 pathway could be a potential target for obesity prevention and treatment. PMID:24009212

  13. Expression of PUMA in Follicular Granulosa Cells Regulated by FoxO1 Activation During Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-Qun; Shen, Ming; Wu, Wang-Jun; Li, Bo-Jiang; Weng, Qian-Nan; Li, Mei; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is a main cause of follicular atresia. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced granulosa cell (GC) apoptosis is regulated by a variety of signaling pathways involving numerous genes and transcription factors. In this study, we found expression of the p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), a BH3-only Bcl-2 subfamily protein, in ovarian GCs during oxidative stress. By overexpression and knockdown of Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), we found that FoxO1 regulates PUMA at the protein level. Moreover, as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to activate FoxO1 by promoting its nuclear import, we used a JNK inhibitor to reduce FoxO1 activation and detected decreased PUMA messenger RNA expression and protein levels during oxidative stress. In addition, in vivo oxidative stress-induced upregulation of PUMA was found following injection of 3 nitropropionic acid in mice. In conclusion, oxidative stress increases PUMA expression regulated by FoxO1 in follicular GCs.

  14. Early-life physical activity reverses metabolic and Foxo1 epigenetic misregulation induced by gestational sleep disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Mutskov, Vesco; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Wang, Yang; Carreras, Alba; Nobrega, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders are highly prevalent during late pregnancy and can impose adverse effects, such as preeclampsia and diabetes. However, the consequences of sleep fragmentation (SF) on offspring metabolism and epigenomic signatures are unclear. We report that physical activity during early life, but not later, reversed the increased body weight, altered glucose and lipid homeostasis, and increased visceral adipose tissue in offspring of mice subjected to gestational SF (SFo). The reversibility of this phenotype may reflect epigenetic mechanisms induced by SF during gestation. Accordingly, we found that the metabolic master switch Foxo1 was epigenetically misregulated in SFo livers in a temporally regulated fashion. Temporal Foxo1 analysis and its gluconeogenetic targets revealed that the epigenetic abnormalities of Foxo1 precede the metabolic syndrome phenotype. Importantly, regular physical activity early, but not later in life, reversed Foxo1 epigenetic misregulation and altered the metabolic phenotype in gestationally SF-exposed offspring. Thus, we have identified a restricted postnatal period during which lifestyle interventions may reverse the Foxo1 epigenetically mediated risk for metabolic dysfunction later in the life, as induced by gestational sleep disorders. PMID:25568076

  15. The Nuclear Zinc Finger Protein Zfat Maintains FoxO1 Protein Levels in Peripheral T Cells by Regulating the Activities of Autophagy and the Akt Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikura, Shuhei; Iwaihara, Yuri; Tanaka, Yoko; Luo, Hao; Nishi, Kensuke; Doi, Keiko; Koyanagi, Midori; Okamura, Tadashi; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Shirasawa, Senji

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) is a key molecule for the development and functions of peripheral T cells. However, the precise mechanisms regulating FoxO1 expression in peripheral T cells remain elusive. We previously reported that Zfatf/f-CD4Cre mice showed a marked decline in FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells, partially through proteasomal degradation. Here we have identified the precise mechanisms, apart from proteasome-mediated degradation, of the decreased FoxO1 levels in Zfat-deficient T cells. First, we confirmed that tamoxifen-inducible deletion of Zfat in Zfatf/f-CreERT2 mice coincidently decreases FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells, indicating that Zfat is essential for maintaining FoxO1 levels in these cells. Although the proteasome-specific inhibitors lactacystin and epoxomicin only moderately increase FoxO1 protein levels, the inhibitors of lysosomal proteolysis bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine restore the decreased FoxO1 levels in Zfat-deficient T cells to levels comparable with those in control cells. Furthermore, Zfat-deficient T cells show increased numbers of autophagosomes and decreased levels of p62 protein, together indicating that Zfat deficiency promotes lysosomal FoxO1 degradation through autophagy. In addition, Zfat deficiency increases the phosphorylation levels of Thr-308 and Ser-473 of Akt and the relative amounts of cytoplasmic to nuclear FoxO1 protein levels, indicating that Zfat deficiency causes Akt activation, leading to nuclear exclusion of FoxO1. Our findings have demonstrated a novel role of Zfat in maintaining FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells by regulating the activities of autophagy and the Akt signaling pathway. PMID:27226588

  16. FOXO1 in the ventromedial hypothalamus regulates energy balance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Woo; Donato, Jose; Berglund, Eric D; Choi, Yun-Hee; Kohno, Daisuke; Elias, Carol F; Depinho, Ronald A; Elmquist, Joel K

    2012-07-01

    The transcription factor FOXO1 plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis by regulating leptin and insulin activity in many cell types, including neurons. However, the neurons mediating these effects and the identity of the molecular targets through which FOXO1 regulates metabolism remain to be defined. Here, we show that the ventral medial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) is a key site of FOXO1 action. We found that mice lacking FOXO1 in steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) neurons of the VMH are lean due to increased energy expenditure. The mice also failed to appropriately suppress energy expenditure in response to fasting. Furthermore, these mice displayed improved glucose tolerance due to increased insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and heart. Gene expression profiling and sequence analysis revealed several pathways regulated by FOXO1. In addition, we identified the nuclear receptor SF-1 as a direct FOXO1 transcriptional target in the VMH. Collectively, our data suggest that the transcriptional networks modulated by FOXO1 in VMH neurons are key components in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis.

  17. FOXO1 in the ventromedial hypothalamus regulates energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Woo; Donato, Jose; Berglund, Eric D.; Choi, Yun-Hee; Kohno, Daisuke; Elias, Carol F.; DePinho, Ronald A.; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor FOXO1 plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis by regulating leptin and insulin activity in many cell types, including neurons. However, the neurons mediating these effects and the identity of the molecular targets through which FOXO1 regulates metabolism remain to be defined. Here, we show that the ventral medial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) is a key site of FOXO1 action. We found that mice lacking FOXO1 in steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) neurons of the VMH are lean due to increased energy expenditure. The mice also failed to appropriately suppress energy expenditure in response to fasting. Furthermore, these mice displayed improved glucose tolerance due to increased insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and heart. Gene expression profiling and sequence analysis revealed several pathways regulated by FOXO1. In addition, we identified the nuclear receptor SF-1 as a direct FOXO1 transcriptional target in the VMH. Collectively, our data suggest that the transcriptional networks modulated by FOXO1 in VMH neurons are key components in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. PMID:22653058

  18. USP7 Attenuates Hepatic Gluconeogenesis Through Modulation of FoxO1 Gene Promoter Occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jessica A.; Tabata, Mitsuhisa; Rodgers, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic forkhead protein FoxO1 is a key component of systemic glucose homeostasis via its ability to regulate the transcription of rate-limiting enzymes in gluconeogenesis. Important in the regulation of FoxO1 transcriptional activity are the modifying/demodifying enzymes that lead to posttranslational modification. Here, we demonstrate the functional interaction and regulation of FoxO1 by herpesvirus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7; also known as herpesvirus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease, HAUSP), a deubiquitinating enzyme. We show that USP7-mediated mono-deubiquitination of FoxO1 results in suppression of FoxO1 transcriptional activity through decreased FoxO1 occupancy on the promoters of gluconeogenic genes. Knockdown of USP7 in primary hepatocytes leads to increased expression of FoxO1-target gluconeogenic genes and elevated glucose production. Consistent with this, USP7 gain-of-function suppresses the fasting/cAMP-induced activation of gluconeogenic genes in hepatocyte cells and in mouse liver, resulting in decreased hepatic glucose production. Notably, we show that the effects of USP7 on hepatic glucose metabolism depend on FoxO1. Together, these results place FoxO1 under the intimate regulation of deubiquitination and glucose metabolic control with important implication in diseases such as diabetes. PMID:24694308

  19. USP7 attenuates hepatic gluconeogenesis through modulation of FoxO1 gene promoter occupancy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jessica A; Tabata, Mitsuhisa; Rodgers, Joseph T; Puigserver, Pere

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic forkhead protein FoxO1 is a key component of systemic glucose homeostasis via its ability to regulate the transcription of rate-limiting enzymes in gluconeogenesis. Important in the regulation of FoxO1 transcriptional activity are the modifying/demodifying enzymes that lead to posttranslational modification. Here, we demonstrate the functional interaction and regulation of FoxO1 by herpesvirus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7; also known as herpesvirus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease, HAUSP), a deubiquitinating enzyme. We show that USP7-mediated mono-deubiquitination of FoxO1 results in suppression of FoxO1 transcriptional activity through decreased FoxO1 occupancy on the promoters of gluconeogenic genes. Knockdown of USP7 in primary hepatocytes leads to increased expression of FoxO1-target gluconeogenic genes and elevated glucose production. Consistent with this, USP7 gain-of-function suppresses the fasting/cAMP-induced activation of gluconeogenic genes in hepatocyte cells and in mouse liver, resulting in decreased hepatic glucose production. Notably, we show that the effects of USP7 on hepatic glucose metabolism depend on FoxO1. Together, these results place FoxO1 under the intimate regulation of deubiquitination and glucose metabolic control with important implication in diseases such as diabetes.

  20. FoxO1 Haploinsufficiency Protects Against High-Fat Diet–Induced Insulin Resistance With Enhanced Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor γ Activation in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane J.; Li, Pingping; Huntley, Jessica; Chang, Jeffrey P.; Arden, Karen C.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors represent evolutionarily conserved targets of insulin signaling, regulating metabolism and cellular differentiation in response to changes in nutrient availability. Although the FoxO1 isoform is known to play a key role in adipogenesis, its physiological role in differentiated adipose tissue remains unclear. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this study, we analyzed the phenotype of FoxO1 haploinsufficient mice to investigate the role of FoxO1 in high-fat diet–induced obesity and adipose tissue metabolism. RESULTS We showed that reduced FoxO1 expression protects mice against obesity-related insulin resistance with marked improvement not only in hepatic insulin sensitivity but also in skeletal muscle insulin action. FoxO1 haploinsufficiency also resulted in increased peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR)γ gene expression in adipose tissue, with enhanced expression of PPARγ target genes known to influence metabolism. Moreover, treatment of mice with the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone caused a greater improvement in in vivo insulin sensitivity in FoxO1 haploinsufficient animals, including reductions in circulating proinflammatory cytokines. CONCLUSIONS These findings indicate that FoxO1 proteins negatively regulate insulin action and that their effect may be explained, at least in part, by inhibition of PPARγ function. PMID:19289458

  1. FoxO1 target Gpr17 activates AgRP neurons to regulate food intake.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongxia; Orozco, Ian J; Su, Ya; Suyama, Shigetomo; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger; Horvath, Tamas L; Wardlaw, Sharon L; Plum, Leona; Arancio, Ottavio; Accili, Domenico

    2012-06-08

    Hypothalamic neurons expressing Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) are critical for initiating food intake, but druggable biochemical pathways that control this response remain elusive. Thus, genetic ablation of insulin or leptin signaling in AgRP neurons is predicted to reduce satiety but fails to do so. FoxO1 is a shared mediator of both pathways, and its inhibition is required to induce satiety. Accordingly, FoxO1 ablation in AgRP neurons of mice results in reduced food intake, leanness, improved glucose homeostasis, and increased sensitivity to insulin and leptin. Expression profiling of flow-sorted FoxO1-deficient AgRP neurons identifies G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr17 as a FoxO1 target whose expression is regulated by nutritional status. Intracerebroventricular injection of Gpr17 agonists induces food intake, whereas Gpr17 antagonist cangrelor curtails it. These effects are absent in Agrp-Foxo1 knockouts, suggesting that pharmacological modulation of this pathway has therapeutic potential to treat obesity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Necdin controls Foxo1 acetylation in hypothalamic arcuate neurons to modulate the thyroid axis.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Koichi; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Fujiwara, Kazushiro; Shimpuku, Mayumi; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2012-04-18

    The forkhead transcription factor Foxo1 regulates energy homeostasis by modulating gene expression in the hypothalamus. Foxo1 undergoes post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation, which modulate its functional activities. Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent protein deacetylase, regulates the acetylation status of Foxo1 in mammalian cells. Necdin, a pleiotropic protein required for neuronal development and survival, interacts with both Sirt1 and p53 to facilitate p53 deacetylation. The necdin gene (Ndn), an imprinted gene transcribed only from the paternal allele, is strongly expressed in hypothalamic neurons. Here, we demonstrate that necdin controls the acetylation status of Foxo1 in vivo in hypothalamic arcuate neurons to modulate the thyroid function. Necdin forms a stable ternary complex with Sirt1 and Foxo1, diminishes Foxo1 acetylation, and suppresses the transcriptional activity of Foxo1 in vitro. Paternal Ndn mutant mice express high levels of acetylated Foxo1 and mRNAs encoding agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus in vivo during the juvenile period. The mutant mice exhibit endocrine dysfunction characteristic of hypothalamic hypothyroidism. Chemically induced hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism lead to hypothalamic responses similar to those under necdin-deficient and excessive conditions, respectively, suggesting that thyroid hormone serves as a negative regulator of this system. These results suggest that necdin regulates Foxo1 acetylation and neuropeptide gene expression in the arcuate neurons to modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis during development.

  3. FoxO1, the Transcriptional Chief of Staff of Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kousteni, Stavroula

    2011-01-01

    FoxO1, one of the four FoxO isoforms of Forkhead transcription factors, is highly expressed in insulin-responsive tissues, including pancreas, liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, as well as in the skeleton. In all these tissues FoxO1 orchestrates the transcriptional cascades regulating glucose metabolism. Indeed, FoxO1 is a major target of insulin which inhibits its transcriptional activity via nuclear exclusion. In the pancreas, FoxO1 regulates β-cell formation and function by a balanced dual mode of action that suppresses β-cell proliferation but promotes survival. Hepatic glucose production is promoted and lipid metabolism is regulated by FoxO1 such that under insulin resistance they lead to hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, two features of type 2 diabetes. In skeletal muscle FoxO1 maintains energy homeostasis during fasting and provides energy supply through breakdown of carbohydrates, a process that leads to atrophy and underlies glycemic control in insulin resistance. In a dual function, FoxO1 regulates energy and nutrient homeostasis though energy storage in white adipose tissue, but promotes energy expenditure in brown adipose tissue. In its most recently discovered novel role, FoxO1 acts as a transcriptional link between the skeleton and pancreas as well as other insulin target tissues to regulate energy homeostasis. Through its expression in osteoblasts it controls glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity and energy expenditure. In a feedback mode of regulation, FoxO1 is also a target of insulin signaling in osteoblasts. Insulin suppresses activity of osteoblastic FoxO1 thus promoting beneficial effects of osteoblasts on glucose metabolism. The multiple actions of FoxO1 in all glucose-regulating organs, along with clinical studies suggesting that its glycemic properties are conserved in humans, establish this transcription factor as a master regulator of energy metabolism across species. PMID:21816244

  4. CBP-mediated FOXO-1 acetylation inhibits pancreatic tumor growth by targeting SirT.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Kartick C; Fofaria, Neel M; Gupta, Parul; Srivastava, Sanjay K

    2014-03-01

    Here, we investigated the potential mechanism of capsaicin-mediated apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Capsaicin treatment phosphorylated c-jun-NH2-kinase (JNK); forkhead box transcription factor, class O (FOXO1); and BIM in BxPC-3, AsPC-1, and L3.6PL cells. The expression of BIM increased in response to capsaicin treatment. Capsaicin treatment caused cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, indicating apoptosis. Antioxidants tiron and PEG-catalase blocked capsaicin-mediated JNK/FOXO/BIM activation and protected the cells from apoptosis. Furthermore, capsaicin treatment caused a steady increase in the nuclear expression of FOXO-1, leading to increased DNA binding. Capsaicin-mediated expression of BIM was found to be directly dependent on the acetylation of FOXO-1. The expression of CREB-binding protein (CBP) was increased, whereas SirT-1 was reduced by capsaicin treatment. Using acetylation mimic or defective mutants, our result demonstrated that phosphorylation of FOXO-1 was mediated through acetylation by capsaicin treatment. JNK inhibitor attenuated the phosphorylation of FOXO-1, activation of BIM, and abrogated capsaicin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, silencing FOXO1 by siRNA blocked capsaicin-mediated activation of BIM and apoptosis, whereas overexpression of FOXO-1 augmented its effects. Silencing Bim drastically reduced capsaicin-mediated cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, indicating the role of BIM in apoptosis. Oral administration of 5 mg/kg capsaicin substantially suppressed the growth of BxPC-3 tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Tumors from capsaicin-treated mice showed an increase in the phosphorylation of JNK, FOXO-1, BIM, and levels of CBP, cleavage of caspase-3, PARP, and decreased SirT-1 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that capsaicin activated JNK and FOXO-1, leading to the acetylation of FOXO-1 through CBP and SirT-1. Acetylated FOXO1 induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells through BIM activation.

  5. Sepsis increases the expression and activity of the transcription factor Forkhead Box O 1 (FOXO1) in skeletal muscle by a glucocorticoid-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ira J; Alamdari, Nima; O'Neal, Patrick; Gonnella, Patricia; Aversa, Zaira; Hasselgren, Per-Olof

    2010-05-01

    Sepsis-induced muscle wasting has severe clinical consequences, including muscle weakness, need for prolonged ventilatory support and stay in the intensive care unit, and delayed ambulation with risk for pulmonary and thromboembolic complications. Understanding molecular mechanisms regulating loss of muscle mass in septic patients therefore has significant clinical implications. Forkhead Box O (FOXO) transcription factors have been implicated in muscle wasting, partly reflecting upregulation of the ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1. The influence of sepsis on FOXO transcription factors in skeletal muscle is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that sepsis upregulates expression and activity of FOXO transcription factors in skeletal muscle by a glucocorticoid-dependent mechanism. Sepsis in rats increased muscle FOXO1 and 3a mRNA and protein levels but did not influence FOXO4 expression. Nuclear FOXO1 levels and DNA binding activity were increased in septic muscle whereas FOXO3a nuclear levels were not increased during sepsis. Sepsis-induced expression of FOXO1 was reduced by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU38486 and treatment of rats with dexamethasone increased FOXO1 mRNA levels suggesting that the expression of FOXO1 is regulated by glucocorticoids. Reducing FOXO1, but not FOXO3a, expression by siRNA in cultured L6 myotubes inhibited dexamethasone-induced atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression, further supporting a role of FOXO1 in glucocorticoid-regulated muscle wasting. Results suggest that sepsis increases FOXO1 expression and activity in skeletal muscle by a glucocorticoid-dependent mechanism and that glucocorticoid-dependent upregulation of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in skeletal muscle is regulated by FOXO1. The study is significant because it provides novel information about molecular mechanisms involved in sepsis-induced muscle wasting.

  6. PKA turnover by the REGγ-proteasome modulates FoxO1 cellular activity and VEGF-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Lai, Li; Zuo, Qiuhong; Dai, Fujun; Wu, Lin; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Qingxia; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jiang; Li, Lei; Lin, Qingxiang; Creighton, Chad J; Costello, Myra Grace; Huang, Shixia; Jia, Caifeng; Liao, Lujian; Luo, Honglin; Fu, Junjiang; Liu, Mingyao; Yi, Zhengfang; Xiao, Jianru; Li, Xiaotao

    2014-07-01

    The REGγ-proteasome serves as a short-cut for the destruction of certain intact mammalian proteins in the absence of ubiquitin- and ATP. The biological roles of the proteasome activator REGγ are not completely understood. Here we demonstrate that REGγ controls degradation of protein kinase A catalytic subunit-α (PKAca) both in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs). Accumulation of PKAca in REGγ-deficient HUVECs or MEFs results in phosphorylation and nuclear exclusion of the transcription factor FoxO1, indicating that REGγ is involved in preserving FoxO1 transcriptional activity. Consequently, VEGF-induced expression of the FoxO1 responsive genes, VCAM-1 and E-Selectin, was tightly controlled by REGγ in a PKA dependent manner. Functionally, REGγ is crucial for the migration of HUVECs. REGγ(-/-) mice display compromised VEGF-instigated neovascularization in cornea and aortic ring models. Implanted matrigel plugs containing VEGF in REGγ(-/-) mice induced fewer capillaries than in REGγ(+/+) littermates. Taken together, our study identifies REGγ as a novel angiogenic factor that plays an important role in VEGF-induced expression of VCAM-1 and E-Selectin by antagonizing PKA signaling. Identification of the REGγ-PKA-FoxO1 pathway in endothelial cells (ECs) provides another potential target for therapeutic intervention in vascular diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. IRS2 signaling in LepR-b neurons suppresses FoxO1 to control energy balance independently of leptin action.

    PubMed

    Sadagurski, Marianna; Leshan, Rebecca L; Patterson, Christa; Rozzo, Aldo; Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Skorupski, Josh; Jones, Justin C; Depinho, Ronald A; Myers, Martin G; White, Morris F

    2012-05-02

    Irs2-mediated insulin/IGF1 signaling in the CNS modulates energy balance and glucose homeostasis; however, the site for Irs2 function is unknown. The hormone leptin mediates energy balance by acting on leptin receptor (LepR-b)-expressing neurons. To determine whether LepR-b neurons mediate the metabolic actions of Irs2 in the brain, we utilized Lepr(cre) together with Irs2(L/L) to ablate Irs2 expression in LepR-b neurons (Lepr(ΔIrs2)). Lepr(ΔIrs2) mice developed obesity, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Leptin action was not altered in young Lepr(ΔIrs2) mice, although insulin-stimulated FoxO1 nuclear exclusion was reduced in Lepr(ΔIrs2) mice. Indeed, deletion of Foxo1 from LepR-b neurons in Lepr(ΔIrs2) mice normalized energy balance, glucose homeostasis, and arcuate nucleus gene expression. Thus, Irs2 signaling in LepR-b neurons plays a crucial role in metabolic sensing and regulation. While not required for leptin action, Irs2 suppresses FoxO1 signaling in LepR-b neurons to promote energy balance and metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel Mechanism of Blood Pressure Regulation By Foxo1-Mediated Transcriptional Control of Hepatic Angiotensinogen

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yajuan; Zhang, Kebin; Wu, Yuxin; Xu, Zihui; Yong, QC; Kumar, Rajesh; Baker, Kenneth M.; Zhu, Qinglei; Chen, Shouwen; Guo, Shaodong

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a major determinant of blood pressure regulation. It consists of a cascade of enzymatic reactions involving three components: angiotensinogen (Agt), renin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), which generate angiotensin II (Ang II) as a biologically active product. Agt is largely produced in the liver, acting as a major determinant of the circulating RAS, which exerts acute hemodynamic effects on blood pressure regulation. How the expression of Agt is regulated is not completely understood. Here we hypothesize that Agt is regulated by forkhead transcription factor forkhead box class O1 (Foxo1), an insulin-suppressed transcription factor, and thereby controls blood pressure in mice. We generated liver-specific Foxo1 knockout mice (L-F1KO mice), which exhibited a reduction in plasma Agt and Ang II levels and a significant decrease in blood pressure. Using hepatocyte cultures, we demonstrated that overexpression of Foxo1 increased Agt expression, while hepatocytes lacking Foxo1 demonstrated a reduction of Agt gene expression and partially impaired insulin inhibition on Agt gene expression. Furthermore, mouse Agt prompter analysis demonstrated that the Agt promoter region contains a functional Foxo1 binding site, which is responsible for both Foxo1 stimulation and insulin suppression on the promoter activity. Together, these data demonstrate that Foxo1 regulates hepatic Agt gene expression and controls plasma Agt and Ang II levels, modulating blood pressure control in mice. PMID:25069665

  9. FoxO1 interacts with transcription factor EB and differentially regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins via autophagy in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Longhua; Tao, Zhipeng; Zheng, Louise D; Brooke, Joseph P; Smith, Cayleen M; Liu, Dongmin; Long, Yun Chau; Cheng, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are inducible and play an important role in metabolic and redox homeostasis. Recent studies have suggested that FoxO1 controls mitochondrial biogenesis and morphology, but it remains largely unknown how FoxO1 may regulate mitochondrial UCPs. Here we show that FoxO1 interacted with transcription factor EB (Tfeb), a key regulator of autophagosome and lysosome, and mediated the expression of UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 differentially via autophagy in adipocytes. UCP1 was down-regulated but UCP2 and UCP3 were upregulated during adipocyte differentiation, which was associated with increased Tfeb and autophagy activity. However, inhibition of FoxO1 suppressed Tfeb and autophagy, attenuating UCP2 and UCP3 but increasing UCP1 expression. Pharmacological blockade of autophagy recapitulated the effects of FoxO1 inhibition on UCPs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that FoxO1 interacted with Tfeb by directly binding to its promoter, and silencing FoxO1 led to drastic decrease in Tfeb transcript and protein levels. These data provide the first line of evidence that FoxO1 interacts with Tfeb to regulate autophagy and UCP expression in adipocytes. Dysregulation of FoxO1→autophagy→UCP pathway may account for metabolic changes in obesity. PMID:27777789

  10. Role of hypothalamic Foxo1 in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Seon; Pak, Youngmi K; Jang, Pil-Geum; Namkoong, Cherl; Choi, Yon-Sik; Won, Jong-Chul; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Kim, Seung-Whan; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Park, Joong-Yeol; Kim, Young-Bum; Lee, Ki-Up

    2006-07-01

    Insulin signaling in the hypothalamus plays a role in maintaining body weight. Studies suggest that the forkhead transcription factor Foxo1 is an important mediator of insulin signaling in peripheral tissues. Here we demonstrate that in normal mice, hypothalamic Foxo1 expression is reduced by the anorexigenic hormones insulin and leptin. These hormones' effects on feeding are inhibited when hypothalamic Foxo1 is activated, establishing a new signaling pathway through which insulin and leptin regulate food intake in hypothalamic neurons. Moreover, activation of Foxo1 in the hypothalamus increases food intake and body weight, whereas inhibition of Foxo1 decreases both. Foxo1 stimulates the transcription of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related protein through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, but suppresses the transcription of anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin by antagonizing the activity of signal transducer-activated transcript-3 (STAT3). Our data suggest that hypothalamic Foxo1 is an important regulator of food intake and energy balance.

  11. Insulin-regulated hepatic gluconeogenesis through FOXO1-PGC-1alpha interaction.

    PubMed

    Puigserver, Pere; Rhee, James; Donovan, Jerry; Walkey, Christopher J; Yoon, J Cliff; Oriente, Francesco; Kitamura, Yukari; Altomonte, Jennifer; Dong, Hengjiang; Accili, Domenico; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2003-05-29

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is absolutely required for survival during prolonged fasting or starvation, but is inappropriately activated in diabetes mellitus. Glucocorticoids and glucagon have strong gluconeogenic actions on the liver. In contrast, insulin suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. Two components known to have important physiological roles in this process are the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 (also known as FKHR) and peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1 (PGC-1alpha; also known as PPARGC1), a transcriptional co-activator; whether and how these factors collaborate has not been clear. Using wild-type and mutant alleles of FOXO1, here we show that PGC-1alpha binds and co-activates FOXO1 in a manner inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation. Furthermore, FOXO1 function is required for the robust activation of gluconeogenic gene expression in hepatic cells and in mouse liver by PGC-1alpha. Insulin suppresses gluconeogenesis stimulated by PGC-1alpha but co-expression of a mutant allele of FOXO1 insensitive to insulin completely reverses this suppression in hepatocytes or transgenic mice. We conclude that FOXO1 and PGC-1alpha interact in the execution of a programme of powerful, insulin-regulated gluconeogenesis.

  12. Molecular Mechanism of Betaine on Hepatic Lipid Metabolism: Inhibition of Forkhead Box O1 (FoxO1) Binding to Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Lee, Bonggi; Kim, Min Jo; Park, Min Hi; An, Hye Jin; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Chung, Ki Wung; Park, June Whoun; Yu, Byung Pal; Choi, Jae Sue; Chung, Hae Young

    2016-09-14

    Betaine is a major water-soluble component of Lycium chinensis. Although there are reports about the protective effects of betaine on hepatic steatosis, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We used db/db mice and HepG2 cells to examine the mechanism underlying betaine-mediated protection against hepatic steatosis. Here, we showed increased hepatic lipid accumulation in db/db mice, which is associated with increased activation of lipogenic transcription factors including forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), whereas betaine administration by oral gavage reversed these characteristics. We investigated whether betaine ameliorates hepatic steatosis by inhibiting FoxO1/PPARγ signaling in HepG2 cells. Although adenovirus-mediated FoxO1 overexpression notably increased mRNA expression levels of PPARγ and its target genes including FAS and ACC, betaine treatment reversed them. Furthermore, betaine inhibited FoxO1 binding to the PPARγ promoter and PPARγ transcriptional activity in HepG2 cells, which was previously shown to induce hepatic steatosis. We concluded that betaine ameliorates hepatic steatosis, at least in part, by inhibiting the FoxO1 binding to PPARγ and their downstream lipogenic signaling cascade.

  13. Involvement of FoxO1 in the effects of follicle-stimulating hormone on inhibition of apoptosis in mouse granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, M; Liu, Z; Li, B; Teng, Y; Zhang, J; Tang, Y; Sun, S-C; Liu, H

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian ovaries, follicular atresia occurs periodically and destroys almost all the follicles in the ovary. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) acts as the primary survival factor during follicular atresia by preventing apoptosis in granulosa cells. FoxO1 is a critical factor in promoting follicular atresia and granulosa cell apoptosis. FSH inhibits the induction of FoxO1. In this report, we investigated the role of FSH-FoxO1 pathway in mouse follicular atresia. FSH dampened stress-induced apoptosis and the expression of FoxO1 and pro-apoptosis genes in mouse granulosa cells (MGCs). In contrast, overexpression of FoxO1 inhibited the viability of MGCs and induced the expression of endogenous FoxO1. The signaling cascades involved in regulating FoxO1 activity upon FSH treatment were identified using FSH signaling antagonists. Blocking protein kinase A (PKA), phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) or protein kinase B (AKT) restored the upregulation of FoxO1 and apoptotic signals, which was suppressed by FSH. Moreover, inhibition of PKA or PI3K impaired FSH-induced AKT activity, but inactivation of PI3K or AKT had little effect on PKA activity in the presence of FSH. Correspondingly, constitutive activation of FoxO1 (all three AKT sites were replaced by alanines) also promoted MGC apoptosis despite FSH administration. Furthermore, both luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that FoxO1 directly bound to a FoxO-recognized element site within the FoxO1 promoter and contributed to the regulation of FoxO1 expression in response to FSH. Taken together, we propose a novel model in which FSH downregulates FoxO1-dependent apoptosis in MGCs by coordinating the PKA–PI3K–AKT–FoxO1 axis and FoxO1–FoxO1 positive feedback. PMID:25321482

  14. Are therapeutic effects of antiacne agents mediated by activation of FoxO1 and inhibition of mTORC1?

    PubMed Central

    Melnik, Bodo C; Schmitz, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Acne pathogenesis has recently been linked to decreased nuclear FoxO1 levels and increased mTORC1 activity. This hypothesis postulates that antiacne agents either enhance nuclear FoxO activity or inhibit mTORC1. Benzoyl peroxide (BPO), by activation of oxidative stress-inducible kinases, increases nuclear FoxO levels promoting Sestrin3-mediated AMPK activation. Furthermore, BPO-derived ROS may activate AMPK via ataxia–telangiectasia mutated. Isotretinoin and all-trans retinoic acid may stimulate FoxO gene expression. Doxycycline may enhance FoxOs nuclear retention by inhibiting the expression of exportin 1. Suppression of TNFα signalling by tetracyclines, erythromycin and other macrolides may attenuate IKKβ-TSC1-mediated mTORC1 activation. Erythromycin attenuates ERK1/2 activity and thereby increases TSC2. Azelaic acid may decrease mTORC1 by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration, increasing cellular ROS and nuclear FoxO levels. Antiandrogens may attenuate mTORC1 by suppressing mTORC2-mediated Akt/TSC2 signalling. This hypothesis unmasks a common mode of action of antiacne agents as either FoxO enhancers or mTORC1 inhibitors and thus provides a rational approach for the development of new antiacne agents. PMID:23800068

  15. Chinese herbal medicine Yi-Gan-San decreases the lipid accumulation in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes by modulating the activities of transcription factors SREBP-1c and FoxO1.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masayuki; Seki, Takashi; Iwasaki, Koh; Sakamoto, Kazuichi

    2009-09-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolism in adipose tissue is closely related to the occurrence and progression of a wide variety of metabolic syndromes. We have analyzed the pharmacological effects of Chinese herbal medicines on cell differentiation and lipid metabolism in adipocytes. Yi-Gan-San (YGS) is a Chinese herbal medicine that is effective in treating the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia; however, its physiological mechanism remains unclear. We analyzed the effects of YGS on lipid accumulation in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Adipocyte differentiation was induced in mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes by treatment with the mixture of dexamethasone, 3-iso-butyl-1-methylxanthine, and insulin, and cells were cultured for 8 days with Chinese herbal medicines, including YGS. YGS effectively reduced the lipid accumulation in the differentiated 3T3-L1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on cell viability. YGS also reduced the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an enzyme involved in lipid synthesis. In contrast, YGS gave no noticeable effect on glucose uptake and fatty acid uptake in the differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Moreover, we established the stably transfected 3T3-L1 cell lines, each of which expresses the luciferase reporter gene under the control of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) or FoxO1. SREBP-1c is a transcription factor involved in fatty acid synthesis, and FoxO1 is a forkhead-type transcription factor involved in adipocyte differentiation. Using these cell lines, we showed that YGS reduced the transcriptional activity of SREBP-1c, whereas YGS increased the activity of FoxO1. Thus, YGS may suppress lipid synthesis and fat accumulation in adipocytes through modulating the activities of SREBP-1c and FoxO1.

  16. FOXO1 Mediates Vitamin D Deficiency-Induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcang; Villalta, S Armando; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-03-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies have consistently shown a relationship between vitamin D deficiency, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This is supported by recent trials showing that vitamin D supplementation in prediabetic or insulin-resistant patients with inadequate vitamin D levels improves insulin sensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency-induced insulin resistance and DM2 remain unknown. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is a primary defect in the majority of patients with DM2. Although sustained activation of forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in skeletal muscle causes insulin resistance, a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and FOXO1 activation in muscle is unknown. We generated skeletal muscle-specific vitamin D receptor (VDR)-null mice and discovered that these mice developed insulin resistance and glucose intolerance accompanied by increased expression and activity of FOXO1. We also found sustained FOXO1 activation in the skeletal muscle of global VDR-null mice. Treatment of C2C12 muscle cells with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (VD3) reduced FOXO1 expression, nuclear translocation, and activity. The VD3-dependent suppression of FOXO1 activation disappeared by knockdown of VDR, indicating that it is VDR-dependent. Taken together, these results suggest that FOXO1 is a critical target mediating VDR-null signaling in skeletal muscle. The novel findings provide the conceptual support that persistent FOXO1 activation may be responsible for insulin resistance and impaired glucose metabolism in vitamin D signaling-deficient mice, as well as evidence for the utility of vitamin D supplementation for intervention in DM2.

  17. FOXO1 Mediates Vitamin D Deficiency-induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcang; Villalta, Armando; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies have consistently shown a relationship between vitamin D deficiency, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This is supported by recent trials showing that vitamin D supplementation in prediabetic or insulin-resistant patients with inadequate vitamin D levels improves insulin sensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency-induced insulin resistance and DM2 remain unknown. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is a primary defect in the majority of patients with DM2. While sustained activation of forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in skeletal muscle causes insulin resistance, a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and FOXO1 activation in muscle is unknown. We generated skeletal muscle-specific vitamin D receptor (VDR)-null mice and discovered that these mice developed insulin resistance and glucose intolerance accompanied by increased expression and activity of FOXO1. We also found sustained FOXO1 activation in the skeletal muscle of global VDR-null mice. Treatment of C2C12 muscle cells with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (VD3) reduced FOXO1 expression, nuclear translocation, and activity. The VD3-dependent suppression of FOXO1 activation disappeared by knockdown of VDR, indicating that it is VDR-dependent. Taken together, these results suggest that FOXO1 is a critical target mediating VDR-null signaling in skeletal muscle. The novel findings provide the conceptual support that persistent FOXO1 activation may be responsible for insulin resistance and impaired glucose metabolism in vitamin D signaling-deficient mice, as well as evidence for the utility of vitamin D supplementation for intervention in DM2. PMID:26462119

  18. Deletion of FoxO1 leads to shortening of QRS by increasing Na(+) channel activity through enhanced expression of both cardiac NaV1.5 and β3 subunit.

    PubMed

    Cai, Benzhi; Wang, Ning; Mao, Weike; You, Tao; Lu, Yan; Li, Xiang; Ye, Bo; Li, Faqian; Xu, Haodong

    2014-09-01

    Our in vitro studies revealed that a transcription factor, Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1), negatively regulates the expression of NaV1.5, a main α subunit of the cardiac Na(+) channel, by altering the promoter activity of SCN5a in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. The in vivo role of FoxO1 in the regulation of cardiac NaV1.5 expression remains unknown. The present study aimed to define the role of FoxO1 in the regulation of NaV1.5 expression and cardiac Na(+) channel activity in mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes and assess the cardiac electrophysiological phenotype of mice with cardiac FoxO1 deletion. Tamoxifen-induced and cardiac-specific FoxO1 deletion was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Cardiac FoxO1 deletion failed to result in either cardiac functional changes or hypertrophy as assessed by echocardiography and individual ventricular cell capacitances, respectively. Western blotting showed that FoxO1 was significantly decreased while NaV1.5 protein level was significantly increased in mouse hearts with FoxO1 deletion. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) revealed that FoxO1 deletion led to an increase in NaV1.5 and Na(+) channel subunit β3 mRNA, but not β1, 2, and 4, or connexin 43. Whole patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that cardiac Na(+) currents were significantly augmented by FoxO1 deletion without affecting the steady-state activation and inactivation, leading to accelerated depolarization of action potentials in mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes. Electrocardiogram recordings showed that the QRS complex was significantly shortened and the P wave amplitude was significantly increased in conscious and unrestrained mice with cardiac FoxO1 deletion. NaV1.5 expression was decreased in the peri-infarct (border-zone) of mice with myocardial infarction and FoxO1 accumulated in the cardiomyocyte nuclei of chronic ischemic human hearts. Our findings indicate that FoxO1 plays an important role in the regulation of NaV1.5 and β3 subunit expressions as well as Na

  19. Loss of Interdependent Binding by the FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 Forkhead Transcription Factors Culminates in Perturbation of Active Chromatin Marks and Binding of Transcriptional Regulators at Insulin-sensitive Genes.

    PubMed

    Yalley, Akua; Schill, Daniel; Hatta, Mitsutoki; Johnson, Nicole; Cirillo, Lisa Ann

    2016-04-15

    FoxO1 binds to insulin response elements located in the promoters of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), activating their expression. Insulin-mediated phosphorylation of FoxO1 promotes cytoplasmic translocation, inhibiting FoxO1-mediated transactivation. We have previously demonstrated that FoxO1 opens and remodels chromatin assembled from the IGFBP1 promoter via a highly conserved winged helix motif. This finding, which established FoxO1 as a "pioneer" factor, suggested a model whereby FoxO1 chromatin remodeling at regulatory targets facilitates binding and recruitment of additional regulatory factors. However, the impact of FoxO1 phosphorylation on its ability to bind chromatin and the effect of FoxO1 loss on recruitment of neighboring transcription factors at its regulatory targets in liver chromatin is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that an amino acid substitution that mimics insulin-mediated phosphorylation of a serine in the winged helix DNA binding motif curtails FoxO1 nucleosome binding. We also demonstrate that shRNA-mediated loss of FoxO1 binding to the IGFBP1 and G6Pase promoters in HepG2 cells significantly reduces binding of RNA polymerase II and the pioneer factors FoxA1/A2. Knockdown of FoxA1 similarly reduced binding of RNA polymerase II and FoxO1. Reduction in acetylation of histone H3 Lys-27 accompanies loss of FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 binding. Interdependent binding of FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 possibly entails cooperative binding because FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 facilitate one another's binding to IGFPB1 promoter DNA. These results illustrate how transcription factors can nucleate transcriptional events in chromatin in response to signaling events and suggest a model for regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism through interdependent FoxO/FoxA binding.

  20. Foxo1-mediated inflammatory response after cerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; He, Qi; Zhai, Xuan; You, Yan; Li, Lingyu; Hou, Yanghao; He, Faming; Zhao, Yong; Zhao, Jing

    2016-08-26

    The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of transcription factors plays a crucial role in cell apoptosis, immune regulation, and tissue development. Foxo1, as the foremost member of the Foxo family, regulates a wide range of molecular signals in many tissues, including tumor, liver, and brain. This study investigated Foxo1 expression at different time points and in different brain areas, and the role of Foxo1 in vivo in regulating inflammatory injury in a rat model of autologous blood-injected cerebral hemorrhage injury. We found that Foxo1 expression peaked at 12h post-intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and in the ipsilateral corpus striatum. Foxo1 knockdown by Foxo1 siRNA decreased ICH injury, improved neurological function, and decreased the expression of inflammatory factors downstream of the Foxo1 pathway, including TLR4, NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-18. Foxo1 knockdown also decreased the expression and activity of myeloperoxidase, IL-1β, and IL-18. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that Foxo1 is a key regulator of inflammatory injury in rats after ICH. By identifying the molecular mechanisms of Foxo1/TLR4/NF-κB signaling, we provide a novel rationale for therapeutic approaches to managing inflammatory injury after ICH. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Role of resveratrol in FOXO1-mediated gluconeogenic gene expression in the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joo-Man; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Bae, Jin-Sik; Kim, Mi-Young; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Ahn, Yong-Ho

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Insulin-suppression of PEPCK and G6Pase gene expression is counteracted by resveratrol. {yields} Resveratrol upregulates hepatic gluconeogenic genes by attenuating insulin signaling and deacetylating FOXO1, which are SIRT1-independent in the cytosol and SIRT1-dependent in the nucleus, respectively. {yields} Resveratrol increases the binding activity of Foxo1 to the IRE of PEPCK and G6Pase. -- Abstract: During a state of fasting, the blood glucose level is maintained by hepatic gluconeogenesis. SIRT1 is an important metabolic regulator during nutrient deprivation and the liver-specific knockdown of SIRT1 resulted in decreased glucose production. We hypothesize that SIRT1 is responsible for the upregulation of insulin-suppressed gluconeogenic genes through the deacetylation of FOXO1. Treatment of primary cultured hepatocytes with resveratrol increased insulin-repressed PEPCK and G6Pase mRNA levels, which depend on SIRT1 activity. We found that the resveratrol treatment resulted in a decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO1, which are independent of SIRT1 action. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that resveratrol caused the nuclear localization of FOXO1. In the nucleus, FOXO1 is deacetylated by SIRT1, which might make it more accessible to the IRE of the PEPCK and G6Pase promoter, causing an increase in their gene expression. Our results indicate that resveratrol upregulates the expression of gluconeogenic genes by attenuating insulin signaling and by deacetylating FOXO1, which are SIRT1-independent in the cytosol and SIRT1-dependent in the nucleus, respectively.

  2. Changes in the levels and phosphorylation status of Akt, AMPK, CREB, and FoxO1 in hypothalamus of rainbow trout under conditions of enhanced glucosensing activity.

    PubMed

    Otero-Rodiño, Cristina; Velasco, Cristina; Álvarez-Otero, Rosa; López-Patiño, Marcos A; Míguez, Jesús M; Soengas, José L

    2017-10-02

    There is no available information in fish about mechanisms linking glucosensing activation and changes in the expression of brain neuropeptides controlling food intake. Therefore, we assessed in rainbow trout hypothalamus the effects of raised levels of glucose on the levels and phosphorylation status of two transcription factors, FoxO1 and CREB, possibly involved in linking those processes. Moreover, we also aimed to assess the changes in the levels and phosphorylation status of two proteins possibly involved in the modulation of these transcription factors such as Akt and AMPK. Therefore, we evaluated in pools of hypothalamus incubated for 3h and 6h at 15 °C in modified Hanks' medium containing 2, 4, or 8 mM D-glucose the response of parameters related to glucosensing mechanisms, neuropeptide expression, and levels and phosphorylation status of proteins of interest. The activation of hypothalamic glucosensing systems and the concomitant enhanced anorectic potential occurred in parallel with activation of Akt and inhibition of AMPK. The changes in these proteins would relate to neuropeptide expression through changes in the levels and phosphorylation status of transcription factors under their control, such as CREB and FoxO1, which displayed inhibitory (CREB) or activatory (FoxO1) responses to increased glucose. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Combined Treatment of MCF-7 Cells with AICAR and Methotrexate, Arrests Cell Cycle and Reverses Warburg Metabolism through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) and FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Tamás; Szántó, Magdolna; Abdul-Rahman, Omar; Nagy, Lilla; Dér, Ádám; Kiss, Borbála; Bai, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by metabolic alterations, namely, depressed mitochondrial oxidation, enhanced glycolysis and pentose phosphate shunt flux to support rapid cell growth, which is called the Warburg effect. In our study we assessed the metabolic consequences of a joint treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with AICAR, an inducer of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) jointly with methotrexate (MTX), a folate-analog antimetabolite that blunts de novo nucleotide synthesis. MCF7 cells, a model of breast cancer cells, were resistant to the individual application of AICAR or MTX, however combined treatment of AICAR and MTX reduced cell proliferation. Prolonged joint application of AICAR and MTX induced AMPK and consequently enhanced mitochondrial oxidation and reduced the rate of glycolysis. These metabolic changes suggest an anti-Warburg rearrangement of metabolism that led to the block of the G1/S and the G2/M transition slowing down cell cycle. The slowdown of cell proliferation was abolished when mitotropic transcription factors, PGC-1α, PGC-1β or FOXO1 were silenced. In human breast cancers higher expression of AMPKα and FOXO1 extended survival. AICAR and MTX exerts similar additive antiproliferative effect on other breast cancer cell lines, such as SKBR and 4T1 cells, too. Our data not only underline the importance of Warburg metabolism in breast cancer cells but nominate the AICAR+MTX combination as a potential cytostatic regime blunting Warburg metabolism. Furthermore, we suggest the targeting of AMPK and FOXO1 to combat breast cancer.

  4. FOXO1A differentially regulates genes of decidualization.

    PubMed

    Buzzio, Oscar L; Lu, Zhenxiao; Miller, Curt D; Unterman, Terry G; Kim, J Julie

    2006-08-01

    The forkhead box O1A (FOXO1A) has been identified as one gene that is up-regulated early in the decidualization process. To further investigate the role of FOXO1A during this process, six genes, IGFBP1, PRL, TIMP3, LAMB1, CNR1, and DCN, shown to be up-regulated during decidualization, were chosen as potential targets of FOXO1A action. Treatment of human endometrial stromal cells with hormones (estradiol and medroxyprogesterone acetate) plus dibutyryl cAMP (H+dbcAMP) for 48 h increased expression of IGFBP1, PRL, TIMP3, CNR1, and DCN but not LAMB1, as measured by real-time PCR. Silencing of FOXO1A using small interfering RNA oligonucleotides decreased IGFBP1 and DCN levels and increased CNR1, TIMP3, and PRL levels. LAMB1 was not affected. When FOXO1A was overexpressed in human endometrial stromal cells, expression of IGFBP1, DCN, and PRL increased, whereas levels of TIMP3 and CNR1 decreased. Addition of H+dbcAMP caused an increased expression of IGFBP1, PRL, and DCN beyond that of FOXO1A alone. TIMP3 and CNR1 levels decreased even further in response to H+dbcAMP compared with FOXO1A alone. LAMB1, which was unresponsive to FOXO1A, decreased when H+dbcAMP was added. Overexpressing FOXO1A also caused a change in cell shape, in that the stromal fibroblasts acquired a rounded, epithelioid appearance. Finally, reporter studies showed that cotransfection of FOXO1A significantly increased PRL promoter activity but not TIMP3 promoter activity. Addition of H+dbcAMP resulted in a significant increase in PRL promoter activity and a significant decrease in TIMP3 promoter activity. In summary, this study demonstrates the versatile nature of FOXO1A in the regulation of a number of decidualization-specific genes.

  5. SIRT2 suppresses adipocyte differentiation by deacetylating FOX01 and enhancing FOXO1's repressive interaction with PPAR gamma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sirtuin family of proteins possesses NAD-dependent deacetylase and ADP ribosyltransferase activities. They are found to respond to nutrient deprivation and profoundly regulate metabolic functions. We have previously reported that caloric restriction increases the expression of one of the seven mamma...

  6. Foxo1, a Novel Regulator of Osteoblast Differentiation and Skeletogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Cristina C.; Liu, Yuexun; Thant, Lwin M.; Pang, Jason; Palmer, Glyn; Alikhani, Mani

    2010-01-01

    Skeletogenesis depends on the activity of bone-forming cells derived from mesenchymal cells. The pathways that control mesenchymal cell differentiation are not well understood. We propose that Foxo1 is an early molecular regulator during mesenchymal cell differentiation into osteoblasts. In mouse embryos, Foxo1 expression is higher in skeletal tissues, while Foxo1 silencing has a drastic impact on skeletogenesis and craniofacial development, specially affecting pre-maxilla, nasal bone, mandible, tibia, and clavicle. Similarly, Foxo1 activity and expression increase in mouse mesenchymal cells under the influence of osteogenic stimulants. In addition, silencing Foxo1 blocks the expression of osteogenic markers such as Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin and results in decreased culture calcification even in the presence of strong osteogenic stimulants. Conversely, the expression of these markers increases significantly in response to Foxo1 overexpression. One mechanism through which Foxo1 affects mesenchymal cell differentiation into osteoblasts is through regulation of a key osteogenic transcription factor, Runx2. Indeed, our results show that Foxo1 directly interacts with the promoter of Runx2 and regulates its expression. Using a tibia organ culture model, we confirmed that silencing Foxo1 decreases the expression of Runx2 and impairs bone formation. Furthermore, our data reveals that Runx2 and Foxo1 interact with each other and cooperate in the transcriptional regulation of osteoblast markers. In conclusion, our in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo results strongly support the notion that Foxo1 is an early molecular regulator in the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into osteoblast. PMID:20650891

  7. Forkhead protein FoxO1 mediates Agrp-dependent effects of leptin on food intake.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Tadahiro; Feng, Yun; Kitamura, Yukari Ido; Chua, Streamson C; Xu, Allison W; Barsh, Gregory S; Rossetti, Luciano; Accili, Domenico

    2006-05-01

    Leptin controls food intake by regulating the transcription of key neuropeptides in the hypothalamus. The mechanism by which leptin regulates gene expression is unclear, however. Here we show that delivery of adenovirus encoding a constitutively nuclear mutant FoxO1, a transcription factor known to control liver metabolism and pancreatic beta-cell function, to the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of rodents results in a loss of the ability of leptin to curtail food intake and suppress expression of Agrp. Conversely, a transactivation-deficient FoxO1 mutant prevents induction of Agrp by fasting. We also find that FoxO1 and the transcription factor Stat3 exert opposing actions on the expression of Agrp and Pomc through transcriptional squelching. FoxO1 promotes opposite patterns of coactivator-corepressor exchange at the Pomc and Agrp promoters, resulting in activation of Agrp and inhibition of Pomc. Thus, FoxO1 represents a shared component of pathways integrating food intake and peripheral metabolism.

  8. TNF-α Inhibits FoxO1 by Upregulating miR-705 to Aggravate Oxidative Damage in Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Li; Su, Xiaoxia; Yang, Xiaohong; Hu, Chenghu; Li, Bei; Lv, Yajie; Shuai, Yi; Jing, Huan; Deng, Zhihong; Jin, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Decline of antioxidant defense after estrogen deficiency leads to oxidative damage in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), resulting a defect of bone formation in osteoporosis. Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) protein is crucial for defending physiological oxidative damage in bone. But whether FoxO1 is involved in the oxidative damage during osteoporosis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that FoxO1 protein accumulation was decreased in BMMSCs of ovariectomized mice. The decrease of FoxO1 resulted in the suppression of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2) and catalase (Cat) expression and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting the osteogenic differentiation of BMMSCs. The decline of FoxO1 protein was caused by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) accumulated after estrogen deficiency. Mechanistically, TNF-α activated NF-κB pathway to promote microRNA-705 expression, which function as a repressor of FoxO1 through post-transcriptional regulation. Inhibition of NF-κB pathway or knockdown of miR-705 largely prevented the decline of FoxO1-mediated antioxidant defense caused by TNF-α and ameliorated the oxidative damage in osteoporotic BMMSCs. Moreover, the accumulated ROS further activated NF-κB pathway with TNF-α, which formed a feed-forward loop to persistently inhibiting FoxO1 protein accumulation in BMMSCs. In conclusion, our study revealed that the decline of FoxO1 is an important etiology factor of osteoporosis and unclosed a novel mechanism of FoxO1 regulation by TNF-α. These findings suggested a close correlation between inflammation and oxidative stress in stem cell dysfunction during degenerative bone diseases.

  9. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase induce expression of FoxO1, FoxO3a, and myostatin after exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kihyuk; Ochi, Eisuke; Song, Hongsun; Nakazato, Koichi

    2015-10-23

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been shown to regulate protein metabolism in skeletal muscle. We previously found that levels of Forkhead box proteins, FoxO1 and FoxO3a, and myostatin in rat gastrocnemius increased after exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). Eccentric muscle contractions (ECs), defined as elongation of muscle under tension, were used for inducing EIMD. The objective of this study was to clarify whether AMPK participates in activation and expression of FoxO proteins and myostatin in rat gastrocnemius muscle after EIMD. Wistar rats were randomly assigned into the following three groups; CON (n = 6), 180ECs group (ankle angular velocity, 180°/s; n = 6), and 30ECs group (ankle angular velocity, 30°/s; n = 6). 20 ECs were conducted with percutaneous electrical stimulation of gastrocnemius and simultaneous forced dorsiflexion of ankle joint (from 0° to 45°). To evaluate activation of AMPK, we measured the phosphorylated states of AMPK and acetyl CoA carboxylase. For evaluation of the direct relationships of AMPK and other proteins, we also examined contents of FoxOs and myostatin with stimulation of L6 myotube with AMPK agonist, 5 -aminoimidazole -4 -carboxamide -1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) (0.1, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mM). Western blotting was employed for protein analysis. Significant torque deficit was only observed in the 180ECs, suggesting EIMD. We also observed that phosphorylated AMPKα was induced in response to 180ECs (p < 0.01 vs. CON). Additionally, the level of phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase was significantly higher in response to 180ECs and 30ECs. The phosphorylated states of FoxO1, FoxO3a, and myostatin expression were increased significantly in response to 180ECs. Furthermore, treatment of L6 myotubes with AICAR showed similar tendencies to that observed in in vivo gastrocnemius muscle treated with 180ECs. Therefore, we conclude that activation of AMPK plays a key role in increasing the level of FoxO1, FoxO3a

  10. Inhibition of hypothalamic Foxo1 expression reduced food intake in diet-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Ropelle, Eduardo R; Pauli, José R; Prada, Patrícia; Cintra, Dennys E; Rocha, Guilherme Z; Moraes, Juliana C; Frederico, Marisa J S; da Luz, Gabrielle; Pinho, Ricardo A; Carvalheira, José B C; Velloso, Licio A; Saad, Mario A; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2009-05-15

    Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus plays a role in maintaining body weight. The forkhead transcription factor Foxo1 is an important mediator of insulin signalling in the hypothalamus. Foxo1 stimulates the transcription of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related protein through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt signalling pathway, but the role of hypothalamic Foxo1 in insulin resistance and obesity remains unclear. Here, we identify that a high-fat diet impaired insulin-induced hypothalamic Foxo1 phosphorylation and degradation, increasing the nuclear Foxo1 activity and hyperphagic response in rats. Thus, we investigated the effects of the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusion of Foxo1-antisense oligonucleotide (Foxo1-ASO) and evaluated the food consumption and weight gain in normal and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Three days of Foxo1-ASO microinfusion reduced the hypothalamic Foxo1 expression by about 85%. i.c.v. infusion of Foxo1-ASO reduced the cumulative food intake (21%), body weight change (28%), epididymal fat pad weight (22%) and fasting serum insulin levels (19%) and increased the insulin sensitivity (34%) in DIO but not in control animals. Collectively, these data showed that the Foxo1-ASO treatment blocked the orexigenic effects of Foxo1 and prevented the hyperphagic response in obese rats. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of Foxo1 may be used to prevent or treat obesity.

  11. FoxO1 is a negative regulator of FSHβ gene expression in basal and GnRH-stimulated conditions in female.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Suk; Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Cho, Yoon Hee; Seo, Mi Ran; Lee, Yoo Jeoung; Lee, Eun Jig

    2014-06-01

    The importance of forkhead box class O (FoxO) proteins in reproductive endocrinology has been confirmed by age-dependent infertility in females in a FoxO3a-knockout mouse model. In this study, FoxO1 was detected in gonadotropes in the anterior pituitary. Overexpression of FoxO1 in primary pituitary cells decreased FSHβ gene expression in both basal and GnRH-stimulated conditions, and this result was replicated by the human FSHβ promoter activity. Although direct binding of FoxO1 to FoxO-binding element (FBE) (at -124 to -119 bp of the human FSHβ promoter) was not detected in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, a DNA pull-down assay and transfection study using the mutant FBE reporter vector revealed that FBE is necessary in FSHβ suppression by FoxO1, suggestive of other cofactor requirements. GnRH stimulated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway, which induced posttranslational modification of FoxO1 and retained it in the cytoplasm. We also confirmed this result in primary cell cultures; most of the FoxO1 was detected in the cytoplasm when treated with GnRH but in the nucleus when the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway was inhibited. These findings suggest that FoxO1 is regulated by the GnRH signaling pathway and functions as a negative regulator of FSHβ gene expression.

  12. Activation of PPAR alpha by fenofibrate inhibits apoptosis in vascular adventitial fibroblasts partly through SIRT1-mediated deacetylation of FoxO1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Rong; Liu, En-Qi; Zhang, Ji-Ye; Li, Yan-Xiang; Yang, Xiao-Feng; He, Yan-Hao; Zhang, Wei; Jing, Ting; Lin, Rong

    2015-10-15

    Recent studies demonstrated that the ligand-activated transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα (PPARα) acts in association with histone deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation involved in cardiovascular diseases. PPARα activation also participates in the modulation of cell apoptosis. Our previous study found that SIRT1 inhibits the apoptosis of vascular adventitial fibroblasts (VAFs). However, whether the role of PPARα in apoptosis of VAFs is mediated by SIRT1 remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of PPARα agonist fenofibrate on cell apoptosis and SIRT1 expression and related mechanisms in ApoE(-/-) mice and VAFs in vitro. We found that fenofibrate inhibited cell apoptosis in vascular adventitia and up-regulated SIRT1 expression in aorta of ApoE(-/-) mice. Moreover, SIRT1 activator resveratrol (RSV) further enhanced these effects of fenofibrate. In vitro study showed that activation of PPARα by fenofibrate inhibited TNF-α-induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in VAFs. Meanwhile, fenofibrate up-regulated SIRT1 expression and inhibited SIRT1 translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm in VAFs stimulated with TNF-α. Moreover, the effects of fenofibrate on cell apoptosis and SIRT1 expression in VAFs were reversed by PPARα antagonist GW6471. Importantly, treatment of VAFs with SIRT1 siRNA or pcDNA3.1(+)-SIRT1 showed that the inhibitory effect of fenofibrate on cell apoptosis in VAFs through SIRT1. On the other hand, knockdown of FoxO1 decreased cell apoptosis of VAFs compared with fenofibrate group. Overexpression of FoxO1 increased cell apoptosis of VAFs compared with fenofibrate group. Further study found that fenofibrate decreased the expression of acetylated-FoxO1 in TNF-α-stimulated VAFs, which was abolished by SIRT1 knockdown. Taken together, these findings indicate that activation of PPARα by fenofibrate inhibits cell apoptosis in VAFs partly through the SIRT1

  13. FOXO1 is a direct target of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein in Ewing's sarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Liu; Hu, Hsien-Ming; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Chansky, Howard A.

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Inducible and reversible siRNA knockdown of an oncogenic fusion protein such as EWS-Fli1 is feasible and more advantageous than other siRNA methods. {yields} The tumor suppressor gene FOXO1 is a new EWS-Fli1 target. {yields} While trans-activators are known for the FOXO1 gene, there has been no report on negative regulators of FOXO1 transcription. {yields} This study provides first evidence that the EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein can function as a transcriptional repressor of the FOXO1 gene. -- Abstract: Ewing's family tumors are characterized by a specific t(11;22) chromosomal translocation that results in the formation of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein. To investigate the effects of EWS-Fli1 on gene expression, we carried out DNA microarray analysis after specific knockdown of EWS-Fli1 through transfection of synthetic siRNAs. EWS-Fli1 knockdown increased expression of genes such as DKK1 and p57 that are known to be repressed by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein. Among other potential EWS-Fli1 targets identified by our microarray analysis, we have focused on the FOXO1 gene since it encodes a potential tumor suppressor and has not been previously reported in Ewing's cells. To better understand how EWS-Fli1 affects FOXO1 expression, we have established a doxycycline-inducible siRNA system to achieve stable and reversible knockdown of EWS-Fli1 in Ewing's sarcoma cells. Here we show that FOXO1 expression in Ewing's cells has an inverse relationship with EWS-Fli1 protein level, and FOXO1 promoter activity is increased after doxycycline-induced EWS-Fli1 knockdown. In addition, we have found that direct binding of EWS-Fli1 to FOXO1 promoter is attenuated after doxycycline-induced siRNA knockdown of the fusion protein. Together, these results suggest that suppression of FOXO1 function by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein may contribute to cellular transformation in Ewing's family tumors.

  14. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American

  15. A Functional Interaction between Hippo-YAP Signaling and FoxO1 Mediates the Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Dan; Zhai, Peiyong; Del Re, Dominic P.; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Yabuta, Norikazu; Nojima, Hiroshi; Lim, Dae-Sik; Pan, Duojia; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo pathway is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ size and tumorigenesis that negatively regulates cell growth and survival. Here we report that YAP, the terminal effector of the Hippo pathway, interacts with FoxO1 in the nucleus of cardiomyocytes, thereby promoting survival. YAP and FoxO1 form a functional complex on the promoters of the catalase and MnSOD antioxidant genes and stimulate their transcription. Inactivation of YAP, induced by Hippo activation, suppresses FoxO1 activity and decreases antioxidant gene expression, suggesting that Hippo signaling modulates the FoxO1-mediated antioxidant response. In the setting of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in the heart, activation of Hippo antagonizes YAP-FoxO1, leading to enhanced oxidative stress-induced cell death through downregulation of catalase and MnSOD. Conversely, restoration of YAP activity protects against I/R injury. These results suggest that YAP is a nuclear co-factor of FoxO1 and that the Hippo pathway negatively affects cardiomyocyte survival by inhibiting the function of YAP-FoxO1. PMID:24525530

  16. FOXO1 Transcription Factor Inhibits Luteinizing Hormone β Gene Expression in Pituitary Gonadotrope Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Arriola, David J.; Mayo, Susan L.; Skarra, Danalea V.; Benson, Courtney A.; Thackray, Varykina G.

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of luteinizing hormone (LH) is tightly controlled by a complex network of hormonal signaling pathways that can be modulated by metabolic cues, such as insulin. One group of candidate genes that may be regulated by insulin signaling in pituitary gonadotrope cells is the FOXO subfamily of forkhead transcription factors. In this study we investigated whether FOXO1 is expressed in gonadotropes and if it can modulate LH β-subunit (Lhb) gene expression. We demonstrated that FOXO1 is expressed in murine gonadotrope cells and that insulin signaling increased FOXO1 phosphorylation and cytoplasmic localization in a PI3K-dependent manner. We also showed that FOXO1 repressed basal transcription and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) induction of both the murine and human LHB genes in LβT2 cells, suggesting that FOXO1 regulation of LHB transcription may be conserved between rodents and humans. Although we did not detect FOXO1 binding to the proximal Lhb promoter, the FOXO1 DNA binding domain was necessary for the suppression, suggesting that FOXO1 exerts its effect through protein-protein interactions with transcription factors/cofactors required for Lhb gene expression. FOXO1 repression mapped to the proximal Lhb promoter containing steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1), pituitary homeobox 1 (PTX1), and early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) binding elements. Additionally, FOXO1 blocked induction of the Lhb promoter with overexpressed SF1, PTX1, and EGR1, indicating that FOXO1 repression occurs via these transcription factors but not through regulation of their promoters. In summary, we demonstrate that FOXO1 phosphorylation and cellular localization is regulated by insulin signaling in gonadotropes and that FOXO1 inhibits Lhb transcription. Our study also suggests that FOXO1 may play an important role in controlling LH levels in response to metabolic cues. PMID:22865884

  17. FOXO1 transcription factor inhibits luteinizing hormone β gene expression in pituitary gonadotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Arriola, David J; Mayo, Susan L; Skarra, Danalea V; Benson, Courtney A; Thackray, Varykina G

    2012-09-28

    Synthesis of luteinizing hormone (LH) is tightly controlled by a complex network of hormonal signaling pathways that can be modulated by metabolic cues, such as insulin. One group of candidate genes that may be regulated by insulin signaling in pituitary gonadotrope cells is the FOXO subfamily of forkhead transcription factors. In this study we investigated whether FOXO1 is expressed in gonadotropes and if it can modulate LH β-subunit (Lhb) gene expression. We demonstrated that FOXO1 is expressed in murine gonadotrope cells and that insulin signaling increased FOXO1 phosphorylation and cytoplasmic localization in a PI3K-dependent manner. We also showed that FOXO1 repressed basal transcription and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) induction of both the murine and human LHB genes in LβT2 cells, suggesting that FOXO1 regulation of LHB transcription may be conserved between rodents and humans. Although we did not detect FOXO1 binding to the proximal Lhb promoter, the FOXO1 DNA binding domain was necessary for the suppression, suggesting that FOXO1 exerts its effect through protein-protein interactions with transcription factors/cofactors required for Lhb gene expression. FOXO1 repression mapped to the proximal Lhb promoter containing steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1), pituitary homeobox 1 (PTX1), and early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) binding elements. Additionally, FOXO1 blocked induction of the Lhb promoter with overexpressed SF1, PTX1, and EGR1, indicating that FOXO1 repression occurs via these transcription factors but not through regulation of their promoters. In summary, we demonstrate that FOXO1 phosphorylation and cellular localization is regulated by insulin signaling in gonadotropes and that FOXO1 inhibits Lhb transcription. Our study also suggests that FOXO1 may play an important role in controlling LH levels in response to metabolic cues.

  18. Transcriptional repression of FOXO1 by KLF4 contributes to glioma progression

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Guodong; Liu, Dingyang; Xiao, Gelei; Liu, Qing; Yuan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, our findings indicated that FOXO1 expression frequently decreased in glioma tissues and cells. FOXO1 expression decrease correlated with glioma progression and predicted a worse overall survival of glioma patients. Restored FOXO1 expression inhibited glioma cells invasion and suppressed glioma cells proliferation in vitro and growth in vivo. Additionally, we found that KLF4 expression frequently increased in glioma tissues and negatively correlated with FOXO1 expression. Bioinformatics analysis and experimental results indicated that KLF4 transcriptionally repressed FOXO1 expression in glioma cells. Moreover, KLF4 expression increase correlated with glioma progression and predicted a poorer overall survival of glioma patients. KLF4 knockdown attenuated glioma cells invasion and growth. These data provide a rationale for targeted intervention on KLF4-FOXO1 signaling pathway to suppress glioma progression. PMID:27835585

  19. FOXO1 is regulated by insulin and IGF1 in pituitary gonadotropes.

    PubMed

    Skarra, Danalea V; Thackray, Varykina G

    2015-04-15

    The FOXO1 transcription factor is important for multiple aspects of reproductive function. We previously reported that FOXO1 functions as a repressor of gonadotropin hormone synthesis, but how FOXO1 is regulated in pituitary gonadotropes is unknown. The growth factors, insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1), function as key regulators of cell proliferation, metabolism and apoptosis in multiple cell types through the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In this study, we found that insulin and IGF1 signaling in gonadotropes induced FOXO1 phosphorylation through the PI3K/AKT pathway in immortalized and primary cells, resulting in FOXO1 relocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, insulin administration in vivo induced phosphorylation of FOXO1 and AKT in the pituitary. Thus, insulin and IGF1 act as negative regulators of FOXO1 activity and may serve to fine-tune gonadotropin expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. FOXO1 is Regulated by Insulin and IGF1 in Pituitary Gonadotropes

    PubMed Central

    Skarra, Danalea V.; Thackray, Varykina G.

    2015-01-01

    The FOXO1 transcription factor is important for multiple aspects of reproductive function. We previously reported that FOXO1 functions as a repressor of gonadotropin hormone synthesis, but how FOXO1 is regulated in pituitary gonadotropes is unknown. The growth factors, insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) function as key regulators of cell proliferation, metabolism and apoptosis in multiple cell types through the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In this study, we found that insulin and IGF1 signaling in gonadotropes induced FOXO1 phosphorylation through the PI3K/AKT pathway in immortalized and primary cells, resulting in FOXO1 relocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, insulin administration in vivo induced phosphorylation of FOXO1 and AKT in the pituitary. Thus, insulin and IGF1 act as negative regulators of FOXO1 activity and may serve to fine-tune gonadotropin expression. PMID:25676570

  1. Novel repressor regulates insulin sensitivity through interaction with Foxo1

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Jun; Cao, Yongheng; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takemori, Hiroshi; Kawano, Yoshinaga; Sekioka, Risa; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshiya; Sakai, Juro; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Forkhead box-containing protein o (Foxo) 1 is a key transcription factor in insulin and glucose metabolism. We identified a Foxo1-CoRepressor (FCoR) protein in mouse adipose tissue that inhibits Foxo1's activity by enhancing acetylation via impairment of the interaction between Foxo1 and the deacetylase Sirt1 and via direct acetylation. FCoR is phosphorylated at Threonine 93 by catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and is translocated into nucleus, making it possible to bind to Foxo1 in both cytosol and nucleus. Knockdown of FCoR in 3T3-F442A cells enhanced expression of Foxo target and inhibited adipocyte differentiation. Overexpression of FCoR in white adipose tissue decreased expression of Foxo-target genes and adipocyte size and increased insulin sensitivity in Leprdb/db mice and in mice fed a high-fat diet. In contrast, Fcor knockout mice were lean, glucose intolerant, and had decreased insulin sensitivity that was accompanied by increased expression levels of Foxo-target genes and enlarged adipocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that FCoR is a novel repressor that regulates insulin sensitivity and energy metabolism in adipose tissue by acting to fine-tune Foxo1 activity. PMID:22510882

  2. Regulatory O-GlcNAcylation sites on FoxO1 are yet to be identified

    SciTech Connect

    Fardini, Yann; Perez-Cervera, Yobana; Camoin, Luc; Pagesy, Patrick; Lefebvre, Tony; Issad, Tarik

    2015-06-26

    O-GlcNAcylation is a reversible post-translational modification that regulates cytosolic and nuclear proteins. We and others previously demonstrated that FoxO1 is O-GlcNAcylated in different cell types, resulting in an increase in its transcriptional activity. Four O-GlcNAcylation sites were identified in human FOXO1 but directed mutagenesis of each site individually had modest (T317) or no effect (S550, T648, S654) on its O-GlcNAcylation status and transcriptional activity. Moreover, the consequences of mutating all four sites had not been investigated. In the present work, we mutated these sites in the mouse Foxo1 and found that mutation of all four sites did not decrease Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation status and transcriptional activity, and would even tend to increase them. In an attempt to identify other O-GlcNAcylation sites, we immunoprecipitated wild-type O-GlcNAcylated Foxo1 and analysed the tryptic digest peptides by mass spectrometry using High-energy Collisional Dissociation. We identified T646 as a new O-GlcNAcylation site on Foxo1. However, site directed mutagenesis of this site individually or together with all four previously identified residues did not impair Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation and transcriptional activity. These results suggest that residues important for the control of Foxo1 activity by O-GlcNAcylation still remain to be identified. - Highlights: • We mutate four previously identified O-GlcNAcylation sites on Foxo1. • Unexpectedly, these mutations do not reduce Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation. • These mutation do not reduce Foxo1 transcriptional activity. • We identify a new O-GlcNAcylation site on Foxo1 by mass spectrometry. • Mutation of this site increases Foxo1 transcriptional activity.

  3. Transcription factor FoxO1, the dominant mediator of muscle wasting in chronic kidney disease, is inhibited by microRNA-486.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Li, Rongshan; Workeneh, Biruh; Dong, Yanlan; Wang, Xiaonan; Hu, Zhaoyong

    2012-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) accelerates muscle protein degradation by stimulating the ubiquitin proteasome system through activation of the E3 ligases, Atrogin-1/MAFbx and MuRF-1. Forkhead transcription factors (FoxOs) can control the expression of these E3 ligases, but the contribution of individual FoxOs to muscle wasting is unclear. To study this we created mice with a muscle-specific FoxO1 deletion. The absence of FoxO1 blocked 70% of the increase in E3 ligase induction by CKD as well as the proteolysis and loss of muscle mass. Thus, FoxO1 has a role in controlling ubiquitin proteasome system-related proteolysis. As microRNA (miR)-486 reportedly dampens FoxO1 expression and its activity,we transfected a miR-486 mimic into primary cultures of myotubes and found this blocked dexamethasone-stimulated protein degradation without influencing protein synthesis.It also decreased FoxO1 protein translation and increased FoxO1 phosphorylation by downregulation of PTEN phosphatase, a negative regulator of p-Akt. To test its efficacy in vivo, we electroporated miR-486 into muscles and found that the expression of the E3 ligases was suppressed and muscle mass increased despite CKD. Thus, FoxO1 is a dominant mediator of CKD-induced muscle wasting, and miR-486 coordinately decreases FoxO1 and PTEN to protect against this catabolic response.

  4. FoxO1 mediates insulin-dependent regulation of hepatic VLDL production in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamagate, Adama; Qu, Shen; Perdomo, German; Su, Dongming; Kim, Dae Hyun; Slusher, Sandra; Meseck, Marcia; Dong, H. Henry

    2008-01-01

    Excessive production of triglyceride-rich VLDL is attributable to hypertriglyceridemia. VLDL production is facilitated by microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) in a rate-limiting step that is regulated by insulin. To characterize the underlying mechanism, we studied hepatic MTP regulation by forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), a transcription factor that plays a key role in hepatic insulin signaling. In HepG2 cells, MTP expression was induced by FoxO1 and inhibited by exposure to insulin. This effect correlated with the ability of FoxO1 to bind and stimulate MTP promoter activity. Deletion or mutation of the FoxO1 target site within the MTP promoter disabled FoxO1 binding and resulted in abolition of insulin-dependent regulation of MTP expression. We generated mice that expressed a constitutively active FoxO1 transgene and found that increased FoxO1 activity was associated with enhanced MTP expression, augmented VLDL production, and elevated plasma triglyceride levels. In contrast, RNAi-mediated silencing of hepatic FoxO1 was associated with reduced MTP and VLDL production in adult mice. Furthermore, we found that hepatic FoxO1 abundance and MTP production were increased in mice with abnormal triglyceride metabolism. These data suggest that FoxO1 mediates insulin regulation of MTP production and that augmented MTP levels may be a causative factor for VLDL overproduction and hypertriglyceridemia in diabetes. PMID:18497885

  5. SIRT1 Protein, by Blocking the Activities of Transcription Factors FoxO1 and FoxO3, Inhibits Muscle Atrophy and Promotes Muscle Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghoon; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    In several cell types, the protein deacetylase SIRT1 regulates the activities of FoxO transcription factors whose activation is critical in muscle atrophy. However, the possible effects of SIRT1 on the activity of FoxOs in skeletal muscle and on the regulation of muscle size have not been investigated. Here, we show that after food deprivation, SIRT1 levels fall dramatically in type II skeletal muscles (tibialis anterior), which show marked atrophy, unlike in the liver (where SIRT1 rises) or heart or the soleus, a type I muscle (where SIRT1 is unchanged). Maintenance of high SIRT1 levels by electroporation in mouse muscle inhibits markedly the muscle wasting induced by fasting as well as by denervation, and these protective effects require its deacetylase activity. SIRT1 overexpression reduces muscle wasting by blocking the activation of FoxO1 and 3. It thus prevents the induction of key atrogenes, including the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases, atrogin1 and MuRF1, and multiple autophagy (Atg) genes and the increase in overall proteolysis. In normal muscle, SIRT1 overexpression by electroporation causes rapid fiber hypertrophy without, surprisingly, activation of the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway. Thus, SIRT1 activation favors postnatal muscle growth, and its fall appears to be critical for atrophy during fasting. Consequently, SIRT1 activation represents an attractive possible pharmacological approach to prevent muscle wasting and cachexia. PMID:24003218

  6. FOXO1 Mediates the Autocrine Effect of Endothelin-1 on Endothelial Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cifarelli, Vincenza; Lee, Sojin; Kim, Dae Hyun; Zhang, Ting; Kamagate, Adama; Slusher, Sandra; Bertera, Suzanne; Luppi, Patrizia; Trucco, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia exerts a deleterious effect on endothelium, contributing to endothelial dysfunction and microvascular complications in poorly controlled diabetes. To understand the underlying mechanism, we studied the effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1) on endothelial production of Forkhead box O1 (FOXO1), a forkhead transcription factor that plays an important role in cell survival. ET-1 is a 21-amino acid peptide that is secreted primarily from endothelium. Using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer approach, we delivered FOXO1 cDNA into cultured human aorta endothelial cells. FOXO1 was shown to stimulate B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2-associated death promoter (BAD) production and promote cellular apoptosis. This effect was counteracted by ET-1. In response to ET-1, FOXO1 was phosphorylated and translocated from the nucleus to cytoplasm, resulting in inhibition of BAD production and mitigation of FOXO1-mediated apoptosis. Hyperglycemia stimulated FOXO1 O-glycosylation and promoted its nuclear localization in human aorta endothelial cells. This effect accounted for unbridled FOXO1 activity in the nucleus, contributing to augmented BAD production and endothelial apoptosis under hyperglycemic conditions. FOXO1 expression became deregulated in the aorta of both streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and diabetic db/db mice. This hyperglycemia-elicited FOXO1 deregulation and its ensuing effect on endothelial cell survival was corrected by ET-1. Likewise, FoxO1 deregulation in the aorta of diabetic mice was reversible after the reduction of hyperglycemia by insulin therapy. These data reveal a mechanism by which FOXO1 mediated the autocrine effect of ET-1 on endothelial cell survival. FOXO1 deregulation, resulting from an impaired ability of ET-1 to control FOXO1 activity in endothelium, may contribute to hyperglycemia-induced endothelial lesion in diabetes. PMID:22570335

  7. Distinct functions for the transcription factor Foxo1 at various stages of B cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Hart S; Baracho, Gisele V; Omori, Sidne A; Bruckner, Shane; Arden, Karen C; Castrillon, Diego H; DePinho, Ronald A; Rickert, Robert C

    2008-12-01

    The transcription factors Foxo1, Foxo3 and Foxo4 modulate cell fate 'decisions' in diverse systems. Here we show that Foxo1-dependent gene expression was critical at many stages of B cell differentiation. Early deletion of Foxo1 caused a substantial block at the pro-B cell stage due to a failure to express interleukin 7 receptor-alpha. Foxo1 inactivation in late pro-B cells resulted in an arrest at the pre-B cell stage due to lower expression of the recombination-activating genes Rag1 and Rag2. Deletion of Foxo1 in peripheral B cells led to fewer lymph node B cells due to lower expression of L-selectin and failed class-switch recombination due to impaired upregulation of the gene encoding activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Thus, Foxo1 regulates a transcriptional program that is essential for early B cell development and peripheral B cell function.

  8. Differential response of glioma cells to FOXO1-directed therapy.

    PubMed

    Lau, Cara J; Koty, Zaf; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2009-07-01

    Gliomas are the most common adult primary brain tumors, and the most malignant form, glioblastoma multiforme, is invariably fatal. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway is altered in most glioblastoma multiforme. PTEN, an important negative regulator of the PI3K-Akt pathway, is also commonly mutated in glioma, leading to constitutive activation of Akt. One ultimate consequence is phosphorylation and inactivation of FOXO forkhead transcription factors that regulate genes involved in apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, nutrient availability, DNA repair, stress, and angiogenesis. We tested the ability of a mutant FOXO1 factor that is not subject to Akt phosphorylation to overcome dysregulated PI3K-Akt signaling in two PTEN-null glioma cell lines, U87 and U251. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of the mutant FOXO1 successfully restored cell cycle arrest and induced cell death in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo in xenograft models of human glioma (33% survival at 1 year of animals bearing U251 tumors). However, U87 were much more resistant than U251 to mutant FOXO1-induced death, showing evidence of increased nuclear export and Akt-independent phosphorylation of FOXO1 at S249. A cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inhibitor decreased phosphorylation of S249 and rendered U87 cells significantly more susceptible to mutant FOXO1-induced death. Our results indicate that targeting FOXO1, which is at the convergence point of several growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase pathways, can effectively induce glioma cell death and inhibit tumor growth. They also highlight the importance of Akt-independent phosphorylation events in the nuclear export of FOXO1.

  9. PAX3-FOXO1 and FGFR4 in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Amy D; van der Ent, Martijn A; Grosveld, Gerard C

    2012-10-01

    We and others have identified FGFR4 as a direct transcriptional target of the alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) specific fusion protein, PAX3-FOXO1. We hypothesized fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) may act as an effector of PAX3-FOXO1, contributing to PAX3-FOXO1 tumorigenic phenotypes. However, we demonstrate that enhanced expression of FGFR4 does not contribute to inhibited differentiation, enhanced proliferation, or transformation downstream of PAX3-FOXO1 in primary mouse myoblasts. Therefore we were unable to identify any contribution of up regulation of wild type FGFR4 to PAX3-FOXO1 driven tumorigenesis. Conversely, a constitutively active mutant of FGFR4 can enhance primary myoblast proliferation and transformation, indicating activating mutations of FGFR4 could contribute to the development and progression of ARMS. We sequenced the FGFR4 mRNA from five ARMS cell lines and identified no somatic mutations, nor any association with any human single nucleotide polymorphism within the FGFR4 coding region.

  10. Kinetics of nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of Foxo1 and Foxo3A in adult skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Schachter, Tova Neustadt; Shen, Tiansheng; Liu, Yewei

    2012-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the transcription factors Foxo1 and Foxo3A control expression of proteins that mediate muscle atrophy, making the nuclear concentration and nuclear-cytoplasmic movements of Foxo1 and Foxo3A of therapeutic interest in conditions of muscle wasting. Here, we use Foxo-GFP fusion proteins adenovirally expressed in cultured adult mouse skeletal muscle fibers to characterize the time course of nuclear efflux of Foxo1-GFP in response to activation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway to determine the time course of nuclear influx of Foxo1-GFP during inhibition of this pathway and to show that Akt mediates the efflux of nuclear Foxo1-GFP induced by IGF-1. Localization of endogenous Foxo1 in muscle fibers, as determined via immunocytochemistry, is consistent with that of Foxo1-GFP. Inhibition of the nuclear export carrier chromosome region maintenance 1 by leptomycin B (LMB) traps Foxo1 in the nucleus and results in a relatively rapid rate of Foxo1 nuclear accumulation, consistent with a high rate of nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of Foxo1 under control conditions before LMB application, with near balance of unidirectional influx and efflux. Expressed Foxo3A-GFP shuttles ∼20-fold more slowly than Foxo1-GFP. Our approach allows quantitative kinetic characterization of Foxo1 and Foxo3A nuclear-cytoplasmic movements in living muscle fibers under various experimental conditions. PMID:22932683

  11. FOXO1 deletion reduces dendritic cell function and enhances susceptibility to periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenmei; Dong, Guangyu; Pacios, Sandra; Alnammary, Maher; Barger, Laura A; Wang, Yu; Wu, Yingying; Graves, Dana T

    2015-04-01

    The host response plays both protective and destructive roles in periodontitis. FOXO1 is a transcription factor that is activated in dendritic cells (DCs), but its function in vivo has not been examined. We investigated the role of FOXO1 in activating DCs in experimental (CD11c.Cre(+).FOXO1(L/L)) compared with matched control mice (CD11c.Cre(-).FOXO1(L/L)) in response to oral pathogens. Lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion reduced the recruitment of DCs to oral mucosal epithelium by approximately 40%. FOXO1 was needed for expression of genes that regulate migration, including integrins αν and β3 and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Ablation of FOXO1 in DCs significantly decreased IL-12 produced by DCs in mucosal surfaces. Moreover, FOXO1 deletion reduced migration of DCs to lymph nodes, reduced capacity of DCs to induce formation of plasma cells, and reduced production of bacteria-specific antibody. The decrease in DC function in the experimental mice led to increased susceptibility to periodontitis through a mechanism that involved a compensatory increase in osteoclastogenic factors, IL-1β, IL-17, and RANKL. Thus, we reveal a critical role for FOXO1 in DC recruitment to oral mucosal epithelium and activation of adaptive immunity induced by oral inoculation of bacteria. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. FOXO1 Deletion Reduces Dendritic Cell Function and Enhances Susceptibility to Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenmei; Dong, Guangyu; Pacios, Sandra; Alnammary, Maher; Barger, Laura A.; Wang, Yu; Wu, Yingying; Graves, Dana T.

    2016-01-01

    The host response plays both protective and destructive roles in periodontitis. FOXO1 is a transcription factor that is activated in dendritic cells (DCs), but its function in vivo has not been examined. We investigated the role of FOXO1 in activating DCs in experimental (CD11c.Cre+.FOXO1L/L) compared with matched control mice (CD11c.Cre−.FOXO1L/L) in response to oral pathogens. Lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion reduced the recruitment of DCs to oral mucosal epithelium by approximately 40%. FOXO1 was needed for expression of genes that regulate migration, including integrins αν and β3 and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Ablation of FOXO1 in DCs significantly decreased IL-12 produced by DCs in mucosal surfaces. Moreover, FOXO1 deletion reduced migration of DCs to lymph nodes, reduced capacity of DCs to induce formation of plasma cells, and reduced production of bacteria-specific antibody. The decrease in DC function in the experimental mice led to increased susceptibility to periodontitis through a mechanism that involved a compensatory increase in osteoclastogenic factors, IL-1β, IL-17, and RANKL. Thus, we reveal a critical role for FOXO1 in DC recruitment to oral mucosal epithelium and activation of adaptive immunity induced by oral inoculation of bacteria. PMID:25794707

  13. The Roles of Cdk5-Mediated Subcellular Localization of FOXO1 in Neuronal Death

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiechao; Li, Huifang; Li, Xiaoping; Zhang, Guanyun; Niu, Yaqiong; Yuan, Zengqiang; Zhang, Yun-Wu; Bu, Guojun; Xu, Huaxi

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been linked to the death of postmitotic cortical neurons during brain development. We now report that, in mouse cortical neurons, Cdk5 is capable of phosphorylating the transcription factor FOXO1 at Ser249 in vitro and in vivo. Cellular stresses resulting from extracellular stimulation by H2O2 or β-amyloid promote hyperactivation of Cdk5, FOXO1 nuclear export and inhibition of its downstream transcriptional activity. In contrast, a loss of Cdk5 leads to FOXO1 translocation into the nucleus: a shift due to decreased AKT activity but independent of S249 phosphorylation. Nuclear FOXO1 upregulates transcription of the proapoptotic gene, BIM, leading to neuronal death, which can be rescued when endogenous FOXO1 was replaced by the cytoplasmically localized form of FOXO1, FOXO1-S249D. Cytoplasmic, but not nuclear, Cdk5 attenuates neuronal death by inhibiting FOXO1 transcriptional activity and BIM expression. Together, our findings suggest that Cdk5 plays a novel and unexpected role in the degeneration of postmitotic neurons through modulation of the cellular location of FOXO1, which constitutes an alternative pathway through which Cdk5 deficiency leads to neuronal death. PMID:25673854

  14. The roles of Cdk5-mediated subcellular localization of FOXO1 in neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiechao; Li, Huifang; Li, Xiaoping; Zhang, Guanyun; Niu, Yaqiong; Yuan, Zengqiang; Herrup, Karl; Zhang, Yun-Wu; Bu, Guojun; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Jie

    2015-02-11

    Deficiency of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been linked to the death of postmitotic cortical neurons during brain development. We now report that, in mouse cortical neurons, Cdk5 is capable of phosphorylating the transcription factor FOXO1 at Ser249 in vitro and in vivo. Cellular stresses resulting from extracellular stimulation by H2O2 or β-amyloid promote hyperactivation of Cdk5, FOXO1 nuclear export and inhibition of its downstream transcriptional activity. In contrast, a loss of Cdk5 leads to FOXO1 translocation into the nucleus: a shift due to decreased AKT activity but independent of S249 phosphorylation. Nuclear FOXO1 upregulates transcription of the proapoptotic gene, BIM, leading to neuronal death, which can be rescued when endogenous FOXO1 was replaced by the cytoplasmically localized form of FOXO1, FOXO1-S249D. Cytoplasmic, but not nuclear, Cdk5 attenuates neuronal death by inhibiting FOXO1 transcriptional activity and BIM expression. Together, our findings suggest that Cdk5 plays a novel and unexpected role in the degeneration of postmitotic neurons through modulation of the cellular location of FOXO1, which constitutes an alternative pathway through which Cdk5 deficiency leads to neuronal death. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/352624-12$15.00/0.

  15. SREBP1c-CRY1 signalling represses hepatic glucose production by promoting FOXO1 degradation during refeeding

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hagoon; Lee, Gha Young; Selby, Christopher P.; Lee, Gung; Jeon, Yong Geun; Lee, Jae Ho; Cheng, Kenneth King Yip; Titchenell, Paul; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Xu, Aimin; Sancar, Aziz; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    SREBP1c is a key lipogenic transcription factor activated by insulin in the postprandial state. Although SREBP1c appears to be involved in suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis, the molecular mechanism is not thoroughly understood. Here we show that CRY1 is activated by insulin-induced SREBP1c and decreases hepatic gluconeogenesis through FOXO1 degradation, at least, at specific circadian time points. SREBP1c−/− and CRY1−/− mice show higher blood glucose than wild-type (WT) mice in pyruvate tolerance tests, accompanied with enhanced expression of PEPCK and G6Pase genes. CRY1 promotes degradation of nuclear FOXO1 by promoting its binding to the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2. Although SREBP1c fails to upregulate CRY1 expression in db/db mice, overexpression of CRY1 attenuates hyperglycaemia through reduction of hepatic FOXO1 protein and gluconeogenic gene expression. These data suggest that insulin-activated SREBP1c downregulates gluconeogenesis through CRY1-mediated FOXO1 degradation and that dysregulation of hepatic SREBP1c-CRY1 signalling may contribute to hyperglycaemia in diabetic animals. PMID:27412556

  16. Green tea component EGCG, insulin and IGF-1 promote nuclear efflux of atrophy-associated transcription factor Foxo1 in skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Robert J; Russell, Sarah J; Schneider, Martin F

    2015-12-01

    Prevention and slowing of skeletal muscle atrophy with nutritional approaches offers the potential to provide far-reaching improvements in the quality of life for our increasingly aging population. Here we show that polyphenol flavonoid epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG), found in the popular beverage green tea (Camellia sinensis), demonstrates similar effects to the endogenous hormones insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin in the ability to suppress action of the atrophy-promoting transcription factor Foxo1 through a net translocation of Foxo1 out of the nucleus as monitored by nucleo-cytoplasmic movement of Foxo1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) in live skeletal muscle fibers. Foxo1-GFP nuclear efflux is rapid in IGF-1 or insulin, but delayed by an additional 30 min for EGCG. Once activated, kinetic analysis with a simple mathematical model shows EGCG, IGF-1 and insulin all produce similar apparent rate constants for Foxo1-GFP unidirectional nuclear influx and efflux. Interestingly, EGCG appears to have its effect at least partially via parallel signaling pathways that are independent of IGF-1's (and insulin's) downstream PI3K/Akt/Foxo1 signaling axis. Using the live fiber model system, we also determine the dose-response curve for both IGF-1 and insulin on Foxo1 nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution. The continued understanding of the activation mechanisms of EGCG could allow for nutritional promotion of green tea's antiatrophy skeletal muscle benefits and have implications in the development of a clinically significant parallel pathway for new drugs to target muscle wasting and the reduced insulin receptor sensitivity which causes type II diabetes mellitus.

  17. Myostatin induces cachexia by activating the ubiquitin proteolytic system through an NF-kappaB-independent, FoxO1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Craig; Plummer, Erin; Thomas, Mark; Hennebry, Alex; Ashby, Murray; Ling, Nicholas; Smith, Heather; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi

    2006-11-01

    Myostatin, a transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) super-family member, has been well characterized as a negative regulator of muscle growth and development. Myostatin has been implicated in several forms of muscle wasting including the severe cachexia observed as a result of conditions such as AIDS and liver cirrhosis. Here we show that Myostatin induces cachexia by a mechanism independent of NF-kappaB. Myostatin treatment resulted in a reduction in both myotube number and size in vitro, as well as a loss in body mass in vivo. Furthermore, the expression of the myogenic genes myoD and pax3 was reduced, while NF-kappaB (the p65 subunit) localization and expression remained unchanged. In addition, promoter analysis has confirmed Myostatin inhibition of myoD and pax3. An increase in the expression of genes involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis is observed during many forms of muscle wasting. Hence we analyzed the effect of Myostatin treatment on proteolytic gene expression. The ubiquitin associated genes atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and E214k were upregulated following Myostatin treatment. We analyzed how Myostatin may be signaling to induce cachexia. Myostatin signaling reversed the IGF-1/PI3K/AKT hypertrophy pathway by inhibiting AKT phosphorylation thereby increasing the levels of active FoxO1, allowing for increased expression of atrophy-related genes. Therefore, our results suggest that Myostatin induces cachexia through an NF-kappaB-independent mechanism. Furthermore, increased Myostatin levels appear to antagonize hypertrophy signaling through regulation of the AKT-FoxO1 pathway.

  18. Caffeine-induced nuclear translocation of FoxO1 triggers Bim-mediated apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Han, Dong-Feng; Cao, Bo-Qiang; Wang, Bo; Dong, Nan; Jiang, De-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Caffeine is one of the most commonly ingested neuroactive compounds and exhibits anticancer effects through induction of apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of caffeine-induced apoptosis in U251 cells (human glioma cell line). We analyzed the inhibitory effects of caffeine on cell proliferation by performing WST-8 and colony formation assays; in addition, cell survival was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blotting was used to investigate the role played by FoxO1 in the proapoptotic effects of caffeine on glioma cells. Results showed that caffeine inhibited proliferation and survival of human glioma cells, induced apoptosis, and increased the expression of FoxO1 and its proapoptotic target Bim. In addition, we found that FoxO1 enhanced the transcription of its proapoptotic target Bim. In summary, our data indicates that FoxO1-Bim mediates caffeine-induced regression of glioma growth by activating cell apoptosis, thereby providing new mechanistic insight into the possible use of caffeine in treating human cancer.

  19. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G; Croce, Carlo M; Christman, John W

    2016-04-05

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation.

  20. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F.; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N.; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G.; Croce, Carlo M.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27007158

  1. Ex vivo modulation of the Foxo1 phosphorylation state does not lead to dysfunction of T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Monica Weaver; Arandjelovic, Sanja

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg cells) prevent maladaptive inflammatory responses to innocuous foreign antigens. Treg cell dysfunction has been linked to many inflammatory diseases, including allergic airway inflammation. Glucocorticoids that are used to treat allergic airway inflammation and asthma are thought to work in part by promoting Treg cell differentiation; patients who are refractory to these drugs have defective induction of anti-inflammatory Treg cells. Previous observations suggest that Treg cells deficient in the transcription factor FoxO1 are pro-inflammatory, and that FoxO1 activity is regulated by its phosphorylation status and nuclear localization. Here, we asked whether altering the phosphorylation state of FoxO1 through modulation of a regulatory phosphatase might affect Treg cell function. In a mouse model of house dust mite-induced allergic airway inflammation, we observed robust recruitment of Treg cells to the lungs and lymph nodes of diseased mice, without an apparent increase in the Treg cytokine interleukin-10 in the airways. Intriguingly, expression of PP2A, a serine/threonine phosphatase linked to the regulation of FoxO1 phosphorylation, was decreased in the mediastinal lymph nodes of HDM-treated mice, mirroring the decreased PP2A expression seen in peripheral blood monocytes of glucocorticoid-resistant asthmatic patients. When we asked whether modulation of PP2A activity alters Treg cell function via treatment with the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid, we observed increased phosphorylation of FoxO1 and decreased nuclear localization. However, dysregulation of FoxO1 did not impair Treg cell differentiation ex vivo or cause Treg cells to adopt a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A activity did not affect the suppressive function of Treg cells ex vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that modulation of the phosphorylation state of FoxO1 via PP2A inhibition does not modify Treg cell function ex vivo. Our data also

  2. FoxO1 regulates Tlr4 inflammatory pathway signalling in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fan, WuQiang; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Kim, Jane J; Bae, Eunju; Spann, Nathanael J; Heinz, Sven; Glass, Christopher K; Olefsky, Jerrold M

    2010-01-01

    The macrophage-mediated inflammatory response is a key etiologic component of obesity-related tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. The transcriptional factor FoxO1 is a key regulator of cell metabolism, cell cycle and cell death. Its activity is tightly regulated by the phosphoinositide-3-kinase-AKT (PI3K-Akt) pathway, which leads to phosphorylation, cytoplasmic retention and inactivation of FoxO1. Here, we show that FoxO1 promotes inflammation by enhancing Tlr4-mediated signalling in mature macrophages. By means of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq), we show that FoxO1 binds to multiple enhancer-like elements within the Tlr4 gene itself, as well as to sites in a number of Tlr4 signalling pathway genes. While FoxO1 potentiates Tlr4 signalling, activation of the latter induces AKT and subsequently inactivates FoxO1, establishing a self-limiting mechanism of inflammation. Given the central role of macrophage Tlr4 in transducing extrinsic proinflammatory signals, the novel functions for FoxO1 in macrophages as a transcriptional regulator of the Tlr4 gene and its inflammatory pathway, highlights FoxO1 as a key molecular adaptor integrating inflammatory responses in the context of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:21045807

  3. FoxO1 deacetylation regulates thyroid hormone-induced transcription of key hepatic gluconeogenic genes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-10-18

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ(-/-)) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status.

  4. Positive intergenic feedback circuitry, involving EBF1 and FOXO1, orchestrates B-cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Mansson, Robert; Welinder, Eva; Åhsberg, Josefine; Benner, Christopher; Glass, Christopher K.; Lucas, Joseph S.; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Murre, Cornelis

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of transcriptional regulators, including E2A, early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1), FOXO1, and paired box gene 5 (PAX5), that promote early B-cell development. However, how this ensemble of regulators mechanistically promotes B-cell fate remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that B-cell development in FOXO1-deficient mice is arrested in the common lymphoid progenitor (CLP) LY6D+ cell stage. We demonstrate that this phenotype closely resembles the arrest in B-cell development observed in EBF1-deficient mice. Consistent with these observations, we find that the transcription signatures of FOXO1- and EBF1-deficient LY6D+ progenitors are strikingly similar, indicating a common set of target genes. Furthermore, we found that depletion of EBF1 expression in LY6D+ CLPs severely affects FOXO1 mRNA abundance, whereas depletion of FOXO1 activity in LY6D+ CLPs ablates EBF1 transcript levels. We generated a global regulatory network from EBF1 and FOXO1 genome-wide transcription factor occupancy and transcription signatures derived from EBF1- and FOXO1-deficient CLPs. This analysis reveals that EBF1 and FOXO1 act in a positive feedback circuitry to promote and stabilize specification to the B-cell lineage. PMID:23213261

  5. Identification of functional glucocorticoid response elements in the mouse FoxO1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Qin, Weiping; Pan, Jiangping; Qin, Yiwen; Lee, David N; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher

    2014-07-25

    Glucocorticoids stimulate muscle atrophy through a cascade of signals that includes activation of FoxO transcription factors which then upregulate multiple genes to promote degradation of myofibrillar and other muscle proteins and inhibit protein synthesis. Our previous finding that glucocorticoids upregulate mRNA levels for FoxO1 in skeletal muscle led us to hypothesize that the FoxO1 gene contains one or more glucocorticoid response elements (GREs). Here we show that upregulation of FoxO1 expression by glucocorticoids requires the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and binding of hormones to it. In cultured C2C12 myoblasts dexamethasone did not alter FoxO1 mRNA stability. Computational analysis predicted that the proximal promoter of the FoxO1 gene contained a cluster of eight GRE half sites and one highly conserved near-consensus SRE; the cluster is found between -800 and -2000bp upstream of the first codon of the FoxO1 gene. A reporter gene constructed using the first 2kb of the FoxO1 promoter was stimulated by dexamethasone. Removal of a 5' domain containing half of the GREs reduced reporter gene activity and removal of all GREs in this region ablated activation by dexamethasone. Restriction fragments of the cluster of 8 upstream GREs bound recombinant GR in gel shift assays. Collectively, the data demonstrate that the proximal promoter of the FoxO1 gene contains multiple functional GREs, indicating that upregulation of FoxO1 expression by glucocorticoids through GREs represents an additional mechanism by which the GR drives glucocorticoid-mediated muscle atrophy. These findings are also relevant to other physiological roles of FoxO1 such as regulation of hepatic metabolism. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Potential role of FoxO1 and mTORC1 in the pathogenesis of Western diet-induced acne.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2013-05-01

    Acne in adolescents of developed countries is an epidemic skin disease and has currently been linked to the Western diet (WD). It is the intention of this viewpoint to discuss the possible impact of WD-mediated nutrient signalling in the pathogenesis of acne. High glycaemic load and dairy protein consumption both increase insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signalling (IIS) that is superimposed on elevated IGF-1 signalling of puberty. The cell's nutritional status is primarily sensed by the forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FoxO1) and the serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Increased IIS extrudes FoxO1 into the cytoplasm, whereas nuclear FoxO1 suppresses hepatic IGF-1 synthesis and thus impairs somatic growth. FoxO1 attenuates androgen signalling, interacts with regulatory proteins important for sebaceous lipogenesis, regulates the activity of innate and adaptive immunity, antagonizes oxidative stress and most importantly functions as a rheostat of mTORC1, the master regulator of cell growth, proliferation and metabolic homoeostasis. Thus, FoxO1 links nutrient availability to mTORC1-driven processes: increased protein and lipid synthesis, cell proliferation, cell differentiation including hyperproliferation of acroinfundibular keratinocytes, sebaceous gland hyperplasia, increased sebaceous lipogenesis, insulin resistance and increased body mass index. Enhanced androgen, TNF-α and IGF-1 signalling due to genetic polymorphisms promoting the risk of acne all converge in mTORC1 activation, which is further enhanced by nutrient signalling of WD. Deeper insights into the molecular interplay of FoxO1/mTORC1-mediated nutrient signalling are thus of critical importance to understand the impact of WD on the promotion of epidemic acne and more serious mTORC1-driven diseases of civilization. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. High Cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 Expression in Astrocytomas Are Associated with Worse Surgical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jinxu; Yan, Yong; Li, Weiqing; Yu, Hongyu; Hu, Guohan; Ding, Xuehua; Chen, Juxiang; Lu, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    FOXO1 is at a convergence point of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, which is one of the three core pathways implicated in glioblastoma. It was recently shown that FOXO1 can effectively induce glioma cell death and inhibit tumor growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We therefore evaluated FOXO1 and pFOXO1 protein expression in 181 primary astrocytoma samples and 16 normal brain samples. Astrocytoma samples expressed higher cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 than normal brain samples. Nuclear pFOXO1 level was significantly higher than nuclear FOXO1 in astrocytomas. High cytoplasmic FOXO1 expression was associated with older onset age (P = 0.001) and higher WHO grade (P = 0.001). The trend was also observed between cytoplasmic pFOXO1 expression and WHO grade although not significant. Univariate survival analysis showed that both high cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 expression indicated a significantly shorter median overall survival and progression-free survival. Multivariate survival analysis revealed cytoplasmic FOXO1 expression, cytoplasmic pFOXO1 expression, WHO grade, gender, extent of resection and radiotherapy to be independent prognostic factors for overall survival and progression-free survival. Thus, our data suggested that cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 expression may serve as valuable prognostic variables in astrocytomas and may have significant implications for the development and application of targeted therapy. PMID:23874926

  8. High cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 expression in astrocytomas are associated with worse surgical outcome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Xu, Tao; Zhou, Jinxu; Yan, Yong; Li, Weiqing; Yu, Hongyu; Hu, Guohan; Ding, Xuehua; Chen, Juxiang; Lu, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    FOXO1 is at a convergence point of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, which is one of the three core pathways implicated in glioblastoma. It was recently shown that FOXO1 can effectively induce glioma cell death and inhibit tumor growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We therefore evaluated FOXO1 and pFOXO1 protein expression in 181 primary astrocytoma samples and 16 normal brain samples. Astrocytoma samples expressed higher cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 than normal brain samples. Nuclear pFOXO1 level was significantly higher than nuclear FOXO1 in astrocytomas. High cytoplasmic FOXO1 expression was associated with older onset age (P = 0.001) and higher WHO grade (P = 0.001). The trend was also observed between cytoplasmic pFOXO1 expression and WHO grade although not significant. Univariate survival analysis showed that both high cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 expression indicated a significantly shorter median overall survival and progression-free survival. Multivariate survival analysis revealed cytoplasmic FOXO1 expression, cytoplasmic pFOXO1 expression, WHO grade, gender, extent of resection and radiotherapy to be independent prognostic factors for overall survival and progression-free survival. Thus, our data suggested that cytoplasmic FOXO1 and pFOXO1 expression may serve as valuable prognostic variables in astrocytomas and may have significant implications for the development and application of targeted therapy.

  9. Hepatic FOXO1 Target Genes Are Co-regulated by Thyroid Hormone via RICTOR Protein Deacetylation and MTORC2-AKT Protein Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brijesh K.; Sinha, Rohit A.; Zhou, Jin; Tripathi, Madhulika; Ohba, Kenji; Wang, Mu-En; Astapova, Inna; Ghosh, Sujoy; Hollenberg, Anthony N.; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    MTORC2-AKT is a key regulator of carbohydrate metabolism and insulin signaling due to its effects on FOXO1 phosphorylation. Interestingly, both FOXO1 and thyroid hormone (TH) have similar effects on carbohydrate and energy metabolism as well as overlapping transcriptional regulation of many target genes. Currently, little is known about the regulation of MTORC2-AKT or FOXO1 by TH. Accordingly, we performed hepatic transcriptome profiling in mice after FOXO1 knockdown in the absence or presence of TH, and we compared these results with hepatic FOXO1 and THRB1 (TRβ1) ChIP-Seq data. We identified a subset of TH-stimulated FOXO1 target genes that required co-regulation by FOXO1 and TH. TH activation of FOXO1 was directly linked to an increase in SIRT1-MTORC2 interaction and RICTOR deacetylation. This, in turn, led to decreased AKT and FOXO1 phosphorylation. Moreover, TH increased FOXO1 nuclear localization, DNA binding, and target gene transcription by reducing AKT-dependent FOXO1 phosphorylation in a THRB1-dependent manner. These events were associated with TH-mediated oxidative phosphorylation and NAD+ production and suggested that downstream metabolic effects by TH can post-translationally activate other transcription factors. Our results showed that RICTOR/MTORC2-AKT can integrate convergent hormonal and metabolic signals to provide coordinated and sensitive regulation of hepatic FOXO1-target gene expression. PMID:26453307

  10. MicroRNA-21 regulates hepatic glucose metabolism by targeting FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ailing; Yan, Haibo; Liang, Jichao; Du, Chunyuan; Zhao, Xuemei; Sun, Lijuan; Chen, Yong

    2017-09-05

    Abnormal activation of hepatic gluconeogenesis is a major contributor to fasting hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes; however, the potential role of microRNAs in gluconeogenesis remains unclear. Here, we showed that hepatic expression levels of microRNA-21 (miR-21) were decreased in db/db and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic mice. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of miR-21 decreased the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and inhibited glucose production in primary mouse hepatocytes. Silencing of miR-21 reversed this effect. Overexpression of miR-21 in the livers of db/db and HFD-induced mice was able to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis, subsequently decreasing blood glucose levels and improving glucose and insulin intolerance. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-21 in primary mouse hepatocytes and mouse livers decreased the protein levels of FOXO1 and increased hepatic insulin sensitivity. By contrast, silencing of miR-21 increased the protein levels of FOXO1, subsequently leading to a decrease in insulin sensitivity and impaired glucose intolerance in C57BL/6 mice fed with high-fat diet for 4weeks. Finally, we confirmed that FOXO1 was a potential target of miR-21. These results suggest that miR-21 is a critical regulator in hepatic gluconeogenesis and may provide a novel therapeutic target for treating insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. FOXO1 and LXRα downregulate the apolipoprotein A-I gene expression during hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Shavva, Vladimir S; Bogomolova, Alexandra M; Nikitin, Artemy A; Dizhe, Ella B; Oleinikova, Galina N; Lapikov, Ivan A; Tanyanskiy, Dmitry A; Perevozchikov, Andrej P; Orlov, Sergey V

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species damage various cell components including DNA, proteins, and lipids, and these impairments could be a reason for severe human diseases including atherosclerosis. Forkhead box O1 (FOXO1), an important metabolic transcription factor, upregulates antioxidant and proapoptotic genes during oxidative stress. Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) forms high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles that are responsible for cholesterol transfer from peripheral tissues to liver for removal in bile in vertebrates. The main sources for plasma ApoA-I in mammals are liver and jejunum. Hepatic apoA-I transcription depends on a multitude of metabolic transcription factors. We demonstrate that ApoA-I synthesis and secretion are decreased during H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Here, we first show that FOXO1 binds to site B of apoA-I hepatic enhancer and downregulates apoA-I gene activity in HepG2 cells. Moreover, FOXO1 and LXRα transcription factors participate in H2O2-triggered downregulation of apoA-I gene together with Src, JNK, p38, and AMPK kinase cascades. Mutations of sites B or C as well as the administration of siRNAs against FOXO1 or LXRα to HepG2 cells abolished the hydrogen peroxide-mediated suppression of apoA-I gene.

  12. Helicase CHD4 is an epigenetic coregulator of PAX3-FOXO1 in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Maria; Marques, Joana G.; Streiff, Natalie; Laubscher, Dominik; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Santoro, Raffaella; Schäfer, Beat W.

    2016-01-01

    A vast number of cancer genes are transcription factors that drive tumorigenesis as oncogenic fusion proteins. Although the direct targeting of transcription factors remains challenging, therapies aimed at oncogenic fusion proteins are attractive as potential treatments for cancer. There is particular interest in targeting the oncogenic PAX3-FOXO1 fusion transcription factor, which induces alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (aRMS), an aggressive cancer of skeletal muscle cells for which patient outcomes remain dismal. In this work, we have defined the interactome of PAX3-FOXO1 and screened 60 candidate interactors using siRNA-mediated depletion to identify candidates that affect fusion protein activity in aRMS cells. We report that chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 4 (CHD4), an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler, acts as crucial coregulator of PAX3-FOXO1 activity. CHD4 interacts with PAX3-FOXO1 via short DNA fragments. Together, they bind to regulatory regions of PAX3-FOXO1 target genes. Gene expression analysis suggested that CHD4 coregulatory activity is essential for a subset of PAX3-FOXO1 target genes. Depletion of CHD4 reduced cell viability of fusion-positive but not of fusion-negative RMS in vitro, which resembled loss of PAX3-FOXO1. It also caused specific regression of fusion-positive xenograft tumors in vivo. Therefore, this work identifies CHD4 as an epigenetic coregulator of PAX3-FOXO1 activity, providing rational evidence for CHD4 as a potential therapeutic target in aRMS. PMID:27760049

  13. The Transcription Factor Foxo1 Controls Central Memory CD8+ T Cell Responses to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoungjoo V.; Ouyang, Weiming; Liao, Will; Zhang, Michael Q.; Li, Ming O.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Memory T cells protect hosts from pathogen reinfection, but how these cells emerge from a pool of antigen-experienced T cells is unclear. Here we show that mice lacking the transcription factor Foxo1 in activated CD8+ T cells had defective secondary, but not primary, responses to Listeria monocytogenes infection. Compared to short-lived effector T cells, memory precursor T cells expressed higher amounts of Foxo1, which promoted their generation and maintenance. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing experiments revealed the transcription factor Tcf7 and the chemokine receptor Ccr7 as Foxo1-bound target genes, which have critical functions in central memory T cell differentiation and trafficking. These findings demonstrate that Foxo1 is selectively incorporated into the genetic program that regulates memory CD8+ T cell responses to infection. PMID:23932570

  14. Progesterone receptors induce FOXO1-dependent senescence in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Caroline H.; Charles, Nathan J.; Gilks, C. Blake; Kalloger, Steve E.; Argenta, Peter A.; Lange, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of nuclear progesterone receptors (PR) and low circulating progesterone levels are associated with increased ovarian cancer (OC) risk. However, PR are abundantly expressed in a significant percentage of serous and endometrioid ovarian tumors; patients with PR+ tumors typically experience longer progression-free survival relative to those with PR-null tumors. The molecular mechanisms of these protective effects are poorly understood. To study PR action in OC in the absence of added estrogen (i.e., needed to induce robust PR expression), we created ES-2 OC cells stably expressing vector control or GFP-tagged PR-B (GFP-PR). Progestin (R5020) stimulation of ES-2 cells stably expressing GFP-PR induced cellular senescence characterized by altered cellular morphology, prolonged survival, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, G1 cell cycle arrest and upregulation of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21, as well as the Forkhead-box transcription factor, FOXO1; these results repeated in unmodified ER+/PR+ PEO4 OC cells. PR-B and FOXO1 were detected within the same PRE-containing regions of the p21 upstream promoter. Knockdown of p21 resulted in molecular compensation via FOXO1-dependent upregulation of numerous FOXO1 target genes (p15, p16, p27) and an increased rate of senescence. Inhibition of FOXO1 (with AS1842856) or stable FOXO1 knockdown inhibited progestin-induced p21 expression and blocked progestin-induced senescence. Overall, these findings support a role for PR as a tumor suppressor in OC cells, which exhibits inhibitory effects by inducing FOXO1-dependent cellular senescence. Clinical “priming” of the PR-FOXO1-p21 signaling pathway using PR agonists may provide a useful strategy to induce irreversible cell cycle arrest and thereby sensitize OC cells to existing chemotherapies as part of combination “two-step” therapies. PMID:23574718

  15. Preserved energy balance in mice lacking FoxO1 in neurons of Nkx2.1 lineage reveals functional heterogeneity of FoxO1 signaling within the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Garrett; Meece, Kana; Wardlaw, Sharon L; Accili, Domenico

    2014-05-01

    Transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) regulates energy expenditure (EE), food intake, and hepatic glucose production. These activities have been mapped to specific hypothalamic neuronal populations using cell type-specific knockout experiments in mice. To parse out the integrated output of FoxO1-dependent transcription from different neuronal populations and multiple hypothalamic regions, we used transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase from the Nkx2.1 promoter to ablate loxP-flanked Foxo1 alleles from a majority of hypothalamic neurons (Foxo1KO(Nkx2.1) mice). This strategy resulted in the expected inhibition of FoxO1 expression, but only produced a transient reduction of body weight as well as a decreased body length. The transient decrease of body weight in male mice was accompanied by decreased fat mass. Male Foxo1KO(Nkx2.1) mice show food intake similar to that in wild-type controls, and, although female knockout mice eat less, they do so in proportion to a reduced body size. EE is unaffected in Foxo1KO(Nkx2.1) mice, although small increases in body temperature are present. Unlike other neuron-specific Foxo1 knockout mice, Foxo1KO(Nkx2.1) mice are not protected from diet-induced obesity. These studies indicate that, unlike the metabolic effects of highly restricted neuronal subsets (proopiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide, and steroidogenic factor 1), those of neurons derived from the Nkx2.1 lineage either occur in a FoxO1-independent fashion or are compensated for through developmental plasticity.

  16. Roles of FoxO1 and Sirt1 in the central regulation of food intake.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamus is the center of controlling food intake and energy expenditure by integrating information on energy status, i.e. adiposity and nutrient signals. Especially, two types of neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons and orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons, play vital roles in regulating feeding and energy expenditure. On the other hand, insulin and leptin are hormones that control food intake via regulating POMC and AgRP expression. FoxO1 is a downstream effecter of insulin signaling and Sirt1 is an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, both of which have been reported to play important roles in the regulation of metabolism in various organs including liver, pancreas, muscle, adipose tissue and hypothalamus. Histological analyses revealed that FoxO1 and Sirt1 are expressed in both AgRP and POMC neurons where FoxO1 localizes to the nucleus in the fasted, while to the cytoplasm in the refed condition. In contrast, hypothalamic Sirt1 protein is decreased in the fasted condition due to increased ubiquitination of Sirt1. In rodents, overexpression of FoxO1 in the hypothalamus by adenovirus microinjection induces hyperphagia and body weight gain, and simultaneous overexpression of Sirt1 suppresses these phenotypes. FoxO1 and the transcription factor Stat3 exert opposing actions on the expression of AgRP and POMC through transcriptional squelching, and Sirt1 suppresses AgRP expression. In conclusion, we propose that FoxO1 and Sirt1 in hypothalamus are key regulators of energy homeostasis and are molecular targets for the development of new strategy of treating obesity.

  17. FOXO1 differentially regulates both normal and diabetic wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenying; Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Tian, Chen; Xu, Fanxing; Tarapore, Rohinton; Batres, Angelika; Alsadun, Sarah; Lim, Jason; Dong, Guangyu

    2015-01-01

    Healing is delayed in diabetic wounds. We previously demonstrated that lineage-specific Foxo1 deletion in keratinocytes interfered with normal wound healing and keratinocyte migration. Surprisingly, the same deletion of Foxo1 in diabetic wounds had the opposite effect, significantly improving the healing response. In normal glucose media, forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) enhanced keratinocyte migration through up-regulating TGFβ1. In high glucose, FOXO1 nuclear localization was induced but FOXO1 did not bind to the TGFβ1 promoter or stimulate TGFβ1 transcription. Instead, in high glucose, FOXO1 enhanced expression of serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade B (ovalbumin), member 2 (SERPINB2), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20). The impact of high glucose on keratinocyte migration was rescued by silencing FOXO1, by reducing SERPINB2 or CCL20, or by insulin treatment. In addition, an advanced glycation end product and tumor necrosis factor had a similar regulatory effect on FOXO1 and its downstream targets and inhibited keratinocyte migration in a FOXO1-dependent manner. Thus, FOXO1 expression can positively or negatively modulate keratinocyte migration and wound healing by its differential effect on downstream targets modulated by factors present in diabetic healing. PMID:25918228

  18. FoxO1-dependent induction of acute myeloid leukemia by osteoblasts in mice.

    PubMed

    Kode, A; Mosialou, I; Manavalan, S J; Rathinam, C V; Friedman, R A; Teruya-Feldstein, J; Bhagat, G; Berman, E; Kousteni, S

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts, the bone forming cells, affect self-renewal and expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), as well as homing of healthy hematopoietic cells and tumor cells into the bone marrow. Constitutive activation of β-catenin in osteoblasts is sufficient to alter the differentiation potential of myeloid and lymphoid progenitors and to initiate the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mice. We show here that Notch1 is the receptor mediating the leukemogenic properties of osteoblast-activated β-catenin in HSCs. Moreover, using cell-specific gene inactivation mouse models, we show that FoxO1 expression in osteoblasts is required for and mediates the leukemogenic properties of β-catenin. At the molecular level, FoxO1 interacts with β-catenin in osteoblasts to induce expression of the Notch ligand, Jagged-1. Subsequent activation of Notch signaling in long-term repopulating HSC progenitors induces the leukemogenic transformation of HSCs and ultimately leads to the development of AML. These findings identify FoxO1 expressed in osteoblasts as a factor affecting hematopoiesis and provide a molecular mechanism whereby the FoxO1/activated β-catenin interaction results in AML. These observations support the notion that the bone marrow niche is an instigator of leukemia and raise the prospect that FoxO1 oncogenic properties may occur in other tissues.

  19. FoxO1-Dependent Induction of Acute Myeloid Leukemia by Osteoblasts in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kode, Aruna; Mosialou, Ioanna; Manavalan, Sanil J.; Rathinam, Choza V.; Friedman, Richard A.; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Bhagat, Govind; Berman, Ellin; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2015-01-01

    Osteoblasts, the bone forming cells, affect self-renewal and expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), as well as homing of healthy hematopoietic cells and tumor cells into the bone marrow. Constitutive activation of β-catenin in osteoblasts is sufficient to alter the differentiation potential of myeloid and lymphoid progenitors and to initiate the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mice. We show here that Notch1 is the receptor mediating the leukemogenic properties of osteoblast-activated β-catenin in HSCs. Moreover, using cell-specific gene inactivation mouse models, we show that FoxO1 expression in osteoblasts is required for and mediates the leukemogenic properties of β-catenin. At the molecular level, FoxO1 interacts with β-catenin in osteoblasts to induce expression of the Notch ligand, Jagged-1. Subsequent activation of Notch signaling in long-term repopulating HSC progenitors induces the leukemogenic transformation of HSCs and ultimately leads to the development of AML. These findings identify FoxO1 expressed in osteoblasts as a factor affecting hematopoiesis and provide a molecular mechanism whereby the FoxO1/activated β-catenin interaction results in AML. These observations support the notion that the bone marrow niche is an instigator of leukemia and raise the prospect that FoxO1 oncogenic properties may occur in other tissues. PMID:26108693

  20. Insulin-Mediated Downregulation of Apolipoprotein A-I Gene in Human Hepatoma Cell Line HepG2: The Role of Interaction Between FOXO1 and LXRβ Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Shavva, Vladimir S; Bogomolova, Alexandra M; Nikitin, Artemy A; Dizhe, Ella B; Tanyanskiy, Dmitry A; Efremov, Alexander M; Oleinikova, Galina N; Perevozchikov, Andrej P; Orlov, Sergey V

    2017-02-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) is a key component of high density lipoproteins which possess anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Insulin is a crucial mediator of the glucose and lipid metabolism that has been implicated in atherosclerotic and inflammatory processes. Important mediators of insulin signaling such as Liver X Receptors (LXRs) and Forkhead Box A2 (FOXA2) are known to regulate apoA-I expression in liver. Forkhead Box O1 (FOXO1) is a well-known target of insulin signaling and a key mediator of oxidative stress response. Low doses of insulin were shown to activate apoA-I expression in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. However, the detailed mechanisms for these processes are still unknown. We studied the possible involvement of FOXO1, FOXA2, LXRα, and LXRβ transcription factors in the insulin-mediated regulation of apoA-I expression. Treatment of HepG2 cells with high doses of insulin (48 h, 100 nM) suppresses apoA-I gene expression. siRNAs against FOXO1, FOXA2, LXRβ, or LXRα abrogated this effect. FOXO1 forms a complex with LXRβ and insulin treatment impairs FOXO1/LXRβ complex binding to hepatic enhancer and triggers its nuclear export. Insulin as well as LXR ligand TO901317 enhance the interaction between FOXA2, LXRα, and hepatic enhancer. These data suggest that high doses of insulin downregulate apoA-I gene expression in HepG2 cells through redistribution of FOXO1/LXRβ complex, FOXA2, and LXRα on hepatic enhancer of apoA-I gene. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 382-396, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Pro-proliferative and inflammatory signaling converge on FoxO1 transcription factor in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Savai, Rajkumar; Al-Tamari, Hamza M; Sedding, Daniel; Kojonazarov, Baktybek; Muecke, Christian; Teske, Rebecca; Capecchi, Mario R; Weissmann, Norbert; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Schermuly, Ralph Theo; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai

    2014-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by increased proliferation and apoptosis resistance of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors are key regulators of cellular proliferation. Here we show that in pulmonary vessels and PASMCs of human and experimental PH lungs, FoxO1 expression is downregulated and FoxO1 is inactivated via phosphorylation and nuclear exclusion. These findings could be reproduced using ex vivo exposure of PASMCs to growth factors and inflammatory cytokines. Pharmacological inhibition and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in smooth muscle cells reproduced PH features in vitro and in vivo. Either pharmacological reconstitution of FoxO1 activity using intravenous or inhaled paclitaxel, or reconstitution of the transcriptional activity of FoxO1 by gene therapy, restored the physiologically quiescent PASMC phenotype in vitro, linked to changes in cell cycle control and bone morphogenic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) signaling, and reversed vascular remodeling and right-heart hypertrophy in vivo. Thus, PASMC FoxO1 is a critical integrator of multiple signaling pathways driving PH, and reconstitution of FoxO1 activity offers a potential therapeutic option for PH.

  2. Transcriptional feedback control of insulin receptor by dFOXO/FOXO1

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Oscar; Tjian, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The insulin signaling pathway, which is conserved in evolution from flies to humans, evolved to allow a fast response to changes in nutrient availability while keeping glucose concentration constant in serum. Here we show that, both in Drosophila and mammals, insulin receptor (InR) represses its own synthesis by a feedback mechanism directed by the transcription factor dFOXO/FOXO1. In Drosophila, dFOXO is responsible for activating transcription of dInR, and nutritional conditions can modulate this effect. Starvation up-regulates mRNA of dInR in wild-type but not dFOXO-deficient flies. Importantly, FOXO1 acts in mammalian cells like its Drosophila counterpart, up-regulating the InR mRNA level upon fasting. Mammalian cells up-regulate the InR mRNA in the absence of serum, conditions that induce the dephosphorylation and activation of FOXO1. Interestingly, insulin is able to reverse this effect. Therefore, dFOXO/FOXO1 acts as an insulin sensor to activate insulin signaling, allowing a fast response to the hormone after each meal. Our results reveal a key feedback control mechanism for dFOXO/FOXO1 in regulating metabolism and insulin signaling. PMID:16230533

  3. Regulation of neuronal cell death by MST1-FOXO1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zengqiang; Lehtinen, Maria K; Merlo, Paola; Villén, Judit; Gygi, Steven; Bonni, Azad

    2009-04-24

    The protein kinase mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) plays a critical role in the regulation of cell death. Recent studies suggest that MST1 mediates oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death by phosphorylating the transcription factor FOXO3 at serine 207, a site that is conserved in other FOXO family members. Here, we show that MST1-induced phosphorylation of FOXO1 at serine 212, corresponding to serine 207 in FOXO3, disrupts the association of FOXO1 with 14-3-3 proteins. Accordingly, MST1 mediates the nuclear translocation of FOXO1 in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons that are deprived of neuronal activity. We also find a requirement for MST1 in cell death of granule neurons upon withdrawal of growth factors and neuronal activity, and MST1 induces cell death in a FOXO1-dependent manner. Finally, we show that the MST1-regulatory, scaffold protein Nore1 is required for survival factor deprivation induced neuronal death. Collectively, these findings define MST1-FOXO1 signaling as an important link survival factor deprivation-induced neuronal cell death with implications for our understanding of brain development and neurological diseases.

  4. FoxO1 regulates myocardial glucose oxidation rates via transcriptional control of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 expression.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Keshav; Saleme, Bruno; Al Batran, Rami; Aburasayn, Hanin; Eshreif, Amina; Ho, Kim L; Ma, Wayne K; Almutairi, Malak; Eaton, Farah; Gandhi, Manoj; Park, Edwards A; Sutendra, Gopinath; Ussher, John R

    2017-09-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for glucose oxidation and a critical regulator of metabolic flexibility during the fasting to feeding transition. PDH is regulated via both PDH kinases (PDHK) and PDH phosphatases, which phosphorylate/inactivate and dephosphorylate/activate PDH, respectively. Our goal was to determine whether the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) regulates PDH activity and glucose oxidation in the heart via increasing the expression of Pdk4, the gene encoding PDHK4. To address this question, we differentiated H9c2 myoblasts into cardiac myocytes and modulated FoxO1 activity, after which Pdk4/PDHK4 expression and PDH phosphorylation/activity were assessed. We assessed binding of FoxO1 to the Pdk4 promoter in cardiac myocytes in conjunction with measuring the role of FoxO1 on glucose oxidation in the isolated working heart. Both pharmacological (1 µM AS1842856) and genetic (siRNA mediated) inhibition of FoxO1 decreased Pdk4/PDHK4 expression and subsequent PDH phosphorylation in H9c2 cardiac myocytes, whereas 10 µM dexamethasone-induced Pdk4/PDHK4 expression was abolished via pretreatment with 1 µM AS1842856. Furthermore, transfection of H9c2 cardiac myocytes with a vector expressing FoxO1 increased luciferase activity driven by a Pdk4 promoter construct containing the FoxO1 DNA-binding element region, but not in a Pdk4 promoter construct lacking this region. Finally, AS1842856 treatment in fasted mice enhanced glucose oxidation rates during aerobic isolated working heart perfusions. Taken together, FoxO1 directly regulates Pdk4 transcription in the heart, thereby controlling PDH activity and subsequent glucose oxidation rates.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Although studies have shown an association between FoxO1 activity and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 expression, our study demonstrated that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 is a direct transcriptional target of FoxO1 (but not FoxO3/FoxO4) in the heart. Furthermore, we report

  5. Feedback regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis through modulation of SHP/Nr0b2 gene expression by Sirt1 and FoxO1

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Dan; Tao, Rongya; Zhang, Yao; White, Morris F.

    2011-01-01

    Protein deacetylase Sirt1 has been implicated in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. To further elucidate how Sirt1 regulates gluconeogenesis, we took a loss-of-function approach by deleting the coding DNA sequence for the catalytic domain of the Sirt1 gene in the liver of a wild-type mouse (LKOSirt1) or a genetic diabetic mouse in which hepatic insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 are deleted (DKOIrs1/2). Whereas LKOSirt1 mice exhibited normal levels of fasting and fed blood glucose, inactivation of Sirt1 in DKOIrs1/2 mice (TKOIrs1/2:Sirt1) reduced blood glucose levels and moderately improved systemic glucose tolerance. Pyruvate tolerance was also significantly improved in TKOIrs1/2:Sirt1 mice, suggesting that Sirt1 promotes hepatic gluconeogenesis in this diabetic mouse model. To understand why inactivation of hepatic Sirt1 does not alter blood glucose levels in the wild-type background, we searched for a potential cause and found that expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP, encoded by the Nr0b2 gene), an orphan nuclear receptor, which has been shown to suppress the activity of forkhead transcription factor FoxO1, was decreased in the liver of LKOSirt1 mice. Furthermore, our luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that the Nr0b2 gene is a target of FoxO1, which is also regulated by Sirt1. After the gene is upregulated, Nr0b2 can feed back and repress FoxO1- and Sirt1-activated G6pc and Pdk4 gene expression. Thus, our results suggest that Sirt1 can both positively and negatively regulate hepatic gluconeogenesis through FoxO1 and Nr0b2 and keep this physiological process in control. PMID:21081708

  6. Inhibition of FoxO1 nuclear exclusion prevents metastasis of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Huang, Qin; Wang, Feng

    2014-07-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, with extremely poor patient survival. Although previous studies have demonstrated that expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) in glioblastoma promotes cancer metastasis, the upstream molecular signaling cascades that control activation of MMP9 remain largely unknown. Here, we used a human glioblastoma line, A-172, to examine molecular signaling to activate MMP9. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in A-172 cells activated MMP9, resulting in an increase in cancer invasiveness. A specific inhibitor for EGFR efficiently blocked EGF-induced activation of MMP9 and then cancer invasiveness. Moreover, an inhibitor for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3 K)/protein kinase B (Akt) significantly inhibited the EGF-induced activation of MMP9. Furthermore, nuclear exclusion of a major Akt downstream target, Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1), was induced by Akt activation, which could be inhibited by either an EGFR inhibitor or by PI-3 K/Akt inhibitor. An expression of a constitutive nuclear form of FoxO1 significantly inhibited MMP9 activation induced by EGF. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGF/EGFR signaling activates downstream PI-3 K/Akt to induce FoxO1 nuclear exclusion, which activates MMP9 to promote glioblastoma invasiveness. Thus, FoxO1 appears to be a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting metastasis of glioblastoma.

  7. Exendin-4 Upregulates Adiponectin Level in Adipocytes via Sirt1/Foxo-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anping; Li, Ting; An, Ping; Yan, Wenhua; Zheng, Hua; Wang, Baoan; Mu, Yiming

    2017-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor plays an essential role in regulating glucose metabolism. GLP-1 receptor agonists have been widely used for treating diabetes and other insulin resistance-related diseases. However, mechanisms underlying the anti-diabetic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of GLP-1 agonist exendin-4 on the expression of adiponectin, an insulin sensitizing hormone. We found that exendin-4 increased the expression and secretion of adiponectin both in vitro and in vivo. Our data showed that exendin-4 upregulated adiponectin expression at both mRNA and protein levels in adipocytes and adipose tissues. The effects of exendin-4 on adiponectin expression were dependent on the GLP-1 receptor. We further demonstrated important roles of Sirt1 and transcriptional factor Foxo-1 in mediating the function of exendin-4 in regulating adiponectin expression. Suppression of Sirt1 or Foxo-1 expression significantly impaired exendin-4-induced adiponectin expression. Consistently, exendin-4 up-regulated Sirt1 and Foxo-1 expression in vivo. Our work is the first study demonstrating the role of Sirt1/Foxo-1 in regulating the regulatory function of a GLP-1 receptor agonist in adiponectin expression both in vitro and in vivo. The results provide important information for the mechanism underlying the function of GLP-1R on improving insulin resistance and related diseases.

  8. Exendin-4 Upregulates Adiponectin Level in Adipocytes via Sirt1/Foxo-1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anping; Li, Ting; An, Ping; Yan, Wenhua; Zheng, Hua; Wang, Baoan; Mu, Yiming

    2017-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor plays an essential role in regulating glucose metabolism. GLP-1 receptor agonists have been widely used for treating diabetes and other insulin resistance-related diseases. However, mechanisms underlying the anti-diabetic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of GLP-1 agonist exendin-4 on the expression of adiponectin, an insulin sensitizing hormone. We found that exendin-4 increased the expression and secretion of adiponectin both in vitro and in vivo. Our data showed that exendin-4 upregulated adiponectin expression at both mRNA and protein levels in adipocytes and adipose tissues. The effects of exendin-4 on adiponectin expression were dependent on the GLP-1 receptor. We further demonstrated important roles of Sirt1 and transcriptional factor Foxo-1 in mediating the function of exendin-4 in regulating adiponectin expression. Suppression of Sirt1 or Foxo-1 expression significantly impaired exendin-4-induced adiponectin expression. Consistently, exendin-4 up-regulated Sirt1 and Foxo-1 expression in vivo. Our work is the first study demonstrating the role of Sirt1/Foxo-1 in regulating the regulatory function of a GLP-1 receptor agonist in adiponectin expression both in vitro and in vivo. The results provide important information for the mechanism underlying the function of GLP-1R on improving insulin resistance and related diseases. PMID:28122026

  9. Foxo1 Is Required for Normal Somatotrope Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kapali, Jyoti; Kabat, Brock E; Schmidt, Kelly L; Stallings, Caitlin E; Tippy, Mason; Jung, Deborah O; Edwards, Brian S; Nantie, Leah B; Raeztman, Lori T; Navratil, Amy M; Ellsworth, Buffy S

    2016-11-01

    The etiology for half of congenital hypopituitarism cases is unknown. Our long-term goal is to expand the molecular diagnoses for congenital hypopituitarism by identifying genes that contribute to this condition. We have previously shown that the forkhead box transcription factor, FOXO1, is present in approximately half of somatotropes at embryonic day (e) 18.5, suggesting it may have a role in somatotrope differentiation or function. To elucidate the role of FOXO1 in somatotrope differentiation and function, Foxo1 was conditionally deleted from the anterior pituitary (Foxo1(Δpit)). Uncommitted progenitor cells are maintained and able to commit to the somatotrope lineage normally based on the expression patterns of Sox2, a marker of uncommitted pituitary progenitors, and Pou1f1 (also known as Pit1), which marks committed progenitors. Interestingly, Foxo1(Δpit) embryonic mice exhibit delayed somatotrope differentiation as evidenced by an almost complete absence of GH immunoreactivity at e16.5 and reduced expression of Gh at e18.5 and postnatal day (P) 3. Consistent with this conclusion, expression of GHRH receptor, a marker of terminally differentiated somatotropes, is significantly reduced at e18.5 and P3 in the absence of FOXO1. The mechanism of FOXO1 regulation of somatotrope differentiation may involve the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Neurod4, which has been implicated in somatotrope differentiation and is significantly reduced in Foxo1(Δpit) mice. Foxo1(Δpit) mice do not exhibit growth defects, and at P21 their pituitary glands exhibit a normal distribution of somatotropes. These studies demonstrate that FOXO1 is important for initial somatotrope specification embryonically but is dispensable for postnatal somatotrope expansion and growth.

  10. Foxo1 Is Required for Normal Somatotrope Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kapali, Jyoti; Kabat, Brock E.; Schmidt, Kelly L.; Stallings, Caitlin E.; Tippy, Mason; Jung, Deborah O.; Edwards, Brian S.; Nantie, Leah B.; Raeztman, Lori T.; Navratil, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    The etiology for half of congenital hypopituitarism cases is unknown. Our long-term goal is to expand the molecular diagnoses for congenital hypopituitarism by identifying genes that contribute to this condition. We have previously shown that the forkhead box transcription factor, FOXO1, is present in approximately half of somatotropes at embryonic day (e) 18.5, suggesting it may have a role in somatotrope differentiation or function. To elucidate the role of FOXO1 in somatotrope differentiation and function, Foxo1 was conditionally deleted from the anterior pituitary (Foxo1Δpit). Uncommitted progenitor cells are maintained and able to commit to the somatotrope lineage normally based on the expression patterns of Sox2, a marker of uncommitted pituitary progenitors, and Pou1f1 (also known as Pit1), which marks committed progenitors. Interestingly, Foxo1Δpit embryonic mice exhibit delayed somatotrope differentiation as evidenced by an almost complete absence of GH immunoreactivity at e16.5 and reduced expression of Gh at e18.5 and postnatal day (P) 3. Consistent with this conclusion, expression of GHRH receptor, a marker of terminally differentiated somatotropes, is significantly reduced at e18.5 and P3 in the absence of FOXO1. The mechanism of FOXO1 regulation of somatotrope differentiation may involve the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Neurod4, which has been implicated in somatotrope differentiation and is significantly reduced in Foxo1Δpit mice. Foxo1Δpit mice do not exhibit growth defects, and at P21 their pituitary glands exhibit a normal distribution of somatotropes. These studies demonstrate that FOXO1 is important for initial somatotrope specification embryonically but is dispensable for postnatal somatotrope expansion and growth. PMID:27631552

  11. FoxO1 negatively regulates leptin-induced POMC transcription through its direct interaction with STAT3.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Fuentes, Gloria; Shi, Xiaohe; Verma, Chandra; Radda, George K; Han, Weiping

    2015-03-01

    FoxO1, which is up-regulated during early stages of diet-induced leptin resistance, directly interacts with STAT3 and prevents STAT3 from binding to specificity protein 1 (SP1)-pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) promoter complex, and thereby inhibits STAT3-mediated regulation of POMC transcription. FoxO1 also binds directly to the POMC promoter and negatively regulates its transcription. The present study aims to understand the relative contribution of the two interactions in regulating POMC expression. We studied the structural requirement of FoxO1 for its interaction with STAT3 and POMC promoter, and tested the inhibitory action of FoxO1 mutants by using biochemical assays, molecular biology and computer modelling. FoxO1 mutant with deletion of residues Ala137-Leu160 failed to bind to STAT3 or inhibit STAT3-mediated POMC activation, although its binding to the POMC promoter was unaffected. Further analysis mapped Gly140-Leu160 to be critical for STAT3 binding. The identified region Gly140-Leu160 was conserved among mammalian FoxO1 proteins, and showed a high degree of sequence identity with FoxO3, but not FoxO4. Consistently, FoxO3 could interact with STAT3 and inhibit POMC promoter activity, whereas FoxO4 could not bind to STAT3 or affect POMC promoter activity. We further identified that five residues (Gln145, Arg147, Lys148, Arg153 and Arg154) in FoxO1 were necessary in FoxO1-STAT3 interaction, and mutation of these residues abolished its interaction with STAT3 and inhibition of POMC promoter activity. Finally, a FoxO1-STAT3 interaction interface model generated by computational docking simulations confirmed that the identified residues of FoxO1 were in close proximity to STAT3. These results show that FoxO1 inhibits STAT3-mediated leptin signalling through direct interaction with STAT3.

  12. Cobalt Protoporphyrin Induces HO-1 Expression Mediated Partially by FOXO1 and Reduces Mitochondria-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meixia; Xu, Haifeng; Zuo, Jin; Fang, Fude; Chang, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species arise in the mitochondria as byproducts of respiration and oxidase activity and have important roles in many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The level of reactive oxygen species is regulated by a number of enzymes and physiological antioxidants, including HO-1, Sod2, catalase and COX-2, etc. And HO-1 against oxidative stress requires an increase in stress-responsive genes, such as Sod2 and catalase. Especially for the activity of HO-1, cobalt protoporphyrin is known to be a potent and effective inducer in many tissues. The transcription factor, FOXO1 is resistant to oxidative stress through downregulating reactive oxygen species production. Previous study showed that FOXO1 induces HO-1 expression by binding to HO-1 promoter. The question whether cobalt protoporphyrin induces HO-1 expression mediated by FOXO1 and subsequently lessens reactive oxygen species production remains to be elucidated. Results Cobalt protoporphyrin enhances the expression of FOXO1 and facilitates FOXO1 binding to HO-1 promoter and increasing its transcriptional activity without influencing the FOXO1 protein stability. CoPP induces HO-1 and other oxidative stress-responsive genes expression, such as catalase, cytochrome c, Sod2, and COX-2, and decreases mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species production, which are mediated partially by FOXO1. Conclusions Cobalt protoporphyrin induces HO-1 and other oxidative stress-responsive genes expression mediated partially by FOXO1, and has an important role in reducing cellular reactive oxygen species level. Cobalt protoporphyrin may be a more promising therapeutic agent to upregulate some antioxidantive genes. PMID:24255720

  13. Systems-wide Experimental and Modeling Analysis of Insulin Signaling through Forkhead Box Protein O1 (FOXO1) in Human Adipocytes, Normally and in Type 2 Diabetes*

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Meenu Rohini; Nyman, Elin; Kjølhede, Preben; Cedersund, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major aspect of type 2 diabetes (T2D), which results from impaired insulin signaling in target cells. Signaling to regulate forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) may be the most important mechanism for insulin to control transcription. Despite this, little is known about how insulin regulates FOXO1 and how FOXO1 may contribute to insulin resistance in adipocytes, which are the most critical cell type in the development of insulin resistance. We report a detailed mechanistic analysis of insulin control of FOXO1 in human adipocytes obtained from non-diabetic subjects and from patients with T2D. We show that FOXO1 is mainly phosphorylated through mTORC2-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B at Ser473 and that this mechanism is unperturbed in T2D. We also demonstrate a cross-talk from the MAPK branch of insulin signaling to stimulate phosphorylation of FOXO1. The cellular abundance and consequently activity of FOXO1 are halved in T2D. Interestingly, inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin reduces the abundance of FOXO1 to the levels in T2D. This suggests that the reduction of the concentration of FOXO1 is a consequence of attenuation of mTORC1, which defines much of the diabetic state in human adipocytes. We integrate insulin control of FOXO1 in a network-wide mathematical model of insulin signaling dynamics based on compatible data from human adipocytes. The diabetic state is network-wide explained by attenuation of an mTORC1-to-insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) feedback and reduced abundances of insulin receptor, GLUT4, AS160, ribosomal protein S6, and FOXO1. The model demonstrates that attenuation of the mTORC1-to-IRS1 feedback is a major mechanism of insulin resistance in the diabetic state. PMID:27226562

  14. Systems-wide Experimental and Modeling Analysis of Insulin Signaling through Forkhead Box Protein O1 (FOXO1) in Human Adipocytes, Normally and in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Meenu Rohini; Nyman, Elin; Kjølhede, Preben; Cedersund, Gunnar; Strålfors, Peter

    2016-07-22

    Insulin resistance is a major aspect of type 2 diabetes (T2D), which results from impaired insulin signaling in target cells. Signaling to regulate forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) may be the most important mechanism for insulin to control transcription. Despite this, little is known about how insulin regulates FOXO1 and how FOXO1 may contribute to insulin resistance in adipocytes, which are the most critical cell type in the development of insulin resistance. We report a detailed mechanistic analysis of insulin control of FOXO1 in human adipocytes obtained from non-diabetic subjects and from patients with T2D. We show that FOXO1 is mainly phosphorylated through mTORC2-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B at Ser(473) and that this mechanism is unperturbed in T2D. We also demonstrate a cross-talk from the MAPK branch of insulin signaling to stimulate phosphorylation of FOXO1. The cellular abundance and consequently activity of FOXO1 are halved in T2D. Interestingly, inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin reduces the abundance of FOXO1 to the levels in T2D. This suggests that the reduction of the concentration of FOXO1 is a consequence of attenuation of mTORC1, which defines much of the diabetic state in human adipocytes. We integrate insulin control of FOXO1 in a network-wide mathematical model of insulin signaling dynamics based on compatible data from human adipocytes. The diabetic state is network-wide explained by attenuation of an mTORC1-to-insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) feedback and reduced abundances of insulin receptor, GLUT4, AS160, ribosomal protein S6, and FOXO1. The model demonstrates that attenuation of the mTORC1-to-IRS1 feedback is a major mechanism of insulin resistance in the diabetic state.

  15. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  16. PAX3-FOXO1 is essential for tumour initiation and maintenance but not recurrence in a human myoblast model of rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Puspa R; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Olanich, Mary E; Khan, Javed; Miettinen, Markku M; Hewitt, Stephen M; Barr, Frederic G

    2017-01-31

    -independent mechanism, in which rare cells are postulated to acquire secondary transforming events that were activated or selected by initial PAX3-FOXO1 expression.

  17. PDK1-Foxo1 in Agouti-Related Peptide Neurons Regulates Energy Homeostasis by Modulating Food Intake and Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yongheng; Nakata, Masanori; Okamoto, Shiki; Takano, Eisuke; Yada, Toshihiko; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Hirata, Yukio; Nakajima, Kazunori; Iskandar, Kristy; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Ogawa, Wataru; Barsh, Gregory S.; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Itoh, Hiroshi; Noda, Tetsuo; Kasuga, Masato; Nakae, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Insulin and leptin intracellular signaling pathways converge and act synergistically on the hypothalamic phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase/3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1). However, little is known about whether PDK1 in agouti-related peptide (AGRP) neurons contributes to energy homeostasis. We generated AGRP neuron-specific PDK1 knockout (AGRPPdk1−/−) mice and mice with selective expression of transactivation-defective Foxo1 (Δ256Foxo1AGRPPdk1−/−). The AGRPPdk1−/− mice showed reductions in food intake, body length, and body weight. The Δ256Foxo1AGRPPdk1−/− mice showed increased body weight, food intake, and reduced locomotor activity. After four weeks of calorie-restricted feeding, oxygen consumption and locomotor activity were elevated in AGRPPdk1−/− mice and reduced in Δ256Foxo1AGRPPdk1−/− mice. In vitro, ghrelin-induced changes in [Ca2+]i and inhibition of ghrelin by leptin were significantly attenuated in AGRPPdk1−/− neurons compared to control neurons. However, ghrelin-induced [Ca2+]i changes and leptin inhibition were restored in Δ256Foxo1AGRPPdk1−/− mice. These results suggested that PDK1 and Foxo1 signaling pathways play important roles in the control of energy homeostasis through AGRP-independent mechanisms. PMID:21694754

  18. FoxO1 inhibits sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) gene expression via transcription factors Sp1 and SREBP-1c.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiong; Zhang, Wenwei; O-Sullivan, InSug; Williams, J Bradley; Dong, Qingming; Park, Edwards A; Raghow, Rajendra; Unterman, Terry G; Elam, Marshall B

    2012-06-08

    Induction of lipogenesis in response to insulin is critically dependent on the transcription factor, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). FoxO1, a forkhead box class-O transcription factor, is an important mediator of insulin action, but its role in the regulation of lipid metabolism has not been clearly defined. We examined the effects of FoxO1 on srebp1 gene expression in vivo and in vitro. In vivo studies showed that constitutively active (CA) FoxO1 (CA-FoxO1) reduced basal expression of SREBP-1c mRNA in liver by ∼60% and blunted induction of SREBP-1c in response to feeding. In liver-specific FoxO knock-out mice, SREBP-1c expression was increased ∼2-fold. Similarly, in primary hepatocytes, CA-FoxO1 suppressed SREBP1-c expression and inhibited basal and insulin-induced SREBP-1c promoter activity. SREBP-1c gene expression is induced by the liver X receptor (LXR), but CA-FoxO1 did not block the activation of SREBP-1c by the LXR agonist TO9. Insulin stimulates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1 and via "feed forward" regulation by newly synthesized SREBP-1c. CA-FoxO1 inhibited SREBP-1c by reducing the transactivational capacity of both Sp1 and SREBP-1c. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicate that FoxO1 can associate with the proximal promoter region of the srebp1 gene and disrupt the assembly of key components of the transcriptional complex of the SREBP-1c promoter. We conclude that FoxO1 inhibits SREBP-1c transcription via combined actions on multiple transcription factors and that this effect is exerted at least in part through reduced transcriptional activity of Sp1 and SREBP-1c and disrupted assembly of the transcriptional initiation complex on the SREBP-1c promoter.

  19. Overexpression of FoxO1 in the hypothalamus and pancreas causes obesity and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Kobayashi, Masaki; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Kikuchi, Osamu; Amano, Kosuke; Kitazumi, Tomoya; Lee, Yong-Soo; Yokota-Hashimoto, Hiromi; Susanti, Vina Yanti; Kitamura, Yukari Ido; Nakae, Jun; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies have revealed that insulin signaling in pancreatic β-cells and the hypothalamus is critical for maintaining nutrient and energy homeostasis, the failure of which are hallmarks of metabolic syndrome. We previously reported that forkhead transcription factor forkhead box-containing protein of the O subfamily (FoxO)1, a downstream effector of insulin signaling, plays important roles in β-cells and the hypothalamus when we investigated the roles of FoxO1 independently in the pancreas and hypothalamus. However, because metabolic syndrome is caused by the combined disorders in hypothalamus and pancreas, to elucidate the combined implications of FoxO1 in these organs, we generated constitutively active FoxO1 knockin (KI) mice with specific activation in both the hypothalamus and pancreas. The KI mice developed obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hypertriglyceridemia due to increased food intake, decreased energy expenditure, and impaired insulin secretion, which characterize metabolic syndrome. The KI mice also had increased hypothalamic Agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y levels and decreased uncoupling protein 1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α levels in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Impaired insulin secretion was associated with decreased expression of pancreatic and duodenum homeobox 1 (Pdx1), muscyloaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA), and neurogenic differentiation 1 (NeuroD) in islets, although β-cell mass was paradoxically increased in KI mice. Based on these results, we propose that uncontrolled FoxO1 activation in the hypothalamus and pancreas accounts for the development of obesity and glucose intolerance, hallmarks of metabolic syndrome.

  20. Oligodendrocyte regeneration after neonatal hypoxia requires FoxO1-mediated p27Kip1 expression.

    PubMed

    Jablonska, Beata; Scafidi, Joseph; Aguirre, Adan; Vaccarino, Flora; Nguyen, Vien; Borok, Erzsebet; Horvath, Tamas L; Rowitch, David H; Gallo, Vittorio

    2012-10-17

    Diffuse white matter injury (DWMI) caused by hypoxia is associated with permanent neurodevelopmental disabilities in preterm infants. The cellular and molecular mechanisms producing DWMI are poorly defined. Using a mouse model of neonatal hypoxia, we demonstrate a biphasic effect on oligodendrocyte development, resulting in hypomyelination. Oligodendrocyte death and oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) proliferation during the week after hypoxia were followed by delayed oligodendrocyte differentiation and abnormal myelination, as demonstrated by electron microscopy. Cdk2 activation was essential for the regenerative OPC response after hypoxia and was accompanied by reduced FoxO1-dependent p27(Kip1) expression. p27(Kip1) was also reduced in OPCs in human infant white matter lesions after hypoxia. The negative effects of hypoxia on oligodendrogenesis and myelination were more pronounced in p27(Kip1)-null mice; conversely, overexpression of FoxO1 or p27(Kip1) in OPCs after hypoxia promoted oligodendrogenesis. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that neonatal hypoxia affects the Foxo1/p27(Kip1) pathway during white matter development. We also show that molecular manipulation of this pathway enhances oligodendrocyte regeneration during a critical developmental time window after DWMI. Thus, FoxO1 and p27(Kip1) may serve as promising target molecules for promoting timely oligodendrogenesis in neonatal DWMI.

  1. Oligodendrocyte Regeneration after Neonatal Hypoxia Requires FoxO1-Mediated p27Kip1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jablonska, Beata; Scafidi, Joseph; Aguirre, Adan; Vaccarino, Flora; Nguyen, Vien; Borok, Erzsebet; Horvath, Tamas L.; Rowitch, David H.; Gallo, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse white matter injury (DWMI) caused by hypoxia is associated with permanent neurodevelopmental disabilities in preterm infants. The cellular and molecular mechanisms producing DWMI are poorly defined. Using a mouse model of neonatal hypoxia, we demonstrate a biphasic effect on oligodendrocyte development, resulting in hypomyelination. Oligodendrocyte death and oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) proliferation during the week after hypoxia were followed by delayed oligodendrocyte differentiation and abnormal myelination, as demonstrated by electron microscopy. Cdk2 activation was essential for the regenerative OPC response after hypoxia and was accompanied by reduced FoxO1-dependent p27 Kip1 expression. p27 Kip1 was also reduced in OPCs in human infant white matter lesions after hypoxia. The negative effects of hypoxia on oligodendrogenesis and myelination were more pronounced in p27 Kip1-null mice; conversely, overexpression of FoxO1 or p27 Kip1 in OPCs after hypoxia promoted oligodendrogenesis. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that neonatal hypoxia affects the Foxo1/p27 Kip1 pathway during white matter development. We also show that molecular manipulation of this pathway enhances oligodendrocyte regeneration during a critical developmental time window after DWMI. Thus, FoxO1 and p27 Kip1 may serve as promising target molecules for promoting timely oligodendrogenesis in neonatal DWMI. PMID:23077062

  2. Effects of FoxO1 on podocyte injury in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qingzhu; Ren, Lei; Zhou, Yingni; Ma, Xiaojun; Wu, Lina; Qin, Guijun

    2015-10-16

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of forkhead transcription factor O1 (FoxO1) on podocyte injury in rats with diabetic nephropathy. Methods: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were served as DM group, while DM rats transfected with blank lentiviral vectors (LV-pSC-GFP) or lentiviral vectors carrying constitutively active FoxO1 (LV-CA-FoxO1) were served as LV-NC group or LV-CA group, respectively. The control group (NG) consisted of uninduced rats that received an injection of diluent buffer. At 2, 4, and 8 weeks after transfection, the levels of urine albumin, blood glucose, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine and urine podocalyxin were measured. Real-time PCR and western blotting were performed to measure mRNA and protein levels of FoxO1, podocalyxin, nephrin, and desmin in renal cortex. In addition, light and electron microscopy were used to detect structural changes in the glomerulus and podocytes. Results: Compared with the rats in LV-NC and DM groups, LV-CA rats showed a significant increase in FoxO1 mRNA and protein levels and a distinct decrease in urine albumin, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine (except at the two-week time point) levels (p < 0.05). Podocalyxin and nephrin mRNA and protein levels increased (p < 0.05), whereas desmin mRNA and protein levels decreased (p < 0.05). Pathological changes in glomerulus were also ameliorated in LV-CA group. Conclusions: Upregulating expression of FoxO1 by transduction with recombinant lentivirus ameliorates podocyte injury in diabetic rats. - Highlights: • The structures and functions of podocytes were impaired in STZ-induced diabetic rats. • Constitutively active FoxO1 ameliorates structure injury and preserves function of podocytes in diabetic rats. • FoxO1 may alleviate the pathological changes associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  3. Forkhead Protein FoxO1 Acts as a Repressor to Inhibit Cell Differentiation in Human Fetal Pancreatic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zongzhe; Tian, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenjian; Yan, Hao; Liu, Liping; Huang, Zhenhe; Lou, Jinning

    2017-01-01

    Our colleagues have reported previously that human pancreatic progenitor cells can readily differentiate into insulin-containing cells. Particularly, transplantation of these cell clusters upon in vitro induction for 3-4 w partially restores hyperglycemia in diabetic nude mice. In this study, we used human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells to identify the forkhead protein FoxO1 as the key regulator for cell differentiation. Thus, induction of human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells for 1 week led to increase of the pancreatic β cell markers such as Ngn3, but decrease of stem cell markers including Oct4, Nanog, and CK19. Of note, FoxO1 knockdown or FoxO1 inhibitor significantly upregulated Ngn3 and insulin as well as the markers such as Glut2, Kir6.2, SUR1, and VDCC, which are designated for mature β cells. On the contrary, overexpression of FoxO1 suppressed the induction and reduced expression of these β cell markers. Taken together, these results suggest that FoxO1 may act as a repressor to inhibit cell differentiation in human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells. PMID:28349071

  4. FOXO1/3 Depletion in Granulosa Cells Alters Follicle Growth, Death and Regulation of Pituitary FSH

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhilin; Castrillon, Diego H.; Zhou, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The Forkhead boxO (FOXO) transcription factors regulate multiple cellular functions. FOXO1 and FOXO3 are highly expressed in granulosa cells of ovarian follicles. Selective depletion of the Foxo1 and Foxo3 genes in granulosa cells of mice reveals a novel ovarian-pituitary endocrine feedback loop characterized by: 1) undetectable levels of serum FSH but not LH, 2) reduced expression of the pituitary Fshb gene and its transcriptional regulators, and 3) ovarian production of a factor(s) that suppresses pituitary cell Fshb expression. Equally notable, and independent of FSH, microarray analyses and quantitative PCR document that depletion of Foxo1/3 alters the expression of specific genes associated with follicle growth vs. apoptosis by disrupting critical and selective regulatory interactions of FOXO1/3 with the activin or bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) pathways, respectively. As a consequence, both granulosa cell proliferation and apoptosis were decreased. These data provide the first evidence that FOXO1/3 divergently regulate follicle growth or death by interacting with the activin or BMP pathways in granulosa cells and by modulating pituitary FSH production. PMID:23322722

  5. FOXO1/3 depletion in granulosa cells alters follicle growth, death and regulation of pituitary FSH.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhilin; Castrillon, Diego H; Zhou, Wei; Richards, Joanne S

    2013-02-01

    The Forkhead boxO (FOXO) transcription factors regulate multiple cellular functions. FOXO1 and FOXO3 are highly expressed in granulosa cells of ovarian follicles. Selective depletion of the Foxo1 and Foxo3 genes in granulosa cells of mice reveals a novel ovarian-pituitary endocrine feedback loop characterized by: 1) undetectable levels of serum FSH but not LH, 2) reduced expression of the pituitary Fshb gene and its transcriptional regulators, and 3) ovarian production of a factor(s) that suppresses pituitary cell Fshb expression. Equally notable, and independent of FSH, microarray analyses and quantitative PCR document that depletion of Foxo1/3 alters the expression of specific genes associated with follicle growth vs. apoptosis by disrupting critical and selective regulatory interactions of FOXO1/3 with the activin or bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) pathways, respectively. As a consequence, both granulosa cell proliferation and apoptosis were decreased. These data provide the first evidence that FOXO1/3 divergently regulate follicle growth or death by interacting with the activin or BMP pathways in granulosa cells and by modulating pituitary FSH production.

  6. Lack of association between FOXO1 polymorphisms and bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Wang, Xiong; Zhu, Yaowu; Lu, Yanjun; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that FOXO1, one critical gene related to the human immune system, probable is closely to the human infection. In the present study we aimed to investigate genetic association of FOXO1 with bacteremia in Han Chinese. 188 patients with bacteremia diagnosed with blood culture and 250 healthy blood donors without signs of infection were studied, two tagging SNPs of FOXO1 (rs9532571, rs3751436) were selected and genotyped using predesigned TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. The results showed that the allele frequency of rs9532571 and rs3751436 in FOXO1 was not associated with an increased risk of bacteremia (P=0.762, OR=1.05, 95% CI 0.77-1.43; P=0.059, OR=1.34, 95% CI 0.99-1.81 respectively), the genotype distribution of these two SNPs was also not significantly different between bacteremia patients and control groups (P=0.9; P=0.16). Haplotypes in this block were not significantly associated with bacteremia risk. Conclusion: the association between FOXO1 genetic polymorphism and bacteremia has not been observed in the study, maybe a larger sample population and more SNPs in the FOXO1 need to reveal the role in bacteremia in the future. PMID:26629162

  7. Drug Repurposing Screen Identifies Foxo1-Dependent Angiopoietin-2 Regulation in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Chandra C.; Thamm, Kristina; Berghelli, Anthony V.; Schrimpf, Claudia; Maski, Manish R.; Abid, Tanaz; Milam, Katelyn E.; Rajakumar, Augustine; Santel, Ansgar; Kielstein, Jan T.; Ahmed, Asif; Thickett, David; Wang, Keqin; Chase, Maureen; Donnino, Michael W.; Aird, William C.; Haller, Hermann; David, Sascha; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The recent withdrawal of a targeted sepsis therapy has diminished pharmaceutical enthusiasm for developing novel drugs for the treatment of sepsis. Angiopoietin-2 is an endothelial-derived protein that potentiates vascular inflammation and leak-age and may be involved in sepsis pathogenesis. We screened approved compounds for putative inhibitors of angiopoietin-2 production and investigated underlying molecular mechanisms. Design Laboratory and animal research plus prospective placebo- controlled randomized controlled trial (NCT00529139) and retrospective analysis (NCT00676897). Setting Research laboratories of Hannover Medical School and Harvard Medical School. Patients Septic patients/C57Bl/6 mice and human endothelial cells. Interventions Food and Drug Administration–approved library screening. Measurements and Main Results In a cell-based screen of more than 650 Food and Drug Administration–approved compounds, we identified multiple members of the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor drug class (referred to as statins) that suppressed angiopoietin-2. Simvastatin inhibited 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, which in turn activated PI3K-kinase. Downstream of this signaling, PI3K-dependent phosphorylation of the transcription factor Foxo1 at key amino acids inhibited its ability to shuttle to the nucleus and bind cis-elements in the angiopoietin-2 promoter. In septic mice, transient inhibition of angiopoietin-2 expression by liposomal siRNA in vivo improved absolute survival by 50%. Simvastatin had a similar effect, but the combination of angiopoietin-2 siRNA and simvastatin showed no additive benefit. To verify the link between statins and angiopoietin-2 in humans, we performed a pilot matched case-control study and a small randomized placebo-controlled trial demonstrating beneficial effects on angiopoietin-2. Conclusions 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors may operate through a novel Foxo1-angiopoietin-2

  8. STAT3 protein interacts with Class O Forkhead transcription factors in the cytoplasm and regulates nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of FoxO1 and FoxO3a proteins in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Mee; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Dambuza, Ivy; Marrero, Bernadette; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2012-08-31

    An important feature of the adaptive immune response is its remarkable capacity to regulate the duration of inflammatory responses, and effector T cells have been shown to limit excessive immune responses by producing anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and IL-27. However, how anti-inflammatory cytokines mediate their suppressive activities is not well understood. In this study, we show that STAT3 contributes to mechanisms that control the duration of T cell proliferation by regulating the subcellular location of FoxO1 and FoxO3a, two Class O Forkhead transcription factors that mediate lymphocyte quiescence and inhibit T cell activation. We show that active FoxO1 and FoxO3a reside exclusively in the nucleus of naïve T cells whereas inactive pFoxO1 and pFoxO3a were most abundant in activated T cells and sequestered in their cytoplasm in association with unphosphorylated STAT3 (U-STAT3) and 14-3-3. We further show that FoxO1/FoxO3a rapidly relocalized into the nucleus in response to pSTAT3 activation by IL-6 or IL-10, and the accumulation of FoxO1/FoxO3a in their nuclei coincided with increased expression of p27(Kip1) and p21(WAF1). STAT3 inhibitors completely abrogated cytokine-induced translocation of FoxO1/FoxO3a into the nucleus. In naïve or resting STAT3-deficient T cells, expression of pFoxO1/pFoxO3a was predominantly in the cytoplasm and correlated with defects in p27(Kip1) and p21(WAF1) expression, suggesting requirement of STAT3 for importation or retention of FoxO in the nucleus and attenuation of lymphocyte proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that U-STAT3 collaborates with 14-3-3 to sequester pFoxO1/pFoxO3a in cytoplasm and thus prolong T cell activation, whereas pSTAT3 activation by anti-inflammatory cytokines would curtail the duration of TCR activation and re-establish lymphocyte quiescence by inducing nuclear localization of FoxO1/FoxO3a and FoxO-mediated expression of growth-inhibitory proteins.

  9. STAT3 Protein Interacts with Class O Forkhead Transcription Factors in the Cytoplasm and Regulates Nuclear/Cytoplasmic Localization of FoxO1 and FoxO3a Proteins in CD4+ T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun-Mee; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Dambuza, Ivy; Marrero, Bernadette; Egwuagu, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    An important feature of the adaptive immune response is its remarkable capacity to regulate the duration of inflammatory responses, and effector T cells have been shown to limit excessive immune responses by producing anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and IL-27. However, how anti-inflammatory cytokines mediate their suppressive activities is not well understood. In this study, we show that STAT3 contributes to mechanisms that control the duration of T cell proliferation by regulating the subcellular location of FoxO1 and FoxO3a, two Class O Forkhead transcription factors that mediate lymphocyte quiescence and inhibit T cell activation. We show that active FoxO1 and FoxO3a reside exclusively in the nucleus of naïve T cells whereas inactive pFoxO1 and pFoxO3a were most abundant in activated T cells and sequestered in their cytoplasm in association with unphosphorylated STAT3 (U-STAT3) and 14-3-3. We further show that FoxO1/FoxO3a rapidly relocalized into the nucleus in response to pSTAT3 activation by IL-6 or IL-10, and the accumulation of FoxO1/FoxO3a in their nuclei coincided with increased expression of p27Kip1 and p21WAF1. STAT3 inhibitors completely abrogated cytokine-induced translocation of FoxO1/FoxO3a into the nucleus. In naïve or resting STAT3-deficient T cells, expression of pFoxO1/pFoxO3a was predominantly in the cytoplasm and correlated with defects in p27Kip1 and p21WAF1 expression, suggesting requirement of STAT3 for importation or retention of FoxO in the nucleus and attenuation of lymphocyte proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that U-STAT3 collaborates with 14-3-3 to sequester pFoxO1/pFoxO3a in cytoplasm and thus prolong T cell activation, whereas pSTAT3 activation by anti-inflammatory cytokines would curtail the duration of TCR activation and re-establish lymphocyte quiescence by inducing nuclear localization of FoxO1/FoxO3a and FoxO-mediated expression of growth-inhibitory proteins. PMID:22761423

  10. FoxO1 Plays an Important Role in Regulating β-Cell Compensation for Insulin Resistance in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Kim, Dae Hyun; Xiao, Xiangwei; Lee, Sojin; Gong, Zhenwei; Muzumdar, Radhika; Calabuig-Navarro, Virtu; Yamauchi, Jun; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Wang, Rennian; Bottino, Rita; Alvarez-Perez, Juan Carlos; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Gittes, George

    2016-01-01

    β-Cell compensation is an essential mechanism by which β-cells increase insulin secretion for overcoming insulin resistance to maintain euglycemia in obesity. Failure of β-cells to compensate for insulin resistance contributes to insulin insufficiency and overt diabetes. To understand the mechanism of β-cell compensation, we characterized the role of forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) in β-cell compensation in mice under physiological and pathological conditions. FoxO1 is a key transcription factor that serves as a nutrient sensor for integrating insulin signaling to cell metabolism, growth, and proliferation. We showed that FoxO1 improved β-cell compensation via 3 distinct mechanisms by increasing β-cell mass, enhancing β-cell glucose sensing, and augmenting β-cell antioxidative function. These effects accounted for increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and enhanced glucose tolerance in β-cell-specific FoxO1-transgenic mice. When fed a high-fat diet, β-cell-specific FoxO1-transgenic mice were protected from developing fat-induced glucose disorder. This effect was attributable to increased β-cell mass and function. Furthermore, we showed that FoxO1 activity was up-regulated in islets, correlating with the induction of physiological β-cell compensation in high-fat-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. These data characterize FoxO1 as a pivotal factor for orchestrating physiological adaptation of β-cell mass and function to overnutrition and obesity. PMID:26727107

  11. miR-182 is a negative regulator of osteoblast proliferation, differentiation, and skeletogenesis through targeting FoxO1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Park, Su Jin; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Eun Jin; Jogeswar, Gadi; Ajita, Jami; Rhee, Yumie; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lim, Sung-Kil

    2012-08-01

    Uncontrolled oxidative stress impairs bone formation and induces age-related bone loss in humans. The FoxO family is widely accepted to play an important role in protecting diverse cells from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Activation of FoxO1, the main FoxO in bone, stimulates proliferation and differentiation as well as inhibits apoptosis of osteoblast lineage cells. Despite the important role of FoxO1, little is known about how FoxO1 expression in bone is regulated. Meanwhile, several recent studies reported that microRNAs (miRNAs) could play a role in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation by targeting various transcriptional factors. Here, we identified one additional crucial miRNA, miR-182, which regulates osteoblastogenesis by repressing FoxO1 and thereby negatively affecting osteogenesis. Overexpression of miR-182 in osteoblast lineage cells increased cell apoptosis and inhibited osteoblast differentiation, whereas in vivo overexpression of miR-182 in zebrafish impaired bone formation. From in silico analysis and validation experiments, FoxO1 was identified as the target of miR-182, and restoration of FoxO1 expression in miR-182-overexpressing osteoblasts rescued them from the inhibitory effects of miR-182. These results indicate that miR-182 functions as a FoxO1 inhibitor to antagonize osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, with a subsequent negative effect on osteogenesis. To treat bone aging, an antisense approach targeting miR-182 could be of therapeutic value.

  12. Monitoring FoxO1 localization in chemically identified neurons.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Makoto; Jones, Juli E; Olson, David; Hill, Jennifer; Lee, Charlotte E; Gautron, Laurent; Choi, Michelle; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Lowell, Bradford B; Elmquist, Joel K

    2008-12-10

    The PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 pathway contributes to the actions of insulin and leptin in several cell types, including neurons in the CNS. However, identifying these actions in chemically identified neurons has proven difficult. To address this problem, we have developed a reporter mouse for monitoring PI3K-Akt signaling in specific populations of neurons, based on FoxO1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. The reporter, FoxO1 fused to green fluorescent protein (FoxO1GFP), is expressed under the control of a ubiquitous promoter that is silenced by a loxP flanked transcriptional blocker. Thus, the expression of the reporter in selected cells is dependent on the action of Cre recombinase. Using this model, we found that insulin treatment resulted in the nuclear exclusion of FoxO1GFP within POMC and AgRP neurons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. FoxO1GFP nuclear exclusion was also observed in POMC neurons following in vivo administration of insulin. In addition, leptin induced transient nuclear export of FoxO1GFP in POMC neurons in a dose dependent manner. Finally, insulin-induced nuclear export was impaired in POMC neurons by pretreatment with free fatty acids, a paradigm known to induce insulin resistance in peripheral insulin target tissues. Thus, our FoxO1GFP mouse provides a tool for monitoring the status of PI3K-Akt signaling in a cell-specific manner under physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  13. Forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in pregnant human myometrial cells: a role as a pro-inflammatory mediator in human parturition.

    PubMed

    Lappas, Martha

    2013-09-01

    Prematurity is the most important complication contributing to neonatal morbidity and mortality. It is the untimely activation of the terminal events of human parturition that lead to preterm birth, with inflammation playing a driving role in initiating uterine contractions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Forkhead box O1 (FOXO1), a pro-inflammatory modulator, during human parturition. FOXO1 mRNA expression was quantified using qRT-PCR, and protein expression using Western blotting in myometrial biopsies from pregnant non-labouring and labouring women at term. In addition, the effect of FOXO1 knockdown in human myometrial cells on IL-β-stimulated expression of pro-inflammatory mediators was investigated. Levels of FOXO1, at both the gene and protein levels, were higher in myometrium obtained from women in labour compared with samples taken from non-labouring women. FOXO1 deletion in myometrial cells attenuated the capacity of IL-1β to induce inflammatory gene expression. Specifically, FOXO1 knockdown significantly decreased IL-1β-induced IL-6 and IL-8 expression; production and COX-2 expression and subsequent prostaglandin (PGE2 and PGF2α) release; and MMP-9 mRNA expression and activity. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the potential role of FOXO1 inflammatory events of both physiological and pathological labour in human myometrium, and may provide a therapeutic target in the management of preterm labour.

  14. FoxO1 regulates muscle fiber-type specification and inhibits calcineurin signaling during C2C12 myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Shi, Xin-e; Liu, Yue-guang; Yang, Gong-she

    2011-02-01

    Adult skeletal muscle fibers can be categorized into slow-oxidative and fast-glycolytic subtypes based on specialized metabolic and contractile properties. The Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) transcription factor governs muscle growth, metabolism, and cell differentiation, and has been shown to be involved in regulating muscle fiber type specification. However, to date, the mechanism behind FoxO1-mediated fiber type diversity is still unclear. In this article, FoxO1 being expressed preferentially in fast twitch fiber enriched muscles is reported. Moreover, the autors also detected that FoxO1 expression decreased in both fast and slow muscles from mice undergoing endurance exercise which induced a fast-to-slow fiber type transition. Using C2C12 myoblast, constitutively active FoxO1 mutant altered the proportion of muscle fiber type composition toward a fast-glycolytic phenotype and attenuated calcineurin phosphatase activity. In addition, a transcriptionally inactive FoxO1 by resveratrol triggered the expression of genes related to slow-oxidative muscle but not sufficient to induce a complete slow fiber transformation. Taken together, these results suggest that FoxO1 up-regulates fast fiber-type formation and down-regulates muscle oxidative capacity at least in part through inhibition of the calcineurin pathway.

  15. FOXO1, TGF-β Regulation and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Liu, Jian; Batres, Angelika; Graves, Gabrielle S.; Graves, Dana T.

    2014-01-01

    Re-epithelialization is a complex process that involves migration and proliferation of keratinocytes, in addition to the production of cytokines and growth factors that affect other cells. The induction of transcription factors during these processes is crucial for successful wound healing. The transcription factor forkhead boxO-1 (FOXO1) has recently been found to be an important regulator of wound healing. In particular, FOXO1 has significant effects through regulation of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) expression and protecting keratinocytes from oxidative stress. In the absence of FOXO1, there is increased oxidative damage, reduced TGF-β1 expression, reduced migration and proliferation of keratinocytes and increased keratinocytes apoptosis leading to impaired re-epithelialization of wounds. PMID:25226535

  16. Cis-Regulatory Evolution of Forkhead Box O1 (FOXO1), a Terminal Selector Gene for Decidual Stromal Cell Identity.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonwoo; Nnamani, Mauris C; Maziarz, Jamie; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-12-01

    Studies in human and mouse have shown that decidual stromal cells (DSC), which develop in the innermost lining of uterus, mediate placentation by regulating maternal immune response against the fetus and the extent of fetal invasion. Investigating when and how DSC evolved is thus a key step to reconstructing the evolutionary history of mammalian pregnancy. We present molecular evidence placing the origin of DSC in the stem lineage of eutherians (extant placental mammals). The transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) is a part of the core regulatory transcription factor complex (CoRC) that establishes the cell type identity of DSC. Decidualization, the process through which DSC differentiate from endometrial stromal fibroblasts, requires transcriptional upregulation of FOXO1 Contrary to other examples in mammals where gene recruitment is caused by the origin of an alternative promoter, FOXO1 is transcribed from the same promoter in DSC as in endometrial stromal fibroblasts. Comparing the activities of FOXO1 promoters from human, mouse, manatee (Afrotheria), and opossum (marsupial) revealed that FOXO1 promoter evolved responsiveness to decidualization signals in the stem lineage of eutherians. This eutherian vs. marsupial pattern of promoter activity was not observed in some other cell types expressing FOXO1, suggesting that this cis-regulatory evolution occurred specifically in the context of the origin of DSC. Sequence comparison revealed eutherian-specifically conserved nucleotides that contribute to the eutherian promoter activity. We conclude that the cis-regulatory activity of a terminal selector gene for decidual stromal cell identity evolved in the stem lineage of eutherians supporting a model where decidual cells are a eutherian innovation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Regulation of glucose metabolism via hepatic forkhead transcription factor 1 (FoxO1) by Morinda citrifolia (noni) in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Nerurkar, Pratibha V; Nishioka, Adrienne; Eck, Philip O; Johns, Lisa M; Volper, Esther; Nerurkar, Vivek R

    2012-07-01

    Renewed interest in alternative medicine among diabetic individuals prompted us to investigate anti-diabetic effects of Morinda citrifolia (noni) in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased glucose production due to the inability of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis and promote glycolysis. Insulin inhibits gluconeogenesis by modulating transcription factors such as forkhead box O (FoxO1). Based on microarray analysis data, we tested the hypothesis that fermented noni fruit juice (fNJ) improves glucose metabolism via FoxO1 phosphorylation. C57BL/6 male mice were fed a HFD and fNJ for 12 weeks. Body weights and food intake were monitored daily. FoxO1 expression was analysed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Specificity of fNJ-associated FoxO1 regulation of gluconeogenesis was confirmed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies using human hepatoma cells, HepG2. Supplementation with fNJ inhibited weight gain and improved glucose and insulin tolerance and fasting glucose in HFD-fed mice. Hypoglycaemic properties of fNJ were associated with the inhibition of hepatic FoxO1 mRNA expression, with a concomitant increase in FoxO1 phosphorylation and nuclear expulsion of the proteins. Gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate C kinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6P), were significantly inhibited in mice fed a HFD+fNJ. HepG2 cells demonstrated more than 80 % inhibition of PEPCK and G6P mRNA expression in cells treated with FoxO1 siRNA and fNJ. These data suggest that fNJ improves glucose metabolism via FoxO1 regulation in HFD-fed mice.

  18. Regulation of glucose metabolism via hepatic forkhead transcription factor 1 (FoxO1) by Morinda citrifolia (noni) in high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Nerurkar, Pratibha V.; Nishioka, Adrienne; Eck, Philip O.; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2016-01-01

    Renewed interest in alternative medicine among diabetic individuals prompted us to investigate anti-diabetic effects of Morinda citrifolia (noni) in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased glucose production due to the inability of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis and promote glycolysis. Insulin inhibits gluconeogenesis by modulating transcription factors such as forkhead box O (FoxO1). Based on microarray analysis data, we tested the hypothesis that fermented noni fruit juice (fNJ) improves glucose metabolism via FoxO1 phosphorylation. C57BL/6 male mice were fed a HFD and fNJ for 12 weeks. Body weights and food intake were monitored daily. FoxO1 expression was analysed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Specificity of fNJ-associated FoxO1 regulation of gluconeogenesis was confirmed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies using human hepatoma cells, HepG2. Supplementation with fNJ inhibited weight gain and improved glucose and insulin tolerance and fasting glucose in HFD-fed mice. Hypoglycaemic properties of fNJ were associated with the inhibition of hepatic FoxO1 mRNA expression, with a concomitant increase in FoxO1 phosphorylation and nuclear expulsion of the proteins. Gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate C kinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6P), were significantly inhibited in mice fed a HFD + fNJ. HepG2 cells demonstrated more than 80% inhibition of PEPCK and G6P mRNA expression in cells treated with FoxO1 siRNA and fNJ. These data suggest that fNJ improves glucose metabolism via FoxO1 regulation in HFD-fed mice. PMID:22011624

  19. Genome-wide analysis of FoxO1 binding in hepatic chromatin: Potential involvement of FoxO1 in linking retinoid signaling to hepatic gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Joshi, Pujan; Hong, Seung-Hyun; Mosure, Kathleen; Shin, Dong-Guk; Osborne, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    The forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 is a critical regulator of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism, and dysregulation of FoxO1 function has been implicated in diabetes and insulin resistance. We globally identified FoxO1 occupancy in mouse hepatic chromatin on a genome-wide level by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq). To establish the specific functional significance of FoxO1 against other FoxO proteins, ChIP-seq was performed with chromatin from liver-specific FoxO1 knockout and wild-type mice. Here we identified 401 genome-wide FoxO1-binding locations. Motif search reveals a sequence element, 5′ GTAAACA 3′, consistent with a previously known FoxO1-binding site. Gene set enrichment analysis shows that the data from FoxO1 ChIP-seq are highly correlated with the global expression profiling of genes regulated by FoxO1, demonstrating the functional relevance of our FoxO1 ChIP-seq study. Interestingly, gene ontology analysis reveals the functional significance of FoxO1 in retinoid metabolic processes. We show here that FoxO1 directly binds to the genomic sites for the genes in retinoid metabolism. Notably, deletion of FoxO1 caused a significantly reduced induction of Pck1 and Pdk4 in response to retinoids. As Pck1 and Pdk4 are downstream targets of retinoid signaling, these results suggest that FoxO1 plays a potential role in linking retinoid metabolism to hepatic gluconeogenesis. PMID:23066095

  20. Transcription Factor FoxO1 Is Essential for Enamel Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Poché, Ross A.; Sharma, Ramaswamy; Garcia, Monica D.; Wada, Aya M.; Nolte, Mark J.; Udan, Ryan S.; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Bartlett, John D.; Dickinson, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    The Transforming growth factor β (Tgf-β) pathway, by signaling via the activation of Smad transcription factors, induces the expression of many diverse downstream target genes thereby regulating a vast array of cellular events essential for proper development and homeostasis. In order for a specific cell type to properly interpret the Tgf-β signal and elicit a specific cellular response, cell-specific transcriptional co-factors often cooperate with the Smads to activate a discrete set of genes in the appropriate temporal and spatial manner. Here, via a conditional knockout approach, we show that mice mutant for Forkhead Box O transcription factor FoxO1 exhibit an enamel hypomaturation defect which phenocopies that of the Smad3 mutant mice. Furthermore, we determined that both the FoxO1 and Smad3 mutant teeth exhibit changes in the expression of similar cohort of genes encoding enamel matrix proteins required for proper enamel development. These data raise the possibility that FoxO1 and Smad3 act in concert to regulate a common repertoire of genes necessary for complete enamel maturation. This study is the first to define an essential role for the FoxO family of transcription factors in tooth development and provides a new molecular entry point which will allow researchers to delineate novel genetic pathways regulating the process of biomineralization which may also have significance for studies of human tooth diseases such as amelogenesis imperfecta. PMID:22291941

  1. Transcription factor FoxO1 is essential for enamel biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Poché, Ross A; Sharma, Ramaswamy; Garcia, Monica D; Wada, Aya M; Nolte, Mark J; Udan, Ryan S; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A; Bartlett, John D; Dickinson, Mary E

    2012-01-01

    The Transforming growth factor β (Tgf-β) pathway, by signaling via the activation of Smad transcription factors, induces the expression of many diverse downstream target genes thereby regulating a vast array of cellular events essential for proper development and homeostasis. In order for a specific cell type to properly interpret the Tgf-β signal and elicit a specific cellular response, cell-specific transcriptional co-factors often cooperate with the Smads to activate a discrete set of genes in the appropriate temporal and spatial manner. Here, via a conditional knockout approach, we show that mice mutant for Forkhead Box O transcription factor FoxO1 exhibit an enamel hypomaturation defect which phenocopies that of the Smad3 mutant mice. Furthermore, we determined that both the FoxO1 and Smad3 mutant teeth exhibit changes in the expression of similar cohort of genes encoding enamel matrix proteins required for proper enamel development. These data raise the possibility that FoxO1 and Smad3 act in concert to regulate a common repertoire of genes necessary for complete enamel maturation. This study is the first to define an essential role for the FoxO family of transcription factors in tooth development and provides a new molecular entry point which will allow researchers to delineate novel genetic pathways regulating the process of biomineralization which may also have significance for studies of human tooth diseases such as amelogenesis imperfecta.

  2. Nuclear receptors CAR and PXR cross talk with FOXO1 to regulate genes that encode drug-metabolizing and gluconeogenic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Susumu; Koike, Chika; Negishi, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Yukio

    2004-09-01

    The nuclear receptors CAR and PXR activate hepatic genes in response to therapeutic drugs and xenobiotics, leading to the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes, such as cytochrome P450. Insulin inhibits the ability of FOXO1 to express genes encoding gluconeogenic enzymes. Induction by drugs is known to be decreased by insulin, whereas gluconeogenic activity is often repressed by treatment with certain drugs, such as phenobarbital (PB). Performing cell-based transfection assays with drug-responsive and insulin-responsive enhancers, glutathione S-transferase pull down, RNA interference (RNAi), and mouse primary hepatocytes, we examined the molecular mechanism by which nuclear receptors and FOXO1 could coordinately regulate both enzyme pathways. FOXO1 was found to be a coactivator to CAR- and PXR-mediated transcription. In contrast, CAR and PXR, acting as corepressors, downregulated FOXO1-mediated transcription in the presence of their activators, such as 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) and pregnenolone 16alpha-carbonitrile, respectively. A constitutively active mutant of the insulin-responsive protein kinase Akt, but not the kinase-negative mutant, effectively blocked FOXO1 activity in cell-based assays. Thus, insulin could repress the receptors by activating the Akt-FOXO1 signal, whereas drugs could interfere with FOXO1-mediated transcription by activating CAR and/or PXR. Treatment with TCPOBOP or PB decreased the levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 mRNA in mice but not in Car(-/-) mice. We conclude that FOXO1 and the nuclear receptors reciprocally coregulate their target genes, modulating both drug metabolism and gluconeogenesis.

  3. FOXO1 expression in keratinocytes promotes connective tissue healing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenying; Lim, Jason; Liu, Jian; Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Alsadun, Sarah; Tian, Chen; Vafa, Rameen; Graves, Dana T.

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing is complex and highly orchestrated. It is well appreciated that leukocytes, particularly macrophages, are essential for inducing the formation of new connective tissue, which requires the generation of signals that stimulate mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), myofibroblasts and fibroblasts. A key role for keratinocytes in this complex process has yet to be established. To this end, we investigated possible involvement of keratinocytes in connective tissue healing. By lineage-specific deletion of the forkhead box-O 1 (FOXO1) transcription factor, we demonstrate for the first time that keratinocytes regulate proliferation of fibroblasts and MSCs, formation of myofibroblasts and production of collagen matrix in wound healing. This stimulation is mediated by a FOXO1 induced TGFβ1/CTGF axis. The results provide direct evidence that epithelial cells play a key role in stimulating connective tissue healing through a FOXO1-dependent mechanism. Thus, FOXO1 and keratinocytes may be an important therapeutic target where healing is deficient or compromised by a fibrotic outcome. PMID:28220813

  4. Dual effects of fructose on ChREBP and FoxO1/3α are responsible for AldoB up-regulation and vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Chang, Tuanjie; Li, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Rui; Wu, Lingyun

    2017-02-01

    Increased production of methylglyoxal (MG) in vascular tissues is one of the causative factors for vascular remodelling in different subtypes of metabolic syndrome, including hypertension and insulin resistance. Fructose-induced up-regulation of aldolase B (AldoB) contributes to increased vascular MG production but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Serum levels of MG and fructose were determined in diabetic patients with hypertension. MG level had significant positive correlations with blood pressure and fructose level respectively. C57BL/6 mice were fed with control or fructose-enriched diet for 3 months and ultrasonographic and histologic analyses were performed to evaluate arterial structural changes. Fructose-fed mice exhibited hypertension and high levels of serum MG with normal glucose level. Fructose intake increased blood vessel wall thickness and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Western blotting and real-time PCR analysis revealed that AldoB level was significantly increased in both the aorta of fructose-fed mice and the fructose-treated VSMCs, whereas aldolase A (AldoA) expression was not changed. The knockdown of AldoB expression prevented fructose-induced MG overproduction and VSMC proliferation. Moreover, fructose significantly increased carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP), phosphorylated FoxO1/3α and Akt1 levels. Fructose induced translocation of ChREBP from the cytosol to nucleus and activated AldoB gene expression, which was inhibited by the knockdown of ChREBP. Meanwhile, fructose caused FoxO1/3α shuttling from the nucleus to cytosol and inhibited its binding to AldoB promoter region. Fructose-induced AldoB up-regulation was suppressed by Akt1 inhibitor but enhanced by FoxO1/3α siRNA. Collectively, fructose activates ChREBP and inactivates FoxO1/3α pathways to up-regulate AldoB expression and MG production, leading to vascular remodelling. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on

  5. Inhibition of FOXO1 by small interfering RNA enhances proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma cells via Akt/FOXO1/Bim pathway

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong-ming; Song, Jia-lu; Li, Deng-feng; Hua, Kai-yao; Zhao, Bing-kun; Fang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) is a multifunctional transcription factor of the forkhead family. It may function as a tumor suppressor through its ability to regulate cellular events, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle control. As reported, FOXO1 is downregulated in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). However, the function of FOXO1 in human PTC remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the function and underlying regulatory mechanisms of FOXO1 in PTC cells. PTC cell lines K1 and TPC1 were transiently transfected with FOXO1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) and negative control RNA. Successful transfection was confirmed by RT-qPCR and Western blot analysis. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cell proliferation assays, colony formation assays, apoptosis, and cell cycle assays were used to explore the potential function of FOXO1 in the PTC cell lines. We found that downregulation of FOXO1 promoted cellular proliferation, enhanced clonogenesis, and inhibited cellular apoptosis. However, the cell cycle was not markedly affected by FOXO1 siRNA. Furthermore, Bim, a downstream target of the Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway, was downregulated at both mRNA and protein levels in cells transfected with FOXO1 siRNA. Collectively, these results indicate that FOXO1 may play an important role in inhibiting PTC development by regulating cellular proliferation, growth, and apoptosis. FOXO1 expression is a potentially useful biomarker for human PTC. Moreover, tumorigenesis of PTC may be associated with repression of the Akt/FOXO1/Bim signaling pathway. PMID:26664140

  6. The transcription factors E2A and HEB act in concert to induce the expression of FOXO1 in the common lymphoid progenitor

    PubMed Central

    Welinder, Eva; Mansson, Robert; Mercer, Elinore M.; Bryder, David; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Murre, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of transcriptional regulators, including E proteins, EBF1, FOXO1, and PAX5, that act together to orchestrate the B-cell fate. However, it still remains unclear as to how they are linked at the earliest stages of B-cell development. Here, we show that lymphocyte development in HEB-ablated mice exhibits a partial developmental arrest, whereas B-cell development in E2A+/−HEB−/− mice is completely blocked at the LY6D− common lymphoid progenitor stage. We show that the transcription signatures of E2A- and HEB-ablated common lymphoid progenitors significantly overlap. Notably, we found that Foxo1 expression was substantially reduced in the LY6D− HEB- and E2A-deficient cells. Finally, we show that E2A binds to enhancer elements across the FOXO1 locus to activate Foxo1 expression, linking E2A and FOXO1 directly in a common pathway. In summary, the data indicate that the earliest event in B-cell specification involves the induction of FOXO1 expression and requires the combined activities of E2A and HEB. PMID:21972416

  7. Analysis of FOXO1 mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Abstract: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) accounts for 30% to 40% of newly diagnosed lymphomas and has an overall cure rate of approximately 60%. Previously, we observed FOXO1 mutations in non-Hodgkin lymphoma patient samples. To explore the effects of FOXO1 mutations, we assessed FOXO1 status in 279 DLBCL patient samples and 22 DLBCL-derived cell lines.

  8. Integrated discovery of FOXO1-DNA stabilizers from marine natural products to restore chemosensitivity to anti-EGFR-based therapy for metastatic lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingjia; Ai, Xinghao; Hou, Jingwen; Ye, Xiangyun; Liu, Ruijun; Shen, Shengping; Li, Ziming; Lu, Shun

    2017-01-31

    The transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) negatively regulates activated EGFR signaling by turning on the gene expression of tumor suppressor Kruppel-like factor 6. Here, we propose that the chemosensitivity to anti-EGFR-based lung cancer therapy can be restored by stabilization of the FOXO1-DNA complex architecture using small-molecule marine natural medicines. A synthetic protocol that integrates computational ligand-protein-DNA binding analysis and an experimental fluorescence binding assay was applied against a large library of structurally diverse, drug-like marine natural products to discover novel stabilizers of DNA-bound FOXO1 conformation. The screening utilized chemical similarity analysis to exclude structurally redundant compounds, and then carried out high-throughput molecular docking and computational binding analysis to identify potential marine natural product candidates. Consequently, eight commercially available hits were selected and tested in vitro, from which four marine natural product compounds (tanzawaic acid D, hymenidin, cribrostatin 6 and barbamide) were found to have high or moderate potency to selectively bind to the FOXO1 DNA-binding domain (DBD) in the presence of its cognate DNA partner. Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations revealed that the identified stabilizers do not directly interact with DNA; instead, they can effectively stabilize the free FOXO1 DBD domain in the DNA-bound conformation and thus promote the binding of FOXO1 to DNA.

  9. Resveratrol protects cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced apoptosis through the SIRT1-FoxO1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Juan; Yu, Wei; Fu, Yu-Cai; Wang, Xin; Li, Ji-Lin; Wang, Wei

    2009-01-16

    Loss of cardiomyocytes through apoptosis has been proposed as a cause of ventricular remodeling and heart failure. Ischemia- and hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes reportedly plays an important role in many cardiac pathologies. We investigated whether resveratrol (Res) has direct cytoprotective effects against ischemia/hypoxia for cardiomyocytes. Exposure of H9c2 embryonic rat heart-derived cells to hypoxia for 24h caused a significant increase in apoptosis, as evaluated by TUNEL and flow cytometry, while treatment with 20 microM Res greatly decreased hypoxia-induced apoptosis in these cells. Exposure of the cells to Res (20 microM) caused rapid activation of SIRT1, which had a dual effect on FoxO1 function: SIRT1 increased FoxO1's ability to induce cell cycle arrest, but inhibited FoxO1's ability to induce cell death. This effect could be reversed by SIRT1 inhibition. Results of our study indicate that Res inhibits hypoxia-induced apoptosis via the SIRT1-FoxO1 pathway in H9c2 cells. This polyphenol may have potential in preventing cardiovascular disease, especially in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients.

  10. FoxO1 integrates direct and indirect effects of insulin on hepatic glucose production and glucose utilization

    PubMed Central

    O-Sullivan, InSug; Zhang, Wenwei; Wasserman, David H.; Liew, Chong Wee; Liu, Jonathan; Paik, Jihye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Kahn, C. Ronald; Schwartz, Michael W.; Unterman, Terry G.

    2016-01-01

    FoxO proteins are major targets of insulin action. To better define the role of FoxO1 in mediating insulin effects in the liver, we generated liver-specific insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) and IR/FoxO1 double knockout (LIRFKO) mice. Here we show that LIRKO mice are severely insulin resistant based on glucose, insulin and C-peptide levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests, and genetic deletion of hepatic FoxO1 reverses these effects. 13C-glucose and insulin clamp studies indicate that regulation of both hepatic glucose production (HGP) and glucose utilization is impaired in LIRKO mice, and these defects are also restored in LIRFKO mice corresponding to changes in gene expression. We conclude that (1) inhibition of FoxO1 is critical for both direct (hepatic) and indirect effects of insulin on HGP and utilization, and (2) extrahepatic effects of insulin are sufficient to maintain normal whole-body and hepatic glucose metabolism when liver FoxO1 activity is disrupted. PMID:25963540

  11. FoxO1 integrates direct and indirect effects of insulin on hepatic glucose production and glucose utilization.

    PubMed

    O-Sullivan, InSug; Zhang, Wenwei; Wasserman, David H; Liew, Chong Wee; Liu, Jonathan; Paik, Jihye; DePinho, Ronald A; Stolz, Donna Beer; Kahn, C Ronald; Schwartz, Michael W; Unterman, Terry G

    2015-05-12

    FoxO proteins are major targets of insulin action. To better define the role of FoxO1 in mediating insulin effects in the liver, we generated liver-specific insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) and IR/FoxO1 double knockout (LIRFKO) mice. Here we show that LIRKO mice are severely insulin resistant based on glucose, insulin and C-peptide levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests, and genetic deletion of hepatic FoxO1 reverses these effects. (13)C-glucose and insulin clamp studies indicate that regulation of both hepatic glucose production (HGP) and glucose utilization is impaired in LIRKO mice, and these defects are also restored in LIRFKO mice corresponding to changes in gene expression. We conclude that (1) inhibition of FoxO1 is critical for both direct (hepatic) and indirect effects of insulin on HGP and utilization, and (2) extrahepatic effects of insulin are sufficient to maintain normal whole-body and hepatic glucose metabolism when liver FoxO1 activity is disrupted.

  12. Isotretinoin and FoxO1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Oral isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) is the most effective drug in the treatment of acne and restores all major pathogenetic factors of acne vulgaris. isotretinoin is regarded as a prodrug which after isomerizisation to all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) induces apoptosis in cells cultured from human sebaceous glands, meibomian glands, neuroblastoma cells, hypothalamic cells, hippocampus cells, Dalton's lymphoma ascites cells, B16F-10 melanoma cells, and neuronal crest cells and others. By means of translational research this paper provides substantial indirect evidence for isotretinoin's mode of action by upregulation of forkhead box class O (FoxO) transcription factors. FoxOs play a pivotal role in the regulation of androgen receptor transactivation, insulin/insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-signaling, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPArγ)- and liver X receptor-α (LXrα)-mediated lipogenesis, β-catenin signaling, cell proliferation, apoptosis, reactive oxygene homeostasis, innate and acquired immunity, stem cell homeostasis, as well as anti-cancer effects. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that the therapeutic, adverse, teratogenic and chemopreventive effecs of isotretinoin are all mediated by upregulation of FoxO-mediated gene transcription. These FoxO-driven transcriptional changes of the second response of retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-mediated signaling counterbalance gene expression of acne due to increased growth factor signaling with downregulated nuclear FoxO proteins. The proposed isotretinoin→ATRA→RAR→FoxO interaction offers intriguing new insights into the mode of isotretinoin action and explains most therapeutic, adverse and teratogenic effects of isotretinoin in the treatment of acne by a common mode of FoxO-mediated transcriptional regulation. PMID:22110774

  13. Regulatory landscape fusion in rhabdomyosarcoma through interactions between the PAX3 promoter and FOXO1 regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Vicente-García, Cristina; Villarejo-Balcells, Barbara; Irastorza-Azcárate, Ibai; Naranjo, Silvia; Acemel, Rafael D; Tena, Juan J; Rigby, Peter W J; Devos, Damien P; Gómez-Skarmeta, Jose L; Carvajal, Jaime J

    2017-06-14

    The organisation of vertebrate genomes into topologically associating domains (TADs) is believed to facilitate the regulation of the genes located within them. A remaining question is whether TAD organisation is achieved through the interactions of the regulatory elements within them or if these interactions are favoured by the pre-existence of TADs. If the latter is true, the fusion of two independent TADs should result in the rewiring of the transcriptional landscape and the generation of ectopic contacts. We show that interactions within the PAX3 and FOXO1 domains are restricted to their respective TADs in normal conditions, while in a patient-derived alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cell line, harbouring the diagnostic t(2;13)(q35;q14) translocation that brings together the PAX3 and FOXO1 genes, the PAX3 promoter interacts ectopically with FOXO1 sequences. Using a combination of 4C-seq datasets, we have modelled the three-dimensional organisation of the fused landscape in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. The chromosomal translocation that leads to alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma development generates a novel TAD that is likely to favour ectopic PAX3:FOXO1 oncogene activation in non-PAX3 territories. Rhabdomyosarcomas may therefore arise from cells which do not normally express PAX3. The borders of this novel TAD correspond to the original 5'- and 3'- borders of the PAX3 and FOXO1 TADs, respectively, suggesting that TAD organisation precedes the formation of regulatory long-range interactions. Our results demonstrate that, upon translocation, novel regulatory landscapes are formed allowing new intra-TAD interactions between the original loci involved.

  14. [Expression and purification of FOXO1 DNA binding domain and its DNA properties].

    PubMed

    Ha, Yinuer; Li, Jun; Chen, Yongheng; Chen, Lin; Chen, Zhuchu

    2017-01-28

    目的:探讨翼螺旋转录因子FOXO1的DNA结合域(FOXO1 DNA binding domain,FOXO1-DBD)的表达、纯化及与DNA的结合特性。方法:采用优化FOXO1-DNA的基因序列和低温诱导的方式实现FOXO1-DBD蛋白的可溶性表达,通过镍亲和层析及阳离子交换层析进行纯化,并经凝胶迁移实验(electrophoretic mobility shift assay,EMSA)验证FOXO1-DBD的DNA结合特性。结果:优化后的FOXO1基因在21 ℃时编码的蛋白大多以可溶性方式表达,通过两步纯化即可获得95%以上纯度的FOXO1-DBD蛋白,纯化的蛋白与含FOX家族DNA结合基序(G/ATAAACA)的DNA序列显示良好的结合特性。结论:建立了FOXO1-DBD蛋白高效表达、纯化的方法,验证了FOXO1蛋白在识别DNA上的复杂性。.

  15. Transcription factor Foxo1 is a negative regulator of natural killer cell maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youcai; Kerdiles, Yann; Chu, Jianhong; Yuan, Shunzong; Wang, Youwei; Chen, Xilin; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Hughes, Tiffany; Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Zou, Xianghong; Liu, Chang-Gong; Freud, Aharon G; Li, Xiaohui; Caligiuri, Michael A; Vivier, Eric; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-03-17

    Little is known about the role of negative regulators in controlling natural killer (NK) cell development and effector functions. Foxo1 is a multifunctional transcription factor of the forkhead family. Using a mouse model of conditional deletion in NK cells, we found that Foxo1 negatively controlled NK cell differentiation and function. Immature NK cells expressed abundant Foxo1 and little Tbx21 relative to mature NK cells, but these two transcription factors reversed their expression as NK cells proceeded through development. Foxo1 promoted NK cell homing to lymph nodes by upregulating CD62L expression and inhibited late-stage maturation and effector functions by repressing Tbx21 expression. Loss of Foxo1 rescued the defect in late-stage NK cell maturation in heterozygous Tbx21(+/-) mice. Collectively, our data reveal a regulatory pathway by which the negative regulator Foxo1 and the positive regulator Tbx21 play opposing roles in controlling NK cell development and effector functions.

  16. GCN5L1 modulates cross-talk between mitochondria and cell signaling to regulate FoxO1 stability and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingdi; Scott, Iain; Zhu, Lu; Wu, Kaiyuan; Han, Kim; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Sack, Michael N

    2017-09-12

    The mitochondrial enriched GCN5-like 1 (GCN5L1) protein has been shown to modulate mitochondrial protein acetylation, mitochondrial content and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Here we show that hepatic GCN5L1 ablation reduces fasting glucose levels and blunts hepatic gluconeogenesis without affecting systemic glucose tolerance. PEPCK and G6Pase transcript levels are downregulated in hepatocytes from GCN5L1 liver specific knockout mice and their upstream regulator, FoxO1 protein levels are decreased via proteasome-dependent degradation and via reactive oxygen species mediated ERK-1/2 phosphorylation. ERK inhibition restores FoxO1, gluconeogenic enzyme expression and glucose production. Reconstitution of mitochondrial-targeted GCN5L1 blunts mitochondrial ROS, ERK activation and increases FoxO1, gluconeogenic enzyme expression and hepatocyte glucose production. We suggest that mitochondrial GCN5L1 modulates post-translational control of FoxO1, regulates gluconeogenesis and controls metabolic pathways via mitochondrial ROS mediated ERK activation. Exploring mechanisms underpinning GCN5L1 mediated ROS signaling may expand our understanding of the role of mitochondria in gluconeogenesis control.Hepatic gluconeogenesis is tightly regulated at transcriptional level and is essential for survival during prolonged fasting. Here Wang et al. show that the mitochondrial enriched GCN5-like 1 protein controls hepatic glucose production by regulating FoxO1 protein levels via proteasome-dependent degradation and, in turn, gluconeogenic gene expression.

  17. A combination of HNF-4 and Foxo1 is required for reciprocal transcriptional regulation of glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase genes in response to fasting and feeding.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Keiko; Sakamaki, Jun-ichi; Ishida, Junji; Shimamoto, Yoko; Nishihara, Shigeki; Kodama, Norio; Ohta, Kazuhide; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Tanimoto, Keiji; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2008-11-21

    Glucokinase (GK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) regulate rate-limiting reactions in the physiologically opposed metabolic cascades, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, respectively. Expression of these genes is conversely regulated in the liver in response to fasting and feeding. We explored the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of these genes by nutritional condition and found that reciprocal function of HNF-4 and Foxo1 plays an important role in this process. In the GK gene regulation, Foxo1 represses HNF-4-potentiated transcription of the gene, whereas it synergizes with HNF-4 in activating the G6Pase gene transcription. These opposite actions of Foxo1 concomitantly take place in the cells under no insulin stimulus, and such gene-specific action was promoter context-dependent. Interestingly, HNF-4-binding elements (HBEs) in the GK and G6Pase promoters were required both for the insulin-stimulated GK gene activation and insulin-mediated G6Pase gene repression. Indeed, mouse in vivo imaging showed that mutating the HBEs in the GK and G6Pase promoters significantly impaired their reactivity to the nutritional states, even in the presence of intact Foxo1-binding sites (insulin response sequences). Thus, in the physiological response of the GK and G6Pase genes to fasting/feeding conditions, Foxo1 distinctly decodes the promoter context of these genes and differently modulates the function of HBE, which then leads to opposite outcomes of gene transcription.

  18. Protection against dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy is related to modulation by testosterone of FOXO1 and PGC-1{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Weiping; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} In rat gastrocnemius muscle, dexamethasone reduced PGC-1{alpha} cellular and nuclear levels without altering mRNA levels for this factor. {yields} Dexamethasone reduced phosphorylating of p38 MAPK, which stabilizes PGC-1{alpha} and promotes its nuclear entry. {yields} Co-administration of testosterone with dexamethasone increased cellular and nuclear levels of PGC-1{alpha} protein without changing its mRNA levels. {yields} Co-administration of testosterone restored p38 MAPK levels to those of controls. -- Abstract: Glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy results from muscle protein catabolism and reduced protein synthesis, associated with increased expression of two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases (MAFbx and MuRF1), and of two inhibitors of protein synthesis, REDD1 and 4EBP1. MAFbx, MuRF1, REDD1 and 4EBP1 are up-regulated by the transcription factors FOXO1 and FOXO3A. The transcriptional co-activator PGC-1{alpha} has been shown to attenuate many forms of muscle atrophy and to repress FOXO3A-mediated transcription of atrophy-specific genes. Dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy can be prevented by testosterone, which blocks up-regulation by dexamethasone of FOXO1. Here, an animal model of dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy was used to further characterize effects of testosterone to abrogate adverse actions of dexamethasone on FOXO1 levels and nuclear localization, and to determine how these agents affect PGC-1{alpha}, and its upstream activators, p38 MAPK and AMPK. In rat gastrocnemius muscle, testosterone blunted the dexamethasone-mediated increase in levels of FOXO1 mRNA, and FOXO1 total and nuclear protein. Dexamethasone reduced total and nuclear PGC-1{alpha} protein levels in the gastrocnemius; co-administration of testosterone with dexamethasone increased total and nuclear PGC-1{alpha} levels above those present in untreated controls. Testosterone blocked dexamethasone-induced decreases in activity of p38 MAPK in the gastrocnemius

  19. Cdk1-FOXO1: a mitotic signal takes center stage in post-mitotic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Albert H; Bonni, Azad

    2008-12-15

    An emerging theme in molecular neurobiology is the discovery of post-mitotic functions for proteins classically associated with mitotic transition in cycling cells. Although neurons have departed the cell cycle, they surprisingly express molecules in the cell cycle apparatus throughout development. The major mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1 plays a critical role during the period of naturally occurring neuronal death in the nervous system and has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms by which Cdk1 promotes neuronal apoptosis are incompletely understood. A recent report by Yuan et al., (2008) has identified a direct relationship between this mitotic kinase and forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, a protein previously implicated in cell death, DNA damage repair and tumor suppression. Here we will discuss the key findings of this report and consider the implications of this mechanism to the regulation of other signal transduction pathways in brain development and diseases.

  20. Reduced FOXO1 Expression Accelerates Skin Wound Healing and Attenuates Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Katsuya; de Kerckhove, Maiko; Okamoto, Momoko; Kashiyama, Kazuya; Tanaka, Katsumi; Kim, Sangeun; Kawata, Takuya; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Park, Seongjoon; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Martin, Paul; Shimokawa, Isao

    2015-01-01

    The forkhead box O (FOXO) family has been extensively investigated in aging and metabolism, but its role in tissue-repair processes remains largely unknown. Herein, we clarify the molecular aspect of the FOXO family in skin wound healing. We demonstrated that Foxo1 and Foxo3a were both up-regulated during murine skin wound healing. Partial knockout of Foxo1 in Foxo1+/− mice throughout the body led to accelerated skin wound healing with enhanced keratinocyte migration, reduced granulation tissue formation, and decreased collagen density, accompanied by an attenuated inflammatory response, but we observed no wound phenotype in Foxo3a−/− mice. Fibroblast growth factor 2, adiponectin, and notch1 genes were significantly increased at wound sites in Foxo1+/− mice, along with markedly altered extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 and AKT phosphorylation. Similarly, transient knockdown of Foxo1 at the wound site by local delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides enhanced skin wound healing. The link between FOXO1 and scarring extends to patients, in particular keloid scars, where we see FOXO1 expression markedly increased in fibroblasts and inflammatory cells within the otherwise normal dermis. This occurs in the immediate vicinity of the keloid by comparison to the center of the mature keloid, indicating that FOXO1 is associated with the overgrowth of this fibrotic response into adjacent normal skin. Overall, our data indicate that molecular targeting of FOXO1 may improve the quality of healing and reduce pathological scarring. PMID:25010393

  1. Increased Atherosclerosis and Endothelial Dysfunction in Mice Bearing Constitutively Deacetylated Alleles of Foxo1 Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Li; Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Kim-Muller, Ja-Young; Lin, Hua V.; Welch, Carrie; Accili, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Complications of atherosclerosis are the leading cause of death of patients with type 2 (insulin-resistant) diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms by which insulin resistance and hyperglycemia contribute to atherogenesis in key target tissues (liver, vessel wall, hematopoietic cells) can assist in the design of therapeutic approaches. We have shown that hyperglycemia induces FoxO1 deacetylation and that targeted knock-in of alleles encoding constitutively deacetylated FoxO1 in mice (Foxo1KR/KR) improves hepatic lipid metabolism and decreases macrophage inflammation, setting the stage for a potential anti-atherogenic effect of this mutation. Surprisingly, we report here that when Foxo1KR/KR mice are intercrossed with low density lipoprotein receptor knock-out mice (Ldlr−/−), they develop larger aortic root atherosclerotic lesions than Ldlr−/− controls despite lower plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The phenotype is unaffected by transplanting bone marrow from Ldlr−/− mice into Foxo1KR/KR mice, indicating that it is independent of hematopoietic cells and suggesting that the primary lesion in Foxo1KR/KR mice occurs in the vessel wall. Experiments in isolated endothelial cells from Foxo1KR/KR mice indicate that deacetylation favors FoxO1 nuclear accumulation and exerts target gene-specific effects, resulting in higher Icam1 and Tnfα expression and increased monocyte adhesion. The data indicate that FoxO1 deacetylation can promote vascular endothelial changes conducive to atherosclerotic plaque formation. PMID:22389493

  2. Critical Role of FoxO1 in Granulosa Cell Apoptosis Caused by Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Grape Seed Procyanidin B2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Qing; Gao, Bin-Wen; Wang, Jing; Ren, Qiao-Ling; Chen, Jun-Feng; Ma, Qiang; Zhang, Zi-Jing; Xing, Bao-Song

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to the follicular granulosa cell apoptosis. Grape seed procyanidin B2 (GSPB2) has been reported to possess potent antioxidant activity. However, the GSPB2-mediated protective effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in granulosa cell apoptosis process remain unknown. In this study, we showed for the first time that GSPB2 treatment decreased FoxO1 protein level, improved granulosa cell viability, upregulated LC3-II protein level, and reduced granulosa cell apoptosis rate. Under a condition of oxidative stress, GSPB2 reversed FoxO1 nuclear localization and increased its level in cytoplasm. In addition, FoxO1 knockdown inhibited the protective effects of GSPB2 induced. Our findings suggest that FoxO1 plays a pivotal role in regulating autophagy in granulosa cells, GSPB2 exerts a potent and beneficial role in reducing granulosa cell apoptosis and inducing autophagy process, and targeting FoxO1 could be significant in fighting against oxidative stress-reduced female reproductive system diseases. PMID:27057282

  3. Associations between Forkhead Box O1 (FoxO1) Expression and Indicators of Hepatic Glucose Production in Transition Dairy Cows Supplemented with Dietary Nicotinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Asako; Locher, Lena; Tienken, Reka; Meyer, Ulrich; Dänicke, Sven; Rehage, Jürgen; Huber, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) is a transcription factor which promotes hepatic glucose production (HGP) by up-regulating the transcription of gluconeogenic enzymes in monogastric species. The activity of FoxO1 is inhibited by insulin-induced phosphorylation. The aims of the present study were to find associations between FoxO1 expression and variables associated with HGP as affected by feeding regimen in dairy cows during the transition period. Twenty one healthy German Holstein cows were allocated to four groups (LC-CON, HC-CON, LC-NA with 5 cows/group and HC-NA with 6 cows/group, respectively). Cows received 0 (LC-CON and HC-CON) or 24 (LC-NA and HC-NA) g/d nicotinic acid with high (HC) or low (LC) concentrate proportion from -42 days (-41.8 + 4.8; mean + standard deviation) relative to expected calving date (d-42) to d24. Liver biopsy was taken at d-42, 1, 21, and 100. The total protein expression of FoxO1 (tFoxO1) and the extent of phosphorylation of FoxO1 at serine 256 (pFoxO1) were analysed semiquantitatively by Western Blotting. The expression of hepatic mRNA of FoxO1 and seven genes associated with HGP was measured by real-time RT-PCR. Mixed model and Pearson’s correlation were used for statistical evaluation with the level of significance at P<0.05. No dietary effect was observed either on feed intake, energy balance, or on the concentration of blood metabolites. Neither time nor diet affected the expression of FoxO1 total protein and mRNA. A NA × concentrate interaction was found in pFoxO1. However, no corresponding dietary effect was found in the mRNA expression of investigated genes. Different patterns of correlations between FoxO1-related variables and investigated indicators for HGP were found at d21 and 100. The results indicated that the regulation of HGP did not take place on the levels of mRNA and protein expression and the phosphorylation of FoxO1 in dairy cows in early lactation. PMID:26800252

  4. Britannin induces apoptosis through AKT-FOXO1 pathway in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moeinifard, Marzieh; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Fallahian, Faranak; Hamzeloo-Moghadam, Maryam; Taghikhani, Mohammad

    2017-10-01

    Induction of apoptosis in cancerous cells is considered as a promising treatment option for cancer therapy. The present study was designed to evaluate the anticancer properties of Britannin and its possible mechanisms of action in human pancreatic cancer cells. Apoptosis induction by Britannin was confirmed by annexin V-FITC/PI staining, Hoechst 33258 staining and caspase-3 activity assay in both AsPC-1 and Panc-1 cells. Additionally, by using western blot and Real-time PCR, we observed that Britannin induced apoptosis by decreasing the expression of BCL-2 and increasing the expression of BAX. Moreover, Britannin increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in different intracellular sites of pancreatic cancer cells. Using western blot analysis, we observed that Britannin decreased the phosphorylated AKT and induced the nuclear accumulation of FOXO1 and also up regulation of FOXO-responsive target BIM in both pancreatic cancer cell lines. Taken together, we found that Britannin is able to induce mitochondrial apoptotic pathway through ROS production and modulation of the AKT-FOXO1 signaling axis in AsPC-1 and Panc-1 human pancreatic cancer cells. Our results can help to illuminate the molecular mechanisms underlying Britannin-induced cell death in pancreatic cancer cell lines and may potentially serve as an anticancer agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Adiponectin regulates bone mass via opposite central and peripheral mechanisms through FoxO1.

    PubMed

    Kajimura, Daisuke; Lee, Ha Won; Riley, Kyle J; Arteaga-Solis, Emilio; Ferron, Mathieu; Zhou, Bin; Clarke, Christopher J; Hannun, Yusuf A; DePinho, Ronald A; Guo, X Edward; Guo, Edward X; Mann, J John; Karsenty, Gerard

    2013-06-04

    The synthesis of adiponectin, an adipokine with ill-defined functions in animals fed a normal diet, is enhanced by the osteoblast-derived hormone osteocalcin. Here we show that adiponectin signals back in osteoblasts to hamper their proliferation and favor their apoptosis, altogether decreasing bone mass and circulating osteocalcin levels. Adiponectin fulfills these functions, independently of its known receptors and signaling pathways, by decreasing FoxO1 activity in a PI3-kinase-dependent manner. Over time, however, these local effects are masked because adiponectin signals in neurons of the locus coeruleus, also through FoxO1, to decrease the sympathetic tone, thereby increasing bone mass and decreasing energy expenditure. This study reveals that adiponectin has the unusual ability to regulate the same function in two opposite manners depending on where it acts and that it opposes, partially, leptin's influence on the sympathetic nervous system. It also proposes that adiponectin regulation of bone mass occurs through a PI3-kinase-FoxO1 pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Alcohol alters hepatic FoxO1, p53, and mitochondrial SIRT5 deacetylation function

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, Charles S. Leo, Maria Anna; Wang, Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-08-22

    Chronic alcohol consumption affects the gene expression of a NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}). Our aim was to verify that it also alters the forkhead (FoxO1) and p53 transcription factor proteins, critical in the hepatic response to oxidative stress and regulated by SIRT1 through its deacetylating capacity. Accordingly, rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli alcohol-containing liquid diets for 28 days. Alcohol increased hepatic mRNA expression of FoxO1 (p = 0.003) and p53 (p = 0.001) while corresponding protein levels remained unchanged. However phospho-FoxO1 and phospho-Akt (protein kinase) were both decreased by alcohol consumption (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively) while hepatic p53 was found hyperacetylated (p = 0.017). Furthermore, mitochondrial SIRT5 was reduced (p = 0.0025), and PGC-1{alpha} hyperacetylated (p = 0.027), establishing their role in protein modification. Thus, alcohol consumption disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial interactions by post-translation protein modifications, which contribute to alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis through the newly discovered reduction of SIRT5.

  7. Revealing the potency of Annona muricata leaves extract as FOXO1 inhibitor for diabetes mellitus treatment through computational study.

    PubMed

    Damayanti, Dini Sri; Utomo, Didik Huswo; Kusuma, Chandra

    2016-12-01

    FOXO1 protein inactivation in the nucleus is one of targets for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Annona muricata leaves contain flavonoid and phenolic compound alkaloids that were known to be able to increase pancreatic β cell proliferation in animal experiment. This research aimed to predict the active compound ability of the Annona muricata leaves to bind and inhibit FOXO1 protein through in silico study. Analysis of molecular docking was performed by using Autodock Vina PyRx. this research proved that anonaine, rutin, muricatocin a, isolaureline, xylopine, and kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside had an equal or smaller free binding energy compared to the control compound. Rutin and Muricatocin A had the same binding ability toward 66% amino acid residues, compared to control compound with hydrogen bond type, while xylopine, anonaine, isolaureline, kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside had a similar binding ability towards 33% amino acid residues compared to control compound with hydrogen bond type.

  8. Resveratrol inhibits the expression of SREBP1 in cell model of steatosis via Sirt1-FOXO1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Li; Fu, Yu-Cai; Xu, Wen-Can; Feng, Ya-Qing; Fang, Shi-Rong; Zhou, Xiao-Hui

    2009-03-13

    Recent studies in mice have shown that resveratrol can protect the liver from fat accumulation induced by high fat diet. However, the exact mechanism is largely unknown. To explore the possible mechanism, we investigated the anti-lipogenic effect of resveratrol in vitro model. Oil Red O staining revealed that resveratrol could significantly ameliorate the excessive triglyceride accumulation in HepG2 cells induced by palmitate. The results of RT-PCR and Western blotting showed that resveratrol upregulated the expression of Sirt1 and forkhead box O1 (FOXO1), whereas downregulated the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein1 (SREBP1). Moreover, resveratrol was shown to inhibit the activity of SREBP1, as evaluated by immunofluorescence assay. Our results suggest that resveratrol may attenuate fat deposition by inhibiting SREBP1 expression via Sirt1-FOXO1 pathway and thus may have application for the treatment of NAFLD.

  9. Mouse Sirt3 promotes autophagy in AngII-induced myocardial hypertrophy through the deacetylation of FoxO1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingyuan; Chen, Tongshuai; Xiao, Ming; Li, Na; Wang, Shujian; Su, Hongyan; Guo, Xiaobin; Liu, Hui; Yan, Fangying; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yun; Bu, Peili

    2016-01-01

    Sirt3, a mitochondrial NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is the only member proven to promote longevity in mammalian Sirtuin family. The processed short form of Sirt3 has been demonstrated to target many mediators of energy metabolism and mitochondrial stress adaptive program. Autophagy serves as a dynamic recycling mechanism and provides energy or metabolic substrates. Among the mechanisms triggered by cardiac stress, opinions vary as to whether autophagy is a protective or detrimental response. Here, by inducing the Sirt3-knockout mice to myocardial hypertrophy with chronic angiotensin II infusion for four weeks, we determined the role of Sirt3 in myocardial hypertrophy and autophagy. In this study, the Sirt3-knockout mice developed deteriorated cardiac function and impaired autophagy compared to wild-type mice. What's more, the overexpression of Sirt3 by lentivirus transfection attenuated cardiomyocytes hypertrophy by promoting autophagy. We further demonstrated that Sirt3 could bind to FoxO1 and activate its deacetylation. Sequentially, deacetylated FoxO1 translocates to the nucleus where it facilitates downstream E3 ubiquitin ligases such as Muscle RING Finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx, Atrogin1). Altogether, these results revealed that Sirt3 activation is essential to improve autophagy flux by reducing the acetylation modification on FoxO1, which in turn alleviates myocardial hypertrophy. PMID:27880725

  10. FoxO1 in dopaminergic neurons regulates energy homeostasis and targets tyrosine hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Khanh V.; Kinyua, Ann W.; Yang, Dong Joo; Ko, Chang Mann; Moh, Sang Hyun; Shong, Ko Eun; Kim, Hail; Park, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Inki; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Yoon, Seul Gi; Kim, Il Yong; Seong, Je Kyung; Choi, Yun-Hee; Kim, Ki Woo

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons are involved in the integration of neuronal and hormonal signals to regulate food consumption and energy balance. Forkhead transcriptional factor O1 (FoxO1) in the hypothalamus plays a crucial role in mediation of leptin and insulin function. However, the homoeostatic role of FoxO1 in DA system has not been investigated. Here we report that FoxO1 is highly expressed in DA neurons and mice lacking FoxO1 specifically in the DA neurons (FoxO1 KODAT) show markedly increased energy expenditure and interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) thermogenesis accompanied by reduced fat mass and improved glucose/insulin homoeostasis. Moreover, FoxO1 KODAT mice exhibit an increased sucrose preference in concomitance with higher dopamine and norepinephrine levels. Finally, we found that FoxO1 directly targets and negatively regulates tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, the rate-limiting enzyme of the catecholamine synthesis, delineating a mechanism for the KO phenotypes. Collectively, these results suggest that FoxO1 in DA neurons is an important transcriptional factor that directs the coordinated control of energy balance, thermogenesis and glucose homoeostasis. PMID:27681312

  11. Loss of TIMP3 underlies diabetic nephropathy via FoxO1/STAT1 interplay

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Loredana; Cavalera, Michele; Menini, Stefano; Marchetti, Valentina; Mavilio, Maria; Fabrizi, Marta; Conserva, Francesca; Casagrande, Viviana; Menghini, Rossella; Pontrelli, Paola; Arisi, Ivan; D'Onofrio, Mara; Lauro, Davide; Khokha, Rama; Accili, Domenico; Pugliese, Giuseppe; Gesualdo, Loreto; Lauro, Renato; Federici, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    ADAM17 and its inhibitor TIMP3 are involved in nephropathy, but their role in diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is unclear. Diabetic Timp3−/− mice showed increased albuminuria, increased membrane thickness and mesangial expansion. Microarray profiling uncovered a significant reduction of Foxo1 expression in diabetic Timp3−/− mice compared to WT, along with FoxO1 target genes involved in autophagy, while STAT1, a repressor of FoxO1 transcription, was increased. Re-expression of Timp3 in Timp3−/− mesangial cells rescued the expression of Foxo1 and its targets, and decreased STAT1 expression to control levels; abolishing STAT1 expression led to a rescue of FoxO1, evoking a role of STAT1 in linking Timp3 deficiency to FoxO1. Studies on kidney biopsies from patients with diabetic nephropathy confirmed a significant reduction in TIMP3, FoxO1 and FoxO1 target genes involved in autophagy compared to controls, while STAT1 expression was strongly increased. Our study suggests that loss of TIMP3 is a hallmark of DKD in human and mouse models and designates TIMP3 as a new possible therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23401241

  12. The flavones apigenin and luteolin induce FOXO1 translocation but inhibit gluconeogenic and lipogenic gene expression in human cells.

    PubMed

    Bumke-Vogt, Christiane; Osterhoff, Martin A; Borchert, Andrea; Guzman-Perez, Valentina; Sarem, Zeinab; Birkenfeld, Andreas L; Bähr, Volker; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2014-01-01

    The flavones apigenin (4',5,7,-trihydroxyflavone) and luteolin (3',4',5,7,-tetrahydroxyflavone) are plant secondary metabolites with antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and anticancer activities. We evaluated their impact on cell signaling pathways related to insulin-resistance and type 2 diabetes. Apigenin and luteolin were identified in our U-2 OS (human osteosarcoma) cell screening assay for micronutrients triggering rapid intracellular translocation of the forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FOXO1), an important mediator of insulin signal transduction. Insulin reversed the translocation of FOXO1 as shown by live cell imaging. The impact on the expression of target genes was evaluated in HepG2 (human hepatoma) cells. The mRNA-expression of the gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), the lipogenic enzymes fatty-acid synthase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (ACC) were down-regulated by both flavones with smaller effective dosages of apigenin than for luteolin. PKB/AKT-, PRAS40-, p70S6K-, and S6-phosphorylation was reduced by apigenin and luteolin but not that of the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1R by apigenin indicating a direct inhibition of the PKB/AKT-signaling pathway distal to the IGF-1 receptor. N-acetyl-L-cysteine did not prevent FOXO1 nuclear translocation induced by apigenin and luteolin, suggesting that these flavones do not act via oxidative stress. The roles of FOXO1, FOXO3a, AKT, sirtuin1 (SIRT1), and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived2)-like2 (NRF2), investigated by siRNA knockdown, showed differential patterns of signal pathways involved and a role of NRF2 in the inhibition of gluconeogenic enzyme expression. We conclude that these flavones show an antidiabetic potential due to reduction of gluconeogenic and lipogenic capacity despite inhibition of the PKB/AKT pathway which justifies detailed investigation in vivo.

  13. TNF-α Mediates Diabetes-Enhanced Chondrocyte Apoptosis During Fracture Healing and Stimulates Chondrocyte Apoptosis Through FOXO1

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Rayyan A; Siqueira, Michelle; Alblowi, Jazia; McLean, Jody; Krothapalli, Nanarao; Faibish, Dan; Einhorn, Thomas A; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Graves, Dana T

    2010-01-01

    To gain insight into the effect of diabetes on fracture healing, experiments were carried out focusing on chondrocyte apoptosis during the transition from cartilage to bone. Type 1 diabetes was induced in mice by multiple low-dose streptozotocin injections, and simple transverse fractures of the tibia or femur was carried out. Large-scale transcriptional profiling and gene set enrichment analysis were performed to examine apoptotic pathways on total RNA isolated from fracture calluses on days 12, 16, and 22, a period of endochondral bone formation when cartilage is resorbed and chondrocyte numbers decrease. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) protein levels were assessed by ELISA and caspase-3 by bioactivity assay. The role of TNF was examined by treating mice with the TNF-specific inhibitor pegsunercept. In vitro studies investigated the proapoptotic transcription factor FOXO1 in regulating TNF-induced apoptosis of chondrogenic ATDC5 and C3H10T1/2 cells as representative of differentiated chondrocytes, which are important during endochondral ossification. mRNA profiling revealed an upregulation of gene sets related to apoptosis in the diabetic group on day 16 when cartilage resorption is active but not day 12 or day 22. This coincided with elevated TNF-α protein levels, chondrocyte apoptosis, enhanced caspase-3 activity, and increased FOXO1 nuclear translocation (p < .05). Inhibition of TNF significantly reduced these parameters in the diabetic mice but not in normoglycemic control mice (p < .05). Silencing FOXO1 using siRNA in vitro significantly reduced TNF-induced apoptosis and caspase activity in differentiated chondrocytes. The mRNA levels of the proapoptotic genes caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and TRAIL were significantly reduced with silencing of FOXO1 in chondrocytic cells. Inhibiting caspase-8 and caspase-9 significantly reduced TNF-induced apoptosis in chondrogenic cells. These results suggest that diabetes causes an upregulation of proapoptotic genes

  14. Reduced FOXO1 expression accelerates skin wound healing and attenuates scarring.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Katsuya; de Kerckhove, Maiko; Okamoto, Momoko; Kashiyama, Kazuya; Tanaka, Katsumi; Kim, Sangeun; Kawata, Takuya; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Park, Seongjoon; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Martin, Paul; Shimokawa, Isao

    2014-09-01

    The forkhead box O (FOXO) family has been extensively investigated in aging and metabolism, but its role in tissue-repair processes remains largely unknown. Herein, we clarify the molecular aspect of the FOXO family in skin wound healing. We demonstrated that Foxo1 and Foxo3a were both up-regulated during murine skin wound healing. Partial knockout of Foxo1 in Foxo1(+/-) mice throughout the body led to accelerated skin wound healing with enhanced keratinocyte migration, reduced granulation tissue formation, and decreased collagen density, accompanied by an attenuated inflammatory response, but we observed no wound phenotype in Foxo3a(-/-) mice. Fibroblast growth factor 2, adiponectin, and notch1 genes were significantly increased at wound sites in Foxo1(+/-) mice, along with markedly altered extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and AKT phosphorylation. Similarly, transient knockdown of Foxo1 at the wound site by local delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides enhanced skin wound healing. The link between FOXO1 and scarring extends to patients, in particular keloid scars, where we see FOXO1 expression markedly increased in fibroblasts and inflammatory cells within the otherwise normal dermis. This occurs in the immediate vicinity of the keloid by comparison to the center of the mature keloid, indicating that FOXO1 is associated with the overgrowth of this fibrotic response into adjacent normal skin. Overall, our data indicate that molecular targeting of FOXO1 may improve the quality of healing and reduce pathological scarring. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional regulation of FoxO1 in neural stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, D-Y; Hwang, I; Muller, F L; Paik, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Forkhead transcription factor family O (FoxO) maintains adult stem cell reserves by supporting their long-term proliferative potential. MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate neuronal stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation and differentiation during neural development by controlling the expression of a specific set of target genes. In the neurogenic subventricular zone, FoxO1 is specifically expressed in NSPCs and is no longer detected during the transition to neuroblast stage, forming an inverse correlation with miR-9 expression. The 3′-untranslated region of FoxO1 contains a conserved target sequence of miR-9 and FoxO1 expression is coordinated in concert with miR-9 during neuronal differentiation. Our study demonstrates that FoxO1 contributes to NSPC fate decision through its cooperation with the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:26470727

  16. The role of transcription factor FoxO1 in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris and the mode of isotretinoin action.

    PubMed

    Melnik, B C

    2010-10-01

    It is the purpose of this review to demonstrate that oral isotretinoin treatment restores all major pathogenetic factors of acne vulgaris by upregulation of the nuclear transcription factor FoxO1, which will be shown to be the major target of retinoid action. Nuclear FoxO1 deficiency is the result of increased growth factor signaling with activated phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt kinase during growth hormone signaling of puberty and increased insulin/IGF-1 signaling due to consumption of insulinotropic milk/dairy products as well as hyperglycemic carbohydrates of Western diet. Nuclear FoxO1 deficiency increases androgen receptor transactivation and modifies the activity of important nuclear receptors and key genes involved in pilosebaceous keratinocyte proliferation, sebaceous lipogenesis and expression of perifollicular inflammatory cytokines. Isotretinoin-induced upregulation of nuclear FoxO1 is proposed to be responsible for the mode of action of isotretinoin on all major pathogenetic factors in acne. Acne pathogenesis can be explained at the genomic level of transcriptional regulation. All major events in acne pathogenesis as well as all major effects of isotretinoin treatment appear to be related to modifications of the PI3K/Akt/FoxO1 signaling pathway, the well-known oncogenic pathway. These insights extend our understanding of FoxO1-mediated retinoid action in acne and other hyperproliferative skin diseases, cancer chemoprevention and cutaneous immune regulation. Understanding FoxO´s pivotal regulatory role in acne allows the development of novel treatment strategies and dietary interventions in acne which focus on the restoration of growth factor- and diet-induced imbalances of nuclear FoxO protein levels.

  17. Transcription Factor Foxo1 Is a Negative Regulator of NK Cell Maturation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Youcai; Kerdiles, Yann; Chu, Jianhong; Yuan, Shunzong; Wang, Youwei; Chen, Xilin; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Hughes, Tiffany; Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Zou, Xianghong; Liu, Chang-Gong; Freud, Aharon G.; Li, Xiaohui; Caligiuri, Michael A; Vivier, Eric; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known about the role of negative regulators in controlling natural killer (NK) cell development and effector functions. Foxo1 is a multifunctional transcription factor of the forkhead family. Using a mouse model of conditional deletion in NK cells, we found that Foxo1 negatively controlled NK cell differentiation and function. Immature NK cells expressed abundant Foxo1 and little Tbx21 relative to mature NK cells, but these two transcription factors reversed their expression as NK cells proceeded through development. Foxo1 promoted NK cell homing to lymph nodes through upregulating CD62L expression, and impaired late-stage maturation and effector functions by repressing Tbx21 expression. Loss of Foxo1 rescued the defect in late-stage NK cell maturation in heterozygous Tbx21+/− mice. Collectively, our data reveal a regulatory pathway by which the negative regulator Foxo1 and the positive regulator Tbx21 play opposing roles in controlling NK cell development and effector functions. PMID:25769609

  18. MiR-181c restrains nitration stress of endothelial cells in diabetic db/db mice through inhibiting the expression of FoxO1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangwei; Wu, Yuanbo; Ye, Shandong

    2017-04-22

    Endothelial dysfunction played an important role in the progression of diabetes mellitus (DM). miR-181c has been implicated in many diseases, including DM. However, the molecular mechanisms of miR-181c regulate this process remained poorly understood. Healthy ICR mice were divided into control group (n = 10) and db/db DM group (n = 10). The expression of miR-181c and FoxO1 were both investigated in diabetic db/db mice or high glucose-induced endothelial cells (MAECs and END-D). Here we found that down-regulation of miR-181c and the activation of FoxO1/iNOS were observed in mice and endothelial cells. Furthermore, we verified that miR-181c directly targeted and inhibited FoxO1 gene expression by targeting its 3'-UTR through luciferase reporter assay. Knockdown of FoxO1 reversed the up-regulation of iNOS, nitrotyrosine and the down-regulation of p-eNOS(Ser1177)/eNOS in high glucose (30 mM)-induced MAECs cells. In addition, over-expression of miR-181c could reverse the enhanced nitration stress induced by high glucose, while this effect could be attenuated by pcDNA-FoxO1 in MAECs. These results shown that miR-181c attenuated nitration stress through regulating FoxO1 expression and affecting endothelial cell function, which offering a new target for the development of preventive or therapeutic agents against DM.

  19. Apelin‐13 administration protects against ischaemia/reperfusion‐mediated apoptosis through the FoxO1 pathway in high‐fat diet‐induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Boal, Frederic; Timotin, Andrei; Roumegoux, Jessica; Alfarano, Chiara; Calise, Denis; Anesia, Rodica; Parini, Angelo; Valet, Philippe; Tronchere, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Apelin‐13, an endogenous ligand for the apelin (APJ) receptor, behaves as a potent modulator of metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. Here, we examined the effects of apelin‐13 on myocardial injury in a mouse model combining ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) and obesity and explored their underlying mechanisms. Experimental Approach Adult male C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet (ND) or high‐fat diet (HFD) for 6 months and then subjected to cardiac I/R. The effects of apelin‐13 post‐treatment on myocardial injury were evaluated in HFD‐fed mice after 24 h I/R. Changes in protein abundance, phosphorylation, subcellular localization and mRNA expression were determined in cardiomyoblast cell line H9C2, primary cardiomyocytes and cardiac tissue from ND‐ and HFD‐fed mice. Apoptosis was evaluated by TUNEL staining and caspase‐3 activity. Mitochondrial ultrastructure was analysed by electron microscopy. Key Results In HFD‐fed mice subjected to cardiac I/R, i.v. administration of apelin‐13 significantly reduced infarct size, myocardial apoptosis and mitochondrial damage compared with vehicle‐treated animals. In H9C2 cells and primary cardiomyocytes, apelin‐13 induced FoxO1 phosphorylation and nuclear exclusion. FoxO1 silencing by siRNA abolished the protective effects of apelin‐13 against hypoxia‐induced apoptosis and mitochondrial ROS generation. Finally, apelin deficiency in mice fed a HFD resulted in reduced myocardial FoxO1 expression and impaired FoxO1 distribution. Conclusions and Implications These data reveal apelin as a novel regulator of FoxO1 in cardiac cells and provide evidence for the potential of apelin‐13 in prevention of apoptosis and mitochondrial damage in conditions combining I/R injury and obesity. PMID:27005319

  20. Pancreatic-β-cell survival and proliferation are promoted by protein kinase G type Iα and downstream regulation of AKT/FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Wong, Janica C; Vo, Van; Gorjala, Priyatham; Fiscus, Ronald R

    2017-09-01

    Early studies showed nitric oxide as a pro-inflammatory-cytokine-induced toxin involved in pancreatic β-cell destruction during pathogenesis of type-1 diabetes. However, nitric oxide has both cytotoxic and cytoprotective effects on mammalian cells, depending on concentration and micro-environmental surroundings. Our studies have shown that low/physiological-level nitric oxide selectively activates protein kinase G type Iα isoform, promoting cytoprotective/pro-cell-survival effects in many cell types. In bone marrow-derived stromal/mesenchymal stem cells, protein kinase G type Iα mediates autocrine effects of nitric oxide and atrial natriuretic peptide, promoting DNA-synthesis/proliferation and cell survival. In this study, endothelial nitric oxide synthase/neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NIO (L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine), soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a] quinoxalin-1-one), atrial natriuretic peptide-receptor inhibitor A71915 and protein kinase G type Iα kinase activity inhibitor DT-2 all increased apoptosis and decreased insulin secretion in RINm5F pancreatic β-cells, suggesting autocrine regulatory role for endogenous nitric oxide- and atrial natriuretic peptide-induced activation of protein kinase G type Iα. In four pancreatic β-cell lines, Beta-TC-6, RINm5F, INS-1 and 1.1B4, protein kinase G type Iα small-interfering RNA decreased phospho-serine-239-VASP (indicator of endogenous protein kinase G type Iα kinase activity), increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation. In protein kinase G type Iα-knockdown β-cell lines, expressions of phospho-protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) (AKT), phospho-Forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) (transcriptional repressor of pancreas duodenum homobox-1) and pancreas duodenum homobox-1 were decreased, suppressing proliferation and survival in pancreatic β-cells. The data suggest autocrine nitric oxide/atrial natriuretic peptide-induced activation of protein kinase G type Iα/p-AKT/p-FOXO

  1. FOXO1 inhibits the invasion and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma by reversing ZEB2-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Tianxiu; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Yaodong; Liu, Pengfei; An, Tingting; Zhang, Jiuwei; Yang, Haichao; Zhu, Wenjing; Yang, Xiuhua

    2017-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program is critical for epithelial cell cancer progression and fibrotic diseases. FOXO1 influences a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. However, the mechanism by which FOXO1 inhibits EMT is not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that FOXO1 overexpression inhibited cell motility and invasiveness in vitro and inhibited lung metastasis in vivo. In addition, we found that FOXO1 couldreverse the EMT program. FOXO1 silencing by siRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines enhanced the expression of mesenchymal markers and decreased the expression of the epithelial markers. Consistent with these findings, FOXO1 overexpression exerted opposite effects. Furthermore, we found that FOXO1 levels were inversely correlated with the levels of EMT inducers, including Snail, Slug, ZEB1, ZEB2 and Twist1 in HCC cells. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry assays revealed that an interaction between FOXO1 and ZEB2. A dual-luciferase reporter assay and a ChIP assay further demonstrated that FOXO1 binds to the ZEB2 promoter. Together, these findings suggest that FOXO1 overexpression or ZEB2 inhibition might be potential therapeutic strategies for treating HCC. PMID:27924058

  2. The novel growth factor, progranulin, stimulates mouse cholangiocyte proliferation via sirtuin-1-mediated inactivation of FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Gabriel; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Quinn, Matthew; McMillin, Matthew; Pae, Hae Yong; Galindo, Cheryl; Leyva-Illades, Dinorah; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2012-12-01

    Progranulin (PGRN), a secreted growth factor, regulates the proliferation of various epithelial cells. Its mechanism of action is largely unknown. Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is a protein deacetylase that is known to regulate the transcriptional activity of the forkhead receptor FOXO1, thereby modulating the balance between proapoptotic and cell cycle-arresting genes. We have shown that PGRN is overexpressed in cholangiocarcinoma and stimulates proliferation. However, its effects on hyperplastic cholangiocyte proliferation are unknown. In the present study, the expression of PGRN and its downstream targets was determined after bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice and in a mouse cholangiocyte cell line after stimulation with PGRN. The effects of PGRN on cholangiocyte proliferation were assessed in sham-operated (sham) and BDL mice treated with PGRN or by specifically knocking down endogenous PGRN expression using Vivo-Morpholinos or short hairpin RNA. PGRN expression and secretion were upregulated in proliferating cholangiocytes isolated after BDL. Treatment of mice with PGRN increased biliary mass and cholangiocyte proliferation in vivo and in vitro and enhanced cholangiocyte proliferation observed after BDL. PGRN treatment decreased Sirt1 expression and increased the acetylation of FOXO1, resulting in the cytoplasmic accumulation of FOXO1 in cholangiocytes. Overexpression of Sirt1 in vitro prevented the proliferative effects of PGRN. Conversely, knocking down PGRN expression in vitro or in vivo inhibited cholangiocyte proliferation. In conclusion, these data suggest that the upregulation of PGRN may be a key feature stimulating cholangiocyte proliferation. Modulating PGRN levels may be a viable technique for regulating the balance between ductal proliferation and ductopenia observed in a variety of cholangiopathies.

  3. [Effect of resveratrol on aniogtensin II induced cardiomyocytes hypertrophy and FoxO1/MnSOD signaling pathway].

    PubMed

    Xiaoyuan, Sun; Xinzhong, Huang

    2015-08-01

    acetylation of FoxO1 was significantly higher in Ang II group than in control group (1.48 ± 0.16 vs. 1.00 ± 0.13, P < 0.05), which was significantly reversed by cotreatment with RSV (25 µmol/L). Resveratrol treatment can inhibit Ang II induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. This protective effect is associated with reduced FoxO1 acetylation and activation of Sirt1, suggesting that Sirt1 may serve as a potential therapeutic target of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

  4. Effects of the Activation of Three Major Hepatic Akt Substrates on Glucose Metabolism in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Gota; Inoue, Ikuo; Suzuki, Tokuko; Sumita, Takashi; Inukai, Kouichi; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya; Yamada, Tetsuya; Asano, Tomoichiro; Katagiri, Hideki; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Shimada, Akira; Ono, Hiraku

    2017-08-01

    Insulin suppresses glucose output from the liver via Akt activation; however, which substrate of Akt plays the major role in transducing this effect is unclear. We tested the postnatal expression of Akt-unresponsive, constitutively active mutants of three major Akt substrates widely considered to regulate glucose metabolism [i.e., FoxO1, PGC1α, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β)] using adenoviral gene delivery to the mouse liver. We performed physiological hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies using these mice under awake and nonrestrained conditions with blood sampling via an arterial catheter. Hepatic expression of constitutively active FoxO1 induced significant hepatic and systemic insulin resistance. However, neither the expression of constitutively active PGC1α nor that of GSK3β significantly changed insulin sensitivity. Simultaneous expression of all three mutants together induced no further insulin resistance compared with that of the FoxO1 mutant. The glycogen content in the liver was significantly reduced by constitutively active GSK3β expression. In cultured hepatocytes, constitutively active PGC1α induced markedly stronger transcriptional enhancement of gluconeogenic key enzymes than did constitutively active FoxO1. From these results, we conclude that FoxO1 has the most prominent role in transducing insulin's effect downstream from Akt to suppress hepatic glucose output, involving mechanisms independent of the transcriptional regulation of key gluconeogenic enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  5. CREB and FoxO1: two transcription factors for the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Han, Hye-Sook; Kim, Min-Jung; Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2013-12-01

    Liver plays a major role in maintaining glucose homeostasis in mammals. Under fasting conditions, hepatic glucose production is critical as a source of fuel to maintain the basic functions in other tissues, including skeletal muscle, red blood cells, and the brain. Fasting hormones glucagon and cortisol play major roles during the process, in part by activating the transcription of key enzyme genes in the gluconeogenesis such as phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose 6 phosphatase catalytic subunit (G6Pase). Conversely, gluconeogenic transcription is repressed by pancreatic insulin under feeding conditions, which effectively inhibits transcriptional activator complexes by either promoting post-translational modifications or activating transcriptional inhibitors in the liver, resulting in the reduction of hepatic glucose output. The transcriptional regulatory machineries have been highlighted as targets for type 2 diabetes drugs to control glycemia, so understanding of the complex regulatory mechanisms for transcription circuits for hepatic gluconeogenesis is critical in the potential development of therapeutic tools for the treatment of this disease. In this review, the current understanding regarding the roles of two key transcriptional activators, CREB and FoxO1, in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenic program is discussed.

  6. A global perspective on FOXO1 in lipid metabolism and lipid-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Ma, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Hu, Wei; Li, Tian; Di, Shouyin; Wang, Dongjin; Yang, Yang

    2017-04-06

    Lipid metabolism is a complex physiological process that is involved in nutrient adjustment, hormone regulation, and homeostasis. An unhealthy lifestyle and chronic nutrient overload can cause lipid metabolism disorders, which may lead to serious lipid-related diseases, including obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Therefore, tools for preventing dysfunctional lipid metabolism are urgently needed. The transcription factor forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) is involved in lipid metabolism and plays a critical role in the development of lipid-related diseases. In this review, we provide a global perspective on the role of FOXO1 in lipid metabolism and lipid-related diseases. The information included here may be useful for the design of future studies and advancing investigations of FOXO1 as a therapeutic target.

  7. FOXO1, FOXO3, AND FOXO4 are differently expressed during mouse oocyte maturation and preimplantation embryo development.

    PubMed

    Kuscu, Nilay; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler

    2015-01-01

    Preimplantation embryo development is affected by its environment. FoxO transcription factors are regulated by PI3K/Akt signaling pathway that essentially supports growth and development. FoxO transcription factors are at the interface of crucial cellular processes, orchestrating programs of gene expression that regulate apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, oxidative stress resistance, DNA repair, glucose metabolism, and differentiation. In the presence of growth factors, FoxO transcription factors are localized in the cytoplasm, whereas under stress conditions they move to the nucleus and trigger transcriptional activities of their target genes. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether FoxO transcription factors are present during in vivo oocyte maturation and preimplantation embryo development. Presence and localizations of FoxO1, FoxO3 and FoxO4 proteins have been determined with immunofluorescence staining. Our results have confirmed that FoxO1, FoxO3 and FoxO4 proteins are differentially expressed in prophase I, metaphase I, metaphase II oocytes, as well as in fertilized oocyte, 2-cell embryo, 4-cell embryo, 8-cell embryo, morula, and blastocyst. FoxOs translocate to nucleus in embryos with developmental delay. Our findings indicate that FoxO transcription factors are present during both oocyte and embryo in vivo maturation and provide fundamental knowledge that FoxOs may regulate in vitro embryo development under stress conditions.

  8. Acetylation curtails nucleosome binding, not stable nucleosome remodeling, by FoxO1

    SciTech Connect

    Hatta, M.; Liu, F.; Cirillo, L.A.

    2009-02-20

    Transcriptional activity of FoxO factors is controlled through the actions of multiple growth factors signaling through protein kinase B, whereby phosphorylation of FoxO factors inhibits FoxO-mediated transactivation by promoting nuclear export. Phosphorylation of FoxO factors is enhanced by p300-mediated acetylation, which decreases their affinity for DNA. The negative effect of acetylation on FoxO DNA binding, together with nuclear FoxO mobility, is eliminated by over-expression of the de-acetylase Sirt1, suggesting that acetylation mobilizes FoxO factors in chromatin for inducible gene expression. Here, we show that acetylation significantly curtails the affinity of FoxO1 for its binding sites in nucleosomal DNA but has no effect on either stable nucleosome binding or remodeling by this factor. We suggest that, while acetylation provides a first, essential step toward mobilizing FoxO factors for inducible gene repression, additional mechanisms exist for overcoming their inherent capacity to stably bind and remodel nuclear chromatin.

  9. FOXO1 is Required for Binding of PR on IRF4, Novel Transcriptional Regulator of Endometrial Stromal Decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Yasmin M.; Mazur, Erik C.; Li, Xilong; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Jiang, Lichun; Chen, Rui; Lanz, Rainer B.; Kovanci, Ertug; Gibbons, William E.

    2015-01-01

    The forkhead box O1A (FOXO1) is an early-induced target of the protein kinase A pathway during the decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). In this study we identified the cistrome and transcriptome of FOXO1 and its role as a transcriptional regulator of the progesterone receptor (PR). Direct targets of FOXO1 were identified by integrating RNA sequencing with chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing. Gene ontology analysis demonstrated that FOXO1 regulates a subset of genes in decidualization such as those involved in cancer, p53 signaling, focal adhesions, and Wnt signaling. An overlap of the FOXO1 and PR chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing intervals revealed the co-occupancy of FOXO1 in more than 75% of PR binding intervals. Among these intervals were highly enriched motifs for the interferon regulatory factor member 4 (IRF4). IRF4 was determined to be a genomic target of both FOXO1 and PR and also to be differentially regulated in HESCs treated with small interfering RNA targeting FOXO1 or PR prior to decidualization stimulus. Ablation of FOXO1 was found to abolish binding of PR to the shared binding interval downstream of the IRF4 gene. Finally, small interfering RNA-mediated ablation of IRF4 was shown to compromise morphological transformation of decidualized HESCs and to attenuate the expression of the decidual markers IGFBP1, PRL, and WNT4. These results provide the first evidence that FOXO1 is functionally required for the binding of PR to genomic targets. Most notably, FOXO1 and PR are required for the regulation of IRF4, a novel transcriptional regulator of decidualization in HESCs. PMID:25584414

  10. MicroRNA-214 suppresses gluconeogenesis by targeting activating transcriptional factor 4.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Zhang, Jin; Yu, Junjie; Liu, Bin; Guo, Yajie; Deng, Jiali; Chen, Shanghai; Wang, Chunxia; Guo, Feifan

    2015-03-27

    Although the gluconeogenesis pathway is already a target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, the potential role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in gluconeogenesis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological functions of miR-214 in gluconeogenesis. The expression of miR-214 was suppressed by glucagon via protein kinase A signaling in primary hepatocytes, and miR-214 was down-regulated in the livers of fasted, high fat diet-induced diabetic and leptin receptor-mutated (db/db) mice. The overexpression of miR-214 in primary hepatocytes suppressed glucose production, and silencing miR-214 reversed this effect. Gluconeogenesis was suppressed in the livers of mice injected with an adenovirus expressing miR-214 (Ad-miR-214). Additionally, Ad-miR-214 alleviated high fat diet-induced elevation of gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia. Furthermore, we found that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a reported target of miR-214, can reverse the suppressive effect of miR-214 on gluconeogenesis in primary hepatocytes, and this suppressive effect was blocked in liver-specific ATF4 knock-out mice. ATF4 regulated gluconeogenesis via affecting forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) transcriptional activity. Finally, liver-specific miR-214 transgenic mice exhibited suppressed gluconeogenesis and reduced expression of ATF4, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and glucose-6-phosphatase in liver. Taken together, our results suggest that the miR-214-ATF4 axis is a novel pathway for the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

  11. MicroRNA-214 Suppresses Gluconeogenesis by Targeting Activating Transcriptional Factor 4*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Zhang, Jin; Yu, Junjie; Liu, Bin; Guo, Yajie; Deng, Jiali; Chen, Shanghai; Wang, Chunxia; Guo, Feifan

    2015-01-01

    Although the gluconeogenesis pathway is already a target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, the potential role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in gluconeogenesis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological functions of miR-214 in gluconeogenesis. The expression of miR-214 was suppressed by glucagon via protein kinase A signaling in primary hepatocytes, and miR-214 was down-regulated in the livers of fasted, high fat diet-induced diabetic and leptin receptor-mutated (db/db) mice. The overexpression of miR-214 in primary hepatocytes suppressed glucose production, and silencing miR-214 reversed this effect. Gluconeogenesis was suppressed in the livers of mice injected with an adenovirus expressing miR-214 (Ad-miR-214). Additionally, Ad-miR-214 alleviated high fat diet-induced elevation of gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia. Furthermore, we found that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a reported target of miR-214, can reverse the suppressive effect of miR-214 on gluconeogenesis in primary hepatocytes, and this suppressive effect was blocked in liver-specific ATF4 knock-out mice. ATF4 regulated gluconeogenesis via affecting forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) transcriptional activity. Finally, liver-specific miR-214 transgenic mice exhibited suppressed gluconeogenesis and reduced expression of ATF4, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and glucose-6-phosphatase in liver. Taken together, our results suggest that the miR-214-ATF4 axis is a novel pathway for the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis. PMID:25657009

  12. PGC-1α and FOXO1 mRNA levels and fiber characteristics of the soleus and plantaris muscles in rats after hindlimb unloading.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Fumiko; Fujino, Hidemi; Kondo, Hiroyo; Suzuki, Hideki; Kouzaki, Motoki; Takeda, Isao; Ishihara, Akihiko

    2011-12-01

    Fifteen-week-old rats were subjected to unloading induced by hindlimb suspension for 3 weeks. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and forkhead box-containing protein O1 (FOXO1) mRNA levels and fiber profiles of the soleus and plantaris muscles in rats subjected to unloading (unloaded group) were determined and compared with those of age-matched control rats (control group). The body weight and both the soleus and plantaris muscle weights were lower in the unloaded group than in the control group. The PGC-1α mRNA was downregulated in the soleus, but not in the plantaris muscle of the unloaded group. The FOXO1 mRNA was upregulated in both the soleus and plantaris muscles of the unloaded group. The oxidative enzyme activity was reduced in the soleus, but not in the plantaris muscle of the unloaded group. The percentage of type I fibers was decreased and the percentages of type IIA and IIC fibers were increased in the soleus muscle of the unloaded group, whereas there was no change in fiber type distribution in the plantaris muscle of the unloaded group. Atrophy of all types of fibers was observed in both the soleus and plantaris muscles of the unloaded group. We conclude that decreased oxidative capacity and fiber atrophy in unloaded skeletal muscles are associated with decreased PGC-1α and increased FOXO1 mRNA levels.

  13. Inhibition of SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2) ameliorates palmitate induced-apoptosis through regulating Akt/FOXO1 pathway and ROS production in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gorgani-Firuzjaee, Sattar; Adeli, Khosrow; Meshkani, Reza

    2015-08-21

    The serine–threonine kinase Akt regulates proliferation and survival by phosphorylating a network of protein substrates; however, the role of a negative regulator of the Akt pathway, the SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2) in apoptosis of the hepatocytes, remains unknown. In the present study, we studied the molecular mechanisms linking SHIP2 expression to apoptosis using overexpression or suppression of SHIP2 gene in HepG2 cells exposed to palmitate (0.5 mM). Overexpression of the dominant negative mutant SHIP2 (SHIP2-DN) significantly reduced palmitate-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells, as these cells had increased cell viability, decreased apoptotic cell death and reduced the activity of caspase-3, cytochrome c and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Overexpression of the wild-type SHIP2 gene led to a massive apoptosis in HepG2 cells. The protection from palmitate-induced apoptosis by SHIP2 inhibition was accompanied by a decrease in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, SHIP2 inhibition was accompanied by an increased Akt and FOXO-1 phosphorylation, whereas overexpression of the wild-type SHIP2 gene had the opposite effects. Taken together, these findings suggest that SHIP2 expression level is an important determinant of hepatic lipoapotosis and its inhibition can potentially be a target in treatment of hepatic lipoapoptosis in diabetic patients. - Highlights: • Lipoapoptosis is the major contributor to the development of NAFLD. • The PI3-K/Akt pathway regulates apoptosis in different cells. • The role of negative regulator of this pathway, SHIP2 in lipoapoptosis is unknown. • SHIP2 inhibition significantly reduces palmitate-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. • SHIP2 inhibition prevents palmitate induced-apoptosis by regulating Akt/FOXO1 pathway.

  14. SIRT1 inhibits TNF-α-induced apoptosis of vascular adventitial fibroblasts partly through the deacetylation of FoxO1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weirong; Yan, Chunfang; Zhang, Jiye; Lin, Rong; Lin, Qinqin; Yang, Lina; Ren, Feng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Ji, Meixi; Li, Yanxiang

    2013-06-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD(+)-dependent class III histone deacetylase, participates in regulating cellular apoptosis, senescence and metabolism by deacetylating histones and multiple transcription factors. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of SIRT1 on the apoptosis of vascular adventitial fibroblasts (VAFs) and related signaling pathways. SIRT1 was found in the nucleus of VAFs and translocated into the cytoplasm in response to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Moreover, SIRT1 protein expression was reduced in VAFs stimulated with TNF-α. In addition, TNF-α increased the apoptosis of VAFs. Activation of SIRT1 by resveratrol (RSV) or overexpression of SIRT1 attenuated TNF-α-induced VAF apoptosis by decreasing the percentage of apoptotic cells and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression and increasing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. In contrast, inhibition of SIRT1 by sirtinol/nicotinamide or knockdown of SIRT1 enhanced apoptosis of VAFs. On the other hand, knockdown of FoxO1 reduced TNF-α-induced VAF apoptosis. SIRT1 interacted with FoxO1 in VAFs by the co-immunoprecipitation assay. Further study showed that RSV or SIRT1 overexpression decreased acetylated-FoxO1 (Ac-FoxO1) protein expression in VAFs stimulated with TNF-α. Knockdown of SIRT1 resulted in an increase in Ac-FoxO1 protein expression. Taken together, these findings indicate that SIRT1 inhibits the apoptosis of VAFs, whereas FoxO1 promotes VAF apoptosis. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of SIRT1 on VAF apoptosis is partly mediated by the deacetylation of FoxO1.

  15. Sirt1 rescues the obesity induced by insulin-resistant constitutively-nuclear FoxO1 in POMC neurons of male mice.

    PubMed

    Susanti, Vina Yanti; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Yokota-Hashimoto, Hiromi; Matsui, Sho; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kikuchi, Osamu; Shimpuku, Mayumi; Kim, Hye-Jin; Kobayashi, Masaki; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2014-10-01

    The hypothalamus is the brain center that controls the energy balance. Anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons and orexigenic AgRP neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus plays critical roles in energy balance regulation. FoxO1 is a transcription factor regulated by insulin signaling that is deacetylated by Sirt1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide- (NAD(+) -) dependent deacetylase. Overexpression of insulin-resistant constitutively-nuclear FoxO1 (CN-FoxO1) in POMC neurons leads to obesity, whereas Sirt1 overexpression in POMC neurons leads to leanness. Whether overexpression of Sirt1 in POMC neurons could rescue the obesity caused by insulin-resistant CN-FoxO1 was tested here. POMC neuron-specific CN-FoxO1/Sirt1 double-KI (DKI) mice were analyzed. The obese phenotype of CN-FoxO1 KI mice was rescued in male DKI mice. Reduced O2 consumption, increased adiposity, and fewer POMC neurons observed in CN-FoxO1 mice were rescued in male DKI mice without affecting food intake and locomotor activity. Sirt1 overexpression decreased FoxO1 acetylation and protein levels without affecting its nuclear localization in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and hypothalamic N41 cells. Sirt1 rescues the obesity induced by insulin-resistant CN-FoxO1 in POMC neurons of male mice by decreasing FoxO1 protein through deacetylation. Sirt1 ameliorates obesity caused by a genetic model of central insulin resistance. © 2014 The Authors Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  16. Dehydroepiandrosterone Stimulates Phosphorylation of FoxO1 in Vascular Endothelial Cells via Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase- and Protein Kinase A-dependent Signaling Pathways to Regulate ET-1 Synthesis and Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Lin, Alice Seraphina; Li, Yunhua; Reiter, Chad E. N.; Ver, Maria R.; Quon, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is an endogenous adrenal steroid hormone with controversial actions in humans. We previously reported that DHEA has opposing actions in endothelial cells to stimulate phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase/Akt/endothelial nitric-oxide synthase leading to increased production of nitric oxide while simultaneously stimulating MAPK-dependent secretion of the vasoconstrictor ET-1. In the present study we hypothesized that DHEA may stimulate PI 3-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of FoxO1 in endothelial cells to help regulate endothelial function. In bovine or human aortic endothelial cells (BAEC and HAEC), treatment with DHEA (100 nm) acutely enhanced phosphorylation of FoxO1. DHEA-stimulated phosphorylation of FoxO1 was inhibited by pretreatment of cells with wortmannin (PI 3-kinase inhibitor) or H89 (protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor) but not ICI182780 (estrogen receptor blocker), or PD98059 (MEK (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase) inhibitor). Small interfering RNA knockdown of PKA inhibited DHEA-stimulated phosphorylation of FoxO1. DHEA promoted nuclear exclusion of FoxO1 that was blocked by pretreatment of cells with wortmannin, H89, or by small interfering RNA knockdown of PKA. DHEA treatment of endothelial cells increased PKA activity and intracellular cAMP concentrations. Transfection of BAEC with a constitutively nuclear FoxO1 mutant transactivated a co-transfected ET-1 promoter luciferase reporter. Treatment of BAEC with DHEA inhibited transactivation of the ET-1 promoter reporter in cells overexpressing FoxO1. ET-1 promoter activity and secretion in response to DHEA treatment was augmented by PI 3-kinase blockade and inhibited by MAPK blockade. We conclude that DHEA stimulates phosphorylation of FoxO1 via PI 3-kinase- and PKA-dependent pathways in endothelial cells that negatively regulates ET-1 promoter activity and secretion. Balance between PI 3-kinase-dependent inhibition and MAPK-dependent stimulation of ET-1

  17. FOXO1 locus and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Paroni, Giulia; Seripa, Davide; Fontana, Andrea; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Gravina, Carolina; Urbano, Maria; Cascavilla, Leandro; Pellegrini, Fabio; Greco, Antonio; Pilotto, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) may reduce the oxidative stress in brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) protein has been reported as the link between oxidative stress and AD. We evaluated a potential association between FOXO1 gene locus and the response to AChEI treatment in patients with sporadic AD. In this prospective study, 109 Caucasian AD patients were treated with standard doses of donepezil, galantamine, or rivastigmine for 6 months. Functional and cognitive status were evaluated at baseline and after treatment. Response to therapy was defined according to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence criteria. Genotype analyses, including the APOE polymorphism, were made in blinded fashion. A significantly higher frequency of FOXO1 rs7981045 G/G genotype was observed in nonresponders compared with responders (17.14% versus 2.70%, P=0.010). Age, sex, and APOE-adjusted logistic regression analysis confirmed that patients with the G/G genotype had a significantly higher risk of poor response to AChEI treatment (odds ratio =10.310; 95% confidence interval, 1.510-70.362). Haplotype analysis revealed significant differences in haplotype frequency distribution between these groups. FOXO1 may influence the clinical response to AChEIs in AD patients.

  18. Forkhead Box O1 (FOXO1) Protein, but Not p53, Contributes to Robust Induction of p21 Expression in Fasted Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Tinkum, Kelsey L.; White, Lynn S.; Marpegan, Luciano; Herzog, Erik; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Reporter mice that enable the activity of the endogenous p21 promoter to be dynamically monitored in real time in vivo and under a variety of experimental conditions revealed ubiquitous p21 expression in mouse organs including the brain. Low light bioluminescence microscopy was employed to localize p21 expression to specific regions of the brain. Interestingly, p21 expression was observed in the paraventricular, arcuate, and dorsomedial nuclei of the hypothalamus, regions that detect nutrient levels in the blood stream and signal metabolic actions throughout the body. These results suggested a link between p21 expression and metabolic regulation. We found that short-term food deprivation (fasting) potently induced p21 expression in tissues involved in metabolic regulation including liver, pancreas and hypothalamic nuclei. Conditional reporter mice were generated that enabled hepatocyte-specific expression of p21 to be monitored in vivo. Bioluminescence imaging demonstrated that fasting induced a 7-fold increase in p21 expression in livers of reporter mice and Western blotting demonstrated an increase in protein levels as well. The ability of fasting to induce p21 expression was found to be independent of p53 but dependent on FOXO1. Finally, occupancy of the endogenous p21 promoter by FOXO1 was observed in the livers of fasted but not fed mice. Thus, fasting promotes loading of FOXO1 onto the p21 promoter to induce p21 expression in hepatocytes. PMID:23918930

  19. Forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) protein, but not p53, contributes to robust induction of p21 expression in fasted mice.

    PubMed

    Tinkum, Kelsey L; White, Lynn S; Marpegan, Luciano; Herzog, Erik; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2013-09-27

    Reporter mice that enable the activity of the endogenous p21 promoter to be dynamically monitored in real time in vivo and under a variety of experimental conditions revealed ubiquitous p21 expression in mouse organs including the brain. Low light bioluminescence microscopy was employed to localize p21 expression to specific regions of the brain. Interestingly, p21 expression was observed in the paraventricular, arcuate, and dorsomedial nuclei of the hypothalamus, regions that detect nutrient levels in the blood stream and signal metabolic actions throughout the body. These results suggested a link between p21 expression and metabolic regulation. We found that short-term food deprivation (fasting) potently induced p21 expression in tissues involved in metabolic regulation including liver, pancreas and hypothalamic nuclei. Conditional reporter mice were generated that enabled hepatocyte-specific expression of p21 to be monitored in vivo. Bioluminescence imaging demonstrated that fasting induced a 7-fold increase in p21 expression in livers of reporter mice and Western blotting demonstrated an increase in protein levels as well. The ability of fasting to induce p21 expression was found to be independent of p53 but dependent on FOXO1. Finally, occupancy of the endogenous p21 promoter by FOXO1 was observed in the livers of fasted but not fed mice. Thus, fasting promotes loading of FOXO1 onto the p21 promoter to induce p21 expression in hepatocytes.

  20. The Polycomb group (PcG) protein EZH2 supports the survival of PAX3-FOXO1 alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma by repressing FBXO32 (Atrogin1/MAFbx).

    PubMed

    Ciarapica, R; De Salvo, M; Carcarino, E; Bracaglia, G; Adesso, L; Leoncini, P P; Dall'Agnese, A; Walters, Z S; Verginelli, F; De Sio, L; Boldrini, R; Inserra, A; Bisogno, G; Rosolen, A; Alaggio, R; Ferrari, A; Collini, P; Locatelli, M; Stifani, S; Screpanti, I; Rutella, S; Yu, Q; Marquez, V E; Shipley, J; Valente, S; Mai, A; Miele, L; Puri, P L; Locatelli, F; Palacios, D; Rota, R

    2014-08-07

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate stem cell differentiation via the repression of gene transcription, and their deregulation has been widely implicated in cancer development. The PcG protein Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) works as a catalytic subunit of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) by methylating lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me3), a hallmark of PRC2-mediated gene repression. In skeletal muscle progenitors, EZH2 prevents an unscheduled differentiation by repressing muscle-specific gene expression and is downregulated during the course of differentiation. In rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a pediatric soft-tissue sarcoma thought to arise from myogenic precursors, EZH2 is abnormally expressed and its downregulation in vitro leads to muscle-like differentiation of RMS cells of the embryonal variant. However, the role of EZH2 in the clinically aggressive subgroup of alveolar RMS, characterized by the expression of PAX3-FOXO1 oncoprotein, remains unknown. We show here that EZH2 depletion in these cells leads to programmed cell death. Transcriptional derepression of F-box protein 32 (FBXO32) (Atrogin1/MAFbx), a gene associated with muscle homeostasis, was evidenced in PAX3-FOXO1 RMS cells silenced for EZH2. This phenomenon was associated with reduced EZH2 occupancy and H3K27me3 levels at the FBXO32 promoter. Simultaneous knockdown of FBXO32 and EZH2 in PAX3-FOXO1 RMS cells impaired the pro-apoptotic response, whereas the overexpression of FBXO32 facilitated programmed cell death in EZH2-depleted cells. Pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 by either 3-Deazaneplanocin A or a catalytic EZH2 inhibitor mirrored the phenotypic and molecular effects of EZH2 knockdown in vitro and prevented tumor growth in vivo. Collectively, these results indicate that EZH2 is a key factor in the proliferation and survival of PAX3-FOXO1 alveolar RMS cells working, at least in part, by repressing FBXO32. They also suggest that the reducing activity of EZH2 could represent a novel

  1. Involvement of the Up-regulated FoxO1 Expression in Follicular Granulosa Cell Apoptosis Induced by Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ming; Lin, Fei; Zhang, Jiaqing; Tang, Yiting; Chen, Wei-Kang; Liu, Honglin

    2012-01-01

    Follicular atresia is common in female mammalian ovaries, where most follicles undergo degeneration at any stage of growth and development. Oxidative stress gives rise to triggering granulosa cell apoptosis, which has been suggested as a major cause of follicular atresia. However, the underlying mechanism by which the oxidative stress induces follicular atresia remains unclear. FoxO transcription factors are known as critical mediators in the regulation of oxidative stress and apoptosis. In this study, the involvement of FoxO1 in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis of mouse follicular granulosa cells (MGCs) was investigated in vivo and in vitro. It was observed that increased apoptotic signals correlated with elevated expression of FoxO1 in MGCs when mice were treated with the oxidant. Correspondingly, the expressions of FoxO1 target genes, such as proapoptotic genes and antioxidative genes, were also up-regulated. In primary cultured MGCs, treatment with H2O2 led to FoxO1 nuclear translocation. Further studies with overexpression and knockdown of FoxO1 demonstrated the critical role of FoxO1 in the induction of MGC apoptosis by oxidative stress. Finally, inactivation of FoxO1 by insulin treatment confirmed that FoxO1 induced by oxidative stress played a pivotal role in up-regulating the expression of downstream apoptosis-related genes in MGCs. Our results suggest that up-regulation of FoxO1 by oxidative stress leads to apoptosis of granulosa cells, which eventually results in follicular atresia in mice. PMID:22669940

  2. Nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of the transcription factor FoxO1 is regulated by neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lixia; Zheng, Wenhua; Chabot, Jean-Guy; Unterman, Terry G; Quirion, Remi

    2005-06-01

    FoxO1, a member of the FoxO subfamily of forkhead transcription factors, is an important target for insulin and growth factor signaling in the regulation of metabolism, cell cycle and proliferation, and survival in peripheral tissues. However, its role in the central nervous system is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of neurotrophic factors on nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FoxO1. We showed that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and nerve growth factor (NGF) potently induced the nuclear exclusion of FoxO1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) while neurotrophin (NT)-3 and NT-4 were much weaker and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) failed to induce FoxO1 translocation in PC12 cells. FoxO1 translocation was inhibited by LY294002, a well-established PI3K/Akt kinase inhibitor. Moreover, FoxO1 was phosphorylated at Thr24 and Ser256 residues by the above neurotrophic factors, with the exception of BDNF. Triple mutant FoxO1, in which three Akt/PKB phosphorylation sites (Thr24, Ser256 and Ser319) were mutated to alanine, resulted in the complete nuclear targeting of the expressed FoxO1-GFP fusion protein in the presence of the above neurotrophic factors in both PC12 cells and cultured hippocampal and cortical neurons. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that neurotrophic factors are able to regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FoxO1 via the PI3K/Akt pathway in neuronal cells.

  3. Role of FOXO1 in aldosterone-induced autophagy: A compensatory protective mechanism related to podocyte injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Minmin; Li, Hongmei; Guo, Honglei; Lin, Lilu; Chen, Jing; Gu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to elucidate whether and how autophagy was regulated in aldosterone (Aldo)-induced podocyte injury and to examine its role in this model both in vitro and in vivo. In cultured podocytes, Aldo increased autophagy flux as indicated by the enhanced expression of LC3-II/LC3-I and the reduction of p62. Autophagy induction with rapamycin (RP) provided a cytoprotective effect, and inhibition of autophagy with Atg7-specific siRNA, chloroquine (CQ) or 3-methyladenine (3-MA) worsened Aldo-induced podocyte injury by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Aldo inhibited Akt phosphorylation but increased the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway; however, Aldo up-regulated the expression of FOXO1 and its downstream effector Rab7. Either knockdown of FOXO1 or Rab7 inhibited Aldo-induced autophagy. Additionally, an elevated level of P300-regulated acetylation of FOXO1 and the interaction of acetylated FOXO1 and Atg7 were also confirmed to be involved in regulating autophagy in Aldo-induced podocytes. Similar results were further confirmed in vivo. We propose that autophagy enhancement through enhancing of the FOXO1/Rab7 axis and post-translational modification of FOXO1 may represent a potential therapeutic strategy against podocyte injury by promoting autophagy. PMID:27244896

  4. FOXO1 and GSK-3β Are Main Targets of Insulin-Mediated Myogenesis in C2C12 Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Litwiniuk, Anna; Pijet, Barbara; Pijet-Kucicka, Maja; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Myogenesis and muscle hypertrophy account for muscle growth and adaptation to work overload, respectively. In adults, insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 stimulate muscle growth, although their links with cellular energy homeostasis are not fully explained. Insulin plays critical role in the control of mitochondrial activity in skeletal muscle cells, and mitochondria are essential for insulin action. The aim of this study was to elucidate molecular mechanism(s) involved in mitochondrial control of insulin-dependent myogenesis. The effects of several metabolic inhibitors (LY294002, PD98059, SB216763, LiCl, rotenone, oligomycin) on the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts in culture were examined in the short-term (hours) and long-term (days) experiments. Muscle cell viability and mitogenicity were monitored and confronted with the activities of selected genes and proteins expression. These indices focus on the roles of insulin, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) on myogenesis using a combination of treatments and inhibitors. Long-term insulin (10 nM) treatment in “normoglycemic” conditions led to increased myogenin expression and accelerated myogenesis in C2C12 cells. Insulin-dependent myogenesis was accompanied by the rise of mtTFA, MtSSB, Mfn2, and mitochondrially encoded Cox-1 gene expressions and elevated levels of proteins which control functions of mitochondria (kinase—PKB/AKT, mitofusin 2 protein—Mfn-2). Insulin, via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/AKT-dependent pathway reduced transcription factor FOXO1 activity and altered GSK-3β phosphorylation status. Once FOXO1 and GSK-3β activities were inhibited the rise in Cox-1 gene action and nuclear encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX IV) expressions were observed, even though some mRNA and protein results varied. In contrast to SB216763, LiCl markedly elevated Mfn2 and COX IV protein expression levels when given together with insulin. Thus

  5. FOXO1 and GSK-3β Are Main Targets of Insulin-Mediated Myogenesis in C2C12 Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Litwiniuk, Anna; Pijet, Barbara; Pijet-Kucicka, Maja; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Myogenesis and muscle hypertrophy account for muscle growth and adaptation to work overload, respectively. In adults, insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 stimulate muscle growth, although their links with cellular energy homeostasis are not fully explained. Insulin plays critical role in the control of mitochondrial activity in skeletal muscle cells, and mitochondria are essential for insulin action. The aim of this study was to elucidate molecular mechanism(s) involved in mitochondrial control of insulin-dependent myogenesis. The effects of several metabolic inhibitors (LY294002, PD98059, SB216763, LiCl, rotenone, oligomycin) on the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts in culture were examined in the short-term (hours) and long-term (days) experiments. Muscle cell viability and mitogenicity were monitored and confronted with the activities of selected genes and proteins expression. These indices focus on the roles of insulin, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) on myogenesis using a combination of treatments and inhibitors. Long-term insulin (10 nM) treatment in "normoglycemic" conditions led to increased myogenin expression and accelerated myogenesis in C2C12 cells. Insulin-dependent myogenesis was accompanied by the rise of mtTFA, MtSSB, Mfn2, and mitochondrially encoded Cox-1 gene expressions and elevated levels of proteins which control functions of mitochondria (kinase--PKB/AKT, mitofusin 2 protein--Mfn-2). Insulin, via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/AKT-dependent pathway reduced transcription factor FOXO1 activity and altered GSK-3β phosphorylation status. Once FOXO1 and GSK-3β activities were inhibited the rise in Cox-1 gene action and nuclear encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX IV) expressions were observed, even though some mRNA and protein results varied. In contrast to SB216763, LiCl markedly elevated Mfn2 and COX IV protein expression levels when given together with insulin. Thus

  6. A physiological increase in insulin suppresses gluconeogenic gene activation in fetal sheep with sustained hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Stephanie R; Sekar, Satya M; Lavezzi, Jinny R; O'Meara, Meghan C; Brown, Laura D; Hay, William W; Rozance, Paul J

    2012-10-15

    Reduced maternal glucose supply to the fetus and resulting fetal hypoglycemia and hypoinsulinemia activate fetal glucose production as a means to maintain cellular glucose uptake. However, this early activation of fetal glucose production may be accompanied by hepatic insulin resistance. We tested the capacity of a physiological increase in insulin to suppress fetal hepatic gluconeogenic gene activation following sustained hypoglycemia to determine whether hepatic insulin sensitivity is maintained. Control fetuses (CON), hypoglycemic fetuses induced by maternal insulin infusion for 8 wk (HG), and 8 wk HG fetuses that received an isoglycemic insulin infusion for the final 7 days (HG+INS) were studied. Glucose and insulin concentrations were 60% lower in HG compared with CON fetuses. Insulin was 50% higher in HG+INS compared with CON and four-fold higher compared with HG fetuses. Expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, PCK1, G6PC, FBP1, GLUT2, and PGC1A was increased in the HG and reduced in the HG+INS liver. Expression of the insulin-regulated glycolytic and lipogenic genes, PFKL and FAS, was increased in the HG+INS liver. Total FOXO1 protein expression, a gluconeogenic activator, was 60% higher in the HG liver. Despite low glucose, insulin, and IGF1 concentrations, phosphorylation of AKT and ERK was higher in the HG liver. Thus, a physiological increase in fetal insulin is sufficient for suppression of gluconeogenic genes and activation of glycolytic and lipogenic genes in the HG fetal liver. These results demonstrate that fetuses exposed to sustained hypoglycemia have maintained hepatic insulin action in contrast to fetuses exposed to placental insufficiency.

  7. An isoform-specific SnoN1-FOXO1 repressor complex controls neuronal morphogenesis and positioning in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Mai Anh; Ikeuchi, Yoshiho; Netherton, Stuart; de la Torre-Ubieta, Luis; Kanadia, Rahul; Stegmüller, Judith; Cepko, Constance; Bonni, Shirin; Bonni, Azad

    2011-03-10

    Control of neuronal positioning is fundamental to normal brain development. However, the cell-intrinsic mechanisms that govern neuronal positioning remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that the spliced protein products of the transcriptional regulator SnoN, SnoN1 and SnoN2, harbor opposing functions in the coordinate regulation of neuronal branching and positioning. Knockdown of SnoN2 stimulates axon branching in primary neurons and impairs migration of granule neurons in the rat cerebellar cortex in vivo. By contrast, SnoN1 knockdown suppresses SnoN2 knockdown-induced neuronal branching and strikingly triggers excessive migration of granule neurons in the cerebellar cortex. We also find that SnoN1 forms a complex with the transcription factor FOXO1 that represses the X-linked lissencephaly gene encoding doublecortin (DCX). Accordingly, repression of DCX mediates the ability of SnoN1 to regulate branching in primary neurons and granule neuron migration in vivo. These data define an isoform-specific SnoN1-FOXO1 transcriptional complex that orchestrates neuronal branching and positioning in the brain with important implications for the study of developmental disorders of cognition and epilepsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeting the UPR transcription factor XBP1 protects against Huntington's disease through the regulation of FoxO1 and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Rene L; Figueroa, Alicia; Court, Felipe A; Thielen, Peter; Molina, Claudia; Wirth, Craig; Caballero, Benjamin; Kiffin, Roberta; Segura-Aguilar, Juan; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Glimcher, Laurie H; Hetz, Claudio

    2012-05-15

    Mutations leading to expansion of a poly-glutamine track in Huntingtin (Htt) cause Huntington's disease (HD). Signs of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been recently reported in animal models of HD, associated with the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Here we have investigated the functional contribution of ER stress to HD by targeting the expression of two main UPR transcription factors, XBP1 and ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4), in full-length mutant Huntingtin (mHtt) transgenic mice. XBP1-deficient mice were more resistant to developing disease features, associated with improved neuronal survival and motor performance, and a drastic decrease in mHtt levels. The protective effects of XBP1 deficiency were associated with enhanced macroautophagy in both cellular and animal models of HD. In contrast, ATF4 deficiency did not alter mHtt levels. Although, XBP1 mRNA splicing was observed in the striatum of HD transgenic brains, no changes in the levels of classical ER stress markers were detected in symptomatic animals. At the mechanistic level, we observed that XBP1 deficiency led to augmented expression of Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), a key transcription factor regulating autophagy in neurons. In agreement with this finding, ectopic expression of FoxO1 enhanced autophagy and mHtt clearance in vitro. Our results provide strong evidence supporting an involvement of XBP1 in HD pathogenesis probably due to an ER stress-independent mechanism involving the control of FoxO1 and autophagy levels.

  9. Targeting the UPR transcription factor XBP1 protects against Huntington's disease through the regulation of FoxO1 and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Rene L.; Figueroa, Alicia; Court, Felipe A.; Thielen, Peter; Molina, Claudia; Wirth, Craig; Caballero, Benjamin; Kiffin, Roberta; Segura-Aguilar, Juan; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Hetz, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Mutations leading to expansion of a poly-glutamine track in Huntingtin (Htt) cause Huntington's disease (HD). Signs of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been recently reported in animal models of HD, associated with the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Here we have investigated the functional contribution of ER stress to HD by targeting the expression of two main UPR transcription factors, XBP1 and ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4), in full-length mutant Huntingtin (mHtt) transgenic mice. XBP1-deficient mice were more resistant to developing disease features, associated with improved neuronal survival and motor performance, and a drastic decrease in mHtt levels. The protective effects of XBP1 deficiency were associated with enhanced macroautophagy in both cellular and animal models of HD. In contrast, ATF4 deficiency did not alter mHtt levels. Although, XBP1 mRNA splicing was observed in the striatum of HD transgenic brains, no changes in the levels of classical ER stress markers were detected in symptomatic animals. At the mechanistic level, we observed that XBP1 deficiency led to augmented expression of Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), a key transcription factor regulating autophagy in neurons. In agreement with this finding, ectopic expression of FoxO1 enhanced autophagy and mHtt clearance in vitro. Our results provide strong evidence supporting an involvement of XBP1 in HD pathogenesis probably due to an ER stress-independent mechanism involving the control of FoxO1 and autophagy levels. PMID:22337954

  10. Increased hepatic glucose production in fetal sheep with intrauterine growth restriction is not suppressed by insulin.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Stephanie R; Brown, Laura D; Rozance, Paul J; Hay, William W; Friedman, Jacob E

    2013-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the risk for metabolic disease and diabetes, although the developmental origins of this remain unclear. We measured glucose metabolism during basal and insulin clamp periods in a fetal sheep model of placental insufficiency and IUGR. Compared with control fetuses (CON), fetuses with IUGR had increased basal glucose production rates and hepatic PEPCK and glucose-6-phosphatase expression, which were not suppressed by insulin. In contrast, insulin significantly increased peripheral glucose utilization rates in CON and IUGR fetuses. Insulin robustly activated AKT, GSK3β, and forkhead box class O (FOXO)1 in CON and IUGR fetal livers. IUGR livers, however, had increased basal FOXO1 phosphorylation, nuclear FOXO1 expression, and Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation during hyperinsulinemia. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α were increased in IUGR livers during basal and insulin periods. Cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations were positively correlated with glucose production rates. Isolated IUGR hepatocytes maintained increased glucose production in culture. In summary, fetal sheep with IUGR have increased hepatic glucose production, which is not suppressed by insulin despite insulin sensitivity for peripheral glucose utilization. These data are consistent with a novel mechanism involving persistent transcriptional activation in the liver that seems to be unique in the fetus with IUGR.

  11. De-novo NAD+ synthesis regulates SIRT1-FOXO1 apoptotic pathway in response to NQO1 substrates in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuefang; Li, Qingran; Liu, Fang; Ye, Hui; Zhao, Min; Wang, Hong; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan metabolism is essential in diverse kinds of tumors via regulating tumor immunology. However, the direct role of tryptophan metabolism and its signaling pathway in cancer cells remain largely elusive. Here, we establish a mechanistic link from L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) mediated transport of tryptophan and the subsequent de-novo NAD+ synthesis to SIRT1-FOXO1 regulated apoptotic signaling in A549 cells in response to NQO1 activation. In response to NQO1 activation, SIRT1 is repressed leading to the increased cellular accumulation of acetylated FOXO1 that transcriptionally activates apoptotic signaling. Decreased uptake of tryptophan due to the downregulation of LAT1 coordinates with PARP-1 hyperactivation to induce rapid depletion of NAD+ pool. Particularly, the LAT1-NAD+-SIRT1 signaling is activated in tumor tissues of patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Because NQO1 activation is characterized with oxidative challenge induced DNA damage, these results suggest that LAT1 and de-novo NAD+ synthesis in NSCLC cells may play essential roles in sensing excessive oxidative stress. PMID:27566573

  12. Interaction Between the FOXO1A-209 Genotype and Tea Drinking Is Significantly Associated with Reduced Mortality at Advanced Ages.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi; Chen, Huashuai; Ni, Ting; Ruan, Rongping; Nie, Chao; Liu, Xiaomin; Feng, Lei; Zhang, Fengyu; Lu, Jiehua; Li, Jianxin; Li, Yang; Tao, Wei; Gregory, Simon G; Gottschalk, William; Lutz, Michael W; Land, Kenneth C; Yashin, Anatoli; Tan, Qihua; Yang, Ze; Bolund, Lars; Ming, Qi; Yang, Huanming; Min, Junxia; Willcox, D Craig; Willcox, Bradley J; Gu, Jun; Hauser, Elizabeth; Tian, Xiao-Li; Vaupel, James W

    2016-06-01

    On the basis of the genotypic/phenotypic data from Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) and Cox proportional hazard model, the present study demonstrates that interactions between carrying FOXO1A-209 genotypes and tea drinking are significantly associated with lower risk of mortality at advanced ages. Such a significant association is replicated in two independent Han Chinese CLHLS cohorts (p = 0.028-0.048 in the discovery and replication cohorts, and p = 0.003-0.016 in the combined dataset). We found the associations between tea drinking and reduced mortality are much stronger among carriers of the FOXO1A-209 genotype compared to non-carriers, and drinking tea is associated with a reversal of the negative effects of carrying FOXO1A-209 minor alleles, that is, from a substantially increased mortality risk to substantially reduced mortality risk at advanced ages. The impacts are considerably stronger among those who carry two copies of the FOXO1A minor allele than those who carry one copy. On the basis of previously reported experiments on human cell models concerning FOXO1A-by-tea-compounds interactions, we speculate that results in the present study indicate that tea drinking may inhibit FOXO1A-209 gene expression and its biological functions, which reduces the negative impacts of FOXO1A-209 gene on longevity (as reported in the literature) and offers protection against mortality risk at oldest-old ages. Our empirical findings imply that the health outcomes of particular nutritional interventions, including tea drinking, may, in part, depend upon individual genetic profiles, and the research on the effects of nutrigenomics interactions could potentially be useful for rejuvenation therapies in the clinic or associated healthy aging intervention programs.

  13. Genetic dissection reveals that Akt is the critical kinase downstream of LRRK2 to phosphorylate and inhibit FOXO1, and promotes neuron survival.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chia-Lung; Lu, Yu-Ning; Wang, Hung-Cheng; Chang, Hui-Yun

    2014-11-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a complex kinase and mutations in LRRK2 are perhaps the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the identification of the normal physiological function of LRRK2 remains elusive. Here, we show that LRRK2 protects neurons against apoptosis induced by the Drosophila genes grim, hid and reaper. Genetic dissection reveals that Akt is the critical downstream kinase of LRRK2 that phosphorylates and inhibits FOXO1, and thereby promotes survival. Like human LRRK2, Drosophila lrrk also promotes neuron survival; lrrk loss-of-function mutant displays reduced cell numbers, which can be rescued by LRRK2 expression. Importantly, LRRK2 G2019S and LRRK2 R1441C mutants impair the ability of LRRK2 to activate Akt, and fail to prevent apoptotic death. Ectopic expression of a constitutive active form of Akt hence is sufficient to rescue this functional deficit. These data establish that LRRK2 can protect neurons from apoptotic insult through a survival pathway in which LRRK2 signals to activate Akt, and then inhibits FOXO1. These results might indicate that a LRRK-Akt therapeutic pathway to promote neuron survival and to prevent neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Lithium normalizes amphetamine-induced changes in striatal FoxO1 phosphorylation and behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenhua; Zeng, Zhiwen; Bhardwaj, Sanjeev K; Jamali, Sara; Srivastava, Lalit K

    2013-07-10

    Administration of the psychostimulant drug amphetamine (AMPH) to animals causes hyperactivity and deficit in prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle, behaviors that are often observed in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Enhanced central dopamine (DA) transmission is believed to mediate AMPH-induced behavioral alterations. Lithium, a drug used primarily in the treatment of bipolar disorder, is reported to interact with the DA system and antagonize some DA-related behaviors. Here, we provide evidence that AMPH and lithium reciprocally regulate the activity of the transcription factor forkhead box, class O1 (FoxO1), a downstream target of Akt. Administration of d-AMPH (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) to Sprague-Dawley rats resulted in a concomitant decrease in levels of phosphorylated (p) Akt as well as p-FoxO1 in the striatum, whereas lithium chloride (LiCl,100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) exerted the opposite effect, that is, it increased levels of p-Akt and p-FoxO1. Pretreatment of animals with lithium prevented an AMPH-induced decrease in striatal p-Akt and p-FoxO1 levels. Pretreatment of animals with lithium also attenuated AMPH-induced locomotor activity and decreased prepulse inhibition. These in-vivo data suggest that the Akt-FoxO1 pathway may be a common target for the action of dopaminergic and antidopaminergic drugs, and its modulation may be relevant to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  15. Both FOXO3a and FOXO1 are involved in the HGF-protective pathway against apoptosis in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Qu, Huan; Cao, Heng-Chang; Li, Mei-Hong; Chen, Chen; Chen, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Bo; Yu, Lin; Zheng, Le-Min; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was identified as an endogenous tissue protective agent against apoptosis in many cell types. The mechanism by which HGF protects primary endothelial cells (ECs) has not yet been completely elucidated. FOXO1 and FOXO3a, two members of the FOXO family, are the most abundant FOXO isoforms in mature endothelial cells. In this study, we aimed to explore whether FOXO1 and FOXO3a play similar roles in HGF-mediated protection against apoptosis in mature endothelial cells. Our result showed that HGF prevented ECs from oxidative-stress induced apoptosis in part by inducing the phosphorylation of FOXO proteins. FOXO1 and FOXO3a are equally important in this process by regulating the expression of Bim, PUMA, FasL, and TRAIL. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  16. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  17. Adiponectin regulates bone mass accrual through two opposite mechanisms, one local and one central, that both rely on FoxO1

    PubMed Central

    Kajimura, Daisuke; Lee, Ha Won; Riley, Kyle J.; Arteaga-Solis, Emilio; Ferron, Mathieu; Zhou, Bin; Clarke, Christopher J.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; DePinho, Ronald A; Guo, Edward X.; Mann, J. John; Karsenty, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of adiponectin, an adipokine with ill-defined functions in animals fed a normal diet, is enhanced by the osteoblast-derived hormone osteocalcin. Here we show that adiponectin signals back in osteoblasts to hamper their proliferation and favor their apoptosis, altogether decreasing bone mass and circulating osteocalcin levels. Adiponectin fulfills these functions, independently of its known receptors and signaling pathways, by decreasing FoxO1 activity in a PI3 kinase-dependent manner. Overtime however, these local effects are masked because adiponectin signals in neurons of the locus coeruleus, also through FoxO1, to decrease the sympathetic tone thereby increasing bone mass, and decreasing energy expenditure. This study reveals that adiponectin has the unusual ability to regulate the same function in two opposite manners depending on where it acts and that it opposes, partially, leptin’s influence on the sympathetic nervous system. It also proposes that adiponectin regulation of bone mass occurs through a PI3 kinase-FoxO1 pathway. PMID:23684624

  18. Fucosterol, isolated from Ecklonia stolonifera, inhibits adipogenesis through modulation of FoxO1 pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jung, Hyun Ah; Kang, Min Jae; Choi, Jae Sue; Kim, Gun-Do

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fucosterol on adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and its underlying mechanisms. Fucosterol, isolated from brown algae, Ecklonia stolonifera. We investigated the levels of lipid accumulation using Oil Red O staining. We conducted Western blot analysis to investigate regulatory effects of fucosterol on expression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), forkhead box protein O 1 (FoxO1) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Fucosterol significantly reduced intracellular lipid accumulation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes at concentrations of 25 and 50 μm. Fucosterol downregulated insulin-triggered PI3K/Akt, and ERK pathways. It subsequently decreased expression of adipogenic transcription factors, including PPARγ, C/EBPα and SREBP-1. In addition, fucosterol enhanced SirT1 expression while decreased phospho-FoxO1 expression which resulted in the activation of FoxO1. We revealed that fucosterol inhibited adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes through modulation of FoxO signalling pathway. Therefore, our results suggest that fucosterol may be used for novel agents for the treatment of obesity. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  19. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  20. Gene expression profiles in Parkinson disease prefrontal cortex implicate FOXO1 and genes under its transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Dumitriu, Alexandra; Latourelle, Jeanne C; Hadzi, Tiffany C; Pankratz, Nathan; Garza, Dan; Miller, John P; Vance, Jeffery M; Foroud, Tatiana; Beach, Thomas G; Myers, Richard H

    2012-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with largely unknown genetic mechanisms. While the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in PD mainly takes place in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN) region, other brain areas, including the prefrontal cortex, develop Lewy bodies, the neuropathological hallmark of PD. We generated and analyzed expression data from the prefrontal cortex Brodmann Area 9 (BA9) of 27 PD and 26 control samples using the 44K One-Color Agilent 60-mer Whole Human Genome Microarray. All samples were male, without significant Alzheimer disease pathology and with extensive pathological annotation available. 507 of the 39,122 analyzed expression probes were different between PD and control samples at false discovery rate (FDR) of 5%. One of the genes with significantly increased expression in PD was the forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) transcription factor. Notably, genes carrying the FoxO1 binding site were significantly enriched in the FDR-significant group of genes (177 genes covered by 189 probes), suggesting a role for FoxO1 upstream of the observed expression changes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from a recent meta-analysis of PD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were successfully genotyped in 50 out of the 53 microarray brains, allowing a targeted expression-SNP (eSNP) analysis for 52 SNPs associated with PD affection at genome-wide significance and the 189 probes from FoxO1 regulated genes. A significant association was observed between a SNP in the cyclin G associated kinase (GAK) gene and a probe in the spermine oxidase (SMOX) gene. Further examination of the FOXO1 region in a meta-analysis of six available GWAS showed two SNPs significantly associated with age at onset of PD. These results implicate FOXO1 as a PD-relevant gene and warrant further functional analyses of its transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  1. The transcription factor Foxo1 controls germinal center B cell proliferation in response to T cell help.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takeshi; Shinnakasu, Ryo; Ise, Wataru; Kawai, Chie; Egawa, Takeshi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2017-04-03

    Germinal center (GC) B cells cycle between two states, the light zone (LZ) and the dark zone (DZ), and in the latter they proliferate and hypermutate their immunoglobulin genes. How this functional transition takes place is still controversial. In this study, we demonstrate that ablation of Foxo1 after GC development led to the loss of the DZ GC B cells and disruption of the GC architecture, which is consistent with recent studies. Mechanistically, even upon provision of adequate T cell help, Foxo1-deficient GC B cells showed less proliferative expansion than controls. Moreover, we found that the transcription factor BATF was transiently induced in LZ GC B cells in a Foxo1-dependent manner and that deletion of BATF similarly led to GC disruption. Thus, our results are consistent with a model where the switch from the LZ to the DZ is triggered after receipt of T cell help, and suggest that Foxo1-mediated BATF up-regulation is at least partly involved in this switch.

  2. The transcription factor Foxo1 controls germinal center B cell proliferation in response to T cell help

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takeshi; Shinnakasu, Ryo; Ise, Wataru; Kawai, Chie

    2017-01-01

    Germinal center (GC) B cells cycle between two states, the light zone (LZ) and the dark zone (DZ), and in the latter they proliferate and hypermutate their immunoglobulin genes. How this functional transition takes place is still controversial. In this study, we demonstrate that ablation of Foxo1 after GC development led to the loss of the DZ GC B cells and disruption of the GC architecture, which is consistent with recent studies. Mechanistically, even upon provision of adequate T cell help, Foxo1-deficient GC B cells showed less proliferative expansion than controls. Moreover, we found that the transcription factor BATF was transiently induced in LZ GC B cells in a Foxo1-dependent manner and that deletion of BATF similarly led to GC disruption. Thus, our results are consistent with a model where the switch from the LZ to the DZ is triggered after receipt of T cell help, and suggest that Foxo1-mediated BATF up-regulation is at least partly involved in this switch. PMID:28351982

  3. FOXO1 promotes wound healing through the up-regulation of TGF-β1 and prevention of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Xu, Fanxing; Zhang, Chenying; Tian, Chen; Pacios, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Keratinocyte mobilization is a critical aspect of wound re-epithelialization, but the mechanisms that control its precise regulation remain poorly understood. We set out to test the hypothesis that forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) has a negative effect on healing because of its capacity to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis. Contrary to expectations, FOXO1 is required for keratinocyte transition to a wound-healing phenotype that involves increased migration and up-regulation of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and its downstream targets, integrin-α3 and -β6 and MMP-3 and -9. Furthermore, we show that FOXO1 functions in keratinocytes to reduce oxidative stress, which is necessary to maintain cell migration and prevent cell death in a TGF-β1–independent manner. Thus, our studies identify a novel function for FOXO1 in coordinating the response of keratinocytes to wounding through up-regulation of TGF-β1 and other factors needed for keratinocyte migration and protection against oxidative stress, which together promote migration and decrease apoptosis. PMID:24145170

  4. Concurrent acetylation of FoxO1/3a and p53 due to sirtuins inhibition elicit Bim/PUMA mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in berberine-treated HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shatrunajay; Sharma, Ankita; Pandey, Vivek Kumar; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Kakkar, Poonam

    2016-01-15

    Post-translational modifications i.e. phosphorylation and acetylation are pivotal requirements for proper functioning of eukaryotic proteins. The current study aimed to decode the impact of acetylation/deacetylation of non-histone targets i.e. FoxO1/3a and p53 of sirtuins (NAD(+) dependent enzymes with lysine deacetylase activity) in berberine treated human hepatoma cells. Berberine (100 μM) inhibited sirtuins significantly (P<0.05) at transcriptional level as well as at translational level. Combination of nicotinamide (sirtuin inhibitor) with berberine potentiated sirtuins inhibition and increased the expression of FoxO1/3a and phosphorylation of p53 tumor suppressor protein. As sirtuins deacetylate non-histone targets including FoxO1/3a and p53, berberine increased the acetylation load of FoxO1/3a and p53 proteins. Acetylated FoxO and p53 proteins transcriptionally activate BH3-only proteins Bim and PUMA (3.89 and 3.87 fold respectively, P<0.001), which are known as direct activator of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein Bax that culminated into mitochondria mediated activation of apoptotic cascade. Bim/PUMA knock-down showed no changes in sirtuins' expression while cytotoxicity induced by berberine and nicotinamide was curtailed up to 28.3% (P<0.001) and it restored pro/anti apoptotic protein ratio in HepG2 cells. Sirtuins inhibition was accompanied by decline in NAD(+)/NADH ratio, ATP generation, enhanced ROS production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. TEM analysis confirmed mitochondrial deterioration and cell damage. SRT-1720 (1-10 μM), a SIRT-1 activator, when pre-treated with berberine (25 μM), reversed sirtuins expression comparable to control and significantly restored the cell viability (P<0.05). Thus, our findings suggest that berberine mediated sirtuins inhibition resulting into FoxO1/3a and p53 acetylation followed by BH3-only protein Bim/PUMA activation may in part be responsible for mitochondria-mediated apoptosis.

  5. The FOXO1 Gene-Obesity Interaction Increases the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Here, we aimed to study the effect of the forkhead box O1-insulin receptor substrate 2 (FOXO1-IRS2) gene interaction and the FOXO1 and IRS2 genes-environment interaction for the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a Chinese Han population. We genotyped 7 polymorphism sites of FOXO1 gene and IRS2 gene in 780 unrelated Chinese Han people (474 cases of T2DM, 306 cases of healthy control). The risk of T2DM in individuals with AA genotype for rs7986407 and CC genotype for rs4581585 in FOXO1 gene was 2.092 and 2.57 times higher than that with GG genotype (odds ratio [OR] = 2.092; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.178–3.731; P = 0.011) and TT genotype (OR = 2.571; 95% CI = 1.404–4.695; P = 0.002), respectively. The risk of T2DM in individuals with GG genotype for Gly1057Asp in IRS2 gene was 1.42 times higher than that with AA genotype (OR = 1.422; 95% CI = 1.037–1.949; P = 0.029). The other 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had no significant association with T2DM (P > 0.05). Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis showed that the interaction between SNPs rs7986407 and rs4325426 in FOXO1 gene and waist was the best model confirmed by interaction analysis, closely associating with T2DM. There was an increased risk for T2DM in the case of non-obesity with genotype combined AA/CC, AA/AC or AG/AA for rs7986407 and rs4325426, and obesity with genotype AA for rs7986407 or AA for rs4325426 (OR = 3.976; 95% CI = 1.156–13.675; P value from sign test [Psign] = 0.025; P value from permutation test [Pperm] = 0.000–0.001). Together, this study indicates an association of FOXO1 and IRS2 gene polymorphisms with T2DM in Chinese Han population, supporting FOXO1-obesity interaction as a key factor for the risk of T2DM. PMID:28049237

  6. The FOXO1 Gene-Obesity Interaction Increases the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lilin; Li, Rong; Ren, Wei; Wang, Zengchan; Wang, Zhihong; Yang, Maosheng; Zhang, Suhua

    2017-02-01

    Here, we aimed to study the effect of the forkhead box O1-insulin receptor substrate 2 (FOXO1-IRS2) gene interaction and the FOXO1 and IRS2 genes-environment interaction for the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a Chinese Han population. We genotyped 7 polymorphism sites of FOXO1 gene and IRS2 gene in 780 unrelated Chinese Han people (474 cases of T2DM, 306 cases of healthy control). The risk of T2DM in individuals with AA genotype for rs7986407 and CC genotype for rs4581585 in FOXO1 gene was 2.092 and 2.57 times higher than that with GG genotype (odds ratio [OR] = 2.092; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.178-3.731; P = 0.011) and TT genotype (OR = 2.571; 95% CI = 1.404-4.695; P = 0.002), respectively. The risk of T2DM in individuals with GG genotype for Gly1057Asp in IRS2 gene was 1.42 times higher than that with AA genotype (OR = 1.422; 95% CI = 1.037-1.949; P = 0.029). The other 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had no significant association with T2DM (P > 0.05). Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis showed that the interaction between SNPs rs7986407 and rs4325426 in FOXO1 gene and waist was the best model confirmed by interaction analysis, closely associating with T2DM. There was an increased risk for T2DM in the case of non-obesity with genotype combined AA/CC, AA/AC or AG/AA for rs7986407 and rs4325426, and obesity with genotype AA for rs7986407 or AA for rs4325426 (OR = 3.976; 95% CI = 1.156-13.675; P value from sign test [P(sign)] = 0.025; P value from permutation test [P(perm)] = 0.000-0.001). Together, this study indicates an association of FOXO1 and IRS2 gene polymorphisms with T2DM in Chinese Han population, supporting FOXO1-obesity interaction as a key factor for the risk of T2DM.

  7. Assessing FOXO1A as a potential susceptibility locus for type 2 diabetes and obesity in American Indians.

    PubMed

    Muller, Yunhua L; Hanson, Robert L; Wiessner, Gregory; Nieboer, Lori; Kobes, Sayuko; Piaggi, Paolo; Abdussamad, Mahdi; Okani, Chidinma; Knowler, William C; Bogardus, Clifton; Baier, Leslie J

    2015-10-01

    A prior genome-wide association study (GWAS) in Pima Indians identified variation within FOXO1A that modestly associated with early-onset (onset age < 25 years) type 2 diabetes (T2D). FOXO1A encodes the forkhead transcription factor involved in pancreatic β-cell growth and hypothalamic energy balance; therefore, FOXO1A was analyzed as a candidate gene for T2D and obesity in a population-based sample of 7,710 American Indians. Tag SNPs in/near FOXO1A (minor allele frequency ≥ 0.05) were analyzed for association with T2D at early onset (n = 1,060) and all ages (n = 7,710) and with insulin secretion (n = 298). SNPs were also analyzed for association with maximum body mass index (BMI) in adulthood (n = 5,918), maximum BMI z-score in childhood (n = 5,350), and % body fat (n = 555). An intronic SNP rs2297627 associated with early-onset T2D [OR = 1.34 (1.13-1.58), P = 8.7 × 10(-4)] and T2D onset at any age [OR = 1.19 (1.09-1.30), P = 1 × 10(-4) ]. The T2D risk allele also associated with lower acute insulin secretion (β = 0.88, as a multiplier, P = 0.02). Another intronic SNP (rs1334241, D' = 0.99, r(2) = 0.49 with rs2297627) associated with maximum adulthood BMI (β = 1.02, as a multiplier, P = 3 × 10(-5)), maximum childhood BMI z-score (β = 0.08, P = 3 × 10(-4)), and % body fat (β = 0.83%, P = 0.04). Common variation in FOXO1A may modestly affect risk for T2D and obesity in American Indians. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  8. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  9. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  10. Cancer-associated fibroblasts mediated chemoresistance by a FOXO1/TGFβ1 signaling loop in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongfang; Xie, Conghua; Yue, Jing; Jiang, Zhenzhen; Zhou, Rongjing; Xie, Ruifei; Wang, Yan; Wu, Shixiu

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies on the mechanisms underlying ESCC (esophageal squamous cell carcinoma) chemoresistance only focused on tumor cells while tumor microenvironment has been completely ignored. Our study aimed to clarify the effect of CAFs (cancer-associated fibroblasts), one major component of tumor microenvironment, on the chemoresistance of ESCC. By primary culture, two pairs of CAFs and matched NFs (normal fibroblasts) were isolated from tumor tissues of ESCC patients and matched normal esophageal epithelial tissues, respectively. The association of CAFs and chemoresistance was assessed in esophageal carcinoma cells, in xenograft tumor models and in clinical specimens of ESCC patients. We found CAFs conferred ESCC cells significant resistance to several common chemotherapeutic drugs including cisplatin, taxol, irinotecan (CPT-11), 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), carboplatin, docetaxel, pharmorubicin, and vincristine. Mechanism studies revealed that blockage of CAFs-secreted TGFβ1 signaling by its receptor TGFβR1 inhibitor LY2157299 significantly reversed the chemoresistance in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the crosstalk of CAFs and ESCC cells enhanced the expression and activation of FOXO1, a member of the forkhead transcription factors in the O-box sub-family, inducing TGFβ1 expression in an autocrine/paracrine signaling loop. In 130 ESCC patients, the expression of TGFβ1 in CAFs was significantly associated with overall survival of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Together, our study highlighted TGFβ1 expressed in CAFs as an attractive target to reverse tumor chemoresistance, and can be used as an independent prognostic factor of ESCC patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Active suppression after involuntary capture of attention.

    PubMed

    Sawaki, Risa; Luck, Steven J

    2013-04-01

    After attention has been involuntarily captured by a distractor, how is it reoriented toward a target? One possibility is that attention to the distractor passively fades over time, allowing the target to become attended. Another possibility is that the captured location is actively suppressed so that attention can be directed toward the target location. The present study investigated this issue with event-related potentials (ERPs), focusing on the N2pc component (a neural measure of attentional deployment) and the Pd component (a neural measure of attentional suppression). Observers identified a color-defined target in a search array, which was preceded by a task-irrelevant cue array. When the cue array contained an item that matched the target color, this item captured attention (as measured both behaviorally and with the N2pc component). This capture of attention was followed by active suppression (indexed by the Pd component), and this was then followed by a reorienting of attention toward the target in the search array (indexed by the N2pc component). These findings indicate that the involuntary capture of attention by a distractor is followed by an active suppression process that presumably facilitates the subsequent voluntary orienting of attention to the target.

  12. The obesity susceptibility gene Cpe links FoxO1 signaling in hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin neurons with regulation of food intake.

    PubMed

    Plum, Leona; Lin, Hua V; Dutia, Roxanne; Tanaka, Jun; Aizawa, Kumiko S; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Kim, Andrea J; Cawley, Niamh X; Paik, Ji-Hye; Loh, Y Peng; DePinho, Ronald A; Wardlaw, Sharon L; Accili, Domenico

    2009-10-01

    Reduced food intake brings about an adaptive decrease in energy expenditure that contributes to the recidivism of obesity after weight loss. Insulin and leptin inhibit food intake through actions in the central nervous system that are partly mediated by the transcription factor FoxO1. We show that FoxO1 ablation in pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc)-expressing neurons in mice (here called Pomc-Foxo1(-/-) mice) increases Carboxypeptidase E (Cpe) expression, resulting in selective increases of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-Msh) and carboxy-cleaved beta-endorphin, the products of Cpe-dependent processing of Pomc. This neuropeptide profile is associated with decreased food intake and normal energy expenditure in Pomc-Foxo1(-/-) mice. We show that Cpe expression is downregulated by diet-induced obesity and that FoxO1 deletion offsets the decrease, protecting against weight gain. Moreover, moderate Cpe overexpression in the arcuate nucleus phenocopies features of the FoxO1 mutation. The dissociation of food intake from energy expenditure in Pomc-Foxo1(-/-) mice represents a model for therapeutic intervention in obesity and raises the possibility of targeting Cpe to develop weight loss medications.

  13. Mevastatin ameliorates sphingosine 1‐phosphate‐induced COX‐2/PGE2‐dependent cell migration via FoxO1 and CREB phosphorylation and translocation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih‐Kai; Lin, Chih‐Chung; Hsiao, Li‐Der

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sphingosine 1‐phosphate (S1P), an important inflammatory mediator, has been shown to regulate COX‐2 production and promote various cellular responses such as cell migration. Mevastatin, an inhibitor of 3‐hydroxy‐3‐methylglutaryl‐CoA reductase (HMG‐CoA), effectively inhibits inflammatory responses. However, the mechanisms underlying S1P‐evoked COX‐2‐dependent cell migration, which is modulated by mevastatin in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) remain unclear. Experimental Approach The expression of COX‐2 was determined by Western blotting, real time‐PCR and promoter analyses. The signalling molecules were investigated by pretreatment with respective pharmacological inhibitors or transfection with siRNAs. The interaction between COX‐2 promoter and transcription factors was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Finally, the effect of mevastatin on HTSMC migration and leukocyte counts in BAL fluid and COX‐2 expression induced by S1P was determined by a cell migration assay, cell counting and Western blot. Key Results S1P stimulated mTOR activation through the Nox2/ROS and PI3K/Akt pathways, which can further stimulate FoxO1 phosphorylation and translocation to the cytosol. We also found that S1P induced CREB activation and translocation via an mTOR‐independent signalling pathway. Finally, we showed that pretreatment with mevastatin markedly reduced S1P‐induced cell migration and COX‐2/PGE2 production via a PPARγ‐dependent signalling pathway. Conclusions and Implications Mevastatin attenuates the S1P‐induced increased expression of COX‐2 and cell migration via the regulation of FoxO1 and CREB phosphorylation and translocation by PPARγ in HTSMCs. Mevastatin could be beneficial for prevention of airway inflammation in the future. PMID:26359950

  14. Akt-mediated FoxO1 inhibition is required for liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pauta, Montse; Rotllan, Noemi; Fernández-Hernando, Ana; Langhi, Cedric; Ribera, Jordi; Lu, Mingjian; Boix, Loreto; Bruix, Jordi; Jimenez, Wladimiro; Suárez, Yajaira; Ford, David A.; Baldán, Angel; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the hepatic regenerative process has clinical interest, since the effectiveness of many treatments for chronic liver diseases is conditioned by an efficient liver regeneration. Experimental evidence points to the need of a temporal coordination between cytokines, growth factors and metabolic signaling pathways to enable successful liver regeneration. One intracellular mediator that acts as a signal integration node for these processes is the serine-threonine kinase Akt/PKB (Akt). To investigate the contribution of Akt during hepatic regeneration, we performed partial hepatectomy in mice lacking Akt1, Akt2 or both isoforms. We found that absence of Akt1 or Akt2 does not influence liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. However, hepatic-specific Akt1 and Akt2 null mice show impaired liver regeneration and increase mortality. The major abnormal cellular events observed in total Akt deficient livers were a marked reduction in cell proliferation, cell hypertrophy, glycogenesis and lipid droplets formation. Most importantly, liver-specific deletion of FoxO1, a transcription factor regulated by Akt, rescued the hepatic regenerative capability in Akt1 and Akt2 deficient mice and normalized the cellular events associated with liver regeneration. These results establish an essential role for the Akt-FoxO1 signaling pathway during liver regeneration that has not been previously described. PMID:26473496

  15. Akt-mediated foxo1 inhibition is required for liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pauta, Montse; Rotllan, Noemi; Fernández-Hernando, Ana; Langhi, Cedric; Ribera, Jordi; Lu, Mingjian; Boix, Loreto; Bruix, Jordi; Jimenez, Wladimiro; Suárez, Yajaira; Ford, David A; Baldán, Angel; Birnbaum, Morris J; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the hepatic regenerative process has clinical interest as the effectiveness of many treatments for chronic liver diseases is conditioned by efficient liver regeneration. Experimental evidence points to the need for a temporal coordination between cytokines, growth factors, and metabolic signaling pathways to enable successful liver regeneration. One intracellular mediator that acts as a signal integration node for these processes is the serine-threonine kinase Akt/protein kinase B (Akt). To investigate the contribution of Akt during hepatic regeneration, we performed partial hepatectomy in mice lacking Akt1, Akt2, or both isoforms. We found that absence of Akt1 or Akt2 does not influence liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. However, hepatic-specific Akt1 and Akt2 null mice show impaired liver regeneration and increased mortality. The major abnormal cellular events observed in total Akt-deficient livers were a marked reduction in cell proliferation, cell hypertrophy, glycogenesis, and lipid droplet formation. Most importantly, liver-specific deletion of FoxO1, a transcription factor regulated by Akt, rescued the hepatic regenerative capability in Akt1-deficient and Akt2-deficient mice and normalized the cellular events associated with liver regeneration. The Akt-FoxO1 signaling pathway plays an essential role during liver regeneration. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  16. Downregulation of FOXO1 mRNA levels predicts treatment failure in patients with endometrial pathology conservatively managed with progestin-containing intrauterine devices.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Henry D; Carlson, Matthew J; Devor, Eric J; Zhang, Yuping; Thiel, Kristina W; Samuelson, Megan I; McDonald, Megan; Yang, Shujie; Stephan, Jean-Marie; Savage, Erica C; Dai, Donghai; Goodheart, Michael J; Leslie, Kimberly K

    2016-01-01

    To examine hormone receptor expression levels and downstream gene activation in pre-treatment and post-treatment biopsies in a cohort of patients with endometrial pathology who were being conservatively managed with a progestin-containing intrauterine device (IUD). A molecular signature of treatment failure is proposed. A retrospective analysis of pre- and post-treatment biopsy specimens from 10 women treated with progestin-containing IUD for complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH) or grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma was performed. Expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and PR target genes was examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and quantitative RT-PCR. The mean treatment duration was 14.3 months. Four CAH patients had stable disease or regressed after treatment, and four progressed to endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Both patients with an initial diagnosis of endometrioid adenocarcinoma regressed to CAH or no disease. In general, hormone receptor levels diminished post-treatment compared to pre-treatment biopsies; however, we noted unexpected higher expression of the B isoform of PR (PRB) as well as ER in those patients who progressed to frank cancer. There was a trend towards a non-nuclear cytoplasmic location of PRB in these patients. Importantly, the differentiating impact of PR signaling, as determined by the expression of the progestin-controlled tumor suppressor FOXO1, was lost in individuals who progressed on therapy. FOXO1 mRNA levels may serve as a biomarker for response to therapy and an indicator of PR function in patients being conservatively managed with a progestin-containing IUD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate suppresses adipocyte differentiation through the MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyojung; Sakamoto, Kazuichi

    2012-02-01

    EGCG [(-)-epigallocatechin gallate], tea catechin, is one of the compounds that has been reported to act against obesity and diabetes. To determine the effect of EGCG on adipocyte differentiation, we treated 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with different catechins. Oil Red O staining showed significantly reduced intracellular lipid accumulation, especially with EGCG. Cell cycle analysis showed that EGCG inhibited cell proliferation by disturbing the cell cycle during the clonal expansion of 3T3-L1. RT-PCR (real-time PCR) demonstrated that EGCG noticeably reduced mRNA expression of PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ), C/EBPα (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α) and FoxO1 (forkhead box class O1). EGCG also caused a significant decrease in the transcription of FoxO1 - the forkhead transcription factor class O1 involved in adipocyte differentiation - via the PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt and MEK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) kinase] pathways. These results suggest that EGCG suppresses the clonal expansion of adipocytes by inactivating FoxO1 via insulin signalling and stress-dependent MAPK pathways.

  18. Active flutter suppression using dipole filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.; Waszak, Martin R.

    1992-01-01

    By using traditional control concepts of gain root locus, the active suppression of a flutter mode of a flexible wing is examined. It is shown that the attraction of the unstable mode towards a critical system zero determines the degree to which the flutter mode can be stabilized. For control situations where the critical zero is adversely placed in the complex plane, a novel compensation scheme called a 'Dipole' filter is proposed. This filter ensures that the flutter mode is stabilized with acceptable control energy. The control strategy is illustrated by designing flutter suppression laws for an active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model, where minimal control effort solutions are mandated by control rate saturation problems caused by wind-tunnel turbulence.

  19. PAX-FOXO1 fusion status drives unfavorable outcome for children with rhabdomyosarcoma: a children's oncology group report.

    PubMed

    Skapek, Stephen X; Anderson, James; Barr, Frederic G; Bridge, Julia A; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Parham, David M; Rudzinski, Erin R; Triche, Timothy; Hawkins, Douglas S

    2013-09-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is divided into two major histological subtypes: alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS), with most ARMS expressing one of two oncogenic genes fusing PAX3 or PAX7 with FOXO1 (P3F and P7F, respectively). The Children's Oncology Group (COG) carried out a multi-institutional clinical trial to evaluate the prognostic value of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status. Study participants were treated on COG protocol D9803 for intermediate risk ARMS or ERMS using multi-agent chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Central diagnostic pathology review and molecular testing for fusion genes were carried out on prospectively collected specimens. Event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years were correlated with histological subtype and PAX-FOXO1 status. Of 616 eligible D9803 enrollees, 434 cases had adequate clinical, molecular, and pathology data for definitive classification as ERMS, ARMS P3F+ or P7F+, or ARMSn (without detectable fusion). EFS was worse for those with ARMS P3F+ (54%) and P7F+ (65%) than those with ERMS (77%; P < 0.001). EFS for ARMSn and ERMS were not statistically different (90% vs. 77%, P = 0.15). ARMS P3F+ had poorer OS (64%) than ARMS P7F+ (87%), ARMSn (89%), and ERMS (82%; P = 0.006). ARMSn has an outcome similar to ERMS and superior EFS compared to ARMS with either P3F or P7F, when given therapy designed for children with intermediate risk RMS. This prospective analysis supports incorporation of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status into risk stratification and treatment allocation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A global network of transcription factors, involving E2A, EBF1 and Foxo1, that orchestrates the B cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yin C; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Benner, Christopher; Heinz, Sven; Welinder, Eva; Mansson, Robert; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Hagman, James; Espinoza, Celso A; Dutkowski, Janusz; Ideker, Trey; Glass, Christopher K; Murre, Cornelis

    2010-01-01

    It is now established that the transcription factors E2A, EBF1 and Foxo1 play critical roles in B cell development. Here we show that E2A and EBF1 bound regulatory elements present in the Foxo1 locus. E2A and EBF1 as well as E2A and Foxo1, in turn, were wired together by a vast spectrum of cis-regulatory codes. These associations were dynamic during developmental progression. Occupancy by the E2A isoform, E47, directly elevated the abundance as well as the pattern of histone H3K4 monomethylation across putative enhancer regions. Finally, the pro-B cell epigenome was divided into clusters of loci that show E2A, EBF and Foxo1 occupancy. From this analysis a global network consisting of transcriptional regulators, signaling and survival factors, was constructed that we propose orchestrates the B cell fate. PMID:20543837

  1. NF-κB and AKT signaling prevent DNA damage in transformed pre-B cells by suppressing RAG1/2 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Ochodnicka-Mackovicova, Katarina; Bahjat, Mahnoush; Bloedjes, Timon A; Maas, Chiel; de Bruin, Alexander M; Bende, Richard J; van Noesel, Carel J M; Guikema, Jeroen E J

    2015-09-10

    In developing lymphocytes, expression and activity of the recombination activation gene protein 1 (RAG1) and RAG2 endonuclease complex is tightly regulated to ensure ordered recombination of the immunoglobulin genes and to avoid genomic instability. Aberrant RAG activity has been implicated in the generation of secondary genetic events in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs), illustrating the oncogenic potential of the RAG complex. Several layers of regulation prevent collateral genomic DNA damage by restricting RAG activity to the G1 phase of the cell cycle. In this study, we show a novel pathway that suppresses RAG expression in cycling-transformed mouse pre-B cells and human pre-B B-ALL cells that involves the negative regulation of FOXO1 by nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). Inhibition of NF-κB in cycling pre-B cells resulted in upregulation of RAG expression and recombination activity, which provoked RAG-dependent DNA damage. In agreement, we observe a negative correlation between NF-κB activity and the expression of RAG1, RAG2, and TdT in B-ALL patients. Our data suggest that targeting NF-κB in B-ALL increases the risk of RAG-dependent genomic instability.

  2. Modeling of the Human Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma Pax3-Foxo1 Chromosome Translocation in Mouse Myoblasts Using CRISPR-Cas9 Nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Lagutina, Irina V.; Valentine, Virginia; Picchione, Fabrizio; Harwood, Frank; Valentine, Marcus B.; Villarejo-Balcells, Barbara; Carvajal, Jaime J.; Grosveld, Gerard C.

    2015-01-01

    Many recurrent chromosome translocations in cancer result in the generation of fusion genes that are directly implicated in the tumorigenic process. Precise modeling of the effects of cancer fusion genes in mice has been inaccurate, as constructs of fusion genes often completely or partially lack the correct regulatory sequences. The reciprocal t(2;13)(q36.1;q14.1) in human alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (A-RMS) creates a pathognomonic PAX3-FOXO1 fusion gene. In vivo mimicking of this translocation in mice is complicated by the fact that Pax3 and Foxo1 are in opposite orientation on their respective chromosomes, precluding formation of a functional Pax3-Foxo1 fusion via a simple translocation. To circumvent this problem, we irreversibly inverted the orientation of a 4.9 Mb syntenic fragment on chromosome 3, encompassing Foxo1, by using Cre-mediated recombination of two pairs of unrelated oppositely oriented LoxP sites situated at the borders of the syntenic region. We tested if spatial proximity of the Pax3 and Foxo1 loci in myoblasts of mice homozygous for the inversion facilitated Pax3-Foxo1 fusion gene formation upon induction of targeted CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease-induced DNA double strand breaks in Pax3 and Foxo1. Fluorescent in situ hybridization indicated that fore limb myoblasts show a higher frequency of Pax3/Foxo1 co-localization than hind limb myoblasts. Indeed, more fusion genes were generated in fore limb myoblasts via a reciprocal t(1;3), which expressed correctly spliced Pax3-Foxo1 mRNA encoding Pax3-Foxo1 fusion protein. We conclude that locus proximity facilitates chromosome translocation upon induction of DNA double strand breaks. Given that the Pax3-Foxo1 fusion gene will contain all the regulatory sequences necessary for precise regulation of its expression, we propose that CRISPR-Cas9 provides a novel means to faithfully model human diseases caused by chromosome translocation in mice. PMID:25659124

  3. Foxo1 is a downstream effector of Isl1 in direct pathway striatal projection neuron development within the embryonic mouse telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Waclaw, R R; Ehrman, L A; Merchan-Sala, P; Kohli, V; Nardini, D; Campbell, K

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Isl1 is required for the survival and differentiation of direct pathway striatonigral neurons during embryonic development. The downstream effectors of Isl1 in these processes are presently unknown. We show here that Foxo1, a transcription factor that has been implicated in cell survival, is expressed in striatal projection neurons (SPNs) that derive from the Isl1 lineage (i.e. direct pathway SPNs). Moreover, Isl1 conditional knockouts (cKOs) show a severe loss of Foxo1 expression at E15.5 with a modest recovery by E18.5. Although Foxo1 is enriched in the direct pathway SPNs at embryonic stages, it is expressed in both direct and indirect pathway SPNs at postnatal time points as evidenced by co-localization with EGFP in both Drd1-EGFP and Drd2-EGFP BAC transgenic mice. Foxo1 was not detected in striatal interneurons as marked by the transcription factor Nkx2.1. Conditional knockout of Foxo1 using Dlx5/6-CIE mice results in reduced expression of the SPN marker Darpp-32, as well as in the direct pathway SPN markers Ebf1 and Zfp521 within the embryonic striatum at E15.5. However, this phenotype improves in the conditional mutants by E18.5. Interestingly, the Foxo family members, Foxo3 and Foxo6, remain expressed at late embryonic stages in the Foxo1 cKOs unlike the Isl1 cKOs where Foxo1/3/6 as well as the Foxo1/3 target Bach2 are all reduced. Taken together, these findings suggest that Foxo-regulated pathways are downstream of Isl1 in the survival and/or differentiation of direct pathway SPNs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. G protein-coupled purinergic receptor GPR17 mediates orexigenic effects of FoxO1 in AgRP neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongxia; Orozco, Ian J.; Su, Ya; Suyama, Shigetomo; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger; Horvath, Tamas L.; Wardlaw, Sharon L.; Plum, Leona; Arancio, Ottavio; Accili, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Hypothalamic neurons expressing Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) are critical for initiating food intake. But druggable biochemical pathways that control this response remain elusive. Thus, genetic ablation of anorexigenic signaling by insulin or leptin in AgRP neurons fails to affect food intake. FoxO1 is a shared mediator of both pathways, and its inhibition is required for their anorexigenic effects. We postulated that FoxO1 effectors include pathways regulating food intake. Accordingly, FoxO1 ablation in AgRP neurons of mice results in reduced food intake, leanness, improved glucose homeostasis, and increased sensitivity to insulin and leptin. Expression profiling of flow-sorted FoxO1-deficient AgRP neurons identifies G protein-coupled receptor Gpr17 as a FoxO1 target whose expression is regulated by nutritional status. Intracerebroventricular injection of Gpr17 agonists induces food intake, while Gpr17 antagonist cangrelor curtails it. These effects are absent in Agrp-Foxo1 knockouts, suggesting that pharmacological modulation of this pathway has therapeutic potential to treat obesity. PMID:22682251

  5. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties.

  6. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties.

  7. Eigenspace techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Liebst, Bradley S.; Farm, Jerome A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of eigenspace techniques for the design of an active flutter suppression system for a hypothetical research drone is discussed. One leading edge and two trailing edge aerodynamic control surfaces and four sensors (accelerometers) are available for each wing. Full state control laws are designed by selecting feedback gains which place closed loop eigenvalues and shape closed loop eigenvectors so as to stabilize wing flutter and reduce gust loads at the wing root while yielding accepatable robustness and satisfying constrains on rms control surface activity. These controllers are realized by state estimators designed using an eigenvalue placement/eigenvector shaping technique which results in recovery of the full state loop transfer characteristics. The resulting feedback compensators are shown to perform almost as well as the full state designs. They also exhibit acceptable performance in situations in which the failure of an actuator is simulated.

  8. Acupuncture may exert its therapeutic effect through microRNA-339/Sirt2/NFκB/FOXO1 axis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-You; Li, Hui; Ma, Chun-Mei; Wang, Jia-Lu; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have found that a number of microRNAs (miRNAs) and proteins are involved in the response to acupuncture therapy in hypertensive rats. Our bioinformatics study suggests an association between these miRNAs and proteins, which include miR-339 and sirtuin 2 (Sirt2). In this paper, we aimed to investigate whether Sirt2 was a direct target of miR-339 in neurons. In human SH-SY5Y cells, the luciferase assay implied that Sirt2 was likely a target of miRNA-339. Overexpression of miR-339 downregulated Sirt2 expression, while knockdown of miR-339 upregulated Sirt2 expression in human SH-SY5Y cells and rat PC12 cells. In addition, overexpression of miR-399 increased the acetylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) in SH-SY5Y cells, which are known targets of Sirt2. Our findings demonstrate that miR-339 regulates Sirt2 in human and rat neurons. Since Sirt2 plays a critical role in multiple important cellular functions, our data imply that acupuncture may act through epigenetic changes and subsequent action on their targets, such as miRNA-339/Sirt2/NF-κB/FOXO1 axis. Some physiological level changes of neurons after altering the miR-339 levels are needed to validate the suggested therapeutic role of miR-339/Sirt2/NF-κB/FOXO1 axis in response to acupuncture therapy in the future work.

  9. Acupuncture May Exert Its Therapeutic Effect through MicroRNA-339/Sirt2/NFκB/FOXO1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-You; Li, Hui; Ma, Chun-Mei; Wang, Jia-Lu; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have found that a number of microRNAs (miRNAs) and proteins are involved in the response to acupuncture therapy in hypertensive rats. Our bioinformatics study suggests an association between these miRNAs and proteins, which include miR-339 and sirtuin 2 (Sirt2). In this paper, we aimed to investigate whether Sirt2 was a direct target of miR-339 in neurons. In human SH-SY5Y cells, the luciferase assay implied that Sirt2 was likely a target of miRNA-339. Overexpression of miR-339 downregulated Sirt2 expression, while knockdown of miR-339 upregulated Sirt2 expression in human SH-SY5Y cells and rat PC12 cells. In addition, overexpression of miR-399 increased the acetylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) in SH-SY5Y cells, which are known targets of Sirt2. Our findings demonstrate that miR-339 regulates Sirt2 in human and rat neurons. Since Sirt2 plays a critical role in multiple important cellular functions, our data imply that acupuncture may act through epigenetic changes and subsequent action on their targets, such as miRNA-339/Sirt2/NF-κB/FOXO1 axis. Some physiological level changes of neurons after altering the miR-339 levels are needed to validate the suggested therapeutic role of miR-339/Sirt2/NF-κB/FOXO1 axis in response to acupuncture therapy in the future work. PMID:25695055

  10. Influence of divergent exercise contraction mode and whey protein supplementation on atrogin-1, MuRF1, and FOXO1/3A in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Stefanetti, Renae J; Lamon, Séverine; Rahbek, Stine K; Farup, Jean; Zacharewicz, Evelyn; Wallace, Marita A; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Russell, Aaron P; Vissing, Kristian

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge from human exercise studies on regulators of muscle atrophy is lacking, but it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms influencing skeletal muscle protein turnover and net protein gain. This study examined the regulation of muscle atrophy-related factors, including atrogin-1 and MuRF1, their upstream transcription factors FOXO1 and FOXO3A and the atrogin-1 substrate eIF3-f, in response to unilateral isolated eccentric (ECC) vs. concentric (CONC) exercise and training. Exercise was performed with whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) or isocaloric carbohydrate (CHO) supplementation. Twenty-four subjects were divided into WPH and CHO groups and completed both single-bout exercise and 12 wk of training. Single-bout ECC exercise decreased atrogin-1 and FOXO3A mRNA compared with basal and CONC exercise, while MuRF1 mRNA was upregulated compared with basal. ECC exercise downregulated FOXO1 and phospho-FOXO1 protein compared with basal, and phospho-FOXO3A was downregulated compared with CONC. CONC single-bout exercise mediated a greater increase in MuRF1 mRNA and increased FOXO1 mRNA compared with basal and ECC. CONC exercise downregulated FOXO1, FOXO3A, and eIF3-f protein compared with basal. Following training, an increase in basal phospho-FOXO1 was observed. While WPH supplementation with ECC and CONC training further increased muscle hypertrophy, it did not have an additional effect on mRNA or protein levels of the targets measured. In conclusion, atrogin-1, MuRF1, FOXO1/3A, and eIF3-f mRNA, and protein levels, are differentially regulated by exercise contraction mode but not WPH supplementation combined with hypertrophy-inducing training. This highlights the complexity in understanding the differing roles these factors play in healthy muscle adaptation to exercise.

  11. SIRT3 overexpression antagonizes high glucose accelerated cellular senescence in human diploid fibroblasts via the SIRT3-FOXO1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Cui, Shaoyuan; Bai, Xueyuan; Zhuo, Li; Sun, Xuefeng; Hong, Quan; Fu, Bo; Wang, Jianzhong; Chen, Xiangmei; Cai, Guangyan

    2013-12-01

    Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is one of the seven mammalian sirtuins, which are homologs of the yeast Sir2 gene. SIRT3 is the only sirtuin reported to be associated with human life span. Many recent studies have indicated that SIRT3 levels are elevated by exercise and caloric restriction, but whether SIRT3 influences cell senescence under stressed conditions in human diploid fibroblasts has not been established. Our data showed that expression of SIRT3 is elevated in human diploid fibroblasts under low glucose (3.3 mM glucose) growth conditions and decreased under high glucose (25 mM glucose) growth conditions. We have demonstrated that SIRT3 interacts with forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1). High glucose levels also increased aging phenotypes and FOXO1 acetylation level. We have demonstrated that overexpression of SIRT3 under high glucose conditions reduces FOXO1 acetylation, suggesting that deacetylation of FOXO1 by SIRT3 elevates the expression of the FOXO1 target genes, catalase, and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) while decreasing senescence phenotypes. We studied the effects of SIRT3 protein knockdown by shRNA under low glucose conditions. The data showed that shRNA-SIRT3 accelerated senescence phenotypes and acetylation of FOXO1; the expression level of catalase and MnSOD decreased compared with the control group. As a consequence, SIRT3 antagonized cellular senescence with the characteristic features of delayed SA-β-gal staining, senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF) formation, and p16(INK4A) expression. These results demonstrate for the first time that SIRT3 overexpression antagonizes high glucose-induced cellular senescence in human diploid fibroblasts via the SIRT3-FOXO1 signaling pathway.

  12. Eigenspace design techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, W. L.; Liebst, B. S.

    1984-01-01

    The application of eigenspace design techniques to an active flutter suppression system for the DAST ARW-2 research drone is examined. Eigenspace design techniques allow the control system designer to determine feedback gains which place controllable eigenvalues in specified configurations and which shape eigenvectors to achieve desired dynamic response. Eigenspace techniques were applied to the control of lateral and longitudinal dynamic response of aircraft. However, little was published on the application of eigenspace techniques to aeroelastic control problems. This discussion will focus primarily on methodology for design of full-state and limited-state (output) feedback controllers. Most of the states in aeroelastic control problems are not directly measurable, and some type of dynamic compensator is necessary to convert sensor outputs to control inputs. Compensator design are accomplished by use of a Kalman filter modified if necessary by the Doyle-Stein procedure for full-state loop transfer function recovery, by some other type of observer, or by transfer function matching.

  13. Active vibration suppression of helicopter horizontal stabilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinquemani, Simone; Cazzulani, Gabriele; Resta, Ferruccio

    2017-04-01

    Helicopters are among the most complex machines ever made. While ensuring high performance from the aeronautical point of view, they are not very comfortable due to vibration mainly created by the main rotor and by the interaction with the surrounding air. One of the most solicited structural elements of the vehicle are the horizontal stabilizers. These elements are particularly stressed because of their composite structure which, while guaranteeing lightness and strength, is characterized by a low damping. This work makes a preliminary analysis on the dynamics of the structure and proposes different solutions to actively suppress vibrations. Among them, the best in terms of the relationship between performance and weight / complexity of the system is that based on inertial actuators mounted on the inside of the horizontal stabilizers. The work addresses the issue of the design of the device and its use in the stabilizer from both the numerical and the experimental points of view.

  14. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma: morphoproteomics and personalized tumor graft testing further define the biology of PAX3-FKHR(FOXO1) subtype and provide targeted therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert E.; Buryanek, Jamie; Katz, Amanda M.; Paz, Keren; Wolff, Johannes E.

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) represents a block in differentiation of malignant myoblasts. Genomic events implicated in the pathogenesis of ARMS involve PAX3-FKHR (FOXO1) or PAX7-FKHR (FOXO1) translocation with corresponding fusion transcripts and fusion proteins. Commonalities in ARMS include uncontrollable proliferation and failure to differentiate. The genomic-molecular correlates contributing to the etiopathogenesis of ARMS incorporate PAX3-FKHR (FOXO1) fusion protein stimulation of the IGF-1R, c-Met and GSK3-β pathways. With sequential morphoproteomic profiling on such a case in conjunction with personalized tumor graft testing, we provide an expanded definition of the biology of PAX3-FKHR (FOXO1) ARMS that integrates genomics, proteomics and pharmacogenomics. Moreover, therapies that target the genomic and molecular biology and lead to tumoral regression and/or tumoral growth inhibition in a xenograft model of ARMS are identified. Significance This case study could serve as a model for clinical trials using relatively low toxicity agents in both initial and maintenance therapies to induce remission and reduce the risk of recurrent disease in PAX3-FKHR (FOXO1) subtype of ARMS. PMID:27323832

  15. Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire - Part 5: Fire suppression activities

    Treesearch

    Charles W. McHugh; Paul Gleason

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the suppression actions taken during the Hayman Fire. The long duration of suppression activities (June 8 through July 18), and multiple incident management teams assigned to the fire, makes this a challenging task. Original records and reports produced independently by the various teams assigned to different portions of the...

  16. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion

    PubMed Central

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  17. Movento influences development of granulosa cells and ovarian follicles and FoxO1 and Vnn1 gene expression in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Kafshgiri, Sakineh Kaboli; Parivar, Kazem; Baharara, Javad; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin; Roodbari, Nasim Hayati

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Pesticides has wide range of infertility in female reproductive. This study was done to evaluate the effect of movento pesticide on development of granulosa cells and ovarian follicles and FoxO1 and Vnn1 gene expression in BALB/c mice. Materials and Methods: In this study 40 healthy BALB/c mice 5-6 weeks age were used. Animals were randomly allocated into four groups. Control (without any intervention), three experimental groups received 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg movento dissolved in PBS by gavage for 21 days. Animals scarified after three weeks. For determining the effects of movento on granulosa cells in culture, treatments were conducted to movento (125, 250, 500 μg/ml) for 24 hr. We surveyed the expression of the FoxO1 and Vnn1 in granulosa cells in vitro, and its relation to cell death by flowcytometer and DAPI. Levels of FoxO1 and Vnn1 were analyzed by real-time PCR. Results: Exposure to movento significantly decreased ovarian weight and the number of primary, secondary and antral follicles. Further, treatment with different concentration of movento induced apoptosis on granulosa cells. Gene expression analysis showed the transcriptional expression of FoxO1 and vnn1 in granulosa cells. Level of Vnn1 mRNA in granulosa cells was decreased in granulosa cells and expression of FoxO1 significantly increased in treated groups in compare to controls (P-value <0.05). Conclusion: Exposure to movento significantly reduced the number of follicles and increased apoptosis of granulosa cells leading disruption of the reproductive system. Also movento reduced expression of Vnn1 and increased FoxO1 genes in a dose dependent manner. PMID:27917277

  18. PDK1 deficiency in POMC-expressing cells reveals FOXO1-dependent and -independent pathways in control of energy homeostasis and stress response.

    PubMed

    Belgardt, Bengt F; Husch, Andreas; Rother, Eva; Ernst, Marianne B; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Hampel, Brigitte; Klöckener, Tim; Alessi, Dario; Kloppenburg, Peter; Brüning, Jens C

    2008-04-01

    Insulin- and leptin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) activation has been demonstrated to play a critical role in central control of energy homeostasis. To delineate the importance of pathways downstream of PI3K specifically in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) cell regulation, we have generated mice with selective inactivation of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) in POMC-expressing cells (PDK1(DeltaPOMC) mice). PDK1(DeltaPOMC) mice initially display hyperphagia, increased body weight, and impaired glucose metabolism caused by reduced hypothalamic POMC expression. On the other hand, PDK1(DeltaPOMC) mice exhibit progressive, severe hypocortisolism caused by loss of POMC-expressing corticotrophs in the pituitary. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of FOXO1 specifically in POMC cells is sufficient to ameliorate positive energy balance in PDK1(DeltaPOMC) mice but cannot restore regular pituitary function. These results reveal important but differential roles for PDK1 signaling in hypothalamic and pituitary POMC cells in the control of energy homeostasis and stress response.

  19. Suppression of Antigen-Specific Lymphocyte Activation in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, David; Pride, Michael W.; Brown, Eric L.; Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.

    1999-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in astronauts during and after spaceflight, and in isolated immune cells in true and simulated microgravity. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T cells is severely suppressed in true and simulated microgravity. These recent findings with various polyclonal activators suggests a suppression of oligoclonal lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR), as a model for a primary immune response; a tetanus toxoid (TT) response and a B. burgdorferi (Bb) response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  20. Calorie restriction minimizes activation of insulin signaling in response to glucose: potential involvement of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroko; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Park, Seongjoon; Chiba, Takuya; Higami, Yoshikazu; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Isao

    2008-09-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) may modulate insulin signaling in response to energy intake through suppression of the growth hormone (GH)-IGF-1 axis. We investigated the glucose-stimulated serum insulin response and subsequent alterations in insulin receptor (IR), Akt, and FoxO1 in the rat liver and quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM). Nine-month-old wild-type (W) male Wistar rats fed ad libitum (AL) or a 30% CR diet initiated at 6 weeks of age and GH-suppressed transgenic (Tg) rats fed AL were killed 15 min after intraperitoneal injection of glucose or saline. In W-AL rats, the serum insulin concentration was elevated by glucose injection. Concomitantly, the phosphorylated (p)-IR and p-Akt levels were increased in both tissues. The active FoxO1 level was decreased in the liver, but not significantly in the QFM. In W-CR and Tg-AL rats, the serum insulin response was lower, and no significant changes were noted for the p-IR, p-Akt, or active FoxO1 levels in the liver. In the QFM, the p-Akt level was increased in W-CR and Tg-AL rats with an insignificant elevation of p-IR levels. The phenotypic similarity of W-CR and Tg-AL rats suggest that CR minimizes activation of insulin signaling in response to energy intake mostly through the GH-IGF-1 axis.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a complex of the FOXO1 and Ets1 DNA-binding domains and DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, Wing W.; Datta, Drishadwatti; Geiger, Catherine A.; Birrane, Gabriel; Grant, Marianne A.

    2013-12-24

    The DNA-binding domains of Ets1 and FOXO1 were expressed, purified, and crystallized in complex with DNA containing a composite sequence for a noncanonical forkhead binding site and an ETS site. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.2 Å.

  2. MiR-222 promotes drug-resistance of breast cancer cells to adriamycin via modulation of PTEN/Akt/FOXO1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongyu; Wang, Dandan; Li, Liangpeng; Yang, Sujin; Chen, Xiu; Zhou, Siying; Zhong, Shanliang; Zhao, Jianhua; Tang, Jinhai

    2017-01-05

    Acquisition of resistance to adriamycin (ADR) is one of the most important clinical obstacles in the treatment of breast cancer, but the molecular mechanisms underlying sensitivity to ADR remain elusive. In our previous study, through miRNA microarray and experiments, we have emphasized that miR-222 could promote the ADR-resistance in breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to explore the possible mechanism by which miR-222 affects sensitivity to ADR. Through pathway enrichment analyses for miR-222, we found that PTEN/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway may be of importance. RT-qPCR analyses and western blot assays confirmed the relationship between miR-222 expression and target genes. Immunofluorescence further visually displayed the location of FOXO1. When blocking PTEN/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway, we demonstrated the effects of miR-222-mediated ADR resistance by MTT and apoptosis assays. RT-qPCR and Western blot results showed that miR-222 expression was negatively correlated with FOXO1 expression. In addition, the subcellular translocation of FOXO1 due to the altered expression of miR-222 was observed from immunofluorescence. Moreover, upregulation of miR-222 expression in MCF-7/S cells is associated with decreased PTEN expression levels and increased phospho-Akt (p-Akt) expression. Conversely in MCF-7/ADR cells, inhibition of miR-222 resulted in increased PTEN expression and decreased p-Akt expression. For further validation, results of the present study also demonstrated that PTEN/Akt/FOXO1 signaling was responsible for the ADR-resistance of breast cancer cells since LY294002, an inhibitor of Akt signaling, partially increased the sensitivity of MCF-7/S cells to ADR. More importantly, we postulated that high expression of miR-222 is closely related to poor overall survival by TCGA database validation. Taken together, these data elucidated that miR-222 mediated ADR-resistance of breast cancer cells partly through regulation of PTEN/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway

  3. Active flutter suppression - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of an active flutter suppression controller for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design is accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach uses a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple controller structure to meet stringent design specifications. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in flutter dynamic pressure and flutter frequency in the mathematical model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a roll maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  4. Active flutter suppression - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of an active flutter suppression controller for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design is accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach uses a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple controller structure to meet stringent design specifications. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in flutter dynamic pressure and flutter frequency in the mathematical model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a roll maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  5. Active Suppression Of Vibrations In Stirling-Cycle Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Gaffney, Monique S.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents results of early research directed toward development of active control systems for suppression of vibrations in spacecraft Stirling-cycle cryocoolers. Researchers developed dynamical models of cryocooler compressor.

  6. Active Suppression Of Vibrations In Stirling-Cycle Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Gaffney, Monique S.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents results of early research directed toward development of active control systems for suppression of vibrations in spacecraft Stirling-cycle cryocoolers. Researchers developed dynamical models of cryocooler compressor.

  7. Robust control design techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozbay, Hitay; Bachmann, Glen R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, an active flutter suppression problem is studied for a thin airfoil in unsteady aerodynamics. The mathematical model of this system is infinite dimensional because of Theodorsen's function which is irrational. Several second order approximations of Theodorsen's function are compared. A finite dimensional model is obtained from such an approximation. We use H infinity control techniques to find a robustly stabilizing controller for active flutter suppression.

  8. CBMG, a novel derivative of mansonone G suppresses adipocyte differentiation via suppression of PPARγ activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Kyeong; Hairani, Rita; Jeong, Hana; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Chavasiri, Warinthorn; Hwang, Eun Sook

    2017-08-01

    Mansorins and mansonones have been isolated from Mansonia gagei heartwoods, a traditional herbal medicine used to treat heart failure, and characterized to have anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-tumor, and anti-estrogenic activities. However, there is as yet no information on their effects on adipogenesis and lipid storage associated with heart disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of naturally occurring compounds on adipogenic differentiation and sought to develop more potent anti-adipogenic compound. We found that mansonone G (MG) suppressed adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, with a 40% decrease in lipid accumulation at 10 μM. MG derivatives including ether and ester analogues were then synthesized and assayed for their ability to suppress adipogenesis. A novel MG derivative, chlorobenzoyl MG (CBMG) most potently suppressed adipocyte differentiation with the decreased level of aP2 and adiponectin. Interestingly, CBMG treatment decreased the expression of CCAAT enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). Further analysis confirmed that CBMG suppressed both the expression and activity of PPARγ, a master regulator of adipogenesis, and subsequently led to decreases in transcription of C/EBPα, aP2, and adiponectin in adipogenesis, thereby attenuating adipocyte differentiation. Our results suggest that a novel MG derivative, CBMG may have beneficial applications in the control of obesity through the suppression of PPARγ-induced adipocyte differentiation and lipid accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Line Suppression of Phagolysosome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, AW; Dixit, S; Yu, J

    2015-01-01

    The eye is an immune privileged tissue with multiple mechanisms of immunosuppression to protect the light gathering tissues from the damage of inflammation. One of theses mechanisms involves retinal pigment epithelial cell suppression of phagosome activation in macrophages. The objective of this work is to determine if the human RPE cell line ARPE-19 is capable of suppressing the activation of the phagolysosome in macrophages in a manner similar to primary RPE. The conditioned media of RPE eyecups, sub-confluent, just confluent cultures, or established confluent cultures of human ARPE-19 cells were generated. These condition media were used to treat macrophages phagocytizing pHrodo bioparticles. After 24 hours incubation the macrophages were imaged by fluorescent microscopy, and fluorescence was measured. The fluorescent intensity is proportional to the amount of bioparticles phagocytized and are in an activated phagolysosome. The conditioned media of in situ mouse RPE eyecups significantly suppressed the activation of phagolysosome. The conditioned media from cultures of human ARPE-19 cells, grown to sub-confluence (50%) or grown to confluence had no effect on phagolysosome activation. In contrast, the conditioned media from established confluent cultures significantly suppressed phagolysosome activation. The neuropeptides alpha-MSH and NPY were depleted from the conditioned media of established confluent ARPE-19 cell cultures. This depleted conditioned media had diminished suppression of phagolysosome activation while promoting macrophage cell death. In addition, the condition media from cultures of ARPE-19 monolayers wounded with a bisecting scrape was diminished in suppressing phagolysosome activation. This technical report suggests that like primary RPE monolayers, established confluent cultures of ARPE-19 cells produce soluble factors that suppress the activation of macrophages, and can be used to study the molecular mechanisms of retinal immunobiology. In

  10. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Line Suppression of Phagolysosome Activation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A W; Dixit, S; Yu, J

    2015-01-29

    The eye is an immune privileged tissue with multiple mechanisms of immunosuppression to protect the light gathering tissues from the damage of inflammation. One of theses mechanisms involves retinal pigment epithelial cell suppression of phagosome activation in macrophages. The objective of this work is to determine if the human RPE cell line ARPE-19 is capable of suppressing the activation of the phagolysosome in macrophages in a manner similar to primary RPE. The conditioned media of RPE eyecups, sub-confluent, just confluent cultures, or established confluent cultures of human ARPE-19 cells were generated. These condition media were used to treat macrophages phagocytizing pHrodo bioparticles. After 24 hours incubation the macrophages were imaged by fluorescent microscopy, and fluorescence was measured. The fluorescent intensity is proportional to the amount of bioparticles phagocytized and are in an activated phagolysosome. The conditioned media of in situ mouse RPE eyecups significantly suppressed the activation of phagolysosome. The conditioned media from cultures of human ARPE-19 cells, grown to sub-confluence (50%) or grown to confluence had no effect on phagolysosome activation. In contrast, the conditioned media from established confluent cultures significantly suppressed phagolysosome activation. The neuropeptides alpha-MSH and NPY were depleted from the conditioned media of established confluent ARPE-19 cell cultures. This depleted conditioned media had diminished suppression of phagolysosome activation while promoting macrophage cell death. In addition, the condition media from cultures of ARPE-19 monolayers wounded with a bisecting scrape was diminished in suppressing phagolysosome activation. This technical report suggests that like primary RPE monolayers, established confluent cultures of ARPE-19 cells produce soluble factors that suppress the activation of macrophages, and can be used to study the molecular mechanisms of retinal immunobiology. In

  11. Cold Suppresses Agonist-induced Activation of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Chung, M.-K.; Wang, S.

    2011-01-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppressed by cold, it is not known if cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of recombinant TRPV1. We demonstrate that cold strongly suppressed the activation of recombinant TRPV1 by multiple agonists and capsaicin-evoked currents in trigeminal ganglia neurons under normal and phosphorylated conditions. Cold-induced suppression was partially impaired in a TRPV1 mutant that lacked heat-mediated activation and potentiation. These results suggest that cold-induced suppression of TRPV1 may share a common molecular basis with heat-induced potentiation, and that allosteric inhibition may contribute, in part, to the cold-induced suppression. We also show that combination of cold and a specific antagonist of TRPV1 can produce an additive suppression. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for cold therapy and may enhance anti-nociceptive approaches that target TRPV1 for managing pain under inflammation and tissue injury, including that from tooth extraction. PMID:21666106

  12. Cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Chung, M-K; Wang, S

    2011-09-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppressed by cold, it is not known if cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of recombinant TRPV1. We demonstrate that cold strongly suppressed the activation of recombinant TRPV1 by multiple agonists and capsaicin-evoked currents in trigeminal ganglia neurons under normal and phosphorylated conditions. Cold-induced suppression was partially impaired in a TRPV1 mutant that lacked heat-mediated activation and potentiation. These results suggest that cold-induced suppression of TRPV1 may share a common molecular basis with heat-induced potentiation, and that allosteric inhibition may contribute, in part, to the cold-induced suppression. We also show that combination of cold and a specific antagonist of TRPV1 can produce an additive suppression. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for cold therapy and may enhance anti-nociceptive approaches that target TRPV1 for managing pain under inflammation and tissue injury, including that from tooth extraction.

  13. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D; Pride, M W; Brown, E L; Risin, D; Pellis, N R

    2001-02-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  14. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pride, M. W.; Brown, E. L.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  15. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pride, M. W.; Brown, E. L.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  16. Effect of acute and chronic eccentric exercise on FOXO1 mRNA expression as fiber type transition factor in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Azad, Milad; Khaledi, Neda; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2016-06-15

    Skeletal muscle is a highly elastic tissue which can respond to various functional demands by altering fiber-type composition. Exercise affects muscle fiber phenotype. One of the transcription factors that induce fiber-type transition is forkhead box O1 (FOXO1). Since eccentric contraction considered an essential part of exercise, so we are interested to see the effects of eccentric exercise (acute/chronic) on FOXO1 as an important factor of fiber-type transition in rat skeletal muscles. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats (190-235g) were divided to 3 groups of 8 rats: 1) chronic eccentric exercise (CEE), 2) acute eccentric exercise (AEE), and 3) control (C). The exercise groups underwent downhill running protocol. CEE was running on treadmill in 3 days of week for 9 weeks, that slope and duration gradually managed from -4° to -16° and 15 to 90 min, respectively. AEE group was running with 16 m/min on -16° slope for 3 consecutive days that included 18 sets of 5 min with rest interval of 2 min in between. Soleus and super vastus lateralis (SVL) muscles mRNA were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. SVL FOXO1 mRNA levels increased by 3.92-fold in the AEE and decreased 0.56-fold in the CEE group and were not significant in soleus muscle. In soleus muscle, myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIa, IIx, and IIb decreased in the AEE group and MHC IIa and IIx decreased in the CEE group. In SVL muscle, MHC I, IIa, and IIx increased in the AEE group and MHC IIa and IIX increased in the CEE group. In summary, both acute and chronic eccentric exercise could lead to change in FOXO1 mRNA only in fast SVL muscle of rat and so could induce fiber-type transition in both muscles regardless of changes in expression of FOXO1. So, oxidative stress can play important role in change of FOXO1.

  17. Valproic acid reduces insulin-resistance, fat deposition and FOXO1-mediated gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sabbir; Kumar, Sandeep; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in insulin-resistance, gluconeogenesis and islet function. HDACs can modulate the expression of various genes, which directly or indirectly affect glucose metabolism. This study was aimed to evaluate the role of valproic acid (VPA) on fat deposition, insulin-resistance and gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat. Diabetes was developed in Sprague-Dawley rats by the combination of high-fat diet and low dose streptozotocin. VPA at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg/day and metformin (positive control) 150 mg/kg twice daily for 10 weeks were administered by oral gavage. Insulin-resistance, dyslipidemia and glycemia were evaluated by biochemical estimations, while fat accumulation and structural alteration were assessed by histopathology. Protein expression and insulin signaling were evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry. VPA treatment significantly reduced the plasma glucose, HbA1c, insulin-resistance, fat deposition in brown adipose tissue, white adipose tissue and liver, which are comparable to metformin treatment. Further, VPA inhibited the gluconeogenesis and glucagon expression as well as restored the histopathological alterations in pancreas and liver. Our findings provide new insights on the anti-diabetic role of VPA in type-2 diabetes mellitus by the modulation of insulin signaling and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1)-mediated gluconeogenesis. Since VPA is a well established clinical drug, the detailed molecular mechanisms of the present findings can be further investigated for possible clinical use.

  18. Direct binding of MEK1 and MEK2 to AKT induces Foxo1 phosphorylation, cellular migration and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Procaccia, Shiri; Ordan, Merav; Cohen, Izel; Bendetz-Nezer, Sarit; Seger, Rony

    2017-01-01

    Crosstalk between the ERK cascade and other signaling pathways is one of the means by which it acquires its signaling specificity. Here we identified a direct interaction of both MEK1 and MEK2 with AKT. The interaction is mediated by the proline rich domain of MEK1/2 and regulated by phosphorylation of Ser298 in MEK1, or Ser306 in MEK2, which we identified here as a novel regulatory site. We further developed a blocking peptide, which inhibits the interaction between MEK and AKT, and when applied to cells, affects migration and adhesion, but not proliferation. The specific mechanism of action of the MEK-AKT complex involves phosphorylation of the migration-related transcription factor FoxO1. Importantly, prevention of the interaction results in a decreased metastasis formation in a breast cancer mouse model. Thus, the identified interaction both sheds light on how signaling specificity is determined, and represents a possible new therapeutic target for metastatic cancer. PMID:28225038

  19. [Suppression of epileptiform activity by micropolarizing brain structures].

    PubMed

    Tsukunov, S G; Gal'dinov, G V

    1980-05-01

    Penicillin administration elicited epileptiform responses whereas micropolarization (MCP) affected the epileptogenic foci in cats with indwelled electrodes and chemotrodes. Three types of experimental epilepsy models were obtained: focal petit mal seizures, adversive, and grand mal seizures. The MCP of amygdala and caudate nucleus completely suppressed all three types of seizures whereas MCP of hippocampus enhanced the pathology. Two mechanisms of seizure suppression seem to exist: the inhibitory and the activating ones.

  20. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'–based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  1. Active Suppression of Instabilities in Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2004-01-01

    A method of feedback control has been proposed as a means of suppressing thermo-acoustic instabilities in a liquid- fueled combustor of a type used in an aircraft engine. The basic principle of the method is one of (1) sensing combustor pressure oscillations associated with instabilities and (2) modulating the rate of flow of fuel to the combustor with a control phase that is chosen adaptively so that the pressure oscillations caused by the modulation oppose the sensed pressure oscillations. The need for this method arises because of the planned introduction of advanced, lean-burning aircraft gas turbine engines, which promise to operate with higher efficiencies and to emit smaller quantities of nitrogen oxides, relative to those of present aircraft engines. Unfortunately, the advanced engines are more susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities. These instabilities are hard to control because they include large dead-time phase shifts, wide-band noise characterized by amplitudes that are large relative to those of the instabilities, exponential growth of the instabilities, random net phase walks, and amplitude fluctuations. In this method (see figure), the output of a combustion-pressure sensor would be wide-band-pass filtered and then further processed to generate a control signal that would be applied to a fast-actuation valve to modulate the flow of fuel. Initially, the controller would rapidly take large phase steps in order to home in, within a fraction of a second, to a favorable phase region within which the instability would be reduced. Then the controller would restrict itself to operate within this phase region and would further restrict itself to operate within a region of stability, as long as the power in the instability signal was decreasing. In the phase-shifting scheme of this method, the phase of the control vector would be made to continuously bounce back and forth from one boundary of an effective stability region to the other. Computationally

  2. Active and passive vibration suppression for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The relative benefits of passive and active vibration suppression for large space structures (LSS) are discussed. The intent is to sketch the true ranges of applicability of these approaches using previously published technical results. It was found that the distinction between active and passive vibration suppression approaches is not as sharp as might be thought at first. The relative simplicity, reliability, and cost effectiveness touted for passive measures are vitiated by 'hidden costs' bound up with detailed engineering implementation issues and inherent performance limitations. At the same time, reliability and robustness issues are often cited against active control. It is argued that a continuum of vibration suppression measures offering mutually supporting capabilities is needed. The challenge is to properly orchestrate a spectrum of methods to reap the synergistic benefits of combined advanced materials, passive damping, and active control.

  3. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes.

  4. Endogenous GABAA receptor activity suppresses glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Blanchart, A; Fernando, R; Häring, M; Assaife-Lopes, N; Romanov, R A; Andäng, M; Harkany, T; Ernfors, P

    2017-02-09

    Although genome alterations driving glioma by fueling cell malignancy have largely been resolved, less is known of the impact of tumor environment on disease progression. Here, we demonstrate functional GABAA receptor-activated currents in human glioblastoma cells and show the existence of a continuous GABA signaling within the tumor cell mass that significantly affects tumor growth and survival expectancy in mouse models. Endogenous GABA released by tumor cells, attenuates proliferation of the glioma cells with enriched expression of stem/progenitor markers and with competence to seed growth of new tumors. Our results suggest that GABA levels rapidly increase in tumors impeding further growth. Thus, shunting chloride ions by a maintained local GABAA receptor activity within glioma cells has a significant impact on tumor development by attenuating proliferation, reducing tumor growth and prolonging survival, a mechanism that may have important impact on therapy resistance and recurrence following tumor resection.

  5. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  6. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Elastic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Fuller, Chris R.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    1993-01-01

    Pairs of colocated piezoelectric transducers, independently controlled by multichannel adaptive controller, employed as actuators and sensors to achieve simultaneous attenuation of both extensional and flexural motion. Single pair used to provide simultaneous control of flexural and extensional waves, or two pairs used to control torsional motion also. Capability due to nature of piezoelectric transducers, when bonded to surfaces of structures and activated by oscillating voltages, generate corresponding oscillating distributions of stresses in structures. Phases and amplitudes of actuator voltages adjusted by controller to impede flow of vibrational energy simultaneously, in waves of various forms, beyond locations of actuators. Concept applies equally to harmonic or random response of structure and to multiple responses of structure to transverse bending, torsion, and compression within structural element. System has potential for many situations in which predominant vibration transmission path through framelike structure.

  7. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Elastic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Fuller, Chris R.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    1993-01-01

    Pairs of colocated piezoelectric transducers, independently controlled by multichannel adaptive controller, employed as actuators and sensors to achieve simultaneous attenuation of both extensional and flexural motion. Single pair used to provide simultaneous control of flexural and extensional waves, or two pairs used to control torsional motion also. Capability due to nature of piezoelectric transducers, when bonded to surfaces of structures and activated by oscillating voltages, generate corresponding oscillating distributions of stresses in structures. Phases and amplitudes of actuator voltages adjusted by controller to impede flow of vibrational energy simultaneously, in waves of various forms, beyond locations of actuators. Concept applies equally to harmonic or random response of structure and to multiple responses of structure to transverse bending, torsion, and compression within structural element. System has potential for many situations in which predominant vibration transmission path through framelike structure.

  8. Sigma Receptors Suppress Multiple Aspects of Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hall Aaron, A.; Yelenis, Herrera; Ajmo Craig, T.; Javier, Cuevas; Pennypacker Keith, R.

    2009-01-01

    During brain injury, microglia become activated and migrate to areas of degenerating neurons. These microglia release pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species causing additional neuronal death. Microglia express high levels of sigma receptors, however, the function of these receptors in microglia and how they may affect the activation of these cells remain poorly understood. Using primary rat microglial cultures, it was found that sigma receptor activation suppresses the ability of microglia to rearrange their actin cytoskeleton, migrate, and release cytokines in response to the activators adenosine triphosphate (ATP), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Next, the role of sigma receptors in the regulation of calcium signaling during microglial activation was explored. Calcium fluorometry experiments in vitro show that stimulation of sigma receptors suppressed both transient and sustained intracellular calcium elevations associated with the microglial response to these activators. Further experiments showed that sigma receptors suppress microglial activation by interfering with increases in intracellular calcium. In addition, sigma receptor activation also prevented membrane ruffling in a calcium-independent manner, indicating that sigma receptors regulate the function of microglia via multiple mechanisms. PMID:19031439

  9. Soy Leaf Extract Containing Kaempferol Glycosides and Pheophorbides Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Enhancing Pancreatic β-Cell Function and Suppressing Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Ji, Hyeon-Seon; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Dong-Ha; Park, Ho-Yong; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, In-Kyung; Yun, Bong-Sik; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2015-08-19

    This study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the antidiabetic effect of an ethanol extract of soy leaves (ESL) in db/db mice. Control groups (db/+ and db/db) were fed a normal diet (ND), whereas the db/db-ESL group was fed ND with 1% ESL for 8 weeks. Dietary ESL improved glucose tolerance and lowered plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin, HOMA-IR, and triglyceride levels. The pancreatic insulin content of the db/db-ESL group was significantly greater than that of the db/db group. ESL supplementation altered pancreatic IRS1, IRS2, Pdx1, Ngn3, Pax4, Ins1, Ins2, and FoxO1 expression. Furthermore, ESL suppressed lipid accumulation and increased glucokinase activity in the liver. ESL primarily contained kaempferol glycosides and pheophorbides. Kaempferol, an aglycone of kaempferol glycosides, improved β-cell proliferation through IRS2-related FoxO1 signaling, whereas pheophorbide a, a product of chlorophyll breakdown, improved insulin secretion and β-cell proliferation through IRS1-related signaling with protein kinase A in MIN6 cells. ESL effectively regulates glucose homeostasis by enhancing IRS-mediated β-cell insulin signaling and suppressing SREBP-1-mediated hepatic lipid accumulation in db/db mice.

  10. Suppression of CMEs on active stars by overlying magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Garraffo, Cecilia; Cohen, Ofer; Alvarado-Gomez, Julian; Moschou, Sofia-Paraskevi

    2017-08-01

    On the Sun, the association rate of flares with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) increases with flare energy such that energetic X-class flares are nearly all associated with CMEs. Flares on active stars are commonly orders of magnitude more energetic than their solar counterparts, and extrapolating the solar trend suggests that all the flares we observe on active stars should be associated with CMEs. Such an association can imply uncomfortably high CME mass loss rates of more than 10^-11 Msun/yr for the most active stars. We suggest that, instead, only the more energetic CMEs escape and most are suppressed by strong overlying magnetic field. Here, we investigate the suppression threshold and its implications for CME rates and mass loss on active stars.

  11. Potent cough suppression by physiologically active substance in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Norio; Ito, Yushi; Ogawa, Sachie K; Maeda, Megumi; Wakita, Masahito; Takahama, Kazuo; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Kamei, Shintaro; Hamamoto, Takayoshi; Umehashi, Misako; Maeda, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Human plasma contains wide variety of bioactive proteins that have proved essential in therapeutic discovery. However many human plasma proteins remain orphans with unknown biological functions. Evidences suggest that some plasma components target the respiratory system. In the present study we adapted heparin affinity chromatography to fractionate human plasma for functional bioassay. Fractions from pooled human plasma yielded particular plasma fractions with strong cough suppressing effects. Purification yielded a fraction that was finally identified as an activated blood coagulation factor fXIa using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS). The fraction almost completely suppressed coughs induced by either chemical or mechanical stimulation applied to larynx or bifurcation of guinea-pig trachea. Cough suppressing effect of the fraction and commercially available fXIa were one million times stronger than codeine and codeine only partially suppressed the mechanically triggered coughing in animal model. Recent reviews highlighted prominent shortcomings of current available antitussives, including narcotic opioids such as codeine and their unpleasant or intolerable side effects. Therefore, safer and more effective cough suppressants would be welcome, and present findings indicate that fXIa in human plasma as a very promising, new therapeutic candidate for effective antitussive action.

  12. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  13. Suppression of NF-κB Activation By Gentian Violet Promotes Osteoblastogenesis and Suppresses Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M.; Vikulina, T.; Arbiser, J.L.; Weitzmann, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal mass is regulated by the coordinated action of bone forming osteoblasts and bone resorbing osteoclasts. Accelerated rates of bone resorption relative to bone formation lead to net bone loss and the development of osteoporosis, a devastating disease that predisposes the skeleton to fractures. Bone fractures are associated with significant morbidity and in the case of hip fractures, high mortality. Gentian violet (GV), a cationic triphenylmethane dye, has long been used as an antifungal and antibacterial agent and is presently under investigation as a potential chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic agent. However, effects on bone cells have not been previously reported and the mechanisms of action of GV, are poorly understood. In this study we show that GV suppresses receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced differentiation of RAW264.7 osteoclast precursors into mature osteoclasts, but paradoxically stimulates the differentiation of MC3T3 cells into mineralizing osteoblasts. These actions stem from the capacity of GV to suppress activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signal transduction pathway that is required for osteoclastogenesis, but inhibitory to osteoblast differentiation and activity. Our data reveal that GV is an inhibitor of NF-κB activation and may hold promise for modulation of bone turnover to promote a balance between bone formation and bone resorption, favorable to gain of bone mass. PMID:25056540

  14. Recurrent (2;2) and (2;8) Translocations in Rhabdomyosarcoma without the Canonical PAX-FOXO1 fuse PAX3 to Members of the Nuclear Receptor Transcriptional Coactivator (NCOA) Family

    PubMed Central

    Sumegi, Janos; Streblow, Renae; Frayer, Robert W.; Cin, Paola Dal; Rosenberg, Andrew; Meloni-Ehrig, Aurelia; Bridge, Julia A.

    2009-01-01

    The fusion oncoproteins PAX3-FOXO1 [t(2;13)(q35;q14)] and PAX7-FOXO1 [t(1;13)(p36;q14)] typify alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS); however, 20-30% of cases lack these specific translocations. In this study, cytogenetic and/or molecular characterization to include FISH, RT-PCR and sequencing analyses of five rhabdomyosarcomas [four ARMS and one embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS)] with novel, recurrent t(2;2)(p23;q35) or t(2;8)(q35;q13) revealed that these non-canonical translocations fuse PAX3 to NCOA1 or NCOA2 respectively. The PAX3-NCOA1 and PAX3-NCOA2 transcripts encode chimeric proteins composed of the paired-box and homeodomain DNA-binding domains of PAX3, and the CID domain, the Q-rich region and the AD2 domain of NCOA1 or NCOA2. To investigate the biological function of these recurrent variant translocations, the coding regions of PAX3-NCOA1 and PAX3-NCOA2 cDNA constructs were introduced into expression vectors with tetracycline-regulated expression. Both fusion proteins showed transforming activity in the soft agar assay. Deletion of the AD2 portion of the PAX3-NCOA fusion proteins reduced the transforming activity of each chimeric protein. Similarly, but with greater impact, CID domain deletion fully abrogated the transforming activity of the chimeric protein. These studies: (1) expand our knowledge of PAX3 variant translocations in RMS with identification of a novel PAX3-NCOA2 fusion; (2) show that both PAX3-NCOA1 and PAX3-NCOA2 represent recurrent RMS rearrangements; (3) confirm the transforming activity of both translocation events and demonstrate the essentiality of intact AD2 and CID domains for optimal transforming activity; and, (5) provide alternative approaches (FISH and RT-PCR) for detecting PAX-NCOA fusions in nondividing cells of RMS. The latter could potentially be utilized as aids in diagnostically challenging cases. PMID:19953635

  15. Anti-neoplastic activity of low-dose endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide-II results from defective autophagy and G2/M arrest mediated by PI3K/Akt/FoxO1 axis in human glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Libo; Xue, Yixue; Meng, Fanjie; Li, Shuai; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yunhui

    2014-06-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a life-threatening brain tumor with fatal recurrence, for which glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) are held responsible. Though endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) has been confirmed as a possible antitumor agent that can induce apoptosis of endothelial cells and inhibit tumor angiogenesis, the direct cytotoxicity by EMAP-II on tumor cells and its underlying mechanism are largely unknown. In the present study, it was demonstrated that low-dose (0.05 nM) EMAP-II reduces cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential in vitro. Likewise, EMAP-II suppressed tumor growth in GSC-xenografted mice. Though no apoptosis was detected, all these antitumor effects were attenuated when GSCs were pretreated with 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Analysis of EMAP-II-treated GSCs exhibited the morphological and biochemical changes typical of autophagy, which was further shown to be defective. Moreover, EMAP-II was found to suppress tumor growth by inducing G2/M arrest in GSCs. Our data further showed that EMAP-II inhibited PI3K/Akt activation with concomitant induction of FoxO1 activation. FoxO1 knockdown significantly attenuated the induction of autophagy and G2/M arrest. Excessive accumulation of lipid droplets was intriguingly detected by transmission electron microscope, which was accompanied by autophagosomes. Further investigation indicated that the transcriptional regulation of Atg2B by FoxO1 was responsible for the induction of autophagy and formation of lipid droplets. These results suggest that EMAP-II is an effective anticancer agent for glioblastoma therapy, which can induce direct growth suppression in GSCs through defective autophagy and G2/M arrest mediated by the PI3K/Akt/FoxO1 axis.

  16. Occipital TMS has an activity-dependent suppressive effect

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Francesca; Cattaneo, Luigi; Carrasco, Marisa; Schwarzbach, Jens V.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) vary depending on the brain state at the stimulation moment. Four mechanisms have been proposed to underlie these effects: (i) virtual lesion–TMS suppresses neural signals; (ii) preferential activation of less active neurons–TMS drives up activity in the stimulated area, but active neurons are saturating, (iii) noise generation–TMS adds random neuronal activity and its effect interacts with stimulus-intensity; (iv) noise generation–TMS adds random neuronal activity and its effect depends on TMS-intensity. Here we explore these hypotheses by investigating the effects of TMS on early visual cortex on the contrast response function while varying adaptation state of the observers. We tested human participants in an orientation discrimination task, in which performance is contingent upon contrast sensitivity. Before each trial, neuronal activation of visual cortex was altered through contrast adaptation to two flickering gratings. In a factorial design, with or without adaptation, a single TMS pulse was delivered simultaneously with targets of varying contrast. Adaptation decreased contrast sensitivity. The effect of TMS on performance was state-dependent: TMS decreased contrast sensitivity in the absence of adaptation but increased it after adaptation. None of the proposed mechanisms can account for the results in their entirety, in particular, for the facilitatory effect at intermediate to high contrasts after adaptation. We propose an alternative hypothesis: TMS effects are activity-dependent, so that TMS suppresses the most active neurons and thereby changes the balance between excitation and inhibition. PMID:22956826

  17. Apigenin blocks IKKα activation and suppresses prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sanjeev; Kanwal, Rajnee; Shankar, Eswar; Datt, Manish; Chance, Mark R; Fu, Pingfu; MacLennan, Gregory T; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-10-13

    IKKα has been implicated as a key regulator of oncogenesis and driver of the metastatic process; therefore is regarded as a promising therapeutic target in anticancer drug development. In spite of the progress made in the development of IKK inhibitors, no potent IKKα inhibitor(s) have been identified. Our multistep approach of molecular modeling and direct binding has led to the identification of plant flavone apigenin as a specific IKKα inhibitor. Here we report apigenin, in micro molar range, inhibits IKKα kinase activity, demonstrates anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities in functional cell based assays and exhibits anticancer efficacy in experimental tumor model. We found that apigenin directly binds with IKKα, attenuates IKKα kinase activity and suppresses NF-ĸB/p65 activation in human prostate cancer PC-3 and 22Rv1 cells much more effectively than IKK inhibitor, PS1145. We also showed that apigenin caused cell cycle arrest similar to knockdown of IKKα in prostate cancer cells. Studies in xenograft mouse model indicate that apigenin feeding suppresses tumor growth, lowers proliferation and enhances apoptosis. These effects correlated with inhibition of p-IKKα, NF-ĸB/p65, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and increase in cleaved caspase 3 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, our results suggest that inhibition of cell proliferation, invasiveness and decrease in tumor growth by apigenin are mediated by its ability to suppress IKKα and downstream targets affecting NF-ĸB signaling pathways.

  18. Apigenin blocks IKKα activation and suppresses prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Sanjeev; Kanwal, Rajnee; Shankar, Eswar; Datt, Manish; Chance, Mark R.; Fu, Pingfu; MacLennan, Gregory T.; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    IKKα has been implicated as a key regulator of oncogenesis and driver of the metastatic process; therefore is regarded as a promising therapeutic target in anticancer drug development. In spite of the progress made in the development of IKK inhibitors, no potent IKKα inhibitor(s) have been identified. Our multistep approach of molecular modeling and direct binding has led to the identification of plant flavone apigenin as a specific IKKα inhibitor. Here we report apigenin, in micro molar range, inhibits IKKα kinase activity, demonstrates anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities in functional cell based assays and exhibits anticancer efficacy in experimental tumor model. We found that apigenin directly binds with IKKα, attenuates IKKα kinase activity and suppresses NF-ĸB/p65 activation in human prostate cancer PC-3 and 22Rv1 cells much more effectively than IKK inhibitor, PS1145. We also showed that apigenin caused cell cycle arrest similar to knockdown of IKKα in prostate cancer cells. Studies in xenograft mouse model indicate that apigenin feeding suppresses tumor growth, lowers proliferation and enhances apoptosis. These effects correlated with inhibition of p-IKKα, NF-ĸB/p65, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and increase in cleaved caspase 3 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, our results suggest that inhibition of cell proliferation, invasiveness and decrease in tumor growth by apigenin are mediated by its ability to suppress IKKα and downstream targets affecting NF-ĸB signaling pathways. PMID:26435478

  19. Active vibration suppression for maneuvering spacecraft with high flexible appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qiufan; Liu, Yanfang; Qi, Naiming

    2017-10-01

    The rotational and translational coupling effects that exist in the dynamics of the maneuvering spacecraft with high flexible structures are considered in this paper. The active vibration suppression using the modified positive position feedback control law is applied to the maneuvering spacecraft. The active vibration controller is designed based on the coupling dynamics. Using the calculated coupling parameters, the controller parameters are optimized via the M-norm optimization method. The controller is verified mathematically and experimentally. An air bearing spacecraft simulator is built to carry out the experiment. Simulation and experiment results show that the vibration of the flexible structures is efficiently suppressed by the designed controller and more residual vibration is reduced compared with the same controller without considering the coupling effects. The stability of the angular velocity is improved. As a conclusion, the proposed controller is efficient. The rotational and translational coupling effects should be considered in designing the vibration controller of maneuvering spacecraft.

  20. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1975-01-01

    Application of the aerodynamic energy approach to some problems of flutter suppression and gust alleviation were considered. A simple modification of the control-law is suggested for achieving the required pitch control in the use of a leading edge - trailing edge activated strip. The possible replacement of the leading edge - trailing edge activated strip by a trailing edge - tab strip is also considered as an alternate solution. Parameters affecting the performance of the activated leading edge - trailing edge strip were tested on the Arava STOL Transport and the Westwind Executive Jet Transport and include strip location, control-law gains and a variation in the control-law itself.

  1. Small Molecules that Suppress IGF-Activated Prostate Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    organic molecules that suppress IGF-activated prostate cancers by cell-based screening and to analyze their action mechanisms . During the funding...prostate cancer cells but not serum-dependent growth. We analyzed the mechanism of action of 125B11 to gain molecular insights into how IGF1 stimulates the...screening and to analyze their action mechanisms . We have been taking a unique two-step approach to discovering such molecules: we first examine the

  2. Laboratory experiments on active suppression of advanced turboprop noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The noise generated by supersonic tip speed propellers may be a cabin environment problem for future propeller-driven airplanes. Active suppression from speakers inside the airplane cabin has been proposed for canceling out this noise. The potential of active suppression of advanced turboprop noise was tested by using speakers in a rectangular duct. Experiments were first performed with sine wave signals. The results compared well with the ideal cancellation curve of noise as a function of phase angle. Recorded noise signals from subsonic and supersonic tip speed propellers were than used in the duct to deterthe potential for canceling their noise. The subsonic propeller data showed significant cancellations but less than those obtained with the sine wave. The blade-passing-tone cancellation curve for the supersonic propeller was very similar to the subsonic curve, indicating that it is potentially just as easy to cancel supersonic as subsonic propeller blade-passing-tone noise. Propeller duct data from a recorded propeller source and spatial data taken on a propeller-drive airplane showed generally good agreement when compared versus phase angle. This agreement, combined with the similarity of the subsonic and supersonic duct propeller data, indicates that the area of cancellation for advanced supersonic propellers will be similar to that measured on the airplane. Since the area of cancellation on the airplane was small, a method for improving the active noise suppression by using outside speakers is discussed.

  3. Vibrissa motor cortex activity suppresses contralateral whisking behavior.

    PubMed

    Ebbesen, Christian Laut; Doron, Guy; Lenschow, Constanze; Brecht, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical, stimulation and lesion data implicate vibrissa motor cortex in whisker motor control. Work on motor cortex has focused on movement generation, but correlations between vibrissa motor cortex activity and whisking are weak. The exact role of vibrissa motor cortex remains unknown. We recorded vibrissa motor cortex neurons during various forms of vibrissal touch, which were invariably associated with whisker protraction and movement. Free whisking, object palpation and social touch all resulted in decreased cortical activity. To understand this activity decrease, we performed juxtacellular recordings, nanostimulation and in vivo whole-cell recordings. Social touch resulted in decreased spiking activity, decreased cell excitability and membrane hyperpolarization. Activation of vibrissa motor cortex by intracortical microstimulation elicited whisker retraction, as if to abort vibrissal touch. Various vibrissa motor cortex inactivation protocols resulted in contralateral protraction and increased whisker movements. These data collectively point to movement suppression as a prime function of vibrissa motor cortex activity.

  4. Suppression of spontaneous epileptiform activity with applied currents.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, M; Durand, D

    1991-12-20

    It has been well established that both applied and endogenous electric fields can modulate neuronal activity in various preparations. In this paper, we present the effects of applied currents on spontaneous epileptiform activity in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus. A computer-controlled system was designed to detect the spontaneous abnormal activity and then apply current pulses of programmable amplitude with monopolar electrodes in the stratum pyramidale. The epileptiform activity was generated by subperfusion of the neural tissue with an elevated potassium artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) solution. Extracellular recordings showed that the interictal bursts could be fully suppressed in 90% of the slices by subthreshold currents with an average amplitude of 12.5 microA. Intracellular recordings showed that the anodic currents generated hyperpolarization of the somatic membrane thereby suppressing neuronal firing. This inhibitory effect of applied current pulses is important for the understanding of electric field effects on abnormal neuronal activity and could be an effective means of preventing the spread of epileptiform activity.

  5. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, John J.

    1988-01-01

    A method is developed that determines the placement of an active control surface for maximum effectiveness in suppressing flutter. No specific control law is required by this method which is based on the aerodynamic energy concept. It is argued that the spanwise placement of the active controls should coincide with the locations where maximum energy per unit span is fed into the system. The method enables one to determine the distribution, over the different surfaces of the aircraft, of the energy input into the system as a result of the unstable fluttering mode. The method is illustrated using three numerical examples.

  6. Suppressive Activity of Quercetin on Periostin Functions In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Irie, Shinji; Kashiwabara, Misako; Yamada, Asako; Asano, Kazuhito

    2016-01-01

    Periostin, a 90-kDa extracellular matrix protein, has been attracting attention as a novel biomarker of airway inflammatory diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma. Although oral administration of quercetin to patients with AR can favorably modify the clinical condition of this disease, the influence of quercetin on periostin functions is not well understood. The present study was, therefore, undertaken to examine the influence of quercetin on the production of both periostin and periostin-induced eosinophil chemoattractants from human nasal epithelial cells (HNEpC) in vitro. HNEpC were stimulated with 15.0 ng/ml interleukin (IL)-4 in the absence or presence of quercetin for 72 h. Periostin levels in the culture supernatants were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Addition of 4.0 μM quercetin into cell cultures suppressed periostin production from HNEpC that was induced by IL-4 stimulation through inhibitation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) activation. We then examined whether quercetin could inhibit production of the periostin-induced eosinophil chemoattractants, regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and eotaxin, from HNEpC. HNEpC were stimulated with 2.0 ng/ml periostin in the absence or presence of quercetin for 72 h. RANTES and eotaxin levels in culture supernatants were examined using ELISA. Treatment of HNEpC with quercetin at a concentration of 4.0 μM suppressed the ability of cells to produce RANTES and eotaxin. This suppression was mediated through suppression of activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, as measured using ELISA, and of chemokine mRNA expression, as measured using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). These results strongly suggest that quercetin suppresses the production of both periostin and periostin-induced eosinophil chemoattractants from HNEpC and results in improvement of the

  7. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Suppress Phagolysosome Activation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric; Choe, Yoona; Ng, Tat Fong; Taylor, Andrew W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The eye is an immune-privileged microenvironment that has adapted several mechanisms of immune regulation to prevent inflammation. One of these potential mechanisms is retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) altering phagocytosis in macrophages. Methods The conditioned media of RPE eyecups from eyes of healthy mice and mice with experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) were used to treat primary macrophage phagocytizing pHrodo bacterial bioparticles. In addition, the neuropeptides were depleted from the conditioned media of healthy RPE eyecups and used to treat phagocytizing macrophages. The conditioned media from healthy and EAU RPE eyecups were assayed for IL-6, and IL-6 was added to the healthy conditioned media, and neutralized in the EAU conditioned media. The macrophages were treated with the conditioned media and assayed for fluorescence. The macrophages were imaged, and the fluorescence intensity, relative to active phagolysosomes, was measured. Also, the macrophages were assayed using fluorescent viability dye staining. Results The conditioned media from healthy, but not from EAU RPE eyecups suppressed phagolysosome activation. Depletion of the neuropeptides alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y from the healthy RPE eyecup conditioned media resulted in macrophage death. In the EAU RPE eyecup conditioned media was 0.96 ± 0.18 ng/mL of IL-6, and when neutralized the conditioned media suppressed phagolysosome activation. Conclusions The healthy RPE through soluble molecules, including alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y, suppresses the activation of the phagolysosome in macrophages. In EAU, the IL-6 produced by the RPE promotes the activation of phagolysosomes in macrophages. These results demonstrate that under healthy conditions, RPE promotes an altered pathway of phagocytized material in macrophages with implications on antigen processing and clearance. PMID:28241314

  8. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  9. IKKα activation of NOTCH links tumorigenesis via FOXA2 suppression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mo; Lee, Dung-Fang; Chen, Chun-Te; Yen, Chia-Jui; Li, Long-Yuan; Lee, Hong-Jen; Chang, Chun-Ju; Chang, Wei-Chao; Hsu, Jung-Mao; Kuo, Hsu-Ping; Xia, Weiya; Wei, Yongkun; Chiu, Pei-Chun; Chou, Chao-Kai; Du, Yi; Dhar, Debanjan; Karin, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2012-01-27

    Proinflammatory cytokine TNFα plays critical roles in promoting malignant cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and tumor metastasis in many cancers. However, the mechanism of TNFα-mediated tumor development remains unclear. Here, we show that IKKα, an important downstream kinase of TNFα, interacts with and phosphorylates FOXA2 at S107/S111, thereby suppressing FOXA2 transactivation activity and leading to decreased NUMB expression, and further activates the downstream NOTCH pathway and promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Moreover, we found that levels of IKKα, pFOXA2 (S107/111), and activated NOTCH1 were significantly higher in hepatocellular carcinoma tumors than in normal liver tissues and that pFOXA2 (S107/111) expression was positively correlated with IKKα and activated NOTCH1 expression in tumor tissues. Therefore, dysregulation of NUMB-mediated suppression of NOTCH1 by TNFα/IKKα-associated FOXA2 inhibition likely contributes to inflammation-mediated cancer pathogenesis. Here, we report a TNFα/IKKα/FOXA2/NUMB/NOTCH1 pathway that is critical for inflammation-mediated tumorigenesis and may provide a target for clinical intervention in human cancer.

  10. Berberine Suppresses Adipocyte Differentiation via Decreasing CREB Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Tang, Hongju; Deng, Ruyuan; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yuqing; Wang, Yao; Liu, Yun; Li, Fengying; Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Libin

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, one of the major constituents of Chinese herb Rhizoma coptidis, has been demonstrated to lower blood glucose, blood lipid, and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The anti-obesity effect of berberine has been attributed to its anti-adipogenic activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. In the present study, we found that berberine significantly suppressed the expressions of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)α, peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2), and other adipogenic genes in the process of adipogenesis. Berberine decreased cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression at the early stage of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation. In addition, CREB phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression induced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and forskolin were also attenuated by berberine. The binding activities of cAMP responsive element (CRE) stimulated by IBMX and forskolin were inhibited by berberine. The binding of phosphorylated CREB to the promoter of C/EBPβ was abrogated by berberine after the induction of preadipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that berberine blocks adipogenesis mainly via suppressing CREB activity, which leads to a decrease in C/EBPβ-triggered transcriptional cascades.

  11. Berberine Suppresses Adipocyte Differentiation via Decreasing CREB Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ruyuan; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yuqing; Wang, Yao; Liu, Yun; Li, Fengying; Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Libin

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, one of the major constituents of Chinese herb Rhizoma coptidis, has been demonstrated to lower blood glucose, blood lipid, and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The anti-obesity effect of berberine has been attributed to its anti-adipogenic activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. In the present study, we found that berberine significantly suppressed the expressions of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)α, peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2), and other adipogenic genes in the process of adipogenesis. Berberine decreased cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression at the early stage of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation. In addition, CREB phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression induced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and forskolin were also attenuated by berberine. The binding activities of cAMP responsive element (CRE) stimulated by IBMX and forskolin were inhibited by berberine. The binding of phosphorylated CREB to the promoter of C/EBPβ was abrogated by berberine after the induction of preadipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that berberine blocks adipogenesis mainly via suppressing CREB activity, which leads to a decrease in C/EBPβ-triggered transcriptional cascades. PMID:25928058

  12. Design, test, and evaluation of three active flutter suppression controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, William M., Jr.; Christhilf, David M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    Three control law design techniques for flutter suppression are presented. Each technique uses multiple control surfaces and/or sensors. The first method uses traditional tools (such as pole/zero loci and Nyquist diagrams) for producing a controller that has minimal complexity and which is sufficiently robust to handle plant uncertainty. The second procedure uses linear combinations of several accelerometer signals and dynamic compensation to synthesize the model rate of the critical mode for feedback to the distributed control surfaces. The third technique starts with a minimum-energy linear quadratic Gaussian controller, iteratively modifies intensity matrices corresponding to input and output noise, and applies controller order reduction to achieve a low-order, robust controller. The resulting designs were implemented digitally and tested subsonically on the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Only the traditional pole/zero loci design was sufficiently robust to errors in the nominal plant to successfully suppress flutter during the test. The traditional pole/zero loci design provided simultaneous suppression of symmetric and antisymmetric flutter with a 24-percent increase in attainable dynamic pressure. Posttest analyses are shown which illustrate the problems encountered with the other laws.

  13. Targeting Gli Transcription Activation by Small Molecule Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Clément, Geneviève; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Li, Hui; Mikami, Iwao; Hirata, Tomomi; Yagui-Beltran, Adam; Lui, Natalie; Do, Hanh T.; Cheng, Tiffany; Tseng, Hsin-Hui; Choi, Helen; Fang, Li-Tai; Kim, Il-Jin; Yue, Dongsheng; Wang, Changli; Zheng, Qingfeng; Fujii, Naoaki; Mann, Michael; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of Hedgehog signaling at the cell membrane has been associated with anti-cancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies. Hedgehog signaling involves activation of Gli transcription factors that can also be induced by alternative pathways. In this study we identified an interaction between Gli proteins and a transcription co-activator TAF9, and validated its functional relevance in regulating Gli transactivation. We also describe a novel, synthetic small molecule, FN1-8, that efficiently interferes with Gli/TAF9 interaction and down-regulate Gli/TAF9 dependent transcriptional activity. More importantly, FN1-8 suppresses cancer cell proliferation in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that blocking Gli transactivation, a key control point of multiple oncogenic pathways, may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:23686308

  14. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    All flutter suppression systems require sensors to detect the movement of the lifting surface and to activate a control surface according to a synthesized control law. Most of the work performed to date relates to the development of control laws based on predetermined locations of sensors and control surfaces. These locations of sensors and control surfaces are determined either arbitrarily, or by means of a trial and error procedure. The aerodynamic energy concept indicates that the sensors should be located within the activated strip. Furthermore, the best chordwise location of a sensor activating a T.E. control surface is around the 65 percent chord location. The best chordwise location for a sensor activating a L.E. surface is shown to lie upstream of the wing (around 20 percent upstream of the leading edge), or alternatively, two sensors located along the same chord should be used.

  15. SCAR arrow-wing active flutter suppression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, C. K.; Visor, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    The potential performance and direct operating cost benefits of an active flutter suppression system (FSS) for the NASA arrow-wing supersonic cruise configuration were determined. A FSS designed to increase the flutter speed of the baseline airplane 20 percent. A comparison was made of the performance and direct operating cost between the FSS equipped aircraft and a previously defined configuration with structural modifications to provide the same flutter speed. Control system synthesis and evaluation indicated that a FSS could provide the increase in flutter speed without degrading airplane reliability, safety, handling qualities, or ride quality, and without increasing repeated loads or hydraulic and electrical power capacity requirements.

  16. Design of an active flutter suppression system for the Active Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Buttrill, Carey S.

    1991-01-01

    The design of an active flutter suppression controller and wind tunnel validation test results are presented. This controller, designed using Nyquist methods and traditional root locus, is applied to the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model. Wind tunnel tests were conducted to validate the design and demonstrate flutter suppression at a fixed altitude while performing aggressive rolling maneuvers representative of high-performance military aircraft. The controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two distinct flutter modes by significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure in spite of errors in the mathematical model.

  17. Comparative study between two different active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    An activated leading-edge (LE)-tailing-edge (TE) control system is applied to a drone aircraft with the objective of enabling the drone to fly subsonically at dynamic pressures which are 44% above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. The control synthesis approach is based on the aerodynamic energy concept and it incorporates recent developments in this area. A comparison is made between the performance of the activated LE-TE control system and the performance of a TE control system, analyzed in a previous work. The results obtained indicate that although all the control systems achieve the flutter suppression objectives, the TE control system appears to be somewhat superior to the LE-TE control system, in this specific application. This superiority is manifested through reduced values of control surface activity over a wide range of flight conditions.

  18. Comparative study between two different active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    An activated leading-edge (LE)-tailing-edge (TE) control system is applied to a drone aircraft with the objective of enabling the drone to fly subsonically at dynamic pressures which are 44% above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. The control synthesis approach is based on the aerodynamic energy concept and it incorporates recent developments in this area. A comparison is made between the performance of the activated LE-TE control system and the performance of a TE control system, analyzed in a previous work. The results obtained indicate that although all the control systems achieve the flutter suppression objectives, the TE control system appears to be somewhat superior to the LE-TE control system, in this specific application. This superiority is manifested through reduced values of control surface activity over a wide range of flight conditions.

  19. Transient and selective suppression of neural activity with infrared light

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Austin R.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2013-01-01

    Analysis and control of neural circuitry requires the ability to selectively activate or inhibit neurons. Previous work showed that infrared laser light selectively excited neural activity in endogenous unmyelinated and myelinated axons. However, inhibition of neuronal firing with infrared light was only observed in limited cases, is not well understood and was not precisely controlled. Using an experimentally tractable unmyelinated preparation for detailed investigation and a myelinated preparation for validation, we report that it is possible to selectively and transiently inhibit electrically-initiated axonal activation, as well as to both block or enhance the propagation of action potentials of specific motor neurons. Thus, in addition to previously shown excitation, we demonstrate an optical method of suppressing components of the nervous system with functional spatiotemporal precision. We believe this technique is well-suited for non-invasive investigations of diverse excitable tissues and may ultimately be applied for treating neurological disorders. PMID:24009039

  20. Type I neuregulin1α is a novel local mediator to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Takatomo; Ono, Yumika; Arimura, Yujiro; Sayama, Keimon; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Satoko; Kanai, Mai; Abe, Shin-ichi; Semba, Kentaro; Goda, Nobuhito

    2017-01-01

    Neuregulin1 is an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain-containing protein that has multiple isoforms and functions as a local mediator in the control of various cellular functions. Here we show that type I isoform of neuregulin1 with an α-type EGF-like domain (Nrg1α) is the major isoform in mouse liver and regulates hepatic glucose production. Forced expression of Nrg1α in mouse liver enhanced systemic glucose disposal and decreased hepatic glucose production with reduced fasting blood glucose levels. Nuclear forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) and its downstream targets, PEPCK and G6Pase, were suppressed in liver and isolated hepatocytes by Nrg1α overexpression. In contrast, silencing of Nrg1α enhanced glucose production with increased PEPCK and G6Pase expressions in cAMP/dexamethasone-stimulated hepatocytes. Mechanistically, the recombinant α-type EGF-like domain of NRG1α (rNRG1α) stimulated the ERBB3 signalling pathway in hepatocytes, resulting in decreased nuclear FoxO1 accumulation via activation of both the AKT and ERK pathways. In addition, acute treatment with rNRG1α also suppressed elevation of blood glucose levels after both glucose and pyruvate challenge. Although a liver-specific deletion of Nrg1 gene in mice showed little effect on systemic glucose metabolism, these results suggest that NRG1α have a novel regulatory function in hepatic gluconeogenesis by regulating the ERBB3-AKT/ERK-FoxO1 cascade. PMID:28218289

  1. [Suppression of cycling activity in sheep using parenteral progestagen treatment].

    PubMed

    Janett, F; Camponovo, L; Lanker, U; Hässig, M; Thun, R

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two synthetic progestagen preparations Chlormadinone acetate (CAP, Chronosyn, Veterinaria AG Zürich) and Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, Nadigest, G Streuli & Co. Uznach) on cycling activity and fertility in sheep. A flock of 28 non pregnant white alpine sheep was randomly divided into three groups, A (n = 10), B (n = 9) and C (n = 9). During a period of 4 weeks the cycling activity was confirmed by blood progesterone analysis. Thereafter, the animals of group A were treated with 50 mg CAP, those of group B with 140 mg MPA and those of group C with physiological saline solution. All injections were given intramuscularly. Suppression of endogenous progesterone secretion lasted from 28 to 49 days (mean = 39 days) in group A and from 42 to 70 days (mean = 50 days) in group B. The synchronization effect of both preparations was unsatisfactory as the occurrence of first estrus was distributed over a period of 3 weeks in group A and 4 weeks in group B. These findings could also be confirmed by the lambing period which lasted 52 days in group A and 36 days in group B. Control animals lambed within 9 days due to the synchronizing effect of the ram. The first fertile estrus was observed 36 days (group A) and 45 days (group B) after the treatment. In group A all 10 animals and in groups B and C 8 of 9 ewes each became pregnant. Parenteral progestagen application with CAP and MPA is a simple, safe and reversible method of estrus suppression in the sheep. The minimal suppressive duration of 4 (CAP) and 5 weeks (MPA) is not sufficient when a period of 3 months (alpine pasture period) is desired.

  2. Ferroptosis as a p53-mediated activity during tumour suppression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Le; Kon, Ning; Li, Tongyuan; Wang, Shang-Jui; Su, Tao; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Baer, Richard; Gu, Wei

    2015-04-02

    Although p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis serve as critical barriers to cancer development, emerging evidence suggests that the metabolic activities of p53 are also important. Here we show that p53 inhibits cystine uptake and sensitizes cells to ferroptosis, a non-apoptotic form of cell death, by repressing expression of SLC7A11, a key component of the cystine/glutamate antiporter. Notably, p53(3KR), an acetylation-defective mutant that fails to induce cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, fully retains the ability to regulate SLC7A11 expression and induce ferroptosis upon reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced stress. Analysis of mutant mice shows that these non-canonical p53 activities contribute to embryonic development and the lethality associated with loss of Mdm2. Moreover, SLC7A11 is highly expressed in human tumours, and its overexpression inhibits ROS-induced ferroptosis and abrogates p53(3KR)-mediated tumour growth suppression in xenograft models. Our findings uncover a new mode of tumour suppression based on p53 regulation of cystine metabolism, ROS responses and ferroptosis.

  3. Design and test of three active flutter suppression controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Adams, William M.; Srinathkumar, S.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1991-01-01

    Three flutter suppression control law design techniques are presented. Each uses multiple control surfaces and/or sensors. The first uses linear combinations of several accelerometer signals together with dynamic compensation to synthesize the modal rate of the critical mode for feedback to distributed control surfaces. The second uses traditional tools (pole/zero loci and Nyquist diagrams) to develop a good understanding of the flutter mechanism and produce a controller with minimal complexity and good robustness to plant uncertainty. The third starts with a minimum energy Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller, applies controller order reduction, and then modifies weight and noise covariance matrices to improve multi-variable robustness. The resulting designs were implemented digitally and tested subsonically on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model. Test results presented here include plant characteristics, maximum attained closed-loop dynamic pressure, and Root Mean Square control surface activity. A key result is that simultaneous symmetric and antisymmetric flutter suppression was achieved by the second control law, with a 24 percent increase in attainable dynamic pressure.

  4. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution.

  5. Active flutter suppression using optical output feedback digital controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A method for synthesizing digital active flutter suppression controllers using the concept of optimal output feedback is presented. A convergent algorithm is employed to determine constrained control law parameters that minimize an infinite time discrete quadratic performance index. Low order compensator dynamics are included in the control law and the compensator parameters are computed along with the output feedback gain as part of the optimization process. An input noise adjustment procedure is used to improve the stability margins of the digital active flutter controller. Sample rate variation, prefilter pole variation, control structure variation and gain scheduling are discussed. A digital control law which accommodates computation delay can stabilize the wing with reasonable rms performance and adequate stability margins.

  6. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of active controls on the suppression of flutter and gust alleviation of two different types of subsonic aircraft (the Arava, twin turboprop STOL transport, and the Westwind twin-jet business transport) are investigated. The active controls are introduced in pairs which include, in any chosen wing strip, a leading-edge (LE) control and a trailing-edge (TE) control. Each control surface is allowed to be driven by a combined linear-rotational sensor system, located on the activated strip. The control law, which translates the sensor signals into control surface rotations, is based on the concept of aerodynamic energy. The results indicate the extreme effectiveness of the active systems in controlling flutter. A single system spanning 10% of the wing semispan made the Arava flutter-free, and a similar active system, for the Westwind aircraft, yielded a reduction of 75% in the maximum bending moment of the wing and a reduction of 90% in the acceleration of the cg of the aircraft. Results for simultaneous activation of several LE - TE systems are presented. Further work needed to bring the investigation to completion is also discussed.

  7. NLRC4 suppresses melanoma tumor progression independently of inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Ann M.; Colegio, Oscar R.; Hornick, Emma E.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Martin, Matthew D.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Norian, Lyse A.; Zhang, Weizhou; Cassel, Suzanne L.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the NLR family can assemble inflammasome complexes with the adaptor protein ASC and caspase-1 that result in the activation of caspase-1 and the release of IL-1β and IL-18. Although the NLRC4 inflammasome is known to have a protective role in tumorigenesis, there is an increased appreciation for the inflammasome-independent actions of NLRC4. Here, we utilized a syngeneic subcutaneous murine model of B16F10 melanoma to explore the role of NLRC4 in tumor suppression. We found that NLRC4-deficient mice exhibited enhanced tumor growth that was independent of the inflammasome components ASC and caspase-1. Nlrc4 expression was critical for cytokine and chemokine production in tumor-associated macrophages and was necessary for the generation of protective IFN-γ–producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Tumor progression was diminished when WT or caspase-1–deficient, but not NLRC4-deficient, macrophages were coinjected with B16F10 tumor cells in NLRC4-deficient mice. Finally, examination of human primary melanomas revealed the extensive presence of NLRC4+ tumor-associated macrophages. In contrast, there was a paucity of NLRC4+ tumor-associated macrophages observed in human metastatic melanoma, supporting the concept that NLRC4 expression controls tumor growth. These results reveal a critical role for NLRC4 in suppressing tumor growth in an inflammasome-independent manner. PMID:27617861

  8. Suppression of integrin activation by activated Ras or Raf does not correlate with bulk activation of ERK MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Paul E; Oertli, Beat; Hansen, Malene; Chou, Fan-Li; Willumsen, Berthe M; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2002-07-01

    The rapid modulation of ligand-binding affinity ("activation") is a central property of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors. The Ras family of small GTP-binding proteins and their downstream effectors are key players in regulating integrin activation. H-Ras can suppress integrin activation in fibroblasts via its downstream effector kinase, Raf-1. In contrast, to H-Ras, a closely related small GTP-binding protein R-Ras has the opposite activity, and promotes integrin activation. To gain insight into the regulation of integrin activation by Ras GTPases, we created a series of H-Ras/R-Ras chimeras. We found that a 35-amino acid stretch of H-Ras was required for full suppressive activity. Furthermore, the suppressive chimeras were weak activators of the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway, suggesting that the suppression of integrin activation may be independent of the activation of the bulk of ERK MAP kinase. Additional data demonstrating that the ability of H-Ras or Raf-1 to suppress integrin activation was unaffected by inhibition of bulk ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation supported this hypothesis. Thus, the suppression of integrin activation is a Raf kinase induced regulatory event that can be mediated independently of bulk activation of the ERK MAP-kinase pathway.

  9. Adenine suppresses IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silwal, Prashanta; Shin, Keuna; Choi, Seulgi; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, Jin Bong; Lee, Hyang-Joo; Koo, Suk-Jin; Chung, Kun-Hoe; Namgung, Uk; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun-Young; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung-Kiel

    2015-06-01

    Nucleobase adenine is produced by dividing human lymphoblasts mainly from polyamine synthesis and inhibits immunological functions of lymphocytes. We investigated the anti-allergic effect of adenine on IgE-mediated mast cell activation in vitro and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of adenine to IgE-sensitized mice attenuated IgE-mediated PCA reaction in a dose dependent manner, resulting in a median effective concentration of 4.21 mg/kg. In mast cell cultures, only adenine among cytosine, adenine, adenosine, ADP and ATP dose-dependently suppressed FcɛRI (a high affinity receptor for IgE)-mediated degranulation with a median inhibitory concentration of 1.6mM. It also blocked the production of LTB4, an inflammatory lipid mediator, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-4. In addition, adenine blocked thapsigargin-induced degranulation which is FcɛRI-independent but shares FcɛRI-dependent signaling events. Adenine inhibited the phosphorylation of signaling molecules important to FcɛRI-mediated allergic reactions such as Syk, PLCγ2, Gab2, Akt, and mitogen activated protein kinases ERK and JNK. From this result, we report for the first time that adenine inhibits PCA in mice and allergic reaction by inhibiting FcɛRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells. Therefore, adenine may be useful for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. Also, the upregulation of adenine production may provide another mechanism for suppressing mast cell activity especially at inflammatory sites.

  10. Transcription through enhancers suppresses their activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enhancer elements determine the level of target gene transcription in a tissue-specific manner, providing for individual patterns of gene expression in different cells. Knowledge of the mechanisms controlling enhancer action is crucial for understanding global regulation of transcription. In particular, enhancers are often localized within transcribed regions of the genome. A number of experiments suggest that transcription can have both positive and negative effects on regulatory elements. In this study, we performed direct tests for the effect of transcription on enhancer activity. Results Using a transgenic reporter system, we investigated the relationship between the presence of pass-through transcription and the activity of Drosophila enhancers controlling the expression of the white and yellow genes. The results show that transcription from different promoters affects the activity of enhancers, counteracting their ability to activate the target genes. As expected, the presence of a transcriptional terminator between the inhibiting promoter and the affected enhancer strongly reduces the suppression. Moreover, transcription leads to dislodging of the Zeste protein that is responsible for the enhancer-dependent regulation of the white gene, suggesting a 'transcription interference’ mechanism for this regulation. Conclusions Our findings suggest a role for pass-through transcription in negative regulation of enhancer activity. PMID:24279291

  11. C23 promotes tumorigenesis via suppressing p53 activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Hu, Guilin; Fang, Xing; Hu, Yamin; Tao, Tingting; Wei, Xin; Tang, Haitao; Huang, Baojun; Hu, Wanglai

    2016-01-01

    C23 is an abundant and multi-functional protein, which plays an important role in various biological processes, including ribosome biogenesis and maturation, cell cycle checkpoints and transcriptional regulation [1, 2]. However, the role of C23 in controlling tumorigenesis has not been well defined. Here we report that C23 is highly expressed in cancer cells and the elevated expression of C23 facilitates cancer cell proliferation in vitro and tumor xenograft growth in vivo. Notably, C23 binds to p53 through its GAR domain and suppresses the transcriptional activity of p53 under DNA damage and hypoxia. Moreover, the GAR domain is critical for C23-mediated tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings reveal a novel role of C23 in tumorigenesis and suggest that C23 may represent a potential therapeutic target for treating malignancy. PMID:27506938

  12. Immune-suppressive activity of punicalagin via inhibition of NFAT activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Ik; Kim, Byoung-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Shin; Lee, Samkeun; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Lim, Jong-Soon

    2008-07-11

    Since T cell activation is central to the development of autoimmune diseases, we screened a natural product library comprising 1400 samples of medicinal herbal extracts, to identify compounds that suppress T cell activity. Punicalagin (PCG) isolated from the fruit of Punica granatum was identified as a potent immune suppressant, based on its inhibitory action on the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). PCG downregulated the mRNA and soluble protein expression of interleukin-2 from anti-CD3/anti-CD28-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells and suppressed mixed leukocytes reaction (MLR) without exhibiting cytotoxicity to the cells. In vivo, the PCG treatment inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced chronic ear edema in mice and decreased CD3+ T cell infiltration of the inflamed tissue. These results suggest that PCG could be a potential candidate for the therapeutics of various immune pathologies.

  13. Paeonol Suppresses Neuroinflammatory Responses in LPS-Activated Microglia Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Li Xia; Tong, Xiaoyun; Zeng, Jing; Tu, Yuanqing; Wu, Saicun; Li, Manping; Deng, Huaming; Zhu, Miaomiao; Li, Xiucun; Nie, Hong; Yang, Li; Huang, Feng

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we assessed the anti-inflammatory effects of paeonol (PAE) in LPS-activated N9 microglia cells, as well as its underlying molecular mechanisms. PAE had no adverse effect on the viability of murine microglia N9 cell line within a broad range (0.12∼75 μM). When N9 cell line was activated by LPS, PAE (0.6, 3, 15 μM) significantly suppressed the release of proinflammatory products, such as nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), demonstrated by the ELISA assay. Moreover, the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were significantly reduced in PAE-treated N9 microglia cells. We also examined some proteins involved in immune signaling pathways and found that PAE treatment significantly decreased the expression of TLR4, MyD88, IRAK4, TNFR-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), p-IkB-α, and NF-kB p65, as well as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway molecules p-P38, p-JNK, and p-ERK, indicating that PAE might act on these signaling pathways to inhibit inflammatory responses. Overall, we found that PAE had anti-inflammatory effect on LPS-activated N9 microglia cells, possibly via inhibiting the TLR4 signaling pathway, and it could be a potential drug therapy for inflammation-associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Hybrid Active/Passive Jet Engine Noise Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parente, C. A.; Arcas, N.; Walker, B. E.; Hersh, A. S.; Rice, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A novel adaptive segmented liner concept has been developed that employs active control elements to modify the in-duct sound field to enhance the tone-suppressing performance of passive liner elements. This could potentially allow engine designs that inherently produce more tone noise but less broadband noise, or could allow passive liner designs to more optimally address high frequency broadband noise. A proof-of-concept validation program was undertaken, consisting of the development of an adaptive segmented liner that would maximize attenuation of two radial modes in a circular or annular duct. The liner consisted of a leading active segment with dual annuli of axially spaced active Helmholtz resonators, followed by an optimized passive liner and then an array of sensing microphones. Three successively complex versions of the adaptive liner were constructed and their performances tested relative to the performance of optimized uniform passive and segmented passive liners. The salient results of the tests were: The adaptive segmented liner performed well in a high flow speed model fan inlet environment, was successfully scaled to a high sound frequency and successfully attenuated three radial modes using sensor and active resonator arrays that were designed for a two mode, lower frequency environment.

  15. Nitroxyl (HNO) suppresses vascular Nox2 oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alyson A; Maxwell, Kate F; Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Bullen, Michelle L; Ku, Jacqueline M; Michael De Silva, T; Selemidis, Stavros; Hooker, Elizabeth U; Drummond, Grant R; Sobey, Christopher G; Kemp-Harper, Barbara K

    2013-07-01

    Nox2 oxidase activity underlies the oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction associated with several vascular-related diseases. We have reported that nitric oxide (NO) decreases reactive oxygen species production by endothelial Nox2. This study tested the hypothesis that nitroxyl (HNO), the redox sibling of NO, also suppresses vascular Nox2 oxidase activity. Specifically, we examined the influence of two well-characterized HNO donors, Angeli's salt and isopropylamine NONOate (IPA/NO), on Nox2-dependent responses to angiotensin II (reactive oxygen species production and vasoconstriction) in mouse cerebral arteries. Angiotensin II (0.1μmol/L)-stimulated superoxide (measured by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence) and hydrogen peroxide (Amplex red fluorescence) levels in cerebral arteries (pooled basilar and middle cerebral (MCA)) from wild-type (WT) mice were ~60% lower (P<0.05) in the presence of either Angeli's salt (1μmol/L) or IPA/NO (1μmol/L). Similarly, phorbyl 12,13-dibutyrate (10μmol/L; Nox2 activator)-stimulated hydrogen peroxide levels were ~40% lower in the presence of IPA/NO (1μmol/L; P<0.05). The ability of IPA/NO to decrease superoxide levels was reversible and abolished by the HNO scavenger l-cysteine (3mmol/L; P<0.05), but was unaffected by hydroxocobalamin (100μmol/L; NO scavenger), ODQ (10μmol/L; soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor), or Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS (10μmol/L; cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase inhibitor). Angiotensin II-stimulated superoxide was substantially less in arteries from Nox2-deficient (Nox2(-/y)) versus WT mice (P<0.05). In contrast to WT, IPA/NO (1μmol/L) had no effect on superoxide levels in arteries from Nox2(-/y) mice. Finally, angiotensin II (1-1000μmol/L)-induced constriction of WT MCA was virtually abolished by IPA/NO (1μmol/L), whereas constrictor responses to either the thromboxane A2 mimetic U46619 (1-100 nmol/L) or high potassium (122.7mmol/L) were unaffected. In conclusion, HNO

  16. Coupling between Nutrient Availability and Thyroid Hormone Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Lartey, Lattoya J.; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro; O-Sullivan, InSug; Unterman, Terry G.; Bianco, Antonio C.

    2015-01-01

    The activity of the thyroid gland is stimulated by food availability via leptin-induced thyrotropin-releasing hormone/thyroid-stimulating hormone expression. Here we show that food availability also stimulates thyroid hormone activation by accelerating the conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine via type 2 deiodinase in mouse skeletal muscle and in a cell model transitioning from 0.1 to 10% FBS. The underlying mechanism is transcriptional derepression of DIO2 through the mTORC2 pathway as defined in rictor knockdown cells. In cells kept in 0.1% FBS, there is DIO2 inhibition via FOXO1 binding to the DIO2 promoter. Repression of DIO2 by FOXO1 was confirmed using its specific inhibitor AS1842856 or adenoviral infection of constitutively active FOXO1. ChIP studies indicate that 4 h after 10% FBS-containing medium, FOXO1 binding markedly decreases, and the DIO2 promoter is activated. Studies in the insulin receptor FOXO1 KO mouse indicate that insulin is a key signaling molecule in this process. We conclude that FOXO1 represses DIO2 during fasting and that derepression occurs via nutritional activation of the PI3K-mTORC2-Akt pathway. PMID:26499800

  17. Monetary reward suppresses anterior insula activity during social pain

    PubMed Central

    Cristofori, Irene; Harquel, Sylvain; Isnard, Jean; Mauguière, François

    2015-01-01

    Social pain after exclusion by others activates brain regions also involved in physical pain. Here we evaluated whether monetary reward could compensate for the negative feeling of social pain in the brain. To address this question we used the unique technique of intracranial electroencephalography in subjects with drug resistant epilepsy. Specifically, we recorded theta activity from intracranial electrodes implanted in the insular cortex while subjects experienced conditions of social inclusion and exclusion associated with monetary gain and loss. Our study confirmed that theta rhythm in the insular cortex is the neural signature of social exclusion. We found that while monetary gain suppresses the effect of social pain in the anterior insula, there is no such effect in the posterior insula. These results imply that the anterior insula can use secondary reward signals to compensate for the negative feeling of social pain. Hence, here we propose that the anterior insula plays a pivotal role in integrating contingencies to update social pain feelings. Finally, the possibility to modulate the theta rhythm through the reward system might open new avenues of research for treating pathologies related to social exclusion. PMID:25964499

  18. Caerulomycin A Suppresses Immunity by Inhibiting T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Arun; Khatri, Neeraj; Vohra, Rakesh M.; Jolly, Ravinder S.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Caerulomycin A (CaeA) is a known antifungal and antibiotic agent. Further, CaeA is reported to induce the expansion of regulatory T cell and prolongs the survival of skin allografts in mouse model of transplantation. In the current study, CaeA was purified and characterized from a novel species of actinomycetes, Actinoalloteichus spitiensis. The CaeA was identified for its novel immunosuppressive property by inhibiting in vitro and in vivo function of T cells. Methods Isolation, purification and characterization of CaeA were performed using High Performance Flash Chromatography (HPFC), NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. In vitro and in vivo T cell studies were conducted in mice using flowcytometry, ELISA and thymidine-[methyl-3H] incorporation. Results CaeA significantly suppressed T cell activation and IFN-γ secretion. Further, it inhibited the T cells function at G1 phase of cell cycle. No apoptosis was noticed by CaeA at a concentration responsible for inducing T cell retardation. Furthermore, the change in the function of B cells but not macrophages was observed. The CaeA as well exhibited substantial inhibitory activity in vivo. Conclusion This study describes for the first time novel in vitro and in vivo immunosuppressive function of CaeA on T cells and B cells. CaeA has enough potential to act as a future immunosuppressive drug. PMID:25286329

  19. Cytokine Treatment of Macrophage Suppression of T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Daniel; Bucknum, Amanda; Kozlowski, Megan; Matlack, Robin; Riggs, James

    2009-01-01

    High Mφ:T cell ratios suppress the immune response to the retroviral superantigen Mls by IFNγ-triggered production of the arg- and trp-consuming enzymes iNOS and IDO. Attempts to reverse suppression by treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines revealed that IL-6 improved the T cell response to Mls and the pro-hematopoietic cyokines IL-3 and GM-CSF increased suppression. GM-CSF treatment increased Mφ expression of CD80, a ligand for the immune suppressive B7H1 and CTLA-4 receptors. These results illustrate potential strategies for reversing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity characteristic of the high Mφ:T cell ratios found in many tumors. PMID:19249120

  20. Cytokine treatment of macrophage suppression of T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Daniel; Bucknum, Amanda; Kozlowski, Megan; Matlack, Robin; Riggs, James

    2010-01-01

    High Mphi:T cell ratios suppress the immune response to the retroviral superantigen Mls by IFNgamma-triggered production of the arg- and trp-consuming enzymes iNOS and IDO. Attempts to reverse suppression by treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines revealed that IL-6 improved the T cell response to Mls and the pro-hematopoietic cyokines IL-3 and GM-CSF increased suppression. GM-CSF treatment increased Mphi expression of CD80, a ligand for the immune suppressive B7H1 and CTLA-4 receptors. These results illustrate potential strategies for reversing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity characteristic of the high Mphi:T cell ratios found in many tumors.

  1. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  2. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-09

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  3. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  4. Mincle suppresses Toll-like receptor 4 activation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Ochi, Atsuo; Batel, Jennifer; Deutsch, Michael; Barilla, Rocky; Seifert, Lena; Pachter, H Leon; Daley, Donnele; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Miller, George

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of Toll-like receptor responses is critical for limiting tissue injury and autoimmunity in both sepsis and sterile inflammation. We found that Mincle, a C-type lectin receptor, regulates proinflammatory Toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Specifically, Mincle ligation diminishes Toll-like receptor 4-mediated inflammation, whereas Mincle deletion or knockdown results in marked hyperresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide in vitro, as well as overwhelming lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation in vivo. Mechanistically, Mincle deletion does not up-regulate Toll-like receptor 4 expression or reduce interleukin 10 production after Toll-like receptor 4 ligation; however, Mincle deletion decreases production of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent inhibitory intermediate suppressor of cytokine signaling 1, A20, and ABIN3 and increases expression of the Toll-like receptor 4 coreceptor CD14. Blockade of CD14 mitigates the increased sensitivity of Mincle(-/-) leukocytes to Toll-like receptor 4 ligation. Collectively, we describe a major role for Mincle in suppressing Toll-like receptor 4 responses and implicate its importance in nonmycobacterial models of inflammation.

  5. FANCD2 Activates Transcription of TAp63 and Suppresses Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunmi; Kim, Hyungjin; Kim, Jung Min; Primack, Benjamin; Vidal-Cardenas, Sofia; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan D.; Mills, Alea A.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by an increased susceptibility to squamous cell cancers. Fifteen FA genes are known, and the encoded proteins cooperate in a common DNA repair pathway. A critical step is the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 protein, and cells from most FA patients are deficient in this step. How monoubiquitinated FANCD2 suppresses squamous cell cancers is unknown. Here we show that Fancd2-deficient mice are prone to Ras oncogene-driven skin carcinogenesis, while Usp1-deficient mice, expressing elevated cellular levels of Fancd2-Ub, are resistant to skin tumors. Moreover, Fancd2-Ub activates the transcription of the tumor suppressor TAp63, thereby promoting cellular senescence and blocking skin tumorigenesis. For FA patients, the reduction of FANCD2-Ub and TAp63 protein levels may account for their susceptibility to squamous cell neoplasia. Taken together, Usp1 inhibition may be a useful strategy for upregulating TAp63 and preventing or treating squamous cell cancers in the general non-FA population. PMID:23806336

  6. Honokiol suppresses survival signals mediated by Ras-dependent phospholipase D activity in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Avalon; Zheng, Yang; Zhao, Chen; Toschi, Alfredo; Fan, Judy; Shraibman, Natalie; Brown, H Alex; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Foster, David A; Arbiser, Jack L

    2008-07-01

    Elevated phospholipase D (PLD) activity provides a survival signal in several human cancer cell lines and suppresses apoptosis when cells are subjected to the stress of serum withdrawal. Thus, targeting PLD survival signals has potential to suppress survival in cancer cells that depend on PLD for survival. Honokiol is a compound that suppresses tumor growth in mouse models. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of honokiol on PLD survival signals and the Ras dependence of these signals. The effect of honokiol upon PLD activity was examined in human cancer cell lines where PLD activity provides a survival signal. The dependence of PLD survival signals on Ras was investigated, as was the effect of honokiol on Ras activation. We report here that honokiol suppresses PLD activity in human cancer cells where PLD has been shown to suppress apoptosis. PLD activity is commonly elevated in response to the stress of serum withdrawal, and, importantly, the stress-induced increase in PLD activity is selectively suppressed by honokiol. The stress-induced increase in PLD activity was accompanied by increased Ras activation, and the stress-induced increase in PLD activity in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells was dependent on a Ras. The PLD activity was also dependent on the GTPases RalA and ADP ribosylation factor. Importantly, honokiol suppressed Ras activation. The data provided here indicate that honokiol may be a valuable therapeutic reagent for targeting a large number of human cancers that depend on Ras and PLD for their survival.

  7. TGFβ signaling regulates the timing of CNS myelination by modulating oligodendrocyte progenitor cell cycle exit through SMAD3/4/FoxO1/Sp1.

    PubMed

    Palazuelos, Javier; Klingener, Michael; Aguirre, Adan

    2014-06-04

    Research on myelination has focused on identifying molecules capable of inducing oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation in an effort to develop strategies that promote functional myelin regeneration in demyelinating disorders. Here, we show that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling is crucial for allowing oligodendrocyte progenitor (OP) cell cycle withdrawal, and therefore, for oligodendrogenesis and postnatal CNS myelination. Enhanced oligodendrogenesis and subcortical white matter (SCWM) myelination was detected after TGFβ gain of function, while TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) deletion in OPs prevents their development into mature myelinating OLs, leading to SCWM hypomyelination in mice. TGFβ signaling modulates OP cell cycle withdrawal and differentiation through the transcriptional modulation of c-myc and p21 gene expression, mediated by the interaction of SMAD3/4 with Sp1 and FoxO1 transcription factors. Our study is the first to demonstrate an autonomous and crucial role of TGFβ signaling in OL development and CNS myelination, and may provide new avenues in the treatment of demyelinating diseases.

  8. Preparatory activity in visual cortex indexes distractor suppression during covert spatial orienting.

    PubMed

    Serences, John T; Yantis, Steven; Culberson, Andrew; Awh, Edward

    2004-12-01

    The deployment of spatial attention induces retinotopically specific increases in neural activity that occur even before a target stimulus is presented. Although this preparatory activity is thought to prime the attended regions, thereby improving perception and recognition, it is not yet clear whether this activity is a manifestation of signal enhancement at the attended locations or suppression of interference from distracting stimuli (or both). We investigated the functional role of these preparatory shifts by isolating a distractor suppression component of selection. Behavioral data have shown that manipulating the probability that visual distractors will appear modulates distractor suppression without concurrent changes in signal enhancement. In 2 experiments, functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased cue-evoked activity in retinotopically specific regions of visual cortex when increased distractor suppression was elicited by a high probability of distractors. This finding directly links cue-evoked preparatory activity in visual cortex with a distractor suppression component of visual selective attention.

  9. Iron deficiency suppresses ileal nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, M I; Choi, S H; Swartz-Basile, D A; Nakeeb, A; Sarna, S K; Pitt, H A

    2001-01-01

    (3) a normal excitatory response. We conclude that iron deficiency suppresses ileal NOS activity.

  10. Non-muscle Mlck is required for β-catenin- and FoxO1-dependent downregulation of Cldn5 in IL-1β-mediated barrier dysfunction in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Beard, Richard S; Haines, Ricci J; Wu, Kevin Y; Reynolds, Jason J; Davis, Stephanie M; Elliott, John E; Malinin, Nikolay L; Chatterjee, Victor; Cha, Byeong J; Wu, Mack H; Yuan, Sarah Y

    2014-04-15

    Aberrant elevation in the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) contributes to neuroinflammatory diseases. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction is a hallmark phenotype of neuroinflammation. It is known that IL-1β directly induces BBB hyperpermeability but the mechanisms remain unclear. Claudin-5 (Cldn5) is a tight junction protein found at endothelial cell-cell contacts that are crucial for maintaining brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMVEC) integrity. Transcriptional regulation of Cldn5 has been attributed to the transcription factors β-catenin and forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1), and the signaling molecules regulating their nuclear translocation. Non-muscle myosin light chain kinase (nmMlck, encoded by the Mylk gene) is a key regulator involved in endothelial hyperpermeability, and IL-1β has been shown to mediate nmMlck-dependent barrier dysfunction in epithelia. Considering these factors, we tested the hypothesis that nmMlck modulates IL-1β-mediated downregulation of Cldn5 in BMVECs in a manner that depends on transcriptional repression mediated by β-catenin and FoxO1. We found that treating BMVECs with IL-1β induced barrier dysfunction concomitantly with the nuclear translocation of β-catenin and FoxO1 and the repression of Cldn5. Most importantly, using primary BMVECs isolated from mice null for nmMlck, we identified that Cldn5 repression caused by β-catenin and FoxO1 in IL-1β-mediated barrier dysfunction was dependent on nmMlck.

  11. Why the white bear is still there: electrophysiological evidence for ironic semantic activation during thought suppression.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Ryan J; Wicha, Nicole Y Y

    2010-02-26

    Much research has focused on the paradoxical effects of thought suppression, leading to the viewpoint that increases in unwanted thoughts are due to an ironic monitoring process that increases the activation of the very thoughts one is trying to rid from consciousness. However, it remains unclear from behavioral findings whether suppressed thoughts become more accessible during the act of suppression. In the current study, event-related potentials were recorded while participants suppressed or expressed thoughts of a focus word during a simple lexical decision task. Modulations in the N400 component reported here demonstrate the paradoxical effects occurring at the semantic level during suppression, as well as some evidence for the rebound effect after suppression periods. Interestingly, semantic activation was greater for focus words during suppression than expression, despite differences in the N1 window suggesting that expression elicited greater perceptual processing than suppression. Results provide electrophysiological evidence for the Ironic Process model and support recent claims of asymmetric network activation during thought suppression. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Why the White Bear is Still There: Electrophysiological Evidence for Ironic Semantic Activation during Thought Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Ryan J.; Wicha, Nicole Y. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Much research has focused on the paradoxical effects of thought suppression, leading to the viewpoint that increases in unwanted thoughts are due to an ironic monitoring process which increases the activation of the very thoughts one is trying to rid from consciousness. However, it remains unclear from behavioral findings whether suppressed thoughts become more accessible during the act of suppression. In the current study, event-related potentials were recorded while participants suppressed or expressed thoughts of a focus word during a simple lexical decision task. Modulations in the N400 component reported here demonstrate the paradoxical effects occurring at the semantic level during suppression, as well as some evidence for the rebound effect after suppression periods. Interestingly, semantic activation was greater for focus words during suppression than expression, despite differences in the N1 window suggesting that expression elicited greater perceptual processing than suppression. Results provide electrophysiological evidence for the Ironic Process model and support recent claims of asymmetric network activation during thought suppression. PMID:20044982

  13. Development and Flight Test of an Active Flutter Suppression System for the F-4F with Stores. Part I. Design of the Active Flutter Suppression System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    extensive research programs accompanied by wind tunnel tests in the field of active flutter and elastic mode suppression. In 1975, MBB conducted a successful...Pro- gram," Paper presented at the 51th SMP of AGARD, Athens 13-18 April 1980. 6. 0. Sensburg, J. Becker, H. Honlinger, "Active Control of Flutter and

  14. Quantitative activation suppression assay to evaluate human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell potency.

    PubMed

    Salem, Bahey; Miner, Samantha; Hensel, Nancy F; Battiwalla, Minoo; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Stroncek, David F; Gee, Adrian P; Hanley, Patrick J; Bollard, Catherine M; Ito, Sawa; Barrett, A John

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing use of cell therapies involving immune modulatory cells, there is a need for a simple standardized method to evaluate and compare the suppressive potency of different cell products. We used the Karpas 299 (K299) cell line as the reference suppressor cell to develop a standardized suppression assay to quantify the immune-modulatory capacity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs). Healthy donor CD4 T cells were co-cultured with the K299 cell line or with third-party BM-MSCs. After stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 beads, CD154 activation and proliferation of CD4 T cells were measured to calculate suppression. The K299 cell line reproducibly suppressed both the activation and proliferation of healthy donor CD4 T cells in a dose-dependent manner. A rapid (16-h) assay that was based on activation-suppression was selected for development. In replicate testing, there was an inherent variability of suppression of 11% coefficient of variation between different responder T cells. Suppression by BM-MSCs on different responders correlated with suppression by K299. We therefore used K299 suppression as the reference to define suppression potency of BM-MSCs in K299 Suppression Units. We found that inter-donor variability, passage number, method of manufacture and exposure of BM-MSCs to steroids or interferon-γ all affected BM-MSC potency of suppression. This method provides a platform for standardizing suppressor function to facilitate comparisons between laboratories and for use as a cell product release assay. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Lhcgr Expression in Granulosa Cells: Roles for PKA-Phosphorylated β-Catenin, TCF3, and FOXO1

    PubMed Central

    Law, Nathan C.; Weck, Jennifer; Kyriss, Brandon; Nilson, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian follicles lacking FSH or FSH receptors fail to progress to a preovulatory stage, resulting in infertility. One hallmark of the preovulatory follicle is the presence of luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptors (LHCGR) on granulosa cells (GCs). However, the mechanisms by which FSH induces Lhcgr gene expression are poorly understood. Our results show that protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathways are required for FSH to activate both the murine Lhcgr-luciferase reporter and expression of Lhcgr mRNA in rat GCs. Based on results showing that an adenovirus (Ad) expressing a steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) mutant that cannot bind β-catenin abolished FSH-induced Lhcgr mRNA, we evaluated the role of β-catenin in the regulation of Lhcgr gene expression. FSH promoted the PKA-dependent, PI3K-independent phosphorylation of β-catenin on Ser552 and Ser665. FSH activated the β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) artificial promoter-reporter TOPFlash via a PKA-dependent, PI3K-independent pathway, and dominant-negative (DN) TCF abolished FSH-activated Lhcgr-luciferase reporter and induction of Lhcgr mRNA. Microarray analysis of GCs treated with Ad-DN-TCF and FSH identified the Lhcgr as the most down-regulated gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results placed β-catenin phosphorylated on Ser552 and Ser675 and SF1 on the Lhcgr promoter in FSH-treated GCs; TCF3 was constitutively associated with the Lhcgr promoter. Transduction with an Ad-phospho-β-catenin mutant (Ser552/665/Asp) enhanced Lhcgr mRNA expression in FSH-treated cells greater than 3-fold. Finally, we identified a recognized PI3K/AKT target, forkhead box O1, as a negative regulator of Lhcgr mRNA expression. These results provide new understanding of the complex regulation of Lhcgr gene expression in GCs. PMID:23754802

  16. Report on a Cooperative Programme on Active Flutter Suppression,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    assistance to member nations for the purpose of increasing their scientific and technical potential ; - Recommending effective ways for the member nations to ...experience gained in the above-mentioned wind tunnel tests pointed the way to further improve- ments that could be made in the flutter suppression system...console at Northrop’s Hawthorne facility prior to test entry. The wind tunnel tests were performed in September-October 1979 at the NASA Langley Center

  17. Regulation of neuroblastoma differentiation by forkhead transcription factors FOXO1/3/4 through the receptor tyrosine kinase PDGFRA.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yang; Wang, Zhanxiang; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Yiru; Li, Xiaoyu; Liu, Huihui; Ye, Jing; You, Han

    2012-03-27

    Neuroblastoma is a common childhood malignant tumor originated from the neural crest-derived sympathetic nervous system. A crucial early event in neuroblastoma pathogenesis is arrested differentiation of neuroblasts at various stages. Treatment of neuroblastoma with TPA and PDGF-BB leads to terminal differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. However, the signaling pathways that are involved in this process remain largely unknown. Here, we report that inhibition of endogenous FOXO proteins attenuated TPA/PDGF-BB mediated differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. Activated FOXO transcription factors acted on PDGFRA promoter to direct its basal mRNA expression as well as its induction upon serum deprivation. Depletion of endogenous PDGFRA in neuroblastoma cells significantly diminished neurite formation and extension under TPA/PDGF-BB treatment. Furthermore, ectopic expression of PDGFRA abolished the blockage of neuroblastoma differentiation by FOXOs inhibition. These findings define the FOXO-PDGFRA axis as crucial mechanistic components that govern TPA-induced neuroblastoma differentiation.

  18. Growth suppressing activity for endothelial cells induced from macrophages by carboxymethylated curdlan.

    PubMed

    Usui, S; Matsunaga, T; Ukai, S; Kiho, T

    1997-11-01

    A carboxymethylated derivative of a linear (1-->3)-beta-D-glucan (CMCD) from Alcaligenes faecalis var. myxogenes acted directly on mouse peritoneal macrophages and mouse lymphoma P388D1 cells, and induced a growth suppressing activity for bovine artery endothelial cells (BAEs) from themselves at a concentration of 100 micrograms/ml. The suppressing activity was also detected in the mouse serum administered as an i.p. injection of CMCD at a dose of 100 mg/kg, suggesting that the growth suppressing activity was induced from macrophages potentiated by CMCD in vivo.

  19. Constitutive androstane receptor activation by 2,4,6-triphenyldioxane-1,3 suppresses the expression of the gluconeogenic genes.

    PubMed

    Kachaylo, Ekaterina M; Yarushkin, Andrei A; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O

    2012-03-15

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) has a central role in detoxification processes, regulating the expression of a set of genes involved in metabolism. The dual role of NR1I3 as both a xenosensor and as a regulator of endogenous energy metabolism has recently been accepted. Here, we investigated the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the glucose metabolising genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) by the cis isomer of 2,4,6-triphenyldioxane-1,3 (cisTPD), a highly effective NR1I3 activator in rat liver. It was shown that expression of the gluconeogenic genes PEPCK and G6Pase was repressed by cisTPD treatment under fasting conditions. Western-blot analysis demonstrated a clear reduction in the intensity of PEPCK and G6Pase immunobands from the livers of cisTPD-treated animals relative to bands from the livers of control animals. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that cisTPD prevents the binding of FOXO1 to the insulin response sequences in the PEPCK and G6Pase gene promoters in rat liver. Moreover, cisTPD-activated NR1I3 inhibited NR2A1 (HNF-4) transactivation by competing with NR2A1 for binding to the NR2A1-binding element (DR1-site) in the gluconeogenic gene promoters. Thus, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the cisTPD-activated NR1I3 participates in the regulation of the gluconeogenic genes PEPCK and G6Pase.

  20. Vitamin K2 stimulates osteoblastogenesis and suppresses osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Weitzmann, M Neale

    2011-01-01

    Several bone protective factors are reported to exhibit stimulatory activities on bone formation coupled with inhibitory effects on bone resorption; one such factor is vitamin K2. Vitamin K species [K1 (phylloquinone) and K2 (menaquinone)] have long been associated with bone protective activities and are receiving intense interest as nutritional supplements for the prevention or amelioration of bone disease in humans. However, the mechanisms of vitamin K action on the skeleton are poorly defined. Activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal transduction pathway is essential for osteoclast formation and resorption. By contrast, NF-κB signaling potently antagonizes osteoblast differentiation and function, prompting us to speculate that NF-κB antagonists may represent a novel class of dual anti-catabolic and pro-anabolic agents. We now show that vitamin K2 action on osteoblast and osteoclast formation and activity is accomplished by down-regulating basal and cytokine-induced NF-κB activation, by increasing IκB mRNA, in a γ-carboxylation-independent manner. Furthermore, vitamin K2 prevented repression by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) of SMAD signaling induced by either transforming growth factor ß (TGFß) or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Vitamin K2 further antagonized receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-induced NF-κB activation in osteoclast precursors. Our data provide a novel mechanism to explain the dual pro-anabolic and anti-catabolic activities of vitamin K2, and may further support the concept that pharmacological modulation of NF-κB signal transduction may constitute an effective mechanism for ameliorating pathological bone loss and for promoting bone health.

  1. miR-96, miR-145 and miR-9 expression increases, and IGF-1R and FOXO1 expression decreases in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of aging humans.

    PubMed

    Budzinska, Monika; Owczarz, Magdalena; Pawlik-Pachucka, Eliza; Roszkowska-Gancarz, Malgorzata; Slusarczyk, Przemyslaw; Puzianowska-Kuznicka, Monika

    2016-11-30

    In mammals, the IGF-1 pathway affects the phenotype of aging. Since the function of the immune system is modulated by IGF-1, it is plausible that immunosenescence might in part result from altered control by this pathway. We therefore examined whether the expression of IGF-1R, FOXO1, and FOXO3a in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) changes with age and if this might be due to changes in the expression of select miRNAs. The expression of IGF-1R, FOXO1, FOXO3a, as well as of miR-9, miR-96, miR-99a, miR-132, miR-145, and miR-182 was examined in PBMC of young (27.8 ± 3.7 years), elderly (65.6 ± 3.4 years), and long-lived (94.0 ± 3.7 years) Polish Caucasians using real-time PCR. mRNA/miRNA interactions were studied in HEK 293 cells using luciferase-expressing pmirGLO reporter vector. The median expression of IGF-1R decreased with age (p < 0.000001), as did the expression of FOXO1 (p < 0.000001), while the expression of FOXO3a remained stable. We also found an age-associated increase of the median expression of miR-96 (p = 0.002), miR-145 (p = 0.024) and miR-9 (p = 0.026), decrease of the expression of miR-99a (p = 0.037), and no changes regarding miR-132 and miR-182. Functional studies revealed that miR-96 and miR-182 interacted with human IGF-1R mRNA, and that miR-145 and miR-132 interacted with human FOXO1 mRNA. The age-associated higher expression of miR-96 and miR-145 might contribute to the lower expression of IGF-1R while the higher expression of miR-96, miR-145 and miR-9 might contribute to the lower expression of FOXO1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of aging humans. Sustained expression/function of FOXO3a but not of the other two genes might be important for the maintenance of the immune system function in these individuals.

  2. Design and experimental validation of a flutter suppression controller for the active flexible wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of an active flutter suppression controller for the Active Flexible Wing wind tunnel model is presented. The design is accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and extensive simulation based analysis. The design approach uses a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple controller structure to meet stringent design specifications. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite modeling errors in predicted flutter dynamic pressure and flutter frequency. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with another controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  3. Flutter suppression for the Active Flexible Wing - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, M. R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of a control law for an active flutter suppression system for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design was accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach relied on a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple control law structure. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in the design model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a rolling maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  4. Flutter suppression for the Active Flexible Wing - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, M. R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of a control law for an active flutter suppression system for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design was accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach relied on a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple control law structure. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in the design model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a rolling maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  5. Helicopter air resonance modeling and suppression using active control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, M. D.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1991-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. Using this mathematical model, a nominal configuration is selected with an air resonance instability throughout most of its flight envelope. A multivariable compensator is then designed using two swashplate inputs and a single-body roll rate measurement. The controller design is based on the linear quadratic Gaussian technique and the loop transfer recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout a wide range of helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  6. Helicopter air resonance modeling and suppression using active control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, M. D.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1991-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. Using this mathematical model, a nominal configuration is selected with an air resonance instability throughout most of its flight envelope. A multivariable compensator is then designed using two swashplate inputs and a single-body roll rate measurement. The controller design is based on the linear quadratic Gaussian technique and the loop transfer recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout a wide range of helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  7. HMGB1 enhances immune suppression by facilitating the differentiation and suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Katherine H; Sinha, Pratima; Horn, Lucas A; Clements, Virginia K; Yang, Huan; Li, Jianhua; Tracey, Kevin J; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-10-15

    Chronic inflammation often precedes malignant transformation and later drives tumor progression. Likewise, subversion of the immune system plays a role in tumor progression, with tumoral immune escape now well recognized as a crucial hallmark of cancer. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are elevated in most individuals with cancer, where their accumulation and suppressive activity are driven by inflammation. Thus, MDSCs may define an element of the pathogenic inflammatory processes that drives immune escape. The secreted alarmin HMGB1 is a proinflammatory partner, inducer, and chaperone for many proinflammatory molecules that MDSCs develop. Therefore, in this study, we examined HMGB1 as a potential regulator of MDSCs. In murine tumor systems, HMGB1 was ubiquitous in the tumor microenvironment, activating the NF-κB signal transduction pathway in MDSCs and regulating their quantity and quality. We found that HMGB1 promotes the development of MDSCs from bone marrow progenitor cells, contributing to their ability to suppress antigen-driven activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, HMGB1 increased MDSC-mediated production of IL-10, enhanced crosstalk between MDSCs and macrophages, and facilitated the ability of MDSCs to downregulate expression of the T-cell homing receptor L-selectin. Overall, our results revealed a pivotal role for HMGB1 in the development and cancerous contributions of MDSCs. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Tumour-suppression activity of the proapoptotic regulator Par4.

    PubMed

    García-Cao, Isabel; Duran, Angeles; Collado, Manuel; Carrascosa, Maria J; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana M; Diaz-Meco, Maria T; Moscat, Jorge; Serrano, Manuel

    2005-06-01

    The proapoptotic protein encoded by Par4 (prostate apoptosis response 4) has been implicated in tumour suppression, particularly in the prostate. We report here that Par4-null mice are prone to develop tumours, both spontaneously and on carcinogenic treatment. The endometrium and prostate of Par4-null mice were particularly sensitive to the development of proliferative lesions. Most (80%) Par4-null females presented endometrial hyperplasia by 9 months of age, and a significant proportion (36%) developed endometrial adenocarcinomas after 1 year of age. Similarly, Par4-null males showed a high incidence of prostate hyperplasia and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias, and were extraordinarily sensitive to testosterone-induced prostate hyperplasia. Finally, the uterus and prostate of young Par4-null mice have increased levels of the apoptosis inhibitor XIAP (X-chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis), supporting the previously proposed function of Par4 as an inhibitor of the (zeta)PKC (atypical protein kinase)-NF-(kappa)B (nuclear factor-(kappa)B)-XIAP pathway. These data show that Par4 has an important role in tumour suppression, with a particular relevance in the endometrium and prostate.

  9. Tumour-suppression activity of the proapoptotic regulator Par4

    PubMed Central

    García-Cao, Isabel; Duran, Angeles; Collado, Manuel; Carrascosa, Maria J.; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana M.; Diaz-Meco, Maria T.; Moscat, Jorge; Serrano, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    The proapoptotic protein encoded by Par4 (prostate apoptosis response 4) has been implicated in tumour suppression, particularly in the prostate. We report here that Par4-null mice are prone to develop tumours, both spontaneously and on carcinogenic treatment. The endometrium and prostate of Par4-null mice were particularly sensitive to the development of proliferative lesions. Most (80%) Par4-null females presented endometrial hyperplasia by 9 months of age, and a significant proportion (36%) developed endometrial adenocarcinomas after 1 year of age. Similarly, Par4-null males showed a high incidence of prostate hyperplasia and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias, and were extraordinarily sensitive to testosterone-induced prostate hyperplasia. Finally, the uterus and prostate of young Par4-null mice have increased levels of the apoptosis inhibitor XIAP (X-chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis), supporting the previously proposed function of Par4 as an inhibitor of the ζPKC (atypical protein kinase)–NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB)–XIAP pathway. These data show that Par4 has an important role in tumour suppression, with a particular relevance in the endometrium and prostate. PMID:15877079

  10. Neuroligin-1 Knockdown Suppresses Seizure Activity by Regulating Neuronal Hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Wei, Jin-Lai; Tang, Bo; Liu, Jing; Chen, Ling; Tang, Zhao-Hua; Luo, Jing; Chen, Guo-Jun; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abnormally synchronized synaptic transmission in the brain leads to epilepsy. Neuroligin-1 (NL1) is a synaptic cell adhesion molecule localized at excitatory synapses. NL1 modulates synaptic transmission and determines the properties of neuronal networks in the mammalian central nervous system. We showed that the expression of NL1 and its binding partner neurexin-1β was increased in temporal lobe epileptic foci in patients and lithium-pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats. We investigated electrophysiological and behavioral changes in epileptic rats after lentivirally mediated NL1 knockdown in the hippocampus to determine whether NL1 suppression prevented seizures and, if so, to explore the probable underlying mechanisms. Our behavioral studies revealed that NL1 knockdown in epileptic rats reduced seizure severity and increased seizure latency. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices from NL1 knockdown epileptic rats revealed a decrease in spontaneous action potential frequency and a decrease in miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequency but not amplitude. The amplitude of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent EPSCs was also selectively decreased. Notably, NL1 knockdown reduced total NMDAR1 expression and the surface/total ratio in the hippocampus of epileptic rats. Taken together, these data indicate that NL1 knockdown in epileptic rats may reduce the frequency and severity of seizures and suppress neuronal hyperexcitability via changes in postsynaptic NMDARs.

  11. Honokiol Suppresses Survival Signals Mediated by Ras-Dependent Phospholipase D Activity in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Avalon; Zheng, Yang; Zhao, Chen; Toschi, Alfredo; Fan, Judy; Shraibman, Natalie; Brown, H. Alex; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Foster, David A.; Arbiser, Jack L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Elevated phospholipase D (PLD) activity provides a survival signal in several human cancer cell lines and suppresses apoptosis when cells are subjected to the stress of serum withdrawal. Thus, targeting PLD survival signals has potential to suppress survival in cancer cells that depend on PLD for survival. Honokiol is a compound that suppresses tumor growth in mouse models. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of honokiol on PLD survival signals and the Ras dependence of these signals. Experimental Design The effect of honokiol upon PLD activity was examined in human cancer cell lines where PLD activity provides a survival signal. The dependence of PLD survival signals on Ras was investigated, as was the effect of honokiol on Ras activation. Results We report here that honokiol suppresses PLD activity in human cancer cells where PLD has been shown to suppress apoptosis. PLD activity is commonly elevated in response to the stress of serum withdrawal, and, importantly, the stress-induced increase in PLD activity is selectively suppressed by honokiol. The stress-induced increase in PLD activity was accompanied by increased Ras activation, and the stress-induced increase in PLD activity in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells was dependent on a Ras. The PLD activity was also dependent on the GTPases RalA and ADP ribosylation factor. Importantly, honokiol suppressed Ras activation. Conclusion The data provided here indicate that honokiol may be a valuable therapeutic reagent for targeting a large number of human cancers that depend on Ras and PLD for their survival. PMID:18594009

  12. TFE3 controls lipid metabolism in adipose tissue of male mice by suppressing lipolysis and thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yuri; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Satoh, Aoi; Okuda, Kanako; Shingyouchi, Akiko; Naka, Ayano; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yahagi, Naoya; Shimada, Masako; Yatoh, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yogosawa, Satomi; Izumi, Tetsuro; Sone, Hirohito; Urayama, Osamu; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2013-10-01

    Transcription factor E3 (TFE3) is a transcription factor that binds to E-box motifs and promotes energy metabolism-related genes. We previously reported that TFE3 directly binds to the insulin receptor substrate-2 promoter in the liver, resulting in increased insulin response. However, the role of TFE3 in other tissues remains unclear. In this study, we generated adipose-specific TFE3 transgenic (aP2-TFE3 Tg) mice. These mice had a higher weight of white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue than wild-type (WT) mice under fasting conditions. Lipase activity in the WAT in these mice was lower than that in the WT mice. The mRNA level of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate-limiting enzyme for adipocyte lipolysis, was significantly decreased in aP2-TFE3 Tg mice. The expression of Foxo1, which directly activates ATGL expression, was also suppressed in transgenic mice. Promoter analysis confirmed that TFE3 suppressed promoter activities of the ATGL gene. In contrast, G0S2 and Perilipin1, which attenuate ATGL activity, were higher in transgenic mice than in WT mice. These results indicated that the decrease in lipase activity in adipose tissues was due to a decrease in ATGL expression and suppression of ATGL activity. We also showed that thermogenesis was suppressed in aP2-TFE3 Tg mice. The decrease in lipolysis in WAT of aP2-TFE3 Tg mice inhibited the supply of fatty acids to brown adipose tissue, resulting in the inhibition of the expression of thermogenesis-related genes such as UCP1. Our data provide new evidence that TFE3 regulates lipid metabolism by controlling the gene expression related to lipolysis and thermogenesis in adipose tissue.

  13. Active Flutter Suppression Using Cooperative, High Frequency, Dynamic-Resonant Aero-Effectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-13

    Final 06/15/03-09/14/06 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa . CONTRACT NUMBER Active Flutter Suppression Using Cooperative, High Frequency, Dynamic Resonant Aero...maneuvering performance. Conventional active vibration control and flutter suppression systems are servo -hydraulic. Conventional servo -hydraulic...technology is burdened by a set of undesirable characteristics that effectively restrict their use to large aircraft. The servo -hydraulic based systems have

  14. Idelalisib and caffeine reduce suppression of T cell responses mediated by activated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hock, Barry D; MacPherson, Sean A; McKenzie, Judith L

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is associated with T cell dysfunction. Activated CLL cells are found within the lymphoid tumor micro-environment and overcoming immuno-suppression induced by these cells may improve anti-CLL immune responses. However, the mechanisms by which activated CLL cells inhibit T cell responses, and reagents targeting such mechanisms have not been identified. Here we demonstrate that the ability of in vitro activated CLL cells to suppress T cell proliferation is not reversed by the presence of ecto-nuclease inhibitors or blockade of IL-10, PD-1 and CTLA-4 pathways. Caffeine is both an adenosine receptor antagonist and a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, p110δ (PI3Kδ) inhibitor and, at physiologically relevant levels, significantly reversed suppression. Significant reversal of suppression was also observed with the PI3Kδ specific inhibitor Idelalisib but not with adenosine receptor specific antagonists. Furthermore, addition of caffeine or Idelalisib to activated CLL cells significantly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT, a downstream kinase of PI3K, but did not affect CLL viability. These results suggest that caffeine, in common with Idelalisib, reduces the immuno-suppressive activity of activated CLL cells by inhibiting PI3Kδ. These findings raise the possibility that these compounds may provide a useful therapeutic adjunct by reducing immuno-suppression within the tumor micro-environment of CLL.

  15. Idelalisib and caffeine reduce suppression of T cell responses mediated by activated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Hock, Barry D.; MacPherson, Sean A.; McKenzie, Judith L.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is associated with T cell dysfunction. Activated CLL cells are found within the lymphoid tumor micro-environment and overcoming immuno-suppression induced by these cells may improve anti-CLL immune responses. However, the mechanisms by which activated CLL cells inhibit T cell responses, and reagents targeting such mechanisms have not been identified. Here we demonstrate that the ability of in vitro activated CLL cells to suppress T cell proliferation is not reversed by the presence of ecto-nuclease inhibitors or blockade of IL-10, PD-1 and CTLA-4 pathways. Caffeine is both an adenosine receptor antagonist and a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, p110δ (PI3Kδ) inhibitor and, at physiologically relevant levels, significantly reversed suppression. Significant reversal of suppression was also observed with the PI3Kδ specific inhibitor Idelalisib but not with adenosine receptor specific antagonists. Furthermore, addition of caffeine or Idelalisib to activated CLL cells significantly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT, a downstream kinase of PI3K, but did not affect CLL viability. These results suggest that caffeine, in common with Idelalisib, reduces the immuno-suppressive activity of activated CLL cells by inhibiting PI3Kδ. These findings raise the possibility that these compounds may provide a useful therapeutic adjunct by reducing immuno-suppression within the tumor micro-environment of CLL. PMID:28257435

  16. Suppression of Active-Region CME Production by the Presence of Other Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser; Khazanov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    From the SOHO mission s data base of MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning solar cycle 23, we have obtained a set of 40,000 magnetograms of 1,300 active regions, tracking each active region across the 30 degree central solar disk. Each active region magnetogram is cropped from the full-disk magnetogram by an automated code. The cadence is 96 minutes. From each active-region magnetogram, we have measured two whole-active-region magnetic quantities: (1) the magnetic size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux), and (2) a gauge of the active region s free magnetic energy (part of the free energy is released in the production of a flare and/or CME eruption). From NOAA Flare/CME catalogs, we have obtained the event (Flare/CME/SEP event) production history of each active region. Using all these data, we find that for each type of eruptive event, an active region s expected rate of event production increases as a power law of our gauge of active-region free magnetic energy. We have also found that, among active regions having nearly the same free energy, the rate of the CME production is less when there are many other active regions on the disk than when there are few or none, but there is no significant discernible suppression of the rate of flare production. This indicates that the presence of other active regions somehow tends to inhibit an active region s flare-producing magnetic explosions from becoming CMEs, contrary to the expectation from the breakout model for the production of CMEs.

  17. Active suppression of an 'apparent shock induced instability'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, William M., Jr.; Tiffany, Sherwood H.; Bardusch, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    A control law was designed, using constrained optimization techniques, to suppress an apparent shock induced instability of a sweptback, aeroelastic wing with supercritical airfoil sections. The controller design was based on an approximate linear plant representation obtained using forced response data from a previous entry in the Langley Transonic Dynamics tunnel. During a second tunnel entry, it was found that there was not an instability in the uncontrolled case but there was a region of very low damping (high dynamic response) near a Mach number of 0.92. Controller performance was obtained during the test in near real-time and revealed that the controller attenuated the open-loop response and provided a small but significant amount of damping over a Mach number range from M = 0.70 to M = 0.92.

  18. Anti-neuroinflammatory activity of nobiletin on suppression of microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanji; Wu, Jinji; Jung, Sung-Cherl; Park, Deok-Bae; Maeng, Young-Hee; Hong, Jeong Yun; Kim, Se-Jae; Lee, Sun-Ryung; Kim, Soon-Jong; Kim, Sang Jeong; Eun, Su-Yong

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that nobiletin (5,6,7,8,3',4'-hexamethoxy flavone) from the peel of citrus fruits, enhances the damaged cognitive function in disease animal models. However, the neuroprotective mechanism has not been clearly elucidated. Since nobiletin has shown anti-inflammatory effects in several tissues, we investigated whether nobiletin suppresses excessive microglial activation implicated in neurotoxicity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 microglia cell culture models. Release of nitric oxide (NO), the major inflammatory mediator in microglia, was markedly suppressed in a dose-dependent manner following nobiletin treatment (1-50 µM) in LPS-stimulated BV-2 microglia cells. The inhibitory effect of nobiletin was similar to that of minocycline, a well-known microglial inactivator. Nobiletin significantly inhibited the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). LPS-induced phosphorylations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were also significantly inhibited by nobiletin treatment. In addition, nobiletin markedly inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway by suppressing nuclear NF-κB translocation from the cytoplasm and subsequent expression of NF-κB in the nucleus. Taken together, these results may contribute to further exploration of the therapeutic potential and molecular mechanism of nobiletin in relation to neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Suppression of newborn natural killer cell activity by prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Milch, P.O.; Salvatore, W.; Luft, B.; Baker, D.A.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 on natural killer cell activity of cord blood was examined. Natural killer cell activity, determined by chromium 51 release, was significantly reduced after prostaglandin E2 (1 microgram/ml) treatment. Prostaglandin E2 has been found to enhance the cellular spread of herpesvirus. Thus prostaglandins may enhance viral infections indirectly by suppressing natural killer cell activity.

  20. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  1. Active vertical tail buffeting suppression based on macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengzhe; Li, Bin; Liang, Li; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic buffet is unsteady airflow exerting forces onto a surface, which can lead to premature fatigue damage of aircraft vertical tail structures, especially for aircrafts with twin vertical tails at high angles of attack. In this work, Macro Fiber Composite (MFC), which can provide strain actuation, was used as the actuator for the buffet-induced vibration control, and the positioning of the MFC patches was led by the strain energy distribution on the vertical tail. Positive Position Feedback (PPF) control algorithm has been widely used for its robustness and simplicity in practice, and consequently it was developed to suppress the buffet responses of first bending and torsional mode of vertical tail. However, its performance is usually attenuated by the phase contributions from non-collocated sensor/actuator configuration and plants. The phase lag between the input and output signals of the control system was identified experimentally, and the phase compensation was considered in the PPF control algorithm. The simulation results of the amplitude frequency of the closed-loop system showed that the buffet response was alleviated notably around the concerned bandwidth. Then the wind tunnel experiment was conducted to verify the effectiveness of MFC actuators and compensated PPF, and the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the acceleration response was reduced 43.4%, 28.4% and 39.5%, respectively, under three different buffeting conditions.

  2. The activating transcription factor 3 protein suppresses the oncogenic function of mutant p53 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-03-28

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer.

  3. Extinction cross-section suppression and active acoustic invisibility cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2017-10-01

    Invisibility in its canonical form requires rendering a zero extinction cross-section (or energy efficiency) from an active or a passive object. This work demonstrates the successful theoretical realization of this physical effect for an active cylindrically radiating acoustic body, undergoing periodic axisymmetric harmonic vibrations near a flat rigid boundary. Radiating, amplification and extinction cross-sections of the active source are defined. Assuming monopole and dipole modal oscillations of the circular source, conditions are found where the extinction energy efficiency factor of the active source vanishes, achieving total invisibility with minimal influence of the source size. It also takes positive or negative values, depending on its size and distance from the boundary. Moreover, the amplification energy efficiency factor is negative for the acoustically-active source. These effects also occur for higher-order modal oscillations of the active source. The results find potential applications in the development of acoustic cloaking devices and invisibility.

  4. A role for chloride in the suppressive effect of acetylcholine on afferent vestibular activity.

    PubMed

    Pantoja, A M; Holt, J C; Guth, P S

    1997-10-01

    Afferents of the frog semicircular canal (SCC) respond to acetylcholine (ACh) application (0.3-1.0 mM) with a facilitation of their activity while frog saccular afferents respond with suppression (Guth et al., 1994). All recordings are of resting (i.e., non-stimulated) multiunit activity as previously reported (Guth et al., 1994). Substitution of 80% of external chloride (Cl-) by large, poorly permeant anions of different structures (isethionate, methanesulfonate, methylsulfate, and gluconate) reduced the suppressive effect of ACh in the frog saccular afferents. This substitution did not affect the facilitatory response of SCC afferents to ACh. Chloride channel blockers were also used to test further whether Cl- is involved in the ACh suppressive effect. These included: niflumic and flufenamic acids, picrotoxin, 5-nitro-2-(-3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB), and 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DNDS). As with the Cl- substitutions, all of these agents reduced the suppressive response to ACh in the saccule, but not the facilitatory response seen in the SCC. The suppressive effect of ACh on saccular afferents is considered to be due to activation of a nicotinic-like receptor (Guth et al., 1994; Guth and Norris, 1996). Taking into account the effects of both Cl- substitutions and Cl- channel blockers, we conclude that changes in Cl- availability influence the suppressive effect of ACh and that therefore Cl- may be involved in this effect.

  5. KIF4 motor regulates activity-dependent neuronal survival by suppressing PARP-1 enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Ryosuke; Takei, Yosuke; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2006-04-21

    In brain development, apoptosis is a physiological process that controls the final numbers of neurons. Here, we report that the activity-dependent prevention of apoptosis in juvenile neurons is regulated by kinesin superfamily protein 4 (KIF4), a microtubule-based molecular motor. The C-terminal domain of KIF4 is a module that suppresses the activity of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a nuclear enzyme known to maintain cell homeostasis by repairing DNA and